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Sample records for human cells infected

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of human uterine epithelial cells: viral shedding and cell contact-mediated infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asin, Susana N; Wildt-Perinic, Dunja; Mason, Sarah I; Howell, Alexandra L; Wira, Charles R; Fanger, Michael W

    2003-05-15

    We examined the mechanism of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 infection of human uterine epithelial cells to gain a clearer understanding of the events by which HIV-1 infects cells within the female reproductive tract. We demonstrated that these cells can be productively infected by HIV-1 and that infection is associated with viral RNA reverse transcription, DNA transcription, and secretion of infectious virus. Levels of viral DNA and secreted virus decreased gradually after infection. Moreover, virus released by the uterine epithelial cells shortly after infection was able to infect human T cell lines, but virus released later did not. In contrast, human CD4(+) T cell lines were infected after cocultivation with epithelial cells at both early and late stages of infection. These data demonstrated that HIV-1 infects human epithelial cells of upper reproductive tract origin and that productive viral infection of epithelial cells may be an important mechanism of transmission of HIV-1 infection in women.

  2. Growth in agarose of human cells infected with cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, D J; Montagnier, L; Latarjet, R

    1974-08-01

    After infection by human cytomegalovirus (CMV), human diploid fibroblasts could grow in agarose medium for several generations. Clones of infected cells grew for weeks, although in every case they ultimately underwent lysis owing to the cytopathic effect of the virus. Virus was inoculated at high dilution and after UV irradiation in an effort to derive cells infected with noninfectious defective particles still capable of inducing cell stimulation. Dilute or irradiated virus occasionally yielded large colonies of replicating cells, although permanent transformation was not observed. One clone derived from UV-CMV-infected cells was passaged four times before undergoing lysis. During these passages the cells exhibited alterations in morphology and orientation.

  3. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived models to investigate human cytomegalovirus infection in neural cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo D'Aiuto

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection is one of the leading prenatal causes of congenital mental retardation and deformities world-wide. Access to cultured human neuronal lineages, necessary to understand the species specific pathogenic effects of HCMV, has been limited by difficulties in sustaining primary human neuronal cultures. Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells now provide an opportunity for such research. We derived iPS cells from human adult fibroblasts and induced neural lineages to investigate their susceptibility to infection with HCMV strain Ad169. Analysis of iPS cells, iPS-derived neural stem cells (NSCs, neural progenitor cells (NPCs and neurons suggests that (i iPS cells are not permissive to HCMV infection, i.e., they do not permit a full viral replication cycle; (ii Neural stem cells have impaired differentiation when infected by HCMV; (iii NPCs are fully permissive for HCMV infection; altered expression of genes related to neural metabolism or neuronal differentiation is also observed; (iv most iPS-derived neurons are not permissive to HCMV infection; and (v infected neurons have impaired calcium influx in response to glutamate.

  4. Growth in Agarose of Human Cells Infected with Cytomegalovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, David J.; Montagnier, Luc; Latarjet, Raymond

    1974-01-01

    After infection by human cytomegalovirus (CMV), human diploid fibroblasts could grow in agarose medium for several generations. Clones of infected cells grew for weeks, although in every case they ultimately underwent lysis owing to the cytopathic effect of the virus. Virus was inoculated at high dilution and after UV irradiation in an effort to derive cells infected with noninfectious defective particles still capable of inducing cell stimulation. Dilute or irradiated virus occasionally yielded large colonies of replicating cells, although permanent transformation was not observed. One clone derived from UV-CMV-infected cells was passaged four times before undergoing lysis. During these passages the cells exhibited alterations in morphology and orientation. Images PMID:4367907

  5. HCMV Infection Depress NGF Expression in Human Glioma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-tao WANG; Bin WANG; Zhi-jun LIU; Zhi-qiang BAI; Ling LI; Dong-meng QIAN; Zhi-yong YAN; Xu-xia SONG

    2009-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the most common cause of congenital infection, resulting in birth defects such as microcephaly. In this study, RT-PCR and Western Blotting were performed to quantify the regulation of endogenic nerve growth factor expression in neuroglia cells by HCMV infection. The results showed that basal, endogenous NGF expression in U251 was unchanged during early HCMV infection. NGF expression is strongly down-regulated during the latent phase of infection. These results suggest that HCMV can depress the NGF expression in U251 cells.

  6. Effect of Human Cytomegalovirus Infection on Nerve Growth Factor Expression in Human Glioma U251 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAI-TAO WANG; BIN WANG; ZHI-JUN LIU; ZHI-QIANG BAI; LING LI; HAI-YAN LIU; DONG-MENG QIAN; ZHI-YONG YAN; XU-XIA SONG

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To explore the change of endogenic nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in human glioma cells infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). Methods U251 cells were cultured in RPMI 1640 culture medium and infected with HCMV AD169 strain in vitro to establish a cell model of viral infection. Morphologic changes of U251 cells were observed under inverted microscope before and after infection with HCMV. Expression of NGF gene and protein of cells was detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting before and after infection with HCMV. Results The cytopathic effects of HCMV-infected cells appeared on day 5 after infection. However, differential NGF expression was evident on day 7. NGF expression was decreased significantly in U251 cells on day 7 after infection in comparison with control group (P<0.05). Conclusion HCMV can down-regulate endogenous NGF levels in human glioma cell line U251.

  7. In vitro Study on Human Trophoblast Cells Infected with HCMV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖娟; 张丹丹; 陈娟娟; 尹宗智; 刘涛; 艾继辉; 陈素华

    2010-01-01

    Human trophoblast cells were isolated and cultured in vitro in order to investigate possible pathogenesis of intrauterine infection caused by HCMV.Trophoblast cells were obtained by compound enzymes digestion and discontinuous percoll gradient.Cells and purity were identified by using immunocytochemistry assay with anti-CK7,Vim and β-hCG antibodies.HCMV AD169 strain replication in isolated trophoblast cells and cell apoptosis were detected at different time points post infection(p.i.).The results showed tha...

  8. Suppression of HIV-1 Infectivity by Human Glioma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Sheikh Ariful; Tanaka, Atsushi; Islam, Salequl; Ahsan, Gias Uddin; Jinno-Oue, Atsushi; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2016-05-01

    HIV-1 infection to the central nervous system (CNS) is very common in AIDS patients. The predominant cell types infected in the brain are monocytes and macrophages, which are surrounded by several HIV-1-resistant cell types, such as astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, neurons, and microvascular cells. The effect of these HIV-1-resistant cells on HIV-1 infection is largely unknown. In this study, we examined the stability of HIV-1 cultured with several human glioblastoma cell lines, for example, NP-2, U87MG, T98G, and A172, to determine whether these HIV-1-resistant brain cells could enhance or suppress HIV-1 infection and thus modulate HIV-1 infection in the CNS. The HIV-1 titer was determined using the MAGIC-5A indicator cell line as well as naturally occurring CD4(+) T cells. We found that the stability of HIV-1 incubated with NP-2 or U87MG cells at 37°C was significantly shorter (half-life, 2.5-4 h) compared to that of HIV-1 incubated with T98G or A172 cells or in culture medium without cells (half-life, 8-18 h). The spent culture media (SCM) of NP-2 and U87MG cells had the ability to suppress both R5- and X4-HIV-1 infection by inhibiting HIV-1 attachment to target cells. This inhibitory effect was eliminated by the treatment of the SCM with chondroitinase ABC but not heparinase, suggesting that the inhibitory factor(s) secreted by NP-2 and U87MG cells was chiefly mediated by chondroitin sulfate (CS) or CS-like moiety. Thus, this study reveals that some but not all glioma cells secrete inhibitory molecules to HIV-1 infection that may contribute in lowering HIV-1 infection in the CNS in vivo.

  9. Human neuronal cell protein responses to Nipah virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Sharifah

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nipah virus (NiV, a recently discovered zoonotic virus infects and replicates in several human cell types. Its replication in human neuronal cells, however, is less efficient in comparison to other fully susceptible cells. In the present study, the SK-N-MC human neuronal cell protein response to NiV infection is examined using proteomic approaches. Results Method for separation of the NiV-infected human neuronal cell proteins using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE was established. At least 800 protein spots were resolved of which seven were unique, six were significantly up-regulated and eight were significantly down-regulated. Six of these altered proteins were identified using mass spectrometry (MS and confirmed using MS/MS. The heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP F, guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein, voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2 and cytochrome bc1 were present in abundance in the NiV-infected SK-N-MC cells in contrast to hnRNPs H and H2 that were significantly down-regulated. Conclusion Several human neuronal cell proteins that are differentially expressed following NiV infection are identified. The proteins are associated with various cellular functions and their abundance reflects their significance in the cytopathologic responses to the infection and the regulation of NiV replication. The potential importance of the ratio of hnRNP F, and hnRNPs H and H2 in regulation of NiV replication, the association of the mitochondrial protein with the cytopathologic responses to the infection and induction of apoptosis are highlighted.

  10. Human skin Langerhans cells are targets of dengue virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, SJL; Grouard-Vogel, G; Mascola, [No Value; Brachtel, E; Putvatana, R; Louder, MK; Filgueira, L; Marovich, MA; Wong, HK; Blauvelt, A; Murphy, GS; Robb, ML; Innes, BL; Birx, DL; Hayes, CG; Frankel, SS

    2000-01-01

    Dengue virus (DV), an arthropod-borne flavivirus, causes a febrile illness for which there is no antiviral treatment and no vaccine(1,2). Macrophages are important in dengue pathogenesis; however, the initial target cell for DV infection remains unknown. As DV is introduced into human skin by mosqui

  11. Transient Oral Human Cytomegalovirus Infections Indicate Inefficient Viral Spread from Very Few Initially Infected Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Bryan T; Krantz, Elizabeth M; Swan, David; Ferrenberg, James; Simmons, Karen; Selke, Stacy; Huang, Meei-Li; Casper, Corey; Corey, Lawrence; Wald, Anna; Schiffer, Joshua T; Gantt, Soren

    2017-06-15

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is acquired by the oral route in children, and primary infection is associated with abundant mucosal replication, as well as the establishment of latency in myeloid cells that results in lifelong infection. The efficiency of primary CMV infection in humans following oral exposure, however, is unknown. We consistently detected self-limited, low-level oral CMV shedding events, which we termed transient CMV infections, in a prospective birth cohort of 30 highly exposed CMV-uninfected infants. We estimated the likelihood of transient oral CMV infections by comparing their observed frequency to that of established primary infections, characterized by persistent high-level shedding, viremia, and seroconversion. We developed mathematical models of viral dynamics upon initial oral CMV infection and validated them using clinical shedding data. Transient infections comprised 76 to 88% of oral CMV shedding events. For this high percentage of transient infections to occur, we identified two mathematical prerequisites: a very small number of initially infected oral cells (1 to 4) and low viral infectivity (<1.5 new cells infected/cell). These observations indicate that oral CMV infection in infants typically begins with a single virus that spreads inefficiently to neighboring cells. Thus, although the incidence of CMV infection is high during infancy, our data provide a mechanistic framework to explain why multiple CMV exposures are typically required before infection is successfully established. These findings imply that a sufficiently primed immune response could prevent CMV from establishing latent infection in humans and support the achievability of a prophylactic CMV vaccine.IMPORTANCE CMV infects the majority of the world's population and is a major cause of birth defects. Developing a vaccine to prevent CMV infection would be extremely valuable but would be facilitated by a better understanding of how natural human CMV infection is acquired. We

  12. Bioactive molecules released from cells infected with the Human Cytomegalovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eLuganini

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Following primary infection in humans, the Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV persists in a latent state throughout the host’s lifetime despite a strong and efficient immune response. If the host experiences some form of immune dysregulation, such as immunosuppression or immunodeficiency, HCMV reactivates, thereby emerging from latency. Thus, in the absence of effective functional immune responses, as occurs in immunocompromised or immunoimmature individuals, both HCMV primary infections and reactivations from latency can cause significant morbidity and mortality. However, even in immunocompetent hosts, HCMV represents a relevant risk factor for the development of several chronic inflammatory diseases and certain forms of neoplasia. HCMV infection may shift between the lytic and latent state, regulated by a delicate and intricate balance between virus-mediated immunomodulation and host immune defenses. Indeed, HCMV is a master in manipulating innate and adaptive host defense pathways, and a large portion of its genome is devoted to encoding immunomodulatory proteins; such proteins may thus represent important virulence determinants. However, the pathogenesis of HCMV-related diseases is strengthened by the activities of bioactive molecules, of both viral and cellular origin, that are secreted from infected cells and collectively named as the secretome. Here, we review the state of knowledge on the composition and functions of HCMV-derived secretomes. In lytic infections of fibroblasts and different types of endothelial cells, the majority of HCMV-induced secreted proteins act in a paracrine fashion to stimulate the generation of an inflammatory microenvironment around infected cells; this may lead to vascular inflammation and angiogenesis that, in turn, foster HCMV replication and its dissemination through host tissues. Conversely, the HCMV secretome derived from latently infected hematopoietic progenitor cells induces an immunosuppressive

  13. Human borna disease virus infection impacts host proteome and histone lysine acetylation in human oligodendroglia cells

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    Liu, Xia [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Department of Neurology, The Fifth People' s Hospital of Shanghai, School of Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200240 (China); Zhao, Libo [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Department of Neurology, The Third People' s Hospital of Chongqing, 400014 (China); Yang, Yongtao [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Bode, Liv [Bornavirus Research Group affiliated to the Free University of Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Huang, Hua [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Liu, Chengyu [Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Huang, Rongzhong [Department of Rehabilitative Medicine, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400010 (China); Zhang, Liang [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); and others

    2014-09-15

    Background: Borna disease virus (BDV) replicates in the nucleus and establishes persistent infections in mammalian hosts. A human BDV strain was used to address the first time, how BDV infection impacts the proteome and histone lysine acetylation (Kac) of human oligodendroglial (OL) cells, thus allowing a better understanding of infection-driven pathophysiology in vitro. Methods: Proteome and histone lysine acetylation were profiled through stable isotope labeling for cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics. The quantifiable proteome was annotated using bioinformatics. Histone acetylation changes were validated by biochemistry assays. Results: Post BDV infection, 4383 quantifiable differential proteins were identified and functionally annotated to metabolism pathways, immune response, DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcriptional regulation. Sixteen of the thirty identified Kac sites in core histones presented altered acetylation levels post infection. Conclusions: BDV infection using a human strain impacted the whole proteome and histone lysine acetylation in OL cells. - Highlights: • A human strain of BDV (BDV Hu-H1) was used to infect human oligodendroglial cells (OL cells). • This study is the first to reveal the host proteomic and histone Kac profiles in BDV-infected OL cells. • BDV infection affected the expression of many transcription factors and several HATs and HDACs.

  14. Early Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Reprograms Human Epithelial Cells

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    María Laura Chiribao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, has the peculiarity, when compared with other intracellular parasites, that it is able to invade almost any type of cell. This property makes Chagas a complex parasitic disease in terms of prophylaxis and therapeutics. The identification of key host cellular factors that play a role in the T. cruzi invasion is important for the understanding of disease pathogenesis. In Chagas disease, most of the focus is on the response of macrophages and cardiomyocytes, since they are responsible for host defenses and cardiac lesions, respectively. In the present work, we studied the early response to infection of T. cruzi in human epithelial cells, which constitute the first barrier for establishment of infection. These studies identified up to 1700 significantly altered genes regulated by the immediate infection. The global analysis indicates that cells are literally reprogrammed by T. cruzi, which affects cellular stress responses (neutrophil chemotaxis, DNA damage response, a great number of transcription factors (including the majority of NFκB family members, and host metabolism (cholesterol, fatty acids, and phospholipids. These results raise the possibility that early host cell reprogramming is exploited by the parasite to establish the initial infection and posterior systemic dissemination.

  15. Target cell cyclophilins facilitate human papillomavirus type 16 infection.

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    Malgorzata Bienkowska-Haba

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Following attachment to primary receptor heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG, human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16 particles undergo conformational changes affecting the major and minor capsid proteins, L1 and L2, respectively. This results in exposure of the L2 N-terminus, transfer to uptake receptors, and infectious internalization. Here, we report that target cell cyclophilins, peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases, are required for efficient HPV16 infection. Cell surface cyclophilin B (CyPB facilitates conformational changes in capsid proteins, resulting in exposure of the L2 N-terminus. Inhibition of CyPB blocked HPV16 infection by inducing noninfectious internalization. Mutation of a putative CyP binding site present in HPV16 L2 yielded exposed L2 N-terminus in the absence of active CyP and bypassed the need for cell surface CyPB. However, this mutant was still sensitive to CyP inhibition and required CyP for completion of infection, probably after internalization. Taken together, these data suggest that CyP is required during two distinct steps of HPV16 infection. Identification of cell surface CyPB will facilitate the study of the complex events preceding internalization and adds a putative drug target for prevention of HPV-induced diseases.

  16. In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin A.; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia A.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-01-30

    Human noroviruses (NoV) cause severe, self-limiting gastroenteritis that typically lasts 24 - 48 hours. The true nature of NoV pathogenesis remains unknown due to the lack of suitable tissue culture or animal models. Here we show, for the first time, that NoV can infect and replicate in an organoid, three-dimensional (3-D) model of human small intestinal epithelium (INT-407). Cellular differentiation for this model was achieved by growing the cells in 3-D on porous collagen I-coated microcarrier beads under conditions of physiological fluid shear in rotating wall vessel bioreactors. Microscopy, PCR, and fluorescent in-situ hybridization were employed to provide evidence of NoV infection. CPE and norovirus RNA was detected at each of the five cell passages for both genogroup I and II viruses. Our results demonstrate that the highly differentiated 3-D cell culture model can support the natural growth of human noroviruses, whereas previous attempts using differentiated monolayer cultures failed.

  17. In Vitro Brucella suis Infection Prevents the Programmed Cell Death of Human Monocytic Cells

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    Gross, Antoine; Terraza, Annie; Ouahrani-Bettache, Safia; Liautard, Jean-Pierre; Dornand, Jacques

    2000-01-01

    During the complex interaction between an infectious agent and a host organism, the pathogen can interfere with the host cell's programmed death to its own benefit. Induction or prevention of host cell apoptosis appears to be a critical step for determining the infection outcome. Members of the gram-negative bacterial genus Brucella are intracellular pathogens which preferentially invade monocytic cells and develop within these cells. We investigated the effect of Brucella suis infection on apoptosis of human monocytic phagocytes. The present study provides evidence that Brucella infection inhibited spontaneously occurring apoptosis in human monocytes. Prevention of monocyte apoptosis was not mediated by Brucella lipopolysaccharide and required bacterial survival within infected cells. Both invaded and noninvaded cells were protected, indicating that soluble mediators released during infection were involved in the phenomenon. Analysis of Brucella-infected monocytes revealed specific overexpression of the A1 gene, a member of the bcl-2 family implicated in the survival of hematopoietic cells. Brucella infection also rendered macrophage-like cells resistant to Fas ligand- or gamma interferon-induced apoptosis, suggesting that Brucella infection protected host cells from several cytotoxic processes occurring at different steps of the immune response. The present data clearly show that Brucella suis modulated the monocyte/macrophage's apoptotic response to the advantage of the pathogen, thus preventing host cell elimination. This might represent a strategy for Brucella development in infected hosts. PMID:10603407

  18. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection induces non-apoptotic cell death of human dendritic cells

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Ruth CM

    2011-10-24

    Abstract Background Dendritic cells (DCs) connect innate and adaptive immunity, and are necessary for an efficient CD4+ and CD8+ T cell response after infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). We previously described the macrophage cell death response to Mtb infection. To investigate the effect of Mtb infection on human DC viability, we infected these phagocytes with different strains of Mtb and assessed viability, as well as DNA fragmentation and caspase activity. In parallel studies, we assessed the impact of infection on DC maturation, cytokine production and bacillary survival. Results Infection of DCs with live Mtb (H37Ra or H37Rv) led to cell death. This cell death proceeded in a caspase-independent manner, and without nuclear fragmentation. In fact, substrate assays demonstrated that Mtb H37Ra-induced cell death progressed without the activation of the executioner caspases, 3\\/7. Although the death pathway was triggered after infection, the DCs successfully underwent maturation and produced a host-protective cytokine profile. Finally, dying infected DCs were permissive for Mtb H37Ra growth. Conclusions Human DCs undergo cell death after infection with live Mtb, in a manner that does not involve executioner caspases, and results in no mycobactericidal effect. Nonetheless, the DC maturation and cytokine profile observed suggests that the infected cells can still contribute to TB immunity.

  19. Infection of brain-derived cells with the human immunodeficiency virus.

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    Chiodi, F; Fuerstenberg, S; Gidlund, M; Asjö, B; Fenyö, E M

    1987-01-01

    A malignant glioma cell line was infected with the human T-lymphotropic virus type IIIB isolate of the human immunodeficiency virus. Infection appeared to be latent rather than productive. Through contact with monocytic or lymphoid cells, the virus present in the glioma cells could be transmitted and gave rise to a fully productive infection. Images PMID:3644020

  20. Proinflammatory Response of Human Trophoblastic Cells to Brucella abortus Infection and upon Interactions with Infected Phagocytes.

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    Fernández, Andrea G; Ferrero, Mariana C; Hielpos, M Soledad; Fossati, Carlos A; Baldi, Pablo C

    2016-02-01

    Trophoblasts are targets of infection by Brucella spp. but their role in the pathophysiology of pregnancy complications of brucellosis is unknown. Here we show that Brucella abortus invades and replicates in the human trophoblastic cell line Swan-71 and that the intracellular survival of the bacterium depends on a functional virB operon. The infection elicited significant increments of interleukin 8 (IL8), monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), and IL6 secretion, but levels of IL1beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) did not vary significantly. Such proinflammatory response was not modified by the absence of the Brucella TIR domain-containing proteins BtpA and BtpB. The stimulation of Swan-71 cells with conditioned medium (CM) from B. abortus-infected human monocytes (THP-1 cells) or macrophages induced a significant increase of IL8, MCP-1 and IL6 as compared to stimulation with CM from non-infected cells. Similar results were obtained when stimulation was performed with CM from infected neutrophils. Neutralization studies showed that IL1beta and/or TNF-alpha mediated the stimulating effects of CM from infected phagocytes. Reciprocally, stimulation of monocytes and neutrophils with CM from Brucella-infected trophoblasts increased IL8 and/or IL6 secretion. These results suggest that human trophoblasts may provide a local inflammatory environment during B. abortus infections either through a direct response to the pathogen or through interactions with monocytes/macrophages or neutrophils, potentially contributing to the pregnancy complications of brucellosis.

  1. Dendritic Cells Enhance HIV Infection of Memory CD4(+) T Cells in Human Lymphoid Tissues.

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    Reyes-Rodriguez, Angel L; Reuter, Morgan A; McDonald, David

    2016-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in controlling infections by coordinating innate and adaptive immune responses to invading pathogens. Paradoxically, DCs can increase HIV-1 dissemination in vitro by binding and transferring infectious virions to CD4(+) T cells, a process called transinfection. Transinfection has been well characterized in cultured cell lines and circulating primary T cells, but it is unknown whether DCs enhance infection of CD4(+) T cells in vivo. In untreated HIV infection, massive CD4(+) T-cell infection and depletion occur in secondary lymphoid tissues long before decline is evident in the peripheral circulation. To study the role of DCs in HIV infection of lymphoid tissues, we utilized human tonsil tissues, cultured either as tissue blocks or as aggregate suspension cultures, in single-round infection experiments. In these experiments, addition of monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) to the cultures increased T-cell infection, particularly in CD4(+) T cells expressing lower levels of HLA-DR. Subset analysis demonstrated that MDDCs increased HIV-1 infection of central and effector memory T-cell populations. Depletion of endogenous myeloid DCs (myDCs) from the cultures decreased memory T-cell infection, and readdition of MDDCs restored infection to predepletion levels. Using an HIV-1 fusion assay, we found that MDDCs equally increased HIV delivery into naïve, central, and effector memory T cells in the cultures, whereas predepletion of myDCs reduced fusion into memory T cells. Together, these data suggest that resident myDCs facilitate memory T-cell infection in lymphoid tissues, implicating DC-mediated transinfection in driving HIV dissemination within these tissues in untreated HIV/AIDS.

  2. Productive infection of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells by feline immunodeficiency virus: implications for vector development.

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    Johnston, J; Power, C

    1999-03-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a lentivirus causing immune suppression and neurological disease in cats. Like primate lentiviruses, FIV utilizes the chemokine receptor CXCR4 for infection. In addition, FIV gene expression has been demonstrated in immortalized human cell lines. To investigate the extent and mechanism by which FIV infected primary and immortalized human cell lines, we compared the infectivity of two FIV strains, V1CSF and Petaluma, after cell-free infection. FIV genome was detected in infected human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and macrophages at 21 and 14 days postinfection, respectively. Flow cytometry analysis of FIV-infected human PBMC indicated that antibodies to FIV p24 recognized 12% of the cells. Antibodies binding the CCR3 chemokine receptor maximally inhibited infection of human PBMC by both FIV strains compared to antibodies to CXCR4 or CCR5. Reverse transcriptase levels increased in FIV-infected human PBMC, with detection of viral titers of 10(1.3) to 10(2.1) 50% tissue culture infective doses/10(6) cells depending on the FIV strain examined. Cell death in human PBMC infected with either FIV strain was significantly elevated relative to uninfected control cultures. These findings indicate that FIV can productively infect primary human cell lines and that viral strain specificity should be considered in the development of an FIV vector for gene therapy.

  3. Selective destruction of cells infected with human immunodeficiency virus

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    Keener, William K.; Ward, Thomas E.

    2003-09-30

    Compositions and methods for selectively killing a cell containing a viral protease are disclosed. The composition is a variant of a protein synthesis inactivating toxin wherein a viral protease cleavage site is interposed between the A and B chains. The variant of the type II ribosome-inactivating protein is activated by digestion of the viral protease cleavage site by the specific viral protease. The activated ribosome-inactivating protein then kills the cell by inactivating cellular ribosomes. A preferred embodiment of the invention is specific for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and uses ricin as the ribosome-inactivating protein. In another preferred embodiment of the invention, the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein is modified by attachment of one or more hydrophobic agents. The hydrophobic agent facilitates entry of the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein into cells and can lead to incorporation of the ribosome-inactivating protein into viral particles. Still another preferred embodiment of the invention includes a targeting moiety attached to the variants of the ribosome-inactivating protein to target the agent to HIV infectable cells.

  4. Selective Destruction Of Cells Infected With The Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keener, William K.; Ward, Thomas E.

    2006-03-28

    Compositions and methods for selectively killing a cell containing a viral protease are disclosed. The composition is a varient of a protein synthesis inactivating toxin wherein a viral protease cleavage site is interposed between the A and B chains. The variant of the type II ribosome-inactivating protein is activated by digestion of the viral protease cleavage site by the specific viral protease. The activated ribosome-inactivating protein then kills the cell by inactivating cellular ribosomes. A preferred embodiment of the invention is specific for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and uses ricin as the ribosome-inactivating protein. In another preferred embodiment of the invention, the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein is modified by attachment of one or more hydrophobic agents. The hydrophobic agent facilitates entry of the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein into cells and can lead to incorporation of the ribosome-inactivating protein into viral particles. Still another preferred embodiment of the invention includes a targeting moiety attached to the variants of the ribosome-inactivating protein to target the agent to HIV infectable cells.

  5. Apoptosis mechanisms of human gastric cancer cell line MKN-45 infected with human mutant p27

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Shui Zhu; Long Wang; Guo-Qiang Cheng; Qin Li; Zu-Ming Zhu; Li Zhu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To explore the inducing effect of human mutant p27 gene on the apoptosis of the human gastric cancer cell line MKN-45 and its associated mechanisms. METHODS: The recombinant adenovirus Ad-p27mt was constructed to infect the human gastric cancer cell line MKN-45. Using flow cytometry, TUNEL assay and DNA fragment analysis, we measured the apoptotic effect of Ad-p27mt on the human gastric cancer cells. RESULTS: Ad-p27mt was successfully constructed and the infection efficiency reached 100%. After 18 h of infection, we observed an apoptotic hypodiploid peak on the flow cytometer before G1-S and apoptotic characteristic bands in the DNA electrophoresis. The apoptotic rate detected by TUNEL method was significantly higher in the Ad-p27mt group (89.4±3.12%)compared to the control group (3.12±0.13%, P < 0.01).CONCLUSION: Human mutant p27 can induce apoptosis of the human gastric cancer cells in vitro.

  6. Preliminary study on Herpes simplex virus type 1 infection of human oral epithelial cell in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Zhao; Weibin Sun; Juan Wang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the functions and mechanisms of herpes simplex virus type 1(HSV-1) while infecting human oral epithelial cells in vitro(being similar to the infection in vivo). Methods:An abundance of HSV-1 strains amplified in Vero cells were used to infect human oral epithelial cells. The culture supernatant was collected to infect Veto cells again. Morphology of HSV-1 was identified by inverted microscope and transmission electron microscope. Nucleic acid of the virus was detected by PCR. Results:The infected human oral epithelial cells didn't display an obvious cytopathic effect(CPE) under inverted microscope(while Veto cells which were infected by the culture supematant showed typical(CPE). The virus particles were not observed in the cytoplasm nor in nucleus of human oral epithelial cells, however under transmission electron microscope in the cytoplasm of Vero cells, the nucleic acid of HSV-1 could be detected in infected human oral epithelial cells, by PCR. Conclusion:HSV-1 can successfully infect human oral epithelial cells. This model may provide a useful approach for studying the pathogenesis of herpes virus-associated periodontal disease.

  7. Gamma interferon augments Fc gamma receptor-mediated dengue virus infection of human monocytic cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Kontny, U.; Kurane, I; Ennis, F A

    1988-01-01

    It has been reported that anti-dengue antibodies at subneutralizing concentrations augment dengue virus infection of monocytic cells. This is due to the increased uptake of dengue virus in the form of virus-antibody complexes by cells via Fc gamma receptors. We analyzed the effects of recombinant human gamma interferon (rIFN-gamma) on dengue virus infection of human monocytic cells. U937 cells, a human monocytic cell line, were infected with dengue virus in the form of virus-antibody complexe...

  8. Dendritic cells are less susceptible to human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) infection than to HIV-1 infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G. Duvall (Melody); K. Loré (Karin); H. Blaak (Hetty); D.A. Ambrozak (David); W.C. Adams (William); K. Santos (Kathlyn); C. Geldmacher (Christof); J.R. Mascola (John); A.J. McMichael (Andrew); A. Jaye (Assan); H. Whittle (Hilton); S.L. Rowland-Jones (Sarah); R.A. Koup (Richard)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractHuman immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of dendritic cells (DCs) has been documented in vivo and may be an important contributor to HIV-1 transmission and pathogenesis. HIV-1-specific CD4+T cells respond to HIV antigens presented by HIV-1-infected DCs and in this process

  9. HumanViCe: Host ceRNA network in virus infected cells in human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman eGhosal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Host-virus interaction via host cellular components has been an important field of research in recent times. RNA interference mediated by short interfering RNAs and microRNAs (miRNA, is a widespread anti-viral defence strategy. Importantly, viruses also encode their own miRNAs. In recent times miRNAs were identified as key players in host-virus interaction. Furthermore, viruses were shown to exploit the host miRNA networks to suite their own need. The complex cross-talk between host and viral miRNAs and their cellular and viral targets forms the environment for viral pathogenesis. Apart from protein-coding mRNAs, non-coding RNAs may also be targeted by host or viral miRNAs in virus infected cells, and viruses can exploit the host miRNA mediated gene regulatory network via the competing endogenous RNA effect. A recent report showed that viral U-rich non-coding RNAs called HSUR, expressed in primate virus herpesvirus saimiri (HVS infected T cells, were able to bind to three host miRNAs, causing significant alteration in cellular level for one of the miRNAs. We have predicted protein coding and non protein-coding targets for viral and human miRNAs in virus infected cells. We identified viral miRNA targets within host non-coding RNA loci from AGO interacting regions in three different virus infected cells. Gene ontology (GO and pathway enrichment analysis of the genes comprising the ceRNA networks in the virus infected cells revealed enrichment of key cellular signalling pathways related to cell fate decisions and gene transcription, like Notch and Wnt signalling pathways, as well as pathways related to viral entry, replication and virulence. We identified a vast number of non-coding transcripts playing as potential ceRNAs to the immune response associated genes; e.g. APOBEC family genes, in some virus infected cells. All these information are compiled in HumanViCe, a comprehensive database that provides the potential ceRNA networks in virus

  10. Differential Mucin Expression by Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Human Metapneumovirus Infection in Human Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma. Del Rocío Baños-Lara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucins (MUC constitute an important component of the inflammatory and innate immune response. However, the expression of these molecules by respiratory viral infections is still largely unknown. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and human metapneumovirus (hMPV are two close-related paramyxoviruses that can cause severe low respiratory tract disease in infants and young children worldwide. Currently, there is not vaccine available for neither virus. In this work, we explored the differential expression of MUC by RSV and hMPV in human epithelial cells. Our data indicate that the MUC expression by RSV and hMPV differs significantly, as we observed a stronger induction of MUC8, MUC15, MUC20, MUC21, and MUC22 by RSV infection while the expression of MUC1, MUC2, and MUC5B was dominated by the infection with hMPV. These results may contribute to the different immune response induced by these two respiratory viruses.

  11. Proteomic profile of human monocytic cells infected with dengue virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Viviana Martnez-Betancur; Marlen Martnez-Gutierrez

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify the changes in the proteome of U937 cells infected with dengue virus (DENV). Methods: In this study, differentiated U937 cultures were infected with two DENV-2 strains, one of which was associated with dengue (DENV-2/NG) and the other one with severe dengue (DENV-2/16681), with the aim of determining the cellular proteomic profiles under different infection conditions. Cellular proteins were extracted and sepa-rated by two-dimensional electrophoresis, and those proteins with differential expression profiles were identified by mass spectrometry. The obtained results were correlated with cellular viability, the number of infectious viral particles, and the viral DNA/protein quantity. Results: In comparison with non-infected cultures, in the cells infected with the DENV-2/NG strain, nine proteins were expressed differentially (five were upregulated and four were downregulated); in those cultures infected with the DENV-2/16681 strain, six proteins were differentially expressed (two were downregulated and four were upregu-lated). The downregulated proteins included fatty acid-binding protein, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein 1, protein disulfide isomerase, enolase 1, heat shock 70 kDa protein 9, phosphotyrosyl phosphatase, and annexin IV. The upregulated proteins included heat shock 90 kDa protein AA1, tubulin beta, enolase 1, pyruvate kinase, transaldolase and phospholipase C-alpha. Conclusions: Because the monocyte/macrophage lineage is critical for disease patho-genicity, additional studies on these proteins could provide a better understanding of the cellular response to DENV infection and could help identify new therapeutic targets against infection.

  12. Sustained CD8+ T-cell responses induced after acute parvovirus B19 infection in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norbeck, Oscar; Isa, Adiba; Pöhlmann, Christoph

    2005-01-01

    Murine models have suggested that CD8+ T-cell responses peak early in acute viral infections and are not sustained, but no evidence for humans has been available. To address this, we longitudinally analyzed the CD8+ T-cell response to human parvovirus B19 in acutely infected individuals. We...... observed striking CD8+ T-cell responses, which were sustained or even increased over many months after the resolution of acute disease, indicating that CD8+ T cells may play a prominent role in the control of parvovirus B19 and other acute viral infections of humans, including potentially those generated...

  13. A Role for Human Skin Mast Cells in Dengue Virus Infection and Systemic Spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troupin, Andrea; Shirley, Devon; Londono-Renteria, Berlin; Watson, Alan M; McHale, Cody; Hall, Alex; Hartstone-Rose, Adam; Klimstra, William B; Gomez, Gregorio; Colpitts, Tonya M

    2016-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that causes serious global human disease and mortality. Skin immune cells are an important component of initial DENV infection and systemic spread. Here, we show that mast cells are a target of DENV in human skin and that DENV infection of skin mast cells induces degranulation and alters cytokine and growth factor expression profiles. Importantly, to our knowledge, we also demonstrate for the first time that DENV localizes within secretory granules in infected skin mast cells. In addition, DENV within extracellular granules was infectious in vitro and in vivo, trafficking through lymph to draining lymph nodes in mice. We demonstrate an important role for human skin mast cells in DENV infection and identify a novel mechanism for systemic spread of DENV infection from the initial peripheral mosquito injection site. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  14. Brugia malayi infective larvae fail to activate Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, R N; McDonald-Fleming, R; Boyd, A; Spates, K; Nutman, T B; Tolouei Semnani, R

    2015-02-01

    Filarial infection in humans is initiated when a mosquito deposits third-stage parasite larvae (L3) in the skin. Langerhans cells (LCs) and dermal dendritic cells (DDCs) are the first cells that the parasite encounters, and L3s must evade these highly effective antigen-presenting cells to establish infection. To assess LC and DDC responses to L3 in human skin, we employed three models of increasing physiologic relevance: in vitro-generated LCs, epidermal blister explants and full-thickness human skin sections. In vitro-generated LCs expressed TLR1-10 and robustly produced IL-6 and TNF-α in response to PolyI:C, but pre-exposure to L3s did not alter inflammatory cytokine production or TLR expression. L3s did not modulate expression of LC markers CDH1, CD207, or CD1a, or the regulatory products TSLP or IDO in epidermal explants or in vitro-generated LC. LC, CD14+ DDC, CD1c+ DC and CD141+ DC from human skin sections were analysed by flow cytometry. While PolyI:C potently induced CCL22 production in LC, CD1c+ DC, and CD141+ DC, and IL-10 production in LC, L3s did not modulate the numbers of or cytokine production by any skin DC subset. L3s broadly failed to activate or modulate LCs or DDCs, suggesting filarial larvae expertly evade APC detection in human skin.

  15. Sp110 transcription is induced and required by Anaplasma phagocytophilum for infection of human promyelocytic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naranjo Victoria

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tick-borne intracellular pathogen, Anaplasma phagocytophilum (Rickettsiales: Anaplasmataceae causes human granulocytic anaplasmosis after infection of polymorphonuclear leucocytes. The human Sp110 gene is a member of the nuclear body (NB components that functions as a nuclear hormone receptor transcriptional coactivator and plays an important role in immunoprotective mechanisms against pathogens in humans. In this research, we hypothesized that Sp110 may be involved in the infection of human promyelocytic HL-60 cells with A. phagocytophilum. Methods The human Sp110 and A. phagocytophilum msp4 mRNA levels were evaluated by real-time RT-PCR in infected human HL-60 cells sampled at 0, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours post-infection. The effect of Sp110 expression on A. phagocytophilum infection was determined by RNA interference (RNAi. The expression of Sp110 was silenced in HL-60 cells by RNAi using pre-designed siRNAs using the Nucleofector 96-well shuttle system (Amaxa Biosystems, Gaithersburg, MD, USA. The A. phagocytophilum infection levels were evaluated in HL-60 cells after RNAi by real-time PCR of msp4 and normalizing against human Alu sequences. Results While Sp110 mRNA levels increased concurrently with A. phagocytophilum infections in HL-60 cells, the silencing of Sp110 expression by RNA interference resulted in decreased infection levels. Conclusion These results demonstrated that Sp110 expression is required for A. phagocytophilum infection and multiplication in HL-60 cells, and suggest a previously undescribed mechanism by which A. phagocytophilum modulates Sp110 mRNA levels to facilitate establishment of infection of human HL-60 cells.

  16. Zika Virus Infection of the Human Glomerular Cells: Implications for Viral Reservoirs and Renal Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcendor, Donald J

    2017-07-15

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in the human renal compartment has not been reported. Several clinical reports have describe high-level persistent viral shedding in the urine of infected patients, but the associated mechanisms have not been explored until now. The current study examined cellular components of the glomerulus of the human kidney for ZIKV infectivity. I infected primary human podocytes, renal glomerular endothelial cells (GECs), and mesangial cells with ZIKV. Viral infectivity was analyzed by means of microscopy, immunofluorescence, real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), and the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 1β, interferon β, and RANTES (regulated on activation of normal T cells expressed and secreted) were assessed using qRT-PCR. I show that glomerular podocytes, renal GECs, and mesangial cells are permissive for ZIKV infection. ZIKV infectivity was confirmed in all 3 cell types by means of immunofluorescence staining, RT-PCR, and qRT-PCR, and qRT-PCR analysis revealed increased transcriptional induction of interleukin 1β, interferon β, and RANTES in ZIKV-infected podocytes at 72 hours, compared with renal GECs and mesangial cells. The findings of this study support the notion that the glomerulus may serve as an amplification reservoir for ZIKV in the renal compartment. The impact of ZIKV infection in the human renal compartment is unknown and will require further study.

  17. Barriers to Infection of Human Cells by Feline Leukemia Virus: Insights into Resistance to Zoonosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Anne; Kilbey, Anna; Naseer, Asif; Levy, Laura S.; Ahmad, Shamim; Watts, Ciorsdaidh; Mackay, Nancy; Cameron, Ewan; Wilson, Sam

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human genome displays a rich fossil record of past gammaretrovirus infections, yet no current epidemic is evident, despite environmental exposure to viruses that infect human cells in vitro. Feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) rank high on this list, but neither domestic nor workplace exposure has been associated with detectable serological responses. Nonspecific inactivation of gammaretroviruses by serum factors appears insufficient to explain these observations. To investigate further, we explored the susceptibilities of primary and established human cell lines to FeLV-B, the most likely zoonotic variant. Fully permissive infection was common in cancer-derived cell lines but was also a feature of nontransformed keratinocytes and lung fibroblasts. Cells of hematopoietic origin were generally less permissive and formed discrete groups on the basis of high or low intracellular protein expression and virion release. Potent repression was observed in primary human blood mononuclear cells and a subset of leukemia cell lines. However, the early steps of reverse transcription and integration appear to be unimpaired in nonpermissive cells. FeLV-B was subject to G→A hypermutation with a predominant APOBEC3G signature in partially permissive cells but was not mutated in permissive cells or in nonpermissive cells that block secondary viral spread. Distinct cellular barriers that protect primary human blood cells are likely to be important in protection against zoonotic infection with FeLV. IMPORTANCE Domestic exposure to gammaretroviruses such as feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) occurs worldwide, but the basis of human resistance to infection remains incompletely understood. The potential threat is evident from the human genome sequence, which reveals many past epidemics of gammaretrovirus infection, and from recent cross-species jumps of gammaretroviruses from rodents to primates and marsupials. This study examined resistance to infection at the cellular level

  18. Barriers to Infection of Human Cells by Feline Leukemia Virus: Insights into Resistance to Zoonosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Anne; Kilbey, Anna; Naseer, Asif; Levy, Laura S; Ahmad, Shamim; Watts, Ciorsdaidh; Mackay, Nancy; Cameron, Ewan; Wilson, Sam; Neil, James C

    2017-03-01

    The human genome displays a rich fossil record of past gammaretrovirus infections, yet no current epidemic is evident, despite environmental exposure to viruses that infect human cells in vitro Feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) rank high on this list, but neither domestic nor workplace exposure has been associated with detectable serological responses. Nonspecific inactivation of gammaretroviruses by serum factors appears insufficient to explain these observations. To investigate further, we explored the susceptibilities of primary and established human cell lines to FeLV-B, the most likely zoonotic variant. Fully permissive infection was common in cancer-derived cell lines but was also a feature of nontransformed keratinocytes and lung fibroblasts. Cells of hematopoietic origin were generally less permissive and formed discrete groups on the basis of high or low intracellular protein expression and virion release. Potent repression was observed in primary human blood mononuclear cells and a subset of leukemia cell lines. However, the early steps of reverse transcription and integration appear to be unimpaired in nonpermissive cells. FeLV-B was subject to G→A hypermutation with a predominant APOBEC3G signature in partially permissive cells but was not mutated in permissive cells or in nonpermissive cells that block secondary viral spread. Distinct cellular barriers that protect primary human blood cells are likely to be important in protection against zoonotic infection with FeLV.IMPORTANCE Domestic exposure to gammaretroviruses such as feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) occurs worldwide, but the basis of human resistance to infection remains incompletely understood. The potential threat is evident from the human genome sequence, which reveals many past epidemics of gammaretrovirus infection, and from recent cross-species jumps of gammaretroviruses from rodents to primates and marsupials. This study examined resistance to infection at the cellular level with the most

  19. Permissive human cytomegalovirus infection of a first trimester extravillous cytotrophoblast cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LaMarca Heather L

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is the leading cause of congenital viral infection in the United States and Europe. Despite the significant morbidity associated with prenatal HCMV infection, little is known about how the virus infects the fetus during pregnancy. To date, primary human cytotrophoblasts (CTBs have been utilized to study placental HCMV infection and replication; however, the minimal mitotic potential of these cells restricts experimentation to a few days, which may be problematic for mechanistic studies of the slow-replicating virus. The aim of this study was to determine whether the human first trimester CTB cell line SGHPL-4 was permissive for HCMV infection and therefore could overcome such limitations. HCMV immediate early (IE protein expression was detected as early as 3 hours post-infection in SGHPL-4 cells and progressively increased as a function of time. HCMV growth assays revealed the presence of infectious virus in both cell lysates and culture supernatants, indicating that viral replication and the release of progeny virus occurred. Compared to human fibroblasts, viral replication was delayed in CTBs, consistent with previous studies reporting delayed viral kinetics in HCMV-infected primary CTBs. These results indicate that SGHPL-4 cells are fully permissive for the complete HCMV replicative cycle. Our findings suggest that these cells may serve as useful tools for future mechanistic studies of HCMV pathogenesis during early pregnancy.

  20. Differences in Cell Activation by Chlamydophila pneumoniae and Chlamydia trachomatis Infection in Human Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüll, M.; Kramp, J.; Petrov, T.; Klucken, A. C.; Hocke, A. C.; Walter, C.; Schmeck, B.; Seybold, J.; Maass, M.; Ludwig, S.; Kuipers, Jens G.; Suttorp, N.; Hippenstiel, S.

    2004-01-01

    Seroepidemiological studies and demonstration of viable bacteria in atherosclerotic plaques have linked Chlamydophila pneumoniae infection to the development of chronic vascular lesions and coronary heart disease. In this study, we characterized C. pneumoniae-mediated effects on human endothelial cells and demonstrated enhanced phosphorylation and activation of the endothelial mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family members extracellular receptor kinase (ERK1/2), p38-MAPK, and c-Jun-NH2 kinase (JNK). Subsequent interleukin-8 (IL-8) expression was dependent on p38-MAPK and ERK1/2 activation as demonstrated by preincubation of endothelial cells with specific inhibitors for the p38-MAPK (SB202190) or ERK (U0126) pathway. Inhibition of either MAPK had almost no effect on intercellular cell adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) expression. While Chlamydia trachomatis was also able to infect endothelial cells, it did not induce the expression of endothelial IL-8 or ICAM-1. These effects were specific for a direct stimulation with viable C. pneumoniae and independent of paracrine release of endothelial cell-derived mediators like platelet-activating factor, NO, prostaglandins, or leukotrienes. Thus, C. pneumoniae triggers an early signal transduction cascade in target cells that could lead to endothelial cell activation, inflammation, and thrombosis, which in turn may result in or promote atherosclerosis. PMID:15501794

  1. Constitutively Expressed IFITM3 Protein in Human Endothelial Cells Poses an Early Infection Block to Human Influenza Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiangjie; Zeng, Hui; Kumar, Amrita; Belser, Jessica A; Maines, Taronna R; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2016-12-15

    A role for pulmonary endothelial cells in the orchestration of cytokine production and leukocyte recruitment during influenza virus infection, leading to severe lung damage, has been recently identified. As the mechanistic pathway for this ability is not fully known, we extended previous studies on influenza virus tropism in cultured human pulmonary endothelial cells. We found that a subset of avian influenza viruses, including potentially pandemic H5N1, H7N9, and H9N2 viruses, could infect human pulmonary endothelial cells (HULEC) with high efficiency compared to human H1N1 or H3N2 viruses. In HULEC, human influenza viruses were capable of binding to host cellular receptors, becoming internalized and initiating hemifusion but failing to uncoat the viral nucleocapsid and to replicate in host nuclei. Unlike numerous cell types, including epithelial cells, we found that pulmonary endothelial cells constitutively express a high level of the restriction protein IFITM3 in endosomal compartments. IFITM3 knockdown by small interfering RNA (siRNA) could partially rescue H1N1 virus infection in HULEC, suggesting IFITM3 proteins were involved in blocking human influenza virus infection in endothelial cells. In contrast, selected avian influenza viruses were able to escape IFITM3 restriction in endothelial cells, possibly by fusing in early endosomes at higher pH or by other, unknown mechanisms. Collectively, our study demonstrates that the human pulmonary endothelium possesses intrinsic immunity to human influenza viruses, in part due to the constitutive expression of IFITM3 proteins. Notably, certain avian influenza viruses have evolved to escape this restriction, possibly contributing to virus-induced pneumonia and severe lung disease in humans. Avian influenza viruses, including H5N1 and H7N9, have been associated with severe respiratory disease and fatal outcomes in humans. Although acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and progressive pulmonary endothelial damage

  2. Viral infection triggers rapid differentiation of human blood monocytes into dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Wanqiu; Gibbs, James S; Lu, Xiuju; Brooke, Christopher B; Roy, Devika; Modlin, Robert L; Bennink, Jack R; Yewdell, Jonathan W

    2012-03-29

    Surprisingly little is known about the interaction of human blood mononuclear cells with viruses. Here, we show that monocytes are the predominant cell type infected when peripheral blood mononuclear cells are exposed to viruses ex vivo. Remarkably, infection with vesicular stomatitis virus, vaccinia virus, and a variety of influenza A viruses (including circulating swine-origin virus) induces monocytes to differentiate within 18 hours into CD16(-)CD83(+) mature dendritic cells with enhanced capacity to activate T cells. Differentiation into dendritic cells does not require cell division and occurs despite the synthesis of viral proteins, which demonstrates that monocytes counteract the capacity of these highly lytic viruses to hijack host cell biosynthetic capacity. Indeed, differentiation requires infectious virus and viral protein synthesis. These findings demonstrate that monocytes are uniquely susceptible to viral infection among blood mononuclear cells, with the likely purpose of generating cells with enhanced capacity to activate innate and acquired antiviral immunity.

  3. Influenza H5N1 virus infection of polarized human alveolar epithelial cells and lung microvascular endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuen Kit M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 virus is entrenched in poultry in Asia and Africa and continues to infect humans zoonotically causing acute respiratory disease syndrome and death. There is evidence that the virus may sometimes spread beyond respiratory tract to cause disseminated infection. The primary target cell for HPAI H5N1 virus in human lung is the alveolar epithelial cell. Alveolar epithelium and its adjacent lung microvascular endothelium form host barriers to the initiation of infection and dissemination of influenza H5N1 infection in humans. These are polarized cells and the polarity of influenza virus entry and egress as well as the secretion of cytokines and chemokines from the virus infected cells are likely to be central to the pathogenesis of human H5N1 disease. Aim To study influenza A (H5N1 virus replication and host innate immune responses in polarized primary human alveolar epithelial cells and lung microvascular endothelial cells and its relevance to the pathogenesis of human H5N1 disease. Methods We use an in vitro model of polarized primary human alveolar epithelial cells and lung microvascular endothelial cells grown in transwell culture inserts to compare infection with influenza A subtype H1N1 and H5N1 viruses via the apical or basolateral surfaces. Results We demonstrate that both influenza H1N1 and H5N1 viruses efficiently infect alveolar epithelial cells from both apical and basolateral surface of the epithelium but release of newly formed virus is mainly from the apical side of the epithelium. In contrast, influenza H5N1 virus, but not H1N1 virus, efficiently infected polarized microvascular endothelial cells from both apical and basolateral aspects. This provides a mechanistic explanation for how H5N1 virus may infect the lung from systemic circulation. Epidemiological evidence has implicated ingestion of virus-contaminated foods as the source of infection in some instances and our

  4. HIV infection of naturally occurring and genetically reprogrammed human regulatory T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald-Richter, Kyra; Grill, Stacy M; Shariat, Nikki; Leelawong, Mindy; Sundrud, Mark S; Haas, David W; Unutmaz, Derya

    2004-07-01

    A T-cell subset, defined as CD4(+)CD25(hi) (regulatory T-cells [Treg cells]), was recently shown to suppress T-cell activation. We demonstrate that human Treg cells isolated from healthy donors express the HIV-coreceptor CCR5 and are highly susceptible to HIV infection and replication. Because Treg cells are present in very few numbers and are difficult to expand in vitro, we genetically modified conventional human T-cells to generate Treg cells in vitro by ectopic expression of FoxP3, a transcription factor associated with reprogramming T-cells into a Treg subset. Overexpression of FoxP3 in naïve human CD4(+) T-cells recapitulated the hyporesponsiveness and suppressive function of naturally occurring Treg cells. However, FoxP3 was less efficient in reprogramming memory T-cell subset into regulatory cells. In addition, FoxP3-transduced T-cells also became more susceptible to HIV infection. Remarkably, a portion of HIV-positive individuals with a low percentage of CD4(+) and higher levels of activated T-cells have greatly reduced levels of FoxP3(+)CD4(+)CD25(hi) T-cells, suggesting disruption of the Treg cells during HIV infection. Targeting and disruption of the T-cell regulatory system by HIV may contribute to hyperactivation of conventional T-cells, a characteristic of HIV disease progression. Moreover, the ability to reprogram human T-cells into Treg cells in vitro will greatly aid in decoding their mechanism of suppression, their enhanced susceptibility to HIV infection, and the unique markers expressed by this subset.

  5. HIV infection of naturally occurring and genetically reprogrammed human regulatory T-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyra Oswald-Richter

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available A T-cell subset, defined as CD4(+CD25(hi (regulatory T-cells [Treg cells], was recently shown to suppress T-cell activation. We demonstrate that human Treg cells isolated from healthy donors express the HIV-coreceptor CCR5 and are highly susceptible to HIV infection and replication. Because Treg cells are present in very few numbers and are difficult to expand in vitro, we genetically modified conventional human T-cells to generate Treg cells in vitro by ectopic expression of FoxP3, a transcription factor associated with reprogramming T-cells into a Treg subset. Overexpression of FoxP3 in naïve human CD4(+ T-cells recapitulated the hyporesponsiveness and suppressive function of naturally occurring Treg cells. However, FoxP3 was less efficient in reprogramming memory T-cell subset into regulatory cells. In addition, FoxP3-transduced T-cells also became more susceptible to HIV infection. Remarkably, a portion of HIV-positive individuals with a low percentage of CD4(+ and higher levels of activated T-cells have greatly reduced levels of FoxP3(+CD4(+CD25(hi T-cells, suggesting disruption of the Treg cells during HIV infection. Targeting and disruption of the T-cell regulatory system by HIV may contribute to hyperactivation of conventional T-cells, a characteristic of HIV disease progression. Moreover, the ability to reprogram human T-cells into Treg cells in vitro will greatly aid in decoding their mechanism of suppression, their enhanced susceptibility to HIV infection, and the unique markers expressed by this subset.

  6. [Promoting effect of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection on human laryngeal carcinoma HEp-2 cell adhesion and migration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Jun; Hong, Li; Chen, Ning; Shen, Bing-Ling; Deng, Yan-Qiu; Quan, Wei; Wang, Bei-Bei; Zhang, Li-Jun

    2011-01-01

    To explore the effect of Chlamydia pneumoniae (C.pn) infection on human laryngeal carcinoma cell line HEp-2 cell adhesion and migration, to further clarify the role and mechanism of C.pn infection in tumor metastasis. HEp-2 cells were infected with C.pn after the culture and propagation of C.pn. The cytopathic effect was observed by microscopy. Morphological characteristics of C.pn inclusions in HEp-2 cells were examined by fluorescence microscopy and acridine orange staining. The ultrastructural changes of C.pn inclusions in the HEp-2 cells were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Cell adhesion assay was performed to investigate the effect of C.pn infection on the adhesion of HEp-2 cells to collagen I. Wound-healing assay and transwell assay were performed to explore the effect of C.pn infection on HEp-2 cell migration. At 72 h post-infection, C.pn infected-HEp-2 cells were swollen and partially desquamated. Numerous vacuoles (inclusions) were observed and C.pn inclusions occupied almost the whole cytoplasm of the HEp-2 cells. Grape-like C.pn inclusions were observed in the HEp-2 cells stained with acridine orange under a fluorescence microscope at 72 h after infection. Under TEM, there were more mature pear-shaped elementary bodies, but less larger and round reticulate bodies in the HEp-2 cells infected with C.pn for 72 h. In the cell adhesion assay, the A value in C.pn infection group was 0.669 ± 0.011, significantly higher than that in the control group (0.558 ± 0.005) at 2 h after infection (P HEp-2 cells in the wound-healing assay was significantly longer than that of control cells at 24 h after infection (P HEp-2 cells infected with C.pn for 12 h migrated more than the control cells in the transwell assay (23.40 ± 2.41 vs 10.40 ± 1.67) (P HEp-2 cell adhesion to collagen I and migration of HEp-2 cells, indicating that C.pn infection may play an important role in promoting the metastasis of laryngeal cancer.

  7. Cell-mediated infection of cervix derived epithelial cells with primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, X; Phillips, D M

    1996-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that HIV-infected transformed T-cells or monocytes adhere to monolayers of CD4-negative epithelial cells. Adhesion is soon followed by budding of HIV from infected mononuclear cells onto the surface of epithelial cells. Epithelial cells subsequently take up virus and become productively infected. Based on these findings, we proposed that sexual transmission of HIV may involve cell-mediated infection of intact mucosal epithelia of the urogenital tract. However, it has become increasingly clear that primary cells and HIV strains isolated from patients are more appropriate models for HIV infection than established cell lines and lab strains of virus. In the studies described here, we infected cervix-derived epithelial monolayers with primary monocytes infected with patient isolates of non-syncytial inducing (NSI) macrophage-tropic strains of HIV. Under the culture conditions employed, HIV-infected primary monocytes do not remain adherent to the apical surface of the epithelium, as did HIV-infected transformed cells. Instead, following adherence, the primary cells migrate between epithelial cells. Virus is secreted from a pseudopod as HIV-infected primary monocytes pass between cells of the epithelium. Productive infection of the epithelium was detected by p24 ELISA and PCR Southern blot analysis. Infection can be blocked by sera from HIV-seropositive individuals or by certain sulfated polysaccharides. These findings support the supposition that transmission of HIV may occur via cell-mediated infection of intact epithelia. The observations also hint at the possibility that-HIV-infected monocyte/macrophages in semen or cervical-vaginal secretions could cross intact epithelia by passing between epithelial cells. Blocking studies suggest that it may be possible to inhibit sexual transmission of HIV either by antibodies in genital tract secretions or by a topical formulation containing certain sulfated polysaccharides.

  8. Severe cutaneous human papilloma virus infection associated with Natural Killer cell deficiency following stem cell transplantation for severe combined immunodeficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamili, Qurat-ul-Ain; Seeborg, Filiz O; Saxena, Kapil; Nicholas, Sarah K; Banerjee, Pinaki P; Angelo, Laura S; Mace, Emily M; Forbes, Lisa R; Martinez, Caridad; Wright, Teresa S; Orange, Jordan S.; Hanson, Imelda Celine

    2016-01-01

    Capsule Summary The authors identify Natural Killer cell deficiency in post-transplant severe combined immunodeficiency patients who developed severe human papilloma virus infections as a long term complication. PMID:25159470

  9. Differential transcriptional responses to Ebola and Marburg virus infection in bat and human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hölzer, Martin; Krähling, Verena; Amman, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    The unprecedented outbreak of Ebola in West Africa resulted in over 28,000 cases and 11,000 deaths, underlining the need for a better understanding of the biology of this highly pathogenic virus to develop specific counter strategies. Two filoviruses, the Ebola and Marburg viruses, result...... expressed genes, activity motifs and pathways in human and bat cells infected with the Ebola and Marburg viruses, and we demonstrate that the replication of filoviruses is more rapid in human cells than in bat cells. We also found that the most strongly regulated genes upon filovirus infection are chemokine...

  10. Susceptibility of human placenta derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells to human herpesviruses infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Avanzi

    Full Text Available Fetal membranes (FM derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs are higher in number, expansion and differentiation abilities compared with those obtained from adult tissues, including bone marrow. Upon systemic administration, ex vivo expanded FM-MSCs preferentially home to damaged tissues promoting regenerative processes through their unique biological properties. These characteristics together with their immune-privileged nature and immune suppressive activity, a low infection rate and young age of placenta compared to other sources of SCs make FM-MSCs an attractive target for cell-based therapy and a valuable tool in regenerative medicine, currently being evaluated in clinical trials. In the present study we investigated the permissivity of FM-MSCs to all members of the human Herpesviridae family, an issue which is relevant to their purification, propagation, conservation and therapeutic use, as well as to their potential role in the vertical transmission of viral agents to the fetus and to their potential viral vector-mediated genetic modification. We present here evidence that FM-MSCs are fully permissive to infection with Herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2, Varicella zoster virus (VZV, and Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV, but not with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, Human Herpesvirus-6, 7 and 8 (HHV-6, 7, 8 although these viruses are capable of entering FM-MSCs and transient, limited viral gene expression occurs. Our findings therefore strongly suggest that FM-MSCs should be screened for the presence of herpesviruses before xenotransplantation. In addition, they suggest that herpesviruses may be indicated as viral vectors for gene expression in MSCs both in gene therapy applications and in the selective induction of differentiation.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus Infection Reduces Nutrition Uptake and Nucleotide Biosynthesis in a Human Airway Epithelial Cell Line

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    Philipp Gierok

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Gram positive opportunistic human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus induces a variety of diseases including pneumonia. S. aureus is the second most isolated pathogen in cystic fibrosis patients and accounts for a large proportion of nosocomial pneumonia. Inside the lung, the human airway epithelium is the first line in defence with regard to microbial recognition and clearance as well as regulation of the immune response. The metabolic host response is, however, yet unknown. To address the question of whether the infection alters the metabolome and metabolic activity of airway epithelial cells, we used a metabolomics approach. The nutrition uptake by the human airway epithelial cell line A549 was monitored over time by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR and the intracellular metabolic fingerprints were investigated by gas chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography (GC-MS and (HPLC-MS. To test the metabolic activity of the host cells, glutamine analogues and labelled precursors were applied after the infection. We found that A549 cells restrict uptake of essential nutrients from the medium after S. aureus infection. Moreover, the infection led to a shutdown of the purine and pyrimidine synthesis in the A549 host cell, whereas other metabolic routes such as the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway remained active. In summary, our data show that the infection with S. aureus negatively affects growth, alters the metabolic composition and specifically impacts the de novo nucleotide biosynthesis in this human airway epithelial cell model.

  12. DC-SIGN Facilitates Fusion of Dendritic Cells with Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1-Infected Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccaldi, Pierre-Emmanuel; Delebecque, Frédéric; Prevost, Marie-Christine; Moris, Arnaud; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Gessain, Antoine; Schwartz, Olivier; Ozden, Simona

    2006-01-01

    Interactions between the oncogenic retrovirus human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and dendritic cells (DCs) are poorly characterized. We show here that monocyte-derived DCs form syncytia and are infected upon coculture with HTLV-1-infected lymphocytes. We examined the role of DC-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), a C-type lectin expressed in DCs, in HTLV-1-induced syncytium formation. DC-SIGN is known to bind with high affinity to various viral envelope glycoproteins, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus, as well as to the cellular receptors ICAM-2 and ICAM-3. After cocultivating DCs and HTLV-1-infected cells, we found that anti-DC-SIGN monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were able to decrease the number and size of HTLV-1-induced syncytia. Moreover, expression of the lectin in epithelial-cell lines dramatically enhanced the ability to fuse with HTLV-1-positive cells. Interestingly, in contrast to the envelope (Env) glycoproteins of HIV and other viruses, that of HTLV-1 does not bind directly to DC-SIGN. The facilitating role of the lectin in HTLV-1 syncytium formation is mediated by its interaction with ICAM-2 and ICAM-3, as demonstrated by use of MAbs directed against these adhesion molecules. Altogether, our results indicate that DC-SIGN facilitates HTLV-1 infection and fusion of DCs through an ICAM-dependent mechanism. PMID:16641270

  13. Cell-to-cell contact of human monocytes with infected arterial smooth-muscle cells enhances growth of Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puolakkainen, Mirja; Campbell, Lee Ann; Lin, Tsun-Mei; Richards, Theresa; Patton, Dorothy L; Kuo, Cho-Chou

    2003-02-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae can infect arterial cells. It has been shown that coculture of human monocytes (U937) and endothelial cells promotes infection of C. pneumoniae in endothelial cells and that the enhancement was mediated by a soluble factor (insulin-like growth factor 2) secreted by monocytes. In this study, it is shown that coculture of monocytes with C. pneumoniae enhances infection of C. pneumoniae in arterial smooth-muscle cells 5.3-fold at a monocyte-to-smooth-muscle cell ratio of 5. However, unlike endothelial cells, no enhancement was observed if monocytes were placed in cell culture inserts or if conditioned medium from monocyte cultures was used, which suggests that cell-to-cell contact is critical. The addition of mannose 6-phosphate or octyl glucoside, a nonionic detergent containing a sugar group, to cocultures inhibited the enhancement. These findings suggest that the monocyte-smooth-muscle cell interaction may be mediated by mannose 6-phosphate receptors present on monocytes.

  14. Varicella zoster virus infection of human fetal lung cells alters mitochondrial morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Amy C; Badani, Hussain; McClatchey, P Mason; Baird, Nicholas L; Bowlin, Jacqueline L; Bouchard, Ron; Perng, Guey-Chuen; Reusch, Jane E B; Kaufer, Benedikt B; Gilden, Don; Shahzad, Aamir; Kennedy, Peter G E; Cohrs, Randall J

    2016-10-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is a ubiquitous alphaherpesvirus that establishes latency in ganglionic neurons throughout the neuraxis after primary infection. Here, we show that VZV infection induces a time-dependent significant change in mitochondrial morphology, an important indicator of cellular health, since mitochondria are involved in essential cellular functions. VZV immediate-early protein 63 (IE63) was detected in mitochondria-rich cellular fractions extracted from infected human fetal lung fibroblasts (HFL) by Western blotting. IE63 interacted with cytochrome c oxidase in bacterial 2-hybrid analyses. Confocal microscopy of VZV-infected HFL cells at multiple times after infection revealed the presence of IE63 in the nucleus, mitochondria, and cytoplasm. Our data provide the first evidence that VZV infection induces alterations in mitochondrial morphology, including fragmentation, which may be involved in cellular damage and/or death during virus infection.

  15. Temporal proteomic profiling of Chlamydia trachomatis-infected HeLa-229 human cervical epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Grace Min Yi; Lim, Hui Jing; Yeow, Tee Cian; Movahed, Elaheh; Looi, Chung Yeng; Gupta, Rishein; Arulanandam, Bernard P; Abu Bakar, Sazaly; Sabet, Negar Shafiei; Chang, Li-Yen; Wong, Won Fen

    2016-05-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the leading causative agent of bacterial sexually transmitted infections worldwide which can lead to female pelvic inflammatory disease and infertility. A greater understanding of host response during chlamydial infection is essential to design intervention technique to reduce the increasing incidence rate of genital chlamydial infection. In this study, we investigated proteome changes in epithelial cells during C. trachomatis infection by using an isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling technique coupled with a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS(3) ) analysis. C. trachomatis (serovar D, MOI 1)-infected HeLa-229 human cervical carcinoma epithelial cells (at 2, 4 and 8 h) showed profound modifications of proteome profile which involved 606 host proteins. MGST1, SUGP2 and ATXN10 were among the top in the list of the differentially upregulated protein. Through pathway analysis, we suggested the involvement of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in host cells upon C. trachomatis infection. Network analysis underscored the participation of DNA repair mechanism during C. trachomatis infection. In summary, intense modifications of proteome profile in C. trachomatis-infected HeLa-229 cells indicate complex host-pathogen interactions at early phase of chlamydial infection.

  16. Infection kinetics of human adenovirus serotype 41 in HEK 293 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joselma Siqueira-Silva

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to acquire an overview of the infectious cycle of HAdV-41 in permissive HEK 293 cells and compare it to that observed with the prototype of the genus, Human adenovirus C HAdV-2. HEK 293 cells were infected with each virus separately and were harvested every 12 h for seven days. Infection kinetics were analysed using confocal and electronic microscopy. The results show that, when properly cultivated, HAdV-41 was not fastidious. It had a longer multiplication cycle, which resulted in the release of complete viral particles and viral stocks reached high titres. After 60 h of infection, the export of viral proteins from the infected cell to the extracellular milieu was observed, with a pattern similar to that previously described for HAdV-2 penton-base trafficking after 30 h of infection. HAdV-41 had a non-lytic cycle and the infection spread from the first infected cell to its neighbours. The release process of the viral particles is unknown. The results observed for HAdV-41 infection in HEK 293 cells show how different this virus is from the prototype HAdV-2 and provides information for the development of this vector for use in gene therapy.

  17. Differential transcriptional responses to Ebola and Marburg virus infection in bat and human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölzer, Martin; Krähling, Verena; Amman, Fabian; Barth, Emanuel; Bernhart, Stephan H.; Carmelo, Victor A. O.; Collatz, Maximilian; Doose, Gero; Eggenhofer, Florian; Ewald, Jan; Fallmann, Jörg; Feldhahn, Lasse M.; Fricke, Markus; Gebauer, Juliane; Gruber, Andreas J.; Hufsky, Franziska; Indrischek, Henrike; Kanton, Sabina; Linde, Jörg; Mostajo, Nelly; Ochsenreiter, Roman; Riege, Konstantin; Rivarola-Duarte, Lorena; Sahyoun, Abdullah H.; Saunders, Sita J.; Seemann, Stefan E.; Tanzer, Andrea; Vogel, Bertram; Wehner, Stefanie; Wolfinger, Michael T.; Backofen, Rolf; Gorodkin, Jan; Grosse, Ivo; Hofacker, Ivo; Hoffmann, Steve; Kaleta, Christoph; Stadler, Peter F.; Becker, Stephan; Marz, Manja

    2016-01-01

    The unprecedented outbreak of Ebola in West Africa resulted in over 28,000 cases and 11,000 deaths, underlining the need for a better understanding of the biology of this highly pathogenic virus to develop specific counter strategies. Two filoviruses, the Ebola and Marburg viruses, result in a severe and often fatal infection in humans. However, bats are natural hosts and survive filovirus infections without obvious symptoms. The molecular basis of this striking difference in the response to filovirus infections is not well understood. We report a systematic overview of differentially expressed genes, activity motifs and pathways in human and bat cells infected with the Ebola and Marburg viruses, and we demonstrate that the replication of filoviruses is more rapid in human cells than in bat cells. We also found that the most strongly regulated genes upon filovirus infection are chemokine ligands and transcription factors. We observed a strong induction of the JAK/STAT pathway, of several genes encoding inhibitors of MAP kinases (DUSP genes) and of PPP1R15A, which is involved in ER stress-induced cell death. We used comparative transcriptomics to provide a data resource that can be used to identify cellular responses that might allow bats to survive filovirus infections. PMID:27713552

  18. Differential transcriptional responses to Ebola and Marburg virus infection in bat and human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölzer, Martin; Krähling, Verena; Amman, Fabian; Barth, Emanuel; Bernhart, Stephan H; Carmelo, Victor A O; Collatz, Maximilian; Doose, Gero; Eggenhofer, Florian; Ewald, Jan; Fallmann, Jörg; Feldhahn, Lasse M; Fricke, Markus; Gebauer, Juliane; Gruber, Andreas J; Hufsky, Franziska; Indrischek, Henrike; Kanton, Sabina; Linde, Jörg; Mostajo, Nelly; Ochsenreiter, Roman; Riege, Konstantin; Rivarola-Duarte, Lorena; Sahyoun, Abdullah H; Saunders, Sita J; Seemann, Stefan E; Tanzer, Andrea; Vogel, Bertram; Wehner, Stefanie; Wolfinger, Michael T; Backofen, Rolf; Gorodkin, Jan; Grosse, Ivo; Hofacker, Ivo; Hoffmann, Steve; Kaleta, Christoph; Stadler, Peter F; Becker, Stephan; Marz, Manja

    2016-10-07

    The unprecedented outbreak of Ebola in West Africa resulted in over 28,000 cases and 11,000 deaths, underlining the need for a better understanding of the biology of this highly pathogenic virus to develop specific counter strategies. Two filoviruses, the Ebola and Marburg viruses, result in a severe and often fatal infection in humans. However, bats are natural hosts and survive filovirus infections without obvious symptoms. The molecular basis of this striking difference in the response to filovirus infections is not well understood. We report a systematic overview of differentially expressed genes, activity motifs and pathways in human and bat cells infected with the Ebola and Marburg viruses, and we demonstrate that the replication of filoviruses is more rapid in human cells than in bat cells. We also found that the most strongly regulated genes upon filovirus infection are chemokine ligands and transcription factors. We observed a strong induction of the JAK/STAT pathway, of several genes encoding inhibitors of MAP kinases (DUSP genes) and of PPP1R15A, which is involved in ER stress-induced cell death. We used comparative transcriptomics to provide a data resource that can be used to identify cellular responses that might allow bats to survive filovirus infections.

  19. AXL-Mediated Productive Infection of Human Endothelial Cells by Zika Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shufeng; DeLalio, Leon J; Isakson, Brant E; Wang, Tony T

    2016-11-11

    The mosquito-borne Zika virus (ZIKV) is now recognized as a blood-borne pathogen, raising an important question about how the virus gets into human bloodstream. The imminent threat of the ZIKV epidemic to the global blood supply also demands novel therapeutics to stop virus transmission though transfusion. We intend to characterize ZIKV tropism for human endothelial cells (ECs) and provide potential targets for intervention. We conducted immunostaining, plaque assay, and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction of ZIKV RNA to evaluate the possible infection of ECs by ZIKV. Both the African and the South American ZIKV strains readily infect human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human ECs derived from aortic and coronary artery, as well as the saphenous vein. Infected ECs released infectious progeny virus. Compared with the African strains, South American ZIKV isolates replicate faster in ECs and are partially cytopathic, suggesting enhanced virulence of these isolates. Flow cytometric analyses showed that the susceptibility of ECs positively correlated with the cell surface levels of tyrosine-protein kinase receptor UFO (AXL) receptor tyrosine kinase. Gain- and loss-of-function studies further revealed that AXL is required for ZIKV entry at a postbinding step. Finally, small-molecule inhibitors of the AXL kinase significantly reduced ZIKA infection of ECs. We identified EC as a key cell type for ZIKV infection. These data support the view of hematogenous dissemination of ZIKV and implicate AXL as a new target for antiviral therapy. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Induction of proinflammatory cytokines in human lung epithelial cells during Rhodococcus equi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remuzgo-Martínez, Sara; Pilares-Ortega, Lilian; Alvarez-Rodríguez, Lorena; Aranzamendi-Zaldunbide, Maitane; Padilla, Daniel; Icardo, Jose Manuel; Ramos-Vivas, Jose

    2013-08-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an opportunistic human pathogen associated with immunosuppressed people. While the interaction of R. equi with macrophages has been comprehensively studied, little is known about its interactions with non-phagocytic cells. Here, we characterized the entry process of this bacterium into human lung epithelial cells. The invasion is inhibited by nocodazole and wortmannin, suggesting that the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway and microtubule cytoskeleton are important for invasion. Pre-incubation of R. equi with a rabbit anti-R. equi polyclonal antiserum resulted in a dramatic reduction in invasion. Also, the invasion process as studied by immunofluorescence and scanning electron microscopy indicates that R. equi make initial contact with the microvilli of the A549 cells, and at the structural level, the entry process was observed to occur via a zipper-like mechanism. Infected lung epithelial cells upregulate the expression of cytokines IL-8 and IL-6 upon infection. The production of these pro-inflammatory cytokines was significantly enhanced in culture supernatants from cells infected with non-mucoid plasmid-less strains when compared with cells infected with mucoid strains. These results demonstrate that human airway epithelial cells produce pro-inflammatory mediators against R. equi isolates.

  1. Efficient human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection of cells lacking PDZD8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shijian; Sodroski, Joseph

    2015-07-01

    PDZD8 can bind the capsid proteins of different retroviruses, and transient knockdown of PDZD8 results in a decrease in the efficiency of an early, post-entry event in the retrovirus life cycle. Here we used the CRISPR-CAS9 system to create cell lines in which PDZD8 expression is stably eliminated. The PDZD8-knockout cell lines were infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) and murine leukemia virus as efficiently as the parental PDZD8-expressing cells. These results indicate that PDZD8 is not absolutely necessary for HIV-1 infection and diminishes its attractiveness as a potential target for intervention.

  2. Myxoma and vaccinia viruses exploit different mechanisms to enter and infect human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Nancy Y; Bartee, Eric; Mohamed, Mohamed R; Rahman, Masmudur M; Barrett, John W; McFadden, Grant

    2010-06-05

    Myxoma (MYXV) and vaccinia (VACV) viruses have recently emerged as potential oncolytic agents that can infect and kill different human cancer cells. Although both are structurally similar, it is unknown whether the pathway(s) used by these poxviruses to enter and cause oncolysis in cancer cells are mechanistically similar. Here, we compared the entry of MYXV and VACV-WR into various human cancer cells and observed significant differences: 1--low-pH treatment accelerates fusion-mediated entry of VACV but not MYXV, 2--the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein inhibits entry of VACV, but not MYXV, 3--knockdown of PAK1 revealed that it is required for a late stage event downstream of MYXV entry into cancer cells, whereas PAK1 is required for VACV entry into the same target cells. These results suggest that VACV and MYXV exploit different mechanisms to enter into human cancer cells, thus providing some rationale for their divergent cancer cell tropisms.

  3. Altered distribution of peripheral blood memory B cells in humans chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Esteban R; Olivera, Gabriela C; Quebrada Palacio, Luz P; González, Mariela N; Hernandez-Vasquez, Yolanda; Sirena, Natalia María; Morán, María L; Ledesma Patiño, Oscar S; Postan, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Numerous abnormalities of the peripheral blood T cell compartment have been reported in human chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection and related to prolonged antigenic stimulation by persisting parasites. Herein, we measured circulating lymphocytes of various phenotypes based on the differential expression of CD19, CD4, CD27, CD10, IgD, IgM, IgG and CD138 in a total of 48 T. cruzi-infected individuals and 24 healthy controls. Infected individuals had decreased frequencies of CD19+CD27+ cells, which positively correlated with the frequencies of CD4+CD27+ cells. The contraction of CD19+CD27+ cells was comprised of IgG+IgD-, IgM+IgD- and isotype switched IgM-IgD- memory B cells, CD19+CD10+CD27+ B cell precursors and terminally differentiated CD19+CD27+CD138+ plasma cells. Conversely, infected individuals had increased proportions of CD19+IgG+CD27-IgD- memory and CD19+IgM+CD27-IgD+ transitional/naïve B cells. These observations prompted us to assess soluble CD27, a molecule generated by the cleavage of membrane-bound CD27 and used to monitor systemic immune activation. Elevated levels of serum soluble CD27 were observed in infected individuals with Chagas cardiomyopathy, indicating its potentiality as an immunological marker for disease progression in endemic areas. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that chronic T. cruzi infection alters the distribution of various peripheral blood B cell subsets, probably related to the CD4+ T cell deregulation process provoked by the parasite in humans.

  4. Altered distribution of peripheral blood memory B cells in humans chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban R Fernández

    Full Text Available Numerous abnormalities of the peripheral blood T cell compartment have been reported in human chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection and related to prolonged antigenic stimulation by persisting parasites. Herein, we measured circulating lymphocytes of various phenotypes based on the differential expression of CD19, CD4, CD27, CD10, IgD, IgM, IgG and CD138 in a total of 48 T. cruzi-infected individuals and 24 healthy controls. Infected individuals had decreased frequencies of CD19+CD27+ cells, which positively correlated with the frequencies of CD4+CD27+ cells. The contraction of CD19+CD27+ cells was comprised of IgG+IgD-, IgM+IgD- and isotype switched IgM-IgD- memory B cells, CD19+CD10+CD27+ B cell precursors and terminally differentiated CD19+CD27+CD138+ plasma cells. Conversely, infected individuals had increased proportions of CD19+IgG+CD27-IgD- memory and CD19+IgM+CD27-IgD+ transitional/naïve B cells. These observations prompted us to assess soluble CD27, a molecule generated by the cleavage of membrane-bound CD27 and used to monitor systemic immune activation. Elevated levels of serum soluble CD27 were observed in infected individuals with Chagas cardiomyopathy, indicating its potentiality as an immunological marker for disease progression in endemic areas. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that chronic T. cruzi infection alters the distribution of various peripheral blood B cell subsets, probably related to the CD4+ T cell deregulation process provoked by the parasite in humans.

  5. The Fc and not CD4 Receptor Mediates Antibody Enhancement of HIV Infection in Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homsy, Jacques; Meyer, Mia; Tateno, Masatoshi; Clarkson, Sarah; Levy, Jay A.

    1989-06-01

    Antibodies that enhance human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infectivity have been found in the blood of infected individuals and in infected or immunized animals. These findings raise serious concern for the development of a safe vaccine against acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. To address the in vivo relevance and mechanism of this phenomenon, antibody-dependent enhancement of HIV infectivity in peripheral blood macrophages, lymphocytes, and human fibroblastoid cells was studied. Neither Leu3a, a monoclonal antibody directed against the CD4 receptor, nor soluble recombinant CD4 even at high concentrations prevented this enhancement. The addition of monoclonal antibody to the Fc receptor III (anti-FcRIII), but not of antibodies that react with FcRI or FcRII, inhibited HIV type 1 and HIV type 2 enhancement in peripheral blood macrophages. Although enhancement of HIV infection in CD4+ lymphocytes could not be blocked by anti-FcRIII, it was inhibited by the addition of human immunoglobulin G aggregates. The results indicate that the FcRIII receptor on human macrophages and possibly another Fc receptor on human CD4+ lymphocytes mediate antibody-dependent enhancement of HIV infectivity and that this phenomenon proceeds through a mechanism independent of the CD4 protein.

  6. DENV inhibits type I IFN production in infected cells by cleaving human STING.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Aguirre

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is a pathogen with a high impact on human health. It replicates in a wide range of cells involved in the immune response. To efficiently infect humans, DENV must evade or inhibit fundamental elements of the innate immune system, namely the type I interferon response. DENV circumvents the host immune response by expressing proteins that antagonize the cellular innate immunity. We have recently documented the inhibition of type I IFN production by the proteolytic activity of DENV NS2B3 protease complex in human monocyte derived dendritic cells (MDDCs. In the present report we identify the human adaptor molecule STING as a target of the NS2B3 protease complex. We characterize the mechanism of inhibition of type I IFN production in primary human MDDCs by this viral factor. Using different human and mouse primary cells lacking STING, we show enhanced DENV replication. Conversely, mutated versions of STING that cannot be cleaved by the DENV NS2B3 protease induced higher levels of type I IFN after infection with DENV. Additionally, we show that DENV NS2B3 is not able to degrade the mouse version of STING, a phenomenon that severely restricts the replication of DENV in mouse cells, suggesting that STING plays a key role in the inhibition of DENV infection and spread in mice.

  7. Mitochondrial and bioenergetic dysfunction in human hepatic cells infected with dengue 2 virus

    OpenAIRE

    El-Bacha, Tatiana; Midlej, Victor; Pereira da Silva, Ana Paula; Silva da Costa, Leandro; Benchimol, Marlene; Galina, Antonio; Da Poian, Andrea T.

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial and bioenergetic dysfunction in human hepatic cells infected with dengue 2 virus correspondence: Corresponding author. Fax: +55 21 22708647. (El-Bacha, Tatiana) (El-Bacha, Tatiana) Laboratorio de Bioquimica de Virus, Instituto de Bioquimica Medica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro - RJ-Brasil--> , Av. Bauhinia n? 400 ? CCS Bloco H 2? andar--> , sala 22. Ilha do Governador--> ...

  8. Mitochondrial and bioenergetic dysfunction in human hepatic cells infected with dengue 2 virus

    OpenAIRE

    El-Bacha, Tatiana; Midlej, Victor; Silva, Ana Paula Pereira da; COSTA,LEANDRO SILVA DA; Benchimol, Marlene; Galina, Antonio; POIAN,ANDREA T. DA

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial and bioenergetic dysfunction in human hepatic cells infected with dengue 2 virus correspondence: Corresponding author. Fax: +55 21 22708647. (El-Bacha, Tatiana) (El-Bacha, Tatiana) Laboratorio de Bioquimica de Virus, Instituto de Bioquimica Medica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro - RJ-Brasil--> , Av. Bauhinia n? 400 ? CCS Bloco H 2? andar--> , sala 22. Ilha do Governador--> ...

  9. A Novel Human Radixin Peptide Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Infection at the Level of Cell Entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukong, Terence N; Kodys, Karen; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2014-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus infection of hepatocytes is a multistep process involving the interaction between viral and host cell molecules. Recently, we identified ezrin-moesin-radixin proteins and spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) as important host therapeutic targets for HCV treatment development. Previously, an ezrin hinge region peptide (Hep1) has been shown to exert anti-HCV properties in vivo, though its mechanism of action remains limited. In search of potential novel inhibitors of HCV infection and their functional mechanism we analyzed the anti-HCV properties of different human derived radixin peptides. Sixteen different radixin peptides were derived, synthesized and tested. Real-time quantitative PCR, cell toxicity assay, immuno-precipitation/western blot analysis and computational resource for drug discovery software were used for experimental analysis. We found that a human radixin hinge region peptide (Peptide1) can specifically block HCV J6/JFH-1 infection of Huh7.5 cells. Peptide 1 had no cell toxicity or intracellular uptake into Huh7.5 cells. Mechanistically, the anti-HCV activity of Peptide 1 extended to disruption of HCV engagement of CD81 thereby blocking downstream SYK activation, which we have recently demonstrated to be important for effective HCV infection of target hepatocytes. Our findings highlight a novel functional class of anti-HCV agents that can inhibit HCV infection, most likely by disrupting vital viral-host signaling interactions at the level of virus entry.

  10. Human papillomavirus-related basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder associated with genital tract human papillomavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginori, Alessandro; Barone, Aurora; Santopietro, Rosa; Barbanti, Gabriele; Cecconi, Filippo; Tripodi, Sergio Antonio

    2015-02-01

    Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma is a biologically aggressive neoplasm mainly found in the head and neck region. Recently, four cases of basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder have been reported, and three of them occurred in patients with neurogenic bladder, repeated catheterizations and human papillomavirus infection of the urinary tract. To the best of our knowledge, none of the patients affected by basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder described in the literature had documented genital involvement by human papillomavirus. Herein, we describe the case of a woman with neurogenic bladder affected by basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder and by a concomitant genital tract human papillomavirus infection. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  11. α1-Antitrypsin reduces rhinovirus infection in primary human airway epithelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berman R

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Reena Berman, Di Jiang, Qun Wu, Hong Wei Chu Department of Medicine, National Jewish Health, Denver, CO, USA Abstract: Human rhinovirus (HRV infections target airway epithelium and are the leading cause of acute exacerbations of COPD. Cigarette smoke (CS increases the severity of viral infections, but there is no effective therapy for HRV infection. We determined whether α1-antitrypsin (A1AT reduces HRV-16 infection in CS-exposed primary human airway epithelial cells. Brushed bronchial epithelial cells from normal subjects and patients diagnosed with COPD were cultured at air–liquid interface to induce mucociliary differentiation. These cells were treated with A1AT or bovine serum albumin for 2 hours and then exposed to air or whole cigarette smoke (WCS with or without HRV-16 (5×104 50% Tissue Culture Infective Dose [TCID50]/transwell infection for 24 hours. WCS exposure significantly increased viral load by an average of fivefold and decreased the expression of antiviral genes interferon-λ1, OAS1, and MX1. When A1AT was added to WCS-exposed cells, viral load significantly decreased by an average of 29-fold. HRV-16 infection significantly increased HRV-16 receptor intercellular adhesion molecule-1 messenger RNA expression in air-exposed cells, which was decreased by A1AT. A1AT-mediated reduction of viral load was not accompanied by increased epithelial antiviral gene expression or by inhibiting the activity of 3C protease involved in viral replication or maturation. Our findings demonstrate that A1AT treatment prevents a WCS-induced increase in viral load and for the first time suggest a therapeutic effect of A1AT on HRV infection. Keywords: α1-antitrypsin, rhinovirus, COPD, cigarette smoke, ICAM-1

  12. Persistent human Borna disease virus infection modifies the acetylome of human oligodendroglia cells towards higher energy and transporter levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xia [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Forensic Medicine, Institute of Forensic Science, Ministry of Justice, Shanghai 200063 (China); Liu, Siwen [Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Bode, Liv [Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Liu, Chengyu [Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Zhang, Liang [Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Wang, Xiao [Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Li, Dan [Department of Pathology, Faculty of Basic Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Lei, Yang [Department of Internal Medicine, University-Town Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Peng, Xiaojun [Jingjie PTM BioLab (Hangzhou) Co. Ltd, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Cheng, Zhongyi [Advanced Institute of Translational Medicine, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); and others

    2015-11-15

    Background: Borna disease virus (BDV) is a neurotropic RNA virus persistently infecting mammalian hosts including humans. Lysine acetylation (Kac) is a key protein post-translational modification (PTM). The unexpectedly broad regulatory scope of Kac let us to profile the entire acetylome upon BDV infection. Methods: The acetylome was profiled through stable isotope labeling for cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics. The quantifiable proteome was annotated using bioinformatics. Results: We identified and quantified 791 Kac sites in 473 Kac proteins in human BDV Hu-H1-infected and non-infected oligodendroglial (OL) cells. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that BDV infection alters the acetylation of metabolic proteins, membrane-associated proteins and transmembrane transporter activity, and affects the acetylation of several lysine acetyltransferases (KAT). Conclusions: Upon BDV persistence the OL acetylome is manipulated towards higher energy and transporter levels necessary for shuttling BDV proteins to and from nuclear replication sites. - Highlights: • We used SILAC-based proteomics to analyze the acetylome of BDV infected OL cells. • We quantified 791Kac sites in 473 proteins. • Bioinformatic analysis revealed altered acetylation of metabolic proteins et al. • BDV manipulates the OL acetylome towards higher energy and transporter levels. • BDV infection is associated with enriched phosphate-associated metabolic processes.

  13. Hepatitis C virus infection of human hepatoma cell line 7721 in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Qiang Song; Fei Hao; Feng Min; Qiao-Yu Ma; Guo-Dong Liu

    2001-01-01

    AIM To establish a cell culture system with long-term replication of hepatitis C virus in vitro.``METHODS Human hepatoma cell line 7721 was tested for its susceptibility to HCV by incubating with a serum from a patient with chronic hepatitis C. Cells and supernatant were harvested at various phases during the culturing periods The presence of HCV RNA, the expression of HCV antigens in cells and/or supernatant were examined by RT-PCR, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry respectively.``RESULTS The intracellular HCV RNA was first detected on d 2 after infection and then could be intermittently detected in both cells and supernatant over a period of at least three months. The expression of HCV NS3, CP10antigens could be observed in cells. The fresh cells could be infected by supematant from cultured infected cells and the transmission of viral genome from HCV-infected 7721 cells to PBMCs was also observed.``CONCLUSION The hepatoma line 7721 is not only susceptible to HCV but also supports its long-term replication in vitro.``

  14. Differential Responses of Human Fetal Brain Neural Stem Cells to Zika Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica L. McGrath

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV infection causes microcephaly in a subset of infants born to infected pregnant mothers. It is unknown whether human individual differences contribute to differential susceptibility of ZIKV-related neuropathology. Here, we use an Asian-lineage ZIKV strain, isolated from the 2015 Mexican outbreak (Mex1-7, to infect primary human neural stem cells (hNSCs originally derived from three individual fetal brains. All three strains of hNSCs exhibited similar rates of Mex1-7 infection and reduced proliferation. However, Mex1-7 decreased neuronal differentiation in only two of the three stem cell strains. Correspondingly, ZIKA-mediated transcriptome alterations were similar in these two strains but significantly different from that of the third strain with no ZIKV-induced neuronal reduction. This study thus confirms that an Asian-lineage ZIKV strain infects primary hNSCs and demonstrates a cell-strain-dependent response of hNSCs to ZIKV infection.

  15. Borna disease virus infection perturbs energy metabolites and amino acids in cultured human oligodendroglia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongzhong Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Borna disease virus is a neurotropic, non-cytolytic virus that has been widely employed in neuroscientific research. Previous studies have revealed that metabolic perturbations are associated with Borna disease viral infection. However, the pathophysiological mechanism underlying its mode of action remains unclear. METHODOLOGY: Human oligodendroglia cells infected with the human strain Borna disease virus Hu-H1 and non-infected matched control cells were cultured in vitro. At day 14 post-infection, a proton nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomic approach was used to differentiate the metabonomic profiles of 28 independent intracellular samples from Borna disease virus-infected cells (n = 14 and matched control cells (n = 14. Partial least squares discriminant analysis was performed to demonstrate that the whole metabonomic patterns enabled discrimination between the two groups, and further statistical testing was applied to determine which individual metabolites displayed significant differences between the two groups. FINDINGS: Metabonomic profiling revealed perturbations in 23 metabolites, 19 of which were deemed individually significant: nine energy metabolites (α-glucose, acetate, choline, creatine, formate, myo-inositol, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, pyruvate, succinate and ten amino acids (aspartate, glutamate, glutamine, glycine, histidine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, threonine, tyrosine, valine. Partial least squares discriminant analysis demonstrated that the whole metabolic patterns enabled statistical discrimination between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Borna disease viral infection perturbs the metabonomic profiles of several metabolites in human oligodendroglia cells cultured in vitro. The findings suggest that Borna disease virus manipulates the host cell's metabolic network to support viral replication and proliferation.

  16. Lactic acid bacteria protect human intestinal epithelial cells from Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affhan, S; Dachang, W; Xin, Y; Shang, D

    2015-12-16

    Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic pathogens that cause nosocomial and food-borne infections. They promote intestinal diseases. Gastrointestinal colonization by S. aureus and P. aeruginosa has rarely been researched. These organisms spread to extra gastrointestinal niches, resulting in increasingly progressive infections. Lactic acid bacteria are Gram-positive bacteria that produce lactic acid as the major end-product of carbohydrate fermentation. These bacteria inhibit pathogen colonization and modulate the host immune response. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus rhamnosus on enteric infections caused by the paradigmatic human pathogens S. aureus ATCC25923 and P. aeruginosa ATCC27853. The effect of whole cells and neutralized cell-free supernatant (CFS) of the lactobacilli on LoVo human carcinoma enterocyte (ATCC CCL-229) infection was analyzed by co-exposure, pre-exposure, and post-exposure studies. Simultaneous application of whole cells and CFS of the lactobacilli significantly eradicated enterocyte infection (P cells and CFS were added after or prior to the infection (P > 0.05). This result could be attributed to interference by extracellular polymeric substances and cell surface hydrophobicity, which resulted in the development of a pathogen that did not form colonies. Furthermore, results of the plate count and LIVE/ DEAD BacLight bacterial viability staining attributed this inhibition to a non-bacteriocin-like substance, which acted independently of organic acid and H2O2 production. Based on these results, the cell-free supernatant derived from lactobacilli was concluded to restrain the development of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa enteric infections.

  17. Human cytomegalovirus gene expression in long-term infected glioma stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estefania Fiallos

    Full Text Available The most common adult primary brain tumor, glioblastoma (GBM, is characterized by fifteen months median patient survival and has no clear etiology. We and others have identified the presence of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV gene products endogenously expressed in GBM tissue and primary cells, with a subset of viral genes being consistently expressed in most samples. Among these viral genes, several have important oncomodulatory properties, regulating tumor stemness, proliferation, immune evasion, invasion and angiogenesis. These findings lead us to hypothesize that a specific HCMV gene signature may be associated with GBM pathogenesis. To investigate this hypothesis, we used glioma cell lines and primary glioma stem-like cells (GSC infected with clinical and laboratory HCMV strains and measured relative viral gene expression levels along several time points up to 15 weeks post-infection. While HCMV gene expression was detected in several infected glioma lines through week 5 post-infection, only HCMV-infected GSC expressed viral gene products 15 weeks post-infection. Efficiency of infection across time was higher in GSC compared to cell lines. Importantly, HCMV-infected GSC outlived their uninfected counterparts, and this extended survival was paralleled by increased tumorsphere frequency and upregulation of stemness regulators, such as SOX2, p-STAT3, and BMX (a novel HCMV target identified in this study. Interleukin 6 (IL-6 treatment significantly upregulated HCMV gene expression in long-term infected glioma cultures, suggesting that pro-inflammatory signaling in the tumor milieu may further augment HCMV gene expression and subsequent tumor progression driven by viral-induced cellular signaling. Together, our data support a critical role for long-term, low-level HCMV infection in promoting survival, stemness, and proliferation of GSC that could significantly contribute to GBM pathogenesis.

  18. Ambroxol inhibits rhinovirus infection in primary cultures of human tracheal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaya, Mutsuo; Nishimura, Hidekazu; Nadine, Lusamba Kalonji; Ota, Chiharu; Kubo, Hiroshi; Nagatomi, Ryoichi

    2014-04-01

    The mucolytic drug ambroxol hydrochloride reduces the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the frequency of exacerbation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the inhibitory effects of ambroxol on rhinovirus infection, the major cause of COPD exacerbations, have not been studied. We examined the effects of ambroxol on type 14 rhinovirus (RV14) infection, a major RV group, in primary cultures of human tracheal epithelial cells. RV14 infection increased virus titers and cytokine content in the supernatants and RV14 RNA in the cells. Ambroxol (100 nM) reduced RV14 titers and cytokine concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 in the supernatants and RV14 RNA in the cells after RV14 infection, in addition to reducing susceptibility to RV14 infection. Ambroxol also reduced the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), the receptor for RV14, and the number of acidic endosomes from which RV14 RNA enters the cytoplasm. In addition, ambroxol reduced the activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in the nucleus. These results suggest that ambroxol inhibits RV14 infection partly by reducing ICAM-1 and acidic endosomes via the inhibition of NF-κB activation. Ambroxol may modulate airway inflammation by reducing the production of cytokines in rhinovirus infection.

  19. Human Invariant Natural Killer T cells possess immune-modulating functions during Aspergillus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitzen-Heineke, Antonia; Bouzani, Maria; Schmitt, Anna-Lena; Kurzai, Oliver; Hünniger, Kerstin; Einsele, Hermann; Loeffler, Juergen

    2016-02-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common cause for invasive fungal infections, a disease associated with high mortality in immune-compromised patients. CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells compose a small subset of T cells known to impact the immune response toward various infectious pathogens. To investigate the role of human iNKT cells during A. fumigatus infection, we studied their activation as determined by CD69 expression and cytokine production in response to distinct fungal morphotypes in the presence of different CD1d(+) antigen presenting cells using flow cytometry and multiplex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Among CD1d(+) subpopulations, CD1d(+)CD1c(+) mDCs showed the highest potential to activate iNKT cells on a per cell basis. The presence of A. fumigatus decreased this effect of CD1d(+)CD1c(+) mDCs on iNKT cells and led to reduced secretion of TNF-α, G-CSF and RANTES. Production of other Th1 and Th2 cytokines was not affected by the fungus, suggesting an immune-modulating function for human iNKT cells during A. fumigatus infection.

  20. West Nile virus-infected human dendritic cells fail to fully activate invariant natural killer T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovats, S; Turner, S; Simmons, A; Powe, T; Chakravarty, E; Alberola-Ila, J

    2016-11-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) infection is a mosquito-borne zoonosis with increasing prevalence in the United States. WNV infection begins in the skin, and the virus replicates initially in keratinocytes and dendritic cells (DCs). In the skin and cutaneous lymph nodes, infected DCs are likely to interact with invariant natural killer T cells (iNKTs). Bidirectional interactions between DCs and iNKTs amplify the innate immune response to viral infections, thus controlling viral load and regulating adaptive immunity. iNKTs are stimulated by CD1d-bound lipid antigens or activated indirectly by inflammatory cytokines. We exposed human monocyte-derived DCs to WNV Kunjin and determined their ability to activate isolated blood iNKTs. DCs became infected as judged by synthesis of viral mRNA and Envelope and NS-1 proteins, but did not undergo significant apoptosis. Infected DCs up-regulated the co-stimulatory molecules CD86 and CD40, but showed decreased expression of CD1d. WNV infection induced DC secretion of type I interferon (IFN), but no or minimal interleukin (IL)-12, IL-23, IL-18 or IL-10. Unexpectedly, we found that the WNV-infected DCs stimulated human iNKTs to up-regulate CD69 and produce low amounts of IL-10, but not proinflammatory cytokines such as IFN-γ or tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Both CD1d and IFNAR blockade partially abrogated this iNKT response, suggesting involvement of a T cell receptor (TCR)-CD1d interaction and type I interferon receptor (IFNAR) signalling. Thus, WNV infection interferes with DC-iNKT interactions by preventing the production of proinflammatory cytokines. iNKTs may be a source of IL-10 observed in human flavivirus infections and initiate an anti-inflammatory innate response that limits adaptive immunity and immune pathology upon WNV infection. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  1. Viral Interleukin-10 Expressed by Human Cytomegalovirus during the Latent Phase of Infection Modulates Latently Infected Myeloid Cell Differentiation ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Avdic, Selmir; Cao, John Z.; Cheung, Allen K.L.; Abendroth, Allison; Slobedman, Barry

    2011-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus UL111A gene is expressed during latent and productive infections, and it codes for homologs of interleukin-10 (IL-10). We examined whether viral IL-10 expressed during latency altered differentiation of latently infected myeloid progenitors. In comparison to infection with parental virus or mock infection, latent infection with a virus in which the gene encoding viral IL-10 has been deleted upregulated cytokines associated with dendritic cell (DC) formation and incre...

  2. Marked induction of matrix metalloproteinase-10 by respiratory syncytial virus infection in human nasal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, Satoshi; Kojima, Takashi; Obata, Kazufumi; Okabayashi, Tamaki; Yokota, Shin-Ichi; Nomura, Kazuaki; Obonai, Toshimasa; Fuchimoto, Jun; Himi, Tetsuo; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Sawada, Norimasa

    2013-12-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important pathogen of bronchiolitis, asthma, and severe lower respiratory tract disease in infants and young children. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play key roles in viral infection, inflammation and remodeling of the airway. However, the roles and regulation of MMPs in human nasal epithelial cells (HNECs) after RSV infection remain unclear. To investigate the regulation of MMP induced after RSV infection in HNECs, an RSV-infected model of HNECs in vitro was used. It was found that mRNA of MMP-10 was markedly increased in HNECs after RSV infection, together with induction of mRNAs of MMP-1, -7, -9, and -19. The amount of MMP-10 released from HNECs was also increased in a time-dependent manner after RSV infection as was that of chemokine RANTES. The upregulation of MMP-10 in HNECs after RSV infection was prevented by inhibitors of NF-κB and pan-PKC with inhibition of RSV replication, whereas it was prevented by inhibitors of JAK/STAT, MAPK, and EGF receptors without inhibition of RSV replication. In lung tissue of an infant with severe RSV infection in which a few RSV antibody-positive macrophages were observed, MMP-10 was expressed at the apical side of the bronchial epithelial cells and alveolar epithelial cells. In conclusion, MMP-10 induced by RSV infection in HNECs is regulated via distinct signal transduction pathways with or without relation to RSV replication. MMP-10 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of RSV diseases and it has the potential to be a novel marker and therapeutic target for RSV infection.

  3. Cytomegalovirus infection induces a stem cell phenotype in human primary glioblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fornara, O; Bartek, J; Rahbar, A;

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is associated with poor prognosis despite aggressive surgical resection, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. Unfortunately, this standard therapy does not target glioma cancer stem cells (GCSCs), a subpopulation of GBM cells that can give rise to recurrent tumors. GBMs express......-expression of these two proteins predicted poor patient survival. Infection of GBM cells with HCMV led to upregulation of CD133 and other GSCS markers (Notch1, Sox2, Oct4, Nestin). HCMV infection also promoted the growth of GBM cells as neurospheres, a behavior typically displayed by GCSCs, and this phenotype...... was prevented by either chemical inhibition of the Notch1 pathway or by treatment with the anti-viral drug ganciclovir. GBM cells that maintained expression of HCMV-IE failed to differentiate into neuronal or astrocytic phenotypes. Our findings imply that HCMV infection induces phenotypic plasticity of GBM...

  4. Detection of Human Papillomavirus Infections at the Single-Cell level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulbert, Ayaka; Koutsky, Laura A.; Kiviat, Nancy B.; Xi, Long Fu

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore a possibility of single-cell analysis of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Methods Two hundred and twenty cells were isolated by laser-capture microdissection from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded cervical tissue blocks from 8 women who had HPV DNA detected in their cervical swab samples. The number of type-specific HPV copies in individual cells was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction with and without a prior reverse transcription. Cells were assayed and counted for more than once if the corresponding swab sample was positive for ≥2 HPV types. Results Infection with HPV16, HPV39, HPV51, HPV52, HPV58, HPV59, and HPV73 was detected in 12 (5.5%) of 220, 3 (9.4%) of 32, 3 (5.8%) of 52, 11 (22.9%) of 48, 9 (18.8%) of 48, 3 (9.4%) of 32 and none of 20 cells, respectively. Numbers of HPV genome copies varied widely from cell to cell. Coexistence of multiple HPV types was detected in 6 (31.6%) of 19 positive cells from one of the 6 women who had 2 or 3 HPV types detected in their swab samples. Conclusion Given the heterogeneity of HPV status in individual cells, further clarification of HPV infection at the single-cell level may refine our understanding of HPV-related carcinogenesis. PMID:26820741

  5. Abortive HIV infection mediates CD4 T cell depletion and inflammation in human lymphoid tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doitsh, Gilad; Cavrois, Marielle; Lassen, Kara G; Zepeda, Orlando; Yang, Zhiyuan; Santiago, Mario L; Hebbeler, Andrew M; Greene, Warner C

    2010-11-24

    The mechanism by which CD4 T cells are depleted in HIV-infected hosts remains poorly understood. In ex vivo cultures of human tonsil tissue, CD4 T cells undergo a pronounced cytopathic response following HIV infection. Strikingly, >95% of these dying cells are not productively infected but instead correspond to bystander cells. We now show that the death of these "bystander" cells involves abortive HIV infection. Inhibitors blocking HIV entry or early steps of reverse transcription prevent CD4 T cell death while inhibition of later events in the viral life cycle does not. We demonstrate that the nonpermissive state exhibited by the majority of resting CD4 tonsil T cells leads to accumulation of incomplete reverse transcripts. These cytoplasmic nucleic acids activate a host defense program that elicits a coordinated proapoptotic and proinflammatory response involving caspase-3 and caspase-1 activation. While this response likely evolved to protect the host, it centrally contributes to the immunopathogenic effects of HIV. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Abortive HIV Infection Mediates CD4 T-Cell Depletion and Inflammation in Human Lymphoid Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doitsh, Gilad; Cavrois, Marielle; Lassen, Kara G.; Zepeda, Orlando; Yang, Zhiyuan; Santiago, Mario L.; Hebbeler, Andrew M.; Greene, Warner C.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The mechanism by which CD4 T-cells are depleted in HIV-infected hosts remains poorly understood. In ex vivo cultures of human tonsil tissue, CD4 T cells undergo a pronounced cytopathic response following HIV infection. Strikingly, >95% of these dying cells are not productively infected but instead correspond to bystander cells. We now show that the death of these “bystander” cells involves abortive HIV infection. Inhibitors blocking HIV entry or early steps of reverse transcription prevent CD4 T-cell death while inhibition of later events in viral life cycle does not. We propose that the nonpermissive state exhibited by the majority of resting CD4 tonsil T-cells leads to accumulation of incomplete reverse transcripts. These cytoplasmic nucleic acids activate a host defense program that elicits a coordinated proapoptotic and proinflammatory response involving caspase-3 and caspase-1 activation. While this response likely evolved to protect the host, it centrally contributes to the immunopathogenic effects of HIV. PMID:21111238

  7. Reduced cell turnover in lymphocytic monkeys infected by human T-lymphotropic virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debacq, Christophe; Héraud, Jean-Michel; Asquith, Becca; Bangham, Charles; Merien, Fabrice; Moules, Vincent; Mortreux, Franck; Wattel, Eric; Burny, Arsène; Kettmann, Richard; Kazanji, Mirdad; Willems, Luc

    2005-11-17

    Understanding cell dynamics in animal models have implications for therapeutic strategies elaborated against leukemia in human. Quantification of the cell turnover in closely related primate systems is particularly important for rare and aggressive forms of human cancers, such as adult T-cell leukemia. For this purpose, we have measured the death and proliferation rates of the CD4+ T lymphocyte population in squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) infected by human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). The kinetics of in vivo bromodeoxyuridine labeling revealed no modulation of the cell turnover in HTLV-1-infected monkeys with normal CD4 cell counts. In contrast, a substantial decrease in the proliferation rate of the CD4+ T population was observed in lymphocytic monkeys (e.g. characterized by excessive proportions of CD4+ T lymphocytes and by the presence of abnormal flower-like cells). Unexpectedly, onset of HTLV-associated leukemia thus occurs in the absence of increased CD4+ T-cell proliferation. This dynamics significantly differs from the generalized activation of the T-cell turnover induced by other primate lymphotropic viruses like HIV and SIV.

  8. Pneumococcal infections in humans are associated with increased apoptosis and trafficking of type 1 cytokine-producing T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, Kåre; Bruunsgaard, Helle; Skinhøj, Peter

    2002-01-01

    , little is known regarding the T-cell response during in vivo infections in humans. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that activated T cells producing type 1 cytokines were engaged in the host response to pneumococcal infections. The phenotype and function of T cells were studied in 22...

  9. Human Endometrial Stromal Cells Are Highly Permissive To Productive Infection by Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagani, Isabel; Ghezzi, Silvia; Ulisse, Adele; Rubio, Alicia; Turrini, Filippo; Garavaglia, Elisabetta; Candiani, Massimo; Castilletti, Concetta; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Poli, Guido; Broccoli, Vania; Panina-Bordignon, Paola; Vicenzi, Elisa

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a recently re-emerged flavivirus transmitted to humans by mosquito bites but also from mother to fetus and by sexual intercourse. We here show that primary human endometrial stromal cells (HESC) are highly permissive to ZIKV infection and support its in vitro replication. ZIKV envelope expression was detected in the endoplasmic reticulum whereas double-stranded viral RNA colocalized with vimentin filaments to the perinuclear region. ZIKV productive infection also occurred in the human T-HESC cell line together with the induction of interferon-β (IFN-β) and of IFN-stimulated genes. Notably, in vitro decidualization of T-HESC with cyclic AMP and progesterone upregulated the cell surface expression of the ZIKV entry co-receptor AXL and boosted ZIKV replication by ca. 100-fold. Thus, endometrial stromal cells, particularly if decidualized, likely represent a crucial cell target of ZIKV reaching them, either via the uterine vasculature in the viremic phase of the infection or by sexual viral transmission, and a potential source of virus spreading to placental trophoblasts during pregnancy. PMID:28281680

  10. Human T-lymphotropic Virus Type 1-infected Cells Secrete Exosomes That Contain Tax Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Elizabeth; Narayanan, Aarthi; Van Duyne, Rachel; Shabbeer-Meyering, Shabana; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Das, Ravi; Afonso, Philippe V.; Sampey, Gavin C.; Chung, Myung; Popratiloff, Anastas; Shrestha, Bindesh; Sehgal, Mohit; Jain, Pooja; Vertes, Akos; Mahieux, Renaud; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2014-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. The HTLV-1 transactivator protein Tax controls many critical cellular pathways, including host cell DNA damage response mechanisms, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. Extracellular vesicles called exosomes play critical roles during pathogenic viral infections as delivery vehicles for host and viral components, including proteins, mRNA, and microRNA. We hypothesized that exosomes derived from HTLV-1-infected cells contain unique host and viral proteins that may contribute to HTLV-1-induced pathogenesis. We found exosomes derived from infected cells to contain Tax protein and proinflammatory mediators as well as viral mRNA transcripts, including Tax, HBZ, and Env. Furthermore, we observed that exosomes released from HTLV-1-infected Tax-expressing cells contributed to enhanced survival of exosome-recipient cells when treated with Fas antibody. This survival was cFLIP-dependent, with Tax showing induction of NF-κB in exosome-recipient cells. Finally, IL-2-dependent CTLL-2 cells that received Tax-containing exosomes were protected from apoptosis through activation of AKT. Similar experiments with primary cultures showed protection and survival of peripheral blood mononuclear cells even in the absence of phytohemagglutinin/IL-2. Surviving cells contained more phosphorylated Rb, consistent with the role of Tax in regulation of the cell cycle. Collectively, these results suggest that exosomes may play an important role in extracellular delivery of functional HTLV-1 proteins and mRNA to recipient cells. PMID:24939845

  11. Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1-infected cells secrete exosomes that contain Tax protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Elizabeth; Narayanan, Aarthi; Van Duyne, Rachel; Shabbeer-Meyering, Shabana; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Das, Ravi; Afonso, Philippe V; Sampey, Gavin C; Chung, Myung; Popratiloff, Anastas; Shrestha, Bindesh; Sehgal, Mohit; Jain, Pooja; Vertes, Akos; Mahieux, Renaud; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2014-08-08

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. The HTLV-1 transactivator protein Tax controls many critical cellular pathways, including host cell DNA damage response mechanisms, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. Extracellular vesicles called exosomes play critical roles during pathogenic viral infections as delivery vehicles for host and viral components, including proteins, mRNA, and microRNA. We hypothesized that exosomes derived from HTLV-1-infected cells contain unique host and viral proteins that may contribute to HTLV-1-induced pathogenesis. We found exosomes derived from infected cells to contain Tax protein and proinflammatory mediators as well as viral mRNA transcripts, including Tax, HBZ, and Env. Furthermore, we observed that exosomes released from HTLV-1-infected Tax-expressing cells contributed to enhanced survival of exosome-recipient cells when treated with Fas antibody. This survival was cFLIP-dependent, with Tax showing induction of NF-κB in exosome-recipient cells. Finally, IL-2-dependent CTLL-2 cells that received Tax-containing exosomes were protected from apoptosis through activation of AKT. Similar experiments with primary cultures showed protection and survival of peripheral blood mononuclear cells even in the absence of phytohemagglutinin/IL-2. Surviving cells contained more phosphorylated Rb, consistent with the role of Tax in regulation of the cell cycle. Collectively, these results suggest that exosomes may play an important role in extracellular delivery of functional HTLV-1 proteins and mRNA to recipient cells.

  12. Zika Virus Antagonizes Type I Interferon Responses during Infection of Human Dendritic Cells.

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    James R Bowen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus that is causally linked to severe neonatal birth defects, including microcephaly, and is associated with Guillain-Barre syndrome in adults. Dendritic cells (DCs are an important cell type during infection by multiple mosquito-borne flaviviruses, including dengue virus, West Nile virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, and yellow fever virus. Despite this, the interplay between ZIKV and DCs remains poorly defined. Here, we found human DCs supported productive infection by a contemporary Puerto Rican isolate with considerable variability in viral replication, but not viral binding, between DCs from different donors. Historic isolates from Africa and Asia also infected DCs with distinct viral replication kinetics between strains. African lineage viruses displayed more rapid replication kinetics and infection magnitude as compared to Asian lineage viruses, and uniquely induced cell death. Infection of DCs with both contemporary and historic ZIKV isolates led to minimal up-regulation of T cell co-stimulatory and MHC molecules, along with limited secretion of inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of type I interferon (IFN protein translation was observed during ZIKV infection, despite strong induction at the RNA transcript level and up-regulation of other host antiviral proteins. Treatment of human DCs with RIG-I agonist potently restricted ZIKV replication, while type I IFN had only modest effects. Mechanistically, we found all strains of ZIKV antagonized type I IFN-mediated phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT2. Combined, our findings show that ZIKV subverts DC immunogenicity during infection, in part through evasion of type I IFN responses, but that the RLR signaling pathway is still capable of inducing an antiviral state, and therefore may serve as an antiviral therapeutic target.

  13. Zika Virus Antagonizes Type I Interferon Responses during Infection of Human Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddur, Mohan S.; O’Neal, Justin T.; Fedorova, Nadia B.; Puri, Vinita; Pulendran, Bali; Suthar, Mehul S.

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus that is causally linked to severe neonatal birth defects, including microcephaly, and is associated with Guillain-Barre syndrome in adults. Dendritic cells (DCs) are an important cell type during infection by multiple mosquito-borne flaviviruses, including dengue virus, West Nile virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, and yellow fever virus. Despite this, the interplay between ZIKV and DCs remains poorly defined. Here, we found human DCs supported productive infection by a contemporary Puerto Rican isolate with considerable variability in viral replication, but not viral binding, between DCs from different donors. Historic isolates from Africa and Asia also infected DCs with distinct viral replication kinetics between strains. African lineage viruses displayed more rapid replication kinetics and infection magnitude as compared to Asian lineage viruses, and uniquely induced cell death. Infection of DCs with both contemporary and historic ZIKV isolates led to minimal up-regulation of T cell co-stimulatory and MHC molecules, along with limited secretion of inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of type I interferon (IFN) protein translation was observed during ZIKV infection, despite strong induction at the RNA transcript level and up-regulation of other host antiviral proteins. Treatment of human DCs with RIG-I agonist potently restricted ZIKV replication, while type I IFN had only modest effects. Mechanistically, we found all strains of ZIKV antagonized type I IFN-mediated phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT2. Combined, our findings show that ZIKV subverts DC immunogenicity during infection, in part through evasion of type I IFN responses, but that the RLR signaling pathway is still capable of inducing an antiviral state, and therefore may serve as an antiviral therapeutic target. PMID:28152048

  14. A Single Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Dose Improves B Cell Memory in Previously Infected Subjects

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    Erin M. Scherer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Although licensed human papillomavirus (HPV vaccines are most efficacious in persons never infected with HPV, they also reduce infection and disease in previously infected subjects, indicating natural immunity is not entirely protective against HPV re-infection. The aim of this exploratory study was to examine the B cell memory elicited by HPV infection and evaluate whether vaccination merely boosts antibody (Ab levels in previously infected subjects or also improves the quality of B cell memory. Toward this end, the memory B cells (Bmem of five unvaccinated, HPV-seropositive subjects were isolated and characterized, and subject recall responses to a single HPV vaccine dose were analyzed. Vaccination boosted Ab levels 24- to 930-fold (median 77-fold and Bmem numbers 3- to 27-fold (median 6-fold. In addition, Abs cloned from naturally elicited Bmem were generally non-neutralizing, whereas all those isolated following vaccination were neutralizing. Moreover, Ab and plasmablast responses indicative of memory recall responses were only observed in two subjects. These results suggest HPV vaccination augments both the magnitude and quality of natural immunity and demonstrate that sexually active persons could also benefit from HPV vaccination. This study may have important public policy implications, especially for the older ‘catch-up’ group within the vaccine's target population.

  15. Selective susceptibility of human skin antigen presenting cells to productive dengue virus infection.

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    Daniela Cerny

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is a growing global concern with 390 million people infected each year. Dengue virus (DENV is transmitted by mosquitoes, thus host cells in the skin are the first point of contact with the virus. Human skin contains several populations of antigen-presenting cells which could drive the immune response to DENV in vivo: epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs, three populations of dermal dendritic cells (DCs, and macrophages. Using samples of normal human skin we detected productive infection of CD14(+ and CD1c(+ DCs, LCs and dermal macrophages, which was independent of DC-SIGN expression. LCs produced the highest viral titers and were less sensitive to IFN-β. Nanostring gene expression data showed significant up-regulation of IFN-β, STAT-1 and CCL5 upon viral exposure in susceptible DC populations. In mice infected intra-dermally with DENV we detected parallel populations of infected DCs originating from the dermis and migrating to the skin-draining lymph nodes. Therefore dermal DCs may simultaneously facilitate systemic spread of DENV and initiate the adaptive anti-viral immune response.

  16. Infection with human coronavirus NL63 enhances streptococcal adherence to epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golda, Anna; Malek, Natalia; Dudek, Bartosz; Zeglen, Slawomir; Wojarski, Jacek; Ochman, Marek; Kucewicz, Ewa; Zembala, Marian

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of augmented bacterial pathogenicity in post-viral infections is the first step in the development of an effective therapy. This study assessed the effect of human coronavirus NL63 (HCoV-NL63) on the adherence of bacterial pathogens associated with respiratory tract illnesses. It was shown that HCoV-NL63 infection resulted in an increased adherence of Streptococcus pneumoniae to virus-infected cell lines and fully differentiated primary human airway epithelium cultures. The enhanced binding of bacteria correlated with an increased expression level of the platelet-activating factor receptor (PAF-R), but detailed evaluation of the bacterium–PAF-R interaction revealed a limited relevance of this process. PMID:21325482

  17. Kinetic analysis of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 gene expression in cell culture and infected animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Kesic, Matthew; Yin, Han; Yu, Lianbo; Green, Patrick L

    2009-04-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection causes adult T-cell leukemia and is associated with a variety of lymphocyte-mediated disorders. It has been hypothesized that a highly regulated pattern of HTLV-1 gene expression is critical for virus survival and disease pathogenesis. In this study, real-time reverse transcriptase PCR was used to determine the kinetics of viral gene expression in cells transiently transfected with an HTLV-1 proviral plasmid, in newly infected human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and in PBMCs from newly infected rabbits. The HTLV-1 gene expression profiles in transiently transfected and infected cells were similar; over time, all transcripts increased and then maintained stable levels. gag/pol, tax/rex, and env mRNA were detected first and at the highest levels, whereas the expression levels of the accessory genes, including the antisense Hbz, were significantly lower than the tax/rex levels (ranging from 1 to 4 logs depending on the specific mRNA). In infected rabbits, tax/rex and gag/pol mRNA levels peaked early after inoculation and progressively decreased, which correlated inversely with the proviral load and host antibody response against viral proteins. Interestingly, Hbz mRNA was detectable at 1 week postinfection and increased and stabilized. The expression levels of all other HTLV-1 genes in infected rabbit PBMCs were at or below our limit of detection. This analysis provides insight into viral gene expression under various in vitro and in vivo experimental conditions. Our in vivo data indicate that in infected rabbits, Hbz mRNA expression over time directly correlates with the proviral load, which provides the first evidence linking Hbz expression to proviral load and the survival of the virus-infected cell in the host.

  18. Polymer based biosensor for rapid electrochemical detection of virus infection of human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilerich-Pedersen, Katrine; Poulsen, Claus R.; Jain, Titoo

    2011-01-01

    The demand in the field of medical diagnostics for simple, cost efficient and disposable devices is growing. Here, we present a label free, all-polymer electrochemical biosensor for detection of acute viral disease. The dynamics of a viral infection in human cell culture was investigated in a micro...... fluidic system on conductive polymer PEDOT:TsO microelectrodes by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and video time lapse microscopy.Employing this sensitive, real time electrochemical technique, we could measure the immediate cell response to cytomegalovirus, and detect an infection within 3h, which...... is several hours before the cytopathic effect is apparent with conventional imaging techniques. Atomic force microscopy and scanning ion conductance microscopy imaging consolidate the electrochemical measurements by demonstrating early virus induced changes in cell morphology of apparent programmed cell...

  19. Genetic battle between Helicobacter pylori and humans. The mechanism underlying homologous recombination in bacteria, which can infect human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Katsuhiro; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2014-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative pathogenic bacterium that colonises the human stomach. The chronic infection it causes results in peptic ulcers and gastric cancers. H. pylori can easily establish a chronic infection even if the immune system attacks this pathogen with oxidative stress agents and immunoglobulins. This is attributed to bacterial defence mechanisms against these stresses. As a defence mechanism against oxidative stresses, in bacterial genomes, homologous recombination can act as a repair pathway of DNA's double-strand breaks (DSBs). Moreover, homologous recombination is also involved in the antigenic variation in H. pylori. Gene conversion alters genomic structures of babA and babB (encoding outer membrane proteins), resulting in escape from immunoglobulin attacks. Thus, homologous recombination in bacteria plays an important role in the maintenance of a chronic infection. In addition, H. pylori infection causes DSBs in human cells. Homologous recombination is also involved in the repair of DSBs in human cells. In this review, we describe the roles of homologous recombination with an emphasis on the maintenance of a chronic infection.

  20. Efficient Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) Infection of Cells Lacking PDZD8

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shijian; Sodroski, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    PDZD8 can bind the capsid proteins of different retroviruses, and transient knockdown of PDZD8 results in a decrease in the efficiency of an early, post-entry event in the retrovirus life cycle. Here we used the CRISPR-CAS9 system to create cell lines in which PDZD8 expression is stably eliminated. The PDZD8-knockout cell lines were infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) and murine leukemia virus as efficiently as the parental PDZD8-expressing cells. These results indicate that PDZD...

  1. Deciphering the differential response of two human fibroblast cell lines following Chikungunya virus infection

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    Thon-Hon Vincent G

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is an arthritogenic member of the Alphavirus genus (family Togaviridae transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. CHIKV is now known to target non hematopoietic cells such as epithelial, endothelial cells, fibroblasts and to less extent monocytes/macrophages. The type I interferon (IFN response is an early innate immune mechanism that protects cells against viral infection. Cells express different pattern recognition receptors (including TLR7 and RIG-I to sense viruses and to induce production of type I IFNs which in turn will bind to their receptor. This should result in the phosphorylation and translocation of STAT molecules into the nucleus to promote the transcription of IFN-stimulated antiviral genes (ISGs. We herein tested the capacity of CHIKV clinical isolate to infect two different human fibroblast cell lines HS 633T and HT-1080 and we analyzed the resulting type I IFN innate immune response. Methods Indirect immunofluorescence and quantitative RT-PCR were used to test for the susceptibility of both fibroblast cell lines to CHIKV. Results Interestingly, the two fibroblast cell lines HS 633T and HT-1080 were differently susceptible to CHIKV infection and the former producing at least 30-fold higher viral load at 48 h post-infection (PI. We found that the expression of antiviral genes (RIG-I, IFN-β, ISG54 and ISG56 was more robust in the more susceptible cell line HS 633T at 48 h PI. Moreover, CHIKV was shown to similarly interfere with the nuclear translocation of pSTAT1 in both cell lines. Conclusion Critically, CHIKV can control the IFN response by preventing the nuclear translocation of pSTAT1 in both fibroblast cell lines. Counter-intuitively, the relative resistance of HT-1080 cells to CHIKV infection could not be attributed to more robust innate IFN- and ISG-dependent antiviral responses. These cell lines may prove to be valuable models to screen for novel mechanisms mobilized differentially by

  2. Cell and molecular biology of simian virus 40: implications for human infections and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butel, J. S.; Lednicky, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40), a polyomavirus of rhesus macaque origin, was discovered in 1960 as a contaminant of polio vaccines that were distributed to millions of people from 1955 through early 1963. SV40 is a potent DNA tumor virus that induces tumors in rodents and transforms many types of cells in culture, including those of human origin. This virus has been a favored laboratory model for mechanistic studies of molecular processes in eukaryotic cells and of cellular transformation. The viral replication protein, named large T antigen (T-ag), is also the viral oncoprotein. There is a single serotype of SV40, but multiple strains of virus exist that are distinguishable by nucleotide differences in the regulatory region of the viral genome and in the part of the T-ag gene that encodes the protein's carboxyl terminus. Natural infections in monkeys by SV40 are usually benign but may become pathogenic in immunocompromised animals, and multiple tissues can be infected. SV40 can replicate in certain types of simian and human cells. SV40-neutralizing antibodies have been detected in individuals not exposed to contaminated polio vaccines. SV40 DNA has been identified in some normal human tissues, and there are accumulating reports of detection of SV40 DNA and/or T-ag in a variety of human tumors. This review presents aspects of replication and cell transformation by SV40 and considers their implications for human infections and disease pathogenesis by the virus. Critical assessment of virologic and epidemiologic data suggests a probable causative role for SV40 in certain human cancers, but additional studies are necessary to prove etiology.

  3. Cell and molecular biology of simian virus 40: implications for human infections and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butel, J. S.; Lednicky, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40), a polyomavirus of rhesus macaque origin, was discovered in 1960 as a contaminant of polio vaccines that were distributed to millions of people from 1955 through early 1963. SV40 is a potent DNA tumor virus that induces tumors in rodents and transforms many types of cells in culture, including those of human origin. This virus has been a favored laboratory model for mechanistic studies of molecular processes in eukaryotic cells and of cellular transformation. The viral replication protein, named large T antigen (T-ag), is also the viral oncoprotein. There is a single serotype of SV40, but multiple strains of virus exist that are distinguishable by nucleotide differences in the regulatory region of the viral genome and in the part of the T-ag gene that encodes the protein's carboxyl terminus. Natural infections in monkeys by SV40 are usually benign but may become pathogenic in immunocompromised animals, and multiple tissues can be infected. SV40 can replicate in certain types of simian and human cells. SV40-neutralizing antibodies have been detected in individuals not exposed to contaminated polio vaccines. SV40 DNA has been identified in some normal human tissues, and there are accumulating reports of detection of SV40 DNA and/or T-ag in a variety of human tumors. This review presents aspects of replication and cell transformation by SV40 and considers their implications for human infections and disease pathogenesis by the virus. Critical assessment of virologic and epidemiologic data suggests a probable causative role for SV40 in certain human cancers, but additional studies are necessary to prove etiology.

  4. Borrelia burgdorferi infection regulates CD1 expression in human cells and tissues via IL1-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakimchuk, Konstantin; Roura-Mir, Carme; Magalhaes, Kelly G; de Jong, Annemieke; Kasmar, Anne G; Granter, Scott R; Budd, Ralph; Steere, Allen; Pena-Cruz, Victor; Kirschning, Carsten; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Moody, D Branch

    2011-03-01

    The appearance of group 1 CD1 proteins (CD1a, CD1b and CD1c) on maturing myeloid DC is a key event that converts myeloid DC to effective lipid APC. Here, we show that Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, triggers appearance of group 1 CD1 proteins at high density on the surface of human myeloid DC during infection. Within human skin, CD1b and CD1c expression was low or absent prior to infection, but increased significantly after experimental infections and in erythema migrans lesions from Lyme disease patients. The induction of CD1 was initiated by borrelial lipids acting through TLR-2 within minutes, but required 3 days for maximum effect. The delay in CD1 protein appearance involved a multi-step process whereby TLR-2 stimulated cells release soluble factors, which are sufficient to transfer the CD1-inducing effect in trans to other cells. Analysis of these soluble factors identified IL-1β as a previously unknown pathway leading to group 1 CD1 protein function. This study establishes that upregulation of group 1 CD1 proteins is an early event in B. burgdorferi infection and suggests a stepwise mechanism whereby bacterial cell walls, TLR activation and cytokine release cause DC precursors to express group 1 CD1 proteins.

  5. Adenosine deaminase enhances the immunogenicity of human dendritic cells from healthy and HIV-infected individuals.

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    Víctor Casanova

    Full Text Available ADA is an enzyme implicated in purine metabolism, and is critical to ensure normal immune function. Its congenital deficit leads to severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID. ADA binding to adenosine receptors on dendritic cell surface enables T-cell costimulation through CD26 crosslinking, which enhances T-cell activation and proliferation. Despite a large body of work on the actions of the ecto-enzyme ADA on T-cell activation, questions arise on whether ADA can also modulate dendritic cell maturation. To this end we investigated the effects of ADA on human monocyte derived dendritic cell biology. Our results show that both the enzymatic and non-enzymatic activities of ADA are implicated in the enhancement of CD80, CD83, CD86, CD40 and CCR7 expression on immature dendritic cells from healthy and HIV-infected individuals. These ADA-mediated increases in CD83 and costimulatory molecule expression is concomitant to an enhanced IL-12, IL-6, TNF-α, CXCL8(IL-8, CCL3(MIP1-α, CCL4(MIP-1β and CCL5(RANTES cytokine/chemokine secretion both in healthy and HIV-infected individuals and to an altered apoptotic death in cells from HIV-infected individuals. Consistently, ADA-mediated actions on iDCs are able to enhance allogeneic CD4 and CD8-T-cell proliferation, globally yielding increased iDC immunogenicity. Taken together, these findings suggest that ADA would promote enhanced and correctly polarized T-cell responses in strategies targeting asymptomatic HIV-infected individuals.

  6. Cytoarchitecture of Zika virus infection in human neuroblastoma and Aedes albopictus cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offerdahl, Danielle K; Dorward, David W; Hansen, Bryan T; Bloom, Marshall E

    2017-01-15

    The Zika virus (ZIKV) pandemic is a global concern due to its role in the development of congenital anomalies of the central nervous system. This mosquito-borne flavivirus alternates between mammalian and mosquito hosts, but information about the biogenesis of ZIKV is limited. Using a human neuroblastoma cell line (SK-N-SH) and an Aedes albopictus mosquito cell line (C6/36), we characterized ZIKV infection by immunofluorescence, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electron tomography (ET) to better understand infection in these disparate host cells. ZIKV replicated well in both cell lines, but infected SK-N-SH cells suffered a lytic crisis. Flaviviruses scavenge host cell membranes to serve as replication platforms and ZIKV showed the hallmarks of this process. Via TEM, we identified virus particles and 60-100nm spherular vesicles. ET revealed these vesicular replication compartments contain smaller 20-30nm spherular structures. Our studies indicate that SK-N-SH and C6/36 cells are relevant models for viral cytoarchitecture study. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. The percentage of CD133+ cells in human colorectal cancer cell lines is influenced by Mycoplasma hyorhinis infection

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    Mirabelli Peppino

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mollicutes contamination is recognized to be a critical issue for the cultivation of continuous cell lines. In this work we characterized the effect of Mycoplasma hyorhinis contamination on CD133 expression in human colon cancer cell lines. Methods MycoAlert® and mycoplasma agar culture were used to detect mycoplasma contamination on GEO, SW480 and HT-29 cell lines. Restriction fragment length polymorphism assay was used to determine mycoplasma species. All cellular models were decontaminated by the use of a specific antibiotic panel (Enrofloxacin, Ciprofloxacin, BM Cyclin 1 and 2, Mycoplasma Removal Agent and MycoZap®. The percentage of CD133 positive cells was analyzed by flow cytometry on GEO, SW480 and HT-29 cell lines, before and after Mycoplasma hyorhinis eradication. Results Mycoplasma hyorhinis infected colon cancer cell lines showed an increased percentage of CD133+ cells as compared to the same cell lines rendered mycoplasma-free by effective exposure to antibiotic treatment. The percentage of CD133 positive cells increased again when mycoplasma negative cells were re-infected by Mycoplasma hyorhinis. Conclusions Mycoplasma hyorhinis infection has an important role on the quality of cultured human colon cancer cell lines giving a false positive increase of cancer stem cells fraction characterized by CD133 expression. Possible explanations are (i the direct involvement of Mycoplasma on CD133 expression or (ii the selective pressure on a subpopulation of cells characterized by constitutive CD133 expression. In keeping with United Kingdom Coordinating Committee on Cancer Research (UKCCCR guidelines, the present data indicate the mandatory prerequisite, for investigators involved in human colon cancer research area, of employing mycoplasma-free cell lines in order to avoid the production of non-reproducible or even false data.

  8. Increased proinflammatory responses from asthmatic human airway smooth muscle cells in response to rhinovirus infection

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    King Nicholas JC

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exacerbations of asthma are associated with viral respiratory tract infections, of which rhinoviruses (RV are the predominant virus type. Airway smooth muscle is important in asthma pathogenesis, however little is known about the potential interaction of RV and human airway smooth muscle cells (HASM. We hypothesised that rhinovirus induction of inflammatory cytokine release from airway smooth muscle is augmented and differentially regulated in asthmatic compared to normal HASM cells. Methods HASM cells, isolated from either asthmatic or non-asthmatic subjects, were infected with rhinovirus. Cytokine production was assayed by ELISA, ICAM-1 cell surface expression was assessed by FACS, and the transcription regulation of IL-6 was measured by luciferase activity. Results RV-induced IL-6 release was significantly greater in HASM cells derived from asthmatic subjects compared to non-asthmatic subjects. This response was RV specific, as 5% serum- induced IL-6 release was not different in the two cell types. Whilst serum stimulated IL-8 production in cells from both subject groups, RV induced IL-8 production in only asthmatic derived HASM cells. The transcriptional induction of IL-6 was differentially regulated via C/EBP in the asthmatic and NF-κB + AP-1 in the non-asthmatic HASM cells. Conclusion This study demonstrates augmentation and differential transcriptional regulation of RV specific innate immune response in HASM cells derived from asthmatic and non-asthmatics, and may give valuable insight into the mechanisms of RV-induced asthma exacerbations.

  9. Electronic cigarette liquid increases inflammation and virus infection in primary human airway epithelial cells.

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    Qun Wu

    Full Text Available The use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes is rapidly increasing in the United States, especially among young people since e-cigarettes have been perceived as a safer alternative to conventional tobacco cigarettes. However, the scientific evidence regarding the human health effects of e-cigarettes on the lung is extremely limited. The major goal of our current study is to determine if e-cigarette use alters human young subject airway epithelial functions such as inflammatory response and innate immune defense against respiratory viral (i.e., human rhinovirus, HRV infection.We examined the effects of e-cigarette liquid (e-liquid on pro-inflammatory cytokine (e.g., IL-6 production, HRV infection and host defense molecules (e.g., short palate, lung, and nasal epithelium clone 1, SPLUNC1 in primary human airway epithelial cells from young healthy non-smokers. Additionally, we examined the role of SPLUNC1 in lung defense against HRV infection using a SPLUNC1 knockout mouse model. We found that nicotine-free e-liquid promoted IL-6 production and HRV infection. Addition of nicotine into e-liquid further amplified the effects of nicotine-free e-liquid. Moreover, SPLUNC1 deficiency in mice significantly increased lung HRV loads. E-liquid inhibited SPLUNC1 expression in primary human airway epithelial cells. These findings strongly suggest the deleterious health effects of e-cigarettes in the airways of young people. Our data will guide future studies to evaluate the impact of e-cigarettes on lung health in human populations, and help inform the public about potential health risks of e-cigarettes.

  10. Electronic cigarette liquid increases inflammation and virus infection in primary human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qun; Jiang, Di; Minor, Maisha; Chu, Hong Wei

    2014-01-01

    The use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) is rapidly increasing in the United States, especially among young people since e-cigarettes have been perceived as a safer alternative to conventional tobacco cigarettes. However, the scientific evidence regarding the human health effects of e-cigarettes on the lung is extremely limited. The major goal of our current study is to determine if e-cigarette use alters human young subject airway epithelial functions such as inflammatory response and innate immune defense against respiratory viral (i.e., human rhinovirus, HRV) infection. We examined the effects of e-cigarette liquid (e-liquid) on pro-inflammatory cytokine (e.g., IL-6) production, HRV infection and host defense molecules (e.g., short palate, lung, and nasal epithelium clone 1, SPLUNC1) in primary human airway epithelial cells from young healthy non-smokers. Additionally, we examined the role of SPLUNC1 in lung defense against HRV infection using a SPLUNC1 knockout mouse model. We found that nicotine-free e-liquid promoted IL-6 production and HRV infection. Addition of nicotine into e-liquid further amplified the effects of nicotine-free e-liquid. Moreover, SPLUNC1 deficiency in mice significantly increased lung HRV loads. E-liquid inhibited SPLUNC1 expression in primary human airway epithelial cells. These findings strongly suggest the deleterious health effects of e-cigarettes in the airways of young people. Our data will guide future studies to evaluate the impact of e-cigarettes on lung health in human populations, and help inform the public about potential health risks of e-cigarettes.

  11. BAG3 protein regulates caspase-3 activation in HIV-1-infected human primary microglial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Alessandra; Khalili, Kamel; Deshmane, Satish L.; Radhakrishnan, Sujatha; Pascale, Maria; Turco, M. Caterina; Marzullo, Liberato

    2015-01-01

    BAG3, a member of the BAG co-chaperones family, is expressed in several cell types subjected to stressful conditions, such as exposure to high temperature, heavy metals, drugs. Furthermore, it is constitutively expressed in some tumors. Among the biological activities of the protein, there is apoptosis downmodulation; this appears to be exerted through BAG3 interaction with the heat shock protein (Hsp) 70, that influences cell apoptosis at several levels. We recently reported that BAG3 protein was detectable in the cytoplasm of reactive astrocytes in HIV-1-associated encephalopathy biopsies. Here we report that downmodulation of BAG3 protein levels allows caspase-3 activation by HIV-1 infection in human primary microglial cells. This is the first reported evidence of a role for BAG3 in the balance of death versus survival during viral infection. PMID:18821563

  12. Latent cytomegalovirus infection enhances anti-tumour cytotoxicity through accumulation of NKG2C+ NK cells in healthy humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bigley, A.B.; Rezvani, K.; Shah, N.; Sekine, T.; Balneger, N.; Pistillo, M.; Agha, N.; Kunz, H.; O'Connor, D.P.; Bollard, C.M.; Simpson, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection markedly expands NKG2C+/NKG2A- NK cells, which are potent killers of infected cells expressing human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-E. As HLA-E is also over-expressed in several haematological malignancies and CMV has been linked to a reduced risk of leukaemic relapse, we

  13. Small RNA analysis in Sindbis virus infected human HEK293 cells.

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    Andras Donaszi-Ivanov

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In contrast to the defence mechanism of RNA interference (RNAi in plants and invertebrates, its role in the innate response to virus infection of mammals is a matter of debate. Since RNAi has a well-established role in controlling infection of the alphavirus Sindbis virus (SINV in insects, we have used this virus to investigate the role of RNAi in SINV infection of human cells. RESULTS: SINV AR339 and TR339-GFP were adapted to grow in HEK293 cells. Deep sequencing of small RNAs (sRNAs early in SINV infection (4 and 6 hpi showed low abundance (0.8% of viral sRNAs (vsRNAs, with no size, sequence or location specific patterns characteristic of Dicer products nor did they possess any discernible pattern to ascribe to a specific RNAi biogenesis pathway. This was supported by multiple variants for each sequence, and lack of hot spots along the viral genome sequence. The abundance of the best defined vsRNAs was below the limit of Northern blot detection. The adaptation of the virus to HEK293 cells showed little sequence changes compared to the reference; however, a SNP in E1 gene with a preference from G to C was found. Deep sequencing results showed little variation of expression of cellular microRNAs (miRNAs at 4 and 6 hpi compared to uninfected cells. Twelve miRNAs exhibiting some minor differential expression by sequencing, showed no difference in expression by Northern blot analysis. CONCLUSIONS: We show that, unlike SINV infection of invertebrates, generation of Dicer-dependent svRNAs and change in expression of cellular miRNAs were not detected as part of the Human response to SINV.

  14. Infected T98G glioblastoma cells support human cytomegalovirus reactivation from latency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shuang; Jiang, Xuan; Yang, Bo; Wen, Le; Zhao, Fei; Zeng, Wen-Bo; Liu, Xi-Juan; Dong, Xiao; Sun, Jin-Yan; Ming, Ying-Zi; Zhu, Hua; Rayner, Simon; Tang, Qiyi; Fortunato, Elizabeth; Luo, Min-Hua

    2017-10-01

    T98G cells have been shown to support long-term human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) genome maintenance without infectious virus release. However, it remains unclear whether these viral genomes could be reactivated. To address this question, a recombinant HCMV (rHCMV) containing a GFP gene was used to infect T98G cells, and the infected cells absent of infectious virus production were designated T98G-LrV. Upon dibutyryl cAMP plus IBMX (cAMP/IBMX) treatment, a serial of phenomena were observed, including GFP signal increase, viral genome replication, lytic genes expression and infectious viruses release, indicating the reactivation of HCMV in T98G-LrV cells from a latent status. Mechanistically, HCMV reactivation in the T98G-LrV cells induced by cAMP/IBMX was associated with the PKA-CREB signaling pathway. These results demonstrate that HCMV was latent in T98G-LrV cells and could be reactivated. The T98G-LrV cells represent an effective model for investigating the mechanisms of HCMV reactivation from latency in the context of neural cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Modulation of Whole-Cell Currents in Plasmodium Falciparum-Infected Human Red Blood Cells by Holding Potential and Serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staines, Henry M; Powell, Trevor; Clive Ellory, J; Egée, Stéphane; Lapaix, Franck; Decherf, Gaëtan; Thomas, Serge L Y; Duranton, Christophe; Lang, Florian; Huber, Stephan M

    2003-01-01

    Recent electrophysiological studies have identified novel ion channel activity in the host plasma membrane of Plasmodium falciparum-infected human red blood cells (RBCs). However, conflicting data have been published with regard to the characteristics of induced channel activity measured in the whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique. In an effort to establish the reasons for these discrepancies, we demonstrate here two factors that have been found to modulate whole-cell recordings in malaria-infected RBCs. Firstly, negative holding potentials reduced inward currents (i.e. at negative potentials), although this result was highly complex. Secondly, the addition of human serum increased outward currents (i.e. at positive potentials) by approximately 4-fold and inward currents by approximately 2-fold. These two effects may help to resolve the conflicting data in the literature, although further investigation is required to understand the underlying mechanisms and their physiological relevance in detail. PMID:12937282

  16. Susceptibility of KSHV-Infected PEL Cell Lines to the Human Complement System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Seung-Min; Jeon, Hyungtaek; Lee, Suhyuk; Lee, Myung-Shin

    2016-03-01

    Pleural effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a rare B-cell lymphoma that has a very poor prognosis with a median survival time of around 6 months. PEL is caused by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, and is often co-infected with the Epstein Barr virus. The complement system is fundamental in the innate immune system against pathogen invasion and tumor development. In the present study, we investigated the activation of the complement system in PEL cells using human serum complements. Interestingly, two widely used PEL cell lines, BCP-1 and BCBL-1, showed different susceptibility to the complement system, which may be due to CD46 expression on their cell membranes. Complement activation did not induce apoptosis but supported cell survival considerably. Our results demonstrated the susceptibility of PEL to the complement system and its underlying mechanisms, which would provide insight into understanding the pathogenesis of PEL.

  17. Bispecific Antibodies that Mediate Killing of Cells Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus of Any Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Jorg; Lotscher, Erika; Steimer, Kathelyn S.; Capon, Daniel J.; Baenziger, Jurg; Jack, Hans-Martin; Wabl, Matthias

    1991-06-01

    Although AIDS patients lose human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific cytotoxic T cells, their remaining CD8-positive T lymphocytes maintain cytotoxic function. To exploit this fact we have constructed bispecific antibodies that direct cytotoxic T lymphocytes of any specificity to cells that express gp120 of HIV. These bispecific antibodies comprise one heavy/light chain pair from an antibody to CD3, linked to a heavy chain whose variable region has been replaced with sequences from CD4 plus a second light chain. CD3 is part of the antigen receptor on T cells and is responsible for signal transduction. In the presence of these bispecific antibodies, T cells of irrelevant specificity effectively lyse HIV-infected cells in vitro.

  18. Cell-specific RNA aptamer against human CCR5 specifically targets HIV-1 susceptible cells and inhibits HIV-1 infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiehua; Satheesan, Sangeetha; Li, Haitang; Weinberg, Marc S; Morris, Kevin V; Burnett, John C; Rossi, John J

    2015-03-19

    The C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is a receptor expressed by T cells and macrophages that serves as a coreceptor for macrophage-tropic HIV-1. Loss of CCR5 is associated with resistance to HIV-1. Here, we combine the live-cell-based SELEX with high-throughput sequencing technology to generate CCR5 RNA aptamers capable of specifically targeting HIV-1 susceptible cells (as small interfering RNA [siRNA] delivery agent) and inhibiting HIV-1 infectivity (as antiviral agent) via block of the CCR5 required for HIV-1 to enter cells. One of the best candidates, G-3, efficiently bound and was internalized into human CCR5-expressing cells. The G-3 specifically neutralized R5 virus infection in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and in vivo generated human CD4(+) T cells with a nanomolar inhibitory concentration 50%. G-3 was also capable of transferring functional siRNAs to CCR5-expressing cells. Collectively, the cell-specific, internalizing, CCR5-targeted aptamers and aptamer-siRNA conjugates offer promise for overcoming some of the current challenges of drug resistance in HIV-1 by providing cell-type- or tissue-specific delivery of various therapeutic moieties.

  19. Transcriptome Remodeling in Trypanosoma cruzi and Human Cells during Intracellular Infection.

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    Yuan Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular colonization and persistent infection by the kinetoplastid protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, underlie the pathogenesis of human Chagas disease. To obtain global insights into the T. cruzi infective process, transcriptome dynamics were simultaneously captured in the parasite and host cells in an infection time course of human fibroblasts. Extensive remodeling of the T. cruzi transcriptome was observed during the early establishment of intracellular infection, coincident with a major developmental transition in the parasite. Contrasting this early response, few additional changes in steady state mRNA levels were detected once mature T. cruzi amastigotes were formed. Our findings suggest that transcriptome remodeling is required to establish a modified template to guide developmental transitions in the parasite, whereas homeostatic functions are regulated independently of transcriptomic changes, similar to that reported in related trypanosomatids. Despite complex mechanisms for regulation of phenotypic expression in T. cruzi, transcriptomic signatures derived from distinct developmental stages mirror known or projected characteristics of T. cruzi biology. Focusing on energy metabolism, we were able to validate predictions forecast in the mRNA expression profiles. We demonstrate measurable differences in the bioenergetic properties of the different mammalian-infective stages of T. cruzi and present additional findings that underscore the importance of mitochondrial electron transport in T. cruzi amastigote growth and survival. Consequences of T. cruzi colonization for the host include dynamic expression of immune response genes and cell cycle regulators with upregulation of host cholesterol and lipid synthesis pathways, which may serve to fuel intracellular T. cruzi growth. Thus, in addition to the biological inferences gained from gene ontology and functional enrichment analysis of differentially expressed genes in parasite and

  20. Impaired cell mediated immunity in haemophilia in the absence of infection with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhok, R; Gracie, A; Lowe, G D; Burnett, A; Froebel, K; Follett, E; Forbes, C D

    1986-10-18

    The cell mediated immune response was evaluated in vivo in 29 patients with clinically severe haemophilia by means of the dinitrochlorobenzene skin test. All patients had a response below the median normal value, and in 19 the response was on or below the lower limit of the normal range. There was no difference in skin response between patients positive and negative for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV; formerly known as human T cell lymphotropic virus III or lymphadenopathy associated virus). In the whole group, and in seronegative patients (n = 17), there was an inverse relation between exposure to clotting factor and skin response. In seropositive patients (n = 12) no such association was apparent. This study shows that clotting factor concentrate impairs the cell mediated immune response to a new antigen in the absence of infection with HIV.

  1. Risk of zidovudine-induced anemia on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection patients with different CD4 cell counts

    OpenAIRE

    wedayani, anak agung ayu niti; Sholikhah, Eti Nurwening; Kristin, Erna; Triyono, Erwin Astha

    2017-01-01

    Anemia is the most common hematologic abnormality in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This abnormality is associated with HIV infection itself, HIV-related opportunities infections or drug use. Zidovudine (AZT) is the most common cause of anemia in HIV patients. Recent study showed anemia in HIV patients is also associated with CD4 cell counts. Aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of anemia on HIV patients with different CD4 cell counts after AZT-based antiret...

  2. Effects of different cytokines on proliferation and apoptosis of pleural mesothelial cells in human Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊亮

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of different cytokines (IL-22,IL-17,IFN-γ) on proliferation and apoptosis of human pleural mesothelial cells (PMC) during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.Methods The

  3. Differential cleavage of IRES trans-acting factors (ITAFs) in cells infected by human rhinovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Amanda J; Semler, Bert L

    2014-01-20

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) is a major causative agent of the common cold, and thus has several important health implications. As a member of the picornavirus family, HRV has a small genomic RNA that utilizes several host cell proteins for RNA replication. Host proteins poly(rC) binding protein 2 (PCBP2) and polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB) are cleaved by a viral proteinase during the course of infection by the related picornavirus, poliovirus. The cleavage of PCBP2 and PTB inhibits poliovirus translation and has been proposed to mediate a switch in poliovirus template usage from translation to RNA replication. HRV RNA replication also requires a switch in template usage from translation to RNA replication; however, the mechanism is not yet known. We demonstrate that PCBP2 and PTB are differentially cleaved during HRV infection in different cell lines, suggesting that HRV utilizes a mechanism distinct from PCBP2 or PTB cleavage to mediate a switch in template usage.

  4. Evidence of human papilloma virus infection and its epidemiology in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pin-Fang Yao; Ju-Wei Sha; Guang-Can Li; Jin Li; He-Shun Xia; Xiao-Ling Yang; Huan-Yuan Huang; You-Gao Fu; Rui-Qin Wang; Xi-Yin Wang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To look for the evidence of human papilloma virus (HPV) infection in esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCC) and to investigate the potential role and epidemiology of HPV infection in the pathogenesis of esophageal carcinomas in Henan emigrants.METHODS: Papilloma virus (PV) and HPV were determined by UltrasensiveTM S-P immunohistochemistry (IHC)and in situ hybridization (ISH) in esophageal carcinoma tissues (82.cases) and the normal mucosa (40 cases).RESULTS: IHC revealed that the positive rate of PV was 75.0%, 68.18% and 72.5% respectively while the HPV (16/18-E6) positive rate was 45.0%, 36.36%, 37.5%,respectively in esophageal carcinoma tissue specimens from Henan emigrants,the local citizens and patients in Hubei Cancer Hospital. The PV and HPV (16/18-E6) were negative in all normal esophageal mucosa specimens. No correlation was found between HPV in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma tissues and in grade 1-3 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells. In situ hybridization showed that the HPV (16/18) DNA positive rate was 30.0%, 31.8%, 25.0%, respectively in the 3 groups of samples. No positive hybridization signal was found in 40 normal esophageal mucosa specimens. The positive rate of HPV (16/18) DNA in the esophageal carcinoma specimens was significantly higher than that in normal mucosa specimens (P< 0.05). The positive rate was not different among the 3 groups of esophageal carcinoma tissue specimens (P>0.05).CONCLUSION: HPV infection is high in esophageal carcinoma of Henan emigrants, local residents and patients in Hubei Cancer Hospital. HPV is closely related with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. HPV infection may play an important role in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

  5. Merkel cell polyomavirus and human papillomavirus infections in cervical disease in Iranian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi-Vaziri, Mostafa; Sadeghi, Farzin; Alamsi-Hashiani, Amir; Haeri, Hayedeh; Monavari, Seyed Hamidreza; Keyvani, Hossein

    2015-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a necessary cause of cervical neoplasia. Concomitant infection with other infectious agents has been demonstrated to be a cofactor for HPV-related cervical carcinogenesis. The present investigation aimed to determine the prevalence of HPV and Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) infections and to evaluate the role of MCPyV as a co-factor for HPV-related cervical carcinogenesis in Iranian women. From 2011 to 2013, a total of 112 cervical samples were examined. Forty-five samples (40.2 %) were positive for HPV. MCPyV was found in 37 samples (33 %). Both HPV and MCPyV were present in 14 samples (12.5 %). MCPyV was seen in 30 % of squamous cell carcinomas, 37.5 % of adenocarcinomas, and 16.7 % of undifferentiated carcinomas. The MCPyV large T antigen (LT-Ag) DNA load was determined as the viral copy number per cell. The median MCPyV LT-Ag copy number in positive women was 0.049 × 10(-3) per cell (range 0.0006 × 10(-3)-4.558 × 10(-3) copies per cell). In comparison with other types of cervical cancer, the MCPyV LT-Ag load was higher in adenocarcinomas (0.1024 × 10(-3) copies per cell). A logistic regression model adjusted to HPV positivity and age revealed no statistically significant association between MCPyV infection and cervical cancer (OR, 1.12; 95 % CI, 0.07-16.83). More studies should be conducted to clarify the role of MCPyV in cervical carcinogenesis.

  6. Pathogenic potential of Escherichia coli clinical strains from orthopedic implant infections towards human osteoblastic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crémet, Lise; Broquet, Alexis; Brulin, Bénédicte; Jacqueline, Cédric; Dauvergne, Sandie; Brion, Régis; Asehnoune, Karim; Corvec, Stéphane; Heymann, Dominique; Caroff, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the first causes of Gram-negative orthopedic implant infections (OII), but little is known about the pathogenicity of this species in such infections that are increasing due to the ageing of the population. We report how this pathogen interacts with human osteoblastic MG-63 cells in vitro, by comparing 20 OII E. coli strains to two Staphylococcus aureus and two Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. LDH release assay revealed that 6/20 (30%) OII E. coli induced MG-63 cell lysis whereas none of the four control strains was cytotoxic after 4 h of coculture. This high cytotoxicity was associated with hemolytic properties and linked to hlyA gene expression. We further showed by gentamicin protection assay and confocal microscopy that the non-cytotoxic E. coli were not able to invade MG-63 cells unlike S. aureus strains (internalization rate coli versus 8.88 ± 2.31% and 4.60 ± 0.42% for both S. aureus). The non-cytotoxic E. coli also demonstrated low adherence rates (coli eliciting higher IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA expression in the osteoblastic cells. Either highly cytotoxic or slightly invasive OII E. coli do not show the same infection strategies as S. aureus towards osteoblasts. PMID:26333570

  7. Alterations of T-cell surface markers in older women with persistent human papillomavirus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Ana Cecilia; García-Piñeres, Alfonso J; Hildesheim, Allan; Herrero, Rolando; Trivett, Matthew; Williams, Marcus; Atmella, Ivannia; Ramírez, Margarita; Villegas, Maricela; Schiffman, Mark; Burk, Robert; Freer, Enrique; Bonilla, José; Bratti, Concepción; Pinto, Ligia A

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported decreased lymphocyte proliferative responses among older women with persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. To characterize the phenotype of peripheral lymphocytes associated with persistent HPV infection, we evaluated the expression of different cell surface markers in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from a case-control study within a 10,049-woman population-based cohort study in Guanacaste, Costa Rica. Women in the cohort aged 46 to 74 and with HPV results at their 5th year anniversary visit were considered, and all women (n=87) with persistent HPV infections, all women (n=196) with transient HPV infections and a random sample of HPV DNA-negative women (n=261) frequency-matched to cases on age were selected for this study. A median of 3 years after the case-control matching visit, cervical cells were collected for liquid-based cytology and repeat HPV DNA genotyping. Blood was obtained from which PBMCs were extracted and cryopreserved for immunological phenotyping via flow cytometry. Significant increases in risk of HPV persistence were observed for three marker subsets indicative of immune cell activation/differentiation. Relative risk estimates were 5.4 (95%CI=2.2–13.3) for CD69+CD4+, 2.6 (95%CI=1.2–5.9) for HLADR+CD3+CD4+ and 2.3 (95%CI=1.1–4.7) for CD45RO+CD27−CD8+. A significant decrease in HPV persistence was observed for a subset marker indicative of an immature, undifferentiated memory state CD45RO+CD27+CD4+ (OR=0.36; 95%CI = 0.17–0.76). Adjustment for these markers only partially explained the previously reported association between decreased lymphoproliferative responses and persistent HPV infection. Whether phenotypic alterations observed predispose to HPV persistence or result from it should be the focus of future studies. PMID:20473864

  8. Inhibition of antiviral drug cidofovir on proliferation of human papillomavirus-infected cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Dai, Lv-Xia; Chen, Ming; Li, Bei; Ding, Nana; Li, Gang; Liu, Yan-Qing; Li, Ming-Yuan; Wang, Bao-Ning; Shi, Xin-Li; Tan, Hua-Bing

    2016-11-01

    In order to evaluate the potential application value of cidofovir (CDV) in the prevention of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and treatment of cervical cancer, the inhibitory effect of CDV on the proliferation of HPV 18-positive HeLa cells in cervical cancer was preliminarily investigated, using cisplatin (DDP) as a positive control. An MTT assay was used to analyze the effects of CDV and DDP on HeLa cell proliferation. In addition, clone formation assay and Giemsa staining were used to examine the extent of HeLa cell apoptosis caused by CDV and DDP. Flow cytometry was also used to detect the shape and size of apoptotic cells following propidium iodide staining, while western blot analysis identified the expression levels of of E6 and p53 proteins in HeLa cells. A cell climbing immunofluorescence technique was used to locate the subcellular position of p53 in HeLa cells. The results demonstrated that CDV and DDP inhibited the proliferation of HeLa cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Flow cytometry showed that CDV and DDP treatments resulted in cell arrest in the S-phase, and triggered programmed cell death. Furthermore, western blot analysis revealed that CDV and DDP inhibited E6 protein expression and activated p53 expression in HeLa cells. Finally, the immunofluorescence results indicated that CDV and DDP inhibited the nuclear export of p53 by E6 protein, which is required for degradation of endogenous p53 by MDM2 and human papilloma virus E6. In conclusion, CDV and DDP inhibited HeLa cell proliferation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, reduced the expression of E6 protein, and reinstated p53 protein activity. Thus, CDV regulates cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and may be a potential cervical cancer therapeutic strategy.

  9. Inhibition of antiviral drug cidofovir on proliferation of human papillomavirus-infected cervical cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Dai, Lv-Xia; Chen, Ming; Li, Bei; Ding, Nana; Li, Gang; Liu, Yan-Qing; Li, Ming-Yuan; Wang, Bao-Ning; Shi, Xin-Li; Tan, Hua-Bing

    2016-01-01

    In order to evaluate the potential application value of cidofovir (CDV) in the prevention of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and treatment of cervical cancer, the inhibitory effect of CDV on the proliferation of HPV 18-positive HeLa cells in cervical cancer was preliminarily investigated, using cisplatin (DDP) as a positive control. An MTT assay was used to analyze the effects of CDV and DDP on HeLa cell proliferation. In addition, clone formation assay and Giemsa staining were used to examine the extent of HeLa cell apoptosis caused by CDV and DDP. Flow cytometry was also used to detect the shape and size of apoptotic cells following propidium iodide staining, while western blot analysis identified the expression levels of of E6 and p53 proteins in HeLa cells. A cell climbing immunofluorescence technique was used to locate the subcellular position of p53 in HeLa cells. The results demonstrated that CDV and DDP inhibited the proliferation of HeLa cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Flow cytometry showed that CDV and DDP treatments resulted in cell arrest in the S-phase, and triggered programmed cell death. Furthermore, western blot analysis revealed that CDV and DDP inhibited E6 protein expression and activated p53 expression in HeLa cells. Finally, the immunofluorescence results indicated that CDV and DDP inhibited the nuclear export of p53 by E6 protein, which is required for degradation of endogenous p53 by MDM2 and human papilloma virus E6. In conclusion, CDV and DDP inhibited HeLa cell proliferation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, reduced the expression of E6 protein, and reinstated p53 protein activity. Thus, CDV regulates cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and may be a potential cervical cancer therapeutic strategy. PMID:27882102

  10. Effect of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection on the adherence of pathogenic bacteria to human epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faden, H.; Hong, J.J.; Ogra, P.L.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of RSV infection on the adherence of Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP), Haemophilus influenzae (HI) and Staphylococcus aureus (SA) to human epithelial cells was determined. RSV-infected Hep-2 cell cultures at different stages of expression of surface viral antigens and bacteria labeled with /sup 3/H-thymidine were employed to examine the kinetics of bacterial adherence to virus-infected cells. RSV infection did not alter the magnitude of adherence of HI or SA to HEp-2 cells. However, adherence of SP to HEp-2 cells was significantly (P < 0.01) enhanced by prior RSV infection. The degree of adherence was directly related to the amount of viral antigen expressed on the cell surface. The adherence was temperature dependent, with maximal adherence observed at 37/sup 0/C. Heat-inactivation of SP did not alter adherence characteristics. These data suggest that RSV infection increases adherence of SP to the surface of epithelial cells in vitro. Since attachment of bacteria to mucosal surfaces is the first step in many infections, it is suggested that viral infections of epithelial cells render them more susceptible to bacterial adherence. Thus, RSV infection in vivo may predispose children to SP infections, such as in otitis media, by increasing colonization with SP.

  11. Multiple human papilloma virus infections predominant in squamous cell cervical carcinoma in Bandung

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    Edhyana Sahiratmadja

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Persistent infection of high risk genotypes of human papilloma virus (hrHPV has been established as the etiological cause for cervical cancer, and the most prevalent genotypes that infect the cervical tissue are HPV-16 and HPV-18. However, HPV genotype profile has been shown to differ according to geographical distribution across the globe. The present study aimed to determine the HPV genotype distribution in cervical cancer patients from Bandung, Indonesia. METHODS During the period of July – November 2010 viral DNA was extracted from randomly chosen cervical cancer biopsies and subjected to genotype determination using the diagnostic linear array genotyping test (Roche. The distribution of HPV genotypes was explored and the prevalence of HPV genotypes was mapped. RESULTS Of 96 cervical cancer tissue samples, 76 (79.2% were histopathologically classified as squamous cell cervical carcinoma. Due to the high cost of HPV genotyping tests, only twenty-five samples were randomly genotyped. Almost 90% of the cervical cancer patients were multiply infected with HPV-16 in combination with HPV-18, HPV-45, or HPV-52. The HPV-16 genotype had the highest prevalence, all samples being infected with HPV-16. CONCLUSION The cervical cancer cases were predominantly infected by multiple hrHPVs with HPV-16 as the major genotype among other hrHPVs, supporting the carcinogenic role of this hrHPV. Therefore, screening for hrHPVs in the general population is urgently needed as a means of early detection of cervical cancer.

  12. Multiple human papilloma virus infections predominant in squamous cell cervical carcinoma in Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edhyana Sahiratmadja

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Persistent infection of high risk genotypes of human papilloma virus (hrHPV has been established as the etiological cause for cervical cancer, and the most prevalent genotypes that infect the cervical tissue are HPV-16 and HPV-18. However, HPV genotype profile has been shown to differ according to geographical distribution across the globe. The present study aimed to determine the HPV genotype distribution in cervical cancer patients from Bandung, Indonesia. Methods During the period of July – November 2010 viral DNA was extracted from randomly chosen cervical cancer biopsies and subjected to genotype determination using the diagnostic linear array genotyping test (Roche. The distribution of HPV genotypes was explored and the prevalence of HPV genotypes was mapped. Results Of 96 cervical cancer tissue samples, 76 (79.2% were histopathologically classified as squamous cell cervical carcinoma. Due to the high cost of HPV genotyping tests, only twenty-five samples were randomly genotyped. Almost 90% of the cervical cancer patients were multiply infected with HPV-16 in combination with HPV-18, HPV-45, or HPV-52. The HPV-16 genotype had the highest prevalence, all samples being infected with HPV-16. Conclusion The cervical cancer cases were predominantly infected by multiple hrHPVs with HPV-16 as the major genotype among other hrHPVs, supporting the carcinogenic role of this hrHPV. Therefore, screening for hrHPVs in the general population is urgently needed as a means of early detection of cervical cancer.

  13. Infection of human endothelial cells by Japanese encephalitis virus: increased expression and release of soluble HLA-E.

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    Shwetank

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV is a single stranded RNA virus that infects the central nervous system leading to acute encephalitis in children. Alterations in brain endothelial cells have been shown to precede the entry of this flavivirus into the brain, but infection of endothelial cells by JEV and their consequences are still unclear. Productive JEV infection was established in human endothelial cells leading to IFN-β and TNF-α production. The MHC genes for HLA-A, -B, -C and HLA-E antigens were upregulated in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, the endothelial-like cell line, ECV 304 and human foreskin fibroblasts upon JEV infection. We also report the release/shedding of soluble HLA-E (sHLA-E from JEV infected human endothelial cells for the first time. This shedding of sHLA-E was blocked by an inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP. In addition, MMP-9, a known mediator of HLA solubilisation was upregulated by JEV. In contrast, human fibroblasts showed only upregulation of cell-surface HLA-E. Addition of UV inactivated JEV-infected cell culture supernatants stimulated shedding of sHLA-E from uninfected ECV cells indicating a role for soluble factors/cytokines in the shedding process. Antibody mediated neutralization of TNF-α as well as IFNAR receptor together not only resulted in inhibition of sHLA-E shedding from uninfected cells, it also inhibited HLA-E and MMP-9 gene expression in JEV-infected cells. Shedding of sHLA-E was also observed with purified TNF-α and IFN-β as well as the dsRNA analog, poly (I:C. Both IFN-β and TNF-α further potentiated the shedding when added together. The role of soluble MHC antigens in JEV infection is hitherto unknown and therefore needs further investigation.

  14. Reconstruction of the temporal signaling network in Salmonella-infected human cells

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    Gungor eBudak

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica is a bacterial pathogen that usually infects its host through food sources. Translocation of the pathogen proteins into the host cells leads to changes in the signaling mechanism either by activating or inhibiting the host proteins. Using high-throughput ‘omic’ technologies, changes in the signaling components can be quantified at different levels; however, experimental hits are usually incomplete to represent the whole signaling system as some driver proteins stay hidden within the experimental data. Given that the bacterial infection modifies the response network of the host, more coherent view of the underlying biological processes and the signaling networks can be obtained by using a network modeling approach based on the reverse engineering principles in which a confident region from the protein interactome is found by inferring hits from the omic experiments. In this work, we have used a published temporal phosphoproteomic dataset of Salmonella-infected human cells and reconstructed the temporal signaling network of the human host by integrating the interactome and the phosphoproteomic datasets. We have combined two well-established network modeling frameworks, the Prize-collecting Steiner Forest (PCSF approach and the Integer Linear Programming (ILP based edge inference approach. The resulting network conserves the information on temporality, direction of interactions, while revealing hidden entities in the signaling, such as the SNARE binding, mTOR signaling, immune response, cytoskeleton organization, and apoptosis pathways. Targets of the Salmonella effectors in the host cells such as CDC42, RHOA, 14-3-3δ, Syntaxin family, Oxysterol-binding proteins were included in the reconstructed signaling network although they were not present in the initial phosphoproteomic data. We believe that integrated approaches have a high potential for the identification of clinical targets in infectious diseases, especially in the

  15. [Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, oropharynx and larynx].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villagómez-Ortíz, Vicente José; Paz-Delgadillo, Diana Estela; Marino-Martínez, Iván; Ceseñas-Falcón, Luis Ángel; Sandoval-de la Fuente, Anabel; Reyes-Escobedo, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Cancer of the head and neck comprises a group of neoplasms that share a similar anatomical origin. Most originate from the epithelium of the aerodigestive tract and 90% correspond to squamous cell carcinoma. In the last 15 years, an increase in the incidence of squamous cell carcinoma induced by human papillomavirus (HPV) has been seen, mainly types 16 and 18, which are the most frequent found in cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx, and types 6 and 11 in laryngeal cancer. There are reports in the literature that show HPV as the leading cause of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Determine the prevalence of infection with high-risk HPV in patients diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, oropharynx and larynx. An observational, cross-sectional, descriptive, unblinded study was performed. Prevalence of HPV infection was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in DNA samples from tumour tissue of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, oropharynx and larynx. Typing was subsequently performed in HPV positive samples in order to detect types 18, 16, 11 and 6, using custom primers. A total of 45 patients were included. The association between laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and HPV was established in two patients, which represented an overall prevalence of 4.4% in our population, and 10% for laringeal tumours. There is a low prevalence of HPV infection in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, oropharynx and larynx, in our population. Prospective studies on younger patients could provide more information. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  16. The role of human papillomavirus infection in the pathogenesis of penile squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaux, Alcides; Cubilla, Antonio L

    2012-05-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that penile cancer follows 2 etiologic pathways, 1 related to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and the other related to other factors including phimosis, chronic inflammation, and lichen sclerosus. HPV DNA is found in 47% to 48% of all penile tumors, and most of these cases correspond to high-risk genotypes, preferentially HPV-16. HPV status is associated with histologic subtype, with higher detection ratios in warty-basaloid carcinomas and lower detection ratios in keratinizing variants (ie, verrucous, papillary, and usual squamous cell carcinomas). It is the cell type, rather than a distinctive architecture, that is more strongly associated with HPV presence. The detection ratio is higher in tumors composed entirely or partially of cells with basaloid features. In addition, a few studies have evaluated the impact of HPV infection on the prognosis of patients with penile cancer. However, results are controversial, and more data are needed to clarify this matter. A proper understanding of the role of HPV in penile carcinogenesis might help in planning intervention strategies such as vaccination against HPV infection.

  17. Human herpesvirus-8 infection leads to expansion of the preimmune/natural effector B cell compartment.

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    Silvia Della Bella

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8 is the etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS and of some lymphoproliferative disorders of B cells. Most malignancies develop after long-lasting viral dormancy, and a preventing role for both humoral and cellular immune control is suggested by the high frequency of these pathologies in immunosuppressed patients. B cells, macrophages and dendritic cells of peripheral lymphoid organs and blood represent the major reservoir of HHV-8. Due to the dual role of B cells in HHV-8 infection, both as virus reservoir and as agents of humoral immune control, we analyzed the subset distribution and the functional state of peripheral blood B cells in HHV-8-infected individuals with and without cKS. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Circulating B cells and their subsets were analyzed by 6-color flow cytometry in the following groups: 1- patients HHV-8 positive with classic KS (cKS (n = 47; 2- subjects HHV-8 positive and cKS negative (HSP (n = 10; 3- healthy controls, HHV-8 negative and cKS negative (HC (n = 43. The number of B cells belonging to the preimmune/natural effector compartment, including transitional, pre-naïve, naïve and MZ-like subsets, was significantly higher among HHV-8 positive subjects, with or without cKS, while was comparable to healthy controls in the antigen-experienced T-cell dependent compartment. The increased number of preimmune/natural effector B cells was associated with increased resistance to spontaneous apoptosis, while it did not correlate with HHV-8 viral load. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that long-lasting HHV-8 infection promotes an imbalance in peripheral B cell subsets, perturbing the equilibrium between earlier and later steps of maturation and activation processes. This observation may broaden our understanding of the complex interplay between viral and immune factors leading HHV-8-infected individuals to develop HHV-8-associated malignancies.

  18. SPOC1-Mediated Antiviral Host Cell Response Is Antagonized Early in Human Adenovirus Type 5 Infection

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    Schreiner, Sabrina; Kinkley, Sarah; Bürck, Carolin; Mund, Andreas; Wimmer, Peter; Schubert, Tobias; Groitl, Peter; Will, Hans; Dobner, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about immediate phases after viral infection and how an incoming viral genome complex counteracts host cell defenses, before the start of viral gene expression. Adenovirus (Ad) serves as an ideal model, since entry and onset of gene expression are rapid and highly efficient, and mechanisms used 24–48 hours post infection to counteract host antiviral and DNA repair factors (e.g. p53, Mre11, Daxx) are well studied. Here, we identify an even earlier host cell target for Ad, the chromatin-associated factor and epigenetic reader, SPOC1, recently found recruited to double strand breaks, and playing a role in DNA damage response. SPOC1 co-localized with viral replication centers in the host cell nucleus, interacted with Ad DNA, and repressed viral gene expression at the transcriptional level. We discovered that this SPOC1-mediated restriction imposed upon Ad growth is relieved by its functional association with the Ad major core protein pVII that enters with the viral genome, followed by E1B-55K/E4orf6-dependent proteasomal degradation of SPOC1. Mimicking removal of SPOC1 in the cell, knock down of this cellular restriction factor using RNAi techniques resulted in significantly increased Ad replication, including enhanced viral gene expression. However, depletion of SPOC1 also reduced the efficiency of E1B-55K transcriptional repression of cellular promoters, with possible implications for viral transformation. Intriguingly, not exclusive to Ad infection, other human pathogenic viruses (HSV-1, HSV-2, HIV-1, and HCV) also depleted SPOC1 in infected cells. Our findings provide a general model for how pathogenic human viruses antagonize intrinsic SPOC1-mediated antiviral responses in their host cells. A better understanding of viral entry and early restrictive functions in host cells should provide new perspectives for developing antiviral agents and therapies. Conversely, for Ad vectors used in gene therapy, counteracting mechanisms eradicating incoming

  19. High-risk human papillomavirus infection in different histological subtypes of renal cell carcinoma.

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    Farhadi, Ali; Behzad-Behbahani, Abbas; Geramizadeh, Bita; Sekawi, Zamberi; Rahsaz, Marjan; Sharifzadeh, Sedigheh

    2014-07-01

    Limited data exist regarding whether a high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection increases the risk of developing renal cell carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate whether HPV infection has a role in the pathogenesis or development of a certain histological subtype of renal cell carcinoma. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) specimens of 122 patients with histopathologically proven renal cell carcinoma and their respective peritumoral tissues were examined. The presence of HPV-DNA was determined by a combination of MY/GP+ consensus primers and HPV-16/18 type specific nested PCRs followed by direct sequencing. Catalyzed signal-amplified colorimetric in situ hybridization (CSAC-ISH) technique was applied to determine the physical status of viral genome. The expression of p16INK4a and HPV L1 capsid proteins was evaluated using immunohistochemistry. HPV genome was detected in 37 (30.3%) tumor specimens and their four (4.1%) corresponding peritumoral tissues. HPV-18 was the most common viral type identified followed by HPV-16 and 58. Immunoexpression of p16INK4a was detected in 24 (20.3%) cases. Data analysis showed a significant correlation between p16INK4a expression and the presence of HR-HPV DNA (P infection in 45% of tumors, which were previously tested positive for HPV-DNA. Diffuse signal pattern was identified in 15 (83.3%) samples whereas a mixed pattern of diffuse and punctate signals was only detectable in three cases. The results indicate an association of HR-HPV types with renal cell carcinoma. It is proposed that HPV infection in high-grade tumors might precede disease progression in a number of tumors, particularly of the papillary subtype. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Differential susceptibility of human trophoblastic (BeWo) and uterine cervical (HeLa) cells to Neospora caninum infection.

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    Carvalho, Julianne V; Alves, Celene M O S; Cardoso, Mariana R D; Mota, Caroline M; Barbosa, Bellisa F; Ferro, Eloísa A V; Silva, Neide M; Mineo, Tiago W P; Mineo, José R; Silva, Deise A O

    2010-12-01

    Neospora caninum is an apicomplexan parasite, closely related to Toxoplasma gondii, and causes abortion and congenital neosporosis in cattle worldwide. Trophoblast cells act in mechanisms of innate immune defense at the fetal-maternal interface and no data are available about the interaction of Neospora with human trophoblasts. Thus, this study aimed to verify the susceptibility of human trophoblastic (BeWo) compared with uterine cervical (HeLa) cell lines to N. caninum. BeWo and HeLa cells were infected with different parasite:cell ratios of N. caninum tachyzoites and analyzed at different times after infection for cell viability using thiazolyl blue tetrazole and lactate dehydrogenase assays. Both cell lines were also evaluated for cytokine production and parasite infection/replication assays when pre-treated or not with Neospora lysate antigen (NLA) or human recombinant IFN-γ. Cell viability was increased up to 48 h of infection in both types of cells, suggesting that infection could inhibit early cell death and/or induce cell proliferation. Neospora infection induced up-regulation of the macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), mainly in HeLa cells, which was enhanced by cell pre-treatment by NLA or IFN-γ. Conversely, parasite infection induced down-regulation of the transforming growth factor (TGF-β), mostly in BeWo cells, which was decreased with NLA or IFN-γ pre-treatment. HeLa cells were more susceptible to Neospora infection than BeWo cells and IFN-γ pre-treatment resulted in reduced infection indices in both cell lines. Control of parasite growth was mediated by IFN-γ through an indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase-dependent mechanism in HeLa cells alone. Based on these results, we concluded that BeWo and HeLa cells are readily infected by N. caninum, although presenting differences in susceptibility to infection, cytokine production and cell viability. Thus, these host cells can be considered in comparative approaches to understand strategies used by N

  1. HCMV-infection in a human arterial organ culture model: effects on cell proliferation and neointimal hyperplasia

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    Rössler Wolfgang

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The impact of infections with the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV for the development of atherosclerosis and restenosis is still unclear. Both a clear correlation and no correlation at all have been reported in clinical, mostly serological studies. In our study we employed a human non-injury ex vivo organ culture model to investigate the effect of an in vitro permissive HCMV-infection on cell proliferation and neointimal hyperplasia for a period of 56 days. Results During routine-nephrectomies parts of renal arteries from 71 patients were obtained and prepared as human organ cultures. Cell free HCMV infection was performed with the fibroblast adapted HCMV strain AD169, the endotheliotropic strain TB40E, and a clinical isolate (AN 365. After 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 56 days in culture staining of HCMV-antigens was carried out and reactive cell proliferation and neointimal thickening were analysed. Successful HCMV-infection was accomplished with all three virus strains studied. During the first 21 days in organ culture no cell proliferation or neointimal hyperplasia was detected. At day 35 and day 56 moderate cell proliferation and neointimal hyperplasia was found both in HCMV-infected segments and mock infected controls. Neointimal hyperplasia in productively HCMV-infected segments was lower than in non infected at day 35 and day 56, but relatively higher after infection with the endotheliotropic TB40E in comparison with the two other strains. Conclusion The data do not support the hypothesis that HCMV-infection triggers restenosis via a stimulatory effect on cell proliferation and neointimal hyperplasia in comparison to non infected controls. Interestingly however, even after lytic infection, a virus strain specific difference was observed.

  2. Human T cell aging and the impact of persistent viral infections

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    Tamas eFulop

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with a dysregulation of the immune response, loosely termed immunosenescence. Each part of the immune system is influenced to some extent by the aging process. However, adaptive immunity seems more extensively affected and among all participating cells it is the T cells that are most altered. There is a large body of experimental work devoted to the investigation of age-associated differences in T cell phenotypes and functions in young and old individuals, but few longitudinal studies in humans actually delineating changes at the level of the individual. In most studies, the number and proportion of late-differentiated T cells, especially CD8+ T cells, is reported to be higher in the elderly than in the young. Limited longitudinal studies suggest that accumulation of these cells is a dynamic process and does indeed represent an age-associated change. Accumulations of such late-stage cells may contribute to the enhanced systemic pro-inflammatory milieu commonly seen in older people. We do not know exactly what causes these observed changes, but an understanding of the possible causes is now beginning to emerge. A favored hypothesis is that these events are at least partly due to the effects of the maintenance of essential immune surveillance against persistent viral infections, notably Cytomegalovirus (CMV, which may exhaust the immune system over time. It is still a matter of debate as to whether these changes are compensatory and beneficial or pathological and detrimental to the proper functioning of the immune system and whether they impact longevity. Here, we will review present knowledge of T cell changes with aging and their relation to chronic viral and possibly other persistent infections.

  3. Cutaneous Human Papillomavirus Infection and Development of Subsequent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Skin

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    Shalaka S. Hampras

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV infection in the development of subsequent cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC is unknown. Pathologically confirmed cases of SCC (n=150 enrolled in a previously conducted case-control study were included in a retrospective cohort study to examine the association of cutaneous HPV at the time of SCC diagnosis with the risk of subsequent SCC development. Data on HPV seropositivity, HPV DNA in eyebrow hairs (EB and SCC tumors were available from the parent study. Incidence of subsequent SCC was estimated using person-years of follow up. Cox Proportional Hazards ratios were estimated to evaluate the associations of both, HPV seropositivity and HPV DNA positivity with subsequent SCC. The five year cumulative incidence of subsequent SCC was 72%. Seropositivity to cutaneous HPV was not associated with the risk of subsequent SCC (HR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.41–1.67. Any beta HPV infection in EB was associated with reduced risk (HR = 0.30, 95% CI = 0.11–0.78 of subsequent SCC among cases who were positive for beta HPV DNA in tumor tissue. Infection with beta HPV type 2 (HR = 0.32, 95% CI = 0.12–0.86 in EB was associated with reduced risk of subsequent SCC among HPV DNA positive SCCs. In conclusion, beta HPV infection was inversely associated with the risk of subsequent SCC.

  4. Echovirus 6 Infects Human Exocrine and Endocrine Pancreatic Cells and Induces Pro-Inflammatory Innate Immune Response

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    Luis Sarmiento

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human enteroviruses (HEV, especially coxsackievirus serotype B (CVB and echovirus (E, have been associated with diseases of both the exocrine and endocrine pancreas, but so far evidence on HEV infection in human pancreas has been reported only in islets and ductal cells. This study aimed to investigate the capability of echovirus strains to infect human exocrine and endocrine pancreatic cells. Infection of explanted human islets and exocrine cells with seven field strains of E6 caused cytopathic effect, virus titer increase and production of HEV protein VP1 in both cell types. Virus particles were found in islets and acinar cells infected with E6. No cytopathic effect or infectious progeny production was observed in exocrine cells exposed to the beta cell-tropic strains of E16 and E30. Endocrine cells responded to E6, E16 and E30 by upregulating the transcription of interferon-induced with helicase C domain 1 (IF1H1, 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1, interferon-β (IFN-β, chemokine (C–X–C motif ligand 10 (CXCL10 and chemokine (C–C motif ligand 5 (CCL5. Echovirus 6, but not E16 or E30, led to increased transcription of these genes in exocrine cells. These data demonstrate for the first time that human exocrine cells represent a target for E6 infection and suggest that certain HEV serotypes can replicate in human pancreatic exocrine cells, while the pancreatic endocrine cells are permissive to a wider range of HEV.

  5. The rapid and sustained responses of dendritic cells to influenza virus infection in a non-human primate model.

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    Jie, Zhijun; Sun, Wei; Wang, Shanze; Koster, Frederick; Li, Bilan; Harrod, Kevin S

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are readily infected by influenza viruses and play a crucial role in regulating host innate and adaptive immune responses to viral infection. The aims of this study are to characterize the dynamic changes in the numbers and maturation status of dendritic cells present in the lung and lung-associated lymph nodes (LALNs) in the model of a non-human primate (NHP) infected by influenza A virus (IAV). Cynomolgus macaques were infected with influenza A virus (H3N2) via bronchoscopy. Flow cytometry was used to analyze the DC numbers, maturation status and subsets during the time of acute infection (days 1, 2, 3, 4, 7) and the resolution phase (day 30). A dramatic increase in the numbers of influenza A virus-infected CD11c+CD14- myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) and CD11c-CD123+ plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) were observed from day 1 to day 4 and peak up from day 7 post-infection. In lung and lung-associated lymph nodes, the numbers and maturation status of myeloid dendritic cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells increased more slowly than those in the lung tissues. On day 30 post-infection, influenza A virus challenge increased the number of myeloid dendritic cells, but not plasmacytoid dendritic cells, compared with baseline. These findings indicate that dendritic cells are susceptible to influenza A virus infection, with the likely purpose of increasing mature myeloid dendritic cells numbers in the lung and lung and lung-associated lymph nodes, which provides important new insights into the regulation of dendritic cells in a non-human primate model.

  6. Human Cytomegalovirus US28 Is Important for Latent Infection of Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells

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    Humby, Monica S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) resides latently in hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). During latency, only a subset of HCMV genes is transcribed, including one of the four virus-encoded G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), US28. Although US28 is a multifunctional lytic protein, its function during latency has remained undefined. We generated a panel of US28 recombinant viruses in the bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-derived clinical HCMV strain TB40/E-mCherry. We deleted the entire US28 open reading frame (ORF), deleted all four of the viral GPCR ORFs, or deleted three of the HCMV GPCRs but not the US28 wild-type protein. Using these recombinant viruses, we assessed the requirement for US28 during latency in the Kasumi-3 in vitro latency model system and in primary ex vivo-cultured CD34+ HPCs. Our data suggest that US28 is required for latency as infection with viruses lacking the US28 ORF alone or in combination with the remaining HCMV-encoded GPCR results in transcription from the major immediate early promoter, the production of extracellular virions, and the production of infectious virus capable of infecting naive fibroblasts. The other HCMV GPCRs are not required for this phenotype as a virus expressing only US28 but not the remaining virus-encoded GPCRs is phenotypically similar to that of wild-type latent infection. Finally, we found that US28 copurifies with mature virions and is expressed in HPCs upon virus entry although its expression at the time of infection does not complement the US28 deletion latency phenotype. This work suggests that US28 protein functions to promote a latent state within hematopoietic progenitor cells. IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a widespread pathogen that, once acquired, remains with its host for life. HCMV remains latent, or quiescent, in cells of the hematopoietic compartment and upon immune challenge can reactivate to cause disease. HCMV-encoded US28 is one of several genes expressed during

  7. HIV Replication Is Not Controlled by CD8+ T Cells during the Acute Phase of the Infection in Humanized Mice.

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    Nicolas Y Petit

    Full Text Available HIV replication follows a well-defined pattern during the acute phase of the infection in humans. After reaching a peak during the first few weeks after infection, viral replication resolves to a set-point thereafter. There are still uncertainties regarding the contribution of CD8(+ T cells in establishing this set-point. An alternative explanation, supported by in silico modeling, would imply that viral replication is limited by the number of available targets for infection, i.e. CD4(+CCR5(+ T cells. Here, we used NOD.SCID.gc(-/- mice bearing human CD4(+CCR5(+ and CD8(+ T cells derived from CD34(+ progenitors to investigate the relative contribution of both in viral control after the peak. Using low dose of a CCR5-tropic HIV virus, we observed an increase in viral replication followed by "spontaneous" resolution of the peak, similar to humans. To rule out any possible role for CD8(+ T cells in viral control, we infected mice in which CD8(+ T cells had been removed by a depleting antibody. Globally, viral replication was not affected by the absence of CD8(+ T cells. Strikingly, resolution of the viral peak was equally observed in mice with or without CD8(+ T cells, showing that CD8(+ T cells were not involved in viral control in the early phase of the infection. In contrast, a marked and specific loss of CCR5-expressing CD4(+ T cells was observed in the spleen and in the bone marrow, but not in the blood, of infected animals. Our results strongly suggest that viral replication during the acute phase of the infection in humanized mice is mainly constrained by the number of available targets in lymphoid tissues rather than by CD8(+ T cells.

  8. HIV Replication Is Not Controlled by CD8+ T Cells during the Acute Phase of the Infection in Humanized Mice.

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    Petit, Nicolas Y; Lambert-Niclot, Sidonie; Marcelin, Anne-Geneviève; Garcia, Sylvie; Marodon, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    HIV replication follows a well-defined pattern during the acute phase of the infection in humans. After reaching a peak during the first few weeks after infection, viral replication resolves to a set-point thereafter. There are still uncertainties regarding the contribution of CD8(+) T cells in establishing this set-point. An alternative explanation, supported by in silico modeling, would imply that viral replication is limited by the number of available targets for infection, i.e. CD4(+)CCR5(+) T cells. Here, we used NOD.SCID.gc(-/-) mice bearing human CD4(+)CCR5(+) and CD8(+) T cells derived from CD34(+) progenitors to investigate the relative contribution of both in viral control after the peak. Using low dose of a CCR5-tropic HIV virus, we observed an increase in viral replication followed by "spontaneous" resolution of the peak, similar to humans. To rule out any possible role for CD8(+) T cells in viral control, we infected mice in which CD8(+) T cells had been removed by a depleting antibody. Globally, viral replication was not affected by the absence of CD8(+) T cells. Strikingly, resolution of the viral peak was equally observed in mice with or without CD8(+) T cells, showing that CD8(+) T cells were not involved in viral control in the early phase of the infection. In contrast, a marked and specific loss of CCR5-expressing CD4(+) T cells was observed in the spleen and in the bone marrow, but not in the blood, of infected animals. Our results strongly suggest that viral replication during the acute phase of the infection in humanized mice is mainly constrained by the number of available targets in lymphoid tissues rather than by CD8(+) T cells.

  9. Rac1 regulates the NLRP3 inflammasome which mediates IL-1beta production in Chlamydophila pneumoniae infected human mononuclear cells.

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    Julia Eitel

    Full Text Available Chlamydophila pneumoniae causes acute respiratory tract infections and has been associated with development of asthma and atherosclerosis. The production of IL-1β, a key mediator of acute and chronic inflammation, is regulated on a transcriptional level and additionally on a posttranslational level by inflammasomes. In the present study we show that C. pneumoniae-infected human mononuclear cells produce IL-1β protein depending on an inflammasome consisting of NLRP3, the adapter protein ASC and caspase-1. We further found that the small GTPase Rac1 is activated in C. pneumoniae-infected cells. Importantly, studies with specific inhibitors as well as siRNA show that Rac1 regulates inflammasome activation in C. pneumoniae-infected cells. In conclusion, C. pneumoniae infection of mononuclear cells stimulates IL-1β production dependent on a NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated processing of proIL-1β which is controlled by Rac1.

  10. Low frequency of human papillomavirus infection in conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma of Mexican patients

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    Peralta Raúl

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between Human Papillomavirus (HPV infection and conjunctiva cancer is controversial. HPV detection will provide more information about the role of this infectious agent in the biology of conjunctiva cancer. In the present study, DNA extracted and purified from 36 Conjunctival Squamous Cell Carcinomas (CSCC was evaluated by PCR for HPV DNA sequences. The results were correlated with the clinical and histopathological variables. Results The results showed that HPV DNA was present in 8 CSCC samples (22%; HPV16 was the sole type detected. Significant association was found between HPV detection and the limbus tumor subtype (p = 0.03. All the samples were non-metastatic squamous cell carcinoma. Conclusions The HPV presence in CSCC from Mexican patients is not a common event.

  11. Selective Loss of Innate CD4+ Vα24 Natural Killer T Cells in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

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    Sandberg, Johan K.; Fast, Noam M.; Palacios, Emil H.; Fennelly, Glenn; Dobroszycki, Joanna; Palumbo, Paul; Wiznia, Andrew; Grant, Robert M.; Bhardwaj, Nina; Rosenberg, Michael G.; Nixon, Douglas F.

    2002-01-01

    Vα24 natural killer T (NKT) cells are innate immune cells involved in regulation of immune tolerance, autoimmunity, and tumor immunity. However, the effect of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection on these cells is unknown. Here, we report that the Vα24 NKT cells can be subdivided into CD4+ or CD4− subsets that differ in their expression of the homing receptors CD62L and CD11a. Furthermore, both CD4+ and CD4− NKT cells frequently express both CXCR4 and CCR5 HIV coreceptors. We find that the numbers of NKT cells are reduced in HIV-infected subjects with uncontrolled viremia and marked CD4+ T-cell depletion. The number of CD4+ NKT cells is inversely correlated with HIV load, indicating depletion of this subset. In contrast, CD4− NKT-cell numbers are unaffected in subjects with high viral loads. HIV infection experiments in vitro show preferential depletion of CD4+ NKT cells relative to regular CD4+ T cells, in particular with virus that uses the CCR5 coreceptor. Thus, HIV infection causes a selective loss of CD4+ lymph node homing (CD62L+) NKT cells, with consequent skewing of the NKT-cell compartment to a predominantly CD4− CD62L− phenotype. These data indicate that the key immunoregulatory NKT-cell compartment is compromised in HIV-1-infected patients. PMID:12097565

  12. High-Throughput Sequencing of MicroRNAs in Adenovirus Type 3 Infected Human Laryngeal Epithelial Cells

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    Yuhua Qi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenovirus infection can cause various illnesses depending on the infecting serotype, such as gastroenteritis, conjunctivitis, cystitis, and rash illness, but the infection mechanism is still unknown. MicroRNAs (miRNA have been reported to play essential roles in cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and pathogenesis of human diseases including viral infections. We analyzed the miRNA expression profiles from adenovirus type 3 (AD3 infected Human laryngeal epithelial (Hep2 cells using a SOLiD deep sequencing. 492 precursor miRNAs were identified in the AD3 infected Hep2 cells, and 540 precursor miRNAs were identified in the control. A total of 44 miRNAs demonstrated high expression and 36 miRNAs showed lower expression in the AD3 infected cells than control. The biogenesis of miRNAs has been analyzed, and some of the SOLiD results were confirmed by Quantitative PCR analysis. The present studies may provide a useful clue for the biological function research into AD3 infection.

  13. Localization of human immunodeficiency virus antigens in infected cells by scanning/transmission-immunogold techniques

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    Herrera, M.I.; Santa Maria, I.; de Andres, R.; Najera, R.

    1988-01-01

    An application of high resolution scanning/transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and gold-labelling techniques for the rapid detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in infected cells has been developed. Experimental in vitro studies for detecting two HIV structural proteins, gp41 and p17, were performed following an indirect labeling procedure that uses monoclonal anti-p17 and anti-gp41 antibodies as primary antibodies and 40 nm gold-linked goat antimouse IgG as secondary antibodies. The cells were then studied by STEM in the scanning mode. Unambiguous localization of the viral antigens was possible by combining the three-dimensional image provided by the secondary electron image and the atomic number-dependent backscattered electron image for the identification of the gold marker. This technique combines both the morphological information and the rapid procedures of scanning electron microscopy with the precise and sensitive antigen detection provided by the use of STEM and immunological methods. The preliminary results of its application to the study of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from four anti-HIV-seropositive patients showing the presence of specific labeling in all of them suggest that it might prove useful for early detection of HIV infection before seroconversion, as well as for quantitative studies.

  14. Cell-Based Screen Identifies Human Interferon-Stimulated Regulators of Listeria monocytogenes Infection

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    Eitson, Jennifer L.; Chen, Didi; Jimenez, Alyssa; Mettlen, Marcel; Schoggins, John W.; Alto, Neal M.

    2016-01-01

    The type I interferon (IFN) activated transcriptional response is a critical antiviral defense mechanism, yet its role in bacterial pathogenesis remains less well characterized. Using an intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) as a model bacterial pathogen, we sought to identify the roles of individual interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) in context of bacterial infection. Previously, IFN has been implicated in both restricting and promoting Lm growth and immune stimulatory functions in vivo. Here we adapted a gain-of-function flow cytometry based approach to screen a library of more than 350 human ISGs for inhibitors and enhancers of Lm infection. We identify 6 genes, including UNC93B1, MYD88, AQP9, and TRIM14 that potently inhibit Lm infection. These inhibitors act through both transcription-mediated (MYD88) and non-transcriptional mechanisms (TRIM14). Further, we identify and characterize the human high affinity immunoglobulin receptor FcγRIa as an enhancer of Lm internalization. Our results reveal that FcγRIa promotes Lm uptake in the absence of known host Lm internalization receptors (E-cadherin and c-Met) as well as bacterial surface internalins (InlA and InlB). Additionally, FcγRIa-mediated uptake occurs independently of Lm opsonization or canonical FcγRIa signaling. Finally, we established the contribution of FcγRIa to Lm infection in phagocytic cells, thus potentially linking the IFN response to a novel bacterial uptake pathway. Together, these studies provide an experimental and conceptual basis for deciphering the role of IFN in bacterial defense and virulence at single-gene resolution. PMID:28002492

  15. Magnetically enhanced adeno-associated viral vector delivery for human neural stem cell infection.

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    Kim, Eunmi; Oh, Ji-Seon; Ahn, Ik-Sung; Park, Kook In; Jang, Jae-Hyung

    2011-11-01

    Gene therapy technology is a powerful tool to elucidate the molecular cues that precisely regulate stem cell fates, but developing safe vehicles or mechanisms that are capable of delivering genes to stem cells with high efficiency remains a challenge. In this study, we developed a magnetically guided adeno-associated virus (AAV) delivery system for gene delivery to human neural stem cells (hNSCs). Magnetically guided AAV delivery resulted in rapid accumulation of vectors on target cells followed by forced penetration of the vectors across the plasma membrane, ultimately leading to fast and efficient cellular transduction. To combine AAV vectors with the magnetically guided delivery, AAV was genetically modified to display hexa-histidine (6xHis) on the physically exposed loop of the AAV2 capsid (6xHis AAV), which interacted with nickel ions chelated on NTA-biotin conjugated to streptavidin-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NiStNPs). NiStNP-mediated 6xHis AAV delivery under magnetic fields led to significantly enhanced cellular transduction in a non-permissive cell type (i.e., hNSCs). In addition, this delivery method reduced the viral exposure times required to induce a high level of transduction by as much as to 2-10 min of hNSC infection, thus demonstrating the great potential of magnetically guided AAV delivery for numerous gene therapy and stem cell applications.

  16. Infection of xenotransplanted human cell lines by murine retroviruses: A lesson brought back to light by XMRV

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    Heidi Anne Hempel

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Infection of xenotransplanted human cells by xenotropic retroviruses is a known phenomenon in the scientific literature, with examples cited since the early 1970’s. However, arguably, until recently, the importance of this phenomenon had not been largely recognized. The emergence and subsequent debunking of Xenotropic Murine leukemia virus-Related Virus (XMRV as a cell culture contaminant as opposed to a potential pathogen in several human diseases, notably prostate cancer and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, highlighted a potential problem of murine endogenous gammaretroviruses infecting commonly used human cell lines. Subsequent to the discovery of XMRV, many additional cell lines that underwent xenotransplantation in mice have been shown to harbor murine gammaretroviruses. Such retroviral infection poses the threat of not only confounding experiments performed in these cell lines via virus-induced changes in cellular behavior but also the potential infection of other cell lines cultured in the same laboratory. Thus, the possibility of xenotropic retroviral infection of cell lines may warrant additional precautions, such as periodic testing for retroviral sequences in cell lines cultured in the laboratory.

  17. High-risk human papilloma virus infection decreases the frequency of dendritic Langerhans' cells in the human female genital tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Flores, Rafael; Mendez-Cruz, Rene; Ojeda-Ortiz, Jorge; Muñoz-Molina, Rebeca; Balderas-Carrillo, Oscar; de la Luz Diaz-Soberanes, Maria; Lebecque, Serge; Saeland, Sem; Daneri-Navarro, Adrian; Garcia-Carranca, Alejandro; Ullrich, Stephen E; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are often arranged in planar layers in tissues with high antigenic exposure, such as skin and mucosae. Providing an en face view, this arrangement optimizes in situ analysis regarding morphology (even of individual dendrites), topographic distribution (regular/clustered) and quantification. The few reports on human genital DC usually utilize single markers and conventional sections, restricting immunolabelling only to cell parts sectioned by the cut. To better assess DC in situ, we labelled epithelial sheets, prepared from fresh cervix biopsies, with antibodies to major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-CII, CD1a and Langerin, revealing (with each of these markers) a dense DC network in a planar-like, regular distribution. Using the hybrid capture system to detect the high-risk mucotropic human papilloma virus (HPV) group, 16 positive and five negative women were studied and the results were compared between these groups. DC frequency per area was substantially reduced (to ≈ 50% for the three markers) in samples from all HPV-infected patients compared with samples from controls. Unlike HPV– samples, Langerin+ DC in HPV+ cervix exhibited a highly accentuated dendritic appearance. We believe this to be the first study using these three DC-restricted markers (Langerin, CD1a and MHC-CII) in cervical epithelial sheets from high-risk HPV+ donors and also the first study to demonstrate the morphological and quantitative changes triggered by high-risk HPV infection. Cervical DC reduction in early, premalignant high-risk HPV infection might represent viral subversion strategies interfering with efficient antigen handling by the immune system's peripheral sentinels, the DC, perhaps hampering appropriate recruitment and subsequent development of effector (cytotoxic) T cells. PMID:16423058

  18. Productive infection of human neural progenitor cells by R5 tropic HIV-1: opiate co-exposure heightens infectivity and functional vulnerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balinang, Joyce M.; Masvekar, Ruturaj R.; Hauser, Kurt F.; Knapp, Pamela E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective HIV type-1 (HIV-1) causes a spectrum of central nervous system (CNS) complications; many are worsened by opiate co-exposure. Human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) give rise to all CNS neurons and macroglia. We tested the hypothesis that hNPC maturation and fate are altered by HIV and opiates, contributing to HIV-1-related neuropathology. Reports of hNPC infection remain controversial. We rigorously examined this question, testing whether hNPC propagated infection and whether HIV affected hNPCs absent their infection. Design and methods Primary hNPCs were characterized over multiple passages. Following R5 HIV-1BaL exposure, p24, Nef, and tat assays monitored infection; a serial dilution approach tested infection transfer to naive hNPCs. Bromodeoxyuridine uptake, population doubling time, and immunostaining assessed proliferation and differentiation. Morphine co-exposure assessed opiate interactions. Supernatant from HIV-1BaL-infected PBMCs (HIVsup), HIV-1BaL, and ultraviolet light-inactivated HIVsup were compared to test effects of inflammatory milieu versus virus or infection per se. Results The hNPCs (CD4_/CD8_/Iba_/CXC3CL1_/CD11b_) were infectable and could transfer infection to naive hNPCs. Infection was partly blocked by maraviroc, implicating CCR5. HIVsup reduced hNPC proliferation and caused premature differentiation into neurons/astroglia. Effects on proliferation were due to soluble factors/viral proteins, not infection per se. Morphine co-exposure exacerbated certain functional consequences of HIVsup, and sustained the infection of hNPCs. Conclusion hNPCs can be infected and propagate virus in vitro. hNPCs or their progeny may represent an underappreciated viral reservoir. Factors from infected cells alter hNPC proliferation and neural cell maturation which likely compromises CNS structure and function. Morphine–HIV interactions may worsen dysfunction and sustain infection. PMID:28099189

  19. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Growth of Infected T Cells by the Immunosuppressive Drugs Cyclosporin A and FK 506

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpas, Abraham; Lowdell, Mark; Jacobson, S. Kim; Hill, Fergal

    1992-09-01

    The effects of the immunosuppressive drugs cyclosporin A and FK 506 were studied on cells chronically infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) as well as on uninfected and newly infected cells. When cells chronically infected with HIV-1 or with HIV-2 were cocultivated with uninfected cells in the presence of cyclosporin A or FK 506 there was a delay in the formation of syncytia and of cytopathic effects. This inhibitory effect was not due to decreased membrane expression of CD4. In addition, there was an ≈100-fold reduction in the yield of infectious HIV-1 when the infected cells were grown in the presence of these drugs, a finding consistent with other evidence of decreased HIV expression. Both drugs were found to inhibit the growth of chronically infected cells at concentrations that did not inhibit the growth of the uninfected cells. These results, demonstrating that cyclosporin A and FK 506 interfere with HIV production and selectively inhibit the growth of infected cells, suggest that they may be useful in the treatment of this infection and indicate further cellular targets for antiviral agents.

  20. Characterization of Yellow Fever Virus Infection of Human and Non-human Primate Antigen Presenting Cells and Their Interaction with CD4+ T Cells.

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    Yu Cong

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Humans infected with yellow fever virus (YFV, a mosquito-borne flavivirus, can develop illness ranging from a mild febrile disease to hemorrhagic fever and death. The 17D vaccine strain of YFV was developed in the 1930s, has been used continuously since development and has proven very effective. Genetic differences between vaccine and wild-type viruses are few, yet viral or host mechanisms associated with protection or disease are not fully understood. Over the past 20 years, a number of cases of vaccine-associated disease have been identified following vaccination with 17D; these cases have been correlated with reduced immune status at the time of vaccination. Recently, several studies have evaluated T cell responses to vaccination in both humans and non-human primates, but none have evaluated the response to wild-type virus infection. In the studies described here, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM and dendritic cells (MoDC from both humans and rhesus macaques were evaluated for their ability to support infection with either wild-type Asibi virus or the 17D vaccine strain and the host cytokine and chemokine response characterized. Human MoDC and MDM were also evaluated for their ability to stimulate CD4+ T cells. It was found that MoDC and MDM supported viral replication and that there were differential cytokine responses to infection with either wild-type or vaccine viruses. Additionally, MoDCs infected with live 17D virus were able to stimulate IFN-γ and IL-2 production in CD4+ T cells, while cells infected with Asibi virus were not. These data demonstrate that wild-type and vaccine YFV stimulate different responses in target antigen presenting cells and that wild-type YFV can inhibit MoDC activation of CD4+ T cells, a critical component in development of protective immunity. These data provide initial, but critical insight into regulatory capabilities of wild-type YFV in development of disease.

  1. Characterization of Yellow Fever Virus Infection of Human and Non-human Primate Antigen Presenting Cells and Their Interaction with CD4+ T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Yu; McArthur, Monica A; Cohen, Melanie; Jahrling, Peter B; Janosko, Krisztina B; Josleyn, Nicole; Kang, Kai; Zhang, Tengfei; Holbrook, Michael R

    2016-05-01

    Humans infected with yellow fever virus (YFV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus, can develop illness ranging from a mild febrile disease to hemorrhagic fever and death. The 17D vaccine strain of YFV was developed in the 1930s, has been used continuously since development and has proven very effective. Genetic differences between vaccine and wild-type viruses are few, yet viral or host mechanisms associated with protection or disease are not fully understood. Over the past 20 years, a number of cases of vaccine-associated disease have been identified following vaccination with 17D; these cases have been correlated with reduced immune status at the time of vaccination. Recently, several studies have evaluated T cell responses to vaccination in both humans and non-human primates, but none have evaluated the response to wild-type virus infection. In the studies described here, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) and dendritic cells (MoDC) from both humans and rhesus macaques were evaluated for their ability to support infection with either wild-type Asibi virus or the 17D vaccine strain and the host cytokine and chemokine response characterized. Human MoDC and MDM were also evaluated for their ability to stimulate CD4+ T cells. It was found that MoDC and MDM supported viral replication and that there were differential cytokine responses to infection with either wild-type or vaccine viruses. Additionally, MoDCs infected with live 17D virus were able to stimulate IFN-γ and IL-2 production in CD4+ T cells, while cells infected with Asibi virus were not. These data demonstrate that wild-type and vaccine YFV stimulate different responses in target antigen presenting cells and that wild-type YFV can inhibit MoDC activation of CD4+ T cells, a critical component in development of protective immunity. These data provide initial, but critical insight into regulatory capabilities of wild-type YFV in development of disease.

  2. Recovery of infectious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 after fusion of defectively infected clones of U-937 cells.

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    Polyethylene glycol was used to induce polykaryon formation among U-937 cell subclones carrying defective human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 proviral DNA. Fusion of cells which produced gp120-defective virions (UHC15.7) with cells unable to generate reverse transcriptase (RT) activity (UHC8 and UHC18) yielded polykaryons which made infectious viral progeny that showed normal protein profiles. Southern blot analysis of proviral DNA of cells infected with such fusion-derived virus reveal...

  3. Human Herpesvirus 6B Downregulates Expression of Activating Ligands during Lytic Infection To Escape Elimination by Natural Killer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiedel, Dominik; Tai, Julie; Levi-Schaffer, Francesca; Dovrat, Sarah; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2016-11-01

    The Herpesviridae family consists of eight viruses, most of which infect a majority of the human population. One of the less-studied members is human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) (Roseolovirus), which causes a mild, well-characterized childhood disease. Primary HHV-6 infection is followed by lifelong latency. Reactivation frequently occurs in immunocompromised patients, such as those suffering from HIV infection or cancer or following transplantation, and causes potentially life-threatening complications. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms that HHV-6 utilizes to remain undetected by natural killer (NK) cells, which are key participants in the innate immune response to infections. We revealed viral mechanisms which downregulate ligands for two powerful activating NK cell receptors: ULBP1, ULBP3, and MICB, which trigger NKG2D, and B7-H6, which activates NKp30. Accordingly, this downregulation impaired the ability of NK cells to recognize HHV-6-infected cells. Thus, we describe for the first time immune evasion mechanisms of HHV-6 that protect lytically infected cells from NK elimination. Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) latently infects a large portion of the human population and can reactivate in humans lacking a functional immune system, such as cancer or AIDS patients. Under these conditions, it can cause life-threatening diseases. To date, the actions and interplay of immune cells, and particularly cells of the innate immune system, during HHV-6 infection are poorly defined. In this study, we aimed to understand how cells undergoing lytic HHV-6 infection interact with natural killer (NK) cells, innate lymphocytes constituting the first line of defense against viral intruders. We show that HHV-6 suppresses the expression of surface proteins that alert the immune cells by triggering two major receptors on NK cells, NKG2D and NKp30. As a consequence, HHV-6 can replicate undetected by the innate immune system and potentially spread infection throughout the body. This

  4. Human T cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I infection of a CD4+ proliferative/cytotoxic T cell clone progresses in at least two distinct phases based on changes in function and phenotype of the infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yssel, H; de Waal Malefyt, R; Duc Dodon, M D; Blanchard, D; Gazzolo, L; de Vries, J E; Spits, H

    1989-04-01

    The effect of human T cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I (HTLV-I) infection on the function and the phenotype of a human proliferating/cytotoxic T cell clone, specific for tetanus toxin, was investigated. During the period after infection, two distinct phases were observed, based on growth properties, phenotype, and functional activity of the infected cells. Phase I HTLV-I infected cells (0 to about 150 days after infection) proliferated in an IL-2-dependent way, but without the requirement for repetitive antigenic stimulation. No differences in expression of the CD2, CD3, CD4, Tp103, and CD28 Ag between these cells and the parental cells could be demonstrated, with the exception of the expression of IL-R p55 and HLA-DR Ag, which were constitutively expressed on the phase I cells. The phase I HTLV-I-infected cells, as well as the parental 827 cells reacted with a mAb specific for an epitope on the variable part of the TCR beta-chain, indicating that the TCR was not altered after HTLV-I infection. Like the parental clone, the phase I cells proliferated in response to tetanus toxin, but the tetanus toxin-specific response of the phase I cells did not require the presence of APC. Results of experiments, in which the levels of intracellular Ca2+ were measured, indicated that HTLV-I cells can acquire the capability to process Ag and present that to themselves. Phase I HTLV-I-infected T cells had lost their cytotoxic activity which was likely to be due to an effect on the lytic machinery rather than on Ag recognition by the TCR, inasmuch as it was found that phase I HTLV-I-infected T cells did no longer contain N-alpha-benzyloxy-L-lysine thiobenzylester-serine esterase activity. Furthermore, it was found that phase I HTLV-I-infected T cells had a diminished capacity to form conjugates with target cells. From a period of about 200 days after HTLV-I infection, phase II cells emerged that proliferated strongly in the absence of IL-2 and that had lost all functional

  5. Zika Virus Persistently Infects and Is Basolaterally Released from Primary Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan C. Mladinich

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is a mosquito-borne Flavivirus that has emerged as the cause of encephalitis and fetal microencephaly in the Americas. ZIKV uniquely persists in human bodily fluids for up to 6 months, is sexually transmitted, and traverses the placenta and the blood-brain barrier (BBB to damage neurons. Cells that support persistent ZIKV replication and mechanisms by which ZIKV establishes persistence remain enigmatic but central to ZIKV entry into protected neuronal compartments. The endothelial cell (EC lining of capillaries normally constrains transplacental transmission and forms the BBB, which selectively restricts access of blood constituents to neurons. We found that ZIKV (strain PRVABC59 persistently infects and continuously replicates in primary human brain microvascular ECs (hBMECs, without cytopathology, for >9 days and following hBMEC passage. ZIKV did not permeabilize hBMECs but was released basolaterally from polarized hBMECs, suggesting a direct mechanism for ZIKV to cross the BBB. ZIKV-infected hBMECs were rapidly resistant to alpha interferon (IFN-α and transiently induced, but failed to secrete, IFN-β and IFN-λ. Global transcriptome analysis determined that ZIKV constitutively induced IFN regulatory factor 7 (IRF7, IRF9, and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs 1 to 9 days postinfection, despite persistently replicating in hBMECs. ZIKV constitutively induced ISG15, HERC5, and USP18, which are linked to hepatitis C virus (HCV persistence and IFN regulation, chemokine CCL5, which is associated with immunopathogenesis, as well as cell survival factors. Our results reveal that hBMECs act as a reservoir of persistent ZIKV replication, suggest routes for ZIKV to cross hBMECs into neuronal compartments, and define novel mechanisms of ZIKV persistence that can be targeted to restrict ZIKV spread.

  6. Infectomic Analysis of Gene Expression Profiles of Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells Infected with Cryptococcus neoformans

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    Ambrose Jong

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to dissect the pathogenesis of Cryptococcus neoformans meningoencephalitis, a genomic survey of the changes in gene expression of human brain microvascular endothelial cells infected by C. neoformans was carried out in a time-course study. Principal component analysis (PCA revealed sigificant fluctuations in the expression levels of different groups of genes during the pathogen-host interaction. Self-organizing map (SOM analysis revealed that most genes were up- or downregulated 2 folds or more at least at one time point during the pathogen-host engagement. The microarray data were validated by Western blot analysis of a group of genes, including β-actin, Bcl-x, CD47, Bax, Bad, and Bcl-2. Hierarchical cluster profile showed that 61 out of 66 listed interferon genes were changed at least at one time point. Similarly, the active responses in expression of MHC genes were detected at all stages of the interaction. Taken together, our infectomic approaches suggest that the host cells significantly change the gene profiles and also actively participate in immunoregulations of the central nervous system (CNS during C. neoformans infection.

  7. Tick-borne encephalitis virus infects human brain microvascular endothelial cells without compromising blood-brain barrier integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palus, Martin; Vancova, Marie; Sirmarova, Jana; Elsterova, Jana; Perner, Jan; Ruzek, Daniel

    2017-07-01

    Alteration of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a hallmark of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE), a life-threating human viral neuroinfection. However, the mechanism of BBB breakdown during TBE, as well as TBE virus (TBEV) entry into the brain is unclear. Here, primary human microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) were infected with TBEV to study interactions with the BBB. Although the number of infected cells was relatively low in culture (10(6)pfu/ml). Infection did not induce any significant changes in the expression of key tight junction proteins or upregulate the expression of cell adhesion molecules, and did not alter the highly organized intercellular junctions between HBMECs. In an in vitro BBB model, the virus crossed the BBB via a transcellular pathway without compromising the integrity of the cell monolayer. The results indicate that HBMECs may support TBEV entry into the brain without altering BBB integrity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. HSV-1 infection of human brain cells induces miRNA-146a and Alzheimer-type inflammatory signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, James M; Zhao, Yuhai; Clement, Christian; Neumann, Donna M; Lukiw, Walter J

    2009-10-28

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) infection of human brain cells induces changes in gene expression favorable to the propagation of the infecting agent and detrimental to the function of the host cells. We report that infection of human primary neural cells with a high phenotypic reactivator HSV-1 (17syn+) induces upregulation of a brain-enriched microRNA (miRNA)-146a that is associated with proinflammatory signaling in stressed brain cells and Alzheimer's disease. Expression of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2, the inducible prostaglandin synthase cyclooxygenase-2, and the neuroinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1beta were each upregulated. A known miRNA-146a target in the brain, complement factor H, was downregulated. These data suggest a role for HSV-1-induced miRNA-146a in the evasion of HSV-1 from the complement system, and the activation of key elements of the arachidonic acid cascade known to contribute to Alzheimer-type neuropathological change.

  9. Relationship Among Strongyloides stercoralis Infection, Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Infection, and Cancer: A 24-Year Cohort Inpatient Study in Okinawa, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Teruhisa; Hirata, Tetsuo; Parrott, Gretchen; Higashiarakawa, Miwa; Kinjo, Takeshi; Kinjo, Tetsu; Hokama, Akira; Fujita, Jiro

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis infection and human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection in the population. In addition, this study investigated the relationship between S. stercoralis infection or HTLV-1 infection and a patient's risk of developing related cancers. This is a retrospective cohort study of 5,209 patients. The prevalence of S. stercoralis infection was 5.2% among all patients. The prevalence among men (6.3%) was significantly higher than among women (3.6%, P stercoralis and HTLV-1 in the Okinawan population has been steadily decreasing over the past 24 years. HTLV-1 infection significantly increases the odds of developing liver cancer and lymphomas other than ATLL.

  10. HIV-1 infection initiates an inflammatory cascade in human renal tubular epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Michael J; Fan, Cheng; Ross, Michael D; Chu, Te-Huatearina; Shi, Yueyue; Kaufman, Lewis; Zhang, Weijia; Klotman, Mary E; Klotman, Paul E

    2006-05-01

    HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) is the most common cause of chronic renal failure in HIV-infected patients. Tubulointerstitial inflammation is a prominent component of the histopathology of HIVAN. The pathogenesis of HIVAN is a result of infection of renal epithelial cells, but the cellular response to this infection remains poorly defined. In these studies, we used oligonucleotide microarrays to identify differentially expressed genes in renal tubular epithelial cells from a patient with HIVAN at three time points after infection with vesicular stomatitis virus-pseudotyped gag/pol-deleted HIV-1. Very few genes were differentially expressed 12 and 24 hours after infection. Three days after infection, however, 47 genes were upregulated by at least 1.8-fold. The most prominent response of these cells to HIV-1 expression was production of proinflammatory mediators, including chemokines, cytokines, and adhesion molecules. Many of the upregulated genes are targets of interleukin 6 and nuclear factor kappa B regulation, suggesting a central role for these proteins in the response of tubular epithelial cells to HIV-1 infection. Analysis of kidneys from HIV-1 transgenic mice revealed upregulation of many of the proinflammatory genes identified in the microarray studies. These studies provide novel insights into the mechanisms by which HIV-1 infection of tubular epithelial cells leads to tubulointerstitial inflammation and progressive renal injury.

  11. Human immunodeficiency virus receptor and coreceptor expression on human uterine epithelial cells: regulation of expression during the menstrual cycle and implications for human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeaman, Grant R; Howell, Alexandra L; Weldon, Sally; Demian, Douglas J; Collins, Jane E; O'Connell, Denise M; Asin, Susana N; Wira, Charles R; Fanger, Michael W

    2003-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is primarily a sexually transmitted disease. Identification of cell populations within the female reproductive tract that are initially infected, and the events involved in transmission of infection to other cells, remain to be established. In this report, we evaluated expression of HIV receptors and coreceptors on epithelial cells in the uterus and found they express several receptors critical for HIV infection including CD4, CXCR4, CCR5 and galactosylceramide (GalC). Moreover, expression of these receptors varied during the menstrual cycle. Expression of CD4 and CCR5 on uterine epithelial cells is high throughout the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle when blood levels of oestradiol are high. In contrast, CXCR4 expression increased gradually throughout the proliferative phase. During the secretory phase of the cycle when both oestradiol and progesterone are elevated, CD4 and CCR5 expression decreased whereas CXCR4 expression remained elevated. Expression of GalC on endometrial glands is higher during the secretory phase than during the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle. Because epithelial cells line the female reproductive tract and express HIV receptors and coreceptors, it is likely that they are one of the first cell types to become infected. The hormonal regulation of HIV receptor expression may affect a woman's susceptibility to HIV infection during her menstrual cycle. Moreover, selective coreceptor expression could account for the preferential transmission of R5-HIV-1 strains to women. In addition, these studies provide evidence that the uterus, and potentially the entire upper reproductive tract, are important sites for the initial events involved in HIV infection.

  12. Reference gene selection for quantitative real-time PCR analysis in virus infected cells: SARS corona virus, Yellow fever virus, Human Herpesvirus-6, Camelpox virus and Cytomegalovirus infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Marcel A

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ten potential reference genes were compared for their use in experiments investigating cellular mRNA expression of virus infected cells. Human cell lines were infected with Cytomegalovirus, Human Herpesvirus-6, Camelpox virus, SARS coronavirus or Yellow fever virus. The expression levels of these genes and the viral replication were determined by real-time PCR. Genes were ranked by the BestKeeper tool, the GeNorm tool and by criteria we reported previously. Ranking lists of the genes tested were tool dependent. However, over all, β-actin is an unsuitable as reference gene, whereas TATA-Box binding protein and peptidyl-prolyl-isomerase A are stable reference genes for expression studies in virus infected cells.

  13. T-bet+ B cells are induced by human viral infections and dominate the HIV gp140 response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, James J.; Buggert, Marcus; Kardava, Lela; Seaton, Kelly E.; Eller, Michael A.; Canaday, David H.; Robb, Merlin L.; Ostrowski, Mario A.; Slifka, Mark K.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Moir, Susan; Moody, M. Anthony; Betts, Michael R.

    2017-01-01

    Humoral immunity is critical for viral control, but the identity and mechanisms regulating human antiviral B cells are unclear. Here, we characterized human B cells expressing T-bet and analyzed their dynamics during viral infections. T-bet+ B cells demonstrated an activated phenotype, a distinct transcriptional profile, and were enriched for expression of the antiviral immunoglobulin isotypes IgG1 and IgG3. T-bet+ B cells expanded following yellow fever virus and vaccinia virus vaccinations and also during early acute HIV infection. Viremic HIV-infected individuals maintained a large T-bet+ B cell population during chronic infection that was associated with increased serum and cell-associated IgG1 and IgG3 expression. The HIV gp140–specific B cell response was dominated by T-bet–expressing memory B cells, and we observed a concomitant biasing of gp140-specific serum immunoglobulin to the IgG1 isotype. These findings suggest that T-bet induction promotes antiviral immunoglobulin isotype switching and development of a distinct T-bet+ B cell subset that is maintained by viremia and coordinates the HIV Env–specific humoral response. PMID:28422752

  14. Innate immune response of human alveolar type II cells infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhaohui; Travanty, Emily A; Oko, Lauren; Edeen, Karen; Berglund, Andrew; Wang, Jieru; Ito, Yoko; Holmes, Kathryn V; Mason, Robert J

    2013-06-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-coronavirus (CoV) produces a devastating primary viral pneumonia with diffuse alveolar damage and a marked increase in circulating cytokines. One of the major cell types to be infected is the alveolar type II cell. However, the innate immune response of primary human alveolar epithelial cells infected with SARS-CoV has not been defined. Our objectives included developing a culture system permissive for SARS-CoV infection in primary human type II cells and defining their innate immune response. Culturing primary human alveolar type II cells at an air-liquid interface (A/L) improved their differentiation and greatly increased their susceptibility to infection, allowing us to define their primary interferon and chemokine responses. Viral antigens were detected in the cytoplasm of infected type II cells, electron micrographs demonstrated secretory vesicles filled with virions, virus RNA concentrations increased with time, and infectious virions were released by exocytosis from the apical surface of polarized type II cells. A marked increase was evident in the mRNA concentrations of interferon-β and interferon-λ (IL-29) and in a large number of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. A surprising finding involved the variability of expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme-2, the SARS-CoV receptor, in type II cells from different donors. In conclusion, the cultivation of alveolar type II cells at an air-liquid interface provides primary cultures in which to study the pulmonary innate immune responses to infection with SARS-CoV, and to explore possible therapeutic approaches to modulating these innate immune responses.

  15. Identification of site-specific adaptations conferring increased neural cell tropism during human enterovirus 71 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Cordey

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is one of the most virulent enteroviruses, but the specific molecular features that enhance its ability to disseminate in humans remain unknown. We analyzed the genomic features of EV71 in an immunocompromised host with disseminated disease according to the different sites of infection. Comparison of five full-length genomes sequenced directly from respiratory, gastrointestinal, nervous system, and blood specimens revealed three nucleotide changes that occurred within a five-day period: a non-conservative amino acid change in VP1 located within the BC loop (L97R, a region considered as an immunogenic site and possibly important in poliovirus host adaptation; a conservative amino acid substitution in protein 2B (A38V; and a silent mutation in protein 3D (L175. Infectious clones were constructed using both BrCr (lineage A and the clinical strain (lineage C backgrounds containing either one or both non-synonymous mutations. In vitro cell tropism and competition assays revealed that the VP1₉₇ Leu to Arg substitution within the BC loop conferred a replicative advantage in SH-SY5Y cells of neuroblastoma origin. Interestingly, this mutation was frequently associated in vitro with a second non-conservative mutation (E167G or E167A in the VP1 EF loop in neuroblastoma cells. Comparative models of these EV71 VP1 variants were built to determine how the substitutions might affect VP1 structure and/or interactions with host cells and suggest that, while no significant structural changes were observed, the substitutions may alter interactions with host cell receptors. Taken together, our results show that the VP1 BC loop region of EV71 plays a critical role in cell tropism independent of EV71 lineage and, thus, may have contributed to dissemination and neurotropism in the immunocompromised patient.

  16. Detection of Human Papillomaviral Infection on Kazakh Patients with Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Chen; Lan Yang; Zhenzhu Sun; Haiyang Zhang; Tao Ren; Xiuyun Tian; Lijuan Pang; Bin Chang; Hongan Li; Feng Li

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the detection rate of human papilloma virus (HPV) DNA in the Kazakh esophageal carcinoma (EC) patients of Xinjiang.METHODS We detected the prevalence of a HPV gene in tumor tissues from 318 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC).Tumor tissues were kept in formalin and embedded in paraffin.One hundred seventeen samples used crude cell suspension, while the other 201 used the method of DNA extraction with phenol-Tris/chloroform. We analyzed the relevance to EC of Kazakh's in Xinjiang.RESULTS In the ESCC samples of Kazakh's in Xinjiang, total detection rate for HPV DNA was 64.5% (205/318). The positive rate of HPV in group of crude cell suspensions was 82.9% (97/117) compared with the rate of 53.7% (108/201) in the group of DNA extraction. The results in the two groups showed significant diffference (X2 = 5.711, P < 0.05).CONCLUSION HPV DNA infection may be one of the most important factors related to EC of Kazakh's in Xinjiang.

  17. Defining CD8+ T cell determinants during human viral infection in populations of Asian ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivino, Laura; Tan, Anthony T; Chia, Adeline; Kumaran, Emmanuelle A P; Grotenbreg, Gijsbert M; MacAry, Paul A; Bertoletti, Antonio

    2013-10-15

    The identification of virus-specific CD8(+) T cell determinants is a fundamental requirement for our understanding of viral disease pathogenesis. T cell epitope mapping strategies increasingly rely on algorithms that predict the binding of peptides to MHC molecules. There is, however, little information on the reliability of predictive algorithms in the context of human populations, in particular, for those expressing HLA class I molecules for which there are limited experimental data available. In this study, we evaluate the ability of NetMHCpan to predict antiviral CD8(+) T cell epitopes that we identified with a traditional approach in patients of Asian ethnicity infected with Dengue virus, hepatitis B virus, or severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus. We experimentally demonstrate that the predictive power of algorithms defining peptide-MHC interaction directly correlates with the amount of training data on which the predictive algorithm has been constructed. These results highlight the limited applicability of the NetMHCpan algorithm for populations expressing HLA molecules for which there are little or no experimental binding data, such as those of Asian ethnicity.

  18. Human cytomegalovirus persistent infection in a human central nervous system cell line: production of a variant virus with different growth characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, T; Tanaka, J; Kamiya, S; Sato, H; Ogura, H; Hatano, M

    1986-12-01

    The susceptibility of human central nervous system cell lines to human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and the fate of infected cultures were studied. Significant amounts of infectious progeny virus were produced in 118MGC glioma and IMR-32 neuroblastoma, but not in KGC oligodendroglioma cells when the cultures were infected with wild-type virus (HCMVwt) at an m.o.i. of 10 p.f.u. per cell. Further passage of infected 118MGC cells resulted in the establishment of a long-term persistent infection. This infection, designated 118MGC/Towne, continuously produced infectious virus (HCMVpi) with titres ranging from 10(2) to 10(5) p.f.u./10(6) cells up to 360 days post-infection (corresponding to 50 subcultures). Since no temperature-sensitive mutants, defective interfering particles or interferon-like activity were found in the 118MGC/Towne cultures, maintenance of the persistent infection seemed to be due to a balance between the release of infectious virus and the growth of uninfected cells. The HCMVpi produced in long-term persistently infected cultures was shown to be different from the HCMVwt originally used to infect by the following characteristics: HCMVpi replicated slowly and yielded lower amounts of progeny virus than HCMVwt; HCMVpi induced a 73,000 mol. wt. immediate early protein that was not synthesized in HCMVwt-infected cells; HCMVpi had a different DNA structure from that of HCMVwt. These results suggest that HCMVpi is a slower growing variant of HCMVwt and probably plays an important role in the maintenance of the persistent infection.

  19. Vitamin D reduces the inflammatory response by Porphyromonas gingivalis infection by modulating human β-defensin-3 in human gingival epithelium and periodontal ligament cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippis, Anna; Fiorentino, Margherita; Guida, Luigi; Annunziata, Marco; Nastri, Livia; Rizzo, Antonietta

    2017-04-03

    Periodontitis is a multifactorial polymicrobial infection characterized by a destructive inflammatory process. Porphyromonas gingivalis, a Gram-negative black-pigmented anaerobe, is a major pathogen in the initiation and progression of periodontitis; it produces several virulence factors that stimulate human gingival epithelium (HGE) cells and human periodontal ligament (HPL) cells to produce various inflammatory mediators. A variety of substances, such as vitamin D, have growth-inhibitory effects on some bacterial pathogens and have shown chemo-preventive and anti-inflammatory activity. We used a model with HGE and HPL cells infected with P. gingivalis to determine the influence of vitamin D on P. gingivalis growth and adhesion and the immunomodulatory effect on TNF-α, IL-8, IL-12 and human-β-defensin 3 production. Our results demonstrated, firstly, the lack of any cytotoxic effect on the HGE and HPL cells when treated with vitamin D; in addition, vitamin D inhibited P. gingivalis adhesion and infectivity in HGE and HPL cells. Our study then showed that vitamin D reduced TNF-α, IL-8, IL-12 production in P. gingivalis-infected HGE and HPL cells. In contrast, a significant upregulation of the human-β-defensin 3 expression in HGE and HPL cells induced by P. gingivalis was demonstrated. Our results indicate that vitamin D specifically enhances the production of the human-β-defensin 3 antimicrobial peptide and exerts an inhibitory effect on the pro-inflammatory cytokines, thus suggesting that vitamin D may offer possible therapeutic applications for periodontitis.

  20. An In vitro Model to Study Immune Responses of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells to Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, M.; Habets, M.N.; Ahout, I.M.L.; Jans, J.; Jonge, M.I. de; Diavatopoulos, D.A.; Ferwerda, G.

    2013-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) infections present a broad spectrum of disease severity, ranging from mild infections to life-threatening bronchiolitis. An important part of the pathogenesis of severe disease is an enhanced immune response leading to immunopathology. Here, we describe a

  1. An In vitro Model to Study Immune Responses of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells to Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, M.; Habets, M.N.; Ahout, I.M.L.; Jans, J.; Jonge, M.I. de; Diavatopoulos, D.A.; Ferwerda, G.

    2013-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) infections present a broad spectrum of disease severity, ranging from mild infections to life-threatening bronchiolitis. An important part of the pathogenesis of severe disease is an enhanced immune response leading to immunopathology. Here, we describe a pro

  2. Introduction of new genetic material into human myeloid leukemic blast stem cells by retroviral infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, L.J.; Benchimol, S.

    1988-02-01

    An amphotropic retroviral vector containing the bacterial neomycin phosphotransferase gene (neo) was used to infect blast cells from patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia. The infected cells acquired a G418-resistant phenotype that was stable as measured in a clonogenic assay and in long-term suspension culture. Thus, gene transfer into stem cells was accomplished by this procedure. This approach for manipulating gene expression in blast stem cells provides a means to assess the roles of a variety of genes in self-renewal, differentiation, and leukemogenesis.

  3. Human synaptic plasticity gene expression profile and dendritic spine density changes in HIV-infected human CNS cells: role in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Subba Rao Atluri

    Full Text Available HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND is characterized by development of cognitive, behavioral and motor abnormalities, and occur in approximately 50% of HIV infected individuals. Our current understanding of HAND emanates mainly from HIV-1 subtype B (clade B, which is prevalent in USA and Western countries. However very little information is available on neuropathogenesis of HIV-1 subtype C (clade C that exists in Sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. Therefore, studies to identify specific neuropathogenic mechanisms associated with HAND are worth pursuing to dissect the mechanisms underlying this modulation and to prevent HAND particularly in clade B infection. In this study, we have investigated 84 key human synaptic plasticity genes differential expression profile in clade B and clade C infected primary human astrocytes by using RT(2 Profile PCR Array human Synaptic Plasticity kit. Among these, 31 and 21 synaptic genes were significantly (≥3 fold down-regulated and 5 genes were significantly (≥3 fold up-regulated in clade B and clade C infected cells, respectively compared to the uninfected control astrocytes. In flow-cytometry analysis, down-regulation of postsynaptic density and dendrite spine morphology regulatory proteins (ARC, NMDAR1 and GRM1 was confirmed in both clade B and C infected primary human astrocytes and SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells. Further, spine density and dendrite morphology changes by confocal microscopic analysis indicates significantly decreased spine density, loss of spines and decreased dendrite diameter, total dendrite and spine area in clade B infected SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells compared to uninfected and clade C infected cells. We have also observed that, in clade B infected astrocytes, induction of apoptosis was significantly higher than in the clade C infected astrocytes. In conclusion, this study suggests that down-regulation of synaptic plasticity genes, decreased dendritic spine density and induction of

  4. Specificity and dynamics of effector and memory CD8 T cell responses in human tick-borne encephalitis virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Blom

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV is transferred to humans by ticks. The virus causes tick-borne encephalitis (TBE with symptoms such as meningitis and meningoencephalitis. About one third of the patients suffer from long-lasting sequelae after clearance of the infection. Studies of the immune response during TBEV-infection are essential to the understanding of host responses to TBEV-infection and for the development of therapeutics. Here, we studied in detail the primary CD8 T cell response to TBEV in patients with acute TBE. Peripheral blood CD8 T cells mounted a considerable response to TBEV-infection as assessed by Ki67 and CD38 co-expression. These activated cells showed a CD45RA-CCR7-CD127- phenotype at day 7 after hospitalization, phenotypically defining them as effector cells. An immunodominant HLA-A2-restricted TBEV epitope was identified and utilized to study the characteristics and temporal dynamics of the antigen-specific response. The functional profile of TBEV-specific CD8 T cells was dominated by variants of mono-functional cells as the effector response matured. Antigen-specific CD8 T cells predominantly displayed a distinct Eomes+Ki67+T-bet+ effector phenotype at the peak of the response, which transitioned to an Eomes-Ki67-T-bet+ phenotype as the infection resolved and memory was established. These transcription factors thus characterize and discriminate stages of the antigen-specific T cell response during acute TBEV-infection. Altogether, CD8 T cells responded strongly to acute TBEV infection and passed through an effector phase, prior to gradual differentiation into memory cells with distinct transcription factor expression-patterns throughout the different phases.

  5. Photoacoustic detection of hemozoin in human mononuclear cells as an early indicator of malaria infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, Jonathan R.; Kariuki, Michael; Beerntsen, Brenda T.; Viator, John A.

    2010-02-01

    Malaria is a blood borne infection affecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide2. The parasites reproduce within the blood cells, eventually causing their death and lysis. This process releases the parasites into the blood, continuing the cycle of infection. Usually, malaria is diagnosed only after a patient presents symptoms, including high fever, nausea, and, in advanced cases, coma and death. While invading the bloodstream of a host, malaria parasites convert hemoglobin into an insoluble crystal, known as hemozoin. These crystals, approximately several hundred nanometers in size, are contained within red blood cells and white blood cells that ingest free hemozoin in the blood. Thus, infected red blood cells and white blood cells contain a unique optical absorber that can be detected in blood samples using static photoacoustic detection methods. We separated the white blood cells from malaria infected blood and tested it in a photoacoustic set up using a tunable laser system consisting of an optical parametric oscillator pumped by an Nd:YAG laser with pulse duration of 5 ns. Our threshold of detection was 10 infected white blood cells per microliter, which is more sensitive than current diagnosis methods using microscopic analysis of blood.

  6. Expression of the UL16 glycoprotein of Human Cytomegalovirus protects the virus-infected cell from attack by natural killer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Browne Helena

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV has acquired through evolution a number of genes to try to evade immune recognition of the virus-infected cell. Many of these mechanisms act to inhibit the MHC class I antigen presentation pathway, but any virus-infected cell which has down-regulated cell surface expression of MHC class I proteins, to avoid CTL attack, would be expected to become susceptible to lysis by Natural Killer cells. Surprisingly, however, HCMV infected fibroblasts were found to be resistant to NK cell mediated cytotoxicity. Expression of the UL16 glycoprotein could represent one mechanism to help the virus to escape from NK cell attack, as it has been shown to bind, in vitro, some of the ligands for NKG2D, the NK cell activating receptor. Here, we explored the role of UL16, in the context of a viral infection, by comparing the susceptibility to NK lysis of cells infected with HCMV and cells infected with a UL16 deletion mutant of this virus. Results Cells infected with the UL16 knockout virus were killed at substantially higher levels than cells infected with the wild-type virus. This increased killing could be correlated with a UL16-dependent reduction in surface expression of ligands for the NK cell activating receptor NKG2D. Conclusions Expression of the UL16 glycoprotein was associated with protection of HCMV-infected cells from NK cell attack. This observation could be correlated with the downregulation of cell surface expression of NKG2D ligands. These data represent a first step towards understanding the mechanism(s of action of the UL16 protein.

  7. Structural optimization of a retrograde trafficking inhibitor that protects cells from infections by human polyoma- and papillomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Daniel W; Nelson, Christian D S; Ferris, Bennett D; Stevens, Julia P; Lipovsky, Alex; Kazakov, Teymur; DiMaio, Daniel; Atwood, Walter J; Sello, Jason K

    2014-09-01

    Human polyoma- and papillomaviruses are non-enveloped DNA viruses that cause severe pathologies and mortalities. Under circumstances of immunosuppression, JC polyomavirus causes a fatal demyelinating disease called progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) and the BK polyomavirus is the etiological agent of polyomavirus-induced nephropathy and hemorrhagic cystitis. Human papillomavirus type 16, another non-enveloped DNA virus, is associated with the development of cancers in tissues like the uterine cervix and oropharynx. Currently, there are no approved drugs or vaccines to treat or prevent polyomavirus infections. We recently discovered that the small molecule Retro-2(cycl), an inhibitor of host retrograde trafficking, blocked infection by several human and monkey polyomaviruses. Here, we report diversity-oriented syntheses of Retro-2(cycl) and evaluation of the resulting analogs using an assay of human cell infections by JC polyomavirus. We defined structure-activity relationships and also discovered analogs with significantly improved potency as suppressors of human polyoma- and papillomavirus infection in vitro. Our findings represent an advance in the development of drug candidates that can broadly protect humans from non-enveloped DNA viruses and toxins that exploit retrograde trafficking as a means for cell entry.

  8. Using Zebrafish Models of Human Influenza A Virus Infections to Screen Antiviral Drugs and Characterize Host Immune Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Con; Jurcyzszak, Denise; Goody, Michelle F; Gabor, Kristin A; Longfellow, Jacob R; Millard, Paul J; Kim, Carol H

    2017-01-20

    Each year, seasonal influenza outbreaks profoundly affect societies worldwide. In spite of global efforts, influenza remains an intractable healthcare burden. The principle strategy to curtail infections is yearly vaccination. In individuals who have contracted influenza, antiviral drugs can mitigate symptoms. There is a clear and unmet need to develop alternative strategies to combat influenza. Several animal models have been created to model host-influenza interactions. Here, protocols for generating zebrafish models for systemic and localized human influenza A virus (IAV) infection are described. Using a systemic IAV infection model, small molecules with potential antiviral activity can be screened. As a proof-of-principle, a protocol that demonstrates the efficacy of the antiviral drug Zanamivir in IAV-infected zebrafish is described. It shows how disease phenotypes can be quantified to score the relative efficacy of potential antivirals in IAV-infected zebrafish. In recent years, there has been increased appreciation for the critical role neutrophils play in the human host response to influenza infection. The zebrafish has proven to be an indispensable model for the study of neutrophil biology, with direct impacts on human medicine. A protocol to generate a localized IAV infection in the Tg(mpx:mCherry) zebrafish line to study neutrophil biology in the context of a localized viral infection is described. Neutrophil recruitment to localized infection sites provides an additional quantifiable phenotype for assessing experimental manipulations that may have therapeutic applications. Both zebrafish protocols described faithfully recapitulate aspects of human IAV infection. The zebrafish model possesses numerous inherent advantages, including high fecundity, optical clarity, amenability to drug screening, and availability of transgenic lines, including those in which immune cells such as neutrophils are labeled with fluorescent proteins. The protocols detailed here

  9. Different features of Vδ2 T and NK cells in fatal and non-fatal human Ebola infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimini, Eleonora; Viola, Domenico; Cabeza-Cabrerizo, Mar; Romanelli, Antonella; Tumino, Nicola; Sacchi, Alessandra; Bordoni, Veronica; Casetti, Rita; Turchi, Federica; Martini, Federico; Bore, Joseph A; Koundouno, Fara Raymond; Duraffour, Sophie; Michel, Janine; Holm, Tobias; Zekeng, Elsa Gayle; Cowley, Lauren; Garcia Dorival, Isabel; Doerrbecker, Juliane; Hetzelt, Nicole; Baum, Jonathan H J; Portmann, Jasmine; Wölfel, Roman; Gabriel, Martin; Miranda, Osvaldo; Díaz, Graciliano; Díaz, José E; Fleites, Yoel A; Piñeiro, Carlos A; Castro, Carlos M; Koivogui, Lamine; Magassouba, N'Faly; Diallo, Boubacar; Ruibal, Paula; Oestereich, Lisa; Wozniak, David M; Lüdtke, Anja; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Capobianchi, Maria R; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Carroll, Miles W; Günther, Stephan; Di Caro, Antonino; Muñoz-Fontela, César; Agrati, Chiara

    2017-05-01

    Human Ebola infection is characterized by a paralysis of the immune system. A signature of αβ T cells in fatal Ebola infection has been recently proposed, while the involvement of innate immune cells in the protection/pathogenesis of Ebola infection is unknown. Aim of this study was to analyze γδ T and NK cells in patients from the Ebola outbreak of 2014-2015 occurred in West Africa, and to assess their association with the clinical outcome. Nineteen Ebola-infected patients were enrolled at the time of admission to the Ebola Treatment Centre in Guinea. Patients were divided in two groups on the basis of the clinical outcome. The analysis was performed by using multiparametric flow cytometry established by the European Mobile Laboratory in the field. A low frequency of Vδ2 T-cells was observed during Ebola infection, independently from the clinical outcome. Moreover, Vδ2 T-cells from Ebola patients massively expressed CD95 apoptotic marker, suggesting the involvement of apoptotic mechanisms in Vδ2 T-cell loss. Interestingly, Vδ2 T-cells from survivors expressed an effector phenotype and presented a lower expression of the CTLA-4 exhaustion marker than fatalities, suggesting a role of effector Vδ2 T-cells in the protection. Furthermore, patients with fatal Ebola infection were characterized by a lower NK cell frequency than patients with non fatal infection. In particular, both CD56bright and CD56dim NK frequency were very low both in fatal and non fatal infections, while a higher frequency of CD56neg NK cells was associated to non-fatal infections. Finally, NK activation and expression of NKp46 and CD158a were independent from clinical outcome. Altogether, the data suggest that both effector Vδ2 T-cells and NK cells may play a role in the complex network of protective response to EBOV infection. Further studies are required to characterize the protective effector functions of Vδ2 and NK cells.

  10. Different features of Vδ2 T and NK cells in fatal and non-fatal human Ebola infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Cimini

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Human Ebola infection is characterized by a paralysis of the immune system. A signature of αβ T cells in fatal Ebola infection has been recently proposed, while the involvement of innate immune cells in the protection/pathogenesis of Ebola infection is unknown. Aim of this study was to analyze γδ T and NK cells in patients from the Ebola outbreak of 2014-2015 occurred in West Africa, and to assess their association with the clinical outcome.Nineteen Ebola-infected patients were enrolled at the time of admission to the Ebola Treatment Centre in Guinea. Patients were divided in two groups on the basis of the clinical outcome. The analysis was performed by using multiparametric flow cytometry established by the European Mobile Laboratory in the field. A low frequency of Vδ2 T-cells was observed during Ebola infection, independently from the clinical outcome. Moreover, Vδ2 T-cells from Ebola patients massively expressed CD95 apoptotic marker, suggesting the involvement of apoptotic mechanisms in Vδ2 T-cell loss. Interestingly, Vδ2 T-cells from survivors expressed an effector phenotype and presented a lower expression of the CTLA-4 exhaustion marker than fatalities, suggesting a role of effector Vδ2 T-cells in the protection. Furthermore, patients with fatal Ebola infection were characterized by a lower NK cell frequency than patients with non fatal infection. In particular, both CD56bright and CD56dim NK frequency were very low both in fatal and non fatal infections, while a higher frequency of CD56neg NK cells was associated to non-fatal infections. Finally, NK activation and expression of NKp46 and CD158a were independent from clinical outcome.Altogether, the data suggest that both effector Vδ2 T-cells and NK cells may play a role in the complex network of protective response to EBOV infection. Further studies are required to characterize the protective effector functions of Vδ2 and NK cells.

  11. Human Zika infection induces a reduction of IFN-γ producing CD4 T-cells and a parallel expansion of effector Vδ2 T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimini, Eleonora; Castilletti, Concetta; Sacchi, Alessandra; Casetti, Rita; Bordoni, Veronica; Romanelli, Antonella; Turchi, Federica; Martini, Federico; Tumino, Nicola; Nicastri, Emanuele; Corpolongo, Angela; Di Caro, Antonino; Kobinger, Gary; Zumla, Alimuddin; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Agrati, Chiara

    2017-07-24

    The definition of the immunological response to Zika (ZIKV) infection in humans represents a key issue to identify protective profile useful for vaccine development and for pathogenesis studies. No data are available on the cellular immune response in the acute phase of human ZIKV infection, and its role in the protection and/or pathogenesis needs to be clarified. We studied and compared the phenotype and functionality of T-cells in patients with acute ZIKV and Dengue viral (DENV) infections. A significant activation of T-cells was observed during both ZIKV and DENV infections. ZIKV infection was characterized by a CD4 T cell differentiation toward effector cells and by a lower frequency of IFN-γ producing CD4 T cells. Moreover, a substantial expansion of CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) T-cell subset expressing Vδ2 TCR was specifically observed in ZIKV patients. Vδ2 T cells presented a terminally differentiated profile, expressed granzyme B and maintained their ability to produce IFN-γ. These findings provide new knowledge on the immune response profile during self-limited infection that may help in vaccine efficacy definition, and in identifying possible immuno-pathogenetic mechanisms of severe infection.

  12. Captopril increases the intensity of monocyte infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and induces human T helper type 17 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho dos Santos, J S; Menezes, C A S; Villani, F N A; Magalhães, L M D; Scharfstein, J; Gollob, K J; Dutra, W O

    2010-01-01

    The anti-hypertensive drug captopril is used commonly to reduce blood pressure of patients with severe forms of Chagas disease, a cardiomyopathy caused by chronic infection with the intracellular protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. Captopril acts by inhibiting angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), the vasopressor metallopeptidase that generates angiotensin II and promotes the degradation of bradykinin (BK). Recent studies in mice models of Chagas disease indicated that captopril can potentiate the T helper type 1 (Th1)-directing natural adjuvant property of BK. Equipped with kinin-releasing cysteine proteases, T. cruzi trypomastigotes were shown previously to invade non-professional phagocytic cells, such as human endothelial cells and murine cardiomyocytes, through the signalling of G protein-coupled bradykinin receptors (B2KR). Monocytes are also parasitized by T. cruzi and these cells are known to be important for the host immune response during infection. Here we showed that captopril increases the intensity of T. cruzi infection of human monocytes in vitro. The increased parasitism was accompanied by up-regulated expression of ACE in human monocytes. While T. cruzi infection increased the expression of interleukin (IL)-10 by monocytes significantly, compared to uninfected cells, T. cruzi infection in association with captopril down-modulated IL-10 expression by the monocytes. Surprisingly, studies with peripheral blood mononuclear cells revealed that addition of the ACE inhibitor in association with T. cruzi increased expression of IL-17 by CD4+ T cells in a B2KR-dependent manner. Collectively, our results suggest that captopril might interfere with host–parasite equilibrium by enhancing infection of monocytes, decreasing the expression of the modulatory cytokine IL-10, while guiding development of the proinflammatory Th17 subset. PMID:20964644

  13. Phagocytosis of Picornavirus-Infected Cells Induces an RNA-Dependent Antiviral State in Human Dendritic Cells▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Matthijs; Schulte, Barbara M.; Toonen, Liza W. J.; Barral, Paola M.; Fisher, Paul B.; Lanke, Kjerstin H. W.; Galama, Jochem M. D.; van Kuppeveld, Frank J. M.; Adema, Gosse J.

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in instructing antiviral immune responses. DCs, however, can become targeted by different viruses themselves. We recently demonstrated that human DCs can be productively infected with echoviruses (EVs), but not coxsackie B viruses (CVBs), both of which are RNA viruses belonging to the Enterovirus genus of the Picornaviridae family. We now show that phagocytosis of CVB-infected, type I interferon-deficient cells induces an antiviral state in human DCs. Uptake of infected cells increased the expression of the cytoplasmic RNA helicases retinoic acid-inducible gene I and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 as well as other interferon-stimulated genes and protected DCs against subsequent infection with EV9. These effects depended on recognition of viral RNA and could be mimicked by exposure to the synthetic double-stranded RNA analogue poly(I:C) but not other Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands. Blocking endosomal acidification abrogated protection, suggesting a role for TLRs in the acquisition of an antiviral state in DCs. In conclusion, recognition of viral RNA rapidly induces an antiviral state in human DCs. This might provide a mechanism by which DCs protect themselves against viruses when attracted to an environment with ongoing infection. PMID:18184700

  14. Viral infection of human progenitor and liver-derived cells encapsulated in three-dimensional PEG-based hydrogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Nam-Joon; Elazar, Menashe; Xiong, Anming; Glenn, Jeffrey S [Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, CCSR Building Room 3115A, 269 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Lee, Wonjae [Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Chiao, Eric; Baker, Julie [Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Frank, Curtis W, E-mail: jeffrey.glenn@stanford.ed, E-mail: curt.frank@stanford.ed [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2009-02-15

    We have studied the encapsulation of human progenitor cells into 3D PEG hydrogels. Replication-incompetent lentivirus promoter reporter vectors were found to efficiently detect the in vivo expression of human hepatic genes in hydrogel-encapsulated liver progenitor cells. Similarly, hydrogel-encapsulated cells could be efficiently infected with hepatitis C virus, and progeny infectious virus could be recovered from the media supernatants of the hydrogels. Provocatively, the diameters of these virus particles range from {approx}50 to 100 nm, while the calculated mesh size of the 8 k hydrogel is 44.6 +- 1.7 A. To reconcile how viral particles can penetrate the hydrogels to infect the encapsulated cells, we propose that microfractures/defects of the hydrogel result in a functional pore size of up to 20 fold greater than predicted by theoretical mesh calculations. These results suggest a new model of hydrogel structure, and have exciting implications for tissue engineering and hepatitis virus studies. (communication)

  15. Human intestinal epithelial cells produce proinflammatory cytokines in response to infection in a SCID mouse-human intestinal xenograft model of amebiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seydel, K B; Li, E; Swanson, P E; Stanley, S L

    1997-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica causes amebic dysentery and amebic liver abscess, diseases associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. E. histolytica infection appears to involve the initial attachment of amebic trophozoites to intestinal epithelial cells, followed by lysis of these cells and subsequent invasion into the submucosa. A recent in vitro study (L. Eckmann, S. L. Reed, J. R. Smith, and M. F. Kagnoff, J. Clin. Invest. 96:1269-1279, 1995) demonstrated that incubation of E. histolytica trophozoites with epithelial cell lines results in epithelial cell production of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1 (IL-1) and IL-8, suggesting that intestinal epithelial cell production of cytokines might play a role in the inflammatory response and tissue damage seen in intestinal amebiasis. To determine whether intestinal epithelial cell production of IL-1 and IL-8 occurs in response to E. histolytica infection in vivo and as an approach to studying the specific interactions between amebic trophozoites and human intestine, we used a SCID mouse-human intestinal xenograft (SCID-HU-INT) model of disease, where human intestinal xenografts were infected with virulent E. histolytica trophozoites. Infection of xenografts with E. histolytica trophozoites resulted in extensive tissue damage, which was associated with the development of an early inflammatory response composed primarily of neutrophils. Using oligonucleotide primers that specifically amplify human IL-1beta and IL-8, we could demonstrate by reverse transcription PCR that mRNA for both IL-1beta and IL-8 is produced by human intestinal xenografts in response to amebic infection. The increase in human intestinal IL-1beta and IL-8 in response to invasive amebiasis was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays specific for human IL-1beta and IL-8. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that human intestinal epithelial cells were the source of IL-8 in infected xenografts

  16. Human monocyte-derived insulin-like growth factor-2 enhances the infection of human arterial endothelial cells by Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, T M; Campbell, L A; Rosenfeld, M E; Kuo, C C

    2001-05-01

    It has been shown that infection of human endothelial cells by Chlamydia pneumoniae is enhanced by co-culturing endothelial cells with human monocytes and is mediated by monocyte-derived soluble factors. This study was conducted to identify the infectivity-enhancing factor. Serum-free conditioned medium of human monocytic cells was fractionated by ultrafiltration. The enhancing activity was found in the fraction in the molecular mass range between 5000 and 10,000 kDa. Recombinant human insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 or -2, with a molecular mass of 7500 kDa, was added to the culture medium of human endothelial cells for growing C. pneumoniae. Only IGF-2 enhanced C. pneumoniae growth. Pretreatment of the conditioned medium with a monoclonal antibody against IGF-2 blocked the enhancing activity. This suggests that the infectivity-enhancing factor is IGF-2 and that paracrine interactions between monocytes and endothelial cells in vivo can induce secretory products and sustain infection with C. pneumoniae within atherosclerotic lesions.

  17. A Novel Human Radixin Peptide Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Infection at the Level of Cell Entry

    OpenAIRE

    Bukong, Terence N; Kodys, Karen; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus infection of hepatocytes is a multistep process involving the interaction between viral and host cell molecules. Recently, we identified ezrin–moesin–radixin proteins and spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) as important host therapeutic targets for HCV treatment development. Previously, an ezrin hinge region peptide (Hep1) has been shown to exert anti-HCV properties in vivo, though its mechanism of action remains limited. In search of potential novel inhibitors of HCV infection and...

  18. Persistent infection of human pancreatic cells with Coxsackievirus B4 is cured by fluoxetine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alidjinou, Enagnon Kazali; Sané, Famara; Bertin, Antoine; Caloone, Delphine; Hober, Didier

    2015-04-01

    Group B Coxsackieviruses (CVB) are involved in various acute clinical features and they can play a role in the development of chronic diseases like type 1 diabetes. The persistence of CVB has been described in vitro and in vivo in various models. Fluoxetine was reported to inhibit the replication of CVB1-3, which prompted us to study the in vitro antiviral activity of fluoxetine against CVB4 in models of acute infection. In addition we took advantage of a chronically CVB4-infected Panc-1 cell line to evaluate the antiviral effect of fluoxetine in a model of persistent CVB4 infection. An inhibition of the CVB4 replication was obtained when fluoxetine was added at 5.48μM to Hep-2 cell cultures. No inhibitory effect was observed when CVB4 was mixed with fluoxetine for 2h and filtered to eliminate fluoxetine before inoculation to cells, or when cells were treated up to 96h and washed before viral inoculation. Fluoxetine (5.48μM) reduced viral replication by more than 50% in acutely infected Panc-1 cell cultures. A dramatic decrease of infectious particles levels in supernatants of Panc-1 cells chronically infected with CVB4 was obtained a few days after treatment with fluoxetine and no infectious viral particle was found as soon as day 21 of treatment, and intracellular enteroviral RNA was undetectable by RT-PCR after three weeks of treatment. These data display that fluoxetine can inhibit the replication of CVB4 and can cure Panc-1 cells chronically infected with CVB4.

  19. Presence of IgE cells in human placenta is independent of malaria infection or chorioamnionitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindsjö, E; Hulthén Varli, I; Ofori, M F

    2006-01-01

    We have shown previously that numerous IgE(+) macrophage-like cells are present in the villous stroma of full term placenta and that there was no difference in the amount of IgE(+) cells between allergic and non-allergic mothers. The presence of such an abundant number of IgE(+) cells...... from Ghana with and without malaria parasites. The immunohistochemical staining pattern for IgE looked similar to our previous study, with the IgE located on Hofbauer-like cells. We could not find any difference in the amount or distribution of IgE(+) cells between malaria-infected and non...

  20. Mechanism and role of MCP-1 upregulation upon chikungunya virus infection in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

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    Ruiz Silva, Mariana; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Mulder, H. Lie; Smit, Jolanda M.; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A.

    2016-01-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2)-mediated migration of monocytes is essential for immunological surveillance of tissues. During chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection however, excessive production of MCP-1 has been linked to disease pathogenesis. High MCP-1 serum levels are detected during the viremic phase of CHIKV infection and correlate with the virus titre. In vitro CHIKV infection was also shown to stimulate MCP-1 production in whole blood; yet the role and the mechanism of MCP-1 production upon infection of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells remain unknown. Here we found that active CHIKV infection stimulated production of MCP-1 in monocytes. Importantly however, we found that communication with other leukocytes is crucial to yield MCP-1 by monocytes upon CHIKV infection. Indeed, blocking interferon-α/β receptor or the JAK1/JAK2 signalling downstream of the receptor abolished CHIKV-mediated MCP-1 production. Additionally, we show that despite the apparent correlation between IFN type I, CHIKV replication and MCP-1, modulating the levels of the chemokine did not influence CHIKV infection. In summary, our data disclose the complexity of MCP-1 regulation upon CHIKV infection and point to a crucial role of IFNβ in the chemokine secretion. We propose that balance between these soluble factors is imperative for an appropriate host response to CHIKV infection. PMID:27558873

  1. Ex vivo 2D and 3D HSV-2 infection model using human normal vaginal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yaqi; Yang, Yan; Guo, Juanjuan; Dai, Ying; Ye, Lina; Qiu, Jianbin; Zeng, Zhihong; Wu, Xiaoting; Xing, Yanmei; Long, Xiang; Wu, Xufeng; Ye, Lin; Wang, Shubin; Li, Hui

    2017-01-27

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infects human genital mucosa and establishes life-long latent infection. It is unmet need to establish a human cell-based microphysiological system for virus biology and anti-viral drug discovery. One of barriers is lacking of culture system of normal epithelial cells in vitro over decades. In this study, we established human normal vaginal epithelial cell (HNVEC) culture using co-culture system. HNVEC cells were then propagated rapidly and stably in a defined culture condition. HNVEC cells exhibited a normal diploid karyotype and formed the well-defined and polarized spheres in matrigel three-dimension (3D) culture, while malignant cells (HeLa) formed disorganized and nonpolar solid spheres. HNVEC cells had a normal cellular response to DNA damage and had no transforming property using soft agar assays. HNVEC expressed epithelial marker cytokeratin 14 (CK14) and p63, but not cytokeratin 18 (CK18). Next, we reconstructed HNVEC-derived 3D vaginal epithelium using air-liquid interface (ALI) culture. This 3D vaginal epithelium has the basal and apical layers with expression of epithelial markers as its originated human vaginal tissue. Finally, we established an HSV-2 infection model based on the reconstructed 3D vaginal epithelium. After inoculation of HSV-2 (G strain) at apical layer of the reconstructed 3D vaginal epithelium, we observed obvious pathological effects gradually spreading from the apical layer to basal layer with expression of a viral protein. Thus, we established an ex vivo 2D and 3D HSV-2 infection model that can be used for HSV-2 virology and anti-viral drug discovery.

  2. Infectivity of chimeric human T-cell leukemia virus type I molecular clones assessed by naked DNA inoculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, T M; Robinson, M A; Bowers, F S; Kindt, T J

    1996-06-25

    Two human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) molecular clones, K30p and K34p were derived from HTLV-I-infected rabbit cell lines. K30p and K34p differ by 18 bp with changes in the long terminal repeats (LTRs) as well as in the gag, pol, and rex but not tax or env gene products. Cells transfected with clone K30p were infectious in vitro and injection of the K30p transfectants or naked K30p DNA into rabbits leads to chronic infection. In contrast, K34p did not mediate infection in vitro or in vivo, although the cell line from which it was derived is fully infectious and K34p transfectants produce intact virus particles. To localize differences involved in the ability of the clones to cause infection, six chimeric HTLV-I clones were constructed by shuffling corresponding fragments containing the substitutions in the LTRs, the gag/pol region and the rex region between K30p and K34p. Cells transfected with any of the six chimeras produced virus, but higher levels of virus were produced by cells transfected with those constructs containing the K30p rex region. Virus production was transient except in cells transfected with K30p or with a chimera consisting of the entire protein coding region of K30p flanked by K34p LTRs; only the transfectants showing persistent virus production mediated in vitro infection. In vivo infection in rabbits following intramuscular DNA injection was mediated by K30p as well as by a chimera of K30p containing the K34p rex gene. Comparisons revealed that virus production was greater and appeared earlier in rabbits injected with K30p. These data suggest that several defects in the K34p clone preclude infectivity and furthermore, provide systems to explore functions of HTLV-I genes.

  3. Conserved host response to highly pathogenic avian influenza virus infection in human cell culture, mouse and macaque model systems

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    McDermott Jason E

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding host response to influenza virus infection will facilitate development of better diagnoses and therapeutic interventions. Several different experimental models have been used as a proxy for human infection, including cell cultures derived from human cells, mice, and non-human primates. Each of these systems has been studied extensively in isolation, but little effort has been directed toward systematically characterizing the conservation of host response on a global level beyond known immune signaling cascades. Results In the present study, we employed a multivariate modeling approach to characterize and compare the transcriptional regulatory networks between these three model systems after infection with a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus of the H5N1 subtype. Using this approach we identified functions and pathways that display similar behavior and/or regulation including the well-studied impact on the interferon response and the inflammasome. Our results also suggest a primary response role for airway epithelial cells in initiating hypercytokinemia, which is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of H5N1 viruses. We further demonstrate that we can use a transcriptional regulatory model from the human cell culture data to make highly accurate predictions about the behavior of important components of the innate immune system in tissues from whole organisms. Conclusions This is the first demonstration of a global regulatory network modeling conserved host response between in vitro and in vivo models.

  4. Probing host pathogen cross-talk by transcriptional profiling of both Mycobacterium tuberculosis and infected human dendritic cells and macrophages.

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    Ludovic Tailleux

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcriptional profiling using microarrays provides a unique opportunity to decipher host pathogen cross-talk on the global level. Here, for the first time, we have been able to investigate gene expression changes in both Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a major human pathogen, and its human host cells, macrophages and dendritic cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In addition to common responses, we could identify eukaryotic and microbial transcriptional signatures that are specific to the cell type involved in the infection process. In particular M. tuberculosis shows a marked stress response when inside dendritic cells, which is in accordance with the low permissivity of these specialized phagocytes to the tubercle bacillus and to other pathogens. In contrast, the mycobacterial transcriptome inside macrophages reflects that of replicating bacteria. On the host cell side, differential responses to infection in macrophages and dendritic cells were identified in genes involved in oxidative stress, intracellular vesicle trafficking and phagosome acidification. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides the proof of principle that probing the host and the microbe transcriptomes simultaneously is a valuable means to accessing unique information on host pathogen interactions. Our results also underline the extraordinary plasticity of host cell and pathogen responses to infection, and provide a solid framework to further understand the complex mechanisms involved in immunity to M. tuberculosis and in mycobacterial adaptation to different intracellular environments.

  5. Roflumilast inhibits respiratory syncytial virus infection in human differentiated bronchial epithelial cells.

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    Manuel Mata

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV causes acute exacerbations in COPD and asthma. RSV infects bronchial epithelial cells (HBE that trigger RSV associated lung pathology. This study explores whether the phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4 inhibitor Roflumilast N-oxide (RNO, alters RSV infection of well-differentiated HBE (WD-HBE in vitro. WD-HBE were RSV infected in the presence or absence of RNO (0.1-100 nM. Viral infection (staining of F and G proteins, nucleoprotein RNA level, mRNA of ICAM-1, ciliated cell markers (digital high speed videomicroscopy, β-tubulin immunofluorescence, Foxj1 and Dnai2 mRNA, Goblet cells (PAS, mRNA of MUC5AC and CLCA1, mRNA and protein level of IL-13, IL-6, IL-8, TNFα, formation of H2O2 and the anti-oxidative armamentarium (mRNA of Nrf2, HO-1, GPx; total antioxidant capacity (TAC were measured at day 10 or 15 post infection. RNO inhibited RSV infection of WD-HBE, prevented the loss of ciliated cells and markers, reduced the increase of MUC5AC and CLCA1 and inhibited the increase of IL-13, IL-6, IL-8, TNFα and ICAM-1. Additionally RNO reversed the reduction of Nrf2, HO-1 and GPx mRNA levels and consequently restored the TAC and reduced the H2O2 formation. RNO inhibits RSV infection of WD-HBE cultures and mitigates the cytopathological changes associated to this virus.

  6. Susceptibility of Human Pancreatic beta Cells for Cytomegalovirus Infection and the Effects on Cellular Immunogenicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smelt, M.J.; Faas, M.M.; de Haan, Bart; Draijer, C.; Hugenholtz, G.C.G.; de Haan, A.; Engelse, M.A.; de Koning, E.J.P.; de Vos, P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection has been suggested to be a causal factor in the development of type 1 diabetes, posttransplantation diabetes, and the failure of islet allografts. This effect of CMV has been interpreted as an indirect effect on the immune system rather than direct

  7. Increased proinflammatory responses from asthmatic human airway smooth muscle cells in response to rhinovirus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oliver, Brian G G; Johnston, Sebastian L; Baraket, Melissa; Burgess, Janette K; King, Nicholas J C; Roth, Michael; Lim, Sam; Black, Judith L

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exacerbations of asthma are associated with viral respiratory tract infections, of which rhinoviruses (RV) are the predominant virus type. Airway smooth muscle is important in asthma pathogenesis, however little is known about the potential interaction of RV and human airway smooth muscl

  8. Cell-Free versus Cell-to-Cell Infection by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1: Exploring the Link among Viral Source, Viral Trafficking, and Viral Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutartre, Hélène; Clavière, Mathieu; Journo, Chloé; Mahieux, Renaud

    2016-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) are complex retroviruses mainly infecting CD4(+) T lymphocytes. In addition, antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DCs) are targeted in vivo by both viruses, although to a lesser extent. Interaction of HIV-1 with DCs plays a key role in viral dissemination from the mucosa to CD4(+) T lymphocytes present in lymphoid organs. While similar mechanisms may occur for HTLV-1 as well, most HTLV-1 data were obtained from T-cell studies, and little is known regarding the trafficking of this virus in DCs. We first compared the efficiency of cell-free versus cell-associated viral sources of both retroviruses at infecting DCs. We showed that both HIV-1 and HTLV-1 cell-free particles are poorly efficient at productively infecting DCs, except when DC-SIGN has been engaged. Furthermore, while SAMHD-1 accounts for restriction of cell-free HIV-1 infection, it is not involved in HTLV-1 restriction. In addition, cell-free viruses lead mainly to a nonproductive DC infection, leading to trans-infection of T-cells, a process important for HIV-1 spread but not for that of HTLV-1. Finally, we show that T-DC cell-to-cell transfer implies viral trafficking in vesicles that may both increase productive infection of DCs ("cis-infection") and allow viral escape from immune surveillance. Altogether, these observations allowed us to draw a model of HTLV-1 and HIV-1 trafficking in DCs.

  9. Mycoplasma genitalium Infection Activates Cellular Host Defense and Inflammation Pathways in a 3-Dimensional Human Endocervical Epithelial Cell Model

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    McGowin, Chris L.; Radtke, Andrea L.; Abraham, Kyle; Martin, David H.; Herbst-Kralovetz, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Background. Because Mycoplasma genitalium is a prevalent and emerging cause of sexually transmitted infections, understanding the mechanisms by which M. genitalium elicits mucosal inflammation is an essential component to managing lower and upper reproductive tract disease syndromes in women. Methods. We used a rotating wall vessel bioreactor system to create 3-dimensional (3-D) epithelial cell aggregates to model and assess endocervical infection by M. genitalium. Results. Attachment of M. genitalium to the host cell's apical surface was observed directly and confirmed using immunoelectron microscopy. Bacterial replication was observed from 0 to 72 hours after inoculation, during which time host cells underwent ultrastructural changes, including reduction of microvilli, and marked increases in secretory vesicle formation. Using genome-wide transcriptional profiling, we identified a host defense and inflammation signature activated by M. genitalium during acute infection (48 hours after inoculation) that included cytokine and chemokine activity and secretion of factors for antimicrobial defense. Multiplex bead-based protein assays confirmed secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, several of which are involved in leukocyte recruitment and hypothesized to enhance susceptibility to human immunodeficiency type 1 infection. Conclusions. These findings provide insight into key molecules and pathways involved in innate recognition of M. genitalium and the response to acute infection in the human endocervix. PMID:23493725

  10. Infection of a human respiratory epithelial cell line with rhinovirus. Induction of cytokine release and modulation of susceptibility to infection by cytokine exposure.

    OpenAIRE

    Subauste, M C; Jacoby, D B; Richards, S M; Proud, D

    1995-01-01

    Rhinovirus infections cause over one third of all colds and are a contributing factor to exacerbations of asthma. To gain insights into the early biochemical events that occur in infected epithelial cells, we develop, for the first time, a model in which a pure respiratory epithelial cell population can be routinely infected by rhinovirus. Viral infection was confirmed by demonstrating that viral titers of supernatants and lysates from infected cell increased with time and by PCR. Infection b...

  11. Microarray analysis of Long non-coding RNA expression profiles in human gastric cells and tissues with Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong; Wang, Qiang; Yao, Yizheng; Fang, Jian; Sun, Fengying; Ni, Ying; Shen, Yixin; Wang, Hua; Shao, Shihe

    2015-12-21

    Although Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) is the dominant gastrointestinal pathogen, the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying H.pylori-related diseases have not been fully elucidated. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been identified in eukaryotic cells, many of which play important roles in regulating biological processes and pathogenesis. However, the expression changes of lncRNAs in human infected by H.pylori have been rarely reported. This study aimed to identify the dysregulated lncRNAs in human gastric epithelial cells and tissues infected with H.pylori. The aberrant expression profiles of lncRNAs and mRNAs in GES-1 cells with or without H.pylori infection were explored by microarray analysis. LncRNA-mRNA co-expression network was constructed based on Pearson correlation analysis. Gene Ontology (GO) and KEGG Pathway analyses of aberrantly expressed mRNAs were performed to identify the related biological functions and pathologic pathways. The expression changes of target lncRNAs were validated by qRT-PCR to confirm the microarray data in both cells and clinical specimens. Three hundred three lncRNAs and 565 mRNAs were identified as aberrantly expressed transcripts (≥2 or ≤0.5-fold change, P microarray. These dysregulated lncRNAs might contribute to the pathological processes during H.pylori infection.

  12. In Vitro Infection of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by GB Virus C/Hepatitis G Virus

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    Fogeda, Marta; Navas, Sonia; Martín, Julio; Casqueiro, Mercedes; Rodríguez, Elena; Arocena, Carlos; Carreño, Vicente

    1999-01-01

    GB virus C (GBV-C), also known as hepatitis G virus, is a recently discovered flavivirus-like RNA agent with unclear pathogenic implications. To investigate whether human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) are susceptible to in vitro GBV-C infection, we have incubated PBMC from four healthy blood donors with a human GBV-C RNA-positive serum. By means of (i) strand-specific reverse transcription-PCR, cloning, and sequencing; (ii) sucrose ultracentrifugation and RNase sensitivity assays; (iii) fluorescent in situ hybridization; and (iv) Western blot analysis, it has been demonstrated that GBV-C is able to infect in vitro cells and replicate for as long as 30 days under the conditions developed in our cell culture system. The concentration of GBV-C RNA increased during the second and third weeks of culture. The titers of the genomic strand were 10 times higher than the titers of the antigenomic strand. In addition, the same predominant GBV-C sequence was found in all PBMC cultures and in the in vivo-GBV-C-infected PBMC isolated from the donor of the inoculum. GBV-C-specific fluorescent in situ hybridization signals were confined to the cytoplasm of cells at different times during the culture period. Finally, evidence obtained by sucrose ultracentrifugation, RNase sensitivity assays, and Western blot analysis of the culture supernatants suggests that viral particles are released from in vitro-GBV-C-infected PBMC. In conclusion, our study has demonstrated, for the first time, GBV-C replication in human lymphoid cells under experimental in vitro infection conditions. PMID:10196301

  13. Human adenovirus type 19 infection of corneal cells induces p38 MAPK-dependent interleukin-8 expression

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    Chodosh James

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human adenovirus type 19 (HAdV-19 is a major cause of epidemic keratoconjunctivitis, the only ocular adenoviral infection associated with prolonged corneal inflammation. In this study, we investigated the role of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK in HAdV-19 infection, with particular attention to the role of p38 MAPK in the transcriptional control of interleukin-8 (IL-8, a chemokine previously shown to be central to the initiation of adenovirus keratitis. Results We found that infection of corneal cells with HAdV-19 led to activation of p38 MAPK and its downstream targets, HSP-27 and ATF-2, within 15 to 30 minutes post-infection. Infection also induced phosphorylation of IκB and NFκB in a p38 MAPK-dependent fashion. Furthermore, HAdV-19 induced an interaction between p38 MAPK and NFκB-p65, followed by nuclear translocation of activated NFκB-p65 and its binding to the IL-8 promoter. The interaction between p38 MAPK and NFκB-p65 was inhibited in concentration-dependent fashion by SB203580, a chemical inhibitor of p38 MAPK, but not by SP600125, an inhibitor of JNK – another MAPK implicated in chemokine expression by HAdV-19 infected cells. IL-8 gene expression in HAdV-19 infection was significantly reduced in the presence of sequence-specific p38 MAPK siRNA but not control siRNA. Conclusion These results provide the first direct evidence for transcriptional regulation of IL-8 in HAdV-19 infected cells through the activation of the p38 MAPK signaling pathway. The p38 MAPK pathway may play a biologically important role in regulation of IL-8 gene expression in the adenovirus-infected cornea.

  14. Human Herpesvirus 8 (HHV8 sequentially shapes the NK cell repertoire during the course of asymptomatic infection and Kaposi sarcoma.

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    Stéphanie Dupuy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of innate immunity to immunosurveillance of the oncogenic Human Herpes Virus 8 (HHV8 has not been studied in depth. We investigated NK cell phenotype and function in 70 HHV8-infected subjects, either asymptomatic carriers or having developed Kaposi's sarcoma (KS. Our results revealed substantial alterations of the NK cell receptor repertoire in healthy HHV8 carriers, with reduced expression of NKp30, NKp46 and CD161 receptors. In addition, down-modulation of the activating NKG2D receptor, associated with impaired NK-cell lytic capacity, was observed in patients with active KS. Resolution of KS after treatment was accompanied with restoration of NKG2D levels and NK cell activity. HHV8-latently infected endothelial cells overexpressed ligands of several NK cell receptors, including NKG2D ligands. The strong expression of NKG2D ligands by tumor cells was confirmed in situ by immunohistochemical staining of KS biopsies. However, no tumor-infiltrating NK cells were detected, suggesting a defect in NK cell homing or survival in the KS microenvironment. Among the known KS-derived immunoregulatory factors, we identified prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 as a critical element responsible for the down-modulation of NKG2D expression on resting NK cells. Moreover, PGE2 prevented up-regulation of the NKG2D and NKp30 receptors on IL-15-activated NK cells, and inhibited the IL-15-induced proliferation and survival of NK cells. Altogether, our observations are consistent with distinct immunoevasion mechanisms that allow HHV8 to escape NK cell responses stepwise, first at early stages of infection to facilitate the maintenance of viral latency, and later to promote tumor cell growth through suppression of NKG2D-mediated functions. Importantly, our results provide additional support to the use of PGE2 inhibitors as an attractive approach to treat aggressive KS, as they could restore activation and survival of tumoricidal NK cells.

  15. Influenza A virus infection of human primary dendritic cells impairs their ability to cross-present antigen to CD8 T cells.

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    Anna Smed-Sörensen

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV infection is normally controlled by adaptive immune responses initiated by dendritic cells (DCs. We investigated the consequences of IAV infection of human primary DCs on their ability to function as antigen-presenting cells. IAV was internalized by both myeloid DCs (mDCs and plasmacytoid DCs but only mDCs supported viral replication. Although infected mDCs efficiently presented endogenous IAV antigens on MHC class II, this was not the case for presentation on MHC class I. Indeed, cross-presentation by uninfected cells of minute amounts of endocytosed, exogenous IAV was -300-fold more efficient than presentation of IAV antigens synthesized by infected cells and resulted in a statistically significant increase in expansion of IAV-specific CD8 T cells. Furthermore, IAV infection also impaired cross-presentation of other exogenous antigens, indicating that IAV infection broadly attenuates presentation on MHC class I molecules. Our results suggest that cross-presentation by uninfected mDCs is a preferred mechanism of antigen-presentation for the activation and expansion of CD8 T cells during IAV infection.

  16. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Cell Wall Fragments Released upon Bacterial Contact with the Human Lung Mucosa Alter the Neutrophil Response to Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scordo, Julia M.; Arcos, Jesús; Kelley, Holden V.; Diangelo, Lauren; Sasindran, Smitha J.; Youngmin, Ellie; Wewers, Mark D.; Wang, Shu-Hua; Balada-Llasat, Joan-Miquel; Torrelles, Jordi B.

    2017-01-01

    In 2016, the World Health Organization reported that one person dies of tuberculosis (TB) every 21 s. A host environment that Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) finds during its route of infection is the lung mucosa bathing the alveolar space located in the deepest regions of the lungs. We published that human lung mucosa, or alveolar lining fluid (ALF), contains an array of hydrolytic enzymes that can significantly alter the M.tb surface during infection by cleaving off parts of its cell wall. This interaction results in two different outcomes: modifications on the M.tb cell wall surface and release of M.tb cell wall fragments into the environment. Typically, one of the first host immune cells at the site of M.tb infection is the neutrophil. Neutrophils can mount an extracellular and intracellular innate immune response to M.tb during infection. We hypothesized that exposure of neutrophils to ALF-induced M.tb released cell wall fragments would prime neutrophils to control M.tb infection better. Our results show that ALF fragments activate neutrophils leading to an increased production of inflammatory cytokines and oxidative radicals. However, neutrophil exposure to these fragments reduces production of chemoattractants (i.e., interleukin-8), and degranulation, with the subsequent reduction of myeloperoxidase release, and does not induce cytotoxicity. Unexpectedly, these ALF fragment-derived modulations in neutrophil activity do not further, either positively or negatively, contribute to the intracellular control of M.tb growth during infection. However, secreted products from neutrophils primed with ALF fragments are capable of regulating the activity of resting macrophages. These results indicate that ALF-induced M.tb fragments could further contribute to the control of M.tb growth and local killing by resident neutrophils by switching on the total oxidative response and limiting migration of neutrophils to the infection site. PMID:28373877

  17. Clinical features of pure red cell aplasia associated with human parvovirus B19 infection after liver transplantation

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    ZHANG Dali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the clinical features of patients with pure red cell aplasia (PRCA associated with human parvovirus B19 (HPV B19 infection after liver transplantation. MethodsThe clinical data of 420 patients who underwent liver transplantation in 302 Hospital of PLA from July 2007 to July 2016 and were followed up regularly were collected, and among these patients, five had a progressive reduction in hemoglobin (Hb level within a short period of time. Bone marrow cytological examination showed erythropoiesis disorders and positive HPV B19 IgM, and the patients were diagnosed with PRCA after the exclusion of other causes. The patients were given human gamma-globulin, glucocorticoids, and adjustment of immunosuppressants. The patients′ clinical manifestations during treatment and the changes in reticulocyte count (RC, Hb, white blood cell count (WBC, platelet count (PLT, and myelogram findings determined by peripheral blood cell analysis were observed, as well as the changes in liver and renal function parameters. ResultsAfter the multimodality therapy using human gamma-globulin, glucocorticoids, and red blood cell infusion, the five patients had significant alleviation in the symptoms of weakness, short breath, and dizziness, and the peripheral blood cell analysis showed recovery of Hb and RC, suggesting that anemia was corrected. ConclusionAs for patients with PRCA associated with HPV B19 infection, early diagnosis and treatment with human gamma-globulin and glucocorticoids can achieve a good therapeutic effect.

  18. In vitro expansion of human gastric epithelial stem cells and their responses to bacterial infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartfeld, Sina; Bayram, Tülay; van de Wetering, Marc; Huch, Meritxell; Begthel, Harry; Kujala, Pekka; Vries, Robert; Peters, Peter J; Clevers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: We previously established long-term, 3-dimensional culture of organoids from mouse tissues (intestine, stomach, pancreas, and liver) and human intestine and pancreas. Here we describe conditions required for long-term 3-dimensional culture of human gastric stem cells. The technolo

  19. In vitro expansion of human gastric epithelial stem cells and their responses to bacterial infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartfeld, Sina; Bayram, Tülay; van de Wetering, Marc; Huch, Meritxell; Begthel, Harry; Kujala, Pekka; Vries, Robert; Peters, Peter J; Clevers, Hans

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: We previously established long-term, 3-dimensional culture of organoids from mouse tissues (intestine, stomach, pancreas, and liver) and human intestine and pancreas. Here we describe conditions required for long-term 3-dimensional culture of human gastric stem cells. The

  20. In vitro expansion of human gastric epithelial stem cells and their responses to bacterial infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartfeld, Sina; Bayram, Tülay; van de Wetering, Marc; Huch, Meritxell; Begthel, Harry; Kujala, Pekka; Vries, Robert|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341413755; Peters, Peter J; Clevers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: We previously established long-term, 3-dimensional culture of organoids from mouse tissues (intestine, stomach, pancreas, and liver) and human intestine and pancreas. Here we describe conditions required for long-term 3-dimensional culture of human gastric stem cells. The technolo

  1. Infection with human herpesvirus type 8 and human T-cell leukaemia virus type 1 among individuals participating in a case–control study in Havana City, Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, L; Serraino, D; Rezza, G; Lence, J; Ortiz, R M; Cruz, T; Vaccarella, S; Sarmati, L; Andreoni, M; Franceschi, S

    2002-01-01

    Infection with human herpesvirus type 8 and with human T-cell leukaemia virus type-1 shows strong geographic variations. We conducted this study to assess prevalence and risk factors for human herpesvirus type 8 infection in Havana City, Cuba. Information and residual serum samples already collected for a hospital based case–control study were used. A total of 379 individuals (267 males and 112 females; median age=63 years) were evaluated. Antibodies to the lytic antigen of human herpesvirus type 8 were detected by using an immunofluorescence assay, while human T-cell leukaemia virus type-1 serology was performed by means of an ELISA test (alpha Biotech). Overall, 64 subjects (16.9%, 95% confidence interval: 13.1–20.0) were positive for human herpesvirus type 8 antibodies. Human herpesvirus type 8 seroprevalence significantly increased with age (odds ratio=1.9 for ⩾65 vs Havana City, Cuba, suggesting that Cuba may represent an intermediate endemical area. Sexual transmission does not seem to play a major role in the spread human herpesvirus type 8 infection. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 87, 1253–1256. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6600613 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12439714

  2. Human Influenza Virus Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteranderl, Christin; Herold, Susanne; Schmoldt, Carole

    2016-08-01

    Seasonal and pandemic influenza are the two faces of respiratory infections caused by influenza viruses in humans. As seasonal influenza occurs on an annual basis, the circulating virus strains are closely monitored and a yearly updated vaccination is provided, especially to identified risk populations. Nonetheless, influenza virus infection may result in pneumonia and acute respiratory failure, frequently complicated by bacterial coinfection. Pandemics are, in contrary, unexpected rare events related to the emergence of a reassorted human-pathogenic influenza A virus (IAV) strains that often causes increased morbidity and spreads extremely rapidly in the immunologically naive human population, with huge clinical and economic impact. Accordingly, particular efforts are made to advance our knowledge on the disease biology and pathology and recent studies have brought new insights into IAV adaptation mechanisms to the human host, as well as into the key players in disease pathogenesis on the host side. Current antiviral strategies are only efficient at the early stages of the disease and are challenged by the genomic instability of the virus, highlighting the need for novel antiviral therapies targeting the pulmonary host response to improve viral clearance, reduce the risk of bacterial coinfection, and prevent or attenuate acute lung injury. This review article summarizes our current knowledge on the molecular basis of influenza infection and disease progression, the key players in pathogenesis driving severe disease and progression to lung failure, as well as available and envisioned prevention and treatment strategies against influenza virus infection.

  3. Upregulation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication by CD4 cross-linking in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV-infected adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Than, S; Oyaizu, N; Tetali, S; Romano, J; Kaplan, M; Pahwa, S

    1997-08-01

    This study was conducted with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 67 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults. It supports the hypothesis that cross-linking of CD4 molecules by HIV gp120 can result in HIV upregulation and spread of infection. Underlying mechanisms include activation of latent infection by factors in addition to, or other than, tumor necrosis factor alpha.

  4. Characterization of Human CD8 T Cell Responses in Dengue Virus-Infected Patients from India

    OpenAIRE

    Chandele, Anmol; Sewatanon, Jaturong; Gunisetty, Sivaram; Singla, Mohit; Onlamoon, Nattawat; Akondy, Rama S.; Kissick, Haydn Thomas; Nayak, Kaustuv; Reddy, Elluri Seetharami; Kalam, Haroon; Kumar, Dhiraj; Verma, Anil; Panda, Harekrushna; Wang, Siyu; Angkasekwinai, Nasikarn

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epidemiological studies suggest that India has the largest number of dengue virus infection cases worldwide. However, there is minimal information about the immunological responses in these patients. CD8 T cells are important in dengue, because they have been implicated in both protection and immunopathology. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of HLA-DR+ CD38+ and HLA-DR− CD38+ effector CD8 T cell subsets in dengue patients from India and Thailand. Both CD8 T cell subsets expanded ...

  5. Proteomic analysis of mitochondria in respiratory epithelial cells infected with human respiratory syncytial virus and functional implications for virus and cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, Diane C; Howell, Gareth; Barr, John N; Hiscox, Julian A

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively characterise the mitochondrial proteome of airway epithelial cells infected with human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV), a major cause of paediatric illness. Quantitative proteomics, underpinned by stable isotope labelling with amino acids in cell culture, coupled to LC-MS/MS, was applied to mitochondrial fractions prepared from HRSV-infected and mock-infected cells 12 and 24 h post-infection. Datasets were analysed using ingenuity pathway analysis, and the results were validated and characterised using bioimaging, targeted inhibition and gene depletion. The data quantitatively indicated that antiviral signalling proteins converged on mitochondria during HRSV infection. The mitochondrial receptor protein Tom70 was found to act in an antiviral manner, while its chaperone, Hsp90, was confirmed to be a positive viral factor. Proteins associated with different organelles were also co-enriched in the mitochondrial fractions from HRSV-infected cells, suggesting that alterations in organelle dynamics and membrane associations occur during virus infection. Protein and pathway-specific alterations occur to the mitochondrial proteome in a spatial and temporal manner during HRSV infection, suggesting that this organelle may have altered functions. These could be targeted as part of potential therapeutic strategies to disrupt virus biology. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  6. Response to rhinovirus infection by human airway epithelial cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells in an in vitro two-chamber tissue culture system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi Rajan

    Full Text Available Human rhinovirus (HRV infections are associated with the common cold, occasionally with more serious lower respiratory tract illnesses, and frequently with asthma exacerbations. The clinical features of HRV infection and its association with asthma exacerbation suggest that some HRV disease results from virus-induced host immune responses to infection. To study the HRV-infection-induced host responses and the contribution of these responses to disease, we have developed an in vitro model of HRV infection of human airway epithelial cells (Calu-3 cells and subsequent exposure of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs to these infected cells in a two-chamber trans-well tissue culture system. Using this model, we studied HRV 14 (species B and HRV 16 (species A induced cytokine and chemokine responses with PBMCs from four healthy adults. Infection of Calu-3 cells with either virus induced HRV-associated increases in FGF-Basic, IL-15, IL-6, IL-28A, ENA-78 and IP-10. The addition of PBMCs to HRV 14-infected cells gave significant increases in MIP-1β, IL-28A, MCP-2, and IFN-α as compared with mock-infected cells. Interestingly, ENA-78 levels were reduced in HRV 14 infected cells that were exposed to PBMCs. Addition of PBMCs to HRV 16-infected cells did not induce MIP-1β, IL-28A and IFN-α efficiently nor did it decrease ENA-78 levels. Our results demonstrate a clear difference between HRV 14 and HRV 16 and the source of PBMCs, in up or down regulation of several cytokines including those that are linked to airway inflammation. Such differences might be one of the reasons for variation in disease associated with different HRV species including variation in their link to asthma exacerbations as suggested by other studies. Further study of immune responses associated with different HRVs and PBMCs from different patient groups, and the mechanisms leading to these differences, should help characterize pathogenesis of HRV disease and generate

  7. NK cells are strongly activated by Lassa and Mopeia virus-infected human macrophages in vitro but do not mediate virus suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russier, Marion; Reynard, Stéphanie; Tordo, Noël; Baize, Sylvain

    2012-07-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) and Mopeia virus (MOPV) are closely related Arenaviruses. LASV causes hemorrhagic fever, whereas MOPV is not pathogenic. Both viruses display tropism for APCs such as DCs and macrophages. During viral infections, NK cells are involved in the clearance of infected cells and promote optimal immune responses by interacting with APCs. We used an in vitro model of human NK and APC coculture to study the role of NK cells and to characterize their interactions with APCs during LASV and MOPV infections. As expected, NK cells alone were neither infected nor activated by LASV and MOPV, and infected DCs did not activate NK cells. By contrast, LASV- and MOPV-infected macrophages activated NK cells, as shown by the upregulation of CD69, NKp30, and NKp44, the downregulation of CXCR3, and an increase in NK-cell proliferation. NK cells acquired enhanced cytotoxicity, as illustrated by the increase in granzyme B (GrzB) expression and killing of K562 targets, but did not produce IFN-γ. Contact between NK cells and infected macrophages and type I IFNs were essential for activation; however, NK cells could not kill infected cells and control infection. Overall, these findings show that MOPV- as well as pathogenic LASV-infected macrophages mediate NK-cell activation.

  8. Alcohol and cannabinoids differentially affect HIV infection and function of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC

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    Marisela eAgudelo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available During human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection, alcohol has been known to induce inflammation while cannabinoids have been shown to have an anti-inflammatory role. For instance cannabinoids have been shown to reduce susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and attenuate HIV replication in macrophages. Recently, we demonstrated that alcohol induces cannabinoid receptors and regulates cytokine production by monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC. However, the ability of alcohol and cannabinoids to alter MDDC function during HIV infection has not been clearly elucidated yet. In order to study the potential impact of alcohol and cannabinoids on differentiated MDDC infected with HIV, monocytes were cultured for 7 days with GM-CSF and IL-4, differentiated MDDC were infected with HIV-1Ba-L and treated with EtOH (0.1 and 0.2%, THC (5 and 10 uM, or JWH-015 (5 and 10 uM for 4-7 days. HIV infection of MDDC was confirmed by p24 and Long Terminal Repeats (LTR estimation. MDDC endocytosis assay and cytokine array profiles were measured to investigate the effects of HIV and substances of abuse on MDDC function. Our results show the HIV+EtOH treated MDDC had the highest levels of p24 production and expression when compared with the HIV positive controls and the cannabinoid treated cells. Although both cannabinoids, THC and JWH-015 had lower levels of p24 production and expression, the HIV+JWH-015 treated MDDC had the lowest levels of p24 when compared to the HIV+THC treated cells. In addition, MDDC endocytic function and cytokine production were also differentially altered after alcohol and cannabinoid treatments. Our results show a differential effect of alcohol and cannabinoids, which may provide insights into the divergent inflammatory role of alcohol and cannabinoids to modulate MDDC function in the context of HIV infection.

  9. Subdominant/cryptic CD8 T cell epitopes contribute to resistance against experimental infection with a human protozoan parasite.

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    Mariana R Dominguez

    Full Text Available During adaptive immune response, pathogen-specific CD8(+ T cells recognize preferentially a small number of epitopes, a phenomenon known as immunodominance. Its biological implications during natural or vaccine-induced immune responses are still unclear. Earlier, we have shown that during experimental infection, the human intracellular pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi restricts the repertoire of CD8(+ T cells generating strong immunodominance. We hypothesized that this phenomenon could be a mechanism used by the parasite to reduce the breath and magnitude of the immune response, favoring parasitism, and thus that artificially broadening the T cell repertoire could favor the host. Here, we confirmed our previous observation by showing that CD8(+ T cells of H-2(a infected mice recognized a single epitope of an immunodominant antigen of the trans-sialidase super-family. In sharp contrast, CD8(+ T cells from mice immunized with recombinant genetic vaccines (plasmid DNA and adenovirus expressing this same T. cruzi antigen recognized, in addition to the immunodominant epitope, two other subdominant epitopes. This unexpected observation allowed us to test the protective role of the immune response to subdominant epitopes. This was accomplished by genetic vaccination of mice with mutated genes that did not express a functional immunodominant epitope. We found that these mice developed immune responses directed solely to the subdominant/cryptic CD8 T cell epitopes and a significant degree of protective immunity against infection mediated by CD8(+ T cells. We concluded that artificially broadening the T cell repertoire contributes to host resistance against infection, a finding that has implications for the host-parasite relationship and vaccine development.

  10. Expression of Human CD4 and chemokine receptors in cotton rat cells confers permissiveness for productive HIV infection

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    Broder Christopher C

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current small animal models for studying HIV-1 infection are very limited, and this continues to be a major obstacle for studying HIV-1 infection and pathogenesis, as well as for the urgent development and evaluation of effective anti-HIV-1 therapies and vaccines. Previously, it was shown that HIV-1 can infect cotton rats as indicated by development of antibodies against all major proteins of the virus, the detection of viral cDNA in spleen and brain of challenged animals, the transmission of infectious virus, albeit with low efficiency, from animal to animal by blood, and an additional increase in the mortality in the infected groups. Results Using in vitro experiments, we now show that cotton rat cell lines engineered to express human receptor complexes for HIV-1 (hCD4 along with hCXCR4 or hCCR5 support virus entry, viral cDNA integration, and the production of infectious virus. Conclusion These results further suggest that the development of transgenic cotton rats expressing human HIV-1 receptors may prove to be useful small animal model for HIV infection.

  11. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor increases CD4+ T cell counts of human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients receiving stable, highly active antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aladdin, H; Ullum, H; Dam Nielsen, S.

    2000-01-01

    counts resulted from increases in CD45RO+ memory T cells and cells expressing the CD38 activation marker. Lymphocyte proliferative responses to phytohemagglutinin and Candida antigen decreased, whereas NK cell activity and plasma HIV RNA did not change during G-CSF treatment. After 24 weeks, all immune......Thirty human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with CD4+ T cell counts

  12. Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I infection and the onset of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsuoka Masao

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The clinical entity of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL was established around 1977, and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-I was subsequently identified in 1980. In the 25 years since the discovery of HTLV-I, HTLV-I infection and its associated diseases have been extensively studied, and many of their aspects have been clarified. However, the detailed mechanism of leukemogenesis remains unsolved yet, and the prognosis of ATL patients still poor because of its resistance to chemotherapy and immunodeficiency. In this review, I highlight the recent progress and remaining enigmas in HTLV-I infection and its associated diseases, especially ATL.

  13. The Role of RhoA, RhoB and RhoC GTPases in Cell Morphology, Proliferation and Migration in Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV Infected Glioblastoma Cells

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    Melpomeni Tseliou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Rho GTPases are crucial regulators of the actin cytoskeleton, membrane trafficking and cell signaling and their importance in cell migration and invasion is well- established. The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is a widespread pathogen responsible for generally asymptomatic and persistent infections in healthy people. Recent evidence indicates that HCMV gene products are expressed in over 90% of malignant type glioblastomas (GBM. In addition, the HCMV Immediate Early-1 protein (IE1 is expressed in >90% of tumors analyzed. Methods: RhoA, RhoB and RhoC were individually depleted in U373MG glioblastoma cells as well as U373MG cells stably expressing the HCMV IE1 protein (named U373MG-IE1 cells shRNA lentivirus vectors. Cell proliferation assays, migration as well as wound-healing assays were performed in uninfected and HCMV-infected cells. Results: The depletion of RhoA, RhoB and RhoC protein resulted in significant alterations in the morphology of the uninfected cells, which were further enhanced by the cytopathic effect caused by HCMV. Furthermore, in the absence or presence of HCMV, the knockdown of RhoB and RhoC proteins decreased the proliferation rate of the parental and the IE1-expressing glioblastoma cells, whereas the knockdown of RhoA protein in the HCMV infected cell lines restored their proliferation rate. In addition, wound healing assays in U373MG cells revealed that depletion of RhoA, RhoB and RhoC differentially reduced their migration rate, even in the presence or the absence of HCMV. Conclusion: Collectively, these data show for the first time a differential implication of Rho GTPases in morphology, proliferation rate and motility of human glioblastoma cells during HCMV infection, further supporting an oncomodulatory role of HCMV depending on the Rho isoforms' state.

  14. Characterization of Human CD8 T Cell Responses in Dengue Virus-Infected Patients from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandele, Anmol; Sewatanon, Jaturong; Gunisetty, Sivaram; Singla, Mohit; Onlamoon, Nattawat; Akondy, Rama S; Kissick, Haydn Thomas; Nayak, Kaustuv; Reddy, Elluri Seetharami; Kalam, Haroon; Kumar, Dhiraj; Verma, Anil; Panda, HareKrushna; Wang, Siyu; Angkasekwinai, Nasikarn; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Medigeshi, Guruprasad R; Lodha, Rakesh; Kabra, Sushil; Ahmed, Rafi; Murali-Krishna, Kaja

    2016-12-15

    Epidemiological studies suggest that India has the largest number of dengue virus infection cases worldwide. However, there is minimal information about the immunological responses in these patients. CD8 T cells are important in dengue, because they have been implicated in both protection and immunopathology. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of HLA-DR(+) CD38(+) and HLA-DR(-) CD38(+) effector CD8 T cell subsets in dengue patients from India and Thailand. Both CD8 T cell subsets expanded and expressed markers indicative of antigen-driven proliferation, tissue homing, and cytotoxic effector functions, with the HLA-DR(+) CD38(+) subset being the most striking in these effector qualities. The breadth of the dengue-specific CD8 T cell response was diverse, with NS3-specific cells being the most dominant. Interestingly, only a small fraction of these activated effector CD8 T cells produced gamma interferon (IFN-γ) when stimulated with dengue virus peptide pools. Transcriptomics revealed downregulation of key molecules involved in T cell receptor (TCR) signaling. Consistent with this, the majority of these CD8 T cells remained IFN-γ unresponsive even after TCR-dependent polyclonal stimulation (anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28) but produced IFN-γ by TCR-independent polyclonal stimulation (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate [PMA] plus ionomycin). Thus, the vast majority of these proliferating, highly differentiated effector CD8 T cells probably acquire TCR refractoriness at the time the patient is experiencing febrile illness that leads to IFN-γ unresponsiveness. Our studies open novel avenues for understanding the mechanisms that fine-tune the balance between CD8 T cell-mediated protective versus pathological effects in dengue.

  15. Infection and Coinfection of Human Rhinovirus C in Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Canducci

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In 54 adult stem cell transplant recipients, the presence and persistence of human rhinoviruses (including the novel lineage C were evaluated by molecular detection and phylogenetic analysis, independently from respiratory symptoms. In the same group of patients, the presence of other coinfecting respiratory pathogens, including the novel enterovirus 109, was also evaluated.

  16. Brazilian propolis promotes immunomodulation on human cells from American Tegumentar Leishmaniasis patients and healthy donors infected with L. braziliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos Thomazelli, Ana Paula Fortes; Tomiotto-Pellissier, Fernanda; da Silva, Suelen Santos; Panis, Carolina; Orsini, Tatiane Marcusso; Cataneo, Allan Henrique Depieri; Miranda-Sapla, Milena Menegazzo; Custódio, Luiz Antonio; Tatakihara, Vera Lúcia Hideko; Bordignon, Juliano; Silveira, Guilherme Ferreira; Sforcin, José Maurício; Pavanelli, Wander Rogério; Conchon-Costa, Ivete

    2017-01-01

    American Tegumentar Leishmaniasis (ATL) is an infectious disease caused by Leishmania parasites with ineffective treatment. The properties of propolis have been studied in different experimental studies, however, few works have investigated the effects of propolis on human-derived peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in leishmaniasis models. Thus, we investigate the immunomodulatory effects of propolis treatment on PBMC from ATL patients and on PBMC from healthy donors infected with Leishmania braziliensis. Our data demonstrate that propolis pretreatment shows immunomodulatory effects on both healthy donors and ATL patients adherent cells, increasing IL-4 and IL-17 and decreasing IL-10, in either the presence or absence of the L. braziliensis infection, demonstrating that propolis contributes with the decrease of the inflammation and could also contribute with parasite control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Avian Influenza infection in Human

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    Mohan. M

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Outbreaks caused by the H5N1 strain are presently of the greatest concern for human health. In assessing risks to human health, it is important to know exactly which avian virus strains are causing the outbreaks in birds.All available evidence points to an increased risk of transmission to humans when outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza are widespread in poultry. There is mounting evidence that this strain has a unique capacity to jump the species barrier and cause severe disease, with high mortality, in humans. There is no evidence, to date that efficient human to human transmission of H5N1 strain has occurred and very often. Efficient transmission among humans is a key property of pandemic strains and a property that the avian H5N1 and H9N2 viruses apparently lacked. The biological and molecular basis for effective aerosol transmission among humans is not known. The virus can improve its transmissibility among humans via two principal mechanisms. The first is a “reassortment” event, in which genetic material is exchanged between human and avian viruses during co-infection of a human or pig.Reassortment could result in a fully transmissible pandemic virus, announced by a sudden surge of cases with explosive spread. The second mechanism is a more gradual process of adaptive mutation, whereby the capability of the virus to bind to human cells increases during subsequent infections of humans. Adaptive mutation, expressed initially as small clusters of human cases with some evidence of human-to-human transmission, would probably give the world some time to take defensive action, if detected sufficiently early. As the number of human infections grows, the risk increases that a new virus subtype could emerge, triggering an influenza pandemic. Humans as well as swine must now be considered a potential mixing vessel for the generation of such a virus. This link between widespread infection in poultry and increased risk of human

  18. Genetic-and-epigenetic Interspecies Networks for Cross-talk Mechanisms in Human Macrophages and Dendritic Cells During MTB Infection

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    Cheng-Wei Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb infection. Mtb is one of the oldest human pathogens, and evolves mechanisms implied in human evolution. The lungs are the first organ exposed to aerosol-transmitted Mtb during gaseous exchange. Therefore, the guards of the immune system in the lungs, such as macrophages (Mϕs and dendritic cells (DCs, are the most important defense against Mtb infection. There have been several studies discussing the functions of Mϕs and DCs during Mtb infection, but the genome-wide pathways and networks are still incomplete. Furthermore, the immune response induced by Mϕs and DCs varies. Therefore, we analyzed the cross-talk genome-wide genetic-and-epigenetic interspecies networks (GWGEINs between Mϕs vs. Mtb and DCs vs. Mtb to determine the varying mechanisms of both the host and pathogen as it relates to Mϕs and DCs during early Mtb infection.First, we performed database mining to construct candidate cross-talk GWGEIN between human cells and Mtb. Then we constructed dynamic models to characterize the molecular mechanisms, including intraspecies gene/microRNA (miRNA regulation networks (GRNs, intraspecies protein-protein interaction networks (PPINs, and the interspecies PPIN of the cross-talk GWGEIN. We applied a system identification method and a system order detection scheme to dynamic models to identify the real cross-talk GWGEINs using the microarray data of Mϕs, DCs and Mtb.After identifying the real cross-talk GWGEINs, the principal network projection (PNP method was employed to construct host-pathogen core networks (HPCNs between Mϕs vs. Mtb and DCs vs. Mtb during infection process. Thus, we investigated the underlying cross-talk mechanisms between the host and the pathogen to determine how the pathogen counteracts host defense mechanisms in Mϕs and DCs during Mtb H37Rv early infection. Based on our findings, we propose Rv1675c as a potential drug target because of its important defensive

  19. Amebic infection in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhuri, Gourdas; Rangan, Murali

    2012-07-01

    Clinical human infections with the protozoa Entamoeba histolytica is still estimated to occur in 50 million people worldwide, of which approximately 100,000 die annually. Although most clinical symptoms are due to involvement of the large intestine, 1 % present with involvement of the liver in the form of a liver abscess, a potentially fatal condition. Distinguishing an invasive form (E. histolytica) from a morphologically identical non-invasive one (E. dispar) requires molecular or enzymatic characterization. Further, the pattern of infection, interpretation of presence of antibodies in the host, manifestations of disease, approach to investigations and strategies for management remain complex. This article also provides a comprehensive review of the parasite and host factors that govern the complex relationship of the prozoa and humans, and tries to explain why some develop a particular form of the disease in endemic zones. Application of modern imaging and image guided therapy seems to be playing a major role in diagnosis and management of the potentially most serious form of the disease, amebic liver abscess. Despite lack of controlled studies there is a tendency to lower the threshold of their use in clinical practice, and indeed in-hospital mortality rate seems to be falling for amebic liver abscess. In a world getting increasingly swamped by non-infectious metabolic diseases, awareness of amebic infections, its bed-side diagnosis, the use of appropriate laboratory tests, and decision making in management are shrinking. This review tries to update the scientific developments in amebiasis.

  20. Cell host response to infection with novel human coronavirus EMC predicts potential antivirals and important differences with SARS coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josset, Laurence; Menachery, Vineet D; Gralinski, Lisa E; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Sova, Pavel; Carter, Victoria S; Yount, Boyd L; Graham, Rachel L; Baric, Ralph S; Katze, Michael G

    2013-04-30

    A novel human coronavirus (HCoV-EMC) was recently identified in the Middle East as the causative agent of a severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) resembling the illness caused by SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). Although derived from the CoV family, the two viruses are genetically distinct and do not use the same receptor. Here, we investigated whether HCoV-EMC and SARS-CoV induce similar or distinct host responses after infection of a human lung epithelial cell line. HCoV-EMC was able to replicate as efficiently as SARS-CoV in Calu-3 cells and similarly induced minimal transcriptomic changes before 12 h postinfection. Later in infection, HCoV-EMC induced a massive dysregulation of the host transcriptome, to a much greater extent than SARS-CoV. Both viruses induced a similar activation of pattern recognition receptors and the interleukin 17 (IL-17) pathway, but HCoV-EMC specifically down-regulated the expression of several genes within the antigen presentation pathway, including both type I and II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes. This could have an important impact on the ability of the host to mount an adaptive host response. A unique set of 207 genes was dysregulated early and permanently throughout infection with HCoV-EMC, and was used in a computational screen to predict potential antiviral compounds, including kinase inhibitors and glucocorticoids. Overall, HCoV-EMC and SARS-CoV elicit distinct host gene expression responses, which might impact in vivo pathogenesis and could orient therapeutic strategies against that emergent virus. Identification of a novel coronavirus causing fatal respiratory infection in humans raises concerns about a possible widespread outbreak of severe respiratory infection similar to the one caused by SARS-CoV. Using a human lung epithelial cell line and global transcriptomic profiling, we identified differences in the host response between HCoV-EMC and SARS-CoV. This enables rapid assessment of viral properties and the

  1. Effects of subcutaneous interleukin-2 therapy on phenotype and function of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in human immunodeficiency virus infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aladdin, H; Larsen, C S; Møller, B K

    2000-01-01

    In the context of clinical therapy with recombinant human interleukin-2 (IL-2), we monitored immunological alteration in 10 human immunodeficiency virus type-I (HIV-1)-infected individuals, on stable antiretroviral therapy, who had a CD4+ cell count between 200 and 500 cells/mm3. Subcutaneous IL-2...

  2. Prevalence of human retroviral infection in Quillabamba and Cuzco, Peru: a new endemic area for human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurita, S; Costa, C; Watts, D; Indacochea, S; Campos, P; Sanchez, J; Gotuzzo, E

    1997-05-01

    An epidemiologic study was conducted to determine the prevalence of retroviral infections among people of Qucchua origin in Cuzco and Quillabamba, Peru. The study volunteers included individuals at low and at high risk for retroviral infections. Each volunteer was interviewed to obtain clinical and epidemiologic data, and to identify risk behaviors for infection. The serum was tested for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and human T cell lymphotropic virus types 1/2 (HTLV-1/2) by standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent and Western blot assays. Among a total of 370 volunteers enrolled in the study, 276 were women and 94 were men whose ages ranged between 15 and 49 years. Infection with HTLV-1 was demonstrated in 5.1% (19 of 370), and one of these, a homosexual, was also positive for HIV-1; none had HTLV-2. Overall, the rate of HTLV-1 infection was 5.3% (5 of 94) for males and 5% (14 of 276) for females. Among the low risk group of 211 healthy pregnant women, five (2.3%) were positive for HTLV-1. The rate of HTLV-1 infection in this group was significantly correlated with a history of dental surgery, as well as other surgical procedures, and a history of jaundice. Among the volunteers who practiced risk behavior(s) for retroviral infections, the positive rates for HTLV-1 were 13.7% (7 of 51) for female sex workers, 6.2% (3 of 48) for homosexuals and/or bisexuals, 8.5% (4 of 47) for patients with sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and 0.0% (0 of 13) for promiscuous heterosexual males. In female sex workers. HTLV-1 infection was found to be significantly associated with age, a history of STDs or genital ulcers, sexual intercourse during menses, and vaginal douching (P < 0.05). A low prevalence of HIV-1 infection indicates that the virus has not yet spread significantly in these areas.

  3. Effects ofPlasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes on matrix metalloproteinase-9 regulation in human microvascular endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarah D Alessandro; Nicoletta Basilico; Mauro Prato

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the regulation of matrix metalloproteinases(MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases(TIMPs) in human microvascular endothelium(HMEC-1) exposed to erythrocytes infected by different strains ofPlasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum).Methods:HMEC-1 cells were co-incubated for72 h with erythrocytes infected by late stage trophozoite of D10(chloroquine-sensitive) orW2(chloroquine-resistant)P. falciparum strains.Cell supernatants were then collected and the levels of pro- or active gelatinasesMMP-9 andMMP-2 were evaluated by gelatin zymography and densitometry.The release of pro-MMP-9,MMP-3,MMP-1 andTIMP-1 proteins was analyzed by western blotting and densitometry.Results:Infected erythrocytes inducedde novo proMMP-9 andMMP-9 release.Neither basal levels of proMMP-2 were altered, nor activeMMP-2 was found.MMP-3 andMMP-1 secretion was significantly enhanced, whereas basalTIMP-1 was unaffected.All effects were similar for both strains. Conclusions:P. falciparum parasites, either chloroquine-sensitive or -resistant, induce the release of activeMMP-9 protein from human microvascular endothelium, by impairing balances between proMMP-9 and its inhibitor, and by enhancing the levels of its activators.This work provides new evidence onMMP involvement in malaria, pointing atMMP-9 as a possible target in adjuvant therapy.

  4. Human papillomavirus infection and immunohistochemical p16(INK4a) expression as predictors of outcome in penile squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Stephania M; Chaux, Alcides; Ball, Mark W; Faraj, Sheila F; Munari, Enrico; Gonzalez-Roibon, Nilda; Sharma, Rajni; Bivalacqua, Trinity J; Burnett, Arthur L; Netto, George J

    2015-04-01

    Approximately 50% of penile squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) are associated with high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection. We evaluated the correlation of p16(INK4a) expression and HR-HPV with clinicopathological features and outcome in a cohort of patients with penile SCC. Two tissue microarrays were constructed from 53 invasive penile SCC at our hospital. p16(INK4a) expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry (CINtec Kit). High-risk human papillomavirus status was assessed by in situ hybridization (INFORM HPV III family 16 probe B cocktail). High-risk human papillomavirus was detected in 8 cases (15%), and p16(INK4a) overexpression was found in 23 cases (44%). Both markers showed a significant association with histologic subtype (P = .017 and P = .01, respectively) and lymphovascular invasion (P = .015 and P = .015, respectively). Regarding outcome analyses, neither HPV infection nor p16(INK4a) overexpression significantly predicted overall survival or cancer-specific survival using Cox proportional hazards regression model. High-risk human papillomavirus positivity and p16(INK4a) overexpression were significantly associated with histologic subtype and presence of lymphovascular invasion. Human papillomavirus status was not predictive of outcome in our cohort.

  5. Several Human Liver Cell Expressed Apolipoproteins Complement HCV Virus Production with Varying Efficacy Conferring Differential Specific Infectivity to Released Viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Hueging

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein E (ApoE, an exchangeable apolipoprotein, is necessary for production of infectious Hepatitis C virus (HCV particles. However, ApoE is not the only liver-expressed apolipoprotein and the role of other apolipoproteins for production of infectious HCV progeny is incompletely defined. Therefore, we quantified mRNA expression of human apolipoproteins in primary human hepatocytes. Subsequently, cDNAs encoding apolipoproteins were expressed in 293T/miR-122 cells to explore if they complement HCV virus production in cells that are non-permissive due to limiting endogenous levels of human apolipoproteins. Primary human hepatocytes expressed high mRNA levels of ApoA1, A2, C1, C3, E, and H. ApoA4, A5, B, D, F, J, L1, L2, L3, L4, L6, M, and O were expressed at intermediate levels, and C2, C4, and L5 were not detected. All members of the ApoA and ApoC family of lipoproteins complemented HCV virus production in HCV transfected 293T/miR-122 cells, albeit with significantly lower efficacy compared with ApoE. In contrast, ApoD expression did not support production of infectious HCV. Specific infectivity of released particles complemented with ApoA family members was significantly lower compared with ApoE. Moreover, the ratio of extracellular to intracellular infectious virus was significantly higher for ApoE compared to ApoA2 and ApoC3. Since apolipoproteins complementing HCV virus production share amphipathic alpha helices as common structural features we altered the two alpha helices of ApoC1. Helix breaking mutations in both ApoC1 helices impaired virus assembly highlighting a critical role of alpha helices in apolipoproteins supporting HCV assembly. In summary, various liver expressed apolipoproteins with amphipathic alpha helices complement HCV virus production in human non liver cells. Differences in the efficiency of virus assembly, the specific infectivity of released particles, and the ratio between extracellular and intracellular

  6. Longitudinal characterization of dysfunctional T cell-activation during human acute Ebola infection

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    Agrati, C; Castilletti, C; Casetti, R; Sacchi, A; Falasca, L; Turchi, F; Tumino, N; Bordoni, V; Cimini, E; Viola, D; Lalle, E; Bordi, L; Lanini, S; Martini, F; Nicastri, E; Petrosillo, N; Puro, V; Piacentini, M; Di Caro, A; Kobinger, G P; Zumla, A; Ippolito, G; Capobianchi, M R

    2016-01-01

    Data on immune responses during human Ebola virus disease (EVD) are scanty, due to limitations imposed by biosafety requirements and logistics. A sustained activation of T-cells was recently described but functional studies during the acute phase of human EVD are still missing. Aim of this work was to evaluate the kinetics and functionality of T-cell subsets, as well as the expression of activation, autophagy, apoptosis and exhaustion markers during the acute phase of EVD until recovery. Two EVD patients admitted to the Italian National Institute for Infectious Diseases, Lazzaro Spallanzani, were sampled sequentially from soon after symptom onset until recovery and analyzed by flow cytometry and ELISpot assay. An early and sustained decrease of CD4 T-cells was seen in both patients, with an inversion of the CD4/CD8 ratio that was reverted during the recovery period. In parallel with the CD4 T-cell depletion, a massive T-cell activation occurred and was associated with autophagic/apoptotic phenotype, enhanced expression of the exhaustion marker PD-1 and impaired IFN-gamma production. The immunological impairment was accompanied by EBV reactivation. The association of an early and sustained dysfunctional T-cell activation in parallel to an overall CD4 T-cell decline may represent a previously unknown critical point of Ebola virus (EBOV)-induced immune subversion. The recent observation of late occurrence of EBOV-associated neurological disease highlights the importance to monitor the immuno-competence recovery at discharge as a tool to evaluate the risk of late sequelae associated with resumption of EBOV replication. Further studies are required to define the molecular mechanisms of EVD-driven activation/exhaustion and depletion of T-cells. PMID:27031961

  7. HIV-1 infection and CD4 T cell depletion in the humanized Rag2-/-γc-/- (RAG-hu mouse model

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    Connick Elizabeth

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The currently well-established humanized mouse models, namely the hu-PBL-SCID and SCID-hu systems played an important role in HIV pathogenesis studies. However, despite many notable successes, several limitations still exist. They lack multi-lineage human hematopoiesis and a functional human immune system. These models primarily reflect an acute HIV infection with rapid CD4 T cell loss thus limiting pathogenesis studies to a short-term period. The new humanized Rag2-/-γc-/- mouse model (RAG-hu created by intrahepatic injection of CD34 hematopoietic stem cells sustains long-term multi-lineage human hematopoiesis and is capable of mounting immune responses. Thus, this model shows considerable promise to study long-term in vivo HIV infection and pathogenesis. Results Here we demonstrate that RAG-hu mice produce human cell types permissive to HIV-1 infection and that they can be productively infected by HIV-1 ex vivo. To assess the capacity of these mice to sustain long-term infection in vivo, they were infected by either X4-tropic or R5-tropic HIV-1. Viral infection was assessed by PCR, co-culture, and in situ hybridization. Our results show that both X4 and R5 viruses are capable of infecting RAG-hu mice and that viremia lasts for at least 30 weeks. Moreover, HIV-1 infection leads to CD4 T cell depletion in peripheral blood and thymus, thus mimicking key aspects of HIV-1 pathogenesis. Additionally, a chimeric HIV-1 NL4-3 virus expressing a GFP reporter, although capable of causing viremia, failed to show CD4 T cell depletion possibly due to attenuation. Conclusion The humanized RAG-hu mouse model, characterized by its capacity for sustained multi-lineage human hematopoiesis and immune response, can support productive HIV-1 infection. Both T cell and macrophage tropic HIV-1 strains can cause persistent infection of RAG-hu mice resulting in CD4 T cell loss. Prolonged viremia in the context of CD4 T cell depletion seen in this

  8. Differential Effects of Escherichia coli Nissle and Lactobacillus rhamnosus Strain GG on Human Rotavirus Binding, Infection, and B Cell Immunity.

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    Kandasamy, Sukumar; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Fischer, David; Kumar, Anand; Chattha, Kuldeep S; Rauf, Abdul; Shao, Lulu; Langel, Stephanie N; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2016-02-15

    Rotavirus (RV) causes significant morbidity and mortality in children worldwide. The intestinal microbiota plays an important role in modulating host-pathogen interactions, but little is known about the impact of commonly used probiotics on human RV (HRV) infection. In this study, we compared the immunomodulatory effects of Gram-positive (Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG [LGG]) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli Nissle [EcN]) probiotic bacteria on virulent human rotavirus (VirHRV) infection and immunity using neonatal gnotobiotic piglets. Gnotobiotic piglets were colonized with EcN, LGG, or EcN+LGG or uncolonized and challenged with VirHRV. Mean peak virus shedding titers and mean cumulative fecal scores were significantly lower in EcN-colonized compared with LGG-colonized or uncolonized piglets. Reduced viral shedding titers were correlated with significantly reduced small intestinal HRV IgA Ab responses in EcN-colonized compared with uncolonized piglets post-VirHRV challenge. However the total IgA levels post-VirHRV challenge in the intestine and pre-VirHRV challenge in serum were significantly higher in EcN-colonized than in LGG-colonized piglets. In vitro treatment of mononuclear cells with these probiotics demonstrated that EcN, but not LGG, induced IL-6, IL-10, and IgA, with the latter partially dependent on IL-10. However, addition of exogenous recombinant porcine IL-10 + IL-6 to mononuclear cells cocultured with LGG significantly enhanced IgA responses. The greater effectiveness of EcN in moderating HRV infection may also be explained by the binding of EcN but not LGG to Wa HRV particles or HRV 2/4/6 virus-like particles but not 2/6 virus-like particles. Results suggest that EcN and LGG differentially modulate RV infection and B cell responses.

  9. Incidence of human herpes virus-6 and human cytomegalovirus infections in donated bone marrow and umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells

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    Behzad-Behbahani A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the incidence of human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6 and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infections that are potentially transmitted to haematopoietic stem cells (HSC transplant recipients via bone marrow (BM or umbilical cord blood (UCB. Bone marrow progenitor cells were collected from 30 allogenic BM donors. UCB HSC were collected from 34 subjects. The extracted DNA was then processed using nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR technique. HCMV and HHV-6 serological status were determined by enzyme immunoassay (EIA. Nested PCR identified HCMV in 22 (73% of 30 samples of BM progenitor cells but in only eight (23.5% of 34 samples of UBC HSC ( P = 0.001. HHV-6 DNA was detected in 11 (36.6% of 30 BM progenitor cells and in only one (2.9% of 34 UBC cells ( P = 0.002. Both HHV-6 and HCMV infections were determined in nine (26.5% of 34 bone marrow samples. The results indicate that, the risk of HCMV and HHV-6 via BM progenitor cells is higher than transmission by UCB cells ( P= 0.04.

  10. A Spirulina maxima-derived peptide inhibits HIV-1 infection in a human T cell line MT4

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    In-Seung Jang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is the causative agent of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS. Anti-HIV agents targeting various steps in HIV life cycle have been developed; however, so far, no effective drugs have been found. We show here that a peptide isolated from Spirulina maxima (SM-peptide inhibits HIV-1 infection in a human T cell line MT4. SM-peptide inhibited HIV-1IIIB-induced cell lysis with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 of 0.691 mM, while its 50 % cytotoxic concentration (CC50 was greater than 1.457 mM. Furthermore, the SM-peptide inhibited the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity and p24 antigen production. This suggests that SM-peptide is a novel candidate peptide, which may be developed as a therapeutic agent for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients.

  11. Risk of zidovudine-induced anemia on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection patients with different CD4 cell counts

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    anak agung ayu niti wedayani

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Anemia is the most common hematologic abnormality in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection. This abnormality is associated with HIV infection itself, HIV-related opportunities infections or drug use. Zidovudine (AZT is the most common cause of anemia in HIV patients. Recent study showed anemia in HIV patients is also associated with CD4 cell counts. Aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of anemia on HIV patients with different CD4 cell counts after AZT-based antiretroviral therapy (ART.This retrospective cohort study was conducted using medical record of HIV patients in Dr. Soetomo General Hospital, Surabaya. Subjects who fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria were divided into two group i.e. HIV patients with CD4 cell counts 200-350 cell/mm3 and those with CD4cell counts ≥350 cell/mm3. All available demographics, clinical and laboratory data of subjects before and after AZT-based ART were then recorded and evaluated. Ninety-seven HIV patients (50 male and 47 female were involved in this study. The result showed that the anemia incidence significantly increased after AZT-based ART (p0.05. Gender, age, weight and clinical stage were not associated with anemia incidence (p>0.05. In contrast, anemia incidence is associated with Hb level before AZT therapy (p<0.05. In conclusion, the anemia incidence in HIV patients after AZT based ART is not associated with the level of CD4 cell counts, however it is associated with Hb levels before AZT therapy.

  12. Chronic infection drives expression of the inhibitory receptor CD200R, and its ligand CD200, by mouse and human CD4 T cells.

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    Stefano Caserta

    Full Text Available Certain parasites have evolved to evade the immune response and establish chronic infections that may persist for many years. T cell responses in these conditions become muted despite ongoing infection. Upregulation of surface receptors with inhibitory properties provides an immune cell-intrinsic mechanism that, under conditions of chronic infection, regulates immune responses and limits cellular activation and associated pathology. The negative regulator, CD200 receptor, and its ligand, CD200, have been shown to regulate macrophage activation and reduce pathology following infection. We show that CD4 T cells also increase expression of inhibitory CD200 receptors (CD200R in response to chronic infection. CD200R was upregulated on murine effector T cells in response to infection with bacterial, Salmonella enterica, or helminth, Schistosoma mansoni, pathogens that respectively drive predominant Th1- or Th2-responses. In vitro chronic and prolonged stimuli were required for the sustained upregulation of CD200R, and its expression coincided with loss of multifunctional potential in T effector cells during infection. Importantly, we show an association between IL-4 production and CD200R expression on T effector cells from humans infected with Schistosoma haematobium that correlated effectively with egg burden and, thus infection intensity. Our results indicate a role of CD200R:CD200 in T cell responses to helminths which has diagnostic and prognostic relevance as a marker of infection for chronic schistosomiasis in mouse and man.

  13. In vitro infection with HIV enables human CD4+ T cell clones to induce noncognate contact-dependent polyclonal B cell activation.

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    Macchia, D; Parronchi, P; Piccinni, M P; Simonelli, C; Mazzetti, M; Ravina, A; Milo, D; Maggi, E; Romagnani, S

    1991-05-15

    Eleven (nine CD4+ and two CD8+) protein purified derivative-specific and eight tetanus toxoid-specific T cell clones (TCC), established from the peripheral blood of healthy persons, were cocultured in vitro with irradiated mononuclear cells from patients infected by HIV in the presence of PHA and polybrene. Two weeks post-HIV exposure, all 17 CD4+, but neither of the two CD8+, TCC exhibited integration of HIV in their genoma, as detected by polymerase chain reaction analysis, and released HIV into their supernatants, as detected by measuring both reverse transcriptase activity and p24 Ag. When co-cultured with either autologous or allogeneic B cells, all CD4+ HIV-infected TCC induced the synthesis of extraordinarily high amounts of IgM, IgG, and IgA. In contrast, their noninfected counterparts could provide helper function for Ig synthesis by autologous B cells only in the presence of the specific Ag (or anti-CD3 antibody), and induced allogeneic B cells to synthesize Ig only upon stimulation with anti-CD3 antibody. The supernatants of HIV-infected TCC failed to stimulate Ig synthesis in B cells. More importantly, when HIV-infected clonal T blasts and B cells were cultured in different chambers separated by a millipore membrane, permeable to molecules but not to cells, Ig synthesis did not occur. The Ig synthesis induced by HIV-infected TCC was also markedly inhibited by the addition in culture of either anti-CD4 or anti-LFA-1 antibody. In contrast, HIV-infected TCC maintained their ability to provide helper function for Ig synthesis in the absence of any stimulus, even after fixation with p-formaldehyde. These data demonstrate that in vitro infection with HIV enables human T cells to stimulate Ig synthesis by B cells by an Ag-nonspecific, MHC-unrestricted, contact-dependent mechanism. This may explain, at least in part, the hypergammaglobulinemia and other phenomena related to polyclonal B cell activation frequently seen in HIV-infected persons.

  14. The role of cyclin D2 and p21/waf1 in human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 infected cells

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    Pumfery Anne

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 Tax protein indirectly influences transcriptional activation, signal transduction, cell cycle control, and apoptosis. The function of Tax primarily relies on protein-protein interactions. We have previously shown that Tax upregulates the cell cycle checkpoint proteins p21/waf1 and cyclin D2. Here we describe the consequences of upregulating these G1/S checkpoint regulators in HTLV-1 infected cells. Results To further decipher any physical and functional interactions between cyclin D2 and p21/waf1, we used a series of biochemical assays from HTLV-1 infected and uninfected cells. Immunoprecipitations from HTLV-1 infected cells showed p21/waf1 in a stable complex with cyclin D2/cdk4. This complex is active as it phosphorylates the Rb protein in kinase assays. Confocal fluorescent microscopy indicated that p21/waf1 and cyclin D2 colocalize in HTLV-1 infected, but not in uninfected cells. Furthermore, in vitro kinase assays using purified proteins demonstrated that the addition of p21/waf1 to cyclin D2/cdk4 increased the kinase activity of cdk4. Conclusion These data suggest that the p21/cyclin D2/cdk4 complex is not an inhibitory complex and that p21/waf1 could potentially function as an assembly factor for the cyclin D2/cdk4 complex in HTLV-1 infected cells. A by-product of this assembly with cyclin D2/cdk4 is the sequestration of p21/waf1 away from the cyclin E/cdk2 complex, allowing this active cyclin-cdk complex to phosphorylate Rb pocket proteins efficiently and push cells through the G1/S checkpoint. These two distinct functional and physical activities of p21/waf1 suggest that RNA tumor viruses manipulate the G1/S checkpoint by deregulating cyclin and cdk complexes.

  15. The role of cyclin D2 and p21/waf1 in human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 infected cells

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    Kehn, Kylene; Deng, Longwen; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Strouss, Katharine; Wu, Kaili; Maddukuri, Anil; Baylor, Shanese; Rufner, Robyn; Pumfery, Anne; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2004-01-01

    Background The human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax protein indirectly influences transcriptional activation, signal transduction, cell cycle control, and apoptosis. The function of Tax primarily relies on protein-protein interactions. We have previously shown that Tax upregulates the cell cycle checkpoint proteins p21/waf1 and cyclin D2. Here we describe the consequences of upregulating these G1/S checkpoint regulators in HTLV-1 infected cells. Results To further decipher any physical and functional interactions between cyclin D2 and p21/waf1, we used a series of biochemical assays from HTLV-1 infected and uninfected cells. Immunoprecipitations from HTLV-1 infected cells showed p21/waf1 in a stable complex with cyclin D2/cdk4. This complex is active as it phosphorylates the Rb protein in kinase assays. Confocal fluorescent microscopy indicated that p21/waf1 and cyclin D2 colocalize in HTLV-1 infected, but not in uninfected cells. Furthermore, in vitro kinase assays using purified proteins demonstrated that the addition of p21/waf1 to cyclin D2/cdk4 increased the kinase activity of cdk4. Conclusion These data suggest that the p21/cyclin D2/cdk4 complex is not an inhibitory complex and that p21/waf1 could potentially function as an assembly factor for the cyclin D2/cdk4 complex in HTLV-1 infected cells. A by-product of this assembly with cyclin D2/cdk4 is the sequestration of p21/waf1 away from the cyclin E/cdk2 complex, allowing this active cyclin-cdk complex to phosphorylate Rb pocket proteins efficiently and push cells through the G1/S checkpoint. These two distinct functional and physical activities of p21/waf1 suggest that RNA tumor viruses manipulate the G1/S checkpoint by deregulating cyclin and cdk complexes. PMID:15169570

  16. Human CD4+ T cell epitopes from vaccinia virus induced by vaccination or infection.

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    J Mauricio Calvo-Calle

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of vaccinia virus in basic and applied immunology, our knowledge of the human immune response directed against this virus is very limited. CD4(+ T cell responses are an important component of immunity induced by current vaccinia-based vaccines, and likely will be required for new subunit vaccine approaches, but to date vaccinia-specific CD4(+ T cell responses have been poorly characterized, and CD4(+ T cell epitopes have been reported only recently. Classical approaches used to identify T cell epitopes are not practical for large genomes like vaccinia. We developed and validated a highly efficient computational approach that combines prediction of class II MHC-peptide binding activity with prediction of antigen processing and presentation. Using this approach and screening only 36 peptides, we identified 25 epitopes recognized by T cells from vaccinia-immune individuals. Although the predictions were made for HLA-DR1, eight of the peptides were recognized by donors of multiple haplotypes. T cell responses were observed in samples of peripheral blood obtained many years after primary vaccination, and were amplified after booster immunization. Peptides recognized by multiple donors are highly conserved across the poxvirus family, including variola, the causative agent of smallpox, and may be useful in development of a new generation of smallpox vaccines and in the analysis of the immune response elicited to vaccinia virus. Moreover, the epitope identification approach developed here should find application to other large-genome pathogens.

  17. Expression of suppressor of cytokine signalling 3 (SOCS3) in human bladder epithelial cells infected with uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

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    Demirel, Isak; Säve, Susanne; Kruse, Robert; Persson, Katarina

    2013-02-01

    Suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS) proteins inhibit pro-inflammatory signalling mediated by Janus-activated kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathways. To evade the immune response some pathogens appear to modify the host SOCS proteins. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are able to subvert the host response evoked by bladder epithelial cells, but the mechanisms are not fully understood. The objective of this study was to investigate whether UPEC can modify the host SOCS and STAT3 response. Real time RT-PCR studies demonstrated an increased SOCS1 and SOCS3 expression in the isolated human bladder epithelial cell lines (RT-4 and 5637) in response to cytokines. UPEC strain IA2 increased SOCS3, but not SOCS1, mRNA levels with a peak at 6 h after infection. The increase of SOCS3 was confirmed at the protein level by Western blotting. The UPEC strain IA2 caused a time-dependent decrease in the phosphorylation of STAT3. This study demonstrates that UPEC are able to affect SOCS3 and STAT3 signalling in human uroepithelial cells. The finding that UPEC are able to induce mediators involved in suppression of host cytokine signalling may help to elucidate how UPEC may circumvent the host response during urinary tract infection.

  18. Protein Malnutrition Modifies Innate Immunity and Gene Expression by Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Human Rotavirus Infection in Neonatal Gnotobiotic Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paim, Francine C.; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Alhamo, Moyasar A.; Fischer, David D.; Langel, Stephanie N.; Deblais, Loic; Kumar, Anand; Chepngeno, Juliet; Shao, Lulu; Huang, Huang-Chi; Candelero-Rueda, Rosario A.; Rajashekara, Gireesh

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Malnutrition affects millions of children in developing countries, compromising immunity and contributing to increased rates of death from infectious diseases. Rotavirus is a major etiological agent of childhood diarrhea in developing countries, where malnutrition is prevalent. However, the interactions between the two and their combined effects on immune and intestinal functions are poorly understood. In this study, we used neonatal gnotobiotic (Gn) pigs transplanted with the fecal microbiota of a healthy 2-month-old infant (HIFM) and fed protein-deficient or -sufficient bovine milk diets. Protein deficiency induced hypoproteinemia, hypoalbuminemia, hypoglycemia, stunting, and generalized edema in Gn pigs, as observed in protein-malnourished children. Irrespective of the diet, human rotavirus (HRV) infection early, at HIFM posttransplantation day 3 (PTD3), resulted in adverse health effects and higher mortality rates (45 to 75%) than later HRV infection (PTD10). Protein malnutrition exacerbated HRV infection and affected the morphology and function of the small intestinal epithelial barrier. In pigs infected with HRV at PTD10, there was a uniform decrease in the function and/or frequencies of natural killer cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and CD103+ and apoptotic mononuclear cells and altered gene expression profiles of intestinal epithelial cells (chromogranin A, mucin 2, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, SRY-Box 9, and villin). Thus, we have established the first HIFM-transplanted neonatal pig model that recapitulates major aspects of protein malnutrition in children and can be used to evaluate physiologically relevant interventions. Our findings provide an explanation of why nutrient-rich diets alone may lack efficacy in malnourished children. IMPORTANCE Malnutrition and rotavirus infection, prevalent in developing countries, individually and in combination, affect the health of millions of children, compromising their immunity and increasing

  19. Infection by Cx43 adenovirus increased chemotherapy sensitivity in human gastric cancer BGC-823 cells: not involving in induction of cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Zhou, Hongfeng; Wu, Jin; Liu, Wentao; Li, Yongqing; Shi, Guangyue; Yue, Xiaolong; Sun, Xiwen; Zhao, Yanbin; Hu, Xiaowei; Wang, Tianjiao; Zhang, Xufeng

    2015-12-15

    There is a lower basal expression of Connexin43 (Cx43) in human gastric cancer BGC-823 cells. In the present study, BGC-823 cells were transfected with recombinant Cx43 adenovirus plasmid vector, and we explored the influences of Cx43 expression on cell proliferation, chemo-sensitivity, colony forming ability, invasion ability and apoptosis. Moreover, we also determined the expression of Pgp, Cx43, as well as apoptosis-related proteins (bcl-2, bax, caspase3 and caspase 9). MTT assay was performed to determine the proliferation of BGC-823 cells before and after Cx43 transfection. The influences of Cx43 infection on sensitivity of chemotherapy (including Doxorubicin, fluorouracil, oxaliplatin) were detected by MTT assay. Expression levels of Pgp, Cx43, as well as apoptosis-related proteins (bcl-2, bax, caspase-3 and caspase-9) in BGC-823 cells were determined by Western blotting analysis before and after the infection with Cx43 adenovirus. MDR expression was determined by RT-PCR before and after Cx43 infection. Invasive ability was detected by invasion chamber. Influence of Cx43 adenovirus infection on apoptosis of BGC-823 cells was determined by flow cytometry. After infection by Cx43 adenovirus, colony forming rate and invasive ability of BGC-823 cells were decreased. Flow cytometry results revealed that cell apoptosis were insignificantly increased. The data of MTT assay revealed that infection with Cx43 adenovirus, cell proliferation ability decreased and sensitivity to chemotherapy drugs (including doxorubicin, fluorouracil, oxaliplatin) increased. Results of Western blotting analysis revealed that increasing expression levels of Cx43, decreasing expression levels of Pgp, and insignificant changes of bcl-2, bax, caspase3 and caspase 9 were detected. RT-PCR revealed the expression of MDR1 gene, the gene encoding Pgp, decreased significantly (pinfected with Cx43-IRES2-EGFP recombinant adenovirus vector. Colony formation, invasive ability and cell proliferation all

  20. Comparison of dengue infection in human mononuclear leukocytes with mosquito C6/36 and mammalian Vero cells using flow cytometry to detect virus antigen

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    Sydow Farid FO von

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent activated cell sorter (FACS analysis is useful for the detection of cellular surface antigens and intracellular proteins. We used this methodology in order to detect and quantify dengue antigens in highly susceptible cells such as clone C6/36 (Aedes albopictus and Vero cells (green monkey kidney. Additionally, we analyzed the infection in vitro of human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBML. FACS analysis turned out to be a reliable technique to quantify virus growth in traditional cell cultures of C6/36 as well as Vero cells. High rates of infection were achieved with a good statistical correlation between the virus amount used in infection and the percentage of dengue antigen containing cells detected in infected cultures. We also showed that human monocytes (CD14+ are preferred target cells for in vitro dengue infection among PBML. Monocytes were much less susceptible to virus infection than cell lines but they displayed dengue antigens detected by FACS five days after infection. In contrast, lymphocytes showed no differences in their profile for dengue specific immunofluorescence. Without an animal model to reproduce dengue disease, alternative assays have been sought to correlate viral virulence with clinical manifestations and disease severity. Study of in vitro interaction of virus and host cells may highlight this relationship.

  1. Dengue virus-infected human dendritic cells reveal hierarchies of naturally expressed novel NS3 CD8 T cell epitopes.

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    Piazza, P; Campbell, D; Marques, E; Hildebrand, W H; Buchli, R; Mailliard, R; Rinaldo, C R

    2014-09-01

    Detailed knowledge of dengue virus (DENV) cell-mediated immunity is limited. In this study we characterize CD8(+) T lymphocytes recognizing three novel and two known non-structural protein 3 peptide epitopes in DENV-infected dendritic cells. Three epitopes displayed high conservation (75-100%), compared to the others (0-50%). A hierarchy ranking based on magnitude and polyfunctionality of the antigen-specific response showed that dominant epitopes were both highly conserved and cross-reactive against multiple DENV serotypes. These results are relevant to DENV pathogenesis and vaccine design.

  2. A rapid crosstalk of human gammadelta T cells and monocytes drives the acute inflammation in bacterial infections.

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    Matthias Eberl

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Vgamma9/Vdelta2 T cells are a minor subset of T cells in human blood and differ from other T cells by their immediate responsiveness to microbes. We previously demonstrated that the primary target for Vgamma9/Vdelta2 T cells is (E-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate (HMB-PP, an essential metabolite produced by a large range of pathogens. Here we wished to study the consequence of this unique responsiveness in microbial infection. The majority of peripheral Vgamma9/Vdelta2 T cells shares migration properties with circulating monocytes, which explains the presence of these two distinct blood cell types in the inflammatory infiltrate at sites of infection and suggests that they synergize in anti-microbial immune responses. Our present findings demonstrate a rapid and HMB-PP-dependent crosstalk between Vgamma9/Vdelta2 T cells and autologous monocytes that results in the immediate production of inflammatory mediators including the cytokines interleukin (IL-6, interferon (IFN-gamma, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha, and oncostatin M (OSM; the chemokines CCL2, CXCL8, and CXCL10; and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL. Moreover, under these co-culture conditions monocytes differentiate within 18 hours into inflammatory dendritic cells (DCs with antigen-presenting functions. Addition of further microbial stimuli (lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan induces CCR7 and enables these inflammatory DCs to trigger the generation of CD4(+ effector alphabeta T cells expressing IFN-gamma and/or IL-17. Importantly, our in vitro model replicates the responsiveness to microbes of effluent cells from peritoneal dialysis (PD patients and translates directly to episodes of acute PD-associated bacterial peritonitis, where Vgamma9/Vdelta2 T cell numbers and soluble inflammatory mediators are elevated in patients infected with HMB-PP-producing pathogens. Collectively, these findings suggest a direct link between invading pathogens, microbe

  3. Altered distribution of natural killer cell subsets identified by CD56, CD27 and CD70 in primary and chronic human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titanji, Kehmia; Sammicheli, Stefano; De Milito, Angelo; Mantegani, Paola; Fortis, Claudio; Berg, Louise; Kärre, Klas; Travi, Giovanna; Tassandin, Chiara; Lopalco, Lucia; Rethi, Bence; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Chiodi, Francesca

    2008-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) (CD3− CD56+) cells can be divided into two functionally distinct subsets, CD3− CD56dim and CD3− CD56bright. We analysed the distribution of NK cell subsets in primary and chronic human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection, to determine if HIV infection stage may influence the subset distribution. In primary infection, contrary to chronic infection, the CD3− CD56dim subset was expanded compared to healthy controls. We also studied the effect of antiretroviral therapy administered early in infection and found that NK cell subset distribution was partially restored after 6 months of antiretroviral therapy in primary infection, but not normalized. Recently, NK cells have been divided into CD27− and CD27+ subsets with different migratory and functional capacity and CD27-mediated NK cell activation has been described in mice. We therefore investigated whether CD27 and/or CD70 (CD27 ligand) expression on NK cells, and thus the distribution of these novel NK subsets, was altered in HIV-1-infected patients. We found up-regulated expression of both CD27 and CD70 on NK cells of patients, resulting in higher proportions of CD27high and CD70high NK cells, and this phenomenon was more pronounced in chronic infection. Experiments conducted in vitro suggest that the high interleukin-7 levels found during HIV-1 infection may participate in up-regulation of CD70 on NK cell subsets. Imbalance of NK cell subsets and up-regulated expression of CD27 and CD70 initiated early in HIV-1 infection may indicate NK cell activation and intrinsic defects initiated by HIV-1 to disarm the innate immune response to the virus. PMID:17627773

  4. Molecular and clinical evaluation of the acute human parvovirus B19 infection: comparison of two cases in children with sickle cell disease and discussion of the literature

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    Svetoslav Nanev Slavov

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Human parvovirus B19 is a well-known cause of severe conditions in patients with sickle cell disease, but the molecular mechanisms of the infection are insufficiently understood. The different clinical outcome of the acute parvovirus B19 infection in two pediatric patients with sickle cell disease has been examined. One of them developed life-threatening condition requiring emergency transfusions, while the other had asymptomatic infection, diagnosed occasionally. Both cases had high viral load and identical subgenotype, indicating that the viral molecular characteristics play a minimal role in the infection outcome.

  5. Human dental stem cells suppress PMN activity after infection with the periodontopathogens Prevotella intermedia and Tannerella forsythia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieke, Cathleen; Kriebel, Katja; Engelmann, Robby; Müller-Hilke, Brigitte; Lang, Hermann; Kreikemeyer, Bernd

    2016-12-15

    Periodontitis is characterized by inflammation associated with the colonization of different oral pathogens. We here aimed to investigate how bacteria and host cells shape their environment in order to limit inflammation and tissue damage in the presence of the pathogen. Human dental follicle stem cells (hDFSCs) were co-cultured with gram-negative P. intermedia and T. forsythia and were quantified for adherence and internalization as well as migration and interleukin secretion. To delineate hDFSC-specific effects, gingival epithelial cells (Ca9-22) were used as controls. Direct effects of hDFSCs on neutrophils (PMN) after interaction with bacteria were analyzed via chemotactic attraction, phagocytic activity and NET formation. We show that P. intermedia and T. forsythia adhere to and internalize into hDFSCs. This infection decreased the migratory capacity of the hDFSCs by 50%, did not disturb hDFSC differentiation potential and provoked an increase in IL-6 and IL-8 secretion while leaving IL-10 levels unaltered. These environmental modulations correlated with reduced PMN chemotaxis, phagocytic activity and NET formation. Our results suggest that P. intermedia and T. forsythia infected hDFSCs maintain their stem cell functionality, reduce PMN-induced tissue and bone degradation via suppression of PMN-activity, and at the same time allow for the survival of the oral pathogens.

  6. Expression of vitamin D receptor and cathelicidin in human corneal epithelium cells during fusarium solani infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Lin; Xia, Yi-Ping; Zhao, Gui-Qiu; Lin, Jing; Xu, Qiang; Hu, Li-Ting; Qu, Jian-Qiu; Peng, Xu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    To observe the expression of vitamin D receptor (VDR) in human specimen and immortalized human corneal epithelium cells (HCEC) when challenged with fusarium solani. Moreover, we decided to discover the pathway of VDR expression. Also, we would like to detect the expression of cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP) in the downstream pathway of VDR. Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the VDR expression in HCEC from healthy and fungal keratitis patients. Real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed to observe the messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) change of VDR when immortalized HCEC were challenged with fusarium solani for different hours. CAMP was detected at both mRNA and protein levels. We found out that the VDR expression in fusarium solani keratitis patients' specimen was much more than that in healthy people. The mRNA and protein expression of VDR increased when we stimulated HCEC with fusarium solani antigen (Pfusarium solani antigen stimulation (Pfusarium solani antigen.

  7. Arsenic alters transcriptional responses to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection and decreases antimicrobial defense of human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodale, Britton C; Rayack, Erica J; Stanton, Bruce A

    2017-09-15

    Arsenic contamination of drinking water and food threatens the health of hundreds of millions of people worldwide by increasing the risk of numerous diseases. Arsenic exposure has been associated with infectious lung disease in epidemiological studies, but it is not yet understood how ingestion of low levels of arsenic increases susceptibility to bacterial infection. Accordingly, the goal of this study was to examine the effect of arsenic on gene expression in primary human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells and to determine if arsenic altered epithelial cell responses to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen. Bronchial epithelial cells line the airway surface, providing a physical barrier and serving critical roles in antimicrobial defense and signaling to professional immune cells. We used RNA-seq to define the transcriptional response of HBE cells to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and investigated how arsenic affected HBE gene networks in the presence and absence of the bacterial challenge. Environmentally relevant levels of arsenic significantly changed the expression of genes involved in cellular redox homeostasis and host defense to bacterial infection, and decreased genes that code for secreted antimicrobial factors such as lysozyme. Using pathway analysis, we identified Sox4 and Nrf2-regulated gene networks that are predicted to mediate the arsenic-induced decrease in lysozyme secretion. In addition, we demonstrated that arsenic decreased lysozyme in the airway surface liquid, resulting in reduced lysis of Microccocus luteus. Thus, arsenic alters the expression of genes and proteins in innate host defense pathways, thereby decreasing the ability of the lung epithelium to fight bacterial infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. CD21-independent Infection of Epstein-Barr Virus in Human Signet Ring Gastric Carcinoma Cell Line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗兵; MasanaoMurakami; MakotoFukuta; KazuyoshiYanagihara; TakeshiSairenji

    2003-01-01

    To study the mechanism of infection of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in gastric carcinoma cells, the Akata and P3HR-1 strains of EBV were used as the test strains of viruses, and the signet ring cell line HSC-39 of gastric carcinoma cells was used as the target cells of infection. The virus-infected cell clones were isolated by limited dilution method. It was found that the EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER) could be detected in the infected cells. The Akata and P3HR-1 EBV infected parental cells and most of clones expressed EBNA1, but not EBNA2. Latent membrane protein (LMP-1) and LMP-2,and the Q promoter (p), but not the Cp/Wp for EBNA gene transcription was active in the infected parental cells as well as all the clones. Uninfected HSC-39 cells did not express CD21, however, Akata but not P3HR-1 EBV-infected clones ex-pressed low level of CD21 mRNA. These results demonstrate that HSC-39 cells are susceptible to both EBV strains and EBVinfects HSC-39 cells through the CD21-independent pathway. This study defines a signet ring type of gastric carcinoma cellsline as a unique target cells for the study of EBV infection mechanism.

  9. Leptin induces the phagocytosis and protective immune response in Leishmania donovani infected THP-1 cell line and human PBMCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayakar, Alti; Chandrasekaran, Sambamurthy; Veronica, Jalaja; Maurya, Radheshyam

    2016-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is an infectious disease responsible for several deaths in malnourished children due to impaired cell-mediated immunity, which is accompanied by low circulating leptin levels. The cytokine function of leptin is implicated for several immune regulation activities such as hematopoiesis, angiogenesis, innate and adaptive immunity. Its deficiency associated with polarization of Th2 response, which coincides with VL pathogenesis. To determine the cytokine role of leptin in case of experimental VL, we tested the leptin associated Th1/Th2 type cytokine profile at mRNA level from Leishmania donovani infected human monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We also tested the effect of leptin on macrophages activation (viz. studying the phosphorylation of signaling moieties), phagocytic activity and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production during infection. We observed that leptin induced Th1 specific response by upregulation of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-8 and TNF-α in THP-1 and IFN-γ, IL-12 and IL-2 in PBMCs. We also observed the downregulation of Th2 type cytokine i.e. IL-10 in THP-1 and unaltered expression of cytokines i.e. TGF-β, IL-10 and IL-4 in PBMCs. In addition, leptin stimulates the macrophages by inducing phosphorylation of Erk1/2 and Akt which are usually dephosphorylated in L. donovani infection. In concordance, leptin also induces the macrophage phagocytic activity by enhancing the intracellular ROS generation which helps in phagolysosome formation and oxidative killing of the parasite. In compilation, leptin is able to maintain the defensive environment against L. donovani infection through the classical macrophage activity.

  10. HIV-1 infection, response to treatment and establishment of viral latency in a novel humanized T cell-only mouse (TOM) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeycutt, Jenna B; Wahl, Angela; Archin, Nancie; Choudhary, Shailesh; Margolis, David; Garcia, J Victor

    2013-10-24

    The major targets of HIV infection in humans are CD4⁺ T cells. CD4⁺ T cell depletion is a hallmark of AIDS. Previously, the SCID-hu thy/liv model was used to study the effect of HIV on thymopoeisis in vivo. However, these mice did not develop high levels of peripheral T cell reconstitution and required invasive surgery for infection and analysis. Here, we describe a novel variant of this model in which thy/liv implantation results in systemic reconstitution with human T cells in the absence of any other human hematopoietic lineages. NOD/SCID-hu thy/liv and NSG-hu thy/liv mice were created by implanting human fetal thymus and liver tissues under the kidney capsule of either NOD/SCID or NSG mice. In contrast to NOD/SCID-hu thy/liv mice that show little or no human cells in peripheral blood or tissues, substantial systemic human reconstitution occurs in NSG-hu thy/liv. These mice are exclusively reconstituted with human T cells (i.e. T-cell only mice or TOM). Despite substantial levels of human T cells no signs of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were noted in these mice over a period of 14 months. TOM are readily infected after parenteral exposure to HIV-1. HIV replication is sustained in peripheral blood at high levels and results in modest reduction of CD4⁺ T cells. HIV-1 replication in TOM responds to daily administration of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) resulting in strong suppression of virus replication as determined by undetectable viral load in plasma. Latently HIV infected resting CD4⁺ T cells can be isolated from suppressed mice that can be induced to express HIV ex-vivo upon activation demonstrating the establishment of latency in vivo. NSG-hu thy/liv mice are systemically reconstituted with human T cells. No other human lymphoid lineages are present in these mice (i.e. monocytes/macrophages, B cells and DC are all absent). These T cell only mice do not develop GVHD, are susceptible to HIV-1 infection and can efficiently maintain virus

  11. Quantitative Imaging of Human Red Blood Cells Infected with Plasmodium falciparum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Alessandro; Choimet, Jean-Baptiste; Skepper, Jeremy N.; Mauritz, Jakob M.A.; Lew, Virgilio L.; Kaminski, Clemens F.; Tiffert, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    During its 48 h asexual reproduction cycle, the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum ingests and digests hemoglobin in excess of its metabolic requirements and causes major changes in the homeostasis of the host red blood cell (RBC). A numerical model suggested that this puzzling excess consumption of hemoglobin is necessary for the parasite to reduce the colloidosmotic pressure within the host RBC, thus preventing lysis before completion of its reproduction cycle. However, the validity of the colloidosmotic hypothesis appeared to be compromised by initial conflicts between model volume predictions and experimental observations. Here, we investigated volume and membrane area changes in infected RBCs (IRBCs) using fluorescence confocal microscopy on calcein-loaded RBCs. Substantial effort was devoted to developing and testing a new threshold-independent algorithm for the precise estimation of cell volumes and surface areas to overcome the shortfalls of traditional methods. We confirm that the volume of IRBCs remains almost constant during parasite maturation, suggesting that the reported increase in IRBCs' osmotic fragility results from a reduction in surface area and increased lytic propensity on volume expansion. These results support the general validity of the colloidosmotic hypothesis, settle the IRBC volume debate, and help to constrain the range of parameter values in the numerical model. PMID:20682274

  12. The molecular fingerprint of human papillomavirus infection and its effect on the Langerhans cell population in squamous cell carcinomas of the genital skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose M Rios-Yuil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Information is scarce about the presence of molecular alterations related to human papillomavirus (HPV infection in squamous cell carcinomas of the genital skin and about the effect of this infection in the number of Langerhans cells present in these tumors. Aims: To determine the presence of HPV in genital skin squamous cell carcinomas and to see the relationship between HPV infection and changes in the expression of Ki-67 antigen (Ki-67, p53 protein (p53, retinoblastoma protein (pRb and E-cadherin and to alterations in Langerhans cell density, if any. Methods: A descriptive, comparative, retrospective and cross-sectional study was performed with all the cases diagnosed as squamous cell carcinomas of the genital skin at the Dermatopathology Service from 2001 to 2011. The diagnosis was verified by histopathological examination. The presence of HPV was examined using chromogenic in situ hybridization, and protein expression was studied via immunohistochemical analysis. Results: The 34 cases studied were verified as squamous cell carcinomas and 44.1% were HPV positive. The degree of expression of pRb was 17.50% ±14.11% (mean ± SD in HPV-positive cases and 29.74% ±20.38% in HPV-negative cases (P = 0.0236. The degree of expression of Ki-67 was 47.67% ±30.64% in HPV-positive cases and 29.87% ±15.95% in HPV-negative cases (P = 0.0273. Conclusion: HPV infection was related to lower pRb expression and higher Ki-67 expression in comparison with HPV negative samples. We could not find a relationship between HPV infection and the degree of expression of p53 and E-cadherin or with Langerhans cell density.

  13. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III infection in a cohort of homosexual men in New York City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, C.E.; Taylor, P.E.; Zang, E.A.; Morrison, J.M.; Harley, E.J.; de Cordoba, S.R.; Bacino, C.; Ting, R.C.; Bodner, A.J.; Sarngadharan, M.G.; Gallo, R.C.

    1986-04-25

    Using blood samples collected since 1978, the authors investigated the epidemiology of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III), the etiologic agent of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, in a group of 378 homosexually active men who have resided in New York City since the acquire immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic began. The anti-HTLV-III prevalence was 6.6% in sera from 1978 or 1979, and the subsequent annual incidence of seroconversion among susceptible men ranged between 5.5% and 10.6%. The highest incidences were in recent years, even though these men reported a decrease in their sexual activity during this time. These data demonstrate the continuing risk of HTLV-III infections in the homosexual population studied and emphasize the need for more effective prevention of transmission. The year during which antibody was first present was the only factor identified that was associated with altered cell-mediated immunity in antibody-positive men.

  14. Counting mycobacteria in infected human cells and mouse tissue: a comparison between qPCR and CFU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Sharad; Awuh, Jane A; Leversen, Nils Anders; Flo, Trude H; Asjø, Birgitta

    2012-01-01

    Due to the slow growth rate and pathogenicity of mycobacteria, enumeration by traditional reference methods like colony counting is notoriously time-consuming, inconvenient and biohazardous. Thus, novel methods that rapidly and reliably quantify mycobacteria are warranted in experimental models to facilitate basic research, development of vaccines and anti-mycobacterial drugs. In this study we have developed quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays for simultaneous quantification of mycobacterial and host DNA in infected human macrophage cultures and in mouse tissues. The qPCR method cannot discriminate live from dead bacteria and found a 10- to 100-fold excess of mycobacterial genomes, relative to colony formation. However, good linear correlations were observed between viable colony counts and qPCR results from infected macrophage cultures (Pearson correlation coefficient [r] for M. tuberculosis = 0.82; M. a. avium = 0.95; M. a. paratuberculosis = 0.91). Regression models that predict colony counts from qPCR data in infected macrophages were validated empirically and showed a high degree of agreement with observed counts. Similar correlation results were also obtained in liver and spleen homogenates of M. a. avium infected mice, although the correlations were distinct for the early phase (< day 9 post-infection) and later phase (≥ day 20 post-infection) liver r = 0.94 and r = 0.91; spleen r = 0.91 and r = 0.87, respectively. Interestingly, in the mouse model the number of live bacteria as determined by colony counts constituted a much higher proportion of the total genomic qPCR count in the early phase (geometric mean ratio of 0.37 and 0.34 in spleen and liver, respectively), as compared to later phase of infection (geometric mean ratio of 0.01 in both spleen and liver). Overall, qPCR methods offer advantages in biosafety, time-saving, assay range and reproducibility compared to colony counting. Additionally, the duplex format allows enumeration of

  15. VP2 capsid domain of the H-1 parvovirus determines susceptibility of human cancer cells to H-1 viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, I-R; Kaowinn, S; Song, J; Kim, S; Koh, S S; Kang, H-Y; Ha, N-C; Lee, K H; Jun, H-S; Chung, Y-H

    2015-05-01

    Although H-1 parvovirus is used as an antitumor agent, not much is known about the relationship between its specific tropism and oncolytic activity. We hypothesize that VP2, a major capsid protein of H-1 virus, determines H-1-specific tropism. To assess this, we constructed chimeric H-1 viruses expressing Kilham rat virus (KRV) capsid proteins, in their complete or partial forms. Chimeric H-1 viruses (CH1, CH2 and CH3) containing the whole KRV VP2 domain could not induce cytolysis in HeLa, A549 and Panc-1 cells. However, the other chimeric H-1 viruses (CH4 and CH5) expressing a partial KRV VP2 domain induced cytolysis. Additionally, the significant cytopathic effect caused by CH4 and CH5 infection in HeLa cells resulted from preferential viral amplification via DNA replication, RNA transcription and protein synthesis. Modeling of VP2 capsid protein showed that two variable regions (VRs) (VR0 and VR2) of H-1 VP2 protein protrude outward, because of the insertion of extra amino-acid residues, as compared with those of KRV VP2 protein. This might explain the precedence of H-1 VP2 protein over KRV in determining oncolytic activity in human cancer cells. Taking these results together, we propose that the VP2 protein of oncolytic H-1 parvovirus determines its specific tropism in human cancer cells.

  16. BCG Infection to Human B Cells Induce Cell Apoptosis%卡介苗感染人B细胞诱导细胞凋亡

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱旗; 冯国栋; 杨毅宁; 赵青; 王文菁; 张敏; 刘扬; 赵钢

    2015-01-01

    目的 探究卡介苗( BCG)是否能感染人B细胞及观察感染后对细胞的影响. 方法 人B细胞系Raji细胞与BCG共培养, 4、12和24h后分别用共聚焦及透射电镜观察Raji细胞对BCG的结合和摄取情况,用CCK-8法检测细胞毒性,流式An-nexin Ⅴ-PI双标法检测细胞凋亡和坏死情况. 结果 培养4、12和24h后,感染了BCG的细胞比例分别为12. 4%±2. 0%, 23. 8%±5. 1%, 25. 2%±4. 8%.BCG感染可引起细胞毒性,4h后Raji细胞存活率为75. 5%±8. 8%,12h后细胞存活率降至51. 0%± 5. 3%,24h后细胞存活率仅为21. 6%±4. 2%,而感染灭活BCG的细胞存活率均在95%以上. 进一步用流式检测凋亡坏死发现,与未感染细胞相比,Raji细胞感染BCG后凋亡,坏死均有所增加,以凋亡增加为主. 结论 BCG可以感染人B细胞并诱导细胞凋亡.%Objective To explore whether Bacillus Calmette-Guérin ( BCG) can infect human B cells and observe the effects of the infection on B cells. Methods Human B cell line Raji cells were incubated with BCG. After incubation for 4h, 12h and 24h, the direct interaction of Raji cells with BCG was observed under confocal microscopy and transmission electronic microscopy. Cytotoxity was detected by cell counting kit (CCK-8). Cell apoptosis and necrosis were assayed by flow cytometry. Results After 4h, 12h and 24h of incuba-tion, the percentage of Raji cells that were infected by BCG was 12. 4%±2. 0%, 23. 8%±5. 1%, 25. 2%±4. 8%, respectively. Live BCG infection induced cytotoxicity. The cell survival rates at 4h, 12h, 24h were 75. 5%±8. 8%, 51. 0%±5. 3%, 21. 6%±4. 2% re-spectively, while the cells infected with inactivated BCG showed a high survival rate of 95% at any time. Further analysis by flow cytome-try showed that cell apoptosis and necrosis, predominantly cell apoptosis of Raji cells were increased by BCG infection. Conclusion BCG can infect human B cells and induce cell apoptosis.

  17. Latent HIV-1 infection of resting CD4⁺ T cells in the humanized Rag2⁻/⁻ γc⁻/⁻ mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Shailesh K; Archin, Nancie M; Cheema, Manzoor; Dahl, Noelle P; Garcia, J Victor; Margolis, David M

    2012-01-01

    Persistent human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of resting CD4⁺ T cells, unaffected by antiretroviral therapy (ART), provides a long-lived reservoir of HIV infection. Therapies that target this viral reservoir are needed to eradicate HIV-1 infection. A small-animal model that recapitulates HIV-1 latency in resting CD4⁺ T cells may accelerate drug discovery and allow the rational design of nonhuman primate (NHP) or human studies. We report that in humanized Rag2⁻/⁻ γ(c)⁻/⁻ (hu-Rag2⁻/⁻ γ(c)⁻/⁻) mice, as in humans, resting CD4⁺ T cell infection (RCI) can be quantitated in pooled samples of circulating cells and tissue reservoirs (e.g., lymph node, spleen, bone marrow) following HIV-1 infection with the CCR5-tropic JR-CSF strain and suppression of viremia by ART. Replication-competent virus was recovered from pooled resting CD4⁺ T cells in 7 of 16 mice, with a median frequency of 8 (range, 2 to 12) infected cells per million T cells, demonstrating that HIV-1 infection can persist despite ART in the resting CD4⁺ T cell reservoir of hu-Rag2⁻/⁻ γ(c)⁻/⁻ mice. This model will allow rapid preliminary assessments of novel eradication approaches and combinatorial strategies that may be challenging to perform in the NHP model or in humans, as well as a rigorous analysis of the effect of these interventions in specific anatomical compartments.

  18. Effect of Different Antibiotic Chemotherapies on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection In Vitro of Primary Human Corneal Fibroblast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria del Mar Cendra

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of bacterial keratitis (BK worldwide. Inappropriate or non-optimal antibiotic chemotherapy can lead to corneal perforation and rapid sight loss. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 invades primary human corneal fibroblasts (hCFs in vitro and persists intracellularly, despite chemotherapy with antibiotics used commonly to treat BK. In rank order, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin and polymyxin B showed the highest activity against planktonic PAO1 growth (100% inhibitory concentration ≤10 μg/mL; 50% inhibitory concentration ≤1 μg/mL, followed by gentamicin and ofloxacin (100% inhibitory concentration ≤50 μg/mL; 50% inhibitory concentration ≤10 μg/mL. These bactericidal antibiotics (50–200 μg/mL concentrations all killed PAO1 in the extracellular environment of infected hCF monolayers. By contrast, the bactericidal antibiotic cefuroxime and the bacteriostatic antibiotic chloramphenicol failed to sterilize both PAO1 broth cultures, even at a concentration of ≥200 μg/mL and infected hCF monolayers. Statistically, all antibiotics were able to prevent LDH release from PAO1-infected hCF monolayers at both concentrations tested. Intracellular Pseudomonas were significantly reduced (>99%, P < 0.05 following treatment with ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin and ofloxacin, whereas gentamicin, polymyxin B and cefuroxime failed to clear intracellular bacteria over 24 h. Intracellular Pseudomonas infection was resistant to chloramphenicol, with hCF death observed by 9 h. Eventual growth of remaining intracellular Pseudomonas was observed in hCF after removal of all antibiotics, resulting in re-infection cycles and cell death by 48 h. All of the antibiotics reduced significantly (P < 0.05 IL-1β secretion by hCF infected with a Multiplicity Of Infection (MOI = 1 of PAO1. With higher MOI, no pro-inflammatory effects were observed with antibiotic treatment, expect with polymyxin B and

  19. RNA sensors enable human mast cell anti-viral chemokine production and IFN-mediated protection in response to antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G Brown

    Full Text Available Dengue hemorrhagic fever and/or dengue shock syndrome represent the most serious pathophysiological manifestations of human dengue virus infection. Despite intensive research, the mechanisms and important cellular players that contribute to dengue disease are unclear. Mast cells are tissue-resident innate immune cells that play a sentinel cell role in host protection against infectious agents via pathogen-recognition receptors by producing potent mediators that modulate inflammation, cell recruitment and normal vascular homeostasis. Most importantly, mast cells are susceptible to antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection and respond with selective cytokine and chemokine responses. In order to obtain a global view of dengue virus-induced gene regulation in mast cells, primary human cord blood-derived mast cells (CBMCs and the KU812 and HMC-1 mast cell lines were infected with dengue virus in the presence of dengue-immune sera and their responses were evaluated at the mRNA and protein levels. Mast cells responded to antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection or polyinosiniċpolycytidylic acid treatment with the production of type I interferons and the rapid and potent production of chemokines including CCL4, CCL5 and CXCL10. Multiple interferon-stimulated genes were also upregulated as well as mRNA and protein for the RNA sensors PKR, RIG-I and MDA5. Dengue virus-induced chemokine production by KU812 cells was significantly modulated by siRNA knockdown of RIG-I and PKR, in a negative and positive manner, respectively. Pretreatment of fresh KU812 cells with supernatants from dengue virus-infected mast cells provided protection from subsequent infection with dengue virus in a type I interferon-dependent manner. These findings support a role for tissue-resident mast cells in the early detection of antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection via RNA sensors, the protection of neighbouring cells through interferon production and the potential recruitment of

  20. Quantitative analysis of individual hepatocyte growth factor receptor clusters in influenza A virus infected human epithelial cells using localization microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiaoyun; Dierkes, Rüdiger; Kaufmann, Rainer; Cremer, Christoph

    2014-04-01

    In this report, we applied a special localization microscopy technique (Spectral Precision Distance/Spatial Position Determination Microscopy/SPDM) to quantitatively analyze the effect of influenza A virus (IAV) infection on the spatial distribution of individual HGFR (Hepatocyte Growth Factor Receptor) proteins on the membrane of human epithelial cells at the single molecule resolution level. We applied this SPDM method to Alexa 488 labeled HGFR proteins with two different ligands. The ligands were either HGF (Hepatocyte Growth Factor), or IAV. In addition, the HGFR distribution in a control group of mock-incubated cells without any ligands was investigated. The spatial distribution of 1×10(6) individual HGFR proteins localized in large regions of interest on membranes of 240 cells was quantitatively analyzed and found to be highly non-random. Between 21% and 24% of the HGFR molecules were located in 44,304 small clusters with an average diameter of 54nm. The mean density of HGFR molecule signals per individual cluster was very similar in control cells, in cells with ligand only, and in IAV infected cells, independent of the incubation time. From the density of HGFR molecule signals in the clusters and the diameter of the clusters, the number of HGFR molecule signals per cluster was estimated to be in the range between 4 and 11 (means 5-6). This suggests that the membrane bound HGFR clusters form small molecular complexes with a maximum diameter of few tens of nm, composed of a relatively low number of HGFR molecules. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Viral Membrane Proteins - Channels for Cellular Networking. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Human beta-defensin 1, 2 and 3 production by amniotic epithelial cells with respect to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, HPV oncogenic potential and the mode of delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szukiewicz, Dariusz; Alkhalayla, Habib; Pyzlak, Michal; Watroba, Mateusz; Szewczyk, Grzegorz; Wejman, Jaroslaw

    2016-08-01

    Human beta-defensins (HBD) produced by human amniotic epithelial cells (HAEC) co-create an innate antiviral immune response in the materno-placento-fetal unit. Oncogenic potential of HPV may reflect its ability to avoid immune recognition. In this study we assessed the risk of HAEC infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) in relation to the type of labor and the impact of the oncogenic potential of HPV on HBD production in HAEC. A comparative analysis [HPV(+) vs. HPV(-)HAEC] of the production of HBD were performed. HAEC were isolated from placentas of 116 HPV(+) and 36 HPV(-) parturients (groups I and II, respectively) using trypsin-based method. The cases of premature rupture of membranes (PROM), natural labors (NL) and cesarean sections (CS) were analysed in respective subgroups. High-risk (HR-HPV) and low-risk (LR-HPV) genotypes of HPV in cervical smears and HAEC were identified using the Roche Linear Array(®) HPV Genotyping Test. HBD-1,-2,-3 concentrations in the HAEC culture supernatant were assessed using ELISA. The highest percentage (42.1%) of HPV transmission to HAEC occurred in PROM, an intermediate value was observed after NL (38.5%), and the lowest (25.6%) after CS. The mean concentrations of HBD-2 and HBD-3 in group I were up to 3.1- and 2.8-fold higher (p infection compared with HR-HPV. The course of labor and the mode of delivery influence the risk of HPV transmission to the HAEC. HPV infection upregulates HBD-2 and HBD-3 production in HAEC. Smaller increases in HBD-2 level after HR-HPV infection as compared to LR-HPV may affect cancerogenesis. Therapeutic potential of HBD-2 for HR-HPV infection should be assessed in future studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. HCV Infection Induces Autocrine Interferon Signaling by Human Liver Endothelial Cell and Release of Exosomes, Which Inhibits Viral Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giugliano, Silvia; Kriss, Michael; Golden-Mason, Lucy; Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; Stone, Amy E.L.; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Mitchell, Angela; Khetani, Salman R.; Yamane, Daisuke; Stoddard, Mark; Li, Hui; Shaw, George M.; Edwards, Michael G.; Lemon, Stanley M.; Gale, Michael; Shah, Vijay H.; Rosen, Hugo R.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) make up a large proportion of the non-parenchymal cells in the liver. LSECs are involved in induction of immune tolerance, but little is known about their functions during hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Methods Primary human LSECs (HLSECs) and immortalized liver endothelial cells (TMNK-1) were exposed to various forms of HCV, including full-length transmitted/founder virus, sucrose-purified Japanese Fulminant Hepatitis-1 (JFH-1), a virus encoding a luciferase reporter, and the HCV-specific pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules. Cells were analyzed by confocal immunofluorescence, immunohistochemical, and PCR assays. Results HLSECs internalized HCV, independent of cell–cell contacts; HCV RNA was translated but not replicated. Through pattern recognition receptors (TLR7 and retinoic acid inducible gene 1), HCV RNA induced consistent and broad transcription of multiple interferons (IFNs); supernatants from primary HLSECs transfected with HCV-specific pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules increased induction of IFNs and IFN-stimulated genes in HLSECs. Recombinant type I and type III IFNs strongly up-regulated HLSEC transcription of interferon λ 3 (IFNL3) and viperin (RSAD2), which inhibit replication of HCV. Compared to CD8+ T cells, HLSECs suppressed HCV replication within Huh7.5.1 cells, also inducing IFN-stimulated genes in co-culture. Conditioned media from IFN-stimulated HLSECs induced expression of antiviral genes by uninfected primary human hepatocytes. Exosomes, derived from HLSECs following stimulation with either type I or type III IFNs, controlled HCV replication in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusions Cultured HLSECs produce factors that mediate immunity against HCV. HLSECs induce self-amplifying IFN-mediated responses and release of exosomes with antiviral activity. PMID:25447848

  3. Flow cytometry crossmatch reactivity with pronase-treated T cells induced by non-HLA autoantibodies in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyk, Katarzyna; Barrios, Kelly; Magas, Daniel; Sieg, Kristin; Labuda, Bozena; Jendrisak, Martin D; Jaramillo, Andrés

    2016-06-01

    Pronase treatment is used in the flow cytometry crossmatch (FCXM) to prevent nonspecific antibody binding on B cells. However, we have observed unexpected positive results with pronase-treated T cells in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. In this study, 25 HIV-infected patients without HLA antibodies were tested with pronase-treated and nontreated cells. HIV-positive sera were pretreated with reducing agents and preabsorbed with pronase-treated and nontreated T or B cells before crossmatching. All patients displayed FCXM reactivity with pronase-treated T cells but not with nontreated T cells. None of the patients exhibited FCXM reactivity with pronase-treated and nontreated B cells. These patients displayed FCXM reactivity with pronase-treated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells but not with their nontreated counterparts. Preabsorption with pronase-treated T cells reduced the T cell FCXM reactivity. Preabsorption with pronase-treated B cells or nontreated T and B cells did not have any effect on the T cell FCXM reactivity. Pretreatment with reducing agents did not affect the T cell FCXM reactivity. 15 of 21 HIV-infected kidney allograft recipients with pronase-treated T cell FCXM reactivity display long-term graft survival (1193±631days). These data indicate that HIV-infected patients have nondeleterious autoantibodies recognizing cryptic epitopes exposed by pronase on T cells.

  4. Effects of cytomegalovirus infection in human neural precursor cells depend on their differentiation state

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    © 2015, Journal of NeuroVirology, Inc. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most common cause of congenital infection in developed countries and a major cause of neurological disability in children. Although CMV can affect multiple organs, the most important sequelae of intrauterine infection are related to lesions of the central nervous system. However, little is known about the pathogenesis and the cellular events responsible for neuronal damage in infants with congenital infection. Some studies ha...

  5. NK Cells and Poxvirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah N. Burshtyn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years our understanding of the role of NK cells in the response to viral infection has grown rapidly. Not only do we realize viruses have many immune evasion strategies to escape NK cell responses, but that stimulation of NK cell subsets during an antiviral response occurs through receptors seemingly geared directly at viral products and that NK cells can provide a memory response to viral pathogens. Tremendous knowledge has been gained in this area through the study of Herpes viruses, but appreciation for the significance of NK cells in the response to other types of viral infections is growing. The function of NK cells in defense against poxviruses has emerged over several decades beginning with the early seminal studies showing the role of NK cells and the NK gene complex in susceptibility of mouse strains to Ectromelia, a poxvirus pathogen of mice. More recently, greater understanding has emerged of the molecular details of the response. Given that human diseases caused by poxviruses can be as lethal as smallpox or as benign as Molluscum contagiosum, and that Vaccinia virus, the prototypic member of the pox family, persists as a mainstay of vaccine design and has potential as an oncolytic virus for tumor therapy, further research in this area remains important. This review focuses on recent advances in understanding the role of NK cells in the immune response to poxviruses, the receptors involved in activation of NK cells during poxvirus infection, and the viral evasion strategies poxviruses employ to avoid the NK response.

  6. Altered growth, differentiation, and responsiveness to epidermal growth factor of human embryonic mesenchymal cells of palate by persistent rubella virus infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Yoneda, T.; Urade, M; Sakuda, M.; Miyazaki, T

    1986-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that human embryonic mesenchymal cells derived from the palate (HEMP cells) retain alkaline phosphatase (ALP) content and capacity for collagen synthesis after long-term culture, and their growth is markedly stimulated by epidermal growth factor (EGF). There was a dramatic decrease in ALP content and capacity to synthesize collagen in HEMP cells (HEMP-RV cells) persistently infected with rubella virus (RV). EGF increased ALP activity and decreased collagen synthesis...

  7. Regulation of type I-interferon responses in the human epidermal melanocyte cell line SKMEL infected by the Ross River alphavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assi, Mohamad; Thon-Hon, Vincent Gérard; Jaffar-Bandjee, Marie-Christine; Martinez, Audrey; Gasque, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Melanocytes are melanin-producing cells and with emerging innate immune functions including the expression of antiviral interferon-type I cytokines. We herein ascertained the susceptibility of the human melanocytes to Ross River alphavirus (RRV) infection and analyzed the subsequent immune responses. We demonstrated for the first time that (1) SKMEL-28 melanocyte cell line was susceptible to RRV infection and displaying major cytopathic activities and (2) RRV interfered with the interferon-type I response by altering nuclear translocation of pSTAT1 and pSTAT2 in infected SKMEL-28. These results suggest that the human melanoma cell line SKMEL-28 is a valuable model to analyze the mechanisms involved in severe skin manifestations and melanocyte's immunity at the portal of entry of major infection by arboviruses.

  8. Direct transfer of viral and cellular proteins from varicella-zoster virus-infected non-neuronal cells to human axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryan, Sergei; Yee, Michael B; Glick, Yair; Gerber, Doron; Kepten, Eldad; Garini, Yuval; Yang, In Hong; Kinchington, Paul R; Goldstein, Ronald S

    2015-01-01

    Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV), the alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella upon primary infection and Herpes zoster (shingles) following reactivation in latently infected neurons, is known to be fusogenic. It forms polynuclear syncytia in culture, in varicella skin lesions and in infected fetal human ganglia xenografted to mice. After axonal infection using VZV expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) in compartmentalized microfluidic cultures there is diffuse filling of axons with GFP as well as punctate fluorescence corresponding to capsids. Use of viruses with fluorescent fusions to VZV proteins reveals that both proteins encoded by VZV genes and those of the infecting cell are transferred in bulk from infecting non-neuronal cells to axons. Similar transfer of protein to axons was observed following cell associated HSV1 infection. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments provide evidence that this transfer is by diffusion of proteins from the infecting cells into axons. Time-lapse movies and immunocytochemical experiments in co-cultures demonstrate that non-neuronal cells fuse with neuronal somata and proteins from both cell types are present in the syncytia formed. The fusogenic nature of VZV therefore may enable not only conventional entry of virions and capsids into axonal endings in the skin by classical entry mechanisms, but also by cytoplasmic fusion that permits viral protein transfer to neurons in bulk.

  9. Direct transfer of viral and cellular proteins from varicella-zoster virus-infected non-neuronal cells to human axons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei Grigoryan

    Full Text Available Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV, the alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella upon primary infection and Herpes zoster (shingles following reactivation in latently infected neurons, is known to be fusogenic. It forms polynuclear syncytia in culture, in varicella skin lesions and in infected fetal human ganglia xenografted to mice. After axonal infection using VZV expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP in compartmentalized microfluidic cultures there is diffuse filling of axons with GFP as well as punctate fluorescence corresponding to capsids. Use of viruses with fluorescent fusions to VZV proteins reveals that both proteins encoded by VZV genes and those of the infecting cell are transferred in bulk from infecting non-neuronal cells to axons. Similar transfer of protein to axons was observed following cell associated HSV1 infection. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP experiments provide evidence that this transfer is by diffusion of proteins from the infecting cells into axons. Time-lapse movies and immunocytochemical experiments in co-cultures demonstrate that non-neuronal cells fuse with neuronal somata and proteins from both cell types are present in the syncytia formed. The fusogenic nature of VZV therefore may enable not only conventional entry of virions and capsids into axonal endings in the skin by classical entry mechanisms, but also by cytoplasmic fusion that permits viral protein transfer to neurons in bulk.

  10. Liver immune-pathogenesis and therapy of human liver tropic virus infection in humanized mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bility, Moses T; Li, Feng; Cheng, Liang; Su, Lishan

    2013-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infect and replicate primarily in human hepatocytes. Few reliable and easy accessible animal models are available for studying the immune system's contribution to the liver disease progression during hepatitis virus infection. Humanized mouse models reconstituted with human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been developed to study human immunology, human immunodeficiency virus 1 infection, and immunopathogenesis. However, a humanized mouse model engrafted with both human immune and human liver cells is needed to study infection and immunopathogenesis of HBV/HCV infection in vivo. We have recently developed the humanized mouse model with both human immune and human liver cells (AFC8-hu HSC/Hep) to study immunopathogenesis and therapy of HCV infection in vivo. In this review, we summarize the current models of HBV/HCV infection and their limitations in immunopathogenesis. We will then present our recent findings of HCV infection and immunopathogenesis in the AFC8-hu HSC/Hep mouse, which supports HCV infection, human T-cell response and associated liver pathogenesis. Inoculation of humanized mice with primary HCV isolates resulted in long-term HCV infection. HCV infection induced elevated infiltration of human immune cells in the livers of HCV-infected humanized mice. HCV infection also induced HCV-specific T-cell immune response in lymphoid tissues of humanized mice. Additionally, HCV infection induced liver fibrosis in humanized mice. Anti-human alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA) staining showed elevated human hepatic stellate cell activation in HCV-infected humanized mice. We discuss the limitation and future improvements of the AFC8-hu HSC/Hep mouse model and its application in evaluating novel therapeutics, as well as studying both HCV and HBV infection, human immune responses, and associated human liver fibrosis and cancer.

  11. CD8αα expression marks terminally differentiated human CD8+ T cells expanded in chronic viral infection

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    Lucy Jane Walker

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The T cell co-receptor CD8αβ enhances T cell sensitivity to antigen, however studies indicate CD8αα has the converse effect and acts as a co-repressor. Using a combination of Thymic Leukaemia antigen (TL tetramer, which directly binds CD8αα, anti-CD161 and anti-Vα7.2 antibodies we have been able for the first time to clearly define CD8αα expression on human CD8 T cells subsets. In healthy controls CD8αα is most highly expressed by CD161 bright (CD161++ mucosal associated invariant T (MAIT cells, with CD8αα expression highly restricted to the TCR Vα7.2+ cells of this subset. We also identified CD8αα-expressing populations within the CD161 mid (CD161+ and negative (CD161- non-MAIT CD8 T cell subsets and show TL-tetramer binding to correlate with expression of CD8β at low levels in the context of maintained CD8α expression (CD8α+CD8βlow. In addition, we found CD161-CD8α+CD8βlow populations to be significantly expanded in the peripheral blood of HIV-1 and hepatitis B (mean of 47% and 40% of CD161- T cells respectively infected individuals. Such CD8αα expressing T cells are an effector-memory population (CD45RA-, CCR7-, CD62L- that express markers of activation and maturation (HLA-DR+, CD28-, CD27-, CD57+ and are functionally distinct, expressing greater levels of TNF-α and IFN-γ on stimulation and perforin at rest than their CD8α+CD8βhigh counterparts. Antigen-specific T cells in HLA-B*4201+HIV-1 infected patients are found within both the CD161-CD8α+CD8βhigh and CD161-CD8α+CD8βlow populations. Overall we have clearly defined CD8αα expressing human T cell subsets using the TL-tetramer, and have demonstrated CD161-CD8α+CD8βlow populations, highly expanded in disease settings, to co-express CD8αβ and CD8αα. Co-expression of CD8αα on CD8αβ T cells may impact on their overall function in-vivo and contribute to the distinctive phenotype of highly differentiated populations in HBV and HIV-1 infection.

  12. Barefoot Plantar Pressure Indicates Progressive Neurological Damage in Patients with Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Infection.

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    Beatriz Helena B Vasconcelos

    Full Text Available The human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1 is a retrovirus associated with neurological alterations; individuals with HTLV-1 infection may develop HTLV-1 associated myelopathy / tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. Frequent neurological complaints include foot numbness and leg weakness. In this study, we compared the distribution of the body weight on different areas of the foot in HTLV-1 patients with HAM/TSP, asymptomatic HTLV-1 patients, and healthy individuals.We studied 36 HTLV-1 infected patients, who were divided in two groups of 18 patients each based on whether or not they had been diagnosed with HAM/TSP, and 17 control subjects. The evaluation included an interview on the patient's clinical history and examinations of the patient's reflexes, foot skin tactile sensitivity, and risk of falling. The pressure distribution on different areas of the foot was measured with baropodometry, using a pressure platform, while the patients had their eyes open or closed.The prevalence of neurological disturbances-altered reflexes and skin tactile sensitivity and increased risk of falling-was higher in HTLV-1 HAM/TSP patients than in HTLV-1 asymptomatic patients. The medium and maximum pressure values were higher in the forefoot than in the midfoot and hindfoot in both HTLV-1 groups. In addition, the pressure on the hindfoot was lower in HAM/TSP patients compared to control subjects.The neurological disturbances associated with HTLV-1 infection gradually worsened from HTLV-1 asymptomatic patients to HAM/TSP patients. Baropodometry is a valuable tool to establish the extent of neurological damage in patients suffering from HTLV-1 infection.

  13. Low prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1), HIV-2, and human T cell lymphotropic virus-1 infection in Somalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, D A; Corwin, A L; Constantine, N T; Omar, M A; Guled, A; Yusef, M; Roberts, C R; Watts, D M

    1991-12-01

    A seroepidemiologic survey was conducted to determine the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), HIV-2, human T cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I), and Treponema pallidum infection among southern Somalis. Sera were collected from 1,269 study subjects in the urban area of the capital city, Mogadishu, and in the rural towns of Merka, Qoryoley, and Kismayo. The subjects included 57 prostitutes, 79 sexually transmitted disease (STD) patients, and 1,133 others, including outpatient and hospitalized patients with leprosy, tuberculosis, other infectious diseases, individuals from rehabilitation camps and secondary schools, and Ethiopian immigrants. Results indicated that none of the sera were positive for HIV-1 and HIV-2 by Western blot, but one was positive for HTLV-I. The prostitutes had a significantly higher prevalence of treponemal antibody (50.8%; P less than 0.0001) than either the STD patients (12.6%) or the other subjects (5.2%). Epidemiologic data indicated that 94% of the males and females were circumcised and only 2.6% of the males used condoms. Overall, the results of this study suggested a very low prevalence of HIV-1, HIV-2, and HTLV-I infections, especially among prostitutes and STD patients, who were considered at greatest risk of contracting these retroviral infections.

  14. Relationship between regulatory T cells and immune activation in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients interrupting antiretroviral therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Weiss

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Persistent immune activation plays a central role in driving Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV disease progression. Whether CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs are harmful by suppressing HIV-specific immune responses and/or beneficial through a decrease in immune activation remains debatable. We analysed the relationship between proportion and number of regulatory T cells (Tregs and immune activation in HIV-infected patients interrupting an effective antiretroviral therapy (ART. Twenty-five patients were included in a substudy of a prospective multicenter trial of treatment interruption (TI (ANRS 116. Proportions and numbers of Tregs and the proportion of activated CD4 and CD8 T cells were assessed at baseline and month 12 (M12 of TI. Specific anti-HIV CD4 and CD8 responses were investigated at baseline and M12. Non parametric univariate analyses and multivariate linear regression models were conducted. At baseline, the proportion of Tregs negatively correlated with the proportion of HLA-DR+CD8+T cells (r=-0.519. Following TI, the proportion of Tregs increased from 6.3% to 7.2% (p=0.029; absolute numbers of Tregs decreased. The increase in the proportion of HLA-DR+CD38+CD8+T cells was significantly related to the increase in proportion of Tregs (p=0.031. At M12, the proportion of Tregs did not negatively correlate with CD8 T-cell activation. Nevertheless, Tregs retain a suppressive function since depletion of Treg-containing CD4+CD25+ cells led to an increase in lymphoproliferative responses in most patients studied. Our data suggest that Tregs are efficient in controlling residual immune activation in patients with ART-mediated viral suppression. However, the insufficient increase in the proportion and/or the decrease in the absolute number of Tregs result in a failure to control immune activation following TI. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00118677.

  15. Quantitative analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected CD4+ cell proteome: dysregulated cell cycle progression and nuclear transport coincide with robust virus production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Eric Y; Qian, Wei-Jun; Diamond, Deborah L; Liu, Tao; Gritsenko, Marina A; Monroe, Matthew E; Camp, David G; Smith, Richard D; Katze, Michael G

    2007-07-01

    Relatively little is known at the functional genomic level about the global host response to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Microarray analyses by several laboratories, including our own, have revealed that HIV-1 infection causes significant changes in host mRNA abundance and regulation of several cellular biological pathways. However, it remains unclear what consequences these changes bring about at the protein level. Here we report the expression levels of approximately 3,200 proteins in the CD4(+) CEMx174 cell line after infection with the LAI strain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1); the proteins were assessed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry coupled with stable isotope labeling and the accurate mass and time tag approach. Furthermore, we found that 687 (21%) proteins changed in abundance at the peak of virus production at 36 h postinfection. Pathway analysis revealed that the differential expression of proteins was concentrated in select biological pathways, exemplified by ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes in ubiquitination, carrier proteins in nucleocytoplasmic transport, cyclin-dependent kinase in cell cycle progression, and pyruvate dehydrogenase of the citrate cycle pathways. Moreover, we observed changes in the abundance of proteins with known interactions with HIV-1 viral proteins. Our proteomic analysis captured changes in the host protein milieu at the time of robust virus production, depicting changes in cellular processes that may contribute to virus replication. Continuing analyses are expected to focus on blocking virus replication by targeting these pathways and their effector proteins.

  16. Induction of cyclooxygenase-2 expression during HIV-1-infected monocyte-derived macrophage and human brain microvascular endothelial cell interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereira, CF; Boven, LA; Middel, J; Verhoef, J; Nottet, HSLM

    2000-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1)-associated dementia (HAD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by HIV infection and replication in brain tissue. HIV-1-infected monocytes overexpress inflammatory molecules that facilitate their entry into the brain. Prostanoids are lipid mediators

  17. Component co-expression and purification of recombinant human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from baculovirus infected SF9 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yong; Wang, Juan; Zhang, Guofeng; Oza, Khyati; Myers, Linda; Holbert, Marc A; Sweitzer, Sharon

    2014-05-01

    The mammalian pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) is a multi-component mitochondrial enzyme that plays a key role in the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA connecting glycolysis to the citric acid cycle. Recent studies indicate that targeting the regulation of PDC enzymatic activity might offer therapeutic opportunities by inhibiting cancer cell metabolism. To facilitate drug discovery in this area, a well defined PDC sample is needed. Here, we report a new method of producing functional, recombinant, high quality human PDC complex. All five components were co-expressed in the cytoplasm of baculovirus-infected SF9 cells by deletion of the mitochondrial localization signal sequences of all the components and E1a was FLAG-tagged to facilitate purification. The protein FLAG tagged E1a complex was purified using FLAG-M2 affinity resin, followed by Superdex 200 sizing chromatography. The E2 and E3BP components were then Lipoylated using an enzyme based in vitro process. The resulting PDC is over 90% pure and homogenous. This non-phosphorylated, lipoylated human PDC was demonstrated to produce a robust detection window when used to develop an enzyme coupled assay of PDHK.

  18. Antiviral CD8(+) T Cells Restricted by Human Leukocyte Antigen Class II Exist during Natural HIV Infection and Exhibit Clonal Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranasinghe, Srinika; Lamothe, Pedro A; Soghoian, Damien Z; Kazer, Samuel W; Cole, Michael B; Shalek, Alex K; Yosef, Nir; Jones, R Brad; Donaghey, Faith; Nwonu, Chioma; Jani, Priya; Clayton, Gina M; Crawford, Frances; White, Janice; Montoya, Alana; Power, Karen; Allen, Todd M; Streeck, Hendrik; Kaufmann, Daniel E; Picker, Louis J; Kappler, John W; Walker, Bruce D

    2016-10-18

    CD8(+) T cell recognition of virus-infected cells is characteristically restricted by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I, although rare examples of MHC class II restriction have been reported in Cd4-deficient mice and a macaque SIV vaccine trial using a recombinant cytomegalovirus vector. Here, we demonstrate the presence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II-restricted CD8(+) T cell responses with antiviral properties in a small subset of HIV-infected individuals. In these individuals, T cell receptor β (TCRβ) analysis revealed that class II-restricted CD8(+) T cells underwent clonal expansion and mediated killing of HIV-infected cells. In one case, these cells comprised 12% of circulating CD8(+) T cells, and TCRα analysis revealed two distinct co-expressed TCRα chains, with only one contributing to binding of the class II HLA-peptide complex. These data indicate that class II-restricted CD8(+) T cell responses can exist in a chronic human viral infection, and may contribute to immune control. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Regulatory T Cell Effect on CD8(+) T Cell Responses to Human Herpesvirus 8 Infection and Development of Kaposi's Sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepone, Lauren M; Rappocciolo, Giovanna; Piazza, Paolo A; Campbell, Diana M; Jenkins, Frank J; Rinaldo, Charles R

    2017-03-02

    We assessed CD8(+) T cell reactivity to human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8; Kaposi's sarcoma [KS]-associated herpesvirus) and the role of CD4(+)CD25(hi)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) in HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants of the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study who did or did not develop KS. There were similarly low CD8(+) T cell interferon-γ responses to MHC class I-restricted epitopes of HHV-8 lytic and latent proteins over 5.7 years before KS in participants who developed KS compared to those who did not. T cell reactivity to HHV-8 antigens was low relative to responses to a combination of cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus and influenza A virus (CEF) peptide epitopes, and dominant HIV peptide epitopes. There was no change in %Treg in the HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants who did not develop KS, whereas there was a significant increase in %Treg in HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants who developed KS beginning 1.8 years before development of KS. Removal of Treg enhanced HHV-8-specific T cell responses in HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants who did or did not develop KS, with a similar pattern observed in response to CEF and HIV peptides. Thus, long-term, low levels of anti-HHV-8 CD8(+) T cell reactivity were present in both HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected men who did and did not develop KS. This was related to moderately enhanced Treg function.

  20. Defective glucose and lipid metabolism in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with lipodystrophy involve liver, muscle tissue and pancreatic beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Dela, Flemming

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Lipodystrophy and insulin resistance are prevalent among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients on combined antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Aiming to provide a detailed description of the metabolic adverse effects of HIV-lipodystrophy, we investigated several aspects of ....... CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that normoglycaemic lipodystrophic HIV-infected patients display impaired glucose and lipid metabolism in multiple pathways involving liver, muscle tissue and beta-cell function....

  1. Enterococcus faecalis infection causes inflammation, intracellular oxphos-independent ROS production, and DNA damage in human gastric cancer cells.

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    Jesper A B Strickertsson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Achlorhydria caused by e.g. atrophic gastritis allows for bacterial overgrowth, which induces chronic inflammation and damage to the mucosal cells of infected individuals driving gastric malignancies and cancer. Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis can colonize achlohydric stomachs and we therefore wanted to study the impact of E. faecalis infection on inflammatory response, reactive oxygen species (ROS formation, mitochondrial respiration, and mitochondrial genetic stability in gastric mucosal cells. METHODS: To separate the changes induced by bacteria from those of the inflammatory cells we established an in vitro E. faecalis infection model system using the gastric carcinoma cell line MKN74. Total ROS and superoxide was measured by fluorescence microscopy. Cellular oxygen consumption was characterized non-invasively using XF24 microplate based respirometry. Gene expression was examined by microarray, and response pathways were identified by Gene Set Analysis (GSA. Selected gene transcripts were verified by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. Mitochondrial mutations were determined by sequencing. RESULTS: Infection of MKN74 cells with E. faecalis induced intracellular ROS production through a pathway independent of oxidative phosphorylation (oxphos. Furthermore, E. faecalis infection induced mitochondrial DNA instability. Following infection, genes coding for inflammatory response proteins were transcriptionally up-regulated while DNA damage repair and cell cycle control genes were down-regulated. Cell growth slowed down when infected with viable E. faecalis and responded in a dose dependent manner to E. faecalis lysate. CONCLUSIONS: Infection by E. faecalis induced an oxphos-independent intracellular ROS response and damaged the mitochondrial genome in gastric cell culture. Finally the bacteria induced an NF-κB inflammatory response as well as impaired DNA damage response and cell cycle control gene

  2. BST2/CD317 counteracts human coronavirus 229E productive infection by tethering virions at the cell surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shiu-Mei [Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei Veterans General Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei 11217, Taiwan (China); Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, Kuo-Jung [Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei Veterans General Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei 11217, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chin-Tien, E-mail: chintien@ym.edu.tw [Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei Veterans General Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei 11217, Taiwan (China); Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-20

    Bone marrow stromal antigen 2 (BST2), an interferon-inducible antiviral factor, has been shown to block the release of various enveloped viruses from cells. It has also been identified as an innate immune system component. Most enveloped viruses subject to BST2 restriction bud at the plasma membrane. Here we report our findings that (a) the production of human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E) progeny viruses, whose budding occurs at the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC), markedly decreases in the presence of BST2; and (b) BST2 knockdown expression results in enhanced HCoV-229E virion production. Electron microscopy analyses indicate that HCoV-229E virions are tethered to cell surfaces or intracellular membranes by BST2. Our results suggest that BST2 exerts a broad blocking effect against enveloped virus release, regardless of whether budding occurs at the plasma membrane or intracellular compartments. - Highlights: • BST2 knockdown expression results in enhanced HCoV-229E egress. • HCoV-229E virions are tethered to cell surfaces or intracellular membranes by BST2. • HCoV-229E infection at high MOI can significantly downregulate HeLa BST2 and rescue HIV-1 egress.

  3. Peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst prevents apoptotic cell death in a human astrocytoma cell line incubated with supernatants of HIV-infected macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perno Carlo

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxidative stress has shown to contribute in the mechanisms underlying apoptotic cell death occuring in AIDS-dementia complex. Here we investigated the role of peroxynitrite in apoptosis occurring in astroglial cells incubated with supernatants of HIV-infected human primary macrophages (M/M. Results Flow cytometric analysis (FACS of human cultured astrocytes shortly incubated with HIV-1-infected M/M supernatants showed apoptotic cell death, an effect accompanied by pronounced staining for nitrotyrosine (footprint of peroxynitrite and by abnormal formation of malondialdehyde (MDA. Pretreatment of astrocytes with the peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst FeTMPS antagonized HIV-related astrocytic apoptosis, MDA formation and nitrotyrosine staining. Conclusions Taken together, our results suggest that inibition of peroxynitrite leads to protection against peroxidative stress accompanying HIV-related apoptosis of astrocytes. Overall results support the role of peroxynitrite in HIV-related programmed death of astrocytes and suggest the use of peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst to counteract HIV-1-related neurological disorders.

  4. Virus-Specific Interleukin-17-Producing CD4+ T Cells Are Detectable in Early Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Feng Yun; Merchant, Asad; Kovacs, Colin M.; Loutfy, Mona; Persad, Desmond; Ostrowski, Mario A.

    2008-01-01

    TH-17 cells have been shown to play a role in bacterial defense, acute inflammation, and autoimmunity. We examined the role of interleukin 17 (IL-17) production in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Both HIV-1- and cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific IL-17-producing CD4+ T cells were detectable in early HIV-1 infection but were reduced to nondetectable levels in chronic and nonprogressive HIV-1 infection. IL-17-producing CMV-specific cells were not detected in blood from HIV-1-uninfected normal volunteers. Virus-specific TH-17 cells could coexpress other cytokines and could express CCR4 or CXCR3. Although the etiology of these cells has yet to be established, we propose that microbial translocation may induce them. PMID:18434403

  5. [Parameters of the CD4-Cell count and viral load in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infected patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selimova, L M; Serebrovskaya, L V; Ivanova, L A; Kravchenko, A V; Buravtsova, E V

    2015-01-01

    In this work the specific features of parameters of plasma CD4 T-lymphocytes count and level virus RNA in the HIV-infected patients were studied. 22% correlation between reduction of CD4 cell count and an increase in virus RNA level was observed in persons that did not receive antiretroviral treatment during the third HIV-infection phase. During this phase of infection patients exhibited a growth of the median value of virus load in cases of both rise as decline in CD4 cell count during long observation period. In addition, towards the end of the observation period, the percentage of patients with virus load > 3.3 Ig copies/ml considerably expanded. 43% correlation between CD4 cell count and duration of the HIV-infection was detected during the fourth infection phase in persons that did not receive antiretroviral treatment. Most of the patients in the third and the fourth infection phases had essential CD4 cell count growth during antiretroviral treatment. Best values were observed in patients with the initial value of CD4 > 400 cells/μl belonging to the third HIV-infection phase.

  6. Current Status of Monocyte Differentiation-Inducing (MDI Factors Derived from Human Fetal Membrane Chorion Cells Undergoing Apoptosis after Infl uenza Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noboru Uchide

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza virus infection induces apoptosis and the expression of a set of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes, such as interleukin (IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, interferon (IFN-β and IFN-γ, in cultured human fetal membrane chorion cells. Monocyte differentiation-inducing (MDI activity in culture supernatants is simultaneously increased by the virus infection. The MDI activity is predominantly influenced by IL-6 molecule in culture supernatants, and partly by TNF-α and IFN-β, but not IFN-γ, molecules. The MDI factors are able to induce the mRNA expression of macrophage class A scavenger receptor (SR-A, which is one of adhesion and apoptotic cell-recognizing molecules, and gp91phox, which is a catalytic subunit of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase enzyme complex, on monocytic cells. As a result, monocytes are initiated to differentiate into well-matured macrophages capable of adhering and producing superoxide through NADPH oxidase. The matured macrophages, obtained from human monocytic leukemia THP-1 cells by the treatment with MDI factors, phagocytose apoptotic chorion cell debris resulting from the virus infection. Subsequent to phagocytosis, an abrupt increase of superoxide production by macrophages may occur. In this article, we summarize recent knowledge about the MDI factors derived from human fetal membrane chorion cells undergoing apoptosis after influenza virus infection, and discuss their possible pathological roles during pregnancy.

  7. Cross-reactivity and expansion of dengue-specific T cells during acute primary and secondary infections in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friberg, Heather; Bashyam, Hema; Toyosaki-Maeda, Tomoko; Potts, James A; Greenough, Thomas; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Gibbons, Robert V; Nisalak, Ananda; Srikiatkhachorn, Anon; Green, Sharone; Stephens, Henry A F; Rothman, Alan L; Mathew, Anuja

    2011-01-01

    Serotype-cross-reactive memory T cells responding to secondary dengue virus (DENV) infection are thought to contribute to disease. However, epitope-specific T cell responses have not been thoroughly compared between subjects with primary versus secondary DENV infection. We studied CD8(+) T cells specific for the HLA-A*1101-restricted NS3(133) epitope in a cohort of A11(+) DENV-infected patients throughout acute illness and convalescence. We compared the expansion, serotype-cross-reactivity, and activation of these cells in PBMC from patients experiencing primary or secondary infection and mild or severe disease by flow cytometry. Our results show expansion and activation of DENV-specific CD8(+) T cells during acute infection, which are predominantly serotype-cross-reactive regardless of DENV infection history. These data confirm marked T cell activation and serotype-cross-reactivity during the febrile phase of dengue; however, A11-NS3(133)-specific responses did not correlate with prior antigenic exposure or current disease severity.

  8. Suppression of chikungunya virus replication and differential innate responses of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells during co-infection with dengue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Silva, Mariana; Aguilar Briseño, José A; Upasani, Vinit; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Smit, Jolanda M; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A

    2017-06-01

    Dengue and chikungunya are viral diseases transmitted to humans by infected Aedes spp. mosquitoes. With an estimated 390 million infected people per year dengue virus (DENV) currently causes the most prevalent arboviral disease. During the last decade chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has caused large outbreaks and has expanded its territory causing millions of cases in Asia, Africa and America. The viruses share a common mosquito vector and during the acute phase cause similar flu-like symptoms that can proceed to more severe or debilitating symptoms. The growing overlap in the geographical distribution of these mosquito-borne infections has led to an upsurge in reported cases of DENV/CHIKV co-infections. Unfortunately, at present we have little understanding of consequences of the co-infections to the human host. The overall aim of this study was to define viral replication dynamics and the innate immune signature involved in concurrent DENV and CHIKV infections in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We demonstrate that concomitant infection resulted in a significant reduction of CHIKV progeny and moderate enhancement of DENV production. Remarkably, the inhibitory effect of DENV on CHIKV infection occurred independently of DENV replication. Furthermore, changes in type I IFN, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, MCP-1 and IP-10 production were observed during concomitant infections. Notably, co-infections led to a significant increase in the levels of TNF-α and IL-6, cytokines that are widely considered to play a crucial role in the early pathogenesis of both viral diseases. In conclusion, our study reveals the interplay of DENV/CHIKV during concomitant infection and provides a framework to investigate viral interaction during co-infections.

  9. Suppression of chikungunya virus replication and differential innate responses of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells during co-infection with dengue virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Ruiz Silva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Dengue and chikungunya are viral diseases transmitted to humans by infected Aedes spp. mosquitoes. With an estimated 390 million infected people per year dengue virus (DENV currently causes the most prevalent arboviral disease. During the last decade chikungunya virus (CHIKV has caused large outbreaks and has expanded its territory causing millions of cases in Asia, Africa and America. The viruses share a common mosquito vector and during the acute phase cause similar flu-like symptoms that can proceed to more severe or debilitating symptoms. The growing overlap in the geographical distribution of these mosquito-borne infections has led to an upsurge in reported cases of DENV/CHIKV co-infections. Unfortunately, at present we have little understanding of consequences of the co-infections to the human host. The overall aim of this study was to define viral replication dynamics and the innate immune signature involved in concurrent DENV and CHIKV infections in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. We demonstrate that concomitant infection resulted in a significant reduction of CHIKV progeny and moderate enhancement of DENV production. Remarkably, the inhibitory effect of DENV on CHIKV infection occurred independently of DENV replication. Furthermore, changes in type I IFN, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, MCP-1 and IP-10 production were observed during concomitant infections. Notably, co-infections led to a significant increase in the levels of TNF-α and IL-6, cytokines that are widely considered to play a crucial role in the early pathogenesis of both viral diseases. In conclusion, our study reveals the interplay of DENV/CHIKV during concomitant infection and provides a framework to investigate viral interaction during co-infections.

  10. Local CD4 and CD8 T-cell reactivity to HSV-1 antigens documents broad viral protein expression and immune competence in latently infected human trigeminal ganglia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique van Velzen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 infection results in lifelong chronic infection of trigeminal ganglion (TG neurons, also referred to as neuronal HSV-1 latency, with periodic reactivation leading to recrudescent herpetic disease in some persons. HSV-1 proteins are expressed in a temporally coordinated fashion during lytic infection, but their expression pattern during latent infection is largely unknown. Selective retention of HSV-1 reactive T-cells in human TG suggests their role in controlling reactivation by recognizing locally expressed HSV-1 proteins. We characterized the HSV-1 proteins recognized by virus-specific CD4 and CD8 T-cells recovered from human HSV-1-infected TG. T-cell clusters, consisting of both CD4 and CD8 T-cells, surrounded neurons and expressed mRNAs and proteins consistent with in situ antigen recognition and antiviral function. HSV-1 proteome-wide scans revealed that intra-TG T-cell responses included both CD4 and CD8 T-cells directed to one to three HSV-1 proteins per person. HSV-1 protein ICP6 was targeted by CD8 T-cells in 4 of 8 HLA-discordant donors. In situ tetramer staining demonstrated HSV-1-specific CD8 T-cells juxtaposed to TG neurons. Intra-TG retention of virus-specific CD4 T-cells, validated to the HSV-1 peptide level, implies trafficking of viral proteins from neurons to HLA class II-expressing non-neuronal cells for antigen presentation. The diversity of viral proteins targeted by TG T-cells across all kinetic and functional classes of viral proteins suggests broad HSV-1 protein expression, and viral antigen processing and presentation, in latently infected human TG. Collectively, the human TG represents an immunocompetent environment for both CD4 and CD8 T-cell recognition of HSV-1 proteins expressed during latent infection. HSV-1 proteins recognized by TG-resident T-cells, particularly ICP6 and VP16, are potential HSV-1 vaccine candidates.

  11. Polyvinylpyrrolidone-Capped Silver Nanoparticle Inhibits Infection of Carbapenem-Resistant Strain of Acinetobacter baumannii in the Human Pulmonary Epithelial Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishvanath Tiwari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii, an opportunistic ESKAPE pathogen, causes respiratory and urinary tract infections. Its prevalence increases gradually in the clinical setup. Pathogenicity of Acinetobacter is significantly influenced by its ability to infect and survive in human pulmonary cells. Therefore, it is important to study the infection of A. baumannii in human pulmonary host cell (A-549, monitoring surface interacting and internalized bacteria. It was found that during infection of A. baumannii, about 40% bacteria adhered to A-549, whereas 20% got internalized inside pulmonary cell and induces threefold increase in the reactive oxygen species production. We have synthesized polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP-capped AgNPs using chemical methods and tested its efficacy against carbapenem-resistant strain of A. baumannii. PVP-capped silver nanoparticles (PVP-AgNPs (30 µM have shown antibacterial activity against carbapenem-resistant strain of A. baumannii and this concentration does not have any cytotoxic effect on the human pulmonary cell line (IC50 is 130 µM. Similarly, PVP-AgNPs treatment decreases 80% viability of intracellular bacteria, decreases adherence of A. baumannii to A-549 (40 to 2.2%, and decreases intracellular concentration (20 to 1.3% of A. baumannii. This concludes that PVP-AgNPs can be developed as a substitute for carbapenem to control the infection caused by carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii.

  12. Dengue Virus Infection Perturbs Lipid Homeostasis in Infected Mosquito Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, Rushika M.; Riley, Catherine; Isaac, Georgis; Hopf- Jannasch, Amber; Moore, Ronald J.; Weitz, Karl K.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Metz, Thomas O.; Adamec, Jiri; Kuhn, Richard J.

    2012-03-22

    Dengue virus causes {approx}50-100 million infections per year and thus is considered one of the most aggressive arthropod-borne human pathogen worldwide. During its replication, dengue virus induces dramatic alterations in the intracellular membranes of infected cells. This phenomenon is observed both in human and vector-derived cells. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry of mosquito cells, we show that this membrane remodeling is directly linked to a unique lipid repertoire induced by dengue virus infection. Specifically, 15% of the metabolites detected were significantly different between DENV infected and uninfected cells while 85% of the metabolites detected were significantly different in isolated replication complex membranes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that intracellular lipid redistribution induced by the inhibition of fatty acid synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme in lipid biosynthesis, is sufficient for cell survival but is inhibitory to dengue virus replication. Lipids that have the capacity to destabilize and change the curvature of membranes as well as lipids that change the permeability of membranes are enriched in dengue virus infected cells. Several sphingolipids and other bioactive signaling molecules that are involved in controlling membrane fusion, fission, and trafficking as well as molecules that influence cytoskeletal reorganization are also up regulated during dengue infection. These observations shed light on the emerging role of lipids in shaping the membrane and protein environments during viral infections and suggest membrane-organizing principles that may influence virus-induced intracellular membrane architecture.

  13. Dengue virus infection perturbs lipid homeostasis in infected mosquito cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rushika Perera

    Full Text Available Dengue virus causes ∼50-100 million infections per year and thus is considered one of the most aggressive arthropod-borne human pathogen worldwide. During its replication, dengue virus induces dramatic alterations in the intracellular membranes of infected cells. This phenomenon is observed both in human and vector-derived cells. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry of mosquito cells, we show that this membrane remodeling is directly linked to a unique lipid repertoire induced by dengue virus infection. Specifically, 15% of the metabolites detected were significantly different between DENV infected and uninfected cells while 85% of the metabolites detected were significantly different in isolated replication complex membranes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that intracellular lipid redistribution induced by the inhibition of fatty acid synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme in lipid biosynthesis, is sufficient for cell survival but is inhibitory to dengue virus replication. Lipids that have the capacity to destabilize and change the curvature of membranes as well as lipids that change the permeability of membranes are enriched in dengue virus infected cells. Several sphingolipids and other bioactive signaling molecules that are involved in controlling membrane fusion, fission, and trafficking as well as molecules that influence cytoskeletal reorganization are also up regulated during dengue infection. These observations shed light on the emerging role of lipids in shaping the membrane and protein environments during viral infections and suggest membrane-organizing principles that may influence virus-induced intracellular membrane architecture.

  14. Effect of Puumala hantavirus infection on Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cell hemostatic function: platelet interactions, increased tissue factor expression and fibrinolysis regulator release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eGoeijenbier

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Puumala virus (PUUV infection causes over 5000 cases of hemorrhagic fever in Europe annually and can influence the hemostatic balance extensively. Infection might lead to hemorrhage, while a recent study showed an increased risk of myocardial infarction during or shortly after PUUV infection. The mechanism by which this hantavirus influences the coagulation system remains unknown. Therefore we aimed to elucidate mechanisms explaining alterations seen in primary and secondary hemostasis during PUUV infection. By using low passage PUUV isolates to infect primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs we were able to show alterations in the regulation of primary- and secondary hemostasis and in the release of fibrinolysis regulators. Our main finding was an activation of secondary hemostasis due to increased tissue factor expression leading to increased thrombin generation in a functional assay. Furthermore, we showed that during infection platelets adhered to HUVECs and subsequently specifically to PUUV virus particles. Infection of HUVECs with PUUV did not result in increased von Willebrand factor while they produced more plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1 compared to controls. The PAI-1 produced in this model formed complexes with vitronectin. This is the first report that reveals a potential mechanism behind the pro-coagulant changes in PUUV patients, which could be the result of increased thrombin generation due to an increased tissue factor expression on endothelial cells during infection. Furthermore, we provide insight into the contribution of endothelial cell responses regarding hemostasis in PUUV pathogenesis.

  15. Role played by CD4+FOXP3+ regulatory T Cells in suppression of host responses to Haemophilus ducreyi during experimental infection of human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Tenner-Racz, Klara; Racz, Paul; Janowicz, Diane M; Fortney, Kate R; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M

    2010-06-15

    Haemophilus ducreyi causes chancroid, a genital ulcer disease. Among human volunteers, the majority of experimentally infected individuals fail to clear the infection and form pustules. Here, we investigated the role played by CD4(+)FOXP3(+) regulatory T (T(reg)) cells in the formation of pustules. In pustules, there was a significant enrichment of CD4(+)FOXP3(+) T cells, compared with that in peripheral blood. The majority of lesional FOXP3(+) T cells were CD4(+), CD25(+), CD127(lo/-), and CTLA-4(+). FOXP3(+) T cells were found throughout pustules but were most abundant at their base. Significantly fewer lesional CD4(+)FOXP3(+) T cells expressed interferon gamma, compared with lesional CD4(+)FOXP3(-) effector T cells. Depletion of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells from the peripheral blood of infected and uninfected volunteers significantly enhanced proliferation of H. ducreyi-reactive CD4(+) T cells. Our results indicate that the population of CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(lo/-)FOXP3(+) T(reg) cells are expanded at H. ducreyi-infected sites and that these cells may play a role in suppressing the host immune response to the bacterium.

  16. Effects of infection with recombinant adenovirus on human vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quax, P.H.A.; Lamfers, M.L.M.; Grimbergen, J.M.; Teeling, J.; Hoeben, R.C.; Nieuw Amerongen, G.P. van; Hinsbergh, V.W.M. van

    1996-01-01

    The plasminogen activation (PA) system is involved in vascular remodelling. Modulating its activity in vascular cells might be a way to interfere in processes such as angiogenesis and restenosis. Adenoviral vectors have become a favourable tool for direct gene transfer into vascular cells. In the in

  17. Phenotype and susceptibility to HIV infection of CD4+ Th17 cells in the human female reproductive tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Garcia, M; Barr, F D; Crist, S G; Fahey, J V; Wira, C R

    2014-11-01

    Prevention of sexual acquisition of HIV in women requires a substantial increase in our knowledge about HIV-target cell availability and regulation in the female reproductive tract (FRT). In this study, we analyzed the phenotype and susceptibility to HIV infection of CD4(+) T cell in the endometrium (EM), endocervix (END), and ectocervix (ECT) of the FRT. We found that T helper type 17 (Th17) cells represent a major subset in FRT tissues analyzed and that Th17 cells were the main CD4(+) T-cell population expressing C-C motif chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) and CD90. In premenopausal women, CD4(+) T cells and Th17 cells, in particular, were significantly lower in EM relative to END and ECT. Th17 cells were elevated in EM from postmenopausal women relative to premenopausal tissues but not changed in END and ECT. Susceptibility of CD4(+) T cells to HIV infection measured as intracellular p24 was lowest in the EM and highest in the ECT. Additionally, we found that Th17 cells co-expressing CCR5 and CD90 were the most susceptible to HIV infection. Our results provide valuable information for designing preventive strategies directed at targeting highly susceptible target cells in the FRT.

  18. Secretion of human parathyroid hormone from rat pituitary cells infected with a recombinant retrovirus encoding preproparathyroid hormone.

    OpenAIRE

    Hellerman, J G; Cone, R C; Potts, J. T.; Rich, A; Mulligan, R C; Kronenberg, H M

    1984-01-01

    In order to study the functions of precursors to secreted proteins, we expressed cloned DNA encoding human preproparathyroid hormone (preproPTH) in rat pituitary cells. We first constructed a recombinant plasmid containing human preproPTH cDNA and retroviral control signals. This recombinant plasmid was transfected into psi-2 cells, a packaging cell line that produces Moloney murine leukemia viral particles containing no retroviral RNA. The transfected psi-2 cells generated helper-free recomb...

  19. Human CD4(+) T Cell Responses to an Attenuated Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine Parallel Those Induced by Natural Infection in Magnitude, HLA Restriction, and Antigen Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelo, Michael A; Grifoni, Alba; O'Rourke, Patrick H; Sidney, John; Paul, Sinu; Peters, Bjoern; de Silva, Aruna D; Phillips, Elizabeth; Mallal, Simon; Diehl, Sean A; Kirkpatrick, Beth D; Whitehead, Stephen S; Durbin, Anna P; Sette, Alessandro; Weiskopf, Daniela

    2017-03-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is responsible for growing numbers of infections worldwide and has proven to be a significant challenge for vaccine development. We previously demonstrated that CD8(+) T cell responses elicited by a dengue live attenuated virus (DLAV) vaccine resemble those observed after natural infection. In this study, we screened peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from donors vaccinated with a tetravalent DLAV vaccine (TV005) with pools of dengue virus-derived predicted major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II binding peptides. The definition of CD4(+) T cell responses after live vaccination is important because CD4(+) T cells are known contributors to host immunity, including cytokine production, help for CD8(+) T and B cells, and direct cytotoxicity against infected cells. While responses to all antigens were observed, DENV-specific CD4(+) T cells were focused predominantly on the capsid and nonstructural NS3 and NS5 antigens. Importantly, CD4(+) T cell responses in vaccinees were similar in magnitude and breadth to those after natural infection, recognized the same antigen hierarchy, and had similar profiles of HLA restriction. We conclude that TV005 vaccination has the capacity to elicit CD4(+) cell responses closely mirroring those observed in a population associated with natural immunity.IMPORTANCE The development of effective vaccination strategies against dengue virus infection is of high global public health interest. Here we study the CD4 T cell responses elicited by a tetravalent live attenuated dengue vaccine and show that they resemble responses seen in humans naturally exposed to dengue virus. This is an important issue, since it is likely that optimal immunity induced by a vaccine requires induction of CD4(+) responses against the same antigens as those recognized as dominant in natural infection. Detailed knowledge of the T cell response may further contribute to the identification of robust correlates of protection against

  20. Live-cell imaging of the early stages of colony development in Fusarium oxysporum in vitro and ex vivo during infection of a human corneal model

    OpenAIRE

    Kurian, Smija Mariam

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACTThe University of ManchesterName: Smija Mariam KurianDegree title: Doctor of PhilosophyResearch title: Live-cell imaging of the early stages of colony development in Fusarium oxysporum in vitro and ex vivo during infection of a human corneal modelDate: May 2016Abstract: Fusarium oxysporum is a major fungal plant pathogen and emerging human pathogen. It has been hypothesised that conidial anastomosis tube (CAT) fusion may facilitate horizontal gene/chromosome transfer that could result...

  1. Toll-like receptor 4 is involved in the cell cycle modulation and required for effective human cytomegalovirus infection in THP-1 macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcangeletti, Maria-Cristina, E-mail: mariacristina.arcangeletti@unipr.it [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Germini, Diego; Rodighiero, Isabella [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Mirandola, Prisco [Department of Biomedical, Biotechnological and Translational Sciences, University of Parma, Parma (Italy); De Conto, Flora; Medici, Maria-Cristina [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Gatti, Rita [Department of Biomedical, Biotechnological and Translational Sciences, University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Chezzi, Carlo; Calderaro, Adriana [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Parma, Parma (Italy)

    2013-05-25

    Suitable host cell metabolic conditions are fundamental for the effective development of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) lytic cycle. Indeed, several studies have demonstrated the ability of this virus to interfere with cell cycle regulation, mainly by blocking proliferating cells in G1 or G1/S. In the present study, we demonstrate that HCMV deregulates the cell cycle of THP-1 macrophages (a cell line irreversibly arrested in G0) by pushing them into S and G2 phases. Moreover, we show that HCMV infection of THP-1 macrophages leads to Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation. Since various studies have indicated TLR4 to be involved in promoting cell proliferation, here we investigate the possible role of TLR4 in the observed HCMV-induced cell cycle perturbation. Our data strongly support TLR4 as a mediator of HCMV-triggered cell cycle activation in THP-1 macrophages favouring, in turn, the development of an efficient viral lytic cycle. - Highlights: ► We studied HCMV infection impact on THP-1 macrophage cell cycle. ► We analysed the role played by Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 upon HCMV infection. ► HCMV pushes THP-1 macrophages (i.e. resting cells) to re-enter the cell cycle. ► TLR4 pathway inhibition strongly affects the effectiveness of HCMV replication. ► TLR4 pathway inhibition significantly decreases HCMV-induced cell cycle re-entry.

  2. HCMV infection of humanized mice after transplantation of G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells from HCMV-seropositive donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakki, Morgan; Goldman, Devorah C; Streblow, Daniel N; Hamlin, Kimberly L; Krekylwich, Craig N; Fleming, William H; Nelson, Jay A

    2014-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection, including primary infection resulting from transmission from a seropositive donor to a seronegative recipient (D(+)/R(-)), remains a significant problem in the setting of peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT). The lack of a suitable animal model for studying HCMV transmission after PBSCT is a major barrier to understanding this process and, consequently, developing novel interventions to prevent HCMV infection. Our previous work demonstrated that human CD34(+) progenitor cell-engrafted NOD-scid IL2Rγc(null) (NSG) mice support latent HCMV infection after direct inoculation and reactivation after treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. To more accurately recapitulate HCMV infection in the D(+)/R(-) PBSCT setting, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells from seropositive donors were used to engraft NSG mice. All recipient mice demonstrated evidence of HCMV infection in liver, spleen, and bone marrow. These findings validate the NSG mouse model for studying HCMV transmission during PBSCT.

  3. Simultaneous RNA quantification of human and retroviral genomes reveals intact interferon signaling in HTLV-1-infected CD4+ T cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moens Britta

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background IFN-α contributes extensively to host immune response upon viral infection through antiviral, pro-apoptotic, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. Although extensively documented in various types of human cancers and viral infections, controversy exists in the exact mechanism of action of IFN-α in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 and human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 retroviral infections. Results IFN-α displayed strong anti-HIV-1 effects in HIV-1/HTLV-1 co-infected MT-4 cells in vitro, demonstrated by the dose-dependent inhibition of the HIV-1-induced cytopathic effect (IC50 = 83.5 IU/ml, p 50 = 1.2 IU/ml, p  Conclusions Taken together, our results indicate that both the absence of in vitro antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic activity as well as the modest post-transcriptional antiviral activity of IFN-α against HTLV-1, were not due to a cell-intrinsic defect in IFN-α signalisation, but rather represents a retrovirus-specific phenomenon, considering the strong HIV-1 inhibition in co-infected cells.

  4. Regulator and effector functions of T-cell subsets in human Leishmania infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, M

    1997-01-01

    of vaccines against human leishmaniasis should aim at introducing powerful Th1 like responses. Importantly, once generation of either Th1 or Th2 has started, the immune response seems to be locked in this pattern, even when it is harmful to the host. Therefore new vaccines against leishmaniasis should...

  5. Enterococcus faecalis Infection Causes Inflammation, Intracellular Oxphos-Independent ROS Production, and DNA Damage in Human Gastric Cancer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strickertsson, Jesper A. B; Desler, Claus; Martin-Bertelsen, Tomas;

    2013-01-01

    Background Achlorhydria caused by e.g. atrophic gastritis allows for bacterial overgrowth, which induces chronic inflammation and damage to the mucosal cells of infected individuals driving gastric malignancies and cancer. Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) can colonize achlohydric stomachs and we...... therefore wanted to study the impact of E. faecalis infection on inflammatory response, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, mitochondrial respiration, and mitochondrial genetic stability in gastric mucosal cells. Methods To separate the changes induced by bacteria from those of the inflammatory cells...... we established an in vitro E. faecalis infection model system using the gastric carcinoma cell line MKN74. Total ROS and superoxide was measured by fluorescence microscopy. Cellular oxygen consumption was characterized non-invasively using XF24 microplate based respirometry. Gene expression...

  6. Hantaan virus infection induces both Th1 and ThGranzyme B+ cell immune responses that associated with viral control and clinical outcome in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Ma

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hantaviruses infection causing severe emerging diseases with high mortality rates in humans has become public health concern globally. The potential roles of CD4(+T cells in viral control have been extensively studied. However, the contribution of CD4(+T cells to the host response against Hantaan virus (HTNV infection remains unclear. Here, based on the T-cell epitopes mapped on HTNV glycoprotein, we studied the effects and characteristics of CD4(+T-cell responses in determining the outcome of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. A total of 79 novel 15-mer T-cell epitopes on the HTNV glycoprotein were identified, among which 20 peptides were dominant target epitopes. Importantly, we showed the presence of both effective Th1 responses with polyfunctional cytokine secretion and ThGranzyme B(+ cell responses with cytotoxic mediators production against HTNV infection. The HTNV glycoprotein-specific CD4(+T-cell responses inversely correlated with the plasma HTNV RNA load in patients. Individuals with milder disease outcomes showed broader epitopes targeted and stronger CD4(+T-cell responses against HTNV glycoproteins compared with more severe patients. The CD4(+T cells characterized by broader antigenic repertoire, stronger polyfunctional responses, better expansion capacity and highly differentiated effector memory phenotype(CD27-CD28-CCR7-CD45RA-CD127(hi would elicit greater defense against HTNV infection and lead to much milder outcome of the disease. The host defense mediated by CD4(+T cells may through the inducing antiviral condition of the host cells and cytotoxic effect of ThGranzyme B+ cells. Thus, these findings highlight the efforts of CD4(+T-cell immunity to HTNV control and provide crucial information to better understand the immune defense against HTNV infection.

  7. Reactivation of Latent Infection of Human Herpesvirus 8 in BC-3 Cells from Primary Effusion Lymphoma by Recombinant CytokinesSimilar to that Produced by HIV-1-infected T Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢春; 曾怡; 黄丽

    2003-01-01

    Objective:To study and confirm that recombinant cytokines similar to those produced by HIV-1 infected T cells induced lytic cycle replication of human pervirus 8(HHV-8) in BC-3 cells,another cell line from primary effusion lymphoma(PEL).Methods:The persistent stimulation of BC-3 was conducted by several cytokines known to be produced by HIV-1-infected T cells and important in grouth and proliferation of Kaposi's sarcoma(KS) cells in vitro,such as the inter feron-γ(IFN-γ),the hepatocyte grouth factor /scatter factor (HGF/SF),the Oncostain M(OSM),and the tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α)which is not produced by HIV-1-infeted T cells.Treated and antrented BC-3 cells were collected at the 3rd and 7th day of persistent stimulation,respeclively.Immunohistochemical(IHC) staining. Northern blot,quantitative PCR(real-time PCR) and electron microscopy(EM) were carried out to detect the expression of immumogenic protein ORF59,messenger RNA(mRNA) of minor capsid protein ORF26,and the presence of viral particles of HHV-8 from treated and untreated BC-3 cells.Results:It showed that IFN-γ,HGF/SF/OSM,and TNF-α were found to induce an increase in mRNA expression of ORF26 when added individually to BC-3 cells.Particularly,ORF26 expression stimulated with IFN-γ and TNF-α respectively,increased 6.1 and 2.5-fold(from,real-time PCR results) at the 7th day when compared with untreated BC-3 cells.Meanwhile ,about 20% of IFN-γ stimulated BC-3 cells expressed ORF59 at the 7th day as compared with 1.5% of untreated BC-3 cells when IHC staining was employed.In addition,viral particles of HHV-8 were readily idelified in BC-3 cells stimulated with IFN-γ at the 7th day with EM analysis.Conclusion:TNF-α and recombinant cytokines being similar to those produced by HIV-1 infected T Cells could really induce HHV-8 lytic cycle replication in BC-3 cells,another cell line of PEL.

  8. Defective glucose and lipid metabolism in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with lipodystrophy involve liver, muscle tissue and pancreatic beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    of glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism and beta-cell function in lipodystrophic HIV-infected patients. METHODS: [3-3H]glucose was applied during euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamps in association with indirect calorimetry in 43 normoglycaemic HIV-infected patients (18 lipodystrophic patients on HAART (LIPO....... CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that normoglycaemic lipodystrophic HIV-infected patients display impaired glucose and lipid metabolism in multiple pathways involving liver, muscle tissue and beta-cell function.......OBJECTIVES: Lipodystrophy and insulin resistance are prevalent among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients on combined antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Aiming to provide a detailed description of the metabolic adverse effects of HIV-lipodystrophy, we investigated several aspects...

  9. Coinfection by Strongyloides stercoralis in blood donors infected with human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type 1 in São Paulo city, Brazil

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    Pedro P Chieffi

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of coinfection with Strongyloides stercoralis and human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type 1 (HTML-1 was determined in 91 blood donors examined at the blood bank of a large hospital in São Paulo city, Brazil. As control group 61 individuals, not infected by HTLV-1, were submitted to the same techniques for the diagnosis of S. stercoralis infection. In HTLV-1 infected patients the frequency of S. stercoralis infection was 12.1%; on the other hand, the control group showed a frequency significantly lower of S. stercoralis infection (1.6%, suggesting that HTLV-1 patients shoud be considered as a high risk group for strongyloidiasis in São Paulo city.

  10. No evidence of parvovirus B19, Chlamydia pneumoniae or human herpes virus infection in temporal artery biopsies in patients with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helweg-Larsen, J; Tarp, B; Obel, N

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Recent studies have suggested that infective agents may be involved in the pathogenesis of giant cell arteritis (GCA), in particular Chlamydia pneumoniae and parvovirus B19. We investigated temporal arteries from patients with GCA for these infections as well as human herpes viruses...... conditions. DNA was extracted from frozen biopsies and PCR was used to amplify genes from Chlamydia pneumoniae, parvovirus B19 and each of the eight human herpes viruses: herpes simplex viruses HSV-1 and 2, Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, varicella zoster virus and human herpes viruses HHV-6, -7 and -8....... RESULTS: In all 30 biopsies, PCR was negative for DNAs of parvovirus B19, each of the eight human herpes viruses and C. pneumoniae. CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence of DNA from parvovirus B19, human herpes virus or C. pneumoniae in any of the temporal arteries. These agents do not seem to play a unique...

  11. Defining the HLA class I-associated viral antigen repertoire from HIV-1-infected human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ternette, Nicola; Yang, Hongbing; Partridge, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    % of the identified sequences originated from viral protein regions for which T-cell responses have previously been reported but for which the precise HLA class I-binding sequences have not yet been defined. These results validate and expand the current knowledge of virus-specific antigenic peptide presentation...

  12. Identification of human T cell targets recognized during Chlamydia trachomatis genital infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Anja Weinreich; Follmann, Frank; Højrup, Peter;

    2007-01-01

    were recognized in each specimen. Mass spectrometry analysis of the 30-42-kDa T cell-stimulating region identified 10 C. trachomatis proteins. Of these, CT583, CT603, and CT610 were identified as strong antigens that induced significantly higher levels of IFN- gamma secretion in PBMCs from case...

  13. Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine Strains Elicit a Greater Innate Immune Response than Antigenically-Matched Seasonal Influenza Viruses during Infection of Human Nasal Epithelial Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, William A.; Brighton, Missy; Jaspers, Ilona

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses are global pathogens that infect approximately 10–20% of the world’s population each year. Vaccines, including the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), are the best defense against influenza infections. The LAIV is a novel vaccine that actively replicates in the human nasal epithelium and elicits both mucosal and systemic protective immune responses. The differences in replication and innate immune responses following infection of human nasal epithelium with influenza seasonal wild type (WT) and LAIV viruses remain unknown. Using a model of primary differentiated human nasal epithelial cell (hNECs) cultures, we compared influenza WT and antigenically-matched cold adapted (CA) LAIV virus replication and the subsequent innate immune response including host cellular pattern recognition protein expression, host innate immune gene expression, secreted pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and intracellular viral RNA levels. Growth curves comparing virus replication between WT and LAIV strains revealed significantly less infectious virus production during LAIV compared with WT infection. Despite this disparity in infectious virus production the LAIV strains elicited a more robust innate immune response with increased expression of RIG-I, TLR-3, IFNβ, STAT-1, IRF-7, MxA, and IP-10. There were no differences in cytotoxicity between hNEC cultures infected with WT and LAIV strains as measured by basolateral levels of LDH. Elevated levels of intracellular viral RNA during LAIV as compared with WT virus infection of hNEC cultures at 33°C may explain the augmented innate immune response via the up-regulation of pattern recognition receptors and down-stream type I IFN expression. Taken together our results suggest that the decreased replication of LAIV strains in human nasal epithelial cells is associated with a robust innate immune response that differs from infection with seasonal influenza viruses, limits LAIV shedding and plays a role in the

  14. Live attenuated influenza vaccine strains elicit a greater innate immune response than antigenically-matched seasonal influenza viruses during infection of human nasal epithelial cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, William A; Chason, Kelly D; Brighton, Missy; Jaspers, Ilona

    2014-03-26

    Influenza viruses are global pathogens that infect approximately 10-20% of the world's population each year. Vaccines, including the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), are the best defense against influenza infections. The LAIV is a novel vaccine that actively replicates in the human nasal epithelium and elicits both mucosal and systemic protective immune responses. The differences in replication and innate immune responses following infection of human nasal epithelium with influenza seasonal wild type (WT) and LAIV viruses remain unknown. Using a model of primary differentiated human nasal epithelial cell (hNECs) cultures, we compared influenza WT and antigenically-matched cold adapted (CA) LAIV virus replication and the subsequent innate immune response including host cellular pattern recognition protein expression, host innate immune gene expression, secreted pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and intracellular viral RNA levels. Growth curves comparing virus replication between WT and LAIV strains revealed significantly less infectious virus production during LAIV compared with WT infection. Despite this disparity in infectious virus production the LAIV strains elicited a more robust innate immune response with increased expression of RIG-I, TLR-3, IFNβ, STAT-1, IRF-7, MxA, and IP-10. There were no differences in cytotoxicity between hNEC cultures infected with WT and LAIV strains as measured by basolateral levels of LDH. Elevated levels of intracellular viral RNA during LAIV as compared with WT virus infection of hNEC cultures at 33°C may explain the augmented innate immune response via the up-regulation of pattern recognition receptors and down-stream type I IFN expression. Taken together our results suggest that the decreased replication of LAIV strains in human nasal epithelial cells is associated with a robust innate immune response that differs from infection with seasonal influenza viruses, limits LAIV shedding and plays a role in the silent

  15. CCL20 and Beta-Defensin 2 Production by Human Lung Epithelial Cells and Macrophages in Response to Brucella abortus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Andrea G.; Bonetto, Josefina; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.; Fossati, Carlos A.; Baldi, Pablo C.

    2015-01-01

    Both CCL20 and human β-defensin 2 (hBD2) interact with the same membrane receptor and display chemotactic and antimicrobial activities. They are produced by airway epithelia in response to infectious agents and proinflammatory cytokines. Whereas Brucella spp. can infect humans through inhalation, their ability to induce CCL20 and hBD2 in lung cells is unknown. Here we show that B. abortus induces CCL20 expression in human alveolar (A549) or bronchial (Calu-6) epithelial cell lines, primary alveolar epithelial cells, primary human monocytes, monocyte-derived macrophages and the monocytic cell line THP-1. CCL20 expression was mainly mediated by JNK1/2 and NF-kB in both Calu-6 and THP-1 cells. CCL20 secretion was markedly induced in A549, Calu-6 and THP-1 cells by heat-killed B. abortus or a model Brucella lipoprotein (L-Omp19) but not by the B. abortus lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Accordingly, CCL20 production by B. abortus-infected cells was strongly TLR2-dependent. Whereas hBD2 expression was not induced by B. abortus infection, it was significantly induced in A549 cells by conditioned media from B. abortus-infected THP-1 monocytes (CMB). A similar inducing effect was observed on CCL20 secretion. Experiments using blocking agents revealed that IL-1β, but not TNF-α, was involved in the induction of hBD2 and CCL20 secretion by CMB. In the in vitro antimicrobial assay, the lethal dose (LD) 50 of CCL20 for B. abortus (>50 μg/ml) was markedly higher than that against E. coli (1.5 μg/ml) or a B. abortus mutant lacking the O polysaccharide in its LPS (8.7 ug/ml). hBD2 did not kill any of the B. abortus strains at the tested concentrations. These results show that human lung epithelial cells secrete CCL20 and hBD2 in response to B. abortus and/or to cytokines produced by infected monocytes. Whereas these molecules do not seem to exert antimicrobial activity against this pathogen, they could recruit immune cells to the infection site. PMID:26448160

  16. CCL20 and Beta-Defensin 2 Production by Human Lung Epithelial Cells and Macrophages in Response to Brucella abortus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hielpos, M Soledad; Ferrero, Mariana C; Fernández, Andrea G; Bonetto, Josefina; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H; Fossati, Carlos A; Baldi, Pablo C

    2015-01-01

    Both CCL20 and human β-defensin 2 (hBD2) interact with the same membrane receptor and display chemotactic and antimicrobial activities. They are produced by airway epithelia in response to infectious agents and proinflammatory cytokines. Whereas Brucella spp. can infect humans through inhalation, their ability to induce CCL20 and hBD2 in lung cells is unknown. Here we show that B. abortus induces CCL20 expression in human alveolar (A549) or bronchial (Calu-6) epithelial cell lines, primary alveolar epithelial cells, primary human monocytes, monocyte-derived macrophages and the monocytic cell line THP-1. CCL20 expression was mainly mediated by JNK1/2 and NF-kB in both Calu-6 and THP-1 cells. CCL20 secretion was markedly induced in A549, Calu-6 and THP-1 cells by heat-killed B. abortus or a model Brucella lipoprotein (L-Omp19) but not by the B. abortus lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Accordingly, CCL20 production by B. abortus-infected cells was strongly TLR2-dependent. Whereas hBD2 expression was not induced by B. abortus infection, it was significantly induced in A549 cells by conditioned media from B. abortus-infected THP-1 monocytes (CMB). A similar inducing effect was observed on CCL20 secretion. Experiments using blocking agents revealed that IL-1β, but not TNF-α, was involved in the induction of hBD2 and CCL20 secretion by CMB. In the in vitro antimicrobial assay, the lethal dose (LD) 50 of CCL20 for B. abortus (>50 μg/ml) was markedly higher than that against E. coli (1.5 μg/ml) or a B. abortus mutant lacking the O polysaccharide in its LPS (8.7 ug/ml). hBD2 did not kill any of the B. abortus strains at the tested concentrations. These results show that human lung epithelial cells secrete CCL20 and hBD2 in response to B. abortus and/or to cytokines produced by infected monocytes. Whereas these molecules do not seem to exert antimicrobial activity against this pathogen, they could recruit immune cells to the infection site.

  17. HuR interacts with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase, and modulates reverse transcription in infected cells

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    Ennifar Eric

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Reverse transcription of the genetic material of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 is a critical step in the replication cycle of this virus. This process, catalyzed by reverse transcriptase (RT, is well characterized at the biochemical level. However, in infected cells, reverse transcription occurs in a multiprotein complex – the reverse transcription complex (RTC – consisting of viral genomic RNA associated with viral proteins (including RT and, presumably, as yet uncharacterized cellular proteins. Very little is known about the cellular proteins interacting with the RTC, and with reverse transcriptase in particular. We report here that HIV-1 reverse transcription is affected by the levels of a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein – the RNA-binding protein HuR. A direct protein-protein interaction between RT and HuR was observed in a yeast two-hybrid screen and confirmed in vitro by homogenous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF. We mapped the domain interacting with HuR to the RNAse H domain of RT, and the binding domain for RT to the C-terminus of HuR, partially overlapping the third RRM RNA-binding domain of HuR. HuR silencing with specific siRNAs greatly impaired early and late steps of reverse transcription, significantly inhibiting HIV-1 infection. Moreover, by mutagenesis and immunoprecipitation studies, we could not detect the binding of HuR to the viral RNA. These results suggest that HuR may be involved in and may modulate the reverse transcription reaction of HIV-1, by an as yet unknown mechanism involving a protein-protein interaction with HIV-1 RT.

  18. Differences between Human and Rodent Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells May Explain the Pathogenic Disparity of Hantavirus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion Several forms of skin cancer are successfully treated with the topical drug Imiquimod, which activates pDCs through toll-like receptor 7 engagement...neoplastic cells and in some cases, a complete regression [31,55–58]. Antineoplastic functions of pDCs DCs have the potential to invoke antitumour...typically associated with a positive diagnostic outcome [67,68]. The use of immunomodulating drugs to increase CTL responses has been shown to be an

  19. Peptide inhibition of human cytomegalovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Cindy A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is the most prevalent congenital viral infection in the United States and Europe causing significant morbidity and mortality to both mother and child. HCMV is also an opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised individuals, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV- infected patients with AIDS, and solid organ and allogeneic stem cell transplantation recipients. Current treatments for HCMV-associated diseases are insufficient due to the emergence of drug-induced resistance and cytotoxicity, necessitating novel approaches to limit HCMV infection. The aim of this study was to develop therapeutic peptides targeting glycoprotein B (gB, a major glycoprotein of HCMV that is highly conserved across the Herpesviridae family, that specifically inhibit fusion of the viral envelope with the host cell membrane preventing HCMV entry and infection. Results Using the Wimley-White Interfacial Hydrophobicity Scale (WWIHS, several regions within gB were identified that display a high potential to interact with lipid bilayers of cell membranes and hydrophobic surfaces within proteins. The ability of synthetic peptides analogous to WWIHS-positive sequences of HCMV gB to inhibit viral infectivity was evaluated. Human foreskin fibroblasts (HFF were infected with the Towne-GFP strain of HCMV (0.5 MOI, preincubated with peptides at a range of concentrations (78 nm to 100 μM, and GFP-positive cells were visualized 48 hours post-infection by fluorescence microscopy and analyzed quantitatively by flow cytometry. Peptides that inhibited HCMV infection demonstrated different inhibitory concentration curves indicating that each peptide possesses distinct biophysical properties. Peptide 174-200 showed 80% inhibition of viral infection at a concentration of 100 μM, and 51% and 62% inhibition at concentrations of 5 μM and 2.5 μM, respectively. Peptide 233-263 inhibited infection by 97% and 92% at concentrations of 100

  20. Infectivity and expression of the early adenovirus proteins are important regulators of wild-type and DeltaE1B adenovirus replication in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steegenga, W T; Riteco, N; Bos, J L

    1999-09-09

    An adenovirus mutant lacking the expression of the large E1B protein (DeltaE1B) has been reported to replicate selectively in cells lacking the expression of functionally wild-type (wt) p53. Based on these results the DeltaE1B or ONYX-015 virus has been proposed to be an oncolytic virus which might be useful to treat p53-deficient tumors. Recently however, contradictory results have been published indicating that p53-dependent cell death is required for productive adenovirus infection. Since there is an urgent need for new methods to treat aggressive, mutant p53-expressing primary tumors and their metastases we carefully examined adenovirus replication in human cells to determine whether or not the DeltaE1B virus can be used for tumor therapy. The results we present here show that not all human tumor cell lines take up adenovirus efficiently. In addition, we observed inhibition of the expression of adenovirus early proteins in tumor cells. We present evidence that these two factors rather than the p53 status of the cell determine whether adenovirus infection results in lytic cell death. Furthermore, the results we obtained by infecting a panel of different tumor cell lines show that viral spread of the DeltaE1B is strongly inhibited in almost all p53-proficient and -deficient cell lines compared to the wt virus. We conclude that the efficiency of the DeltaE1B virus to replicate efficiently in tumor cells is determined by the ability to infect cells and to express the early adenovirus proteins rather than the status of p53.

  1. Early expression of mannose-binding lectin 2 during Aspergillus fumigatus infection in human corneal epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Ye; Che; Jing-Fen; Zhang; Ji-Eun; Lee; Jing; Lin; Li-Ting; Hu; Nan; Jiang; Qian; Wang; Qiang; Xu; Gui-Qiu; Zhao

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the early expression of mannose-binding lectin 2(MBL2) in human corneal epithelial cells(HCECs) infected by Aspergillus fumigatus(AF).METHODS: HCECs cultured in vitro with AF antigens and sampled at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8h. The expression of MBL2 m RNA was evaluated by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR). The expression of MBL2 protein in supernatant fluid was shown by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA). MBL2 protein in HCECs was detected by immunocytochemistry at 0 and 24 h.RESULTS: MBL2 m RNA and protein are expressed in normal HCECs. The expression of MBL2 m RNA and protein in supernatant fluid begin to increase after being stimulated with AF antigens. The most significantly peak of MBL2 m RNA is in 2h. The protein of MBL2 in supernatant fluid decrease gradually after 0.5h. The protein in HCECs expression increase after stimulation of24 h.· CONCLUSION: MBL2 receptor expressed in normal HCECs in vitro. The stimulation by AF antigens can increase the early expression of it.

  2. Liver immune-pathogenesis and therapy of human liver tropic virus infection in humanized mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Bility, Moses T.; Li, Feng; Cheng, Liang; Su, Lishan

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infect and replicate primarily in human hepatocytes. Few reliable and easy accessible animal models are available for studying the immune system’s contribution to the liver disease progression during hepatitis virus infection. Humanized mouse models reconstituted with human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been developed to study human immunology, human immunodeficiency virus 1 infection, and immunopathogenesis. However, a humanized mous...

  3. Analysis of memory-like natural killer cells in human cytomegalovirus-infected children undergoing αβ+T and B cell-depleted hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muccio, Letizia; Bertaina, Alice; Falco, Michela; Pende, Daniela; Meazza, Raffaella; Lopez-Botet, Miguel; Moretta, Lorenzo; Locatelli, Franco; Moretta, Alessandro; Della Chiesa, Mariella

    2016-03-01

    We analyzed the impact of human cytomegalovirus infection on the development of natural killer cells in 27 pediatric patients affected by hematological malignancies, who had received a HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, depleted of both α/β+ T cells and B cells. In line with previous studies in adult recipients of umbilical cord blood transplantation, we found that human cytomegalovirus reactivation accelerated the emergence of mature natural killer cells. Thus, most children displayed a progressive expansion of a memory-like natural killer cell subset expressing NKG2C, a putative receptor for human cytomegalovirus, and CD57, a marker of terminal natural killer cell differentiation. NKG2C(+)CD57(+) natural killer cells were detectable by month 3 following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and expanded until at least month 12. These cells were characterized by high killer Ig-like receptors (KIRs) and leukocyte inhibitory receptor 1 (LIR-1) and low Siglec-7, NKG2A and Interleukin-18Rα expression, killed tumor targets and responded to cells expressing HLA-E (a NKG2C ligand). In addition, they were poor Interferon-γ producers in response to Interleukin-12 and Interleukin-18. The impaired response to these cytokines, together with their highly differentiated profile, may reflect their skewing toward an adaptive condition specialized in controlling human cytomegalovirus. In conclusion, in pediatric patients receiving a type of allograft different from umbilical cord blood transplantation, human cytomegalovirus also induced memory-like natural killer cells, possibly contributing to controlling infections and reinforcing anti-leukemia effects. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  4. Cellular transcriptional profiling in human lung epithelial cells infected by different subtypes of influenza A viruses reveals an overall down-regulation of the host p53 pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Bruno

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza viruses can modulate and hijack several cellular signalling pathways to efficiently support their replication. We recently investigated and compared the cellular gene expression profiles of human lung A549 cells infected by five different subtypes of human and avian influenza viruses (Josset et al. Plos One 2010. Using these transcriptomic data, we have focused our analysis on the modulation of the p53 pathway in response to influenza infection. Results Our results were supported by both RT-qPCR and western blot analyses and reveal multiple alterations of the p53 pathway during infection. A down-regulation of mRNA expression was observed for the main regulators of p53 protein stability during infection by the complete set of viruses tested, and a significant decrease in p53 mRNA expression was also observed in H5N1 infected cells. In addition, several p53 target genes were also down-regulated by these influenza viruses and the expression of their product reduced. Conclusions Our data reveal that influenza viruses cause an overall down-regulation of the host p53 pathway and highlight this pathway and p53 protein itself as important viral targets in the altering of apoptotic processes and in cell-cycle regulation.

  5. High rate of infection with the human T-cell leukemia retrovirus type II in four Indian populations of Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, J F; Del Pino, N; Esteban, E; Sherman, M P; Dube, S; Dube, D K; Basombrio, M A; Pimentel, E; Segovia, A; Quirulas, S

    1993-12-01

    Sera from 215 non-drug-injecting Toba and Mataco-Mataguayo pure Indians belonging to four communities in northern Argentina were examined using assays that allow differentiation between reactivities due to type-specific antigens of the human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus (HTLV). Three of these populations have very little contact with non-Indian groups and reside in remote, isolated areas. HTLV-II type-specific seroreactivity was present in 24 (13.7%) of the 175 Indians older than 13 years of age and in none of the 40 who were of younger ages. None of the Indians had antibodies reacting with HTLV-I type-specific antigen. Seroreactivity was more prevalent and appeared at younger ages in females than in males. The majority of the HTLV-II-seropositive Indians belonged to the more isolated communities. The seroprevalences among the Tobas and Mataco-Mataguayo Indians were comparable. With the exception of a Toba who was positive in a test for Treponema pallidum, no serological evidence of sexually transmitted infections with this spirochete, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus was found among the Indians tested. None of the 55 non-Indian people tested in the region showed HTLV-II type-specific seroreactivity. PCR analysis of DNA isolated from peripheral blood lymphocytes of seropositive Indians confirmed that the virus present in these populations is HTLV-II. Sequence analysis of PCR-amplified genomic segments showed that the virus belongs to the HTLV-II subtype which has been found to be endemic in other Paleo-American Indians.

  6. Infection of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells by ANDES Hantavirus enhances pro-inflammatory state, the secretion of active MMP-9 and indirectly enhances endothelial permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez-Lastra Marcelo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Andes virus (ANDV, a rodent-borne Hantavirus, is the major etiological agent of Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS in South America, which is mainly characterized by a vascular leakage with high rate of fatal outcomes for infected patients. Currently, neither specific therapy nor vaccines are available against this pathogen. ANDV infects both dendritic and epithelial cells, but in despite that the severity of the disease directly correlates with the viral RNA load, considerable evidence suggests that immune mechanisms rather than direct viral cytopathology are responsible for plasma leakage in HCPS. Here, we assessed the possible effect of soluble factors, induced in viral-activated DCs, on endothelial permeability. Activated immune cells, including DC, secrete gelatinolytic matrix metalloproteases (gMMP-2 and -9 that modulate the vascular permeability for their trafficking. Methods A clinical ANDES isolate was used to infect DC derived from primary PBMC. Maturation and pro-inflammatory phenotypes of ANDES-infected DC were assessed by studying the expression of receptors, cytokines and active gMMP-9, as well as some of their functional status. The ANDES-infected DC supernatants were assessed for their capacity to enhance a monolayer endothelial permeability using primary human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC. Results Here, we show that in vitro primary DCs infected by a clinical isolate of ANDV shed virus RNA and proteins, suggesting a competent viral replication in these cells. Moreover, this infection induces an enhanced expression of soluble pro-inflammatory factors, including TNF-α and the active gMMP-9, as well as a decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-10 and TGF-β. These viral activated cells are less sensitive to apoptosis. Moreover, supernatants from ANDV-infected DCs were able to indirectly enhance the permeability of a monolayer of primary HUVEC. Conclusions Primary human DCs

  7. Influence of antiretroviral therapy on programmed death-1 (CD279) expression on T cells in lymph nodes of human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhard, Simone; Wernli, Marion; Dürmüller, Ursula; Battegay, Manuel; Gudat, Fred; Erb, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus infection leads to T-cell exhaustion and involution of lymphoid tissue. Recently, the programmed death-1 pathway was found to be crucial for virus-specific T-cell exhaustion during human immunodeficiency virus infection. Programmed death-1 expression was elevated on human immunodeficiency virus-specific peripheral blood CD8+ and CD4+ T cells and correlated with disease severity. During human immunodeficiency infection, lymphoid tissue acts as a major viral reservoir and is an important site for viral replication, but it is also essential for regulatory processes important for immune recovery. We compared programmed death-1 expression in 2 consecutive inguinal lymph nodes of 14 patients, excised before antiretroviral therapy (antiretroviral therapy as of 1997-1999) and 16 to 20 months under antiretroviral therapy. In analogy to lymph nodes of human immunodeficiency virus-negative individuals, in all treated patients, the germinal center area decreased, whereas the number of germinal centers did not significantly change. Programmed death-1 expression was mostly found in germinal centers. The absolute extent of programmed death 1 expression per section was not significantly altered after antiretroviral therapy resulting in a significant-relative increase of programmed death 1 per shrunken germinal center. In colocalization studies, CD45R0+ cells that include helper/inducer T cells strongly expressed programmed death-1 before and during therapy, whereas CD8+ T cells, fewer in numbers, showed a weak expression for programmed death-1. Thus, although antiretroviral therapy seems to reduce the number of programmed death-1-positive CD8+ T lymphocytes within germinal centers, it does not down-regulate programmed death-1 expression on the helper/inducer T-cell subset that may remain exhausted and therefore unable to trigger immune recovery.

  8. Delineation of the innate and adaptive T-cell immune outcome in the human host in response to Campylobacter jejuni infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Lindsey A; Nistala, Kiran; Mills, Dominic C; Stephenson, Holly N; Zilbauer, Matthias; Wren, Brendan W; Dorrell, Nick; Lindley, Keith J; Wedderburn, Lucy R; Bajaj-Elliott, Mona

    2010-11-09

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most prevalent cause of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Despite the significant health burden this infection presents, molecular understanding of C. jejuni-mediated disease pathogenesis remains poorly defined. Here, we report the characterisation of the early, innate immune response to C. jejuni using an ex-vivo human gut model of infection. Secondly, impact of bacterial-driven dendritic cell activation on T-cell mediated immunity was also sought. Healthy, control paediatric terminal ileum or colonic biopsy tissue was infected with C. jejuni for 8-12 hours. Bacterial colonisation was followed by confocal microscopy and mucosal innate immune responses measured by ELISA. Marked induction of IFNγ with modest increase in IL-22 and IL-17A was noted. Increased mucosal IL-12, IL-23, IL-1β and IL-6 were indicative of a cytokine milieu that may modulate subsequent T-cell mediated immunity. C. jejuni-driven human monocyte-derived dendritic cell activation was followed by analyses of T cell immune responses utilising flow cytometry and ELISA. Significant increase in Th-17, Th-1 and Th-17/Th-1 double-positive cells and corresponding cytokines was observed. The ability of IFNγ, IL-22 and IL-17 cytokines to exert host defence via modulation of C. jejuni adhesion and invasion to intestinal epithelia was measured by standard gentamicin protection assay. Both innate and adaptive T cell-immunity to C. jejuni infection led to the release of IFNγ, IL-22 and IL-17A; suggesting a critical role for this cytokine triad in establishing host anti-microbial immunity during the acute and effectors phase of infection. In addition, to their known anti-microbial functions; IL-17A and IL-17F reduced the number of intracellular C. jejuni in intestinal epithelia, highlighting a novel aspect of how IL-17 family members may contribute to protective immunity against C. jejuni.

  9. Delineation of the innate and adaptive T-cell immune outcome in the human host in response to Campylobacter jejuni infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsey A Edwards

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Campylobacter jejuni is the most prevalent cause of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Despite the significant health burden this infection presents, molecular understanding of C. jejuni-mediated disease pathogenesis remains poorly defined. Here, we report the characterisation of the early, innate immune response to C. jejuni using an ex-vivo human gut model of infection. Secondly, impact of bacterial-driven dendritic cell activation on T-cell mediated immunity was also sought. METHODOLOGY: Healthy, control paediatric terminal ileum or colonic biopsy tissue was infected with C. jejuni for 8-12 hours. Bacterial colonisation was followed by confocal microscopy and mucosal innate immune responses measured by ELISA. Marked induction of IFNγ with modest increase in IL-22 and IL-17A was noted. Increased mucosal IL-12, IL-23, IL-1β and IL-6 were indicative of a cytokine milieu that may modulate subsequent T-cell mediated immunity. C. jejuni-driven human monocyte-derived dendritic cell activation was followed by analyses of T cell immune responses utilising flow cytometry and ELISA. Significant increase in Th-17, Th-1 and Th-17/Th-1 double-positive cells and corresponding cytokines was observed. The ability of IFNγ, IL-22 and IL-17 cytokines to exert host defence via modulation of C. jejuni adhesion and invasion to intestinal epithelia was measured by standard gentamicin protection assay. CONCLUSIONS: Both innate and adaptive T cell-immunity to C. jejuni infection led to the release of IFNγ, IL-22 and IL-17A; suggesting a critical role for this cytokine triad in establishing host anti-microbial immunity during the acute and effectors phase of infection. In addition, to their known anti-microbial functions; IL-17A and IL-17F reduced the number of intracellular C. jejuni in intestinal epithelia, highlighting a novel aspect of how IL-17 family members may contribute to protective immunity against C. jejuni.

  10. Can Helicobacter pylori infection influence human reproduction?

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    Moretti, Elena; Figura, Natale; Collodel, Giulia; Ponzetto, Antonio

    2014-05-21

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection could be associated with extra-digestive diseases. Here, we report the evidences concerning the decrease in reproductive potential occurring in individuals infected by H. pylori, especially by strains expressing CagA. This infection is more prevalent in individuals with fertility disorders. Infected women have anti-H. pylori antibodies in cervical mucus and follicular fluid that may decrease sperm motility and cross react immunologically with spermatozoa, conceivably hampering the oocyte/sperm fusion. Infection by CagA positive organisms enhances the risk of preeclampsia, which is a main cause of foetus death. These findings are supported by the results of experimental infections of pregnant mice, which may cause reabsorption of a high number of foetuses and alter the balance between Th1 and Th2 cell response. Infected men have decreased sperm motility, viability and numbers of normally shaped sperm and augmented systemic levels of inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, which may damage spermatozoa. In countries where parasitic infestation is endemic, detrimental effects of infection upon spermatozoa may not occur, because the immune response to parasites could determine a switch from a predominant Th1 type to Th2 type lymphocytes, with production of anti-inflammatory cytokines. In conclusion, the evidences gathered until now should be taken into consideration for future studies aiming to explore the possible role of H. pylori infection on human reproduction.

  11. Highly active antiretroviral therapy normalizes the function of progenitor cells in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam Nielsen, S; Kjaer Ersboll, A; Mathiesen, Lars Reinhardt;

    1998-01-01

    -infected patients were determined prior to HAART and after 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks of therapy. The mean number of colony-forming units (cells) per milliliter (cfu/mL) was 15.0 prior to HAART vs. 109.8 in healthy controls (Pcfu/mL increased to 100.3 (Pcfu...

  12. Human papillomavirus infects placental trophoblast and Hofbauer cells, but appears not to play a causal role in miscarriage and preterm labor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambühl, Lea Maria Margareta; Leonhard, Anne Katrine; Zakhary, Carina Widen

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Recently, an association between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and both spontaneous abortion and spontaneous preterm delivery was suggested. However, the reported HPV prevalence in pregnant women varies considerably and reliable conclusions are difficult. We aimed to investig......INTRODUCTION: Recently, an association between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and both spontaneous abortion and spontaneous preterm delivery was suggested. However, the reported HPV prevalence in pregnant women varies considerably and reliable conclusions are difficult. We aimed......, and in parts of the encasing endometrium. CONCLUSION: We conclude that placental HPV infections are not likely to constitute a risk factor for spontaneous preterm labor or spontaneous abortions in the Danish population, although an effect of HPV DNA in placental cells cannot be excluded. This article...

  13. Heat Shock Enhances the Expression of the Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type-I (HTLV-I) Trans-Activator (Tax) Antigen in Human HTLV-I Infected Primary and Cultured T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunihiro, Marie; Fujii, Hideki; Miyagi, Takuya; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Reiko; Fukushima, Takuya; Ansari, Aftab A; Tanaka, Yuetsu

    2016-07-11

    The environmental factors that lead to the reactivation of human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-I) in latently infected T cells in vivo remain unknown. It has been previously shown that heat shock (HS) is a potent inducer of HTLV-I viral protein expression in long-term cultured cell lines. However, the precise HTLV-I protein(s) and mechanisms by which HS induces its effect remain ill-defined. We initiated these studies by first monitoring the levels of the trans-activator (Tax) protein induced by exposure of the HTLV-I infected cell line to HS. HS treatment at 43 °C for 30 min for 24 h led to marked increases in the level of Tax antigen expression in all HTLV-I-infected T cell lines tested including a number of HTLV-I-naturally infected T cell lines. HS also increased the expression of functional HTLV-I envelope gp46 antigen, as shown by increased syncytium formation activity. Interestingly, the enhancing effect of HS was partially inhibited by the addition of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70)-inhibitor pifithlin-μ (PFT). In contrast, the HSP 70-inducer zerumbone (ZER) enhanced Tax expression in the absence of HS. These data suggest that HSP 70 is at least partially involved in HS-mediated stimulation of Tax expression. As expected, HS resulted in enhanced expression of the Tax-inducible host antigens, such as CD83 and OX40. Finally, we confirmed that HS enhanced the levels of Tax and gp46 antigen expression in primary human CD4⁺ T cells isolated from HTLV-I-infected humanized NOD/SCID/γc null (NOG) mice and HTLV-I carriers. In summary, the data presented herein indicate that HS is one of the environmental factors involved in the reactivation of HTLV-I in vivo via enhanced Tax expression, which may favor HTLV-I expansion in vivo.

  14. Paradoxical expression of IL-28B mRNA in peripheral blood in human T-cell leukemia virus Type-1 mono-infection and co-infection with hepatitis C Virus

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    Kamihira Shimeru

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1 carriers co-infected with and hepatitis C virus (HCV have been known to be at higher risk of their related diseases than mono-infected individuals. The recent studies clarified that IL-28B polymorphism rs8099917 is associated with not only the HCV therapeutic response by IFN, but also innate immunity and antiviral activity. The aim of our research was to clarify study whether IL-28B gene polymorphism (rs8099917 is associated with HTLV-1/HCV co-infection. Results The genotyping and viral-serological analysis for 340 individuals showed that IL-28B genotype distribution of rs8099917 SNP did not differ significantly by respective viral infection status. However, the IL-28B mRNA expression level was 3.8 fold higher in HTLV-1 mono-infection than HTLV-1/HCV co-infection. The high expression level was associated with TT (OR, 6.25, whiles the low expression was associated with co-infection of the two viruses (OR, 9.5. However, there was no association between down-regulation and ATL development (OR, 0.8. Conclusion HTLV-1 mono-infection up-regulates the expression of IL-28B transcripts in genotype-dependent manner, whiles HTLV-1/HCV co-infection down-regulates regardless of ATL development.

  15. Leishmania major infection in humanized mice induces systemic infection and provokes a nonprotective human immune response.

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    Anja Kathrin Wege

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leishmania (L. species are the causative agent of leishmaniasis. Due to the lack of efficient vaccine candidates, drug therapies are the only option to deal with cutaneous leishmaniasis. Unfortunately, chemotherapeutic interventions show high toxicity in addition to an increased risk of dissemination of drug-resistant parasites. An appropriate laboratory animal based model is still missing which allows testing of new drug strategies in the context of human immune cells in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Humanized mice were infected subcutaneously with stationary phase promastigote L. major into the footpad. The human immune response against the pathogen and the parasite host interactions were analyzed. In addition we proved the versatility of this new model to conduct drug research studies by the inclusion of orally given Miltefosine. We show that inflammatory human macrophages get infected with Leishmania parasites at the site of infection. Furthermore, a Leishmania-specific human-derived T cell response is initiated. However, the human immune system is not able to prevent systemic infection. Thus, we treated the mice with Miltefosine to reduce the parasitic load. Notably, this chemotherapy resulted in a reduction of the parasite load in distinct organs. Comparable to some Miltefosine treated patients, humanized mice developed severe side effects, which are not detectable in the classical murine model of experimental leishmaniasis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study describes for the first time L. major infection in humanized mice, characterizes the disease development, the induction of human adaptive and innate immune response including cytokine production and the efficiency of Miltefosine treatment in these animals. In summary, humanized mice might be beneficial for future preclinical chemotherapeutic studies in systemic (visceral leishmaniasis allowing the investigation of human immune response, side effects of the drug

  16. Beta-cell dysfunction and low insulin clearance in insulin-resistant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with lipodystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Vølund, Aage

    2005-01-01

    of diabetes mellitus or impaired glucose tolerance. Prehepatic insulin secretion rates were estimated by deconvolution of C-peptide concentrations. A composite measure of insulin sensitivity was derived from the OGTT. RESULTS: Beta-cell secretory capacity (i.e. the rate of change in insulin secretion per unit...... and diabetes mellitus (63%vs. 20%, P insulin sensitivity despite simultaneous reduction in insulin clearance.......OBJECTIVE: To obtain a better understanding of the physiological aspects of glucose homeostasis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with lipodystrophy, we evaluated separately beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity after an oral glucose load. DESIGN: Beta-cell function...

  17. Increased infectivity in human cells and resistance to antibody-mediated neutralization by truncation of the SIV gp41 cytoplasmic tail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo eKuwata

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of antibodies in protecting the host from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection is of considerable interest, particularly because the RV144 trial results suggest that antibodies contribute to protection. Although infection of nonhuman primates with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV is commonly used as an animal model of HIV-1 infection, the viral epitopes that elicit potent and broad neutralizing antibodies to SIV have not been identified. We isolated a monoclonal antibody (MAb B404 that potently and broadly neutralizes various SIV strains. B404 targets a conformational epitope comprising the V3 and V4 loops of Env that intensely exposed when Env binds CD4. B404-resistant variants were obtained by passaging viruses in the presence of increasing concentration of B404 in PM1/CCR5 cells. Genetic analysis revealed that the Q733stop mutation, which truncates the cytoplasmic tail of gp41, was the first major substitution in Env during passage. The maximal inhibition by B404 and other MAbs were significantly decreased against a recombinant virus with a gp41 truncation compared with the parental SIVmac316. This indicates that the gp41 truncation was associated with resistance to antibody-mediated neutralization. The infectivities of the recombinant virus with the gp41 truncation were 7900-fold, 1000-fold, and 140-fold higher than those of SIVmac316 in PM1, PM1/CCR5, and TZM-bl cells, respectively. Immunoblotting analysis revealed that the gp41 truncation enhanced the incorporation of Env into virions. The effect of the gp41 truncation on infectivity was not obvious in the HSC-F macaque cell line, although the resistance of viruses harboring the gp41 truncation to neutralization was maintained. These results suggest that viruses with a truncated gp41 cytoplasmic tail were selected by increased infectivity in human cells and by acquiring resistance to neutralizing antibody.

  18. Optimized Infectivity of the Cell-Free Single-Cycle Human Immunodeficiency Viruses Type 1 (HIV-1 and Its Restriction by Host Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin H Kim

    Full Text Available The infectivity of retroviruses such as HIV-1 in plasma or cultured media is less than 0.1% in general, the mechanisms of which are not yet fully understood. One possible explanation among others is the potential presence of large numbers of defective virions in a virus pool, which limits the apparent infectivity of HIV virions. To test this hypothesis, we have varied the culture conditions used to generate single-cycle HIV-1 virions. Among these culture variables, virion harvest time, media change after transfection, and envelope plasmid input can all improve HIV-1 infectivity by reducing the number of defective virions. A harvest time of 18-24 hours post transfection as opposed to 48 hours, and a media change six hours post transfection both improve viral infectivity. An optimal quantity of envelope plasmid input during transfection was also found. Collectively, these conditions increased the infectivity of HIV-1 virions by sevenfold compared to normally reported values in TZM-bl indicator cell lines. These conditions also increased the infectivity of HIV-1 in CD4(+ T cells, suggesting that these conditions work by increasing the intrinsic infectivity of a virus pool. Nevertheless, these improvements on virion infectivity were marginal compared to the impact of host cells on HIV infection, which can decrease the apparent infectivity by 19-fold even for the most optimized viruses. These results suggest that the infectivity of HIV-1 virions can be optimized by reducing the number of defective virions; however, viral-cell interactions may pose a major barrier for HIV-1 infectivity.

  19. Human glioblastoma cells persistently infected with simian virus 40 carry nondefective episomal viral DNA and acquire the transformed phenotype and numerous chromosomal abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkin, L C; Steinberg, V I; Kosz-Vnenchak, M

    1985-02-01

    A stable, persistent infection of A172 human glioblastoma cells with simian virus 40 (SV40) was readily established after infection at an input of 450 PFU per cell. Only 11% of the cells were initially susceptible to SV40, as shown by indirect immunofluorescent staining for the SV40 T antigen at 48 h. However, all cells produced T antigen by week 11. In contrast, viral capsid proteins were made in only about 1% of the cells in the established carrier system. Weekly viral yields ranged between 10(4) and 10(6) PFU/ml. Most of the capsid protein-producing cells contained enormous aberrant (lobulated or multiple) nuclei. Persistent viral DNA appeared in an episomal or "free" state exclusively in Southern blots and was indistinguishable from standard SV40 DNA by restriction analysis. Viral autointerference activity was not detected, and yield reduction assays did not indicate defective interfering particle activity, further implying that variant viruses were not a factor in this carrier system. Interferon was also not a factor in the system, as shown by direct challenge with vesicular stomatitis virus. Persistent infection resulted in cellular growth changes (enhanced saturation density and plating efficiency) characteristic of SV40 transformation. Persistent infection also led to an increased frequency of cytogenetic effects. These included sister chromatid exchanges, a variety of chromosomal abnormalities (ring chromosomes, acentric fragments, breaks, and gaps), and an increase in the chromosome number. Nevertheless, the persistently infected cells continued to display a bipolar glial cell-like morphology with extensive process extension and intercellular contacts.

  20. Examination of a Viral Infection Mimetic Model in Human iPS Cell-Derived Insulin-Producing Cells and the Anti-Apoptotic Effect of GLP-1 Analogue.

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    Megu Yamaguchi Baden

    Full Text Available Viral infection is associated with pancreatic beta cell destruction in fulminant type 1 diabetes mellitus. The aim of this study was to investigate the acceleration and protective mechanisms of beta cell destruction by establishing a model of viral infection in pancreatic beta cells.Polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid was transfected into MIN6 cells and insulin-producing cells differentiated from human induced pluripotent stem cells via small molecule applications. Gene expression was analyzed by real-time PCR, and apoptosis was evaluated by caspase-3 activity and TUNEL staining. The anti-apoptotic effect of Exendin-4 was also evaluated.Polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid transfection led to elevated expression of the genes encoding IFNα, IFNβ, CXCL10, Fas, viral receptors, and IFN-inducible antiviral effectors in MIN6 cells. Exendin-4 treatment suppressed the elevated gene expression levels and reduced polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid-induced apoptosis both in MIN6 cells and in insulin-producing cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor, protein kinase A, and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase inhibitors counteracted the anti-apoptotic effect of Exendin-4.Polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid transfection can mimic viral infection, and Exendin-4 exerted an anti-apoptotic effect both in MIN6 and insulin-producing cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

  1. Production and characterization of human anti-V3 monoclonal antibodies from the cells of HIV-1 infected Indian donors

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    Andrabi Raiees

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs developed from HIV-1 infected donors have enormously contributed to the identification of neutralization sensitive epitopes on the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. The third variable region (V3 is a crucial target on gp120, primarily due to its involvement in co-receptor (CXCR4 or CCR5 binding and presence of epitopes recognized by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Methods Thirty-three HIV-1 seropositive drug naive patients (18 males and 15 females within the age range of 20–57 years (median = 33 years were recruited in this study for mAb production. The mAbs were selected from EBV transformed cultures with conformationally constrained Cholera-toxin-B containing V3C (V3C-CTB fusion protein. We tested the mAbs for their binding with HIV-1 derived proteins and peptides by ELISA and for neutralization against HIV-1 viruses by TZM-bl assays. Results We isolated three anti-V3 mAbs, 277, 903 and 904 from the cells of different individuals. The ELISA binding revealed a subtype-C and subtype-A specific binding of antibody 277 and 903 while mAb 904 exhibited cross reactivity also with subtype-B V3. Epitope mapping of mAbs with overlapping V3 peptides showed exclusive binding to V3 crown. The antibodies displayed high and low neutralizing activity against 2/5 tier 1 and 1/6 tier 2 viruses respectively. Overall, we observed a resistance of the tier 2 viruses to neutralization by the anti-V3 mAbs, despite the exposure of the epitopes recognized by these antibodies on two representative native viruses (Du156.12 and JRFL, suggesting that the affinity of mAb might equally be crucial for neutralization, as the epitope recognition. Conclusions Our study suggests that the anti-V3 antibodies derived from subtype-C infected Indian patients display neutralization potential against tier 1 viruses while such activity may be limited against more resistant tier 2 viruses. Defining the fine epitope

  2. Effect of soy and milk protein-related compounds on Listeria monocytogenes infection in human enterocyte Caco-2 cells and A/J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuda, Takashi; Nakamura, Shinsuke; An, Choa; Takahashi, Hajime; Kimura, Bon

    2012-10-15

    Listeria monocytogenes causes listeriosis in humans, mainly through the consumption of ready-to-eat foods such as cheese. Immunocompromised persons, the elderly, and pregnant women and their fetuses or newborns are at the highest risk for the infection. We examined the effects of dietary milk-casein (MC) and soy-protein (SP), and their digested compounds tryptone (TP) and phytone peptone (PP), respectively, on L. monocytogenes invasion and infection in human enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells and A/J mice. Invasion into Caco-2 cells tended to be high with TP. In A/J mice orally infected with L. monocytogenes, viable numbers in the liver and spleen showed a tendency of decreasing with the 20% SP diet compared to the 20% MC diet. SP suppressed the inflammation marker tumour necrosis factor-α in spleen tissue. Furthermore, bacteria lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated nitric oxide (NO) secretion from murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells was suppressed by PP more than TP. These results suggest that major dietary proteins might affect infection and inflammation by L. monocytogenes.

  3. Chlamydia trachomatis infection results in a modest pro-inflammatory cytokine response and a decrease in T cell chemokine secretion in human polarized endocervical epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, Lyndsey R; Lewis, Maria E; Greene, Sheila J; Foster, Timothy P; Quayle, Alison J

    2013-08-01

    The endocervical epithelium is a major reservoir for Chlamydia trachomatis in women, and genital infections are extended in their duration. Epithelial cells act as mucosal sentinels by secreting cytokines and chemokines in response to pathogen challenge and infection. We therefore determined the signature cytokine and chemokine response of primary-like endocervix-derived epithelial cells in response to a common genital serovar (D) of C. trachomatis. For these studies, we used a recently-established polarized, immortalized, endocervical epithelial cell model (polA2EN) that maintains, in vitro, the architectural and functional characteristics of endocervical epithelial cells in vivo including the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. PolA2EN cells were susceptible to C. trachomatis infection, and chlamydiae in these cells underwent a normal developmental cycle as determined by a one-step growth curve. IL1α protein levels were increased in both apical and basolateral secretions of C. trachomatis infected polA2EN cells, but this response did not occur until 72h after infection. Furthermore, protein levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines IL6, TNFα and CXCL8 were not significantly different between C. trachomatis infected polA2EN cells and mock infected cells at any time during the chlamydial developmental cycle up to 120h post-infection. Intriguingly, C. trachomatis infection resulted in a significant decrease in the constitutive secretion of T cell chemokines IP10 and RANTES, and this required a productive C. trachomatis infection. Examination of anti-inflammatory cytokines revealed a high constitutive apical secretion of IL1ra from polA2EN cells that was not significantly modulated by C. trachomatis infection. IL-11 was induced by C. trachomatis, although only from the basolateral membrane. These results suggest that C. trachomatis can use evasion strategies to circumvent a robust pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine response. These evasion

  4. A Choroid Plexus Epithelial Cell-based Model of the Human Blood-Cerebrospinal Fluid Barrier to Study Bacterial Infection from the Basolateral Side.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinner, Stefanie; Borkowski, Julia; Stump-Guthier, Carolin; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Tenenbaum, Tobias; Schroten, Horst; Schwerk, Christian

    2016-05-06

    The epithelial cells of the choroid plexus (CP), located in the ventricular system of the brain, form the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB). The BCSFB functions in separating the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the blood and restricting the molecular exchange to a minimum extent. An in vitro model of the BCSFB is based on cells derived from a human choroid plexus papilloma (HIBCPP). HIBCPP cells display typical barrier functions including formation of tight junctions (TJs), development of a transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), as well as minor permeabilities for macromolecules. There are several pathogens that can enter the central nervous system (CNS) via the BCSFB and subsequently cause severe disease like meningitis. One of these pathogens is Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis), a human-specific bacterium. Employing the HIBCPP cells in an inverted cell culture filter insert system enables to study interactions of pathogens with cells of the BCSFB from the basolateral cell side, which is relevant in vivo. In this article, we describe seeding and culturing of HIBCPP cells on cell culture inserts. Further, infection of the cells with N. meningitidis along with analysis of invaded and adhered bacteria via double immunofluorescence is demonstrated. As the cells of the CP are also involved in other diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer`s disease and Multiple Sclerosis, as well as during the brain metastasis of tumor cells, the model system can also be applied in other fields of research. It provides the potential to decipher molecular mechanisms and to identify novel therapeutic targets.

  5. B Cell Activity Is Impaired in Human and Mouse Obesity and Is Responsive to an Essential Fatty Acid upon Murine Influenza Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaraju, Rasagna; Guesdon, William; Crouch, Miranda J; Teague, Heather L; Sullivan, E Madison; Karlsson, Erik A; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Gowdy, Kymberly; Bridges, Lance C; Reese, Lauren R; Neufer, P Darrell; Armstrong, Michael; Reisdorph, Nichole; Milner, J Justin; Beck, Melinda; Shaikh, Saame Raza

    2017-06-15

    Obesity is associated with increased risk for infections and poor responses to vaccinations, which may be due to compromised B cell function. However, there is limited information about the influence of obesity on B cell function and underlying factors that modulate B cell responses. Therefore, we studied B cell cytokine secretion and/or Ab production across obesity models. In obese humans, B cell IL-6 secretion was lowered and IgM levels were elevated upon ex vivo anti-BCR/TLR9 stimulation. In murine obesity induced by a high fat diet, ex vivo IgM and IgG were elevated with unstimulated B cells. Furthermore, the high fat diet lowered bone marrow B cell frequency accompanied by diminished transcripts of early lymphoid commitment markers. Murine B cell responses were subsequently investigated upon influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34 infection using a Western diet model in the absence or presence of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). DHA, an essential fatty acid with immunomodulatory properties, was tested because its plasma levels are lowered in obesity. Relative to controls, mice consuming the Western diet had diminished Ab titers whereas the Western diet plus DHA improved titers. Mechanistically, DHA did not directly target B cells to elevate Ab levels. Instead, DHA increased the concentration of the downstream specialized proresolving lipid mediators (SPMs) 14-hydroxydocosahexaenoic acid, 17-hydroxydocosahexaenoic acid, and protectin DX. All three SPMs were found to be effective in elevating murine Ab levels upon influenza infection. Collectively, the results demonstrate that B cell responses are impaired across human and mouse obesity models and show that essential fatty acid status is a factor influencing humoral immunity, potentially through an SPM-mediated mechanism. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  6. Effective use of frozen donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolation from vertically infected pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, M O; Tetali, S; Pahwa, S

    1994-05-01

    In this study, we examined variables related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) isolation utilizing samples from 51 HIV-infected (153 plasma and 122 peripheral blood mononuclear cell [PBMC] samples) and 57 uninfected (182 plasma and 163 PBMC samples) infants. Our chief observation was that cryopreservation of donor PBMCs does not significantly alter their sensitivity or specificity for isolation of HIV from patient PBMCs or plasma.

  7. Wnt11 plays an important role in the osteogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells in a PHA/FN/ALG composite scaffold: possible treatment for infected bone defect

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hai; He, Xiao-Qing; Jin, Tao; Li, Yang; Fan, Xin-Yu; Wang, Yi; Xu, Yong-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Background Infected bone defect poses a great challenge for orthopedists because it is difficult to cure. Tissue-engineered bone based on the human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), has currently taken a promising treatment protocol in clinical practice. In a previous study, a porous hydroxyapatite/fibronectin/alginate (PHA/FN/ALG) composite scaffold displayed favorable biological properties as a novel scaffold, which was considered better than single-material scaffolds. In addition, Wnt11 has ...

  8. Dysregulated immune profiles for skin and dendritic cells are associated with increased host susceptibility to Haemophilus ducreyi infection in human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Tricia L; Li, Lang; Li, Xiaoman; Janowicz, Diane M; Fortney, Kate R; Zhao, Qianqian; Li, Wei; McClintick, Jeanette; Katz, Barry P; Wilkes, David S; Edenberg, Howard J; Spinola, Stanley M

    2007-12-01

    In experimentally infected human volunteers, the cutaneous immune response to Haemophilus ducreyi is orchestrated by serum, polymorphonuclear leukocytes, macrophages, T cells, and myeloid dendritic cells (DC). This response either leads to spontaneous resolution of infection or progresses to pustule formation, which is associated with the failure of phagocytes to ingest the organism and the presence of Th1 and regulatory T cells. In volunteers who are challenged twice, some subjects form at least one pustule twice (PP group), while others have all inoculated sites resolve twice (RR group). Here, we infected PP and RR subjects with H. ducreyi and used microarrays to profile gene expression in infected and wounded skin. The PP and RR groups shared a core response to H. ducreyi. Additional transcripts that signified effective immune function were differentially expressed in RR infected sites, while those that signified a hyperinflammatory, dysregulated response were differentially expressed in PP infected sites. To examine whether DC drove these responses, we profiled gene expression in H. ducreyi-infected and uninfected monocyte-derived DC. Both groups had a common response that was typical of a type 1 DC (DC1) response. RR DC exclusively expressed many additional transcripts indicative of DC1. PP DC exclusively expressed differentially regulated transcripts characteristic of DC1 and regulatory DC. The data suggest that DC from the PP and RR groups respond differentially to H. ducreyi. PP DC may promote a dysregulated T-cell response that contributes to phagocytic failure, while RR DC may promote a Th1 response that facilitates bacterial clearance.

  9. Dual-color bioluminescent assay using infected HepG2 cells sheds new light on Chlamydia pneumoniae and human cytomegalovirus effects on human cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelini, Elisa; Donati, Manuela; Aldini, Rita; Cevenini, Luca; Mezzanotte, Laura; Nardini, Paola; Foschi, Claudio; Zvi, Ido Ben; Cevenini, Monica; Montagnani, Marco; Marangoni, Antonella; Roda, Aldo; Cevenini, Roberto

    2012-11-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) are intracellular pathogens able to infect hepatocytes, causing an increase in serum triglycerides and cholesterol levels due to the production of inflammatory cytokines. We investigated whether these pathogens could interfere with cholesterol metabolism by affecting activity of hepatic cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) promoter. CYP7A1 is the rate-limiting enzyme responsible for conversion of cholesterol to bile acids, which represents the main route of cholesterol catabolism. A straightforward dual-reporter bioluminescent assay was developed to simultaneously monitor CYP7A1 transcriptional regulation and cell viability in infected human hepatoblastoma HepG2 cells. C. pneumoniae and HCMV infection significantly decreased CYP7A1 promoter activity in a dose-dependent manner, with maximal inhibitions of 33±10% and 32±4%, respectively, at a multiplicity of infection of 1. To support in vitro experiments, serum cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose levels were also measured in Balb/c mice infected with C. pneumoniae. Serum cholesterol and triglycerides also increased in infected mice compared with controls. Although further investigation is required, this work presents the first experimental evidence that C. pneumoniae and HCMV inhibit CYP7A1 gene transcription in the cultured human hepatoblastoma cell line.

  10. Up-Regulation of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines and Chemokine Production in Avian Influenza H9N2 Virus-Infected Human Lung Epithelial Cell Line (A549).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzin, Hamidreza; Toroghi, Reza; Haghparast, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Influenza H9N2 virus mostly infects avian species but poses a potential health risk to humans. Little is known about the mammalian host immune responses to H9N2 virus. To obtain insight into the innate immune responses of human lung epithelial cells to the avian H9N2 virus, the expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokine in the human airway epithelial cells infected with avian H9N2 virus were examined by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). H9N2 virus was able to cultivate in the human lung epithelial cell line (A549) and stimulate production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6) and chemokine (IL-8). Expressions of cytokine genes were up-regulated to a significantly higher level for IL-1β (p cytokines and chemokine. The findings in this study will broaden our understanding of host innate immune mechanisms and the pathogenesis of H9N2 influenza viruses in human respiratory epithelium.

  11. Selective killing of human immunodeficiency virus infected cells by non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-induced activation of HIV protease

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    Smeulders Liesbeth

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current antiretroviral therapy against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 reduces viral load and thereby prevents viral spread, but it cannot eradicate proviral genomes from infected cells. Cells in immunological sanctuaries as well as cells producing low levels of virus apparently contribute to a reservoir that maintains HIV persistence in the presence of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Thus, accelerated elimination of virus producing cells may represent a complementary strategy to control HIV infection. Here we sought to exploit HIV protease (PR related cytotoxicity in order to develop a strategy for drug induced killing of HIV producing cells. PR processes the viral Gag and Gag-Pol polyproteins during virus maturation, but is also implicated in killing of virus producing cells through off-target cleavage of host proteins. It has been observed previously that micromolar concentrations of certain non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs can stimulate intracellular PR activity, presumably by enhancing Gag-Pol dimerization. Results Using a newly developed cell-based assay we compared the degree of PR activation displayed by various NNRTIs. We identified inhibitors showing higher potency with respect to PR activation than previously described for NNRTIs, with the most potent compounds resulting in ~2-fold increase of the Gag processing signal at 250 nM. The degree of enhancement of intracellular Gag processing correlated with the compound's ability to enhance RT dimerization in a mammalian two-hybrid assay. Compounds were analyzed for their potential to mediate specific killing of chronically infected MT-4 cells. Levels of cytotoxicity on HIV infected cells determined for the different NNRTIs corresponded to the relative degree of drug induced intracellular PR activation, with CC50 values ranging from ~0.3 μM to above the tested concentration range (10 μM. Specific cytotoxicity was reverted by addition

  12. Human metapneumovirus infections in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Terho; Osterback, Riikka; Peltola, Ville; Jartti, Tuomas; Vainionpää, Raija

    2008-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is an important cause of lower respiratory tract infections in hospitalized children, but the age-related incidence and effect of hMPV in unselected children in the community have not been evaluated. We studied a cohort of 1,338 children <13 years of age throughout 1 respiratory season in Finland during 2000-2001. We examined children and obtained a nasal swab for viral detection at any sign of respiratory infection. hMPV was detected in 47 (3.5%) of the 1,338 children. The age-related incidence of hMPV infection was highest (7.6%) in children <2 years of age, in whom hMPV accounted for 1.7% of all infections during the season. During the epidemic peak, hMPV caused 7.1% of all respiratory infections in the cohort. Acute otitis media developed in 61% of hMPV-infected children <3 years of age. Our findings demonstrate that the effect of hMPV in the community is greatest in children <2 years of age.

  13. Gene Knockout Shows That PML (TRIM19) Does Not Restrict the Early Stages of HIV-1 Infection in Human Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masroori, Nasser; Cherry, Pearl; Merindol, Natacha; Li, Jia-Xin; Dufour, Caroline; Poulain, Lina; Plourde, Mélodie B; Berthoux, Lionel

    2017-01-01

    The PML (promyelocytic leukemia) protein is a member of the TRIM family, a large group of proteins that show high diversity in functions but possess a common tripartite motif giving the family its name. We and others recently reported that both murine PML (mPML) and human PML (hPML) strongly restrict the early stages of infection by HIV-1 and other lentiviruses when expressed in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). This restriction activity was found to contribute to the type I interferon (IFN-I)-mediated inhibition of HIV-1 in MEFs. Additionally, PML caused transcriptional repression of the HIV-1 promoter in MEFs. In contrast, the modulation of the early stages of HIV-1 infection of human cells by PML has been investigated by RNA interference, with unclear results. In order to conclusively determine whether PML restricts HIV-1 or not in human cells, we used the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat with Cas9 (CRISPR-Cas9) system to knock out its gene in epithelial, lymphoid, and monocytic human cell lines. Infection challenges showed that PML knockout had no effect on the permissiveness of these cells to HIV-1 infection. IFN-I treatments inhibited HIV-1 equally whether PML was expressed or not. Overexpression of individual hPML isoforms, or of mPML, in a human T cell line did not restrict HIV-1. The presence of PML was not required for the restriction of nonhuman retroviruses by TRIM5α (another human TRIM protein), and TRIM5α was inhibited by arsenic trioxide through a PML-independent mechanism. We conclude that PML is not a restriction factor for HIV-1 in human cell lines representing diverse lineages. IMPORTANCE PML is involved in innate immune mechanisms against both DNA and RNA viruses. Although the mechanism by which PML inhibits highly divergent viruses is unclear, it was recently found that it can increase the transcription of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). However, whether human PML inhibits HIV-1 has been debated. Here we provide

  14. Production of cytokine and chemokines by human mononuclear cells and whole blood cells after infection with Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Karine Rezende-Oliveira

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The innate immune response is the first mechanism of protection against Trypanosoma cruzi, and the interaction of inflammatory cells with parasite molecules may activate this response and modulate the adaptive immune system. This study aimed to analyze the levels of cytokines and chemokines synthesized by the whole blood cells (WBC and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC of individuals seronegative for Chagas disease after interaction with live T. cruzi trypomastigotes. METHODS: IL-12, IL-10, TNF-α, TGF-β, CCL-5, CCL-2, CCL-3, and CXCL-9 were measured by ELISA. Nitrite was determined by the Griess method. RESULTS: IL-10 was produced at high levels by WBC compared with PBMC, even after incubation with live trypomastigotes. Production of TNF-α by both PBMC and WBC was significantly higher after stimulation with trypomastigotes. Only PBMC produced significantly higher levels of IL-12 after parasite stimulation. Stimulation of cultures with trypomastigotes induced an increase of CXCL-9 levels produced by WBC. Nitrite levels produced by PBMC increased after the addition of parasites to the culture. CONCLUSIONS: Surface molecules of T. cruzi may induce the production of cytokines and chemokines by cells of the innate immune system through the activation of specific receptors not evaluated in this experiment. The ability to induce IL-12 and TNF-α contributes to shift the adaptive response towards a Th1 profile.

  15. Novel epidermal growth factor receptor pathway mediates release of human β-defensin 3 from Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Jibran S; Zaidi, Syed F; Zhou, Yue; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2016-04-01

    Persistent Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in hostile gastric mucosa can result in gastric diseases. Helicobacter pylori induces to express antimicrobial peptides from gastric epithelial cells, especially human β-defensin 3 (hBD3), as an innate immune response, and this expression of hBD3 is mediated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation. In this study, we found that phosphorylation of a serine residue of EGFR via transforming growth factor β-activated kinase-1 (TAK1), and subsequent p38α activation is essential for H. pylori-induced hBD3 release from gastric epithelial cells. We showed that this pathway was dependent on H. pylori type IV secretion system and was independent of H. pylori-derived CagA or peptidoglycan. H. pylori infection induced phosphorylation of serine residue of EGFR, and this phosphorylation was followed by internalization of EGFR; consequently, hBD3 was released at an early phase of the infection. In the presence of TAK1 or p38α inhibitors, synthesis of hBD3 was completely inhibited. Similar results were observed in EGFR-, TAK1- or p38α-knockdown cells. However, NOD1 knockdown in gastric epithelial cells did not inhibit hBD3 induction. Our study has firstly demonstrated that this novel EGFR activating pathway functioned to induce hBD3 at an early phase of H. pylori infection.

  16. Possible Roles of Proinflammatory and Chemoattractive Cytokines Produced by Human Fetal Membrane Cells in the Pathology of Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes Associated with Influenza Virus Infection

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    Noboru Uchide

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnant women are at an increased risk of influenza-associated adverse outcomes, such as premature delivery, based on data from the latest pandemic with a novel influenza A (H1N1 virus in 2009-2010. It has been suggested that the transplacental transmission of influenza viruses is rarely detected in humans. A series of our study has demonstrated that influenza virus infection induced apoptosis in primary cultured human fetal membrane chorion cells, from which a factor with monocyte differentiation-inducing (MDI activity was secreted. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, and interferon (IFN-β, were identified as a member of the MDI factor. Influenza virus infection induced the mRNA expression of not only the proinflammatory cytokines but also chemoattractive cytokines, such as monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1, regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-1β, IL-8, growth-regulated oncogene (GRO-α, GRO-β, epithelial cell-derived neutrophil-activating protein (ENA-78, and interferon inducible protein (IP-10 in cultured chorion cells. These cytokines are postulated to associate with human parturition. This paper, therefore, reviews (1 lessons from pandemic H1N1 2009 in pregnancy, (2 production of proinflammatory and chemoattractive cytokines by human fetal membranes and their functions in gestational tissues, and (3 possible roles of cytokines produced by human fetal membranes in the pathology of adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with influenza virus infection.

  17. PSC-RANTES blocks R5 human immunodeficiency virus infection of Langerhans cells isolated from individuals with a variety of CCR5 diplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Tatsuyoshi; Bruse, Shannon E; Abraha, Awet; Sugaya, Makoto; Hartley, Oliver; Offord, Robin E; Arts, Eric J; Zimmerman, Peter A; Blauvelt, Andrew; Bruce, Shannon E

    2004-07-01

    Topical microbicides that effectively block interactions between CCR5(+) immature Langerhans cells (LC) residing within genital epithelia and R5 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) may decrease sexual transmission of HIV. Here, we investigated the ability of synthetic RANTES analogues (AOP-, NNY-, and PSC-RANTES) to block R5 HIV infection of human immature LC by using a skin explant model. In initial experiments using activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, each analogue compound demonstrated marked antiviral activity against two R5 HIV isolates. Next, we found that 20-min preincubation of skin explants with each RANTES analogue blocked R5 HIV infection of LC in a dose-dependent manner (1 to 100 nM) and that PSC-RANTES was the most potent of these compounds. Similarly, preincubation of LC with each analogue was able to block LC-mediated infection of cocultured CD4(+) T cells. Competition experiments between primary R5 and X4 HIV isolates showed blocking of R5 HIV by PSC-RANTES and no evidence of increased propagation of X4 HIV, data that are consistent with the specificity of PSC-RANTES for CCR5 and the CCR5(+) CXCR4(-) phenotype of immature LC. Finally, when CCR5 genetic polymorphism data were integrated with results from the in vitro LC infection studies, PSC-RANTES was found to be equally effective in inhibiting R5 HIV in LC isolated from individuals with CCR5 diplotypes known to be associated with low, intermediate, and high cell surface levels of CCR5. In summary, PSC-RANTES is a potent inhibitor of R5 HIV infection in immature LC, suggesting that it may be useful as a topical microbicide to block sexual transmission of HIV.

  18. Poxvirus antigen staining of immune cells as a biomarker to predict disease outcome in monkeypox and cowpox virus infection in non-human primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Song

    Full Text Available Infection of non-human primates (NHPs such as rhesus and cynomolgus macaques with monkeypox virus (MPXV or cowpox virus (CPXV serve as models to study poxvirus pathogenesis and to evaluate vaccines and anti-orthopox therapeutics. Intravenous inoculation of macaques with high dose of MPXV (>1-2×10(7 PFU or CPXV (>10(2 PFU results in 80% to 100% mortality and 66 to 100% mortality respectively. Here we report that NHPs with positive detection of poxvirus antigens in immune cells by flow cytometric staining, especially in monocytes and granulocytes succumbed to virus infection and that early positive pox staining is a strong predictor for lethality. Samples from four independent studies were analyzed. Eighteen NHPs from three different experiments were inoculated with two different MPXV strains at lethal doses. Ten NHPs displayed positive pox-staining and all 10 NHPs reached moribund endpoint. In contrast, none of the three NHPs that survived anticipated lethal virus dose showed apparent virus staining in the monocytes and granulocytes. In addition, three NHPs that were challenged with a lethal dose of MPXV and received cidofovir treatment were pox-antigen negative and all three NHPs survived. Furthermore, data from a CPXV study also demonstrated that 6/9 NHPs were pox-antigen staining positive and all 6 NHPs reached euthanasia endpoint, while the three survivors were pox-antigen staining negative. Thus, we conclude that monitoring pox-antigen staining in immune cells can be used as a biomarker to predict the prognosis of virus infection. Future studies should focus on the mechanisms and implications of the pox-infection of immune cells and the correlation between pox-antigen detection in immune cells and disease progression in human poxviral infection.

  19. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in a case-control study of oral squamous cell carcinoma and its increasing trend in northeastern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phusingha, Pensiri; Ekalaksananan, Tipaya; Vatanasapt, Patravoot; Loyha, Kulchaya; Promthet, Supannee; Kongyingyoes, Bunkerd; Patarapadungkit, Natcha; Chuerduangphui, Jureeporn; Pientong, Chamsai

    2016-12-09

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is an independent risk factor for development of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). This study aimed to investigate the role of HPV infection and the trend in percentage of HPV-associated OSCC over a 5-year period in northeastern Thailand. In this case-control study, 91 exfoliated oral cell samples and 80 lesion cell samples from OSCC cases and exfoliated oral cells from 100 age/gender-matched controls were collected. HPV infection was investigated by PCR using GP5+/GP6+ primers followed by HPV genotyping using reverse line blot hybridization. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to evaluate HPV oncogene transcription. Temporal trends of HPV infection were evaluated in archived formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) OSCC tissues using in situ hybridization. HPV DNA was found in 17.5% (14/80) of lesion samples from OSCC cases and 29.7% (27/91) of exfoliated oral cell samples from the same cases. These values were significantly higher than in exfoliated oral cell samples from controls (13%, 13/100). HPV-16 was the genotype most frequently found in OSCC cases (92.8%, 13/14 infected cases). Interestingly, HPV oncogene mRNA expression was detected and correlated with OSCC cases (P HPV DNA and 64 (43.8%) cases were positive for HPV E6/E7 mRNA expression. There was a trend of increasing percentage of HPV-associated OSCC from 2005 to 2010. This was especially so for females with well-differentiated tumors in specific tongue sub-sites. We suggest that HPV infection plays an important role in oral carcinogenesis in northeastern Thailand.

  20. Comparative expression profile of miRNA and mRNA in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1.

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    Ankit Gupta

    Full Text Available Host cells respond to exogenous infectious agents such as viruses, including HIV-1. Studies have evaluated the changes associated with virus infection at the transcriptional and translational levels of the cellular genes involved in specific pathways. While this approach is useful, in our view it provides only a partial view of genome-wide changes. Recently, technological advances in the expression profiling at the microRNA (miRNA and mRNA levels have made it possible to evaluate the changes in the components of multiple pathways. To understand the role of miRNA and its interplay with host cellular gene expression (mRNA during HIV-1 infection, we performed a comparative global miRNA and mRNA microarray using human PBMCs infected with HIV-1. The PBMCs were derived from multiple donors and were infected with virus generated from the molecular clone pNL4-3. The results showed that HIV-1 infection led to altered regulation of 21 miRNAs and 444 mRNA more than 2-fold, with a statistical significance of p<0.05. Furthermore, the differentially regulated miRNA and mRNA were shown to be associated with host cellular pathways involved in cell cycle/proliferation, apoptosis, T-cell signaling, and immune activation. We also observed a number of inverse correlations of miRNA and mRNA expression in infected PBMCs, further confirming the interrelationship between miRNA and mRNA regulation during HIV-1 infection. These results for the first time provide evidence that the miRNA profile could be an early indicator of host cellular dysfunction induced by HIV-1.

  1. Interleukin 10 promotes immune response by increasing the survival of activated CD8(+) T cells in human papillomavirus 16-infected cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Ma, Yan; Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Jin; Xu, Xin-Yan

    2016-10-11

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-specific CD8(+) T cells are present in HPV-infected cervical cancer patients and have demonstrated potent antitumor properties. However, these cells cannot control tumor progression in most patients. To investigate the underlying mechanisms involved in suppressing or promoting CD8(+) T cell functions, we focused on interleukin 10 (IL-10), a pleiotropic cytokine with controversial roles in antitumor immunity. We found that compared to healthy controls, circulating CD8(+) T cells in HPV 16-infected cervical cancer patients expressed significantly higher levels of IL-10. Interestingly, these CD8(+) T cells from cervical cancer patients, but not those from healthy controls, responded to HPV 16 E6/E7 peptide stimulation by increasing IL-10 expression, demonstrating an antigen-specific IL-10 release. Addition of exogenous IL-10 improved the survival, but did not increase the proliferation, of peptide-stimulated CD8(+) T cells. CD8(+) T cells cultured in the presence of IL-10 also resulted in significantly higher interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) and granzyme B concentration, primarily due to improved cell survival. In resected cervical tumors, the frequency of tumor-infiltrating IL-10(+) CD8(+) T cells was positively correlated with the frequency of tumor-infiltrating IFN-gamma(+) and granzyme B(+) CD8(+) T cells. Tumor-associated macrophages were more potent than peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages at inducing IL-10 expression in CD8(+) T cells, possibly explaining the elevated IL-10(+) CD8(+) T cell frequency in cervical cancer patients. Together, these results are consistent with an immunostimulatory role of IL-10, which promoted CD8(+) T cell response by increasing the survival of activated CD8(+) T cells.

  2. Adenovirus infection reverses the antiviral state induced by human interferon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    1987-04-06

    HeLa cells treated with human lymphoblastoid interferon do not synthesize poliovirus proteins. The antiviral state against poliovirus is reversed if cells are previously infected with adenovirus type 5. A late gene product seems to be involved in this reversion, since no effect is observed at early stages of infection or in the presence of aphidicolin.

  3. Co-infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 and human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1: does immune activation lead to a faster progression to AIDS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savino Wilson

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent data have shown that HTLV-1 is prevalent among HIV positive patients in Mozambique, although the impact of HTLV-1 infection on HIV disease progression remains controversial. Our aim was to determine the phenotypic profile of T lymphocytes subsets among Mozambican patients co-infected by HIV and HTLV-1. Methods We enrolled 29 patients co-infected by HTLV-1 and HIV (co-infected, 59 patients mono-infected by HIV (HIV and 16 healthy controls (HC, respectively. For phenotypic analysis, cells were stained with the following fluorochrome-labeled anti-human monoclonal antibodies CD4-APC, CD8-PerCP, CD25-PE, CD62L-FITC, CD45RA-FITC. CD45RO-PE, CD38-PE; being analysed by four-colour flow cytometry. Results We initially found that CD4+ T cell counts were significantly higher in co-infected, as compared to HIV groups. Moreover, CD4+ T Lymphocytes from co-infected patients presented significantly higher levels of CD45RO and CD25, but lower levels of CD45RA and CD62L, strongly indicating that CD4+ T cells are more activated under HTLV-1 plus HIV co-infection. Conclusion Our data indicate that HTLV-1/HIV co-infected patients progress with higher CD4+ T cell counts and higher levels of activation markers. In this context, it is conceivable that in co-infected individuals, these higher levels of activation may account for a faster progression to AIDS.

  4. Uncaria tomentosa alkaloidal fraction reduces paracellular permeability, IL-8 and NS1 production on human microvascular endothelial cells infected with dengue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima-Junior, Raimundo Sousa; Mello, Cintia da Silva; Siani, Antonio Carlos; Valente, Ligia M Marino; Kubelka, Claire Fernandes

    2013-11-01

    Dengue is the major Arbovirus in the world, annually causing morbidity and death. Severe dengue is associated with changes in the endothelial barrier function due to the production of inflammatory mediators by immune cells and by the endothelium. Dengue virus (DENV) replicates efficiently in human endothelial cells in vitro and elicits immune responses resulting in endothelial permeability. Uncaria tomentosa (Willd.) DC.(Rubiaceae), known as cat's claw, has been used in folk medicine for the treatment of a wide-array of symptoms, and several scientific studies reported its antiviral, immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Here we infected a human lineage of dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) with DENV-2 and treated it with an alkaloidal fraction from U. tomentosa bark (AFUT). We showed antiviral and immunomodulatory activities of U. tomentosa by determining the NS1 antigen and IL-8 in supernatant of DENV-2 infected HMEC-1. Furthermore, by measurement of transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) we demonstrated, for the first time, that a plant derivative contributed to the reduction of paracellular permeability in DENV-2 infected HMEC-1. We also showed that IL-8 contributed significantly to the induction of permeability. Although further investigations should be conducted before a new drug can be suggested, our in vitro data support evidence that AFUT could be potentially useful in developing a treatment for severe dengue.

  5. Effect of sodium-alginate and laminaran on Salmonella Typhimurium infection in human enterocyte-like HT-29-Luc cells and BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuda, Takashi; Kosaka, Misa; Hirano, Shino; Kawahara, Miho; Sato, Masahiro; Kaneshima, Tai; Nishizawa, Makoto; Takahashi, Hajime; Kimura, Bon

    2015-07-10

    Brown algal polysaccharides such as alginate, polymers of uronic acids, and laminaran, beta-1,3 and 1,6-glucan, can be fermented by human intestinal microbiota. To evaluate the effects of these polysaccharides on infections caused by food poisoning pathogens, we investigated the adhesion and invasion of pathogens (Salmonella Typhimurium, Listeria monocytogenes and Vibrio parahaemolyticus) in human enterocyte-like HT-29-Luc cells and in infections caused in BALB/c mice. Both sodium Na-alginate and laminaran (0.1% each) inhibited the adhesion of the pathogens to HT-29-Luc cells by approximately 70-90%. The invasion of S. Typhimurium was also inhibited by approximately 70 and 80% by Na-alginate and laminaran, respectively. We observed that incubation with Na-alginate for 18 h increased the transepithelial electrical resistance of HT-29-Luc monolayer cells. Four days after inoculation with 7 log CFU/mouse of S. Typhimurium, the faecal pathogen count in mice that were not fed polysaccharides (control mice) was about 6.5 log CFU/g while the count in mice that were fed Na-alginate had decreased to 5.0 log CFU/g. The liver pathogen count, which was 4.1 log CFU/g in the control mice, was also decreased in mice that were fed Na-alginate. In contrast, the mice that were fed laminaran exhibited a more severe infection than that exhibited by control mice.

  6. Human immunodeficiency virus infection alters tumor necrosis factor alpha production via Toll-like receptor-dependent pathways in alveolar macrophages and U1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Marlynne Q; Mathys, Jean-Marie; Pereira, Albertina; Ollington, Kevin; Ieong, Michael H; Skolnik, Paul R

    2008-08-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive persons are predisposed to pulmonary infections, even after receiving effective highly active antiretroviral therapy. The reasons for this are unclear but may involve changes in innate immune function. HIV type 1 infection of macrophages impairs effector functions, including cytokine production. We observed decreased constitutive tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) concentrations and increased soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor type II (sTNFRII) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples from HIV-positive subjects compared to healthy controls. Moreover, net proinflammatory TNF-alpha activity, as measured by the TNF-alpha/sTNFRII ratio, decreased as HIV-related disease progressed, as manifested by decreasing CD4 cell count and increasing HIV RNA (viral load). Since TNF-alpha is an important component of the innate immune system and is produced upon activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathways, we hypothesized that the mechanism associated with deficient TNF-alpha production in the lung involved altered TLR expression or a deficit in the TLR signaling cascade. We found decreased Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1) and TLR4 surface expression in HIV-infected U1 monocytic cells compared to the uninfected parental U937 cell line and decreased TLR message in alveolar macrophages (AMs) from HIV-positive subjects. In addition, stimulation with TLR1/2 ligand (Pam(3)Cys) or TLR4 ligand (lipopolysaccharide) resulted in decreased intracellular phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase and subsequent decreased transcription and expression of TNF-alpha in U1 cells compared to U937 cells. AMs from HIV-positive subjects also showed decreased TNF-alpha production in response to these TLR2 and TLR4 ligands. We postulate that HIV infection alters expression of TLRs with subsequent changes in mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and cytokine production that ultimately leads to deficiencies of innate immune responses that

  7. Changes in human dendritic cell number and function in severe obesity may contribute to increased susceptibility to viral infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Shea, D

    2013-02-26

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key immune sentinels linking the innate and adaptive immune systems. DCs recognise danger signals and initiate T-cell tolerance, memory and polarisation. They are critical cells in responding to a viral illness. Obese individuals have been shown to have an impaired response to vaccinations against virally mediated conditions and to have an increased susceptibility to multi-organ failure in response to viral illness. We investigated if DCs are altered in an obese cohort (mean body mass index 51.7±7.3 kg m(-2)), ultimately resulting in differential T-cell responses. Circulating DCs were found to be significantly decreased in the obese compared with the lean cohort (0.82% vs 2.53%). Following Toll-like receptor stimulation, compared with lean controls, DCs generated from the obese cohort upregulated significantly less CD83 (40% vs 17% mean fluorescence intensity), a molecule implicated in the elicitation of T-cell responses, particularly viral responses. Obese DCs produced twofold more of the immunosuppressive cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 than lean controls, and in turn stimulated fourfold more IL-4-production from allogenic naive T cells. We conclude that obesity negatively impacts the ability of DCs to mature and elicit appropriate T-cell responses to a general stimulus. This may contribute to the increased susceptibility to viral infection observed in severe obesity.International Journal of Obesity advance online publication, 26 February 2013; doi:10.1038\\/ijo.2013.16.

  8. Heparin increases the infectivity of Human Papillomavirus type 16 independent of cell surface proteoglycans and induces L1 epitope exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cerqueira, C.; Liu, Y.; Kuhling, L.; Chai, W.; Hafezi, W.; Kuppevelt, T.H. van; Kuhn, J.E.; Feizi, T.; Schelhaas, M.

    2013-01-01

    Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the etiological agents of cervical cancer, and HPV-16 is the most prevalent type. Several HPVs require heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) for cell binding. Here, we analyse the phenomenon that preincubation of HPV-16 with increasing concentrations of heparin resu

  9. Quantitative-PCR Assessment of Cryptosporidium parvum Cell Culture Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Di Giovanni, George D.; LeChevallier, Mark W.

    2005-01-01

    A quantitative TaqMan PCR method was developed for assessing the Cryptosporidium parvum infection of in vitro cultivated human ileocecal adenocarcinoma (HCT-8) cell cultures. This method, termed cell culture quantitative sequence detection (CC-QSD), has numerous applications, several of which are presented. CC-QSD was used to investigate parasite infection in cell culture over time, the effects of oocyst treatment on infectivity and infectivity assessment of different C. parvum isolates. CC-Q...

  10. A low level of CD4+CD28+ T cells is an independent predictor of high mortality in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, Sisse R; Gerstoft, Jan; Pedersen, Bente K

    2003-01-01

    important novel finding was that a 50% reduction in CD4(+)CD28(+) cells predicted increased mortality (relative hazards [HR], 1.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-2.6; P=.04), even after adjusting for the CD4(+) cell counts, virus load, beta(2)-microglobulin and hemoglobin levels, and HIV disease stage......This study investigated coexpression of CD28, CD45RA, and CD45RO on CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells in 107 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1-infected patients, who were followed-up prospectively and were not treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy, and 65 control subjects. The most....... Patients with progressed HIV infection had decreased concentrations of all studied cell subsets. Concerning the proportions of cells, only CD4(+)CD28(+), CD4(+)CD45RA(+), and CD8(+)CD45RO(+) cells decreased with HIV progression. Low proportions of CD4(+)CD45RA(+), CD8(+)CD45RA(+), and CD8(+)CD45RO(+) cells...

  11. Polymorphism in the promoter region of the mannose-binding lectin gene among human T-cell lymphotropic virus infected subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AEM Alves

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the frequency of the mutations at positions -550 and -221 of the mannose-binding lectin (MBL gene in a sample of 75 human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV infected patients and 96 HTLV seronegative controls, in order to evaluate the occurrence of a possible association between the polymorphism and HTLV infection. A sequence specific primer-polymerase chain reaction was used for discrimination of the polymorphism. The analysis of allele frequencies at position -550 did not show any significant differences between HTLV infected group and controls, but there was a significant difference at position -221. The comparative analysis of haplotypes frequencies were not significant, but the genotype frequencies between the two groups, revealed a higher prevalence of genotype LYLX (25.3%, associated with medium and low MBL serum levels among HTLV infected subjects. The odds ratio estimation demonstrated that the presence of genotype LYLX was associated with an increased risk of HTLV infection (p = 0.0096; 1.38 < IC95% < 7.7605. There was no association between proviral load and the promoter polymorphism, but when promoter and exon 1 mutations were matched, it was possible to identify a significant higher proviral load among HTLV infected individuals carrying haplotypes correlated to low serum levels of MBL. The present study shows that the polymorphism in the promoter region of the MBL gene may be a genetic marker associated with HTLV infection, and emphasizes the need for further studies to determinate if the present polymorphism have any impact on diseases linked to HTLV infection.

  12. Parasite Infection, Carcinogenesis and Human Malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoang van Tong

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer may be induced by many environmental and physiological conditions. Infections with viruses, bacteria and parasites have been recognized for years to be associated with human carcinogenicity. Here we review current concepts of carcinogenicity and its associations with parasitic infections. The helminth diseases schistosomiasis, opisthorchiasis, and clonorchiasis are highly carcinogenic while the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causing agent of Chagas disease, has a dual role in the development of cancer, including both carcinogenic and anticancer properties. Although malaria per se does not appear to be causative in carcinogenesis, it is strongly associated with the occurrence of endemic Burkitt lymphoma in areas holoendemic for malaria. The initiation of Plasmodium falciparum related endemic Burkitt lymphoma requires additional transforming events induced by the Epstein-Barr virus. Observations suggest that Strongyloides stercoralis may be a relevant co-factor in HTLV-1-related T cell lymphomas. This review provides an overview of the mechanisms of parasitic infection-induced carcinogenicity.

  13. Expanding the host range of small insect RNA viruses: Providence virus (Carmotetraviridae) infects and replicates in a human tissue culture cell line.

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    Jiwaji, Meesbah; Short, James Roswell; Dorrington, Rosemary Ann

    2016-10-01

    Tetraviruses are small, positive (+ve)-sense ssRNA viruses that infect the midgut cells of lepidopteran larvae. Providence virus (PrV) is the only member of the family Carmotetraviridae (previously Tetraviridae). PrV particles exhibit the characteristic tetraviral T=4 icosahedral symmetry, but PrV is distinct from other tetraviruses with respect to genome organization and viral non-structural proteins. Currently, PrV is the only tetravirus known to infect and replicate in lepidopteran cell culture lines. In this report we demonstrate, using immunofluorescence microscopy, that PrV infects and replicates in a human tissue culture cell line (HeLa), producing infectious virus particles. We also provide evidence for PrV replication in vitro in insect, mammalian and plant cell-free systems. This study challenges the long-held view that tetraviruses have a narrow host range confined to one or a few lepidopteran species and highlights the need to consider the potential for apparently non-infectious viruses to be transferred to new hosts in the laboratory.

  14. Human intestinal dendritic cells decrease cytokine release against Salmonella infection in the presence of Lactobacillus paracasei upon TLR activation.

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    Miriam Bermudez-Brito

    Full Text Available Probiotic bacteria have been shown to modulate immune responses and could have therapeutic effects in allergic and inflammatory disorders. However, little is known about the signalling pathways that are engaged by probiotics. Dendritic cells (DCs are antigen-presenting cells that are involved in immunity and tolerance. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs and murine DCs are different from human gut DCs; therefore, in this study, we used human DCs generated from CD34+ progenitor cells (hematopoietic stem cells harvested from umbilical cord blood; those DCs exhibited surface antigens of dendritic Langerhans cells, similar to the lamina propria DCs in the gut. We report that both a novel probiotic strain isolated from faeces of exclusively breast-fed newborn infants, Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4034, and its cell-free culture supernatant (CFS decreased pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in human intestinal DCs challenged with Salmonella. Interestingly, the supernatant was as effective as the bacteria in reducing pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. In contrast, the bacterium was a potent inducer of TGF-β2 secretion, whereas the supernatant increased the secretion of TGF-β1 in response to Salmonella. We also showed that both the bacteria and its supernatant enhanced innate immunity through the activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR signalling. These treatments strongly induced the transcription of the TLR9 gene. In addition, upregulation of the CASP8 and TOLLIP genes was observed. This work demonstrates that L. paracasei CNCM I-4034 enhanced innate immune responses, as evidenced by the activation of TLR signalling and the downregulation of a broad array of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The use of supernatants like the one described in this paper could be an effective and safe alternative to using live bacteria in functional foods.

  15. Potent antiproliferative cembrenoids accumulate in tobacco upon infection with Rhodococcus fascians and trigger unusual microtubule dynamics in human glioblastoma cells.

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    Aminata P Nacoulma

    Full Text Available AIMS: Though plant metabolic changes are known to occur during interactions with bacteria, these were rarely challenged for pharmacologically active compounds suitable for further drug development. Here, the occurrence of specific chemicals with antiproliferative activity against human cancer cell lines was evidenced in hyperplasia (leafy galls induced when plants interact with particular phytopathogens, such as the Actinomycete Rhodococcus fascians. METHODS: We examined leafy galls fraction F3.1.1 on cell proliferation, cell division and cytoskeletal disorganization of human cancer cell lines using time-lapse videomicroscopy imaging, combined with flow cytometry and immunofluorescence analysis. We determined the F3.1.1-fraction composition by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. RESULTS: The leafy galls induced on tobacco by R. fascians yielded fraction F3.1.1 which inhibited proliferation of glioblastoma U373 cells with an IC50 of 4.5 µg/mL, F.3.1.1 was shown to increase cell division duration, cause nuclear morphological deformations and cell enlargement, and, at higher concentrations, karyokinesis defects leading to polyploidization and apoptosis. F3.1.1 consisted of a mixture of isomers belonging to the cembrenoids. The cellular defects induced by F3.1.1 were caused by a peculiar cytoskeletal disorganization, with the occurrence of fragmented tubulin and strongly organized microtubule aggregates within the same cell. Colchicine, paclitaxel, and cembrene also affected U373 cell proliferation and karyokinesis, but the induced microtubule rearrangement was very different from that provoked by F3.1.1. Altogether our data indicate that the cembrenoid isomers in F3.1.1 have a unique mode of action and are able to simultaneously modulate microtubule polymerization and stability.

  16. Sugar-binding proteins potently inhibit dendritic cell human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and dendritic-cell-directed HIV-1 transfer.

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    Turville, Stuart G; Vermeire, Kurt; Balzarini, Jan; Schols, Dominique

    2005-11-01

    Both endocytic uptake and viral fusion can lead to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transfer to CD4+ lymphocytes, either through directional regurgitation (infectious transfer in trans [I-IT]) or through de novo viral production in dendritic cells (DCs) resulting in a second-phase transfer to CD4+ lymphocytes (infectious second-phase transfer [I-SPT]). We have evaluated in immature monocyte-derived DCs both pathways of transfer with regard to their susceptibilities to being blocked by potential microbicidal compounds, including cyanovirin (CNV); the plant lectins Hippeastrum hybrid agglutinin, Galanthus nivalis agglutinin, Urtica dioica agglutinin, and Cymbidium hybrid agglutinin; and the glycan mannan. I-IT was a relatively inefficient means of viral transfer compared to I-SPT at both high and low levels of the viral inoculum. CNV was able to completely block I-IT at 15 microg/ml. All other compounds except mannan could inhibit I-IT by at least 90% when used at doses of 15 microg/ml. In contrast, efficient inhibition of I-SPT was remarkably harder to achieve, as 50% effective concentration levels for plant lectins and CNV to suppress this mode of HIV-1 transfer increased significantly. Thus, our findings indicate that I-SPT may be more elusive to targeting by antiviral drugs and stress the need for drugs affecting the pronounced inhibition of the infection of DCs by HIV-1.

  17. Mannan binding lectin-associated serine protease 1 is induced by hepatitis C virus infection and activates human hepatic stellate cells.

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    Saeed, A; Baloch, K; Brown, R J P; Wallis, R; Chen, L; Dexter, L; McClure, C P; Shakesheff, K; Thomson, B J

    2013-11-01

    Mannan binding lectin (MBL)-associated serine protease type 1 (MASP-1) has a central role in the lectin pathway of complement activation and is required for the formation of C3 convertase. The activity of MASP-1 in the peripheral blood has been identified previously as a highly significant predictor of the severity of liver fibrosis in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, but not in liver disease of other aetiologies. In this study we tested the hypotheses that expression of MASP-1 may promote disease progression in HCV disease by direct activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and may additionally be up-regulated by HCV. In order to do so, we utilized a model for the maintenance of primary human HSC in the quiescent state by culture on basement membrane substrate prior to stimulation. In comparison to controls, recombinant MASP-1 stimulated quiescent human HSCs to differentiate to the activated state as assessed by both morphology and up-regulation of HSC activation markers α-smooth muscle actin and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1. Further, the expression of MASP-1 was up-regulated significantly by HCV infection in hepatocyte cell lines. These observations suggest a new role for MASP-1 and provide a possible mechanistic link between high levels of MASP-1 and the severity of disease in HCV infection. Taken together with previous clinical observations, our new findings suggest that the balance of MASP-1 activity may be proinflammatory and act to accelerate fibrosis progression in HCV liver disease.

  18. Human Paraoxonase-1 Activity Is Related to the Number of CD4+ T-Cells and Is Restored by Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-1-Infected Individuals

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    Luciana Morganti Ferreira Maselli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Paraoxonase-1 (PON1 activity is suggested to be altered in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1. We investigated PON1 activity in individuals receiving different regimens of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. Methods. PON1 activity was evaluated in 91 HIV-1 seronegative and 624 HIV-1 infected individuals (115 were not undergoing therapy (ART-naïve, and 509 were receiving HAART. HIV-1 infected individuals were treated with the following: efavirenz (EFV; n=195 or nevirapine (NVP; n=95 or lopinavir/ritonavir (LOP/r; n=219. Serum levels of total cholesterol (TC, HDL, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL fractions and the atherogenic indices (AI, TC : HDL, and LDL : HDL ratios were determined. Results. PON1 activity (U/L was lower in the ART-naïve group compared with the other groups. PON1 activity correlated with CD4+ T-cell number of ART-naïve group (r=0,121; P=0,014. The LOP/r group showed a reduction in HDL and an increase in AI (TC : HDL ratio in comparison with other groups. Conclusion. PON1 activity was reduced in untreated individuals, but not in individuals receiving HAART. PON1 activity correlated with the number of CD4+ T-cells. The findings suggest that the activity of PON1 is associated with the immune status of HIV-1 infected individuals.

  19. The prevalence of human papilloma virus (HPV) infections in oral squamous cell carcinomas: a retrospective analysis of 88 patients and literature overview.

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    Krüger, M; Pabst, A M; Walter, C; Sagheb, K; Günther, C; Blatt, S; Weise, K; Al-Nawas, B; Ziebart, T

    2014-10-01

    In addition to tobacco and alcohol consumption, the two main risk factors for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), recent studies have revealed infections with human papilloma virus (HPV) as an additional risk factor for OSCC development. In the field of head and neck malignancies, the prevalence of HPV infections in oropharyngeal cancer (OC) ranges in different studies up to 84%. While HPV infection is discussed as an independent risk factor in this region, its distinguished role in carcinogenesis of tumours localized to the oral cavity remains still uncertain. In this study, we analysed the HPV status in 88 consecutive patients with OSCCs localized anterior of the palatoglossal arch who were treated in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the University Medical Center Mainz. The HPV status analysis was performed using DNA-PCR and immunostaining of p16 protein. The prevalence of HPV-positive OSCCs was about 6% (5 patients). In 3 patients the HPV subtypes 16/18 were found. No significant differences between the HPV positive and negative patients regarding age, gender, smoking and alcohol consumption, localization and TNM level could be detected. Contrary to other studies focussing on cancers of the lingual and palatine tonsil, the prevalence of HPV infections was much lower in the oral cavity. Therefore HPV infection might play a less important role in oral carcinogenesis.

  20. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Vitamin D on Human Immune Cells in the Context of Bacterial Infection

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    Hoe, Edwin; Nathanielsz, Jordan; Toh, Zheng Quan; Spry, Leena; Marimla, Rachel; Balloch, Anne; Mulholland, Kim; Licciardi, Paul V.

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D induces a diverse range of biological effects, including important functions in bone health, calcium homeostasis and, more recently, on immune function. The role of vitamin D during infection is of particular interest given data from epidemiological studies suggesting that vitamin D deficiency is associated with an increased risk of infection. Vitamin D has diverse immunomodulatory functions, although its role during bacterial infection remains unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of 1,25(OH)2D3, the active metabolite of vitamin D, on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and purified immune cell subsets isolated from healthy adults following stimulation with the bacterial ligands heat-killed pneumococcal serotype 19F (HK19F) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We found that 1,25(OH)2D3 significantly reduced pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-1β as well as the chemokine IL-8 for both ligands (three- to 53-fold), while anti-inflammatory IL-10 was increased (two-fold, p = 0.016) in HK19F-stimulated monocytes. Levels of HK19F-specific IFN-γ were significantly higher (11.7-fold, p = 0.038) in vitamin D-insufficient adults (50 nmol/L). Vitamin D also shifted the pro-inflammatory/anti-inflammatory balance towards an anti-inflammatory phenotype and increased the CD14 expression on monocytes (p = 0.008) in response to LPS but not HK19F stimulation. These results suggest that 1,25(OH)2D3 may be an important regulator of the inflammatory response and supports further in vivo and clinical studies to confirm the potential benefits of vitamin D in this context. PMID:27973447

  1. Perturbation of the natural killer cell compartment during primary human immunodeficiency virus 1 infection primarily involving the CD56bright subset

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    Mantegani, Paola; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Galli, Laura; Din, Chiara Tassan; Lazzarin, Adriano; Fortis, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the distribution of natural killer (NK) cell subsets, their activating and inhibitory receptors, and their cytolytic potential, in primary human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected (PHI) individuals at baseline and during 1 year of follow-up with or without antiretroviral therapy, and compared the results with those obtained in treatment-naïve, chronically HIV-infected (CHI) individuals, and HIV-seronegative (HN) healthy individuals. The proportion of the CD56dim and CD56bright subsets decreased with disease progression, whereas that of the CD56− CD16+ subset increased. In the CD56dim subset, the proportion of cells with natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs) decreased with disease progression, and their cytolytic potential was reduced. Conversely, the CD56bright subset was characterized by a high proportion of NCR-positive, killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR)-positive NKG2A+ cells in both CHI and PHI individuals, which was associated with an increase in their cytolytic potential. During the 1 year of follow-up, the PHI individuals with high viraemia levels and low CD4+ T-cell counts who received highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) had a similar proportion of NK subsets to CHI individuals, while patients with low viraemia levels and high CD4+ T-cell counts who remained untreated had values similar to those of the HN individuals. Our results indicate a marked perturbation of the NK cell compartment during HIV-1 infection that is multifaceted, starts early and is progressive, primarily involves the CD56bright subset, and is partially corrected by effective HAART. PMID:19824914

  2. Reconstitution of Human Cytomegalovirus-Specific CD4+ T Cells is Critical for Control of Virus Reactivation in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients but Does Not Prevent Organ Infection.

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    Gabanti, Elisa; Lilleri, Daniele; Ripamonti, Francesco; Bruno, Francesca; Zelini, Paola; Furione, Milena; Colombo, Anna A; Alessandrino, Emilio P; Gerna, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    The relative contribution of human cytomegalovirus (HMCV)-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells to the control of HCMV infection in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients is still controversial. HCMV reactivation and HCMV-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell reconstitution were monitored for 1 year in 63 HCMV-seropositive patients receiving HSCT. HCMV reactivation was detected in all but 2 patients. In 20 of 63 (31.7%) patients (group 1) HCMV infection resolved spontaneously, whereas 32 of 63 (50.8%) patients (group 2) controlled the infection after a single short-course of pre-emptive therapy and the remaining 9 (14.3%) patients (group 3) suffered from relapsing episodes of HCMV infection, requiring multiple courses of antiviral therapy. The kinetics and magnitude of HCMV-specific CD8(+) T cell reconstitution were comparable among the 3 groups, but HCMV-specific CD4(+) T cells were lower in number in patients requiring antiviral treatment. HCMV-seronegative donors, as well as unrelated donors (receiving antithymocyte globulin) and acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were associated with both delayed HCMV-specific CD4(+) T cell reconstitution and severity of infection. Conversely, these risk factors had no impact on HCMV-specific CD8(+) T cells. Eight patients with previous GVHD suffered from HCMV gastrointestinal disease, although in the presence of HCMV-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) systemic immunity and undetectable HCMV DNA in blood. Reconstitution of systemic HCMV-specific CD4(+) T cell immunity is required for control of HCMV reactivation in adult HSCT recipients, but it may not be sufficient to prevent late-onset organ localization in patients with GVHD. HCMV-specific CD8(+) T cells contribute to control of HCMV infection, but only after HCMV-specific CD4(+) T cell reconstitution.

  3. Evaluation of annexin V and Calcein-AM as markers of mononuclear cell apoptosis during human immunodeficiency virus infection

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    Priscila F.R. Palma

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of apoptosis by flow cytometry is generally accomplished by methods that use annexin V-FITC as vital dye, which access phosphatidylserine exposed on the external membrane at the beginning of this process. In addition, the concomitant use of propidium iodide makes possible to verify the characteristic nuclear alterations in the late stages of apoptosis, as a consequence of the increase in membrane permeability. On the other hand, the use of calcein-AM in association with ethidium homodimer (EthD-1 allows the evaluation of cell apoptosis through detection of esterase activity and cellular membrane physical and chemical alterations. The aim of this study was to compare the sensibility of calcein-AM and EthD-1 with annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide for early apoptosis evaluation in peripheral blood mononuclear cell culture, obtained from HIV-infected patients. Apoptosis and cellular viability were detected and quantified by flow cytometry after 24 and 48 hours incubation times. Our results showed that calcein-AM/EthD-1 was more sensitive for apoptotic cell quantification in both incubation times than annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide (mean of 46.95% ± 3.56, p < 0.0001, for 24 hours and mean of 37.67% ± 2.47, p < 0.0014 for 48 hours, besides allowing to clearly define viable, apoptotic and dead cell populations.

  4. Investigation of hTERT gene expression levels in two cell lines infected by high-risk human papilloma virus

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    Maryam Akhtari

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human papilloma virus (HPV is one of the most important factors in cervical cancer. Viral sequences are integrated into the host cell genome. In mild cases the virus causes skin damages, in severe cases it leads to cancer. Like many other cancers, telomerase gene expression was increased in cervical cancer. This enzyme is a reverse transcriptase that contains two common subunits: i catalytic protein called human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT and, ii RNA sequence called hTR. hTERT expression is hardly found in any somatic tissues. Detection of high telomerase activity in human cells, lead to tumor genesis. So hTERT can be used as a diagnostic tool in cancer detection. Methods: This experimental study was carried out from May 2013 to April 2014 in Nanobiotechnology Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences in Tehran, Iran. Caski and Hela cancer cell lines were used which contain HPV16 and HPV18 respectively. Cell lines were cultured and total RNA was extracted. Following normalization agent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GADPH, hTERT expression level was determining by real-time PCR method. For each sample, the expression level of hTERT and GAPDH were quantified as copy numbers (per reaction using the standard curve. Finally, hTERT levels in Hela and Caski cell lines were compared quantitatively by t-test using GraphPad statistic software version 5 (San Diego, CA, USA. Results: According to the charts real-time PCR, hTERT gene expression in Hela and Caski cancer cell lines is significantly different (t=0.0319. Conclusion: All results confirm that hTERT expression levels in Hela and Caski cell lines are significantly different and the level of hTERT expression in the Caski cell line was slightly higher than that of Hela cell line. The significant difference between hTERT mRNA expression levels reported here could be used as a tumor marker for HPV16 and HPV18 in cervical cancer.

  5. Nuclear actin is partially associated with Cajal bodies in human cells in culture and relocates to the nuclear periphery after infection of cells by adenovirus 5.

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    Gedge, L J E; Morrison, E E; Blair, G E; Walker, J H

    2005-02-15

    Cajal bodies are intra-nuclear structures enriched in proteins involved in transcription and mRNA processing. In this study, immunofluorescence microscopy experiments using a highly specific antibody to actin revealed nuclear actin spots that colocalize