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Sample records for human cell survival

  1. Stimulated human fibroblast cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.P.; Gale, K.L.; Einspenner, M.; Greenstock, C.L.; Gentner, N.E.

    1992-01-01

    Techniques for cloning cultured mammalian cells have supported the most universally-accepted method for measuring the induction of lethality by geno-toxicants such as ionizing radiation: the 'survival of colony-forming ability (CFA)' assay. Since most cultured human cell lines exhibit plating efficiency (i.e. the percentage of cells that are capable of reproductively surviving and dividing to form visible colonies) well below 100%, such assays are in essence 'survival of plating efficiency' assays, since they are referred to the plating (or cloning) efficiency of control (i.e. unirradiated) cells. (author). 8 refs., 2 figs

  2. Survival of human osteosarcoma cells and normal human fibroblasts following alpha particle irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, E.L.; Gemmell, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    Cell survival of human osteosarcoma cells in culture following alpha particle irradiation is reported here for the first time. The osteosarcoma cell line (TE-85) is found to be less sensitive to inactivation by 5.6 MeV alpha particles (LET 86 keV/μm) than normal diploid human fibroblasts (NFS). Values for the mean lethal doses were estimated to be 103 rads for the TE-85 cells compared with 68 rads for the NFS cultures irradiated under identical conditions. It is postulated that the aneuploidy of the tumor cells with increased DNA chromosomal material may confer a selective advantage for the survival of tumor cells relative to normal cells with diploid chromosomes

  3. Repurposing Lesogaberan to Promote Human Islet Cell Survival and β-Cell Replication

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    Jide Tian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The activation of β-cell’s A- and B-type gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAA-Rs and GABAB-Rs can promote their survival and replication, and the activation of α-cell GABAA-Rs promotes their conversion into β-cells. However, GABA and the most clinically applicable GABA-R ligands may be suboptimal for the long-term treatment of diabetes due to their pharmacological properties or potential side-effects on the central nervous system (CNS. Lesogaberan (AZD3355 is a peripherally restricted high-affinity GABAB-R-specific agonist, originally developed for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD that appears to be safe for human use. This study tested the hypothesis that lesogaberan could be repurposed to promote human islet cell survival and β-cell replication. Treatment with lesogaberan significantly enhanced replication of human islet cells in vitro, which was abrogated by a GABAB-R antagonist. Immunohistochemical analysis of human islets that were grafted into immune-deficient mice revealed that oral treatment with lesogaberan promoted human β-cell replication and islet cell survival in vivo as effectively as GABA (which activates both GABAA-Rs and GABAB-Rs, perhaps because of its more favorable pharmacokinetics. Lesogaberan may be a promising drug candidate for clinical studies of diabetes intervention and islet transplantation.

  4. Cell survival of human tumor cells compared with normal fibroblasts following 60Co gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, E.L.; Henning, C.B.; Reynolds, S.D.; Holmblad, G.L.; Trier, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    Three tumor cell lines, two of which were shown to be HeLa cells, were irradiated with 60 Co gamma irradiation, together with two cell cultures of normal human diploid fibroblasts. Cell survival was studied in three different experiments over a dose range of 2 to 14 gray. All the tumor cell lines showed a very wide shoulder in the dose response curves in contrast to the extremely narrow shoulder of the normal fibroblasts. In addition, the D/sub o/ values for the tumor cell lines were somewhat greater. These two characteristics of the dose response curves resulted in up to 2 orders of magnitude less sensitivity for cell inactivation of HeLa cells when compared with normal cells at high doses (10 gray). Because of these large differences, the extrapolation of results from the irradiation of HeLa cells concerning the mechanisms of normal cell killing should be interpreted with great caution

  5. Curcumin affects cell survival and cell volume regulation in human renal and intestinal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kössler, Sonja; Nofziger, Charity; Jakab, Martin; Dossena, Silvia; Paulmichl, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Curcumin (1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1E,6E-heptadiene-3,5-dione or diferuloyl methane) is a polyphenol derived from the Curcuma longa plant, commonly known as turmeric. This substance has been used extensively in Ayurvedic medicine for centuries for its anti-oxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antiseptic activity. More recently curcumin has been found to possess anti-cancer properties linked to its pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative actions. The underlying mechanisms of these diverse effects are complex, not fully elucidated and subject of intense scientific debate. Despite increasing evidence indicating that different cation channels can be a molecular target for curcumin, very little is known about the effect of curcumin on chloride channels. Since, (i) the molecular structure of curcumin indicates that the substance could potentially interact with chloride channels, (ii) chloride channels play a role during the apoptotic process and regulation of the cell volume, and (iii) apoptosis is a well known effect of curcumin, we set out to investigate whether or not curcumin could (i) exert a modulatory effect (direct or indirect) on the swelling activated chloride current IClswell in a human cell system, therefore (ii) affect cell volume regulation and (iii) ultimately modulate cell survival. The IClswell channels, which are essential for regulating the cell volume after swelling, are also known to be activated under isotonic conditions as an early event in the apoptotic process. Here we show that long-term exposure of a human kidney cell line to extracellular 0.1–10 μM curcumin modulates IClswell in a dose-dependent manner (0.1 μM curcumin is ineffective, 0.5–5.0 μM curcumin increase, while 10 μM curcumin decrease the current), and short-term exposure to micromolar concentrations of curcumin does not affect IClswell neither if applied from the extracellular nor from the intracellular side – therefore, a direct effect of curcumin on

  6. Curcumin affects cell survival and cell volume regulation in human renal and intestinal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kössler, Sonja; Nofziger, Charity; Jakab, Martin; Dossena, Silvia; Paulmichl, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Curcumin (1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1E,6E-heptadiene-3,5-dione or diferuloyl methane) is a polyphenol derived from the Curcuma longa plant, commonly known as turmeric. This substance has been used extensively in Ayurvedic medicine for centuries for its anti-oxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antiseptic activity. More recently curcumin has been found to possess anti-cancer properties linked to its pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative actions. The underlying mechanisms of these diverse effects are complex, not fully elucidated and subject of intense scientific debate. Despite increasing evidence indicating that different cation channels can be a molecular target for curcumin, very little is known about the effect of curcumin on chloride channels. Since, (i) the molecular structure of curcumin indicates that the substance could potentially interact with chloride channels, (ii) chloride channels play a role during the apoptotic process and regulation of the cell volume, and (iii) apoptosis is a well known effect of curcumin, we set out to investigate whether or not curcumin could (i) exert a modulatory effect (direct or indirect) on the swelling activated chloride current ICl swell in a human cell system, therefore (ii) affect cell volume regulation and (iii) ultimately modulate cell survival. The ICl swell channels, which are essential for regulating the cell volume after swelling, are also known to be activated under isotonic conditions as an early event in the apoptotic process. Here we show that long-term exposure of a human kidney cell line to extracellular 0.1–10 μM curcumin modulates ICl swell in a dose-dependent manner (0.1 μM curcumin is ineffective, 0.5–5.0 μM curcumin increase, while 10 μM curcumin decrease the current), and short-term exposure to micromolar concentrations of curcumin does not affect ICl swell neither if applied from the extracellular nor from the intracellular side – therefore, a direct effect of curcumin on ICl

  7. IL22/IL-22R pathway induces cell survival in human glioblastoma cells.

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    Hussein Akil

    Full Text Available Interleukin-22 (IL-22 is a member of the IL-10 cytokine family that binds to a heterodimeric receptor consisting of IL-22 receptor 1 (IL-22R1 and IL-10R2. IL-22R expression was initially characterized on epithelial cells, and plays an essential role in a number of inflammatory diseases. Recently, a functional receptor was detected on cancer cells such as hepatocarcinoma and lung carcinoma, but its presence was not reported in glioblastoma (GBM. Two GBM cell lines and 10 primary cell lines established from patients undergoing surgery for malignant GBM were used to investigate the expression of IL-22 and IL-22R by using quantitative RT-PCR, western blotting and confocal microscopy studies. The role of IL-22 in proliferation and survival of GBM cell lines was investigated in vitro by BrdU and ELISA cell death assays. We report herein that the two subunits of the IL-22R complex are expressed on human GBM cells. Their activation, depending on exogenous IL-22, induced antiapoptotic effect and cell proliferation. IL-22 treatment of GBM cells resulted in increased levels of phosphorylated Akt, STAT3 signaling protein and its downstream antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL and decreased level of phosphorylated ERK1/2. In addition, IL-22R subunits were expressed in all the 10 tested primary cell lines established from GBM tumors. Our results showed that IL-22R is expressed on GBM established and primary cell lines. Depending on STAT3, ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt pathways, IL-22 induced GBM cell survival. These data are consistent with a potential role of IL-22R in tumorigenesis of GBM. Since endogenous IL-22 was not detected in all studied GBM cells, we hypothesize that IL-22R could be activated by immune microenvironmental IL-22 producing cells.

  8. EDAG promotes the expansion and survival of human CD34+ cells.

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    Ke Zhao

    Full Text Available EDAG is multifunctional transcriptional regulator primarily expressed in the linloc-kit+Sca-1+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSC and CD34+ progenitor cells. Previous studies indicate that EDAG is required for maintaining hematopoietic lineage commitment balance. Here using ex vivo culture and HSC transplantation models, we report that EDAG enhances the proliferative potential of human cord blood CD34+ cells, increases survival, prevents cell apoptosis and promotes their repopulating capacity. Moreover, EDAG overexpression induces rapid entry of CD34+ cells into the cell cycle. Gene expression profile analysis indicate that EDAG knockdown leads to down-regulation of various positive cell cycle regulators including cyclin A, B, D, and E. Together these data provides novel insights into EDAG in regulation of expansion and survival of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

  9. Inhibition of human lung cancer cell proliferation and survival by wine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Compounds of plant origin and food components have attracted scientific attention for use as agents for cancer prevention and treatment. Wine contains polyphenols that were shown to have anti-cancer and other health benefits. The survival pathways of Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk), and the tumor suppressor p53 are key modulators of cancer cell growth and survival. In this study, we examined the effects of wine on proliferation and survival of human Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and its effects on signaling events. Methods Human NSCLC adenocarcinoma A549 and H1299 cells were used. Cell proliferation was assessed by thymidine incorporation. Clonogenic assays were used to assess cell survival. Immunoblotting was used to examine total and phosphorylated levels of Akt, Erk and p53. Results In A549 cells red wine inhibited cell proliferation and reduced clonogenic survival at doses as low as 0.02%. Red wine significantly reduced basal and EGF-stimulated Akt and Erk phosphorylation while it increased the levels of total and phosphorylated p53 (Ser15). Control experiments indicated that the anti-proliferative effects of wine were not mediated by the associated contents of ethanol or the polyphenol resveratrol and were independent of glucose transport into cancer cells. White wine also inhibited clonogenic survival, albeit at a higher doses (0.5-2%), and reduced Akt phosphorylation. The effects of both red and white wine on Akt phosphorylation were also verified in H1299 cells. Conclusions Red wine inhibits proliferation of lung cancer cells and blocks clonogenic survival at low concentrations. This is associated with inhibition of basal and EGF-stimulated Akt and Erk signals and enhancement of total and phosphorylated levels of p53. White wine mediates similar effects albeit at higher concentrations. Our data suggest that wine may have considerable anti-tumour and chemoprevention properties in lung cancer and deserves further

  10. Clonogenic cell line survival of a human liver cancer cell line SMMC-7721 after carbon ion irradiation with different LET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Suwen; Su Xu; Wang Jifang; Li Wenjian

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the survival fraction of a human liver cancer cell line SMMC-7721 following irradiation with carbon ions with different LET. Methods: cells of the human liver cancer cell line SMMC-7721 were irradiated with carbon ions (LET=30 and 70 keV/μm). The survival fraction was determined with clonogenic assay after 9 days incubation in a 5% CO 2 incubator at 37 degree C. Results: When the survival fractions of 70 keV/μm were D s = 0.1 and D s=0.01 absorption dose were 2.94 and 5.88 Gy respectively, and those of 30 keV/μm were 4.00 and 8.00 Gy respectively. Conclusion: For the SMMC-7721 cell line, 70 keV/μm is more effective for cell killing than 30 keV/μm

  11. Dissociation of Survival, Proliferation, and State Control in Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, David J H F; Hammond, Colin A; Miller, Paul H; Rabu, Gabrielle M; Beer, Philip A; Ricicova, Marketa; Lecault, Véronique; Da Costa, Daniel; VanInsberghe, Michael; Cheung, Alice M; Pellacani, Davide; Piret, James; Hansen, Carl; Eaves, Connie J

    2017-01-10

    The role of growth factors (GFs) in controlling the biology of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) remains limited by a lack of information concerning the individual and combined effects of GFs directly on the survival, Mitogenesis, and regenerative activity of highly purified human HSCs. We show that the initial input HSC activity of such a purified starting population of human cord blood cells can be fully maintained over a 21-day period in serum-free medium containing five GFs alone. HSC survival was partially supported by any one of these GFs, but none were essential, and different combinations of GFs variably stimulated HSC proliferation. However, serial transplantability was not detectably compromised by many conditions that reduced human HSC proliferation and/or survival. These results demonstrate the dissociated control of these three human HSC bio-responses, and set the stage for future improvements in strategies to modify and expand human HSCs ex vivo. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of alpha-particles on survival and chromosomal aberrations in human mammary epithelial cells

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    Durante, M.; Grossi, G. F.; Gialanella, G.; Pugliese, M.; Nappo, M.; Yang, T. C.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the radiation responses of a human mammary epithelial cell line, H184B5 F5-1 M/10. This cell line was derived from primary mammary cells after treatment with chemicals and heavy ions. The F5-1 M/10 cells are immortal, density-inhibited in growth, and non-tumorigenic in athymic nude mice and represent an in vitro model of the human epithelium for radiation studies. Because epithelial cells are the target of alpha-particles emitted from radon daughters, we concentrated our studies on the efficiency of alpha-particles. Confluent cultures of M/10 cells were exposed to accelerated alpha-particles [beam energy incident at the cell monolayer = 3.85 MeV, incident linear energy transfer (LET) in cell = 109 keV/microns] and, for comparison, to 80 kVp x-rays. The following endpoints were studied: (1) survival, (2) chromosome aberrations at the first postirradiation mitosis, and (3) chromosome alterations at later passages following irradiation. The survival curve was exponential for alpha-particles (D0 = 0.73 +/- 0.04 Gy), while a shoulder was observed for x-rays (alpha/beta = 2.9 Gy; D0 = 2.5 Gy, extrapolation number 1.6). The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of high-LET alpha-particles for human epithelial cell killing was 3.3 at 37% survival. Dose-response curves for the induction of chromosome aberrations were linear for alpha-particles and linearquadratic for x-rays. The RBE for the induction of chromosome aberrations varied with the type of aberration scored and was high (about 5) for chromosome breaks and low (about 2) for chromosome exchanges.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  13. Snail regulates cell survival and inhibits cellular senescence in human metastatic prostate cancer cell lines.

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    Emadi Baygi, Modjtaba; Soheili, Zahra Soheila; Schmitz, Ingo; Sameie, Shahram; Schulz, Wolfgang A

    2010-12-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is regarded as an important step in cancer metastasis. Snail, a master regulator of EMT, has been recently proposed to act additionally as a cell survival factor and inducer of motility. We have investigated the function of Snail (SNAI1) in prostate cancer cells by downregulating its expression via short (21-mer) interfering RNA (siRNA) and measuring the consequences on EMT markers, cell viability, death, cell cycle, senescence, attachment, and invasivity. Of eight carcinoma cell lines, the prostate carcinoma cell lines LNCaP and PC-3 showed the highest and moderate expression of SNAI1 mRNA, respectively, as measured by quantitative RT-PCR. Long-term knockdown of Snail induced a severe decline in cell numbers in LNCaP and PC-3 and caspase activity was accordingly enhanced in both cell lines. In addition, suppression of Snail expression induced senescence in LNCaP cells. SNAI1-siRNA-treated cells did not tolerate detachment from the extracellular matrix, probably due to downregulation of integrin α6. Expression of E-cadherin, vimentin, and fibronectin was also affected. Invasiveness of PC-3 cells was not significantly diminished by Snail knockdown. Our data suggest that Snail acts primarily as a survival factor and inhibitor of cellular senescence in prostate cancer cell lines. We therefore propose that Snail can act as early driver of prostate cancer progression.

  14. Androgen receptor signaling is required for androgen-sensitive human prostate cancer cell proliferation and survival

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    Day Wanda V

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Androgens and androgen receptors (AR regulate normal prostate development and growth. They also are involved in pathological development of prostatic diseases, including benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH and prostate cancer (PCa. Antiandrogen therapy for PCa, in conjunction with chemical or surgical castration, offers initial positive responses and leads to massive prostate cell death. However, cancer cells later appear as androgen-independent PCa. To investigate the role of AR in prostate cell proliferation and survival, we introduced a vector-based small interfering RNA (siRNA. This siRNA targeted 5'-untranslated region of AR mRNA for extended suppression of AR expression in androgen-sensitive human prostate LNCaP cells. Results The siRNA design successfully suppressed endogenous AR expression, as revealed by western blotting and immunofluorescence staining in LNCaP cells. LNCaP cells did not proliferate in the absence of AR and underwent apoptosis, based on elevated phospho-Histone H2B expression and higher number of apoptotic body as compared to control cells. Conclusion We demonstrated that AR is vital for prostate cell proliferation and survival in this androgen-sensitive prostate cell line. These results further strengthen the hypothesis that AR can be a therapeutic target for treating androgen-sensitive stages of PCa. Unlike antiandorgens, however, siRNA targeting AR provides a direct inactivation of AR function through the suppression of AR protein expression.

  15. Altered serotonin physiology in human breast cancers favors paradoxical growth and cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Vaibhav P; Marshall, Aaron M; Hernandez, Laura L; Buckley, Arthur R; Horseman, Nelson D

    2009-01-01

    The breast microenvironment can either retard or accelerate the events associated with progression of latent cancers. However, the actions of local physiological mediators in the context of breast cancers are poorly understood. Serotonin (5-HT) is a critical local regulator of epithelial homeostasis in the breast and other organs. Herein, we report complex alterations in the intrinsic mammary gland serotonin system of human breast cancers. Serotonin biosynthetic capacity was analyzed in human breast tumor tissue microarrays using immunohistochemistry for tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1). Serotonin receptors (5-HT1-7) were analyzed in human breast tumors using the Oncomine database. Serotonin receptor expression, signal transduction, and 5-HT effects on breast cancer cell phenotype were compared in non-transformed and transformed human breast cells. In the context of the normal mammary gland, 5-HT acts as a physiological regulator of lactation and involution, in part by favoring growth arrest and cell death. This tightly regulated 5-HT system is subverted in multiple ways in human breast cancers. Specifically, TPH1 expression undergoes a non-linear change during progression, with increased expression during malignant progression. Correspondingly, the tightly regulated pattern of 5-HT receptors becomes dysregulated in human breast cancer cells, resulting in both ectopic expression of some isoforms and suppression of others. The receptor expression change is accompanied by altered downstream signaling of 5-HT receptors in human breast cancer cells, resulting in resistance to 5-HT-induced apoptosis, and stimulated proliferation. Our data constitutes the first report of direct involvement of 5-HT in human breast cancer. Increased 5-HT biosynthetic capacity accompanied by multiple changes in 5-HT receptor expression and signaling favor malignant progression of human breast cancer cells (for example, stimulated proliferation, inappropriate cell survival). This occurs

  16. Effect of 3D-scaffold formation on differentiation and survival in human neural progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortinau, Stefanie; Schmich, Jürgen; Block, Stephan; Liedmann, Andrea; Jonas, Ludwig; Weiss, Dieter G; Helm, Christiane A; Rolfs, Arndt; Frech, Moritz J

    2010-11-11

    3D-scaffolds have been shown to direct cell growth and differentiation in many different cell types, with the formation and functionalisation of the 3D-microenviroment being important in determining the fate of the embedded cells. Here we used a hydrogel-based scaffold to investigate the influences of matrix concentration and functionalisation with laminin on the formation of the scaffolds, and the effect of these scaffolds on human neural progenitor cells cultured within them. In this study we used different concentrations of the hydrogel-based matrix PuraMatrix. In some experiments we functionalised the matrix with laminin I. The impact of concentration and treatment with laminin on the formation of the scaffold was examined with atomic force microscopy. Cells from a human fetal neural progenitor cell line were cultured in the different matrices, as well as in a 2D culture system, and were subsequently analysed with antibody stainings against neuronal markers. In parallel, the survival rate of the cells was determined by a live/dead assay. Atomic force microscopy measurements demonstrated that the matrices are formed by networks of isolated PuraMatrix fibres and aggregates of fibres. An increase of the hydrogel concentration led to a decrease in the mesh size of the scaffolds and functionalisation with laminin promoted aggregation of the fibres (bundle formation), which further reduces the density of isolated fibres. We showed that laminin-functionalisation is essential for human neural progenitor cells to build up 3D-growth patterns, and that proliferation of the cells is also affected by the concentration of matrix. In addition we found that 3D-cultures enhanced neuronal differentiation and the survival rate of the cells compared to 2D-cultures. Taken together, we have demonstrated a direct influence of the 3D-scaffold formation on the survival and neuronal differentiation of human neural progenitor cells. These findings emphasize the importance of optimizing 3

  17. Mean inactivation dose: a useful concept for intercomparison of human cell survival curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fertil, B.; Dertinger, H.; Courdi, A.; Malaise, E.P.

    1984-01-01

    The mean inactivation dose (anti D) is calculated for published in vitro survival curves obtained from cell lines of both normal and neoplastic human tissues. Cells belonging to different histological categories (melanomas, carcinomas, etc.) are shown to be characterized by distinct values of anti D which are related to the clinical radiosensitivity of tumors from these categories. Compared to other ways of representing in vitro radiosensitivity, e.g., by the multitarget parameters D 8 and n, the parameter anti D has several specific advantages

  18. Initial slope of human tumor cell survival curves: its modification by the oxic cell sensitizer beta-arabinofuranosyladenine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavaudra, N.; Halimi, M.; Parmentier, C.; Gaillard, N.; Grinfeld, S.; Malaise, E.P.

    1989-01-01

    The initial slope of the survival curve, which is a characteristic of each tumor cell line, varies with the histological group of the tumor. It is one of the factors on which clinical radioresponsiveness depends. The DNA dependant DNA polymerase inhibitor beta-ara A acts as an oxic cell sensitizer. This study was carried out on human tumor cell lines to look for a correlation between the degree of radiosensitization induced by beta-ara A and the radiosensitivity of a given cell line. Six human tumor cell lines with different radiosensitivities were used (the survival rate at 2 Gy and D ranged from 20 to 73% and from 1.2 to 3.2 Gy, respectively). beta-ara A had a major toxic effect on all cell lines but this varied greatly from one cell line to another and was concentration dependant; this toxic effect was taken into account when calculating the surviving fractions. For all cell lines, beta-ara A acted as an oxic radiosensitizer and the radiosensitization was concentration dependant. Analysis of the survival curves of the 6 cell lines using the linear quadratic model showed that concentrations of beta-ara A between 200 and 1000 microM induced an increase in the linear component while the quadratic component underwent no systematic change. The sensitizing enhancement ratio (SER) measured from the Ds ratios, varied greatly from one line to another. For example, at a concentration of 500 microM, the extreme values of Ds ratios were 1.5 and 2.6. The radiosensitization is greater, the higher the radiosensitivity of the cell line studied during exponential growth. The results do not favor the use of beta-ara A in the treatment of intrinsically radioresistant human tumors

  19. Initial slope of human tumor cell survival curves: its modification by the oxic cell sensitizer beta-arabinofuranosyladenine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavaudra, N.; Halimi, M.; Parmentier, C.; Gaillard, N.; Grinfeld, S.; Malaise, E.P.

    1989-05-01

    The initial slope of the survival curve, which is a characteristic of each tumor cell line, varies with the histological group of the tumor. It is one of the factors on which clinical radioresponsiveness depends. The DNA dependant DNA polymerase inhibitor beta-ara A acts as an oxic cell sensitizer. This study was carried out on human tumor cell lines to look for a correlation between the degree of radiosensitization induced by beta-ara A and the radiosensitivity of a given cell line. Six human tumor cell lines with different radiosensitivities were used (the survival rate at 2 Gy and D ranged from 20 to 73% and from 1.2 to 3.2 Gy, respectively). beta-ara A had a major toxic effect on all cell lines but this varied greatly from one cell line to another and was concentration dependant; this toxic effect was taken into account when calculating the surviving fractions. For all cell lines, beta-ara A acted as an oxic radiosensitizer and the radiosensitization was concentration dependant. Analysis of the survival curves of the 6 cell lines using the linear quadratic model showed that concentrations of beta-ara A between 200 and 1000 microM induced an increase in the linear component while the quadratic component underwent no systematic change. The sensitizing enhancement ratio (SER) measured from the Ds ratios, varied greatly from one line to another. For example, at a concentration of 500 microM, the extreme values of Ds ratios were 1.5 and 2.6. The radiosensitization is greater, the higher the radiosensitivity of the cell line studied during exponential growth. The results do not favor the use of beta-ara A in the treatment of intrinsically radioresistant human tumors.

  20. Human and Autologous Adipose-derived Stromal Cells Increase Flap Survival in Rats Independently of Host Immune Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toyserkani, Navid Mohamadpour; Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Andersen, Ditte Caroline

    2018-01-01

    evaluated after 7 days. RESULTS: The mean survival rates for SVF treatment regardless of human or autologous origin were significantly increased as compared with the control group. Adipose stem/stromal cell and SVF lysate injection did not increase flap survival. Vessel density was increased for human...... injections lead to increased vessel density, but it did not necessarily lead to increased flap survival. Further research should elaborate which molecular events make SVF treatment more efficacious than ASC....

  1. Lesion-induced increase in survival and migration of human neural progenitor cells releasing GDNF

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    Behrstock, Soshana; Ebert, Allison D.; Klein, Sandra; Schmitt, Melanie; Moore, Jeannette M.; Svendsen, Clive N.

    2009-01-01

    The use of human neural progenitor cells (hNPC) has been proposed to provide neuronal replacement or astrocytes delivering growth factors for brain disorders such as Parkinson’s and Huntington’s disease. Success in such studies likely requires migration from the site of transplantation and integration into host tissue in the face of ongoing damage. In the current study, hNPC modified to release glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (hNPCGDNF) were transplanted into either intact or lesioned animals. GDNF release itself had no effect on the survival, migration or differentiation of the cells. The most robust migration and survival was found using a direct lesion of striatum (Huntington’s model) with indirect lesions of the dopamine system (Parkinson’s model) or intact animals showing successively less migration and survival. No lesion affected differentiation patterns. We conclude that the type of brain injury dictates migration and integration of hNPC which has important consequences when considering transplantation of these cells as a therapy for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19044202

  2. Hydrostatic Pressure Does Not Cause Detectable Changes in Survival of Human Retinal Ganglion Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Andrew; Aldarwesh, Amal; Rhodes, Jeremy D.; Broadway, David C.; Everitt, Claire; Sanderson, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is a major risk factor for glaucoma. One consequence of raised IOP is that ocular tissues are subjected to increased hydrostatic pressure (HP). The effect of raised HP on stress pathway signaling and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival in the human retina was investigated. Methods A chamber was designed to expose cells to increased HP (constant and fluctuating). Accurate pressure control (10-100mmHg) was achieved using mass flow controllers. Human organotypic retinal cultures (HORCs) from donor eyes (pressure for 24 or 48h caused no loss of structural integrity, LDH release, decrease in RGC marker expression (THY-1) or loss of RGCs compared with controls. In addition, there was no increase in TUNEL-positive NeuN-labelled cells at either time-point indicating no increase in apoptosis of RGCs. OGD increased apoptosis, reduced RGC marker expression and RGC number and caused elevated LDH release at 24h. p38 and JNK phosphorylation remained unchanged in HORCs exposed to fluctuating pressure (10-100mmHg; 1 cycle/min) for 15, 30, 60 and 90min durations, whereas OGD (3h) increased activation of p38 and JNK, remaining elevated for 90min post-OGD. Conclusions Directly applied HP had no detectable impact on RGC survival and stress-signalling in HORCs. Simulated ischemia, however, activated stress pathways and caused RGC death. These results show that direct HP does not cause degeneration of RGCs in the ex vivo human retina. PMID:25635827

  3. Entrance and Survival of Brucella pinnipedialis Hooded Seal Strain in Human Macrophages and Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briquemont, Benjamin; Sørensen, Karen K.; Godfroid, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Marine mammal Brucella spp. have been isolated from pinnipeds (B. pinnipedialis) and cetaceans (B. ceti) from around the world. Although the zoonotic potential of marine mammal brucellae is largely unknown, reports of human disease exist. There are few studies of the mechanisms of bacterial intracellular invasion and multiplication involving the marine mammal Brucella spp. We examined the infective capacity of two genetically different B. pinnipedialis strains (reference strain; NTCT 12890 and a hooded seal isolate; B17) by measuring the ability of the bacteria to enter and replicate in cultured phagocytes and epithelial cells. Human macrophage-like cells (THP-1), two murine macrophage cell lines (RAW264.7 and J774A.1), and a human malignant epithelial cell line (HeLa S3) were challenged with bacteria in a gentamicin protection assay. Our results show that B. pinnipedialis is internalized, but is then gradually eliminated during the next 72 – 96 hours. Confocal microscopy revealed that intracellular B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain colocalized with lysosomal compartments at 1.5 and 24 hours after infection. Intracellular presence of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain was verified by transmission electron microscopy. By using a cholesterol-scavenging lipid inhibitor, entrance of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain in human macrophages was significantly reduced by 65.8 % (± 17.3), suggesting involvement of lipid-rafts in intracellular entry. Murine macrophages invaded by B. pinnipedialis do not release nitric oxide (NO) and intracellular bacterial presence does not induce cell death. In summary, B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain can enter human and murine macrophages, as well as human epithelial cells. Intracellular entry of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain involves, but seems not to be limited to, lipid-rafts in human macrophages. Brucella pinnipedialis does not multiply or survive for prolonged periods intracellulary. PMID:24376851

  4. Autophagy sustains the survival of human pancreatic cancer PANC-1 cells under extreme nutrient deprivation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Eun; Park, Hye-Jin; Jeong, Hye Kyoung; Kim, Mi-Jung; Kim, Minyeong; Bae, Ok-Nam; Baek, Seung-Hoon

    2015-07-31

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas are an extremely aggressive and devastating type of cancer with high mortality. Given the dense stroma and poor vascularization, accessibility to nutrients is limited in the tumor microenvironment. Here, we aimed to elucidate the role of autophagy in promoting the survival of human pancreatic cancer PANC-1 cells exposed to nutrient-deprived media (NDM) lacking glucose, amino acids, and serum. NDM inhibited Akt activity and phosphorylation of p70 S6K, and induced AMPK activation and mitochondrial depolarization. NDM also time-dependently increased LC3-II accumulation, number of GFP-LC3 puncta, and colocalization between GFP-LC3 and lysosomes. These results suggested that autophagy was progressively activated through Akt- and AMPK-mTOR pathway in nutrient-deficient PANC-1 cells. Autophagy inhibitors (chloroquine and wortmannin) or silencing of Atg5 augmented PANC-1 cell death in NDM. In cells exposed to NDM, chloroquine and wortmannin induced apoptosis and Z-VAD-fmk inhibited cytotoxicity of these inhibitors. These data demonstrate that autophagy is anti-apoptotic and sustains the survival of PANC-1 cells following extreme nutrient deprivation. Autophagy modulation may be a viable therapeutic option for cancer cells located in the core of solid tumors with a nutrient-deficient microenvironment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of recombinant human epidermal growth factor on the proliferation and radiation survival of human fibroblast cell lines in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Sook; Kang, Ki Mun; Na, Jae Boem; Chai, Gyu Young; Lee, Sang Wook

    2006-01-01

    To explore the effect of recombinant human EGF on the proliferation and survival of human fibroblast cell lines following irradiation. Fibroblast was originated human skin and primary cultured. The trypan blue stain assay and MTT assay were used to study the proliferative effects of EGF on human fibroblast cell lines in vitro. An incubation of fibroblasts with rhEGF for 24 hours immediately after irradiation was counted everyday. Cell cycle distributions were analyzed by FACS analysis. Number of fibroblast was significant more increased rhEGF (1.0 nM, 10 nM, 100 nM, 1,000 nM) treated cell than control after 8 Gy irradiation. Most effective dose of rhEGF was at 160 nM. These survival differences were maintained at 1 week later. Proportion of S phase was significantly increased on rhEGF treated cells. rhEGF cause increased fibroblast proliferation following irradiation. We expect that rhEGF was effective for radiation induced wound healing

  6. Identification of cytoskeleton-associated proteins essential for lysosomal stability and survival of human cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth-Pedersen, Line; Aits, Sonja; Corcelle-Termeau, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Microtubule-disturbing drugs inhibit lysosomal trafficking and induce lysosomal membrane permeabilization followed by cathepsin-dependent cell death. To identify specific trafficking-related proteins that control cell survival and lysosomal stability, we screened a molecular motor siRNA library...... in human MCF7 breast cancer cells. SiRNAs targeting four kinesins (KIF11/Eg5, KIF20A, KIF21A, KIF25), myosin 1G (MYO1G), myosin heavy chain 1 (MYH1) and tropomyosin 2 (TPM2) were identified as effective inducers of non-apoptotic cell death. The cell death induced by KIF11, KIF21A, KIF25, MYH1 or TPM2 si......), increased dextran accumulation (KIF20A), or reduced autophagic flux (MYO1G, MYH1). Importantly, all seven siRNAs also killed human cervix cancer (HeLa) and osteosarcoma (U-2-OS) cells and sensitized cancer cells to other lysosome-destabilizing treatments, i.e. photo-oxidation, siramesine, etoposide...

  7. Subretinal Implantation of Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells Derived From Human Embryonic Stem Cells: Improved Survival When Implanted as a Monolayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Bruno; Thomas, Padmaja; Thomas, Biju; Ribeiro, Ramiro; Hu, Yuntao; Brant, Rodrigo; Ahuja, Ashish; Zhu, Danhong; Liu, Laura; Koss, Michael; Maia, Mauricio; Chader, Gerald; Hinton, David R.; Humayun, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate cell survival and tumorigenicity of human embryonic stem cell–derived retinal pigment epithelium (hESC-RPE) transplantation in immunocompromised nude rats. Cells were transplanted as a cell suspension (CS) or as a polarized monolayer plated on a parylene membrane (PM). Methods. Sixty-nine rats (38 male, 31 female) were surgically implanted with CS (n = 33) or PM (n = 36). Cohort subsets were killed at 1, 6, and 12 months after surgery. Both ocular tissues and systemic organs (brain, liver, kidneys, spleen, heart, and lungs) were fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde, embedded in paraffin, and sectioned. Every fifth section was stained with hematoxylin and eosin and analyzed histologically. Adjacent sections were processed for immunohistochemical analysis (as needed) using the following antibodies: anti-RPE65 (RPE-specific marker), anti-TRA-1-85 (human cell marker), anti-Ki67 (proliferation marker), anti-CD68 (macrophage), and anti-cytokeratin (epithelial marker). Results. The implanted cells were immunopositive for the RPE65 and TRA-1-85. Cell survival (P = 0.006) and the presence of a monolayer (P < 0.001) of hESC-RPE were significantly higher in eyes that received the PM. Gross morphological and histological analysis of the eye and the systemic organs after the surgery revealed no evidence of tumor or ectopic tissue formation in either group. Conclusions. hESC-RPE can survive for at least 12 months in an immunocompromised animal model. Polarized monolayers of hESC-RPE show improved survival compared to cell suspensions. The lack of teratoma or any ectopic tissue formation in the implanted rats bodes well for similar results with respect to safety in human subjects. PMID:23833067

  8. Radiosensitivity of different human tumor cells lines grown as multicellular spheroids determined from growth curves and survival data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwachoefer, J.H.C.; Crooijmans, R.P.; van Gasteren, J.J.; Hoogenhout, J.; Jerusalem, C.R.; Kal, H.B.; Theeuwes, A.G.

    1989-01-01

    Five human tumor cell lines were grown as multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS) to determine whether multicellular tumor spheroids derived from different types of tumors would show tumor-type dependent differences in response to single-dose irradiation, and whether these differences paralleled clinical behavior. Multicellular tumor spheroids of two neuroblastoma, one lung adenocarcinoma, one melanoma, and a squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue, were studied in terms of growth delay, calculated cell survival, and spheroid control dose50 (SCD50). Growth delay and cell survival analysis for the tumor cell lines showed sensitivities that correlated well with clinical behavior of the tumor types of origin. Similar to other studies on melanoma multicellular tumor spheroids our spheroid control dose50 results for the melanoma cell line deviated from the general pattern of sensitivity. This might be due to the location of surviving cells, which prohibits proliferation of surviving cells and hence growth of melanoma multicellular tumor spheroids. This study demonstrates that radiosensitivity of human tumor cell lines can be evaluated in terms of growth delay, calculated cell survival, and spheroid control dose50 when grown as multicellular tumor spheroids. The sensitivity established from these evaluations parallels clinical behavior, thus offering a unique tool for the in vitro analysis of human tumor radiosensitivity

  9. Anti-apoptotic BFL-1 is the major effector in activation-induced human mast cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ekoff

    Full Text Available Mast cells are best known for their role in allergic reactions, where aggregation of FcεRI leads to the release of mast cell mediators causing allergic symptoms. The activation also induces a survival program in the cells, i.e., activation-induced mast cell survival. The aim of the present study was to investigate how the activation-induced survival is mediated. Cord blood-derived mast cells and the mast cell line LAD-2 were activated through FcεRI crosslinking, with or without addition of chemicals that inhibit the activity or expression of selected Bcl-2 family members (ABT-737; roscovitine. Cell viability was assessed using staining and flow cytometry. The expression and function of Bcl-2 family members BFL-1 and MCL-1 were investigated using real-time quantitative PCR and siRNA treatment. The mast cell expression of Bfl-1 was investigated in skin biopsies. FcεRI crosslinking promotes activation-induced survival of human mast cells and this is associated with an upregulation of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member Bfl-1. ABT-737 alone or in combination with roscovitine decreases viability of human mast cells although activation-induced survival is sustained, indicating a minor role for Bcl-X(L, Bcl-2, Bcl-w and Mcl-1. Reducing BFL-1 but not MCL-1 levels by siRNA inhibited activation-induced mast cell survival. We also demonstrate that mast cell expression of Bfl-1 is elevated in birch-pollen-provocated skin and in lesions of atopic dermatitis and psoriasis patients. Taken together, our results highlight Bfl-1 as a major effector in activation-induced human mast cell survival.

  10. Extracellular sphingosine-1-phosphate: a novel actor in human glioblastoma stem cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Riccitelli

    Full Text Available Glioblastomas are the most frequent and aggressive intracranial neoplasms in humans, and despite advances and the introduction of the alkylating agent temozolomide in therapy have improved patient survival, resistance mechanisms limit benefits. Recent studies support that glioblastoma stem-like cells (GSCs, a cell subpopulation within the tumour, are involved in the aberrant expansion and therapy resistance properties of glioblastomas, through still unclear mechanisms. Emerging evidence suggests that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P a potent onco-promoter able to act as extracellular signal, favours malignant and chemoresistance properties in GSCs. Notwithstanding, the origin of S1P in the GSC environment remains unknown. We investigated S1P metabolism, release, and role in cell survival properties of GSCs isolated from either U87-MG cell line or a primary culture of human glioblastoma. We show that both GSC models, grown as neurospheres and expressing GSC markers, are resistant to temozolomide, despite not expressing the DNA repair protein MGMT, a major contributor to temozolomide-resistance. Pulse experiments with labelled sphingosine revealed that both GSC types are able to rapidly phosphorylate the long-chain base, and that the newly produced S1P is efficiently degraded. Of relevance, we found that S1P was present in GSC extracellular medium, its level being significantly higher than in U87-MG cells, and that the extracellular/intracellular ratio of S1P was about ten-fold higher in GSCs. The activity of sphingosine kinases was undetectable in GSC media, suggesting that mechanisms of S1P transport to the extracellular environment are constitutive in GSCs. In addition we found that an inhibitor of S1P biosynthesis made GSCs sensitive to temozolomide (TMZ, and that exogenous S1P reverted this effect, thus involving extracellular S1P as a GSC survival signal in TMZ resistance. Altogether our data implicate for the first time GSCs as a pivotal source

  11. Hydrogen sulfide mediates the anti-survival effect of sulforaphane on human prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Yanxi [Department of Biology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay (Canada); College of Life Science, Shanxi University, Taiyuan (China); Wu, Bo [Department of Biology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay (Canada); Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin (China); Cao, Qiuhui [Department of Biology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay (Canada); Wu, Lingyun [Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin (China); Department of Pharmacology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada); Yang, Guangdong, E-mail: gyang@lakeheadu.ca [The School of Kinesiology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) is a novel gasotransmitter that regulates cell proliferation and other cellular functions. Sulforaphane (SFN) is a sulfur-containing compound that exhibits anticancer properties, and young sprouts of broccoli are particularly rich in SFN. There is consistent epidemiological evidence that the consumption of sulfur-containing vegetables, such as garlic and cruciferous vegetables, may help reduce the occurrence of prostate cancer. Here we found that a large amount of H{sub 2}S is released when SFN is added into cell culture medium or mixed with mouse liver homogenates, respectively. Both SFN and NaHS (a H{sub 2}S donor) decreased the viability of PC-3 cells (a human prostate cancer cell line) in a dose-dependent manner, and supplement of methemoglobin or oxidized glutathione (two H{sub 2}S scavengers) reversed SFN-reduced cell viability. We further found both cystathionine gamma-lyase (CSE) and cystathionine beta-synthase are expressed in PC-3 cells and mouse prostate tissues. H{sub 2}S production in prostate tissues from CSE knockout mice was only 20% of that from wild-type mice, suggesting CSE is a major H{sub 2}S-producing enzyme in prostate. CSE overexpression enhanced H{sub 2}S production and inhibited cell viability in PC-3 cells. In addition, both SFN and NaHS activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Pre-treatment of PC-3 cells with methemoglobin decreased SFN-stimulated MAPK activities. Suppression of both p38 MAPK and JNK reversed H{sub 2}S- or SFN-reduced viability of PC-3 cells. Our results demonstrated that H{sub 2}S mediates the inhibitory effect of SFN on the proliferation of PC-3 cells, which suggests that H{sub 2}S-releasing diet or drug might be beneficial in the treatment of prostate cancer. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A large amount of H{sub 2}S is released from sulforaphane. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}S mediates the anti-survival effect of

  12. Hydrogen sulfide mediates the anti-survival effect of sulforaphane on human prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei, Yanxi; Wu, Bo; Cao, Qiuhui; Wu, Lingyun; Yang, Guangdong

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) is a novel gasotransmitter that regulates cell proliferation and other cellular functions. Sulforaphane (SFN) is a sulfur-containing compound that exhibits anticancer properties, and young sprouts of broccoli are particularly rich in SFN. There is consistent epidemiological evidence that the consumption of sulfur-containing vegetables, such as garlic and cruciferous vegetables, may help reduce the occurrence of prostate cancer. Here we found that a large amount of H 2 S is released when SFN is added into cell culture medium or mixed with mouse liver homogenates, respectively. Both SFN and NaHS (a H 2 S donor) decreased the viability of PC-3 cells (a human prostate cancer cell line) in a dose-dependent manner, and supplement of methemoglobin or oxidized glutathione (two H 2 S scavengers) reversed SFN-reduced cell viability. We further found both cystathionine gamma-lyase (CSE) and cystathionine beta-synthase are expressed in PC-3 cells and mouse prostate tissues. H 2 S production in prostate tissues from CSE knockout mice was only 20% of that from wild-type mice, suggesting CSE is a major H 2 S-producing enzyme in prostate. CSE overexpression enhanced H 2 S production and inhibited cell viability in PC-3 cells. In addition, both SFN and NaHS activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Pre-treatment of PC-3 cells with methemoglobin decreased SFN-stimulated MAPK activities. Suppression of both p38 MAPK and JNK reversed H 2 S- or SFN-reduced viability of PC-3 cells. Our results demonstrated that H 2 S mediates the inhibitory effect of SFN on the proliferation of PC-3 cells, which suggests that H 2 S-releasing diet or drug might be beneficial in the treatment of prostate cancer. Highlights: ► A large amount of H 2 S is released from sulforaphane. ► H 2 S mediates the anti-survival effect of sulforaphane on human prostate cancer cells. ► Cystathionine gamma-lyase is a major H 2 S

  13. REST/NRSF Knockdown Alters Survival, Lineage Differentiation and Signaling in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

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    Kaushali Thakore-Shah

    Full Text Available REST (RE1 silencing transcription factor, also known as NRSF (neuron-restrictive silencer factor, is a well-known transcriptional repressor of neural genes in non-neural tissues and stem cells. Dysregulation of REST activity is thought to play a role in diverse diseases including epilepsy, cancer, Down's syndrome and Huntington's disease. The role of REST/NRSF in control of human embryonic stem cell (hESC fate has never been examined. To evaluate the role of REST in hESCs we developed an inducible REST knockdown system and examined both growth and differentiation over short and long term culture. Interestingly, we have found that altering REST levels in multiple hESC lines does not result in loss of self-renewal but instead leads to increased survival. During differentiation, REST knockdown resulted in increased MAPK/ERK and WNT signaling and increased expression of mesendoderm differentiation markers. Therefore we have uncovered a new role for REST in regulation of growth and early differentiation decisions in human embryonic stem cells.

  14. Influence of heavy ions on cell survival, cytogenetic damage and mitochondrial function of human endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Sylvia; Helm, Alexander; Lee, Ryonfa; Pollet, Dieter; Durante, Marco

    There is increasing evidence that there is an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease among atomic bomb survivors and radiotherapy patients, typically developing with a long latency. However, essentially no information is available on the potential cardiovascular risks associated with space radiation, in particular heavy ions. To address this issue, we have chosen human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) as a model system. Cells at an early passage number were irradiated with 0.1 to 4 Gy of either 9.8 MeV/u C-ions (LET=170 keV/µm), 91 MeV/u C-ions (LET=29 keV/µm) or 250 kV X-rays. Cells were regularly subcultured up to 40 days (20 population doublings) post-irradiation. Immediately after exposure cell inactivation was deter-mined by the colony forming assay. Furthermore, at selected time-points cytogenetic damage (formation of micronuclei in binucleated cells) and the mitochondrial membrane potential ΨM (flow cytometric analysis following JC-1 staining) were assessed. Measurement of the directly induced radiation damage showed that 9.8 MeV/u and 91 MeV/u C-ions were more effective than X-rays (i.e. about 3 and 2 times, respectively) with respect to cell inactivation or the in-duction of cytogenetic damage. At the subsequent days in the irradiated cultures the number of cells with micronuclei declined to the control level (3-5Altogether our data indicate that under the applied radiation conditions the integrity of mitochondria which play a significant role in the regulation of cardiovascular cell function is not impaired. With respect to directly induced genetic damage C-ions are more effective than X-rays as observed in other cell systems. If the effectiveness of charged particles for the occurrence of late chromosomal damage in endothelial cells is higher than that of sparsely ionizing radiation needs further clarification. The data obtained up to now indicate that sophisticated cytogenetic techniques have to be applied in order to draw any firm

  15. Artichoke compound cynarin differentially affects the survival, growth and stress response of normal, immortalized and cancerous human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gezer, Ceren; Yücecan, Sevinç; Rattan, Suresh Inder Singh

    2015-01-01

    of CYN on the proliferative potential, survival, morphology, and stress response (SR) markers haemoxygenase-1 (HO-1) and heat shock protein-70 (HSP70) in normal human skin fibroblasts (FSF-1), telomerase-immortalized mesenchymal stem cells (hTERT-MSC) and cervical cancer cells, HeLa. Effects of CYN...

  16. Emerging role of LRRK2 in human neural progenitor cell cycle progression, survival and differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Anne K

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite a comprehensive mapping of the Parkinson's disease (PD-related mRNA and protein leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 in the mammalian brain, its physiological function in healthy individuals remains enigmatic. Based on its structural features and kinase properties, LRRK2 may interact with other proteins involved in signalling pathways. Here, we show a widespread LRRK2 mRNA and/or protein expression in expanded or differentiated human mesencephalic neural progenitor cells (hmNPCs and in post-mortem substantia nigra PD patients. Using small interfering RNA duplexes targeting LRRK2 in hmNPCs following their differentiation into glia and neurons, we observed a reduced number of dopaminergic neurons due to apoptosis in LRRK2 knockdown samples. LRRK2-deficient hmNPCs exhibited elevated cell cycle- and cell death-related markers. In conclusion, a reduction of LRRK2 expression in hmNPCs severely impaired dopaminergic differentiation and/or survival of dopaminergic neurons most likely via preserving or reactivating the cell cycle.

  17. Hydrostatic pressure does not cause detectable changes in survival of human retinal ganglion cells.

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    Andrew Osborne

    Full Text Available Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP is a major risk factor for glaucoma. One consequence of raised IOP is that ocular tissues are subjected to increased hydrostatic pressure (HP. The effect of raised HP on stress pathway signaling and retinal ganglion cell (RGC survival in the human retina was investigated.A chamber was designed to expose cells to increased HP (constant and fluctuating. Accurate pressure control (10-100 mmHg was achieved using mass flow controllers. Human organotypic retinal cultures (HORCs from donor eyes (<24 h post mortem were cultured in serum-free DMEM/HamF12. Increased HP was compared to simulated ischemia (oxygen glucose deprivation, OGD. Cell death and apoptosis were measured by LDH and TUNEL assays, RGC marker expression by qRT-PCR (THY-1 and RGC number by immunohistochemistry (NeuN. Activated p38 and JNK were detected by Western blot.Exposure of HORCs to constant (60 mmHg or fluctuating (10-100 mmHg; 1 cycle/min pressure for 24 or 48 h caused no loss of structural integrity, LDH release, decrease in RGC marker expression (THY-1 or loss of RGCs compared with controls. In addition, there was no increase in TUNEL-positive NeuN-labelled cells at either time-point indicating no increase in apoptosis of RGCs. OGD increased apoptosis, reduced RGC marker expression and RGC number and caused elevated LDH release at 24 h. p38 and JNK phosphorylation remained unchanged in HORCs exposed to fluctuating pressure (10-100 mmHg; 1 cycle/min for 15, 30, 60 and 90 min durations, whereas OGD (3 h increased activation of p38 and JNK, remaining elevated for 90 min post-OGD.Directly applied HP had no detectable impact on RGC survival and stress-signalling in HORCs. Simulated ischemia, however, activated stress pathways and caused RGC death. These results show that direct HP does not cause degeneration of RGCs in the ex vivo human retina.

  18. Notch1 is a 5-fluorouracil resistant and poor survival marker in human esophagus squamous cell carcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Liu

    Full Text Available Notch signaling involves the processes that govern cell proliferation, cell fate decision, cell differentiation and stem cell maintenance. Due to its fundamental role in stem cells, it has been speculated during the recent years that Notch family may have critical functions in cancer stem cells or cancer cells with a stem cell phenotype, therefore playing an important role in the process of oncogenesis. In this study, expression of Notch family in KYSE70, KYSE140 and KYSE450 squamous esophageal cancer cell lines and virus transformed squamous esophageal epithelial cell line Het-1A was examined by quantitative RT-PCR. Compared to the Het-1A cells, higher levels of Nocth1 and Notch3 expression in the cancer cell lines were identified. Due to the finding that NOTCH3 mainly mediates squamous cell differentiation, NOTCH1 expression was further studied in these cell lines. By Western blot analyses, the KYSE70 cell line which derived from a poorly differentiated tumor highly expressed Notch1, and the Notch1 expression in this cell line was hypoxia inducible, while the KYSE450 cell line which derived from a well differentiated tumor was always negative for Notch1, even in hypoxia. Additional studies demonstrated that the KYSE70 cell line was more 5-FU resistant than the KYSE450 cell line and such 5-FU resistance is correlated to Notch1 expression verified by Notch1 knockdown experiments. In clinical samples, Notch1 protein expression was detected in the basal cells of human esophagus epithelia, and its expression in squamous cell carcinomas was significantly associated with higher pathological grade and shorter overall survival. We conclude that Notch1 expression is associated with cell aggressiveness and 5-FU drug resistance in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell lines in vitro and is significantly associated with a poor survival in human esophageal squamous cell carcinomas.

  19. Cell adhesion-mediated radioresistance (CAM-RR). Extracellular matrix-dependent improvement of cell survival in human tumor and normal cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordes, N.; Meineke, V.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) contact is thought to have great impact on cellular mechanisms resulting in increased cell survival upon exposure to ionizing radiation. Several human tumor cell lines and normal human fibroblastic cell strains of different origin, all of them expressing the wide-spread and important integrin subunit β1, were irradiated, and clonogenic cell survival, β1-integrin cell surface expression, and adhesive functionality were investigated. Material and Methods: Human tumor cell lines A172 (glioblastoma), PATU8902 (pancreas carcinoma), SKMES1 (lung carcinoma), A549 (lung carcinoma), and IPC298 (melanoma) as well as normal human skin (HSF1) and lung fibroblasts (CCD32) and human keratinocytes (HaCaT) were irradiated with 0-8 Gy. Besides colony formation assays, β1-integrin cell surface expression by flow cytometry and adhesive functionality by adhesion assays were analyzed. Results: All cell lines showed improved clonogenic survival after irradiation in the presence of fibronectin as compared to plastic. Irradiated cells exhibited a significant, dose-dependent increase in β1-integrin cell surface expression following irradiation. As a parameter of the adhesive functionality of the β1-integrin, a radiation-dependent elevation of cell adhesion to fibronectin in comparison with adhesion to plastic was demonstrated. Conclusion: The in vitro cellular radiosensitivity is highly influenced by fibronectin according to the phenomenon of cell adhesion-mediated radioresistance. Additionally, our emerging data question the results of former and current in vitro cytotoxicity studies performed in the absence of an ECM. These findings might also be important for the understanding of malignant transformation, anchorage-independent cell growth, optimization of radiotherapeutic regimes and the prevention of normal tissue side effects on the basis of experimental radiobiological data. (orig.)

  20. Active Stat3 is required for survival of human squamous cell carcinoma cells in serum-free conditions

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    DiGiovanni John

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC of the skin is the most aggressive form of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC, and is the single most commonly diagnosed cancer in the U.S., with over one million new cases reported each year. Recent studies have revealed an oncogenic role of activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3 in many human tumors, especially in those of epithelial origin, including skin SCC. Stat3 is a mediator of numerous growth factor and cytokine signaling pathways, all of which activate it through phosphorylation of tyrosine 705. Results To further address the role of Stat3 in skin SCC tumorigenesis, we have analyzed a panel of human skin-derived cell lines ranging from normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK, to non-tumorigenic transformed skin cells (HaCaT, to highly tumorigenic cells (SRB1-m7 and SRB12-p9 and observed a positive correlation between Stat3 phosphorylation and SCC malignancy. We next determined the role of Stat3 activity in cell proliferation and viability under serum-free culture conditions. This was accomplished by suppressing Stat3 activity in the SRB12-p9 cells through stable expression of a dominant negative acting form of Stat3β, which contains a tyrosine 705 to phenylalanine mutation (S3DN. The S3DN cells behaved similar to parental SRB12-p9 cells when cultured in optimal growth conditions, in the presence of 10% fetal calf serum. However, unlike the SRB12-p9 cells, S3DN cells underwent apoptotic cell death when cultured in serum-free medium (SFM. This was evidenced by multiple criteria, including accumulation of sub-G1 particles, induced PARP cleavage, and acquisition of the characteristic morphological changes associated with apoptosis. Conclusion This study provides direct evidence for a role for Stat3 in maintaining cell survival in the conditions of exogenous growth factor deprivation produced by culture in SFM. We also propose that delivery of the S3DN gene or

  1. Ionizing radiation-induced MEK and Erk activation does not enhance survival of irradiated human squamous carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonner, James A.; Vroman, Benjamin T.; Christianson, Teresa J.H.; Karnitz, Larry M.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Ionizing radiation (IR) triggers several intracellular signaling cascades that have commonly been regarded as mitogenic, including the Raf-MEK-Erk kinase cascade. In addition to promoting proliferation, activated MEK and Erk may also prevent cell death induced by cytotoxic stimuli. Because Raf, MEK, and Erk are activated by IR in some tumor cell lines, this suggests that IR-induced activation of the kinase cascade may enhance the survival of irradiated cells. Methods and Materials: IR-induced activation of MEK and Erk was assessed in irradiated UM-SCC-6 cells, a human squamous carcinoma cell line. Activation of MEK and Erk was blocked with the pharmacological inhibitor of MEK activation, PD098059. Clonogenic survival was assessed in irradiated UM-SCC-6 cells that were pretreated with nothing or with the MEK inhibitor. Results: In UM-SCC-6 cells, IR doses as low as 2 Gy rapidly activated MEK and Erk. Pretreatment of the cells with the pharmacological inhibitor of MEK activation, PD098059, effectively blocked IR-induced activation of MEK and Erk. However, inhibition of the kinase cascade did not affect the clonogenic survival of irradiated cells in either early or delayed-plating experiments. Conclusion: Taken together, these results suggest that although MEK and Erk are rapidly activated by IR treatment, these protein kinases do not affect the clonogenic survival of irradiated UM-SCC6 cells

  2. DNA crosslinking and cell survival in human lymphoid cells treated with 8-methoxypsoralen and long wavelength ultraviolet radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, L F; Glaubiger, D L [National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (USA). Pediatric Oncology Branch; Kraemer, K H; Waters, H L [National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (USA). Lab. of Molecular Carcinogenesis; Kohn, K W [National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (USA). Lab. of Molecular Pharmacology

    1981-01-01

    8-Methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) when irradiated with long wavelength ultraviolet radiation (UV-A) inhibits DNA synthesis in lymphocytes in vitro and in vivo. 8-MOP binds reversibly to DNA in the dark; when exposed to UV-A, covalent monoadducts and cross-links are formed with the DNA. The present study correlates the cytotoxic effects of 8-MOP plus UV-A with DNA crosslinking. E-B virus transformed human lymphoblastoid cells were suspended in a colorless salt solution containing 8-MOP and exposed to UV-A from fluorescent lamps filtered to remove radiation below 320 nm (22.5 J/m/sup 2/-sec). Cells were then returned to complete medium and assayed for survival (by daily counts of viable cells and by cloning in microtiter wells) and for DNA crosslinking by alkaline elution. 8-MOP alone or UV-A alone resulted in minimal to no alterations in survivial or in DNA crosslinking. DNA crosslinking was found to be linearly dependent on 8-MOP concentration (in the range of 0.01-1.0 ..mu..g/ml) for 3 different UV-A doses (3000-15000 J/m/sup 2/). The surviving fraction declined exponentially as a function of the relative number of DNA crosslinks.

  3. Proliferation and clonal survival of human lung cancer cells treated with fractionated irradiation in combination with paclitaxel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rijn, Johannes van; Berg, Jaap van den; Meijer, Otto W.M.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: This study was performed to determine the effects of a continuous exposure to paclitaxel (taxol) in combination with fractionated irradiation on cell proliferation and survival. Methods and Materials: Human lung carcinoma cells (SW1573) were given a daily treatment with 3 Gy of x-rays during 5 days in the continuous presence of 5 nM taxol. The surviving fraction and the total number of cells were determined every 24 h before and immediately after irradiation. Results: Irradiation with 5 x 3 Gy and 5 nM taxol cause approximately the same inhibition of cell proliferation. In combination these treatments have an additional effect and the cell population increases no further after the first 24 h. Whereas the cells become more resistant to taxol after the first 24 h with a minimum survival of 42%, taxol progressively reduces the population of surviving cells in combination with x-rays when the number of fractions increases, up to 25-fold relative to irradiation alone. The enhancement effect of 5 nM taxol is likely to be attributed to an inhibition of the repopulation during fractionated irradiation and not to an increased radiosensitivity. Only after treatment with 10 or 100 nM taxol for 24 h, which is attended with a high cytotoxicity, is moderate radiosensitization observed. Conclusion: Taxol, continuously present at a low concentration with little cytotoxicity, causes a progressive reduction of the surviving cell population in combination with fractionated irradiation, mainly by an inhibition of the repopulation of surviving cells between the dose fractions

  4. Effect of different culture media and deswelling agents on survival of human corneal endothelial and epithelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtink, Monika; Donath, Patricia; Engelmann, Katrin; Knels, Lilla

    2016-02-01

    To examine the effects of media and deswelling agents on human corneal endothelial and epithelial cell viability using a previously developed screening system. The human corneal endothelial cell line HCEC-12 and the human corneal epithelial cell line HCE-T were cultured in four different corneal organ culture media (serum-supplemented: MEM +2 % FCS, CorneaMax®/CorneaJet®, serum-free: Human Endothelial-SFM, Stemalpha-2 and -3) with and without 6 % dextran T500 or 7 % HES 130/0.4. Standard growth media F99HCEC and DMEM/F12HCE-T served as controls. In additional controls, the stress inducers staurosporine or hydrogen peroxide were added. After 5 days in the test media, cell viability was assessed by flow cytometrically quantifying apoptotic and necrotic cells (sub-G1 DNA content, vital staining with YO-PRO-1® and propidium iodide) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). The MEM-based media were unable to support HCEC-12 and HCE-T survival under stress conditions, resulting in significantly increased numbers of apoptotic and necrotic cells. HCEC-12 survival was markedly improved in SFM-based media even under staurosporine or hydrogen peroxide. Likewise, HCE-T survival was improved in SFM with or without dextran. The media CorneaMax®, CorneaJet®, and CorneaMax® with HES supported HCEC-12 survival better than MEM-based media, but less well than SFM-based media. HCE-T viability was also supported by CorneaJet®, but not by CorneaMax® with or without HES. Stemalpha-based media were not suitable for maintaining viability of HCEC-12 or HCE-T in the applied cell culture system. The use of serum-supplemented MEM-based media for corneal organ culture should be discontinued in favour of serum-free media like SFM.

  5. Survival of human mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow and adipose tissue after xenogenic transplantation in immunocompetent mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemeyer, P; Vohrer, J; Schmal, H

    2008-01-01

    of the current paper was to evaluate the survival of undifferentiated and osteogenically induced human MSC from different origins after transplantation in immunocompetent mice. METHODS: Human MSC were isolated from bone marrow (BMSC) and adipose tissue (ASC). After cultivation on mineralized collagen, MSC were......INTRODUCTION: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) represent an attractive cell population for tissue engineering purposes. As MSC are described as immunoprivileged, non-autologous applications seem possible. A basic requirement is the survival of MSC after transplantation in the host. The purpose...... transplanted subcutaneously into immunocompetent mice (n=12). Undifferentiated MSC (group A) were compared with osteogenic-induced MSC (group B). Human-specific in situ hybridization and anti-vimentin staining was used to follow MSC after transplantation. Quantitative evaluation of lymphocytes and macrophages...

  6. Small molecule screening with laser cytometry can be used to identify pro-survival molecules in human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Sean P; Pyle, April D

    2013-01-01

    Differentiated cells from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) provide an unlimited source of cells for use in regenerative medicine. The recent derivation of human induced pluripotent cells (hiPSCs) provides a potential supply of pluripotent cells that avoid immune rejection and could provide patient-tailored therapy. In addition, the use of pluripotent cells for drug screening could enable routine toxicity testing and evaluation of underlying disease mechanisms. However, prior to establishment of patient specific cells for cell therapy it is important to understand the basic regulation of cell fate decisions in hESCs. One critical issue that hinders the use of these cells is the fact that hESCs survive poorly upon dissociation, which limits genetic manipulation because of poor cloning efficiency of individual hESCs, and hampers production of large-scale culture of hESCs. To address the problems associated with poor growth in culture and our lack of understanding of what regulates hESC signaling, we successfully developed a screening platform that allows for large scale screening for small molecules that regulate survival. In this work we developed the first large scale platform for hESC screening using laser scanning cytometry and were able to validate this platform by identifying the pro-survival molecule HA-1077. These small molecules provide targets for both improving our basic understanding of hESC survival as well as a tool to improve our ability to expand and genetically manipulate hESCs for use in regenerative applications.

  7. Small molecule screening with laser cytometry can be used to identify pro-survival molecules in human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean P Sherman

    Full Text Available Differentiated cells from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs provide an unlimited source of cells for use in regenerative medicine. The recent derivation of human induced pluripotent cells (hiPSCs provides a potential supply of pluripotent cells that avoid immune rejection and could provide patient-tailored therapy. In addition, the use of pluripotent cells for drug screening could enable routine toxicity testing and evaluation of underlying disease mechanisms. However, prior to establishment of patient specific cells for cell therapy it is important to understand the basic regulation of cell fate decisions in hESCs. One critical issue that hinders the use of these cells is the fact that hESCs survive poorly upon dissociation, which limits genetic manipulation because of poor cloning efficiency of individual hESCs, and hampers production of large-scale culture of hESCs. To address the problems associated with poor growth in culture and our lack of understanding of what regulates hESC signaling, we successfully developed a screening platform that allows for large scale screening for small molecules that regulate survival. In this work we developed the first large scale platform for hESC screening using laser scanning cytometry and were able to validate this platform by identifying the pro-survival molecule HA-1077. These small molecules provide targets for both improving our basic understanding of hESC survival as well as a tool to improve our ability to expand and genetically manipulate hESCs for use in regenerative applications.

  8. In vitro oxygen-dependent survival of two human cell lines after combined radiations tirapazamin and cisplatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lartigau, E.; Stern, S.; Guichard, M.

    2000-01-01

    Recent data have shown that the in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity of bioreductive drugs could be significantly cytotoxicity of bioreductive drugs could be significantly increased by combination with ionising radiation or chemotherapy. Various parameters such as oxygen tension and timing of administration of the drugs could play a crucial role in the efficacy of combined treatment modalities. The aim of this study was to define the oxygen dependency of cell survival after in vitro irradiation and incubation with tirapazamin, a bioreductive drug, and cisplatin given alone or simultaneously. Two human cell lines were studied: one cell line sensitive to tirapazamin, Na11+, a pigmented melanoma with a high percentage of hypoxic cells, and a less sensitive cell line to tirapazamin, HRT18, a rectal adenocarcinoma. Gas changes were made to study cell survival at four different oxygen concentrations (pO 2 ): air (20.9 % O 2 ), 10.2 and 0.2 %. Cells were incubated with tirapazamin and cisplatin alone or combined for one hour at 37 deg C, then irradiated and cultured. For Na11+, cell survival after irradiation was comparable in air and at 10 % oxygen with the two drugs given alone or combined. At 2 and 0.2 % oxygen, cell killing was largely increased by tirapazamin and was not modified by the addition of cisplatin. For HRT18, cell survival was not modified when cisplatin was added to radiation, whatever the oxygen partial pressure. At low pO 2 (2 and 0.2 %) the cytotoxic effect of tirapazamin was not significantly decreased by the addition of cisplatin. When cytotoxic and bioreductive drugs are combined to radiation, the magnitude of the observed effect is highly dependent on the partial oxygen pressure and on the sensitivity of the cell line to the individual drugs. This has very important implications for clinical strategies based on combined chemo-radiotherapy. (authors)

  9. Errantum: Treatment of human astrocytoma U87 cells with silicon dioxide nanoparticles lowers their survival and alters their expression of mitochondrial and cell signaling proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai JCK

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Lai JCK, Ananthakrishnan G, Jandhyam S, et al. Treatment of human astrocytoma U87 cells with silicon dioxide nanoparticles lowers their survival and alters their expression of mitochondrial and cell signaling proteins. Int J Nanomedicine. 2010;5:715–723.The wrong image was used in Figure 5 on page 719.

  10. Effects of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells on the Survival of Rabbit Ear Composite Grafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chae Min Kim

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Composite grafts are frequently used for facial reconstruction. However, the unpredictability of the results and difficulties with large defects are disadvantages. Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs express several cytokines, and increase the survival of random flaps and fat grafts owing to their angiogenic potential. Methods This study investigated composite graft survival after ADSC injection. Circular chondrocutaneous composite tissues, 2 cm in diameter, from 15 New Zealand white rabbits were used. Thirty ears were randomly divided into 3 groups. In the experimental groups (1 and 2, ADSCs were subcutaneously injected 7 days and immediately before the operation, respectively. Similarly, phosphate-buffered saline was injected in the control group just before surgery in the same manner as in group 2. In all groups, chondrocutaneous composite tissue was elevated, rotated 90 degrees, and repaired in its original position. Skin flow was assessed using laser Doppler 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 days after surgery. At 1 and 12 days after surgery, the viable area was assessed using digital photography; the rabbits were euthanized, and immunohistochemical staining for CD31 was performed to assess neovascularization. Results The survival of composite grafts increased significantly with the injection of ADSCs (P<0.05. ADSC injection significantly improved neovascularization based on anti-CD31 immunohistochemical analysis and vascular endothelial growth factor expression (P<0.05 in both group 1 and group 2 compared to the control group. No statistically significant differences in graft survival, anti-CD31 neovascularization, or microcirculation were found between groups 1 and 2. Conclusions Treatment with ADSCs improved the composite graft survival, as confirmed by the survival area and histological evaluation. The differences according to the injection timing were not significant.

  11. Radiobilogical cell survival models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zackrisson, B.

    1992-01-01

    A central issue in clinical radiobiological research is the prediction of responses to different radiation qualities. The choice of cell survival and dose-response model greatly influences the results. In this context the relationship between theory and model is emphasized. Generally, the interpretations of experimental data depend on the model. Cell survival models are systematized with respect to their relations to radiobiological theories of cell kill. The growing knowlegde of biological, physical, and chemical mechanisms is reflected in the formulation of new models. The present overview shows that recent modelling has been more oriented towards the stochastic fluctuations connected to radiation energy deposition. This implies that the traditional cell surivival models ought to be complemented by models of stochastic energy deposition processes and repair processes at the intracellular level. (orig.)

  12. Intermittent, low dose carbon monoxide exposure enhances survival and dopaminergic differentiation of human neural stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer-Andersen, Nanna; Almeida, Ana Sofia; Jensen, Pia

    2018-01-01

    Exploratory studies using human fetal tissue have suggested that intrastriatal transplantation of dopaminergic neurons may become a future treatment for patients with Parkinson's disease. However, the use of human fetal tissue is compromised by ethical, regulatory and practical concerns. Human stem...... cells constitute an alternative source of cells for transplantation in Parkinson's disease, but efficient protocols for controlled dopaminergic differentiation need to be developed. Short-term, low-level carbon monoxide (CO) exposure has been shown to affect signaling in several tissues, resulting...... in Parkinson's disease....

  13. Regulatory dendritic cell infusion prolongs kidney allograft survival in non-human primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzelarab, M.; Zahorchak, A.F.; Lu, L.; Morelli, A.E.; Chalasani, G.; Demetris, A.J.; Lakkis, F.G.; Wijkstrom, M.; Murase, N.; Humar, A.; Shapiro, R.; Cooper, D.K.C.; Thomson, A.W.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the influence of regulatory dendritic cells (DCreg), generated from cytokine-mobilized donor blood monocytes in vitamin D3 and IL-10, on renal allograft survival in a clinically-relevant rhesus macaque model. DCreg expressed low MHC class II and costimulatory molecules, but comparatively high levels of programmed death ligand-1 (B7-H1), and were resistant to pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced maturation. They were infused intravenously (3.5–10×106/kg), together with the B7-CD28 costimulation blocking agent CTLA4Ig, 7 days before renal transplantation. CTLA4Ig was given for up to 8 weeks and rapamycin, started on day −2, was maintained with tapering of blood levels until full withdrawal at 6 months. Median graft survival time was 39.5 days in control monkeys (no DC infusion; n=6) and 113.5 days (pDCreg-treated animals (n=6). No adverse events were associated with DCreg infusion, and there was no evidence of induction of host sensitization based on circulating donor-specific alloantibody levels. Immunologic monitoring also revealed regulation of donor-reactive memory CD95+ T cells and reduced memory/regulatory T cell ratios in DCreg-treated monkeys compared with controls. Termination allograft histology showed moderate combined T cell- and Ab-mediated rejection in both groups. These findings justify further pre-clinical evaluation of DCreg therapy and their therapeutic potential in organ transplantation. PMID:23758811

  14. Overexpression of FABP3 inhibits human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell proliferation but enhances their survival in hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Suna; Zhou, Yifu; Andreyev, Oleg; Hoyt, Robert F.; Singh, Avneesh; Hunt, Timothy; Horvath, Keith A.

    2014-01-01

    Studying the proliferative ability of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells in hypoxic conditions can help us achieve the effective regeneration of ischemic injured myocardium. Cardiac-type fatty acid binding protein (FABP3) is a specific biomarker of muscle and heart tissue injury. This protein is purported to be involved in early myocardial development, adult myocardial tissue repair and responsible for the modulation of cell growth and proliferation. We have investigated the role of FABP3 in human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells under ischemic conditions. MSCs from 12 donors were cultured either in standard normoxic or modified hypoxic conditions, and the differential expression of FABP3 was tested by quantitative RT PCR and western blot. We also established stable FABP3 expression in MSCs and searched for variation in cellular proliferation and differentiation bioprocesses affected by hypoxic conditions. We identified: (1) the FABP3 differential expression pattern in the MSCs under hypoxic conditions; (2) over-expression of FABP3 inhibited the growth and proliferation of the MSCs; however, improved their survival in low oxygen environments; (3) the cell growth factors and positive cell cycle regulation genes, such as PCNA, APC, CCNB1, CCNB2 and CDC6 were all down-regulated; while the key negative cell cycle regulation genes TP53, BRCA1, CASP3 and CDKN1A were significantly up-regulated in the cells with FABP3 overexpression. Our data suggested that FABP3 was up-regulated under hypoxia; also negatively regulated the cell metabolic process and the mitotic cell cycle. Overexpression of FABP3 inhibited cell growth and proliferation via negative regulation of the cell cycle and down-regulation of cell growth factors, but enhances cell survival in hypoxic or ischemic conditions. - Highlights: • FABP3 expression pattern was studied in 12 human hypoxic-MSCs. • FABP3 mRNA and proteins are upregulated in the MSCs under hypoxic conditions.

  15. Impact of alemtuzumab treatment on the survival and function of human regulatory T cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havari, Evis; Turner, Michael J; Campos-Rivera, Juanita; Shankara, Srinivas; Nguyen, Tri-Hung; Roberts, Bruce; Siders, William; Kaplan, Johanne M

    2014-01-01

    Alemtuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody specific for the CD52 protein present at high levels on the surface of B and T lymphocytes. In clinical trials, alemtuzumab has shown a clinical benefit superior to that of interferon-β in relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis patients. Treatment with alemtuzumab leads to the depletion of circulating lymphocytes followed by a repopulation process characterized by alterations in the number, proportions and properties of lymphocyte subsets. Of particular interest, an increase in the percentage of T cells with a regulatory phenotype (Treg cells) has been observed in multiple sclerosis patients after alemtuzumab. Since Treg cells play an important role in the control of autoimmune responses, the effect of alemtuzumab on Treg cells was further studied in vitro. Alemtuzumab effectively mediated complement-dependent cytolysis of human T lymphocytes and the remaining population was enriched in T cells with a regulatory phenotype. The alemtuzumab-exposed T cells displayed functional regulatory characteristics including anergy to stimulation with allogeneic dendritic cells and ability to suppress the allogeneic response of autologous T cells. Consistent with the observed increase in Treg cell frequency, the CD25hi T-cell population was necessary for the suppressive activity of alemtuzumab-exposed T cells. The mechanism of this suppression was found to be dependent on both cell–cell contact and interleukin-2 consumption. These findings suggest that an alemtuzumab-mediated increase in the proportion of Treg cells may play a role in promoting the long-term efficacy of alemtuzumab in patients with multiple sclerosis. PMID:24116901

  16. Regulatory dendritic cell infusion prolongs kidney allograft survival in non-human primates

    OpenAIRE

    Ezzelarab, M.; Zahorchak, A.F.; Lu, L.; Morelli, A.E.; Chalasani, G.; Demetris, A.J.; Lakkis, F.G.; Wijkstrom, M.; Murase, N.; Humar, A.; Shapiro, R.; Cooper, D.K.C.; Thomson, A.W.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the influence of regulatory dendritic cells (DCreg), generated from cytokine-mobilized donor blood monocytes in vitamin D3 and IL-10, on renal allograft survival in a clinically-relevant rhesus macaque model. DCreg expressed low MHC class II and costimulatory molecules, but comparatively high levels of programmed death ligand-1 (B7-H1), and were resistant to pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced maturation. They were infused intravenously (3.5–10×106/kg), together with the B7-CD28 cos...

  17. UV survival of human mycoplasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Shigeji; Ito, Shoko; Watanabe, Takehiko

    1979-01-01

    The inactivation by ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation of mycoplasma cells of five human strains was monitored by investigating the colony-forming ability. The survival curves of five strains tested indicated that the cells of Mycoplasma buccale only are single and homogenously susceptible to UV light. The effect of the repair inhibitor, caffeine, on the colony-forming ability of UV-irradiated cells was investigated with M. buccale because of its homogeneous susceptibility to UV light. The colony formation of irradiated cells was markedly depressed by post-irradiation treatment with caffeine at concentration that had little or no effect on the colony formation of unirradiated cells. The colony-forming units (CFU) of UV-irradiated cells which were kept in broth without caffeine in the dark increased without a lag as the time in the dark increased. The colony-forming ability of the irradiated cells completely recovered after 3 hr in the dark. However, when irradiated cells were kept in the presence of caffeine, no increase in their CFU was observed. The mode of action of caffeine on UV-irradiated cells closely resembles that described for other organisms which possess dark reactivation systems for UV-induced damage in deoxyribonucleic acid. Thus, the results obtained provide evidence for the existence of a dark repair function in M. buccale. (author)

  18. The suppression of manganese superoxide dismutase decreased the survival of human glioblastoma multiforme T98G cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novi S. Hardiany

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a primary malignant brain tumor which has poor prognosis. High incidence of oxidative stress-based therapy resistance could be related to the high antioxidant status of GBM cells. Our previous study has reported that manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD antioxidant expression was significantly higher in high grade glioma than in low grade. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of MnSOD suppression toward GBM cell survival.Methods: This study is an experimental study using human glioblastoma multiforme T98G cell line. Suppression of MnSOD expression was performed using in vitro transfection MnSOD-siRNA. The MnSOD expression was analyzed by measuring the mRNA using real time RT-PCR, protein using ELISA technique, and specific activity of enzyme using inhibition of xantine oxidase. Concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS intracellular was determined by measuring superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide. Cell survival was analyzed by measuring viability, proliferation, and cell apoptosis.Results: In vitro transfection of MnSOD-siRNA suppressed the mRNA, protein, and specific activity of MnSOD. This treatment significantly increased the concentration of superoxide radical; however, it did not influence the concentration of hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, viability MnSOD-suppressing cell significantly decreased, accompanied by increase of cell apoptosis without affecting cell proliferation.Conclusion: The suppression of MnSOD expression leads to decrease glioblastoma multiforme cell survival, which was associated to the increase of cell apoptotic.

  19. Culture of normal human blood cells in diffusion chamber systems. I. Granulocyte survival and proliferation. [X radiation, mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikkappa, G.; Carsten, A.L.; Chanana, A.D.; Cronkite, E.P.

    1978-01-01

    Blood cells from four normal volunteers were cultured in diffusion chambers (DC), made of Millipore (MDC) or Nuclepore (NDC) filters, in the peritoneal cavities of whole body X-irradiated (700 rad) mice. The total nucleated cell recovery from the two types of DC over 18 days indicates that the cells in DC persist and proliferate. The mature neutrophilic cells, metamyelocytes (M/sub 5/) + band forms (M/sub 6/) + segmented forms (M/sub 7/), survived with T/sup 1///sub 2/ of 29 and 34 h in MDC and NDC, respectively. The reduction of the cells in the DC was surmised to be due to degeneration and death of the M/sub 7/. The /sup 3/H-diisopropylfluorophosphate (/sup 3/HDFP) labeled M/sub /sub 6/+/sub 7// survival in MDC was slightly shorter than that of unlabeled cells, which may be explained on the basis of the loss of /sup 3/HDFP (5.1%/day) from the cells. The eosinophils survived with an average T/sup 1///sub 2/ of 7.2 days (range 4.8 to 9.6), and the results were comparable in both types of DC. Formation of myeloblasts, promyelocytes, and neutrophilic, eosinophilic and basophilic myelocytes, occasional megakaryocytes and rare normoblasts in DC indicated that the normal human blood contains progenitors (pluripotent and/or committed stem cells) of hemopoietic cells. The neutrophilic cell recovery pattern was similar from both types of DC, but the total number recovered was always greater from NDC than from MDC.

  20. Additive effects of 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine and irradiation on clonogenic survival of human medulloblastoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patties, Ina; Jahns, Jutta; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Glasow, Annegret [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig AoeR (Germany); Hildebrandt, Guido [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig AoeR (Germany); Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. of Rostock (Germany)

    2009-05-15

    Background and purpose: in recent years, epigenetic modulators were introduced into tumor therapy. Here, the authors investigated the antitumor effect of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine-(5-aza-dC-)induced demethylation combined with irradiation on human medulloblastoma (MB) cells, which form the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Material and methods: three MB cell lines were treated with 5-aza-dC in a low-dose (0.1 {mu}M, 6 days) or high-dose (3/5 {mu}M, 3 days) setting and irradiated with 2, 4, 6, or 8 Gy single dose on an X-ray unit. Methylation status and mRNA expression of three candidate genes were analyzed by methylation-specific PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Cell survival and mortality were determined by trypan blue exclusion test. Proliferation was analyzed by BrdU incorporation assay, and long-term cell survival was assessed by clonogenic assay. Results: 5-aza-dC treatment resulted in partial promoter demethylation and increased expression of hypermethylated candidate genes. A significant decrease of vital cell count, proliferation inhibition and increase of mortality was observed in 5-aza-dC-treated as well as in irradiated MB cells, whereby combination of both treatments led to additive effects. Although high-dose 5-aza-dC treatment was more effective in terms of demethylation, clonogenic assay revealed no differences between high- and low-dose settings indicating no relevance of 5-aza-dC-induced demethylation for decreased cell survival. MB cells pretreated with 5-aza-dC showed significantly lower plating efficiencies than untreated cells at all irradiation doses investigated. Analysis of surviving curves in irradiated MB cells, however, revealed no significant differences of {alpha}-, {beta}-values and 2-Gy surviving fraction with or without 5-aza-dC treatment. Conclusion: 5-aza-dC did not enhance radiation sensitivity of MB cells but significantly reduced the clonogenicity versus irradiation alone, which

  1. Galectin-9 enhances cytokine secretion, but suppresses survival and degranulation, in human mast cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiji Kojima

    Full Text Available Galectin-9 (Gal-9, a lectin having a β-galactoside-binding domain, can induce apoptosis of Th1 cells by binding to TIM-3. In addition, Gal-9 inhibits IgE/Ag-mediated degranulation of mast cell/basophilic cell lines by binding to IgE, thus blocking IgE/Ag complex formation. However, the role of Gal-9 in mast cell function in the absence of IgE is not fully understood. Here, we found that recombinant Gal-9 directly induced phosphorylation of Erk1/2 but not p38 MAPK in a human mast cell line, HMC-1, which does not express FcεRI. Gal-9 induced apoptosis and inhibited PMA/ionomycin-mediated degranulation of HMC-1 cells. On the other hand, Gal-9 induced cytokine and/or chemokine production by HMC-1 cells, dependent on activation of ERK1/2 but not p38 MAPK. In addition, the lectin activity of Gal-9 was required for Gal-9-mediated cytokine secretion by HMC-1 cells. These observations suggest that Gal-9 has dual properties as both a regulator and an activator of mast cells.

  2. Micronucleus formation compared to the survival rate of human melanoma cells after X-ray and neutron irradiation and hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Beuningen, D.; Streffer, C.; Bertholdt, G.

    1981-09-01

    After neutron and X-ray irradiation and combined X-ray irradiation and hyperthermia (3 hours, 42/sup 0/C), the survival rate of human melanoma cells was measured by means of the colony formation test and compared to the formation of micronuclei. Neutrons had a stronger effect on the formation of micronuclei than the combination of X-rays and hyperthermia. X-rays had the lowest effect. The dose effect curve showed a break at that dose level at which a reduction of cells was observed in the cultures. A good relation between survival rate and formation of micronuclei was found for the X-ray irradiation, but not for the neutron irradiation and the combined treatment. These observations are discussed. At least for X-rays, the micronucleus test has turned out to be a good screening method for the radiosensitivity of a biologic system.

  3. Neuropilin-2 mediated β-catenin signaling and survival in human gastro-intestinal cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaija Samuel

    Full Text Available NRP-2 is a high-affinity kinase-deficient receptor for ligands belonging to the class 3 semaphorin and vascular endothelial growth factor families. NRP-2 has been detected on the surface of several types of human cancer cells, but its expression and function in gastrointestinal (GI cancer cells remains to be determined. We sought to determine the function of NRP-2 in mediating downstream signals regulating the growth and survival of human gastrointestinal cancer cells. In human gastric cancer specimens, NRP-2 expression was detected in tumor tissues but not in adjacent normal mucosa. In CNDT 2.5 cells, shRNA mediated knockdown NRP-2 expression led to decreased migration and invasion in vitro (p<0.01. Focused gene-array analysis demonstrated that loss of NRP-2 reduced the expression of a critical metastasis mediator gene, S100A4. Steady-state levels and function of β-catenin, a known regulator of S100A4, were also decreased in the shNRP-2 clones. Furthermore, knockdown of NRP-2 sensitized CNDT 2.5 cells in vitro to 5FU toxicity. This effect was associated with activation of caspases 3 and 7, cleavage of PARP, and downregulation of Bcl-2. In vivo growth of CNDT 2.5 cells in the livers of nude mice was significantly decreased in the shNRP-2 group (p<0.05. Intraperitoneal administration of NRP-2 siRNA-DOPC decreased the tumor burden in mice (p = 0.01. Collectively, our results demonstrate that tumor cell-derived NRP-2 mediates critical survival signaling in gastrointestinal cancer cells.

  4. Intermittent, low dose carbon monoxide exposure enhances survival and dopaminergic differentiation of human neural stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer-Andersen, Nanna; Almeida, Ana Sofia; Jensen, Pia

    2018-01-01

    cells constitute an alternative source of cells for transplantation in Parkinson's disease, but efficient protocols for controlled dopaminergic differentiation need to be developed. Short-term, low-level carbon monoxide (CO) exposure has been shown to affect signaling in several tissues, resulting...... in both protection and generation of reactive oxygen species. The present study investigated the effect of CO produced by a novel CO-releasing molecule on dopaminergic differentiation of human neural stem cells. Short-term exposure to 25 ppm CO at days 0 and 4 significantly increased the relative content...... of β-tubulin III-immunoreactive immature neurons and tyrosine hydroxylase expressing catecholaminergic neurons, as assessed 6 days after differentiation. Also the number of microtubule associated protein 2-positive mature neurons had increased significantly. Moreover, the content of apoptotic cells...

  5. Treating fat grafts with human endothelial progenitor cells promotes their vascularization and improves their survival in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Saher; Ben-Nun, Ohad; Egozi, Dana; Keren, Aviad; Malyarova, Nastya; Kruchevsky, Danny; Gilhar, Amos; Ullmann, Yehuda

    2012-10-01

    Bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells are required for vascularization of a fat graft to form a functional microvasculature within the graft and to facilitate its integration into the surrounding tissues. Organ transplantation carries a high risk of graft loss and rejection in patients with diabetes mellitus because endothelial progenitor cell function is impaired. The authors investigated the influence of endothelial progenitor cell treatment on the phenotype and survival of human fat grafts in immunocompromised mice with experimentally induced diabetes mellitus. The authors injected 1 ml of human fat tissue into the scalps of 14 nondiabetic and 28 diabetic immunocompromised mice, and then treated some of the grafts with endothelial progenitor cells that was isolated from the blood of a human donor. The phenotype of the endothelial progenitor cell-treated fat grafts from the 14 diabetic mice was compared with that of the untreated fat grafts from 14 nondiabetic and 14 diabetic mice, 18 days and 15 weeks after fat transplantation. Determination of graft phenotype included measurements of weight and volume, vascular endothelial growth factor levels, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and caspase 3 expression levels, and histologic analysis of the extent of vascularization. The untreated grafts from the diabetic mice were fully resorbed 15 weeks after fat transplantation. The phenotype of endothelial progenitor cell-treated fat grafts from the diabetic mice was similar to that of the untreated fat grafts from the nondiabetic mice. Endothelial progenitor cell treatment of transplanted fat can increase the survival of a fat graft by inducing its vascularization and decreasing the extent of apoptosis.

  6. Implications of the quadratic cell survival curve and human skin radiation ''tolerance doses'' on fractionation and superfractionation dose selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, B.G.

    1982-01-01

    An analysis of early published multifraction orthovoltage human acute skin irradiation tolerance isoeffect doses is presented. It indicates that human acute skin radiation reactions may result from the repetition, with each dose fraction, of a cell survival curve of the form: S = e/sup -(αD + βD 2 )/). The analysis also shows no need for an independent proliferation related time factor for skin, for daily treatments of six weeks or less in duration. The value obtained for the constant β/α for orthovoltage irradiation from these data is 2.9 x 10 -3 rad -1 for the cell line determining acute skin tolerance. A radiation isoeffect relationship, based on the quadratic cell survival curve, is introduced for human skin. This relationship has some advantages over the nominal standard dose (NSD). First, its use is not restricted to tolerance level reactions. Second, a modification of the relationship, which is also introduced, may be employed in the selection of doses per treatment when irradiation dose fractions are administered at short intervals where repair of sublethal injury is incomplete

  7. PEA-15 Induces Autophagy in Human Ovarian Cancer Cells and is Associated with Prolonged Overall Survival

    OpenAIRE

    Bartholomeusz, Chandra; Rosen, Daniel; Wei, Caimiao; Kazansky, Anna; Yamasaki, Fumiyuki; Takahashi, Takeshi; Itamochi, Hiroaki; Kondo, Seiji; Liu, Jinsong; Ueno, Naoto T.

    2008-01-01

    Phospho-enriched protein in astrocytes (PEA-15) is a 15-kDa phosphoprotein that slows cell proliferation by binding to and sequestering extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in the cytoplasm, thereby inhibiting ERK-dependent transcription and proliferation. In previous studies of E1A human gene therapy for ovarian cancer, we discovered that PEA-15 induced the antitumor effect of E1A by sequestering activated ERK in the cytoplasm of cancer cells. Here, we investigated the role of PEA-15 ...

  8. Survival of mossy cells of the hippocampal dentate gyrus in humans with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seress, László; Abrahám, Hajnalka; Horváth, Zsolt; Dóczi, Tamás; Janszky, József; Klemm, Joyce; Byrne, Richard; Bakay, Roy A E

    2009-12-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis can be identified in most patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Surgical removal of the sclerotic hippocampus is widely performed to treat patients with drug-resistant mesial TLE. In general, both epilepsy-prone and epilepsy-resistant neurons are believed to be in the hippocampal formation. The hilar mossy cells of the hippocampal dentate gyrus are usually considered one of the most vulnerable types of neurons. The aim of this study was to clarify the fate of mossy cells in the hippocampus in epileptic humans. Of the 19 patients included in this study, 15 underwent temporal lobe resection because of drug-resistant TLE. Four patients were used as controls because they harbored tumors that had not invaded the hippocampus and they had experienced no seizures. Histological evaluation of resected hippocampal tissues was performed using immunohistochemistry. Mossy cells were identified in the control as well as the epileptic hippocampi by using cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide immunohistochemistry. In most cases the number of mossy cells was reduced and thorny excrescences were smaller in the epileptic hippocampi than in controls; however, there was a significant loss of pyramidal cells and a partial loss of granule cells in the same epileptic hippocampi in which mossy cell loss was apparent. The loss of mossy cells could be correlated with the extent of hippocampal sclerosis, patient age at seizure onset, duration of epilepsy, and frequency of seizures. In many cases large numbers of mossy cells were present in the hilus of the dentate gyrus when most pyramidal neurons of the CA1 and CA3 areas of the Ammon's horn were lost, suggesting that mossy cells may not be more vulnerable to epileptic seizures than the hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

  9. Human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) kills human glioblastoma cells in brain xenografts by an apoptosis-like mechanism and prolongs survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Walter; Gustafsson, Lotta; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Gronli, Janne; Mork, Sverre; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Svanborg, Catharina

    2004-03-15

    Malignant brain tumors present a major therapeutic challenge because no selective or efficient treatment is available. Here, we demonstrate that intratumoral administration of human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) prolongs survival in a human glioblastoma (GBM) xenograft model, by selective induction of tumor cell apoptosis. HAMLET is a protein-lipid complex that is formed from alpha-lactalbumin when the protein changes its tertiary conformation and binds oleic acid as a cofactor. HAMLET induces apoptosis in a wide range of tumor cells in vitro, but the therapeutic effect in vivo has not been examined. In this study, invasively growing human GBM tumors were established in nude rats (Han:rnu/rnu Rowett, n = 20) by transplantation of human GBM biopsy spheroids. After 7 days, HAMLET was administered by intracerebral convection-enhanced delivery for 24 h into the tumor area; and alpha-lactalbumin, the native, folded variant of the same protein, was used as a control. HAMLET reduced the intracranial tumor volume and delayed the onset of pressure symptoms in the tumor-bearing rats. After 8 weeks, all alpha-lactalbumin-treated rats had developed pressure symptoms, but the HAMLET-treated rats remained asymptomatic. Magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed large differences in tumor volume (456 versus 63 mm(3)). HAMLET caused apoptosis in vivo in the tumor but not in adjacent intact brain tissue or in nontransformed human astrocytes, and no toxic side effects were observed. The results identify HAMLET as a new candidate in cancer therapy and suggest that HAMLET should be additionally explored as a novel approach to controlling GBM progression.

  10. RELM-β promotes human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation via FAK-stimulated surviving

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chunlong; Li, Xiaohui; Luo, Qiong; Yang, Hui; Li, Lun; Zhou, Qiong; Li, Yue; Tang, Hao; Wu, Lifu

    2017-01-01

    Resistin-like molecule-β (RELM-β), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and survivin may be involved in the proliferation of cultured human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (HPAMSCs), which is involved in pulmonary hypertension. HPAMSCs were treated with human recombinant RELM-β (rhRELM-β). siRNAs against FAK and survivin were transfected into cultured HPASMCs. Expression of FAK and survivin were examined by RT-PCR and western blot. Immunofluorescence was used to localize FAK. Flow cytometry was used to examine cell cycle distribution and cell death. Compared to the control group, all rhRELM-β-treated groups demonstrated significant increases in the expression of FAK and survivin (P<0.05). rhRELM-β significantly increased the proportion of HPASMCs in the S phase and decreased the proportion in G0/G1. FAK siRNA down-regulated survivin expression while survivin siRNA did not affect FAK expression. FAK siRNA effectively inhibited FAK and survivin expression in RELM-β-treated HPASMCs and partially suppressed cell proliferation. RELM-β promoted HPASMC proliferation and upregulated FAK and survivin expression. In conclusion, results suggested that FAK is upstream of survivin in the signaling pathway mediating cell proliferation. FAK seems to be important in RELM-β-induced HPASMC proliferation, partially by upregulating survivin expression. - Highlights: • rhRELM-β increased the expression of FAK and survivin. • rhRELM-β increased the proportion of HPASMCs in the S phase. • FAK is upstream of survivin in the signaling pathway mediating cell proliferation. • FAK is important in RELM-β-induced HPASMC proliferation, partly via survivin.

  11. RELM-β promotes human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation via FAK-stimulated surviving

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chunlong, E-mail: lclmd@sina.com; Li, Xiaohui; Luo, Qiong; Yang, Hui; Li, Lun; Zhou, Qiong; Li, Yue; Tang, Hao; Wu, Lifu

    2017-02-01

    Resistin-like molecule-β (RELM-β), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and survivin may be involved in the proliferation of cultured human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (HPAMSCs), which is involved in pulmonary hypertension. HPAMSCs were treated with human recombinant RELM-β (rhRELM-β). siRNAs against FAK and survivin were transfected into cultured HPASMCs. Expression of FAK and survivin were examined by RT-PCR and western blot. Immunofluorescence was used to localize FAK. Flow cytometry was used to examine cell cycle distribution and cell death. Compared to the control group, all rhRELM-β-treated groups demonstrated significant increases in the expression of FAK and survivin (P<0.05). rhRELM-β significantly increased the proportion of HPASMCs in the S phase and decreased the proportion in G0/G1. FAK siRNA down-regulated survivin expression while survivin siRNA did not affect FAK expression. FAK siRNA effectively inhibited FAK and survivin expression in RELM-β-treated HPASMCs and partially suppressed cell proliferation. RELM-β promoted HPASMC proliferation and upregulated FAK and survivin expression. In conclusion, results suggested that FAK is upstream of survivin in the signaling pathway mediating cell proliferation. FAK seems to be important in RELM-β-induced HPASMC proliferation, partially by upregulating survivin expression. - Highlights: • rhRELM-β increased the expression of FAK and survivin. • rhRELM-β increased the proportion of HPASMCs in the S phase. • FAK is upstream of survivin in the signaling pathway mediating cell proliferation. • FAK is important in RELM-β-induced HPASMC proliferation, partly via survivin.

  12. Transmission of clonal chromosomal abnormalities in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells surviving radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraft, Daniela, E-mail: d.kraft@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Department of Biophysics, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institute for Transfusion Medicine und Immunohematology, DRK-Blutspendedienst Baden-Wuerttemberg—Hessen, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Hospital, Sandhofstrasse 1, 60528 Frankfurt (Germany); Ritter, Sylvia, E-mail: s.ritter@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Department of Biophysics, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Durante, Marco, E-mail: m.durante@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Department of Biophysics, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institute for Condensed Matter Physics, Physics Department, Technical University Darmstadt, Hochschulstraße 6-8, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Seifried, Erhard, E-mail: e.seifried@blutspende.de [Institute for Transfusion Medicine und Immunohematology, DRK-Blutspendedienst Baden-Wuerttemberg—Hessen, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Hospital, Sandhofstrasse 1, 60528 Frankfurt (Germany); Fournier, Claudia, E-mail: c.fournier@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Department of Biophysics, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Tonn, Torsten, E-mail: t.tonn@blutspende.de [Institute for Transfusion Medicine und Immunohematology, DRK-Blutspendedienst Baden-Wuerttemberg—Hessen, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Hospital, Sandhofstrasse 1, 60528 Frankfurt (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, Med. Fakultät Carl Gustav Carus, Institute for Transfusion Medicine Dresden, German Red Cross Blood Donation Service North-East, Blasewitzer Straße 68/70, 01307 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Radiation induced formation and transmission of chromosomal aberrations were assessed. • Cytogenetic analysis was performed in human CD34+ HSPC by mFISH. • We report transmission of stable aberrations in irradiated, clonally expanded HSPC. • Unstable aberrations in clonally expanded HSPC occur independently of irradiation. • Carbon ions and X-rays bear a similar risk for propagation of cytogenetic changes. - Abstract: In radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia (rAML), clonal chromosomal abnormalities are often observed in bone marrow cells of patients, suggesting that their formation is crucial in the development of the disease. Since rAML is considered to originate from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), we investigated the frequency and spectrum of radiation-induced chromosomal abnormalities in human CD34{sup +} cells. We then measured stable chromosomal abnormalities, a possible biomarker of leukemia risk, in clonally expanded cell populations which were grown for 14 days in a 3D-matrix (CFU-assay). We compared two radiation qualities used in radiotherapy, sparsely ionizing X-rays and densely ionizing carbon ions (29 and 60–85 keV/μm, doses between 0.5 and 4 Gy). Only a negligible number of de novo arising, unstable aberrations (≤0.05 aberrations/cell, 97% breaks) were measured in the descendants of irradiated HSPC. However, stable aberrations were detected in colonies formed by irradiated HSPC. All cells of the affected colonies exhibited one or more identical aberrations, indicating their clonal origin. The majority of the clonal rearrangements (92%) were simple exchanges such as translocations (77%) and pericentric inversions (15%), which are known to contribute to the development of rAML. Carbon ions were more efficient in inducing cell killing (maximum of ∼30–35% apoptotic cells for 2 Gy carbon ions compared to ∼25% for X-rays) and chromosomal aberrations in the first cell-cycle after exposure (∼70% and

  13. MicroRNA-146a modulates human bronchial epithelial cell survival in response to the cytokine-induced apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiangde; Nelson, Amy; Wang Xingqi; Kanaji, Nobuhiro; Kim, Miok; Sato, Tadashi; Nakanishi, Masanori; Li Yingji; Sun Jianhong; Michalski, Joel; Patil, Amol; Basma, Hesham; Rennard, Stephen I.

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNA plays an important role in cell differentiation, proliferation and cell death. The current study found that miRNA-146a was up-regulated in human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) in response to stimulation by TGF-ss1 plus cytomix (a mixture of IL-1ss, IFN-γ and TNF-α). TGF-ss1 plus cytomix (TCM) induced apoptosis in HBECs (3.4 ± 0.6% of control vs 83.1 ± 4.0% of TCM treated cells, p < 0.01), and this was significantly blocked by the miRNA-146a mimic (8.8 ± 1.5%, p < 0.01). In contrast, a miRNA-146a inhibitor had only a modest effect on cell survival but appeared to augment the induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in response to the cytokines. The MicroRNA-146a mimic appears to modulate HBEC survival through a mechanism of up-regulating Bcl-XL and STAT3 phosphorylation, and by this mechanism it could contribute to tissue repair and remodeling.

  14. Human umbilical-cord-blood mononucleated cells enhance the survival of lethally irradiated mice. Dosage and the window of time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, Olga A.; Ende, Norman; Azzam, Edouard I.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the window of time and dose of human umbilical-cord-blood (HUCB) mononucleated cells necessary for successful treatment of radiation injury in mice. Female A/J mice (27-30 weeks old) were exposed to an absorbed dose of 9-10 Gy of 137 Cs γ-rays delivered acutely to the whole body. They were treated either with 1 × 10 8 or 2 × 10 8 HUCB mononucleated cells at 24-52 h after the irradiation. The antibiotic Levaquin was applied 4 h postirradiation. The increased dose of cord-blood cells resulted in enhanced survival. The enhancement of survival in animals that received 2 × 10 8 HUCB mononucleated cells relative to irradiated but untreated animals was highly significant (P < 0.01). Compared with earlier studies, the increased dose of HUCB mononucleated cells, coupled with early use of an antibiotic, extended the window of time for effective treatment of severe radiation injury from 4 to 24-52 h after exposure. (author)

  15. Silibinin inhibits fibronectin induced motility, invasiveness and survival in human prostate carcinoma PC3 cells via targeting integrin signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deep, Gagan [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); University of Colorado Cancer Center, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Kumar, Rahul; Jain, Anil K. [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Agarwal, Chapla [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); University of Colorado Cancer Center, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Agarwal, Rajesh, E-mail: Rajesh.agarwal@ucdenver.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); University of Colorado Cancer Center, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Silibinin inhibits fibronectin-induce motile morphology in PC3 cells. • Silibinin inhibits fibronectin-induced migration and invasion in PC3 cells. • Silibinin targets fibronectin-induced integrins and downstream signaling molecule. - Abstract: Prostate cancer (PCA) is the 2nd leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in the United States. Preventing or inhibiting metastasis-related events through non-toxic agents could be a useful approach for lowering high mortality among PCA patients. We have earlier reported that natural flavonoid silibinin possesses strong anti-metastatic efficacy against PCA however, mechanism/s of its action still remains largely unknown. One of the major events during metastasis is the replacement of cell–cell interaction with integrins-based cell–matrix interaction that controls motility, invasiveness and survival of cancer cells. Accordingly, here we examined silibinin effect on advanced human PCA PC3 cells’ interaction with extracellular matrix component fibronectin. Silibinin (50–200 μM) treatment significantly decreased the fibronectin (5 μg/ml)-induced motile morphology via targeting actin cytoskeleton organization in PC3 cells. Silibinin also decreased the fibronectin-induced cell proliferation and motility but significantly increased cell death in PC3 cells. Silibinin also inhibited the PC3 cells invasiveness in Transwell invasion assays with fibronectin or cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) serving as chemoattractant. Importantly, PC3-luc cells cultured on fibronectin showed rapid dissemination and localized in lungs following tail vein injection in athymic male nude mice; however, in silibinin-treated PC3-luc cells, dissemination and lung localization was largely compromised. Molecular analyses revealed that silibinin treatment modulated the fibronectin-induced expression of integrins (α5, αV, β1 and β3), actin-remodeling (FAK, Src, GTPases, ARP2 and cortactin), apoptosis (cPARP and

  16. Silibinin inhibits fibronectin induced motility, invasiveness and survival in human prostate carcinoma PC3 cells via targeting integrin signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deep, Gagan; Kumar, Rahul; Jain, Anil K.; Agarwal, Chapla; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Silibinin inhibits fibronectin-induce motile morphology in PC3 cells. • Silibinin inhibits fibronectin-induced migration and invasion in PC3 cells. • Silibinin targets fibronectin-induced integrins and downstream signaling molecule. - Abstract: Prostate cancer (PCA) is the 2nd leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in the United States. Preventing or inhibiting metastasis-related events through non-toxic agents could be a useful approach for lowering high mortality among PCA patients. We have earlier reported that natural flavonoid silibinin possesses strong anti-metastatic efficacy against PCA however, mechanism/s of its action still remains largely unknown. One of the major events during metastasis is the replacement of cell–cell interaction with integrins-based cell–matrix interaction that controls motility, invasiveness and survival of cancer cells. Accordingly, here we examined silibinin effect on advanced human PCA PC3 cells’ interaction with extracellular matrix component fibronectin. Silibinin (50–200 μM) treatment significantly decreased the fibronectin (5 μg/ml)-induced motile morphology via targeting actin cytoskeleton organization in PC3 cells. Silibinin also decreased the fibronectin-induced cell proliferation and motility but significantly increased cell death in PC3 cells. Silibinin also inhibited the PC3 cells invasiveness in Transwell invasion assays with fibronectin or cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) serving as chemoattractant. Importantly, PC3-luc cells cultured on fibronectin showed rapid dissemination and localized in lungs following tail vein injection in athymic male nude mice; however, in silibinin-treated PC3-luc cells, dissemination and lung localization was largely compromised. Molecular analyses revealed that silibinin treatment modulated the fibronectin-induced expression of integrins (α5, αV, β1 and β3), actin-remodeling (FAK, Src, GTPases, ARP2 and cortactin), apoptosis (cPARP and

  17. Impact of plant extracts tested in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder treatment on cell survival and energy metabolism in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Andreas Johannes; Krieg, Jürgen-Christian; Hemmeter, Ulrich Michael; Kircher, Tilo; Schulz, Eberhard; Clement, Hans-Willi; Heiser, Philip

    2010-10-01

    Plant extracts such as Hypericum perforatum and Pycnogenol have been tested as alternatives to the classical ADHD drugs. It has been possible to describe neuroprotective effects of such plant extracts. A reduction of ADHD symptoms could be shown in clinical studies after the application of Pycnogenol, which is a pine bark extract. The impacts of the standardized herbal extracts Hypericum perforatum, Pycnogenol and Enzogenol up to a concentration of 5000 ng/mL on cell survival and energy metabolism in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells has been investigated in the present examination. Hypericum perforatum significantly decreased the survival of cells after treatment with a concentration of 5000 ng/mL, whereas lower concentrations exerted no significant effects. Pycnogenol( induced a significant increase of cell survival after incubation with a concentration of 32.25 ng/mL and a concentration of 250 ng/mL. Other applied concentrations of Pycnogenol failed to exert significant effects. Treatment with Enzogenol did not lead to significant changes in cell survival.Concerning energy metabolism, the treatment of cells with a concentration of 5000 ng/mL Hypericum perforatum led to a significant increase of ATP levels, whereas treatment with a concentration of 500 ng/mL had no significant effect. Incubation of cells with Pycnogenol and Enzogenol exerted no significant effects.None of the tested substances caused any cytotoxic effect when used in therapeutically relevant concentrations. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Adipose stem cells from chronic pancreatitis patients improve mouse and human islet survival and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lili; Sun, Zhen; Kim, Do-Sung; Gou, Wenyu; Strange, Charlie; Dong, Huansheng; Cui, Wanxing; Gilkeson, Gary; Morgan, Katherine A; Adams, David B; Wang, Hongjun

    2017-08-30

    Chronic pancreatitis has surgical options including total pancreatectomy to control pain. To avoid surgical diabetes, the explanted pancreas can have islets harvested and transplanted. Immediately following total pancreatectomy with islet autotransplantation (TP-IAT), many islet cells die due to isolation and transplantation stresses. The percentage of patients remaining insulin free after TP-IAT is therefore low. We determined whether cotransplantation of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) from chronic pancreatitis patients (CP-ASCs) would protect islets after transplantation. In a marginal mass islet transplantation model, islets from C57BL/6 mice were cotransplanted with CP-ASCs into syngeneic streptozotocin-treated diabetic mice. Treatment response was defined by the percentage of recipients reaching normoglycemia, and by the area under the curve for glucose and c-peptide in a glucose tolerance test. Macrophage infiltration, β-cell apoptosis, and islet graft vasculature were measured in transplanted islet grafts by immunohistochemistry. mRNA expression profiling of 84 apoptosis-related genes in islet grafts transplanted alone or with CP-ASCs was measured by the RT 2 Profiler™ Apoptosis PCR Array. The impact of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) on islet apoptosis was determined in islets stimulated with cytokines (IL-1β and IFN-γ) in the presence and absence of CP-ASC conditioned medium. CP-ASC-treated mice were more often normoglycemic compared to mice receiving islets alone. ASC cotransplantation reduced macrophage infiltration, β-cell death, suppressed expression of TNF-α and Bcl-2 modifying factor (BMF), and upregulated expressions of IGF-1 and TNF Receptor Superfamily Member 11b (TNFRSF11B) in islet grafts. Islets cultured in conditioned medium from CP-ASCs showed reduced cell death. This protective effect was diminished when IGF-1 was blocked in the conditioned medium by the anti-IGF-1 antibody. Cotransplantation of islets with ASCs

  19. XIAP is not required for human tumor cell survival in the absence of an exogenous death signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sensintaffar, John; Scott, Fiona L; Peach, Robert; Hager, Jeffrey H

    2010-01-01

    The X-linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis (XIAP) has attracted much attention as a cancer drug target. It is the only member of the IAP family that can directly inhibit caspase activity in vitro, and it can regulate apoptosis and other biological processes through its C-terminal E3 ubiquitin ligase RING domain. However, there is controversy regarding XIAP's role in regulating tumor cell proliferation and survival under normal growth conditions in vitro. We utilized siRNA to systematically knock down XIAP in ten human tumor cell lines and then monitored both XIAP protein levels and cell viability over time. To examine the role of XIAP in the intrinsic versus extrinsic cell death pathways, we compared the viability of XIAP depleted cells treated either with a variety of mechanistically distinct, intrinsic pathway inducing agents, or the canonical inducer of the extrinsic pathway, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). XIAP knockdown had no effect on the viability of six cell lines, whereas the effect in the other four was modest and transient. XIAP knockdown only sensitized tumor cells to TRAIL and not the mitochondrial pathway inducing agents. These data indicate that XIAP has a more central role in regulating death receptor mediated apoptosis than it does the intrinsic pathway mediated cell death

  20. Survival curves for irradiated cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, D.K.

    1975-01-01

    The subject of the lecture is the probability of survival of biological cells which have been subjected to ionising radiation. The basic mathematical theories of cell survival as a function of radiation dose are developed. A brief comparison with observed survival curves is made. (author)

  1. Survival Improvement in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells via Fas Receptor Targeting by miR-374a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasharrofi, Nooshin; Kouhkan, Fatemeh; Soleimani, Masoud; Soheili, Zahra-Sheila; Kabiri, Mahboubeh; Mahmoudi Saber, Mohaddeseh; Dorkoosh, Farid Abedin

    2017-12-01

    Oxidative conditions of the eye could contribute to retinal cells loss through activating the Fas-L/Fas pathway. This phenomenon is one of the leading causes of some ocular diseases like age-related macular degeneration (AMD). By targeting proteins at their mRNA level, microRNAs (miRNAs) can regulate gene expression and cell function. The aim of the present study is to investigate Fas targeting by miR-374a and find whether it can inhibit Fas-mediated apoptosis in primary human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells under oxidative stress. So, the primary human RPE cells were transfected with pre-miR-374a pLEX construct using polymeric carrier and were exposed to H 2 O 2 (200 μM) as an oxidant agent for induction of Fas expression. Fas expression at mRNA and protein level was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. These results revealed that miR-374a could prevent Fas upregulation under oxidative conditions. Moreover, Luciferase activity assay confirmed that Fas could be a direct target of miR-374a. The cell viability studies demonstrated that caspase-3 activity was negligible in miR-374a treated cells compared to the controls. Our data suggest miR-374a is a negative regulator of Fas death receptor which is able to enhance the cell survival and protect RPE cells against oxidative conditions. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 4854-4861, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. STAT3 signaling pathway is necessary for cell survival and tumorsphere forming capacity in ALDH{sup +}/CD133{sup +} stem cell-like human colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Li, E-mail: lin.796@osu.edu [Center for Childhood Cancer, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43205 (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Fuchs, James; Li, Chenglong [Division of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, College of Pharmacy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Olson, Veronica [Center for Childhood Cancer, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43205 (United States); Bekaii-Saab, Tanios [Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Lin, Jiayuh, E-mail: lin.674@osu.edu [Center for Childhood Cancer, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43205 (United States)

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phosphorylated or activated form of STAT3 was expressed in colon cancer stem-like cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer STAT3 inhibitor, FLLL32 inhibits P-STAT3 and STAT3 target genes in colon cancer stem-like cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of STAT3 resulted in decreased cell viability and reduced numbers of tumorspheres. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer STAT3 is required for survival and tumorsphere forming capacity in colon cancer stem-like cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeting STAT3 in cancer stem-like cells may offer a novel treatment approach for colon cancer. -- Abstract: Persistent activation of Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription 3 (STAT3) is frequently detected in colon cancer. Increasing evidence suggests the existence of a small population of colon cancer stem or cancer-initiating cells may be responsible for tumor initiation, metastasis, and resistance to chemotherapy and radiation. Whether STAT3 plays a role in colon cancer-initiating cells and the effect of STAT3 inhibition is still unknown. Flow cytometry was used to isolate colon cancer stem-like cells from three independent human colon cancer cell lines characterized by both aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH)-positive and CD133-positive subpopulation (ALDH{sup +}/CD133{sup +}). The effects of STAT3 inhibition in colon cancer stem-like cells were examined. The phosphorylated or activated form of STAT3 was expressed in colon cancer stem-like cells and was reduced by a STAT3-selective small molecular inhibitor, FLLL32. FLLL32 also inhibited the expression of potential STAT3 downstream target genes in colon cancer stem-like cells including survivin, Bcl-XL, as well as Notch-1, -3, and -4, which may be involved in stem cell function. Furthermore, FLLL32 inhibited cell viability and tumorsphere formation as well as induced cleaved caspase-3 in colon cancer stem-like cells. FLLL32 is more potent than curcumin as evidenced with lower

  3. STAT3 signaling pathway is necessary for cell survival and tumorsphere forming capacity in ALDH+/CD133+ stem cell-like human colon cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Li; Fuchs, James; Li, Chenglong; Olson, Veronica; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Lin, Jiayuh

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► The phosphorylated or activated form of STAT3 was expressed in colon cancer stem-like cells. ► STAT3 inhibitor, FLLL32 inhibits P-STAT3 and STAT3 target genes in colon cancer stem-like cells. ► Inhibition of STAT3 resulted in decreased cell viability and reduced numbers of tumorspheres. ► STAT3 is required for survival and tumorsphere forming capacity in colon cancer stem-like cells. ► Targeting STAT3 in cancer stem-like cells may offer a novel treatment approach for colon cancer. -- Abstract: Persistent activation of Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription 3 (STAT3) is frequently detected in colon cancer. Increasing evidence suggests the existence of a small population of colon cancer stem or cancer-initiating cells may be responsible for tumor initiation, metastasis, and resistance to chemotherapy and radiation. Whether STAT3 plays a role in colon cancer-initiating cells and the effect of STAT3 inhibition is still unknown. Flow cytometry was used to isolate colon cancer stem-like cells from three independent human colon cancer cell lines characterized by both aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH)-positive and CD133-positive subpopulation (ALDH + /CD133 + ). The effects of STAT3 inhibition in colon cancer stem-like cells were examined. The phosphorylated or activated form of STAT3 was expressed in colon cancer stem-like cells and was reduced by a STAT3-selective small molecular inhibitor, FLLL32. FLLL32 also inhibited the expression of potential STAT3 downstream target genes in colon cancer stem-like cells including survivin, Bcl-XL, as well as Notch-1, -3, and -4, which may be involved in stem cell function. Furthermore, FLLL32 inhibited cell viability and tumorsphere formation as well as induced cleaved caspase-3 in colon cancer stem-like cells. FLLL32 is more potent than curcumin as evidenced with lower IC50 in colon cancer stem-like cells. In summary, our results indicate that STAT3 is a novel therapeutic target in colon cancer stem

  4. HIV-1 and recombinant gp120 affect the survival and differentiation of human vessel wall-derived mesenchymal stem cells

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    Pasquinelli Gianandrea

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV infection elicits the onset of a progressive immunodeficiency and also damages several other organs and tissues such as the CNS, kidney, heart, blood vessels, adipose tissue and bone. In particular, HIV infection has been related to an increased incidence of cardiovascular diseases and derangement in the structure of blood vessels in the absence of classical risk factors. The recent characterization of multipotent mesenchymal cells in the vascular wall, involved in regulating cellular homeostasis, suggests that these cells may be considered a target of HIV pathogenesis. This paper investigated the interaction between HIV-1 and vascular wall resident human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. Results MSCs were challenged with classical R5 and X4 HIV-1 laboratory strains demonstrating that these strains are able to enter and integrate their retro-transcribed proviral DNA in the host cell genome. Subsequent experiments indicated that HIV-1 strains and recombinant gp120 elicited a reliable increase in apoptosis in sub-confluent MSCs. Since vascular wall MSCs are multipotent cells that may be differentiated towards several cell lineages, we challenged HIV-1 strains and gp120 on MSCs differentiated to adipogenesis and endotheliogenesis. Our experiments showed that the adipogenesis is increased especially by upregulated PPARγ activity whereas the endothelial differentiation induced by VEGF treatment was impaired with a downregulation of endothelial markers such as vWF, Flt-1 and KDR expression. These viral effects in MSC survival and adipogenic or endothelial differentiation were tackled by CD4 blockade suggesting an important role of CD4/gp120 interaction in this context. Conclusions The HIV-related derangement of MSC survival and differentiation may suggest a direct role of HIV infection and gp120 in impaired vessel homeostasis and in genesis of vessel damage observed in HIV-infected patients.

  5. Cisplatin-induced apoptosis inhibits autophagy, which acts as a pro-survival mechanism in human melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bello, Barbara; Toscano, Marzia; Moretti, Daniele; Maellaro, Emilia

    2013-01-01

    The interplay between a non-lethal autophagic response and apoptotic cell death is still a matter of debate in cancer cell biology. In the present study performed on human melanoma cells, we investigate the role of basal or stimulated autophagy in cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity, as well as the contribution of cisplatin-induced activation of caspases 3/7 and conventional calpains. The results show that, while down-regulating Beclin-1, Atg14 and LC3-II, cisplatin treatment inhibits the basal autophagic response, impairing a physiological pro-survival response. Consistently, exogenously stimulated autophagy, obtained with trehalose or calpains inhibitors (MDL-28170 and calpeptin), protects from cisplatin-induced apoptosis, and such a protection is reverted by inhibiting autophagy with 3-methyladenine or ATG5 silencing. In addition, during trehalose-stimulated autophagy, the cisplatin-induced activation of calpains is abrogated, suggesting the existence of a feedback loop between the autophagic process and calpains. On the whole, our results demonstrate that in human melanoma cells autophagy may function as a beneficial stress response, hindered by cisplatin-induced death mechanisms. In a therapeutic perspective, these findings suggest that the efficacy of cisplatin-based polychemotherapies for melanoma could be potentiated by inhibitors of autophagy.

  6. The effects of pentoxifylline on the survival of human glioma cells with continuous and intermittent stereotactic radiosurgery irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eley, Kerry W.; Benedict, Stanley H.; Chung, Theodore D.K.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Broaddus, William C.; Schmidt-Ullrich, Rupert K.A.; Lin, P.-S.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: In linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery, treatment is delivered intermittently via multiple individual small radiotherapy arcs. The time lapses between the individual arcs permit greater damage repair and increased tumor cell survival in comparison with continuous irradiation. Because pentoxifylline (PTX) has been reported to prevent radiation-induced cell cycle arrest at the G2/M checkpoint, where damage repair is critically linked to cell survival, we hypothesized that PTX would exert a favorable radiosensitization effect by reducing the recovery observed during intermittent stereotactic radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: The human glioma cell line T98G was used to study the effects of continuous vs. intermittent irradiation with or without PTX. Cell cycle patterns were studied using flow cytometry. Clonogenic assays of single cells and spheroid outgrowth assays provided a quantitative measure of PTX-mediated radiosensitization. The PTX effect upon cells in low oxygen conditions was also studied in vitro after enzymatic oxygen scavenging. Results: Flow Cytometry: T98G cells exposed to both continuous and intermittent irradiation exhibit similar arrest at the G2/M checkpoint. The addition of 2 mM PTX significantly reduced the radiation-induced G2/M block in both irradiation schemes. Clonogenic Assays: The same PTX concentration applied before a continuous dose of 12 Gy, two intermittent doses of 6 Gy, or three intermittent doses of 4 Gy, all given within a 1-h interval, consistently caused radiosensitization. The drug enhancement ratios for PTX were 1.5, 2.7, and 6.0 for the continuous and two different intermittent dose schedules, respectively. Adding PTX after irradiation yielded lower enhancement ratios than pre-irradiation application. A similar pattern was observed after total doses of 4, 6, 9, or 12 Gy, as well. In low oxygen conditions, PTX was seen to have the same effects as in normoxic conditions. Spheroid Outgrowth Assays: The in vitro PTX

  7. Additive influence of extracellular pH, oxygen tension, and pressure on invasiveness and survival of human osteosarcoma cells

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    Takao eMatsubara

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/PURPOSE:The effects of chemical and physical interactions in the microenvironment of solid tumors have not been fully elucidated. We hypothesized that acidosis, hypoxia, and elevated interstitial fluid pressure (eIFP have additive effects on tumor cell biology and lead to more aggressive behavior during tumor progression. We investigated this phenomenon using 3 human osteosarcoma cell lines and a novel in vitro cell culture apparatus. MATERIALS AND METHODS:U2OS, SaOS, and MG63 cell lines were cultured in media adjusted to various pH levels, oxygen tension (hypoxia 2% O2, normoxia 20% O2, and hydrostatic gauge pressure (0 or 50 mm Hg. Growth rate, apoptosis, cell cycle parameters, and expression of mRNA for proteins associated with invasiveness and tumor microenvironment (CA IX, VEGF-A, HIF-1A, MMP-9, and TIMP-2 were analyzed. Levels of CA IX, HIF-1α, and MMP-9 were measured using immunofluorescence. The effect of pH on invasiveness was evaluated in a Matrigel chamber assay.RESULTS: Within the acidic–hypoxic–pressurized conditions that simulate the microenvironment at a tumor’s center, invasive genes were upregulated, but the cell cycle was downregulated. The combined influence of acidosis, hypoxia, and IFP promoted invasiveness and angiogenesis to a greater extent than did pH, pO2, or eIFP individually. Significant cell death after brief exposure to acidic conditions occurred in each cell line during acclimation to acidic media, while prolonged exposure to acidic media resulted in reduced cell death. Furthermore, 48-hour exposure to acidic conditions promoted tumor invasiveness in the Matrigel assay. CONCLUSION: Our findings demonstrate that tumor microenvironmental parameters—particularly pH, pO2, and eIFP—additively influence tumor proliferation, invasion, metabolism, and viability to enhance cell survival.

  8. Aging impairs transcriptional regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor in human microvascular endothelial cells: implications for angiogenesis and cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, A; Jones, M K; Szabo, S; Tarnawski, A S

    2014-04-01

    In some tissues, aging impairs angiogenesis and reduces expression of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF), a fundamental regulator of angiogenesis. We previously examined angiogenesis in aging and young gastric mucosa in vivo and in vitro and showed that an imbalance between expressions of VEGF (pro-angiogenic factor) and endostatin (anti-angiogenic protein) results in an aging-related impairment of angiogenesis in rats. However, the human relevance of these findings, and whether these mechanisms apply to endothelial cells derived from other tissues, is not clear. Since P-STAT3 and P-CREB are transcription factors that, in association with HIF-1α, can activate VEGF gene expression in some cells (e.g., liver cancer cells, vascular smooth muscle cells), we examined the expression of these two proteins in human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) derived from aging and neonatal individuals. We examined and quantified in vitro angiogenesis, expression of VEGF, P-STAT3, P-CREB and importin-α in HMVECs isolated from neonates (neonatal) and a 66 year old subject (aging). We also examined the effects of treatment with exogenous VEGF and endostatin on in vitro angiogenesis in these cells. Endothelial cells isolated from aging individuals had impaired angiogenesis (vs. neonatal endothelial cells) and reduced expression of VEGF mRNA and protein. Aged HMVECs also had reduced importin-α expression, and reduced expression and nuclear translocation of P-STAT3 and P-CREB. Reduced VEGF gene expression in aged HMVECs strongly correlated with the decreased levels of P-STAT3, P-CREB and importin-α in these cells. Our study clearly demonstrates that endothelial cells from aging individuals have impaired angiogenesis and reduced expression of VEGF likely due to impaired nuclear transport of P-STAT3 and P-CREB transcription factors in these cells.

  9. Cooperation of decay-accelerating factor and membrane cofactor protein in regulating survival of human cervical cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Ling-Juan; Guo, Shu-Yu; Cai, You-Qun; Gu, Ping-Qing; Su, Ya-Juan; Gong, Hui; Liu, Yun; Chen, Chen

    2009-01-01

    Decay-accelerating factor (DAF) and membrane cofactor protein (MCP) are the key molecules involved in cell protection against autologus complement, which restricts the action of complement at critical stages of the cascade reaction. The cooperative effect of DAF and MCP on the survival of human cervical cancer cell (ME180) has not been demonstrated. In this study we applied, for the first time, short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to knock down the expression of the DAF and MCP with the aim of exploiting complement more effectively for tumor cell damage. Meanwhile, we investigated the cooperative effects of DAF and MCP on the viability and migration, moreover the proliferation of ME180 cell. The results showed that shRNA inhibition of DAF and MCP expression enhanced complement-dependent cytolysis (CDC) up to 39% for MCP and up to 36% for DAF, and the combined inhibition of both regulators yielded further additive effects in ME180 cells. Thus, the activities of DAF and MCP, when present together, are greater than the sum of the two protein individually. These data indicated that combined DAF and MCP shRNA described in this study may offer an additional alternative to improve the efficacy of antibody-and complement-based cancer immunotherapy

  10. LIGHT (TNFSF14 Increases the Survival and Proliferation of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

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    Sook-Kyoung Heo

    Full Text Available LIGHT (HVEM-L, TNFSF14, or CD258, an entity homologous to lymphotoxins, with inducible nature and the ability to compete with herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D for herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM/tumor necrosis factor (TNF-related 2, is a member of the TNF superfamily. It is expressed as a homotrimer on activated T cells and dendritic cells (DCs, and has three receptors: HVEM, LT-β receptor (LTβR, and decoy receptor 3 (DcR3. So far, three receptors with distinct cellular expression patterns are known to interact with LIGHT. Follicular DCs and stromal cells bind LIGHT through LTβR. We monitored the effects of LIGHT on human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs. At first, we checked the negative and positive differentiation markers of BM-MSCs. And we confirmed the quality of MSCs by staining cells undergoing adipogenesis (Oil Red O staining, chondrogenesis (Alcian blue staining, and osteogenesis (Alizarin red staining. After rhLIGHT treatment, we monitored the count, viability, and proliferation of cells and cell cycle distribution. PDGF and TGFβ production by rhLIGHT was examined by ELISA, and the underlying biological mechanisms were studied by immunoblotting by rhLIGHT treatment. LTβR was constitutively expressed on the surface of human BM-MSCs. Cell number and viability increased after rhLIGHT treatment. BM-MSC proliferation was induced by an increase in the S/G2/M phase. The expression of not only diverse cyclins such as cyclin B1, D1, D3, and E, but also CDK1 and CDK2, increased, while that of p27 decreased, after rhLIGHT treatment. RhLIGHT-induced PDGF and TGFβ production mediated by STAT3 and Smad3 activation accelerated BM-MSC proliferation. Thus, LIGHT and LTβR interaction increases the survival and proliferation of human BM-MSCs, and therefore, LIGHT might play an important role in stem cell therapy.

  11. Radionuclide blood cell survival studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentley, S.A.; Miller, D.T.

    1986-01-01

    Platelet and red cell survival studies are reviewed. The use of 51 Cr and di-isopropylfluoridate labelled with tritium or 32 P is discussed for red cell survival study and 51 Cr and 111 In-oxine are considered as platelet labels. (UK)

  12. Stromal cell derived factor-1: its influence on invasiveness and migration of breast cancer cells in vitro, and its association with prognosis and survival in human breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hua; Watkins, Gareth; Parr, Christian; Douglas-Jones, Anthony; Mansel, Robert E; Jiang, Wen G

    2005-01-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1 (CXC chemokine ligand-12) is a member of the CXC subfamily of chemokines, which, through its cognate receptor (CXC chemokine receptor [CXCR]4), plays an important role in chemotaxis of cancer cells and in tumour metastasis. We conducted the present study to evaluate the effect of SDF-1 on the invasiveness and migration of breast cancer cells, and we analyzed the expression of SDF-1 and its relation to clinicopathological features and clinical outcomes in human breast cancer. Expression of SDF-1 mRNA in breast cancer, endothelial (HECV) and fibroblast (MRC5) cell lines and in human breast tissues were studied using RT-PCR. MDA-MB-231 cells were transfected with a SDF-1 expression vector, and their invasiveness and migration was tested in vitro. In addition, the expression of SDF-1 was investigated using immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR in samples of normal human mammary tissue (n = 32) and mammary tumour (n = 120). SDF-1 expression was identified in MRC5, MDA-MB-435s and MDA-MB-436 cell lines, but CXCR4 expression was detected in all cell lines and breast tissues. An autocrine loop was created following transfection of MDA-MB-231 (which was CXCR4 positive and SDF-1 negative) with a mammalian expression cassette encoding SDF-1 (MDA-MB-231SDF1 +/+ ) or with control plasmid pcDNA4/GFP (MDA-MB-231 +/- ). MDA-MB-231SDF1 +/+ cells exhibited significantly greater invasion and migration potential (in transfected cells versus in wild type and empty MDA-MB-231 +/- ; P < 0.01). In mammary tissues SDF-1 staining was primarily seen in stromal cells and weakly in mammary epithelial cells. Significantly higher levels of SDF-1 were seen in node-positive than in node-negative tumours (P = 0.05), in tumours that metastasized (P = 0.05), and tumours from patients who died (P = 0.03) than in tumours from patients who were disease free. It was most notable that levels of SDF-1 correlated significantly with overall survival (P = 0.001) and

  13. Neonatal Desensitization Supports Long-Term Survival and Functional Integration of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Rat Joint Cartilage Without Immunosuppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shufang; Jiang, Yang Zi; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Longkun; Tong, Tong; Liu, Wanlu; Mu, Qin; Liu, Hua; Ji, Junfeng; Ouyang, Hong Wei

    2013-01-01

    Immunological response hampers the investigation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or their derivates for tissue regeneration in vivo. Immunosuppression is often used after surgery, but exhibits side effects of significant weight loss and allows only short-term observation. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether neonatal desensitization supports relative long-term survival of hESC-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hESC-MSCs) and promotes cartilage regeneration. hESC-MSCs were injected on the day of birth in rats. Six weeks after neonatal injection, a full-thickness cylindrical cartilage defect was created and transplanted with a hESC-MSC-seeded collagen bilayer scaffold (group d+s+c) or a collagen bilayer scaffold (group d+s). Rats without neonatal injection were transplanted with the hESC-MSC-seeded collagen bilayer scaffold to serve as controls (group s+c). Cartilage regeneration was evaluated by histological analysis, immunohistochemical staining, and biomechanical test. The role of hESC-MSCs in cartilage regeneration was analyzed by CD4 immunostaining, cell death detection, and visualization of human cells in regenerated tissues. hESC-MSCs expressed CD105, CD73, CD90, CD29, and CD44, but not CD45 and CD34, and possessed trilineage differentiation potential. Group d+s+c exhibited greater International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) scores than group d+s or group s+c. Abundant collagen type II and improved mechanical properties were detected in group d+s+c. There were less CD4+ inflammatory cell infiltration and cell death at week 1, and hESC-MSCs were found to survive as long as 8 weeks after transplantation in group d+s+c. Our study suggests that neonatal desensitization before transplantation may be an efficient way to develop a powerful tool for preclinical study of human cell-based therapies in animal models. PMID:22788986

  14. BIRC6 protein, an inhibitor of apoptosis: role in survival of human prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher G Low

    Full Text Available BIRC6 is a member of the Inhibitors of Apoptosis Protein (IAP family which is thought to protect a variety of cancer cells from apoptosis. The main objective of the present study was to investigate whether BIRC6 plays a role in prostate cancer and could be useful as a novel therapeutic target.BIRC6 expression in cell lines was assessed using Western blot analysis and in clinical samples using immunohistochemistry of tissue microarrays. The biological significance of BIRC6 was determined by siRNA-induced reduction of BIRC6 expression in LNCaP cells followed by functional assays.Elevated BIRC6 protein expression was found in prostate cancer cell lines and clinical specimens as distinct from their benign counterparts. Increased BIRC6 expression was associated with Gleason 6-8 cancers and castration resistance. Reduction of BIRC6 expression in LNCaP cells led to a marked reduction in cell proliferation which was associated with an increase in apoptosis and a decrease in autophagosome formation. Doxorubicin-induced apoptosis was found to be coupled to a reduction in BIRC6 protein expression.The data suggest a role for BIRC6 in prostate cancer progression and treatment resistance, and indicate for the first time that the BIRC6 gene and its product are potentially valuable targets for treatment of prostate cancers.

  15. Survival, differentiation, and neuroprotective mechanisms of human stem cells complexed with neurotrophin-3-releasing pharmacologically active microcarriers in an ex vivo model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daviaud, Nicolas; Garbayo, Elisa; Sindji, Laurence; Martínez-Serrano, Alberto; Schiller, Paul C; Montero-Menei, Claudia N

    2015-06-01

    Stem cell-based regenerative therapies hold great potential for the treatment of degenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD). We recently reported the repair and functional recovery after treatment with human marrow-isolated adult multilineage inducible (MIAMI) cells adhered to neurotrophin-3 (NT3) releasing pharmacologically active microcarriers (PAMs) in hemiparkinsonian rats. In order to comprehend this effect, the goal of the present work was to elucidate the survival, differentiation, and neuroprotective mechanisms of MIAMI cells and human neural stem cells (NSCs), both adhering to NT3-releasing PAMs in an ex vivo organotypic model of nigrostriatal degeneration made from brain sagittal slices. It was shown that PAMs led to a marked increase in MIAMI cell survival and neuronal differentiation when releasing NT3. A significant neuroprotective effect of MIAMI cells adhering to PAMs was also demonstrated. NSCs barely had a neuroprotective effect and differentiated mostly into dopaminergic neuronal cells when adhering to PAM-NT3. Moreover, those cells were able to release dopamine in a sufficient amount to induce a return to baseline levels. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analyses identified vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and stanniocalcin-1 as potential mediators of the neuroprotective effect of MIAMI cells and NSCs, respectively. It was also shown that VEGF locally stimulated tissue vascularization, which might improve graft survival, without excluding a direct neuroprotective effect of VEGF on dopaminergic neurons. These results indicate a prospective interest of human NSC/PAM and MIAMI cell/PAM complexes in tissue engineering for PD. Stem cell-based regenerative therapies hold great potential for the treatment of degenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD). The present work elucidates and compares the survival, differentiation, and neuroprotective mechanisms

  16. Plasmid-based genetic modification of human bone marrow-derived stromal cells: analysis of cell survival and transgene expression after transplantation in rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronsyn, Mark W; Daans, Jasmijn; Spaepen, Gie; Chatterjee, Shyama; Vermeulen, Katrien; D'Haese, Patrick; Van Tendeloo, Viggo Fi; Van Marck, Eric; Ysebaert, Dirk; Berneman, Zwi N; Jorens, Philippe G; Ponsaerts, Peter

    2007-12-14

    Bone marrow-derived stromal cells (MSC) are attractive targets for ex vivo cell and gene therapy. In this context, we investigated the feasibility of a plasmid-based strategy for genetic modification of human (h)MSC with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and neurotrophin (NT)3. Three genetically modified hMSC lines (EGFP, NT3, NT3-EGFP) were established and used to study cell survival and transgene expression following transplantation in rat spinal cord. First, we demonstrate long-term survival of transplanted hMSC-EGFP cells in rat spinal cord under, but not without, appropriate immune suppression. Next, we examined the stability of EGFP or NT3 transgene expression following transplantation of hMSC-EGFP, hMSC-NT3 and hMSC-NT3-EGFP in rat spinal cord. While in vivo EGFP mRNA and protein expression by transplanted hMSC-EGFP cells was readily detectable at different time points post-transplantation, in vivo NT3 mRNA expression by hMSC-NT3 cells and in vivo EGFP protein expression by hMSC-NT3-EGFP cells was, respectively, undetectable or declined rapidly between day 1 and 7 post-transplantation. Further investigation revealed that the observed in vivo decline of EGFP protein expression by hMSC-NT3-EGFP cells: (i) was associated with a decrease in transgenic NT3-EGFP mRNA expression as suggested following laser capture micro-dissection analysis of hMSC-NT3-EGFP cell transplants at day 1 and day 7 post-transplantation, (ii) did not occur when hMSC-NT3-EGFP cells were transplanted subcutaneously, and (iii) was reversed upon re-establishment of hMSC-NT3-EGFP cell cultures at 2 weeks post-transplantation. Finally, because we observed a slowly progressing tumour growth following transplantation of all our hMSC cell transplants, we here demonstrate that omitting immune suppressive therapy is sufficient to prevent further tumour growth and to eradicate malignant xenogeneic cell transplants. In this study, we demonstrate that genetically modified hMSC lines can survive

  17. Human immune cells' behavior and survival under bioenergetically restricted conditions in an in vitro fracture hematoma model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Paula; Maschmeyer, Patrick; Gaber, Timo; Schütze, Tabea; Raue, Tobias; Schmidt-Bleek, Katharina; Dziurla, René; Schellmann, Saskia; Lohanatha, Ferenz Leonard; Röhner, Eric; Ode, Andrea; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger; Duda, Georg N; Perka, Carsten; Buttgereit, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The initial inflammatory phase of bone fracture healing represents a critical step for the outcome of the healing process. However, both the mechanisms initiating this inflammatory phase and the function of immune cells present at the fracture site are poorly understood. In order to study the early events within a fracture hematoma, we established an in vitro fracture hematoma model: we cultured hematomas forming during an osteotomy (artificial bone fracture) of the femur during total hip arthroplasty (THA) in vitro under bioenergetically controlled conditions. This model allowed us to monitor immune cell populations, cell survival and cytokine expression during the early phase following a fracture. Moreover, this model enabled us to change the bioenergetical conditions in order to mimic the in vivo situation, which is assumed to be characterized by hypoxia and restricted amounts of nutrients. Using this model, we found that immune cells adapt to hypoxia via the expression of angiogenic factors, chemoattractants and pro-inflammatory molecules. In addition, combined restriction of oxygen and nutrient supply enhanced the selective survival of lymphocytes in comparison with that of myeloid derived cells (i.e., neutrophils). Of note, non-restricted bioenergetical conditions did not show any similar effects regarding cytokine expression and/or different survival rates of immune cell subsets. In conclusion, we found that the bioenergetical conditions are among the crucial factors inducing the initial inflammatory phase of fracture healing and are thus a critical step for influencing survival and function of immune cells in the early fracture hematoma. PMID:23396474

  18. Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 p30 alters cell cycle G2 regulation of T lymphocytes to enhance cell survival

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    Silverman Lee

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1 causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and is linked to a number of lymphocyte-mediated disorders. HTLV-1 contains both regulatory and accessory genes in four pX open reading frames. pX ORF-II encodes two proteins, p13 and p30, whose roles are still being defined in the virus life cycle and in HTLV-1 virus-host cell interactions. Proviral clones of HTLV-1 with pX ORF-II mutations diminish the ability of the virus to maintain viral loads in vivo. p30 expressed exogenously differentially modulates CREB and Tax-responsive element-mediated transcription through its interaction with CREB-binding protein/p300 and while acting as a repressor of many genes including Tax, in part by blocking tax/rex RNA nuclear export, selectively enhances key gene pathways involved in T-cell signaling/activation. Results Herein, we analyzed the role of p30 in cell cycle regulation. Jurkat T-cells transduced with a p30 expressing lentivirus vector accumulated in the G2-M phase of cell cycle. We then analyzed key proteins involved in G2-M checkpoint activation. p30 expression in Jurkat T-cells resulted in an increase in phosphorylation at serine 216 of nuclear cell division cycle 25C (Cdc25C, had enhanced checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1 serine 345 phosphorylation, reduced expression of polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1, diminished phosphorylation of PLK1 at tyrosine 210 and reduced phosphorylation of Cdc25C at serine 198. Finally, primary human lymphocyte derived cell lines immortalized by a HTLV-1 proviral clone defective in p30 expression were more susceptible to camptothecin induced apoptosis. Collectively these data are consistent with a cell survival role of p30 against genotoxic insults to HTLV-1 infected lymphocytes. Conclusion Collectively, our data are the first to indicate that HTLV-1 p30 expression results in activation of the G2-M cell cycle checkpoint, events that would promote early viral spread and T-cell

  19. Neutron and photon clonogenic survival curves of two chemotherapy resistant human intermediate-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aref, Amr; Yudelev, Mark; Mohammad, Ramzi; Choudhuri, Rajani; Orton, Colin; Al-Katib, Ayad

    1999-01-01

    Background: The potential role of neutron therapy in the management of intermediate-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma (IGNHL) has not been examined because of the belief that the anticipated radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) would be uniformly very low. Purpose: To determine the fast neutron RBE for two chemotherapy-resistant IGNHL cell lines. Methods and Materials: Conventional soft agar clonogenic survival curves following irradiation by 60 Co and fast neutron were established for two IGNHL cell lines. These cell lines, WSU-DLCL2 and SK-DHL2B, were found in previous studies to be able to repair sublethal damage, and were also resistant to L-Pam and doxorubicin chemotherapy. Results: When the surviving fraction after 2 Gy photon was chosen as the biological endpoint, the RBE for WSU-DLCL2 and SK-DHL2B measured 3.34 and 3.06. Similarly, when 10% survival was considered, the RBE for these two cell lines measured 2.54 and 2.59. The RBE, as measured by the ratios α neutron/α photon, for WSU-DLCL2, SK-DHL2B cell lines are 6.67 and 5.65, respectively. These results indicate that the RBE for these IGNHL cell lines is higher than the average RBE for cell lines of other histological types. Conclusion: Fast neutron irradiation may be of potential value in treating selected cases of IGNHL

  20. Spatial distribution and survival of human and goat mesenchymal stromal cells on hydroxyapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, H.J.; Fernandes, H.A.M.; Rozemuller, H.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan; Martens, ACM

    2016-01-01

    The combination of scaffolds and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) is a promising approach in bone tissue engineering (BTE). Knowledge on the survival, outgrowth and bone-forming capacity of MSCs in vivo is limited. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI), histomorphometry and immunohistochemistry were

  1. Doxorubicin induces ZAKα overexpression with a subsequent enhancement of apoptosis and attenuation of survivability in human osteosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chien-Yao; Tseng, Yan-Shen; Chen, Ming-Cheng; Hsu, Hsi-Hsien; Yang, Jaw-Ji; Tu, Chuan-Chou; Lin, Yueh-Min; Viswanadha, Vijaya Padma; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2018-02-01

    Human osteosarcoma (OS) is a malignant cancer of the bone. It exhibits a characteristic malignant osteoblastic transformation and produces a diseased osteoid. A previous study demonstrated that doxorubicin (DOX) chemotherapy decreases human OS cell proliferation and might enhance the relative RNA expression of ZAK. However, the impact of ZAKα overexpression on the OS cell proliferation that is inhibited by DOX and the molecular mechanism underlying this effect are not yet known. ZAK is a protein kinase of the MAPKKK family and functions to promote apoptosis. In our study, we found that ZAKα overexpression induced an apoptotic effect in human OS cells. Treatment of human OS cells with DOX enhanced ZAKα expression and decreased cancer cell viability while increasing apoptosis of human OS cells. In the meantime, suppression of ZAKα expression using shRNA and inhibitor D1771 both suppressed the DOX therapeutic effect. These findings reveal a novel molecular mechanism underlying the DOX effect on human OS cells. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that ZAKα enhances the apoptotic effect and decreases cell viability in DOX-treated human OS cells. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells suppress MHC class II expression on rat vascular endothelium and prolong survival time of cardiac allograft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Ying; Yun, Mark M; Han, Xia; Zhao, Ruidong; Zhou, Erxia; Yun, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Background: Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells (UC-MSCs) have low immunogenicity and immune regulation. To investigate immunomodulatory effects of human UC-MSCs on MHC class II expression and allograft, we transplanted heart of transgenic rats with MHC class II expression on vascular endothelium. Methods: UC-MSCs were obtained from human umbilical cords and confirmed with flow cytometry analysis. Transgenic rat line was established using the construct of human MHC class II transactivator gene (CIITA) under mouse ICAM-2 promoter control. The induced MHC class II expression on transgenic rat vascular endothelial cells (VECs) was assessed with immunohistological staining. And the survival time of cardiac allograft was compared between the recipients with and without UC-MSC transfusion. Results: Flow cytometry confirmed that the human UC-MSCs were positive for CD29, CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105, CD271, and negative for CD34 and HLA-DR. Repeated infusion of human UC-MSCs reduced MHC class II expression on vascular endothelia of transplanted hearts, and increased survival time of allograft. The UC-MSCs increased regulatory cytokines IL10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and suppressed proinflammatory cytokines IL2 and IFN-γ in vivo. The UC-MSC culture supernatant had similar effects on cytokine expression, and decreased lymphocyte proliferation in vitro. Conclusions: Repeated transfusion of the human UC-MSCs reduced MHC class II expression on vascular endothelia and prolonged the survival time of rat cardiac allograft. PMID:25126177

  3. Survival of hypoxic human mesenchymal stem cells is enhanced by a positive feedback loop involving miR-210 and hypoxia-inducible factor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Woochul; Lee, Chang Youn; Park, Jun-Hee; Park, Moon-Seo; Maeng, Lee-So; Yoon, Chee Soon; Lee, Min Young; Hwang, Ki-Chul; Chung, Yong-An

    2013-01-01

    The use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has emerged as a potential new treatment for myocardial infarction. However, the poor viability of MSCs after transplantation critically limits the efficacy of this new strategy. The expression of microRNA-210 (miR-210) is induced by hypoxia and is important for cell survival under hypoxic conditions. Hypoxia increases the levels of hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) protein and miR-210 in human MSCs (hMSCs). miR-210 positively regulates HIF-1α activity. Furthermore, miR-210 expression is also induced by hypoxia through the regulation of HIF-1α. To investigate the effect of miR-210 on hMSC survival under hypoxic conditions, survival rates along with signaling related to cell survival were evaluated in hMSCs over-expressing miR-210 or ones that lacked HIF-1α expression. Elevated miR-210 expression increased survival rates along with Akt and ERK activity in hMSCs with hypoxia. These data demonstrated that a positive feedback loop involving miR-210 and HIF-1α was important for MSC survival under hypoxic conditions.

  4. TGF-β signaling is an effective target to impair survival and induce apoptosis of human cholangiocarcinoma cells: A study on human primary cell cultures.

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    Anna Maria Lustri

    Full Text Available Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA and its subtypes (mucin- and mixed-CCA arise from the neoplastic transformation of cholangiocytes, the epithelial cells lining the biliary tree. CCA has a high mortality rate owing to its aggressiveness, late diagnosis and high resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapeutics. We have demonstrated that CCA is enriched for cancer stem cells which express epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT traits, with these features being associated with aggressiveness and drug resistance. TGF-β signaling is upregulated in CCA and involved in EMT. We have recently established primary cell cultures from human mucin- and mixed-intrahepatic CCA. In human CCA primary cultures with different levels of EMT trait expression, we evaluated the anticancer effects of: (i CX-4945, a casein kinase-2 (CK2 inhibitor that blocks TGF-β1-induced EMT; and (ii LY2157299, a TGF-β receptor I kinase inhibitor. We tested primary cell lines expressing EMT trait markers (vimentin, N-cadherin and nuclear catenin but negative for epithelial markers, and cell lines expressing epithelial markers (CK19-positive in association with EMT traits. Cell viability was evaluated by MTS assays, apoptosis by Annexin V FITC and cell migration by wound-healing assay.at a dose of 10 μM, CX4945 significantly decreased cell viability of primary human cell cultures from both mucin and mixed CCA, whereas in CK19-positive cell cultures, the effect of CX4945 on cell viability required higher concentrations (>30μM. At the same concentrations, CX4945 also induced apoptosis (3- fold increase vs controls which correlated with the expression level of CK2 in the different CCA cell lines (mucin- and mixed-CCA. Indeed, no apoptotic effects were observed in CK19-positive cells expressing lower CK2 levels. The effects of CX4945 on viability and apoptosis were associated with an increased number of γ-H2ax (biomarker for DNA double-strand breaks foci, suggesting the active role of CK2 as

  5. Cell Survival Signaling in Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megison, Michael L.; Gillory, Lauren A.; Beierle, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood and is responsible for over 15% of pediatric cancer deaths. Neuroblastoma tumorigenesis and malignant transformation is driven by overexpression and dominance of cell survival pathways and a lack of normal cellular senescence or apoptosis. Therefore, manipulation of cell survival pathways may decrease the malignant potential of these tumors and provide avenues for the development of novel therapeutics. This review focuses on several facets of cell survival pathways including protein kinases (PI3K, AKT, ALK, and FAK), transcription factors (NF-κB, MYCN and p53), and growth factors (IGF, EGF, PDGF, and VEGF). Modulation of each of these factors decreases the growth or otherwise hinders the malignant potential of neuroblastoma, and many therapeutics targeting these pathways are already in the clinical trial phase of development. Continued research and discovery of effective modulators of these pathways will revolutionize the treatment of neuroblastoma. PMID:22934706

  6. Pathophysiological hypoxia affects the redox state and IL-2 signalling of human CD4+ T cells and concomitantly impairs survival and proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaber, Timo; Tran, Cam Loan; Schellmann, Saskia; Hahne, Martin; Strehl, Cindy; Hoff, Paula; Radbruch, Andreas; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger; Buttgereit, Frank

    2013-06-01

    Inflamed areas are characterized by infiltration of immune cells, local hypoxia and alterations of cellular redox states. We investigated the impact of hypoxia on survival, proliferation, cytokine secretion, intracellular energy and redox state of human CD4(+) T cells. We found that pathophysiological hypoxia (<2% O2 ) significantly decreased CD4(+) T-cell survival after mitogenic stimulation. This effect was not due to an increased caspase-3/7-mediated apoptosis or adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) consumption/depletion. However, the ability of stimulated T cells to proliferate was reduced under hypoxic conditions, despite increased expression of CD25. Pathophysiological hypoxia was also found to modify intracellular ROS (iROS) levels in stimulated T cells over time as compared with levels found in normoxia. Physiological hypoxia (5% O2 ) did not decrease CD4(+) T-cell survival and proliferation or modify iROS levels as compared with normoxia. We conclude that pathophysiological hypoxia affects T-cell proliferation and viability via disturbed IL-2R signalling downstream of STAT5a phosphorylation, but not as a result of impaired cellular energy homeostasis. We suggest iROS links early events in T-cell stimulation to the inhibition of the lymphoproliferative response under pathophysiological hypoxic conditions. The level of iROS may therefore act as a mediator of immune functions leading to down-regulation of long-term T-cell activity in inflamed tissues. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Genistein, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, enhanced radiosensitivity in human esophageal cancer cell lines in vitro: Possible involvement of inhibition of survival signal transduction pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Tetsuo; Nonaka, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Saitoh, Jun-ichi; Takahashi, Takeo; Mitsuhashi, Norio

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The effect of genistein, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, on radiosensitivity was examined, especially focusing on 'survival signal transduction pathways'. Methods and Materials: Two human esophageal squamous cell cancer cell lines, TE-1 (p53, mutant) and TE-2 (p53, wild), were used. Radiosensitivity was determined by clonogenic assay, and activation of survival signals was examined by Western blot. Results: Genistein (30 μM) greatly enhanced radiosensitivity in these cell lines by suppressing radiation-induced activation of survival signals, p42/p44 extracellular signal-regulated kinase and AKT/PKB. Significant increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells and increased poly[ADP-ribose] polymerase cleavage were observed in TE-2, but not in TE-1 even after combination of genistein with irradiation. In terms of changes in expression of p53-related proteins, increase in expression of Bax and decrease in that of Bcl-2 were observed in TE-2 but not in TE-1, suggesting that the main mode of cell death induced by genistein in a cell line with wild type p53 differed from that with mutant p53. Conclusions: This study suggested that survival signals, including p42/p44 ERK and AKT/PKB, may be involved in determining radiosensitivity, and genistein would be a potent therapeutic agent that has an enhancing effect on radiation

  8. In Vitro Evaluation of the Impact of the Probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 on Campylobacter jejuni's Invasion and Intracellular Survival in Human Colonic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmy, Yosra A; Kassem, Issmat I; Kumar, Anand; Rajashekara, Gireesh

    2017-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of bacterial food poisoning in humans. Due to the rise in antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter , there exists a need to develop antibiotic-independent interventions to control infections in humans. Here, we evaluated the impact of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN), a probiotic strain, on C. jejuni's invasion and intracellular survival in polarized human colonic cells (HT-29). To further understand how EcN mediates its impact, the expression of 84 genes associated with tight junctions and cell adhesion was profiled in HT-29 cells after treatment with EcN and challenge with C. jejuni . The pre-treatment of polarized HT-29 cells with EcN for 4 h showed a significant effect on C. jejuni 's invasion (∼2 log reduction) of the colonic cells. Furthermore, no intracellular C. jejuni were recovered from EcN pre-treated HT-29 cells at 24 h post-infection. Other probiotic strains tested had no significant impact on C. jejuni invasion and intracellular survival. C. jejuni decreased the expression of genes associated with epithelial cells permeability and barrier function in untreated HT-29 cells. However, EcN positively affected the expression of genes that are involved in enhanced intestinal barrier function, decreased cell permeability, and increased tight junction integrity. The results suggest that EcN impedes C. jejuni invasion and subsequent intracellular survival by affecting HT-29 cells barrier function and tight junction integrity. We conclude that EcN might be a viable alternative for controlling C. jejuni infections.

  9. Therapeutic targeting of Neu1 sialidase with oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu® disables cancer cell survival in human pancreatic cancer with acquired chemoresistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O’Shea LK

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leah K O'Shea,1 Samar Abdulkhalek,1 Stephanie Allison,2 Ronald J Neufeld,2 Myron R Szewczuk11Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, 2Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, CanadaBackground: Resistance to drug therapy, along with high rates of metastasis, contributes to the low survival rate in patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. An alternate treatment for human pancreatic cancer involving targeting of Neu1 sialidase with oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu® was investigated in human pancreatic cancer (PANC1 cells with acquired resistance to cisplatin and gemcitabine. Its efficacy in overcoming the intrinsic resistance of the cell to chemotherapeutics and metastasis was evaluated.Methods: Microscopic imaging, immunocytochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and WST-1 cell viability assays were used to evaluate cell survival, morphologic changes, and expression levels of E-cadherin, N-cadherin, and VE-cadherin before and after treatment with oseltamivir phosphate in PANC1 cells with established resistance to cisplatin, gemcitabine, or a combination of the two agents, and in archived paraffin-embedded PANC1 tumors grown in RAGxCγ double mutant mice.Results: Oseltamivir phosphate overcame the chemoresistance of PANC1 to cisplatin and gemcitabine alone or in combination in a dose-dependent manner, and disabled the cancer cell survival mechanism(s. Oseltamivir phosphate also reversed the epithelial-mesenchymal transition characteristic of the phenotypic E-cadherin to N-cadherin changes associated with resistance to drug therapy. Low-dose oseltamivir phosphate alone or in combination with gemcitabine in heterotopic xenografts of PANC1 tumors growing in RAGxCγ double mutant mice did not prevent metastatic spread to the liver and lung.Conclusion: Therapeutic targeting of Neu1 sialidase with oseltamivir phosphate at the growth factor receptor level disables the intrinsic signaling platform for cancer cell survival

  10. Caffeine Induces Cell Death via Activation of Apoptotic Signal and Inactivation of Survival Signal in Human Osteoblasts

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    Wen-Hsiung Chan

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine consumption is a risk factor for osteoporosis, but the precise regulatory mechanisms are currently unknown. Here, we show that cell viability decreases in osteoblasts treated with caffeine in a dose-dependent manner. This cell death is attributed primarily to apoptosis and to a smaller extent, necrosis. Moreover, caffeine directly stimulates intracellular oxidative stress. Our data support caffeine-induced apoptosis in osteoblasts via a mitochondria-dependent pathway. The apoptotic biochemical changes were effectively prevented upon pretreatment with ROS scavengers, indicating that ROS plays a critical role as an upstream controller in the caffeine-induced apoptotic cascade. Additionally, p21-activated protein kinase 2 (PAK2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK were activated in caffeine-treated osteoblasts. Experiments further found that PAK2 activity is required for caffeine-induced JNK activation and apoptosis. Importantly, our data also show that caffeine triggers cell death via inactivation of the survival signal, including the ERK- and Akt-mediated anti-apoptotic pathways. Finally, exposure of rats to dietary water containing 10~20 μM caffeine led to bone mineral density loss. These results demonstrate for the first time that caffeine triggers apoptosis in osteoblasts via activation of mitochondria-dependent cell death signaling and inactivation of the survival signal, and causes bone mineral density loss in vivo.

  11. The novel mTORC1/2 dual inhibitor INK-128 suppresses survival and proliferation of primary and transformed human pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou, Hai-zhou; Weng, Xiao-chuan; Pan, Hong-ming; Pan, Qin; Sun, Peng; Liu, Li-li; Chen, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • INK-128 inhibits the survival and growth of human pancreatic cancer cells. • INK-128 induced pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis and necrosis simultaneously. • INK-128 blocks mTORC1/2 activation simultaneously in pancreatic cancer cells. • INK-128 down-regulates cyclin D1 and causes pancreatic cancer cell cycle arrest. • INK-128 significantly increases sensitivity of pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine. - Abstract: Pancreatic cancer has one of worst prognosis among all human malignancies around the world, the development of novel and more efficient anti-cancer agents against this disease is urgent. In the current study, we tested the potential effect of INK-128, a novel mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 and 2 (mTORC1/2) dual inhibitor, against pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Our results demonstrated that INK-128 concentration- and time-dependently inhibited the survival and growth of pancreatic cancer cells (both primary cells and transformed cells). INK-128 induced pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis and necrosis simultaneously. Further, INK-128 dramatically inhibited phosphorylation of 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and Akt at Ser 473 in pancreatic cancer cells. Meanwhile, it downregulated cyclin D1 expression and caused cell cycle arrest. Finally, we found that a low concentration of INK-128 significantly increased the sensitivity of pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine. Together, our in vitro results suggest that INK-128 might be further investigated as a novel anti-cancer agent or chemo-adjuvant for pancreatic cancer treatment

  12. The novel mTORC1/2 dual inhibitor INK-128 suppresses survival and proliferation of primary and transformed human pancreatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lou, Hai-zhou [Department of Medical Oncology, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310016 (China); Weng, Xiao-chuan [Department of Anesthesiology, Hangzhou Xia-sha Hospital, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Pan, Hong-ming; Pan, Qin [Department of Medical Oncology, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310016 (China); Sun, Peng [Department of Medical Oncology, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Liu, Li-li [Department of Medical Oncology, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310016 (China); Chen, Bin, E-mail: chenbinhangzhou126@126.com [Department of Hepatopancreatobiliary Surgery, First People’s Hospital of Hangzhou, Hangzhou 310006 (China)

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • INK-128 inhibits the survival and growth of human pancreatic cancer cells. • INK-128 induced pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis and necrosis simultaneously. • INK-128 blocks mTORC1/2 activation simultaneously in pancreatic cancer cells. • INK-128 down-regulates cyclin D1 and causes pancreatic cancer cell cycle arrest. • INK-128 significantly increases sensitivity of pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine. - Abstract: Pancreatic cancer has one of worst prognosis among all human malignancies around the world, the development of novel and more efficient anti-cancer agents against this disease is urgent. In the current study, we tested the potential effect of INK-128, a novel mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 and 2 (mTORC1/2) dual inhibitor, against pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Our results demonstrated that INK-128 concentration- and time-dependently inhibited the survival and growth of pancreatic cancer cells (both primary cells and transformed cells). INK-128 induced pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis and necrosis simultaneously. Further, INK-128 dramatically inhibited phosphorylation of 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and Akt at Ser 473 in pancreatic cancer cells. Meanwhile, it downregulated cyclin D1 expression and caused cell cycle arrest. Finally, we found that a low concentration of INK-128 significantly increased the sensitivity of pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine. Together, our in vitro results suggest that INK-128 might be further investigated as a novel anti-cancer agent or chemo-adjuvant for pancreatic cancer treatment.

  13. Inhibition of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) expression decreases the survival and myogenic differentiation of human rhabdomyosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croci, Stefania; Landuzzi, Lorena; Astolfi, Annalisa; Nicoletti, Giordano; Rosolen, Angelo; Sartori, Francesca; Follo, Matilde Y; Oliver, Noelynn; De Giovanni, Carla; Nanni, Patrizia; Lollini, Pier-Luigi

    2004-03-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2), a cysteine-rich protein of the CCN (Cyr61, CTGF, Nov) family of genes, emerged from a microarray screen of genes expressed by human rhabdomyosarcoma cells. Rhabdomyosarcoma is a soft tissue sarcoma of childhood deriving from skeletal muscle cells. In this study, we investigated the role of CTGF in rhabdomyosarcoma. Human rhabdomyosarcoma cells of the embryonal (RD/12, RD/18, CCA) and the alveolar histotype (RMZ-RC2, SJ-RH4, SJ-RH30), rhabdomyosarcoma tumor specimens, and normal skeletal muscle cells expressed CTGF. To determine the function of CTGF, we treated rhabdomyosarcoma cells with a CTGF antisense oligonucleotide or with a CTGF small interfering RNA (siRNA). Both treatments inhibited rhabdomyosarcoma cell growth, suggesting the existence of a new autocrine loop based on CTGF. CTGF antisense oligonucleotide-mediated growth inhibition was specifically due to a significant increase in apoptosis, whereas cell proliferation was unchanged. CTGF antisense oligonucleotide induced a strong decrease in the level of myogenic differentiation of rhabdomyosarcoma cells, whereas the addition of recombinant CTGF significantly increased the proportion of myosin-positive cells. CTGF emerges as a survival and differentiation factor and could be a new therapeutic target in human rhabdomyosarcoma.

  14. BDNF Increases Survival and Neuronal Differentiation of Human Neural Precursor Cells Cotransplanted with a Nanofiber Gel to the Auditory Nerve in a Rat Model of Neuronal Damage

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    Yu Jiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To study possible nerve regeneration of a damaged auditory nerve by the use of stem cell transplantation. Methods. We transplanted HNPCs to the rat AN trunk by the internal auditory meatus (IAM. Furthermore, we studied if addition of BDNF affects survival and phenotypic differentiation of the grafted HNPCs. A bioactive nanofiber gel (PA gel, in selected groups mixed with BDNF, was applied close to the implanted cells. Before transplantation, all rats had been deafened by a round window niche application of β-bungarotoxin. This neurotoxin causes a selective toxic destruction of the AN while keeping the hair cells intact. Results. Overall, HNPCs survived well for up to six weeks in all groups. However, transplants receiving the BDNF-containing PA gel demonstrated significantly higher numbers of HNPCs and neuronal differentiation. At six weeks, a majority of the HNPCs had migrated into the brain stem and differentiated. Differentiated human cells as well as neurites were observed in the vicinity of the cochlear nucleus. Conclusion. Our results indicate that human neural precursor cells (HNPC integration with host tissue benefits from additional brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF treatment and that these cells appear to be good candidates for further regenerative studies on the auditory nerve (AN.

  15. Depression of p53-independent Akt survival signals in human oral cancer cells bearing mutated p53 gene after exposure to high-LET radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Yosuke [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Takahashi, Akihisa [Advanced Scientific Research Leader Development Unit, Gunma University, 3-39-22 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511 (Japan); Kajihara, Atsuhisa; Yamakawa, Nobuhiro; Imai, Yuichiro [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Ota, Ichiro; Okamoto, Noritomo [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Mori, Eiichiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Noda, Taichi [Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Furusawa, Yoshiya [Heavy-ion Radiobiology Research Group, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Kirita, Tadaaki [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Ohnishi, Takeo, E-mail: tohnishi@naramed-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan)

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-LET radiation induces efficiently apoptosis regardless of p53 gene status. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examined whether high-LET radiation depresses the Akt-survival signals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-LET radiation depresses of survival signals even in the mp53 cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-LET radiation activates Caspase-9 through depression of survival signals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-LET radiation suppresses cell growth through depression of survival signals. -- Abstract: Although mutations and deletions in the p53 tumor suppressor gene lead to resistance to low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, high-LET radiation efficiently induces cell lethality and apoptosis regardless of the p53 gene status in cancer cells. Recently, it has been suggested that the induction of p53-independent apoptosis takes place through the activation of Caspase-9 which results in the cleavage of Caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). This study was designed to examine if high-LET radiation depresses serine/threonine protein kinase B (PKB, also known as Akt) and Akt-related proteins. Human gingival cancer cells (Ca9-22 cells) harboring a mutated p53 (mp53) gene were irradiated with 2 Gy of X-rays or Fe-ion beams. The cellular contents of Akt-related proteins participating in cell survival signaling were analyzed with Western Blotting 1, 2, 3 and 6 h after irradiation. Cell cycle distributions after irradiation were assayed with flow cytometric analysis. Akt-related protein levels decreased when cells were irradiated with high-LET radiation. High-LET radiation increased G{sub 2}/M phase arrests and suppressed the progression of the cell cycle much more efficiently when compared to low-LET radiation. These results suggest that high-LET radiation enhances apoptosis through the activation of Caspase-3 and Caspase-9, and suppresses cell growth by suppressing Akt-related signaling, even in mp

  16. Bovine lactoferricin induces caspase-independent apoptosis in human B-lymphoma cells and extends the survival of immune-deficient mice bearing B-lymphoma xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, Suzanne J; Mader, Jamie S; Hoskin, David W

    2010-06-01

    Although current treatments based on the use of B-cell-specific anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies and aggressive combinatorial chemotherapy have improved the survival of patients suffering from B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), some individuals fail to respond to treatment and relapses remain common. New and more effective treatments for B-cell NHL are therefore required. Bovine lactoferricin (LfcinB) is a cationic antimicrobial peptide that is cytotoxic for several human tumor cell lines but does not harm healthy cells. Here we show that in vitro treatment with LfcinB caused Raji and Ramos human B-lymphoma cells to die by apoptosis, as indicated by DNA fragmentation, chromatin condensation, and nuclear disintegration. LfcinB killed B-lymphoma cells more efficiently at low serum concentrations and was inhibited in the presence of exogenous bovine serum albumin, suggesting partial neutralization of cationic LfcinB by anionic serum components. LfcinB-induced apoptosis in B-lymphoma cells was caspase-independent since caspase-3 activation was not detected by Western blotting and the general caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk did not prevent LfcinB-induced DNA fragmentation. Importantly, immune-deficient SCID/beige mice that were inoculated intravenously with Ramos B-lymphoma cells in order to model B-cell NHL exhibited extended survival following systemic administration of LfcinB, indicating that LfcinB warrants further investigation as a novel therapeutic agent for the possible treatment of B-cell NHL. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Interaction of Mycobacterium leprae with human airway epithelial cells: adherence, entry, survival, and identification of potential adhesins by surface proteome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Carlos A M; Danelishvili, Lia; McNamara, Michael; Berredo-Pinho, Márcia; Bildfell, Robert; Biet, Franck; Rodrigues, Luciana S; Oliveira, Albanita V; Bermudez, Luiz E; Pessolani, Maria C V

    2013-07-01

    This study examined the in vitro interaction between Mycobacterium leprae, the causative agent of leprosy, and human alveolar and nasal epithelial cells, demonstrating that M. leprae can enter both cell types and that both are capable of sustaining bacterial survival. Moreover, delivery of M. leprae to the nasal septum of mice resulted in macrophage and epithelial cell infection in the lung tissue, sustaining the idea that the airways constitute an important M. leprae entry route into the human body. Since critical aspects in understanding the mechanisms of infection are the identification and characterization of the adhesins involved in pathogen-host cell interaction, the nude mouse-derived M. leprae cell surface-exposed proteome was studied to uncover potentially relevant adhesin candidates. A total of 279 cell surface-exposed proteins were identified based on selective biotinylation, streptavidin-affinity purification, and shotgun mass spectrometry; 11 of those proteins have been previously described as potential adhesins. In vitro assays with the recombinant forms of the histone-like protein (Hlp) and the heparin-binding hemagglutinin (HBHA), considered to be major mycobacterial adhesins, confirmed their capacity to promote bacterial attachment to epithelial cells. Taking our data together, they suggest that the airway epithelium may act as a reservoir and/or portal of entry for M. leprae in humans. Moreover, our report sheds light on the potentially critical adhesins involved in M. leprae-epithelial cell interaction that may be useful in designing more effective tools for leprosy control.

  18. Advanced glycation end-product (AGE)-albumin from activated macrophage is critical in human mesenchymal stem cells survival and post-ischemic reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Myeongjoo; Kang, Woong Chol; Oh, Seyeon; Bayarsaikhan, Delger; Ahn, Hyosang; Lee, Jaesuk; Park, Hyunjin; Lee, Sojung; Choi, Junwon; Lee, Hye Sun; Yang, Phillip C; Byun, Kyunghee; Lee, Bonghee

    2017-09-14

    Post-ischemic reperfusion injury (PIRI) triggers an intense inflammatory response which is essential for repair but is also implicated in pathogenesis of post-ischemic remodeling in several organs in human. Stem cell therapy has recently emerged as a promising method for treatment of PIRI in human. However, satisfactory results have not been reported due to severe loss of injected stem cells in PIRI including critical limb ischemia (CLI). For investigating the advanced glycation end-product-albumin (AGE-albumin) from activated macrophages is critical in both muscle cell and stem cell death, we evaluated the recovery of PIRI-CLI by injection of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBD-MSCs) with or without soluble receptor for AGEs (sRAGE). Our results showed that activated M1 macrophages synthesize and secrete AGE-albumin, which induced the skeletal muscle cell death and injected hBD-MSCs in PIRI-CLI through RAGE increase. Combined injection of sRAGE and hBD-MSCs resulted in enhanced survival of hBD-MSCs and angiogenesis in PIRI-CLI mice. Taken together, AGE-albumin from activated macrophages is critical for both skeletal muscle cell and hBD-MSCs death in PIRI-CLI. Therefore, the inhibition of AGE-albumin from activated macrophages could be a successful therapeutic strategy for treatment of PIRI including CLI with or without stem cell therapy.

  19. Survivin as a potential mediator to support autoreactive cell survival in myasthenia gravis: a human and animal model study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda L Kusner

    Full Text Available The mechanisms that underlie the development and maintenance of autoimmunity in myasthenia gravis are poorly understood. In this investigation, we evaluate the role of survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family, in humans and in two animal models. We identified survivin expression in cells with B lymphocyte and plasma cells markers, and in the thymuses of patients with myasthenia gravis. A portion of survivin-expressing cells specifically bound a peptide derived from the alpha subunit of acetylcholine receptor indicating that they recognize the peptide. Thymuses of patients with myasthenia gravis had large numbers of survivin-positive cells with fewer cells in the thymuses of corticosteroid-treated patients. Application of a survivin vaccination strategy in mouse and rat models of myasthenia gravis demonstrated improved motor assessment, a reduction in acetylcholine receptor specific autoantibodies, and a retention of acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction, associated with marked reduction of survivin-expressing circulating CD20+ cells. These data strongly suggest that survivin expression in cells with lymphocyte and plasma cell markers occurs in patients with myasthenia gravis and in two animal models of myasthenia gravis. Survivin expression may be part of a mechanism that inhibits the apoptosis of autoreactive B cells in myasthenia gravis and other autoimmune disorders.

  20. Effect of oxaliplatin on the survival rate of human Y79 cells after down-regulation of Mcl-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Zhou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To study the effect of oxaliplatin on the survival rate of Y79 after down-regulation of Mcl-1 by SiRNA. METHODS: Y79 cells were cultured in RPMI1640. The cultured cells were stimulated with 0.25μmol/L of oxaliplatin. The expression of Mcl-1 protein was detected by Western blot after 6, 16 and 24h respectively. Cells in logarithmic phase were collected and used for single-cell suspension. Then they were transfected with empty plasmid, Mcl-1-homo-991, Mcl-1-homo-1114 and Mcl-1-homo-1235. After 6h, fluorescence microscope was used to observe the transfection efficiency and the optimal one was selected. The cells were divided into Group A and transfected with empty plasmids. The cells transfected with Mcl-1 were divided into Group B and Group C. Group A and Group C were treated with 0.25μmol/L oxaliplatin for stimulating induction, and the apoptotic rate was compared after 24h.RESULTS: The expression of Mcl-1 in Y79 stimulated by oxaliplatin was the most after 24h of culture. Mcl-1-homo-991 significantly inhibited the expression of Mcl-1 in Y79 after transfection. There was no significant difference in the apoptosis rate in Group A(11.1%±1.2%and in the control group(6.1%±0.6%(P>0.05. The apoptotic rate of Group C(49.2%±2.7%was significantly higher than that of Group B(20.8%±1.9%. At the same time, the apoptotic rates of these two groups were significantly higher than those of Group A and control group, the difference was statistically significant(PCONCLUSION:Downregulation of Mcl-1 by siRNA can reduce the drug resistance of Y79, thereby enhancing the apoptosis of Y79, and reducing the survival rate of Y79.

  1. Lung cells support osteosarcoma cell migration and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shibing; Fourman, Mitchell Stephen; Mahjoub, Adel; Mandell, Jonathan Brendan; Crasto, Jared Anthony; Greco, Nicholas Giuseppe; Weiss, Kurt Richard

    2017-01-25

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary bone tumor, with a propensity to metastasize to the lungs. Five-year survival for metastatic OS is below 30%, and has not improved for several decades despite the introduction of multi-agent chemotherapy. Understanding OS cell migration to the lungs requires an evaluation of the lung microenvironment. Here we utilized an in vitro lung cell and OS cell co-culture model to explore the interactions between OS and lung cells, hypothesizing that lung cells would promote OS cell migration and survival. The impact of a novel anti-OS chemotherapy on OS migration and survival in the lung microenvironment was also examined. Three human OS cell lines (SJSA-1, Saos-2, U-2) and two human lung cell lines (HULEC-5a, MRC-5) were cultured according to American Type Culture Collection recommendations. Human lung cell lines were cultured in growth medium for 72 h to create conditioned media. OS proliferation was evaluated in lung co-culture and conditioned media microenvironment, with a murine fibroblast cell line (NIH-3 T3) in fresh growth medium as controls. Migration and invasion were measured using a real-time cell analysis system. Real-time PCR was utilized to probe for Aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ALDH1) expression. Osteosarcoma cells were also transduced with a lentivirus encoding for GFP to permit morphologic analysis with fluorescence microscopy. The anti-OS efficacy of Disulfiram, an ALDH-inhibitor previously shown to inhibit OS cell proliferation and metastasis in vitro, was evaluated in each microenvironment. Lung-cell conditioned medium promoted osteosarcoma cell migration, with a significantly higher attractive effect on all three osteosarcoma cell lines compared to basic growth medium, 10% serum containing medium, and NIH-3 T3 conditioned medium (p cell conditioned medium induced cell morphologic changes, as demonstrated with GFP-labeled cells. OS cells cultured in lung cell conditioned medium had increased alkaline

  2. Cell survival studies using ultrasoft x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schillaci, M.E.; Raju, M.R.; Carpenter, S.; Cornforth, M.; Wilder, M.

    1987-01-01

    Cell survival was studied for V79 hamster, 10T1/2 mouse, and human skin fibroblast cell lines, using carbon K (0.28 keV), copper K (8.0 keV), and 250 kVp x rays. Because of the rapid attenuation of the carbon x rays, cellular dimensions at the time of exposure were measured using optical and electron microscopy, and frequency distributions of mean dose absorbed by the cell nucleus were obtained. The results indicate that the differences in cell killing between ultra-soft and hard x rays may depend on the nuclear thickness of the cells. Studies of the effects of hypoxia on V79 and 10T1/2 cells using carbon K, aluminum K (1.5 keV), and copper K x rays show decreasing OER values with decreasing x-ray energy and no difference between the two cell lines. Age response studies with V79 cells show similar cell-cycle variation of survival for carbon K and aluminum K x rays as for hard x rays

  3. Hyperthermia radiosensitization in human glioma cells comparison of recovery of polymerase activity, survival, and potentially lethal damage repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raaphorst, G.P.; Feeley, M.M.

    1994-01-01

    DNA polymerase inactivation is compared to thermal radiosensitization and inhibition of damage recovery in human glioma cells. Two human glioma cell lines (U87MG and U373MG) were exposed to hyperthermia and irradiation. Hyperthermia was given at 43 degrees C and 45 degrees C and DNA polymerase α + δ + ε and β activities were measured. Hyperthermia was given at various times before irradiation and the degree of radiosensitization and polymerase activity was assessed at various times after heating. In addition the ability of cells to undergo repair of potentially lethal radiation damage was assessed for cells irradiated at various times after heating. Polymerase α + δ + ε and polymerase β both recovered after heating but polymerase β was faster and was complete in U373MG but not in the U87MG cell lines after 48 h incubation after heating (45 degrees C, 60 min). Incubation, between hyperthermia and irradiation resulted in a loss of radiosensitization and a loss of inhibition of repair of potentially lethal damage. These changes correlated well with recovery of polymerase β but not with polymerase α + δ + ε. The correlation of polymerase β activity and thermoradiosensitization and its recovery indicate that polymerase β may be one of the mechanisms involved in thermoradiosensitization. 35 refs., 7 figs

  4. Effect of methyl butyrate aroma on the survival and viability of human breast cancer cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.A.; Rumana Ahmad, R.; Srivastava, A.N.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Aroma can have far reaching effects on mind, body and soul. Pleasant aromas are known to have a soothing effect on the mind and are known to relieve stress and enhance concentration. Recently, it has been demonstrated that aroma may also have some curative effects as well as benefits and can be used both for prophylaxis and therapy of diseases. Our aim was to test our hypothesis whether aroma can cure or prevent cancer. Methyl butyrate (MB) is the methyl ester of butyric acid having a characteristic sweet and fruity odor like that of apples and pineapples. It occurs in many plant products in minute quantities and in pineapple oil. Methods: In the present study, the effect of aroma of MB has been evaluated on human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 in vitro . The percentage viability of the cell line was determined by using Trypan blue dye exclusion assay. Results: It was found that MB at a concentration of 0.01 M was effective in causing considerable cytotoxicity (40%) in breast cancer cells (without even coming in contact with cells) while at 0.02 M, % cytotoxicity was found to be 50%. Mechanism of action of MB on cancer cells was investigated by acridine orange–ethidium bromide assay using fluorescence microscopy and DNA fragmentation assay. MB aroma appeared to induce necrosis in cancer cells exposed to it. Conclusion: No study involving the effect of aroma/smell on cancer cells has ever been reported before and warrants further investigation on other cancer and normal cell lines.

  5. Cell survival and radiation induced chromosome aberrations. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauchinger, M.; Schmid, E.; Braselmann, H.

    1986-01-01

    Human peripheral lymphocytes were irradiated in whole blood with 0.5-4.0 Gy of 220 kVp X-rays and the frequency of chromosome aberrations was determined in 1st or 2nd division metaphases discriminated by fluorescence plus giemsa staining. Using the empirical distributions of aberrations among cells, cell survival and transmission of aberrations were investigated. Considering both daughter cells, we found that 20% of fragments and 55% of dicentrics or ring chromosomes are lost during the 1st cell division; i.e. cell survival rate from 1st to 2nd generation is mainly influenced by anaphase bridging of these two-hit aberrations. Cell survival to 2nd mitosis was calculated considering this situation and compared with the survival derived from the fraction of M1 cells without unstable aberrations. The resulting shouldered survival curves showed significantly different slopes, indicating that cell reproductive death is overestimated in the latter approach. (orig.)

  6. Reproductive survival of explanted human tumor cells after exposure to nitrogen mustard or x irradiation; differences in response with subsequent subculture in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, J.; Berry, R.J.; Laing, A.H.

    1977-01-01

    Curves for the survival of reproductive capacity of explanted human tumor cells, following exposure to the alkylating agent nitrogen mustard (mustine hydrochloride) or 250-kVp x rays, were obtained as soon as a satisfactory plating efficiency, i.e., greater than or approximately equal to 10 percent, was obtained from the tumor cells in vitro (usually within 2-10 weeks of explanation). It was found that all six tumor explants tested became more sensitive to the action of nitrogen mustard on serial subculture, whereas the response of four explants which were X-irradiated was invariant with further subculturing. Furthermore, all but one explant yielded survival curves which were extremely similar, with D/sub q/ values circa 440-610 rad. One line, from a seminoma, however, had a D/sub q/ of 150 rad. These radiosensitive seminoma cells were, however, the most resistant to the action of nitrogen mustard. The increase in sensitivity to nitrogen mustard with serial subculture in vitro was not associated with any change in the proliferative rate of the cells, although it may be associated with an increase in the efficiency of transport

  7. Absent/weak CD44 intensity and positive human papillomavirus (HPV) status in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma indicates a very high survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Näsman, Anders; Nordfors, Cecilia; Grün, Nathalie; Munck-Wikland, Eva; Ramqvist, Torbjörn; Marklund, Linda; Lindquist, David; Dalianis, Tina

    2013-01-01

    Patients with human papillomavirus DNA positive (HPV DNA +) oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) have better clinical outcome than those with HPV DNA negative (HPV DNA −) OSCC upon intensive oncological treatment. All HPV DNA + OSCC patients may not require intensive treatment, however, but before potentially deintensifying treatment, additional predictive markers are needed. Here, we examined HPV, p16 INK4a , and CD44 in OSCC in correlation to clinical outcome. Pretreatment tumors from 290 OSCC patients, the majority not receiving chemotherapy, were analyzed for HPV DNA by Luminex and for p16 INK4a and CD44 by immunohistochemistry. 225/290 (78%) tumors were HPV DNA + and 211/290 (73%) overexpressed p16 INK4a , which correlated to presence of HPV (P < 0.0001). Presence of HPV DNA, absent/weak CD44 intensity staining correlated to favorable 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) by univariate and multivariate analysis, and likewise for p16 INK4a by univariate analysis. Upon stratification for HPV, HPV DNA + OSCC with absent/weak CD44 intensity presented the significantly best 3-year DFS and OS, with >95% 3-year DFS and OS. Furthermore, in HPV DNA + OSCC, p16 INK4a + overexpression correlated to a favorable 3-year OS. In conclusion, patients with HPV DNA + and absent/weak CD44 intensity OSCC presented the best survival and this marker combination could possibly be used for selecting patients for tailored deintensified treatment in prospective clinical trials. Absence of/weak CD44 or presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA was shown as a favorable prognostic factors in tonsillar and tongue base cancer. Moreover, patients with the combination of absence of/weak CD44 and presence of HPV DNA presented a very favorable outcome. Therefore, we suggest that this marker combination could potentially be used to single out patients with a high survival that could benefit from a de-escalated oncological treatment

  8. Decreased cell survival and DNA repair capacity after UVC irradiation in association with down-regulation of GRP78/BiP in human RSa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai Ling; Kita, Kazuko; Wano, Chieko; Wu Yuping; Sugaya, Shigeru; Suzuki, Nobuo

    2005-01-01

    In contrast to extensive studies on the roles of molecular chaperones, such as heat shock proteins, there are only a few reports about the roles of GRP78/BiP, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced molecular chaperone, in mammalian cell responses to DNA-damaging stresses. To investigate whether GRP78/BiP is involved in resistance to a DNA-damaging agent, UVC (principally 254 nm in wavelength), we established human cells with down-regulation of GRP78/BiP by transfection of human RSa cells with antisense cDNA for GRP78/BiP. We found that the transfected cells showed higher sensitivity to UVC-induced cell death than control cells transfected with the vector alone. In the antisense-cDNA transfected cells, the removal capacities of the two major types of UVC-damaged DNA (thymine dimers and (6-4) photoproducts) in vivo and DNA synthesis activity of whole cell extracts to repair UVC-irradiated plasmids in vitro were remarkably decreased compared with those in the control cells. Furthermore, the antisense-cDNA transfected cells also showed slightly higher sensitivity to cisplatin-induced cell death than the control cells. Cisplatin-induced DNA damage is primarily repaired by nucleotide excision repair, like UVC-induced DNA damage. The present results suggest that GRP78/BiP plays a protective role against UVC-induced cell death possibly via nucleotide excision repair, at least in the human RSa cells tested

  9. The independent action of radiation and cisplatin on the survival or recovery of human normal or tumour cells in vitro or in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basham, C.; Mills, J.; Roberts, J.J.

    1989-01-01

    Recovery from γ-radiation- or cisplatin-induced lethal damage was studied in euoxic normal human foetal lung fibroblasts (HFL cells). After 1 hour treatment with cisplatin the half-time of recovery was about 2 days. Recovery after radiation presented half-times of approximately 10 h, with further measurable recovery after 2 days. With either agent recovery ratios (RR) were dose-dependent but recovery (following treatment with equitoxic doses of both agents) was appreciably greater after cisplatin (RR ''approx.'' 123 after 40μm for 1 h) than after radiation (RR ''approx.'' 15 after 900 cGy). When radiation (900 cGy) was combined with cisplatin (40 μm for 1 h) the cell survival (measured at 5 days post-treatment or later) was not significantly less than that predicted by the additive, independent effects of both agents irrespective of whether cisplatin was given 1 h before, during or for 1 h after radiation. In euoxic, exponentially growing HFL or HeLa cells there was no evidence that combinations of cisplatin and radiation gave more than additive toxic effects. The combined effects of cisplatin or carboplatin and whole-body irradiation given 45 min later, on human melanoma cells were essentially the same as that predicted by the additive, independent effects of both agents. (author)

  10. Relationships among cell survival, O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase activity, and reactivation of methylated adenovirus 5 and herpes simplex virus type 1 in human melanoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maynard, K.; Parsons, P.G.; Cerny, T.; Margison, G.P. (Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Herston (Australia))

    1989-09-01

    O6-Alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (ATase) activity and host cell reactivation (HCR) of 5-(3-methyl-1-triazeno)imidazole-4-carboxamide (MTIC)-methylated viruses were compared in human melanoma cell lines that were sensitive or resistant to killing by the antitumor DNA-methylating agent MTIC. Enhanced HCR of adenovirus 5 (defined as the Mer+ phenotype) generally showed a semiquantitative correlation with the natural or induced resistance of the host cells to the toxic effects of MTIC and to the level of ATase activity. However, one MTIC-resistant cell line was found (MM170) which had a low level of ATase and intermediate HCR of adenovirus. The HCR of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was enhanced in the Mer+ cells that had natural resistance to MTIC compared with Mer- cells. On the other hand, HCR of HSV-1 in Mer+ cells with induced resistance to MTIC was similar to that in Mer- cells. Neither adenovirus 5 nor HSV-1 infection induced ATase activity in Mer- cells. This indicates that resistance to the toxic effects of methylating agents is not invariably associated with high levels of ATase activity in human melanoma cells. Furthermore, while induction of the Mer+ phenotype from Mer- cells was usually accompanied by the recovery of ATase activity, induced Mer+ cells had less proficient repair than natural Mer+ cells, as judged quantitatively by slightly lower cellular resistance and qualitatively by deficient HCR response for HSV-1. These results suggest that the Mer- and induced Mer+ cells lack an ATase-independent DNA repair mechanism. No differences in MTIC-induced DNA repair synthesis or strand breaks were found between the Mer-, natural Mer+, and induced Mer+ phenotypes. However, UV-induced DNA repair synthesis was higher in the natural Mer+ than in the Mer- or induced Mer+ cells, both of which had increased cellular sensitivity to the antimetabolites methotrexate and hydroxyurea.

  11. Relationships among cell survival, O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase activity, and reactivation of methylated adenovirus 5 and herpes simplex virus type 1 in human melanoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maynard, K.; Parsons, P.G.; Cerny, T.; Margison, G.P.

    1989-01-01

    O6-Alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (ATase) activity and host cell reactivation (HCR) of 5-(3-methyl-1-triazeno)imidazole-4-carboxamide (MTIC)-methylated viruses were compared in human melanoma cell lines that were sensitive or resistant to killing by the antitumor DNA-methylating agent MTIC. Enhanced HCR of adenovirus 5 (defined as the Mer+ phenotype) generally showed a semiquantitative correlation with the natural or induced resistance of the host cells to the toxic effects of MTIC and to the level of ATase activity. However, one MTIC-resistant cell line was found (MM170) which had a low level of ATase and intermediate HCR of adenovirus. The HCR of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was enhanced in the Mer+ cells that had natural resistance to MTIC compared with Mer- cells. On the other hand, HCR of HSV-1 in Mer+ cells with induced resistance to MTIC was similar to that in Mer- cells. Neither adenovirus 5 nor HSV-1 infection induced ATase activity in Mer- cells. This indicates that resistance to the toxic effects of methylating agents is not invariably associated with high levels of ATase activity in human melanoma cells. Furthermore, while induction of the Mer+ phenotype from Mer- cells was usually accompanied by the recovery of ATase activity, induced Mer+ cells had less proficient repair than natural Mer+ cells, as judged quantitatively by slightly lower cellular resistance and qualitatively by deficient HCR response for HSV-1. These results suggest that the Mer- and induced Mer+ cells lack an ATase-independent DNA repair mechanism. No differences in MTIC-induced DNA repair synthesis or strand breaks were found between the Mer-, natural Mer+, and induced Mer+ phenotypes. However, UV-induced DNA repair synthesis was higher in the natural Mer+ than in the Mer- or induced Mer+ cells, both of which had increased cellular sensitivity to the antimetabolites methotrexate and hydroxyurea

  12. Triiodothyronine regulates cell growth and survival in renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Matak, Damian; Szymanski, Lukasz; Czarnecka, Karolina H; Lewicki, Slawomir; Zdanowski, Robert; Brzezianska-Lasota, Ewa; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-10-01

    Triiodothyronine plays an important role in the regulation of kidney cell growth, differentiation and metabolism. Patients with renal cell cancer who develop hypothyreosis during tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment have statistically longer survival. In this study, we developed cell based model of triiodothyronine (T3) analysis in RCC and we show the different effects of T3 on renal cell cancer (RCC) cell growth response and expression of the thyroid hormone receptor in human renal cell cancer cell lines from primary and metastatic tumors along with human kidney cancer stem cells. Wild-type thyroid hormone receptor is ubiquitously expressed in human renal cancer cell lines, but normalized against healthy renal proximal tube cell expression its level is upregulated in Caki-2, RCC6, SKRC-42, SKRC-45 cell lines. On the contrary the mRNA level in the 769-P, ACHN, HKCSC, and HEK293 cells is significantly decreased. The TRβ protein was abundant in the cytoplasm of the 786-O, Caki-2, RCC6, and SKRC-45 cells and in the nucleus of SKRC-42, ACHN, 769-P and cancer stem cells. T3 has promoting effect on the cell proliferation of HKCSC, Caki-2, ASE, ACHN, SK-RC-42, SMKT-R2, Caki-1, 786-0, and SK-RC-45 cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sunitinib, directly inhibits proliferation of RCC cells, while thyroid hormone receptor antagonist 1-850 (CAS 251310‑57-3) has less significant inhibitory impact. T3 stimulation does not abrogate inhibitory effect of sunitinib. Renal cancer tumor cells hypostimulated with T3 may be more responsive to tyrosine kinase inhibition. Moreover, some tumors may be considered as T3-independent and present aggressive phenotype with thyroid hormone receptor activated independently from the ligand. On the contrary proliferation induced by deregulated VHL and or c-Met pathways may transgress normal T3 mediated regulation of the cell cycle.

  13. Repair models of cell survival and corresponding computer program for survival curve fitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Xun; Hu Yiwei

    1992-01-01

    Some basic concepts and formulations of two repair models of survival, the incomplete repair (IR) model and the lethal-potentially lethal (LPL) model, are introduced. An IBM-PC computer program for survival curve fitting with these models was developed and applied to fit the survivals of human melanoma cells HX118 irradiated at different dose rates. Comparison was made between the repair models and two non-repair models, the multitar get-single hit model and the linear-quadratic model, in the fitting and analysis of the survival-dose curves. It was shown that either IR model or LPL model can fit a set of survival curves of different dose rates with same parameters and provide information on the repair capacity of cells. These two mathematical models could be very useful in quantitative study on the radiosensitivity and repair capacity of cells

  14. Inhibition of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and PI3K/Akt Signaling Suppresses Cell Proliferation and Survival through Regulation of Stat3 Activation in Human Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bito, T.; Sumita, N.; Ashida, M.; Budiyanto, A.; Ueda, M.; Ichihashi, M.; Nishigori, C.; Tokura, Y.; Bito, T.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have emphasized the important role of Stat3 activation in a number of human tumors from the viewpoint of its oncogenic and anti apoptotic activity. In this study, we examined the role and related signaling molecules of Stat3 in the carcinogenesis of human cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). In 35 human cutaneous SCC samples, 86% showed overexpression of phosphorylated (p)-Stat3, and most of those simultaneously over expressed p-EGFR or p-Akt. Constitutive activation of EGFR and Stat3 was observed in three SCC cell lines and four of five SCC tissues. AG1478, an inhibitor of the EGFR, down regulated Stat3 activation in HSC-1 human SCC cells. AG1478 inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis of HSC-1 cells but did not inhibit the growth of normal human epidermal keratinocytes that did not show Stat3 activation. Furthermore, a PI3K inhibitor also suppressed Stat3 activation in HSC-1 cells to some degree. Combined treatment with the PI3K inhibitor and AG1478 strongly suppressed Stat3 activity and dramatically induced apoptosis of HSC-1 cells. These data suggest that Stat3 activation through EGFR and/or PI3K/Akt activation plays a critical role in the proliferation and survival of human cutaneous SCC.

  15. Irradiations of human melanoma cells by 14 MeV neutrons; survival curves interpretation; physical simulation of neutrons interactions in the cellular medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodez, Veronique

    2000-01-01

    14 MeV neutrons are used to irradiate human melanoma cells in order to study survival curves at low dose and low dose rate. We have simulated with the MCNP code, transport of neutrons through the experimental setup to evaluate the contamination of the primary beam by gamma and electrons, for the feasibility of our experiments. We have shown a rapid decrease of the survival curve in the first cGy followed by a plateau for doses up to 30 cGy; after we observed an exponential decrease. This results are observed for the first time, for neutrons at low dose rate (5 cGy/h). In parallel with this experimental point, we have developed a simulation code which permitted the study of neutrons interactions with the cellular medium for individual cells defined as in our experimental conditions. We show that most of the energy is deposited by protons from neutron interactions with external medium, and by heavy ions for interactions into the cell. On the other hand the code gives a good order of magnitude of the dose rate, compared to the experimental values given by silicon diodes. The first results show that we can, using a theory based on induced repair of cells, give an interpretation of the observed experimental plateau. We can give an estimation of the radial distribution of dose for the tracks of charged ions, we show the possibility of calculate interaction cross sections with cellular organelles. Such a work gives interesting perspectives for the future in radiobiology, radiotherapy or radioprotection. (author) [fr

  16. Inhibitory Effects of Salinomycin on Cell Survival, Colony Growth, Migration, and Invasion of Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer A549 and LNM35: Involvement of NAG-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kholoud Arafat

    Full Text Available A major challenge for oncologists and pharmacologists is to develop more potent and less toxic drugs that will decrease the tumor growth and improve the survival of lung cancer patients. Salinomycin is a polyether antibiotic used to kill gram-positive bacteria including mycobacteria, protozoans such as plasmodium falciparum, and the parasites responsible for the poultry disease coccidiosis. This old agent is now a serious anti-cancer drug candidate that selectively inhibits the growth of cancer stem cells. We investigated the impact of salinomycin on survival, colony growth, migration and invasion of the differentiated human non-small cell lung cancer lines LNM35 and A549. Salinomycin caused concentration- and time-dependent reduction in viability of LNM35 and A549 cells through a caspase 3/7-associated cell death pathway. Similarly, salinomycin (2.5-5 µM for 7 days significantly decreased the growth of LNM35 and A549 colonies in soft agar. Metastasis is the main cause of death related to lung cancer. In this context, salinomycin induced a time- and concentration-dependent inhibition of cell migration and invasion. We also demonstrated for the first time that salinomycin induced a marked increase in the expression of the pro-apoptotic protein NAG-1 leading to the inhibition of lung cancer cell invasion but not cell survival. These findings identify salinomycin as a promising novel therapeutic agent for lung cancer.

  17. Laser bioprinting of human induced pluripotent stem cells-the effect of printing and biomaterials on cell survival, pluripotency, and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Lothar; Deiwick, Andrea; Franke, Annika; Schwanke, Kristin; Haverich, Axel; Zweigerdt, Robert; Chichkov, Boris

    2018-04-25

    Research on human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) is one of the fastest growing fields in biomedicine. Generated from patient's own somatic cells, hiPSCs can be differentiated towards all functional cell types and returned to the patient without immunological concerns. 3D printing of hiPSCs could enable the generation of functional organs for replacement therapies or realization of organ-on-chip systems for individualized medicine. Printing of living cells was demonstrated with immortalized cell lines, primary cells, and adult stem cells with different printing technologies and biomaterials. However, hiPSCs are more sensitive to handling procedures, in particular, when dissociated into single cells. Both pluripotency and directed differentiation are influenced by numerous environmental factors including culture media, biomaterials, and cell density. Notably, existing literature on the effect of applied biomaterials on pluripotency is rather ambiguous. In this study, laser bioprinting of undifferentiated hiPSCs in combination with different biomaterials was performed and the impact on cells' behavior, pluripotency, and differentiation was investigated. Our findings suggest that hiPSCs are indeed more sensitive to the applied biomaterials, but not to laser printing itself. With appropriate biomaterials, such as the hyaluronic acid based solutions applied in this study, hiPSCs can be successfully laser printed without losing their pluripotency.

  18. Survival and Functionality of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Oligodendrocytes in a Nonhuman Primate Model for Multiple Sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiruvalluvan, Arun; Czepiel, Marcin; Kap, Yolanda A.; Mantingh-Otter, Ietje; Vainchtein, Ilia; Kuipers, Jeroen; Bijlard, Marjolein; Baron, Wia; Giepmans, Ben; Brueck, Wolfgang; 'T Hart, Bert A.; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    2016-01-01

    : Fast remyelination by endogenous oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) is essential to prevent axonal and subsequent retrograde neuronal degeneration in demyelinating lesions in multiple sclerosis (MS). In chronic lesions, however, the remyelination capacity of OPCs becomes insufficient. Cell

  19. E1(-)E4(+) adenoviral gene transfer vectors function as a "pro-life" signal to promote survival of primary human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, R; Rafii, S; Worgall, S; Brough, D E; Crystal, R G

    1999-05-01

    Although endothelial cells are quiescent and long-lived in vivo, when they are removed from blood vessels and cultured in vitro they die within days to weeks. In studies of the interaction of E1(-)E4(+) replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) vectors and human endothelium, the cells remained quiescent and were viable for prolonged periods. Evaluation of these cultures showed that E1(-)E4(+) Ad vectors provide an "antiapoptotic" signal that, in association with an increase in the ratio of Bcl2 to Bax levels, induces the endothelial cells to enter a state of "suspended animation," remaining viable for at least 30 days, even in the absence of serum and growth factors. Although the mechanisms initiating these events are unclear, the antiapoptoic signal requires the presence of E4 genes in the vector genome, suggesting that one or more E4 open reading frames of subgroup C Ad initiate a "pro-life" program that modifies cultured endothelial cells to survive for prolonged periods.

  20. Eomesoderminlo CTLA4hi Alloreactive CD8+ Memory T Cells Are Associated With Prolonged Renal Transplant Survival Induced by Regulatory Dendritic Cell Infusion in CTLA4Ig-Treated Non-Human Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzelarab, Mohamed B.; Lu, Lien; Guo, Hao; Zahorchak, Alan F.; Shufesky, William F.; Cooper, David K.C.; Morelli, Adrian E.; Thomson, Angus W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Memory T cells (Tmem), particularly those resistant to costimulation blockade (CB), are a major barrier to transplant tolerance. The transcription factor Eomesodermin (Eomes) is critical for Tmem development and maintenance, but its expression by alloactivated T cells has not been examined in non-human primates. Methods We evaluated Eomes and co-inhibitory cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA4) expression by alloactivated rhesus monkey T cells in the presence of CTLA4 immunoglobulin (Ig), both in vitro and in renal allograft recipients treated with CTLA4Ig, with or without regulatory dendritic cell (DCreg) infusion. Results In normal monkeys, CD8+ T cells expressed significantly more Eomes than CD4+T cells. By contrast, CD8+T cells displayed minimal CTLA4. Among T cell subsets, central Tmem (Tcm) expressed the highest levels of Eomes. Notably, EomesloCTLA4hi cells displayed higher levels of CD25 and Foxp3 than EomeshiCTLA4lo CD8+ T cells. Following allostimulation, distinct proliferating EomesloCTLA4hi and EomeshiCTLA4lo CD8+ T cell populations were identified, with a high proportion of Tcm being EomesloCTLA4hi. CB with CTLA4Ig during allostimulation of CD8+T cells reduced CTLA4 but not Eomes expression, significantly reducing EomesloCTLA4hi cells. After transplantation with CB and rapamycin, donor-reactive EomesloCTLA4hi CD8+T cells were reduced. However, in monkeys also given DCreg, absolute numbers of these cells were elevated significantly. Conclusions Low Eomes and high CTLA4 expression by donor-reactive CD8+ Tmem is associated with prolonged renal allograft survival induced by DCreg infusion in CTLA4Ig-treated monkeys. Prolonged allograft survival associated with DCreg infusion may be related to maintenance of donor-reactive EomesloCTLA4hi Tcm. PMID:26680373

  1. Role of Estrogen and Progesterone in the Survival of Ovarian Tumors — A Study of the Human Ovarian Adenocarcinoma Cell Line OC-117-VGH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kung-Chong Chao

    2005-08-01

    Conclusion: Based on the findings of decreased survival and/or growth in OC-117-VGH ovarian adenocarcinoma cells treated with either estrogen or progesterone, we suspect that both hormones act effectively against ER-negative and PR-negative ovarian cancer cells. These findings should lead to a reassessment of hormone therapy for ovarian cancers.

  2. The growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) antagonist JV-1-36 inhibits proliferation and survival of human ectopic endometriotic stromal cells (ESCs) and the T HESC cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annunziata, Marta; Grande, Cristina; Scarlatti, Francesca; Deltetto, Francesco; Delpiano, Elena; Camanni, Marco; Ghigo, Ezio; Granata, Riccarda

    2010-08-01

    To determine the effect of the GHRH antagonist JV-1-36 on proliferation and survival of primary ectopic human endometriotic stromal cells (ESCs) and the T HESC cell line. Prospective laboratory study. University hospital. 22 women with endometriosis (aged 34.8+/-5.7 years) undergoing therapeutic laparoscopy. Eutopic (n=10) and ectopic (n=22) endometrial tissues were collected from women who underwent therapeutic laparoscopic surgery for endometriosis (stage III/IV). Expression of GHRH, GHRH receptor (GHRH-R) and GHRH-R splice variant (SV) 1 mRNA was determined by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The ESC proliferation was assessed by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine incorporation, cell survival by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and Trypan blue assay. The T HESC survival was evaluated by MTT, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels by ELISA, extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation by Western blot, and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-2 mRNA by real-time PCR. The ESCs and T HESCs, but not normal endometrial tissues, expressed GHRH-R mRNA; SV1 mRNA was determined in normal endometrial tissues, ESCs, and T HESCs; GHRH mRNAwas found in T HESCs; JV-1-36 inhibited ESC proliferation and ESC and T HESC survival. In T HESCs, JV-1-36 reduced cAMP production and ERK1/2 phosphorylation but had no effect on IGF-2 mRNA expression. The GHRH antagonist JV-1-36 inhibits endometriotic cell proliferation and survival, suggesting that GHRH antagonist may represent promising tools for treatment of endometriosis. Copyright (c) 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Changes in keratin 8/18 expression in human granulosa cell lineage are associated to cell death/survival events: potential implications for the maintenance of the ovarian reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaytan, F; Morales, C; Roa, J; Tena-Sempere, M

    2018-04-01

    Is keratin 8/18 (K8/K18) expression linked to cell death/survival events in the human granulosa cell lineage? A close association exists between changes in K8/K18 expression and cell death/survival events along the human granulosa cell lineage lifespan. In addition to their structural and mechanical functions, K8/K18 play essential roles regulating cell death, survival and differentiation in several non-gonadal epithelial tissues. Transfection of the granulosa-like tumor KGN cells with siRNA to interfere KRT8 and KRT18 expression increases FAS-mediated apoptosis, while an inverse association between K8/K18 expression and cell death has been found in the bovine antral follicles and corpus luteum. Yet, only fragmentary and inconclusive information exists regarding K8/K18 expression in the human ovary. Expression of K8/K18 was assessed by immunohistochemistry at different stages of the granulosa cell lineage, from flattened granulosa cells in primordial follicles to fully luteinized granulosa-lutein cells in the corpus luteum (including corpus luteum of pregnancy). Immunohistochemical detection of K8/K18 was conducted in 40 archival ovarian samples from women aged 17-39 years. K8/K18 expression was analyzed at the different stages of follicle development and corpus luteum lifespan. The proportions of primordial follicles showing all K8/K18-positive, all K8/K18 negative, or a mixture of K8/K18 negative and positive granulosa cells were quantified in 18 ovaries, divided into three age groups: ≤ 25 years (N = 6), 26-30 (N = 6) and 31-36 (N = 6) years. A total number of 1793 primordial, 750 transitional and 140 primary follicles were scored. A close association was found between changes in K8/K18 expression and cell death/cell survival events in the human granulosa cell lineage. Large secondary and early antral follicles (most of them undergoing atresia) and regressing corpora lutea displayed low/absent K8/K18 expression. Conversely, early growing and some large antral

  4. Improved Survival and Initiation of Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Hepatocyte-Like Cells upon Culture in William's E Medium followed by Hepatocyte Differentiation Inducer Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoru Tomizawa

    Full Text Available Hepatocyte differentiation inducer (HDI lacks both glucose and arginine, but is supplemented with galactose and ornithine, and is added together with other reagents such as apoptosis inhibitor and oncostatin M. Although human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells initiate hepatocyte differentiation, most die within 7 days. In this study, we investigated both HDI and conventional media for their potential to improve cell survival.201B7 iPS cells were cultured in conventional media. This consisted of three cycles of 5-day culture in William's E (WE medium, followed by a 2-day culture in HDI.Expression levels of α-feto protein (AFP were higher in cells cultured in WE and in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium/Nutrient F-12 Ham (DF12. 201B7 cells expressed the highest AFP and albumin (ALB when cultured in HDI for 2 days following 7-day culture in WE. After three cycles of 5-day culture in WE followed by 2 days in HDI, 201B7 cells expressed AFP and ALB 54 ± 2.3 (average ± standard deviation and 73 ± 15.1 times higher, respectively, than those cultured in ReproFF (feeder-free condition.201B7 cells survived culture in WE for 7 days followed HDI for 2 days. After three cycles of culture under these conditions, hepatocyte differentiation was enhanced, as evidenced by increased AFP and ALB expression.

  5. Tracking plasma cell differentiation and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Katrin; Oehme, Laura; Zehentmeier, Sandra; Zhang, Yang; Niesner, Raluca; Hauser, Anja E

    2014-01-01

    Plasma cells play a crucial role for the humoral immune response as they represent the body's factories for antibody production. The differentiation from a B cell into a plasma cell is controlled by a complex transcriptional network and happens within secondary lymphoid organs. Based on their lifetime, two types of antibody secreting cells can be distinguished: Short-lived plasma cells are located in extrafollicular sites of secondary lymphoid organs such as lymph node medullary cords and the splenic red pulp. A fraction of plasmablasts migrate from secondary lymphoid organs to the bone marrow where they can become long-lived plasma cells. Bone marrow plasma cells reside in special microanatomical environments termed survival niches, which provide factors promoting their longevity. Reticular stromal cells producing the chemokine CXCL12, which is known to attract plasmablasts to the bone marrow but also to promote plasma cell survival, play a crucial role in the maintenance of these niches. In addition, hematopoietic cells are contributing to the niches by providing other soluble survival factors. Here, we review the current knowledge on the factors involved in plasma cell differentiation, their localization and migration. We also give an overview on what is known regarding the maintenance of long lived plasma cells in survival niches of the bone marrow. © 2013 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  6. In vivo bioluminescence imaging for prolonged survival of transplanted human neural stem cells using 3D biocompatible scaffold in corticectomized rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Do Won Hwang

    Full Text Available Stem cell-based treatment of traumatic brain injury has been limited in its capacity to bring about complete functional recovery, because of the poor survival rate of the implanted stem cells. It is known that biocompatible biomaterials play a critical role in enhancing survival and proliferation of transplanted stem cells via provision of mechanical support. In this study, we noninvasively monitored in vivo behavior of implanted neural stem cells embedded within poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA scaffold, and showed that they survived over prolonged periods in corticectomized rat model. Corticectomized rat models were established by motor-cortex ablation of the rat. F3 cells expressing enhanced firefly luciferase (F3-effLuc were established through retroviral infection. The F3-effLuc within PLLA was monitored using IVIS-100 imaging system 7 days after corticectomized surgery. F3-effLuc within PLLA robustly adhered, and gradually increased luciferase signals of F3-effLuc within PLLA were detected in a day dependent manner. The implantation of F3-effLuc cells/PLLA complex into corticectomized rats showed longer-lasting luciferase activity than F3-effLuc cells alone. The bioluminescence signals from the PLLA-encapsulated cells were maintained for 14 days, compared with 8 days for the non-encapsulated cells. Immunostaining results revealed expression of the early neuronal marker, Tuj-1, in PLLA-F3-effLuc cells in the motor-cortex-ablated area. We observed noninvasively that the mechanical support by PLLA scaffold increased the survival of implanted neural stem cells in the corticectomized rat. The image-guided approach easily proved that scaffolds could provide supportive effect to implanted cells, increasing their viability in terms of enhancing therapeutic efficacy of stem-cell therapy.

  7. The statistical treatment of cell survival data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boag, J.W.

    1975-01-01

    The paper considers the sources of experimental error in cell survival experiments and discusses in simple terms how these combine to influence the accuracy of single points and the parameters of complete survival curves. Cell sampling and medium-dilution errors are discussed at length and one way of minimizing the former is examined. The Monte-Carlo method of estimating the distribution of derived parameters in small samples is recommended and illustrated. (author)

  8. A Complex Role for FGF-2 in Self-Renewal, Survival, and Adhesion of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eiselleová, L.; Matulka, K.; Kříž, V.; Kunová, M.; Schmidtová, Z.; Neradil, J.; Tichý, B.; Dvořáková, D.; Pospíšilová, Š.; Hampl, Aleš; Dvořák, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 8 (2009), s. 1847-1857 ISSN 1066-5099 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0538; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06077; EC FP6(XE) LSHG-CT-2006-018739 Program:1M; LC Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512; CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : fibroblast growth factor-2 * human ESCs * self-renewal Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.747, year: 2009

  9. In vitro cytotoxicity of {sup 211}At-labeled trastuzumab in human breast cancer cell lines: effect of specific activity and HER2 receptor heterogeneity on survival fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akabani, Gamal [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, P.O. Box 3808, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Carlin, Sean [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, P.O. Box 3808, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Welsh, Phil [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, P.O. Box 3808, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Zalutsky, Michael R. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, P.O. Box 3808, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)]. E-mail: zalut001@mc.duke.edu

    2006-04-15

    Introduction: Radioimmunotherapy with anti-HER2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) such as trastuzumab is a promising strategy for treating HER2-positive breast and ovarian carcinoma patients. The objective of this study was to determine the cytotoxic effectiveness of trastuzumab labeled with the 7.2-h half-life {alpha}-particle emitter {sup 211}At. Methods: Experiments were performed on SKBr-3, BT-474 and the transfected MCF7/HER2-18 human breast carcinoma cell lines. Intrinsic radiosensitivity was determined after exposure to external beam irradiation. The cytotoxicity of {sup 211}At-labeled trastuzumab was measured by clonogenic assays. The distribution of HER2 receptor expression on the cell lines was measured using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. A pharmacokinetic (PK)/microdosimetric model was established to assess the effects of specific activity (SA), HER2 receptor expression and absorbed dose on survival fraction (SF). Results: With external beam irradiation, the 2-Gy SF for BT-474, SKBr-3 and MCF7/HER2-18 cells was 0.78, 0.53 and 0.64 Gy, respectively. Heterogeneous HER2 expression was observed, with a subpopulation of cells lacking measurable receptor (14.5%, SKBr-3; 0.34%, MCF-7/HER2; 1.73%, BT-474). When plotted as a function of activity concentration, SF curves were biphasic and inversely proportional to SA; however, when the model was applied and absorbed doses calculated, the SF curve was monoexponential independent of SA. Thus, the PK model was able to demonstrate the effects of competition between cold and labeled mAb. These studies showed that the relative biological effectiveness of {sup 211}At-labeled trastuzaumab was about 10 times higher than that of external beam therapy. Conclusion: These in vitro studies showed that {sup 211}At-labeled trastuzumab mAb is an effective cytotoxic agent for the treatment of HER2-positive tumor cells. The SA of the labeled mAb and the homogeneity of HER2 receptor expression are important variables influencing

  10. The Relationship of a Combination of Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells and Frozen Fat with the Survival Rate of Transplanted Fat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Young Ha

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe survival rate of grafted fat is difficult to predict, and repeated procedures are frequently required. In this study, the effects of the freezing period of harvested adipose tissue and the addition of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs on the process of fat absorption were studied.MethodsAdipose tissue was obtained from patients who underwent a lipoaspirated fat graft. The fat tissue was cryopreserved at -20℃ in a domestic refrigerator. A total of 40 nude mice were used. The mice in the experimental group received three different subcutaneous injections in the back: an injection of fresh fat and ASCs, an injection of fat that had been frozen for one month and ASCs, and an injection of fat that had been frozen for two months and ASCs. The control mice received fat grafts without ASCs. The mice were sacrificed at four or eight weeks after the procedure, and the grafted fat tissues were harvested. The extracted fat was evaluated using photographic analysis, volume measurements, and histological examination.ResultsIn the control group, the fat resorption rates four weeks after transplantation in the grafts of fresh fat, fat that had been frozen for one month, and fat that had been frozen for two months were 21.14%, 22.46%, and 42.56%, respectively. In the experimental group, the corresponding resorption rates were 6.68%, 13.0%, and 33.9%, respectively.ConclusionsASCs can increase the fat graft survival rate. The use of ASCs in fat grafting can reduce the need for repeated fat grafts and provide good long term results.

  11. Tax Protein-induced Expression of Antiapoptotic Bfl-1 Protein Contributes to Survival of Human T-cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected T-cells*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaire, Héloïse; Riquet, Aurélien; Moncollin, Vincent; Biémont-Trescol, Marie-Claude; Duc Dodon, Madeleine; Hermine, Olivier; Debaud, Anne-Laure; Mahieux, Renaud; Mesnard, Jean-Michel; Pierre, Marlène; Gazzolo, Louis; Bonnefoy, Nathalie; Valentin, Hélène

    2012-01-01

    Human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiologic agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). ATLL is a severe malignancy with no effective treatment. HTLV-1 regulatory proteins Tax and HTLV-1 basic leucine zipper factor (HBZ) play a major role in ATLL development, by interfering with cellular functions such as CD4+ T-cell survival. In this study, we observed that the expression of Bfl-1, an antiapoptotic protein of the Bcl-2 family, is restricted to HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines and to T-cells expressing both Tax and HBZ proteins. We showed that Tax-induced bfl-1 transcription through the canonical NF-κB pathway. Moreover, we demonstrated that Tax cooperated with c-Jun or JunD, but not JunB, transcription factors of the AP-1 family to stimulate bfl-1 gene activation. By contrast, HBZ inhibited c-Jun-induced bfl-1 gene activation, whereas it increased JunD-induced bfl-1 gene activation. We identified one NF-κB, targeted by RelA, c-Rel, RelB, p105/p50, and p100/p52, and two AP-1, targeted by both c-Jun and JunD, binding sites in the bfl-1 promoter of T-cells expressing both Tax and HBZ. Analyzing the potential role of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins in HTLV-1-infected T-cell survival, we demonstrated that these cells are differentially sensitive to silencing of Bfl-1, Bcl-xL, and Bcl-2. Indeed, both Bfl-1 and Bcl-xL knockdowns decreased the survival of HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines, although no cell death was observed after Bcl-2 knockdown. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Bfl-1 knockdown sensitizes HTLV-1-infected T-cells to ABT-737 or etoposide treatment. Our results directly implicate Bfl-1 and Bcl-xL in HTLV-1-infected T-cell survival and suggest that both Bfl-1 and Bcl-xL represent potential therapeutic targets for ATLL treatment. PMID:22553204

  12. Co-culture of human CD34+ cells with mesenchymal stem cells increases the survival of CD34+ cells against the 5-aza-deoxycytidine- or trichostatin A-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Sang Hyeok; Choi, Hyoung Soo; Park, Eun Sil; Kang, Hyoung Jin; Ahn, Hyo Seop; Shin, Hee Young

    2005-01-01

    It has been suggested that epigenetic regulation plays an important role in maintaining the stemness and lineage differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), 5-aza-deoxycytidine (aza-D) and Trichostatin A (TSA) being candidate additives for HSC ex vivo expansion. Although they have potent activity to maintain the stemness, they can also cause serious cell death. This study examined the effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on the maintenance of CD34+ cells driven by aza-D and TSA in culture with the combined cytokines of thrombopoietin, flt-3 ligand, stem cell factor, interleukin-3, and interleukin-6. In cultures without MSCs, although aza-D and TSA retained the CD34 frequency 4 to 8 times more than in the cytokines alone, a large portion of cells underwent apoptotic cell death. Consequently, CD34+ cell expansion could not be achieved in any condition without MSCs. In cultures with MSCs, the total cell number was higher in aza-D or TSA than in any conditions in the cultures without MSCs. The CD34 frequency was also similar to the level in the cultures in aza-D or TSA without the MSCs. These results suggest that a co-culture of CD34+ cells with the MSCs might not simply deliver the proliferation signals but also stemness and survival signals, and overlap the action of epigenetic regulators

  13. Controlled copper ion release from phosphate-based glasses improves human umbilical vein endothelial cell survival in a reduced nutrient environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stähli, Christoph; Muja, Naser; Nazhat, Showan N

    2013-02-01

    The success of tissue engineering is dependent on rapid scaffold vascularization after engraftment. Copper ions are well known to be angiogenic but exhibit cytotoxicity at elevated doses. The high sensitivity to copper concentration underlines the need of a controlled release mechanism. This study investigated the effect of copper ions released from phosphate-based glasses (PGs) on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) under standard growth conditions (SGC), as well as in a reduced nutrient environment (RNE) with decreased bovine serum and growth factor concentrations to approximate conditions in the core of large volume scaffolds where nutrient diffusion is limited. Initially, HUVECs were exposed to a range of CuCl(2) concentrations in order to identify an optimal response in terms of their metabolism, viability, and apoptotic activity. Under SGC, HUVEC metabolic activity and viability were reduced in a dose-dependent manner in the presence of 0.44-12 ppm Cu(2+). In contrast, HUVEC death induced by the RNE was delayed by an optimal dose of 4 ppm Cu(2+), which was associated with a down-regulation of apoptosis as evidenced by caspase-3/7 activity. Copper ion release from soluble PGs of the formulation 50P(2)O(5)-30CaO-(20-x)Na(2)O-xCuO [mol%] (x=0, 1, 5 and 10) demonstrated a controllable increase with CuO content. The presence of 4 ppm copper ions released from the 10% CuO PG composition reproduced the delay in HUVEC death in the RNE, suggesting the potential of these materials to extend survival of transplanted endothelial cells in large volume scaffolds.

  14. RhoE interferes with Rb inactivation and regulates the proliferation and survival of the U87 human glioblastoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poch, Enric; Minambres, Rebeca; Mocholi, Enric; Ivorra, Carmen; Perez-Arago, Amparo; Guerri, Consuelo; Perez-Roger, Ignacio; Guasch, Rosa M.

    2007-01-01

    Rho GTPases are important regulators of actin cytoskeleton, but they are also involved in cell proliferation, transformation and oncogenesis. One of this proteins, RhoE, inhibits cell proliferation, however the mechanism that regulates this effect remains poorly understood. Therefore, we undertook the present study to determine the role of RhoE in the regulation of cell proliferation. For this purpose we generated an adenovirus system to overexpress RhoE in U87 glioblastoma cells. Our results show that RhoE disrupts actin cytoskeleton organization and inhibits U87 glioblastoma cell proliferation. Importantly, RhoE expressing cells show a reduction in Rb phosphorylation and in cyclin D1 expression. Furthermore, RhoE inhibits ERK activation following serum stimulation of quiescent cells. Based in these findings, we propose that RhoE inhibits ERK activation, thereby decreasing cyclin D1 expression and leading to a reduction in Rb inactivation, and that this mechanism is involved in the RhoE-induced cell growth inhibition. Moreover, we also demonstrate that RhoE induces apoptosis in U87 cells and also in colon carcinoma and melanoma cells. These results indicate that RhoE plays an important role in the regulation of cell proliferation and survival, and suggest that this protein may be considered as an oncosupressor since it is capable to induce apoptosis in several tumor cell lines

  15. Humanity can survive a nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper, the author expresses his belief that while a nuclear war would be a horrendous experience, the United States could still survive and ultimately recover. The author describes what the United States would be like two weeks after a full-scale attack against major military targets and population centers. He says about one half of the population will survive but their lifestyles will be drastically different. Although water distribution systems could be damaged and water service interrupted, analysis has shown that in most cases enough drinking water would be available. Food would also not be a serious complicating factor. With the right precautions, there is no intrinsic reason why life-support requirements for the survivors of a nuclear attack should not be met. The author also discusses how epidemics and diseases could be avoided. He also explains why the genetic effects of radiation are misunderstood and why a nuclear war would not cause sufficient mutations to threaten the survival of the society. The author concludes that the argument that a nuclear war could eliminate the human species or bring an end to civilization as we know it has not stood up to the light of objective and scientific examination

  16. Subpopulations of lymphocytes and their bearing on the radiation dose-response of the human lymphocyte (cell survival, mitogenic stimulation and chromosome aberration frequency)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    To determine whether in the lymphocyte the frequency of chromosome aberrations might be influenced by a differential radiation response of the varying types of cells, as well as interactions among them, subpopulations were separated on the basis of differences in cell surface receptors. The subpopulations, namely, T and B lymphocytes and three T subsets, T-M, T-G, T-null, were found to differ in radiosensitivity as measured by survival in culture and mitotic index after PHA stimulation. All the populations studied are represented to varying degrees among the mitotic cells of unirradiated samples 48 hours after PHA stimulation. At increasing doses of 6 Co gamma rays (50, 100, 250, 500 rads), however, their proportions change both as a direct result of irradiation, such as cell killing, and as an indirect effect, such as the reduction in suppressor cell action

  17. Murine Th9 cells promote the survival of myeloid dendritic cells in cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jungsun; Li, Haiyan; Zhang, Mingjun; Lu, Yong; Hong, Bangxing; Zheng, Yuhuan; He, Jin; Yang, Jing; Qian, Jianfei; Yi, Qing

    2014-08-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells to initiate immune responses, and DC survival time is important for affecting the strength of T-cell responses. Interleukin (IL)-9-producing T-helper (Th)-9 cells play an important role in anti-tumor immunity. However, it is unclear how Th9 cells communicate with DCs. In this study, we investigated whether murine Th9 cells affected the survival of myeloid DCs. DCs derived from bone marrow of C57BL/6 mice were cocultured with Th9 cells from OT-II mice using transwell, and the survival of DCs was examined. DCs cocultured with Th9 cells had longer survival and fewer apoptotic cells than DCs cultured alone in vitro. In melanoma B16-OVA tumor-bearing mice, DCs conditioned by Th9 cells lived longer and induced stronger anti-tumor response than control DCs did in vivo. Mechanistic studies revealed that IL-3 but not IL-9 secreted by Th9 cells was responsible for the prolonged survival of DCs. IL-3 upregulated the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL and activated p38, ERK and STAT5 signaling pathways in DCs. Taken together, our data provide the first evidence that Th9 cells can promote the survival of DCs through IL-3, and will be helpful for designing Th9 cell immunotherapy and more effective DC vaccine for human cancers.

  18. Intracoronary artery transplantation of cardiomyoblast-like cells from human adipose tissue-derived multi-lineage progenitor cells improve left ventricular dysfunction and survival in a swine model of chronic myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okura, Hanayuki [The Center for Medical Engineering and Informatics, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0879 (Japan); Department of Somatic Stem Cell Therapy and Health Policy, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Foundation for Biomedical Research and Innovation, 2-2 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan); Saga, Ayami; Soeda, Mayumi [Department of Somatic Stem Cell Therapy and Health Policy, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Foundation for Biomedical Research and Innovation, 2-2 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan); Miyagawa, Shigeru; Sawa, Yoshiki [Department of Surgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0879 (Japan); Daimon, Takashi [Division of Biostatistics, Hyogo College of Medicine, 1-1 Mukogawa-cho, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan); Ichinose, Akihiro [Department of Plastic Surgery, Kobe University Hospital, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Matsuyama, Akifumi, E-mail: akifumi-matsuyama@umin.ac.jp [The Center for Medical Engineering and Informatics, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0879 (Japan); Department of Plastic Surgery, Kobe University Hospital, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); RIKEN Program for Drug Discovery and Medical Technology Platforms, 1-7-22 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 230-0045 (Japan)

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We administered human CLCs in a swine model of MI via intracoronary artery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Histological studies demonstrated engraftment of hCLCs into the scarred myocardium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Echocardiography showed rescue of cardiac function in the hCLCs transplanted swine. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transplantation of hCLCs is an effective therapeutics for cardiac regeneration. -- Abstract: Transplantation of human cardiomyoblast-like cells (hCLCs) from human adipose tissue-derived multi-lineage progenitor cells improved left ventricular function and survival of rats with myocardial infarction. Here we examined the effect of intracoronary artery transplantation of human CLCs in a swine model of chronic heart failure. Twenty-four pigs underwent balloon-occlusion of the first diagonal branch followed by reperfusion, with a second balloon-occlusion of the left ascending coronary artery 1 week later followed by reperfusion. Four weeks after the second occlusion/reperfusion, 17 of the 18 surviving animals with severe chronic MI (ejection fraction <35% by echocardiography) were immunosuppressed then randomly assigned to receive either intracoronary artery transplantation of hCLCs hADMPCs or placebo lactic Ringer's solution with heparin. Intracoronary artery transplantation was followed by the distribution of DiI-stained hCLCs into the scarred myocardial milieu. Echocardiography at post-transplant days 4 and 8 weeks showed rescue and maintenance of cardiac function in the hCLCs transplanted group, but not in the control animals, indicating myocardial functional recovery by hCLCs intracoronary transplantation. At 8 week post-transplantation, 7 of 8 hCLCs transplanted animals were still alive compared with only 1 of the 5 control (p = 0.0147). Histological studies at week 12 post-transplantation demonstrated engraftment of the pre DiI-stained hCLCs into the scarred myocardium and their expression of

  19. In vivo effects of myeloablative alkylator therapy on survival and differentiation of MGMTP140K-transduced human G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shanbao; Hartwell, Jennifer R; Cooper, Ryan J; Juliar, Beth E; Kreklau, Emi; Abonour, Rafat; Goebel, W Scott; Pollok, Karen E

    2006-05-01

    High-intensity alkylator-based chemotherapy is required to eradicate tumors expressing high levels of O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT). This treatment, however, can lead to life-threatening myelosuppression. We investigated a gene therapy strategy to protect human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood CD34+ cells (MPB) from a high-intensity alkylator-based regimen. We transduced MPB with an oncoretroviral vector that coexpresses MGMT(P140K) and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) (n = 5 donors). At 4 weeks posttransplantation into nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice, cohorts were not treated or were treated with low- or high-intensity alkylating chemotherapy. In the high-intensity-treated cohort, it was necessary to infuse NOD/SCID bone marrow (BM) to alleviate hematopoietic toxicity. At 8 weeks posttreatment, human CD45+ cells in the BM of mice treated with either regimen were EGFP+ and contained MGMT-specific DNA repair activity. In cohorts receiving low-intensity therapy, both primitive and mature hematopoietic cells were present in the BM. Although B-lymphoid and myeloid cells were resistant to in vivo drug treatment in cohorts that received high-intensity therapy, no human CD34+ cells or B-cell precursors were detected. These data suggest that improved strategies to optimize repair of DNA damage in primitive human hematopoietic cells are needed when using high-intensity anti-cancer therapy.

  20. Human survival depends on nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbertson, J.

    1977-01-01

    Both the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times published feature articles Dec. 1 advertising a report by the U.S. government's General Accounting Office as evidence that the breeder reactor component of this nation's nuclear energy program was properly on its way to the scrap heap. According to the author, these and similar press accounts are intended to further legitimize the widely believed (and totally false) notion that increased plutonium use and nuclear fission generally represent a danger to humanity. Purposefully ignored in such accounts, he says, is the evidence that the elimination of plutonium as a nuclear fuel will mean the demise of the entire U.S. nuclear power industry and ultimately the human race itself. At stake in the short term, in addition to the breeder reactor program, is the well-established use of light water reactors for generating electricity, since these must, within a matter of years, be fueled with plutonium. The attack is also directed at the more advanced, more capital-intensive nuclear fusion technology, since the elimination of fission programs will wipe out the trained cadre force of engineers, scientists, technicians, and skilled workers needed to develop fusion power. The growth of fission power over the next two decades is absolutely necessary for the transition to a full fusion-based economy, according to Mr. Gilbertson. Only nuclear fusion has the inherent capability of transforming industry to the necessary higher mode of production and output, as well as providing a limitless source of usable power in several forms, thus insuring the survival of the human race beyond this century. Fission power and conventional fossil power must be expanded and possibly even exhausted during this transition in order to guarantee the achievement of this goal, he says

  1. Transferrin-polycation-mediated introduction of DNA into human leukemic cells: Stimulation by agents that affect the survival of transfected DNA or modulate transferrin receptor levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotten, M.; Laengle-Rouault, F.; Kirlappos, H.; Wagner, E.; Mechtler, K.; Zenke, M.; Beug, H.; Birnstiel, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have subverted a receptor-mediated endocytosis event to transport genes into human leukemic cells. By coupling the natural iron-delivery protein transferrin to the DNA-binding polycations polylysine or protamine, they have created protein conjugates that bind nucleic acids and carry them into the cell during the normal transferrin cycle. They demonstrate here that this procedure is useful for a human leukemic cell line. They enhanced the rate of gene delivery by (i) increasing the transferrin receptor density through treatment of the cells with the cell permeable iron chelator desferrioxamine, (ii) interfering with the synthesis of heme with succinyl acetone treatment, or (iii) stimulating the degradation of heme with cobalt chloride treatment. Consistent with gene delivery as an endocytosis event, they show that the subsequent expression in K-562 cells of a gene included in the transported DNA depends upon the cellular presence of the lysosomotropic agent chloroquine. By contrast, monensin blocks transferrinfection, as does incubation of the cells at 18 degree C

  2. Anemia and survival in human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Mocroft, Amanda

    2003-01-01

    The prospective, multicenter cohort study EuroSIDA has previously reported on predictors and outcomes of anemia in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. In a Cox proportional-hazards model with serial measures of CD4+ cell count, plasma viral load, and degrees of anemia fitted...... as time-dependent variables, the relative hazard of death increased markedly for patients with anemia versus no anemia. A clinical scoring system was developed and validated for patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy using the most recent laboratory measures. Mild and severe anemia were...... independently (Panemia. The mechanisms underlying why hemoglobin is such a strong prognostic...

  3. Cell survival in a simulated Mars environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Paul; Kurk, Michael Andy; Boland, Eugene; Thomas, David

    2016-07-01

    The most ancient life forms on earth date back comfortably to the time when liquid water was believed to be abundant on Mars. These ancient life forms include cyanobacteria, contemporary autotrophic earth organisms believed to have descended from ancestors present as long as 3.5 billion years ago. Contemporary cyanobacteria have adapted to the earth environment's harshest conditions (long-term drying, high and low temperature), and, being autotrophic, they are among the most likely life forms to withstand space travel and the Mars environment. However, it is unlikely that humans would unwittingly contaminate a planetary spacecraft with these microbes. One the other hand, heterotrophic microbes that co-habit with humans are more likely spacecraft contaminants, as history attests. Indeed, soil samples from the Atacama desert have yielded colony-forming organisms resembling enteric bacteria. There is a need to understand the survivability of cyanobacteria (likely survivors, unlikely contaminants) and heterotrophic eubacteria (unlikely survivors, likely contaminants) under simulated planetary conditions. A 35-day test was performed in a commercial planetary simulation system (Techshot, Inc., Greenville, IN) in which the minimum night-time temperature was -80 C, the maximum daytime temperature was +26 C, the simulated day-night light cycle in earth hours was 12-on and 12-off, and the total pressure of the pure CO _{2} atmosphere was maintained below 11 mbar. Any water present was allowed to equilibrate with the changing temperature and pressure. The gas phase was sampled into a CR1-A low-pressure hygrometer (Buck Technologies, Boulder, CO), and dew/frost point was measured once every hour and recorded on a data logger, along with the varying temperature in the chamber, from which the partial pressure of water was calculated. According to measurements there was no liquid water present throughout the test except during the initial pump-down period when aqueous specimens

  4. Triterpenoid saponins from Albizia lebbeck (L.) Benth and their inhibitory effect on the survival of high grade human brain tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noté, Olivier Placide; Jihu, Dong; Antheaume, Cyril; Zeniou, Maria; Pegnyemb, Dieudonné Emmanuel; Guillaume, Dominique; Chneiwess, Hervé; Kilhoffer, Marie Claude; Lobstein, Annelise

    2015-03-02

    As part of our search of new bioactive triterpenoid saponins from Cameroonian Mimosaceae plants, phytochemical investigation of the roots of Albizia lebbeck led to the isolation of two new oleanane-type saponins, named lebbeckosides A-B (1-2). Their structures were established on the basis of extensive 1D and 2D NMR ((1)H, (13)C NMR, DEPT, COSY, TOCSY, ROESY, HSQC, and HMBC) and HRESIMS studies, and by chemical evidence. Compounds 1-2 were evaluated for their inhibitory effect on the metabolism of high grade human brain tumor cells, the human glioblastoma U-87 MG cell lines and the glioblastoma stem-like TG1 cells isolated from a patient tumor, and known to be particularly resistant to standard therapies. The isolated saponins showed significant cytotoxic activity against U-87 MG and TG1 cancer cells with IC50 values of 3.46 μM and 1.36 μM for 1, and 2.10 μM and 2.24 μM for 2, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Survival of human lymphocytes after exposure to densely ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhvanath, U.; Raju, M.R.; Kelly, L.S.

    1976-01-01

    Interphase death of human blood lymphocytes cultured in vitro was studied after exposure to 60 Co gamma rays and to accelerated ions of 1 H, 4 He, 7 Li, 11 B, 12 C, 20 Ne, 40 Ar, and π - meson beam under aerobic conditions. Exposures were also conducted under hypoxic conditions with 60 Co gamma rays, 4 He, 7 Li, and 12 C ion beams. Time course of interphase death was followed for 6 days after irradiation. Percent survivals were determined by using the trypan blue exclusion method. Survival curves at 5 days postirradiation were exponential for all radiations studied. These observations indicate that the production of interphase death of lymphocytes by densely ionizing radiations follows a pattern similar to that observed with colony-forming mammalian cells. However, the reproductive capacity of the latter cells is impaired with maximum effectiveness at energy densities associated with 220 keV/μm for the beam conditions used in this investigation. The much lower energy densities required to kill a lymphocyte suggest that a sensitive structure other than DNA may be responsible for the production of lymphocyte death, perhaps the membranes. The calculated inactivation cross sections for high-LET radiations above 650 keV/μm yielded values larger than the actual cell dimensions. It appears that contributions from delta rays become appreciable in this system at these LET's

  6. Fentanyl Suppresses the Survival of CD4+ T Cells Isolated from Human Umbilical Cord Blood through Inhibition of IKKs-mediated NF-κB Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, K; Ma, P; Lu, H; Liu, S; Cao, Q

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects and the underlying mechanisms of fentanyl anaesthetic on T lymphocytes isolated from human umbilical cord blood in vitro. The percentages of CD4 + , CD8 + and regulatory T (Treg) cells in human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (UBMC) treated with fentanyl in vitro were analysed by flow cytometry. The levels of cytokines IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-17 secreted by activated CD4 + T cells were measured by ELISA assays. Expressions of MAPK and NF-κB signalling pathway proteins were determined by Western blotting. Effects of fentanyl on IKK and p65 expression promoter activities were analysed by luciferase assay. Fentanyl decreased the percentages and amounts of CD4 + , CD8 + and Foxp3 + Treg T lymphocyte subsets in UBMCs in a dose-dependent manner. Fentanyl inhibited the proliferation and induced apoptosis of activated CD4 + T cells dose dependently. Fentanyl could not reverse the increase of cell proliferation in activated groups to be equivalent with those in inactivated group. Secretions of IFN-γ, IL-2 and IL-4 cytokines were significantly decreased by moderate to high dose of fentanyl compared with controls. No significant differences were observed in protein expressions of MAPK pathway. In addition, fentanyl suppressed the IKKs-mediated activation of NF-κB. This study demonstrates that fentanyl exerts immunosuppressive effects on T lymphocytes obtained from UBMCs. Thus, the clinical application of fentanyl would not only relieve pain caused by surgery but regulate immune responses post-operation possibly through inhibition of IKKs-mediated NF-κB activation. © 2017 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  7. Calcium-independent phospholipase A₂, group VIA, is critical for RPE cell survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolko, Miriam; Vohra, Rupali; Westlund, Barbro S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the significance of calcium-independent phospholipase A₂, group VIA (iPLA2-VIA), in RPE cell survival following responses to sodium iodate (SI) in cell cultures. METHODS: The human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell line (ARPE-19) cells and primary mouse-RPE cultures were...

  8. Modification of bacterial cell survival by postirradiation hypoxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vexler, F B; Eidus, L Kh

    1986-01-27

    It is shown that postirradiation hypoxia affects the survival of E.coli. Hypoxic conditions immediately after a single-dose irradiation diminish cell survival in nutrient medium. Increasing time intervals between irradiation and hypoxia decrease the efficiency of the latter, while 1 h after irradiation hypoxia does not modify the survival of irradiated cells. These findings reveal that the mechanisms of action of postirradiation hypoxia on eu- and prokaryotic cells are similar.

  9. The Human Cell Atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, Aviv; Teichmann, Sarah A; Lander, Eric S; Amit, Ido; Benoist, Christophe; Birney, Ewan; Bodenmiller, Bernd; Campbell, Peter; Carninci, Piero; Clatworthy, Menna; Clevers, Hans; Deplancke, Bart; Dunham, Ian; Eberwine, James; Eils, Roland; Enard, Wolfgang; Farmer, Andrew; Fugger, Lars; Göttgens, Berthold; Hacohen, Nir; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Hemberg, Martin; Kim, Seung; Klenerman, Paul; Kriegstein, Arnold; Lein, Ed; Linnarsson, Sten; Lundberg, Emma; Lundeberg, Joakim; Majumder, Partha; Marioni, John C; Merad, Miriam; Mhlanga, Musa; Nawijn, Martijn; Netea, Mihai; Nolan, Garry; Pe'er, Dana; Phillipakis, Anthony; Ponting, Chris P; Quake, Stephen; Reik, Wolf; Rozenblatt-Rosen, Orit; Sanes, Joshua; Satija, Rahul; Schumacher, Ton N; Shalek, Alex; Shapiro, Ehud; Sharma, Padmanee; Shin, Jay W; Stegle, Oliver; Stratton, Michael; Stubbington, Michael J T; Theis, Fabian J; Uhlen, Matthias; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Wagner, Allon; Watt, Fiona; Weissman, Jonathan; Wold, Barbara; Xavier, Ramnik; Yosef, Nir

    2017-12-05

    The recent advent of methods for high-throughput single-cell molecular profiling has catalyzed a growing sense in the scientific community that the time is ripe to complete the 150-year-old effort to identify all cell types in the human body. The Human Cell Atlas Project is an international collaborative effort that aims to define all human cell types in terms of distinctive molecular profiles (such as gene expression profiles) and to connect this information with classical cellular descriptions (such as location and morphology). An open comprehensive reference map of the molecular state of cells in healthy human tissues would propel the systematic study of physiological states, developmental trajectories, regulatory circuitry and interactions of cells, and also provide a framework for understanding cellular dysregulation in human disease. Here we describe the idea, its potential utility, early proofs-of-concept, and some design considerations for the Human Cell Atlas, including a commitment to open data, code, and community.

  10. Human survivability of extreme impacts in free-fall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1963-08-01

    Human deceleration tolerances beyond the limits imposed by voluntary experimental methods were studied by means of intensive case histories of 137 individuals who have survived extremely abrupt impacts in accidental, suicidal, and homicidal free-fall...

  11. Long-term survival in small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, U; Osterlind, K; Hansen, M

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe in patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) the characteristics of those who survive for > or = 5 years, to identify long-term prognostic factors, to analyze survival data of 5-year survivors, and to study 10-year survival in patients entered before 1981. PATIENTS......, especially tobacco-related cancers and other tobacco-related diseases....

  12. Upregulation of LYAR induces neuroblastoma cell proliferation and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuting; Atmadibrata, Bernard; Yu, Denise; Wong, Matthew; Liu, Bing; Ho, Nicholas; Ling, Dora; Tee, Andrew E; Wang, Jenny; Mungrue, Imran N; Liu, Pei Y; Liu, Tao

    2017-09-01

    The N-Myc oncoprotein induces neuroblastoma by regulating gene transcription and consequently causing cell proliferation. Paradoxically, N-Myc is well known to induce apoptosis by upregulating pro-apoptosis genes, and it is not clear how N-Myc overexpressing neuroblastoma cells escape N-Myc-mediated apoptosis. The nuclear zinc finger protein LYAR has recently been shown to modulate gene expression by forming a protein complex with the protein arginine methyltransferase PRMT5. Here we showed that N-Myc upregulated LYAR gene expression by binding to its gene promoter. Genome-wide differential gene expression studies revealed that knocking down LYAR considerably upregulated the expression of oxidative stress genes including CHAC1, which depletes intracellular glutathione and induces oxidative stress. Although knocking down LYAR expression with siRNAs induced oxidative stress, neuroblastoma cell growth inhibition and apoptosis, co-treatment with the glutathione supplement N-acetyl-l-cysteine or co-transfection with CHAC1 siRNAs blocked the effect of LYAR siRNAs. Importantly, high levels of LYAR gene expression in human neuroblastoma tissues predicted poor event-free and overall survival in neuroblastoma patients, independent of the best current markers for poor prognosis. Taken together, our data suggest that LYAR induces proliferation and promotes survival of neuroblastoma cells by repressing the expression of oxidative stress genes such as CHAC1 and suppressing oxidative stress, and identify LYAR as a novel co-factor in N-Myc oncogenesis.

  13. Effects of lonizing radiation and cisplatin on peroxiredoxin I and II expression and survival rate in human neuroblastoma and rat fibroblast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Hwan; Yoon, Sei Chul [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-15

    This study investigated the influence of irradiation and cisplatin on Prxl and Prxll expression and on their survival rates (SR) in SK-N-BE2C and Rat2 cell lines. The amount of Prxl and Prxll production with or without N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) pretreatment was studied using a western blot after 20 Gy irradiation to determine the degree of inhibition of ROS accumulation. In addition, the amount of Prxl and Prxll production after cisplatin and after combination with cisplatin and 20 Gy irradiation was studied. The SRs of the cell lines in SK-N-BE2C and Rat 2 cells, applied with 20 Gy irradiation only, with various concentrations of cisplatin and with the combination of both, were studied. The 20 Gy irradiation-only group and the combination group were each subdivided according to NAC pretreatment, and corresponding SRs were observed at 2, 6, 12 and 48 hours after treatment. Compared with the control group, the amount of Prxl in SK-N-BE2C increased up to 60 minutes after irradiation and slightly increased after irradiation with NAC pretreatment 60 minutes. It did not increase in Rat2 after irradiation regardless of NAC pretreatment. Prxll in SK-N-BE2C and Rat2 was not increased after irradiation regardless of NAC pretreatment. The amounts of Prxl and Prxll in SK-N-BE2C and Rat2 were not increased either with the cisplatin-only treatment or the combination treatment with cisplatin and irradiation. SRs of irradiation group with or without NAC pretreatment and the combination group with or without NAC pretreatment were compared with each other in SK-N-BE2C and Rat2. SR was significantly high for the group with increased amount of Prxl, NAC pretreatment and lower the cisplatin concentration. SR of the group in SK-N-BE2C which had irradiation with NAC pretreatment tended to be slightly higher than the group who had irradiation without NAC pretreatment. SR of the group in Rat2 which had irradiation with NAC pretreatment was significantly higher than that the group which

  14. Effects of lonizing radiation and cisplatin on peroxiredoxin I and II expression and survival rate in human neuroblastoma and rat fibroblast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Hwan; Yoon, Sei Chul

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of irradiation and cisplatin on Prxl and Prxll expression and on their survival rates (SR) in SK-N-BE2C and Rat2 cell lines. The amount of Prxl and Prxll production with or without N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) pretreatment was studied using a western blot after 20 Gy irradiation to determine the degree of inhibition of ROS accumulation. In addition, the amount of Prxl and Prxll production after cisplatin and after combination with cisplatin and 20 Gy irradiation was studied. The SRs of the cell lines in SK-N-BE2C and Rat 2 cells, applied with 20 Gy irradiation only, with various concentrations of cisplatin and with the combination of both, were studied. The 20 Gy irradiation-only group and the combination group were each subdivided according to NAC pretreatment, and corresponding SRs were observed at 2, 6, 12 and 48 hours after treatment. Compared with the control group, the amount of Prxl in SK-N-BE2C increased up to 60 minutes after irradiation and slightly increased after irradiation with NAC pretreatment 60 minutes. It did not increase in Rat2 after irradiation regardless of NAC pretreatment. Prxll in SK-N-BE2C and Rat2 was not increased after irradiation regardless of NAC pretreatment. The amounts of Prxl and Prxll in SK-N-BE2C and Rat2 were not increased either with the cisplatin-only treatment or the combination treatment with cisplatin and irradiation. SRs of irradiation group with or without NAC pretreatment and the combination group with or without NAC pretreatment were compared with each other in SK-N-BE2C and Rat2. SR was significantly high for the group with increased amount of Prxl, NAC pretreatment and lower the cisplatin concentration. SR of the group in SK-N-BE2C which had irradiation with NAC pretreatment tended to be slightly higher than the group who had irradiation without NAC pretreatment. SR of the group in Rat2 which had irradiation with NAC pretreatment was significantly higher than that the group which

  15. Oxidative Stress, Redox Signaling, and Autophagy: Cell Death Versus Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Yepes, Juliana; Burns, Michaela; Anandhan, Annadurai; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; del Razo, Luz Maria; Quintanilla-Vega, Betzabet; Pappa, Aglaia; Panayiotidis, Mihalis I.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The molecular machinery regulating autophagy has started becoming elucidated, and a number of studies have undertaken the task to determine the role of autophagy in cell fate determination within the context of human disease progression. Oxidative stress and redox signaling are also largely involved in the etiology of human diseases, where both survival and cell death signaling cascades have been reported to be modulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Recent Advances: To date, there is a good understanding of the signaling events regulating autophagy, as well as the signaling processes by which alterations in redox homeostasis are transduced to the activation/regulation of signaling cascades. However, very little is known about the molecular events linking them to the regulation of autophagy. This lack of information has hampered the understanding of the role of oxidative stress and autophagy in human disease progression. Critical Issues: In this review, we will focus on (i) the molecular mechanism by which ROS/RNS generation, redox signaling, and/or oxidative stress/damage alter autophagic flux rates; (ii) the role of autophagy as a cell death process or survival mechanism in response to oxidative stress; and (iii) alternative mechanisms by which autophagy-related signaling regulate mitochondrial function and antioxidant response. Future Directions: Our research efforts should now focus on understanding the molecular basis of events by which autophagy is fine tuned by oxidation/reduction events. This knowledge will enable us to understand the mechanisms by which oxidative stress and autophagy regulate human diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 66–85. PMID:24483238

  16. Plasma Rich in Growth Factors Induces Cell Proliferation, Migration, Differentiation, and Cell Survival of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellado-López, Maravillas; Griffeth, Richard J; Meseguer-Ripolles, Jose; Cugat, Ramón; García, Montserrat; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are a promising therapeutic alternative for tissue repair in various clinical applications. However, restrictive cell survival, differential tissue integration, and undirected cell differentiation after transplantation in a hostile microenvironment are complications that require refinement. Plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) from platelet-rich plasma favors human and canine ASC survival, proliferation, and delaying human ASC senescence and autophagocytosis in comparison with serum-containing cultures. In addition, canine and human-derived ASCs efficiently differentiate into osteocytes, adipocytes, or chondrocytes in the presence of PRGF. PRGF treatment induces phosphorylation of AKT preventing ASC death induced by lethal concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. Indeed, AKT inhibition abolished the PRGF apoptosis prevention in ASC exposed to 100  μ M of hydrogen peroxide. Here, we show that canine ASCs respond to PRGF stimulus similarly to the human cells regarding cell survival and differentiation postulating the use of dogs as a suitable translational model. Overall, PRGF would be employed as a serum substitute for mesenchymal stem cell amplification to improve cell differentiation and as a preconditioning agent to prevent oxidative cell death.

  17. Plasma Rich in Growth Factors Induces Cell Proliferation, Migration, Differentiation, and Cell Survival of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maravillas Mellado-López

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs are a promising therapeutic alternative for tissue repair in various clinical applications. However, restrictive cell survival, differential tissue integration, and undirected cell differentiation after transplantation in a hostile microenvironment are complications that require refinement. Plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF from platelet-rich plasma favors human and canine ASC survival, proliferation, and delaying human ASC senescence and autophagocytosis in comparison with serum-containing cultures. In addition, canine and human-derived ASCs efficiently differentiate into osteocytes, adipocytes, or chondrocytes in the presence of PRGF. PRGF treatment induces phosphorylation of AKT preventing ASC death induced by lethal concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. Indeed, AKT inhibition abolished the PRGF apoptosis prevention in ASC exposed to 100 μM of hydrogen peroxide. Here, we show that canine ASCs respond to PRGF stimulus similarly to the human cells regarding cell survival and differentiation postulating the use of dogs as a suitable translational model. Overall, PRGF would be employed as a serum substitute for mesenchymal stem cell amplification to improve cell differentiation and as a preconditioning agent to prevent oxidative cell death.

  18. Cigarette smoke extract promotes human vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and survival through ERK1/2- and NF-κB-dependent pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Qing-Wen; Edvinsson, Lars; Xu, Cang-Bao

    2010-01-01

    and necrosis were found in serum-starved HASMCs. DSPs decreased cell death and increased B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 expression. Blocking phosphorylation of ERK1/2 or NF-κB attenuated DSP-induced cell death inhibition. Cigarette smoke particles stimulate HASMC proliferation and inhibit cell death...

  19. The human cell atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regev, Aviv; Teichmann, Sarah A.; Lander, Eric S.

    2017-01-01

    The recent advent of methods for high-throughput single-cell molecular profiling has catalyzed a growing sense in the scientific community that the time is ripe to complete the 150-year-old effort to identify all cell types in the human body. The Human Cell Atlas Project is an international...... collaborative effort that aims to define all human cell types in terms of distinctive molecular profiles (such as gene expression profiles) and to connect this information with classical cellular descriptions (such as location and morphology). An open comprehensive reference map of the molecular state of cells...... in healthy human tissues would propel the systematic study of physiological states, developmental trajectories, regulatory circuitry and interactions of cells, and also provide a framework for understanding cellular dysregulation in human disease. Here we describe the idea, its potential utility, early...

  20. Can tigers survive in human-dominated landscapes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolipaka, S.S.

    2018-01-01

    S.S. Kolipaka’s thesis questions and investigates the survival prospects of reintroduced tigers and their offspring’s in the human dominated landscape of Panna tiger reserve in India. This thesis recognises the importance of both the sociological (human) and biological (tiger) aspects to address

  1. Survival of Yogurt Bacteria in the Human Gut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elli, Marina; Callegari, Maria Luisa; Ferrari, Susanna; Bessi, Elena; Cattivelli, Daniela; Soldi, Sara; Morelli, Lorenzo; Goupil Feuillerat, Nathalie; Antoine, Jean-Michel

    2006-01-01

    Whether Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus can be recovered after passage through the human gut was tested by feeding 20 healthy volunteers commercial yogurt. Yogurt bacteria were found in human feces, suggesting that they can survive transit in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:16820518

  2. Survival of Yogurt Bacteria in the Human Gut

    OpenAIRE

    Elli, Marina; Callegari, Maria Luisa; Ferrari, Susanna; Bessi, Elena; Cattivelli, Daniela; Soldi, Sara; Morelli, Lorenzo; Goupil Feuillerat, Nathalie; Antoine, Jean-Michel

    2006-01-01

    Whether Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus can be recovered after passage through the human gut was tested by feeding 20 healthy volunteers commercial yogurt. Yogurt bacteria were found in human feces, suggesting that they can survive transit in the gastrointestinal tract.

  3. Humanity cannot survive a nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlich, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    The author documents the unprecedented disaster that a nuclear war would wreak. He and his colleagues conclude that a nuclear war may mean the end of the human species. The environment that will confront most human beings and other organisms after a thermonuclear holocaust will be so altered, and so malign, that extreme and widespread damage to living systems is inevitable. It is, for example, entirely possible that the biological impacts of a war, apart from those resulting directly from a blast, fire, and prompt radiation, could result in the end of civilization in the Northern Hemisphere. The author's primary task in this paper is to give some technical background to explain why numerous biologists, especially ecologists, are convinced that decision-makers in many nations vastly underrate the potential risks of nuclear war

  4. A track-event theory of cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besserer, Juergen; Schneider, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    When fractionation schemes for hypofractionation and stereotactic body radiotherapy are considered, a reliable cell survival model at high dose is needed for calculating doses of similar biological effectiveness. In this work a simple model for cell survival which is valid also at high dose is developed from Poisson statistics. An event is defined by two double strand breaks (DSB) on the same or different chromosomes. An event is always lethal due to direct lethal damage or lethal binary misrepair by the formation of chromosome aberrations. Two different mechanisms can produce events: one-track events (OTE) or two-track-events (TTE). The target for an OTE is always a lethal event, the target for an TTE is one DSB. At least two TTEs on the same or different chromosomes are necessary to produce an event. Both, the OTE and the TTE are statistically independent. From the stochastic nature of cell kill which is described by the Poisson distribution the cell survival probability was derived. It was shown that a solution based on Poisson statistics exists for cell survival. It exhibits exponential cell survival at high dose and a finite gradient of cell survival at vanishing dose, which is in agreement with experimental cell studies. The model fits the experimental data nearly as well as the three-parameter formula of Hug-Kellerer and is only based on two free parameters. It is shown that the LQ formalism is an approximation of the model derived in this work. It could be also shown that the derived model predicts a fractionated cell survival experiment better than the LQ-model. It was shown that cell survival can be described with a simple analytical formula on the basis of Poisson statistics. This solution represents in the limit of large dose the typical exponential behavior and predicts cell survival after fractionated dose application better than the LQ-model.

  5. A track-event theory of cell survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besserer, Juergen; Schneider, Uwe [Zuerich Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. of Physics; Radiotherapy Hirslanden, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2015-09-01

    When fractionation schemes for hypofractionation and stereotactic body radiotherapy are considered, a reliable cell survival model at high dose is needed for calculating doses of similar biological effectiveness. In this work a simple model for cell survival which is valid also at high dose is developed from Poisson statistics. An event is defined by two double strand breaks (DSB) on the same or different chromosomes. An event is always lethal due to direct lethal damage or lethal binary misrepair by the formation of chromosome aberrations. Two different mechanisms can produce events: one-track events (OTE) or two-track-events (TTE). The target for an OTE is always a lethal event, the target for an TTE is one DSB. At least two TTEs on the same or different chromosomes are necessary to produce an event. Both, the OTE and the TTE are statistically independent. From the stochastic nature of cell kill which is described by the Poisson distribution the cell survival probability was derived. It was shown that a solution based on Poisson statistics exists for cell survival. It exhibits exponential cell survival at high dose and a finite gradient of cell survival at vanishing dose, which is in agreement with experimental cell studies. The model fits the experimental data nearly as well as the three-parameter formula of Hug-Kellerer and is only based on two free parameters. It is shown that the LQ formalism is an approximation of the model derived in this work. It could be also shown that the derived model predicts a fractionated cell survival experiment better than the LQ-model. It was shown that cell survival can be described with a simple analytical formula on the basis of Poisson statistics. This solution represents in the limit of large dose the typical exponential behavior and predicts cell survival after fractionated dose application better than the LQ-model.

  6. Role for protein geranylgeranylation in adult T-cell leukemia cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonaka, Mizuho; Uota, Shin; Saitoh, Yasunori; Takahashi, Mayumi; Sugimoto, Haruyo; Amet, Tohti; Arai, Ayako; Miura, Osamu; Yamamoto, Naoki; Yamaoka, Shoji

    2009-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is a fatal lymphoproliferative disease that develops in human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I)-infected individuals. Despite the accumulating knowledge of the molecular biology of HTLV-I-infected cells, effective therapeutic strategies remain to be established. Recent reports showed that the hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-CoA reductase inhibitor statins have anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects on certain tumor cells through inhibition of protein prenylation. Here, we report that statins hinder the survival of ATL cells and induce apoptotic cell death. Inhibition of protein geranylgeranylation is responsible for these effects, since simultaneous treatment with isoprenoid precursors, geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate or farnesyl pyrophosphate, but not a cholesterol precursor squalene, restored the viability of ATL cells. Simvastatin inhibited geranylgeranylation of small GTPases Rab5B and Rac1 in ATL cells, and a geranylgeranyl transferase inhibitor GGTI-298 reduced ATL cell viability more efficiently than a farnesyl transferase inhibitor FTI-277. These results not only unveil an important role for protein geranylgeranylation in ATL cell survival, but also implicate therapeutic potentials of statins in the treatment of ATL

  7. Protein kinase activity of phosphoinositide 3-kinase regulates cytokine-dependent cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Thomas

    Full Text Available The dual specificity protein/lipid kinase, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K, promotes growth factor-mediated cell survival and is frequently deregulated in cancer. However, in contrast to canonical lipid-kinase functions, the role of PI3K protein kinase activity in regulating cell survival is unknown. We have employed a novel approach to purify and pharmacologically profile protein kinases from primary human acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells that phosphorylate serine residues in the cytoplasmic portion of cytokine receptors to promote hemopoietic cell survival. We have isolated a kinase activity that is able to directly phosphorylate Ser585 in the cytoplasmic domain of the interleukin 3 (IL-3 and granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF receptors and shown it to be PI3K. Physiological concentrations of cytokine in the picomolar range were sufficient for activating the protein kinase activity of PI3K leading to Ser585 phosphorylation and hemopoietic cell survival but did not activate PI3K lipid kinase signaling or promote proliferation. Blockade of PI3K lipid signaling by expression of the pleckstrin homology of Akt1 had no significant impact on the ability of picomolar concentrations of cytokine to promote hemopoietic cell survival. Furthermore, inducible expression of a mutant form of PI3K that is defective in lipid kinase activity but retains protein kinase activity was able to promote Ser585 phosphorylation and hemopoietic cell survival in the absence of cytokine. Blockade of p110α by RNA interference or multiple independent PI3K inhibitors not only blocked Ser585 phosphorylation in cytokine-dependent cells and primary human AML blasts, but also resulted in a block in survival signaling and cell death. Our findings demonstrate a new role for the protein kinase activity of PI3K in phosphorylating the cytoplasmic tail of the GM-CSF and IL-3 receptors to selectively regulate cell survival highlighting the importance of targeting

  8. Transitional-2 B cells acquire regulatory function during tolerance induction and contribute to allograft survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Aurélie; Blair, Paul A; Chai, Jian-Guo; Ratnasothy, Kulachelvy; Stolarczyk, Emilie; Alhabbab, Rowa; Rackham, Chloe L; Jones, Peter M; Smyth, Lesley; Elgueta, Raul; Howard, Jane K; Lechler, Robert I; Lombardi, Giovanna

    2015-03-01

    In humans, tolerance to renal transplants has been associated with alterations in B-cell gene transcription and maintenance of the numbers of circulating transitional B cells. Here, we use a mouse model of transplantation tolerance to investigate the contribution of B cells to allograft survival. We demonstrate that transfer of B cells from mice rendered tolerant to MHC class I mismatched skin grafts can prolong graft survival in a dose-dependent and antigen-specific manner to a degree similar to that afforded by graft-specific regulatory T (Treg) cells. Tolerance in this model was associated with an increase in transitional-2 (T2) B cells. Only T2 B cells from tolerized mice, not naïve T2 nor alloantigen experienced T2, were capable of prolonging skin allograft survival, and suppressing T-cell activation. Tolerized T2 B cells expressed lower levels of CD86, increased TIM-1, and demonstrated a preferential survival in vivo. Furthermore, we demonstrate a synergistic effect between tolerized B cells and graft-specific Treg cells. IL-10 production by T2 B cells did not contribute to tolerance, as shown by transfer of B cells from IL-10(-/-) mice. These results suggest that T2 B cells in tolerant patients may include a population of regulatory B cells that directly inhibit graft rejection. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Nerve Growth Factor in Cancer Cell Death and Survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molloy, Niamh H.; Read, Danielle E.; Gorman, Adrienne M., E-mail: adrienne.gorman@nuigalway.ie [Apoptosis Research Centre, School of Natural Sciences, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland)

    2011-02-01

    One of the major challenges for cancer therapeutics is the resistance of many tumor cells to induction of cell death due to pro-survival signaling in the cancer cells. Here we review the growing literature which shows that neurotrophins contribute to pro-survival signaling in many different types of cancer. In particular, nerve growth factor, the archetypal neurotrophin, has been shown to play a role in tumorigenesis over the past decade. Nerve growth factor mediates its effects through its two cognate receptors, TrkA, a receptor tyrosine kinase and p75{sup NTR}, a member of the death receptor superfamily. Depending on the tumor origin, pro-survival signaling can be mediated by TrkA receptors or by p75{sup NTR}. For example, in breast cancer the aberrant expression of nerve growth factor stimulates proliferative signaling through TrkA and pro-survival signaling through p75{sup NTR}. This latter signaling through p75{sup NTR} promotes increased resistance to the induction of cell death by chemotherapeutic treatments. In contrast, in prostate cells the p75{sup NTR} mediates cell death and prevents metastasis. In prostate cancer, expression of this receptor is lost, which contributes to tumor progression by allowing cells to survive, proliferate and metastasize. This review focuses on our current knowledge of neurotrophin signaling in cancer, with a particular emphasis on nerve growth factor regulation of cell death and survival in cancer.

  10. Nerve Growth Factor in Cancer Cell Death and Survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molloy, Niamh H.; Read, Danielle E.; Gorman, Adrienne M.

    2011-01-01

    One of the major challenges for cancer therapeutics is the resistance of many tumor cells to induction of cell death due to pro-survival signaling in the cancer cells. Here we review the growing literature which shows that neurotrophins contribute to pro-survival signaling in many different types of cancer. In particular, nerve growth factor, the archetypal neurotrophin, has been shown to play a role in tumorigenesis over the past decade. Nerve growth factor mediates its effects through its two cognate receptors, TrkA, a receptor tyrosine kinase and p75 NTR , a member of the death receptor superfamily. Depending on the tumor origin, pro-survival signaling can be mediated by TrkA receptors or by p75 NTR . For example, in breast cancer the aberrant expression of nerve growth factor stimulates proliferative signaling through TrkA and pro-survival signaling through p75 NTR . This latter signaling through p75 NTR promotes increased resistance to the induction of cell death by chemotherapeutic treatments. In contrast, in prostate cells the p75 NTR mediates cell death and prevents metastasis. In prostate cancer, expression of this receptor is lost, which contributes to tumor progression by allowing cells to survive, proliferate and metastasize. This review focuses on our current knowledge of neurotrophin signaling in cancer, with a particular emphasis on nerve growth factor regulation of cell death and survival in cancer

  11. Out-of-Field Cell Survival Following Exposure to Intensity-Modulated Radiation Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterworth, Karl T.; McGarry, Conor K.; Trainor, Colman; O'Sullivan, Joe M.; Hounsell, Alan R.; Prise, Kevin M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the in-field and out-of-field cell survival of cells irradiated with either primary field or scattered radiation in the presence and absence of intercellular communication. Methods and Materials: Cell survival was determined by clonogenic assay in human prostate cancer (DU145) and primary fibroblast (AGO1552) cells following exposure to different field configurations delivered using a 6-MV photon beam produced with a Varian linear accelerator. Results: Nonuniform dose distributions were delivered using a multileaf collimator (MLC) in which half of the cell population was shielded. Clonogenic survival in the shielded region was significantly lower than that predicted from the linear quadratic model. In both cell lines, the out-of-field responses appeared to saturate at 40%-50% survival at a scattered dose of 0.70 Gy in DU-145 cells and 0.24 Gy in AGO1522 cells. There was an approximately eightfold difference in the initial slopes of the out-of-field response compared with the α-component of the uniform field response. In contrast, cells in the exposed part of the field showed increased survival. These observations were abrogated by direct physical inhibition of cellular communication and by the addition of the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor aminoguanidine known to inhibit intercellular bystander effects. Additional studies showed the proportion of cells irradiated and dose delivered to the shielded and exposed regions of the field to impact on response. Conclusions: These data demonstrate out-of-field effects as important determinants of cell survival following exposure to modulated irradiation fields with cellular communication between differentially irradiated cell populations playing an important role. Validation of these observations in additional cell models may facilitate the refinement of existing radiobiological models and the observations considered important determinants of cell survival.

  12. The novel JAK inhibitor AZD1480 blocks STAT3 and FGFR3 signaling, resulting in suppression of human myeloma cell growth and survival

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Scuto, A.; Krejčí, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 3 (2011), s. 538-550 ISSN 0887-6924 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : HUMAN MULTIPLE- MYELOMA * BONE-MARROW MICROENVIRONMENT * PROTEIN-KINASE CASCADE Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 9.561, year: 2011

  13. The Mass Media of Entertainment and Human Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorney, Roderic; Steele, Gary

    Urgently needed for human survival is a means of influencing large numbers of people to put into rapid action measures which could neutralize such menances as pollution, overpopulation, and violence. Though the cumulative effect of the mass media is not fully established, media entertainment may be the most influential institution in our society.…

  14. Human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem; Kassem, Moustapha

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a group of clonogenic cells present among the bone marrow stroma and capable of multilineage differentiation into mesoderm-type cells such as osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. Due to their ease of isolation and their differentiation potential, MSC are being...... introduced into clinical medicine in variety of applications and through different ways of administration. Here, we discuss approaches for isolation, characterization and directing differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). An update of the current clinical use of the cells is also provided....

  15. Techniques for measuring red cell, platelet, and WBC survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, K.; Freeman, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    Blood cell survival studies yield valuable information concerning production and destruction of cells circulating in the bloodstream. Methodologies for the measurement of red cell survival include nonisotopic methods such as differential agglutination and hemolysis. The isotopic label may be radioactive or, if not, will require availability of a mass spectrograph. These methods fall into two categories, one where red cells of all ages are labeled ( 51 Cr, DFP32, etc.) and those employing a cohort label of newly formed cells ( 14 C glycine, 75 Se methionine, etc.). Interpretation of results for methodology employed and mechanism of destruction, random or by senescence, are discussed. A similar approach is presented for platelet and leukocyte survival studies. The inherent difficulties and complications of sequestration, storage, and margination of these cells are emphasized and discussed. 38 references

  16. Ras and Rheb Signaling in Survival and Cell Death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrkamp, Anja; Herrmann, Christian; Stoll, Raphael; Heumann, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    One of the most obvious hallmarks of cancer is uncontrolled proliferation of cells partly due to independence of growth factor supply. A major component of mitogenic signaling is Ras, a small GTPase. It was the first identified human protooncogene and is known since more than three decades to promote cellular proliferation and growth. Ras was shown to support growth factor-independent survival during development and to protect from chemical or mechanical lesion-induced neuronal degeneration in postmitotic neurons. In contrast, for specific patho-physiological cases and cellular systems it has been shown that Ras may also promote cell death. Proteins from the Ras association family (Rassf, especially Rassf1 and Rassf5) are tumor suppressors that are activated by Ras-GTP, triggering apoptosis via e.g., activation of mammalian sterile 20-like (MST1) kinase. In contrast to Ras, their expression is suppressed in many types of tumours, which makes Rassf proteins an exciting model for understanding the divergent effects of Ras activity. It seems likely that the outcome of Ras signaling depends on the balance between the activation of its various downstream effectors, thus determining cellular fate towards either proliferation or apoptosis. Ras homologue enriched in brain (Rheb) is a protein from the Ras superfamily that is also known to promote proliferation, growth, and regeneration through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTor) pathway. However, recent evidences indicate that the Rheb-mTor pathway may switch its function from a pro-growth into a cell death pathway, depending on the cellular situation. In contrast to Ras signaling, for Rheb, the cellular context is likely to modulate the whole Rheb-mTor pathway towards cellular death or survival, respectively

  17. Ras and Rheb Signaling in Survival and Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrkamp, Anja [Molecular Neurobiochemistry, Ruhr University of Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Herrmann, Christian [Department of Physical Chemistry1, Protein Interaction, Ruhr University of Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Stoll, Raphael [Biomolecular NMR, Ruhr University of Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Heumann, Rolf, E-mail: rolf.heumann@rub.de [Molecular Neurobiochemistry, Ruhr University of Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2013-05-28

    One of the most obvious hallmarks of cancer is uncontrolled proliferation of cells partly due to independence of growth factor supply. A major component of mitogenic signaling is Ras, a small GTPase. It was the first identified human protooncogene and is known since more than three decades to promote cellular proliferation and growth. Ras was shown to support growth factor-independent survival during development and to protect from chemical or mechanical lesion-induced neuronal degeneration in postmitotic neurons. In contrast, for specific patho-physiological cases and cellular systems it has been shown that Ras may also promote cell death. Proteins from the Ras association family (Rassf, especially Rassf1 and Rassf5) are tumor suppressors that are activated by Ras-GTP, triggering apoptosis via e.g., activation of mammalian sterile 20-like (MST1) kinase. In contrast to Ras, their expression is suppressed in many types of tumours, which makes Rassf proteins an exciting model for understanding the divergent effects of Ras activity. It seems likely that the outcome of Ras signaling depends on the balance between the activation of its various downstream effectors, thus determining cellular fate towards either proliferation or apoptosis. Ras homologue enriched in brain (Rheb) is a protein from the Ras superfamily that is also known to promote proliferation, growth, and regeneration through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTor) pathway. However, recent evidences indicate that the Rheb-mTor pathway may switch its function from a pro-growth into a cell death pathway, depending on the cellular situation. In contrast to Ras signaling, for Rheb, the cellular context is likely to modulate the whole Rheb-mTor pathway towards cellular death or survival, respectively.

  18. The role of caspase 3 and BclxL in the action of interleukin 7 (IL-7): a survival factor in activated human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amos, C L; Woetmann, A; Nielsen, M

    1998-01-01

    cells. Both cytokines abrogated the dexamethasone-induced stimulation of Caspase 3 and prevented the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), a substrate for the Caspase 3. IL-7 upregulated the expression of Bc1xL and counteracted the downregulation of this anti-apoptotic protein...... by the synthetic glucocorticoid, dexamethasone. Bcl-2 protein expression was uupregulated by IL-7 with or without dexamethasone, but Bc1-2 was expressed at a much lower level than BclxL in these cells. Levels of Bax did not markedly change on either cytokine stimulation or dexamethasone treatment. An unidentified...... 23-kDa band, which was recognized by the anti-Bc1-2 antibody, was induced by dexamthasone and suppressed by IL-7 and IL-2. This protein was subject to independent regulation as compared to the p26 Bc1-2 protein, suggesting that it may be a novel factor, possibly involved in the regulation...

  19. Stem cell death and survival in heart regeneration and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelwahid, Eltyeb; Kalvelyte, Audrone; Stulpinas, Aurimas; de Carvalho, Katherine Athayde Teixeira; Guarita-Souza, Luiz Cesar; Foldes, Gabor

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are major causes of mortality and morbidity. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis disrupts cardiac function and leads to cardiac decompensation and terminal heart failure. Delineating the regulatory signaling pathways that orchestrate cell survival in the heart has significant therapeutic implications. Cardiac tissue has limited capacity to regenerate and repair. Stem cell therapy is a successful approach for repairing and regenerating ischemic cardiac tissue; however, transplanted cells display very high death percentage, a problem that affects success of tissue regeneration. Stem cells display multipotency or pluripotency and undergo self-renewal, however these events are negatively influenced by upregulation of cell death machinery that induces the significant decrease in survival and differentiation signals upon cardiovascular injury. While efforts to identify cell types and molecular pathways that promote cardiac tissue regeneration have been productive, studies that focus on blocking the extensive cell death after transplantation are limited. The control of cell death includes multiple networks rather than one crucial pathway, which underlies the challenge of identifying the interaction between various cellular and biochemical components. This review is aimed at exploiting the molecular mechanisms by which stem cells resist death signals to develop into mature and healthy cardiac cells. Specifically, we focus on a number of factors that control death and survival of stem cells upon transplantation and ultimately affect cardiac regeneration. We also discuss potential survival enhancing strategies and how they could be meaningful in the design of targeted therapies that improve cardiac function.

  20. Stem cell aging: Survival of the laziest?

    OpenAIRE

    Muller-Sieburg, Christa; Sieburg, Hans B.

    2008-01-01

    The question whether stem cells age remains an enigma. Traditionally, aging was thought to change the properties of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). We discuss here a new model of stem cell aging that challenges this view. It is now well-established that the HSC compartment is heterogeneous, consisting of epigenetically fixed subpopulations of HSC that differ in self-renewal and differentiation capacity. New data show that the representation of these HSC subsets changes during aging. HSC that ...

  1. Stable shRNA Silencing of Lactate Dehydrogenase A (LDHA) in Human MDA-MB-231 Breast Cancer Cells Fails to Alter Lactic Acid Production, Glycolytic Activity, ATP or Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Nzinga; Mazzio, Elizabeth A; Bauer, David; Flores-Rozas, Hernan; Soliman, Karam F A

    2017-03-01

    In the US, African Americans have a high death rate from triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), characterized by lack of hormone receptors (ER, PR, HER2/ERRB2) which are otherwise valuable targets of chemotherapy. There is a need to identify novel targets that negatively impact TNBC tumorigenesis. TNBCs release an abundance of lactic acid, under normoxic, hypoxic and hyperoxic conditions; this referred to as the Warburg effect. Accumulated lactic acid sustains peri-cellular acidity which propels metastatic invasion and malignant aggressive transformation. The source of lactic acid is believed to be via conversion of pyruvate by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in the last step of glycolysis, with most studies focusing on the LDHA isoform. In this study, LDHA was silenced using long-term MISSION® shRNA lentivirus in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. Down-regulation of LDHA transcription and protein expression was confirmed by western blot, immunocytochemistry and qPCR. A number of parameters were measured in fully viable vector controls versus knock-down (KD) clones, including levels of lactic acid produced, glucose consumed, ATP and basic metabolic rates. The data show that lentivirus V-165 generated a knock-down clone most effective in reducing both gene and protein levels to less than 1% of vector controls. Stable KD showed absolutely no changes in cell viability, lactic acid production, ATP, glucose consumption or basic metabolic rate. Given the complete absence of impact on any observed parameter by LDH-A KD and this being somewhat contrary to findings in the literature, further analysis was required to determine why. Whole-transcriptome analytic profile on MDA-MB-231 for LDH subtypes using Agilent Human Genome 4×44k microarrays, where the data show the following component breakdown. Transcripts: 30.47 % LDHA, 69.36% LDHB, 0.12% LDHC and 0.05% LDHD. These findings underscore the importance of alternative isoforms of LDH in cancer cells to produce lactic acid

  2. Activation of CHK1 in Supporting Cells Indirectly Promotes Hair Cell Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Jadali

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The sensory hair cells of the inner ear are exquisitely sensitive to ototoxic insults. Loss of hair cells after exposure to ototoxic agents causes hearing loss. Chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin causes hair cell loss. Cisplatin forms DNA mono-adducts as well as intra- and inter-strand DNA crosslinks. DNA cisplatin adducts are repaired through the DNA damage response. The decision between cell survival and cell death following DNA damage rests on factors that are involved in determining damage tolerance, cell survival and apoptosis. Cisplatin damage on hair cells has been the main focus of many ototoxic studies, yet the effect of cisplatin on supporting cells has been largely ignored. In this study, the effects of DNA damage response in cochlear supporting cells were interrogated. Supporting cells play a major role in the development, maintenance and oto-protection of hair cells. Loss of supporting cells may indirectly affect hair cell survival or maintenance. Activation of the Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase (PI3K signaling was previously shown to promote hair cell survival. To test whether activating PI3K signaling promotes supporting cell survival after cisplatin damage, cochlear explants from the neural subset (NS Cre Pten conditional knockout mice were employed. Deletion of Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog (PTEN activates PI3K signaling in multiple cell types within the cochlea. Supporting cells lacking PTEN showed increased cell survival after cisplatin damage. Supporting cells lacking PTEN also showed increased phosphorylation of Checkpoint Kinase 1 (CHK1 levels after cisplatin damage. Nearest neighbor analysis showed increased numbers of supporting cells with activated PI3K signaling in close proximity to surviving hair cells in cisplatin damaged cochleae. We propose that increased PI3K signaling promotes supporting cell survival through phosphorylation of CHK1 and increased survival of supporting cells indirectly increases hair cell

  3. Surviving the crash: T-cell homeostasis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TOSHIBA

    The formation of higher order apoptotic structures at the mitochondrion precedes cellular collapse dead. Tracking bax multimerization at mitochondria wildtype. Bax active -6A7. Nucleus – H33342. Apoptotic T-cells ...

  4. Radiation cell survival and growth delay studies in multicellular spheroids of small-cell lung carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchesne, G.M.; Peacock, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    The radiation sensitivity of two small-cell lung carcinoma cell lines growing as multicellular spheroids in static culture was determined using clonogenic cell survival and growth delay as endpoints. Growth delay determination suggested that clonogenic cell kill was less than was obtained by direct assay of cell survival. Recovery from potentially lethal damage was assayed in one line (HC12) but was not demonstrable, and clonogenic cell survival decreased with time in treated spheroids with diameters greater than 300 μm which contained a hypoxic cell population. Microscopic examination of the treated spheroids showed the emergence of an abnormal giant-cell population, and the progressive clonogenic cell loss that occurred after treatment was thought to be due to oxygen and nutrient deprivation of the remaining viable cells by this doomed cell population. Correction of the growth delay measurements for changes in cell size and clonogenic cell population allowed correlation of the growth delay and cell survival data. (author)

  5. c-Myc-Dependent Cell Competition in Human Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manish S; Shah, Heta S; Shrivastava, Neeta

    2017-07-01

    Cell Competition is an interaction between cells for existence in heterogeneous cell populations of multicellular organisms. This phenomenon is involved in initiation and progression of cancer where heterogeneous cell populations compete directly or indirectly for the survival of the fittest based on differential gene expression. In Drosophila, cells having lower dMyc expression are eliminated by cell competition through apoptosis when present in the milieu of cells having higher dMyc expression. Thus, we designed a study to develop c-Myc (human homolog) dependent in vitro cell competition model of human cancer cells. Cells with higher c-Myc were transfected with c-myc shRNA to prepare cells with lower c-Myc and then co-cultured with the same type of cells having a higher c-Myc in equal ratio. Cells with lower c-Myc showed a significant decrease in numbers when compared with higher c-Myc cells, suggesting "loser" and "winner" status of cells, respectively. During microscopy, engulfment of loser cells by winner cells was observed with higher expression of JNK in loser cells. Furthermore, elimination of loser cells was prevented significantly, when co-cultured cells were treated with the JNK (apoptosis) inhibitor. Above results indicate elimination of loser cells in the presence of winner cells by c-Myc-dependent mechanisms of cell competition in human cancer cells. This could be an important mechanism in human tumors where normal cells are eliminated by c-Myc-overexpressed tumor cells. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1782-1791, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Ensemble of cell survival experiments after ion irradiation for validation of RBE models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, Thomas; Scholz, Uwe; Scholz, Michael [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Durante, Marco [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, TU Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    There is persistent interest in understanding the systematics of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Models such as the Local Effect Model (LEM) or the Microdosimetric Kinetic Model have the goal to predict the RBE. For the validation of these models a collection of many in-vitro cell survival experiments is most appropriate. The set-up of an ensemble of in-vitro cell survival data comprising about 850 survival experiments after both ion and photon irradiation is reported. The survival curves have been taken out from publications. The experiments encompass survival curves obtained in different labs, using different ion species from protons to uranium, varying irradiation modalities (shaped or monoenergetic beam), various energies and linear energy transfers, and a whole variety of cell types (human or rodent; normal, mutagenic or tumor; radioresistant or -sensitive). Each cell survival curve has been parameterized by the linear-quadratic model. The photon parameters have been added to the data base to allow to calculate the experimental RBE to any survival level. We report on experimental trends found within the data ensemble. The data will serve as a testing ground for RBE models such as the LEM. Finally, a roadmap for further validation and first model results using the data base in combination with the LEM are presented.

  7. Repair-misrepair model of cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, C.A.; Blakely, E.A.; Ngo, F.Q.H.

    1980-01-01

    During the last three years a new model, the repair-misrepair model (RMR) has been proposed, to interpret radiobiological experiments with heavy ions. In using the RMR model it became apparent that some of its features are suitable for handling the effects produced by a variety of environmental agents in addition to ionizing radiation. Two separate sequences of events are assumed to take place in an irradiated cell. The first sequence begins with an initial energy transfer consisting of ionizations and excitations, culminating via fast secondary physical and chemical processes in established macromolecular lesions in essential cell structures. The second sequence contains the responses of the cell to the lesions and consists of the processes of recognition and molecular repair. In normal cells there exists one repair process or at most a few enzymatic repair processes for each essential macromolecular lesion. The enzymatic repair processes may last for hours and minutes, and can be separated in time from the initial physicochemical and later genetic phases

  8. VEGF improves survival of mesenchymal stem cells in infarcted hearts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pons, Jennifer; Huang Yu; Arakawa-Hoyt, Janice; Washko, Daniel; Takagawa, Junya; Ye, Jianqin; Grossman, William; Su Hua

    2008-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a promising source for cell-based treatment of myocardial infarction (MI), but existing strategies are restricted by low cell survival and engraftment. We examined whether vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) improve MSC viability in infracted hearts. We found long-term culture increased MSC-cellular stress: expressing more cell cycle inhibitors, p16 INK , p21 and p19 ARF . VEGF treatment reduced cellular stress, increased pro-survival factors, phosphorylated-Akt and Bcl-xL expression and cell proliferation. Co-injection of MSCs with VEGF to MI hearts increased cell engraftment and resulted in better improvement of cardiac function than that injected with MSCs or VEGF alone. In conclusion, VEGF protects MSCs from culture-induce cellular stress and improves their viability in ischemic myocardium, which results in improvements of their therapeutic effect for the treatment of MI

  9. An unexpected caffeine-enhanced survival in x-ray-sensitive variant cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsumi, Hiroshi

    1985-01-01

    The sensitivity of normal Chinese hamster cell lines, V79 and CHO, mouse cell lines, L5178Y and L, and human HeLa cells to the killing effect of x-ray is enhanced with addition of caffeine following x-ray irradiation in a dose-dependent fashion. However, the survival rate of variant cell (V79-AL162/S-10) increased with addition of low concentration of caffeine (caffeine-enhanced survival phenomenon). Therefore, the effects of protein synthesis-inhibiting agents, such as cycloheximide and puromycin, on caffeine-enhanced survival phenomenon were examined. This phenomenon was completely abolished by the inhibitory agents, but not abolished by DNA synthesis-damaging agents, such as excess thymidine and aphidicolin. DNA-damaging physiochemical factors, such as neutrons, U.V., methyl methanesulfonate and mitomycin C, were examined in relation to variant cells' sensitivity and caffeine-enhanced survival phenomenon. V79-AL162/S-10 cells showed high sensitivity to the killing effect of mitomycin C, but their survival rate returned to the rate of normal V79-B310H cells with addition of caffeine. (Namekawa, K.)

  10. Human innate lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mjösberg, Jenny; Spits, Hergen

    2016-11-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are increasingly acknowledged as important mediators of immune homeostasis and pathology. ILCs act as early orchestrators of immunity, responding to epithelium-derived signals by expressing an array of cytokines and cell-surface receptors, which shape subsequent immune responses. As such, ILCs make up interesting therapeutic targets for several diseases. In patients with allergy and asthma, group 2 innate lymphoid cells produce high amounts of IL-5 and IL-13, thereby contributing to type 2-mediated inflammation. Group 3 innate lymphoid cells are implicated in intestinal homeostasis and psoriasis pathology through abundant IL-22 production, whereas group 1 innate lymphoid cells are accumulated in chronic inflammation of the gut (inflammatory bowel disease) and lung (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), where they contribute to IFN-γ-mediated inflammation. Although the ontogeny of mouse ILCs is slowly unraveling, the development of human ILCs is far from understood. In addition, the growing complexity of the human ILC family in terms of previously unrecognized functional heterogeneity and plasticity has generated confusion within the field. Here we provide an updated view on the function and plasticity of human ILCs in tissue homeostasis and disease. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Human papilloma virus and survival of oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broglie, Martina A; Soltermann, Alex; Haile, Sarah R; Huber, Gerhard F; Stoeckli, Sandro J

    2015-07-01

    Impact of p16 protein, a surrogate marker for human papilloma virus induced cancer, p53 and EGFR as well as clinical factors on survival in a patient cohort with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) treated by surgical resection and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) ± concomitant chemotherapy (CT). This is a retrospective analysis of patient's charts and tumor tissue. 57 patients were consecutively included and their tumor tissue assembled on a tissue microarray following immunohistochemical analysis. Survival times were estimated by means of Kaplan-Meier analysis. The importance of clinical and immunohistochemical factors for outcome was estimated by cox proportional hazard models. With 88% 5-year overall survival, 91% 5-year disease-specific survival and 91% 5-year disease-free survival, respectively, we found excellent survival rates in this surgically treated patient cohort of mainly advanced OPSCC (93% AJCC stage III or IV). The only factors positively influencing survival were p16 overexpression as well as p53 negativity and even more pronounced the combination of those biomarkers. Survival analysis of patients classified into three risk categories according to an algorithm based on p16, smoking, T- and N-category revealed a low, intermediate and high-risk group with significant survival differences between the low and the high-risk group. Patients with OPSCC can be successfully treated by surgery and adjuvant RT ± CT with a clear survival benefit of p16 positive, p53 negative patients. We recommend considering a combination of immunohistochemical (p16, p53) and clinical factors (smoking, T- and N-category) for risk stratification.

  12. Veratridine increases the survival of retinal ganglion cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.P.F. Pereira

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal cell death is an important phenomenon involving many biochemical pathways. This degenerative event has been studied to understand how the cells activate the mechanisms that lead to self-destruction. Target cells and afferent cells play a relevant role in the regulation of natural cell death. We studied the effect of veratridine (1.5, 3.0, 4.5 and 6.0 µM on the survival of neonatal rat retinal ganglion cells in vitro. Veratridine (3.0 µM, a well-known depolarizing agent that opens the Na+ channel, promoted a two-fold increase in the survival of retinal ganglion cells kept in culture for 48 h. This effect was dose-dependent and was blocked by 1.0 µM tetrodotoxin (a classical voltage-dependent Na+ channel blocker and 30.0 µM flunarizine (a Na+ and Ca2+ channel blocker. These results indicate that electrical activity is also important for the maintenance of retinal ganglion cell survival in vitro

  13. Bmi1 overexpression in the cerebellar granule cell lineage of mice affects cell proliferation and survival without initiating medulloblastoma formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hourinaz Behesti

    2013-01-01

    BMI1 is a potent inducer of neural stem cell self-renewal and neural progenitor cell proliferation during development and in adult tissue homeostasis. It is overexpressed in numerous human cancers – including medulloblastomas, in which its functional role is unclear. We generated transgenic mouse lines with targeted overexpression of Bmi1 in the cerebellar granule cell lineage, a cell type that has been shown to act as a cell of origin for medulloblastomas. Overexpression of Bmi1 in granule cell progenitors (GCPs led to a decrease in cerebellar size due to decreased GCP proliferation and repression of the expression of cyclin genes, whereas Bmi1 overexpression in postmitotic granule cells improved cell survival in response to stress by altering the expression of genes in the mitochondrial cell death pathway and of Myc and Lef-1. Although no medulloblastomas developed in ageing cohorts of transgenic mice, crosses with Trp53−/− mice resulted in a low incidence of medulloblastoma formation. Furthermore, analysis of a large collection of primary human medulloblastomas revealed that tumours with a BMI1high TP53low molecular profile are significantly enriched in Group 4 human medulloblastomas. Our data suggest that different levels and timing of Bmi1 overexpression yield distinct cellular outcomes within the same cellular lineage. Importantly, Bmi1 overexpression at the GCP stage does not induce tumour formation, suggesting that BMI1 overexpression in GCP-derived human medulloblastomas probably occurs during later stages of oncogenesis and might serve to enhance tumour cell survival.

  14. DOCK8 is critical for the survival and function of NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Greg; Enders, Anselm; Gileadi, Uzi; Stankovic, Sanda; Zhang, Qian; Lambe, Teresa; Crockford, Tanya L; Lockstone, Helen E; Freeman, Alexandra; Arkwright, Peter D; Smart, Joanne M; Ma, Cindy S; Tangye, Stuart G; Goodnow, Christopher C; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Godfrey, Dale I; Su, Helen C; Randall, Katrina L; Cornall, Richard J

    2013-09-19

    Patients with the dedicator of cytokinesis 8 (DOCK8) immunodeficiency syndrome suffer from recurrent viral and bacterial infections, hyper-immunoglobulin E levels, eczema, and greater susceptibility to cancer. Because natural killer T (NKT) cells have been implicated in these diseases, we asked if these cells were affected by DOCK8 deficiency. Using a mouse model, we found that DOCK8 deficiency resulted in impaired NKT cell development, principally affecting the formation and survival of long-lived, differentiated NKT cells. In the thymus, DOCK8-deficient mice lack a terminally differentiated subset of NK1.1(+) NKT cells expressing the integrin CD103, whereas in the liver, DOCK8-deficient NKT cells express reduced levels of the prosurvival factor B-cell lymphoma 2 and the integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1. Although the initial NKT cell response to antigen is intact in the absence of DOCK8, their ongoing proliferative and cytokine responses are impaired. Importantly, a similar defect in NKT cell numbers was detected in DOCK8-deficient humans, highlighting the relevance of the mouse model. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that DOCK8 is required for the development and survival of mature NKT cells, consistent with the idea that DOCK8 mediates survival signals within a specialized niche. Accordingly, impaired NKT cell numbers and function are likely to contribute to the susceptibility of DOCK8-deficient patients to recurrent infections and malignant disease.

  15. DOCK8 is critical for the survival and function of NKT cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Greg; Enders, Anselm; Gileadi, Uzi; Stankovic, Sanda; Zhang, Qian; Lambe, Teresa; Crockford, Tanya L.; Lockstone, Helen E.; Freeman, Alexandra; Arkwright, Peter D.; Smart, Joanne M.; Ma, Cindy S.; Tangye, Stuart G.; Goodnow, Christopher C.; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Godfrey, Dale I.; Su, Helen C.; Randall, Katrina L.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with the dedicator of cytokinesis 8 (DOCK8) immunodeficiency syndrome suffer from recurrent viral and bacterial infections, hyper–immunoglobulin E levels, eczema, and greater susceptibility to cancer. Because natural killer T (NKT) cells have been implicated in these diseases, we asked if these cells were affected by DOCK8 deficiency. Using a mouse model, we found that DOCK8 deficiency resulted in impaired NKT cell development, principally affecting the formation and survival of long-lived, differentiated NKT cells. In the thymus, DOCK8-deficient mice lack a terminally differentiated subset of NK1.1+ NKT cells expressing the integrin CD103, whereas in the liver, DOCK8-deficient NKT cells express reduced levels of the prosurvival factor B-cell lymphoma 2 and the integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1. Although the initial NKT cell response to antigen is intact in the absence of DOCK8, their ongoing proliferative and cytokine responses are impaired. Importantly, a similar defect in NKT cell numbers was detected in DOCK8-deficient humans, highlighting the relevance of the mouse model. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that DOCK8 is required for the development and survival of mature NKT cells, consistent with the idea that DOCK8 mediates survival signals within a specialized niche. Accordingly, impaired NKT cell numbers and function are likely to contribute to the susceptibility of DOCK8-deficient patients to recurrent infections and malignant disease. PMID:23929855

  16. p63 promotes cell survival through fatty acid synthase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Sabbisetti

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that p63, and specifically DeltaNp63, plays a central role in both development and tumorigenesis by promoting epithelial cell survival. However, few studies have addressed the molecular mechanisms through which such important function is exerted. Fatty acid synthase (FASN, a key enzyme that synthesizes long-chain fatty acids and is involved in both embryogenesis and cancer, has been recently proposed as a direct target of p53 family members, including p63 and p73. Here we show that knockdown of either total or DeltaN-specific p63 isoforms in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC9 or immortalized prostate epithelial (iPrEC cells caused a decrease in cell viability by inducing apoptosis without affecting the cell cycle. p63 silencing significantly reduced both the expression and the activity of FASN. Importantly, stable overexpression of either FASN or myristoylated AKT (myr-AKT was able to partially rescue cells from cell death induced by p63 silencing. FASN induced AKT phosphorylation and a significant reduction in cell viability was observed when FASN-overexpressing SCC9 cells were treated with an AKT inhibitor after p63 knockdown, indicating that AKT plays a major role in FASN-mediated survival. Activated AKT did not cause any alteration in the FASN protein levels but induced its activity, suggesting that the rescue from apoptosis documented in the p63-silenced cells expressing myr-AKT cells may be partially mediated by FASN. Finally, we demonstrated that p63 and FASN expression are positively associated in clinical squamous cell carcinoma samples as well as in the developing prostate. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that FASN is a functionally relevant target of p63 and is required for mediating its pro-survival effects.

  17. DDX3X Biomarker Correlates with Poor Survival in Human Gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dueng-Yuan Hueng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary high-grade gliomas possess invasive growth and lead to unfavorable survival outcome. The investigation of biomarkers for prediction of survival outcome in patients with gliomas is important for clinical assessment. The DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp box helicase 3, X-linked (DDX3X controls tumor migration, proliferation, and progression. However, the role of DDX3X in defining the pathological grading and survival outcome in patients with human gliomas is not yet clarified. We analyzed the DDX3X gene expression, WHO pathological grading, and overall survival from de-linked data. Further validation was done using quantitative RT-PCR of cDNA from normal brain and glioma, and immunohistochemical (IHC staining of tissue microarray. Statistical analysis of GEO datasets showed that DDX3X mRNA expression demonstrated statistically higher in WHO grade IV (n = 81 than in non-tumor controls (n = 23, p = 1.13 × 10−10. Moreover, DDX3X level was also higher in WHO grade III (n = 19 than in non-tumor controls (p = 2.43 × 10−5. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis showed poor survival in patients with high DDX3X mRNA levels (n = 24 than in those with low DDX3X expression (n = 53 (median survival, 115 vs. 58 weeks, p = 0.0009, by log-rank test, hazard ratio: 0.3507, 95% CI: 0.1893–0.6496. Furthermore, DDX3X mRNA expression and protein production significantly increased in glioma cells compared with normal brain tissue examined by quantitative RT-PCR, and Western blot. IHC staining showed highly staining of high-grade glioma in comparison with normal brain tissue. Taken together, DDX3X expression level positively correlates with WHO pathologic grading and poor survival outcome, indicating that DDX3X is a valuable biomarker in human gliomas.

  18. Characterizing the radioresponse of pluripotent and multipotent human stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary L Lan

    Full Text Available The potential capability of stem cells to restore functionality to diseased or aged tissues has prompted a surge of research, but much work remains to elucidate the response of these cells to genotoxic agents. To more fully understand the impact of irradiation on different stem cell types, the present study has analyzed the radioresponse of human pluripotent and multipotent stem cells. Human embryonic stem (ES cells, human induced pluripotent (iPS cells, and iPS-derived human neural stem cells (iPS-hNSCs cells were irradiated and analyzed for cell survival parameters, differentiation, DNA damage and repair and oxidative stress at various times after exposure. While irradiation led to dose-dependent reductions in survival, the fraction of surviving cells exhibited dose-dependent increases in metabolic activity. Irradiation did not preclude germ layer commitment of ES cells, but did promote neuronal differentiation. ES cells subjected to irradiation exhibited early apoptosis and inhibition of cell cycle progression, but otherwise showed normal repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Cells surviving irradiation also showed acute and persistent increases in reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that were significant at nearly all post-irradiation times analyzed. We suggest that stem cells alter their redox homeostasis to adapt to adverse conditions and that radiation-induced oxidative stress plays a role in regulating the function and fate of stem cells within tissues compromised by radiation injury.

  19. TNF-α promotes cell survival through stimulation of K+ channel and NFκB activity in corneal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ling; Reinach, Peter; Lu, Luo

    2005-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) in various cell types induces either cell death or mitogenesis through different signaling pathways. In the present study, we determined in human corneal epithelial cells how TNF-α also promotes cell survival. Human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells were cultured in DMEM/F-12 medium containing 10% FBS. TNF-α stimulation induced activation of a voltage-gated K + channel detected by measuring single channel activity using patch clamp techniques. The effect of TNF-α on downstream events included NFκB nuclear translocation and increases in DNA binding activities, but did not elicit ERK, JNK, or p38 limb signaling activation. TNF-α induced increases in p21 expression resulting in partial cell cycle attenuation in the G 1 phase. Cell cycle progression was also mapped by flow cytometer analysis. Blockade of TNF-α-induced K + channel activity effectively prevented NFκB nuclear translocation and binding to DNA, diminishing the cell-survival protective effect of TNF-α. In conclusion, TNF-α promotes survival of HCE cells through sequential stimulation of K + channel and NFκB activities. This response to TNF-α is dependent on stimulating K + channel activity because following suppression of K + channel activity TNF-α failed to activate NFκB nuclear translocation and binding to nuclear DNA

  20. Ten-year survival of patients with oesophageal squamous cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. The standard predictive factors of actuarial survival such as T and N stage become less important as patients live for more than 10 years after treatment of cancer. Reports of actual 10-year survivors of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are rare, and demographic and clinicopathological factors ...

  1. Mcl-1 is essential for the survival of plasma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peperzak, Victor; Vikström, Ingela; Walker, Jennifer; Glaser, Stefan P.; LePage, Melanie; Coquery, Christine M.; Erickson, Loren D.; Fairfax, Kirsten; Mackay, Fabienne; Strasser, Andreas; Nutt, Stephen L.; Tarlinton, David M.

    2013-01-01

    The long-term survival of plasma cells is entirely dependent on signals derived from their environment. These extrinsic factors presumably induce and sustain the expression of antiapoptotic proteins of the Bcl-2 family. It is uncertain whether there is specificity among Bcl-2 family members in the

  2. Human platelet lysate improves human cord blood derived ECFC survival and vasculogenesis in three dimensional (3D) collagen matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyojin; Prasain, Nutan; Vemula, Sasidhar; Ferkowicz, Michael J; Yoshimoto, Momoko; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry L; Yoder, Mervin C

    2015-09-01

    Human cord blood (CB) is enriched in circulating endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) that display high proliferative potential and in vivo vessel forming ability. Since diminished ECFC survival is known to dampen the vasculogenic response in vivo, we tested how long implanted ECFC survive and generate vessels in three-dimensional (3D) type I collagen matrices in vitro and in vivo. We hypothesized that human platelet lysate (HPL) would promote cell survival and enhance vasculogenesis in the 3D collagen matrices. We report that the percentage of ECFC co-cultured with HPL that were alive was significantly enhanced on days 1 and 3 post-matrix formation, compared to ECFC alone containing matrices. Also, co-culture of ECFC with HPL displayed significantly more vasculogenic activity compared to ECFC alone and expressed significantly more pro-survival molecules (pAkt, p-Bad and Bcl-xL) in the 3D collagen matrices in vitro. Treatment with Akt1 inhibitor (A-674563), Akt2 inhibitor (CCT128930) and Bcl-xL inhibitor (ABT-263/Navitoclax) significantly decreased the cell survival and vasculogenesis of ECFC co-cultured with or without HPL and implicated activation of the Akt1 pathway as the critical mediator of the HPL effect on ECFC in vitro. A significantly greater average vessel number and total vascular area of human CD31(+) vessels were present in implants containing ECFC and HPL, compared to the ECFC alone implants in vivo. We conclude that implantation of ECFC with HPL in vivo promotes vasculogenesis and augments blood vessel formation via diminishing apoptosis of the implanted ECFC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Human leukaemic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andronikashvili, E.L.; Mosulishvili, L.M.; Belokobil'skiy, A.I.; Kharabadze, N.E.; Shonia, N.I.; Desai, L.S.; Foley, G.E.

    1976-01-01

    The results of the determination of trace elements in nucleic acids and histones in human leukaemic cells by activation analysis are reported. The Cr 2+ , Fe 2+ , Zn 2+ , Co 2+ and Sb 2+ content of DNA and RNA of leukaemic cells compared to that of lymphocytes from a patient with infectious mononucleosis or a normal donor are shown tabulated. Similar comparisons are shown for the same trace metal content of histones isolated from the same type of cells. It is felt that the results afford further interesting speculation that trace metals may be involved in the interactions between histones and DNA (especially at the binding sites of histones to DNA), which affect transcription characteristics. (U.K.)

  4. Is Human Papillomavirus Associated with Prostate Cancer Survival?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariarosa Pascale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of human papillomavirus (HPV in prostate carcinogenesis is highly controversial: some studies suggest a positive association between HPV infection and an increased risk of prostate cancer (PCa, whereas others do not reveal any correlation. In this study, we investigated the prognostic impact of HPV infection on survival in 150 primary PCa patients. One hundred twelve (74.67% patients had positive expression of HPV E7 protein, which was evaluated in tumour tissue by immunohistochemistry. DNA analysis on a subset of cases confirmed HPV infection and revealed the presence of genotype 16. In Kaplan-Meier analysis, HPV-positive cancer patients showed worse overall survival (OS (median 4.59 years compared to HPV-negative (median 8.24 years, P=0.0381. In multivariate analysis age (P<0.001, Gleason score (P<0.001, nuclear grading (P=0.002, and HPV status (P=0.034 were independent prognostic factors for OS. In our cohort, we observed high prevalence of HPV nuclear E7 oncoprotein and an association between HPV infection and PCa survival. In the debate about the oncogenic activity of HPV in PCa, our results further confirm the need for additional studies to clarify the possible role of HPV in prostate carcinogenesis.

  5. Sensing radiosensitivity of human epidermal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rachidi, Walid; Harfourche, Ghida; Lemaitre, Gilles; Amiot, Franck; Vaigot, Pierre; Martin, Michele T.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Radiosensitivity of stem cells is a matter of debate. For mouse somatic stem cells, both radiosensitive and radioresistant stem cells have been described. By contrast, the response of human stem cells to radiation has been poorly studied. As epidermis is a radiosensitive tissue, we evaluated in the present work the radiosensitivity of cell populations enriched for epithelial stem cells of human epidermis. Methods and materials: The total keratinocyte population was enzymatically isolated from normal human skin. We used flow cytometry and antibodies against cell surface markers to isolate basal cell populations from human foreskin. Cell survival was measured after a dose of 2 Gy with the XTT assay at 72 h after exposure and with a clonogenic assay at 2 weeks. Transcriptome analysis using oligonucleotide microarrays was performed to assess the genomic cell responses to radiation. Results: Cell sorting based on two membrane proteins, α6 integrin and the transferrin receptor CD71, allowed isolation of keratinocyte populations enriched for the two types of cells found in the basal layer of epidermis: stem cells and progenitors. Both the XTT assay and the clonogenic assay showed that the stem cells were radioresistant whereas the progenitors were radiosensitive. We made the hypothesis that upstream DNA damage signalling might be different in the stem cells and used microarray technology to test this hypothesis. The stem cells exhibited a much more reduced gene response to a dose of 2 Gy than the progenitors, as we found that 6% of the spotted genes were regulated in the stem cells and 20% in the progenitors. Using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software, we found that radiation exposure induced very specific pathways in the stem cells. The most striking responses were the repression of a network of genes involved in apoptosis and the induction of a network of cytokines and growth factors. Conclusion: These results show for the first time that keratinocyte

  6. Tuft (caveolated) cells in two human colon carcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkla, D H; Whitehead, R H; Foster, H; Tutton, P J

    1988-09-01

    The presence of an unusual cell type in two human colon carcinoma cell lines is reported. The cells show the same morphology as "tuft" (caveolated) cells present in normal gastrointestinal epithelium. Tuft cells were seen in cell line LIM 1863 growing in vitro and in human colon carcinoma cell line LIM 2210 growing as subcutaneous solid tumour xenografts in nude mice. Characteristic morphologic features of tuft cells included a wide base, narrow apex and a tuft of long microvilli projecting from the apical surface. The microvilli are attached by a core of long microfilaments passing deep into the apical cytoplasm. Between the microvilli are parallel arrays of vesicles (caveoli) containing flocculent material. Two different but not mutually exclusive explanations for the presence of tuft cells are proposed. The first explanation is that tuft cells came from the resected tumour and have survived by mitotic division during subsequent passages. The second explanation suggests that tuft cells are the progeny of undifferentiated tumour cells. Descriptions of tuft cells in colon carcinomas are uncommon and possible reasons for this are presented. The morphology of tuft cells is consistent with that of a highly differentiated cell specialised for absorption, and these new models provide an opportunity to further investigate the structure and function of tuft cells.

  7. Intramacrophage survival of uropathogenic Escherichia coli: Differences between diverse clinical isolates and between mouse and human macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bokil, Nilesh J.; Totsika, Makrina; Carey, Alison J.

    2011-01-01

    assays, CFT073 was able to survive within primary mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM) up to 24h post-infection. Three additional well-characterized clinical UPEC isolates associated with distinct UTI symptomatologies displayed variable long-term survival within BMM. UPEC strains UTI89 and VR50...... or initial uptake of bacteria. E. coli UTI89 localized to a Lamp1+ vesicular compartment within BMM. In contrast to survival within mouse BMM, intracellular bacterial loads of VR50 were low in both human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM) and in human T24 bladder epithelial cells. Collectively, these data...

  8. The β-hemolysin and intracellular survival of Streptococcus agalactiae in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Anubha; Klemm, Carolin; Hartjes, Lara; Mauerer, Stefanie; van Zandbergen, Ger; Spellerberg, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    S. agalactiae (group B streptococci, GBS) is a major microbial pathogen in human neonates and causes invasive infections in pregnant women and immunocompromised individuals. The S. agalactiae β-hemolysin is regarded as an important virulence factor for the development of invasive disease. To examine the role of β-hemolysin in the interaction with professional phagocytes, the THP-1 monocytic cell line and human granulocytes were infected with a serotype Ia S. agalactiae wild type strain and its isogenic nonhemolytic mutant. We could show that the nonhemolytic mutants were able to survive in significantly higher numbers than the hemolytic wild type strain, in THP-1 macrophage-like cells and in assays with human granulocytes. Intracellular bacterial multiplication, however, could not be observed. The hemolytic wild type strain stimulated a significantly higher release of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α than the nonhemolytic mutant in THP-1 cells, while similar levels of the chemokine Interleukin-8 were induced. In order to investigate bacterial mediators of IL-8 release in this setting, purified cell wall preparations from both strains were tested and found to exert a potent proinflammatory stimulus on THP-1 cells. In conclusion, our results indicate that the β-hemolysin has a strong influence on the intracellular survival of S. agalactiae and that a tightly controlled regulation of β-hemolysin expression is required for the successful establishment of S. agalactiae in different host niches.

  9. The β-Hemolysin and Intracellular Survival of Streptococcus agalactiae in Human Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Anubha; Klemm, Carolin; Hartjes, Lara; Mauerer, Stefanie; van Zandbergen, Ger; Spellerberg, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    S. agalactiae (group B streptococci, GBS) is a major microbial pathogen in human neonates and causes invasive infections in pregnant women and immunocompromised individuals. The S. agalactiae β-hemolysin is regarded as an important virulence factor for the development of invasive disease. To examine the role of β-hemolysin in the interaction with professional phagocytes, the THP-1 monocytic cell line and human granulocytes were infected with a serotype Ia S. agalactiae wild type strain and its isogenic nonhemolytic mutant. We could show that the nonhemolytic mutants were able to survive in significantly higher numbers than the hemolytic wild type strain, in THP-1 macrophage-like cells and in assays with human granulocytes. Intracellular bacterial multiplication, however, could not be observed. The hemolytic wild type strain stimulated a significantly higher release of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α than the nonhemolytic mutant in THP-1 cells, while similar levels of the chemokine Interleukin-8 were induced. In order to investigate bacterial mediators of IL-8 release in this setting, purified cell wall preparations from both strains were tested and found to exert a potent proinflammatory stimulus on THP-1 cells. In conclusion, our results indicate that the β-hemolysin has a strong influence on the intracellular survival of S. agalactiae and that a tightly controlled regulation of β-hemolysin expression is required for the successful establishment of S. agalactiae in different host niches. PMID:23593170

  10. The β-hemolysin and intracellular survival of Streptococcus agalactiae in human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anubha Sagar

    Full Text Available S. agalactiae (group B streptococci, GBS is a major microbial pathogen in human neonates and causes invasive infections in pregnant women and immunocompromised individuals. The S. agalactiae β-hemolysin is regarded as an important virulence factor for the development of invasive disease. To examine the role of β-hemolysin in the interaction with professional phagocytes, the THP-1 monocytic cell line and human granulocytes were infected with a serotype Ia S. agalactiae wild type strain and its isogenic nonhemolytic mutant. We could show that the nonhemolytic mutants were able to survive in significantly higher numbers than the hemolytic wild type strain, in THP-1 macrophage-like cells and in assays with human granulocytes. Intracellular bacterial multiplication, however, could not be observed. The hemolytic wild type strain stimulated a significantly higher release of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α than the nonhemolytic mutant in THP-1 cells, while similar levels of the chemokine Interleukin-8 were induced. In order to investigate bacterial mediators of IL-8 release in this setting, purified cell wall preparations from both strains were tested and found to exert a potent proinflammatory stimulus on THP-1 cells. In conclusion, our results indicate that the β-hemolysin has a strong influence on the intracellular survival of S. agalactiae and that a tightly controlled regulation of β-hemolysin expression is required for the successful establishment of S. agalactiae in different host niches.

  11. Pancreatic cancer circulating tumour cells express a cell motility gene signature that predicts survival after surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergeant, Gregory; Eijsden, Rudy van; Roskams, Tania; Van Duppen, Victor; Topal, Baki

    2012-01-01

    Most cancer deaths are caused by metastases, resulting from circulating tumor cells (CTC) that detach from the primary cancer and survive in distant organs. The aim of the present study was to develop a CTC gene signature and to assess its prognostic relevance after surgery for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Negative depletion fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) was developed and validated with spiking experiments using cancer cell lines in whole human blood samples. This FACS-based method was used to enrich for CTC from the blood of 10 patients who underwent surgery for PDAC. Total RNA was isolated from 4 subgroup samples, i.e. CTC, haematological cells (G), original tumour (T), and non-tumoural pancreatic control tissue (P). After RNA quality control, samples of 6 patients were eligible for further analysis. Whole genome microarray analysis was performed after double linear amplification of RNA. ‘Ingenuity Pathway Analysis’ software and AmiGO were used for functional data analyses. A CTC gene signature was developed and validated with the nCounter system on expression data of 78 primary PDAC using Cox regression analysis for disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Using stringent statistical analysis, we retained 8,152 genes to compare expression profiles of CTC vs. other subgroups, and found 1,059 genes to be differentially expressed. The pathway with the highest expression ratio in CTC was p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) signaling, known to be involved in cancer cell migration. In the p38 MAPK pathway, TGF-β1, cPLA2, and MAX were significantly upregulated. In addition, 9 other genes associated with both p38 MAPK signaling and cell motility were overexpressed in CTC. High co-expression of TGF-β1 and our cell motility panel (≥ 4 out of 9 genes for DFS and ≥ 6 out of 9 genes for OS) in primary PDAC was identified as an independent predictor of DFS (p=0.041, HR (95% CI) = 1.885 (1.025 – 3.559)) and OS (p=0.047, HR

  12. Pancreatic β-cells activate a JunB/ATF3-dependent survival pathway during inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurzov, E N; Barthson, J; Marhfour, I

    2012-01-01

    Destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells by local autoimmune inflammation is a hallmark of type 1 diabetes. Histochemical analysis of pancreases from non-obese diabetic mice indicated activation of the transcription factor JunB/AP-1 (activator protein-1) after autoimmune infiltration......-cells and human islet cells against pro-inflammatory mediators. These results were confirmed in genetically modified islets derived from Ubi-JunB transgenic mice. Our findings identify ATF3 as a novel downstream target of JunB in the survival mechanism of β-cells under inflammatory stress....

  13. Genetic association with overall survival of taxane-treated lung cancer patients - a genome-wide association study in human lymphoblastoid cell lines followed by a clinical association study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Nifang; Cunningham, Julie M; Li, Liang; Sun, Zhifu; Yang, Ping; Wang, Liewei; Schaid, Daniel J; Abo, Ryan P; Kalari, Krishna; Fridley, Brooke L; Feng, Qiping; Jenkins, Gregory; Batzler, Anthony; Brisbin, Abra G

    2012-01-01

    Taxane is one of the first line treatments of lung cancer. In order to identify novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that might contribute to taxane response, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for two taxanes, paclitaxel and docetaxel, using 276 lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), followed by genotyping of top candidate SNPs in 874 lung cancer patient samples treated with paclitaxel. GWAS was performed using 1.3 million SNPs and taxane cytotoxicity IC50 values for 276 LCLs. The association of selected SNPs with overall survival in 76 small or 798 non-small cell lung cancer (SCLC, NSCLC) patients were analyzed by Cox regression model, followed by integrated SNP-microRNA-expression association analysis in LCLs and siRNA screening of candidate genes in SCLC (H196) and NSCLC (A549) cell lines. 147 and 180 SNPs were associated with paclitaxel or docetaxel IC50s with p-values <10 -4 in the LCLs, respectively. Genotyping of 153 candidate SNPs in 874 lung cancer patient samples identified 8 SNPs (p-value < 0.05) associated with either SCLC or NSCLC patient overall survival. Knockdown of PIP4K2A, CCT5, CMBL, EXO1, KMO and OPN3, genes within 200 kb up-/downstream of the 3 SNPs that were associated with SCLC overall survival (rs1778335, rs2662411 and rs7519667), significantly desensitized H196 to paclitaxel. SNPs rs2662411 and rs1778335 were associated with mRNA expression of CMBL or PIP4K2A through microRNA (miRNA) hsa-miR-584 or hsa-miR-1468. GWAS in an LCL model system, joined with clinical translational and functional studies, might help us identify genetic variations associated with overall survival of lung cancer patients treated paclitaxel

  14. SHMT2 drives glioma cell survival in ischaemia but imposes a dependence on glycine clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dohoon; Fiske, Brian P; Birsoy, Kivanc; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Kami, Kenjiro; Possemato, Richard L; Chudnovsky, Yakov; Pacold, Michael E; Chen, Walter W; Cantor, Jason R; Shelton, Laura M; Gui, Dan Y; Kwon, Manjae; Ramkissoon, Shakti H; Ligon, Keith L; Kang, Seong Woo; Snuderl, Matija; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Sabatini, David M

    2015-04-16

    Cancer cells adapt their metabolic processes to support rapid proliferation, but less is known about how cancer cells alter metabolism to promote cell survival in a poorly vascularized tumour microenvironment. Here we identify a key role for serine and glycine metabolism in the survival of brain cancer cells within the ischaemic zones of gliomas. In human glioblastoma multiforme, mitochondrial serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT2) and glycine decarboxylase (GLDC) are highly expressed in the pseudopalisading cells that surround necrotic foci. We find that SHMT2 activity limits that of pyruvate kinase (PKM2) and reduces oxygen consumption, eliciting a metabolic state that confers a profound survival advantage to cells in poorly vascularized tumour regions. GLDC inhibition impairs cells with high SHMT2 levels as the excess glycine not metabolized by GLDC can be converted to the toxic molecules aminoacetone and methylglyoxal. Thus, SHMT2 is required for cancer cells to adapt to the tumour environment, but also renders these cells sensitive to glycine cleavage system inhibition.

  15. Chromosome aberrations and cell survival in irradiated mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tremp, J.

    1981-01-01

    A possible correlation between chromosome aberrations and reduced proliferation capacity or cell death was investigated. Synchronized Chinese hamster fibroblast cells were irradiated with 300 rad of x rays in early G 1 . Despite synchronization the cells reached the subsequent mitosis at different times. The frequency of chromosome aberrations was determined in the postirradiation division at 2-h intervals. The highest frequency occurred in cells with a first cell cycle of medium length. The colony-forming ability of mitotic cells was measured in parallel samples by following the progress of individual mitoses. The proportion of cells forming macrocolonies decreased with increasing cell cycle length, and the number of non-colony-forming cells increased. Irrespective of various first cell cycle lengths and different frequencies of chromosome aberrations, the number of cells forming microcolonies remained constant. A correlation was found between the absence of chromosome aberrations and the ability of cells to form macrocolonies. However, cells with a long first cell cycle formed fewer macrocolonies than expected

  16. Lysosomal cysteine peptidases - Molecules signaling tumor cell death and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pišlar, Anja; Perišić Nanut, Milica; Kos, Janko

    2015-12-01

    Lysosomal cysteine peptidases - cysteine cathepsins - are general intracellular protein-degrading enzymes that control also a variety of specific physiological processes. They can trigger irreversible events leading to signal transduction and activation of signaling pathways, resulting in cell survival and proliferation or cell death. In cancer cells, lysosomal cysteine peptidases are involved in multiple processes during malignant progression. Their translocation from the endosomal/lysosomal pathway to nucleus, cytoplasm, plasma membrane and extracellular space enables the activation and remodeling of a variety of tumor promoting proteins. Thus, lysosomal cysteine peptidases interfere with cytokine/chemokine signaling, regulate cell adhesion and migration and endocytosis, are involved in the antitumor immune response and apoptosis, and promote cell invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis. Further, lysosomal cysteine peptidases modify growth factors and receptors involved in tyrosine kinase dependent pathways such as MAPK, Akt and JNK, thus representing key signaling tools for the activation of tumor cell growth and proliferation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Polyphosphate is a key factor for cell survival after DNA damage in eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bru, Samuel; Samper-Martín, Bàrbara; Quandt, Eva; Hernández-Ortega, Sara; Martínez-Laínez, Joan M; Garí, Eloi; Rafel, Marta; Torres-Torronteras, Javier; Martí, Ramón; Ribeiro, Mariana P C; Jiménez, Javier; Clotet, Josep

    2017-09-01

    Cells require extra amounts of dNTPs to repair DNA after damage. Polyphosphate (polyP) is an evolutionary conserved linear polymer of up to several hundred inorganic phosphate (Pi) residues that is involved in many functions, including Pi storage. In the present article, we report on findings demonstrating that polyP functions as a source of Pi when required to sustain the dNTP increment essential for DNA repair after damage. We show that mutant yeast cells without polyP produce less dNTPs upon DNA damage and that their survival is compromised. In contrast, when polyP levels are ectopically increased, yeast cells become more resistant to DNA damage. More importantly, we show that when polyP is reduced in HEK293 mammalian cell line cells and in human dermal primary fibroblasts (HDFa), these cells become more sensitive to DNA damage, suggesting that the protective role of polyP against DNA damage is evolutionary conserved. In conclusion, we present polyP as a molecule involved in resistance to DNA damage and suggest that polyP may be a putative target for new approaches in cancer treatment or prevention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Human leukaemic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andronikashvili, E.L.; Mosulishvili, L.M.; Belokobil'skiy, A.I.; Kharabadze, N.E.; Shonia, N.I.; Desai, L.S.; Foley, G.E.

    1976-01-01

    Trace metals were measured by neutron-activation analyses in purified nucleic acids and histone(s) of lymphocytes from patients with acute lymphocytic leukaemia or infectious mononucleosis, and from normal donors. DNA isolated from lymphocytes of a patient with infectious mononucleosis and a normal donor showed a high content of Cr 2+ , Sb 2+ , Fe 2+ , Zn 2+ , whereas DNA of lymphoblasts from a patient with acute lymphocytic leukaemia had a lower content of these trace metals, but the Co 2+ content was 20-fold higher than in DNA of normal donor lymphocytic cells. Total histones from leukaemic cells had higher contents of most of the trace metals except for Zn 2+ , which was present in lesser concentration than in histones from normal donor lymphocytic cells. Lysine-rich (F1) histones showed lower contents of Cr 2+ , Sb 2+ and Co 2+ , whereas arginine-rich (F3) histones had significantly higher contents of these trace metals. These observations may be of interest in that F3 histones more effectively inhibit RNA synthesis in human lymphocytic cells than do other species of histones. (author)

  19. Molecular Imaging of Stem Cells: Tracking Survival, Biodistribution, Tumorigenicity, and Immunogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Gu, Wen-Yi Chen, Jay Gu, Paul Burridge, Joseph C. Wu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Being able to self-renew and differentiate into virtually all cell types, both human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have exciting therapeutic implications for myocardial infarction, neurodegenerative disease, diabetes, and other disorders involving irreversible cell loss. However, stem cell biology remains incompletely understood despite significant advances in the field. Inefficient stem cell differentiation, difficulty in verifying successful delivery to the target organ, and problems with engraftment all hamper the transition from laboratory animal studies to human clinical trials. Although traditional histopathological techniques have been the primary approach for ex vivo analysis of stem cell behavior, these postmortem examinations are unable to further elucidate the underlying mechanisms in real time and in vivo. Fortunately, the advent of molecular imaging has led to unprecedented progress in understanding the fundamental behavior of stem cells, including their survival, biodistribution, immunogenicity, and tumorigenicity in the targeted tissues of interest. This review summarizes various molecular imaging technologies and how they have advanced the current understanding of stem cell survival, biodistribution, immunogenicity, and tumorigenicity.

  20. Neutron-energy-dependent cell survival and oncogenic transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R C; Marino, S A; Martin, S G; Komatsu, K; Geard, C R; Brenner, D J; Hall, E J

    1999-12-01

    Both cell lethality and neoplastic transformation were assessed for C3H10T1/2 cells exposed to neutrons with energies from 0.040 to 13.7 MeV. Monoenergetic neutrons with energies from 0.23 to 13.7 MeV and two neutron energy spectra with average energies of 0.040 and 0.070 MeV were produced with a Van de Graaff accelerator at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) in the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University. For determination of relative biological effectiveness (RBE), cells were exposed to 250 kVp X rays. With exposures to 250 kVp X rays, both cell survival and radiation-induced oncogenic transformation were curvilinear. Irradiation of cells with neutrons at all energies resulted in linear responses as a function of dose for both biological endpoints. Results indicate a complex relationship between RBEm and neutron energy. For both survival and transformation, RBEm was greatest for cells exposed to 0.35 MeV neutrons. RBEm was significantly less at energies above or below 0.35 MeV. These results are consistent with microdosimetric expectation. These results are also compatible with current assessments of neutron radiation weighting factors for radiation protection purposes. Based on calculations of dose-averaged LET, 0.35 MeV neutrons have the greatest LET and therefore would be expected to be more biologically effective than neutrons of greater or lesser energies.

  1. EGFR overexpressing cells and tumors are dependent on autophagy for growth and survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jutten, Barry; Keulers, Tom G.; Schaaf, Marco B.E.; Savelkouls, Kim; Theys, Jan; Span, Paul N.; Vooijs, Marc A.; Bussink, Johan; Rouschop, Kasper M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed, amplified or mutated in various human epithelial tumors, and is associated with tumor aggressiveness and therapy resistance. Autophagy activation provides a survival advantage for cells in the tumor microenvironment. In the current study, we assessed the potential of autophagy inhibition (using chloroquine (CQ)) in treatment of EGFR expressing tumors. Material and methods: Quantitative PCR, immunohistochemistry, clonogenic survival, proliferation assays and in vivo tumor growth were used to assess this potential. Results: We show that EGFR overexpressing xenografts are sensitive to CQ treatment and are sensitized to irradiation by autophagy inhibition. In HNSSC xenografts, a correlation between EGFR and expression of the autophagy marker LC3b is observed, suggesting a role for autophagy in EGFR expressing tumors. This observation was substantiated in cell lines, showing high EGFR expressing cells to be more sensitive to CQ addition as reflected by decreased proliferation and survival. Surprisingly high EGFR expressing cells display a lower autophagic flux. Conclusions: The EGFR high expressing cells and tumors investigated in this study are highly dependent on autophagy for growth and survival. Inhibition of autophagy may therefore provide a novel treatment opportunity for EGFR overexpressing tumors

  2. Discrete dynamic modeling of T cell survival signaling networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ranran

    2009-03-01

    Biochemistry-based frameworks are often not applicable for the modeling of heterogeneous regulatory systems that are sparsely documented in terms of quantitative information. As an alternative, qualitative models assuming a small set of discrete states are gaining acceptance. This talk will present a discrete dynamic model of the signaling network responsible for the survival and long-term competence of cytotoxic T cells in the blood cancer T-LGL leukemia. We integrated the signaling pathways involved in normal T cell activation and the known deregulations of survival signaling in leukemic T-LGL, and formulated the regulation of each network element as a Boolean (logic) rule. Our model suggests that the persistence of two signals is sufficient to reproduce all known deregulations in leukemic T-LGL. It also indicates the nodes whose inactivity is necessary and sufficient for the reversal of the T-LGL state. We have experimentally validated several model predictions, including: (i) Inhibiting PDGF signaling induces apoptosis in leukemic T-LGL. (ii) Sphingosine kinase 1 and NFκB are essential for the long-term survival of T cells in T-LGL leukemia. (iii) T box expressed in T cells (T-bet) is constitutively activated in the T-LGL state. The model has identified potential therapeutic targets for T-LGL leukemia and can be used for generating long-term competent CTL necessary for tumor and cancer vaccine development. The success of this model, and of other discrete dynamic models, suggests that the organization of signaling networks has an determining role in their dynamics. Reference: R. Zhang, M. V. Shah, J. Yang, S. B. Nyland, X. Liu, J. K. Yun, R. Albert, T. P. Loughran, Jr., Network Model of Survival Signaling in LGL Leukemia, PNAS 105, 16308-16313 (2008).

  3. Aplasia Ras homologue member Ⅰ overexpression inhibits tumor growth and induces apoptosis through inhibition of PI3K/Akt survival pathways in human osteosarcoma MG-63 cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Kaishan; Wang, Shuanke; Yang, Yong; Kang, Xuewen; Wang, Jing; Han, Hua

    2015-09-01

    Aplasia Ras homologue member Ⅰ (ARHI), an imprinted tumor-suppressor gene, is downregulated in various types of cancer. However, the expression, function and specific mechanisms of ARHI in human osteosarcoma (OS) cells remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of ARHI on OS cell proliferation and apoptosis and its associated mechanism. In the study, ARHI mRNA and protein levels were markedly downregulated in OS cells compared with the human osteoblast precursor cell line hFOB1.19. By generating stable transfectants, ARHI was overexpressed in OS cells that had low levels of ARHI. Overexpression of ARHI inhibited cell viability and proliferation and induced apoptosis. However, caspase‑3 activity was not changed by ARHI overexpression. In addition, phosphorylated Akt protein expression decreased in the ARHI overexpression group compared to that in the control vector group. The knockdown of ARHI also resulted in the promotion of cell proliferation and the attenuation of apoptosis in MG‑63 cells. Additionally, ARHI silencing increased the level of p‑Akt. The present results indicate that ARHI inhibits OS cell proliferation and may have a key role in the development of OS.

  4. Activated ovarian endothelial cells promote early follicular development and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedem, Alon; Aelion-Brauer, Anate; Guo, Peipei; Wen, Duancheng; Ding, Bi-Sen; Lis, Raphael; Cheng, Du; Sandler, Vladislav M; Rafii, Shahin; Rosenwaks, Zev

    2017-09-19

    New data suggests that endothelial cells (ECs) elaborate essential "angiocrine factors". The aim of this study is to investigate the role of activated ovarian endothelial cells in early in-vitro follicular development. Mouse ovarian ECs were isolated using magnetic cell sorting or by FACS and cultured in serum free media. After a constitutive activation of the Akt pathway was initiated, early follicles (50-150 um) were mechanically isolated from 8-day-old mice and co-cultured with these activated ovarian endothelial cells (AOEC) (n = 32), gel (n = 24) or within matrigel (n = 27) in serum free media for 14 days. Follicular growth, survival and function were assessed. After 6 passages, flow cytometry showed 93% of cells grown in serum-free culture were VE-cadherin positive, CD-31 positive and CD 45 negative, matching the known EC profile. Beginning on day 4 of culture, we observed significantly higher follicular and oocyte growth rates in follicles co-cultured with AOECs compared with follicles on gel or matrigel. After 14 days of culture, 73% of primary follicles and 83% of secondary follicles co-cultured with AOEC survived, whereas the majority of follicles cultured on gel or matrigel underwent atresia. This is the first report of successful isolation and culture of ovarian ECs. We suggest that co-culture with activated ovarian ECs promotes early follicular development and survival. This model is a novel platform for the in vitro maturation of early follicles and for the future exploration of endothelial-follicular communication. In vitro development of early follicles necessitates a complex interplay of growth factors and signals required for development. Endothelial cells (ECs) may elaborate essential "angiocrine factors" involved in organ regeneration. We demonstrate that co-culture with ovarian ECs enables culture of primary and early secondary mouse ovarian follicles.

  5. Genetic association with overall survival of taxane-treated lung cancer patients - a genome-wide association study in human lymphoblastoid cell lines followed by a clinical association study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niu Nifang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taxane is one of the first line treatments of lung cancer. In order to identify novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that might contribute to taxane response, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS for two taxanes, paclitaxel and docetaxel, using 276 lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs, followed by genotyping of top candidate SNPs in 874 lung cancer patient samples treated with paclitaxel. Methods GWAS was performed using 1.3 million SNPs and taxane cytotoxicity IC50 values for 276 LCLs. The association of selected SNPs with overall survival in 76 small or 798 non-small cell lung cancer (SCLC, NSCLC patients were analyzed by Cox regression model, followed by integrated SNP-microRNA-expression association analysis in LCLs and siRNA screening of candidate genes in SCLC (H196 and NSCLC (A549 cell lines. Results 147 and 180 SNPs were associated with paclitaxel or docetaxel IC50s with p-values -4 in the LCLs, respectively. Genotyping of 153 candidate SNPs in 874 lung cancer patient samples identified 8 SNPs (p-value PIP4K2A, CCT5, CMBL, EXO1, KMO and OPN3, genes within 200 kb up-/downstream of the 3 SNPs that were associated with SCLC overall survival (rs1778335, rs2662411 and rs7519667, significantly desensitized H196 to paclitaxel. SNPs rs2662411 and rs1778335 were associated with mRNA expression of CMBL or PIP4K2A through microRNA (miRNA hsa-miR-584 or hsa-miR-1468. Conclusions GWAS in an LCL model system, joined with clinical translational and functional studies, might help us identify genetic variations associated with overall survival of lung cancer patients treated paclitaxel.

  6. The Growing Complexity of Cancer Cell Response to DNA-Damaging Agents: Caspase 3 Mediates Cell Death or Survival?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razmik Mirzayans

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available It is widely stated that wild-type p53 either mediates the activation of cell cycle checkpoints to facilitate DNA repair and promote cell survival, or orchestrates apoptotic cell death following exposure to cancer therapeutic agents. This reigning paradigm has been challenged by numerous discoveries with different human cell types, including solid tumor-derived cell lines. Thus, activation of the p53 signaling pathway by ionizing radiation and other DNA-damaging agents hinders apoptosis and triggers growth arrest (e.g., through premature senescence in some genetic backgrounds; such growth arrested cells remain viable, secrete growth-promoting factors, and give rise to progeny with stem cell-like properties. In addition, caspase 3, which is best known for its role in the execution phase of apoptosis, has been recently reported to facilitate (rather than suppress DNA damage-induced genomic instability and carcinogenesis. This observation is consistent with an earlier report demonstrating that caspase 3 mediates secretion of the pro-survival factor prostaglandin E2, which in turn promotes enrichment of tumor repopulating cells. In this article, we review these and related discoveries and point out novel cancer therapeutic strategies. One of our objectives is to demonstrate the growing complexity of the DNA damage response beyond the conventional “repair and survive, or die” hypothesis.

  7. X-ray sensitivity of human tumor cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Nove, J.; Little, J.B.

    1980-01-01

    Clonally-derived cells from ten human malignant tumors considered radiocurable (breast, neuroblastoma, medulloblastoma) or non-radiocurable (osteosarcoma, hypernephroma, glioblastoma, melanoma) were studied in cell culture and their in vitro x-ray survival curve parameters determined (anti n, D 0 ). There were no significant differences among the tumor cell lines suggesting that survival parameters in vitro do not explain differences in clinical radiocurability. Preliminary investigation with density inhibited human tumor cells indicate that such an approach may yield information regarding inherent cellular differences in radiocurability

  8. Radiosensitivity of normal human epidermal cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dover, R.; Potten, C.S.

    1983-01-01

    Using an in vitro culture system the authors have derived #betta#-radiation survival curves over a dose range 0-8 Gy for the clonogenic cells of normal human epidermis. The culture system used allows the epidermal cells to stratify and form a multi-layered sheet of keratinizing cells. The cultures appear to be a very good model for epidermis in vivo. The survival curves show a population which is apparently more sensitive than murine epidermis in vivo. It remains unclear whether this is an intrinsic difference between the species or is a consequence of the in vitro cultivation of the human cells. (author)

  9. Cell survival in spheroids irradiated with heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, A.; Alpen, E.L.

    1981-01-01

    Biological investigations with accelerated heavy ions have been carried out regularly at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac for the past four years. Most of the cellular investigations have been conducted on cell monolayer and suspension culture systems. The studies to date suggest that heavy charged particle beams may offer some radiotherapeutic advantages over conventional radiotherapy sources. The advantages are thought to lie primarily in an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE), a decrease in the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER), and better tissue distribution dose. Experiments reported here were conducted with 400 MeV/amu carbon ions and 425 MeV/amu neon ions, using a rat brain gliosarcoma cell line grown as multicellular spheroids. Studies have been carried out with x-rays and high-energy carbon and neon ion beams. These studies evaluate high-LET (linear energy transfer) cell survival in terms of RBE and the possible contributions of intercellular communication. Comparisons were made of the post-irradiation survival characteristics for cells irradiated as multicellular spheroids (approximately 100 μm and 300 μm diameters) and for cells irradiated in suspension. These comparisons were made between 225-kVp x-rays, 400 MeV/amu carbon ions, and 425 MeV/amu neon ions

  10. Delayed reproductive death as a dominant phenotype in cell clones surviving X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, W.P.; Little, J.B.

    1992-01-01

    Residual damage manifested as reduced cloning efficiency was observed in many of the cloned progeny of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and human carcinoma SQ-20B cells surviving X-irradiation. This stable phenotype, which we have termed delayed reproductive death, persisted for >50 generations of cell replication post-irradiation. Clones showing this phenotype were aneuploid, and formed colonies with a high proportion of giant cells. By somatic cell hybridization of CHO clones, the delayed reproductive death phenotype was found to be a dominant trait; the cloning efficiency of hybrid clones was persistently depressed, as compared with that of control hybrid cells. These results suggest that delayed reproductive death represents a specific cellular response that may persist in some of the progeny of mammalian cells for long periods after X-irradiation. (author)

  11. Survival rate of eukaryotic cells following electrophoretic nanoinjection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonis, Matthias; Hübner, Wolfgang; Wilking, Alice; Huser, Thomas; Hennig, Simon

    2017-01-25

    Insertion of foreign molecules such as functionalized fluorescent probes, antibodies, or plasmid DNA to living cells requires overcoming the plasma membrane barrier without harming the cell during the staining process. Many techniques such as electroporation, lipofection or microinjection have been developed to overcome the cellular plasma membrane, but they all result in reduced cell viability. A novel approach is the injection of cells with a nanopipette and using electrophoretic forces for the delivery of molecules. The tip size of these pipettes is approximately ten times smaller than typical microinjection pipettes and rather than pressure pulses as delivery method, moderate DC electric fields are used to drive charged molecules out of the tip. Here, we show that this approach leads to a significantly higher survival rate of nanoinjected cells and that injection with nanopipettes has a significantly lower impact on the proliferation behavior of injected cells. Thus, we propose that injection with nanopipettes using electrophoretic delivery is an excellent alternative when working with valuable and rare living cells, such as primary cells or stem cells.

  12. Survival rate of eukaryotic cells following electrophoretic nanoinjection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonis, Matthias; Hübner, Wolfgang; Wilking, Alice; Huser, Thomas; Hennig, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Insertion of foreign molecules such as functionalized fluorescent probes, antibodies, or plasmid DNA to living cells requires overcoming the plasma membrane barrier without harming the cell during the staining process. Many techniques such as electroporation, lipofection or microinjection have been developed to overcome the cellular plasma membrane, but they all result in reduced cell viability. A novel approach is the injection of cells with a nanopipette and using electrophoretic forces for the delivery of molecules. The tip size of these pipettes is approximately ten times smaller than typical microinjection pipettes and rather than pressure pulses as delivery method, moderate DC electric fields are used to drive charged molecules out of the tip. Here, we show that this approach leads to a significantly higher survival rate of nanoinjected cells and that injection with nanopipettes has a significantly lower impact on the proliferation behavior of injected cells. Thus, we propose that injection with nanopipettes using electrophoretic delivery is an excellent alternative when working with valuable and rare living cells, such as primary cells or stem cells. PMID:28120926

  13. Red cell survival and sequestration in acute intermittent porphyria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawalkha, P.L.; Soni, S.G.; Agrawal, V.K.; Misra, S.N.

    1980-01-01

    Life span and sequestration of red cells have been studied in twenty one proved cases of acute intermittent porphyria of different age and sex group from Bikaner District, Rajasthan State (India). Chromium-51 labelled red cells were used in the study and the excess count method of Bughe Jones and Szur was used to calculate the index of sequestration. The mean apparent half survival time of erythrocytes in the control subjects was 25.9 +- 2.9 (S.D.) days and the same in the prophyria patients was 27.0 +- 3.8 days. This shows that the life span of red cells is normal in both the patient and the control. Excess destruction of red blood cells was found to take place in either spleen or liver in the disease and no excess accumulation of erythrocytes occurred over spleen as compared to liver. (M.G.B.)

  14. Laser Phototherapy Enhances Mesenchymal Stem Cells Survival in Response to the Dental Adhesives

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    Ivana Márcia Alves Diniz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We investigated the influence of laser phototherapy (LPT on the survival of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs submitted to substances leached from dental adhesives. Method. MSCs were isolated and characterized. Oral mucosa fibroblasts and osteoblast-like cells were used as comparative controls. Cultured medium conditioned with two adhesive systems was applied to the cultures. Cell monolayers were exposed or not to LPT. Laser irradiations were performed using a red laser (GaAlAs, 780 nm, 0.04 cm2, 40 mW, 1 W/cm2, 0.4 J, 10 seconds, 1 point, 10 J/cm2. After 24 h, cell viability was assessed by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide reduction assay. Data were statistically compared by ANOVA followed by Tukey’s test (P<0.05. Results. Different cell types showed different viabilities in response to the same materials. Substances leached from adhesives were less cytotoxic to MSCs than to other cell types. Substances leached from Clearfil SE Bond were highly cytotoxic to all cell types tested, except to the MSCs when applied polymerized and in association with LPT. LPT was unable to significantly increase the cell viability of fibroblasts and osteoblast-like cells submitted to the dental adhesives. Conclusion. LPT enhances mesenchymal stem cells survival in response to substances leached from dental adhesives.

  15. Control of neural stem cell survival by electroactive polymer substrates.

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    Vanessa Lundin

    Full Text Available Stem cell function is regulated by intrinsic as well as microenvironmental factors, including chemical and mechanical signals. Conducting polymer-based cell culture substrates provide a powerful tool to control both chemical and physical stimuli sensed by stem cells. Here we show that polypyrrole (PPy, a commonly used conducting polymer, can be tailored to modulate survival and maintenance of rat fetal neural stem cells (NSCs. NSCs cultured on PPy substrates containing different counter ions, dodecylbenzenesulfonate (DBS, tosylate (TsO, perchlorate (ClO(4 and chloride (Cl, showed a distinct correlation between PPy counter ion and cell viability. Specifically, NSC viability was high on PPy(DBS but low on PPy containing TsO, ClO(4 and Cl. On PPy(DBS, NSC proliferation and differentiation was comparable to standard NSC culture on tissue culture polystyrene. Electrical reduction of PPy(DBS created a switch for neural stem cell viability, with widespread cell death upon polymer reduction. Coating the PPy(DBS films with a gel layer composed of a basement membrane matrix efficiently prevented loss of cell viability upon polymer reduction. Here we have defined conditions for the biocompatibility of PPy substrates with NSC culture, critical for the development of devices based on conducting polymers interfacing with NSCs.

  16. Human T Cell Memory: A Dynamic View

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    Derek C. Macallan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Long-term T cell-mediated protection depends upon the formation of a pool of memory cells to protect against future pathogen challenge. In this review we argue that looking at T cell memory from a dynamic viewpoint can help in understanding how memory populations are maintained following pathogen exposure or vaccination. For example, a dynamic view resolves the apparent paradox between the relatively short lifespans of individual memory cells and very long-lived immunological memory by focussing on the persistence of clonal populations, rather than individual cells. Clonal survival is achieved by balancing proliferation, death and differentiation rates within and between identifiable phenotypic pools; such pools correspond broadly to sequential stages in the linear differentiation pathway. Each pool has its own characteristic kinetics, but only when considered as a population; single cells exhibit considerable heterogeneity. In humans, we tend to concentrate on circulating cells, but memory T cells in non-lymphoid tissues and bone marrow are increasingly recognised as critical for immune defence; their kinetics, however, remain largely unexplored. Considering vaccination from this viewpoint shifts the focus from the size of the primary response to the survival of the clone and enables identification of critical system pinch-points and opportunities to improve vaccine efficacy.

  17. Cyclophilin B Supports Myc and Mutant p53 Dependent Survival of Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae Won; Schroeder, Mark A.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Bram, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive, treatment-refractory type of brain tumor for which effective therapeutic targets remain important to identify. Here we report that cyclophilin B (CypB), a prolyl isomerase residing in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), provides an essential survival signal in GBM cells. Analysis of gene expression databases revealed that CypB is upregulated in many cases of malignant glioma. We found that suppression of CypB reduced cell proliferation and survival in human GBM cells in vitro and in vivo. We also found that treatment with small molecule inhibitors of cyclophilins, including the approved drug cyclosporine, greatly reduced the viability of GBM cells. Mechanistically, depletion or pharmacologic inhibition of CypB caused hyperactivation of the oncogenic RAS-MAPK pathway, induction of cellular senescence signals, and death resulting from loss of MYC, mutant p53, Chk1 and JAK/STAT3 signaling. Elevated reactive oxygen species, ER expansion and abnormal unfolded protein responses in CypB-depleted GBM cells indicated that CypB alleviates oxidative and ER stresses and coordinates stress adaptation responses. Enhanced cell survival and sustained expression of multiple oncogenic proteins downstream of CypB may thus contribute to the poor outcome of GBM tumors. Our findings link chaperone-mediated protein folding in the ER to mechanisms underlying oncogenic transformation, and they make CypB an attractive and immediately targetable molecule for GBM therapy. PMID:24272483

  18. Cyclophilin B supports Myc and mutant p53-dependent survival of glioblastoma multiforme cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae Won; Schroeder, Mark A; Sarkaria, Jann N; Bram, Richard J

    2014-01-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme is an aggressive, treatment-refractory type of brain tumor for which effective therapeutic targets remain important to identify. Here, we report that cyclophilin B (CypB), a prolyl isomerase residing in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), provides an essential survival signal in glioblastoma multiforme cells. Analysis of gene expression databases revealed that CypB is upregulated in many cases of malignant glioma. We found that suppression of CypB reduced cell proliferation and survival in human glioblastoma multiforme cells in vitro and in vivo. We also found that treatment with small molecule inhibitors of cyclophilins, including the approved drug cyclosporine, greatly reduced the viability of glioblastoma multiforme cells. Mechanistically, depletion or pharmacologic inhibition of CypB caused hyperactivation of the oncogenic RAS-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, induction of cellular senescence signals, and death resulting from loss of MYC, mutant p53, Chk1, and Janus-activated kinase/STAT3 signaling. Elevated reactive oxygen species, ER expansion, and abnormal unfolded protein responses in CypB-depleted glioblastoma multiforme cells indicated that CypB alleviates oxidative and ER stresses and coordinates stress adaptation responses. Enhanced cell survival and sustained expression of multiple oncogenic proteins downstream of CypB may thus contribute to the poor outcome of glioblastoma multiforme tumors. Our findings link chaperone-mediated protein folding in the ER to mechanisms underlying oncogenic transformation, and they make CypB an attractive and immediately targetable molecule for glioblastoma multiforme therapy.

  19. The influence of fractionation on cell survival and premature differentiation after carbon ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jufang; Li Renming; Guo Chuanling; Fournier, C.; K-Weyrather, W.

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the influence of fractionation on cell survival and radiation induced premature differentiation as markers for early and late effects after X-rays and carbon irradiation. Normal human fibroblasts NHDF, AG1522B and WI-38 were irradiated with 250 kV X-rays, or 266 MeV/u, 195 MeV/u and 11 MeV/u carbon ions. Cytotoxicity was measured by a clonogenic survival assay or by determination of the differentiation pattern. Experiments with high-energy carbon ions show that fractionation induced repair effects are similar to photon irradiation. The relative biological effective (RBE) 10 values for clonogenic survival are 1.3 and 1.6 for irradiation in one or two fractions for NHDF cells and around 1.2 for AG1522B cells regardless of the fractionation scheme. The RBE for a doubling of post mitotic fibroblasts (PMF) in the population is 1 for both single and two fractionated irradiation of NHDF cells. Using 11 MeV/u carbon ions, no repair effect can be seen in WI-38 cells. The RBE 10 for clonogenic survival is 3.2 for single irradiation and 4.9 for two fractionated irradiations. The RBE for a doubling of PMF is 3.1 and 5.0 for single and two fractionated irradiations, respectively. For both cell lines the effects of high-energy carbon ions representing the irradiation of the skin and the normal tissue in the entrance channel are similar to the effects of X-rays. The fractionation effects are maintained. For the lower energy, which is representative for the irradiation of the tumor region, RBE is enhanced for clonogenic survival as well as for premature terminal differentiation. Fractionation effects are not detectable. Consequently, the therapeutic ratio is significantly enhanced by fractionated irradiation with carbon ions. (author)

  20. Oral squamous cell carcinoma: survival, recurrence and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Camilo Souza Cruz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper was based in data survey from macro and microscopic oral lesions characteristics, personal data and medical history of patients diagnosed with oral squamous cell carcinoma in the Lab of Pathological Anatomy from the Federal University of Alfenas from January 2000 to December 2010, establishing comparative parameters among clinical data, type of treatment, recurrence, survival and anatomic pathological characteristics of the lesions. Were analyzed the histopathological reports, dental and hospital records. The highest incidence was in white men, age between 50 and 60 years, married, with low education and socioeconomic levels. The beginning of treatment occurred in average 67 days after the histopathological diagnosis. The estimated survival of patients at five years was 42%. The consumption of alcohol and tobacco and the occurrence of metastasis were statistically significant for the increase of recurrence and lethality.

  1. Auditor human capital and audit firm survival - The Dutch audit industry in 1930-1992

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brocheler, [No Value; Maijoor, S; van Witteloostuijn, A; Bröcheler, V.

    2004-01-01

    This paper studies the relationship between auditor human capital and audit firm survival. Specifically, the effects are investigated of the human capital of auditors on the survival chances of newly established audit firms. Human capital is analyzed both at the time of entry of a new audit firm and

  2. Aggregative adherent strains of Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum enter and survive within HEp-2 epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Cristina de Souza

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum is a well-known human pathogen that mainly causes respiratory disease and is associated with high mortality in compromised hosts. Little is known about the virulence factors and pathogenesis of C. pseudodiphtheriticum. In this study, cultured human epithelial (HEp-2 cells were used to analyse the adherence pattern, internalisation and intracellular survival of the ATCC 10700 type strain and two additional clinical isolates. These microorganisms exhibited an aggregative adherence-like pattern to HEp-2 cells characterised by clumps of bacteria with a "stacked-brick" appearance. The differences in the ability of these microorganisms to invade and survive within HEp-2 cells and replicate in the extracellular environment up to 24 h post infection were evaluated. The fluorescent actin staining test demonstrated that actin polymerisation is involved in the internalisation of the C. pseudodiphtheriticum strains. The depolymerisation of microfilaments by cytochalasin E significantly reduced the internalisation of C. pseudodiphtheriticum by HEp-2 cells. Bacterial internalisation and cytoskeletal rearrangement seemed to be partially triggered by the activation of tyrosine kinase activity. Although C. pseudodiphtheriticum strains did not demonstrate an ability to replicate intracellularly, HEp-2 cells were unable to fully clear the pathogen within 24 h. These characteristics may explain how some C. pseudodiphtheriticum strains cause severe infection in human patients.

  3. SOLITARY CHEMORECEPTOR CELL SURVIVAL IS INDEPENDENT OF INTACT TRIGEMINAL INNERVATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulbransen, Brian; Silver, Wayne; Finger, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Nasal solitary chemoreceptor cells (SCCs) are a population of specialized chemosensory epithelial cells presumed to broaden trigeminal chemoreceptivity in mammals (Finger et al., 2003). SCCs are innervated by peptidergic trigeminal nerve fibers (Finger et al., 2003) but it is currently unknown if intact innervation is necessary for SCC development or survival. We tested the dependence of SCCs on innervation by eliminating trigeminal nerve fibers during development with neurogenin-1 knockout mice, during early postnatal development with capsaicin desensitization, and during adulthood with trigeminal lesioning. Our results demonstrate that elimination of innervation at any of these times does not result in decreased SCC numbers. In conclusion, neither SCC development nor mature cell maintenance is dependent on intact trigeminal innervation. PMID:18300260

  4. Romidepsin targets multiple survival signaling pathways in malignant T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdez, B C; Brammer, J E; Li, Y; Murray, D; Liu, Y; Hosing, C; Nieto, Y; Champlin, R E; Andersson, B S

    2015-01-01

    Romidepsin is a cyclic molecule that inhibits histone deacetylases. It is Food and Drug Administration-approved for treatment of cutaneous and peripheral T-cell lymphoma, but its precise mechanism of action against malignant T cells is unknown. To better understand the biological effects of romidepsin in these cells, we exposed PEER and SUPT1 T-cell lines, and a primary sample from T-cell lymphoma patient (Patient J) to romidepsin. We then examined the consequences in some key oncogenic signaling pathways. Romidepsin displayed IC 50 values of 10.8, 7.9 and 7.0 nm in PEER, SUPT1 and Patient J cells, respectively. Strong inhibition of histone deacetylases and demethylases, increased production of reactive oxygen species and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential were observed, which may contribute to the observed DNA-damage response and apoptosis. The stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathway and unfolded protein response in the endoplasmic reticulum were activated, whereas the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) and β-catenin pro-survival pathways were inhibited. The decreased level of β-catenin correlated with the upregulation of its inhibitor SFRP1 through romidepsin-mediated hypomethylation of its gene promoter. Our results provide new insights into how romidepsin invokes malignant T-cell killing, show evidence of its associated DNA hypomethylating activity and offer a rationale for the development of romidepsin-containing combination therapies

  5. Genome engineering in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minjung; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Hyongbum

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing in human cells is of great value in research, medicine, and biotechnology. Programmable nucleases including zinc-finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and RNA-guided engineered nucleases recognize a specific target sequence and make a double-strand break at that site, which can result in gene disruption, gene insertion, gene correction, or chromosomal rearrangements. The target sequence complexities of these programmable nucleases are higher than 3.2 mega base pairs, the size of the haploid human genome. Here, we briefly introduce the structure of the human genome and the characteristics of each programmable nuclease, and review their applications in human cells including pluripotent stem cells. In addition, we discuss various delivery methods for nucleases, programmable nickases, and enrichment of gene-edited human cells, all of which facilitate efficient and precise genome editing in human cells.

  6. Anti-apoptotic effect of hyperglycemia can allow survival of potentially autoreactive T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, P; Kahn, D A; Baltimore, D

    2011-04-01

    Thymocyte development is a tightly controlled multi-step process involving selective elimination of self-reactive and non-functional T cells by apoptosis. This developmental process depends on signaling by Notch, IL-7 and active glucose metabolism. In this study, we explored the requirement of glucose for thymocyte survival and found that in addition to metabolic regulation, glucose leads to the expression of anti-apoptotic genes. Under hyperglycemic conditions, both mouse and human thymocytes demonstrate enhanced survival. We show that glucose-induced anti-apoptotic genes are dependent on NF-κB p65 because high glucose is unable to attenuate normal ongoing apoptosis of thymocytes isolated from p65 knockout mice. Furthermore, we demonstrate that in vivo hyperglycemia decreases apoptosis of thymocytes allowing for survival of potentially self-reactive thymocytes. These results imply that hyperglycemic conditions could contribute to the development of autoimmunity through dysregulated thymic selection. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited

  7. Models for cell survival with low LET radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, M.G.; Garrett, W.R.

    1975-01-01

    A model for cell survival under low LET irradiation was developed in which the cell is considered to have N 0 -independent sensitive sites, each of which can exist in either an undamaged state (state A) or one of two damaged states. Radiation can change the sensitive sites from the undamaged state to either of two damaged states. The first damaged state (state B) can either be repaired or be promoted on the second damaged state (state C), which is irreparable. The promotion from the first damaged state to the second can occur due to any of the following: (1) further radiation damage, (2) an abortive attempt to repair the site, or (3) the arrival at a part of the cell cycle where the damage is ''fixed.'' Subject to the further assumptions that radiation damage can occur either indirectly (i.e., through radiation products) or due to direct interaction, and that repair of the first damaged state is a one-step process, expressions can be derived for P(N/sub A/, N/sub B/,t) = probability that after time t a cell will have N/sub A/ sites in state A and N/sub B/ in state B. The problem of determining P(N/sub A/, N/sub B/, t) is formulated for arbitrary time dependences of the radiation field and of all rate coefficients. A large family of cell-survival models can be described by interpreting the sensitive sites in different ways and by making different choices of rate coefficients and of the combinations of numbers of sites in different states that will lead to cell death. (U.S.)

  8. Survival of Free and Encapsulated Human and Rat Islet Xenografts Transplanted into the Mouse Bone Marrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Raphael P. H.; Seebach, Jörg D.; Morel, Philippe; Mahou, Redouan; Borot, Sophie; Giovannoni, Laurianne; Parnaud, Geraldine; Montanari, Elisa; Bosco, Domenico; Wandrey, Christine; Berney, Thierry; Bühler, Leo H.; Muller, Yannick D.

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow was recently proposed as an alternative and potentially immune-privileged site for pancreatic islet transplantation. The aim of the present study was to assess the survival and rejection mechanisms of free and encapsulated xenogeneic islets transplanted into the medullary cavity of the femur, or under the kidney capsule of streptozotocin-induced diabetic C57BL/6 mice. The median survival of free rat islets transplanted into the bone marrow or under the kidney capsule was 9 and 14 days, respectively, whereas that of free human islets was shorter, 7 days (bone marrow) and 10 days (kidney capsule). Infiltrating CD8+ T cells and redistributed CD4+ T cells, and macrophages were detected around the transplanted islets in bone sections. Recipient mouse splenocytes proliferated in response to donor rat stimulator cells. One month after transplantation under both kidney capsule or into bone marrow, encapsulated rat islets had induced a similar degree of fibrotic reaction and still contained insulin positive cells. In conclusion, we successfully established a small animal model for xenogeneic islet transplantation into the bone marrow. The rejection of xenogeneic islets was associated with local and systemic T cell responses and macrophage recruitment. Although there was no evidence for immune-privilege, the bone marrow may represent a feasible site for encapsulated xenogeneic islet transplantation. PMID:24625569

  9. Survival of free and encapsulated human and rat islet xenografts transplanted into the mouse bone marrow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael P H Meier

    Full Text Available Bone marrow was recently proposed as an alternative and potentially immune-privileged site for pancreatic islet transplantation. The aim of the present study was to assess the survival and rejection mechanisms of free and encapsulated xenogeneic islets transplanted into the medullary cavity of the femur, or under the kidney capsule of streptozotocin-induced diabetic C57BL/6 mice. The median survival of free rat islets transplanted into the bone marrow or under the kidney capsule was 9 and 14 days, respectively, whereas that of free human islets was shorter, 7 days (bone marrow and 10 days (kidney capsule. Infiltrating CD8+ T cells and redistributed CD4+ T cells, and macrophages were detected around the transplanted islets in bone sections. Recipient mouse splenocytes proliferated in response to donor rat stimulator cells. One month after transplantation under both kidney capsule or into bone marrow, encapsulated rat islets had induced a similar degree of fibrotic reaction and still contained insulin positive cells. In conclusion, we successfully established a small animal model for xenogeneic islet transplantation into the bone marrow. The rejection of xenogeneic islets was associated with local and systemic T cell responses and macrophage recruitment. Although there was no evidence for immune-privilege, the bone marrow may represent a feasible site for encapsulated xenogeneic islet transplantation.

  10. Effect of sublethal doses of gamma radiation on DNA super helicity and survival of human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koceva-Chyla, A.

    1992-01-01

    Effect of sublethal doses of gamma radiation on cell survival and DNA super helicity in human fibroblasts was studied. Cell survival was estimated on the basis the basis of clonal growth of irradiated fibroblasts in monolayer culture in vitro. The nucleoid sedimentation technique was used to study ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage in vivo as well as to examine DNA super helicity. Increased concentrations of ethidium bromine (EB) were used to titrate the DNA super coiling response in non-irradiated cells. This response consisted of a relaxation phase (1-5 μg/ml EB) and rewinding phase (5-20 μg/ml EB). Observed biphasic dependence of sedimentation distance of nucleoid on the concentration of EB suggests the dye altered the amount of DNA super coiling in situ. The degree of DNA super coiling and thus the sedimentation rate of nucleoid in absence of EB was very sensitive to strand break induced in DNA by the doses of gamma radiation employed in the cell survival assay. Doses of 2-8 Gy of gamma radiation induced a dose -dependent reduction in the sedimentation of nucleoid. Loss of negative DNA super coiling was initially rapid (about 30% after the dose of 2 Gy) and then proceeded at a slower rate (about 35% and 48% after the doses of 4 Gy and 8 Gy respectively), indicating a significant relaxation of nucleoid structure at the doses of gamma radiation greater than 4 Gy, at which also significant decrease in fibroblasts survival occurred. Significant loss of negative DNA super coiling within the range of doses of gamma radiation resulting in significant decrease of cell survival suggests that destabilizing effect of radiation on DNA tertiary- and quaternary structures (extensive DNA breaks and relaxation of nucleonic super helicity) disturb normal functions and replications of genomic DNA, in consequence leading to a reproductive death of cells. Considering the sensitivity and simplicity of the method, the nucleoid sedimentation technique might be also a useful tool

  11. TRPM4 expression is associated with activated B cell subtype and poor survival in diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loo, Suet K; Ch'ng, Ewe S; Md Salleh, Md Salzihan

    2017-01-01

    to investigate TRPM4 protein expression pattern in non-malignant tissues and DLBCL cases, and its association with clinico-demographic parameters and survival in DLBCL. METHODS AND RESULTS: Analysis of publicly available DLBCL microarray data sets showed that TRPM4 transcripts were up-regulated in DLBCL compared...... to normal germinal centre B (GCB) cells, were expressed more highly in the activated B cell-like DLBCL (ABC-DLBCL) subtype and higher TRPM4 transcripts conferred worse overall survival (OS) in R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone)-treated DLBCL cases (P ... immunohistochemical analysis showed that TRPM4 was expressed in various human tissues but not in normal B cells within lymphoid tissues (reactive tonsil, lymph node and appendix). TRPM4 protein was present in 26% (n = 49 of 189) of our cohort of R-CHOP-treated DLBCL cases and this was associated significantly...

  12. Postirradiation DNA synthesis is inversely related to cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapiszewska, M.; Lange, C.S.

    1987-01-01

    Postirradiation (PI) events which might lead to cellular reproductive death or survival were studied in L5178Y-S (LY-S) cells. PI incubation at 25 0 C protects LY-S cells against the PLD fixation which takes place at 37 0 C. An optimal condition for the repair of PLD is 1h at 37 0 C followed by 4h holding at 25 0 C prior to the second half of a split dose, or 5L holding at 25 0 C without a 37 0 C incubation. Longer incubations at 37 0 C resulted in progressively decreased survivals. Postirradiation inhibition of DNA synthesis at 37 0 C was observed only during the first 30 min; thereafter, /sup 3/H-dThd incorporation was higher than in unirradiated controls. This excess synthesis effect was removed by shifting irradiated cells to 25 0 C holding. The inhibition observed at 25 0 C was reversed by shifting to 37 0 C. Thus the degree of postirradiation DNA synthesis is inversely related to PLD/SLD repair. DNA filter elution shows complete SSB repair by 3h at both temperatures (with faster kinetics at 37 0 C), and DSB repair plateaus at 80% (37 0 C) and 60% (25 0 C) after 90 min

  13. Role of Ku80-dependent end-joining in delayed genomic instability in mammalian cells surviving ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Keiji; Kodama, Seiji; Watanabe, Masami

    2010-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces delayed destabilization of the genome in the progenies of surviving cells. This phenomenon, which is called radiation-induced genomic instability, is manifested by delayed induction of radiation effects, such as cell death, chromosome aberration, and mutation in the progeny of cells surviving radiation exposure. Previously, there was a report showing that delayed cell death was absent in Ku80-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, however, the mechanism of their defect has not been determined. We found that delayed induction of DNA double strand breaks and chromosomal breaks were intact in Ku80-deficient cells surviving X-irradiation, whereas there was no sign for the production of chromosome bridges between divided daughter cells. Moreover, delayed induction of dicentric chromosomes was significantly compromised in those cells compared to the wild-type CHO cells. Reintroduction of the human Ku86 gene complimented the defective DNA repair and recovered delayed induction of dicentric chromosomes and delayed cell death, indicating that defective Ku80-dependent dicentric induction was the cause of the absence of delayed cell death. Since DNA-PKcs-defective cells showed delayed phenotypes, Ku80-dependent illegitimate rejoining is involved in delayed impairment of the integrity of the genome in radiation-survived cells.

  14. Role of Ku80-dependent end-joining in delayed genomic instability in mammalian cells surviving ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Keiji, E-mail: kzsuzuki@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Course of Life Sciences and Radiation Research, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Kodama, Seiji [Research Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-2 Gakuen-machi, Sakai 599-8570 (Japan); Watanabe, Masami [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Kumatori-cho Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan)

    2010-01-05

    Ionizing radiation induces delayed destabilization of the genome in the progenies of surviving cells. This phenomenon, which is called radiation-induced genomic instability, is manifested by delayed induction of radiation effects, such as cell death, chromosome aberration, and mutation in the progeny of cells surviving radiation exposure. Previously, there was a report showing that delayed cell death was absent in Ku80-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, however, the mechanism of their defect has not been determined. We found that delayed induction of DNA double strand breaks and chromosomal breaks were intact in Ku80-deficient cells surviving X-irradiation, whereas there was no sign for the production of chromosome bridges between divided daughter cells. Moreover, delayed induction of dicentric chromosomes was significantly compromised in those cells compared to the wild-type CHO cells. Reintroduction of the human Ku86 gene complimented the defective DNA repair and recovered delayed induction of dicentric chromosomes and delayed cell death, indicating that defective Ku80-dependent dicentric induction was the cause of the absence of delayed cell death. Since DNA-PKcs-defective cells showed delayed phenotypes, Ku80-dependent illegitimate rejoining is involved in delayed impairment of the integrity of the genome in radiation-survived cells.

  15. Parameter resolution in two models for cell survival after radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Cera, E.; Andreasi Bassi, F.; Arcovito, G.

    1989-01-01

    The resolvability of model parameters for the linear-quadratic and the repair-misrepair models for cell survival after radiation has been studied by Monte Carlo simulations as a function of the number of experimental data points collected in a given dose range and the experimental error. Statistical analysis of the results reveals the range of experimental conditions under which the model parameters can be resolved with sufficient accuracy, and points out some differences in the operational aspects of the two models. (orig.)

  16. Survival of Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains inoculated in cheese matrix during simulated human digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitino, Iole; Randazzo, Cinzia L; Cross, Kathryn L; Parker, Mary L; Bisignano, Carlo; Wickham, Martin S J; Mandalari, Giuseppina; Caggia, Cinzia

    2012-08-01

    Survival of probiotic bacteria during transit through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is influenced by a number of environmental variables including stomach acidity, bile salts, digestive enzymes and food matrix. This study assessed survival of seven selected Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains delivered within a model cheese system to the human upper GI tract using a dynamic gastric model (DGM). Good survival rates for all tested strains were recorded during both simulated gastric and duodenal digestion. Strains H12, H25 and N24 demonstrated higher survival capacities during gastric digestion than L. rhamnosus GG strain used as control, with H12 and N24 continuing to grow during duodenal digestion. Strains L. rhamnosus F17, N24 and R61 showed adhesion properties to both HT-29 and Caco-2 cells. The ability to attach to the cheese matrix during digestion was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, also indicating production of extracellular polysaccharides as a response to acid stress. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Sphingosine kinase-2 maintains viral latency and survival for KSHV-infected endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Dai

    Full Text Available Phosphorylation of sphingosine by sphingosine kinases (SphK1 and SphK2 generates sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P, a bioactive sphingolipid which promotes cancer cell survival and tumor progression in vivo. We have recently reported that targeting SphK2 induces apoptosis for human primary effusion lymphoma (PEL cell lines infected by the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, and this occurs in part through inhibition of canonical NF-κB activation. In contrast, pharmacologic inhibition of SphK2 has minimal impact for uninfected B-cell lines or circulating human B cells from healthy donors. Therefore, we designed additional studies employing primary human endothelial cells to explore mechanisms responsible for the selective death observed for KSHV-infected cells during SphK2 targeting. Using RNA interference and a clinically relevant pharmacologic approach, we have found that targeting SphK2 induces apoptosis selectively for KSHV-infected endothelial cells through induction of viral lytic gene expression. Moreover, this effect occurs through repression of KSHV-microRNAs regulating viral latency and signal transduction, including miR-K12-1 which targets IκBα to facilitate activation of NF-κB, and ectopic expression of miR-K12-1 restores NF-κB activation and viability for KSHV-infected endothelial cells during SphK2 inhibition. These data illuminate a novel survival mechanism and potential therapeutic target for KSHV-infected endothelial cells: SphK2-associated maintenance of viral latency.

  18. The development of human mast cells. An historical reappraisal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribatti, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of mast cell (MC) differentiation is derived mainly from in vitro studies of different stages of stem and progenitor cells. The hematopoietic lineage development of human MCs is unique compared to other myeloid-derived cells. Human MCs originate from CD34"+/CD117"+/CD13"+multipotent hematopoietic progenitors, which undergo transendothelial recruitment into peripheral tissues, where they complete differentiation. Stem cell factor (SCF) is a major chemotactic factor for MCs and their progenitors. SCF also elicits cell-cell and cell-substratum adhesion, facilitates the proliferation, and sustains the survival, differentiation, and maturation, of MCs. Because MC maturation is influenced by local microenvironmental factors, different MC phenotypes can develop in different tissues and organs. - Highlights: • Human mast cells originate from CD34/CD117/CD13 positive multipotent hematopoietic progenitors. • Stem cell factor is a major chemotactic factor for mast cells and their progenitors. • Different mast cell phenotypes can develop in different tissues and organs.

  19. Survival and PHA-stimulation of #betta#-irradiated human peripheral blood T lymphocyte subpopulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.L.; Darr, D.C.; Daulden, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    Human peripheral blood T lymphocyte subpopulations were identified and isolated on the basis of their ability to bind IgG (T-G), IgM (T-M), or neither immunoglobulin class (T-null). Lymphocytes were exposed to 0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5 or 5.0 Gy of 60 Co #betta#-rays either as a T-cell suspension or as separated T cell subsets. Survival curves, determined 5 days after irradiation, revealed that each subset has radiosensitive and radioresistant portions, and that the T-G cell is the most sensitive subset. Mitotic indices of 48-h cultures showed that the response of unirradiated T lymphocytes to PHA varied greatly among the subsets, the highest indices being obtained for the T-M and the lowest for the T-G cells. With the possible exception of the T-G cells, the subsets are realtively resistant to mitotic effects of #betta#-rays. T-G cells suppress the PHA-induced mitotic response of the other T lymphocyte subsets, and this suppressor effect is radiosensitive, being abolished by 1.0 Gy. It is concluded that lymphocytes exposed to >= 1 Gy of #betta#-rays will have very few dividing B lymphocytes or T-G cells. This together with radiation-induced loss of T-G suppressor action means that the predominant lymphocyte types in mitosis after >=1 Gy are the radioresistant T-M and T-null cells. (orig.)

  20. Survival and differentiation of human embryonic stem cell-derived neural precursors grafted spinally in spinal ischemia-injured rats or in naive immunosuppressed minipigs: a qualitative and quantitative study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kakinohana, O.; Juhásová, Jana; Juhás, Štefan; Motlík, Jan; Platoshyn, O.; Galik, J.; Hefferan, M. P.; Yuan, S. H.; Vidal, J. G.; Carson, C. T.; Van Gorp, S.; Goldberg, D.; Leerink, M.; Lazar, P.; Maršala, S.; Miyanohara, A.; Keshavarzi, S.; Ciacci, J. D.; Maršala, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 12 (2012), s. 2603-2619 ISSN 0963-6897 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0538; GA TA ČR TA01011466 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : spinal cord ischemia * human embryonic stem (ES) cells * neuronal precursors (NPCs) Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.422, year: 2012

  1. Oral cancer/endothelial cell fusion experiences nuclear fusion and acquisition of enhanced survival potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kai; Song, Yong; Zhao, Xiao-Ping; Shen, Hui; Wang, Meng; Yan, Ting-lin; Liu, Ke; Shang, Zheng-jun

    2014-01-01

    Most previous studies have linked cancer–macrophage fusion with tumor progression and metastasis. However, the characteristics of hybrid cells derived from oral cancer and endothelial cells and their involvement in cancer remained unknown. Double-immunofluorescent staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were performed to confirm spontaneous cell fusion between eGFP-labeled human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and RFP-labeled SCC9, and to detect the expression of vementin and cytokeratin 18 in the hybrids. The property of chemo-resistance of such hybrids was examined by TUNEL assay. The hybrid cells in xenografted tumor were identified by FISH and GFP/RFP dual-immunofluoresence staining. We showed that SCC9 cells spontaneously fused with cocultured endothelial cells, and the resultant hybrid cells maintained the division and proliferation activity after re-plating and thawing. Such hybrids expressed markers of both parental cells and became more resistant to chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin as compared to the parental SCC9 cells. Our in vivo data indicated that the hybrid cells contributed to tumor composition by using of immunostaining and FISH analysis, even though the hybrid cells and SCC9 cells were mixed with 1:10,000, according to the FACS data. Our study suggested that the fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion and acquire a new property of drug resistance and consequently enhanced survival potential. These experimental findings provide further supportive evidence for the theory that cell fusion is involved in cancer progression. - Highlights: • The fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion. • The resulting hybrid cells acquire a new property of drug resistance. • The resulting hybrid cells express the markers of both parental cells (i.e. vimentin and cytokeratin 18). • The hybrid cells contribute to tumor repopulation in vivo

  2. Oral cancer/endothelial cell fusion experiences nuclear fusion and acquisition of enhanced survival potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Kai [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Shandong Province (China); The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Song, Yong [The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Department of Stomatology, Liu Zhou People' s Hospital, Guangxi (China); Zhao, Xiao-Ping; Shen, Hui; Wang, Meng; Yan, Ting-lin [The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Liu, Ke, E-mail: liuke.1999@aliyun.com [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial-Head and Neck oncology, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, 237 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430079 (China); The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Shang, Zheng-jun, E-mail: shangzhengjun@hotmail.com [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial-Head and Neck oncology, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, 237 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430079 (China); The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China)

    2014-10-15

    Most previous studies have linked cancer–macrophage fusion with tumor progression and metastasis. However, the characteristics of hybrid cells derived from oral cancer and endothelial cells and their involvement in cancer remained unknown. Double-immunofluorescent staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were performed to confirm spontaneous cell fusion between eGFP-labeled human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and RFP-labeled SCC9, and to detect the expression of vementin and cytokeratin 18 in the hybrids. The property of chemo-resistance of such hybrids was examined by TUNEL assay. The hybrid cells in xenografted tumor were identified by FISH and GFP/RFP dual-immunofluoresence staining. We showed that SCC9 cells spontaneously fused with cocultured endothelial cells, and the resultant hybrid cells maintained the division and proliferation activity after re-plating and thawing. Such hybrids expressed markers of both parental cells and became more resistant to chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin as compared to the parental SCC9 cells. Our in vivo data indicated that the hybrid cells contributed to tumor composition by using of immunostaining and FISH analysis, even though the hybrid cells and SCC9 cells were mixed with 1:10,000, according to the FACS data. Our study suggested that the fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion and acquire a new property of drug resistance and consequently enhanced survival potential. These experimental findings provide further supportive evidence for the theory that cell fusion is involved in cancer progression. - Highlights: • The fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion. • The resulting hybrid cells acquire a new property of drug resistance. • The resulting hybrid cells express the markers of both parental cells (i.e. vimentin and cytokeratin 18). • The hybrid cells contribute to tumor repopulation in vivo.

  3. Novel bifunctional anthracycline and nitrosourea chemotherapy for human bladder cancer: analysis in a preclinical survival model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaves, D; Murray, M K; Raghavan, D

    1996-08-01

    A hybrid drug [N-2-chloroethylnitrosoureidodaunorubicin (AD312)] that combines structural and functional features of both anthracyclines and nitrosoureas was evaluated in a preclinical survival model of human bladder cancer. To measure the therapeutic activity of AD312, UCRU-BL13 transitional cell carcinoma cells were grown as xenografts in nude mice, and tumor growth rates were compared after i.v. administration of the drug at three dose levels. AD312 treatment at 45 and 60 mg/kg achieved 7-10-fold inhibition of tumor growth and increased host survival by 156 and 249%, respectively. Doses of 60 mg/kg showed optimal therapeutic efficacy, with sustained tumor growth inhibition, an over 2-fold increase in life span, and 40% of mice tumor free ("cured") at 120 days. Tumors were unresponsive to maximum tolerated doses of doxorubicin, a standard anthracycline used as a single agent and in combination therapies for bladder cancer. 1,3-Bis-[2-chloroethyl]-1-nitrosourea was used as a control for the apparently enhanced response of human tumors in murine hosts to nitrosoureas. 1, 3-Bis-[2-chloroethyl]-1-nitrosourea administered in three injections of 20 mg/kg did not cure mice but temporarily inhibited tumor growth by 70% and prolonged survival by 55%; its activity in this model suggests that it may be included in the repertoire of alkylating agents currently used for treatment of bladder cancers. AD312 showed increased antitumor activity with less toxicity than doxorubicin, and its bifunctional properties provide the opportunity for simultaneous treatment of individual cancer cells with two cytotoxic modalities as well as treatment of heterogeneous populations typical of bladder cancers. This novel cytotoxic drug cured doxorubicin-refractory disease and should be investigated for the clinical management of bladder cancer.

  4. Mast cell chymase induces smooth muscle cell apoptosis by disrupting NF-κB-mediated survival signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskinen, Markus J.; Heikkilae, Hanna M.; Speer, Mei Y.; Hakala, Jukka K.; Laine, Mika; Kovanen, Petri T.; Lindstedt, Ken A.

    2006-01-01

    Chymase released from activated mast cells induces apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in vitro by degrading the pericellular matrix component fibronectin, so causing disruption of focal adhesion complexes and Akt dephosphorylation, which are necessary for cell adhesion and survival. However, the molecular mechanisms of chymase-mediated apoptosis downstream of Akt have remained elusive. Here, we show by means of RT-PCR, Western blotting, EMSA, immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy, that chymase induces SMC apoptosis by disrupting NF-κB-mediated survival signaling. Following chymase treatment, the translocation of active NF-κB/p65 to the nucleus was partly abolished and the amount of nuclear p65 was reduced. Pretreatment of SMCs with chymase also inhibited LPS- and IL-1β-induced nuclear translocation of p65. The chymase-induced degradation of p65 was mediated by active caspases. Loss of NF-κB-mediated transactivation resulted in downregulation of bcl-2 mRNA and protein expression, leading to mitochondrial swelling and release of cytochrome c. The apoptotic process involved activation of both caspase 9 and caspase 8. The results reveal that, by disrupting the NF-κB-mediated survival-signaling pathway, activated chymase-secreting mast cells can mediate apoptosis of cultured arterial SMCs. Since activated mast cells colocalize with apoptotic SMCs in vulnerable areas of human atherosclerotic plaques, they may participate in the weakening and rupture of atherosclerotic plaques

  5. Defective repair of UV-damaged DNA in human tumor and SV40-transformed human cells but not in adenovirus-transformed human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rainbow, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    The DNA repair capacities of five human tumor cell lines, one SV40-transformed human cell line and one adenovirus-transformed human cell line were compared with that of normal human fibroblasts using a sensitive host cell reactivation (HCR) technique. Unirradiated and UV-irradiated suspensions of adenovirus type 2 (Ad 2) were assayed for their ability to form viral structural antigens (Vag) in the various cell types using immunofluorescent staining. The survival of Vag formation for UV-irradiated Ad 2 was significantly reduced in all the human tumor cell lines and the SV40-transformed human line compared to the normal human fibroblasts, but was apparently normal in the adenovirus-transformed human cells. D 0 values for the UV survival of Ad 2 Vag synthesis in the tumor and virally transformed lines expressed as a percentage of that obtained on normal fibroblast strains were used as a measure of DNA repair capacity. Percent HCR values ranged from 26 to 53% in the tumor cells. These results indicate a deficiency in the repair of UV-induced DNA damage associated with human tumorigenesis and the transformation of human cells by SV40 but not the transformation of human cells by adenovirus. (author)

  6. Promotion of Metastasis-associated Gene Expression in Survived PANC-1 Cells Following Trichostatin A Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zongjing; Yang, Yunxiu; Liu, Biao; Wang, Benquan; Sun, Meng; Zhang, Ling; Chen, Bicheng; You, Heyi; Zhou, Mengtao

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors represent a promising class of potential anticancer agents for the treatment of human malignancies. In this study, the effects of trichostatin A (TSA) on apoptosis, metastasis-associated gene expression, and activation of the Notch pathway in human pancreatic cancer cell lines were investigated. After treatment with TSA, cell viability and apoptosis were evaluated using the MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthia-zol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay, Hoechst 33258 staining, and flow cytometry. Moreover, RT-PCR and western blot analyses were performed to measure the expression levels of apoptosis-associated genes (Bcl-2, Bax, and caspase-3), metastasis-associated genes (E-cadherin, vimentin, and matrix metalloproteinases), and Notch pathway activation (Notch intracellular domain, NICD). The levels of matrix metalloproteinase 2 and NICD were also semi-quantified by immunoassay. Following treatment with TSA for 24 h, PANC-1, SW1990, and MIATACA-2 cells exhibited cell death. The MTT assay revealed that TSA significantly decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent manner in PANC-1 cells. The Hoechst 33258 staining and flow cytometry results evidenced a significant increase in PANC-1 cell apoptosis following TSA treatment. The expression levels of Bax and caspase-3 were increased significantly, whereas Bcl-2 was down-regulated after TSA treatment. In the PANC-1 cells that survived after TSA treatment, the expression levels of vimentin, E-cadherin, and MMP genes were altered by the promotion of potential metastasis and increased expression of NICD. TSA can induce apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells. In addition, the up-regulation of metastasis-related genes and the activation of the Notch pathway in the survived PANC-1 cells may be associated with a too-low level of TSA or resistance to TSA.

  7. Selective Mitochondrial Uptake of MKT-077 Can Suppress Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma Cell Survival and

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmytro Starenki

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMedullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC is a neuroendocrine tumor mainly caused by mutations in the rearranged during transfection (RET proto-oncogene. Not all patients with progressive MTC respond to current therapy inhibiting RET, demanding additional therapeutic strategies. We recently demonstrated that disrupting mitochondrial metabolism using a mitochondria-targeted agent or by depleting a mitochondrial chaperone effectively suppressed human MTC cells in culture and in mouse xenografts by inducing apoptosis and RET downregulation. These observations led us to hypothesize that mitochondria are potential therapeutic targets for MTC. This study further tests this hypothesis using1-ethyl-2-[[3-ethyl-5-(3-methylbenzothiazolin-2-yliden]-4-oxothiazolidin-2-ylidenemethyl] pyridinium chloride (MKT-077, a water-soluble rhodocyanine dye analogue, which can selectively accumulate in mitochondria.MethodsThe effects of MKT-077 on cell proliferation, survival, expression of RET and tumor protein 53 (TP53, and mitochondrial activity were determined in the human MTC lines in culture and in mouse xenografts.ResultsMKT-077 induced cell cycle arrest in TT and MZ-CRC-1. Intriguingly, MKT-077 also induced RET downregulation and strong cell death responses in TT cells, but not in MZ-CRC-1 cells. This discrepancy was mainly due to the difference between the capacities of these cell lines to retain MKT-077 in mitochondria. The cytotoxicity of MKT-077 in TT cells was mainly attributed to oxidative stress while being independent of TP53. MKT-077 also effectively suppressed tumor growth of TT xenografts.ConclusionMKT-077 can suppress cell survival of certain MTC subtypes by accumulating in mitochondria and interfering with mitochondrial activity although it can also suppress cell proliferation via other mechanisms. These results consistently support the hypothesis that mitochondrial targeting has therapeutic potential for MTC.

  8. Melanin dependent survival of Apergillus fumigatus conidia in lung epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Shayista; Thywissen, Andreas; Heinekamp, Thorsten; Saluz, Hans Peter; Brakhage, Axel A

    2014-07-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most important air-borne pathogenic fungus of humans. Upon inhalation of conidia, the fungus makes close contact with lung epithelial cells, which only possess low phagocytic activity. These cells are in particular interesting to address the question whether there is some form of persistence of conidia of A. fumigatus in the human host. Therefore, by also using uracil-auxotrophic mutant strains, we were able to investigate the interaction of A549 lung epithelial cells and A. fumigatus conidia in detail for long periods. Interestingly, unlike professional phagocytes, our study showed that the presence of conidial dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN) melanin enhanced the uptake of A. fumigatus conidia by epithelial cells when compared with non-pigmented pksP mutant conidia. Furthermore, conidia of A. fumigatus were able to survive within epithelial cells. This was due to the presence of DHN melanin in the cell wall of conidia, because melanised wild-type conidia showed a higher survival rate inside epithelial cells and led to inhibition of acidification of phagolysosomes. Both effects were not observed for white (non-melanised) conidia of the pksP mutant strain. Moreover, in contrast to pksP mutant conidia, melanised wild-type conidia were able to inhibit the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in A549 lung epithelial cells even for longer periods. The anti-apoptotic effect was not restricted to conidia, because both conidia-derived melanin ghosts (cell-free DHN melanin) and a different type of melanin, dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) melanin, acted anti-apoptotically. Taken together, these data indicate the possibility of melanin-dependent persistence of conidia in lung epithelial cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Deregulated GSK3β activity in colorectal cancer: Its association with tumor cell survival and proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakoori, Abbas; Ougolkov, Andrei; Yu Zhiwei; Zhang Bin; Modarressi, Mohammad H.; Billadeau, Daniel D.; Mai, Masayoshi; Takahashi, Yutaka; Minamoto, Toshinari

    2005-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) reportedly has opposing roles, repressing Wnt/β-catenin signaling on the one hand but maintaining cell survival and proliferation through the NF-κB pathway on the other. The present investigation was undertaken to clarify the roles of GSK3β in human cancer. In colon cancer cell lines and colorectal cancer patients, levels of GSK3β expression and amounts of its active form were higher in tumor cells than in their normal counterparts; these findings were independent of nuclear accumulation of β-catenin oncoprotein in the tumor cells. Inhibition of GSK3β activity by phosphorylation was defective in colorectal cancers but preserved in non-neoplastic cells and tissues. Strikingly, inhibition of GSK3β activity by chemical inhibitors and its expression by RNA interference targeting GSK3β induced apoptosis and attenuated proliferation of colon cancer cells in vitro. Our findings demonstrate an unrecognized role of GSK3β in tumor cell survival and proliferation other than its predicted role as a tumor suppressor, and warrant proposing this kinase as a potential therapeutic target in colorectal cancer

  10. Expression of HSF2 decreases in mitosis to enable stress-inducible transcription and cell survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsing, Alexandra N.; Aspelin, Camilla; Björk, Johanna K.; Bergman, Heidi A.; Himanen, Samu V.; Kallio, Marko J.; Roos-Mattjus, Pia

    2014-01-01

    Unless mitigated, external and physiological stresses are detrimental for cells, especially in mitosis, resulting in chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy, or apoptosis. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) maintain protein homeostasis and promote cell survival. Hsps are transcriptionally regulated by heat shock factors (HSFs). Of these, HSF1 is the master regulator and HSF2 modulates Hsp expression by interacting with HSF1. Due to global inhibition of transcription in mitosis, including HSF1-mediated expression of Hsps, mitotic cells are highly vulnerable to stress. Here, we show that cells can counteract transcriptional silencing and protect themselves against proteotoxicity in mitosis. We found that the condensed chromatin of HSF2-deficient cells is accessible for HSF1 and RNA polymerase II, allowing stress-inducible Hsp expression. Consequently, HSF2-deficient cells exposed to acute stress display diminished mitotic errors and have a survival advantage. We also show that HSF2 expression declines during mitosis in several but not all human cell lines, which corresponds to the Hsp70 induction and protection against stress-induced mitotic abnormalities and apoptosis. PMID:25202032

  11. Survival of irradiated glia and glioma cells studied with a new cloning technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, S.; Carlsson, J.; Larsson, B.; Ponten, J.

    1980-01-01

    A method allowing cloning of monolayer cultured cells with a low plating efficiency was developed. Cells were grown in several small palladium squares to obtain a high cell density. These squares were surrounded by non-adhesive agarose to prevent large distance migration and thereby mixing of the clones. By using easily-cloned hamster cells for comparison it was found that the survival curves were similar to the curves obtained with conventional cloning. The new method was used to compare the radiosensitivity of cultured human glia and glioma cells which both have a low plating efficiency ( 0 -values (1.5 to 2.5 Gy) and large shoulders (extrapolation numbers around 5) indicating that they were rather resistant and had a high capacity for accumulation of sublethal damage. The survival curves for glia cells had lower D 0 -values (1.3 to 1.5 Gy) and no shoulders at all, indicating that they were more sensitive than the glioma cells. (author)

  12. Culture conditions affecting the survival response of Chinese hamster ovary cells treated by hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highfield, D.P.; Holahan, E.V.; Dewey, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    Using lethally irradiated feeder cells to control cell population densities, researchers investigated the survival of Chinese hamster ovary cells heated between 42.2 and 45.5 degrees C. Test cells were plated into T25 flasks with or without feeder cells, incubated 2 hours at 37 degrees C, and then given various heat treatments. Under all heating conditions, survival increased in those flasks containing feeder cells. Increased survival (by as much as a factor of 100 for cells heated at 42.4 degrees C for 6-10 hr) was most apparent when cells were heated to thermotolerance. By adjustment of test and feeder cell numbers, survival increased as density increased; however, maximum survival followed a transition period that occurred between the plating of 1 X 10(4) and 6 X 10(4) cells. Experimental artifacts due to improper control of cell density was demonstrated

  13. Cell survival, cell death and cell cycle pathways are interconnected: Implications for cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maddika, S; Ande, SR; Panigrahi, S

    2007-01-01

    )), and the Cip1/Waf1/Kip1-2-family (p21(Cip1/Waf1), p27(Kip1), p57(Kip2)) are shown both in the context of proliferation regulators and as contributors to the apoptotic machinery. Bcl2-family members (i.e. Bcl2, Bcl-X(L) Mcl-1(L); Bax, Bok/Mtd, Bak, and Bcl-X(S); Bad, Bid, Bim(EL), Bmf, Mcl-1(S)) are highlighted...... approaches that would involve redirecting over-active survival and proliferation pathways towards induction of apoptosis in cancer cells....

  14. 5-Fluorouracil-radiation interactions in human colon adenocarcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchholz, Daniel J.; Lepek, Katherine J.; Rich, Tyvin A.; Murray, David

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of cellular proliferation and cell cycle stage on the ability of postirradiation 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) to radiosensitize cultured human colon adenocarcinoma Clone A cells. Methods and Materials: Cell survival curves were generated for irradiated: (a) log- and plateau-phase Clone A cells; and (b) Clone A cells separated by centrifugal elutriation into the various phases of the cell cycle; with and without postirradiation treatment with 100 μg/ml 5-FU. Results: Postirradiation treatment with 5-FU sensitized proliferating cells to a greater degree than it sensitized cells growing in plateau phase. The β component of cell kill in log-phase cells was increased by a factor of 1.5 with a sensitizer enhancement ratio of 1.21 at the 0.01 survival level. Plateau-phase cells showed less radiosensitization (sensitizer enhancement ratio of 1.13 at the 0.01 survival level); however, there was a mild increase in both α and β kill in plateau-phase cells. Elutriated G 1 cells were the most radiosensitive, independent of treatment with 5-FU. The phase of the cell cycle had little effect on the ability of fluorouracil to radiosensitize Clone A cells. Conclusion: Proliferating cells are more susceptible to radiosensitization with 5-FU than plateau-phase cells are, but this effect appears to be independent of the phase of the cell cycle

  15. Protecting and rescuing the effectors: roles of differentiation and survival in the control of memory T cell development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sema eKurtulus

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines, arguably the single most important intervention in improving human health, have exploited the phenomenon of immunological memory. The elicitation of memory T cells is often an essential part of successful long-lived protective immunity. Our understanding of T cell memory has been greatly aided by the development of TCR Tg mice and MHC tetrameric staining reagents that have allowed the precise tracking of antigen-specific T cell responses. Indeed, following acute infection or immunization, naïve T cells undergo a massive expansion culminating in the generation of a robust effector T cell population. This peak effector response is relatively short-lived and, while most effector T cells die by apoptosis, some remain and develop into memory cells. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying this cell fate decision remain incompletely defined, substantial progress has been made, particularly with regards to CD8+ T cells. For example, the effector CD8+ T cells generated during a response are heterogeneous, consisting of cells with more or less potential to develop into full-fledged memory cells. Development of CD8+ T cell memory is regulated by the transcriptional programs that control the differentiation and survival of effector T cells. While the type of antigenic stimulation and level of inflammation control effector CD8+ T cell differentiation, availability of cytokines and their ability to control expression and function of Bcl-2 family members governs their survival. These distinct differentiation and survival programs may allow for finer therapeutic intervention to control both the quality and quantity of CD8+ T cell memory. Effector to memory transition of CD4+ T cells is less well characterized than CD8+ T cells, emerging details will be discussed. This review will focus on the recent progress made in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the development of T cell memory with an emphasis on factors controlling survival of

  16. Survival and kinetics of Chinese hamster ovary cell subpopulations induced by Adriamycin and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneiderman, M.H.

    1979-01-01

    Mitotic selection of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, at 10 min intervals after the initiation of Adriamycin and/or x-ray treatment was used to measure the kinetics and survival of cells which progressed without delay, the ''refractory'' cells, the cells that reached mitosis only after recovery from the treatment-induced delay, the ''recovered'' cells, and the survival of the cells remaining attached to the flask 5 h after treatment. The cell kinetics were determined from the rate at which cells entered mitosis, and the reproductive integrity from the survival of the selected refractory, recovered and remaining (unselected) cells

  17. Cytotoxicity of ophthalmic solutions with and without preservatives to human corneal endothelial cells, epithelial cells and conjunctival epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayaki, Masahiko; Yaguchi, Shigeo; Iwasawa, Atsuo; Koide, Ryohei

    2008-08-01

    The cytotoxicity of a range of commercial ophthalmic solutions in the presence and absence of preservatives was assessed in human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs), corneal epithelia and conjunctival epithelia using in vitro techniques. Cell survival was measured using the WST-1 assay for endothelial cells and the MTT assay for epithelial cells. Commercially available timolol, carteolol, cromoglicate, diclofenac, bromfenac and hyaluronic acid ophthalmic solutions were assessed for cytotoxicity in the presence and absence of preservatives. The preservatives benzalkonium, chlorobutanol and polysorbate were also tested. The survival of cells exposed to test ophthalmic solutions was expressed as a percentage of cell survival in the control solution (distilled water added to media) after 48 h exposure. HCEC survival was 20-30% in ophthalmic solutions diluted 10-fold. The survival of HCEC was significantly greater in all solutions in the absence of preservative than in the presence of preservative. The survival of corneal and conjunctival epithelia was consistent with that of HCECs for all test ophthalmic solutions. The preservatives polysorbate and benzalkonium were highly cytotoxic with cell survival decreasing to 20% at the concentration estimated in commercial ophthalmic solutions. By comparison, the survival of cells exposed to chlorobutanol was 80% or greater. The cytotoxicity of ophthalmic solutions to HCEC, corneal epithelia and conjunctival epithelia decreased in the absence of preservative.

  18. Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldahmash, Abdullah; Zaher, Walid; Al-Nbaheen, May

    2012-01-01

    Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSC) represent a group of non-hematopoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow stroma and the stroma of other organs including subcutaneous adipose tissue, placenta, and muscles. They exhibit the characteristics of somatic stem cells of self......-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation into mesoderm-type of cells, e.g., to osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes and possibly other cell types including hepatocytes and astrocytes. Due to their ease of culture and multipotentiality, hMSC are increasingly employed as a source for cells suitable for a number...

  19. Evaluating human cancer cell metastasis in zebrafish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, Yong; Xie, Xiayang; Walker, Steven; White, David T; Mumm, Jeff S; Cowell, John K

    2013-01-01

    In vivo metastasis assays have traditionally been performed in mice, but the process is inefficient and costly. However, since zebrafish do not develop an adaptive immune system until 14 days post-fertilization, human cancer cells can survive and metastasize when transplanted into zebrafish larvae. Despite isolated reports, there has been no systematic evaluation of the robustness of this system to date. Individual cell lines were stained with CM-Dil and injected into the perivitelline space of 2-day old zebrafish larvae. After 2-4 days fish were imaged using confocal microscopy and the number of metastatic cells was determined using Fiji software. To determine whether zebrafish can faithfully report metastatic potential in human cancer cells, we injected a series of cells with different metastatic potential into the perivitelline space of 2 day old embryos. Using cells from breast, prostate, colon and pancreas we demonstrated that the degree of cell metastasis in fish is proportional to their invasion potential in vitro. Highly metastatic cells such as MDA231, DU145, SW620 and ASPC-1 are seen in the vasculature and throughout the body of the fish after only 24–48 hours. Importantly, cells that are not invasive in vitro such as T47D, LNCaP and HT29 do not metastasize in fish. Inactivation of JAK1/2 in fibrosarcoma cells leads to loss of invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo, and in zebrafish these cells show limited spread throughout the zebrafish body compared with the highly metastatic parental cells. Further, knockdown of WASF3 in DU145 cells which leads to loss of invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo also results in suppression of metastasis in zebrafish. In a cancer progression model involving normal MCF10A breast epithelial cells, the degree of invasion/metastasis in vitro and in mice is mirrored in zebrafish. Using a modified version of Fiji software, it is possible to quantify individual metastatic cells in the transparent larvae to correlate with

  20. IMP3 expression in human ovarian cancer is associated with improved survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noske, Aurelia; Faggad, Areeg; Wirtz, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor-II mRNA-binding protein IMP3 plays an important role in embryogenesis and recent reports suggest an involvement in tumorigenesis. Although IMP3 expression has been well studied in mouse and human fetal and adult gonads, its role in ovarian cancer is unknown. We...... investigated the expression of IMP3 at protein and mRNA levels in a cohort of primary ovarian carcinomas and in 11 ovarian cancer cell lines. Western blot analysis revealed an expression of IMP3 in all ovarian cancer cell lines and immunohistochemistry demonstrated a positive cytoplasmic staining in 32 of 68...... carcinomas (47%). In contrast, epithelium of borderline tumors, as well as, benign ovarian lesions and normal ovaries exhibited only weak or no IMP3 expression. In univariate Kaplan-Meier analysis, IMP3 protein expression was significantly associated with better overall survival (P=0.048). To confirm...

  1. Human innate lymphoid cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazenberg, Mette D.; Spits, Hergen

    2014-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are lymphoid cells that do not express rearranged receptors and have important effector and regulatory functions in innate immunity and tissue remodeling. ILCs are categorized into 3 groups based on their distinct patterns of cytokine production and the requirement of

  2. Human innate lymphoid cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mjösberg, Jenny; Spits, Hergen

    2016-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are increasingly acknowledged as important mediators of immune homeostasis and pathology. ILCs act as early orchestrators of immunity, responding to epithelium-derived signals by expressing an array of cytokines and cell-surface receptors, which shape subsequent immune

  3. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Cells Survive and Mature in the Nonhuman Primate Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina E. Emborg

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs opens up the possibility for personalized cell therapy. Here, we show that transplanted autologous rhesus monkey iPSC-derived neural progenitors survive for up to 6 months and differentiate into neurons, astrocytes, and myelinating oligodendrocytes in the brains of MPTP-induced hemiparkinsonian rhesus monkeys with a minimal presence of inflammatory cells and reactive glia. This finding represents a significant step toward personalized regenerative therapies.

  4. Cellular Glycolysis and The Differential Survival of Lung Fibroblast and Lung Carcinoma Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Ibrahim O

    2016-04-01

    Tumor growth and abnormal cell survival were shown to be associated with a number of cellular metabolic abnormalities revealed by impaired oral glucose tolerance, depressed lipoprotein lipase activity leading to hypertriglyceridemia, and changes in amino acid profile as evidenced by increased plasma free tryptophan levels in patients with breast, lung, colon, stomach, and other cancers from various origins. The above findings seem to relate to or indicate a shift to non-oxidative metabolic pathways in cancer. In contrast to normal cells, cancer cells may lose the ability to utilize aerobic respiration due to either defective mitochondria or hypoxia within the tumor microenvironments. Glucose was shown to be the major energy source in cancer cells where it utilizes aerobic /anaerobic glycolysis with the resultant lactic acid formation. The role of energetic modulations and use of glycolytic inhibitors on cancer/normal cell survival is not clearly established in the literature. We hypothesize that natural intermediates of glycolysis and the citric acid cycle will differentially and negatively impact the cancer phenotype in contrast to their no effects on the normal cell phenotype. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate six potential glycolytic modulators namely, Pyruvic acid, oxalic acid, Zn acetate, sodium citrate, fructose diphosphate (FDP) and sodium bicarbonate at μM concentrations on growing A549 (lung cancer) and MRC-5 (normal; human lung fibroblast) cell lines with the objective of determining their influence on visual impact, cell metabolic activity, cell viability and end-point cell survival. Exposed and non-exposed cells were tested with phase-contrast micro-scanning, survival/death and metabolic activity trends through MTT-assays, as well as death end-point determinations by testing re-growth on complete media and T4 cellometer counts. Results showed that oxalic acid and Zn acetate both influenced the pH of the medium and resulted in

  5. Survival curves and cell restoration of gamma irradiated chlorella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilet, Roland

    1970-01-01

    The characteristics of the living material used and the cultures developed are defined. The irradiation techniques and the dosimetry methods used are described. The clonal growth in a gelified nutrient solution was studied and the survival curves, which are very reproducible when anoxic conditions are eliminated, were established. It is shown that the radiosensitivity of Chlorella decreases with the age of the culture when the plateau of the growth curve is reached, and that for synchronous cells it varies slightly with the phase in the cycle at which the radiation is received. The restoration from sublethal damage occurs quickly and does not depend upon the continuation of the cell cycle when no multiplication occurs during the experiments and is not modified by anoxic conditions. The restoration rate is reduced at 0 deg. C. It explains the variations in the apparent radiosensitivity with the dose rate. In contrast with the results published for many cells, the restoration is incomplete. The problem of the elimination of sublethal damage during clonal development is posed. A model summarizing the experimental results and suggesting future work is given. (author) [fr

  6. High endothelin-converting enzyme-1 expression independently predicts poor survival of patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ching-Fang; Lee, Ching-Tai; Kuo, Yao-Hung; Chen, Tzu-Haw; Chang, Chi-Yang; Chang, I-Wei; Wang, Wen-Lun

    2017-09-01

    Patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma have poor survival and high recurrence rate, thus an effective prognostic biomarker is needed. Endothelin-converting enzyme-1 is responsible for biosynthesis of endothelin-1, which promotes growth and invasion of human cancers. The role of endothelin-converting enzyme-1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma is still unknown. Therefore, this study investigated the significance of endothelin-converting enzyme-1 expression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma clinically. We enrolled patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma who provided pretreated tumor tissues. Tumor endothelin-converting enzyme-1 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and was defined as either low or high expression. Then we evaluated whether tumor endothelin-converting enzyme-1 expression had any association with clinicopathological findings or predicted survival of patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Overall, 54 of 99 patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma had high tumor endothelin-converting enzyme-1 expression, which was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis ( p = 0.04). In addition, tumor endothelin-converting enzyme-1 expression independently predicted survival of patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and the 5-year survival was poorer in patients with high tumor endothelin-converting enzyme-1 expression ( p = 0.016). Among patients with locally advanced and potentially resectable esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (stage II and III), 5-year survival was poorer with high tumor endothelin-converting enzyme-1 expression ( p = 0.003). High tumor endothelin-converting enzyme-1 expression also significantly predicted poorer survival of patients in this population. In patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, high tumor endothelin-converting enzyme-1 expression might indicate high tumor invasive property. Therefore, tumor endothelin-converting enzyme-1 expression

  7. Cytotoxic Vibrio T3SS1 Rewires Host Gene Expression to Subvert Cell Death Signaling and Activate Cell Survival Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nisco, Nicole J.; Kanchwala, Mohammed; Li, Peng; Fernandez, Jessie; Xing, Chao; Orth, Kim

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial effectors are potent manipulators of host signaling pathways. The marine bacterium Vibrio parahaemolyticus (V. para), delivers effectors into host cells through two type three secretion systems (T3SS). The ubiquitous T3SS1 is vital for V. para survival in the environment, whereas T3SS2 causes acute gastroenteritis in human hosts. Although the natural host is undefined, T3SS1 effectors attack highly conserved cellular processes and pathways to orchestrate non-apoptotic cell death. Much is known about how T3SS1 effectors function in isolation, but we wanted to understand how their concerted action globally affects host cell signaling. To assess the host response to T3SS1, we compared gene expression changes over time in primary fibroblasts infected with V. para that have a functional T3SS1 (T3SS1+) to those in cells infected with V. para lacking T3SS1 (T3SS1−). Overall, the host transcriptional response to both T3SS1+ and T3SS1− V. para was rapid, robust, and temporally dynamic. T3SS1 re-wired host gene expression by specifically altering the expression of 398 genes. Although T3SS1 effectors target host cells at the posttranslational level to cause cytotoxicity, network analysis indicated that V. para T3SS1 also precipitates a host transcriptional response that initially activates cell survival and represses cell death networks. The increased expression of several key pro-survival transcripts mediated by T3SS1 was dependent on a host signaling pathway that is silenced later in infection by the posttranslational action of T3SS1. Taken together, our analysis reveals a complex interplay between roles of T3SS1 as both a transcriptional and posttranslational manipulator of host cell signaling. PMID:28512145

  8. Survival of red blood cells after transfusion: processes and consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giel eBosman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The currently available data suggest that efforts towards improving the quality of red blood cell (RBC blood bank products should concentrate on: (1 preventing the removal of a considerable fraction of the transfused RBCs that takes place within the first hours after transfusion; (2 minimizing the interaction of the transfused RBCs with the patient's immune system. These issues are important in reducing the number and extent of the damaging side effects of transfusions, such as generation of alloantibodies and autoantibodies and iron accumulation, especially in transfusion-dependent patients. Thus, it becomes important for blood bank research not only to assess the classical RBC parameters for quality control during storage, but even more so to identify the parameters that predict RBC survival, function and behaviour in the patient after transfusion. These parameters are likely to result from elucidation of the mechanisms that underly physiological RBC aging in vivo, and that lead to the generation of senescent cell antigens and the accumulation of damaged molecules in vesicles. Also, study of RBC pathology-related mechanisms, such as encountered in various hemoglobinopathies and membranopathies, may help to elucidate the mechanisms underlying a storage-associated increase in susceptibility to physiological stress conditions. Recent data indicate that a combination of new approaches in vitro to mimick RBC behaviour in vivo, the growing knowledge of the signaling networks that regulate RBC structure and function, and the rapidly expanding set of proteomic and metabolomic data, will be instrumental to identify the storage-associated processes that control RBC survival after transfusion.

  9. Neuroligin 4X overexpression in human breast cancer is associated with poor relapse-free survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry J Henderson

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms involved in breast cancer progression and metastasis still remain unclear to date. It is a heterogeneous disease featuring several different phenotypes with consistently different biological characteristics. Neuroligins are neural cell adhesion molecules that have been implicated in heterotopic cell adhesion. In humans, alterations in neuroligin genes are implicated in autism and other cognitive diseases. Until recently, neuroligins have been shown to be abundantly expressed in blood vessels and also play a role implicated in the growth of glioma cells. Here we report increased expression of neuroligin 4X (NLGN4X in breast cancer. We found NLGN4X was abundantly expressed in breast cancer tissues. NLGN4X expression data for all breast cancer cell lines in the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE was analyzed. Correlation between NLGN4X levels and clinicopathologic parameters were analyzed within Oncomine datasets. Evaluation of these bioinfomatic datasets results revealed that NLGN4X expression was higher in triple negative breast cancer cells, particularly the basal subtype and tissues versus non-triple-negative sets. Its level was also observed to be higher in metastatic tissues. RT-PCR, flow cytometry and immunofluorescence study of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells validated that NLGN4X was increased in MDA-MB-231. Knockdown of NLGN4X expression by siRNA decreased cell proliferation and migration significantly in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. NLGN4X knockdown in MDA-MB-231 cells resulted in induction of apoptosis as determined by annexin staining, elevated caspase 3/7 and cleaved PARP by flow cytometry. High NLGN4X expression highly correlated with decrease in relapse free-survival in TNBC. NLGN4X might represent novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets for breast cancer. Inhibition of NLGN4X may be a new target for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer.

  10. 3D porous chitosan scaffolds suit survival and neural differentiation of dental pulp stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xingmei; Lu, Xiaohui; Huang, Dan; Xing, Jing; Feng, Guijuan; Jin, Guohua; Yi, Xin; Li, Liren; Lu, Yuanzhou; Nie, Dekang; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Lei; Gu, Zhifeng; Zhang, Xinhua

    2014-08-01

    A key aspect of cell replacement therapy in brain injury treatment is construction of a suitable biomaterial scaffold that can effectively carry and transport the therapeutic cells to the target area. In the present study, we created small 3D porous chitosan scaffolds through freeze-drying, and showed that these can support and enhance the differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) to nerve cells in vitro. The DPSCs were collected from the dental pulp of adult human third molars. At a swelling rate of ~84.33 ± 10.92 %, the scaffold displayed high porosity and interconnectivity of pores, as revealed by SEM. Cell counting kit-8 assay established the biocompatibility of the chitosan scaffold, supporting the growth and survival of DPSCs. The successful neural differentiation of DPSCs was assayed by RT-PCR, western blotting, and immunofluorescence. We found that the scaffold-attached DPSCs showed high expression of Nestin that decreased sharply following induction of differentiation. Exposure to the differentiation media also increased the expression of neural molecular markers Microtubule-associated protein 2, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase. This study demonstrates that the granular 3D chitosan scaffolds are non-cytotoxic, biocompatible, and provide a conducive and favorable micro-environment for attachment, survival, and neural differentiation of DPSCs. These scaffolds have enormous potential to facilitate future advances in treatment of brain injury.

  11. [Survival Strategies of Aspergillus in the Human Body].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Masato; Izumikawa, Koichi

    2017-01-01

     The human body is a hostile environment for Aspergillus species, which originally live outside the human body. There are lots of elimination mechanisms against Aspergillus inhaled into the human body, such as high body temperature, soluble lung components, mucociliary clearance mechanism, or responses of phagocytes. Aspergillus fumigatus, which is the primary causative agent of human infections among the human pathogenic species of Aspergillus, defend itself from the hostile human body environment by various mechanisms, such as thermotolerance, mycotoxin production, and characteristic morphological features. Here we review mechanisms of defense in Aspergillus against elimination from the human body.

  12. Radiation sensitivity of human lung cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmichael, J.; Degraff, W.G.; Gamson, J.; Russo, G.; Mitchell, J.B.; Gazdar, A.F.; Minna, J.D.; Levitt, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    X-Ray survival curves were determined using a panel of 17 human lung cancer cell lines, with emphasis on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In contrast to classic small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines, NSCLC cell lines were generally less sensitive to radiation as evidenced by higher radiation survival curve extrapolation numbers, surviving fraction values following a 2Gy dose (SF2) and the mean inactivation dose values (D) values. The spectrum of in vitro radiation responses observed was similar to that expected in clinical practice, although mesothelioma was unexpectedly sensitive in vitro. Differences in radiosensitivity were best distinguished by comparison of SF2 values. Some NSCLC lines were relatively sensitive, and in view of this demonstrable variability in radiation sensitivity, the SF2 value may be useful for in vitro predictive assay testing of clinical specimens. (author)

  13. Oral cancer/endothelial cell fusion experiences nuclear fusion and acquisition of enhanced survival potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kai; Song, Yong; Zhao, Xiao-Ping; Shen, Hui; Wang, Meng; Yan, Ting-Lin; Liu, Ke; Shang, Zheng-Jun

    2014-10-15

    Most previous studies have linked cancer-macrophage fusion with tumor progression and metastasis. However, the characteristics of hybrid cells derived from oral cancer and endothelial cells and their involvement in cancer remained unknown. Double-immunofluorescent staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were performed to confirm spontaneous cell fusion between eGFP-labeled human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and RFP-labeled SCC9, and to detect the expression of vementin and cytokeratin 18 in the hybrids. The property of chemo-resistance of such hybrids was examined by TUNEL assay. The hybrid cells in xenografted tumor were identified by FISH and GFP/RFP dual-immunofluoresence staining. We showed that SCC9 cells spontaneously fused with cocultured endothelial cells, and the resultant hybrid cells maintained the division and proliferation activity after re-plating and thawing. Such hybrids expressed markers of both parental cells and became more resistant to chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin as compared to the parental SCC9 cells. Our in vivo data indicated that the hybrid cells contributed to tumor composition by using of immunostaining and FISH analysis, even though the hybrid cells and SCC9 cells were mixed with 1:10,000, according to the FACS data. Our study suggested that the fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion and acquire a new property of drug resistance and consequently enhanced survival potential. These experimental findings provide further supportive evidence for the theory that cell fusion is involved in cancer progression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Genetic modification of embryonic stem cells with VEGF enhances cell survival and improves cardiac function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaoyan; Cao, Feng; Sheikh, Ahmad Y; Li, Zongjin; Connolly, Andrew J; Pei, Xuetao; Li, Ren-Ke; Robbins, Robert C; Wu, Joseph C

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac stem cell therapy remains hampered by acute donor cell death posttransplantation and the lack of reliable methods for tracking cell survival in vivo. We hypothesize that cells transfected with inducible vascular endothelial growth factor 165 (VEGF(165)) can improve their survival as monitored by novel molecular imaging techniques. Mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells were transfected with an inducible, bidirectional tetracycline (Bi-Tet) promoter driving VEGF(165) and renilla luciferase (Rluc). Addition of doxycycline induced Bi-Tet expression of VEGF(165) and Rluc significantly compared to baseline (p<0.05). Expression of VEGF(165) enhanced ES cell proliferation and inhibited apoptosis as determined by Annexin-V staining. For noninvasive imaging, ES cells were transduced with a double fusion (DF) reporter gene consisting of firefly luciferase and enhanced green fluorescence protein (Fluc-eGFP). There was a robust correlation between cell number and Fluc activity (R(2)=0.99). Analysis by immunostaining, histology, and RT-PCR confirmed that expression of Bi-Tet and DF systems did not affect ES cell self-renewal or pluripotency. ES cells were differentiated into beating embryoid bodies expressing cardiac markers such as troponin, Nkx2.5, and beta-MHC. Afterward, 5 x 10(5) cells obtained from these beating embryoid bodies or saline were injected into the myocardium of SV129 mice (n=36) following ligation of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and echocardiography showed that VEGF(165) induction led to significant improvements in both transplanted cell survival and cardiac function (p<0.05). This is the first study to demonstrate imaging of embryonic stem cell-mediated gene therapy targeting cardiovascular disease. With further validation, this platform may have broad applications for current basic research and further clinical studies.

  15. Radiation response of haematopoietic cell lines of human origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, S.; Rybka, W.B.; Suissa, S.; Giambattisto, D.

    1986-01-01

    Six human haematopoietic cell lines, five of leukaemic origin, including cells with myeloid, lymphoid and undifferentiated phenotype have been studied with respect to radiation response. The intrinsic radio-sensitivity of the cells varied widely, the D 0 s ranging from 0.53 to 1.39 Gy. Five of the cell lines showed some capacity to accumulate sublethal damage; in three of these, enhanced survival was demonstrated in split-dose experiments. One cell line (HL-60) was anomalous in that although little accumulation of sublethal damage was demonstrable, survival was enhanced by fractionation of the dose. Five of the six cell lines studied were of leukaemic origin. The results support the belief that, in contrast to the almost constant radiosensitivity of normal haematopoietic cell progenitors, leukaemic cell progenitors may show a wide range of radiosensitivities. (author)

  16. SHMT2 drives glioma cell survival in ischaemia but imposes a dependence on glycine clearance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, D.; Fiske, B.P.; Birsoy, K.; Freinkman, E.; Kami, K.; Possemato, R.L.; Chudnovsky, Y.; Pacold, M.E.; Chen, W.W.; Cantor, J.R.; Shelton, L.M.; Gui, D.Y.; Kwon, M.; Ramkissoon, S.H.; Ligon, K.L.; Kang, S.W.; Snuderl, M.; der Heiden, M.G. Van; Sabatini, D.M.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells adapt their metabolic processes to support rapid proliferation, but less is known about how cancer cells alter metabolism to promote cell survival in a poorly vascularized tumour microenvironment. Here we identify a key role for serine and glycine metabolism in the survival of brain

  17. Survival of Potentially Pathogenic Human-Associated Bacteria in the Rhizosphere of Hydroponically Grown Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Anabelle; Garland, Jay L.; Lim, Daniel V.

    1996-01-01

    Plants may serve as reservoirs for human-associated bacteria (H-AB) in long-term space missions containing bioregenerative life support systems. The current study examined the abilities of five human-associated potential pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas cepacia, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Escherichia coli, to colonize and grow in the rhizosphere of hydroponically grown wheat, a candidate crop for life support. All of these bacteria have been recovered from past NASA missions and present potential problems for future missions. The abilities of these organisms to adhere to the roots of axenic five-day-old wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Yecora rojo) were evaluated by enumeration of the attached organisms after a one hour incubation of roots in a suspension (approximately 10(exp 8 cu/ml)) of the H-AB. Results showed that a greater percentage of P. aeruginosa cells adhered to the wheat roots than the other four H-AB. Similarly incubated seedlings were also grown under attempted axenic conditions for seven days to examine the potential of each organism to proliferate in the rhizosphere (root colonization capacity). P. cepacia and P. aeruginosa showed considerable growth. E. coli and S. aureus showed no significant growth, and S. pyogenes died off in the wheat rhizosphere. Studies examining the effects of competition on the survival of these microorganisms indicated that P. aeruginosa was the only organism that survived in the rhizosphere of hydroponically grown wheat in the presence of different levels of microbial competition.

  18. Hedgehog pathway regulators influence cervical cancer cell proliferation, survival and migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samarzija, Ivana [Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne (EPFL), Department of Life Sciences, Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Beard, Peter, E-mail: peter.beard@epfl.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne (EPFL), Department of Life Sciences, Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unknown cellular mutations complement papillomavirus-induced carcinogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hedgehog pathway components are expressed by cervical cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hedgehog pathway activators and inhibitors regulate cervical cancer cell biology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell immortalization by papillomavirus and activation of Hedgehog are independent. -- Abstract: Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is considered to be a primary hit that causes cervical cancer. However, infection with this agent, although needed, is not sufficient for a cancer to develop. Additional cellular changes are required to complement the action of HPV, but the precise nature of these changes is not clear. Here, we studied the function of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway in cervical cancer. The Hh pathway can have a role in a number of cancers, including those of liver, lung and digestive tract. We found that components of the Hh pathway are expressed in several cervical cancer cell lines, indicating that there could exists an autocrine Hh signaling loop in these cells. Inhibition of Hh signaling reduces proliferation and survival of the cervical cancer cells and induces their apoptosis as seen by the up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic protein cleaved caspase 3. Our results indicate that Hh signaling is not induced directly by HPV-encoded proteins but rather that Hh-activating mutations are selected in cells initially immortalized by HPV. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) ligand induces proliferation and promotes migration of the cervical cancer cells studied. Together, these results indicate pro-survival and protective roles of an activated Hh signaling pathway in cervical cancer-derived cells, and suggest that inhibition of this pathway may be a therapeutic option in fighting cervical cancer.

  19. Hedgehog pathway regulators influence cervical cancer cell proliferation, survival and migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samarzija, Ivana; Beard, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Unknown cellular mutations complement papillomavirus-induced carcinogenesis. ► Hedgehog pathway components are expressed by cervical cancer cells. ► Hedgehog pathway activators and inhibitors regulate cervical cancer cell biology. ► Cell immortalization by papillomavirus and activation of Hedgehog are independent. -- Abstract: Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is considered to be a primary hit that causes cervical cancer. However, infection with this agent, although needed, is not sufficient for a cancer to develop. Additional cellular changes are required to complement the action of HPV, but the precise nature of these changes is not clear. Here, we studied the function of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway in cervical cancer. The Hh pathway can have a role in a number of cancers, including those of liver, lung and digestive tract. We found that components of the Hh pathway are expressed in several cervical cancer cell lines, indicating that there could exists an autocrine Hh signaling loop in these cells. Inhibition of Hh signaling reduces proliferation and survival of the cervical cancer cells and induces their apoptosis as seen by the up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic protein cleaved caspase 3. Our results indicate that Hh signaling is not induced directly by HPV-encoded proteins but rather that Hh-activating mutations are selected in cells initially immortalized by HPV. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) ligand induces proliferation and promotes migration of the cervical cancer cells studied. Together, these results indicate pro-survival and protective roles of an activated Hh signaling pathway in cervical cancer-derived cells, and suggest that inhibition of this pathway may be a therapeutic option in fighting cervical cancer.

  20. Nitric oxide maintains cell survival of Trichomonas vaginalis upon iron depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wei-Hung; Huang, Kuo-Yang; Huang, Po-Jung; Hsu, Jo-Hsuan; Fang, Yi-Kai; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Tang, Petrus

    2015-07-25

    Iron plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Trichomonas vaginalis, the causative agent of highly prevalent human trichomoniasis. T. vaginalis resides in the vaginal region, where the iron concentration is constantly changing. Hence, T. vaginalis must adapt to variations in iron availability to establish and maintain an infection. The free radical signaling molecules reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) have been proven to participate in iron deficiency in eukaryotes. However, little is known about the roles of these molecules in iron-deficient T. vaginalis. T. vaginalis cultured in iron-rich and -deficient conditions were collected for all experiments in this study. Next generation RNA sequencing was conducted to investigate the impact of iron on transcriptome of T. vaginalis. The cell viabilities were monitored after the trophozoites treated with the inhibitors of nitric oxide (NO) synthase (L-NG-monomethyl arginine, L-NMMA) and proteasome (MG132). Hydrogenosomal membrane potential was measured using JC-1 staining. We demonstrated that NO rather than ROS accumulates in iron-deficient T. vaginalis. The level of NO was blocked by MG132 and L-NMMA, indicating that NO production is through a proteasome and arginine dependent pathway. We found that the inhibition of proteasome activity shortened the survival of iron-deficient cells compared with untreated iron-deficient cells. Surprisingly, the addition of arginine restored both NO level and the survival of proteasome-inhibited cells, suggesting that proteasome-derived NO is crucial for cell survival under iron-limited conditions. Additionally, NO maintains the hydrogenosomal membrane potential, a determinant for cell survival, emphasizing the cytoprotective effect of NO on iron-deficient T. vaginalis. Collectively, we determined that NO produced by the proteasome prolonged the survival of iron-deficient T. vaginalis via maintenance of the hydrogenosomal functions. The findings in this

  1. AMPK promotes survival of c-Myc-positive melanoma cells by suppressing oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kfoury, Alain; Armaro, Marzia; Collodet, Caterina; Sordet-Dessimoz, Jessica; Giner, Maria Pilar; Christen, Stefan; Moco, Sofia; Leleu, Marion; de Leval, Laurence; Koch, Ute; Trumpp, Andreas; Sakamoto, Kei; Beermann, Friedrich; Radtke, Freddy

    2018-03-01

    Although c-Myc is essential for melanocyte development, its role in cutaneous melanoma, the most aggressive skin cancer, is only partly understood. Here we used the Nras Q61K INK4a -/- mouse melanoma model to show that c-Myc is essential for tumor initiation, maintenance, and metastasis. c-Myc-expressing melanoma cells were preferentially found at metastatic sites, correlated with increased tumor aggressiveness and high tumor initiation potential. Abrogation of c-Myc caused apoptosis in primary murine and human melanoma cells. Mechanistically, c-Myc-positive melanoma cells activated and became dependent on the metabolic energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a metabolic checkpoint kinase that plays an important role in energy and redox homeostasis under stress conditions. AMPK pathway inhibition caused apoptosis of c-Myc-expressing melanoma cells, while AMPK activation protected against cell death of c-Myc-depleted melanoma cells through suppression of oxidative stress. Furthermore, TCGA database analysis of early-stage human melanoma samples revealed an inverse correlation between C-MYC and patient survival, suggesting that C-MYC expression levels could serve as a prognostic marker for early-stage disease. © 2018 The Authors.

  2. Progranulin is expressed within motor neurons and promotes neuronal cell survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay Denis G

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Progranulin is a secreted high molecular weight growth factor bearing seven and one half copies of the cysteine-rich granulin-epithelin motif. While inappropriate over-expression of the progranulin gene has been associated with many cancers, haploinsufficiency leads to atrophy of the frontotemporal lobes and development of a form of dementia (frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin positive inclusions, FTLD-U associated with the formation of ubiquitinated inclusions. Recent reports indicate that progranulin has neurotrophic effects, which, if confirmed would make progranulin the only neuroprotective growth factor that has been associated genetically with a neurological disease in humans. Preliminary studies indicated high progranulin gene expression in spinal cord motor neurons. However, it is uncertain what the role of Progranulin is in normal or diseased motor neuron function. We have investigated progranulin gene expression and subcellular localization in cultured mouse embryonic motor neurons and examined the effect of progranulin over-expression and knockdown in the NSC-34 immortalized motor neuron cell line upon proliferation and survival. Results In situ hybridisation and immunohistochemical techniques revealed that the progranulin gene is highly expressed by motor neurons within the mouse spinal cord and in primary cultures of dissociated mouse embryonic spinal cord-dorsal root ganglia. Confocal microscopy coupled to immunocytochemistry together with the use of a progranulin-green fluorescent protein fusion construct revealed progranulin to be located within compartments of the secretory pathway including the Golgi apparatus. Stable transfection of the human progranulin gene into the NSC-34 motor neuron cell line stimulates the appearance of dendritic structures and provides sufficient trophic stimulus to survive serum deprivation for long periods (up to two months. This is mediated at least in part through

  3. A review of human cell radiosensitivity in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deschavanne, Patrick J.; Fertil, Bernard

    1996-01-01

    The survival curves of 694 human cell lines irradiated in exponentially growing phase in vitro were collected from the literature. Among them, 271 were derived from tumors, 423 were nontransformed fibroblasts and other normal cell strains from healthy people or people with some genetic disorders. Seventy-six different cell types are identified, and a specific radiosensitivity could be associated with each, using D-bar and surviving fraction at 2 Gy. Technical factors such as culture medium, feeder cells, and scoring method were found to affect intrinsic radiosensitivity. In particular, the cell type is not a discriminating factor when cells are studied in agar. Results obtained with cells irradiated in agar must be used cautiously, depending on how the cells were prepared for the experiments. The use of feeder cells narrows the range of radiosensitivity of human cells. For cells irradiated as monolayer, it was possible to build a scale of radiosensitivity according to cell type, ranging, in terms of D-bar from 0.6 Gy for the most sensitive cell lines to more than 4 Gy for the most resistant. Considering that, in most cases, we could estimate the variation of radiosensitivity within each cell type, our classification among cell types can be used by researchers to place their results in the context of the literature

  4. An Optic Nerve Crush Injury Murine Model to Study Retinal Ganglion Cell Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhongshu; Zhang, Shuihua; Lee, Chunsik; Kumar, Anil; Arjunan, Pachiappan; Li, Yang; Zhang, Fan; Li, Xuri

    2011-01-01

    Injury to the optic nerve can lead to axonal degeneration, followed by a gradual death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), which results in irreversible vision loss. Examples of such diseases in human include traumatic optic neuropathy and optic nerve degeneration in glaucoma. It is characterized by typical changes in the optic nerve head, progressive optic nerve degeneration, and loss of retinal ganglion cells, if uncontrolled, leading to vision loss and blindness. The optic nerve crush (ONC) injury mouse model is an important experimental disease model for traumatic optic neuropathy, glaucoma, etc. In this model, the crush injury to the optic nerve leads to gradual retinal ganglion cells apoptosis. This disease model can be used to study the general processes and mechanisms of neuronal death and survival, which is essential for the development of therapeutic measures. In addition, pharmacological and molecular approaches can be used in this model to identify and test potential therapeutic reagents to treat different types of optic neuropathy. Here, we provide a step by step demonstration of (I) Baseline retrograde labeling of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) at day 1, (II) Optic nerve crush injury at day 4, (III) Harvest the retinae and analyze RGC survival at day 11, and (IV) Representative result. PMID:21540827

  5. Mechanosensation Dynamically Coordinates Polar Growth and Cell Wall Assembly to Promote Cell Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davì, Valeria; Tanimoto, Hirokazu; Ershov, Dmitry; Haupt, Armin; De Belly, Henry; Le Borgne, Rémi; Couturier, Etienne; Boudaoud, Arezki; Minc, Nicolas

    2018-04-23

    How growing cells cope with size expansion while ensuring mechanical integrity is not known. In walled cells, such as those of microbes and plants, growth and viability are both supported by a thin and rigid encasing cell wall (CW). We deciphered the dynamic mechanisms controlling wall surface assembly during cell growth, using a sub-resolution microscopy approach to monitor CW thickness in live rod-shaped fission yeast cells. We found that polar cell growth yielded wall thinning and that thickness negatively influenced growth. Thickness at growing tips exhibited a fluctuating behavior with thickening phases followed by thinning phases, indicative of a delayed feedback promoting thickness homeostasis. This feedback was mediated by mechanosensing through the CW integrity pathway, which probes strain in the wall to adjust synthase localization and activity to surface growth. Mutants defective in thickness homeostasis lysed by rupturing the wall, demonstrating its pivotal role for walled cell survival. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Stem cell factor enhances the survival of murine intestinal stem cells after photon irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leigh, B.R.; Khan, W.; Hancock, S.L.

    1995-01-01

    Recombinant rat stem cell factor (SCF) has been shown to decrease lethality in mice exposed to total-body irradiation (TBI) in the lower range of lethality through radioprotection of hematopoietic stem cells and acceleration of bone marrow repopulation. This study evaluates the effect of SCF on the survival of the intestinal mucosal stem cell after TBI. This non-hematopoietic cell is clinically relevant. Gastrointestinal toxicity is common during and after abdominal and pelvic radiation therapy and limits the radiation dose in these regions. As observed with bone marrow, the administration of SCF to mice prior to TBI enhanced the survival of mouse duodenal crypt stem cells. The maximum enhancement of survival was seen when 100 μ/kg of SCF was given intraperitoneally 8 h before irradiation. This regimen increased the survival of duodenal crypt stem cells after 12.0 Gy TBI from 22.5 ± 0.7 per duodenal cross section for controls to 30.0 ± 1.7 after treatment with SCF (P=0.03). The TBI dose producing 50% mortality of 6 days (LD 50/6 ) was increased from 14.9 Gy for control mice to 19.0 Gy for mice treated with SCF (dose modification factor = 1.28). These findings demonstrate that SCF (dose modification factor = 1.28). These findings demonstrate that SCF has radioprotective effects on a non-hematopoietic stem cell population and suggest that SCF may be of clinical value in preventing radiation injury to the intestine. 29 refs., 4 figs

  7. From the Dawn of Humanity to the 21st Century: Creativity as an Enduring Survival Skill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puccio, Gerard J.

    2017-01-01

    While the scientific investigation into creativity is a recent phenomenon, creative thinking has always been a crucial feature of humanity. The ability to creatively solve problems enabled early humans to survive and laid the foundation for the creative imagination that has resulted in our modern society. While most humans no longer face physical…

  8. Germ Cell Cancer and Multiple Relapses: Toxicity and Survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Jakob; Kier, Maria G.G.; Mortensen, Mette S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A small number of patients with germ cell cancer (GCC) receive more than one line of treatment for disseminated disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate late toxicity and survival in an unselected cohort of patients who experienced relapse after receiving first-line treatment...... for disseminated disease. Methods: From the Danish Testicular Cancer database, we identified all patients who received more than one line of treatment for disseminated disease. Information about late toxicity and mortality was obtained by means of linkage to national registers. Prognostic factors for relapse......, compared with patients treated with only orchiectomy, had an increased risk for a second cancer (hazard ratio [HR], 3.2; 95% CI, 1.9 to 5.5), major cardiovascular disease (HR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.0 to 3.3), pulmonary disease (HR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.0 to 3.8), GI disease (HR, 7.3; 95% CI, 3.6 to 14.8), renal...

  9. Mechanisms of ROS modulated cell survival during carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerkin, J S; Naughton, R; Quiney, C; Cotter, T G

    2008-07-18

    There is increasing evidence within the literature that the decreased susceptibility of tumour cells to stimuli that induce apoptosis can be linked to their inherently increased redox potential. The review primarily focuses on the PI3-kinase/Akt pathway, and the multiple points along this signalling pathway that may be redox regulated. The PI3-kinase/Akt pathway can influence a cells' sensitivity to death inducing signals, through direct manipulation of apoptosis regulating molecules or by regulating the activity of key transcription factors. Proteins involved in the control of apoptosis that are directly regulated by the PI3-kinase/Akt pathway include caspase-9, Bad and the transcription factor GSK-3beta. Lately, it is becoming increasingly obvious that phosphatases are a major counter balance to the PI3-kinase/Akt pathway. Phosphatases such as PP2A and PP1alpha can dephosphorylate signalling molecules within the PI3-kinase/Akt pathway, blocking their activity. It is the balance between the kinase activity and the phosphatase activity that determines the presence and strength of the PI3-kinase/Akt signal. This is why any protein modifications that hinder dephosphorylation can increase the tumours survival advantage. One such modification is the oxidation of the sulphydryl group in key cysteine residues present within the active site of the phosphatases. This highlights the link between the increased redox stress in tumours with the PI3-kinase/Akt pathway. This review will discuss the various sources of reactive oxygen species within a tumour and the effect of these radicals on the PI3-kinase/Akt pathway.

  10. Sustainability of keratinocyte gene transfer and cell survival in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choate, K A; Khavari, P A

    1997-05-20

    The epidermis is an attractive site for therapeutic gene delivery because it is accessible and capable of delivering polypeptides to the systemic circulation. A number of difficulties, however, have emerged in attempts at cutaneous gene delivery, and central among these is an inability to sustain therapeutic gene production. We have examined two major potential contributing factors, viral vector stamina and involvement of long-lived epidermal progenitor cells. Human keratinocytes were either untreated or transduced with a retroviral vector for beta-galactosidase (beta-Gal) at > 99% efficiency and then grafted onto immunodeficient mice to regenerate human epidermis. Human epidermis was monitored in vivo after grafting for clinical and histologic appearance as well as for gene expression. Although integrated vector sequences persisted unchanged in engineered epidermis at 10 weeks post-grafting, retroviral long terminal repeat (LTR)-driven beta-Gal expression ceased in vivo after approximately 4 weeks. Endogenous cellular promoters, however, maintained consistently normal gene expression levels without evidence of time-dependent decline, as determined by immunostaining with species-specific antibodies for human involucrin, filaggrin, keratinocyte transglutaminase, keratin 10, type VII collagen, and Laminin 5 proteins out to week 14 post-grafting. Transduced human keratinocytes generated multilayer epidermis sustained through multiple epidermal turnover cycles; this epidermis demonstrated retention of a spatially appropriate pattern of basal and suprabasal epidermal marker gene expression. These results confirm previous findings suggesting that viral promoter-driven gene expression is not durable and demonstrate that keratinocytes passaged in vitro can regenerate and sustain normal epidermis for prolonged periods.

  11. Human embryonic stem cells handbook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Alberto Redi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available After the Nobel prize in physiology or medicine was awarded jointly to Sir John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent it became imperative to write down the review for a book entirely devoted to human embryonic stem cells (hES, those cells that are a urgent need for researchers, those cells that rekindle the ethical debates and finally, last but not least, those cells whose study paved the way to obtain induced pluripotent stem cells by the OSKC’s Yamanaka method (the OSKC acronim refers, for those not familiar with the topic, to the four stemness genes used to transfect somatic fibroblasts: Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc....

  12. Telomere dysfunction and cell survival: Roles for distinct TIN2-containing complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sahn-ho; Davalos, Albert R.; Heo, Seok-Jin; Rodier, Francis; Zou, Ying; Beausejour, Christian; Kaminker, Patrick; Yannone, Steven M.; Campisi, Judith

    2007-10-02

    Telomeres are maintained by three DNA binding proteins (TRF1, TRF2 and POT1), and several associated factors. One factor, TIN2, binds TRF1 and TRF2 directly and POT1 indirectly. Along with two other proteins, TPP1 and hRap1, these form a soluble complex that may be the core telomere maintenance complex. It is not clear whether sub-complexes also exist in vivo. We provide evidence for two TIN2 sub-complexes with distinct functions in human cells. We isolated these two TIN2 sub-complexes from nuclear lysates of unperturbed cells and cells expressing TIN2 mutants TIN2-13, TIN2-15C, which cannot bind TRF2 or TRF1, respectively. In cells with wild-type p53 function, TIN2-15C was more potent than TIN2-13 in causing telomere uncapping and eventual growth arrest. In cells lacking p53 function, TIN2-15C was more potent than TIN2-13 in causing telomere dysfunction and cell death. Our findings suggest that distinct TIN2 complexes exist, and that TIN2-15C-sensitive subcomplexes are particularly important for cell survival in the absence of functional p53.

  13. Reduced Erg Dosage Impairs Survival of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ying; Koch, Mia Lee; Zhang, Xin; Hamblen, Melanie J; Godinho, Frank J; Fujiwara, Yuko; Xie, Huafeng; Klusmann, Jan-Henning; Orkin, Stuart H; Li, Zhe

    2017-07-01

    ERG, an ETS family transcription factor frequently overexpressed in human leukemia, has been implicated as a key regulator of hematopoietic stem cells. However, how ERG controls normal hematopoiesis, particularly at the stem and progenitor cell level, and how it contributes to leukemogenesis remain incompletely understood. Using homologous recombination, we generated an Erg knockdown allele (Erg kd ) in which Erg expression can be conditionally restored by Cre recombinase. Erg kd/kd animals die at E10.5-E11.5 due to defects in endothelial and hematopoietic cells, but can be completely rescued by Tie2-Cre-mediated restoration of Erg in these cells. In Erg kd/+ mice, ∼40% reduction in Erg dosage perturbs both fetal liver and bone marrow hematopoiesis by reducing the numbers of Lin - Sca-1 + c-Kit + (LSK) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and megakaryocytic progenitors. By genetic mosaic analysis, we find that Erg-restored HSPCs outcompete Erg kd/+ HSPCs for contribution to adult hematopoiesis in vivo. This defect is in part due to increased apoptosis of HSPCs with reduced Erg dosage, a phenotype that becomes more drastic during 5-FU-induced stress hematopoiesis. Expression analysis reveals that reduced Erg expression leads to changes in expression of a subset of ERG target genes involved in regulating survival of HSPCs, including increased expression of a pro-apoptotic regulator Bcl2l11 (Bim) and reduced expression of Jun. Collectively, our data demonstrate that ERG controls survival of HSPCs, a property that may be used by leukemic cells. Stem Cells 2017;35:1773-1785. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  14. Mitochondrial respiratory modifiers confer survival advantage by facilitating DNA repair in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, Ankit; Khanna, Suchit; Singh, Saurabh; Rai, Yogesh; Soni, Ravi; Kalra, Namita; Dwarakanath, B.S.; Bhatt, Anant Narayan

    2014-01-01

    High rate of aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect), one of the primary hallmarks of cancer cells, acquired during the multistep development of tumors is also responsible for therapeutic resistance. Underlying this hallmark is the compromised respiratory metabolism that contributes to the acquisition of the glycolytic phenotype for sustained ATP production and cell proliferation. Nevertheless, the exact mechanisms underlying the glycolysis-linked radio-resistance in cancer cells remain elusive. In this study, we transiently elevated glycolysis by treating human cell lines (HEK293, BMG-1 and OCT-1) with mitochondrial respiratory modifiers (MRMs) viz. 2,4-dinitrophenol, Photosan-3, and Methylene blue to examine if transient stimulation of glycolysis before irradiation using MRMs is sufficient to confer radioresistance. Treatment with MRMs led to a significant (two-fold) increase in glucose consumption and lactate production together with a robust increase in the protein levels of two key regulators of glucose metabolism, i.e. GLUT-1 and HK-II. MRMs also enhanced the clonogenic survival and facilitated DNA repair by activating both non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) pathways of DNA double strand break repair leading to reduction in radiation-induced cytogenetic damage (micronuclei formation) in these cells. Inhibition of glucose uptake by inhibitors like 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), 3-bromo pyruvate (3-BP) and fasentin under conditions of stimulated glycolysis not only reversed the effect but also sensitized the cells to radiation more profoundly. The inhibition of glycolysis using 2-DG also reduced the levels of Ku 70 (NHEJ) and Rad-51 (HR) proteins. Thus, our results suggest that enhanced glycolysis in cancer cells may confer radio-resistance and offers survival advantage partly by enhancing the repair of DNA damage. (author)

  15. NF-κB2 mutation targets survival, proliferation and differentiation pathways in the pathogenesis of plasma cell tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCarthy Brian A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormal NF-κB2 activation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma, a cancer of plasma cells. However, a causal role for aberrant NF-κB2 signaling in the development of plasma cell tumors has not been established. Also unclear is the molecular mechanism that drives the tumorigenic process. We investigated these questions by using a transgenic mouse model with lymphocyte-targeted expression of p80HT, a lymphoma-associated NF-κB2 mutant, and human multiple myeloma cell lines. Methods We conducted a detailed histopathological characterization of lymphomas developed in p80HT transgenic mice and microarray gene expression profiling of p80HT B cells with the goal of identifying genes that drive plasma cell tumor development. We further verified the significance of our findings in human multiple myeloma cell lines. Results Approximately 40% of p80HT mice showed elevated levels of monoclonal immunoglobulin (M-protein in the serum and developed plasma cell tumors. Some of these mice displayed key features of human multiple myeloma with accumulation of plasma cells in the bone marrow, osteolytic bone lesions and/or diffuse osteoporosis. Gene expression profiling of B cells from M-protein-positive p80HT mice revealed aberrant expression of genes known to be important in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma, including cyclin D1, cyclin D2, Blimp1, survivin, IL-10 and IL-15. In vitro assays demonstrated a critical role of Stat3, a key downstream component of IL-10 signaling, in the survival of human multiple myeloma cells. Conclusions These findings provide a mouse model for human multiple myeloma with aberrant NF-κB2 activation and suggest a molecular mechanism for NF-κB2 signaling in the pathogenesis of plasma cell tumors by coordinated regulation of plasma cell generation, proliferation and survival.

  16. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural cells survive and mature in the nonhuman primate brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emborg, Marina E; Liu, Yan; Xi, Jiajie; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Yin, Yingnan; Lu, Jianfeng; Joers, Valerie; Swanson, Christine; Holden, James E; Zhang, Su-Chun

    2013-03-28

    The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) opens up the possibility for personalized cell therapy. Here, we show that transplanted autologous rhesus monkey iPSC-derived neural progenitors survive for up to 6 months and differentiate into neurons, astrocytes, and myelinating oligodendrocytes in the brains of MPTP-induced hemiparkinsonian rhesus monkeys with a minimal presence of inflammatory cells and reactive glia. This finding represents a significant step toward personalized regenerative therapies. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Association of ultraviolet-induced retrovirus expression with anchorage-independent survival in rat embryo cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suk, W.A.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have shown in the AI assay that the nontransforming retrovirus increases the differential in enhanced survival response in infected cultures. To more fully understand this aspect of the system, they examined the effect of UV irradiation on infected and uninfected FRE cells. In this communication the authors report that UV irradiation induces AI survival in infected and uninfected cells;in uninfected cells there is a concomitant induction of endogenous retrovirus expression. The AI survival of both cell lines was determined using a previously described procedure. Anchorage-dependent media control and solvent control cells, when suspended in medium above an agar base layer, showed a rapid decline in cell survival;however, cells that had been treated with carcinogen did not undergo the destructive process that took place in control cells, indicating specificity

  18. Altering Cell Survival by Modulating Levels of Mitochondrial DNA Repair Enzymes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shokolenko, Inna

    2002-01-01

    .... Our previous results demonstrated that stable expression of E.coli Exonuclease III in mitochondria of breast cancer cells diminishes mtDNA repair capacity following oxidative stress, which leads to a decrease in long-term cell survival...

  19. Cell cycle arrest and cell survival induce reverse trends of cardiolipin remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jen Chao

    Full Text Available Cell survival from the arrested state can be a cause of the cancer recurrence. Transition from the arrest state to the growth state is highly regulated by mitochondrial activity, which is related to the lipid compositions of the mitochondrial membrane. Cardiolipin is a critical phospholipid for the mitochondrial integrity and functions. We examined the changes of cardiolipin species by LC-MS in the transition between cell cycle arrest and cell reviving in HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells. We have identified 41 cardiolipin species by MS/MS and semi-quantitated them to analyze the detailed changes of cardiolipin species. The mass spectra of cardiolipin with the same carbon number form an envelope, and the C64, C66, C68, C70 C72 and C74 envelopes in HT1080 cells show a normal distribution in the full scan mass spectrum. The cardiolipin quantity in a cell decreases while entering the cell cycle arrest, but maintains at a similar level through cell survival. While cells awakening from the arrested state and preparing itself for replication, the groups with short acyl chains, such as C64, C66 and C68 show a decrease of cardiolipin percentage, but the groups with long acyl chains, such as C70 and C72 display an increase of cardiolipin percentage. Interestingly, the trends of the cardiolipin species changes during the arresting state are completely opposite to cell growing state. Our results indicate that the cardiolipin species shift from the short chain to long chain cardiolipin during the transition from cell cycle arrest to cell progression.

  20. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation is associated with bladder cancer cell growth and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh Fu-Chuan

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Constitutive activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3 signaling pathway plays an important role in several human cancers. Activation of Stat3 is dependent on the phosphorylation at the tyrosine residue 705 by upstream kinases and subsequent nuclear translocation after dimerization. It remains unclear whether oncogenic Stat3 signaling pathway is involved in the oncogenesis of bladder cancer. Results We found that elevated Stat3 phosphorylation in 19 of 100 (19% bladder cancer tissues as well as bladder cancer cell lines, WH, UMUC-3 and 253J. To explore whether Stat3 activation is associated with cell growth and survival of bladder cancer, we targeted the Stat3 signaling pathway in bladder cancer cells using an adenovirus-mediated dominant-negative Stat3 (Y705F and a small molecule compound, STA-21. Both prohibited cell growth and induction of apoptosis in these bladder cancer cell lines but not in normal bladder smooth muscle cell (BdSMC. The survival inhibition might be mediated through apoptotic caspase 3, 8 and 9 pathways. Moreover, down-regulation of anti-apoptotic genes (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and survivin and a cell cycle regulating gene (cyclin D1 was associated with the cell growth inhibition and apoptosis. Conclusion These results indicated that activation of Stat3 is crucial for bladder cancer cell growth and survival. Therefore, interference of Stat3 signaling pathway emerges as a potential therapeutic approach for bladder cancer.

  1. SHMT2 drives glioma cell survival in the tumor microenvironment but imposes a dependence on glycine clearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dohoon; Fiske, Brian P.; Birsoy, Kivanc; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Kami, Kenjiro; Possemato, Richard; Chudnovsky, Yakov; Pacold, Michael E.; Chen, Walter W.; Cantor, Jason R.; Shelton, Laura M.; Gui, Dan Y.; Kwon, Manjae; Ramkissoon, Shakti H.; Ligon, Keith L.; Kang, Seong Woo; Snuderl, Matija; Heiden, Matthew G. Vander; Sabatini, David M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Cancer cells adapt their metabolic processes to support rapid proliferation, but less is known about how cancer cells alter metabolism to promote cell survival in a poorly vascularized tumor microenvironment1–3. Here, we identify a key role for serine and glycine metabolism in the survival of brain cancer cells within the ischemic zones of gliomas. In human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), mitochondrial serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT2) and glycine decarboxylase (GLDC) are highly expressed in the pseudopalisading cells that surround necrotic foci. We find that SHMT2 activity limits that of pyruvate kinase (PKM2) and reduces oxygen consumption, eliciting a metabolic state that confers a profound survival advantage to cells in poorly vascularized tumor regions. GLDC inhibition impairs cells with high SHMT2 levels as the excess glycine not metabolized by GLDC can be converted to the toxic molecules aminoacetone and methylglyoxal. Thus, SHMT2 is required for cancer cells to adapt to the tumor environment, but also renders these cells sensitive to glycine cleavage system inhibition. PMID:25855294

  2. Survival of egg-laying controlling neuroendocrine cells during reproductive senescence of a mollusc

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, C.

    2004-01-01

    During brain aging neuronal degradation occurs. In some neurons this may result in degeneration and cell death, still other neurons may survive and maintain their basic properties. The present study deals with survival of the egg-laying controlling neuroendocrine caudodorsal cells (CDCs) during

  3. Intercellular contact: its influence on the Dsub(q) of mammalian cell survival curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, R.E.; Sutherland, R.M.

    1975-01-01

    Cell survival in tissues exposed to a given dose of ionizing radiation is usually greater than that of similar cells grown individually in vitro, despite the fact that the radiosensitivities (D 0 ) are virtually identical under the two conditions. An analogous increase in cell survival is observed when Chinese hamster V79-171 cells are grown in suspension culture and irradiated as multicell spheroids. Unfortunately, the information gained from the survival curves so obtained is limited by the inhomogeneity of the cell population with respect to both degree of contact and cell cycle position. The latter can be studied using synchronized small spheroids. The ratio of Dsub(q) of spheroid cells to Dsub(q) of single cells increased as the cells progressed through the cell cycle, from a minimum of 1.3 for G 1 phase cells to a maximum of 2.2 for late S-phase cells. The enhanced survival, or 'contact effect', developed slowly as the spheroids grew, after an initial latent period of about one generation cycle of the cells. A second effect of intercellular contact on mammalian cell survival has also been observed. When cells are assayed under conditions in which intercellular contact is maintained, the net cellular survival is increased further. This effect is different from the usual repair of potentially lethal damage, in that it occurs much more slowly and results in modification of the survival-curve shoulder. Not all cell types tested have shown enhanced survival when grown as spheroids. Several MNNG-induced mutants of the Chinese hamster V79-171 line have been isolated and sublines which do and do not show the contact effect are now available. These may permit study of the mechanism(s) of contact effects. (author)

  4. Improvement in autologous human fat transplant survival with SVF plus VEGF-PLA nano-sustained release microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liqun; Pan, Shengsheng; Ni, Binting; Lin, Yuanshao

    2014-08-01

    Early neovascularization is important for autologous fat transplant survival. SVF cells are ideal seed cells. Both vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and SVF cells can promote neovascularization. However, the half-life (about 50 min) of VEGF is too short to sustain an adequate local concentration. We have investigated whether VEGF-polylactic acid (PLA) nano-sustained release microspheres plus SVF cells can improve neovascularization and survival of transplanted fat tissues. SVF cells were harvested and constructed VEGF-PLA nano-sustained release microspheres in vitro. Human fat tissues was mixed with SVF cells plus VEGF-PLA, SVF cells alone or Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium as the control. These three mixtures were injected into random sites in 18 nude mice. Two months later, the transplants were weighed and examined histologically; and capillaries were counted to quantify neovascularization. Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) and anti-VEGF stains were applied to reveal cell infiltration. The mean wet weight of fat in the SVF plus VEGF-PLA, SVF alone, and control transplants were 0.18 ± 0.013 g, 0.16 ± 0.015 g, and 0.071 ± 0.12 g, respectively; the differences between groups were statistically significant. More vessels were present in the SVF plus VEGF-PLA transplants than in the other two types. Transplants mixed with SVF cells also had an acceptable density of capillaries. Histological analysis revealed that both the SVF plus VEGF-PLA and SVF alone transplants, but not the control transplants, were composed of adipose tissue, and had less fat necrosis and less fibrosis than control specimens. SVF plus VEGF-PLA transplants had significantly greater capillary density and VEGF expression than the other two transplant groups. Thus transplanted fat tissue survival and quality can be enhanced by the addition of VEGF-PLA nano-sustained release microspheres plus SVF cells. © 2014 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  5. Cell survival in carbon beams - comparison of amorphous track model predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grzanka, L.; Greilich, S.; Korcyl, M.

    Introduction: Predictions of the radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) play an essential role in treatment planning with heavy charged particles. Amorphous track models ( [1] , [2] , also referred to as track structure models) provide currently the most suitable description of cell survival under i....... Amorphous track modelling of luminescence detector efficiency in proton and carbon beams. 4.Tsuruoka C, Suzuki M, Kanai T, et al. LET and ion species dependence for cell killing in normal human skin fibroblasts. Radiat Res. 2005;163:494-500.......Introduction: Predictions of the radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) play an essential role in treatment planning with heavy charged particles. Amorphous track models ( [1] , [2] , also referred to as track structure models) provide currently the most suitable description of cell survival under ion....... [2] . In addition, a new approach based on microdosimetric distributions is presented and investigated [3] . Material and methods: A suitable software library embrasing the mentioned amorphous track models including numerous submodels with respect to delta-electron range models, radial dose...

  6. Infrared A radiation promotes survival of human melanocytes carrying ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimeswenger, Susanne; Schwarz, Agatha; Födinger, Dagmar; Müller, Susanne; Pehamberger, Hubert; Schwarz, Thomas; Jantschitsch, Christian

    2016-06-01

    The link between solar radiation and melanoma is still elusive. Although infrared radiation (IR) accounts for over 50% of terrestrial solar energy, its influence on human skin is not well explored. There is increasing evidence that IR influences the expression patterns of several molecules independently of heat. A previous in vivo study revealed that pretreatment with IR might promote the development of UVR-induced non-epithelial skin cancer and possibly of melanoma in mice. To expand on this, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of IR on UVR-induced apoptosis and DNA repair in normal human epidermal melanocytes. The balance between these two effects is a key factor of malignant transformation. Human melanocytes were exposed to physiologic doses of IR and UVR. Compared to cells irradiated with UVR only, simultaneous exposure to IR significantly reduced the apoptotic rate. However, IR did not influence the repair of UVR-induced DNA damage. IR partly reversed the pro-apoptotic effects of UVR via modification of the expression and activity of proteins mainly of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. In conclusion, IR enhances the survival of melanocytes carrying UVR-induced DNA damage and thereby might contribute to melanomagenesis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. STAT3 Controls the Long-Term Survival and Phenotype of Repair Schwann Cells during Nerve Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, Cristina; Davis, Catherine M; Gomez-Sanchez, Jose A; Turmaine, Mark; Meijer, Dies; Poli, Valeria; Mirsky, Rhona; Jessen, Kristjan R

    2017-04-19

    After nerve injury, Schwann cells convert to a phenotype specialized to promote repair. But during the slow process of axonal regrowth, these repair Schwann cells gradually lose their regeneration-supportive features and eventually die. Although this is a key reason for the frequent regeneration failures in humans, the transcriptional mechanisms that control long-term survival and phenotype of repair cells have not been studied, and the molecular signaling underlying their decline is obscure. We show, in mice, that Schwann cell STAT3 has a dual role. It supports the long-term survival of repair Schwann cells and is required for the maintenance of repair Schwann cell properties. In contrast, STAT3 is less important for the initial generation of repair Schwann cells after injury. In repair Schwann cells, we find that Schwann cell STAT3 activation by Tyr705 phosphorylation is sustained during long-term denervation. STAT3 is required for maintaining autocrine Schwann cell survival signaling, and inactivation of Schwann cell STAT3 results in a striking loss of repair cells from chronically denervated distal stumps. STAT3 inactivation also results in abnormal morphology of repair cells and regeneration tracks, and failure to sustain expression of repair cell markers, including Shh, GDNF, and BDNF. Because Schwann cell development proceeds normally without STAT3, the function of this factor appears restricted to Schwann cells after injury. This identification of transcriptional mechanisms that support long-term survival and differentiation of repair cells will help identify, and eventually correct, the failures that lead to the deterioration of this important cell population. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Although injured peripheral nerves contain repair Schwann cells that provide signals and spatial clues for promoting regeneration, the clinical outcome after nerve damage is frequently poor. A key reason for this is that, during the slow growth of axons through the proximal

  8. Islet graft survival and function: concomitant culture and transplantation with vascular endothelial cells in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaoming; Xue, Wujun; Li, Yang; Feng, Xinshun; Tian, Xiaohui; Ding, Chenguang

    2011-12-15

    Human islet transplantation is a great potential therapy for type I diabetes. To investigate islet graft survival and function, we recently showed the improved effects after co-culture and co-transplantation with vascular endothelial cells (ECs) in diabetic rats. ECs were isolated, and the viability of isolated islets was assessed in two groups (standard culture group and co-culture group with ECs). Then streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were divided into four groups before islet transplantation as follows: group A with infusion of islet grafts; group B with combined vascular ECs and islet grafts; groups C and D as controls with single ECs infusion and phosphate-buffered saline injection, respectively. Blood glucose and insulin concentrations were measured daily. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor was investigated by immunohistochemical staining. The mean microvascular density was also calculated. More than 90% of acridine orange-propidium iodide staining positive islets demonstrated normal morphology while co-cultured with ECs for 7 days. Compared with standard control, insulin release assays showed a significantly higher simulation index in co-culture group except for the first day (Ptransplantation, there was a significant difference in concentrations of blood glucose and insulin among these groups after 3 days (Pislet group (P=0.04). Co-culture with ECs in vitro could improve the survival and function of isolated rat islet, and co-transplantation of islets with ECs could effectively prolong the islet graft survival in diabetic rats.

  9. Conditional survival of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael Boe; Pedersen, Niels Tinggaard; Christensen, Bjarne E

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prognosis of lymphoma patients is usually estimated at the time of diagnosis and the estimates are guided by the International Prognostic Index (IPI). However, conditional survival estimates are more informative clinically, as they consider those patients only who have already survive...... survival probability provides more accurate prognostic information than the conventional survival rate estimated from the time of diagnosis.......BACKGROUND: Prognosis of lymphoma patients is usually estimated at the time of diagnosis and the estimates are guided by the International Prognostic Index (IPI). However, conditional survival estimates are more informative clinically, as they consider those patients only who have already survived...... a period of time after treatment. Conditional survival data have not been reported for lymphoma patients. METHODS: Conditional survival was estimated for 1209 patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) from the population-based LYFO registry of the Danish Lymphoma Group. The Kaplan-Meier method...

  10. Microparticles shed from multidrug resistant breast cancer cells provide a parallel survival pathway through immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Ritu; Johnson, Michael S; Pokharel, Deep; Krishnan, S Rajeev; Bebawy, Mary

    2017-02-06

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women. Resident macrophages at distant sites provide a highly responsive and immunologically dynamic innate immune response against foreign infiltrates. Despite extensive characterization of the role of macrophages and other immune cells in malignant tissues, there is very little known about the mechanisms which facilitate metastatic breast cancer spread to distant sites of immunological integrity. The mechanisms by which a key healthy defense mechanism fails to protect distant sites from infiltration by metastatic cells in cancer patients remain undefined. Breast tumors, typical of many tumor types, shed membrane vesicles called microparticles (MPs), ranging in size from 0.1-1 μm in diameter. MPs serve as vectors in the intercellular transfer of functional proteins and nucleic acids and in drug sequestration. In addition, MPs are also emerging to be important players in the evasion of cancer cell immune surveillance. A comparative analysis of effects of MPs isolated from human breast cancer cells and non-malignant human brain endothelial cells were examined on THP-1 derived macrophages in vitro. MP-mediated effects on cell phenotype and functionality was assessed by cytokine analysis, cell chemotaxis and phagocytosis, immunolabelling, flow cytometry and confocal imaging. Student's t-test or a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for comparison and statistical analysis. In this paper we report on the discovery of a new cellular basis for immune evasion, which is mediated by breast cancer derived MPs. MPs shed from multidrug resistant (MDR) cells were shown to selectively polarize macrophage cells to a functionally incapacitated state and facilitate their engulfment by foreign cells. We propose this mechanism may serve to physically disrupt the inherent immune response prior to cancer cell colonization whilst releasing mediators required for the recruitment of distant immune cells. These findings

  11. Radiobiological effects of tritiated water short-term exposure on V79 clonogenic cell survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siragusa, Mattia; Fredericia, Nina Pil Møntegaard; Jensen, Mikael

    2018-01-01

    We set out to improve the accuracy of absorbed dose calculations for in-vitro measurements of the Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) of tritiated water (HTO) for the clonogenic cell survival assay, also considering the influence of the end-of-track Linear Energy Transfer (LET) of low-energy...... in suspension are usually comparable to those for adherent cells. RBEs calculated at the 10% survival fraction through the use of the average energy are almost similar to those obtained with the beta-spectrum. For adherent cells, an RBE of 1.6 was found when HTO cell survival curves were compared to acute γ...

  12. Gastrointestinal viral load and enteroendocrine cell number are associated with altered survival in HIV-1 infected individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido van Marle

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infects and destroys cells of the immune system leading to an overt immune deficiency known as HIV acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS. The gut associated lymphoid tissue is one of the major lymphoid tissues targeted by HIV-1, and is considered a reservoir for HIV-1 replication and of major importance in CD4+ T-cell depletion. In addition to immunodeficiency, HIV-1 infection also directly causes gastrointestinal (GI dysfunction, also known as HIV enteropathy. This enteropathy can manifest itself as many pathological changes in the GI tract. The objective of this study was to determine the association of gut HIV-1 infection markers with long-term survival in a cohort of men who have sex with men (MSM enrolled pre-HAART (Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy. We examined survival over 15-years in a cohort of 42 HIV-infected cases: In addition to CD4+ T cell counts and HIV-1 plasma viral load, multiple gut compartment (duodenum and colon biopsies were taken by endoscopy every 6 months during the initial 3-year period. HIV-1 was cultured from tissues and phenotyped and viral loads in the gut tissues were determined. Moreover, the tissues were subjected to an extensive assessment of enteroendocrine cell distribution and pathology. The collected data was used for survival analyses, which showed that patients with higher gut tissue viral load levels had a significantly worse survival prognosis. Moreover, lower numbers of serotonin (duodenum and somatostatin (duodenum and colon immunoreactive cell counts in the gut tissues of patients was associated with significant lower survival prognosis. Our study, suggested that HIV-1 pathogenesis and survival prognosis is associated with altered enteroendocrine cell numbers, which could point to a potential role for enteroendocrine function in HIV infection and pathogenesis.

  13. 5-Fluorouracil modulation of radiosensitivity in cultured human carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smalley, S.R.; Kimler, B.F.; Evans, R.G.

    1991-01-01

    We evaluated conventional pulse exposure versus continuous exposure models of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) radiosensitization in HT-29 (human colon adenocarcinoma) and DU-145 (human prostate cancer adenocarcinoma) cell lines. Cell survival following treatment with drug and/or radiation was determined by colony formation assays. Radiation was delivered either by itself, approximately midway through a 1-hr exposure to 5-FU (10 micrograms/ml), or at various times following initiation of exposure to 5-FU (0.5 microgram/ml) present throughout the entire period of incubation. Drug concentrations were selected to approximate those achieved in vivo in humans. HT-29 cells showed a plating efficiency of 87% and similar cytotoxicity (survival reduced to 0.57-0.71) for all 5-FU conditions. The Do's of the radiation survival curves were not different for 1 hr of 5-FU exposure versus radiation alone. However, continuous exposure conditions demonstrated statistically significantly different Do's from radiation alone and pulse 5-FU exposure. DU-145 cells displayed a plating efficiency of 17% and cytotoxicities of 0.10-0.91 for the 5-FU conditions. DU-145 cells showed different radiation 5-FU interactions: 5-FU produced statistically significant changes in Do well as the differences between cell lines insofar as their radiosensitization by 5-FU underscore the caution required in extrapolating these radiobiologic models to the clinical setting

  14. Pim1 kinase is upregulated in glioblastoma multiforme and mediates tumor cell survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Susann; Fink, Matthias Alexander; Weitmann, Kerstin; Friedel, Claudius; Hadlich, Stefan; Langner, Sönke; Kindermann, Katharina; Holm, Tobias; Böhm, Andreas; Eskilsson, Eskil; Miletic, Hrvoje; Hildner, Markus; Fritsch, Michael; Vogelgesang, Silke; Havemann, Christoph; Ritter, Christoph Alexander; Meyer zu Schwabedissen, Henriette Elisabeth; Rauch, Bernhard; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Kroemer, Heyo Klaus; Schroeder, Henry; Bien-Möller, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Background The current therapy for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most aggressive and common primary brain tumor of adults, involves surgery and a combined radiochemotherapy that controls tumor progression only for a limited time window. Therefore, the identification of new molecular targets is highly necessary. Inhibition of kinases has become a standard of clinical oncology, and thus the oncogenic kinase Pim1 might represent a promising target for improvement of GBM therapy. Methods Expression of Pim1 and associated signaling molecules was analyzed in human GBM samples, and the potential role of this kinase in patients' prognosis was evaluated. Furthermore, we analyzed the in vivo role of Pim1 in GBM cell growth in an orthotopic mouse model and examined the consequences of Pim1 inhibition in vitro to clarify underlying pathways. Results In comparison with normal brain, a strong upregulation of Pim1 was demonstrated in human GBM samples. Notably, patients with short overall survival showed a significantly higher Pim1 expression compared with GBM patients who lived longer than the median. In vitro experiments with GBM cells and analysis of patients' GBM samples suggest that Pim1 regulation is dependent on epidermal growth factor receptor. Furthermore, inhibition of Pim1 resulted in reduced cell viability accompanied by decreased cell numbers and increased apoptotic cells, as seen by elevated subG1 cell contents and caspase-3 and -9 activation, as well as modulation of several cell cycle or apoptosis regulatory proteins. Conclusions Altogether, Pim1 could be a novel therapeutic target, which should be further analyzed to improve the outcome of patients with aggressive GBM. PMID:25155357

  15. Remembrance of Dead Cells Past: Discovering That the Extracellular Matrix Is a Cell Survival Factor

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, Martin A.

    2010-01-01

    In 1992, Jere Meredith and I followed up on a serendipitous observation and showed that matrix deprivation can lead to apoptosis. Our article in Molecular Biology of the Cell, together with work form Steve Frisch's lab, helped establish the paradigm that integrin signals control cell survival in a variety of systems. It has been a pleasure to watch that work take on a life of its own as other investigators have explored its role in processes such as cavitation, regression of the mammary gland...

  16. Toward a psychology of human survival: Psychological approaches to contemporary global threats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, R.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear weapons, population explosion, resource and food-supply depletion, and environmental deterioration have been posing increasing threats to human survival. Moreover, for the first time in history, all these major global threats are human caused and can, therefore, be traced in large part to psychological origins. After a brief overview of the nature and extent of current threats, this paper suggests criteria for an adequate psychology of human survival. The causes and effects of the threats are examined from various psychological perspectives and the psychological principles underlying effective responses are deduced. The ways in which mental health professionals may contribute to this most crucial task are discussed. 76 references

  17. Enhanced endogenous type I interferon cell-driven survival and inhibition of spontaneous apoptosis by Riluzole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achour, Ammar; M'Bika, Jean-Pierre; Biquard, Jean-Michel

    2009-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), although effective in improving the survival of HIV-1-infected individuals, has not been able to reconstitute the adaptive immune response. We have described the use of novel chemical agents to restore T-cell survival/proliferation by inducing cytokine production. Due to its cationic amphiphilic structure, these molecules appear to enhance immune restoration. In this study, we investigated the action of Riluzole (2-amino-6-trifuromethoxybenzothiazole) in HIV-1 infection. Riluzole is able to increase (effective dose from 1 to 1000 nM) the cell-survival of T cells from HIV-1-infected patients and inhibit spontaneous apoptosis. The immunomodulatory effect of riluzole-sensitized cells was ascribed to endogenous type I interferon (IFN) derived from monocytes. Riluzole might be used for restoring the cell survival of immunocompromised patients and eliminating latent infected cells upon HIV-1 reactivation

  18. Acrolein activates cell survival and apoptotic death responses involving the endoplasmic reticulum in A549 lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanel, André; Pallepati, Pragathi; Bettaieb, Ahmed; Morin, Patrick; Averill-Bates, Diana A

    2014-05-01

    Acrolein, a highly reactive α,β-unsaturated aldehyde, is a product of endogenous lipid peroxidation. It is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant that is generated mainly by smoke, overheated cooking oil and vehicle exhaust. Acrolein damages cellular proteins, which could lead to accumulation of aberrantly-folded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This study determines the mechanisms involved in acrolein-induced apoptosis mediated by the ER and possible links with the ER stress response in human A549 lung cells. The exposure of cells to acrolein (15-50μM) for shorter times of 15 to 30min activated several ER stress markers. These included the ER chaperone protein BiP and the three ER sensors: (i) the survival/rescue molecules protein kinase RNA (PKR)-like ER kinase (PERK) and eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2α) were phosphorylated; (ii) cleavage of activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6) occurred, and (iii) inositol-requiring protein-1 alpha (IRE1α) was phosphorylated. Acrolein (25-50μM) caused apoptotic cell death mediated by the ER after 2h, which was characterised by the induction of CHOP and activation of ER proteases calpain and caspase-4. Calpain and caspase-7 were the initiating factors for caspase-4 activation in acrolein-induced apoptosis. These results increase our knowledge about cellular responses to acrolein in lung cells, which have implications for human health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A Multiscale Survival Process for Modeling Human Activity Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianyang; Cui, Peng; Song, Chaoming; Zhu, Wenwu; Yang, Shiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Human activity plays a central role in understanding large-scale social dynamics. It is well documented that individual activity pattern follows bursty dynamics characterized by heavy-tailed interevent time distributions. Here we study a large-scale online chatting dataset consisting of 5,549,570 users, finding that individual activity pattern varies with timescales whereas existing models only approximate empirical observations within a limited timescale. We propose a novel approach that models the intensity rate of an individual triggering an activity. We demonstrate that the model precisely captures corresponding human dynamics across multiple timescales over five orders of magnitudes. Our model also allows extracting the population heterogeneity of activity patterns, characterized by a set of individual-specific ingredients. Integrating our approach with social interactions leads to a wide range of implications.

  20. Long-term survival of transplanted allogeneic cells engineered to express a T cell chemorepellent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papeta, Natalia; Chen, Tao; Vianello, Fabrizio; Gererty, Lyle; Malik, Ashish; Mok, Ying-Ting; Tharp, William G; Bagley, Jessamyn; Zhao, Guiling; Stevceva, Liljana; Yoon, Victor; Sykes, Megan; Sachs, David; Iacomini, John; Poznansky, Mark C

    2007-01-27

    Alloantigen specific T cells have been shown to be required for allograft rejection. The chemokine, stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1) at high concentration, has been shown to act as a T-cell chemorepellent and abrogate T-cell infiltration into a site of antigen challenge in vivo via a mechanism termed fugetaxis or chemorepulsion. We postulated that this mechanism could be exploited therapeutically and that allogeneic cells engineered to express a chemorepellent protein would not be rejected. Allogeneic murine insulinoma beta-TC3 cells and primary islets from BALB/C mice were engineered to constitutively secrete differential levels of SDF-1 and transplanted into allogeneic diabetic C57BL/6 mice. Rejection was defined as the permanent return of hyperglycemia and was correlated with the level of T-cell infiltration. The migratory response of T-cells to SDF-1 was also analyzed by transwell migration assay and time-lapse videomicroscopy. The cytotoxicity of cytotoxic T cell (CTLs) against beta-TC3 cells expressing high levels of SDF-1 was measured in standard and modified chromium-release assays in order to determine the effect of CTL migration on killing efficacy. Control animals rejected allogeneic cells and remained diabetic. In contrast, high level SDF-1 production by transplanted cells resulted in increased survival of the allograft and a significant reduction in blood glucose levels and T-cell infiltration into the transplanted tissue. This is the first demonstration of a novel approach that exploits T-cell chemorepulsion to induce site specific immune isolation and thereby overcomes allograft rejection without the use of systemic immunosuppression.

  1. Cell Survival and DNA Damage in Normal Prostate Cells Irradiated Out-of-Field.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shields, L

    2014-10-31

    Interest in out-of-field radiation dose has been increasing with the introduction of new techniques, such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). These new techniques offer superior conformity of high-dose regions to the target compared to conventional techniques, however more normal tissue is exposed to low-dose radiation with VMAT. There is a potential increase in radiobiological effectiveness associated with lower energy photons delivered during VMAT as normal cells are exposed to a temporal change in incident photon energy spectrum. During VMAT deliveries, normal cells can be exposed to the primary radiation beam, as well as to transmission and scatter radiation. The impact of low-dose radiation, radiation-induced bystander effect and change in energy spectrum on normal cells are not well understood. The current study examined cell survival and DNA damage in normal prostate cells after exposure to out-of-field radiation both with and without the transfer of bystander factors. The effect of a change in energy spectrum out-of-field compared to in-field was also investigated. Prostate cancer (LNCaP) and normal prostate (PNT1A) cells were placed in-field and out-of-field, respectively, with the PNT1A cells being located 1 cm from the field edge when in-field cells were being irradiated with 2 Gy. Clonogenic and γ-H2AX assays were performed postirradiation to examine cell survival and DNA damage. The assays were repeated when bystander factors from the LNCaP cells were transferred to the PNT1A cells and also when the PNT1A cells were irradiated in-field to a different energy spectrum. An average out-of-field dose of 10.8 ± 4.2 cGy produced a significant reduction in colony volume and increase in the number of γ-H2AX foci\\/cell in the PNT1A cells compared to the sham-irradiated control cells. An adaptive response was observed in the PNT1A cells having first received a low out-of-field dose and then the bystander factors. The PNT1A cells showed a significant

  2. Targeted inhibition of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase impairs cell proliferation, survival, and invasion in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fei; Gao, Jun-Yi; Chen, Hua; Du, Zhen-Hua; Zhang, Xue-Qun; Gao, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Colon cancer is the third most common cancer in the world, and its metastasis and drug resistance are challenging for its effective treatment. The PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of colon cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the targeting of PI3K in colon cancer cells HT-29 and HCT-116 in vitro. In HT-29 and HCT-116 cells, BEZ235, a dual inhibitor of PI3K/mTOR, and shRNAtarget to PI3KCA were used to inhibit PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. The inhibition efficiency of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway was detected by RT-PCR and Western blot. Cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and apoptosis were evaluated by Cell Counting Kit-8, Transwell, and flow cytometry assays. The expression of apoptosis-related proteins (cleavage caspase 3, Bcl-2, Bax, and Bim) were also detected. We found that in HT-29 and HCT-116 cells, the treatment of BEZ235 (1 μM) and PI3KCA knockdown inhibited the activation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway and significantly suppressed cell proliferation, migration, and invasion of HT-29 and HCT-116 cells. In addition, we confirmed that knockdown of BEZ235 and PI3KCA induced cell apoptosis through the upregulated levels of cleavage caspase 3 and Bax and downregulated expression of Bcl-2 and Bim. Our results indicated that targeted inhibition of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway impaired cell proliferation, survival, and invasion in human colon cancer.

  3. Response of the MG-63 human osteosarcoma cell line grown as multicellular spheroids to neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Nobuo; Kakehi, Masae; Matsubara, Shou; Koike, Sachiko; Ando, Koichi.

    1993-01-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids are composed of the mixed populations of cells with regard to cell proliferation, nutrition, oxygenation and radiosensitivity. Human osteogenic sarcoma is generally considered clinically radioresistant. However, the in vitro cell survival curves for human osteogenic sarcoma cell lines do not differ from those of other tumor cell lines. In this study, the responses of human osteogenic sarcoma cell line to gamma ray and neutrons were investigated by using spheroid system. The spheroids of the osteogenic sarcoma cell line are considered to be a good in vitro model of radioresistant tumors. The purpose of this study is to measure the response of the spheroids to fast neutron irradiation. MG-63 human osteogenic sarcoma cell line was used for this study. The cell line was cultured in alpha-MEM with supplement. Cell survival was estimated after the trypsinization of spheroids 24 hours after irradiation. The method of measuring spheroid cure is explained. The mean number of surviving cells per spheroid can be obtained from the mean clonogenic number and cell survival curve. The cell survival of MG-63 spheroids exposed to gamma ray and neutrons and the dose effect curves for spheroid cure after irradiation are shown. (K.I.)

  4. Survival of cord blood haematopoietic stem cells in a hyaluronan hydrogel for ex vivo biomimicry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demange, Elise; Kassim, Yusra; Petit, Cyrille; Buquet, Catherine; Dulong, Virginie; Cerf, Didier Le; Buchonnet, Gérard; Vannier, Jean-Pierre

    2013-11-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) grow in a specified niche in close association with the microenvironment, the so-called 'haematopoietic niche'. Scaffolds have been introduced to overcome the liquid culture limitations, mimicking the presence of the extracellular matrix (ECM). In the present study the hyaluronic acid scaffold, already developed in the laboratory, has been used for the first time to maintain long-term cultures of CD34⁺ haematopoietic cells obtained from human cord blood. One parameter investigated was the impact on ex vivo survival of CD34⁺ cord blood cells (CBCs) on the hyaluronic acid surface, immobilized with peptides containing the RGD motif. This peptide was conjugated by coating the hyaluronan hydrogel and cultured in serum-free liquid phase complemented with stem cell factor (SCF), a commonly indispensable cytokine for haematopoiesis. Our work demonstrated that these hyaluronan hydrogels were superior to traditional liquid cultures by maintaining and expanding the HPCs without the need for additional cytokines, and a colonization of 280-fold increment in the hydrogel compared with liquid culture after 28 days of ex vivo expansion. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Survival of transfused red blood cells: In vivo compatibility testing with chromium-51

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dharkar, D.D.; Pineda, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    The /sup 51/Cr red cell survival test and specific test for measurement of the disappearance rate of labeled red cells. This procedure can be used for the assessment of red cell compatibility testing in vivo. The authors recommend that more routine transfusions as well as ''difficult'' transfusions be monitored by /sup 51/Cr in vivo compatibility testing before the actual transfusions, so that more consistent and reliable survival values are achieved

  6. Cognate CD4 T-cell licensing of dendritic cells heralds anti-CMV CD8 T-cell immunity after human allogeneic umbilical cord blood transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flinsenberg, T W H; Spel, Lotte; Jansen, M; Koning, D; de Haar, C; Plantinga, M; Scholman, R; van Loenen, M M; Nierkens, S; Boon, L; van Baarle, D; Heemskerk, M H M; Boelens, J J; Boes, M

    2014-01-01

    Reactivation of human cytomegalovirus (CMV) is hazardous to patients undergoing allogeneic cord-blood transplantation (CBT), lowering survival rates by approximately 25%. While antiviral treatment ameliorates viremia, complete viral control requires CD8(+) T-cell-driven immunity. Mouse studies

  7. Promotion of Survival and Engraftment of Transplanted Adipose Tissue-Derived Stromal and Vascular Cells by Overexpression of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Baldari

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Short-term persistence of transplanted cells during early post-implant period limits clinical efficacy of cell therapy. Poor cell survival is mainly due to the harsh hypoxic microenvironment transplanted cells face at the site of implantation and to anoikis, driven by cell adhesion loss. We evaluated the hypothesis that viral-mediated expression of a gene conferring hypoxia resistance to cells before transplant could enhance survival of grafted cells in early stages after implant. We used adipose tissue as cell source because it consistently provides high yields of adipose-tissue-derived stromal and vascular cells (ASCs, suitable for regenerative purposes. Luciferase positive cells were transduced with lentiviral vectors expressing either green fluorescent protein as control or human manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2. Cells were then exposed in vitro to hypoxic conditions, mimicking cell transplantation into an ischemic site. Cells overexpressing SOD2 displayed survival rates significantly greater compared to mock transduced cells. Similar results were also obtained in vivo after implantation into syngeneic mice and assessment of cell engraftment by in vivo bioluminescent imaging. Taken together, these findings suggest that ex vivo gene transfer of SOD2 into ASCs before implantation confers a cytoprotective effect leading to improved survival and engraftment rates, therefore enhancing cell therapy regenerative potential.

  8. Overexpression of human SOD1 improves survival of mice susceptible to endotoxic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charchaflieh J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Jean Charchaflieh,1,2 Georges I Labaze,1 Pulsar Li,1 Holly Van Remmen,3 Haekyung Lee,1 Helen Stutz,1 Arlan Richardson,3 Asher Emanuel,1 Ming Zhang1,41Department of Anesthesiology, State University of New York (SUNY Downstate Medical Center, New York, NY, USA; 2Department of Anesthesiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA; 3Barshop Center for Longevity and Aging Studies, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA; 4Department of Cell Biology, State University of New York (SUNY Downstate Medical Center, New York, NY, USABackground: Protective effects of the antioxidant enzyme Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1 against endotoxic shock have not been demonstrated in animal models. We used a murine model to investigate whether overexpression of SOD1 protects against endotoxic shock, and whether the genetic background of SOD1 affects its effective protective effects and susceptibility to endotoxic shock.Methods: Transgenic (tg mice overexpressing human SOD1 and control mice were divided into four groups based on their genetic background: (1 tg mice with mixed genetic background (tg-JAX; (2 wild-type (WT littermates of tg-JAX strain (WT-JAX; (3 tg mice with C57BL/6J background (tg-TX; (4 WT littermates of tg-TX strain (WT-TX. Activity of SOD1 in the intestine, heart, and liver of tg and control mice was confirmed using a polyacrylamide activity gel. Endotoxic shock was induced by intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide. Survival rates over 120 hours (mean, 95% confidence interval were analyzed using Kaplan–Meier survival curves.Results: Human SOD1 enzymatic activities were significantly higher in the intestine, heart, and liver of both tg strains (tg-JAX and tg-TX compared with their WT littermates (WT-JAX and WT-TX, respectively. Interestingly, the endogenous SOD1 activities in tg-JAX mice were decreased compared with their WT littermates (WT-JAX, but such aberrant changes were not

  9. Erythrokinetics, ferrokinetics and red cell survival in sickle cell anaemia under subtropical climatic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas, R.

    1975-01-01

    Ferrokinetic parameters were evaluated with 59 Fe and red-cell survival with 51 Cr by classical techniques in a total of 17 patients with sickle-cell disease. The mean plasma 59 Fe half-disappearance time in these patients was 29.5 min as compared with a normal value of 92 min, and the t1/2 51 Cr 8.0 days as compared with a normal value of 26.0 days. The mean red-cell iron turnover rate was elevated to 9 times normal. The increased destruction of red cells appeared to take place predominantly, though not entirely, in the spleen. Eight of the 17 patients studied were identified as having intercurrent complications, but these did not significantly affect the results of the investigations. A group of 5 boys in whom the red-cell iron turnover rate was elevated to a lesser degree than in the other patients were subjected to more detailed studies of plasma 59 Fe clearance with particular reference to ineffective erythropoiesis. In these patients, the plasma 59 Fe clearance curves showed precocious humps characteristic of ineffective erythropoiesis. Detailed analysis of the results indicated ineffective erythropoiesis corresponding to 3.6, 16.0, 22.6, 32.0 and 50.0 % of the iron initially taken up by the bone marrow. It is concluded that while the anaemia in most patients with sickle-cell disease is mainly due to shortened survival of the circulating red cells, with increased destruction of red cells in the spleen, ineffective erythropoiesis may none the less be an important factor determining the actual degree of this anaemia

  10. Epstein-Barr virus ensures B cell survival by uniquely modulating apoptosis at early and late times after infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Alexander M; Dai, Joanne; Bazot, Quentin; Patel, Luv; Nikitin, Pavel A; Djavadian, Reza; Winter, Peter S; Salinas, Cristina A; Barry, Ashley Perkins; Wood, Kris C; Johannsen, Eric C; Letai, Anthony; Allday, Martin J; Luftig, Micah A

    2017-04-20

    Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is causally linked to several human cancers. EBV expresses viral oncogenes that promote cell growth and inhibit the apoptotic response to uncontrolled proliferation. The EBV oncoprotein LMP1 constitutively activates NFκB and is critical for survival of EBV-immortalized B cells. However, during early infection EBV induces rapid B cell proliferation with low levels of LMP1 and little apoptosis. Therefore, we sought to define the mechanism of survival in the absence of LMP1/NFκB early after infection. We used BH3 profiling to query mitochondrial regulation of apoptosis and defined a transition from uninfected B cells (BCL-2) to early-infected (MCL-1/BCL-2) and immortalized cells (BFL-1). This dynamic change in B cell survival mechanisms is unique to virus-infected cells and relies on regulation of MCL-1 mitochondrial localization and BFL-1 transcription by the viral EBNA3A protein. This study defines a new role for EBNA3A in the suppression of apoptosis with implications for EBV lymphomagenesis.

  11. Tuft (caveolated) cells in two human colon carcinoma cell lines.

    OpenAIRE

    Barkla, D. H.; Whitehead, R. H.; Foster, H.; Tutton, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The presence of an unusual cell type in two human colon carcinoma cell lines is reported. The cells show the same morphology as "tuft" (caveolated) cells present in normal gastrointestinal epithelium. Tuft cells were seen in cell line LIM 1863 growing in vitro and in human colon carcinoma cell line LIM 2210 growing as subcutaneous solid tumour xenografts in nude mice. Characteristic morphologic features of tuft cells included a wide base, narrow apex and a tuft of long microvilli projecting f...

  12. Intracellular contacts - effect of survival curve of mammal cells on the Dq value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, R.E.; Sutherland, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    Survival increase is observed in cells of the Chinese hamster of the V79-171 line which grow in the composition of multicell spheroids as compared with the survival after irradiation in a single state. The ratio of the Dsub(q) cell value in the composition of spheroids to Dsub(q) of separately growing cells increases as the mitotic cycle proceeds from the minimum value of 1.3 for cells in the Gi phase to the maximum value of 2.2 for cells in a late S-phase. The increase of survival during growth in the composition of spheroids is not characteristic for all cell types. Only a part of cultured MNNG-mutants of cells of the V79-171 Chinese hamster reveal radiomodifying effect of cell contact acting [ru

  13. Early NK Cell Reconstitution Predicts Overall Survival in T-Cell Replete Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minculescu, Lia; Marquart, Hanne Vibeke; Friis, Lone Smidstrups

    2016-01-01

    Early immune reconstitution plays a critical role in clinical outcome after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Natural killer (NK) cells are the first lymphocytes to recover after transplantation and are considered powerful effector cells in HSCT. We aimed to evaluate...... the clinical impact of early NK cell recovery in T-cell replete transplant recipients. Immune reconstitution was studied in 298 adult patients undergoing HSCT for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) from 2005 to 2013. In multivariate analysis NK...... cell numbers day 30 (NK30) >150cells/µL were independently associated with superior overall survival (hazard ratio 0.79, 95% confidence interval 0.66-0.95, p=0.01). Cumulative incidence analyses showed that patients with NK30 >150cells/µL had significantly less transplant related mortality (TRM), p=0...

  14. Intramacrophage survival of uropathogenic Escherichia coli: Differences between diverse clinical isolates and between mouse and human macrophages

    KAUST Repository

    Bokil, Nilesh J.

    2011-11-01

    Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) are the primary cause of urinary tract infections. Recent studies have demonstrated that UPEC can invade and replicate within epithelial cells, suggesting that this bacterial pathogen may occupy an intracellular niche within the host. Given that many intracellular pathogens target macrophages, we assessed the interactions between UPEC and macrophages. Colonization of the mouse bladder by UPEC strain CFT073 resulted in increased expression of myeloid-restricted genes, consistent with the recruitment of inflammatory macrophages to the site of infection. In in vitro assays, CFT073 was able to survive within primary mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM) up to 24h post-infection. Three additional well-characterized clinical UPEC isolates associated with distinct UTI symptomatologies displayed variable long-term survival within BMM. UPEC strains UTI89 and VR50, originally isolated from patients with cystitis and asymptomatic bacteriuria respectively, showed elevated bacterial loads in BMM at 24h post-infection as compared to CFT073 and the asymptomatic bacteriuria strain 83972. These differences did not correlate with differential effects on macrophage survival or initial uptake of bacteria. E. coli UTI89 localized to a Lamp1 + vesicular compartment within BMM. In contrast to survival within mouse BMM, intracellular bacterial loads of VR50 were low in both human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM) and in human T24 bladder epithelial cells. Collectively, these data suggest that some UPEC isolates may subvert macrophage anti-microbial pathways, and that host species differences may impact on intracellular UPEC survival. © 2011 Elsevier GmbH.

  15. Extracellular histones reduce survival and angiogenic responses of late outgrowth progenitor and mature endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, H A; Carestia, A; Scotti, L; Parborell, F; Schattner, M; Negrotto, S

    2016-02-01

    ESSENTIALS: Extracellular histones are highly augmented in sites of neovessel formation, such as regeneration tissues. We studied histone effect on survival and angiogenic activity of mature and progenitor endothelial cells. Extracellular histones trigger apoptosis and pyroptosis and reduce angiogenesis in vivo and in vitro. Histone blockade can be useful as a therapeutic strategy to improve angiogenesis and tissue regeneration. Extracellular histones are highly augmented in sites of neovessel formation, like regeneration tissues. Their cytotoxic effect has been studied in endothelial cells, although the mechanism involved and their action on endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) remain unknown. To study the effect of histones on ECFC survival and angiogenic functions and compare it with mature endothelial cells. Nuclear morphology analysis showed that each human recombinant histone triggered both apoptotic-like and necrotic-like cell deaths in both mature and progenitor endothelial cells. While H1 and H2A exerted a weak toxicity, H2B, H3 and H4 were the most powerful. The percentage of apoptosis correlated with the percentage of ECFCs exhibiting caspase-3 activation and was zeroed by the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK. Necrotic-like cell death was also suppressed by this compound and the caspase-1 inhibitor Ac-YVAD-CMK, indicating that histones triggered ECFC pyroptosis. All histones, at non-cytotoxic concentrations, reduced migration and H2B, H3 and H4 induced cell cycle arrest and impaired tubulogenesis via p38 activation. Neutrophil-derived histones exerted similar effects. In vivo blood vessel formation in the quail chorioallantoic membrane was also reduced by H2B, H3 and H4. Their cytotoxic and antiangiogenic effects were suppressed by unfractioned and low-molecular-weight heparins and the combination of TLR2 and TLR4 blocking antibodies. Histones trigger both apoptosis and pyroptosis of ECFCs and inhibit their angiogenic functions. Their cytotoxic and

  16. Recovery from radiation-induced damage in primary cultures of human epithelial thyroid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.C.; Hiraoka, Toshio; Enno, Masumi; Takeichi, Nobuo.

    1985-01-01

    Human thyroid epithelial tissues from 23 individuals were obtained from surgical tissue, and cultured in vitro. Dose response survival curves showed thyroid cells, when compared to mammary epithelial and skin fibroblast cells of human origin, to be only slightly more radiosensitive to X-rays. Cell survival curves from the cell strains showed wide variability in radiation sensitivity. Of the 23 cell strains tested, 21 strains displayed significant shoulders (nonzero quasi-threshold (D q ) values and extrapolation number (n) values greater than 1) at low dose exposures. The ability of human cells to recover from radiation damage was further studied by dose fractionation. Two cell strains were given a total X-ray dose of 304 cGy in two equal fractions separated by varying time intervals. Maximal cell survival was observed when the time interval exceeded two hours. When the two cell strains were exposed to 152 cGy of X-rays followed four hours later by second graded doses, cell survival was enhanced as compared to survival after single dose exposures. However, no benefit of dose splitting was observed when cells were exposed to low second doses. These results support previous studies showing that human cells are capable of repair but require relatively large doses to elicit a repair response. (author)

  17. Recovery from radiation-induced damage in primary cultures of human epithelial thyroid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.C.; Hiraoka, Toshio; Enno, Masumi; Takeichi, Nobuo.

    1985-09-01

    Human thyroid epithelial tissue from 23 individuals was obtained from surgical tissue, and cultured in vitro. Dose-response survival curves showed thyroid cells, when compared to mammary epithelial and skin fibroblast cells of human origin, to be only slightly more radiosensitive to X rays. Cell survival curves from the cell strains showed wide variability in radiation sensitivity. Of the 23 cell strains tested, 21 strains displayed significant shoulders (nonzero quasi-threshold (Dsub(q)) values and extrapolation number (n) values greater than 1)* at low dose exposures. The ability of human cells to recover from radiation damage was further studied by dose fractionation. Two cell strains were given a total X-ray dose of 304 cGy in two equal fractions separated by varying time intervals. Maximal cell survival was observed when the time interval exceeded two hours. When the two cell strains were exposed to 152 cGy of X rays followed four hours later by second graded doses, cell survival was enhanced as compared to survival after single dose exposures. However, no benefit of dose splitting was observed when cells were exposed to low second doses. These results support previous studies showing that human cells are capable of repair but require relatively large doses to elicit a repair response. (author)

  18. Thirst for Power: Energy, Water and Human Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubert, E.; Webber, M.

    2017-12-01

    Although it is widely understood that energy and water are the world's two most critical resources, their vital interconnections and vulnerabilities are less often recognized. This talk offers a holistic way of thinking about energy and water—a big picture approach that reveals the interdependence of the two resources, identifies the seriousness of the challenges, and lays out an optimistic approach with an array of solutions to ensure the continuing sustainability of both. The talk discusses how current population growth, economic growth, climate change, and short-sighted policies are likely to make things worse. Yet, more integrated planning with long-term sustainability in mind can avert such a daunting future. Combining anecdotes and personal stories with insights into the latest science of energy and water, the talk identifies a hopeful path toward wise long-range water-energy decisions and a more reliable and abundant future for humanity.

  19. The Adequate Corpus Luteum: miR-96 Promotes Luteal Cell Survival and Progesterone Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Bushra T; Sontakke, Sadanand D; Ioannidis, Jason; Duncan, W Colin; Donadeu, F Xavier

    2017-07-01

    Inadequate progesterone production from the corpus luteum is associated with pregnancy loss. Data available in model species suggest important roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) in luteal development and maintenance. To comprehensively investigate the involvement of miRNAs during the ovarian follicle-luteal transition. The effects of specific miRNAs on survival and steroid production by human luteinized granulosa cells (hLGCs) were tested using specific miRNA inhibitors. Candidate miRNAs were identified through microarray analyses of follicular and luteal tissues in a bovine model. An academic institution in the United Kingdom associated with a teaching hospital. hLGCs were obtained by standard transvaginal follicular-fluid aspiration from 35 women undergoing assisted conception. Inhibition of candidate miRNAs in vitro. Levels of miRNAs, mRNAs, FOXO1 protein, apoptosis, and steroids were measured in tissues and/or cultured cells. Two specific miRNA clusters, miR-183-96-182 and miR-212-132, were dramatically increased in luteal relative to follicular tissues. miR-96 and miR-132 were the most upregulated miRNAs within each cluster. Database analyses identified FOXO1 as a putative target of both these miRNAs. In cultured hLGCs, inhibition of miR-96 increased apoptosis and FOXO1 protein levels, and decreased progesterone production. These effects were prevented by small interfering RNA-mediated downregulation of FOXO1. In bovine luteal cells, miR-96 inhibition also led to increases in apoptosis and FOXO1 protein levels. miR-96 targets FOXO1 to regulate luteal development through effects on cell survival and steroid production. The miR-183-96-182 cluster could provide a novel target for the manipulation of luteal function. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  20. Impact of exogenous lactate on survival and radiosensitivity of carcinoma cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grotius, Janine; Seidel, Claudia; Huether, Melanie; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni A.; Baumann, Michael; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Many solid tumors are characterized by spatiotemporal heterologous supply conditions due to a histomorphological and functional disaster of their vascular network. Hypoxia as a pathophysiologic consequence is a well-established, yet still not entirely understood direct radioresistance factor while other milieu conditions such as tissue acidosis and lactate accumulation are considered only as indirect modulators of tumor radioresponse. An enhanced level of local and overall lactate in tumor tissues may result from the pathologic vascular supply as oxygen deficiency leads to an increased cellular glycolytic flux but disposal of waste products is impeded. In addition, genetic alterations as a consequence of malignant transformation are known to contribute to lactate accumulation under aerobic conditions in tumors. This may be true for genes (i) which control the expression or activity of glycolytic enzymes and related transporters and/or (ii) which lead to a truncated citric acid cycle and which support glutaminolysis. In various tumor entities including squamous cell carcinomas of head and neck and adenocarcinomas of the rectum high lactate concentrations (> 8-10 mM as compared to normal tissues with ∼ 2 mM) were shown to correlate with risk of metastases and/or reduced recurrence-free as well as overall survival. Several in vitro studies show adverse effects of high lactate concentrations on various tumor stromal cell types that may contribute to this phenomenon. Also, most recently, a hypoxia-independent correlation of lactate level with radioresistance was documented in a subcutanous xenograft mouse model of human squamous cell carcinomas indicating that lactate could causally and/or directly relate to radioresponse. The present study was performed to evaluate the impact of pathophysiological, high extracellular lactate levels and reduced pH on the survival and radioresponse of various established cancer cell lines in a classical in vitro assay

  1. Optimal fractionation for the radiotherapy of tumour cells possessing wide-shouldered survival curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheldon, T.E.

    1979-01-01

    A recent publication (Zeitz, L., and McDonald, J.M., 1978, Br. J. Radiol., vol. 51, 637) has considered the use of in vitro survival curves in the evaluation of different treatment schedules. Several studies of oxygenated melanoma cell have demonstrated a wider than average shoulder width for the survival curves. It is possible that hypoxia reduces the width of this shoulder. Theoretical cell survival probabilities were calculated for each of the four treatment schedules considered by Zeitz and McDonald. The calculations were based on hypothetical survival curves for anoxic melanoma cells with the shoulder either fully retained or completely abolished. No allowance was made for either re-population or re-oxygenation. The advantage of small doses per fraction was demonstrated for both types of survival curve. Re-oxygenation during therapy could therefore mean that a non-uniform treatment schedule is the appropriate choice for this type of tumour. (U.K.)

  2. IR-induced autophagy plays a role in survival of HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Mi Young; Jang, Eun Yeong; Ryu, Tae Ho; Chung, Dong Min; Kim, Jin Hong; Kim, Jin Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Cells respond to stress with repair, or are diverted into irreversible cell cycle exit (senescence) or are eliminated through programmed cell death. There are two major morphologically distinctive forms of programmed cell death, apoptosis and autophagic cell death. Apoptosis contribute to cell death, whereas autophagy can play a dual role in mediating either cell survival or death in response to various stress stimuli. Here we analysed cellular responses induced by IR. The understanding of an appropriate cellular stress response is of crucial importance in foreseeing the cell fate. Apoptotic feagures were not detected in HeLa under our experimental irradiation condition. Autophagic cell death in HeLa may play an important role in cell protection and can result in cell survival

  3. The Concerted Action of Type 2 and Type 3 Deiodinases Regulates the Cell Cycle and Survival of Basal Cell Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miro, Caterina; Ambrosio, Raffaele; De Stefano, Maria Angela; Di Girolamo, Daniela; Di Cicco, Emery; Cicatiello, Annunziata Gaetana; Mancino, Giuseppina; Porcelli, Tommaso; Raia, Maddalena; Del Vecchio, Luigi; Salvatore, Domenico; Dentice, Monica

    2017-04-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) mediate pleiotropic cellular processes involved in metabolism, cellular proliferation, and differentiation. The intracellular hormonal environment can be tailored by the type 1 and 2 deiodinase enzymes D2 and D3, which catalyze TH activation and inactivation respectively. In many cellular systems, THs exert well-documented stimulatory or inhibitory effects on cell proliferation; however, the molecular mechanisms by which they control rates of cell cycle progression have not yet been entirely clarified. We previously showed that D3 depletion or TH treatment influences the proliferation and survival of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) cells. Surprisingly, we also found that BCC cells express not only sustained levels of D3 but also robust levels of D2. The aim of the present study was to dissect the contribution of D2 to TH metabolism in the BCC context, and to identify the molecular changes associated with cell proliferation and survival induced by TH and mediated by D2 and D3. We used the CRISPR/Cas9 technology to genetically deplete D2 and D3 in BCC cells and studied the consequences of depletion on cell cycle progression and on cell death. Cell cycle progression was analyzed by fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis of synchronized cells, and the apoptosis rate by annexin V incorporation. Mechanistic investigations revealed that D2 inactivation accelerates cell cycle progression thereby enhancing the proportion of S-phase cells and cyclin D1 expression. Conversely, D3 mutagenesis drastically suppressed cell proliferation and enhanced apoptosis of BCC cells. Furthermore, the basal apoptotic rate was oppositely regulated in D2- and D3-depleted cells. Our results indicate that BCC cells constitute an example in which the TH signal is finely tuned by the concerted expression of opposite-acting deiodinases. The dual regulation of D2 and D3 expression plays a critical role in cell cycle progression and cell death by influencing cyclin D1-mediated

  4. Ten-year survival of patients with oesophageal squamous cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    patients with oesophageal SCC continues to be poor, with 5-year survival rates ranging from 26.2% to ... approach, and the cervico-thoraco-abdominal procedure. The .... abuse, a family history of any cancer, neo-adjuvant treatment, pathological ... Of the entire series, 72 patients (6.9%) underwent neo-adjuvant therapy, and.

  5. Human glomerular epithelial cell proteoglycans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, G.J.; Jenner, L.; Mason, R.M.; Davies, M.

    1990-01-01

    Proteoglycans synthesized by cultures of human glomerular epithelial cells have been isolated and characterized. Three types of heparan sulfate were detected. Heparan sulfate proteoglycan I (HSPG-I; Kav 6B 0.04) was found in the cell layer and medium and accounted for 12% of the total proteoglycans synthesized. HSPG-II (Kav 6B 0.25) accounted for 18% of the proteoglycans and was located in the medium and cell layer. A third population (9% of the proteoglycan population), heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycan (HS-GAG; Kav 6B 0.4-0.8), had properties consistent with single glycosaminoglycan chains or their fragments and was found only in the cell layer. HSPG-I and HSPG-II from the cell layer had hydrophobic properties; they were released from the cell layer by mild trypsin treatment. HS-GAG lacked these properties, consisted of low-molecular-mass heparan sulfate oligosaccharides, and were intracellular. HSPG-I and -II released to the medium lacked hydrophobic properties. The cells also produced three distinct types of chondroitin sulfates. The major species, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan I (CSPG-I) eluted in the excluded volume of a Sepharose CL-6B column, accounted for 30% of the proteoglycans detected, and was found in both the cell layer and medium. Cell layer CSPG-I bound to octyl-Sepharose. It was released from the cell layer by mild trypsin treatment. CSPG-II (Kav 6B 0.1-0.23) accounted for 10% of the total 35S-labeled macromolecules and was found predominantly in the culture medium. A small amount of CS-GAG (Kav 6B 0.25-0.6) is present in the cell extract and like HS-GAG is intracellular. Pulse-chase experiments indicated that HSPG-I and -II and CSPG-I and -II are lost from the cell layer either by direct release into the medium or by internalization where they are metabolized to single glycosaminoglycan chains and subsequently to inorganic sulfate

  6. CEACAM1 induces B-cell survival and is essential for protective antiviral antibody production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairnar, Vishal; Duhan, Vikas; Maney, Sathish Kumar; Honke, Nadine; Shaabani, Namir; Pandyra, Aleksandra A.; Seifert, Marc; Pozdeev, Vitaly; Xu, Haifeng C.; Sharma, Piyush; Baldin, Fabian; Marquardsen, Florian; Merches, Katja; Lang, Elisabeth; Kirschning, Carsten; Westendorf, Astrid M.; Häussinger, Dieter; Lang, Florian; Dittmer, Ulf; Küppers, Ralf; Recher, Mike; Hardt, Cornelia; Scheffrahn, Inka; Beauchemin, Nicole; Göthert, Joachim R.; Singer, Bernhard B.; Lang, Philipp A.; Lang, Karl S.

    2015-01-01

    B cells are essential for antiviral immune defence because they produce neutralizing antibodies, present antigen and maintain the lymphoid architecture. Here we show that intrinsic signalling of CEACAM1 is essential for generating efficient B-cell responses. Although CEACAM1 exerts limited influence on the proliferation of B cells, expression of CEACAM1 induces survival of proliferating B cells via the BTK/Syk/NF-κB-axis. The absence of this signalling cascade in naive Ceacam1−/− mice limits the survival of B cells. During systemic infection with cytopathic vesicular stomatitis virus, Ceacam1−/− mice can barely induce neutralizing antibody responses and die early after infection. We find, therefore, that CEACAM1 is a crucial regulator of B-cell survival, influencing B-cell numbers and protective antiviral antibody responses. PMID:25692415

  7. Cell survival and chromosomal aberrations in CHO-K1 cells irradiated by carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czub, J. [Institute of Physics, Swietokrzyska Academy, ul. Swietokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Banas, D. [Institute of Physics, Swietokrzyska Academy, ul. Swietokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Holycross Cancer Center, ul. Swietokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Blaszczyk, A. [Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Braziewicz, J. [Institute of Physics, Swietokrzyska Academy, ul. Swietokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Holycross Cancer Center, ul. Swietokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Buraczewska, I. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, ul. Dorodna 16, 03-195 Warsaw (Poland); Choinski, J. [Heavy Ion Laboratory, Warsaw University, ul. Pasteura 5A, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Gorak, U. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University, ul. Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Jaskola, M.; Korman, A. [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Lankoff, A.; Lisowska, H. [Institute of Biology, Swietokrzyska Academy, ul. Swietokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Lukaszek, A. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University, ul. Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Main School of Fire Service, ul. Slowackiego 52/54, 01-629 Warsaw (Poland); Szeflinski, Z. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University, ul. Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland)], E-mail: szef@fuw.edu.pl; Wojcik, A. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, ul. Dorodna 16, 03-195 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Biology, Swietokrzyska Academy, ul. Swietokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland)

    2009-03-15

    Chinese hamster ovary CHO-K1 cells were exposed to high LET {sup 12}C-beam (LET: 830 keV/{mu}m) in the dose range of 0-6 Gy and to {sup 60}Co irradiation and the RBE value was obtained. Effects of {sup 12}C-beam exposure on cell survival and chromosomal aberrations were calculated. The chromosomal aberration data were fitted with linear equation. The distribution of aberration in cells was examined with a standard u-test and used to evaluate the data according to Poisson probabilities. The variance to the mean ratio {sigma}{sup 2}/Y and the dispersion index (u) were determined. Overdispersion was significant (p<0.05) when the value of u exceeded 1.96.

  8. HTLV-1 tax stabilizes MCL-1 via TRAF6-dependent K63-linked polyubiquitination to promote cell survival and transformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Bong Choi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 Tax protein hijacks the host ubiquitin machinery to activate IκB kinases (IKKs and NF-κB and promote cell survival; however, the key ubiquitinated factors downstream of Tax involved in cell transformation are unknown. Using mass spectrometry, we undertook an unbiased proteome-wide quantitative survey of cellular proteins modified by ubiquitin in the presence of Tax or a Tax mutant impaired in IKK activation. Tax induced the ubiquitination of 22 cellular proteins, including the anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family member MCL-1, in an IKK-dependent manner. Tax was found to promote the nondegradative lysine 63 (K63-linked polyubiquitination of MCL-1 that was dependent on the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRAF6 and the IKK complex. Tax interacted with and activated TRAF6, and triggered its mitochondrial localization, where it conjugated four carboxyl-terminal lysine residues of MCL-1 with K63-linked polyubiquitin chains, which stabilized and protected MCL-1 from genotoxic stress-induced degradation. TRAF6 and MCL-1 played essential roles in the survival of HTLV-1 transformed cells and the immortalization of primary T cells by HTLV-1. Therefore, K63-linked polyubiquitination represents a novel regulatory mechanism controlling MCL-1 stability that has been usurped by a viral oncogene to precipitate cell survival and transformation.

  9. HTLV-1 Tax Stabilizes MCL-1 via TRAF6-Dependent K63-Linked Polyubiquitination to Promote Cell Survival and Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young Bong; Harhaj, Edward William

    2014-01-01

    The human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax protein hijacks the host ubiquitin machinery to activate IκB kinases (IKKs) and NF-κB and promote cell survival; however, the key ubiquitinated factors downstream of Tax involved in cell transformation are unknown. Using mass spectrometry, we undertook an unbiased proteome-wide quantitative survey of cellular proteins modified by ubiquitin in the presence of Tax or a Tax mutant impaired in IKK activation. Tax induced the ubiquitination of 22 cellular proteins, including the anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family member MCL-1, in an IKK-dependent manner. Tax was found to promote the nondegradative lysine 63 (K63)-linked polyubiquitination of MCL-1 that was dependent on the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRAF6 and the IKK complex. Tax interacted with and activated TRAF6, and triggered its mitochondrial localization, where it conjugated four carboxyl-terminal lysine residues of MCL-1 with K63-linked polyubiquitin chains, which stabilized and protected MCL-1 from genotoxic stress-induced degradation. TRAF6 and MCL-1 played essential roles in the survival of HTLV-1 transformed cells and the immortalization of primary T cells by HTLV-1. Therefore, K63-linked polyubiquitination represents a novel regulatory mechanism controlling MCL-1 stability that has been usurped by a viral oncogene to precipitate cell survival and transformation. PMID:25340740

  10. Gut microbiota modulate T cell trafficking into human colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremonesi, Eleonora; Governa, Valeria; Garzon, Jesus Francisco Glaus; Mele, Valentina; Amicarella, Francesca; Muraro, Manuele Giuseppe; Trella, Emanuele; Galati-Fournier, Virginie; Oertli, Daniel; Däster, Silvio Raffael; Droeser, Raoul A; Weixler, Benjamin; Bolli, Martin; Rosso, Raffaele; Nitsche, Ulrich; Khanna, Nina; Egli, Adrian; Keck, Simone; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Terracciano, Luigi M; Zajac, Paul; Spagnoli, Giulio Cesare; Eppenberger-Castori, Serenella; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; Borsig, Lubor; Iezzi, Giandomenica

    2018-02-06

    Tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) favour survival in human colorectal cancer (CRC). Chemotactic factors underlying their recruitment remain undefined. We investigated chemokines attracting T cells into human CRCs, their cellular sources and microenvironmental triggers. Expression of genes encoding immune cell markers, chemokines and bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (16SrRNA) was assessed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR in fresh CRC samples and corresponding tumour-free tissues. Chemokine receptor expression on TILs was evaluated by flow cytometry on cell suspensions from digested tissues. Chemokine production by CRC cells was evaluated in vitro and in vivo, on generation of intraperitoneal or intracecal tumour xenografts in immune-deficient mice. T cell trafficking was assessed on adoptive transfer of human TILs into tumour-bearing mice. Gut flora composition was analysed by 16SrRNA sequencing. CRC infiltration by distinct T cell subsets was associated with defined chemokine gene signatures, including CCL5, CXCL9 and CXCL10 for cytotoxic T lymphocytes and T-helper (Th)1 cells; CCL17, CCL22 and CXCL12 for Th1 and regulatory T cells; CXCL13 for follicular Th cells; and CCL20 and CCL17 for interleukin (IL)-17-producing Th cells. These chemokines were expressed by tumour cells on exposure to gut bacteria in vitro and in vivo. Their expression was significantly higher in intracecal than in intraperitoneal xenografts and was dramatically reduced by antibiotic treatment of tumour-bearing mice. In clinical samples, abundance of defined bacteria correlated with high chemokine expression, enhanced T cell infiltration and improved survival. Gut microbiota stimulate chemokine production by CRC cells, thus favouring recruitment of beneficial T cells into tumour tissues. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Anti-inflammatory heat shock protein 70 genes are positively associated with human survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Ripudaman; Kølvraa, Steen; Bross, Peter Gerd

    2010-01-01

    A positive relationship between stress tolerance and longevity has been observed in several model systems. That the same correlation is applicable in humans and that it may be open to experimental manipulation for extending human lifespan requires studies on association of stress genes with longe......A positive relationship between stress tolerance and longevity has been observed in several model systems. That the same correlation is applicable in humans and that it may be open to experimental manipulation for extending human lifespan requires studies on association of stress genes...... the opportunity to perform survival analysis on these subjects. Haplotype relative risk, and genotype relative risk were calculated to measure the effects of haplotypes and genotypes on human survival in a sex-specific manner. A significant association of HSPA1A-AA (RR=3.864; p=0.016) and HSPA1B-AA (RR=2.764; p=0...

  12. Staphylococcus aureus MnhF mediates cholate efflux and facilitates survival under human colonic conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Sannasiddappa, Thippeswamy; Hood, Graham; Hanson, Kevan; Costabile, Adele; Gibson, Glenn; Clarke, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to the innate defenses of the intestine is crucial for the survival and carriage of Staphylococcus aureus, a common colonizer of the human gut. Bile salts produced by the liver and secreted into the intestines are one such group of molecules with potent antimicrobial activity. The mechanisms by which S. aureus is able to resist such defenses in order to colonize and survive in the human gut are unknown. Here we show that mnhF confers resistance to bile salts, which can be abrogated...

  13. Thirst for Power: Energy, Water and Human Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, M.

    2016-12-01

    Energy, food and water are precious resources, and they are interconnected. The energy sector uses a lot of water, the food sector uses a lot of energy and water, the water sector uses a lot of energy, and as a nation we are contemplating a biofuels policy that uses food for energy. The thermoelectric power sector alone is the largest user of water in the U.S., withdrawing 200 billion gallons daily for powerplant cooling. Conversely, the water sector is responsible for over twelve percent of national energy consumption for moving, pumping, treating, and heating water. The food system uses over ten percent of national energy consumption. This interdependence means that droughts can cause energy shortages, and power outages can bring the water system to a halt, while energy and water challenges pose constraints to our food system. It also means that water efficiency is a pathway to energy efficiency and vice versa. This talk will give a big-picture overview of global food, energy and water trends to describe how they interact, what conflicts are looming, and how they can work together. This talk will include the vulnerabilities and cross-cutting solutions such as efficient markets and smart technologies that embed more information about resource management. It will include discussion of how population growth, economic growth, climate change, and short-sighted policies are likely to make things worse. Yet, more integrated planning with long-term sustainability in mind along with cultural shifts, advanced technologies, and better design can avert such a daunting future. Combining anecdotes and personal stories with insights into the latest science of energy and water, this talk will identify a hopeful path toward wise, long-range water-energy decisions and a more reliable and abundant future for humanity.

  14. IL-15 expression on RA synovial fibroblasts promotes B cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Benito-Miguel

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to examine the role of RA Synovial Fibroblast (RASFib IL-15 expression on B cell survival. METHODS: Magnetically sorted peripheral blood memory B cells from 15 healthy subjects were cocultured with RASFib. RESULTS: RASFib constitutively expressed membrane IL-15. Survival of isolated B cells cultured for 6 days, below 5%, was extended in coculture with RASFib to 52+/-8% (p<0.001. IL-15 neutralizing agents but not isotype controls, reduced this rate to 31+/-6% (p<0.05. Interestingly, rhIL-15 had no effect on isolated B cells but significantly increased their survival in coculture with RASFib. In parallel, B cell IL-15R chains were upregulated in cocultures. BAFF and VCAM-1, that are expressed on RASFib, were tested as potential candidates involved in upregulating B cell IL-15R. Culture of B cells in the presence of rhBAFF or rhVCAM-1 resulted in significantly increased survival, together with upregulation of all three IL-15R chains; in parallel, rhIL-15 potentiated the anti-apoptotic effect of BAFF and VCAM-1. Both BAFF and VCAM-1 neutralizing agents downmodulated the effect of RASFib on B cell survival and IL-15R expression. In parallel, rhIL-15 had a lower effect on the survival of B cells cocultured with RASFib in the presence of BAFF or VCAM-1 neutralizing agents. Peripheral blood B cells from 15 early RA patients demonstrated an upregulated IL-15R and increased survival in cocultures. CONCLUSION: IL-15 expression on RASFib significantly contributes to the anti-apoptotic effect of RASFib on B cells. IL-15 action is facilitated by BAFF and VCAM-1 expressed on RASFib, through an upregulation of IL-15R chains.

  15. Cell cycle variation in x-ray survival for cells from spheroids measured by volume cell sorting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freyer, J.P.; Wilder, M.E.; Raju, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    Considerable work has been done studying the variation in cell survival as a function of cell cycle position for monolayers or single cells exposed to radiation. Little is known about the effects of multicellular growth on the relative radiation sensitivity of cells in different cell cycle stages. The authors have developed a new technique for measuring the response of cells, using volume cell sorting, which is rapid, non-toxic, and does not require cell synchronization. By combining this technique with selective spheroid dissociation,they have measured the age response of cells located at various depths in EMT6 and Colon 26 spheroids. Although cells in the inner region had mostly G1-phase DNA contents, 15-20% had S- and G2-phase DNA contents. Analysis of these cells using BrdU labeling and flow cytometric analysis with a monoclonal antibody to BrdU indicated that the inner region cells were not synthesizing DNA. Thus, the authors were able to measure the radiation response of cells arrested in G1, S and G2 cell cycle phases. Comparison of inner and outer spheroid regions, and monolayer cultures, indicates that it is improper to extrapolate age response data in standard culture conditions to the situation in spheroids

  16. DNA repair in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regan, J.D.; Carrier, W.L.; Kusano, I.; Furuno-Fukushi, I.; Dunn, W.C. Jr.; Francis, A.A.; Lee, W.H.

    1982-01-01

    Our primary objective is to elucidate the molecular events in human cells when cellular macromolecules such as DNA are damaged by radiation or chemical agents. We study and characterize (i) the sequence of DNA repair events, (ii) the various modalities of repair, (iii) the genetic inhibition of repair due to mutation, (iv) the physiological inhibition of repair due to mutation, (v) the physiological inhibition of repair due to biochemical inhibitors, and (vi) the genetic basis of repair. Our ultimate goals are to (i) isolate and analyze the repair component of the mutagenic and/or carcinogenic event in human cells, and (ii) elucidate the magnitude and significance of this repair component as it impinges on the practical problems of human irradiation or exposure to actual or potential chemical mutagens and carcinogens. The significance of these studies lies in (i) the ubiquitousness of repair (most organisms, including man, have several complex repair systems), (ii) the belief that mutagenic and carcinogenic events may arise only from residual (nonrepaired) lesions or that error-prone repair systems may be the major induction mechanisms of the mutagenic or carcinogenic event, and (iii) the clear association of repair defects and highly carcinogenic disease states in man [xeroderma pigmentosum (XP)

  17. Regularity of survival of the radiation cell progeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkovskaya, I.B.

    1978-01-01

    Considered are lethal events, occurring in irradiated cell posterity. The mechanisms promoting increased dying off in irradiated cell posterity, are not clear. The mechanism of stable inherited increase of cellular mortality level is not connected with mutations absolutely

  18. Survival of the fittest?--survival of stored red blood cells after transfusion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luten, M.; Roerdinkholder-Stoelwinder, B.; Bost, H.J.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.

    2004-01-01

    During the last 90 years many developments have taken place in the world of blood transfusion. Several anticoagulants and storage solutions have been developed. Also the blood processing has undergone many changes. At the moment, in The Netherlands, red blood cell (RBC) concentrates (prepared from a

  19. Reducing macrophages to improve bone marrow stromal cell survival in the contused spinal cord.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritfeld, G.J.; Nandoe Tewarie, R.D.S.; Rahiem, S.T.; Hurtado, A.; Roos, R.A.; Grotenhuis, A.; Oudega, M.

    2010-01-01

    We tested whether reducing macrophage infiltration would improve the survival of allogeneic bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) transplanted in the contused adult rat thoracic spinal cord. Treatment with cyclosporine, minocycline, or methylprednisolone all resulted in a significant decrease in

  20. Survival rate of eukaryotic cells following electrophoretic nanoinjection

    OpenAIRE

    Simonis, Matthias; H?bner, Wolfgang; Wilking, Alice; Huser, Thomas; Hennig, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Insertion of foreign molecules such as functionalized fluorescent probes, antibodies, or plasmid DNA to living cells requires overcoming the plasma membrane barrier without harming the cell during the staining process. Many techniques such as electroporation, lipofection or microinjection have been developed to overcome the cellular plasma membrane, but they all result in reduced cell viability. A novel approach is the injection of cells with a nanopipette and using electrophoretic forces for...

  1. Cyclooxygenase-2: A Role in Cancer Stem Cell Survival and Repopulation of Cancer Cells during Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Y. Pang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 is an inducible form of the enzyme that catalyses the synthesis of prostanoids, including prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, a major mediator of inflammation and angiogenesis. COX-2 is overexpressed in cancer cells and is associated with progressive tumour growth, as well as resistance of cancer cells to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. These therapies are often delivered in multiple doses, which are spaced out to allow the recovery of normal tissues between treatments. However, surviving cancer cells also proliferate during treatment intervals, leading to repopulation of the tumour and limiting the effectiveness of the treatment. Tumour cell repopulation is a major cause of treatment failure. The central dogma is that conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy selects resistant cancer cells that are able to reinitiate tumour growth. However, there is compelling evidence of an active proliferative response, driven by increased COX-2 expression and downstream PGE2 release, which contribute to the repopulation of tumours and poor patient outcome. In this review, we will examine the evidence for a role of COX-2 in cancer stem cell biology and as a mediator of tumour repopulation that can be molecularly targeted to overcome resistance to therapy.

  2. Early death, late death and repair factor in three human tumour cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courdi, A.; Gioanni, J.; Mari, D.; Chauvel, P.

    1997-01-01

    The in vivo colony method used to generate survival curves following exposure to ionizing irradiation allows to score large clones, representing surviving cells, and small colonies, representing late reproductive death. By subtraction, early-dying cells can be estimated. In the three human tumour cell lines examined, we have observed that early cell death is a major mode of action of irradiation. The contribution of early cell death to total mortality increases as the dose increases. Moreover, repair due to dose-splitting and delayed plating in densely-inhibited cells is not observed in early-dying cells. (authors)

  3. Flow cytometric determination of radiation-induced chromosome damage and its correlation with cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welleweerd, J.; Wilder, M.E.; Carpenter, S.G.; Raju, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    Chinese hamster M3-1 cells were irradiated with several doses of x rays or α particles from 238 Pu. Propidium iodide-stained chromosome suspensions were prepared at different times after irradiation; cells were also assayed for survival. The DNA histograms of these chromosomes showed increased background counts with increased doses of radiation. This increase in background was cell-cycle dependent and was correlated with cell survival. The correlation between radiation-induced chromosome damage and cell survival was the same for X rays and α particles. Data are presented which indicate that flow cytometric analysis of chromosomes of irradiated cell populations can be a useful adjunct to classical cytogenic analysis of irradiation-induced chromosomal damage by virtue of its ability to express and measure chromosomal damage not seen by classical cytogenic methods

  4. Protein kinase C-delta inactivation inhibits the proliferation and survival of cancer stem cells in culture and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhihong; Forman, Lora W; Williams, Robert M; Faller, Douglas V

    2014-01-01

    A subpopulation of tumor cells with distinct stem-like properties (cancer stem-like cells, CSCs) may be responsible for tumor initiation, invasive growth, and possibly dissemination to distant organ sites. CSCs exhibit a spectrum of biological, biochemical, and molecular features that are consistent with a stem-like phenotype, including growth as non-adherent spheres (clonogenic potential), ability to form a new tumor in xenograft assays, unlimited self-renewal, and the capacity for multipotency and lineage-specific differentiation. PKCδ is a novel class serine/threonine kinase of the PKC family, and functions in a number of cellular activities including cell proliferation, survival or apoptosis. PKCδ has previously been validated as a synthetic lethal target in cancer cells of multiple types with aberrant activation of Ras signaling, using both genetic (shRNA and dominant-negative PKCδ mutants) and small molecule inhibitors. In contrast, PKCδ is not required for the proliferation or survival of normal cells, suggesting the potential tumor-specificity of a PKCδ-targeted approach. shRNA knockdown was used validate PKCδ as a target in primary cancer stem cell lines and stem-like cells derived from human tumor cell lines, including breast, pancreatic, prostate and melanoma tumor cells. Novel and potent small molecule PKCδ inhibitors were employed in assays monitoring apoptosis, proliferation and clonogenic capacity of these cancer stem-like populations. Significant differences among data sets were determined using two-tailed Student’s t tests or ANOVA. We demonstrate that CSC-like populations derived from multiple types of human primary tumors, from human cancer cell lines, and from transformed human cells, require PKCδ activity and are susceptible to agents which deplete PKCδ protein or activity. Inhibition of PKCδ by specific genetic strategies (shRNA) or by novel small molecule inhibitors is growth inhibitory and cytotoxic to multiple types of human

  5. Mathematical simulation of influence of irradiated cell reparative system saturation on cell survival. Communication 1. Simulation of survival curves in prokaryotes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knyigavko, V.G.; Meshcheryakova, O.P.; Radzyishevs'ka, Je.B.

    2004-01-01

    Mathematical models of the processes of forming survival curves for prokaryotes which are based on the idea about the possibility of saturation of radiation lesion reparation systems of DNA of the irradiated cells at the dose increase were worked out. For the simplest of the discussed models the authors discuss the question about the methods of evaluation of the model parameters

  6. Targeted inhibition of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase impairs cell proliferation, survival, and invasion in colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang F

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Fei Yang,1,* Jun-Yi Gao,2,* Hua Chen,1 Zhen-Hua Du,1 Xue-Qun Zhang,3 Wei Gao4 1Department of Pathology, Jinan Central Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, 2Department of Clinical Medicine, Weifang Medical College, Weifang, 3Graduate School, Taishan Medical University, Xintai, 4Department of Oncology, Jinan Central Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Colon cancer is the third most common cancer in the world, and its metastasis and drug resistance are challenging for its effective treatment. The PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of colon cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the targeting of PI3K in colon cancer cells HT-29 and HCT-116 in vitro. Methods: In HT-29 and HCT-116 cells, BEZ235, a dual inhibitor of PI3K/mTOR, and shRNAtarget to PI3KCA were used to inhibit PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. The inhibition efficiency of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway was detected by RT-PCR and Western blot. Cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and apoptosis were evaluated by Cell Counting Kit-8, Transwell, and flow cytometry assays. The expression of apoptosis-related proteins (cleavage caspase 3, Bcl-2, Bax, and Bim were also detected. Results: We found that in HT-29 and HCT-116 cells, the treatment of BEZ235 (1 µM and PI3KCA knockdown inhibited the activation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway and significantly suppressed cell proliferation, migration, and invasion of HT-29 and HCT-116 cells. In addition, we confirmed that knockdown of BEZ235 and PI3KCA induced cell apoptosis through the upregulated levels of cleavage caspase 3 and Bax and downregulated expression of Bcl-2 and Bim. Conclusion: Our results indicated that targeted inhibition of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway impaired cell proliferation, survival, and invasion in human colon cancer. Keywords: human colon cancer, PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway, BEZ235, PI3KCA knockdown

  7. Relation of intracellular cyclic AMP to the shape of mammalian cell survival curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, S.

    1975-01-01

    Results of experiments with V79 cells growing in tissue culture indicate that the reproductive survival of cells following irradiation is influenced by the level of intracellular 3', 5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP) at the time of irradiation. Cells containing high levels of cyclic AMP induced by treatments with drugs show a characteristic survival curve in which the extent of the shoulder is increased so that the survival after low doses is enhanced. The exponential slope or D 0 , however, is decreased so that at high doses the survival of cells containing high levels of cyclic AMP may be less than that of controls. Naturally occurring changes in radiosensitivity such as those observed as cells pass through the division cycle, may also be related to parallel changes in cyclic AMP concentration occurring during the cycle. Injection of mice with compounds producing elevated cyclic AMP prior to whole-body irradiation increases survival at seven days post-irradiation. The shape of the survival curve for intestinal stem cells in these mice differs from that of the control in having an increased extrapolation number; no change in D 0 is observed in this in vivo situation. (author)

  8. Ethacrynic acid: a novel radiation enhancer in human carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khil, Mark S.; Sang, Hie Kim; Pinto, John T.; Jae, Ho Kim

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Because agents that interfere with thiol metabolism and glutathione S-transferase (GST) functions have been shown to enhance antitumor effects of alkylating agents in vitro and in vivo, the present study was conceived on the basis that an inhibitor of GST would enhance the radiation response of some selected human carcinoma cells. Ethacrynic acid (EA) was chosen for the study because it is an effective inhibitor of GST and is a well known diuretic in humans. Methods and Materials: Experiments were carried out with well-established human tumor cells in culture growing in Eagle's minimum essential medium (MEM) supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum (FCS). Cell lines used were MCF-7, MCF-7 adriamycin resistant (AR) cells (breast carcinoma), HT-29 cells (colon carcinoma), DU-145 cells (prostate carcinoma), and U-373 cells (malignant glioma). Cell survival following the exposure of cells to drug alone, radiation alone, and a combined treatment was assayed by determining the colony-forming ability of single plated cells in culture to obtain dose-survival curves. The drug enhancement ratio was correlated with levels of GST. Results: The cytotoxicity of EA was most pronounced in MCF-7, U-373, and DU-145 cells compared to MCF-7 AR and HT-29 cells. The levels of GST activity were found to be lower in those EA-sensitive cells. A significant radiation enhancement was obtained with EA-sensitive cells exposed to nontoxic concentrations of the drug immediately before or after irradiation. The sensitizer enhancement ratio (SER) of MCF-7 cells was 1.55 with EA (20 μg/ml), while the SER of MCF-7 AR was less than 1.1. Based on five different human tumor cells, a clear inverse relationship was demonstrated between the magnitude of SER and GST levels of tumor cells prior to the combined treatment. Conclusion: The present results suggest that EA, which acts as both a reversible and irreversible inhibitor of GST activity, could significantly enhance the radiation response of

  9. Collagen Promotes Higher Adhesion, Survival and Proliferation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinnapaka Somaiah

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC can differentiate into several cell types and are desirable candidates for cell therapy and tissue engineering. However, due to poor cell survival, proliferation and differentiation in the patient, the therapy outcomes have not been satisfactory. Although several studies have been done to understand the conditions that promote proliferation, differentiation and migration of MSC in vitro and in vivo, still there is no clear understanding on the effect of non-cellular bio molecules. Of the many factors that influence the cell behavior, the immediate cell microenvironment plays a major role. In this context, we studied the effect of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins in controlling cell survival, proliferation, migration and directed MSC differentiation. We found that collagen promoted cell proliferation, cell survival under stress and promoted high cell adhesion to the cell culture surface. Increased osteogenic differentiation accompanied by high active RHOA (Ras homology gene family member A levels was exhibited by MSC cultured on collagen. In conclusion, our study shows that collagen will be a suitable matrix for large scale production of MSC with high survival rate and to obtain high osteogenic differentiation for therapy.

  10. Progression-free survival, post-progression survival, and tumor response as surrogate markers for overall survival in patients with extensive small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisao Imai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The effects of first-line chemotherapy on overall survival (OS might be confounded by subsequent therapies in patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC. We examined whether progression-free survival (PFS, post-progression survival (PPS, and tumor response could be valid surrogate endpoints for OS after first-line chemotherapies for patients with extensive SCLC using individual-level data. Methods: Between September 2002 and November 2012, we analyzed 49 cases of patients with extensive SCLC who were treated with cisplatin and irinotecan as first-line chemotherapy. The relationships of PFS, PPS, and tumor response with OS were analyzed at the individual level. Results: Spearman rank correlation analysis and linear regression analysis showed that PPS was strongly correlated with OS (r = 0.97, p < 0.05, R 2 = 0.94, PFS was moderately correlated with OS (r = 0.58, p < 0.05, R 2 = 0.24, and tumor shrinkage was weakly correlated with OS (r = 0.37, p < 0.05, R 2 = 0.13. The best response to second-line treatment, and the number of regimens employed after progression beyond first-line chemotherapy were both significantly associated with PPS ( p ≤ 0.05. Conclusion: PPS is a potential surrogate for OS in patients with extensive SCLC. Our findings also suggest that subsequent treatment after disease progression following first-line chemotherapy may greatly influence OS.

  11. The development of human mast cells. An historical reappraisal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribatti, Domenico, E-mail: domenico.ribatti@uniba.it

    2016-03-15

    The understanding of mast cell (MC) differentiation is derived mainly from in vitro studies of different stages of stem and progenitor cells. The hematopoietic lineage development of human MCs is unique compared to other myeloid-derived cells. Human MCs originate from CD34{sup +}/CD117{sup +}/CD13{sup +}multipotent hematopoietic progenitors, which undergo transendothelial recruitment into peripheral tissues, where they complete differentiation. Stem cell factor (SCF) is a major chemotactic factor for MCs and their progenitors. SCF also elicits cell-cell and cell-substratum adhesion, facilitates the proliferation, and sustains the survival, differentiation, and maturation, of MCs. Because MC maturation is influenced by local microenvironmental factors, different MC phenotypes can develop in different tissues and organs. - Highlights: • Human mast cells originate from CD34/CD117/CD13 positive multipotent hematopoietic progenitors. • Stem cell factor is a major chemotactic factor for mast cells and their progenitors. • Different mast cell phenotypes can develop in different tissues and organs.

  12. The human airway epithelial basal cell transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil R Hackett

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The human airway epithelium consists of 4 major cell types: ciliated, secretory, columnar and basal cells. During natural turnover and in response to injury, the airway basal cells function as stem/progenitor cells for the other airway cell types. The objective of this study is to better understand human airway epithelial basal cell biology by defining the gene expression signature of this cell population.Bronchial brushing was used to obtain airway epithelium from healthy nonsmokers. Microarrays were used to assess the transcriptome of basal cells purified from the airway epithelium in comparison to the transcriptome of the differentiated airway epithelium. This analysis identified the "human airway basal cell signature" as 1,161 unique genes with >5-fold higher expression level in basal cells compared to differentiated epithelium. The basal cell signature was suppressed when the basal cells differentiated into a ciliated airway epithelium in vitro. The basal cell signature displayed overlap with genes expressed in basal-like cells from other human tissues and with that of murine airway basal cells. Consistent with self-modulation as well as signaling to other airway cell types, the human airway basal cell signature was characterized by genes encoding extracellular matrix components, growth factors and growth factor receptors, including genes related to the EGF and VEGF pathways. Interestingly, while the basal cell signature overlaps that of basal-like cells of other organs, the human airway basal cell signature has features not previously associated with this cell type, including a unique pattern of genes encoding extracellular matrix components, G protein-coupled receptors, neuroactive ligands and receptors, and ion channels.The human airway epithelial basal cell signature identified in the present study provides novel insights into the molecular phenotype and biology of the stem/progenitor cells of the human airway epithelium.

  13. Effect of oxygen on formation of micronuclei and binucleated cells and cell survival in γ-irradiated 3T3 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Peng; Zheng Xiulong

    1991-01-01

    Formation of micronuclei and binucleate cells and their relationships with cell survival were studied in the aerobically- and anaerobically-irradiated 3T3 cells. The results showed taht frequency of micronuclei, percentage of micronucleus cells and percentage of binucleate cells increased linearly with the radiation dose in certain range. Oxygen enhancement ratios (OER) of micronucleus frequency, percentage of micronucleus cells, percentage of binucleate cells and cell survival were 2.02, 1.96, 1.87 and 1.83 respectively. The percentage of micronucleus cells or the percentage of micronucleus cells plus binucleate cells correlated negatively well with cell survival. The mechanism of oxygen effect in the radiation response of 3T3 cells and the significance of formation of micronuclei and binucleate cells were discussed

  14. Igf-I regulates pheochromocytoma cell proliferation and survival in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, María Celia; Venara, Marcela; Nowicki, Susana; Chemes, Héctor E; Barontini, Marta; Pennisi, Patricia A

    2012-08-01

    IGFs are involved in malignant transformation and growth of several tissues, including the adrenal medulla. The present study was designed to evaluate the impact of IGF-I on pheochromocytoma development. We used a murine pheochromocytoma (MPC) cell line (MPC4/30) and an animal model with a reduction of 75% in circulating IGF-I levels [liver-IGF-I-deficient (LID) mice] to perform studies in vitro and in vivo. We found that, in culture, IGF-I stimulation increases proliferation, migration, and anchorage-independent growth, whereas it inhibits apoptosis of MPC cells. When injected to control and to LID mice, MPC cells grow and form tumors with features of pheochromocytoma. Six weeks after cell inoculation, all control mice developed sc tumors. In contrast, in 73% of LID mice, tumor development was delayed to 7-12 wk, and the remaining 27% did not develop tumors up to 12 wk after inoculation. LID mice harboring MPC cells and treated with recombinant human IGF-I (LID+) developed tumors as controls. Tumors developed in control, LID, and LID+ mice had similar histology and were similarly positive for IGF-I receptor expression. The apoptotic index was higher in tumors from LID mice compared with those from control mice, whereas vascular density was decreased. In summary, our work demonstrates that IGF-I has a critical role in maintaining tumor phenotype and survival of already transformed pheochromocytoma cells and is required for the initial establishment of these tumors, providing encouragement to carry on research studies to address the IGF-I/IGF-I receptor system as a target of therapeutic strategies for pheochromocytoma treatment in the future.

  15. Chimeric animal models in human stem cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Joel C; Boulland, Jean-Luc; Halasi, Gabor; Kasumacic, Nedim

    2009-01-01

    The clinical use of stem cells for regenerative medicine is critically dependent on preclinical studies in animal models. In this review we examine some of the key issues and challenges in the use of animal models to study human stem cell biology-experimental standardization, body size, immunological barriers, cell survival factors, fusion of host and donor cells, and in vivo imaging and tracking. We focus particular attention on the various imaging modalities that can be used to track cells in living animals, comparing their strengths and weaknesses and describing technical developments that are likely to lead to new opportunities for the dynamic assessment of stem cell behavior in vivo. We then provide an overview of some of the most commonly used animal models, their advantages and disadvantages, and examples of their use for xenotypic transplantation of human stem cells, with separate reviews of models involving rodents, ungulates, nonhuman primates, and the chicken embryo. As the use of human somatic, embryonic, and induced pluripotent stem cells increases, so too will the range of applications for these animal models. It is likely that increasingly sophisticated uses of human/animal chimeric models will be developed through advances in genetic manipulation, cell delivery, and in vivo imaging.

  16. Bisphenol a promotes cell survival following oxidative DNA damage in mouse fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie R Gassman

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA is a biologically active industrial chemical used in production of consumer products. BPA has become a target of intense public scrutiny following concerns about its association with human diseases such as obesity, diabetes, reproductive disorders, and cancer. Recent studies link BPA with the generation of reactive oxygen species, and base excision repair (BER is responsible for removing oxidatively induced DNA lesions. Yet, the relationship between BPA and BER has yet to be examined. Further, the ubiquitous nature of BPA allows continuous exposure of the human genome concurrent with the normal endogenous and exogenous insults to the genome, and this co-exposure may impact the DNA damage response and repair. To determine the effect of BPA exposure on base excision repair of oxidatively induced DNA damage, cells compromised in double-strand break repair were treated with BPA alone or co-exposed with either potassium bromate (KBrO3 or laser irradiation as oxidative damaging agents. In experiments with KBrO3, co-treatment with BPA partially reversed the KBrO3-induced cytotoxicity observed in these cells, and this was coincident with an increase in guanine base lesions in genomic DNA. The improvement in cell survival and the increase in oxidatively induced DNA base lesions were reminiscent of previous results with alkyl adenine DNA glycosylase-deficient cells, suggesting that BPA may prevent initiation of repair of oxidized base lesions. With laser irradiation-induced DNA damage, treatment with BPA suppressed DNA repair as revealed by several indicators. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that BPA can induce a suppression of oxidized base lesion DNA repair by the base excision repair pathway.

  17. Oxidative stress: a key regulator of leiomyoma cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Nicole M; Abusamaan, Mohammed S; Memaj, Ira; Saed, Mohammed G; Al-Hendy, Ayman; Diamond, Michael P; Saed, Ghassan M

    2017-06-01

    To determine the effects of attenuating oxidative stress with the use of dichloroacetate (DCA) on the expression of key redox enzymes myeloperoxidase (MPO) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) as well as on apoptosis. Prospective experimental study. University medical center. Cells established from myometrium and uterine fibroid from the same patients. Cells were exposed to normal (20% O 2 ) or hypoxic (2% O 2 ) conditions for 24 hours with or without DCA (20 μg/mL), a metabolic modulator that shifts anaerobic to aerobic metabolism. Nitrate/nitrite (iNOS activity indicator), iNOS, Bcl-2/Bax ratio, MPO, and caspase-3 activities and levels were determined by means of Greiss assay, real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and ELISA. Data were analyzed with the use of SPSS by means of one-way analysis of variance with Tukey post hoc analysis and independent t tests. MPO, iNOS, and nitrate/nitrite expression were higher in leiomyoma than in myometrial cells, and they were further enhanced by hypoxia in myometrial cells. Treatment with the use of DCA decreased MPO, iNOS, and nitrate/nitrite levels and negated the effect of hypoxia in both types of cells. Leiomyoma cells showed less apoptosis, as indicated by both caspase-3 activity and the Bcl-2/Bax ratio, than myometrial cells. Hypoxia further decreased apoptosis in myometrial cells with no further effect on leiomyoma cells. Treatment with DCA resulted in increased apoptosis in both types of cells, even in the presence of hypoxia. Shifting anaerobic to aerobic metabolism with the use of DCA resulted in an increase in apoptosis in leiomyoma cells and protected myometrial cells from the acquisition of the leiomyoma-like phenotype. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Survival, Durable Response, and Long-Term Safety in Patients With Previously Treated Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma Receiving Nivolumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, David F; Drake, Charles G; Sznol, Mario; Choueiri, Toni K; Powderly, John D; Smith, David C; Brahmer, Julie R; Carvajal, Richard D; Hammers, Hans J; Puzanov, Igor; Hodi, F Stephen; Kluger, Harriet M; Topalian, Suzanne L; Pardoll, Drew M; Wigginton, Jon M; Kollia, Georgia D; Gupta, Ashok; McDonald, Dan; Sankar, Vindira; Sosman, Jeffrey A; Atkins, Michael B

    2015-06-20

    Blockade of the programmed death-1 inhibitory cell-surface molecule on immune cells using the fully human immunoglobulin G4 antibody nivolumab mediates tumor regression in a portion of patients with advanced treatment-refractory solid tumors. We report clinical activity, survival, and long-term safety in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) treated with nivolumab in a phase I study with expansion cohorts. A total of 34 patients with previously treated advanced RCC, enrolled between 2008 and 2012, received intravenous nivolumab (1 or 10 mg/kg) in an outpatient setting once every two weeks for up to 96 weeks and were observed for survival and duration of response after treatment discontinuation. Ten patients (29%) achieved objective responses (according to RECIST [version 1.0]), with median response duration of 12.9 months; nine additional patients (27%) demonstrated stable disease lasting > 24 weeks. Three of five patients who stopped treatment while in response continued to respond for ≥ 45 weeks. Median overall survival in all patients (71% with two to five prior systemic therapies) was 22.4 months; 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates were 71%, 48%, and 44%, respectively. Grade 3 to 4 treatment-related adverse events occurred in 18% of patients; all were reversible. Patients with advanced treatment-refractory RCC treated with nivolumab demonstrated durable responses that in some responders persisted after drug discontinuation. Overall survival is encouraging, and toxicities were generally manageable. Ongoing randomized clinical trials will further assess the impact of nivolumab on overall