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Sample records for human cell chips

  1. Human iPSC-Derived Endothelial Cells and Microengineered Organ-Chip Enhance Neuronal Development

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    Samuel Sances

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Human stem cell-derived models of development and neurodegenerative diseases are challenged by cellular immaturity in vitro. Microengineered organ-on-chip (or Organ-Chip systems are designed to emulate microvolume cytoarchitecture and enable co-culture of distinct cell types. Brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs share common signaling pathways with neurons early in development, but their contribution to human neuronal maturation is largely unknown. To study this interaction and influence of microculture, we derived both spinal motor neurons and BMECs from human induced pluripotent stem cells and observed increased calcium transient function and Chip-specific gene expression in Organ-Chips compared with 96-well plates. Seeding BMECs in the Organ-Chip led to vascular-neural interaction and specific gene activation that further enhanced neuronal function and in vivo-like signatures. The results show that the vascular system has specific maturation effects on spinal cord neural tissue, and the use of Organ-Chips can move stem cell models closer to an in vivo condition. : Sances et al. combine Organ-Chip technology with human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived spinal motor neurons to study the maturation effects of Organ-Chip culture. By including microvascular cells also derived from the same patient line, the authors show enhancement of neuronal function, reproduction of vascular-neuron pathways, and specific gene activation that resembles in vivo spinal cord development. Keywords: organ-on-chip, spinal cord, iPSC, disease modeling, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, microphysiological system, brain microvascular endothelial cells, spinal motor neurons, vasculature, microfluidic device

  2. On-chip immunoelectrophoresis of extracellular vesicles released from human breast cancer cells.

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    Takanori Akagi

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs including exosomes and microvesicles have attracted considerable attention in the fields of cell biology and medicine. For a better understanding of EVs and further exploration of their applications, the development of analytical methods for biological nanovesicles has been required. In particular, considering the heterogeneity of EVs, methods capable of measuring individual vesicles are desired. Here, we report that on-chip immunoelectrophoresis can provide a useful method for the differential protein expression profiling of individual EVs. Electrophoresis experiments were performed on EVs collected from the culture supernatant of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells using a measurement platform comprising a microcapillary electrophoresis chip and a laser dark-field microimaging system. The zeta potential distribution of EVs that reacted with an anti-human CD63 (exosome and microvesicle marker antibody showed a marked positive shift as compared with that for the normal immunoglobulin G (IgG isotype control. Thus, on-chip immunoelectrophoresis could sensitively detect the over-expression of CD63 glycoproteins on EVs. Moreover, to explore the applicability of on-chip immunoelectrophoresis to cancer diagnosis, EVs collected from the blood of a mouse tumor model were analyzed by this method. By comparing the zeta potential distributions of EVs after their immunochemical reaction with normal IgG, and the anti-human CD63 and anti-human CD44 (cancer stem cell marker antibodies, EVs of tumor origin circulating in blood were differentially detected in the real sample. The result indicates that the present method is potentially applicable to liquid biopsy, a promising approach to the low-invasive diagnosis of cancer.

  3. "NeuroStem Chip": a novel highly specialized tool to study neural differentiation pathways in human stem cells

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    Li Jia-Yi

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human stem cells are viewed as a possible source of neurons for a cell-based therapy of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease. Several protocols that generate different types of neurons from human stem cells (hSCs have been developed. Nevertheless, the cellular mechanisms that underlie the development of neurons in vitro as they are subjected to the specific differentiation protocols are often poorly understood. Results We have designed a focused DNA (oligonucleotide-based large-scale microarray platform (named "NeuroStem Chip" and used it to study gene expression patterns in hSCs as they differentiate into neurons. We have selected genes that are relevant to cells (i being stem cells, (ii becoming neurons, and (iii being neurons. The NeuroStem Chip has over 1,300 pre-selected gene targets and multiple controls spotted in quadruplicates (~46,000 spots total. In this study, we present the NeuroStem Chip in detail and describe the special advantages it offers to the fields of experimental neurology and stem cell biology. To illustrate the utility of NeuroStem Chip platform, we have characterized an undifferentiated population of pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESCs, cell line SA02. In addition, we have performed a comparative gene expression analysis of those cells versus a heterogeneous population of hESC-derived cells committed towards neuronal/dopaminergic differentiation pathway by co-culturing with PA6 stromal cells for 16 days and containing a few tyrosine hydroxylase-positive dopaminergic neurons. Conclusion We characterized the gene expression profiles of undifferentiated and dopaminergic lineage-committed hESC-derived cells using a highly focused custom microarray platform (NeuroStem Chip that can become an important research tool in human stem cell biology. We propose that the areas of application for NeuroStem microarray platform could be the following: (i characterization of the

  4. A 3D Human Renal Cell Carcinoma-on-a-Chip for the Study of Tumor Angiogenesis.

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    Miller, Chris P; Tsuchida, Connor; Zheng, Ying; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Akilesh, Shreeram

    2018-06-01

    Tractable human tissue-engineered 3D models of cancer that enable fine control of tumor growth, metabolism, and reciprocal interactions between different cell types in the tumor microenvironment promise to accelerate cancer research and pharmacologic testing. Progress to date mostly reflects the use of immortalized cancer cell lines, and progression to primary patient-derived tumor cells is needed to realize the full potential of these platforms. For the first time, we report endothelial sprouting induced by primary patient tumor cells in a 3D microfluidic system. Specifically, we have combined primary human clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) cells from six independent donors with human endothelial cells in a vascularized, flow-directed, 3D culture system ("ccRCC-on-a-chip"). The upregulation of key angiogenic factors in primary human ccRCC cells, which exhibited unique patterns of donor variation, was further enhanced when they were cultured in 3D clusters. When embedded in the matrix surrounding engineered human vessels, these ccRCC tumor clusters drove potent endothelial cell sprouting under continuous flow, thus recapitulating the critical angiogenic signaling axis between human ccRCC cells and endothelial cells. Importantly, this phenotype was driven by a primary tumor cell-derived biochemical gradient of angiogenic growth factor accumulation that was subject to pharmacological blockade. Our novel 3D system represents a vascularized tumor model that is easy to image and quantify and is fully tunable in terms of input cells, perfusate, and matrices. We envision that this ccRCC-on-a-chip will be valuable for mechanistic studies, for studying tumor-vascular cell interactions, and for developing novel and personalized antitumor therapies. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cytotoxic and genotoxic responses of human lung cells to combustion smoke particles of Miscanthus straw, softwood and beech wood chips

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    Arif, Ali Talib; Maschowski, Christoph; Garra, Patxi; Garcia-Käufer, Manuel; Petithory, Tatiana; Trouvé, Gwenaëlle; Dieterlen, Alain; Mersch-Sundermann, Volker; Khanaqa, Polla; Nazarenko, Irina; Gminski, Richard; Gieré, Reto

    2017-08-01

    Inhalation of particulate matter (PM) from residential biomass combustion is epidemiologically associated with cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases. This study investigates PM0.4-1 emissions from combustion of commercial Miscanthus straw (MS), softwood chips (SWC) and beech wood chips (BWC) in a domestic-scale boiler (40 kW). The PM0.4-1 emitted during combustion of the MS, SWC and BWC were characterized by ICP-MS/OES, XRD, SEM, TEM, and DLS. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in human alveolar epithelial A549 and human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells were assessed by the WST-1 assay and the DNA-Alkaline Unwinding Assay (DAUA). PM0.4-1 uptake/translocation in cells was investigated with a new method developed using a confocal reflection microscope. SWC and BWC had a inherently higher residual water content than MS. The PM0.4-1 emitted during combustion of SWC and BWC exhibited higher levels of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), a greater variety of mineral species and a higher heavy metal content than PM0.4-1 from MS combustion. Exposure to PM0.4-1 from combustion of SWC and BWC induced cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in human alveolar and bronchial cells, whereby the strongest effect was observed for BWC and was comparable to that caused by diesel PM (SRM 2 975), In contrast, PM0.4-1 from MS combustion did not induce cellular responses in the studied lung cells. A high PAH content in PM emissions seems to be a reliable chemical marker of both combustion efficiency and particle toxicity. Residual biomass water content strongly affects particulate emissions and their toxic potential. Therefore, to minimize the harmful effects of fine PM on health, improvement of combustion efficiency (aiming to reduce the presence of incomplete combustion products bound to PM) and application of fly ash capture technology, as well as use of novel biomass fuels like Miscanthus straw is recommended.

  6. A microfluidic chip containing multiple 3D nanofibrous scaffolds for culturing human pluripotent stem cells

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    Wertheim, Lior; Shapira, Assaf; Amir, Roey J.; Dvir, Tal

    2018-04-01

    In microfluidics-based lab-on-a-chip systems, which are used for investigating the effect of drugs and growth factors on cells, the latter are usually cultured within the device’s channels in two-dimensional, and not in their optimal three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment. Herein, we address this shortfall by designing a microfluidic system, comprised of two layers. The upper layer of the system consists of multiple channels generating a gradient of soluble factors. The lower layer is comprised of multiple wells, each deposited with 3D, nanofibrous scaffold. We first used a mathematical model to characterize the fluid flow within the system. We then show that induced pluripotent stem cells can be seeded within the 3D scaffolds and be exposed to a well-mixed gradient of soluble factors. We believe that utilizing such system may enable in the future to identify new differentiation factors, investigate drug toxicity, and eventually allow to perform analyses on patient-specific tissues, in order to fit the appropriate combination and concentration of drugs.

  7. Transcriptional effect of an Aframomum angustifolium seed extract on human cutaneous cells using low-density DNA chips.

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    Bonnet-Duquennoy, Mathilde; Dumas, Marc; Debacker, Adeline; Lazou, Kristell; Talbourdet, Sylvie; Franchi, Jocelyne; Heusèle, Catherine; André, Patrice; Schnebert, Sylvianne; Bonté, Frédéric; Kurfürst, Robin

    2007-06-01

    Studying photoexposed and photoprotected skin biopsies from young and aged women, it has been found that a specific zone, composed of the basal layers of the epidermis, the dermal epidermal junction, and the superficial dermis, is major target of aging and reactive oxygen species. We showed that this zone is characterized by significant variations at a transcriptional and/or protein levels. Using low-density DNA chip technology, we evaluated the effect of a natural mixture of Aframomum angustifolium seed extract containing labdane diterpenoids on these aging markers. Expression profiles of normal human fibroblasts (NHF) were studied using a customized cDNA macroarray system containing genes covering dermal structure, inflammatory responses, and oxidative stress defense mechanisms. For normal human keratinocyte (NHK) investigations, we chose OLISA technique, a sensitive and quantitative method developed by BioMérieux specifically designed to investigate cell death, proliferation, epidermal structure, differentiation, and oxidative stress defense response. We observed that this extract strongly modified gene expression profiles of treated NHK, but weakly for NHF. This extract regulated antioxidant defenses, dermal-epidermal junction components, and epidermal renewal-related genes. Using low-density DNA chip technology, we identified new potential actions of A. angustifolium seed extract on skin aging.

  8. Screening of radiation-induced genes in human lymphoblastoid cells irradiated with 20 cGy of γ-ray by gene chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Huiping; Long Xianhui; Xu Qinzhi; Bai Bei; Sui Jianli; Zhou Pingkun

    2006-01-01

    cDNA gene chip was used to detect the transcriptional profile of human lymphoblasts cells irradiated with 20 cGy of 60 Co γ-ray. The microarray contains 14112 cDNA probing corresponding to 14112 human genes. The results showed that the transcription level of 83 genes changed; among which 21 genes were up-regulated. Most of them were associated with signal transduction, cell cycle regulation, cellular immunity, cytoskeleton and movement, etc. It indicated that low-dose irradiation can modulate the expression of a series of functional genes, which is the primary molecular basis of cellular responses to radiation. (authors)

  9. ChIP-on-chip analysis identifies IL-22 as direct target gene of ectopically expressed FOXP3 transcription factor in human T cells

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    Jeron Andreas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcription factor (TF forkhead box P3 (FOXP3 is constitutively expressed at high levels in naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (nTregs. It is not only the most accepted marker for that cell population but is also considered lineage determinative. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP of TFs in combination with genomic tiling microarray analysis (ChIP-on-chip has been shown to be an appropriate tool for identifying FOXP3 transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs on a genome-wide scale. In combination with microarray expression analysis, the ChIP-on-chip technique allows identification of direct FOXP3 target genes. Results ChIP-on-chip analysis of the human FOXP3 expressed in resting and PMA/ionomycin–stimulated Jurkat T cells revealed several thousand putative FOXP3 binding sites and demonstrated the importance of intronic regions for FOXP3 binding. The analysis of expression data showed that the stimulation-dependent down-regulation of IL-22 was correlated with direct FOXP3 binding in the IL-22 promoter region. This association was confirmed by real-time PCR analysis of ChIP-DNA. The corresponding ChIP-region also contained a matching FOXP3 consensus sequence. Conclusions Knowledge of the general distribution patterns of FOXP3 TFBSs in the human genome under resting and activated conditions will contribute to a better understanding of this TF and its influence on direct target genes, as well as its importance for the phenotype and function of Tregs. Moreover, FOXP3-dependent repression of Th17-related IL-22 may be relevant to an understanding of the phenomenon of Treg/Th17 cell plasticity.

  10. Development of a cell microarray chip for detection of circulating tumor cells

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    Yamamura, S.; Yatsushiro, S.; Abe, K.; Baba, Y.; Kataoka, M.

    2012-03-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the peripheral blood of metastatic cancer patients has clinical significance in earlier diagnosis of metastases. In this study, a novel cell microarray chip for accurate and rapid detection of tumor cells from human leukocytes was developed. The chip with 20,944 microchambers (105 μm diameter and 50 μm depth) was made from polystyrene, and the surface was rendered to hydrophilic by means of reactive-ion etching, which led to the formation of mono-layers of leukocytes on the microchambers. As the model of CTCs detection, we spiked human bronchioalveolar carcinoma (H1650) cells into human T lymphoblastoid leukemia (CEM) cells suspension and detected H1650 cells using the chip. A CEM suspension contained with H1650 cells was dispersed on the chip surface, followed by 10 min standing to allow the cells to settle down into the microchambers. About 30 CEM cells were accommodated in each microchamber, over 600,000 CEM cells in total being on a chip. We could detect 1 H1650 cell per 106 CEM cells on the microarray by staining with fluorescence-conjugated antibody (Anti-Cytokeratin) and cell membrane marker (DiD). Thus, this cell microarray chip has highly potential to be a novel tool of accurate and rapid detection of CTCs.

  11. Chip based electroanalytical systems for cell analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spegel, C.; Heiskanen, A.; Skjolding, L.H.D.

    2008-01-01

    ' measurements of processes related to living cells, i.e., systems without lysing the cells. The focus is on chip based amperometric and impedimetric cell analysis systems where measurements utilizing solely carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFME) and other nonchip electrode formats, such as CFME for exocytosis...

  12. Accurate detection of carcinoma cells by use of a cell microarray chip.

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    Shohei Yamamura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Accurate detection and analysis of circulating tumor cells plays an important role in the diagnosis and treatment of metastatic cancer treatment. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A cell microarray chip was used to detect spiked carcinoma cells among leukocytes. The chip, with 20,944 microchambers (105 µm width and 50 µm depth, was made from polystyrene; and the formation of monolayers of leukocytes in the microchambers was observed. Cultured human T lymphoblastoid leukemia (CCRF-CEM cells were used to examine the potential of the cell microarray chip for the detection of spiked carcinoma cells. A T lymphoblastoid leukemia suspension was dispersed on the chip surface, followed by 15 min standing to allow the leukocytes to settle down into the microchambers. Approximately 29 leukocytes were found in each microchamber when about 600,000 leukocytes in total were dispersed onto a cell microarray chip. Similarly, when leukocytes isolated from human whole blood were used, approximately 89 leukocytes entered each microchamber when about 1,800,000 leukocytes in total were placed onto the cell microarray chip. After washing the chip surface, PE-labeled anti-cytokeratin monoclonal antibody and APC-labeled anti-CD326 (EpCAM monoclonal antibody solution were dispersed onto the chip surface and allowed to react for 15 min; and then a microarray scanner was employed to detect any fluorescence-positive cells within 20 min. In the experiments using spiked carcinoma cells (NCI-H1650, 0.01 to 0.0001%, accurate detection of carcinoma cells was achieved with PE-labeled anti-cytokeratin monoclonal antibody. Furthermore, verification of carcinoma cells in the microchambers was performed by double staining with the above monoclonal antibodies. CONCLUSION: The potential application of the cell microarray chip for the detection of CTCs was shown, thus demonstrating accurate detection by double staining for cytokeratin and EpCAM at the single carcinoma cell level.

  13. Microfluidic Organ-on-a-Chip Models of Human IntestineSummary

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    Amir Bein

    Full Text Available Microfluidic organ-on-a-chip models of human intestine have been developed and used to study intestinal physiology and pathophysiology. In this article, we review this field and describe how microfluidic Intestine Chips offer new capabilities not possible with conventional culture systems or organoid cultures, including the ability to analyze contributions of individual cellular, chemical, and physical control parameters one-at-a-time; to coculture human intestinal cells with commensal microbiome for extended times; and to create human-relevant disease models. We also discuss potential future applications of human Intestine Chips, including how they might be used for drug development and personalized medicine. Keywords: Organs-on-Chips, Gut-on-a-Chip, Intestine-on-a-Chip, Microfluidic

  14. Characterizing Rat PNS Electrophysiological Response to Electrical Stimulation Using in vitro Chip-Based Human Investigational Platform (iCHIP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khani, Joshua [Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Prescod, Lindsay [Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Enright, Heather [Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Felix, Sarah [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Osburn, Joanne [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wheeler, Elizabeth [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kulp, Kris [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-08-18

    Ex vivo systems and organ-on-a-chip technology offer an unprecedented approach to modeling the inner workings of the human body. The ultimate goal of LLNL’s in vitro Chip-based Human Investigational Platform (iCHIP) is to integrate multiple organ tissue cultures using microfluidic channels, multi-electrode arrays (MEA), and other biosensors in order to effectively simulate and study the responses and interactions of the major organs to chemical and physical stimulation. In this study, we focused on the peripheral nervous system (PNS) component of the iCHIP system. Specifically we sought to expound on prior research investigating the electrophysiological response of rat dorsal root ganglion cells (rDRGs) to chemical exposures, such as capsaicin. Our aim was to establish a protocol for electrical stimulation using the iCHIP device that would reliably elicit a characteristic response in rDRGs. By varying the parameters for both the stimulation properties – amplitude, phase width, phase shape, and stimulation/ return configuration – and the culture conditions – day in vitro and neural cell types - we were able to make several key observations and uncover a potential convention with a minimal number of devices tested. Future work will seek to establish a standard protocol for human DRGs in the iCHIP which will afford a portable, rapid method for determining the effects of toxins and novel therapeutics on the PNS.

  15. Perfusion based cell culture chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiskanen, Arto; Emnéus, Jenny; Dufva, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Performing cell culture in miniaturized perfusion chambers gives possibilities to experiment with cells under near in vivo like conditions. In contrast to traditional batch cultures, miniaturized perfusion systems provide precise control of medium composition, long term unattended cultures...... and tissue like structuring of the cultures. However, as this chapter illustrates, many issues remain to be identified regarding perfusion cell culture such as design, material choice and how to use these systems before they will be widespread amongst biomedical researchers....

  16. NanoTopoChip : High-throughput nanotopographical cell instruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshof, Frits F.B.; Zhao, Yiping; Vasilevich, Aliaksei; Beijer, Nick R.M.; de Boer, Meint; Papenburg, Bernke J.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Stamatialis, Dimitrios; de Boer, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Surface topography is able to influence cell phenotype in numerous ways and offers opportunities to manipulate cells and tissues. In this work, we develop the Nano-TopoChip and study the cell instructive effects of nanoscale topographies. A combination of deep UV projection lithography and

  17. Universal lab-on-a-chip platform for complex, perfused 3D cell cultures

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    Sonntag, F.; Schmieder, F.; Ströbel, J.; Grünzner, S.; Busek, M.; Günther, K.; Steege, T.; Polk, C.; Klotzbach, U.

    2016-03-01

    The miniaturization, rapid prototyping and automation of lab-on-a-chip technology play nowadays a very important role. Lab-on-a-chip technology is successfully implemented not only for environmental analysis and medical diagnostics, but also as replacement of animals used for the testing of substances in the pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries. For that purpose the Fraunhofer IWS and partners developed a lab-on-a-chip platform for perfused cell-based assays in the last years, which includes different micropumps, valves, channels, reservoirs and customized cell culture modules. This technology is already implemented for the characterization of different human cell cultures and organoids, like skin, liver, endothelium, hair follicle and nephron. The advanced universal lab-on-a-chip platform for complex, perfused 3D cell cultures is divided into a multilayer basic chip with integrated micropump and application-specific 3D printed cell culture modules. Moreover a technology for surface modification of the printed cell culture modules by laser micro structuring and a complex and flexibly programmable controlling device based on an embedded Linux system was developed. A universal lab-on-a-chip platform with an optional oxygenator and a cell culture module for cubic scaffolds as well as first cell culture experiments within the cell culture device will be presented. The module is designed for direct interaction with robotic dispenser systems. This offers the opportunity to combine direct organ printing of cells and scaffolds with the microfluidic cell culture module. The characterization of the developed system was done by means of Micro-Particle Image Velocimetry (μPIV) and an optical oxygen measuring system.

  18. On-chip Magnetic Separation and Cell Encapsulation in Droplets

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    Chen, A.; Byvank, T.; Bharde, A.; Miller, B. L.; Chalmers, J. J.; Sooryakumar, R.; Chang, W.-J.; Bashir, R.

    2012-02-01

    The demand for high-throughput single cell assays is gaining importance because of the heterogeneity of many cell suspensions, even after significant initial sorting. These suspensions may display cell-to-cell variability at the gene expression level that could impact single cell functional genomics, cancer, stem-cell research and drug screening. The on-chip monitoring of individual cells in an isolated environment could prevent cross-contamination, provide high recovery yield and ability to study biological traits at a single cell level These advantages of on-chip biological experiments contrast to conventional methods, which require bulk samples that provide only averaged information on cell metabolism. We report on a device that integrates microfluidic technology with a magnetic tweezers array to combine the functionality of separation and encapsulation of objects such as immunomagnetically labeled cells or magnetic beads into pico-liter droplets on the same chip. The ability to control the separation throughput that is independent of the hydrodynamic droplet generation rate allows the encapsulation efficiency to be optimized. The device can potentially be integrated with on-chip labeling and/or bio-detection to become a powerful single-cell analysis device.

  19. Chip based single cell analysis for nanotoxicity assessment.

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    Shah, Pratikkumar; Kaushik, Ajeet; Zhu, Xuena; Zhang, Chengxiao; Li, Chen-Zhong

    2014-05-07

    Nanomaterials, because of their tunable properties and performances, have been utilized extensively in everyday life related consumable products and technology. On exposure, beyond the physiological range, nanomaterials cause health risks via affecting the function of organisms, genomic systems, and even the central nervous system. Thus, new analytical approaches for nanotoxicity assessment to verify the feasibility of nanomaterials for future use are in demand. The conventional analytical techniques, such as spectrophotometric assay-based techniques, usually require a lengthy and time-consuming process and often produce false positives, and often cannot be implemented at a single cell level measurement for studying cell behavior without interference from its surrounding environment. Hence, there is a demand for a precise, accurate, sensitive assessment for toxicity using single cells. Recently, due to the advantages of automation of fluids and minimization of human errors, the integration of a cell-on-a-chip (CoC) with a microfluidic system is in practice for nanotoxicity assessments. This review explains nanotoxicity and its assessment approaches with advantages/limitations and new approaches to overcome the confines of traditional techniques. Recent advances in nanotoxicity assessment using a CoC integrated with a microfluidic system are also discussed in this review, which may be of use for nanotoxicity assessment and diagnostics.

  20. Neural Cell Chip Based Electrochemical Detection of Nanotoxicity.

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    Kafi, Md Abdul; Cho, Hyeon-Yeol; Choi, Jeong Woo

    2015-07-02

    Development of a rapid, sensitive and cost-effective method for toxicity assessment of commonly used nanoparticles is urgently needed for the sustainable development of nanotechnology. A neural cell with high sensitivity and conductivity has become a potential candidate for a cell chip to investigate toxicity of environmental influences. A neural cell immobilized on a conductive surface has become a potential tool for the assessment of nanotoxicity based on electrochemical methods. The effective electrochemical monitoring largely depends on the adequate attachment of a neural cell on the chip surfaces. Recently, establishment of integrin receptor specific ligand molecules arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) or its several modifications RGD-Multi Armed Peptide terminated with cysteine (RGD-MAP-C), C(RGD)₄ ensure farm attachment of neural cell on the electrode surfaces either in their two dimensional (dot) or three dimensional (rod or pillar) like nano-scale arrangement. A three dimensional RGD modified electrode surface has been proven to be more suitable for cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation as well as electrochemical measurement. This review discusses fabrication as well as electrochemical measurements of neural cell chip with particular emphasis on their use for nanotoxicity assessments sequentially since inception to date. Successful monitoring of quantum dot (QD), graphene oxide (GO) and cosmetic compound toxicity using the newly developed neural cell chip were discussed here as a case study. This review recommended that a neural cell chip established on a nanostructured ligand modified conductive surface can be a potential tool for the toxicity assessments of newly developed nanomaterials prior to their use on biology or biomedical technologies.

  1. Neural Cell Chip Based Electrochemical Detection of Nanotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Abdul Kafi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Development of a rapid, sensitive and cost-effective method for toxicity assessment of commonly used nanoparticles is urgently needed for the sustainable development of nanotechnology. A neural cell with high sensitivity and conductivity has become a potential candidate for a cell chip to investigate toxicity of environmental influences. A neural cell immobilized on a conductive surface has become a potential tool for the assessment of nanotoxicity based on electrochemical methods. The effective electrochemical monitoring largely depends on the adequate attachment of a neural cell on the chip surfaces. Recently, establishment of integrin receptor specific ligand molecules arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD or its several modifications RGD-Multi Armed Peptide terminated with cysteine (RGD-MAP-C, C(RGD4 ensure farm attachment of neural cell on the electrode surfaces either in their two dimensional (dot or three dimensional (rod or pillar like nano-scale arrangement. A three dimensional RGD modified electrode surface has been proven to be more suitable for cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation as well as electrochemical measurement. This review discusses fabrication as well as electrochemical measurements of neural cell chip with particular emphasis on their use for nanotoxicity assessments sequentially since inception to date. Successful monitoring of quantum dot (QD, graphene oxide (GO and cosmetic compound toxicity using the newly developed neural cell chip were discussed here as a case study. This review recommended that a neural cell chip established on a nanostructured ligand modified conductive surface can be a potential tool for the toxicity assessments of newly developed nanomaterials prior to their use on biology or biomedical technologies.

  2. Experiment list: SRX367330 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nology) || sirna transfection=siBrd4 http://dbarchive.bi...=HEK293T cell || cell line=Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells || chip antibody=CDK9 || chip antibody details=2316S (Cell Signaling Tech

  3. Experiment list: SRX367328 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nology) || sirna transfection=siCTL http://dbarchive.bio...=HEK293T cell || cell line=Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells || chip antibody=CDK9 || chip antibody details=2316S (Cell Signaling Tech

  4. Integration of Solar Cells on Top of CMOS Chips - Part II: CIGS Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, J.; Liu, Wei; Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.; Sun, Yun; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2011-01-01

    We present the monolithic integration of deepsubmicrometer complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) microchips with copper indium gallium (di)selenide (CIGS) solar cells. Solar cells are manufactured directly on unpackaged CMOS chips. The microchips maintain comparable electronic performance,

  5. Single cell enzyme diagnosis on the chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Sissel Juul; Harmsen, Charlotte; Nielsen, Mette Juul

    2013-01-01

    Conventional diagnosis based on ensemble measurements often overlooks the variation among cells. Here, we present a droplet-microfluidics based platform to investigate single cell activities. Adopting a previously developed isothermal rolling circle amplification-based assay, we demonstrate...... detection of enzymatic activities down to the single cell level with small quantities of biological samples, which outcompetes existing techniques. Such a system, capable of resolving single cell activities, will ultimately have clinical applications in diagnosis, prediction of drug response and treatment...

  6. An optimized protocol for isolating primary epithelial cell chromatin for ChIP.

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    James A Browne

    Full Text Available A critical part of generating robust chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP data is the optimization of chromatin purification and size selection. This is particularly important when ChIP is combined with next-generation sequencing (ChIP-seq to identify targets of DNA-binding proteins, genome-wide. Current protocols refined by the ENCODE consortium generally use a two-step cell lysis procedure that is applicable to a wide variety of cell types. However, the isolation and size selection of chromatin from primary human epithelial cells may often be particularly challenging. These cells tend to form sheets of formaldehyde cross-linked material in which cells are resistant to membrane lysis, nuclei are not released and subsequent sonication produces extensive high molecular weight contamination. Here we describe an optimized protocol to prepare high quality ChIP-grade chromatin from primary human bronchial epithelial cells. The ENCODE protocol was used as a starting point to which we added the following key steps to separate the sheets of formaldehyde-fixed cells prior to lysis. (1 Incubation of the formaldehyde-fixed adherent cells in Trypsin-EDTA (0.25% room temperature for no longer than 5 min. (2 Equilibration of the fixed cells in detergent-free lysis buffers prior to each lysis step. (3 The addition of 0.5% Triton X-100 to the complete cell membrane lysis buffer. (4 Passing the cell suspension (in complete cell membrane lysis buffer through a 25-gauge needle followed by continuous agitation on ice for 35 min. Each step of the modified protocol was documented by light microscopy using the Methyl Green-Pyronin dual dye, which stains cytoplasm red (Pyronin and the nuclei grey-blue (Methyl green. This modified method is reproducibly effective at producing high quality sheared chromatin for ChIP and is equally applicable to other epithelial cell types.

  7. Thermometry in dielectrophoresis chips for contact-free cell handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, M S; Mueller, T; Schnelle, T

    2007-01-01

    Cell biology applications, protocols in immunology and stem cell research, require that individual cells are handled under strict control of their contacts to other cells or synthetic surfaces. Dielectrophoresis (DEP) in microfluidic chips is an established technique to investigate, group, wash, cultivate and sort cells contact-free under physiological conditions: microelectrode octode cages, versatile dielectrophoretic elements energized with radio frequency electric fields, stably trap single cells or cellular aggregates. For medical applications and cell cultivation, possible side effects of the dielectrophoretic manipulation, such as membrane polarization and Joule heating, have to be quantified. Therefore, we characterized the electric field-induced warming in dielectrophoretic cages using ohmic resistance measurements, fluorometry, liquid crystal beads, infra-red thermography and bubble size thermometry. We compare the results of these techniques with respect to the influences of voltage, electric conductivity of buffer, frequency, cage size and electrode surface. We conclude that in the culture medium thermal effects may be neglected if low voltages and an electric field-reducing phase pattern are used. Our experimental results provide explicit values for estimating the thermal effect on dielectrophoretically caged cells and show that Joule heating is best minimized by optimizing the cage geometry and reducing the buffer conductivity. The results may additionally serve to evaluate and improve theoretical predictions on field-induced effects. Based on present-day chip processing possibilities, DEP is well suited for the manipulation of cells

  8. Microfluidic-chip platform for cell sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Sarul; Balyan, Prerna; Akhtar, J.; Agarwal, Ajay

    2016-04-01

    Cell sorting and separation are considered to be very crucial preparatory steps for numerous clinical diagnostics and therapeutics applications in cell biology research arena. Label free cell separation techniques acceptance rate has been increased to multifold by various research groups. Size based cell separation method focuses on the intrinsic properties of the cell which not only avoids clogging issues associated with mechanical and centrifugation filtration methods but also reduces the overall cost for the process. Consequentially flow based cell separation method for continuous flow has attracted the attention of millions. Due to the realization of structures close to particle size in micro dimensions, the microfluidic devices offer precise and rapid particle manipulation which ultimately leads to an extraordinary cell separation results. The proposed microfluidic device is fabricated to separate polystyrene beads of size 1 µm, 5 µm, 10 µm and 20 µm. The actual dimensions of blood corpuscles were kept in mind while deciding the particle size of polystyrene beads which are used as a model particles for study.

  9. NanoTopoChip: High-throughput nanotopographical cell instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulshof, Frits F B; Zhao, Yiping; Vasilevich, Aliaksei; Beijer, Nick R M; de Boer, Meint; Papenburg, Bernke J; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Stamatialis, Dimitrios; de Boer, Jan

    2017-10-15

    Surface topography is able to influence cell phenotype in numerous ways and offers opportunities to manipulate cells and tissues. In this work, we develop the Nano-TopoChip and study the cell instructive effects of nanoscale topographies. A combination of deep UV projection lithography and conventional lithography was used to fabricate a library of more than 1200 different defined nanotopographies. To illustrate the cell instructive effects of nanotopography, actin-RFP labeled U2OS osteosarcoma cells were cultured and imaged on the Nano-TopoChip. Automated image analysis shows that of many cell morphological parameters, cell spreading, cell orientation and actin morphology are mostly affected by the nanotopographies. Additionally, by using modeling, the changes of cell morphological parameters could by predicted by several feature shape parameters such as lateral size and spacing. This work overcomes the technological challenges of fabricating high quality defined nanoscale features on unprecedented large surface areas of a material relevant for tissue culture such as PS and the screening system is able to infer nanotopography - cell morphological parameter relationships. Our screening platform provides opportunities to identify and study the effect of nanotopography with beneficial properties for the culture of various cell types. The nanotopography of biomaterial surfaces can be modified to influence adhering cells with the aim to improve the performance of medical implants and tissue culture substrates. However, the necessary knowledge of the underlying mechanisms remains incomplete. One reason for this is the limited availability of high-resolution nanotopographies on relevant biomaterials, suitable to conduct systematic biological studies. The present study shows the fabrication of a library of nano-sized surface topographies with high fidelity. The potential of this library, called the 'NanoTopoChip' is shown in a proof of principle HTS study which

  10. ChIP on SNP-chip for genome-wide analysis of human histone H4 hyperacetylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porter Christopher J

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SNP microarrays are designed to genotype Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs. These microarrays report hybridization of DNA fragments and therefore can be used for the purpose of detecting genomic fragments. Results Here, we demonstrate that a SNP microarray can be effectively used in this way to perform chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP on chip as an alternative to tiling microarrays. We illustrate this novel application by mapping whole genome histone H4 hyperacetylation in human myoblasts and myotubes. We detect clusters of hyperacetylated histone H4, often spanning across up to 300 kilobases of genomic sequence. Using complementary genome-wide analyses of gene expression by DNA microarray we demonstrate that these clusters of hyperacetylated histone H4 tend to be associated with expressed genes. Conclusion The use of a SNP array for a ChIP-on-chip application (ChIP on SNP-chip will be of great value to laboratories whose interest is the determination of general rules regarding the relationship of specific chromatin modifications to transcriptional status throughout the genome and to examine the asymmetric modification of chromatin at heterozygous loci.

  11. Integration of Solar Cells on Top of CMOS Chips Part I: a-Si Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, J.; Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.; van der Werf, Karine H.M.; Schropp, Ruud E.I.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2011-01-01

    We present the monolithic integration of deepsubmicrometer complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) microchips with a-Si:H solar cells. Solar cells are manufactured directly on the CMOS chips. The microchips maintain comparable electronic performance, and the solar cells show efficiency values

  12. Effect of microwell chip structure on cell microsphere production of various animal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Yusuke; Yoshida, Shirou; Yoshiura, Yukiko; Mori, Rhuhei; Tamura, Tomoko; Yahiro, Kanji; Mori, Hideki; Kanemura, Yonehiro; Yamasaki, Mami; Nakazawa, Kohji

    2010-08-01

    The formation of three-dimensional cell microspheres such as spheroids, embryoid bodies, and neurospheres has attracted attention as a useful culture technique. In this study, we investigated a technique for effective cell microsphere production by using specially prepared microchip. The basic chip design was a multimicrowell structure in triangular arrangement within a 100-mm(2) region in the center of a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) plate (24x24 mm(2)), the surface of which was modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to render it nonadhesive to cells. We also designed six similar chips with microwell diameters of 200, 300, 400, 600, 800, and 1000 microm to investigate the effect of the microwell diameter on the cell microsphere diameter. Rat hepatocytes, HepG2 cells, mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells, and mouse neural progenitor/stem (NPS) cells formed hepatocyte spheroids, HepG2 spheroids, embryoid bodies, and neurospheres, respectively, in the microwells within 5 days of culture. For all the cells, a single microsphere was formed in each microwell under all the chip conditions, and such microsphere configurations remained throughout the culture period. Furthermore, the microsphere diameters of each type of cell were strongly positively correlated with the microwell diameters of the chips, suggesting that microsphere diameter can be factitiously controlled by using different chip conditions. Thus, this chip technique is a promising cellular platform for tissue engineering or regenerative medicine research, pharmacological and toxicological studies, and fundamental studies in cell biology. Copyright 2010 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Priming nanoparticle-guided diagnostics and therapeutics towards human organs-on-chips microphysiological system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin-Ha; Lee, Jaewon; Shin, Woojung; Choi, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Hyun Jung

    2016-10-01

    Nanotechnology and bioengineering have converged over the past decades, by which the application of multi-functional nanoparticles (NPs) has been emerged in clinical and biomedical fields. The NPs primed to detect disease-specific biomarkers or to deliver biopharmaceutical compounds have beena validated in conventional in vitro culture models including two dimensional (2D) cell cultures or 3D organoid models. However, a lack of experimental models that have strong human physiological relevance has hampered accurate validation of the safety and functionality of NPs. Alternatively, biomimetic human "Organs-on-Chips" microphysiological systems have recapitulated the mechanically dynamic 3D tissue interface of human organ microenvironment, in which the transport, cytotoxicity, biocompatibility, and therapeutic efficacy of NPs and their conjugates may be more accurately validated. Finally, integration of NP-guided diagnostic detection and targeted nanotherapeutics in conjunction with human organs-on-chips can provide a novel avenue to accelerate the NP-based drug development process as well as the rapid detection of cellular secretomes associated with pathophysiological processes.

  14. Dental Stem Cell Migration on Pulp Ceiling Cavities Filled with MTA, Dentin Chips, or Bio-Oss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Lymperi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available MTA, Bio-Oss, and dentin chips have been successfully used in endodontics. The aim of this study was to assess the adhesion and migration of dental stem cells on human pulp ceiling cavities filled with these endodontic materials in an experimental model, which mimics the clinical conditions of regenerative endodontics. Cavities were formed, by a homemade mold, on untouched third molars, filled with endodontic materials, and observed with electron microscopy. Cells were seeded on cavities’ surface and their morphology and number were analysed. The phenomenon of tropism was assessed in a migration assay. All three materials demonstrated appropriate microstructures for cell attachment. Cells grew on all reagents, but they showed a differential morphology. Moreover, variations were observed when comparing cells numbers on cavity’s filling versus the surrounding dentine disc. The highest number of cells was recorded on dentin chips whereas the opposite was true for Bio-Oss. This was confirmed in the migration assay where a statistically significant lower number of cells migrated towards Bio-Oss as compared to MTA and dentin chips. This study highlights that MTA and dentin chips have a greater potential compared to Bio-Oss regarding the attraction of dental stem cells and are good candidates for bioengineered pulp regeneration.

  15. Automated, Miniaturized and Integrated Quality Control-on-Chip (QC-on-a-Chip for Advanced Cell Therapy Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eWartmann

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The combination of microfabrication-based technologies with cell biology has laid the foundation for the development of advanced in vitro diagnostic systems capable of evaluating cell cultures under defined, reproducible and standardizable measurement conditions. In the present review we describe recent lab-on-a-chip developments for cell analysis and how these methodologies could improve standard quality control in the field of manufacturing cell-based vaccines for clinical purposes. We highlight in particular the regulatory requirements for advanced cell therapy applications using as an example dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines to describe the tangible advantages of microfluidic devices that overcome most of the challenges associated with automation, miniaturization and integration of cell-based assays. As its main advantage lab-on-a-chip technology allows for precise regulation of culturing conditions, while simultaneously monitoring cell relevant parameters using embedded sensory systems. State-of-the-art lab-on-a-chip platforms for in vitro assessment of cell cultures and their potential future applications for cell therapies and cancer immunotherapy are discussed in the present review.

  16. Pericellular oxygen monitoring with integrated sensor chips for reproducible cell culture experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieninger, J; Aravindalochanan, K; Sandvik, J A; Pettersen, E O; Urban, G A

    2014-04-01

    Here we present an application, in two tumour cell lines, based on the Sensing Cell Culture Flask system as a cell culture monitoring tool for pericellular oxygen sensing. T-47D (human breast cancer) and T98G (human brain cancer) cells were cultured either in atmospheric air or in a glove-box set at 4% oxygen, in both cases with 5% CO2 in the gas phase. Pericellular oxygen tension was measured with the help of an integrated sensor chip comprising oxygen sensor arrays. Obtained results illustrate variation of pericellular oxygen tension in attached cells covered by stagnant medium. Independent of incubation conditions, low pericellular oxygen concentration levels, usually associated with hypoxia, were found in dense cell cultures. Respiration alone brought pericellular oxygen concentration down to levels which could activate hypoxia-sensing regulatory processes in cultures believed to be aerobic. Cells in culture believed to experience conditions of mild hypoxia may, in reality, experience severe hypoxia. This would lead to incorrect assumptions and suggests that pericellular oxygen concentration readings are of great importance to obtain reproducible results when dealing with hypoxic and normoxic (aerobic) incubation conditions. The Sensing Cell Culture Flask system allows continuous monitoring of pericellular oxygen concentration with outstanding long-term stability and no need for recalibration during cell culture experiments. The sensor is integrated into the flask bottom, thus in direct contact with attached cells. No additional equipment needs to be inserted into the flask during culturing. Transparency of the electrochemical sensor chip allows optical inspection of cells attached on top of the sensor. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Lab-On-Chip Clinorotation System for Live-Cell Microscopy Under Simulated Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yew, Alvin G.; Atencia, Javier; Chinn, Ben; Hsieh, Adam H.

    2013-01-01

    Cells in microgravity are subject to mechanical unloading and changes to the surrounding chemical environment. How these factors jointly influence cellular function is not well understood. We can investigate their role using ground-based analogues to spaceflight, where mechanical unloading is simulated through the time-averaged nullification of gravity. The prevailing method for cellular microgravity simulation is to use fluid-filled containers called clinostats. However, conventional clinostats are not designed for temporally tracking cell response, nor are they able to establish dynamic fluid environments. To address these needs, we developed a Clinorotation Time-lapse Microscopy (CTM) system that accommodates lab-on- chip cell culture devices for visualizing time-dependent alterations to cellular behavior. For the purpose of demonstrating CTM, we present preliminary results showing time-dependent differences in cell area between human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) under modeled microgravity and normal gravity.

  18. Stereolithographic hydrogel printing of 3D microfluidic cell culture chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Rujing

    that support the required freedom in design, detail and chemistry for fabricating truly 3D constructs have remained limited. Here, we report a stereolithographic high-resolution 3D printing technique utilizing poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA, MW 700) to manufacture diffusion-open and mechanically...... and material flexibility by embedding a highly compliant cell-laden gelatin hydrogel within the confines of a 3D printed resilient PEGDA hydrogel chip of intermediate compliance. Overall, our proposed strategy represents an automated, cost-effective and high resolution technique to manufacture complex 3D...... epoxy component as structural supports interfacing the external world as well as compliant PEGDA component as microfluidic channels have been manufactured and perfused. Although still in the preliminary stage, this dual-material printing approach shows the potential for constructing complex 3D...

  19. 'Fluorescent Cell Chip' for immunotoxicity testing: Development of the c-fos expression reporter cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trzaska, Dominika; Zembek, Patrycja; Olszewski, Maciej; Adamczewska, Violetta; Ulleras, Erik; Dastych, JarosIaw

    2005-01-01

    The Fluorescent Cell Chip for in vitro immunotoxicity testing employs cell lines derived from lymphocytes, mast cells, and monocytes-macrophages transfected with various EGFP cytokine reporter gene constructs. While cytokine expression is a valid endpoint for in vitro immunotoxicity screening, additional marker for the immediate-early response gene expression level could be of interest for further development and refinement of the Fluorescent Cell Chip. We have used BW.5147.3 murine thymoma transfected with c-fos reporter constructs to obtain reporter cell lines expressing ECFP under the control of murine c-fos promoter. These cells upon serum withdrawal and readdition and incubation with heavy metal compounds showed paralleled induction of c-Fos expression as evidenced by Real-Time PCR and ECFP fluorescence as evidenced by computer-supported fluorescence microscopy. In conclusion, we developed fluorescent reporter cell lines that could be employed in a simple and time-efficient screening assay for possible action of chemicals on c-Fos expression in lymphocytes. The evaluation of usefulness of these cells for the Fluorescent Cell Chip-based detection of immunotoxicity will require additional testing with a larger number of chemicals

  20. Chip-based in situ hybridization for identification of bacteria from the human microbiome.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Light, Yooli Kim; Meagher, Robert J.; Singh, Anup K.; Liu, Peng

    2010-11-01

    The emerging field of metagenomics seeks to assess the genetic diversity of complex mixed populations of bacteria, such as those found at different sites within the human body. A single person's mouth typically harbors up to 100 bacterial species, while surveys of many people have found more than 700 different species, of which {approx}50% have never been cultivated. In typical metagenomics studies, the cells themselves are destroyed in the process of gathering sequence information, and thus the connection between genotype and phenotype is lost. A great deal of sequence information may be generated, but it is impossible to assign any given sequence to a specific cell. We seek non-destructive, culture-independent means of gathering sequence information from selected individual cells from mixed populations. As a first step, we have developed a microfluidic device for concentrating and specifically labeling bacteria from a mixed population. Bacteria are electrophoretically concentrated against a photopolymerized membrane element, and then incubated with a specific fluorescent label, which can include antibodies as well as specific or non-specific nucleic acid stains. Unbound stain is washed away, and the labeled bacteria are released from the membrane. The stained cells can then be observed via epifluorescence microscopy, or counted via flow cytometry. We have tested our device with three representative bacteria from the human microbiome: E. coli (gut, Gram-negative), Lactobacillus acidophilus (mouth, Gram-positive), and Streptococcus mutans (mouth, Gram-positive), with results comparable to off-chip labeling techniques.

  1. Nanoliter Centrifugal Liquid Dispenser Coupled with Superhydrophobic Microwell Array Chips for High-Throughput Cell Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuyi Wang

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidic systems have been regarded as a potential platform for high-throughput screening technology in drug discovery due to their low sample consumption, high integration, and easy operation. The handling of small-volume liquid is an essential operation in microfluidic systems, especially in investigating large-scale combination conditions. Here, we develop a nanoliter centrifugal liquid dispenser (NanoCLD coupled with superhydrophobic microwell array chips for high-throughput cell-based assays in the nanoliter scale. The NanoCLD consists of a plastic stock block with an array of drilled through holes, a reagent microwell array chip (reagent chip, and an alignment bottom assembled together in a fixture. A simple centrifugation at 800 rpm can dispense ~160 nL reagents into microwells in 5 min. The dispensed reagents are then delivered to cells by sandwiching the reagent chip upside down with another microwell array chip (cell chip on which cells are cultured. A gradient of doxorubicin is then dispensed to the cell chip using the NanoCLD for validating the feasibility of performing drug tests on our microchip platform. This novel nanoliter-volume liquid dispensing method is simple, easy to operate, and especially suitable for repeatedly dispensing many different reagents simultaneously to microwells.

  2. Transparent polymeric cell culture chip with integrated temperature control and uniform media perfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petronis, Sarunas; Stangegaard, Michael; Christensen, C.

    2006-01-01

    Modern microfabrication and microfluidic technologies offer new opportunities in the design and fabrication of miniaturized cell culture systems for online monitoring of living cells. We used laser micromachining and thermal bonding to fabricate an optically transparent, low-cost polymeric chip...... for long-term online cell culture observation under controlled conditions. The chip incorporated a microfluidic flow equalization system, assuring uniform perfusion of the cell culture media throughout the cell culture chamber. The integrated indium-tin-oxide heater and miniature temperature probe linked....... HeLa cells were cultured for up to 2 weeks within the cell culture chip and monitored using a time-lapse video recording microscopy setup. Cell attachment and spreading was observed during the first 10-20 h (lag phase). After approximately 20 h, cell growth gained exponential character...

  3. A microfluidic microprocessor: controlling biomimetic containers and cells using hybrid integrated circuit/microfluidic chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issadore, David; Franke, Thomas; Brown, Keith A; Westervelt, Robert M

    2010-11-07

    We present an integrated platform for performing biological and chemical experiments on a chip based on standard CMOS technology. We have developed a hybrid integrated circuit (IC)/microfluidic chip that can simultaneously control thousands of living cells and pL volumes of fluid, enabling a wide variety of chemical and biological tasks. Taking inspiration from cellular biology, phospholipid bilayer vesicles are used as robust picolitre containers for reagents on the chip. The hybrid chip can be programmed to trap, move, and porate individual living cells and vesicles and fuse and deform vesicles using electric fields. The IC spatially patterns electric fields in a microfluidic chamber using 128 × 256 (32,768) 11 × 11 μm(2) metal pixels, each of which can be individually driven with a radio frequency (RF) voltage. The chip's basic functions can be combined in series to perform complex biological and chemical tasks and can be performed in parallel on the chip's many pixels for high-throughput operations. The hybrid chip operates in two distinct modes, defined by the frequency of the RF voltage applied to the pixels: Voltages at MHz frequencies are used to trap, move, and deform objects using dielectrophoresis and voltages at frequencies below 1 kHz are used for electroporation and electrofusion. This work represents an important step towards miniaturizing the complex chemical and biological experiments used for diagnostics and research onto automated and inexpensive chips.

  4. Study of a Microfluidic Chip Integrating Single Cell Trap and 3D Stable Rotation Manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Huang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Single cell manipulation technology has been widely applied in biological fields, such as cell injection/enucleation, cell physiological measurement, and cell imaging. Recently, a biochip platform with a novel configuration of electrodes for cell 3D rotation has been successfully developed by generating rotating electric fields. However, the rotation platform still has two major shortcomings that need to be improved. The primary problem is that there is no on-chip module to facilitate the placement of a single cell into the rotation chamber, which causes very low efficiency in experiment to manually pipette single 10-micron-scale cells into rotation position. Secondly, the cell in the chamber may suffer from unstable rotation, which includes gravity-induced sinking down to the chamber bottom or electric-force-induced on-plane movement. To solve the two problems, in this paper we propose a new microfluidic chip with manipulation capabilities of single cell trap and single cell 3D stable rotation, both on one chip. The new microfluidic chip consists of two parts. The top capture part is based on the least flow resistance principle and is used to capture a single cell and to transport it to the rotation chamber. The bottom rotation part is based on dielectrophoresis (DEP and is used to 3D rotate the single cell in the rotation chamber with enhanced stability. The two parts are aligned and bonded together to form closed channels for microfluidic handling. Using COMSOL simulation and preliminary experiments, we have verified, in principle, the concept of on-chip single cell traps and 3D stable rotation, and identified key parameters for chip structures, microfluidic handling, and electrode configurations. The work has laid a solid foundation for on-going chip fabrication and experiment validation.

  5. Conductive Polymer Microelectrodes for on-chip measurement of transmitter release from living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Tylsgaard; Matteucci, Marco; Taboryski, Rafael J.

    2012-01-01

    driven cell trapping inside closed chip devices. Conductive polymer microelectrodes were used to measure transmitter release using electrochemical methods such as cyclic voltammetry and constant potential amperometry. By measuring the oxidation current at a cyclic voltammogram, the concentration...

  6. Human Brain Organoids on a Chip Reveal the Physics of Folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karzbrun, Eyal; Kshirsagar, Aditya; Cohen, Sidney R; Hanna, Jacob H; Reiner, Orly

    2018-05-01

    Human brain wrinkling has been implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders and yet its origins remain unknown. Polymer gel models suggest that wrinkling emerges spontaneously due to compression forces arising during differential swelling, but these ideas have not been tested in a living system. Here, we report the appearance of surface wrinkles during the in vitro development and self-organization of human brain organoids in a micro-fabricated compartment that supports in situ imaging over a timescale of weeks. We observe the emergence of convolutions at a critical cell density and maximal nuclear strain, which are indicative of a mechanical instability. We identify two opposing forces contributing to differential growth: cytoskeletal contraction at the organoid core and cell-cycle-dependent nuclear expansion at the organoid perimeter. The wrinkling wavelength exhibits linear scaling with tissue thickness, consistent with balanced bending and stretching energies. Lissencephalic (smooth brain) organoids display reduced convolutions, modified scaling and a reduced elastic modulus. Although the mechanism here does not include the neuronal migration seen in in vivo , it models the physics of the folding brain remarkably well. Our on-chip approach offers a means for studying the emergent properties of organoid development, with implications for the embryonic human brain.

  7. Human brain organoids on a chip reveal the physics of folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karzbrun, Eyal; Kshirsagar, Aditya; Cohen, Sidney R.; Hanna, Jacob H.; Reiner, Orly

    2018-05-01

    Human brain wrinkling has been implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders and yet its origins remain unknown. Polymer gel models suggest that wrinkling emerges spontaneously due to compression forces arising during differential swelling, but these ideas have not been tested in a living system. Here, we report the appearance of surface wrinkles during the in vitro development and self-organization of human brain organoids in a microfabricated compartment that supports in situ imaging over a timescale of weeks. We observe the emergence of convolutions at a critical cell density and maximal nuclear strain, which are indicative of a mechanical instability. We identify two opposing forces contributing to differential growth: cytoskeletal contraction at the organoid core and cell-cycle-dependent nuclear expansion at the organoid perimeter. The wrinkling wavelength exhibits linear scaling with tissue thickness, consistent with balanced bending and stretching energies. Lissencephalic (smooth brain) organoids display reduced convolutions, modified scaling and a reduced elastic modulus. Although the mechanism here does not include the neuronal migration seen in vivo, it models the physics of the folding brain remarkably well. Our on-chip approach offers a means for studying the emergent properties of organoid development, with implications for the embryonic human brain.

  8. ImmunoChip study implicates antigen presentation to T cells in narcolepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliette Faraco

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the identification of susceptibility genes and environmental exposures provide broad support for a post-infectious autoimmune basis for narcolepsy/hypocretin (orexin deficiency. We genotyped loci associated with other autoimmune and inflammatory diseases in 1,886 individuals with hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy and 10,421 controls, all of European ancestry, using a custom genotyping array (ImmunoChip. Three loci located outside the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA region on chromosome 6 were significantly associated with disease risk. In addition to a strong signal in the T cell receptor alpha (TRA@, variants in two additional narcolepsy loci, Cathepsin H (CTSH and Tumor necrosis factor (ligand superfamily member 4 (TNFSF4, also called OX40L, attained genome-wide significance. These findings underline the importance of antigen presentation by HLA Class II to T cells in the pathophysiology of this autoimmune disease.

  9. Integration of systems biology with organs-on-chips to humanize therapeutic development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edington, Collin D.; Cirit, Murat; Chen, Wen Li Kelly; Clark, Amanda M.; Wells, Alan; Trumper, David L.; Griffith, Linda G.

    2017-02-01

    "Mice are not little people" - a refrain becoming louder as the gaps between animal models and human disease become more apparent. At the same time, three emerging approaches are headed toward integration: powerful systems biology analysis of cell-cell and intracellular signaling networks in patient-derived samples; 3D tissue engineered models of human organ systems, often made from stem cells; and micro-fluidic and meso-fluidic devices that enable living systems to be sustained, perturbed and analyzed for weeks in culture. Integration of these rapidly moving fields has the potential to revolutionize development of therapeutics for complex, chronic diseases, including those that have weak genetic bases and substantial contributions from gene-environment interactions. Technical challenges in modeling complex diseases with "organs on chips" approaches include the need for relatively large tissue masses and organ-organ cross talk to capture systemic effects, such that current microfluidic formats often fail to capture the required scale and complexity for interconnected systems. These constraints drive development of new strategies for designing in vitro models, including perfusing organ models, as well as "mesofluidic" pumping and circulation in platforms connecting several organ systems, to achieve the appropriate physiological relevance.

  10. Detection of immunotoxicity using T-cell based cytokine reporter cell lines ('Cell Chip')

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringerike, Tove; Ulleraas, Erik; Voelker, Rene; Verlaan, Bert; Eikeset, Aase; Trzaska, Dominika; Adamczewska, Violetta; Olszewski, Maciej; Walczak-Drzewiecka, Aurelia; Arkusz, Joanna; Loveren, Henk van; Nilsson, Gunnar; Lovik, Martinus; Dastych, Jaroslaw; Vandebriel, Rob J.

    2005-01-01

    Safety assessment of chemicals and drugs is an important regulatory issue. The evaluation of potential adverse effects of compounds on the immune system depends today on animal experiments. An increasing demand, however, exists for in vitro alternatives. Cytokine measurement is a promising tool to evaluate chemical exposure effects on the immune system. Fortunately, this type of measurement can be performed in conjunction with in vitro exposure models. We have taken these considerations as the starting point to develop an in vitro method to efficiently screen compounds for potential immunotoxicity. The T-cell lymphoma cell line EL-4 was transfected with the regulatory sequences of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-10, interferon (IFN)-γ or actin fused to the gene for enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in either a stabile or a destabilised form. Consequently, changes in fluorescence intensity represent changes in cytokine expression with one cell line per cytokine. We used this prototype 'Cell Chip' to test, by means of flow cytometry, the immunomodulatory potential of 13 substances and were able to detect changes in cytokine expression in 12 cases (successful for cyclosporine, rapamycin, pentamidine, thalidomide, bis(tri-n-butyltin)oxide, house dust mite allergen (Der p I), 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, benzocaine, tolylene 2,4-diisocyanate, potassium tetrachloroplatinate, sodium dodecyl sulphate and mercuric chloride; unsuccessful for penicillin G). In conclusion, this approach seems promising for in vitro screening for potential immunotoxicity, especially when additional cell lines besides T-cells are included

  11. Low-Cost Energy-Efficient 3-D Nano-Spikes-Based Electric Cell Lysis Chips

    KAUST Repository

    Riaz, Kashif

    2017-05-04

    Electric cell lysis (ECL) is a promising technique to be integrated with portable lab-on-a-chip without lysing agent due to its simplicity and fast processing. ECL is usually limited by the requirements of high power/voltage and costly fabrication. In this paper, we present low-cost 3-D nano-spikes-based ECL (NSP-ECL) chips for efficient cell lysis at low power consumption. Highly ordered High-Aspect-Ratio (HAR). NSP arrays with controllable dimensions were fabricated on commercial aluminum foils through scalable and electrochemical anodization and etching. The optimized multiple pulse protocols with minimized undesirable electrochemical reactions (gas and bubble generation), common on micro parallel-plate ECL chips. Due to the scalability of fabrication process, 3-D NSPs were fabricated on small chips as well as on 4-in wafers. Phase diagram was constructed by defining critical electric field to induce cell lysis and for cell lysis saturation Esat to define non-ECL and ECL regions for different pulse parameters. NSP-ECL chips have achieved excellent cell lysis efficiencies ηlysis (ca 100%) at low applied voltages (2 V), 2~3 orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional systems. The energy consumption of NSP-ECL chips was 0.5-2 mJ/mL, 3~9 orders of magnitude lower as compared with the other methods (5J/mL-540kJ/mL). [2016-0305

  12. From lab-on-a-chip to lab-in-a-cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andersson, Helene; van den Berg, Albert

    2005-01-01

    There are many efforts today trying to mimic the properties of single cells in order to design chips that are as efficient as cells. However, cells are nature"s nanotechnology engineering at the scale of atoms and molecules. Therefore, it might be better to vision a microchip that utilizes a single

  13. The Human Cell Atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, Aviv; Teichmann, Sarah A; Lander, Eric S; Amit, Ido; Benoist, Christophe; Birney, Ewan; Bodenmiller, Bernd; Campbell, Peter; Carninci, Piero; Clatworthy, Menna; Clevers, Hans; Deplancke, Bart; Dunham, Ian; Eberwine, James; Eils, Roland; Enard, Wolfgang; Farmer, Andrew; Fugger, Lars; Göttgens, Berthold; Hacohen, Nir; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Hemberg, Martin; Kim, Seung; Klenerman, Paul; Kriegstein, Arnold; Lein, Ed; Linnarsson, Sten; Lundberg, Emma; Lundeberg, Joakim; Majumder, Partha; Marioni, John C; Merad, Miriam; Mhlanga, Musa; Nawijn, Martijn; Netea, Mihai; Nolan, Garry; Pe'er, Dana; Phillipakis, Anthony; Ponting, Chris P; Quake, Stephen; Reik, Wolf; Rozenblatt-Rosen, Orit; Sanes, Joshua; Satija, Rahul; Schumacher, Ton N; Shalek, Alex; Shapiro, Ehud; Sharma, Padmanee; Shin, Jay W; Stegle, Oliver; Stratton, Michael; Stubbington, Michael J T; Theis, Fabian J; Uhlen, Matthias; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Wagner, Allon; Watt, Fiona; Weissman, Jonathan; Wold, Barbara; Xavier, Ramnik; Yosef, Nir

    2017-12-05

    The recent advent of methods for high-throughput single-cell molecular profiling has catalyzed a growing sense in the scientific community that the time is ripe to complete the 150-year-old effort to identify all cell types in the human body. The Human Cell Atlas Project is an international collaborative effort that aims to define all human cell types in terms of distinctive molecular profiles (such as gene expression profiles) and to connect this information with classical cellular descriptions (such as location and morphology). An open comprehensive reference map of the molecular state of cells in healthy human tissues would propel the systematic study of physiological states, developmental trajectories, regulatory circuitry and interactions of cells, and also provide a framework for understanding cellular dysregulation in human disease. Here we describe the idea, its potential utility, early proofs-of-concept, and some design considerations for the Human Cell Atlas, including a commitment to open data, code, and community.

  14. Identification and utilization of inter-species conserved (ISC probesets on Affymetrix human GeneChip® platforms for the optimization of the assessment of expression patterns in non human primate (NHP samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold Alma

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While researchers have utilized versions of the Affymetrix human GeneChip® for the assessment of expression patterns in non human primate (NHP samples, there has been no comprehensive sequence analysis study undertaken to demonstrate that the probe sequences designed to detect human transcripts are reliably hybridizing with their orthologs in NHP. By aligning probe sequences with expressed sequence tags (ESTs in NHP, inter-species conserved (ISC probesets, which have two or more probes complementary to ESTs in NHP, were identified on human GeneChip® platforms. The utility of human GeneChips® for the assessment of NHP expression patterns can be effectively evaluated by analyzing the hybridization behaviour of ISC probesets. Appropriate normalization methods were identified that further improve the reliability of human GeneChips® for interspecies (human vs NHP comparisons. Results ISC probesets in each of the seven Affymetrix GeneChip® platforms (U133Plus2.0, U133A, U133B, U95Av2, U95B, Focus and HuGeneFL were identified for both monkey and chimpanzee. Expression data was generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of 12 human and 8 monkey (Indian origin Rhesus macaque samples using the Focus GeneChip®. Analysis of both qualitative detection calls and quantitative signal intensities showed that intra-species reproducibility (human vs. human or monkey vs. monkey was much higher than interspecies reproducibility (human vs. monkey. ISC probesets exhibited higher interspecies reproducibility than the overall expressed probesets. Importantly, appropriate normalization methods could be leveraged to greatly improve interspecies correlations. The correlation coefficients between human (average of 12 samples and monkey (average of 8 Rhesus macaque samples are 0.725, 0.821 and 0.893 for MAS5.0 (Microarray Suite version 5.0, dChip and RMA (Robust Multi-chip Average normalization method, respectively. Conclusion It is

  15. Comprehensive Study of Microgel Electrode for On-Chip Electrophoretic Cell Sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Akihiro; Yasuda, Kenji

    2010-06-01

    We have developed an on-chip cell sorting system and microgel electrode for applying electrostatic force in microfluidic pathways in the chip. The advantages of agarose electrodes are 1) current-driven electrostatic force generation, 2) stability against pH change and chemicals, and 3) no bubble formation caused by electrolysis. We examined the carrier ion type and concentration dependence of microgel electrode impedance, and found that CoCl2 has less than 1/10 of the impedance from NaCl, and the reduction of the impedance of NaCl gel electrode was plateaued at 0.5 M. The structure control of the microgel electrode exploiting the surface tension of sol-state agarose was also introduced. The addition of 1% (w/v) trehalose into the microgel electrode allowed the frozen storage of the microgel electrode chip. The experimental results demonstrate the potential of our system and microgel electrode for practical applications in microfluidic chips.

  16. The human cell atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regev, Aviv; Teichmann, Sarah A.; Lander, Eric S.

    2017-01-01

    The recent advent of methods for high-throughput single-cell molecular profiling has catalyzed a growing sense in the scientific community that the time is ripe to complete the 150-year-old effort to identify all cell types in the human body. The Human Cell Atlas Project is an international...... collaborative effort that aims to define all human cell types in terms of distinctive molecular profiles (such as gene expression profiles) and to connect this information with classical cellular descriptions (such as location and morphology). An open comprehensive reference map of the molecular state of cells...... in healthy human tissues would propel the systematic study of physiological states, developmental trajectories, regulatory circuitry and interactions of cells, and also provide a framework for understanding cellular dysregulation in human disease. Here we describe the idea, its potential utility, early...

  17. Nucleic acid and protein extraction from electropermeabilized E. coli cells on a microfluidic chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matos, T.; Senkbeil, Silja; Mendonça, A.

    2013-01-01

    technique has been developed which is based on exposing E. coli cells to low voltages to allow extraction of nucleic acids and proteins. The flow-through electropermeability chip used consists of a microfluidic channel with integrated gold electrodes that promote cell envelope channel formation at low...

  18. Injection molded polymer chip for electrochemical and electrophysiological recordings from single cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanzi, Simone; Larsen, Simon Tylsgaard; Taboryski, Rafael J.

    We present a novel method to fabricate an all in polymer injection molded chip for electrochemical cell recordings and lateral cell trapping. The complete device is molded in thermoplastic polymer and it results from assembling two halves. We tested spin-coated conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylen...

  19. Low temperature co-fired ceramic packaging of CMOS capacitive sensor chip towards cell viability monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halonen, Niina; Kilpijärvi, Joni; Sobocinski, Maciej; Datta-Chaudhuri, Timir; Hassinen, Antti; Prakash, Someshekar B; Möller, Peter; Abshire, Pamela; Kellokumpu, Sakari; Lloyd Spetz, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Cell viability monitoring is an important part of biosafety evaluation for the detection of toxic effects on cells caused by nanomaterials, preferably by label-free, noninvasive, fast, and cost effective methods. These requirements can be met by monitoring cell viability with a capacitance-sensing integrated circuit (IC) microchip. The capacitance provides a measurement of the surface attachment of adherent cells as an indication of their health status. However, the moist, warm, and corrosive biological environment requires reliable packaging of the sensor chip. In this work, a second generation of low temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) technology was combined with flip-chip bonding to provide a durable package compatible with cell culture. The LTCC-packaged sensor chip was integrated with a printed circuit board, data acquisition device, and measurement-controlling software. The packaged sensor chip functioned well in the presence of cell medium and cells, with output voltages depending on the medium above the capacitors. Moreover, the manufacturing of microfluidic channels in the LTCC package was demonstrated.

  20. Low temperature co-fired ceramic packaging of CMOS capacitive sensor chip towards cell viability monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niina Halonen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell viability monitoring is an important part of biosafety evaluation for the detection of toxic effects on cells caused by nanomaterials, preferably by label-free, noninvasive, fast, and cost effective methods. These requirements can be met by monitoring cell viability with a capacitance-sensing integrated circuit (IC microchip. The capacitance provides a measurement of the surface attachment of adherent cells as an indication of their health status. However, the moist, warm, and corrosive biological environment requires reliable packaging of the sensor chip. In this work, a second generation of low temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC technology was combined with flip-chip bonding to provide a durable package compatible with cell culture. The LTCC-packaged sensor chip was integrated with a printed circuit board, data acquisition device, and measurement-controlling software. The packaged sensor chip functioned well in the presence of cell medium and cells, with output voltages depending on the medium above the capacitors. Moreover, the manufacturing of microfluidic channels in the LTCC package was demonstrated.

  1. Modification of Cell Wall Polysaccharides during Drying Process Affects Texture Properties of Apple Chips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Xiao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The influences of hot air drying (AD, medium- and short-wave infrared drying (IR, instant controlled pressure drop drying (DIC, and vacuum freeze drying (FD on cell wall polysaccharide modification were studied, and the relationship between the modifications and texture properties was analyzed. The results showed that the DIC treated apple chips exhibited the highest crispness (92 and excellent honeycomb-like structure among all the dried samples, whereas the FD dried apple chips had low crispness (10, the minimum hardness (17.4 N, and the highest volume ratio (0.76 and rehydration ratio (7.55. Remarkable decreases in the contents of total galacturonic acid and the amounts of water extractable pectin (WEP were found in all the dried apple chips as compared with the fresh materials. The highest retention of WEP fraction (102.7 mg/g AIR was observed in the FD dried apple chips, which may lead to a low structural rigidity and may be partially responsible for the lower hardness of the FD apple chips. In addition, the crispness of the apple chips obtained by DIC treatment, as well as AD and IR at 90°C, was higher than that of the samples obtained from the other drying processes, which might be due to the severe degradation of pectic polysaccharides, considering the results of the amounts of pectic fractions, the molar mass distribution, and concentrations of the WEP fractions. Overall, the data suggested that the modifications of pectic polysaccharides of apple chips, including the amount of the pectic fractions and their structural characteristics and the extent of degradation, significantly affect the texture of apple chips.

  2. Programmable lab-on-a-chip system for single cell analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalhammer, S.

    2009-05-01

    The collection, selection, amplification and detection of minimum genetic samples became a part of everyday life in medical and biological laboratories, to analyze DNA-fragments of pathogens, patient samples and traces on crime scenes. About a decade ago, a handful of researchers began discussing an intriguing idea. Could the equipment needed for everyday chemistry and biology procedures be shrunk to fit on a chip in the size of a fingernail? Miniature devices for, say, analysing DNA and proteins should be faster and cheaper than conventional versions. Lab-on-a-chip is an advanced technology that integrates a microfluidic system on a microscale chip device. The "laboratory" is created by means of channels, mixers, reservoirs, diffusion chambers, integrated electrodes, pumps, valves and more. With lab-ona- chip technology, complete laboratories on a square centimetre can be created. Here, a multifunctional programmable Lab-on-a-Chip driven by nanofluidics and controlled by surface acoustic waves (SAW) is presented. This system combines serial DNA-isolation-, amplification- and array-detection-process on a modified glass-platform. The fluid actuation is controlled via SAW by interdigital transducers implemented in the chemical modified chip surface. The chemical surface modification allows fluid handling in the sub-microliter range. Minute amount of sample material is extracted by laser-based microdissection out of e.g. histological sections at the single cell level. A few picogram of genetic material are isolated and transferred via a low-pressure transfer system (SPATS) onto the chip. Subsequently the genetic material inside single droplets, which behave like "virtual" beaker, is transported to the reaction and analysis centers on the chip surface via surface acoustic waves, mainly known as noise dumping filters in mobile phones. At these "biological reactors" the genetic material is processed, e.g. amplified via polymerase chain reaction methods, and genetically

  3. Size-based cell sorting with a resistive pulse sensor and an electromagnetic pump in a microfluidic chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yongxin; Li, Mengqi; Pan, Xinxiang; Wang, Qi; Li, Dongqing

    2015-02-01

    An electrokinetic microfluidic chip is developed to detect and sort target cells by size from human blood samples. Target-cell detection is achieved by a differential resistive pulse sensor (RPS) based on the size difference between the target cell and other cells. Once a target cell is detected, the detected RPS signal will automatically actuate an electromagnetic pump built in a microchannel to push the target cell into a collecting channel. This method was applied to automatically detect and sort A549 cells and T-lymphocytes from a peripheral fingertip blood sample. The viability of A549 cells sorted in the collecting well was verified by Hoechst33342 and propidium iodide staining. The results show that as many as 100 target cells per minute can be sorted out from the sample solution and thus is particularly suitable for sorting very rare target cells, such as circulating tumor cells. The actuation of the electromagnetic valve has no influence on RPS cell detection and the consequent cell-sorting process. The viability of the collected A549 cell is not impacted by the applied electric field when the cell passes the RPS detection area. The device described in this article is simple, automatic, and label-free and has wide applications in size-based rare target cell sorting for medical diagnostics. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Implementation of Microfluidic Chip Electrophoresis for the Detection of B-cell Clonality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vazan M

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A clonal population of B-cells is defined as those cells arising from the mitotic division of a single somatic cell with the same rearrangement of immunoglobulin genes. This gives rise to DNA markers for each individual lymphoid cell and its progenies and enables us to study clonality in different B-cell malignancies using multiplex polymerase chain reaction - PCR. The BIOMED-2 protocol has been implemented for clonality detection in lymphoproliferative diseases and exploits multiplex PCR reaction, subsequently analyzed by heteroduplex analysis (HDA using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE. With the advent of miniaturization and automation of molecular biology methods, lab-on-chip technologies were developed and replace partially the conventional approaches. We tested device for microfluidic chip, which is used for B-cells clonality analysis, using a PCR reaction for three subregions called frameworks (FR of the immunoglobulin heavy locus (IGH gene.

  5. Microfluidic Devices for Terahertz Spectroscopy of Live Cells Toward Lab-on-a-Chip Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Tang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available THz spectroscopy is an emerging technique for studying the dynamics and interactions of cells and biomolecules, but many practical challenges still remain in experimental studies. We present a prototype of simple and inexpensive cell-trapping microfluidic chip for THz spectroscopic study of live cells. Cells are transported, trapped and concentrated into the THz exposure region by applying an AC bias signal while the chip maintains a steady temperature at 37 °C by resistive heating. We conduct some preliminary experiments on E. coli and T-cell solution and compare the transmission spectra of empty channels, channels filled with aqueous media only, and channels filled with aqueous media with un-concentrated and concentrated cells.

  6. Low-Cost Energy-Efficient 3-D Nano-Spikes-Based Electric Cell Lysis Chips

    KAUST Repository

    Riaz, Kashif; Leung, Siu; Fan, Zhiyong; Lee, Yi-Kuen

    2017-01-01

    Electric cell lysis (ECL) is a promising technique to be integrated with portable lab-on-a-chip without lysing agent due to its simplicity and fast processing. ECL is usually limited by the requirements of high power/voltage and costly fabrication

  7. A microfluidic chip for direct and rapid trapping of white blood cells from whole blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingdong; Chen, Di; Yuan, Tao; Xie, Yao; Chen, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Blood analysis plays a major role in medical and science applications and white blood cells (WBCs) are an important target of analysis. We proposed an integrated microfluidic chip for direct and rapid trapping WBCs from whole blood. The microfluidic chip consists of two basic functional units: a winding channel to mix and arrays of two-layer trapping structures to trap WBCs. Red blood cells (RBCs) were eliminated through moving the winding channel and then WBCs were trapped by the arrays of trapping structures. We fabricated the PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) chip using soft lithography and determined the critical flow velocities of tartrazine and brilliant blue water mixing and whole blood and red blood cell lysis buffer mixing in the winding channel. They are 0.25 μl/min and 0.05 μl/min, respectively. The critical flow velocity of the whole blood and red blood cell lysis buffer is lower due to larger volume of the RBCs and higher kinematic viscosity of the whole blood. The time taken for complete lysis of whole blood was about 85 s under the flow velocity 0.05 μl/min. The RBCs were lysed completely by mixing and the WBCs were trapped by the trapping structures. The chip trapped about 2.0 × 103 from 3.3 × 103 WBCs. PMID:24404026

  8. Polymer Micro- and Nanofabrication for On-Chip Immune Cell Handling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobæk, Thor Christian

    , disposable polymer chips were fabricated by injection molding and ultrasonic welding for the generation of a large number of mature DCs in a closed microfluidic perfusion culture. By using low gas permeable tubings and chip materials, a constant pH and bubble-free culture medium was maintained for 7 days...... olefin copolymer (COC) over large surface areas by injection molding, using nanostructured mold inlays patterned by high-throughput deep-UV stepper photolithography. Injection molding at constant mold temperature below the glass transition point was significantly improved using nanostructured ceramic...... outside a CO2 cell incubator. Numerical simulations of oxygen transport were performed to establish guidelines for medium exchange rates in an impermeable culture system. Maturation of CD83+ mature DCs generated from CD14+ monocytes was demonstrated inside the disposable culture chip, with a yield almost...

  9. Human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem; Kassem, Moustapha

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a group of clonogenic cells present among the bone marrow stroma and capable of multilineage differentiation into mesoderm-type cells such as osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. Due to their ease of isolation and their differentiation potential, MSC are being...... introduced into clinical medicine in variety of applications and through different ways of administration. Here, we discuss approaches for isolation, characterization and directing differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). An update of the current clinical use of the cells is also provided....

  10. Usability of human Infinium MethylationEPIC BeadChip for mouse DNA methylation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needhamsen, Maria; Ewing, Ewoud; Lund, Harald; Gomez-Cabrero, David; Harris, Robert Adam; Kular, Lara; Jagodic, Maja

    2017-11-15

    The advent of array-based genome-wide DNA methylation methods has enabled quantitative measurement of single CpG methylation status at relatively low cost and sample input. Whereas the use of Infinium Human Methylation BeadChips has shown great utility in clinical studies, no equivalent tool is available for rodent animal samples. We examined the feasibility of using the new Infinium MethylationEPIC BeadChip for studying DNA methylation in mouse. In silico, we identified 19,420 EPIC probes (referred as mEPIC probes), which align with a unique best alignment score to the bisulfite converted reference mouse genome mm10. Further annotation revealed that 85% of mEPIC probes overlapped with mm10.refSeq genes at different genomic features including promoters (TSS1500 and TSS200), 1st exons, 5'UTRs, 3'UTRs, CpG islands, shores, shelves, open seas and FANTOM5 enhancers. Hybridization of mouse samples to Infinium Human MethylationEPIC BeadChips showed successful measurement of mEPIC probes and reproducibility between inter-array biological replicates. Finally, we demonstrated the utility of mEPIC probes for data exploration such as hierarchical clustering. Given the absence of cost and labor convenient genome-wide technologies in the murine system, our findings show that the Infinium MethylationEPIC BeadChip platform is suitable for investigation of the mouse methylome. Furthermore, we provide the "mEPICmanifest" with genomic features, available to users of Infinium Human MethylationEPIC arrays for mouse samples.

  11. Cell Monitoring and Manipulation Systems (CMMSs based on Glass Cell-Culture Chips (GC3s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian M. Buehler

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We developed different types of glass cell-culture chips (GC3s for culturing cells for microscopic observation in open media-containing troughs or in microfluidic structures. Platinum sensor and manipulation structures were used to monitor physiological parameters and to allocate and permeabilize cells. Electro-thermal micro pumps distributed chemical compounds in the microfluidic systems. The integrated temperature sensors showed a linear, Pt1000-like behavior. Cell adhesion and proliferation were monitored using interdigitated electrode structures (IDESs. The cell-doubling times of primary murine embryonic neuronal cells (PNCs were determined based on the IDES capacitance-peak shifts. The electrical activity of PNC networks was detected using multi-electrode arrays (MEAs. During seeding, the cells were dielectrophoretically allocated to individual MEAs to improve network structures. MEA pads with diameters of 15, 20, 25, and 35 µm were tested. After 3 weeks, the magnitudes of the determined action potentials were highest for pads of 25 µm in diameter and did not differ when the inter-pad distances were 100 or 170 µm. Using 25-µm diameter circular oxygen electrodes, the signal currents in the cell-culture media were found to range from approximately −0.08 nA (0% O2 to −2.35 nA (21% O2. It was observed that 60-nm thick silicon nitride-sensor layers were stable potentiometric pH sensors under cell-culture conditions for periods of days. Their sensitivity between pH 5 and 9 was as high as 45 mV per pH step. We concluded that sensorized GC3s are potential animal replacement systems for purposes such as toxicity pre-screening. For example, the effect of mefloquine, a medication used to treat malaria, on the electrical activity of neuronal cells was determined in this study using a GC3 system.

  12. DNA transfection of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells using micro electroporation chips

    KAUST Repository

    Deng, Peigang

    2011-02-01

    Experimental study of electroporation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) at the single-cell level was carried out on a micro EP chip by using single electric rectangular pulse. The threshold values of the electrode potential and pulse width for gas bubble generation on the micro electrodes due to electrolysis of water were revealed as 4.5 volt and 100 μs, respectively. Quantitative EP study was performed with various electric field strengths for various pulse widths, ranging from 20μs to 15ms. Over 1,000 single-cell EP results were used to construct an EP "phase diagram", which delineates the boundaries for (1) effective EP of MSCs and (2) electric cell lysis of MSCs. Finally, the micro EP chip showed successful transfection of the pEGFP-C1 plasmid into the MSCs by properly choosing the electric parameters from the EP "phase diagram". © 2011 IEEE.

  13. DNA transfection of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells using micro electroporation chips

    KAUST Repository

    Deng, Peigang; Chang, Donald C.; Lee, Yi Kuen; Zhou, Junwei; Li, Gang

    2011-01-01

    Experimental study of electroporation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) at the single-cell level was carried out on a micro EP chip by using single electric rectangular pulse. The threshold values of the electrode potential and pulse width for gas bubble generation on the micro electrodes due to electrolysis of water were revealed as 4.5 volt and 100 μs, respectively. Quantitative EP study was performed with various electric field strengths for various pulse widths, ranging from 20μs to 15ms. Over 1,000 single-cell EP results were used to construct an EP "phase diagram", which delineates the boundaries for (1) effective EP of MSCs and (2) electric cell lysis of MSCs. Finally, the micro EP chip showed successful transfection of the pEGFP-C1 plasmid into the MSCs by properly choosing the electric parameters from the EP "phase diagram". © 2011 IEEE.

  14. Microfluidic Platform for the Long-Term On-Chip Cultivation of Mammalian Cells for Lab-On-A-Chip Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunge, Frank; Driesche, Sander van den; Vellekoop, Michael J

    2017-07-10

    Lab-on-a-Chip (LoC) applications for the long-term analysis of mammalian cells are still very rare due to the lack of convenient cell cultivation devices. The difficulties are the integration of suitable supply structures, the need of expensive equipment like an incubator and sophisticated pumps as well as the choice of material. The presented device is made out of hard, but non-cytotoxic materials (silicon and glass) and contains two vertical arranged membranes out of hydrogel. The porous membranes are used to separate the culture chamber from two supply channels for gases and nutrients. The cells are fed continuously by diffusion through the membranes without the need of an incubator and low requirements on the supply of medium to the assembly. The diffusion of oxygen is modelled in order to find the optimal dimensions of the chamber. The chip is connected via 3D-printed holders to the macroscopic world. The holders are coated with Parlyene C to ensure that only biocompatible materials are in contact with the culture medium. The experiments with MDCK-cells show the successful seeding inside the chip, culturing and passaging. Consequently, the presented platform is a step towards Lab-on-a-Chip applications that require long-term cultivation of mammalian cells.

  15. Efficient large volume electroporation of dendritic cells through micrometer scale manipulation of flow in a disposable polymer chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmeczi, David; Hansen, Thomas; Met, Özcan

    2011-01-01

    We present a hybrid chip of polymer and stainless steel designed for high-throughput continuous electroporation of cells in suspension. The chip is constructed with two parallel stainless steel mesh electrodes oriented perpendicular to the liquid flow. The relatively high hydrodynamic resistance ...

  16. A monolithic glass chip for active single-cell sorting based on mechanical phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faigle, Christoph; Lautenschläger, Franziska; Whyte, Graeme; Homewood, Philip; Martín-Badosa, Estela; Guck, Jochen

    2015-03-07

    The mechanical properties of biological cells have long been considered as inherent markers of biological function and disease. However, the screening and active sorting of heterogeneous populations based on serial single-cell mechanical measurements has not been demonstrated. Here we present a novel monolithic glass chip for combined fluorescence detection and mechanical phenotyping using an optical stretcher. A new design and manufacturing process, involving the bonding of two asymmetrically etched glass plates, combines exact optical fiber alignment, low laser damage threshold and high imaging quality with the possibility of several microfluidic inlet and outlet channels. We show the utility of such a custom-built optical stretcher glass chip by measuring and sorting single cells in a heterogeneous population based on their different mechanical properties and verify sorting accuracy by simultaneous fluorescence detection. This offers new possibilities of exact characterization and sorting of small populations based on rheological properties for biological and biomedical applications.

  17. A Novel Chip for Cyclic Stretch and Intermittent Hypoxia Cell Exposures Mimicking Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelia Campillo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent hypoxia (IH, a hallmark of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of OSA-associated morbidities, especially in the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Oxidative stress and inflammation induced by IH are suggested as main contributors of end-organ dysfunction in OSA patients and animal models. Since the molecular mechanisms underlying these in vivo pathological responses remain poorly understood, implementation of experimental in vitro cell-based systems capable of inducing high-frequency IH would be highly desirable. Here, we describe the design, fabrication and validation of a versatile chip for subjecting cultured cells to fast changes in gas partial pressure and to cyclic stretch. The chip is fabricated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS and consists of a cylindrical well covered by a thin membrane. Cells cultured on top of the membrane can be subjected to fast changes in oxygen concentration (equilibrium time 6 s. Moreover, cells can be subjected to cyclic stretch at cardiac or respiratory frequencies independently or simultaneously. Rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs exposed to IH mimicking OSA and cyclic stretch at cardiac frequencies revealed that hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α expression was increased in response to both stimuli. Thus, the chip provides a versatile tool for the study of cellular responses to cyclical hypoxia and stretch.

  18. Tip chip : Subcellular sampling from single cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quist, Jos; Sarajlic, Edin; Lai, Stanley C.S.; Lemay, Serge G.

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the molecular content of single cells, cell lysis is typically required, yielding a snapshot of cell behavior only. To follow complex molecular profiles over time, subcellular sampling methods potentially can be used, but to date these methods involve laborious offline analysis. Here we

  19. Chip-based human liver-intestine and liver-skin co-cultures--A first step toward systemic repeated dose substance testing in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschmeyer, Ilka; Hasenberg, Tobias; Jaenicke, Annika; Lindner, Marcus; Lorenz, Alexandra Katharina; Zech, Julie; Garbe, Leif-Alexander; Sonntag, Frank; Hayden, Patrick; Ayehunie, Seyoum; Lauster, Roland; Marx, Uwe; Materne, Eva-Maria

    2015-09-01

    Systemic repeated dose safety assessment and systemic efficacy evaluation of substances are currently carried out on laboratory animals and in humans due to the lack of predictive alternatives. Relevant international regulations, such as OECD and ICH guidelines, demand long-term testing and oral, dermal, inhalation, and systemic exposure routes for such evaluations. So-called "human-on-a-chip" concepts are aiming to replace respective animals and humans in substance evaluation with miniaturized functional human organisms. The major technical hurdle toward success in this field is the life-like combination of human barrier organ models, such as intestine, lung or skin, with parenchymal organ equivalents, such as liver, at the smallest biologically acceptable scale. Here, we report on a reproducible homeostatic long-term co-culture of human liver equivalents with either a reconstructed human intestinal barrier model or a human skin biopsy applying a microphysiological system. We used a multi-organ chip (MOC) platform, which provides pulsatile fluid flow within physiological ranges at low media-to-tissue ratios. The MOC supports submerse cultivation of an intact intestinal barrier model and an air-liquid interface for the skin model during their co-culture with the liver equivalents respectively at (1)/100.000 the scale of their human counterparts in vivo. To increase the degree of organismal emulation, microfluidic channels of the liver-skin co-culture could be successfully covered with human endothelial cells, thus mimicking human vasculature, for the first time. Finally, exposure routes emulating oral and systemic administration in humans have been qualified by applying a repeated dose administration of a model substance - troglitazone - to the chip-based co-cultures. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Blood cleaner on-chip design for artificial human kidney manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwanpayak N

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available N Suwanpayak1, MA Jalil2, MS Aziz3, FD Ismail3, J Ali3, PP Yupapin11Nanoscale Science and Engineering Research Alliance (N'SERA, Advanced Research Center for Photonics, Faculty of Science, King Mongkut's Institute of Technology, Ladkrabang, Bangkok, Thailand; 2Ibnu Sina Institute of Fundamental Science Studies (IIS, 3Institute of Advanced Photonics Science, Nanotechnology Research Alliance, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Johor Bahru, MalaysiaAbstract: A novel design of a blood cleaner on-chip using an optical waveguide known as a PANDA ring resonator is proposed. By controlling some suitable parameters, the optical vortices (gradient optical fields/wells can be generated and used to form the trapping tools in the same way as optical tweezers. In operation, the trapping force is formed by the combination between the gradient field and scattering photons by using the intense optical vortices generated within the PANDA ring resonator. This can be used for blood waste trapping and moves dynamically within the blood cleaner on-chip system (artificial kidney, and is performed within the wavelength routers. Finally, the blood quality test is exploited by the external probe before sending to the destination. The advantage of the proposed kidney on-chip system is that the unwanted substances can be trapped and filtered from the artificial kidney, which can be available for blood cleaning applications.Keywords: optical trapping, blood dialysis, blood cleaner, human kidney manipulation

  1. Internalization of subcellular-scale microfabricated chips by healthy and cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, H.-S. Philip

    2018-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of physiological parameters inside a living cell will lead to major advances in our understanding of biology and complex diseases, such as cancer. It also enables the development of new medical diagnostics and therapeutics. Progress in nanofabrication and wireless communication has opened up the potential of making a wireless chip small enough that it can be wholly inserted into a living cell. To investigate how such chips could be internalized into various types of living single cells and how this process might affect cells’ physiology, we designed and fabricated a series of multilayered micron-scale tag structures with different sizes as potential RFID (Radio Frequency IDentification) cell trackers. While the present structures are test structures that do not resonate, the tags that do resonate have similar structure from device fabrication, material properties, and device size point of view. The structures are in four different sizes, the largest with the lateral dimension of 9 μm × 21 μm. The thickness for these structures is kept constant at 1.5 μm. We demonstrate successful delivery of our fabricated chips into various types of living cells, such as melanoma skin cancer, breast cancer, colon cancer and healthy/normal fibroblast skin cells. To our surprise, we observed a remarkable internalization rate difference between each cell type; the uptake rate was faster for more aggressive cancer cells than the normal/healthy cells. Cell viability before and after tag cellular internalization and persistence of the internalized tags have also been recorded over the course of five days of incubation. These results establish the foundations of the possibility of long term, wireless, intracellular physiological signal monitoring. PMID:29601607

  2. Experiment list: SRX153147 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -Seq source_name=Human breast adenocarcinoma cell-line MCF7 || cell-line=MCF7 || passage=5 || chip antibody=...on=Pleura|Tissue Diagnosis=Adenocarcinoma 64054379,98.7,5.2,764 GSM946851: MCF7 H3K27me3; Homo sapiens; ChIP

  3. Experiment list: SRX153146 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -Seq source_name=Human breast adenocarcinoma cell-line MCF7 || cell-line=MCF7 || passage=5 || chip antibody=...n=Pleura|Tissue Diagnosis=Adenocarcinoma 60170246,98.4,5.7,16756 GSM946850: MCF7 H3K27ac; Homo sapiens; ChIP

  4. Experiment list: SRX153148 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -Seq source_name=Human breast adenocarcinoma cell-line MCF7 || cell-line=MCF7 || passage=5 || chip antibody=...n=Pleura|Tissue Diagnosis=Adenocarcinoma 57306360,95.7,15.1,2666 GSM946852: MCF7 H3K9me3; Homo sapiens; ChIP

  5. Experiment list: SRX119679 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 8,18360 GSM874985: ES.H3K27me3; Homo sapiens; ChIP-Seq source_name=H1 human Embryonic stem cells || cell line=H1 || treatment=diagnos...tic sample (pre-treatment) || chip antibody=H3K27me3 || chip antibody manufacturer=

  6. Experiment list: SRX119684 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2,13603 GSM874990: ES.H3K79me2; Homo sapiens; ChIP-Seq source_name=H1 human Embryonic stem cell || cell line=H1 || treatment=diagnost...ic sample (pre-treatment) || chip antibody=H3K79me2 || chip antibody manufacturer=A

  7. Human innate lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mjösberg, Jenny; Spits, Hergen

    2016-11-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are increasingly acknowledged as important mediators of immune homeostasis and pathology. ILCs act as early orchestrators of immunity, responding to epithelium-derived signals by expressing an array of cytokines and cell-surface receptors, which shape subsequent immune responses. As such, ILCs make up interesting therapeutic targets for several diseases. In patients with allergy and asthma, group 2 innate lymphoid cells produce high amounts of IL-5 and IL-13, thereby contributing to type 2-mediated inflammation. Group 3 innate lymphoid cells are implicated in intestinal homeostasis and psoriasis pathology through abundant IL-22 production, whereas group 1 innate lymphoid cells are accumulated in chronic inflammation of the gut (inflammatory bowel disease) and lung (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), where they contribute to IFN-γ-mediated inflammation. Although the ontogeny of mouse ILCs is slowly unraveling, the development of human ILCs is far from understood. In addition, the growing complexity of the human ILC family in terms of previously unrecognized functional heterogeneity and plasticity has generated confusion within the field. Here we provide an updated view on the function and plasticity of human ILCs in tissue homeostasis and disease. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Identifying EGFR-Expressed Cells and Detecting EGFR Multi-Mutations at Single-Cell Level by Microfluidic Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ren; Zhou, Mingxing; Li, Jine; Wang, Zihua; Zhang, Weikai; Yue, Chunyan; Ma, Yan; Peng, Hailin; Wei, Zewen; Hu, Zhiyuan

    2018-03-01

    EGFR mutations companion diagnostics have been proved to be crucial for the efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeted cancer therapies. To uncover multiple mutations occurred in minority of EGFR-mutated cells, which may be covered by the noises from majority of un-mutated cells, is currently becoming an urgent clinical requirement. Here we present the validation of a microfluidic-chip-based method for detecting EGFR multi-mutations at single-cell level. By trapping and immunofluorescently imaging single cells in specifically designed silicon microwells, the EGFR-expressed cells were easily identified. By in situ lysing single cells, the cell lysates of EGFR-expressed cells were retrieved without cross-contamination. Benefited from excluding the noise from cells without EGFR expression, the simple and cost-effective Sanger's sequencing, but not the expensive deep sequencing of the whole cell population, was used to discover multi-mutations. We verified the new method with precisely discovering three most important EGFR drug-related mutations from a sample in which EGFR-mutated cells only account for a small percentage of whole cell population. The microfluidic chip is capable of discovering not only the existence of specific EGFR multi-mutations, but also other valuable single-cell-level information: on which specific cells the mutations occurred, or whether different mutations coexist on the same cells. This microfluidic chip constitutes a promising method to promote simple and cost-effective Sanger's sequencing to be a routine test before performing targeted cancer therapy.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. Pyrolyzed Photoresist Electrodes for Integration in Microfluidic Chips for Transmitter Detection from Biological Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Tylsgaard; Argyraki, Aikaterini; Amato, Letizia

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we show how pyrolyzed photoresist carbon electrodes can be used for amperometric detection of potassium-induced transmitter release from large groups of neuronal PC 12 cells. This opens the way for the use of carbon film electrodes in microfabricated devices for neurochemical drug ...... by the difference in photoresist viscosity. By adding a soft bake step to the fabrication procedure, the flatness of pyrolyzed AZ 5214 electrodes could be improved which would facilitate their integration in microfluidic chip devices....

  10. In-chip fabrication of free-form 3D constructs for directed cell migration analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Mark Holm; Hjortø, Gertrud Malene; Hansen, Morten

    2013-01-01

    with a range of pore sizes from 5 × 5 μm to 15 × 15 μm and prefilled with fibrillar collagen. Dendritic cells seeded into the polymer chip in a concentration gradient of the chemoattractant CCL21 efficiently negotiated the microporous maze structure for pore sizes of 8 × 8 μm or larger. The cells migrating...... through smaller pore sizes made significantly more turns than those through larger pores. The introduction of additional defined barriers in the microporous structure resulted in dendritic cells making more turns while still being able to follow the chemoattractant concentration gradient....

  11. On-chip enzymatic microbiofuel cell-powered integrated circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Andrew G; Suraniti, Emmanuel; Roche, Jérôme; Richter, Harald; Kuhn, Alexander; Mano, Nicolas; Fischer, Peer

    2017-05-16

    A variety of diagnostic and therapeutic medical technologies rely on long term implantation of an electronic device to monitor or regulate a patient's condition. One proposed approach to powering these devices is to use a biofuel cell to convert the chemical energy from blood nutrients into electrical current to supply the electronics. We present here an enzymatic microbiofuel cell whose electrodes are directly integrated into a digital electronic circuit. Glucose oxidizing and oxygen reducing enzymes are immobilized on microelectrodes of an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) using redox hydrogels to produce an enzymatic biofuel cell, capable of harvesting electrical power from just a single droplet of 5 mM glucose solution. Optimisation of the fuel cell voltage and power to match the requirements of the electronics allow self-powered operation of the on-board digital circuitry. This study represents a step towards implantable self-powered electronic devices that gather their energy from physiological fluids.

  12. 3D-printed microfluidic chips with patterned, cell-laden hydrogel constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Yu, Chu Hsiang; Ersoy, Fulya; Emadi, Sharareh; Khademhosseini, Ali; Tasoglu, Savas

    2016-06-20

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing offers potential to fabricate high-throughput and low-cost fabrication of microfluidic devices as a promising alternative to traditional techniques which enables efficient design iterations in the development stage. In this study, we demonstrate a single-step fabrication of a 3D transparent microfluidic chip using two alternative techniques: a stereolithography-based desktop 3D printer and a two-step fabrication using an industrial 3D printer based on polyjet technology. This method, compared to conventional fabrication using relatively expensive materials and labor-intensive processes, presents a low-cost, rapid prototyping technique to print functional 3D microfluidic chips. We enhance the capabilities of 3D-printed microfluidic devices by coupling 3D cell encapsulation and spatial patterning within photocrosslinkable gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA). The platform presented here serves as a 3D culture environment for long-term cell culture and growth. Furthermore, we have demonstrated the ability to print complex 3D microfluidic channels to create predictable and controllable fluid flow regimes. Here, we demonstrate the novel use of 3D-printed microfluidic chips as controllable 3D cell culture environments, advancing the applicability of 3D printing to engineering physiological systems for future applications in bioengineering.

  13. Inhibition of the Hedgehog Signaling Pathway Depresses the Cigarette Smoke-Induced Malignant Transformation of 16HBE Cells on a Microfluidic Chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yong-Xin; Yang, Zhi-Hui; Du, Xiao-Hui; Zhao, Hui; Liu, Yuan-Bin; Guo, Zhe; Wang, Qi

    2018-05-20

    The hedgehog signaling system (HHS) plays an important role in the regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation during the embryonic phases. However, little is known about the involvement of HHS in the malignant transformation of cells. This study aimed to detect the role of HHS in the malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial (16HBE) cells. In this study, two microfluidic chips were designed to investigate cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-induced malignant transformation of cells. Chip A contained a concentration gradient generator, while chip B had four cell chambers with a central channel. The 16HBE cells cultured in chip A were used to determine the optimal concentration of CSE for inducing malignant transformation. The 16HBE cells in chip B were cultured with 12.25% CSE (Group A), 12.25% CSE + 5 μmol/L cyclopamine (Group B), or normal complete medium as control for 8 months (Group C), to establish the in vitro lung inflammatory-cancer transformation model. The transformed cells were inoculated into 20 nude mice as cells alone (Group 1) or cells with cyclopamine (Group 2) for tumorigenesis testing. Expression of HHS proteins was detected by Western blot. Data were expressed as mean ± standard deviation. The t-test was used for paired samples, and the difference among groups was analyzed using a one-way analysis of variance. The optimal concentration of CSE was 12.25%. Expression of HHS proteins increased during the process of malignant transformation (Group B vs. Group A, F = 7.65, P < 0.05). After CSE exposure for 8 months, there were significant changes in cellular morphology, which allowed the transformed cells to grow into tumors in 40 days after being inoculated into nude mice. Cyclopamine could effectively depress the expression of HHS proteins (Group C vs. Group B, F = 6.47, P < 0.05) and prevent tumor growth in nude mice (Group 2 vs. Group 1, t = 31.59, P < 0.01). The activity of HHS is upregulated during the CSE-induced malignant

  14. Progress and Future Prospectives in Skin-on-Chip Development with Emphasis on the use of Different Cell Types and Technical Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Broek, Lenie J; Bergers, Lambert I J C; Reijnders, Christianne M A; Gibbs, Susan

    2017-06-01

    Understanding the healthy and diseased state of skin is important in many areas of basic and applied research. Although the field of skin tissue engineering has advanced greatly over the last years, current in vitro skin models still do not mimic the complexity of the human skin. Skin-on-chip and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) might be key technologies to improve in vitro skin models. This review summarizes the state of the art of in vitro skin models with regard to cell sources (primary, cell line, iPSC) and microfluidic devices. It can be concluded that iPSC have the potential to be differentiated into many kinds of immunologically matched cells and skin-on-chip technology might lead to more physiologically relevant skin models due to the controlled environment, possible exchange of immune cells, and an increased barrier function. Therefore the combination of iPSC and skin-on-chip is expected to lead to superior healthy and diseased in vitro skin models.

  15. Programming Cell Adhesion for On-Chip Sequential Boolean Logic Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xiangmeng; Wang, Shaopeng; Ge, Zhilei; Wang, Jianbang; Yao, Guangbao; Li, Jiang; Zuo, Xiaolei; Shi, Jiye; Song, Shiping; Wang, Lihua; Li, Li; Pei, Hao; Fan, Chunhai

    2017-08-02

    Programmable remodelling of cell surfaces enables high-precision regulation of cell behavior. In this work, we developed in vitro constructed DNA-based chemical reaction networks (CRNs) to program on-chip cell adhesion. We found that the RGD-functionalized DNA CRNs are entirely noninvasive when interfaced with the fluidic mosaic membrane of living cells. DNA toehold with different lengths could tunably alter the release kinetics of cells, which shows rapid release in minutes with the use of a 6-base toehold. We further demonstrated the realization of Boolean logic functions by using DNA strand displacement reactions, which include multi-input and sequential cell logic gates (AND, OR, XOR, and AND-OR). This study provides a highly generic tool for self-organization of biological systems.

  16. Quantitative measurements of intercellular adhesion between a macrophage and cancer cells using a cup-attached AFM chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyonchol; Yamagishi, Ayana; Imaizumi, Miku; Onomura, Yui; Nagasaki, Akira; Miyagi, Yohei; Okada, Tomoko; Nakamura, Chikashi

    2017-07-01

    Intercellular adhesion between a macrophage and cancer cells was quantitatively measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Cup-shaped metal hemispheres were fabricated using polystyrene particles as a template, and a cup was attached to the apex of the AFM cantilever. The cup-attached AFM chip (cup-chip) approached a murine macrophage cell (J774.2), the cell was captured on the inner concave of the cup, and picked up by withdrawing the cup-chip from the substrate. The cell-attached chip was advanced towards a murine breast cancer cell (FP10SC2), and intercellular adhesion between the two cells was quantitatively measured. To compare cell adhesion strength, the work required to separate two adhered cells (separation work) was used as a parameter. Separation work was almost 2-fold larger between a J774.2 cell and FP10SC2 cell than between J774.2 cell and three additional different cancer cells (4T1E, MAT-LyLu, and U-2OS), two FP10SC2 cells, or two J774.2 cells. FP10SC2 was established from 4T1E as a highly metastatic cell line, indicates separation work increased as the malignancy of cancer cells became higher. One possible explanation of the strong adhesion of macrophages to cancer cells observed in this study is that the measurement condition mimicked the microenvironment of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in vivo, and J774.2 cells strongly expressed CD204, which is a marker of TAMs. The results of the present study, which were obtained by measuring cell adhesion strength quantitatively, indicate that the fabricated cup-chip is a useful tool for measuring intercellular adhesion easily and quantitatively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Human leukaemic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andronikashvili, E.L.; Mosulishvili, L.M.; Belokobil'skiy, A.I.; Kharabadze, N.E.; Shonia, N.I.; Desai, L.S.; Foley, G.E.

    1976-01-01

    The results of the determination of trace elements in nucleic acids and histones in human leukaemic cells by activation analysis are reported. The Cr 2+ , Fe 2+ , Zn 2+ , Co 2+ and Sb 2+ content of DNA and RNA of leukaemic cells compared to that of lymphocytes from a patient with infectious mononucleosis or a normal donor are shown tabulated. Similar comparisons are shown for the same trace metal content of histones isolated from the same type of cells. It is felt that the results afford further interesting speculation that trace metals may be involved in the interactions between histones and DNA (especially at the binding sites of histones to DNA), which affect transcription characteristics. (U.K.)

  18. Anisotropic multi-spot DBR porous silicon chip for the detection of human immunoglobin G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Bomin; Um, Sungyong; Sohn, Honglae

    2014-07-01

    Asymmetric porous silicon multilayer (APSM)-based optical biosensor was developed to specify human Immunoglobin G (Ig G). APSM chip was generated by an electrochemical etching of silicon wafer using an asymmetric electrode configuration in aqueous ethanolic HF solution and constituted with nine arrayed porous silicon multilayer. APSM prepared from anisotropic etching conditions displayed a sharp reflection resonance in the reflectivity spectrum. Each spot displayed single reflection resonance at different wavelengths as a function of the lateral distance from the Pt counter electrode. The sensor system was consisted of the 3 x 3 spot array of APSM modified with protein A. The system was probed with an aqueous human Ig G. Molecular binding and specificity was monitored as a shift in wavelength of reflection resonance.

  19. Skeletal Muscle Differentiation on a Chip Shows Human Donor Mesoangioblasts' Efficiency in Restoring Dystrophin in a Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serena, Elena; Zatti, Susi; Zoso, Alice; Lo Verso, Francesca; Tedesco, F Saverio; Cossu, Giulio; Elvassore, Nicola

    2016-12-01

    : Restoration of the protein dystrophin on muscle membrane is the goal of many research lines aimed at curing Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Results of ongoing preclinical and clinical trials suggest that partial restoration of dystrophin might be sufficient to significantly reduce muscle damage. Different myogenic progenitors are candidates for cell therapy of muscular dystrophies, but only satellite cells and pericytes have already entered clinical experimentation. This study aimed to provide in vitro quantitative evidence of the ability of mesoangioblasts to restore dystrophin, in terms of protein accumulation and distribution, within myotubes derived from DMD patients, using a microengineered model. We designed an ad hoc experimental strategy to miniaturize on a chip the standard process of muscle regeneration independent of variables such as inflammation and fibrosis. It is based on the coculture, at different ratios, of human dystrophin-positive myogenic progenitors and dystrophin-negative myoblasts in a substrate with muscle-like physiological stiffness and cell micropatterns. Results showed that both healthy myoblasts and mesoangioblasts restored dystrophin expression in DMD myotubes. However, mesoangioblasts showed unexpected efficiency with respect to myoblasts in dystrophin production in terms of the amount of protein produced (40% vs. 15%) and length of the dystrophin membrane domain (210-240 µm vs. 40-70 µm). These results show that our microscaled in vitro model of human DMD skeletal muscle validated previous in vivo preclinical work and may be used to predict efficacy of new methods aimed at enhancing dystrophin accumulation and distribution before they are tested in vivo, reducing time, costs, and variability of clinical experimentation. This study aimed to provide in vitro quantitative evidence of the ability of human mesoangioblasts to restore dystrophin, in terms of protein accumulation and distribution, within myotubes derived from

  20. A Cardiac Cell Outgrowth Assay for Evaluating Drug Compounds Using a Cardiac Spheroid-on-a-Chip Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Christoffersson

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D models with cells arranged in clusters or spheroids have emerged as valuable tools to improve physiological relevance in drug screening. One of the challenges with cells cultured in 3D, especially for high-throughput applications, is to quickly and non-invasively assess the cellular state in vitro. In this article, we show that the number of cells growing out from human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC-derived cardiac spheroids can be quantified to serve as an indicator of a drug’s effect on spheroids captured in a microfluidic device. Combining this spheroid-on-a-chip with confocal high content imaging reveals easily accessible, quantitative outgrowth data. We found that effects on outgrowing cell numbers correlate to the concentrations of relevant pharmacological compounds and could thus serve as a practical readout to monitor drug effects. Here, we demonstrate the potential of this semi-high-throughput “cardiac cell outgrowth assay” with six compounds at three concentrations applied to spheroids for 48 h. The image-based readout complements end-point assays or may be used as a non-invasive assay for quality control during long-term culture.

  1. Lab on a chip automates in vitro cell culturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perozziello, Gerardo; Møllenbach, Jacob; Laursen, Steen

    2012-01-01

    A novel in vitro fertilization system is presented based on an incubation chamber and a microfluidic device which serves as advanced microfluidic cultivation chamber. The flow is controlled by hydrostatic height differences and evaporation is avoided with help of mineral oil. Six patient compartm......A novel in vitro fertilization system is presented based on an incubation chamber and a microfluidic device which serves as advanced microfluidic cultivation chamber. The flow is controlled by hydrostatic height differences and evaporation is avoided with help of mineral oil. Six patient...... compartments allow six simultaneous temperature and pH controlled cultivations with 12 embryos with continuous logging of the monitoring data. Two media can be controlled with help of opening or closing of openings at the microfluidic disposable devices. The flow rates through the single cell compartments can...

  2. Implementing oxygen control in chip-based cell and tissue culture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oomen, Pieter E; Skolimowski, Maciej D; Verpoorte, Elisabeth

    2016-09-21

    Oxygen is essential in the energy metabolism of cells, as well as being an important regulatory parameter influencing cell differentiation and function. Interest in precise oxygen control for in vitro cultures of tissues and cells continues to grow, especially with the emergence of the organ-on-a-chip and the desire to emulate in vivo conditions. This was recently discussed in this journal in a Critical Review by Brennan et al. (Lab Chip (2014). DOI: ). Microfluidics can be used to introduce flow to facilitate nutrient supply to and waste removal from in vitro culture systems. Well-defined oxygen gradients can also be established. However, cells can quickly alter the oxygen balance in their vicinity. In this Tutorial Review, we expand on the Brennan paper to focus on the implementation of oxygen analysis in these systems to achieve continuous monitoring. Both electrochemical and optical approaches for the integration of oxygen monitoring in microfluidic tissue and cell culture systems will be discussed. Differences in oxygen requirements from one organ to the next are a challenging problem, as oxygen delivery is limited by its uptake into medium. Hence, we discuss the factors determining oxygen concentrations in solutions and consider the possible use of artificial oxygen carriers to increase dissolved oxygen concentrations. The selection of device material for applications requiring precise oxygen control is discussed in detail, focusing on oxygen permeability. Lastly, a variety of devices is presented, showing the diversity of approaches that can be employed to control and monitor oxygen concentrations in in vitro experiments.

  3. Towards autonomous lab-on-a-chip devices for cell phone biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comina, Germán; Suska, Anke; Filippini, Daniel

    2016-03-15

    Modern cell phones are a ubiquitous resource with a residual capacity to accommodate chemical sensing and biosensing capabilities. From the different approaches explored to capitalize on such resource, the use of autonomous disposable lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices-conceived as only accessories to complement cell phones-underscores the possibility to entirely retain cell phones' ubiquity for distributed biosensing. The technology and principles exploited for autonomous LOC devices are here selected and reviewed focusing on their potential to serve cell phone readout configurations. Together with this requirement, the central aspects of cell phones' resources that determine their potential for analytical detection are examined. The conversion of these LOC concepts into universal architectures that are readable on unaccessorized phones is discussed within this context. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Magnetron sputtered diamond-like carbon microelectrodes for on-chip measurement of quantal catecholamine release from cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Yuanfang; Chen, Xiaohui; Gupta, Sanju; Gillis, Kevin D.; Gangopadhyay, Shubhra

    2008-01-01

    Carbon electrodes are widely used in electrochemistry due to their low cost, wide potential window, and low and stable background noise. Carbon-fiber electrodes (CFE) are commonly used to electrochemically measure “quantal” catecholamine release via exocytosis from individual cells, but it is difficult to integrate CFEs into lab-on-a-chip devices. Here we report the development of nitrogen doped diamond-like carbon (DLC:N) microelectrodes on a chip to monitor quantal release of catecholamines...

  5. HuMiChip: Development of a Functional Gene Array for the Study of Human Microbiomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Q.; Deng, Ye; Lin, Lu; Hemme, Chris L.; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Microbiomes play very important roles in terms of nutrition, health and disease by interacting with their hosts. Based on sequence data currently available in public domains, we have developed a functional gene array to monitor both organismal and functional gene profiles of normal microbiota in human and mouse hosts, and such an array is called human and mouse microbiota array, HMM-Chip. First, seed sequences were identified from KEGG databases, and used to construct a seed database (seedDB) containing 136 gene families in 19 metabolic pathways closely related to human and mouse microbiomes. Second, a mother database (motherDB) was constructed with 81 genomes of bacterial strains with 54 from gut and 27 from oral environments, and 16 metagenomes, and used for selection of genes and probe design. Gene prediction was performed by Glimmer3 for bacterial genomes, and by the Metagene program for metagenomes. In total, 228,240 and 801,599 genes were identified for bacterial genomes and metagenomes, respectively. Then the motherDB was searched against the seedDB using the HMMer program, and gene sequences in the motherDB that were highly homologous with seed sequences in the seedDB were used for probe design by the CommOligo software. Different degrees of specific probes, including gene-specific, inclusive and exclusive group-specific probes were selected. All candidate probes were checked against the motherDB and NCBI databases for specificity. Finally, 7,763 probes covering 91.2percent (12,601 out of 13,814) HMMer confirmed sequences from 75 bacterial genomes and 16 metagenomes were selected. This developed HMM-Chip is able to detect the diversity and abundance of functional genes, the gene expression of microbial communities, and potentially, the interactions of microorganisms and their hosts.

  6. Micro solid oxide fuel cell on the chip. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stutz, M.; Hotz, N.; Bieri, N.; Poulikakos, D.

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this project is the numerical and experimental investigation of hydrocarbon-to-syngas reforming in micro reformers for incorporation into an entire micro fuel cell system. Numerical simulations are used to achieve deeper understanding of several determining aspects in such a micro reformer. These insights are used to optimize the reforming performance by proper choice of operational and geometrical parameters of a reformer. These numerical results are continued by comprehensive experimental studies. In the first chapter, the effect of wall conduction of a tubular methane micro reformer is investigated numerically. Methane is used as the representative hydrocarbon because its detailed surface reaction mechanism is known. It is found that the axial wall conduction can strongly influence the performance of the microreactor and should not be neglected without a careful a priori investigation of its impact. In the second chapter, the effect of the catalyst amount and reactor geometry on the reforming process was investigated. It was found that the hydrogen selectivity changes significantly with varying catalyst loading. Thus, the reaction path leading to higher hydrogen production becomes more important by increasing the catalyst surface site density on the active surface. Another unexpected result is the presence of optimum channel geometry and optimum catalyst amount. In the third chapter of this project, the capability of flame-made Rh/Ce{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 0.5}O{sub 2} nanoparticles catalyzing the reforming of butane to H{sub 2}- and CO-rich syngas was investigated experimentally in a packed bed reactor. The main goal of this study was the efficient reforming of butane at temperatures between 500 and 600 {sup o}C for a micro intermediate-temperature SOFC system. Our results showed that Rh/Ce{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 0.5}O{sub 2} nanoparticles proved to be a very promising material for butane-to-syngas reforming with complete butane conversion and a hydrogen yield of 77

  7. Human leukaemic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andronikashvili, E.L.; Mosulishvili, L.M.; Belokobil'skiy, A.I.; Kharabadze, N.E.; Shonia, N.I.; Desai, L.S.; Foley, G.E.

    1976-01-01

    Trace metals were measured by neutron-activation analyses in purified nucleic acids and histone(s) of lymphocytes from patients with acute lymphocytic leukaemia or infectious mononucleosis, and from normal donors. DNA isolated from lymphocytes of a patient with infectious mononucleosis and a normal donor showed a high content of Cr 2+ , Sb 2+ , Fe 2+ , Zn 2+ , whereas DNA of lymphoblasts from a patient with acute lymphocytic leukaemia had a lower content of these trace metals, but the Co 2+ content was 20-fold higher than in DNA of normal donor lymphocytic cells. Total histones from leukaemic cells had higher contents of most of the trace metals except for Zn 2+ , which was present in lesser concentration than in histones from normal donor lymphocytic cells. Lysine-rich (F1) histones showed lower contents of Cr 2+ , Sb 2+ and Co 2+ , whereas arginine-rich (F3) histones had significantly higher contents of these trace metals. These observations may be of interest in that F3 histones more effectively inhibit RNA synthesis in human lymphocytic cells than do other species of histones. (author)

  8. Towards pH sensing in blood-vessel-on-a-chip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanumihardja, Esther; Olthuis, Wouter; van den Berg, Albert

    2017-01-01

    The Vascular Engineering on chip using differentiated Stem Cells (VESCEL) project aims to realize an on-chip model of human vasculature, where living cells are cultured and perfused in micrometer size compartments to mimic human vasculature function. This part of the VESCEL project aims to integrate

  9. All polymer chip for amperometric studies of transmitter release from large groups of neuronal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon T.; Taboryski, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    We present an all polymer electrochemical chip for simple detection of transmitter release from large groups of cultured PC 12 cells. Conductive polymer PEDOT:tosylate microelectrodes were used together with constant potential amperometry to obtain easy-to-analyze oxidation signals from potassium......-induced release of transmitter molecules. The nature of the resulting current peaks is discussed, and the time for restoring transmitter reservoirs is studied. The relationship between released transmitters and potassium concentration was found to fit to a sigmoidal dose–response curve. Finally, we demonstrate...

  10. Chips 2020

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The release of this second volume of CHIPS 2020 coincides with the 50th anniversary of Moore’s Law, a critical year marked by the end of the nanometer roadmap and by a significantly reduced annual rise in chip performance. At the same time, we are witnessing a data explosion in the Internet, which is consuming 40% more electrical power every year, leading to fears of a major blackout of the Internet by 2020. The messages of the first CHIPS 2020, published in 2012, concerned the realization of quantum steps for improving the energy efficiency of all chip functions. With this second volume, we review these messages and amplify upon the most promising directions: ultra-low-voltage electronics, nanoscale monolithic 3D integration, relevant-data, brain- and human-vision-inspired processing, and energy harvesting for chip autonomy. The team of authors, enlarged by more world leaders in low-power, monolithic 3D, video, and Silicon brains, presents new vistas in nanoelectronics, promising  Moore-like exponential g...

  11. Fast Prototyping of Sensorized Cell Culture Chips and Microfluidic Systems with Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian M. Bonk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We developed a confined microfluidic cell culture system with a bottom plate made of a microscopic slide with planar platinum sensors for the measurement of acidification, oxygen consumption, and cell adhesion. The slides were commercial slides with indium tin oxide (ITO plating or were prepared from platinum sputtering (100 nm onto a 10-nm titanium adhesion layer. Direct processing of the sensor structures (approximately three minutes per chip by an ultrashort pulse laser facilitated the production of the prototypes. pH-sensitive areas were produced by the sputtering of 60-nm Si3N4 through a simple mask made from a circuit board material. The system body and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS molding forms for the microfluidic structures were manufactured by micromilling using a printed circuit board (PCB milling machine for circuit boards. The microfluidic structure was finally imprinted in PDMS. Our approach avoided the use of photolithographic techniques and enabled fast and cost-efficient prototyping of the systems. Alternatively, the direct production of metallic, ceramic or polymeric molding tools was tested. The use of ultrashort pulse lasers improved the precision of the structures and avoided any contact of the final structures with toxic chemicals and possible adverse effects for the cell culture in lab-on-a-chip systems.

  12. Liver-cell patterning lab chip: mimicking the morphology of liver lobule tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chen-Ta; Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Chen, Rong-Jhe; Chin, Chung-Kuang; Gong, Song-En; Chang, Hwan-You; Peng, Hwei-Ling; Hsu, Long; Yew, Tri-Rung; Chang, Shau-Feng; Liu, Cheng-Hsien

    2013-09-21

    A lobule-mimetic cell-patterning technique for on-chip reconstruction of centimetre-scale liver tissue of heterogeneous hepatic and endothelial cells via an enhanced field-induced dielectrophoresis (DEP) trap is demonstrated and reported. By mimicking the basic morphology of liver tissue, the classic hepatic lobule, the lobule-mimetic-stellate-electrodes array was designed for cell patterning. Through DEP manipulation, well-defined and enhanced spatial electric field gradients were created for in-parallel manipulation of massive individual cells. With this liver-cell patterning labchip design, the original randomly distributed hepatic and endothelial cells inside the microfluidic chamber can be manipulated separately and aligned into the desired pattern that mimicks the morphology of liver lobule tissue. Experimental results showed that both hepatic and endothelial cells were orderly guided, snared, and aligned along the field-induced orientation to form the lobule-mimetic pattern. About 95% cell viability of hepatic and endothelial cells was also observed after cell-patterning demonstration via a fluorescent assay technique. The liver function of CYP450-1A1 enzyme activity showed an 80% enhancement for our engineered liver tissue (HepG2+HUVECs) compared to the non-patterned pure HepG2 for two-day culturing.

  13. A magnetic micropore chip for rapid (<1 hour) unbiased circulating tumor cell isolation and in situ RNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jina; Bhagwat, Neha; Yee, Stephanie S; Black, Taylor; Redlinger, Colleen; Romeo, Janae; O'Hara, Mark; Raj, Arjun; Carpenter, Erica L; Stanger, Ben Z; Issadore, David

    2017-09-12

    The use of microtechnology for the highly selective isolation and sensitive detection of circulating tumor cells has shown enormous promise. One challenge for this technology is that the small feature sizes - which are the key to this technology's performance - can result in low sample throughput and susceptibility to clogging. Additionally, conventional molecular analysis of CTCs often requires cells to be taken off-chip for sample preparation and purification before analysis, leading to the loss of rare cells. To address these challenges, we have developed a microchip platform that combines fast, magnetic micropore based negative immunomagnetic selection (>10 mL h -1 ) with rapid on-chip in situ RNA profiling (>100× faster than conventional RNA labeling). This integrated chip can isolate both rare circulating cells and cell clusters directly from whole blood and allow individual cells to be profiled for multiple RNA cancer biomarkers, achieving sample-to-answer in less than 1 hour for 10 mL of whole blood. To demonstrate the power of this approach, we applied our device to the circulating tumor cell based diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. We used a genetically engineered lineage-labeled mouse model of pancreatic cancer (KPCY) to validate the performance of our chip. We show that in a cohort of patient samples (N = 25) that this device can detect and perform in situ RNA analysis on circulating tumor cells in patients with pancreatic cancer, even in those with extremely sparse CTCs (<1 CTC mL -1 of whole blood).

  14. AC electric field induced dipole-based on-chip 3D cell rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhal, Prateek; Chase, J Geoffrey; Gaynor, Paul; Oback, Björn; Wang, Wenhui

    2014-08-07

    The precise rotation of suspended cells is one of the many fundamental manipulations used in a wide range of biotechnological applications such as cell injection and enucleation in nuclear transfer (NT) cloning. Noticeably scarce among the existing rotation techniques is the three-dimensional (3D) rotation of cells on a single chip. Here we present an alternating current (ac) induced electric field-based biochip platform, which has an open-top sub-mm square chamber enclosed by four sidewall electrodes and two bottom electrodes, to achieve rotation about the two axes, thus 3D cell rotation. By applying an ac potential to the four sidewall electrodes, an in-plane (yaw) rotating electric field is generated and in-plane rotation is achieved. Similarly, by applying an ac potential to two opposite sidewall electrodes and the two bottom electrodes, an out-of-plane (pitch) rotating electric field is generated and rolling rotation is achieved. As a prompt proof-of-concept, bottom electrodes were constructed with transparent indium tin oxide (ITO) using the standard lift-off process and the sidewall electrodes were constructed using a low-cost micro-milling process and then assembled to form the chip. Through experiments, we demonstrate rotation of bovine oocytes of ~120 μm diameter about two axes, with the capability of controlling the rotation direction and the rate for each axis through control of the ac potential amplitude, frequency, and phase shift, and cell medium conductivity. The maximum observed rotation rate reached nearly 140° s⁻¹, while a consistent rotation rate reached up to 40° s⁻¹. Rotation rate spectra for zona pellucida-intact and zona pellucida-free oocytes were further compared and found to have no effective difference. This simple, transparent, cheap-to-manufacture, and open-top platform allows additional functional modules to be integrated to become a more powerful cell manipulation system.

  15. Using single cell cultivation system for on-chip monitoring of the interdivision timer in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cell cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soloviev Mikhail

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Regulation of cell cycle progression in changing environments is vital for cell survival and maintenance, and different regulation mechanisms based on cell size and cell cycle time have been proposed. To determine the mechanism of cell cycle regulation in the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed an on-chip single-cell cultivation system that allows for the strict control of the extracellular environment. We divided the Chlamydomonas cell cycle into interdivision and division phases on the basis of changes in cell size and found that, regardless of the amount of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR and the extent of illumination, the length of the interdivision phase was inversely proportional to the rate of increase of cell volume. Their product remains constant indicating the existence of an 'interdivision timer'. The length of the division phase, in contrast, remained nearly constant. Cells cultivated under light-dark-light conditions did not divide unless they had grown to twice their initial volume during the first light period. This indicates the existence of a 'commitment sizer'. The ratio of the cell volume at the beginning of the division phase to the initial cell volume determined the number of daughter cells, indicating the existence of a 'mitotic sizer'.

  16. Genome engineering in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minjung; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Hyongbum

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing in human cells is of great value in research, medicine, and biotechnology. Programmable nucleases including zinc-finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and RNA-guided engineered nucleases recognize a specific target sequence and make a double-strand break at that site, which can result in gene disruption, gene insertion, gene correction, or chromosomal rearrangements. The target sequence complexities of these programmable nucleases are higher than 3.2 mega base pairs, the size of the haploid human genome. Here, we briefly introduce the structure of the human genome and the characteristics of each programmable nuclease, and review their applications in human cells including pluripotent stem cells. In addition, we discuss various delivery methods for nucleases, programmable nickases, and enrichment of gene-edited human cells, all of which facilitate efficient and precise genome editing in human cells.

  17. Air Quality Effects on Human Health and Approaches for Its Assessment through Microfluidic Chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Frank; Gao, Xinghua; Virzonis, Darius; Damiati, Samar; Schneider, Marlon R; Kodzius, Rimantas

    2017-09-27

    Air quality depends on the various gases and particles present in it. Both natural phenomena and human activities affect the cleanliness of air. In the last decade, many countries experienced an unprecedented industrial growth, resulting in changing air quality values, and correspondingly, affecting our life quality. Air quality can be accessed by employing microchips that qualitatively and quantitatively determine the present gases and dust particles. The so-called particular matter 2.5 (PM2.5) values are of high importance, as such small particles can penetrate the human lung barrier and enter the blood system. There are cancer cases related to many air pollutants, and especially to PM2.5, contributing to exploding costs within the healthcare system. We focus on various current and potential future air pollutants, and propose solutions on how to protect our health against such dangerous substances. Recent developments in the Organ-on-Chip (OoC) technology can be used to study air pollution as well. OoC allows determination of pollutant toxicity and speeds up the development of novel pharmaceutical drugs.

  18. Air Quality Effects on Human Health and Approaches for Its Assessment through Microfluidic Chips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Schulze

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Air quality depends on the various gases and particles present in it. Both natural phenomena and human activities affect the cleanliness of air. In the last decade, many countries experienced an unprecedented industrial growth, resulting in changing air quality values, and correspondingly, affecting our life quality. Air quality can be accessed by employing microchips that qualitatively and quantitatively determine the present gases and dust particles. The so-called particular matter 2.5 (PM2.5 values are of high importance, as such small particles can penetrate the human lung barrier and enter the blood system. There are cancer cases related to many air pollutants, and especially to PM2.5, contributing to exploding costs within the healthcare system. We focus on various current and potential future air pollutants, and propose solutions on how to protect our health against such dangerous substances. Recent developments in the Organ-on-Chip (OoC technology can be used to study air pollution as well. OoC allows determination of pollutant toxicity and speeds up the development of novel pharmaceutical drugs.

  19. A microfabricated microfluidic bioMEMS device to model human brain aneurisms: the aneurysm-on-a-chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, Lisa M.; Khor, Jian Wei; Thakur, Raviraj; Amin, Ahmed; Wereley, Steven T.; Leary, James F.

    2015-03-01

    Aneurysms are pockets of blood that collect outside blood vessel walls forming dilatations and leaving arterial walls very prone to rupture. There is little information concerning the causes of intracranial aneurysm formation, growth, and rupture. Current treatments include: (1) clipping, and (2) coil embolization, including stent-assisted coiling. Further, the evolution of any aneurysm is assumed to be caused by the remodeling of the affected blood vessel's material constituents (tunica intima, tunica media, or tunica adventitia). Velocity, pressure, and wall shear stresses aid in the disease development of aneurysmal growth, while the shear force mechanisms effecting wound closure are elusive. To study aneurysm pathogenesis, a lab-on-a-chip device is the key to discovering the underlying mechanisms of these lesions. A two-dimensional microfluidic model, the Aneurysm-on-a-Chip™ (AOC), was the logical answer to study particle flow within an aneurysm "sac". The AOC apparatus can track particles/cells when it is coupled to particle image velocimetry software (PIV) package. The AOC fluid flow was visualized using standard microscopy techniques with commercial microparticles and human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMC). Images were taken during fluid flow experiments and PIV was utilized to monitor the flow of particles within the "sac" region, as well as particles entering and exiting the device. Quiver plots were generated from fluid flow experiments using standard 7 μm latex particles and fixed HASMC in PBS. PIV analysis shows that the particles flowed nicely from input to output. Wall shear stress provided evidence that there was some back flow at the edges of the "sac" - an indicator of aneurysm development in human patients.

  20. Cytostretch, an Organ-on-Chip Platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaio, N.; van Meer, B.; Quiros Solano, W.F.; Bergers, L.; van de Stolpe, A; Mummery, CL; Sarro, P.M.; Dekker, R.

    2016-01-01

    Organ-on-Chips (OOCs) are micro-fabricated devices which are used to culture cells in order to mimic functional units of human organs. The devices are designed to simulate the physiological environment of tissues in vivo. Cells in some types of OOCs can be stimulated in situ by electrical and/or

  1. Impedance spectra of patch clamp scenarios for single cells immobilized on a lab-on-a-chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alberti, Massimo; Snakenborg, Detlef; Lopacinska, Joanna M.

    2014-01-01

    and simulated impedance spectra proved that the presented method could distinguish between a cell-attached mode and a whole-cell mode even with low-quality seals. In physiological conditions, the capacitance of HeLa cells was measured to *38 pF. The first gigaseal was recorded and maintained for 40 min. Once...... membrane. After incubating the chip for 24 h, HeLa cells adhered and grew on the chip surface but did not survive when trapped on the microapertures. The microfluidic system proved to work as a micro electrophysiological analysis system, and the IS-based method can be used for further studies on the post......A simple method based on impedance spectroscopy (IS) was developed to distinguish between different patch clamp modes for single cells trapped on microapertures in a patch clamp microchannel array designed for patch clamping on cultured cells. The method allows detecting via impedance analysis...

  2. Experiment list: SRX214075 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available age=Undifferentiated || treatment=Overexpress Sox17EK-V5 tagged || cell line=KH2 || chip antibody 1=none || chip antibody manufacture...r 1=none || chip antibody 2=V5 || chip antibody manufacture

  3. Experiment list: SRX214071 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Undifferentiated || treatment=Overexpress Sox2-V5 tagged || cell line=KH2 || chip antibody 1=none || chip antibody manufacture...r 1=none || chip antibody 2=V5 || chip antibody manufacturer 2=

  4. Experiment list: SRX214086 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available entiated || cell line=KH2 || chip antibody 1=none || chip antibody manufacturer 1=none || chip antibody 2=none || chip antibody manuf...acturer 2=none http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-

  5. Experiment list: SRX214074 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ge=Undifferentiated || treatment=Overexpress Sox17EK-V5 tagged || cell line=KH2 || chip antibody 1=none || chip antibody manufacture...r 1=none || chip antibody 2=V5 || chip antibody manufacture

  6. Experiment list: SRX214072 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e=Undifferentiated || treatment=Overexpress Sox2KE-V5 tagged || cell line=KH2 || chip antibody 1=none || chip antibody manufacture...r 1=none || chip antibody 2=V5 || chip antibody manufacture

  7. Experiment list: SRX214067 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available fferentiated || cell line=F9 || chip antibody 1=Pou5f1/Oct4 || chip antibody manufacture...r 1=Santa Cruz || chip antibody 2=none || chip antibody manufacturer 2=none http://dbarchive.bioscien

  8. An electrical bio-chip to transfer and detect electromagnetic stimulation on the cells based on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafizadeh-Tafti, Saeed [Nanoelectronic Center of Excellence, Thin Film and Nanoelectronic Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14395/515, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nano Bio Electronic Devices Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14395/515, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Haqiqatkhah, Mohammad Hossein [Center of Excellence on Applied Electromagnetic Systems, School of Electrical & Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14395-515, North Kargar Avenue, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saviz, Mehrdad [Antenna Laboratory, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14395-515, North Kargar Avenue, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Janmaleki, Mohsen [Medical Nanotechnology and Tissue Engineering Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 1985717443, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faraji Dana, Reza [Center of Excellence on Applied Electromagnetic Systems, School of Electrical & Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14395-515, North Kargar Avenue, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zanganeh, Somayeh [Nanoelectronic Center of Excellence, Thin Film and Nanoelectronic Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14395/515, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nano Bio Electronic Devices Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14395/515, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdolahad, Mohammad, E-mail: m.abdolahad@ut.ac.ir [Nanoelectronic Center of Excellence, Thin Film and Nanoelectronic Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14395/515, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nano Bio Electronic Devices Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14395/515, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-01-01

    A highly sensitive impedimetric bio-chip based on vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes (VAMWCNTs), was applied in direct interaction with lung cancer cells. Our tool provided both inducing and monitoring the bioelectrical changes in the cells initiated by electromagnetic (EM) wave stimulation. EM wave of 940 MHz frequency with different intensities was used. Here, wave ablation might accumulate electrical charge on the tips of nanotubes penetrated into cell's membrane. The charge might induce ionic exchanges into the cell and cause alterations in electrical states of the membrane. Transmembrane electrostatic/dynamic states would be strongly affected due to such exchanges. Our novel modality was that, the cells' vitality changes caused by charge inductions were electrically detected with the same nanotubes in the architecture of electrodes for impedance measurement. The responses of the sensor were confirmed by electron and florescent microscopy images as well as biological assays. In summation, our method provided an effective biochip for enhancing and detecting external EM stimulation on the cells useful for future diagnostic and therapeutic applications, such as wave-guided drug-resistance breakage. - Highlights: • A CNT-chip is fabricated to stimulate cancer cells by electromagnetic wave. • Wave induced charges accumulation on the tip of CNTs penetrated into cells. • Transmembrane electrostatic states would be strongly affected due to such exchanges. • The cells' vitality changes could be happened and electrically detected with the same chip.

  9. Characterization and separation of Cryptosporidium and Giardia cells using on-chip dielectrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan Unni, Harikrishnan; Hartono, Deny; Yue Lanry Yung, Lin; Mah-Lee Ng, Mary; Pueh Lee, Heow; Cheong Khoo, Boo; Lim, Kian-Meng

    2012-03-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) has been shown to have significant potential for the characterization of cells and could become an efficient tool for rapid identification and assessment of microorganisms. The present work is focused on the trapping, characterization, and separation of two species of Cryptosporidium (C. parvum and C. muris) and Giardia lambia (G. lambia) using a microfluidic experimental setup. Cryptosporidium oocysts, which are 2-4 μm in size and nearly spherical in shape, are used for the preliminary stage of prototype development and testing. G. lambia cysts are 8-12 μm in size. In order to facilitate effective trapping, simulations were performed to study the effects of buffer conductivity and applied voltage on the flow and cell transport inside the DEP chip. Microscopic experiments were performed using the fabricated device and the real part of Clausius-Mossotti factor of the cells was estimated from critical voltages for particle trapping at the electrodes under steady fluid flow. The dielectric properties of the cell compartments (cytoplasm and membrane) were calculated based on a single shell model of the cells. The separation of C. muris and G. lambia is achieved successfully at a frequency of 10 MHz and a voltage of 3 Vpp (peak to peak voltage).

  10. Highly sensitive detection of human IgG using a novel bio-barcode assay combined with DNA chip technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zhenbao; Zhou, Bo; Wang, Haiqing; Lu, Feng; Liu, Tianjun; Song, Cunxian; Leng, Xigang

    2013-01-01

    A simple and ultrasensitive detection of human IgG based on signal amplification using a novel bio-barcode assay and DNA chip technology was developed. The sensing platform was a sandwich system made up of antibody-modified magnetic microparticles (Ab-MMPs)/human IgG/Cy3-labeled single-stranded DNA and antibody-modified gold nanoparticles (Cy3-ssDNA-Ab-AuNPs). The MMPs (2.5 μm in diameter) modified with mouse anti-human IgG monoclonal-antibodies could capture human IgG and further be separated and enriched via a magnetic field. The AuNPs (13 nm in diameter) conjugated with goat anti-human IgG polyclonal-antibodies and Cy3-ssDNA could further combine with the human IgG/Ab-MMP complex. The Cy3-ssDNA on AuNPs was then released by TCEP to hybridize with the DNA chip, thus generating a detectable signal by the fluorescence intensity of Cy3. In order to improve detection sensitivity, a three-level cascaded signal amplification was developed: (1) The MMP enrichment as the first-level; (2) Large quantities of Cy3-ssDNA on AuNPs as the second-level; (3) The Cy3-ssDNA conjugate with DNA chip as the third-level. The highly sensitive technique showed an increased response of the fluorescence intensity to the increased concentration of human IgG through a detection range from 1 pg mL −1 to 10 ng mL −1 . This sensing technique could not only improve the detection sensitivity for the low concentration of human IgG but also present a robust and efficient signal amplification model. The detection method has good stability, specificity, and reproducibility and could be applied in the detection of human IgG in the real samples

  11. Highly sensitive detection of human IgG using a novel bio-barcode assay combined with DNA chip technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhenbao [Central South University, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences (China); Zhou, Bo, E-mail: zhoubo1771@163.com [The Affiliated Zhongda Hospital of Southeast University, Department of Gerontology (China); Wang, Haiqing; Lu, Feng; Liu, Tianjun; Song, Cunxian; Leng, Xigang, E-mail: lengxigyky@163.com [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College (China)

    2013-09-15

    A simple and ultrasensitive detection of human IgG based on signal amplification using a novel bio-barcode assay and DNA chip technology was developed. The sensing platform was a sandwich system made up of antibody-modified magnetic microparticles (Ab-MMPs)/human IgG/Cy3-labeled single-stranded DNA and antibody-modified gold nanoparticles (Cy3-ssDNA-Ab-AuNPs). The MMPs (2.5 {mu}m in diameter) modified with mouse anti-human IgG monoclonal-antibodies could capture human IgG and further be separated and enriched via a magnetic field. The AuNPs (13 nm in diameter) conjugated with goat anti-human IgG polyclonal-antibodies and Cy3-ssDNA could further combine with the human IgG/Ab-MMP complex. The Cy3-ssDNA on AuNPs was then released by TCEP to hybridize with the DNA chip, thus generating a detectable signal by the fluorescence intensity of Cy3. In order to improve detection sensitivity, a three-level cascaded signal amplification was developed: (1) The MMP enrichment as the first-level; (2) Large quantities of Cy3-ssDNA on AuNPs as the second-level; (3) The Cy3-ssDNA conjugate with DNA chip as the third-level. The highly sensitive technique showed an increased response of the fluorescence intensity to the increased concentration of human IgG through a detection range from 1 pg mL{sup -1} to 10 ng mL{sup -1}. This sensing technique could not only improve the detection sensitivity for the low concentration of human IgG but also present a robust and efficient signal amplification model. The detection method has good stability, specificity, and reproducibility and could be applied in the detection of human IgG in the real samples.

  12. Highly sensitive detection of human IgG using a novel bio-barcode assay combined with DNA chip technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenbao; Zhou, Bo; Wang, Haiqing; Lu, Feng; Liu, Tianjun; Song, Cunxian; Leng, Xigang

    2013-09-01

    A simple and ultrasensitive detection of human IgG based on signal amplification using a novel bio-barcode assay and DNA chip technology was developed. The sensing platform was a sandwich system made up of antibody-modified magnetic microparticles (Ab-MMPs)/human IgG/Cy3-labeled single-stranded DNA and antibody-modified gold nanoparticles (Cy3-ssDNA-Ab-AuNPs). The MMPs (2.5 μm in diameter) modified with mouse anti-human IgG monoclonal-antibodies could capture human IgG and further be separated and enriched via a magnetic field. The AuNPs (13 nm in diameter) conjugated with goat anti-human IgG polyclonal-antibodies and Cy3-ssDNA could further combine with the human IgG/Ab-MMP complex. The Cy3-ssDNA on AuNPs was then released by TCEP to hybridize with the DNA chip, thus generating a detectable signal by the fluorescence intensity of Cy3. In order to improve detection sensitivity, a three-level cascaded signal amplification was developed: (1) The MMP enrichment as the first-level; (2) Large quantities of Cy3-ssDNA on AuNPs as the second-level; (3) The Cy3-ssDNA conjugate with DNA chip as the third-level. The highly sensitive technique showed an increased response of the fluorescence intensity to the increased concentration of human IgG through a detection range from 1 pg mL-1 to 10 ng mL-1. This sensing technique could not only improve the detection sensitivity for the low concentration of human IgG but also present a robust and efficient signal amplification model. The detection method has good stability, specificity, and reproducibility and could be applied in the detection of human IgG in the real samples.

  13. Monolithically integrated biophotonic lab-on-a-chip for cell culture and simultaneous pH monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munoz-Berbel, Xavier; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Rosalia; Vigues, Nuria; Demming, Stefanie; Mas, Jordi; Buettgenbach, Stephanus; Verpoorte, Elisabeth; Ortiz, Pedro; Llobera, Andreu

    2013-01-01

    A poly(dimethylsiloxane) biophotonic lab-on-a-chip (bioPhLoC) containing two chambers, an incubation chamber and a monitoring chamber for cell retention/proliferation and pH monitoring, respectively, is presented. The bioPhLoC monolithically integrates a filter with 3 mu m high size-exclusion

  14. Active metamaterial: Gain and stability, and microfluidic chip for THz cell spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qi

    . THz spectroscopy becomes an emerging technique for studying the dynamics and interactions of cells and biomolecules, but many practical challenges still remain in experimental studies. We present a prototype of simple and inexpensive cell-trapping microfluidic chip for THz spectroscopic study of live cells. Cells are transported, trapped and concentrated into the THz exposure region by applying an AC bias signal while the chip maintains a steady temperature at 37 ?C by resistive heating. We conduct some preliminary experiments on E. coli and T cell solution and compare the transmission spectra of empty channels, channels filled with aqueous media only, and channels filled with aqueous medium with un-concentrated and concentrated cells.

  15. Low-temperature bonded glass-membrane microfluidic device for in vitro organ-on-a-chip cell culture models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocock, Kyall J.; Gao, Xiaofang; Wang, Chenxi; Priest, Craig; Prestidge, Clive A.; Mawatari, Kazuma; Kitamori, Takehiko; Thierry, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    The integration of microfluidics with living biological systems has paved the way to the exciting concept of "organson- a-chip", which aims at the development of advanced in vitro models that replicate the key features of human organs. Glass based devices have long been utilised in the field of microfluidics but the integration of alternative functional elements within multi-layered glass microdevices, such as polymeric membranes, remains a challenge. To this end, we have extended a previously reported approach for the low-temperature bonding of glass devices that enables the integration of a functional polycarbonate porous membrane. The process was initially developed and optimised on specialty low-temperature bonding equipment (μTAS2001, Bondtech, Japan) and subsequently adapted to more widely accessible hot embosser units (EVG520HE Hot Embosser, EVG, Austria). The key aspect of this method is the use of low temperatures compatible with polymeric membranes. Compared to borosilicate glass bonding (650 °C) and quartz/fused silica bonding (1050 °C) processes, this method maintains the integrity and functionality of the membrane (Tg 150 °C for polycarbonate). Leak tests performed showed no damage or loss of integrity of the membrane for up to 150 hours, indicating sufficient bond strength for long term cell culture. A feasibility study confirmed the growth of dense and functional monolayers of Caco-2 cells within 5 days.

  16. Coverage and characteristics of the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 100K SNP set.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Improvements in technology have made it possible to conduct genome-wide association mapping at costs within reach of academic investigators, and experiments are currently being conducted with a variety of high-throughput platforms. To provide an appropriate context for interpreting results of such studies, we summarize here results of an investigation of one of the first of these technologies to be publicly available, the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 100K set of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. In a systematic analysis of the pattern and distribution of SNPs in the Mapping 100K set, we find that SNPs in this set are undersampled from coding regions (both nonsynonymous and synonymous and oversampled from regions outside genes, relative to SNPs in the overall HapMap database. In addition, we utilize a novel multilocus linkage disequilibrium (LD coefficient based on information content (analogous to the information content scores commonly used for linkage mapping that is equivalent to the familiar measure r2 in the special case of two loci. Using this approach, we are able to summarize for any subset of markers, such as the Affymetrix Mapping 100K set, the information available for association mapping in that subset, relative to the information available in the full set of markers included in the HapMap, and highlight circumstances in which this multilocus measure of LD provides substantial additional insight about the haplotype structure in a region over pairwise measures of LD.

  17. A dual-docking microfluidic cell migration assay (D2-Chip) for testing neutrophil chemotaxis and the memory effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ke; Wu, Jiandong; Xu, Guoqing; Xie, Dongxue; Peretz-Soroka, Hagit; Santos, Susy; Alexander, Murray; Zhu, Ling; Zhang, Michael; Liu, Yong; Lin, Francis

    2017-04-18

    Chemotaxis is a classic mechanism for guiding cell migration and an important topic in both fundamental cell biology and health sciences. Neutrophils are a widely used model to study eukaryotic cell migration and neutrophil chemotaxis itself can lead to protective or harmful immune actions to the body. While much has been learnt from past research about how neutrophils effectively navigate through a chemoattractant gradient, many interesting questions remain unclear. For example, while it is tempting to model neutrophil chemotaxis using the well-established biased random walk theory, the experimental proof was challenged by the cell's highly persistent migrating nature. A special experimental design is required to test the key predictions from the random walk model. Another question that has interested the cell migration community for decades concerns the existence of chemotactic memory and its underlying mechanism. Although chemotactic memory has been suggested in various studies, a clear quantitative experimental demonstration will improve our understanding of the migratory memory effect. Motivated by these questions, we developed a microfluidic cell migration assay (so-called dual-docking chip or D 2 -Chip) that can test both the biased random walk model and the memory effect for neutrophil chemotaxis on a single chip enabled by multi-region gradient generation and dual-region cell alignment. Our results provide experimental support for the biased random walk model and chemotactic memory for neutrophil chemotaxis. Quantitative data analyses provide new insights into neutrophil chemotaxis and memory by making connections to entropic disorder, cell morphology and oscillating migratory response.

  18. Isolation of cells for selective treatment and analysis using a magnetic microfluidic chip

    KAUST Repository

    Yassine, Omar

    2014-05-01

    This study describes the development and testing of a magnetic microfluidic chip (MMC) for trapping and isolating cells tagged with superparamagnetic beads (SPBs) in a microfluidic environment for selective treatment and analysis. The trapping and isolation are done in two separate steps; first, the trapping of the tagged cells in a main channel is achieved by soft ferromagnetic disks and second, the transportation of the cells into side chambers for isolation is executed by tapered conductive paths made of Gold (Au). Numerical simulations were performed to analyze the magnetic flux and force distributions of the disks and conducting paths, for trapping and transporting SPBs. The MMC was fabricated using standard microfabrication processes. Experiments were performed with E. coli (K12 strand) tagged with 2.8 μm SPBs. The results showed that E. coli can be separated from a sample solution by trapping them at the disk sites, and then isolated into chambers by transporting them along the tapered conducting paths. Once the E. coli was trapped inside the side chambers, two selective treatments were performed. In one chamber, a solution with minimal nutrition content was added and, in another chamber, a solution with essential nutrition was added. The results showed that the growth of bacteria cultured in the second chamber containing nutrient was significantly higher, demonstrating that the E. coli was not affected by the magnetically driven transportation and the feasibility of performing different treatments on selectively isolated cells on a single microfluidic platform.

  19. On-Chip Method to Measure Mechanical Characteristics of a Single Cell by Using Moiré Fringe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Sugiura

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We propose a method to characterize the mechanical properties of cells using a robot-integrated microfluidic chip (robochip and microscopy. The microfluidic chip is designed to apply the specified deformations to a single detached cell using an on-chip actuator probe. The reaction force is simultaneously measured using an on-chip force sensor composed of a hollow folded beam and probe structure. In order to measure the cellular characteristics in further detail, a sub-pixel level of resolution of probe position is required. Therefore, we utilize the phase detection of moiré fringe. Using this method, the experimental resolution of the probe position reaches 42 nm. This is approximately ten times smaller than the optical wavelength, which is the limit of sharp imaging with a microscope. Calibration of the force sensor is also important in accurately measuring cellular reaction forces. We calibrated the spring constant from the frequency response, by the proposed sensing method of the probe position. As a representative of mechanical characteristics, we measured the elastic modulus of Madin-Darby Cannie Kidney (MDCK cells. In spite of the rigid spring constant, the resolution and sensitivity were twice that achieved in our previous study. Unique cellular characteristics can be elucidated by the improvements in sensing resolution and accuracy.

  20. On-chip gradient generation in 256 microfluidic cell cultures: simulation and experimental validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somaweera, Himali; Haputhanthri, Shehan O; Ibraguimov, Akif; Pappas, Dimitri

    2015-08-07

    A microfluidic diffusion diluter was used to create a stable concentration gradient for dose response studies. The microfluidic diffusion diluter used in this study consisted of 128 culture chambers on each side of the main fluidic channel. A calibration method was used to find unknown concentrations with 12% error. Flow rate dependent studies showed that changing the flow rates generated different gradient patterns. Mathematical simulations using COMSOL Multi-physics were performed to validate the experimental data. The experimental data obtained for the flow rate studies agreed with the simulation results. Cells could be loaded into culture chambers using vacuum actuation and cultured for long times under low shear stress. Decreasing the size of the culture chambers resulted in faster gradient formation (20 min). Mass transport into the side channels of the microfluidic diffusion diluter used in this study is an important factor in creating the gradient using diffusional mixing as a function of the distance. To demonstrate the device's utility, an H2O2 gradient was generated while culturing Ramos cells. Cell viability was assayed in the 256 culture chambers, each at a discrete H2O2 concentration. As expected, the cell viability for the high concentration side channels increased (by injecting H2O2) whereas the cell viability in the low concentration side channels decreased along the chip due to diffusional mixing as a function of distance. COMSOL simulations were used to identify the effective concentration of H2O2 for cell viability in each side chamber at 45 min. The gradient effects were confirmed using traditional H2O2 culture experiments. Viability of cells in the microfluidic device under gradient conditions showed a linear relationship with the viability of the traditional culture experiment. Development of the microfluidic device used in this study could be used to study hundreds of concentrations of a compound in a single experiment.

  1. Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldahmash, Abdullah; Zaher, Walid; Al-Nbaheen, May

    2012-01-01

    Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSC) represent a group of non-hematopoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow stroma and the stroma of other organs including subcutaneous adipose tissue, placenta, and muscles. They exhibit the characteristics of somatic stem cells of self......-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation into mesoderm-type of cells, e.g., to osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes and possibly other cell types including hepatocytes and astrocytes. Due to their ease of culture and multipotentiality, hMSC are increasingly employed as a source for cells suitable for a number...

  2. Chip-based generation of carbon nanodots via electrochemical oxidation of screen printed carbon electrodes and the applications for efficient cell imaging and electrochemiluminescence enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuanhong; Liu, Jingquan; Zhang, Jizhen; Zong, Xidan; Jia, Xiaofang; Li, Dan; Wang, Erkang

    2015-06-07

    A portable lab-on-a-chip methodology to generate ionic liquid-functionalized carbon nanodots (CNDs) was developed via electrochemical oxidation of screen printed carbon electrodes. The CNDs can be successfully applied for efficient cell imaging and solid-state electrochemiluminescence sensor fabrication on the paper-based chips.

  3. Human innate lymphoid cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazenberg, Mette D.; Spits, Hergen

    2014-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are lymphoid cells that do not express rearranged receptors and have important effector and regulatory functions in innate immunity and tissue remodeling. ILCs are categorized into 3 groups based on their distinct patterns of cytokine production and the requirement of

  4. Human innate lymphoid cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mjösberg, Jenny; Spits, Hergen

    2016-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are increasingly acknowledged as important mediators of immune homeostasis and pathology. ILCs act as early orchestrators of immunity, responding to epithelium-derived signals by expressing an array of cytokines and cell-surface receptors, which shape subsequent immune

  5. Embedded Adaptive Optics for Ubiquitous Lab-on-a-Chip Readout on Intact Cell Phones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pakorn Preechaburana

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of disposable lab-on-a-chip (LOC devices on cell phones is an attractive alternative to migrate the analytical strength of LOC solutions to decentralized sensing applications. Imaging the micrometric detection areas of LOCs in contact with intact phone cameras is central to provide such capability. This work demonstrates a disposable and morphing liquid lens concept that can be integrated in LOC devices and refocuses micrometric features in the range necessary for LOC evaluation using diverse cell phone cameras. During natural evaporation, the lens focus varies adapting to different type of cameras. Standard software in the phone commands a time-lapse acquisition for best focal selection that is sufficient to capture and resolve, under ambient illumination, 50 μm features in regions larger than 500 × 500 μm2. In this way, the present concept introduces a generic solution compatible with the use of diverse and unmodified cell phone cameras to evaluate disposable LOC devices.

  6. On-chip manipulation of single microparticles, cells, and organisms using surface acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Kiraly, Brian; Yue, Hongjun; Li, Sixing; Chiang, I-Kao; Shi, Jinjie; Benkovic, Stephen J; Huang, Tony Jun

    2012-07-10

    Techniques that can dexterously manipulate single particles, cells, and organisms are invaluable for many applications in biology, chemistry, engineering, and physics. Here, we demonstrate standing surface acoustic wave based "acoustic tweezers" that can trap and manipulate single microparticles, cells, and entire organisms (i.e., Caenorhabditis elegans) in a single-layer microfluidic chip. Our acoustic tweezers utilize the wide resonance band of chirped interdigital transducers to achieve real-time control of a standing surface acoustic wave field, which enables flexible manipulation of most known microparticles. The power density required by our acoustic device is significantly lower than its optical counterparts (10,000,000 times less than optical tweezers and 100 times less than optoelectronic tweezers), which renders the technique more biocompatible and amenable to miniaturization. Cell-viability tests were conducted to verify the tweezers' compatibility with biological objects. With its advantages in biocompatibility, miniaturization, and versatility, the acoustic tweezers presented here will become a powerful tool for many disciplines of science and engineering.

  7. A multi-channel clogging-resistant lab-on-a-chip cell counter and analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Jie; Yang, Kecheng; Chiu, Yu-Jui; Wu, Tsung-Feng; Lian, Ian; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Early signs of diseases can be revealed from cell detection in biofluids, such as detection of white blood cells (WBCs) in the peritoneal fluid for peritonitis. A lab-on-a-chip microfluidic device offers an attractive platform for such applications because of its small size, low cost, and ease of use provided the device can meet the performance requirements which many existing LoC devices fail to satisfy. We report an integrated microfluidic device capable of accurately counting low concentration of white blood cells in peritoneal fluid at 150 μl min −1 to offer an accurate (<3% error) and fast (∼10 min/run) WBC count. Utilizing the self-regulating hydrodynamic properties and a unique architecture in the design, the device can achieve higher flow rate (500–1000 μl min −1 ), continuous running for over 5 h without clogging, as well as excellent signal quality for unambiguous WBC count and WBC classification for certain diseases. These properties make the device a promising candidate for point-of-care applications. (paper)

  8. Adhesion strength of a living cell to various substrates measured using a cup-attached atomic force microscopy chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyonchol; Ishibashi, Kenta; Matsuo, Kosuke; Kira, Atsushi; Onomura, Yui; Okada, Tomoko; Nakamura, Chikashi

    2018-03-01

    Cell adhesion strengths to various substrates were quantitatively measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM). A cup-shaped metal hemisphere was attached to the apex of the AFM cantilever, the “cup-chip” approached a cell (FP10SC2) to pick it up, the captured cell approached any one of six different substrates [gold (Au), nickel (Ni), bovine serum albumin (BSA), an amino group (NH2), poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE), and structured PTFE (sPTFE)], and the cell adhesion strength at the initial contact period was evaluated by detaching the cell from the substrate. The results obtained showed that the force needed to detach the cell from the NH2 substrate was more than 3-fold larger than that of metal substrates (Au and Ni), more than 15-fold larger than that of biochemically treated substrates (BSA), and more than 20-fold larger than that of hydrophobic substrates (PTFE and sPTFE). Using differences in adhesion strengths, a cell on a sPTFE substrate was picked up using a BSA-coated cup-chip, placed on a NH2 substrate, repeating this cell manipulation five times, and line patterning of cells was achieved. These results indicate that measurements of cell adhesion strength are fundamental to fabricate desired cell networks and the cup-chip is a useful tool for achieving easy cell manipulation.

  9. Construction of a liver sinusoid based on the laminar flow on chip and self-assembly of endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Shengli; Yi, Xiaoman; Du, Zhichang; Xu, Yuanyuan; Sun, Wei

    2018-02-20

    The liver is one of the main metabolic organs, and nearly all ingested drugs will be metabolized by the liver. Only a small fraction of drugs are able to come onto the market during drug development, and hepatic toxicity is a major cause for drug failure. Since drug development is costly in both time and materials, an in vitro liver model that can accelerate bioreactions in the liver and reduce drug consumption is imperative in the pharmaceutical industry. The liver on a chip is an ideal alternative for its controllable environment and tiny size, which means constructing a more biomimetic model, reducing material consumption as well as promoting drug diffusion and reaction. In this study, taking advantage of the laminar flow on chips and using natural degradable gel rat tail Collagen-I, we constructed a liver sinusoid on a chip. By synchronously injecting two kinds of cell-laden collagen, HepG2-laden collagen and HUVEC-laden collagen, we formed two collagen layers with a clear borderline. By controlling the HUVEC density and injection of growth factors, HUVECs in collagen formed a monolayer through self-assembly. Thus, a liver sinusoid on a chip was achieved in a more biomimetic environment with a more controllable and uniform distribution of discrete HUVECs. Viability, album secretion and urea synthesis of the live sinusoid on a chip were analysed on days 3, 5 and 7 after collagen injection with acetaminophen treatment at 0 (control), 10 and 20 mM. The results indicated that our liver sinusoid on a chip was able to maintain bioactivity and function for at least 7 d and was beneficial for hepatotoxic drug screening.

  10. Study of a novel cell lysis method with titanium dioxide for Lab-on-a-Chip devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Weijie; Yeow, John T W

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, a novel method is proposed and demonstrated to be able to lyse gram-negative (E. coli) bacteria cells for Lab-on-a-Chip applications. The proposed method incorporates using titanium dioxide particles as photocatalysts and a miniaturized UV LED array as an excitation light source to perform cell lysis on microchips. The experimental result demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed prototype device. The working device suggests an inexpensive, easy to be fabricated and effective way for microchip cell lysis. The miniaturized UV LED array and the microchip with a reaction chamber can be easily integrated with other functional components to form a customized whole Lab-on-a-Chip system.

  11. UW VLSI chip tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Neil

    1989-12-01

    We present a design for a low-cost, functional VLSI chip tester. It is based on the Apple MacIntosh II personal computer. It tests chips that have up to 128 pins. All pin drivers of the tester are bidirectional; each pin is programmed independently as an input or an output. The tester can test both static and dynamic chips. Rudimentary speed testing is provided. Chips are tested by executing C programs written by the user. A software library is provided for program development. Tests run under both the Mac Operating System and A/UX. The design is implemented using Xilinx Logic Cell Arrays. Price/performance tradeoffs are discussed.

  12. Materials Characterization of CIGS solar cells on Top of CMOS chips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, J.; Liu, W.; Kovalgin, A.Y.; Sun, Y.; Schmitz, J.; Venkatasubramanian, R.; Radousky, H.; Liang, H.

    2011-01-01

    In the current work, we present a detailed study on the material properties of the CIGS layers, fabricated on top of the CMOS chips, and compare the results with the fabrication on standard glass substrates. Almost identical elemental composition on both glass and CMOS chips (within measurement

  13. The fabrication of a double-layer atom chip with through silicon vias for an ultra-high-vacuum cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, Ho-Chiao; Lin, Yun-Siang; Lin, Yu-Hsin; Huang, Chi-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a double-layer atom chip that provides users with increased diversity in the design of the wire patterns and flexibility in the design of the magnetic field. It is more convenient for use in atomic physics experiments. A negative photoresist, SU-8, was used as the insulating layer between the upper and bottom copper wires. The electrical measurement results show that the upper and bottom wires with a width of 100 µm can sustain a 6 A current without burnout. Another focus of this study is the double-layer atom chips integrated with the through silicon via (TSV) technique, and anodically bonded to a Pyrex glass cell, which makes it a desired vacuum chamber for atomic physics experiments. Thus, the bonded glass cell not only significantly reduces the overall size of the ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) chamber but also conducts the high current from the backside to the front side of the atom chip via the TSV under UHV (9.5 × 10 −10  Torr). The TSVs with a diameter of 70 µm were etched through by the inductively coupled plasma ion etching and filled by the bottom-up copper electroplating method. During the anodic bonding process, the electroplated copper wires and TSVs on atom chips also need to pass the examination of the required bonding temperature of 250 °C, under an applied voltage of 1000 V. Finally, the UHV test of the double-layer atom chips with TSVs at room temperature can be reached at 9.5 × 10 −10  Torr, thus satisfying the requirements of atomic physics experiments under an UHV environment. (paper)

  14. Stimulated human fibroblast cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.P.; Gale, K.L.; Einspenner, M.; Greenstock, C.L.; Gentner, N.E.

    1992-01-01

    Techniques for cloning cultured mammalian cells have supported the most universally-accepted method for measuring the induction of lethality by geno-toxicants such as ionizing radiation: the 'survival of colony-forming ability (CFA)' assay. Since most cultured human cell lines exhibit plating efficiency (i.e. the percentage of cells that are capable of reproductively surviving and dividing to form visible colonies) well below 100%, such assays are in essence 'survival of plating efficiency' assays, since they are referred to the plating (or cloning) efficiency of control (i.e. unirradiated) cells. (author). 8 refs., 2 figs

  15. Experiment list: SRX524970 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX524970 hg19 Input control Input control Uterus Endometrial stromal cells NA 3525...5109,88.2,37.7,339 GSM1372862: Input case1 control; Homo sapiens; ChIP-Seq source_name=Human endometrial stromal cells || tissue=Endo...metrial stromal cells || condition=control (without any induction) || chip antibody

  16. Experiment list: SRX524980 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX524980 hg19 Input control Input control Uterus Endometrial stromal cells NA 2708...7271,98.6,31.8,308 GSM1372876: Input case2 control; Homo sapiens; ChIP-Seq source_name=Human endometrial stromal cells || tissue=Endo...metrial stromal cells || condition=control (without any induction) || chip antibody

  17. Integrated potentiometric detector for use in chip-based flow cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantra; Manz

    2000-07-01

    A new kind of potentiometric chip sensor for ion-selective electrodes (ISE) based on a solvent polymeric membrane is described. The chip sensor is designed to trap the organic cocktail inside the chip and to permit sample solution to flow past the membrane. The design allows the sensor to overcome technical problems of ruggedness and would therefore be ideal for industrial processes. The sensor performance for a Ba2+-ISE membrane based on a Vogtle ionophore showed electrochemical behavior similar to that observed in conventional electrodes and microelectrode arrangements.

  18. Design and Implementation of 8051 Single-Chip Microcontroller for Stationary 1.0 kW PEM Fuel Cell System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Hsing Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs have attracted significant interest as a potential green energy source. However, if the performance of such systems is to be enhanced, appropriate control strategies must be applied. Accordingly, the present study proposes a sophisticated control system for a 1.0 kW PEMFC system comprising a fuel cell stack, an auxiliary power supply, a DC-DC buck converter, and a DC-AC inverter. The control system is implemented using an 8051 single-chip microcontroller and is designed to optimize the system performance and safety in both the startup phase and the long-term operation phase. The major features of the proposed control system are described and the circuit diagrams required for its implementation introduced. In addition, the touch-sensitive, intuitive human-machine interface is introduced and typical screens are presented. Finally, the electrical characteristics of the PEMFC system are briefly examined. Overall, the results confirm that the single-chip microcontroller presented in this study has significant potential for commercialization in the near future.

  19. Human embryonic stem cells handbook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Alberto Redi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available After the Nobel prize in physiology or medicine was awarded jointly to Sir John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent it became imperative to write down the review for a book entirely devoted to human embryonic stem cells (hES, those cells that are a urgent need for researchers, those cells that rekindle the ethical debates and finally, last but not least, those cells whose study paved the way to obtain induced pluripotent stem cells by the OSKC’s Yamanaka method (the OSKC acronim refers, for those not familiar with the topic, to the four stemness genes used to transfect somatic fibroblasts: Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc....

  20. Innovative approaches to cell biomechanics from cell migration to on-chip manipulation

    CERN Document Server

    Okeyo, Kennedy Omondi; Adachi, Taiji

    2015-01-01

    This book covers topics on mechanosensing, mechanotransduction, and actin cytoskeletal dynamics in cell motility. It will contribute to a better understanding of how cells functionally adapt to their mechanical environment as well as highlighting fundamental concepts for designing material niches for cell manipulation. With topics from multidisciplinary fields of the life sciences, medicine, and engineering, the book is the first of its kind, providing comprehensive, integrated coverage of innovative approaches to cell biomechanics. It provides a valuable resource for seniors and graduate students studying cell biomechanics, and is also suitable for researchers interested in the application of methods and strategies in connection with the innovative approaches discussed. Each section of the book has been supplemented with concrete examples and illustrations to facilitate understanding even for readers unfamiliar with cell biomechanics.

  1. Analysis of single-cell differences by use of an on-chip microculture system and optical trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakamoto, Y; Inoue, I; Moriguchi, H; Yasuda, K

    2001-09-01

    A method is described for continuous observation of isolated single cells that enables genetically identical cells to be compared; it uses an on-chip microculture system and optical tweezers. Photolithography is used to construct microchambers with 5-microm-high walls made of thick photoresist (SU-8) on the surface of a glass slide. These microchambers are connected by a channel through which cells are transported, by means of optical tweezers, from a cultivation microchamber to an analysis microchamber, or from the analysis microchamber to a waste microchamber. The microchambers are covered with a semi-permeable membrane to separate them from nutrient medium circulating through a "cover chamber" above. Differential analysis of isolated direct descendants of single cells showed that this system could be used to compare genetically identical cells under contamination-free conditions. It should thus help in the clarification of heterogeneous phenomena, for example unequal cell division and cell differentiation.

  2. Medicaid CHIP ESPC Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Environmental Scanning and Program Characteristic (ESPC) Database is in a Microsoft (MS) Access format and contains Medicaid and CHIP data, for the 50 states and...

  3. A multiplexed chip-based assay system for investigating the functional development of human skeletal myotubes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A S T; Long, C J; Pirozzi, K; Najjar, S; McAleer, C; Vandenburgh, H H; Hickman, J J

    2014-09-20

    This report details the development of a non-invasive in vitro assay system for investigating the functional maturation and performance of human skeletal myotubes. Data is presented demonstrating the survival and differentiation of human myotubes on microscale silicon cantilevers in a defined, serum-free system. These cultures can be stimulated electrically and the resulting contraction quantified using modified atomic force microscopy technology. This system provides a higher degree of sensitivity for investigating contractile waveforms than video-based analysis, and represents the first system capable of measuring the contractile activity of individual human muscle myotubes in a reliable, high-throughput and non-invasive manner. The development of such a technique is critical for the advancement of body-on-a-chip platforms toward application in pre-clinical drug development screens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A Low-Power and Low-Voltage Power Management Strategy for On-Chip Micro Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Cevik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental characteristics of on-chip micro solar cell (MSC structures were investigated in this study. Several MSC structures using different layers in three different CMOS processes were designed and fabricated. Effects of PN junction structure and process technology on solar cell performance were measured. Parameters for low-power and low-voltage implementation of power management strategy and boost converter based circuits utilizing fractional voltage maximum power point tracking (FVMPPT algorithm were determined. The FVMPPT algorithm works based on the fraction between the maximum power point operation voltage and the open circuit voltage of the solar cell structure. This ratio is typically between 0.72 and 0.78 for commercially available poly crystalline silicon solar cells that produce several watts of power under typical daylight illumination. Measurements showed that the fractional voltage ratio is much higher and fairly constant between 0.82 and 0.85 for on-chip mono crystalline silicon micro solar cell structures that produce micro watts of power. Mono crystalline silicon solar cell structures were observed to result in better power fill factor (PFF that is higher than 74% indicating a higher energy harvesting efficiency.

  5. Excimer laser micropatterning of freestanding thermo-responsive hydrogel layers for cells-on-chip applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santaniello, Tommaso; Milani, Paolo; Lenardi, Cristina; Martello, Federico; Tocchio, Alessandro; Gassa, Federico; Webb, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    We report a novel reliable and repeatable technologic manufacturing protocol for the realization of micro-patterned freestanding hydrogel layers based on thermo-responsive poly-(N-isopropyl)acrylamide (PNIPAAm), which have potential to be employed as temperature-triggered smart surfaces for cells-on-chip applications. PNIPAAm-based films with controlled mechanical properties and different thicknesses (100–300 µm thickness) were prepared by injection compression moulding at room temperature. A 9 × 9 array of 20 µm diameter through-holes is machined by means of the KrF excimer laser on dry PNIPAAm films which are physically attached to flat polyvinyl chloride (PVC) substrates. Machining parameters, such as fluence and number of shots, are optimized in order to achieve highly resolved features. Micro-structured freestanding films are then easily obtained after hydrogels are detached from PVC by gradually promoting the film swelling in ethanol. In the PNIPAAm water-swollen state, the machined holes’ diameter approaches a slight larger value (30 µm) according to the measured hydrogel swelling ratio. Thermo-responsive behaviour and through-hole tapering characterization are carried out by metrology measurements using an optical inverted and confocal microscope setup, respectively. After the temperature of freestanding films is raised above 32 °C, we observe that the shrinkage of the whole through-hole array occurs, thus reducing the holes’ diameter to less than a half its original size (about 15 µm) as a consequence of the film dehydration. Different holes’ diameters (10 and 30 µm) are also obtained on dry hydrogel employing suitable projection masks, showing similar shrinking behaviour when hydrated and undergone thermo-response tests. Thermo-responsive PNIPAAm-based freestanding layers could then be integrated with other suitable micro-fabricated thermoplastic components in order to preliminary test their feasibility in operating as temperature

  6. The effect of Cytochalasin D on F-Actin behavior of single-cell electroendocytosis using multi-chamber micro cell chip

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Ran

    2012-03-01

    Electroendocytosis (EED) is a pulsed-electric-field (PEF) induced endocytosis, facilitating cells uptake molecules through nanometer-sized EED vesicles. We herein investigate the effect of a chemical inhibitor, Cytochalasin D (CD) on the actin-filaments (F-Actin) behavior of single-cell EED. The CD concentration (C CD) can control the depolymerization of F-actin. A multi-chamber micro cell chip was fabricated to study the EED under different conditions. Large-scale single-cell data demonstrated EED highly depends on both electric field and C CD. © 2012 IEEE.

  7. The effect of Cytochalasin D on F-Actin behavior of single-cell electroendocytosis using multi-chamber micro cell chip

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Ran; Chang, Donald C.; Lee, Yi Kuen

    2012-01-01

    Electroendocytosis (EED) is a pulsed-electric-field (PEF) induced endocytosis, facilitating cells uptake molecules through nanometer-sized EED vesicles. We herein investigate the effect of a chemical inhibitor, Cytochalasin D (CD) on the actin-filaments (F-Actin) behavior of single-cell EED. The CD concentration (C CD) can control the depolymerization of F-actin. A multi-chamber micro cell chip was fabricated to study the EED under different conditions. Large-scale single-cell data demonstrated EED highly depends on both electric field and C CD. © 2012 IEEE.

  8. Tuft (caveolated) cells in two human colon carcinoma cell lines.

    OpenAIRE

    Barkla, D. H.; Whitehead, R. H.; Foster, H.; Tutton, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The presence of an unusual cell type in two human colon carcinoma cell lines is reported. The cells show the same morphology as "tuft" (caveolated) cells present in normal gastrointestinal epithelium. Tuft cells were seen in cell line LIM 1863 growing in vitro and in human colon carcinoma cell line LIM 2210 growing as subcutaneous solid tumour xenografts in nude mice. Characteristic morphologic features of tuft cells included a wide base, narrow apex and a tuft of long microvilli projecting f...

  9. On-chip fabrication of alkali-metal vapor cells utilizing an alkali-metal source tablet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimoto, K; Hirai, Y; Sugano, K; Tsuchiya, T; Tabata, O; Ban, K; Mizutani, N

    2013-01-01

    We describe a novel on-chip microfabrication technique for the alkali-metal vapor cell of an optically pumped atomic magnetometer (OPAM), utilizing an alkali-metal source tablet (AMST). The newly proposed AMST is a millimeter-sized piece of porous alumina whose considerable surface area holds deposited alkali-metal chloride (KCl) and barium azide (BaN 6 ), source materials that effectively produce alkali-metal vapor at less than 400 °C. Our experiments indicated that the most effective pore size of the AMST is between 60 and 170 µm. The thickness of an insulating glass spacer holding the AMST was designed to confine generated alkali metal to the interior of the vapor cell during its production, and an integrated silicon heater was designed to seal the device using a glass frit, melted at an optimum temperature range of 460–490 °C that was determined by finite element method thermal simulation. The proposed design and AMST were used to successfully fabricate a K cell that was then operated as an OPAM with a measured sensitivity of 50 pT. These results demonstrate that the proposed concept for on-chip microfabrication of alkali-metal vapor cells may lead to effective replacement of conventional glassworking approaches. (paper)

  10. Experiment list: SRX153145 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ast adenocarcinoma cell-line MCF7 || cell-line=MCF7 || passage=5 || chip antibody=H...n=Pleura|Tissue Diagnosis=Adenocarcinoma 93237597,98.2,8.2,1358 GSM946849: MCF7 H3K4me1; Homo sapiens; ChIP-Seq source_name=Human bre

  11. Jllumina - A comprehensive Java-based API for statistical Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 and Infinium MethylationEPIC BeadChip data processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida Diogo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Measuring differential methylation of the DNA is the nowadays most common approach to linking epigenetic modifications to diseases (called epigenome-wide association studies, EWAS. For its low cost, its efficiency and easy handling, the Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip and its successor, the Infinium MethylationEPIC BeadChip, is the by far most popular techniques for conduction EWAS in large patient cohorts. Despite the popularity of this chip technology, raw data processing and statistical analysis of the array data remains far from trivial and still lacks dedicated software libraries enabling high quality and statistically sound downstream analyses. As of yet, only R-based solutions are freely available for low-level processing of the Illumina chip data. However, the lack of alternative libraries poses a hurdle for the development of new bioinformatic tools, in particular when it comes to web services or applications where run time and memory consumption matter, or EWAS data analysis is an integrative part of a bigger framework or data analysis pipeline. We have therefore developed and implemented Jllumina, an open-source Java library for raw data manipulation of Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 and Infinium MethylationEPIC BeadChip data, supporting the developer with Java functions covering reading and preprocessing the raw data, down to statistical assessment, permutation tests, and identification of differentially methylated loci. Jllumina is fully parallelizable and publicly available at http://dimmer.compbio.sdu.dk/download.html

  12. Single cells as experimentation units in lab-on-a-chip devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    le Gac, Severine; van den Berg, Albert

    'Lab-on-a-chip' technology (LOC) has now reached a mature state and is employed commonly in research in the life sciences. LOC devices make novel experimentation possible while providing a sophisticated environment for cellular investigation. As a next step, we introduce here the concept of a

  13. Human glomerular epithelial cell proteoglycans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, G.J.; Jenner, L.; Mason, R.M.; Davies, M.

    1990-01-01

    Proteoglycans synthesized by cultures of human glomerular epithelial cells have been isolated and characterized. Three types of heparan sulfate were detected. Heparan sulfate proteoglycan I (HSPG-I; Kav 6B 0.04) was found in the cell layer and medium and accounted for 12% of the total proteoglycans synthesized. HSPG-II (Kav 6B 0.25) accounted for 18% of the proteoglycans and was located in the medium and cell layer. A third population (9% of the proteoglycan population), heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycan (HS-GAG; Kav 6B 0.4-0.8), had properties consistent with single glycosaminoglycan chains or their fragments and was found only in the cell layer. HSPG-I and HSPG-II from the cell layer had hydrophobic properties; they were released from the cell layer by mild trypsin treatment. HS-GAG lacked these properties, consisted of low-molecular-mass heparan sulfate oligosaccharides, and were intracellular. HSPG-I and -II released to the medium lacked hydrophobic properties. The cells also produced three distinct types of chondroitin sulfates. The major species, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan I (CSPG-I) eluted in the excluded volume of a Sepharose CL-6B column, accounted for 30% of the proteoglycans detected, and was found in both the cell layer and medium. Cell layer CSPG-I bound to octyl-Sepharose. It was released from the cell layer by mild trypsin treatment. CSPG-II (Kav 6B 0.1-0.23) accounted for 10% of the total 35S-labeled macromolecules and was found predominantly in the culture medium. A small amount of CS-GAG (Kav 6B 0.25-0.6) is present in the cell extract and like HS-GAG is intracellular. Pulse-chase experiments indicated that HSPG-I and -II and CSPG-I and -II are lost from the cell layer either by direct release into the medium or by internalization where they are metabolized to single glycosaminoglycan chains and subsequently to inorganic sulfate

  14. Very High Throughput Electrical Cell Lysis and Extraction of Intracellular Compounds Using 3D Carbon Electrodes in Lab-on-a-Chip Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Renaud

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Here we present an electrical lysis throughput of 600 microliters per minute at high cell density (108 yeast cells per ml with 90% efficiency, thus improving the current common throughput of one microliter per minute. We also demonstrate the extraction of intracellular luciferase from mammalian cells with efficiency comparable to off-chip bulk chemical lysis. The goal of this work is to develop a sample preparation module that can act as a stand-alone device or be integrated to other functions already demonstrated in miniaturized devices, including sorting and analysis, towards a true lab-on-a-chip.

  15. Ultrasonic three-dimensional on-chip cell culture for dynamic studies of tumor immune surveillance by natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christakou, Athanasia E; Ohlin, Mathias; Önfelt, Björn; Wiklund, Martin

    2015-08-07

    We demonstrate a simple method for three-dimensional (3D) cell culture controlled by ultrasonic standing waves in a multi-well microplate. The method gently arranges cells in a suspension into a single aggregate in each well of the microplate and, by this, nucleates 3D tissue-like cell growth for culture times between two and seven days. The microplate device is compatible with both high-resolution optical microscopy and maintenance in a standard cell incubator. The result is a scaffold- and coating-free method for 3D cell culture that can be used for controlling the cellular architecture, as well as the cellular and molecular composition of the microenvironment in and around the formed cell structures. We demonstrate the parallel production of one hundred synthetic 3D solid tumors comprising up to thousands of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) HepG2 cells, we characterize the tumor structure by high-resolution optical microscopy, and we monitor the functional behavior of natural killer (NK) cells migrating, docking and interacting with the tumor model during culture. Our results show that the method can be used for determining the collective ability of a given number of NK cells to defeat a solid tumor having a certain size, shape and composition. The ultrasound-based method itself is generic and can meet any demand from applications where it is advantageous to monitor cell culture from production to analysis of 3D tissue or tumor models using microscopy in one single microplate device.

  16. DNA repair in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regan, J.D.; Carrier, W.L.; Kusano, I.; Furuno-Fukushi, I.; Dunn, W.C. Jr.; Francis, A.A.; Lee, W.H.

    1982-01-01

    Our primary objective is to elucidate the molecular events in human cells when cellular macromolecules such as DNA are damaged by radiation or chemical agents. We study and characterize (i) the sequence of DNA repair events, (ii) the various modalities of repair, (iii) the genetic inhibition of repair due to mutation, (iv) the physiological inhibition of repair due to mutation, (v) the physiological inhibition of repair due to biochemical inhibitors, and (vi) the genetic basis of repair. Our ultimate goals are to (i) isolate and analyze the repair component of the mutagenic and/or carcinogenic event in human cells, and (ii) elucidate the magnitude and significance of this repair component as it impinges on the practical problems of human irradiation or exposure to actual or potential chemical mutagens and carcinogens. The significance of these studies lies in (i) the ubiquitousness of repair (most organisms, including man, have several complex repair systems), (ii) the belief that mutagenic and carcinogenic events may arise only from residual (nonrepaired) lesions or that error-prone repair systems may be the major induction mechanisms of the mutagenic or carcinogenic event, and (iii) the clear association of repair defects and highly carcinogenic disease states in man [xeroderma pigmentosum (XP)

  17. Three-Dimensional Scaffold Chip with Thermosensitive Coating for Capture and Reversible Release of Individual and Cluster of Circulating Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shi-Bo; Xie, Min; Chen, Yan; Xiong, Jun; Liu, Ya; Chen, Zhen; Guo, Shan; Shu, Ying; Wang, Ming; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Dong, Wei-Guo; Huang, Wei-Hua

    2017-08-01

    Tumor metastasis is attributed to circulating tumor cells (CTC) or CTC clusters. Many strategies have hitherto been designed to isolate CTCs, but there are few methods that can capture and gently release CTC clusters as efficient as single CTCs. Herein, we developed a three-dimensional (3D) scaffold chip with thermosensitive coating for high-efficiency capture and release of individual and cluster CTCs. The 3D scaffold chip successfully combines the specific recognition and physically obstructed effect of 3D scaffold structure to significantly improve cell clusters capture efficiency. Thermosensitive gelatin hydrogel uniformly coated on the scaffold dissolves at 37 °C quickly, and the captured cells are gently released from chip with high viability. Notably, this platform was applied to isolate CTCs from cancer patients' blood samples. This allows global DNA and RNA methylation analysis of collected single CTC and CTC clusters, indicating the great potential of this platform in cancer diagnosis and downstream analysis at the molecular level.

  18. Experiment list: SRX150696 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -1 || cell organism=human || cell description=pancreatic carcinoma, (PMID: 1140870) PANC-1 was established from a panc...SRX150696 hg19 Input control Input control Pancreas PANC-1 Tissue=Pancreas/Duct|Dis...ease=Epithelioid Carcinoma 41671673,95.8,10.4,1584 GSM935617: USC ChipSeq PANC-1 Input UCDavis source_name=PANC... || datatype=ChipSeq || datatype description=Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell=PANC...reatic carcinoma, which was extracted via pancreatico-duodenectomy specimen from a 56-year-old Cau

  19. Experiment list: SRX199860 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available | cell organism=human || cell description=pancreatic carcinoma, (PMID: 1140870) PANC-1 was established from a panc...SRX199860 hg19 Input control Input control Pancreas PANC-1 Tissue=Pancreas/Duct|Dis...ease=Epithelioid Carcinoma 27365308,98.2,3.6,969 GSM1022632: UW ChipSeq PANC-1 InputRep1 source_name=PANC-1 ...datatype=ChipSeq || datatype description=Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell=PANC-1 |...reatic carcinoma, which was extracted via pancreatico-duodenectomy specimen from a 56-year-old Caucasi

  20. Experiment list: SRX185907 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Homo sapiens; ChIP-Seq source_name=MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells, control, FOXM1 ChIP || cell_line=MCF-...7 || cell_type=ER-positive breast adenocarcinoma cells || treatment=DMSO || chip_

  1. The human airway epithelial basal cell transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil R Hackett

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The human airway epithelium consists of 4 major cell types: ciliated, secretory, columnar and basal cells. During natural turnover and in response to injury, the airway basal cells function as stem/progenitor cells for the other airway cell types. The objective of this study is to better understand human airway epithelial basal cell biology by defining the gene expression signature of this cell population.Bronchial brushing was used to obtain airway epithelium from healthy nonsmokers. Microarrays were used to assess the transcriptome of basal cells purified from the airway epithelium in comparison to the transcriptome of the differentiated airway epithelium. This analysis identified the "human airway basal cell signature" as 1,161 unique genes with >5-fold higher expression level in basal cells compared to differentiated epithelium. The basal cell signature was suppressed when the basal cells differentiated into a ciliated airway epithelium in vitro. The basal cell signature displayed overlap with genes expressed in basal-like cells from other human tissues and with that of murine airway basal cells. Consistent with self-modulation as well as signaling to other airway cell types, the human airway basal cell signature was characterized by genes encoding extracellular matrix components, growth factors and growth factor receptors, including genes related to the EGF and VEGF pathways. Interestingly, while the basal cell signature overlaps that of basal-like cells of other organs, the human airway basal cell signature has features not previously associated with this cell type, including a unique pattern of genes encoding extracellular matrix components, G protein-coupled receptors, neuroactive ligands and receptors, and ion channels.The human airway epithelial basal cell signature identified in the present study provides novel insights into the molecular phenotype and biology of the stem/progenitor cells of the human airway epithelium.

  2. A Facile Droplet-Chip-Time-Resolved Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry Online System for Determination of Zinc in Single Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Han; Chen, Beibei; He, Man; Hu, Bin

    2017-05-02

    Single cell analysis is a significant research field in recent years reflecting the heterogeneity of cells in a biological system. In this work, a facile droplet chip was fabricated and online combined with time-resolved inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) via a microflow nebulizer for the determination of zinc in single HepG2 cells. On the focusing geometric designed PDMS microfluidic chip, the aqueous cell suspension was ejected and divided by hexanol to generate droplets. The droplets encapsulated single cells remain intact during the transportation into ICP for subsequent detection. Under the optimized conditions, the frequency of droplet generation is 3-6 × 10 6 min -1 , and the injected cell number is 2500 min -1 , which can ensure the single cell encapsulation. ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) were used for the quantification of zinc in single cells, and the accuracy was validated by conventional acid digestion-ICPMS method. The ZnO NPs incubated HepG2 cells were analyzed as model samples, and the results exhibit the heterogeneity of HepG2 cells in the uptake/adsorption of ZnO NPs. The developed online droplet-chip-ICPMS analysis system achieves stable single cell encapsulation and has high throughput for single cell analysis. It has the potential in monitoring the content as well as distribution of trace elements/NPs at the single cell level.

  3. Human regulatory B cells control the TFH cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Achouak; Simon, Quentin; Mohr, Audrey; Séité, Jean-François; Youinou, Pierre; Bendaoud, Boutahar; Ghedira, Ibtissem; Pers, Jacques-Olivier; Jamin, Christophe

    2017-07-01

    Follicular helper T (T FH ) cells support terminal B-cell differentiation. Human regulatory B (Breg) cells modulate cellular responses, but their control of T FH cell-dependent humoral immune responses is unknown. We sought to assess the role of Breg cells on T FH cell development and function. Human T cells were polyclonally stimulated in the presence of IL-12 and IL-21 to generate T FH cells. They were cocultured with B cells to induce their terminal differentiation. Breg cells were included in these cultures, and their effects were evaluated by using flow cytometry and ELISA. B-cell lymphoma 6, IL-21, inducible costimulator, CXCR5, and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) expressions increased on stimulated human T cells, characterizing T FH cell maturation. In cocultures they differentiated B cells into CD138 + plasma and IgD - CD27 + memory cells and triggered immunoglobulin secretions. Breg cells obtained by Toll-like receptor 9 and CD40 activation of B cells prevented T FH cell development. Added to T FH cell and B-cell cocultures, they inhibited B-cell differentiation, impeded immunoglobulin secretions, and expanded Foxp3 + CXCR5 + PD-1 + follicular regulatory T cells. Breg cells modulated IL-21 receptor expressions on T FH cells and B cells, and their suppressive activities involved CD40, CD80, CD86, and intercellular adhesion molecule interactions and required production of IL-10 and TGF-β. Human Breg cells control T FH cell maturation, expand follicular regulatory T cells, and inhibit the T FH cell-mediated antibody secretion. These novel observations demonstrate a role for the Breg cell in germinal center reactions and suggest that deficient activities might impair the T FH cell-dependent control of humoral immunity and might lead to the development of aberrant autoimmune responses. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Endocannabinoids and Human Sperm Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Zolese

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available N-acylethanolamides (NAEs are naturally occurring signaling lipids consisting of amides and esters of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. Usually they are present in a very small amounts in many mammalian tissues and cells, including human reproductive tracts and fluids. Recently, the presence of N-arachidonoylethanolamide (anandamide, AEA, the most characterised member of endocannabinoids, and its congeners palmitoylethanolamide (PEA and oleylethanolamide (OEA in seminal plasma, oviductal fluid, and follicular fluids was demonstrated. AEA has been shown to bind not only type-1 (CB1 and type-2 (CB2 cannabinoid receptors, but also type-1 vanilloid receptor (TRPV1, while PEA and OEA are inactive with respect to classical cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 but activate TRPV1 or peroxisome proliferator activate receptors (PPARs. This review concerns the most recent experimental data on PEA and OEA, endocannabinoid-like molecules which appear to exert their action exclusively on sperm cells with altered features, such as membrane characteristics and kinematic parameters. Their beneficial effects on these cells could suggest a possible pharmacological use of PEA and OEA on patients affected by some forms of idiopathic infertility.

  5. Highly efficient capture and harvest of circulating tumor cells on a microfluidic chip integrated with herringbone and micropost arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Peng; Wu, Yafeng; Guo, Jinhong; Kang, Yuejun

    2015-04-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs), which are derived from primary tumor site and transported to distant organs, are considered as the major cause of metastasis. So far, various techniques have been applied for CTC isolation and enumeration. However, there exists great demand to improve the sensitivity of CTC capture, and it remains challenging to elute the cells efficiently from device for further biomolecular and cellular analyses. In this study, we fabricate a dual functional chip integrated with herringbone structure and micropost array to achieve CTC capture and elution through EpCAM-based immunoreaction. Hep3B tumor cell line is selected as the model of CTCs for processing using this device. The results demonstrate that the capture limit of Hep3B cells can reach up to 10 cells (per mL of sample volume) with capture efficiency of 80% on average. Moreover, the elution rate of the captured Hep3B cells can reach up to 69.4% on average for cell number ranging from 1 to 100. These results demonstrate that this device exhibits dual functions with considerably high capture rate and elution rate, indicating its promising capability for cancer diagnosis and therapeutics.

  6. Chip-based magnetic solid phase microextraction coupled with ICP-MS for the determination of Cd and Se in HepG2 cells incubated with CdSe quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaoxiao; Chen, Beibei; He, Man; Wang, Han; Hu, Bin

    2018-03-01

    The quantification of trace Cd and Se in cells incubated with CdSe quantum dots (QDs) is critical to investigate the cytotoxicity of CdSe QDs. In this work, a miniaturized platform, namely chip-based magnetic solid phase microextraction (MSPME) packing with sulfhydryl group functionalized magnetic nanoparticles, was fabricated and combined with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for the determination of trace Cd and Se in cells. Under the optimized conditions, the limits of detection (LOD) of the developed chip-based MSPME-ICP-MS system are 2.2 and 21ngL -1 for Cd and Se, respectively. The proposed method is applied successfully to the analysis of total and released small molecular fraction of Cd and Se in Human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2 cells) incubated with CdSe QDs, and the recoveries for the spiked samples are in the range of 86.0-109%. This method shows great promise to analyze cell samples and the obtained results are instructive to explore the cytotoxicity mechanism of CdSe QDs in cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Stem cells in the human breast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ole William; Polyak, Kornelia

    2010-01-01

    The origins of the epithelial cells participating in the development, tissue homeostasis, and cancer of the human breast are poorly understood. However, emerging evidence suggests a role for adult tissue-specific stem cells in these processes. In a hierarchical manner, these generate the two main...... mammary cell lineages, producing an increasing number of cells with distinct properties. Understanding the biological characteristics of human breast stem cells and their progeny is crucial in attempts to compare the features of normal stem cells and cancer precursor cells and distinguish these from...... nonprecursor cells and cells from the bulk of a tumor. A historical overview of research on human breast stem cells in primary tissue and in culture reveals the progress that has been made in this area, whereas a focus on the cell-of-origin and reprogramming that occurs during neoplastic conversion provides...

  8. Satellite cells in human skeletal muscle plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, Tim; Nederveen, Joshua P; McKay, Bryon R; Joanisse, Sophie; Verdijk, Lex B; van Loon, Luc J C; Parise, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells are considered to play a crucial role in muscle fiber maintenance, repair and remodeling. Our knowledge of the role of satellite cells in muscle fiber adaptation has traditionally relied on in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. Over the past decade, a genuine effort has been made to translate these results to humans under physiological conditions. Findings from in vivo human studies suggest that satellite cells play a key role in skeletal muscle fiber repair/remodeling in response to exercise. Mounting evidence indicates that aging has a profound impact on the regulation of satellite cells in human skeletal muscle. Yet, the precise role of satellite cells in the development of muscle fiber atrophy with age remains unresolved. This review seeks to integrate recent results from in vivo human studies on satellite cell function in muscle fiber repair/remodeling in the wider context of satellite cell biology whose literature is largely based on animal and cell models.

  9. Advanced Good Cell Culture Practice for human primary, stem cell-derived and organoid models as well as microphysiological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamies, David; Bal-Price, Anna; Chesné, Christophe; Coecke, Sandra; Dinnyes, Andras; Eskes, Chantra; Grillari, Regina; Gstraunthaler, Gerhard; Hartung, Thomas; Jennings, Paul; Leist, Marcel; Martin, Ulrich; Passier, Robert; Schwamborn, Jens C; Stacey, Glyn N; Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun; Daneshian, Mardas

    2018-04-13

    A major reason for the current reproducibility crisis in the life sciences is the poor implementation of quality control measures and reporting standards. Improvement is needed, especially regarding increasingly complex in vitro methods. Good Cell Culture Practice (GCCP) was an effort from 1996 to 2005 to develop such minimum quality standards also applicable in academia. This paper summarizes recent key developments in in vitro cell culture and addresses the issues resulting for GCCP, e.g. the development of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and gene-edited cells. It further deals with human stem-cell-derived models and bioengineering of organo-typic cell cultures, including organoids, organ-on-chip and human-on-chip approaches. Commercial vendors and cell banks have made human primary cells more widely available over the last decade, increasing their use, but also requiring specific guidance as to GCCP. The characterization of cell culture systems including high-content imaging and high-throughput measurement technologies increasingly combined with more complex cell and tissue cultures represent a further challenge for GCCP. The increasing use of gene editing techniques to generate and modify in vitro culture models also requires discussion of its impact on GCCP. International (often varying) legislations and market forces originating from the commercialization of cell and tissue products and technologies are further impacting on the need for the use of GCCP. This report summarizes the recommendations of the second of two workshops, held in Germany in December 2015, aiming map the challenge and organize the process or developing a revised GCCP 2.0.

  10. Efficient removal of platelets from peripheral blood progenitor cell products using a novel micro-chip based acoustophoretic platform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefina Dykes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Excessive collection of platelets is an unwanted side effect in current centrifugation-based peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC apheresis. We investigated a novel microchip-based acoustophoresis technique, utilizing ultrasonic standing wave forces for the removal of platelets from PBPC products. By applying an acoustic standing wave field onto a continuously flowing cell suspension in a micro channel, cells can be separated from the surrounding media depending on their physical properties. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: PBPC samples were obtained from patients (n = 15 and healthy donors (n = 6 and sorted on an acoustophoresis-chip. The acoustic force was set to separate leukocytes from platelets into a target fraction and a waste fraction, respectively. The PBPC samples, the target and the waste fractions were analysed for cell recovery, purity and functionality. RESULTS: The median separation efficiency of leukocytes to the target fraction was 98% whereas platelets were effectively depleted by 89%. PBPC samples and corresponding target fractions were similar in the percentage of CD34+ hematopoetic progenitor/stem cells as well as leukocyte/lymphocyte subset distributions. Median viability was 98%, 98% and 97% in the PBPC samples, the target and the waste fractions, respectively. Results from hematopoietic progenitor cell assays indicated a preserved colony-forming ability post-sorting. Evaluation of platelet activation by P-selectin (CD62P expression revealed a significant increase of CD62P+ platelets in the target (19% and waste fractions (20%, respectively, compared to the PBPC input samples (9%. However, activation was lower when compared to stored blood bank platelet concentrates (48%. CONCLUSION: Acoustophoresis can be utilized to efficiently deplete PBPC samples of platelets, whilst preserving the target stem/progenitor cell and leukocyte cell populations, cell viability and progenitor cell colony-forming ability

  11. A chip-type thin-layer electrochemical cell coupled with capillary electrophoresis for online separation of electrode reaction products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Jian-Bo, E-mail: jbhe@hfut.edu.cn; Cui, Ting; Zhang, Wen-Wen; Deng, Ning

    2013-07-05

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •A new coupling of thin-layer electrolysis with capillary electrophoresis (CE). •Rapid electrolysis, direct sampling followed by online CE separation. •At least 13 products of quercetin oxidation were separated. •Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were determined from CE peak areas. -- Abstract: A coupling technique of thin-layer electrolysis with high-performance capillary electrophoresis/UV–vis technique(EC/HPCE/UV–vis) is developed for online separation and determination of electrode reaction products. A chip-type thin-layer electrolytic (CTE) cell was designed and fabricated, which contains a capillary channel and a background electrolyte reservoir, allowing rapid electrolysis, direct sampling and online electrophoretic separation. This chip-type setup was characterized based on an electrophoresis expression of Nernst equation that was applied to the redox equilibrium of o-tolidine at different potentials. The utility of the method was demonstrated by separating and determining the electro-oxidation products of quercetin in different pH media. Two main products were always found in the studied time, potential and pH ranges. The variety of products increased not only with increasing potential but also with increasing pH value, and in total, at least 13 products were observed in the electropherograms. This work illustrates a novel example of capillary electrophoresis used online with thin-layer electrolysis to separate and detect electrode reaction products.

  12. A chip-type thin-layer electrochemical cell coupled with capillary electrophoresis for online separation of electrode reaction products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Jian-Bo; Cui, Ting; Zhang, Wen-Wen; Deng, Ning

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •A new coupling of thin-layer electrolysis with capillary electrophoresis (CE). •Rapid electrolysis, direct sampling followed by online CE separation. •At least 13 products of quercetin oxidation were separated. •Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were determined from CE peak areas. -- Abstract: A coupling technique of thin-layer electrolysis with high-performance capillary electrophoresis/UV–vis technique(EC/HPCE/UV–vis) is developed for online separation and determination of electrode reaction products. A chip-type thin-layer electrolytic (CTE) cell was designed and fabricated, which contains a capillary channel and a background electrolyte reservoir, allowing rapid electrolysis, direct sampling and online electrophoretic separation. This chip-type setup was characterized based on an electrophoresis expression of Nernst equation that was applied to the redox equilibrium of o-tolidine at different potentials. The utility of the method was demonstrated by separating and determining the electro-oxidation products of quercetin in different pH media. Two main products were always found in the studied time, potential and pH ranges. The variety of products increased not only with increasing potential but also with increasing pH value, and in total, at least 13 products were observed in the electropherograms. This work illustrates a novel example of capillary electrophoresis used online with thin-layer electrolysis to separate and detect electrode reaction products

  13. An electrical bio-chip to transfer and detect electromagnetic stimulation on the cells based on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafizadeh-Tafti, Saeed; Haqiqatkhah, Mohammad Hossein; Saviz, Mehrdad; Janmaleki, Mohsen; Faraji Dana, Reza; Zanganeh, Somayeh; Abdolahad, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    A highly sensitive impedimetric bio-chip based on vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes (VAMWCNTs), was applied in direct interaction with lung cancer cells. Our tool provided both inducing and monitoring the bioelectrical changes in the cells initiated by electromagnetic (EM) wave stimulation. EM wave of 940MHz frequency with different intensities was used. Here, wave ablation might accumulate electrical charge on the tips of nanotubes penetrated into cell's membrane. The charge might induce ionic exchanges into the cell and cause alterations in electrical states of the membrane. Transmembrane electrostatic/dynamic states would be strongly affected due to such exchanges. Our novel modality was that, the cells' vitality changes caused by charge inductions were electrically detected with the same nanotubes in the architecture of electrodes for impedance measurement. The responses of the sensor were confirmed by electron and florescent microscopy images as well as biological assays. In summation, our method provided an effective biochip for enhancing and detecting external EM stimulation on the cells useful for future diagnostic and therapeutic applications, such as wave-guided drug-resistance breakage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. c-Myc-Dependent Cell Competition in Human Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manish S; Shah, Heta S; Shrivastava, Neeta

    2017-07-01

    Cell Competition is an interaction between cells for existence in heterogeneous cell populations of multicellular organisms. This phenomenon is involved in initiation and progression of cancer where heterogeneous cell populations compete directly or indirectly for the survival of the fittest based on differential gene expression. In Drosophila, cells having lower dMyc expression are eliminated by cell competition through apoptosis when present in the milieu of cells having higher dMyc expression. Thus, we designed a study to develop c-Myc (human homolog) dependent in vitro cell competition model of human cancer cells. Cells with higher c-Myc were transfected with c-myc shRNA to prepare cells with lower c-Myc and then co-cultured with the same type of cells having a higher c-Myc in equal ratio. Cells with lower c-Myc showed a significant decrease in numbers when compared with higher c-Myc cells, suggesting "loser" and "winner" status of cells, respectively. During microscopy, engulfment of loser cells by winner cells was observed with higher expression of JNK in loser cells. Furthermore, elimination of loser cells was prevented significantly, when co-cultured cells were treated with the JNK (apoptosis) inhibitor. Above results indicate elimination of loser cells in the presence of winner cells by c-Myc-dependent mechanisms of cell competition in human cancer cells. This could be an important mechanism in human tumors where normal cells are eliminated by c-Myc-overexpressed tumor cells. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1782-1791, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Design, Fabrication and Prototype testing of a Chip Integrated Micro PEM Fuel Cell Accumulator combined On-Board Range Extender

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakrishnan, A; Mueller, C; Reinecke, H

    2014-01-01

    In this work we present the design, fabrication and prototype testing of Chip Integrated Micro PEM Fuel Cell Accumulator (CIμ-PFCA) combined On-Board Range Extender (O-BRE). CIμ-PFCA is silicon based micro-PEM fuel cell system with an integrated hydrogen storage feature (palladium metal hydride), the run time of CIμ-PFCA is dependent on the stored hydrogen, and in order to extend its run time an O-BRE is realized (catalytic hydrolysis of chemical hydride, NaBH 4 . Combining the CIμ-PFCA and O-BRE on a system level have few important design requirements to be considered; hydrogen regulation, gas -liquid separator between the CIμ-PFCA and the O-RE. The usage of traditional techniques to regulate hydrogen (tubes), gas-liquid phase membranes (porous membrane separators) are less desirable in the micro domain, due to its space constraint. Our approach is to use a passive hydrogen regulation and gas-liquid phase separation concept; to use palladium membrane. Palladium regulates hydrogen by concentration diffusion, and its property to selectively adsorb only hydrogen is used as a passive gas-liquid phase separator. Proof of concept is shown by realizing a prototype system. The system is an assembly of CIμ-PFCA, palladium membrane and the O-BRE. The CIμ-PFCA consist of 2 individually processed silicon chips, copper supported palladium membrane realized by electroplating followed by high temperature annealing process under inter atmosphere and the O-BRE is realized out of a polymer substrate by micromilling process with platinum coated structures, which functions as a catalyst for the hydrolysis of NaBH 4 . The functionality of the assembled prototype system is demonstrated by the measuring a unit cell (area 1 mm 2 ) when driven by the catalytic hydrolysis of chemical hydride (NaBH 4 and the prototype system shows run time more than 15 hours

  16. Signaling hierarchy regulating human endothelial cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Melissa A; Hirschi, Karen K

    2009-05-01

    Our present knowledge of the regulation of mammalian endothelial cell differentiation has been largely derived from studies of mouse embryonic development. However, unique mechanisms and hierarchy of signals that govern human endothelial cell development are unknown and, thus, explored in these studies. Using human embryonic stem cells as a model system, we were able to reproducibly and robustly generate differentiated endothelial cells via coculture on OP9 marrow stromal cells. We found that, in contrast to studies in the mouse, bFGF and VEGF had no specific effects on the initiation of human vasculogenesis. However, exogenous Ihh promoted endothelial cell differentiation, as evidenced by increased production of cells with cobblestone morphology that coexpress multiple endothelial-specific genes and proteins, form lumens, and exhibit DiI-AcLDL uptake. Inhibition of BMP signaling using Noggin or BMP4, specifically, using neutralizing antibodies suppressed endothelial cell formation; whereas, addition of rhBMP4 to cells treated with the hedgehog inhibitor cyclopamine rescued endothelial cell development. Our studies revealed that Ihh promoted human endothelial cell differentiation from pluripotent hES cells via BMP signaling, providing novel insights applicable to modulating human endothelial cell formation and vascular regeneration for human clinical therapies.

  17. A Method to Study the Epigenetic Chromatin States of Rare Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells; MiniChIP–Chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weishaupt Holger

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dynamic chromatin structure is a fundamental property of gene transcriptional regulation, and has emerged as a critical modulator of physiological processes during cellular differentiation and development. Analysis of chromatin structure using molecular biology and biochemical assays in rare somatic stem and progenitor cells is key for understanding these processes but poses a great challenge because of their reliance on millions of cells. Through the development of a miniaturized genome-scale chromatin immunoprecipitation method (miniChIP–chip, we have documented the genome-wide chromatin states of low abundant populations that comprise hematopoietic stem cells and immediate progeny residing in murine bone marrow. In this report, we describe the miniChIP methodology that can be used for increasing an understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms underlying hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell function. Application of this method will reveal the contribution of dynamic chromatin structure in regulating the function of other somatic stem cell populations, and how this process becomes perturbed in pathological conditions. Additional file 1 Click here for file

  18. Experiment list: SRX152077 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ll organism=human || cell description=pancreatic carcinoma, (PMID: 1140870) PANC-1 was established from a panc...SRX152077 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Pancreas PANC-1 Tissue=Pancreas/Duct|Disease=Epithel...ioid Carcinoma 53620150,97.5,34.9,29597 GSM945856: USC ChipSeq PANC-1 H3K4me3B UCDavis source_name=PANC-1 ||...type=ChipSeq || datatype description=Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell=PANC-1 || ce...reatic carcinoma, which was extracted via pancreatico-duodenectomy specimen from a 56-year-old Caucasian i

  19. Experiment list: SRX190029 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l organism=human || cell description=pancreatic carcinoma, (PMID: 1140870) PANC-1 was established from a panc...SRX190029 hg19 Input control Input control Pancreas PANC-1 Tissue=Pancreas/Duct|Dis...ease=Epithelioid Carcinoma 27365308,98.2,3.6,980 GSM945246: UW ChipSeq PANC-1 Input source_name=PANC-1 || bi...ype=ChipSeq || datatype description=Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell=PANC-1 || cel...reatic carcinoma, which was extracted via pancreatico-duodenectomy specimen from a 56-year-old Caucasian in

  20. Symmetry breaking in human neuroblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Hideki; Kaneko, Yasuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division (ACD) is a characteristic of cancer stem cells, which exhibit high malignant potential. However, the cellular mechanisms that regulate symmetric (self-renewal) and asymmetric cell divisions are mostly unknown. Using human neuroblastoma cells, we found that the oncosuppressor protein tripartite motif containing 32 (TRIM32) positively regulates ACD. PMID:27308367

  1. Rapid, portable and cost-effective yeast cell viability and concentration analysis using lensfree on-chip microscopy and machine learning

    KAUST Repository

    Feizi, Alborz; Zhang, Yibo; Greenbaum, Alon; Guziak, Alex; Luong, Michelle; Chan, Raymond Yan Lok; Berg, Brandon; Ozkan, Haydar; Luo, Wei; Wu, Michael; Wu, Yichen; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-01-01

    and cost-effective automatic yeast analysis platform (AYAP), which can rapidly measure cell concentration and viability. AYAP is based on digital in-line holography and on-chip microscopy and rapidly images a large field-of-view of 22.5 mm2. This lens

  2. Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying, E-mail: ying.chen@hc.msu.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, 333 Bostwick NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Wang, Kai; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V.R. [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, 333 Bostwick NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Knott, Jason G. [Developmental Epigenetics Laboratory, Department of Animal Science, Michigan State University (United States); Leach, Richard, E-mail: Richard.leach@hc.msu.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, 333 Bostwick NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women’s Health, Spectrum Health Medical Group (United States)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Epithelial-like phenotype of trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells. •Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells exhibit trophoblast function. •Trophoblasts from iPS cells provides a proof-of-concept in regenerative medicine. -- Abstract: Background: During implantation, the blastocyst trophectoderm attaches to the endometrial epithelium and continues to differentiate into all trophoblast subtypes, which are the major components of a placenta. Aberrant trophoblast proliferation and differentiation are associated with placental diseases. However, due to ethical and practical issues, there is almost no available cell or tissue source to study the molecular mechanism of human trophoblast differentiation, which further becomes a barrier to the study of the pathogenesis of trophoblast-associated diseases of pregnancy. In this study, our goal was to generate a proof-of-concept model for deriving trophoblast lineage cells from induced pluripotency stem (iPS) cells from human fibroblasts. In future studies the generation of trophoblast lineage cells from iPS cells established from patient’s placenta will be extremely useful for studying the pathogenesis of individual trophoblast-associated diseases and for drug testing. Methods and results: Combining iPS cell technology with BMP4 induction, we derived trophoblast lineage cells from human iPS cells. The gene expression profile of these trophoblast lineage cells was distinct from fibroblasts and iPS cells. These cells expressed markers of human trophoblasts. Furthermore, when these cells were differentiated they exhibited invasive capacity and placental hormone secretive capacity, suggesting extravillous trophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Conclusion: Trophoblast lineage cells can be successfully derived from human iPS cells, which provide a proof-of-concept tool to recapitulate pathogenesis of patient placental trophoblasts in vitro.

  3. Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Ying; Wang, Kai; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V.R.; Knott, Jason G.; Leach, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Epithelial-like phenotype of trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells. •Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells exhibit trophoblast function. •Trophoblasts from iPS cells provides a proof-of-concept in regenerative medicine. -- Abstract: Background: During implantation, the blastocyst trophectoderm attaches to the endometrial epithelium and continues to differentiate into all trophoblast subtypes, which are the major components of a placenta. Aberrant trophoblast proliferation and differentiation are associated with placental diseases. However, due to ethical and practical issues, there is almost no available cell or tissue source to study the molecular mechanism of human trophoblast differentiation, which further becomes a barrier to the study of the pathogenesis of trophoblast-associated diseases of pregnancy. In this study, our goal was to generate a proof-of-concept model for deriving trophoblast lineage cells from induced pluripotency stem (iPS) cells from human fibroblasts. In future studies the generation of trophoblast lineage cells from iPS cells established from patient’s placenta will be extremely useful for studying the pathogenesis of individual trophoblast-associated diseases and for drug testing. Methods and results: Combining iPS cell technology with BMP4 induction, we derived trophoblast lineage cells from human iPS cells. The gene expression profile of these trophoblast lineage cells was distinct from fibroblasts and iPS cells. These cells expressed markers of human trophoblasts. Furthermore, when these cells were differentiated they exhibited invasive capacity and placental hormone secretive capacity, suggesting extravillous trophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Conclusion: Trophoblast lineage cells can be successfully derived from human iPS cells, which provide a proof-of-concept tool to recapitulate pathogenesis of patient placental trophoblasts in vitro

  4. Quantitative measurement of damage caused by 1064-nm wavelength optical trapping of Escherichia coli cells using on-chip single cell cultivation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayano, Satoru; Wakamoto, Yuichi; Yamashita, Shinobu; Yasuda, Kenji

    2006-01-01

    We quantitatively examined the possible damage to the growth and cell division ability of Escherichia coli caused by 1064-nm optical trapping. Using the synchronous behavior of two sister E. coli cells, the growth and interdivision times between those two cells, one of which was trapped by optical tweezers, the other was not irradiated, were compared using an on-chip single cell cultivation system. Cell growth stopped during the optical trapping period, even with the smallest irradiated power on the trapped cells. Moreover, the damage to the cell's growth and interdivision period was proportional to the total irradiated energy (work) on the cell, i.e., irradiation time multiplied by irradiation power. The division ability was more easily affected by a smaller energy, 0.36 J, which was 30% smaller than the energy that adversely affected growth, 0.54 J. The results indicate that the damage caused by optical trapping can be estimated from the total energy applied to cells, and furthermore, that the use of optical trapping for manipulating cells might cause damage to cell division and growth mechanisms, even at wavelengths under 1064 nm, if the total irradiation energy is excessive

  5. Diffusion inside living human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leijnse, N.; Jeon, J. -H.; Loft, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    of the cell or within the nucleus. Also, granules in cells which are stressed by intense laser illumination or which have attached to a surface for a long period of time move in a more restricted fashion than those within healthy cells. For granules diffusing in healthy cells, in regions away from the cell...... cells. For these cells the exact diffusional pattern of a particular granule depends on the physiological state of the cell and on the localization of the granule within the cytoplasm. Granules located close to the actin rich periphery of the cell move less than those located towards to the center...

  6. Improved Laser Manipulation for On-chip Fabricated Microstructures Based on Solution Replacement and Its Application in Single Cell Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Yue

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present the fabrication and assembly of microstructures inside a microfluidic device based on a photocrosslinkable resin and optical tweezers. We also report a method of solution replacement inside the microfluidic channel in order to improve the manipulation performance and apply the assembled microstructures for single cell cultivation. By the illumination of patterned ultraviolet (UV through a microscope, microstructures of arbitrary shape were fabricated by the photocrosslinkable resin inside a microfluidic channel. Based on the microfluidic channel with both glass and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS surfaces, immovable and movable microstructures were fabricated and manipulated. The microstructures were fabricated at the desired places and manipulated by the optical tweezers. A rotational microstructure including a microgear and a rotation axis was assembled and rotated in demonstrating this technique. The improved laser manipulation of microstructures was achieved based on the on-chip solution replacement method. The manipulation speed of the microstructures increased when the viscosity of the solvent decreased. The movement efficiency of the fabricated microstructures inside the lower viscosity solvent was evaluated and compared with those microstructures inside the former high viscosity solvent. A novel cell cage was fabricated and the cultivation of a single yeast cell (w303 was demonstrated in the cell cage, inside the microfluidic device.

  7. Detection of a putative virulence cadF gene of Campylobacter jejuni obtained from different sources using a microfabricated PCR chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Claus Riber; El-Ali, Jamil; Perch-Nielsen, Ivan R.

    2005-01-01

    A microfabricated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chip made of epoxy-based photoresist (SU-8) was recently designed and developed. In this study, we tested whether the PCR chip could be used for rapid detection of a potential virulence determinant, the cadF gene of Campylobacter jejuni. PCR...... was performed using published PCR conditions and primers for the C. jejuni cadF gene. DNA isolated from a C. jejuni reference strain CCUG 11284, C. jejuni isolates obtained from different sources (chicken and human), and Campylobacter whole cells were used as templates in the PCR tests. Conventional PCR in tube...... was used as the control. After optimization of the PCR chip, PCR positives on the chip were obtained from 91.0% (10/11) of the tested chips. A fast transition time was achieved with the PCR chip, and therefore a faster cycling time and a shorter PCR program were obtained. Using the PCR chip, the cadF gene...

  8. File list: Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Endocardial cel...ls http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: DNS.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Endocardial cells ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: His.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Endocardial cells ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Endocardial cells ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: DNS.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Endocardial cells ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Endocardial cel...ls http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Endocardial cells ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Endocardial cel...ls http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: His.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Endocardial cells ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: His.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Endocardial cells ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: His.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Endocardial cells ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: Unc.PSC.50.Unclassified.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.50.Unclassified.AllCell mm9 Unclassified Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell...73,SRX355578 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.50.Unclassified.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Unc.PSC.05.Unclassified.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.05.Unclassified.AllCell mm9 Unclassified Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell...8,SRX1034724 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.05.Unclassified.AllCell.bed ...

  1. Dual-Color Fluorescence Imaging of EpCAM and EGFR in Breast Cancer Cells with a Bull's Eye-Type Plasmonic Chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Shota; Yamamura, Shohei; Hayashi, Naoko; Toma, Mana; Tawa, Keiko

    2017-12-19

    Surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence microscopic observation of a live breast cancer cell was performed with a plasmonic chip. Two cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 (MCF-7), were selected as breast cancer cells, with two kinds of membrane protein, epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), observed in both cells. The membrane proteins are surface markers used to differentiate and classify breast cancer cells. EGFR and EpCAM were detected with Alexa Fluor ® 488-labeled anti-EGFR antibody (488-EGFR) and allophycocyanin (APC)-labeled anti-EpCAM antibody (APC-EpCAM), respectively. In MDA-MB231 cells, three-fold plus or minus one and seven-fold plus or minus two brighter fluorescence of 488-EGFR were observed on the 480-nm pitch and the 400-nm pitch compared with that on a glass slide. Results show the 400-nm pitch is useful. Dual-color fluorescence of 488-EGFR and APC-EpCAM in MDA-MB231 was clearly observed with seven-fold plus or minus two and nine-fold plus or minus three, respectively, on the 400-nm pitch pattern of a plasmonic chip. Therefore, the 400-nm pitch contributed to the dual-color fluorescence enhancement for these wavelengths. An optimal grating pitch of a plasmonic chip improved a fluorescence image of membrane proteins with the help of the surface plasmon-enhanced field.

  2. Molecular regulation of human hematopoietic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Galen, P.L.J.

    2014-01-01

    Peter van Galen focuses on understanding the determinants that maintain the stem cell state. Using human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) as a model, processes that govern self-renewal and tissue regeneration were investigated. Specifically, a role for microRNAs in balancing the human HSC

  3. Bioprinting cell-laden matrigel for radioprotection study of liver by pro-drug conversion in a dual-tissue microfluidic chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, J E; Hamid, Q; Wang, C; Chang, R; Sun, W; Emami, K; Wu, H

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to introduce a novel cell printing and microfluidic system to serve as a portable ground model for the study of drug conversion and radiation protection of living liver tissue analogs. The system is applied to study behavior in ground models of space stress, particularly radiation. A microfluidic environment is engineered by two cell types to prepare an improved higher fidelity in vitro micro-liver tissue analog. Cell-laden Matrigel printing and microfluidic chips were used to test radiation shielding to liver cells by the pro-drug amifostine. In this work, the sealed microfluidic chip regulates three variables of interest: radiation exposure, anti-radiation drug treatment and single- or dual-tissue culture environments. This application is intended to obtain a scientific understanding of the response of the multi-cellular biological system for long-term manned space exploration, disease models and biosensors.

  4. Bioprinting cell-laden matrigel for radioprotection study of liver by pro-drug conversion in a dual-tissue microfluidic chip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, J E; Hamid, Q; Wang, C; Chang, R; Sun, W [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Emami, K; Wu, H, E-mail: sunwei@drexel.edu, E-mail: weisun@tsinghua.edu.cn [Radiation Biophysics Lab, NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 77586 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    The objective of this paper is to introduce a novel cell printing and microfluidic system to serve as a portable ground model for the study of drug conversion and radiation protection of living liver tissue analogs. The system is applied to study behavior in ground models of space stress, particularly radiation. A microfluidic environment is engineered by two cell types to prepare an improved higher fidelity in vitro micro-liver tissue analog. Cell-laden Matrigel printing and microfluidic chips were used to test radiation shielding to liver cells by the pro-drug amifostine. In this work, the sealed microfluidic chip regulates three variables of interest: radiation exposure, anti-radiation drug treatment and single- or dual-tissue culture environments. This application is intended to obtain a scientific understanding of the response of the multi-cellular biological system for long-term manned space exploration, disease models and biosensors.

  5. Development of on-chip multi-imaging flow cytometry for identification of imaging biomarkers of clustered circulating tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyonchol Kim

    Full Text Available An on-chip multi-imaging flow cytometry system has been developed to obtain morphometric parameters of cell clusters such as cell number, perimeter, total cross-sectional area, number of nuclei and size of clusters as "imaging biomarkers", with simultaneous acquisition and analysis of both bright-field (BF and fluorescent (FL images at 200 frames per second (fps; by using this system, we examined the effectiveness of using imaging biomarkers for the identification of clustered circulating tumor cells (CTCs. Sample blood of rats in which a prostate cancer cell line (MAT-LyLu had been pre-implanted was applied to a microchannel on a disposable microchip after staining the nuclei using fluorescent dye for their visualization, and the acquired images were measured and compared with those of healthy rats. In terms of the results, clustered cells having (1 cell area larger than 200 µm2 and (2 nucleus area larger than 90 µm2 were specifically observed in cancer cell-implanted blood, but were not observed in healthy rats. In addition, (3 clusters having more than 3 nuclei were specific for cancer-implanted blood and (4 a ratio between the actual perimeter and the perimeter calculated from the obtained area, which reflects a shape distorted from ideal roundness, of less than 0.90 was specific for all clusters having more than 3 nuclei and was also specific for cancer-implanted blood. The collected clusters larger than 300 µm2 were examined by quantitative gene copy number assay, and were identified as being CTCs. These results indicate the usefulness of the imaging biomarkers for characterizing clusters, and all of the four examined imaging biomarkers-cluster area, nuclei area, nuclei number, and ratio of perimeter-can identify clustered CTCs in blood with the same level of preciseness using multi-imaging cytometry.

  6. Stiffness-Independent Highly Efficient On-Chip Extraction of Cell-Laden Hydrogel Microcapsules from Oil Emulsion into Aqueous Solution by Dielectrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haishui; Sun, Mingrui; Heisler-Taylor, Tyler; Kiourti, Asimina; Volakis, John; Lafyatis, Gregory; He, Xiaoming

    2015-10-28

    A dielectrophoresis (DEP)-based method achieves highly efficient on-chip extraction of cell-laden microcapsules of any stiffness from oil into aqueous solution. The hydrogel microcapsules can be extracted into the aqueous solution by DEP and interfacial tension forces with no trapped oil, while the encapsulated cells are free from electrical damage due to the Faraday cage effect. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. The human brain on a computer, the design neuromorphic chips aims to process information as does the mind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajuelo, L.

    2015-01-01

    Develop chips that mimic the brain processes It will help create computers capable of interpreting information from image, sound and touch so that it may offer answers intelligent-not programmed before- according to these sensory data. chips neuromorphic may mimic the electrical activity neurons and brain synapses, and will be key to intelligence systems artificial (ia) that require interaction with the environment being able to extract information cognitive of what surrounds them. (Author)

  8. File list: DNS.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells hg19 DNase-seq Prostate Prostate cancer cell...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 Histone Gonad Testicular somatic cell...s SRX591729,SRX591717 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 Histone Gonad Testicular somatic cell...s SRX591729,SRX591717 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 Histone Gonad Testicular somatic cell...s SRX591729,SRX591717 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 Histone Gonad Testicular somatic cell...s SRX591729,SRX591717 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: His.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_cells hg19 Histone Pluripotent stem cell iPS cells SRX110016,S...315,SRX381309 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: ALL.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_cells mm9 All antigens Pluripotent stem cell iPS cells SRX9773...1,SRX035985,SRX1090869 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: ALL.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_cells hg19 All antigens Pluripotent stem cell iPS cells SRX088...16,SRX189400,SRX189399 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: ALL.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_cells hg19 All antigens Pluripotent stem cell iPS cells SRX088...27,SRX189400,SRX189399 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_cells hg19 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell iPS cells SRX040379...,SRX040378,SRX135563,SRX040376,SRX040377,SRX189427,SRX189400,SRX189399 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: His.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_cells hg19 Histone Pluripotent stem cell iPS cells SRX317576,S...077,SRX317607 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_cells mm9 TFs and others Pluripotent stem cell iPS cells SRX65...RX146524 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: ALL.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_cells mm9 All antigens Pluripotent stem cell iPS cells SRX9773...30,SRX146522,SRX146547 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: His.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_cells hg19 Histone Pluripotent stem cell iPS cells SRX110015,S...315,SRX381309 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: DNS.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells hg19 DNase-seq Prostate Prostate cancer cell...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: His.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_cells mm9 Histone Pluripotent stem cell iPS cells SRX977417,SR...RX127376,SRX146530,SRX146522,SRX146547,SRX333561,SRX035985,SRX1090869 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: NoD.PSC.20.AllAg.STAP_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.20.AllAg.STAP_cells mm9 No description Pluripotent stem cell STAP cells SRX...472660,SRX472654,SRX472663,SRX472661,SRX472656,SRX472665,SRX472662,SRX472655,SRX472664 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.PSC.20.AllAg.STAP_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.STAP_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.STAP_cells mm9 No description Pluripotent stem cell STAP cells SRX...472660,SRX472663,SRX472654,SRX472665,SRX472656,SRX472662,SRX472661,SRX472664,SRX472655 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.STAP_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell iPS cells SRX97...7435,SRX027462,SRX977434 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: ALL.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_cells mm9 All antigens Pluripotent stem cell iPS cells SRX9774...30,SRX146524,SRX146547,SRX146522 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: DNS.Prs.20.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Prs.20.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells hg19 DNase-seq Prostate Prostate cancer cell...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Prs.20.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells.bed ...

  9. Human monoclonal antibodies reactive with human myelomonocytic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, M R; Santos, D J; Elboim, H S; Tumber, M B; Frackelton, A R

    1989-04-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), in remission, were depleted of CD8-positive T-cells and cultured with Epstein-Barr virus. Four of 20 cultures (20%) secreted human IgG antibodies selectively reactive with the cell surfaces of certain human leukemia cell lines. Three polyclonal, Epstein-Barr virus-transformed, B-cell lines were expanded and fused with the human-mouse myeloma analogue HMMA2.11TG/O. Antibody from secreting clones HL 1.2 (IgG1), HL 2.1 (IgG3), and HL 3.1 (IgG1) have been characterized. All three react with HL-60 (promyelocytic), RWLeu4 (CML promyelocytic), and U937 (monocytic), but not with KG-1 (myeloblastic) or K562 (CML erythroid). There is no reactivity with T-cell lines, Burkitt's cell lines, pre-B-leukemia cell lines, or an undifferentiated CML cell line, BV173. Leukemic cells from two of seven patients with acute myelogenous leukemia and one of five with acute lymphocytic leukemia react with all three antibodies. Normal lymphocytes, monocytes, polymorphonuclear cells, red blood cells, bone marrow cells, and platelets do not react. Samples from patients with other diverse hematopoietic malignancies showed no reactivity. Immunoprecipitations suggest that the reactive antigen(s) is a lactoperoxidase iodinatable series of cell surface proteins with molecular weights of 42,000-54,000 and a noniodinatable protein with a molecular weight of 82,000. Based on these data these human monoclonal antibodies appear to react with myelomonocytic leukemic cells and may detect a leukemia-specific antigen or a highly restricted differentiation antigen.

  10. Development of microfluidic cell culture devices towards an in vitro human intestinal barrier model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Hsih-Yin

    to enable real-time detection of cell responses, adjustment of cellular stimulation etc. leading to establishment of conditional experiments. In this project, microfluidic systems engineering was leveraged to develop an eight chamber multi-layer microchip for intestinal barrier studies. Sandwiched between...... the layers was a modified Teflon porous membrane for cell culture. The novelty lies in modifying the surface of the porous Teflon support membrane using thiol-ene ‘click’ chemistry, thus allowing the modified Teflon membrane to be bonded between the chip layers to form an enclosed microchip. Successful...... application of the multi-layer microchip was demonstrated by integrating the microchip to an existing cell culture fluidic system to culture the human intestinal epithelial cells, Caco-2, for long term studies. Under the continuous low flow conditions, the cells differentiated into columnar cells displaying...

  11. Microfluidic organ-on-chip technology for blood-brain barrier research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Helm, Marinke W; van der Meer, Andries D; Eijkel, Jan C T; van den Berg, Albert; Segerink, Loes I

    2016-01-01

    Organs-on-chips are a new class of microengineered laboratory models that combine several of the advantages of current in vivo and in vitro models. In this review, we summarize the advances that have been made in the development of organ-on-chip models of the blood-brain barrier (BBBs-on-chips) and the challenges that are still ahead. The BBB is formed by specialized endothelial cells and separates blood from brain tissue. It protects the brain from harmful compounds from the blood and provides homeostasis for optimal neuronal function [corrected]. Studying BBB function and dysfunction is important for drug development and biomedical research. Microfluidic BBBs-on-chips enable real-time study of (human) cells in an engineered physiological microenvironment, for example incorporating small geometries and fluid flow as well as sensors. Examples of BBBs-on-chips in literature already show the potential of more realistic microenvironments and the study of organ-level functions. A key challenge in the field of BBB-on-chip development is the current lack of standardized quantification of parameters such as barrier permeability and shear stress. This limits the potential for direct comparison of the performance of different BBB-on-chip models to each other and existing models. We give recommendations for further standardization in model characterization and conclude that the rapidly emerging field of BBB-on-chip models holds great promise for further studies in BBB biology and drug development.

  12. Human hematopoietic cell culture, transduction, and analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jesper; Wirthlin, Louisa; Kohn, Donald B

    2008-01-01

    This unit provides methods for introducing genes into human hematopoietic progenitor cells. The Basic Protocol describes isolation of CD34(+) cells, transduction of these cells with a retroviral vector on fibronectin-coated plates, assaying the efficiency of transduction, and establishing long-te...

  13. The lifetime of hypoxic human tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, Ralph E.; Sham, Edward

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: For hypoxic and anoxic cells in solid tumors to be a therapeutic problem, they must live long enough to be therapeutically relevant, or else be rapidly recruited into the proliferating compartment during therapy. We have, therefore, estimated lifetime and recruitment rate of hypoxic human tumor cells in multicell spheroids in vitro, or in xenografted tumors in SCID mice. Materials and Methods: Cell turnover was followed by flow cytometry techniques, using antibodies directed at incorporated halogenated pyrimidines. The disappearance of labeled cells was quantified, and verified to be cell loss rather than label dilution. Repopulation was studied in SiHa tumor xenografts during twice-daily 2.5-Gy radiation exposures. Results: The longevity of hypoxic human tumor cells in spheroids or xenografts exceeded that of rodent cell lines, and cell turnover was slower in xenografts than under static growth as spheroids. Human tumor cells remained viable in the hypoxic regions of xenografts for 4-10 days, compared to 3-5 days in spheroids, and 1-3 days for most rodent cells in spheroids. Repopulation was observed within the first few radiation treatments for the SiHa xenografts and, with accumulated doses of more than 10 Gy, virtually all recovered cells had progressed through at least one S-phase. Conclusion: Our results suggest an important difference in the ability of human vs. rodent tumor cells to withstand hypoxia, and raise questions concerning the increased longevity seen in vivo relative to the steady-state spheroid system

  14. Experiment list: SRX214084 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available turer 1=Santa Cruz || chip antibody 2=V5 || chip antibody manufacture...ge=Undifferentiated || treatment=Overexpress Sox17-V5 tagged || cell line=KH2 || chip antibody 1=Pou5f1/Oct4 || chip antibody manufac

  15. Experiment list: SRX214077 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erentiated || treatment=Overexpress Sox17_V5 tagged || cell line=KH2 || chip antibody 1=Sox17 || chip antibody manufacture...r 1=R&D || chip antibody 2=V5 || chip antibody manufacturer 2=Invit

  16. Experiment list: SRX214082 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available facturer 1=Santa Cruz || chip antibody 2=V5 || chip antibody manufacture...age=Undifferentiated || treatment=Overexpress Sox17EK-V5 tagged || cell line=KH2 || chip antibody 1=Pou5f1/Oct4 || chip antibody manu

  17. Experiment list: SRX214068 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available inoic acid || cell line=F9 || chip antibody 1=Pou5f1/Oct4 || chip antibody manufacturer 1=Santa Cruz || chip... antibody 2=none || chip antibody manufacturer 2=none http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/eachDat

  18. Experiment list: SRX186172 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1=YY1 || chip antibody manufacturer 1=Abcam || chip antibody 2=YY1 || chip antibody manufacturer 2=Santa Cru...ip-Seq; Mus musculus; ChIP-Seq source_name=Rag1 -/- pro-B cells || chip antibody

  19. Experiment list: SRX214080 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available cturer 1=Santa Cruz || chip antibody 2=V5 || chip antibody manufacture...ge=Undifferentiated || treatment=Overexpress Sox2KE-V5 tagged || cell line=KH2 || chip antibody 1=Pou5f1/Oct4 || chip antibody manufa

  20. Experiment list: SRX214081 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available cturer 1=Santa Cruz || chip antibody 2=V5 || chip antibody manufacture...ge=Undifferentiated || treatment=Overexpress Sox2KE-V5 tagged || cell line=KH2 || chip antibody 1=Pou5f1/Oct4 || chip antibody manufa

  1. Development of an automated chip culture system with integrated on-line monitoring for maturation culture of retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mee-Hae Kim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In cell manufacturing, the establishment of a fully automated, microfluidic, cell culture system that can be used for long-term cell cultures, as well as for process optimization is highly desirable. This study reports the development of a novel chip bioreactor system that can be used for automated long-term maturation cultures of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells. The system consists of an incubation unit, a medium supply unit, a culture observation unit, and a control unit. In the incubation unit, the chip contains a closed culture vessel (2.5 mm diameter, working volume 9.1 μL, which can be set to 37 °C and 5% CO2, and uses a gas-permeable resin (poly- dimethylsiloxane as the vessel wall. RPE cells were seeded at 5.0 × 104 cells/cm2 and the medium was changed every day by introducing fresh medium using the medium supply unit. Culture solutions were stored either in the refrigerator or the freezer, and fresh medium was prepared before any medium change by warming to 37 °C and mixing. Automated culture was allowed to continue for 30 days to allow maturation of the RPE cells. This chip culture system allows for the long-term, bubble-free, culture of RPE cells, while also being able to observe cells in order to elucidate their cell morphology or show the presence of tight junctions. This culture system, along with an integrated on-line monitoring system, can therefore be applied to long-term cultures of RPE cells, and should contribute to process control in RPE cell manufacturing.

  2. Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Differentiation into Functional Epicardial Progenitor Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guadix, Juan Antonio; Orlova, Valeria V.; Giacomelli, Elisa; Bellin, Milena; Ribeiro, Marcelo C.; Mummery, Christine L.; Pérez-Pomares, José M.; Passier, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are widely used to study cardiovascular cell differentiation and function. Here, we induced differentiation of hPSCs (both embryonic and induced) to proepicardial/epicardial progenitor cells that cover the heart during development. Addition of retinoic acid (RA)

  3. Decoding Network Structure in On-Chip Integrated Flow Cells with Synchronization of Electrochemical Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yanxin; Kiss, István Z.

    2017-04-01

    The analysis of network interactions among dynamical units and the impact of the coupling on self-organized structures is a challenging task with implications in many biological and engineered systems. We explore the coupling topology that arises through the potential drops in a flow channel in a lab-on-chip device that accommodates chemical reactions on electrode arrays. The networks are revealed by analysis of the synchronization patterns with the use of an oscillatory chemical reaction (nickel electrodissolution) and are further confirmed by direct decoding using phase model analysis. In dual electrode configuration, a variety coupling schemes, (uni- or bidirectional positive or negative) were identified depending on the relative placement of the reference and counter electrodes (e.g., placed at the same or the opposite ends of the flow channel). With three electrodes, the network consists of a superposition of a localized (upstream) and global (all-to-all) coupling. With six electrodes, the unique, position dependent coupling topology resulted spatially organized partial synchronization such that there was a synchrony gradient along the quasi-one-dimensional spatial coordinate. The networked, electrode potential (current) spike generating electrochemical reactions hold potential for construction of an in-situ information processing unit to be used in electrochemical devices in sensors and batteries.

  4. Comparison of Four Human Papillomavirus Genotyping Methods: Next-generation Sequencing, INNO-LiPA, Electrochemical DNA Chip, and Nested-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilyanimit, Pornjarim; Chansaenroj, Jira; Poomipak, Witthaya; Praianantathavorn, Kesmanee; Payungporn, Sunchai; Poovorawan, Yong

    2018-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection causes cervical cancer, thus necessitating early detection by screening. Rapid and accurate HPV genotyping is crucial both for the assessment of patients with HPV infection and for surveillance studies. Fifty-eight cervicovaginal samples were tested for HPV genotypes using four methods in parallel: nested-PCR followed by conventional sequencing, INNO-LiPA, electrochemical DNA chip, and next-generation sequencing (NGS). Seven HPV genotypes (16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 56, and 58) were identified by all four methods. Nineteen HPV genotypes were detected by NGS, but not by nested-PCR, INNO-LiPA, or electrochemical DNA chip. Although NGS is relatively expensive and complex, it may serve as a sensitive HPV genotyping method. Because of its highly sensitive detection of multiple HPV genotypes, NGS may serve as an alternative for diagnostic HPV genotyping in certain situations. © The Korean Society for Laboratory Medicine

  5. Radiation effects on cultured human lymphoid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, L.; Nilsson, K.; Carlsson, J.; Larsson, B.; Jakobsson, P.

    1981-01-01

    The cloning efficiency of human normal and malignant lymphoid cells is usually low. Radiation effects in vitro on such cells can therefore not be analysed with conventional cloning. However, this problem can be circumscribed by using the growth extrapolation method. A panel of human leukemia-lymphoma cell-lines representing Epstein-Barr virus carrying lymphoblastoid cells of presumed non-neoplastic derivation and neoplastic T- and B-lymphocytes was used to test the efficiency of this method. The sensitivity to radiation could be determined for all these cell types. The growth extrapolation method gave generally the same result as conventional cloning demonstrated by comparison with one exceptional cell-line with capacity for cloning in agar. The sensitivity varied largely between the different cell types. A common feature was that none of the cell lines had a good capacity to accumulate sublethal radiation injury. (Auth.)

  6. File list: Oth.Bld.10.AllAg.Plasma_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.10.AllAg.Plasma_Cells hg19 TFs and others Blood Plasma Cells SRX203389,SRX2...03388,SRX203391,SRX203387,SRX203395,SRX203390,SRX203394 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Bld.10.AllAg.Plasma_Cells.bed ...

  7. File list: InP.Bld.10.AllAg.Plasma_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Bld.10.AllAg.Plasma_Cells hg19 Input control Blood Plasma Cells SRX203397,SRX20...3398 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Bld.10.AllAg.Plasma_Cells.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Bld.20.AllAg.Plasma_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.20.AllAg.Plasma_Cells hg19 Histone Blood Plasma Cells SRX203393,SRX203392 h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.20.AllAg.Plasma_Cells.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Bld.50.AllAg.Plasma_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.50.AllAg.Plasma_Cells hg19 Histone Blood Plasma Cells SRX203393,SRX203392 h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.50.AllAg.Plasma_Cells.bed ...

  10. File list: Oth.Bld.20.AllAg.Plasma_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.20.AllAg.Plasma_Cells hg19 TFs and others Blood Plasma Cells SRX203389,SRX2...03388,SRX203391,SRX203395,SRX203387,SRX203390,SRX203394 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Bld.20.AllAg.Plasma_Cells.bed ...

  11. File list: Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Plasma_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Plasma_Cells hg19 TFs and others Blood Plasma Cells SRX203389,SRX2...03387,SRX203388,SRX203391,SRX203395,SRX203390,SRX203394 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Plasma_Cells.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Bld.05.AllAg.Plasma_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.05.AllAg.Plasma_Cells hg19 Histone Blood Plasma Cells SRX203392,SRX203393 h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.05.AllAg.Plasma_Cells.bed ...

  13. File list: InP.Bld.05.AllAg.Plasma_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Bld.05.AllAg.Plasma_Cells hg19 Input control Blood Plasma Cells SRX203398,SRX20...3397 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Bld.05.AllAg.Plasma_Cells.bed ...

  14. File list: InP.Bld.20.AllAg.Plasma_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Bld.20.AllAg.Plasma_Cells hg19 Input control Blood Plasma Cells SRX203397,SRX20...3398 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Bld.20.AllAg.Plasma_Cells.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.ALL.05.Biotin.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: Oth.ALL.10.Biotin.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: Oth.ALL.50.Biotin.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: Oth.ALL.50.Biotin.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: Oth.PSC.05.Biotin.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: Oth.PSC.20.Biotin.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Oth.ALL.20.Biotin.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.20.Biotin.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Biotin All cell types SRX731138,SRX31...X673711,SRX673716,SRX673717,SRX673719,SRX673713,SRX673714,SRX1091033 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.ALL.20.Biotin.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.CeL.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CeL.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell dm3 TFs and others Epitope tags Cell line SRX099638...099636 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.CeL.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.PSC.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Pluripotent stem c...ell SRX555489 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.PSC.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.ALL.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags All cell types SRX1...995,SRX275809,SRX275811 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Oth.CeL.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CeL.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell dm3 TFs and others Epitope tags Cell line SRX099638...099636 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.CeL.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.ALL.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags All cell types SRX1...460,ERX320411,SRX695808 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Oth.ALL.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags All cell types SRX...644715,SRX555489,SRX644719,SRX527876,SRX644723 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.ALL.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: ALL.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells hg19 All antigens Prostate Prostate cancer c...ells SRX022582,SRX022577,SRX022578,SRX022581,SRX022579,SRX022580 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: ALL.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells hg19 All antigens Prostate Prostate cancer c...ells SRX022579,SRX022582,SRX022581,SRX022577,SRX022580,SRX022578 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: Oth.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells hg19 TFs and others Prostate Prostate cancer... cells SRX022577,SRX022578 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: Oth.ALL.20.TEAD4.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.20.TEAD4.AllCell hg19 TFs and others TEAD4 All cell types SRX190351,SRX1903...43627,SRX378124,SRX378125,SRX360042 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.ALL.20.TEAD4.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.PSC.05.TEAD4.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.05.TEAD4.AllCell hg19 TFs and others TEAD4 Pluripotent stem cell SRX190301,...SRX378124,SRX378125 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.PSC.05.TEAD4.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Oth.ALL.10.TEAD4.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.10.TEAD4.AllCell hg19 TFs and others TEAD4 All cell types SRX190351,SRX1903...11299,SRX378125,SRX243629,SRX360042 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.ALL.10.TEAD4.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Oth.ALL.05.TEAD1.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.05.TEAD1.AllCell hg19 TFs and others TEAD1 All cell types SRX716558,SRX7311...35,SRX1004563,SRX716559,SRX1011298 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.ALL.05.TEAD1.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.PSC.10.TEAD4.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.10.TEAD4.AllCell hg19 TFs and others TEAD4 Pluripotent stem cell SRX190301,...SRX378124,SRX378125 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.PSC.10.TEAD4.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.ALL.05.TEAD4.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.05.TEAD4.AllCell hg19 TFs and others TEAD4 All cell types SRX190331,SRX1903...8125,SRX243629,SRX1011299,SRX360042 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.ALL.05.TEAD4.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.ALL.10.DNA-RNA_hybrids.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.10.DNA-RNA_hybrids.AllCell sacCer3 TFs and others DNA-RNA hybrids All cell ...types http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Oth.ALL.10.DNA-RNA_hybrids.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.ALL.50.DNA-RNA_hybrids.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.50.DNA-RNA_hybrids.AllCell sacCer3 TFs and others DNA-RNA hybrids All cell ...types http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Oth.ALL.50.DNA-RNA_hybrids.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.ALL.05.DNA-RNA_hybrids.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.05.DNA-RNA_hybrids.AllCell sacCer3 TFs and others DNA-RNA hybrids All cell ...types http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Oth.ALL.05.DNA-RNA_hybrids.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.ALL.20.DNA-RNA_hybrids.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.20.DNA-RNA_hybrids.AllCell sacCer3 TFs and others DNA-RNA hybrids All cell ...types http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Oth.ALL.20.DNA-RNA_hybrids.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Oth.ALL.05.BMI1.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.05.BMI1.AllCell hg19 TFs and others BMI1 All cell types SRX644721,SRX109477...79,SRX149715,SRX359986,SRX644717,SRX644709,SRX644713 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.ALL.05.BMI1.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.ALL.20.BMI1.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.20.BMI1.AllCell hg19 TFs and others BMI1 All cell types SRX109477,SRX109480...17,SRX113591,SRX644729,SRX359986,SRX109479,SRX644721 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.ALL.20.BMI1.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.ALL.10.BMI1.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.10.BMI1.AllCell hg19 TFs and others BMI1 All cell types SRX109477,SRX109480...86,SRX644709,SRX644713,SRX644717,SRX113591,SRX644721 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.ALL.10.BMI1.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.ALL.50.BMI1.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.50.BMI1.AllCell hg19 TFs and others BMI1 All cell types SRX109477,SRX109480...08,SRX644729,SRX113591,SRX359986,SRX644717,SRX109479 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.ALL.50.BMI1.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Oth.ALL.05.Taf3.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.05.Taf3.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Taf3 All cell types SRX091892,SRX547091,...SRX547090 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.05.Taf3.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.ALL.05.Taf7l.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.05.Taf7l.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Taf7l All cell types SRX349390,SRX20279...8,SRX202799 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.05.Taf7l.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: InP.ALL.05.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.ALL.05.Input_control.AllCell dm3 Input control Input control All cell types SRX...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/InP.ALL.05.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: InP.ALL.50.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.ALL.50.Input_control.AllCell mm9 Input control Input control All cell types SRX...7314,ERX807291 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.ALL.50.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Emb.20.AllAg.Muscle_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.20.AllAg.Muscle_cells dm3 RNA polymerase Embryo Muscle cells SRX110760,SRX1...X110758,SRX110765,SRX110766,SRX110769 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Emb.20.AllAg.Muscle_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: InP.Emb.10.AllAg.Muscle_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Emb.10.AllAg.Muscle_cells dm3 Input control Embryo Muscle cells SRX110786,SRX11...0794,SRX110789,SRX110785,SRX110790 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/InP.Emb.10.AllAg.Muscle_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: ALL.Emb.50.AllAg.Muscle_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.50.AllAg.Muscle_cells dm3 All antigens Embryo Muscle cells SRX110783,SRX110...X110785,SRX110779,SRX110790,SRX110794 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Emb.50.AllAg.Muscle_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Emb.20.AllAg.Muscle_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.20.AllAg.Muscle_cells dm3 Histone Embryo Muscle cells SRX110783,SRX110777,S...RX110779,SRX110778,SRX110776 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Emb.20.AllAg.Muscle_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Emb.50.AllAg.Muscle_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.50.AllAg.Muscle_cells dm3 Histone Embryo Muscle cells SRX110783,SRX110777,S...RX110778,SRX110776,SRX110779 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Emb.50.AllAg.Muscle_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Emb.05.AllAg.Muscle_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.05.AllAg.Muscle_cells dm3 RNA polymerase Embryo Muscle cells SRX110762,SRX1...X110759,SRX110770,SRX110768,SRX110763 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Emb.05.AllAg.Muscle_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Emb.50.AllAg.Muscle_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.50.AllAg.Muscle_cells dm3 RNA polymerase Embryo Muscle cells SRX110760,SRX1...X110765,SRX110769,SRX110766,SRX110758 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Emb.50.AllAg.Muscle_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Muscle_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Muscle_cells dm3 All antigens Embryo Muscle cells SRX110776,SRX110...X110768,SRX110763,SRX110790,SRX066244 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Muscle_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: InP.Emb.20.AllAg.Muscle_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Emb.20.AllAg.Muscle_cells dm3 Input control Embryo Muscle cells SRX110789,SRX11...0794,SRX110786,SRX110790,SRX110785 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/InP.Emb.20.AllAg.Muscle_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Emb.05.AllAg.Muscle_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.05.AllAg.Muscle_cells dm3 Histone Embryo Muscle cells SRX110776,SRX110778,S...RX110777,SRX110779,SRX110783 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Emb.05.AllAg.Muscle_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Emb.10.AllAg.Muscle_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.10.AllAg.Muscle_cells dm3 Histone Embryo Muscle cells SRX110776,SRX110777,S...RX110783,SRX110778,SRX110779 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Emb.10.AllAg.Muscle_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: ALL.Emb.10.AllAg.Muscle_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.10.AllAg.Muscle_cells dm3 All antigens Embryo Muscle cells SRX110776,SRX110...X110790,SRX066244,SRX110778,SRX110779 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Emb.10.AllAg.Muscle_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: Unc.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: DNS.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: His.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: His.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: Oth.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 TFs and others Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: His.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: ALL.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 All antigens Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells DRX014747 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 TFs and others Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: ALL.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 All antigens Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells DRX014747 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: His.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.ALL.50.Rbfox2.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.50.Rbfox2.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Rbfox2 All cell types SRX551542,SRX551...545,SRX551553,SRX551551,SRX551546 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.50.Rbfox2.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.ALL.10.Rbfox2.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.10.Rbfox2.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Rbfox2 All cell types SRX551545,SRX551...553,SRX551542,SRX551551,SRX551546 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.10.Rbfox2.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: DNS.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 DNase-seq Gonad Testicular somatic ce...lls http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: ALL.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 All antigens Gonad Testicular somatic... cells SRX591728,SRX591729,SRX591717,SRX591716 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 TFs and others Gonad Testicular somat...ic cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_germ_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_germ_cells mm9 TFs and others Gonad Testicular germ cel...ls http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_germ_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: Oth.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 TFs and others Gonad Testicular somat...ic cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_germ_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_germ_cells mm9 TFs and others Gonad Testicular germ cel...ls http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_germ_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_germ_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_germ_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Gonad Testicular germ cel...ls http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_germ_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Gonad Testicular somat...ic cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: DNS.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_germ_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_germ_cells mm9 DNase-seq Gonad Testicular germ cells ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_germ_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: ALL.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 All antigens Gonad Testicular somatic... cells SRX591728,SRX591729,SRX591717,SRX591716 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: Unc.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 Unclassified Adipocyte Adipose progeni...tor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 TFs and others Adipocyte Adipose progeni...tor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: DNS.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 DNase-seq Adipocyte Adipose progenito...r cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: DNS.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 DNase-seq Adipocyte Adipose progenito...r cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 Unclassified Neural Neural progenitor ...cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 Histone Adipocyte Adipose progenitor ...cells SRX127409,SRX127394,SRX127396,SRX127407,SRX127383,SRX127381 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 DNase-seq Neural Neural progenitor cel...ls SRX238870,SRX238868 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 TFs and others Adipocyte Adipose progeni...tor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 TFs and others Neural Neural progenito...r cells SRX109472,SRX315274,SRX109471,SRX802060 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: DNS.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 DNase-seq Neural Neural progenitor cel...ls SRX238870,SRX238868 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Neural progenito...r cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 TFs and others Adipocyte Adipose progeni...tor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Adipocyte Adipose progeni...tor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 TFs and others Neural Neural progenito...r cells SRX109472,SRX315274,SRX802060,SRX109471 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 Histone Neural Neural progenitor cells... SRX315278,SRX667383,SRX668241,SRX315277,SRX315276 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Adipocyte Adipose progeni...tor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 DNase-seq Neural Neural progenitor cel...ls SRX238868,SRX238870 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: Unc.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 Unclassified Adipocyte Adipose progeni...tor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 Unclassified Neural Neural progenitor ...cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: DNS.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 DNase-seq Adipocyte Adipose progenito...r cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 Histone Neural Neural progenitor cells... SRX315277,SRX667383,SRX668241,SRX315278,SRX315276 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: Unc.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 Unclassified Adipocyte Adipose progeni...tor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: Unc.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 Unclassified Adipocyte Adipose progeni...tor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 Histone Adipocyte Adipose progenitor ...cells SRX127409,SRX127407,SRX127394,SRX127396,SRX127383,SRX127381 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Adipocyte Adipose progeni...tor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Prostate Prostate cancer... cells SRX022582 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells hg19 TFs and others Prostate Prostate cancer... cells SRX022578,SRX022577 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: DNS.Utr.10.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Utr.10.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells hg19 DNase-seq Uterus Endometrial stroma...l cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Utr.10.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.Utr.05.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Utr.05.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Uterus Endometrial s...tromal cells SRX1048949 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Utr.05.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: Unc.Utr.05.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Utr.05.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells hg19 Unclassified Uterus Endometrial str...omal cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Utr.05.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: Unc.Utr.10.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Utr.10.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells hg19 Unclassified Uterus Endometrial str...omal cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Utr.10.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: DNS.Utr.50.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Utr.50.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells hg19 DNase-seq Uterus Endometrial stroma...l cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Utr.50.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: Unc.Utr.50.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Utr.50.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells hg19 Unclassified Uterus Endometrial str...omal cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Utr.50.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: Pol.Utr.50.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Utr.50.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Uterus Endometrial s...tromal cells SRX1048949 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Utr.50.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: Oth.Utr.20.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Utr.20.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells hg19 TFs and others Uterus Endometrial s...tromal cells SRX1048945,SRX372174,SRX1048948,SRX1048946,SRX735140,SRX735139 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Utr.20.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: DNS.Utr.20.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Utr.20.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells hg19 DNase-seq Uterus Endometrial stroma...l cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Utr.20.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: Oth.Utr.50.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Utr.50.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells hg19 TFs and others Uterus Endometrial s...tromal cells SRX372174,SRX1048948,SRX735140,SRX735139,SRX1048946,SRX1048945 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Utr.50.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.Utr.10.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Utr.10.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Uterus Endometrial s...tromal cells SRX1048949 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Utr.10.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: Unc.Utr.20.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Utr.20.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells hg19 Unclassified Uterus Endometrial str...omal cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Utr.20.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: DNS.Utr.05.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Utr.05.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells hg19 DNase-seq Uterus Endometrial stroma...l cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Utr.05.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: Oth.Utr.05.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Utr.05.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells hg19 TFs and others Uterus Endometrial s...tromal cells SRX1048945,SRX1048948,SRX1048946,SRX372174,SRX735140,SRX735139 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Utr.05.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.Utr.10.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Utr.10.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells hg19 TFs and others Uterus Endometrial s...tromal cells SRX1048945,SRX1048948,SRX1048946,SRX372174,SRX735140,SRX735139 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Utr.10.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Utr.20.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Utr.20.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Uterus Endometrial s...tromal cells SRX1048949 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Utr.20.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II All cell...,SRX1013886,SRX1013900 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.ALL.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II All cell ...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.ALL.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.ALL.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III All cel...l types ERX204069 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.ALL.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.ALL.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III All cel...l types ERX204069 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.ALL.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell dm3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II All cell ...013077,SRX050604,SRX050605 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.ALL.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II All cell...3965,SRX043869,SRX043867,SRX043875,SRX043967,SRX043881,SRX043879 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.ALL.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II All c...ell types http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.PSC.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Plurip...otent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.PSC.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.Dig.20.AllAg.Intestinal_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Dig.20.AllAg.Intestinal_stem_cells mm9 TFs and others Digestive tract Intestina...l stem cells SRX856961,SRX1141904,SRX1141903 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Dig.20.AllAg.Intestinal_stem_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: Unc.Dig.50.AllAg.Intestinal_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Dig.50.AllAg.Intestinal_stem_cells mm9 Unclassified Digestive tract Intestinal ...stem cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Dig.50.AllAg.Intestinal_stem_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.Dig.10.AllAg.Intestinal_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Dig.10.AllAg.Intestinal_stem_cells mm9 TFs and others Digestive tract Intestina...l stem cells SRX1141904,SRX856961,SRX1141903 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Dig.10.AllAg.Intestinal_stem_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: Oth.ALL.10.ERCC6.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.10.ERCC6.AllCell hg19 TFs and others ERCC6 All cell types SRX338979,SRX3520...46,SRX147681,SRX338978 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.ALL.10.ERCC6.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: InP.Bld.50.AllAg.Plasma_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Bld.50.AllAg.Plasma_Cells hg19 Input control Blood Plasma Cells SRX203397,SRX20...3398 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Bld.50.AllAg.Plasma_Cells.bed ...

  7. File list: Oth.Bld.50.AllAg.Plasma_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.50.AllAg.Plasma_Cells hg19 TFs and others Blood Plasma Cells SRX203389,SRX2...03388,SRX203391,SRX203395,SRX203387,SRX203394,SRX203390 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Bld.50.AllAg.Plasma_Cells.bed ...

  8. File list: Oth.PSC.20.Nanog.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.20.Nanog.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Nanog Pluripotent stem cell SRX213808,S...1351,SRX1141349,SRX1141350,SRX651982,SRX213820 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.20.Nanog.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Oth.ALL.05.Nanog.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.05.Nanog.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Nanog All cell types SRX248286,SRX24828...X1141351,SRX1141350,SRX651982,SRX1008191,SRX213820,SRX1008192 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.05.Nanog.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Oth.PSC.05.Nanog.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.05.Nanog.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Nanog Pluripotent stem cell SRX248286,S...3864,SRX1141351,SRX1141350,SRX651982,SRX213820 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.05.Nanog.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Oth.ALL.10.Nanog.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.10.Nanog.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Nanog All cell types SRX248286,SRX21380...X1141350,SRX1141351,SRX651982,SRX1008192,SRX213820,SRX1008191 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.10.Nanog.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.ALL.20.Nanog.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.20.Nanog.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Nanog All cell types SRX213808,SRX21382...X1141349,SRX1141350,SRX651982,SRX213820,SRX1008191,SRX1008192 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.20.Nanog.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: ALL.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells mm9 All antigens Pancreas Pancreatic cancer... cells SRX174586,SRX174585,SRX174587 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.ALL.10.Polr3d.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.10.Polr3d.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase Polr3d All cell types SRX373040,SRX301...04147 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.ALL.10.Polr3d.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.ALL.05.Polr3d.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.05.Polr3d.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase Polr3d All cell types SRX373040,SRX373...04148 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.ALL.05.Polr3d.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.ALL.50.Brca1.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.50.Brca1.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Brca1 All cell types SRX217117,SRX21712...2,SRX217118,SRX217127,SRX217126 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.50.Brca1.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.ALL.10.Brca1.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.10.Brca1.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Brca1 All cell types SRX217117,SRX21712...7,SRX217122,SRX217118,SRX217126 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.10.Brca1.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.ALL.20.Brca1.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.20.Brca1.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Brca1 All cell types SRX217117,SRX21712...2,SRX217118,SRX217127,SRX217126 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.20.Brca1.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Unc.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 Unclassified Gonad Testicular somatic... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.PSC.20.Smarca4.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.20.Smarca4.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Smarca4 Pluripotent stem cell SRX1300...3820,SRX823825,SRX823833,SRX823835 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.20.Smarca4.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Oth.ALL.50.Smarca5.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.50.Smarca5.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Smarca5 All cell types SRX398109,SRX1...022084,SRX398110 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.50.Smarca5.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.PSC.10.Smarca4.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.10.Smarca4.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Smarca4 Pluripotent stem cell SRX1901...3830,SRX823825,SRX823820,SRX823835 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.10.Smarca4.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.ALL.20.Smarca4.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.20.Smarca4.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Smarca4 All cell types SRX190170,SRX3...SRX823833,SRX823835 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.20.Smarca4.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.ALL.50.Smarca4.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.50.Smarca4.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Smarca4 All cell types SRX190170,SRX3...SRX823833,SRX823835 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.50.Smarca4.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Oth.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 TFs and others Cardiovascular Endocardial c...ells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: ALL.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 All antigens Cardiovascular Endocardial cel...ls DRX014674 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: ALL.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 All antigens Cardiovascular Endocardial cel...ls DRX014674 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Endocardial c...ells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Endocardial c...ells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Endocardial c...ells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: ALL.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 All antigens Cardiovascular Endocardial cel...ls DRX014674 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: InP.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 Input control Cardiovascular Endocardial ce...lls http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: InP.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 Input control Cardiovascular Endocardial ce...lls http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Endocardial c...ells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: NoD.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 No description Cardiovascular Endocardial c...ells DRX014674 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: NoD.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 No description Cardiovascular Endocardial c...ells DRX014674 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: NoD.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 No description Cardiovascular Endocardial c...ells DRX014674 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 TFs and others Cardiovascular Endocardial c...ells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: NoD.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 No description Cardiovascular Endocardial c...ells DRX014674 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 TFs and others Cardiovascular Endocardial c...ells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: DNS.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 DNase-seq Gonad Testicular somatic ce...lls http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: InP.Bld.05.AllAg.Dendritic_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Bld.05.AllAg.Dendritic_Cells mm9 Input control Blood Dendritic Cells SRX885956,...76,SRX122481,SRX667880,SRX667874,SRX667878 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Bld.05.AllAg.Dendritic_Cells.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Gonad Testicular somatic... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 TFs and others Gonad Testicular somatic... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: Unc.Bld.50.AllAg.Dendritic_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Bld.50.AllAg.Dendritic_Cells hg19 Unclassified Blood Dendritic Cells SRX818200,...203,SRX818202,SRX818182,SRX818195,SRX818196,SRX818181 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Bld.50.AllAg.Dendritic_Cells.bed ...

  6. File list: Unc.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 Unclassified Gonad Testicular somatic... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: DNS.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 DNase-seq Gonad Testicular somatic ce...lls http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: Oth.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 TFs and others Gonad Testicular somatic... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: DNS.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 DNase-seq Gonad Testicular somatic ce...lls http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: Unc.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 Unclassified Gonad Testicular somatic... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: Unc.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 Unclassified Gonad Testicular somatic... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: InP.Bld.10.AllAg.Dendritic_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Bld.10.AllAg.Dendritic_Cells hg19 Input control Blood Dendritic Cells SRX627429...,SRX627427 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Bld.10.AllAg.Dendritic_Cells.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Gonad Testicular somatic... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: ALL.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 All antigens Gonad Testicular somatic... cells SRX591729,SRX591728,SRX591717,SRX591716 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Gonad Testicular somatic... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: Unc.Bld.20.AllAg.Dendritic_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Bld.20.AllAg.Dendritic_Cells hg19 Unclassified Blood Dendritic Cells SRX818200,...189,SRX818202,SRX818182,SRX818195,SRX818196,SRX818181 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Bld.20.AllAg.Dendritic_Cells.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.PSC.05.Myc.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.05.Myc.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Myc Pluripotent stem cell SRX266823,SRX21...3819,SRX213807,SRX213828,SRX266824 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.05.Myc.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.PSC.10.Myc.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.10.Myc.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Myc Pluripotent stem cell SRX266823,SRX21...3819,SRX213807,SRX213828,SRX266824 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.10.Myc.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.PSC.50.Myc.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.50.Myc.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Myc Pluripotent stem cell SRX266823,SRX21...3819,SRX213828,SRX213807,SRX266824 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.50.Myc.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.AllCell mm9 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell SRX055368,SRX170840...jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.AllCell.bed ... ...567344,SRX847249,SRX1092372,SRX1092375,SRX1034725,SRX213761,SRX316695,SRX213757,SRX501738,SRX1034724 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.

  1. File list: His.PSC.10.H2APERIODZac.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.10.H2APERIODZac.AllCell mm9 Histone H2A.Zac Pluripotent stem cell SRX111870... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.10.H2APERIODZac.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: His.PSC.05.H2APERIODZac.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.05.H2APERIODZac.AllCell mm9 Histone H2A.Zac Pluripotent stem cell SRX111870... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.05.H2APERIODZac.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.PSC.20.Myc.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.20.Myc.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Myc Pluripotent stem cell SRX266823,SRX21...3807,SRX213828,SRX213819,SRX266824 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.20.Myc.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.PSC.50.Kdm4c.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.50.Kdm4c.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Kdm4c Pluripotent stem cell SRX424007,S...RX424008 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.50.Kdm4c.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.AllCell mm9 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell SRX152135,SRX152134...jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.AllCell.bed ... ...1098125,SRX1034724,SRX1034725,SRX213761,SRX170844,SRX847249,SRX1074907,SRX213757,SRX355573,SRX355578 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.

  6. File list: ALL.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell hg19 All antigens Blood Lymphoma, B-Cell SRX37034...351,SRX092415,SRX370350,SRX092417,SRX092414 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell.bed ...

  7. File list: ALL.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell hg19 All antigens Blood Lymphoma, B-Cell SRX37034...349,SRX370351,SRX370345,SRX092415,SRX092417 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell hg19 Histone Blood Lymphoma, B-Cell SRX370346,SRX...370340,SRX370344,SRX370342,SRX370348,SRX370350 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell hg19 Histone Blood Lymphoma, B-Cell SRX370346,SRX...370350,SRX370344,SRX370342,SRX370348,SRX370340 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell.bed ...

  10. File list: Oth.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell hg19 TFs and others Blood Lymphoma, B-Cell SRX092...416,SRX092414 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell.bed ...

  11. File list: Oth.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell hg19 TFs and others Blood Lymphoma, B-Cell SRX092...416,SRX092414 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell hg19 TFs and others Blood Lymphoma, B-Cell SRX092...416,SRX092414 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell.bed ...

  13. File list: ALL.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell hg19 All antigens Blood Lymphoma, B-Cell SRX37034...416,SRX092414,SRX370350,SRX092417,SRX092415 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell hg19 Histone Blood Lymphoma, B-Cell SRX370346,SRX...370344,SRX370340,SRX370342,SRX370348,SRX370350 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell hg19 TFs and others Blood Lymphoma, B-Cell SRX092...416,SRX092414 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell.bed ...

  16. File list: ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell hg19 All antigens Blood Lymphoma, B-Cell SRX37034...348,SRX370345,SRX092417,SRX370351,SRX092415 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell hg19 Histone Blood Lymphoma, B-Cell SRX370346,SRX...370340,SRX370344,SRX370350,SRX370342,SRX370348 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.Emb.20.AllAg.Neuronal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.20.AllAg.Neuronal_cells dm3 RNA polymerase Embryo Neuronal cells SRX110756 ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Emb.20.AllAg.Neuronal_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.Emb.50.AllAg.Neuronal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.50.AllAg.Neuronal_cells dm3 TFs and others Embryo Neuronal cells SRX066247,...SRX066245 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.Emb.50.AllAg.Neuronal_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.Emb.05.AllAg.Neuronal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.05.AllAg.Neuronal_cells dm3 TFs and others Embryo Neuronal cells SRX066245,...SRX066247 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.Emb.05.AllAg.Neuronal_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.Emb.50.AllAg.Neuronal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.50.AllAg.Neuronal_cells dm3 RNA polymerase Embryo Neuronal cells SRX110756 ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Emb.50.AllAg.Neuronal_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.Emb.05.AllAg.Neuronal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.05.AllAg.Neuronal_cells dm3 RNA polymerase Embryo Neuronal cells SRX110756 ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Emb.05.AllAg.Neuronal_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: InP.Emb.20.AllAg.Neuronal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Emb.20.AllAg.Neuronal_cells dm3 Input control Embryo Neuronal cells SRX110784 h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/InP.Emb.20.AllAg.Neuronal_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: InP.Emb.10.AllAg.Neuronal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Emb.10.AllAg.Neuronal_cells dm3 Input control Embryo Neuronal cells SRX110784 h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/InP.Emb.10.AllAg.Neuronal_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: ALL.Emb.20.AllAg.Neuronal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.20.AllAg.Neuronal_cells dm3 All antigens Embryo Neuronal cells SRX110756,SR...X110784,SRX066245,SRX110775,SRX066247 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Emb.20.AllAg.Neuronal_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: ALL.Emb.10.AllAg.Neuronal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.10.AllAg.Neuronal_cells dm3 All antigens Embryo Neuronal cells SRX110756,SR...X110784,SRX110775,SRX066245,SRX066247 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Emb.10.AllAg.Neuronal_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.Pro-B_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.Pro-B_cells mm9 All antigens Blood Pro-B cells SRX1553109,SRX15531...3,SRX1143907 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.Pro-B_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: InP.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoid_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoid_cells mm9 Input control Blood Lymphoid cells SRX021894,SR...X971601 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoid_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: Oth.Emb.10.AllAg.Neuronal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.10.AllAg.Neuronal_cells dm3 TFs and others Embryo Neuronal cells SRX066245,...SRX066247 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.Emb.10.AllAg.Neuronal_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Neuronal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Neuronal_cells dm3 All antigens Embryo Neuronal cells SRX110775,SR...X110756,SRX110784,SRX066245,SRX066247 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Neuronal_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoid_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoid_cells mm9 All antigens Blood Lymphoid cells SRX658437,SRX...658389,SRX021894,SRX971603,SRX658419,SRX971601,SRX971602,SRX658405 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoid_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Breast Mammary cells SRX852566,SR...X852567,SRX187510,SRX187515 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: ALL.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 All antigens Breast Mammary cells SRX187508,SRX1...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: DNS.Brs.50.AllAg.Breast_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Brs.50.AllAg.Breast_cells hg19 DNase-seq Breast Breast cells SRX081373,SRX08137...4,SRX201197 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Brs.50.AllAg.Breast_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Emb.10.AllAg.Neuronal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.10.AllAg.Neuronal_cells dm3 RNA polymerase Embryo Neuronal cells SRX110756 ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Emb.10.AllAg.Neuronal_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: InP.Emb.05.AllAg.Neuronal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Emb.05.AllAg.Neuronal_cells dm3 Input control Embryo Neuronal cells SRX110784 h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/InP.Emb.05.AllAg.Neuronal_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: ALL.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 All antigens Breast Mammary cells SRX187511,SRX1...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: ALL.Bld.10.AllAg.Naive_T_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Bld.10.AllAg.Naive_T_cells hg19 All antigens Blood Naive T cells SRX1425815,SRX...1425816,SRX1425814,SRX1425808 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Bld.10.AllAg.Naive_T_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: ALL.Bld.50.AllAg.Naive_T_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Bld.50.AllAg.Naive_T_cells hg19 All antigens Blood Naive T cells SRX1425815,SRX...1425816,SRX1425814,SRX1425808 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Bld.50.AllAg.Naive_T_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: InP.Emb.50.AllAg.Neuronal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Emb.50.AllAg.Neuronal_cells dm3 Input control Embryo Neuronal cells SRX110784 h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/InP.Emb.50.AllAg.Neuronal_cells.bed ...