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Sample records for human cartilage glycoprotein-39

  1. The role of serum cartilage glycoprotein-39,HRCT in the airway remodeling caused by the bronchial asthma%血清人软骨糖蛋白-39、HRCT 在支气管哮喘所致气道重塑中所起的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭丽娜; 常晓悦; 王渊; 李红菊; 杨勇; 郭建华; 边喜明

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of serum human cartilage glycoprotein-39,high resolution CT (HRCT)and pulmonary function test in airway remodeling induced by bronchial asthma (asthma).Methods Collect of Baotou Central Hospital inpatient and outpatient asthma patients 5 1 cases and 24 cases of healthy people (from the health examination center)as the object of study.According whether airflow obstruction was reversible or not being usedβ2-receptor agonists (salbutamol 400 lifts), the patiens were divided into irreversible airflow obstruction group (24 cases)and reversible airflow obstruction group (27 cases),and the healthy group (24 cases).The subjects were extracted fasting venous blood,measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay serum concentrations of human cartilage glycoprotein-39.Under the HRCT,measure the 5 parts of airway wall thickness from the aortic arch, tracheal bifurcation,tracheal bifurcation under 1 cm,under the right pulmonary vein and diaphragm top 2 cm,calculate 2T/D,WA%.And collect lung function values (FEV1/FVC,FEV1 %pred,FEF25%-75%, MEF50%,MEF25%).Results ① The irreversible airflow obstruction group serum human cartilage glycoprotein-39,2T/D,WA% level were higher than in reversible airflow obstruction group,higher than that of healthy controls (73.79 ± 29.94,41.77 ± 13.53,22.02 ± 2.74;54.74 ± 3.65,46.06 ± 2.86, 28.83±3.23;79.20±3.50,70.79 ±3.1 6,49.03 ±4.78),with statistical significance (P <0.05 ).Lung function FEV1 %pred,FEV1/FVC,FEF25%-75%,MEF50%,MEF25 % are different compared between three groups,the highest healthy controls,reversible times,minimum irreversible airflow obstruction group.②The spearman correlation analysis results show that the concentration of serum human cartilage glycoprotein-39 was positively correlated with 2T/D,WA% (r = 0.748,P < 0.05;r = 0.739,P <0.05).Serum human cartilage glycoprotein-39 and lung function FEV1 % pred,FEV1/FVC,FEF25%-75%, MEF50%,MEF25% were negatively correlated (r =-0.665,P <0

  2. The distribution of YKL-40 in osteoarthritic and normal human articular cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volck, B; Ostergaard, K; Johansen, J S

    1999-01-01

    YKL-40, also called human cartilage glycoprotein-39, is a major secretory protein of human chondrocytes in cell culture. YKL-40 mRNA is expressed by cartilage from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but is not detectable in normal human cartilage. The aim was to investigate the distribution of YKL......-40 in osteoarthritic (n=9) and macroscopically normal (n=5) human articular cartilage, collected from 12 pre-selected areas of the femoral head, to discover a potential role for YKL-40 in cartilage remodelling in osteoarthritis. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that YKL-40 staining was found...... staining for YKL-40 was in general low in normal cartilage. The present findings, together with previous observations, suggests that YKL-40 may be of importance in cartilage remodelling/degradation of osteoarthritic joints....

  3. Induction of tolerance with intranasal administration of human cartilage gp-39 in DBA/1 mice - Amelioration of clinical, histologic, and radiologic signs of type II collagen-induced arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, LAB; Coenen-de Roo, CJJ; Helsen, MMA; Lubberts, E; Boots, AMH; van den Berg, WB; Miltenburg, AMM

    2000-01-01

    Objective. Human cartilage glycoprotein 39 (HC gp-39) was recently identified as a candidate autoantigen in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis, In the present studies, we investigated the capacity of HC gp-39 to interfere in clinical disease induced by an unrelated autoantigen, type II collage

  4. Thermogravimetry of irradiated human costal cartilage

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    Martinho Junior, Antonio C.; Machado, Luci D.B.; Dias, Djalma B.; Mathor, Monica B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: antonio_carlos_martinho@msn.com; lmachado@ipen.br; dbdias@ipen.br; mathor@ipen.br; Herson, Marisa R. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Banco de Tecidos do Instituto Central]. E-mail: marisah@vifm.org; Meumann, Nilton F.; Pasqualucci, Carlos Augusto G. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Servico de Verificacao de Obitos]. E-mail: svoc@usp.br

    2007-07-01

    Costal cartilage has been sterilized with gamma radiation using {sup 60}Co sources at two different doses, 25 kGy and 50 kGy, for storage in tissue banks. Samples of costal cartilage were deep-freezing as method of preservation. Thermogravimetry (Shimadzu TGA-50) was used to verify the water release of costal cartilage before and after irradiation. The TG tests were carried out at heating rate of 10 deg C/min from room temperature to 600 deg C under a flow rate of 50 mL/min of compressed air. Samples of costal cartilage were divided in 2 parts. One part of them was kept as reference material; the other part was irradiated. This procedure assures better homogeneity of the sample and reproducibility of the experimental results. The obtained data have shown that the TG curves have the same pattern, independently of the sample. Non-irradiated samples showed great variability of thermogravimetric curves among different donors and for the same donor. Further experimental work is being carried out on human cartilage preserved in glycerol in high concentration (> 98%) to compare with those deep freezing. (author)

  5. YKL-40, a mammalian member of the chitinase family, is a matrix protein of specific granules in human neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volck, B; Price, P A; Johansen, J S;

    1998-01-01

    YKL-40, also called human cartilage glycoprotein-39 (HC gp-39), is a member of family 18 glycosyl hydrolases. YKL-40 is secreted by chondrocytes, synovial cells, and macrophages, and recently it has been reported that YKL-40 has a role as an autoantigen in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The function ...

  6. Biochemical effects on long-term frozen human costal cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santin, Stefany P.; Martinho Junior, Antonio C.; Yoshito, Daniele; Soares, Fernando A.N.; Mathor, Monica B., E-mail: mathor@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Currently, the progresses on treatment of musculoskeletal diseases with the evolving of artificial implants and the success of tissue transplantation between genetically different individuals have conducted to an increase in radiosterilization. Regarding to tissue transplantation, it is essential to have sterile tissue and many tissue banks use radiosterilization as an effective method to sterilize these tissues. However, high doses of ionizing radiation and the preservation method may induce structural modifications in the tissues, as degradation of structural scaffold, decreasing its mechanical properties. Particularly, cartilage have been preserved in high concentrations of glycerol or deep-frozen at -70 degree C for storage after radiosterilization. Therefore, it is important to study the modifications induced in cartilage by preservation methods and by radiosterilization to determine the appropriated parameters for high quality of human allografts. Costal cartilages were obtained from cadaveric donors and were frozen at -20 degree C for 2 years long in order to compare with previous studies for fresh, deep-frozen and glycerolised cartilages. The mechanical tests were carried out in a universal testing machine until sample failure. According our results, there is no significant statistical difference between stress at break of fresh, long-term - 20 degree C frozen cartilages and deep-frozen cartilage. This early result suggests, regarding to tensile property, that long-term - 20 degree C frozen cartilages corresponds to glycerolised costal cartilages irradiated with 25 kGy or deep-frozen cartilages irradiated with 25 and 50 kGy. Thus, this long-term frozen cartilages may be used for tissue banks, but more studies about effects of ionizing radiation are necessary. (author)

  7. Human stem cells and articular cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Atsuyuki; Iwakura, Takashi; Reddi, A Hari

    2012-11-05

    The regeneration of articular cartilage damaged due to trauma and posttraumatic osteoarthritis is an unmet medical need. Current approaches to regeneration and tissue engineering of articular cartilage include the use of chondrocytes, stem cells, scaffolds and signals, including morphogens and growth factors. Stem cells, as a source of cells for articular cartilage regeneration, are a critical factor for articular cartilage regeneration. This is because articular cartilage tissue has a low cell turnover and does not heal spontaneously. Adult stem cells have been isolated from various tissues, such as bone marrow, adipose, synovial tissue, muscle and periosteum. Signals of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily play critical roles in chondrogenesis. However, adult stem cells derived from various tissues tend to differ in their chondrogenic potential. Pluripotent stem cells have unlimited proliferative capacity compared to adult stem cells. Chondrogenesis from embryonic stem (ES) cells has been studied for more than a decade. However, establishment of ES cells requires embryos and leads to ethical issues for clinical applications. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are generated by cellular reprogramming of adult cells by transcription factors. Although iPS cells have chondrogenic potential, optimization, generation and differentiation toward articular chondrocytes are currently under intense investigation.

  8. Human Stem Cells and Articular Cartilage Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hari Reddi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available  The regeneration of articular cartilage damaged due to trauma and posttraumatic osteoarthritis is an unmet medical need. Current approaches to regeneration and tissue engineering of articular cartilage include the use of chondrocytes, stem cells, scaffolds and signals, including morphogens and growth factors. Stem cells, as a source of cells for articular cartilage regeneration, are a critical factor for articular cartilage regeneration. This is because articular cartilage tissue has a low cell turnover and does not heal spontaneously. Adult stem cells have been isolated from various tissues, such as bone marrow, adipose, synovial tissue, muscle and periosteum. Signals of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily play critical roles in chondrogenesis. However, adult stem cells derived from various tissues tend to differ in their chondrogenic potential. Pluripotent stem cells have unlimited proliferative capacity compared to adult stem cells. Chondrogenesis from embryonic stem (ES cells has been studied for more than a decade. However, establishment of ES cells requires embryos and leads to ethical issues for clinical applications. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells are generated by cellular reprogramming of adult cells by transcription factors. Although iPS cells have chondrogenic potential, optimization, generation and differentiation toward articular chondrocytes are currently under intense investigation.

  9. Comparative digital cartilage histology for human and common osteoarthritis models

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    Pedersen DR

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Douglas R Pedersen, Jessica E Goetz, Gail L Kurriger, James A MartinDepartment of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USAPurpose: This study addresses the species-specific and site-specific details of weight-bearing articular cartilage zone depths and chondrocyte distributions among humans and common osteoarthritis (OA animal models using contemporary digital imaging tools. Histological analysis is the gold-standard research tool for evaluating cartilage health, OA severity, and treatment efficacy. Historically, evaluations were made by expert analysts. However, state-of-the-art tools have been developed that allow for digitization of entire histological sections for computer-aided analysis. Large volumes of common digital cartilage metrics directly complement elucidation of trends in OA inducement and concomitant potential treatments.Materials and methods: Sixteen fresh human knees, 26 adult New Zealand rabbit stifles, and 104 bovine lateral plateaus were measured for four cartilage zones and the cell densities within each zone. Each knee was divided into four weight-bearing sites: the medial and lateral plateaus and femoral condyles.Results: One-way analysis of variance followed by pairwise multiple comparisons (Holm–Sidak method at a significance of 0.05 clearly confirmed the variability between cartilage depths at each site, between sites in the same species, and between weight-bearing articular cartilage definitions in different species.Conclusion: The present study clearly demonstrates multisite, multispecies differences in normal weight-bearing articular cartilage, which can be objectively quantified by a common digital histology imaging technique. The clear site-specific differences in normal cartilage must be taken into consideration when characterizing the pathoetiology of OA models. Together, these provide a path to consistently analyze the volume and variety of histologic slides necessarily generated

  10. Boundary mode lubrication of articular cartilage by recombinant human lubricin.

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    Gleghorn, Jason P; Jones, Aled R C; Flannery, Carl R; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2009-06-01

    Lubrication of cartilage involves a variety of physical and chemical factors, including lubricin, a synovial glycoprotein that has been shown to be a boundary lubricant. It is unclear how lubricin boundary lubricates a wide range of bearings from tissue to artificial surfaces, and if the mechanism is the same for both soluble and bound lubricin. In the current study, experiments were conducted to investigate the hypothesis that recombinant human lubricin (rh-lubricin) lubricates cartilage in a dose-dependent manner and that soluble and bound fractions of rh-lubricin both contribute to the lubrication process. An rh-lubricin dose response was observed with maximal lubrication achieved at concentrations of rh-lubricin greater than 50 microg/mL. A concentration-response variable-slope model was fit to the data, and indicated that rh-lubricin binding to cartilage was not first order. The pattern of decrease in equilibrium friction coefficient indicated that aggregation of rh-lubricin or steric arrangement may regulate boundary lubrication. rh-lubricin localized at the cartilage surface was found to lubricate a cartilage-glass interface in boundary mode, as did soluble rh-lubricin at high concentrations (150 microg/mL); however, the most effective lubrication occurred when both soluble and bound rh-lubricin were present at the interface. These findings point to two distinct mechanisms by which rh-lubricin lubricates, one mechanism involving lubricin bound to the tissue surface and the other involving lubricin in solution.

  11. Effects of Er:YAG laser irradiation on human cartilage

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    Glinkowski, Wojciech; Brzozowska, Malgorzata; Ciszek, Bogdan; Rowinski, Jan; Strek, Wieslaw

    1996-03-01

    Irradiation of the hyaline or fibrous cartilage excised from the body of a human cadaver with Er:YAG laser beam, single pulse with a dose of 1 J, produces a crater with a depth of approximately 500 micrometers and a diameter varying from 5 to 300 micrometers. Histological examination has revealed that the laser-made craters were surrounded by a thin rim (2-10 micrometer) of charred and coagulated tissue. No damage was observed in the cartilage surrounding the rim. The presence of sharp demarcation between the tissue areas ablated by laser energy and the undamaged areas argues for the potential usefulness of the Er:YAG laser in surgery of cartilages.

  12. 2-photon laser scanning microscopy on native human cartilage

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    Martini, Joerg; Toensing, Katja; Dickob, Michael; Anselmetti, Dario

    2005-08-01

    Native hyaline cartilage from a human knee joint was directly investigated with laser scanning microscopy via 2-photon autofluorescence excitation with no additional staining or labelling protocols in a nondestructive and sterile manner. Using a femtosecond, near-infrared (NIR) Ti:Sa laser for 2-photon excitation and a dedicated NIR long distance objective, autofluorescence imaging and measurements of the extracellular matrix (ECM) tissue with incorporated chondrocytes were possible with a penetration depth of up to 460 μm inside the sample. Via spectral autofluorescence separation these experiments allowed the discrimination of chondrocytes from the ECM and therefore an estimate of chondrocytic cell density within the cartilage tissue to approximately 0.2-2•107cm3. Furthermore, a comparison of the relative autofluorescence signals between nonarthritic and arthritic cartilage tissue exhibited distinct differences in tissue morphology. As these morphological findings are in keeping with the macroscopic diagnosis, our measurement has the potential of being used in future diagnostic applications.

  13. Special pattern of endochondral ossification in human laryngeal cartilages: X-ray and light-microscopic studies on thyroid cartilage.

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    Claassen, Horst; Schicht, Martin; Sel, Saadettin; Paulsen, Friedrich

    2014-04-01

    Endochondral ossification is a process that also occurs in the skeleton of the larynx. Differences in the ossification mechanism in comparison to growth plates are not understood until now. To get deeper insights into this process, human thyroid cartilage was investigated by the use of X-rays and a series of light-microscopic stainings. A statistical analysis of mineralization was done by scanning areas of mineralized cartilage and of ossification. We detected a special mode of endochondral ossification which differs from the processes in growth plates. Thyroid cartilage ossifies very slowly and in a gender-specific manner. Compared with age-matched women, bone formation in thyroid cartilage of men is significantly higher in the age group 41-60 years. Endochondral ossification is prepared by internal changes of extracellular matrix leading to areas of asbestoid fibers with ingrowing cartilage canals. In contrast to growth plates, bone is deposited on large areas of mineralized cartilage, which appear at the rims of cartilage canals. Furthermore, primary parallel fibered bone was observed which was deposited on woven bone. The predominant bone type is cancellous bone with trabeculae, whereas compact bone with Haversian systems was seldom found. Trabeculae contain a great number of reversal and arresting lines meaning that the former were often reconstructed and that bone formation was arrested and resumed again with advancing age. It is hypothesized that throughout life trabeculae of ossified thyroid cartilage undergo adaptation to different loads due to the use of voice.

  14. Human Endogenous Retrovirus W Activity in Cartilage of Osteoarthritis Patients

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    Signy Bendiksen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of viruses in osteoarthritis remains controversial because the prevalence of viral nucleic acid sequences in peripheral blood or synovial fluid from osteoarthritis patients and that in healthy control subjects are similar. Until now the presence of virus has not been analyzed in cartilage. We screened cartilage and chondrocytes from advanced and non-/early osteoarthritis patients for parvovirus B19, herpes simplex virus-1, Epstein Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, human herpes virus-6, hepatitis C virus, and human endogenous retroviruses transcripts. Endogenous retroviruses transcripts, but none of the other viruses, were detected in 15 out the 17 patients. Sequencing identified the virus as HERV-WE1 and E2. HERV-W activity was confirmed by high expression levels of syncytin, dsRNA, virus budding, and the presence of virus-like particles in all advanced osteoarthritis cartilages examined. Low levels of HERV-WE1, but not E2 envelope RNA, were observed in 3 out of 8 non-/early osteoarthritis patients, while only 3 out of 7 chondrocytes cultures displayed low levels of syncytin, and just one was positive for virus-like particles. This study demonstrates for the first time activation of HERV-W in cartilage of osteoarthritis patients; however, a causative role for HERV-W in development or deterioration of the disease remains to be proven.

  15. Human sclera maintains common characteristics with cartilage throughout evolution.

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    Yuko Seko

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The sclera maintains and protects the eye ball, which receives visual inputs. Although the sclera does not contribute significantly to visual perception, scleral diseases such as refractory scleritis, scleral perforation and pathological myopia are considered incurable or difficult to cure. The aim of this study is to identify characteristics of the human sclera as one of the connective tissues derived from the neural crest and mesoderm. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have demonstrated microarray data of cultured human infant scleral cells. Hierarchical clustering was performed to group scleral cells and other mesenchymal cells into subcategories. Hierarchical clustering analysis showed similarity between scleral cells and auricular cartilage-derived cells. Cultured micromasses of scleral cells exposed to TGF-betas and BMP2 produced an abundant matrix. The expression of cartilage-associated genes, such as Indian hedge hog, type X collagen, and MMP13, was up-regulated within 3 weeks in vitro. These results suggest that human 'sclera'-derived cells can be considered chondrocytes when cultured ex vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our present study shows a chondrogenic potential of human sclera. Interestingly, the sclera of certain vertebrates, such as birds and fish, is composed of hyaline cartilage. Although the human sclera is not a cartilaginous tissue, the human sclera maintains chondrogenic potential throughout evolution. In addition, our findings directly explain an enigma that the sclera and the joint cartilage are common targets of inflammatory cells in rheumatic arthritis. The present global gene expression database will contribute to the clarification of the pathogenesis of developmental diseases such as high myopia.

  16. Recapitulation of physiological spatiotemporal signals promotes in vitro formation of phenotypically stable human articular cartilage

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    Wei, Yiyong; Zhou, Bin; Bernhard, Jonathan; Robinson, Samuel; Burapachaisri, Aonnicha; Guo, X. Edward

    2017-01-01

    Standard isotropic culture fails to recapitulate the spatiotemporal gradients present during native development. Cartilage grown from human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) is poorly organized and unstable in vivo. We report that human cartilage with physiologic organization and in vivo stability can be grown in vitro from self-assembling hMSCs by implementing spatiotemporal regulation during induction. Self-assembling hMSCs formed cartilage discs in Transwell inserts following isotropic chondrogenic induction with transforming growth factor β to set up a dual-compartment culture. Following a switch in the basal compartment to a hypertrophic regimen with thyroxine, the cartilage discs underwent progressive deep-zone hypertrophy and mineralization. Concurrent chondrogenic induction in the apical compartment enabled the maintenance of functional and hyaline cartilage. Cartilage homeostasis, chondrocyte maturation, and terminal differentiation markers were all up-regulated versus isotropic control groups. We assessed the in vivo stability of the cartilage formed under different induction regimens. Cartilage formed under spatiotemporal regulation in vitro resisted endochondral ossification, retained the expression of cartilage markers, and remained organized following s.c. implantation in immunocompromised mice. In contrast, the isotropic control groups underwent endochondral ossification. Cartilage formed from hMSCs remained stable and organized in vivo. Spatiotemporal regulation during induction in vitro recapitulated some aspects of native cartilage development, and potentiated the maturation of self-assembling hMSCs into stable and organized cartilage resembling the native articular cartilage. PMID:28228529

  17. Formation of Hyaline Cartilage Tissue by Passaged Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes.

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    Bianchi, Vanessa J; Weber, Joanna F; Waldman, Stephen D; Backstein, David; Kandel, Rita A

    2017-02-01

    When serially passaged in standard monolayer culture to expand cell number, articular chondrocytes lose their phenotype. This results in the formation of fibrocartilage when they are used clinically, thus limiting their use for cartilage repair therapies. Identifying a way to redifferentiate these cells in vitro is critical if they are to be used successfully. Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) family members are known to be crucial for regulating differentiation of fetal limb mesenchymal cells and mesenchymal stromal cells to chondrocytes. As passaged chondrocytes acquire a progenitor-like phenotype, the hypothesis of this study was that TGFβ supplementation will stimulate chondrocyte redifferentiation in vitro in serum-free three-dimensional (3D) culture. Human articular chondrocytes were serially passaged twice (P2) in monolayer culture. P2 cells were then placed in high-density (3D) culture on top of membranes (Millipore) and cultured for up to 6 weeks in chemically defined serum-free redifferentiation media (SFRM) in the presence or absence of TGFβ. The tissues were evaluated histologically, biochemically, by immunohistochemical staining, and biomechanically. Passaged human chondrocytes cultured in SFRM supplemented with 10 ng/mL TGFβ3 consistently formed a continuous layer of articular-like cartilage tissue rich in collagen type 2 and aggrecan and lacking collagen type 1 and X in the absence of a scaffold. The tissue developed a superficial zone characterized by expression of lubricin and clusterin with horizontally aligned collagen fibers. This study suggests that passaged human chondrocytes can be used to bioengineer a continuous layer of articular cartilage-like tissue in vitro scaffold free. Further study is required to evaluate their ability to repair cartilage defects in vivo.

  18. Isolation, identification and differentiation of human embryonic cartilage stem cells.

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    Fu, Changhao; Yan, Zi; Xu, Hao; Zhang, Chen; Zhang, Qi; Wei, Anhui; Yang, Xi; Wang, Yi

    2015-07-01

    We isolated human embryonic cartilage stem cells (hECSCs), a novel stem cell population, from the articular cartilage of eight-week-old human embryos. These stem cells demonstrated a marker expression pattern and differentiation potential intermediate to those of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human adult stem cells (hASCs). hECSCs expressed markers associated with both hESCs (OCT4, NANOG, SOX2, SSEA-3 and SSEA-4) and human adult stem cells (hASCs) (CD29, CD44, CD90, CD73 and CD10). These cells also differentiated into adipocytes, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, neurons and islet-like cells under specific inducing conditions. We identified N(6), 2'-O-dibutyryl cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (Bt2cAMP) as an inducer of chondrogenic differentiation in hECSCs. Similar results using N(6), 2'-O-dibutyryl cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (Bt2cAMP) were obtained for two other types of human embryonic tissue-derived stem cells, human embryonic hepatic stem cells (hEHSCs) and human embryonic amniotic fluid stem cells (hEASCs), both of which exhibited a marker expression pattern similar to that of hECSCs. The isolation of hECSCs and the discovery that N(6), 2'-O-dibutyryl cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (Bt2cAMP) induces chondrogenic differentiation in different stem cell populations might aid the development of strategies in tissue engineering and cartilage repair.

  19. Fibrous cartilage of human menisci is less shock-absorbing and energy-dissipating than hyaline cartilage.

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    Gaugler, Mario; Wirz, Dieter; Ronken, Sarah; Hafner, Mirjam; Göpfert, Beat; Friederich, Niklaus F; Elke, Reinhard

    2015-04-01

    To test meniscal mechanical properties such as the dynamic modulus of elasticity E* and the loss angle δ at two loading frequencies ω at different locations of the menisci and compare it to E* and δ of hyaline cartilage in indentation mode with spherical indenters. On nine pairs of human menisci, the dynamic E*-modulus and loss angle δ (as a measure of the energy dissipation) were determined. The measurements were performed at two different strain rates (slow sinusoidal and fast single impact) to show the strain rate dependence of the material. The measurements were compared to previous similar measurements with the same equipment on human hyaline cartilage. The resultant E* at fast indentation (median 1.16 MPa) was significantly higher, and the loss angle was significantly lower (median 10.2°) compared to slow-loading mode's E* and δ (median 0.18 MPa and 16.9°, respectively). Further, significant differences for different locations are shown. On the medial meniscus, the anterior horn shows the highest resultant dynamic modulus. In dynamic measurements with a spherical indenter, the menisci are much softer and less energy-dissipating than hyaline cartilage. Further, the menisci are stiffer and less energy-dissipating in the middle, intermediate part compared to the meniscal base. In compression, the energy dissipation of meniscus cartilage plays a minor role compared to hyaline cartilage. At high impacts, energy dissipation is less than on low impacts, similar to cartilage.

  20. Effects of mechanical loading on human mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jane Ru; Yong, Kar Wey; Choi, Jean Yu

    2017-05-19

    Today, articular cartilage damage is a major health problem, affecting people of all ages. The existing conventional articular cartilage repair techniques, such as autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI), microfracture, and mosaicplasty, have many shortcomings which negatively affect their clinical outcomes. Therefore, it is essential to develop an alternative and efficient articular repair technique that can address those shortcomings. Cartilage tissue engineering, which aims to create a tissue-engineered cartilage derived from human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), shows great promise for improving articular cartilage defect therapy. However, the use of tissue-engineered cartilage for the clinical therapy of articular cartilage defect still remains challenging. Despite the importance of mechanical loading to create a functional cartilage has been well demonstrated, the specific type of mechanical loading and its optimal loading regime is still under investigation. This review summarizes the most recent advances in the effects of mechanical loading on human MSCs. First, the existing conventional articular repair techniques and their shortcomings are highlighted. The important parameters for the evaluation of the tissue-engineered cartilage, including chondrogenic and hypertrophic differentiation of human MSCs are briefly discussed. The influence of mechanical loading on human MSCs is subsequently reviewed and the possible mechanotransduction signaling is highlighted. The development of non-hypertrophic chondrogenesis in response to the changing mechanical microenvironment will aid in the establishment of a tissue-engineered cartilage for efficient articular cartilage repair. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Engineering Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Matters NIH Research Matters March 3, 2014 Engineering Cartilage Artistic rendering of human stem cells on ... situations has been a major goal in tissue engineering. Cartilage contains water, collagen, proteoglycans, and chondrocytes. Collagens ...

  2. 308-nm excimer laser ablation of human cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodoehl, John A.; Rhodes, Anthony L.; Meller, Menachem M.; Sherk, Henry H.

    1993-07-01

    The XeCl excimer laser was investigated as an ablating tool for human fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage. Quantitative measurements were made of tissue ablation rates as a function of fluence in meniscal fibrocartilage and articular hyaline cartilage. A force of 1.47 Newtons was applied to an 800 micrometers fiber with the laser delivering a range of fluences (40 to 190 mj/mm2) firing at a frequency of 5 Hz. To assess the effect of repetition rate on ablation rate, a set of measurements was made at a constant fluence of 60 mj/mm2, with the repetition rate varying from 10 to 40 Hz. Histologic and morphometric analysis was performed using light microscopy. The results of these studies revealed that the ablation rate was directly proportional to fluence over the range tested. Fibrocartilage was ablated at a rate 2.56 times faster than hyaline cartilage at the maximum fluence tested. Repetition rate had no effect on the penetration per pulse. Adjacent tissue damage was noted to be minimal (10 - 70 micrometers ).

  3. Investigations of micron and submicron wear features of diseased human cartilage surfaces.

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    Peng, Zhongxiao; Baena, Juan C; Wang, Meiling

    2015-02-01

    Osteoarthritis is a common disease. However, its causes and morphological features of diseased cartilage surfaces are not well understood. The purposes of this research were (a) to develop quantitative surface characterization techniques to study human cartilages at a micron and submicron scale and (b) to investigate distinctive changes in the surface morphologies and biomechanical properties of the cartilages in different osteoarthritis grades. Diseased cartilage samples collected from osteoarthritis patients were prepared for image acquisition using two different techniques, that is, laser scanning microscopy at a micrometer scale and atomic force microscopy at a nanometer scale. Three-dimensional, digital images of human cartilages were processed and analyzed quantitatively. This study has demonstrated that high-quality three-dimensional images of human cartilage surfaces could be obtained in a hydrated condition using laser scanning microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Based on the numerical data extracted from improved image quality and quantity, it has been found that osteoarthritis evolution can be identified by specific surface features at the micrometer scale, and these features are amplitude and functional property related. At the submicron level, the spatial features of the surfaces were revealed to differ between early and advanced osteoarthritis grades. The effective indentation moduli of human cartilages effectively revealed the cartilage deterioration. The imaging acquisition and numerical analysis methods established allow quantitative studies of distinctive changes in cartilage surface characteristics and better understanding of the cartilage degradation process.

  4. Study on the Microstructure of Human Articular Cartilage/Bone Interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaxiong Liu; Qin Lian; Jiankang He; Jinna Zhao; Zhongmin Jin; Dichen Li

    2011-01-01

    For improving the theory of gradient microstructure of cartilage/bone interface, human distal femurs were studied. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), histological sections and MicroCT were used to observe, measure and model the microstructure of cartilage/bone interface. The results showed that the cartilage/bone interface is in a hierarchical structure which is composed of four different tissue layers. The interlocking of hyaline cartilage and calcified cartilage and that of calcified cartilage and subchondral bone are in the manner of"protrusion-pore" with average diameter of 17.0 μm and 34.1 μm respectively. In addition, the cancellous bone under the cartilage is also formed by four layer hierarchical structure, and the adjacent layers are connected by bone trabecula in the shape of H, I and Y, forming a complex interwoven network structure. Finally, the simplified structure model of the cartilage/bone interface was proposed according to the natural articular cartilage/bone interface. The simplified model is a 4-layer gradient biomimetic structure, which corresponds to four different tissues of natural cartilage/bone interface. The results of this work would be beneficial to the design of bionic scaffold for the tissue engineering of articular cartilage/bone.

  5. The immunomodulatory effects of shark cartilage on the mouse and human immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ali Sheikhian

    2007-01-01

    Materials and methods: In an experimental study, the effects of different doses of shark cartilage on humoral (antibody titer immune response against sheep red blood cells (SRBC, were measured in mouse. In addition, we evaluated the modulatory effects of the shark cartilage on the natural killer (NK activity of the peritoneal cells of mouse against a tumor cell line called K562, according to the standard methods. The proliferative response of the human peripheral blood mononuclear cells was measured under the influence of shark cartilage. Results: Pure shark cartilage enhanced antibody response against SRBC in vivo. The hemagglutination titer which was 1/147 in the control group (injected with hen cartilage, increased to 1/1355 in the test group. The optimal dose was 100 mg/ml. both type of cartilage had blastogenic effect on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (the blastogenic index was 6.7 and 4.9 for impure shark cartilage and hen cartilage, respectively. NK activity was inhibited completely by pure shark cartilage (the amount of the killing activity of the effector peritoneal cells for the control and test groups against target cells was 25.9% and 5.5% respectively. Conclusion: Shark cartilage has a potent immunomodulatory effect on the specific immune mechanisms and some inhibitory effects on the innate immune mechanisms such as NC activity. Since the specific immunity has a more pivotal role against tumor formation, shark cartilage can be used as a cancer immunotherapeutic.

  6. Large, stratified, and mechanically functional human cartilage grown in vitro by mesenchymal condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhumiratana, Sarindr; Eton, Ryan E.; Oungoulian, Sevan R.; Wan, Leo Q.; Ateshian, Gerard A.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2014-01-01

    The efforts to grow mechanically functional cartilage from human mesenchymal stem cells have not been successful. We report that clinically sized pieces of human cartilage with physiologic stratification and biomechanics can be grown in vitro by recapitulating some aspects of the developmental process of mesenchymal condensation. By exposure to transforming growth factor-β, mesenchymal stem cells were induced to condense into cellular bodies, undergo chondrogenic differentiation, and form cartilagenous tissue, in a process designed to mimic mesenchymal condensation leading into chondrogenesis. We discovered that the condensed mesenchymal cell bodies (CMBs) formed in vitro set an outer boundary after 5 d of culture, as indicated by the expression of mesenchymal condensation genes and deposition of tenascin. Before setting of boundaries, the CMBs could be fused into homogenous cellular aggregates giving rise to well-differentiated and mechanically functional cartilage. We used the mesenchymal condensation and fusion of CMBs to grow centimeter-sized, anatomically shaped pieces of human articular cartilage over 5 wk of culture. For the first time to our knowledge biomechanical properties of cartilage derived from human mesenchymal cells were comparable to native cartilage, with the Young’s modulus of >800 kPa and equilibrium friction coeffcient of CMBs have capability to form mechanically strong cartilage–cartilage interface in an in vitro cartilage defect model. The CMBs, which acted as “lego-like” blocks of neocartilage, were capable of assembling into human cartilage with physiologic-like structure and mechanical properties. PMID:24778247

  7. Human serum provided additional values in growth factors supplemented medium for human chondrocytes monolayer expansion and engineered cartilage construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, K H; Aminuddin, B S; Fuzina, N H; Ruszymah, B H I

    2004-05-01

    We have previously formulated an optimized human chondrocytes growth medium based on 2% fetal bovine serum supplementation. For clinical usage, the animal serum must be replaced by patient own serum. We investigated the effects of human serum concentration for human nasal septum chondrocytes monolayer culture and cartilage reconstruction. Human serum demonstrated a dose dependent manner in promoting chondrocytes growth and cartilage engineering.

  8. Age variations in the properties of human tibial trabecular bone and cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming

    2000-01-01

    ) to investigate the age-related and osteoarthrosis-related changes in the mechanical properties of the human tibial cartilage-bone complex; and 3) to evaluate mutual associations among various properties. Normal specimens from human autopsy proximal tibiae were used for investigation of age variations...... in the properties of trabecular bone and the cartilage-bone complex, and osteoarthrotic specimens were used for the investigation of changes in the mechanical properties of the cartilage-bone complex induced by this disease process. The mechanical properties and physical/compositional properties of trabecular bone...... is parallel to the longitudinal loading axis of the tibia. The mechanical properties of the normal cartilage and bone vary with age and respond simultaneously to mechanical loading. Both cartilage and bone in early-stage OA are mechanically inferior to normal, and OA cartilage and bone have lost their unit...

  9. Streamlined bioreactor-based production of human cartilage tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonnarelli, B; Santoro, R; Adelaide Asnaghi, M; Wendt, D

    2016-05-27

    Engineered tissue grafts have been manufactured using methods based predominantly on traditional labour-intensive manual benchtop techniques. These methods impart significant regulatory and economic challenges, hindering the successful translation of engineered tissue products to the clinic. Alternatively, bioreactor-based production systems have the potential to overcome such limitations. In this work, we present an innovative manufacturing approach to engineer cartilage tissue within a single bioreactor system, starting from freshly isolated human primary chondrocytes, through the generation of cartilaginous tissue grafts. The limited number of primary chondrocytes that can be isolated from a small clinically-sized cartilage biopsy could be seeded and extensively expanded directly within a 3D scaffold in our perfusion bioreactor (5.4 ± 0.9 doublings in 2 weeks), bypassing conventional 2D expansion in flasks. Chondrocytes expanded in 3D scaffolds better maintained a chondrogenic phenotype than chondrocytes expanded on plastic flasks (collagen type II mRNA, 18-fold; Sox-9, 11-fold). After this "3D expansion" phase, bioreactor culture conditions were changed to subsequently support chondrogenic differentiation for two weeks. Engineered tissues based on 3D-expanded chondrocytes were more cartilaginous than tissues generated from chondrocytes previously expanded in flasks. We then demonstrated that this streamlined bioreactor-based process could be adapted to effectively generate up-scaled cartilage grafts in a size with clinical relevance (50 mm diameter). Streamlined and robust tissue engineering processes, as the one described here, may be key for the future manufacturing of grafts for clinical applications, as they facilitate the establishment of compact and closed bioreactor-based production systems, with minimal automation requirements, lower operating costs, and increased compliance to regulatory guidelines.

  10. Identification and clonal characterisation of a progenitor cell sub-population in normal human articular cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Williams

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Articular cartilage displays a poor repair capacity. The aim of cell-based therapies for cartilage defects is to repair damaged joint surfaces with a functional replacement tissue. Currently, chondrocytes removed from a healthy region of the cartilage are used but they are unable to retain their phenotype in expanded culture. The resulting repair tissue is fibrocartilaginous rather than hyaline, potentially compromising long-term repair. Mesenchymal stem cells, particularly bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC, are of interest for cartilage repair due to their inherent replicative potential. However, chondrocyte differentiated BMSCs display an endochondral phenotype, that is, can terminally differentiate and form a calcified matrix, leading to failure in long-term defect repair. Here, we investigate the isolation and characterisation of a human cartilage progenitor population that is resident within permanent adult articular cartilage. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Human articular cartilage samples were digested and clonal populations isolated using a differential adhesion assay to fibronectin. Clonal cell lines were expanded in growth media to high population doublings and karyotype analysis performed. We present data to show that this cell population demonstrates a restricted differential potential during chondrogenic induction in a 3D pellet culture system. Furthermore, evidence of high telomerase activity and maintenance of telomere length, characteristic of a mesenchymal stem cell population, were observed in this clonal cell population. Lastly, as proof of principle, we carried out a pilot repair study in a goat in vivo model demonstrating the ability of goat cartilage progenitors to form a cartilage-like repair tissue in a chondral defect. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, we propose that we have identified and characterised a novel cartilage progenitor population resident in human articular cartilage which will greatly benefit future cell

  11. Mechanical properties of the normal human cartilage-bone complex in relation to age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Dalstra, M; Linde, F

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigates the age-related variations in the mechanical properties of the normal human tibial cartilage-bone complex and the relationships between cartilage and bone. DESIGN: A novel technique was applied to assess the mechanical properties of the cartilage and bone by means...... normal donors aged 16-83 years were tested in compression. The deformation was measured simultaneously in bone and cartilage to obtain the mechanical properties of both tissues. RESULTS: The stiffnesses and elastic energies of both cartilage and bone showed an initial increase, with maxima at 40 years......, followed by a steady decline. The viscoelastic energy was maximal at younger ages (16-29 years), followed by a steady decline. The energy absorption capacity did not vary with age. Stiffnesses and elastic energies were correlated significantly between cartilage and bone. CONCLUSIONS: The present study...

  12. Construction of tissue-engineered cartilage using human placenta-derived stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Human placenta-derived stem cells (hPDSCs) were isolated by trypsinization and further induced into cartilage cells in vitro.The engineered cartilage was constructed by combining hPDSCs with collagen sponge and the cartilage formation was observed by implantation into nude mice.Results showed that hPDSCs featured mesenchymal stem cells and maintained proliferation in vitro for over 30 passages while remaining undifferentiated.All results indicated that hPDSCs have the potential to differentiate into functional cartilage cells in vitro when combined with collagen sponge,which provided experimental evidence for prospective clinical application.

  13. Development and characterization of decellularized human nasoseptal cartilage matrix for use in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, M Elise; Gratzer, Paul F; Bezuhly, Michael; Hong, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Reconstruction of cartilage defects in the head and neck can require harvesting of autologous cartilage grafts, which can be associated with donor site morbidity. To overcome this limitation, tissue-engineering approaches may be used to generate cartilage grafts. The objective of this study was to decellularize and characterize human nasoseptal cartilage with the aim of generating a biological scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering. Laboratory study using nasoseptal cartilage. Remnant human nasoseptal cartilage specimens were collected and subjected to a novel decellularization treatment. The decellularization process involved several cycles of enzymatic detergent treatments. For characterization, decellularized and fresh (control) specimens underwent histological, biochemical, and mechanical analyses. Scanning electron microscopy and biocompatibility assay were also performed. The decellularization process had minimal effect on glycosaminoglycan content of the cartilage extracellular matrix. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) analysis revealed the near-complete removal of genomic DNA from decellularized tissues. The effectiveness of the decellularization process was also confirmed on histological and scanning electron microscopic analyses. Mechanical testing results showed that the structural integrity of the decellularized tissue was maintained, and biocompatibility was confirmed. Overall, the current decellularization treatment resulted in significant reduction of genetic/cellular material with preservation of the underlying extracellular matrix structure. This decellularized material may serve as a potential scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering. N/A. Laryngoscope, 126:2226-2231, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  14. Mechanical and biochemical mapping of human auricular cartilage for reliable assessment of tissue-engineered constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimeskern, Luc; Pleumeekers, Mieke M; Pawson, Duncan J; Koevoet, Wendy L M; Lehtoviita, Iina; Soyka, Michael B; Röösli, Christof; Holzmann, David; van Osch, Gerjo J V M; Müller, Ralph; Stok, Kathryn S

    2015-07-16

    It is key for successful auricular (AUR) cartilage tissue-engineering (TE) to ensure that the engineered cartilage mimics the mechanics of the native tissue. This study provides a spatial map of the mechanical and biochemical properties of human auricular cartilage, thus establishing a benchmark for the evaluation of functional competency in AUR cartilage TE. Stress-relaxation indentation (instantaneous modulus, Ein; maximum stress, σmax; equilibrium modulus, Eeq; relaxation half-life time, t1/2; thickness, h) and biochemical parameters (content of DNA; sulfated-glycosaminoglycan, sGAG; hydroxyproline, HYP; elastin, ELN) of fresh human AUR cartilage were evaluated. Samples were categorized into age groups and according to their harvesting region in the human auricle (for AUR cartilage only). AUR cartilage displayed significantly lower Ein, σmax, Eeq, sGAG content; and significantly higher t1/2, and DNA content than NAS cartilage. Large amounts of ELN were measured in AUR cartilage (>15% ELN content per sample wet mass). No effect of gender was observed for either auricular or nasoseptal samples. For auricular samples, significant differences between age groups for h, sGAG and HYP, and significant regional variations for Ein, σmax, Eeq, t1/2, h, DNA and sGAG were measured. However, only low correlations between mechanical and biochemical parameters were seen (Rbiochemical map of human auricular cartilage. Regional variations in mechanical and biochemical properties were demonstrated in the auricle. This finding highlights the importance of focusing future research on efforts to produce cartilage grafts with spatially tunable mechanics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Postnatal expression in hyaline cartilage of constitutively active human collagenase-3 (MMP-13) induces osteoarthritis in mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Neuhold, L A; Killar, L; Zhao, W; Sung, M L; Warner, L; Kulik, J; Turner, J; Wu, W; Billinghurst, C; Meijers, T; Poole, A R; Babij, P; DeGennaro, L J

    2001-01-01

    ...). We have used tetracycline-regulated transcription in conjunction with a cartilage-specific promoter to target a constitutively active human MMP-13 to the hyaline cartilages and joints of transgenic mice...

  16. Human articular cartilage: in vitro correlation of MRI and histologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhl, M.; Allmann, K.H.; Laubenberger, J.; Langer, M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital of Freiburg (Germany); Ihling, C.; Tauer, U.; Adler, C.P. [Department of Pathology, University Hospital of Freiburg (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    The aim of our study was to correlate MRI with histologic findings in normal and degenerative cartilage. Twenty-two human knees derived from patients undergoing amputation were examined with 1.0- and 1.5-T MR imaging units. Firstly, we optimized two fat-suppressed 3D gradient-echo sequences. In this pilot study two knees were examined with fast imaging with steady precession (FISP) sequences and fast low-angle shot (FLASH, SPGR) sequence by varying the flip angles (40, 60, 90 ) and combining each flip angle with different echo time (7, 10 or 11, 20 ms). We chose the sequences with the best visual contrast between the cartilage layers and the best measured contrast-to-noise ratio between cartilage and bone marrow. Therefore, we used a 3D FLASH fat-saturated sequence (TR/TE/flip angle = 50/11 ms/40 ) and a 3D FISP fat-saturated sequence (TR/TE/flip angle = 40/10 ms/40 ) for cartilage imaging in 22 human knees. The images were obtained at various angles of the patellar cartilage in relation to the main magnetic field (0, 55, 90 ). The MR appearances were classified into five categories: normal, intracartilaginous signal changes, diffuse thinning (cartilage thickness < 3 mm), superficial erosions, and cartilage ulcers. After imaging, the knees were examined macroscopically and photographed. In addition, we performed histologic studies using light microscopy with several different stainings, polarization, and dark field microscopy as well as electron microscopy. The structural characteristics with the cartilage lesions were correlated with the MR findings. We identified a hyperintense superficial zone in the MR image which did not correlate to the histologically identifiable superficial zone. The second lamina was hypointense on MRI and correlated to the bulk of the radial zone. The third (or deep) cartilage lamina in the MR image seemed to represent the combination of the lowest portion of the radial zone and the calcified cartilage. The width of the hypointense second

  17. Endogenous HLA-DR-restricted presentation of the cartilage antigens human cartilage gp-39 and melanoma inhibitory activity in the inflamed rheumatoid joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lierop, M. J. C.; den Hoed, L.; Houbiers, J.; Vencovsky, J.; Ruzickova, S.; Krystufkova, O.; van Schaardenburg, M.; van den Hoogen, F.; Vandooren, B.; Baeten, D.; De Keyser, F.; Sonderstrup, G.; Bos, E.; Boots, A. M.

    2007-01-01

    Objective. The cartilage proteins melanoma inhibitory activity (MIA) and human cartilage gp-39 (HC gp-39) are candidate autoantigens in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The present study was undertaken to investigate the endogenous HLA-DR4-restricted presentation of these self proteins, in order to seek i

  18. Cartilage integrity and proteoglycan turnover are comparable in canine experimentally induced and human joint degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Femke Intema

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The value of experimental models of osteoarthritis (OA largely depends on the ability to translate observations to human OA. Surprisingly, direct comparison of characteristics of human and experimental OA is scarce. In the present study, cartilage integrity and matrix turnover in a canine model of joint degeneration were compared to human clinical OA. In 23 Beagle dogs, joint degeneration was induced in one knee, the contra-lateral knee served as a control. For comparison, human osteoarthritic and healthy knee cartilage were obtained at arthroplasty (n=14 and post-mortem (n=13. Cartilage was analyzed by histology and biochemistry. Values for cartilage integrity and proteoglycan (PG synthesis showed species specific differences; GAG content of healthy cartilage was 2-fold higher in canine cartilage and PG synthesis even 8-fold. However, the relative decrease in PG content between healthy and OA cartilage was similar for humans and canines (-17% vs. -15%, respectively, as was the histological damage (+7.0 vs. +6.1, respectively and the increase of PG synthesis (+100% vs. +70%, respectively. Remarkably, the percentage release of total and of newly formed PGs in human and canine controls was similar, as was the increase due to degeneration (+65% vs. +81% and +91% vs. +52%, respectively. Despite differences in control conditions, the observed changes in characteristics of cartilage integrity and matrix turnover are similar in a canine model of joint degeneration and human clinical OA. The canine Groove model shows that its characteristics reflect those of human OA which makes the model appropriate for studying human OA.

  19. Nd:YAG 1.44 laser ablation of human cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Robert S.; Prodoehl, John A.; Rhodes, Anthony L.; Black, Johnathan D.; Sherk, Henry H.

    1993-07-01

    This study determined the effectiveness of a Neodymium:YAG 1.44 micrometers wavelength laser on human cartilage. This wavelength is strongly absorbed by water. Cadaveric meniscal fibrocartilage and articular hyaline cartilage were harvested and placed in normal saline during the study. A 600 micrometers quartz fiber was applied perpendicularly to the tissues with a force of 0.098 N. Quantitative measurements were then made of the ablation rate as a function of fluence. The laser energy was delivered at a constant repetition rate of 5 Hz., 650 microsecond(s) pulsewidth, and energy levels ranging from 0.5 joules to 2.0 joules. Following the ablation of the tissue, the specimens were fixed in formalin for histologic evaluation. The results of the study indicate that the ablation rate is 0.03 mm/mj/mm2 for hyaline cartilage and fibrocartilage. Fibrocartilage was cut at approximately the same rate as hyaline cartilage. There was a threshold fluence projected to be 987 mj/mm2 for hyaline cartilage and fibrocartilage. Our results indicate that the pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at 1.44 micrometers has a threshold fluence above which it will ablate human cartilage, and that its ablation rate is directly proportional to fluence over the range of parameters tested. Fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage demonstrated similar threshold fluence and ablation rates which is related to the high water content of these tissues.

  20. A comparison of healthy human and swine articular cartilage dynamic indentation mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronken, S; Arnold, M P; Ardura García, H; Jeger, A; Daniels, A U; Wirz, D

    2012-05-01

    Articular cartilage is a multicomponent, poroviscoelastic tissue with nonlinear mechanical properties vital to its function. A consequent goal of repair or replacement of injured cartilage is to achieve mechanical properties in the repair tissue similar to healthy native cartilage. Since fresh healthy human articular cartilage (HC) is not readily available, we tested whether swine cartilage (SC) could serve as a suitable substitute for mechanical comparisons. To a first approximation, cartilage tissue and surgical substitutes can be evaluated mechanically as viscoelastic materials. Stiffness measurements (dynamic modulus, loss angle) are vital to function and are also a non-destructive means of evaluation. Since viscoelastic material stiffness is strongly strain rate dependent, stiffness was tested under different loading conditions related to function. Stiffness of healthy HC and SC specimens was determined and compared using two non-destructive, mm-scale indentation test modes: fast impact and slow sinusoidal deformation. Deformation resistance (dynamic modulus) and energy handling (loss angle) were determined. For equivalent anatomic locations, there was no difference in dynamic modulus. However, the HC loss angle was ~35% lower in fast impact and ~12% higher in slow sinusoidal mode. Differences seem attributable to age (young SC, older HC) but also to species anatomy and biology. Test mode-related differences in human-swine loss angle support use of multiple function-related test modes. Keeping loss angle differences in mind, swine specimens could serve as a standard of comparison for mechanical evaluation of e.g. engineered cartilage or synthetic repair materials.

  1. A spectroscopic approach to imaging and quantification of cartilage lesions in human knee joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, A.; Sundqvist, T.; Kuiper, J.-H.; Öberg, P. Å.

    2011-03-01

    We have previously described a technology based on diffuse reflectance of broadband light for measuring joint articular cartilage thickness, utilizing that optical absorption is different in cartilage and subchondral bone. This study is the first evaluation of the technology in human material. We also investigated the prospects of cartilage lesion imaging, with the specific aim of arthroscopic integration. Cartilage thickness was studied ex vivo in a number of sites (n = 87) on human knee joint condyles, removed from nine patients during total knee replacement surgery. A reflectance spectrum was taken at each site and the cartilage thickness was estimated using the blue, green, red and near-infrared regions of the spectrum, respectively. Estimated values were compared with reference cartilage thickness values (taken after sample slicing) using an exponential model. Two-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations were performed in a theoretical analysis of the experimental results. The reference cartilage thickness of the investigated sites was 1.60 ± 1.30 mm (mean ± SD) in the range 0-4.2 mm. Highest correlation coefficients were seen for the calculations based on the near-infrared region after normalization to the red region (r = 0.86) and for the green region (r = 0.80).

  2. Hyaline cartilage formation and tumorigenesis of implanted tissues derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Taku; Yano, Fumiko; Mori, Daisuke; Kawata, Manabu; Hoshi, Kazuto; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Masaki, Hideki; Otsu, Makoto; Eto, Koji; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Chung, Ung-il; Tanaka, Sakae

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a promising cell source for cartilage regenerative medicine. Meanwhile, the risk of tumorigenesis should be considered in the clinical application of human iPSCs (hiPSCs). Here, we report in vitro chondrogenic differentiation of hiPSCs and maturation of the differentiated hiPSCs through transplantation into mouse knee joints. Three hiPSC clones showed efficient chondrogenic differentiation using an established protocol for human embryonic stem cells. The differentiated hiPSCs formed hyaline cartilage tissues at 8 weeks after transplantation into the articular cartilage of NOD/SCID mouse knee joints. Although tumors were not observed during the 8 weeks after transplantation, an immature teratoma had developed in one mouse at 16 weeks. In conclusion, hiPSCs are a potent cell source for regeneration of hyaline articular cartilage. However, the risk of tumorigenesis should be managed for clinical application in the future.

  3. Anisotropy, inhomogeneity, and tension-compression nonlinearity of human glenohumeral cartilage in finite deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chun-Yuh; Stankiewicz, Anna; Ateshian, Gerard A; Mow, Van C

    2005-04-01

    The tensile and compressive properties of human glenohumeral cartilage were determined by testing 120 rectangular strips in uniaxial tension and 70 cylindrical plugs in confined compression, obtained from five human glenohumeral joints. Specimens were harvested from five regions across the articular surface of the humeral head and two regions on the glenoid. Tensile strips were obtained along two orientations, parallel and perpendicular to the split-line directions. Two serial slices through the thickness, corresponding to the superficial and middle zones of the cartilage layers, were prepared from each tensile strip and each compressive plug. The equilibrium tensile modulus and compressive aggregate modulus of cartilage were determined from the uniaxial tensile and confined compression tests, respectively. Significant differences in the tensile moduli were found with depth and orientation relative to the local split-line direction. Articular cartilage of the humeral head was significantly stiffer in tension than that of the glenoid. There were significant differences in the aggregate compressive moduli of articular cartilage between superficial and middle zones in the humeral head. Furthermore, tensile and compressive stress-strain responses exhibited nonlinearity under finite strain, while the tensile modulus differed by up to two orders of magnitude from the compressive aggregate modulus at 0% strain, demonstrating a high degree of tension-compression nonlinearity. The complexity of the mechanical properties of human glenohumeral cartilage was exposed in this study, showing anisotropy, inhomogeneity, and tension-compression nonlinearity within the same joint. The observed differences in the tensile properties of human glenohumeral cartilage suggest that the glenoid may be more susceptible to cartilage degeneration than the humeral head.

  4. Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Engraft into Rabbit Articular Cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are known to have the potential for articular cartilage regeneration, and are suggested for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA. Here, we investigated whether intra-articular injection of xenogeneic human adipose-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells (haMPCs promoted articular cartilage repair in rabbit OA model and engrafted into rabbit articular cartilage. The haMPCs were cultured in vitro, and phenotypes and differentiation characteristics of cells were evaluated. OA was induced surgically by anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT and medical meniscectomy of knee joints. At six weeks following surgery, hyaluronic acid (HA or haMPCs was injected into the knee joints, the contralateral knee served as normal control. All animals were sacrificed at the 16th week post-surgery. Assessments were carried out by macroscopic examination, hematoxylin/eosin (HE and Safranin-O/Fast green stainings and immunohistochemistry. The data showed that haMPC treatment promoted cartilage repair. Signals of human mitochondrial can be directly detected in haMPC treated cartilage. The haMPCs expressed human leukocyte antigen I (HLA-I but not HLA-II-DR in vivo. These results suggest that intra-articular injection of haMPCs promotes regeneration of articular cartilage in rabbit OA model, and support the notion that MPCs are transplantable between HLA-incompatible individuals.

  5. Fourier transform infrared imaging of focal lesions in Human osteoarthritic cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David-Vaudey E.

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging (FTIRI is a new method for quantitatively assessing the spatial-chemical composition of complex materials. This technique has been applied to examine the feasibility of measuring changes in the composition and distribution of collagen and proteoglycan macromolecules in human osteoarthritic cartilage. Human cartilage was acquired post-operatively from total joint replacement patients. Samples were taken at the site of a focal lesion, adjacent to the lesion, and from relatively healthy cartilage away from the lesion. Sections were prepared for FTIRI and histochemical grading. FTIRI spectral images were acquired for the superficial, intermediate, and deep layers for each sample. Euclidean distance mapping and quantitative partial least squares analysis (PLS were performed using reference spectra for type-II collagen and chondroitin 6-sulphate (CS6. FTIRI results were correlated to the histology-based Mankin scoring system. PLS analysis found relatively low relative concentrations of collagen (38 ± 10% and proteoglycan (22 ± 9% in osteoarthritic cartilage. Focal lesions were generally found to contain less CS6 compared to cartilage tissue adjacent to the lesion. Loss of proteoglycan content was well correlated to histological Mankin scores (r=0.69, p<0.0008. The evaluation of biological tissues with FTIRI can provide unique quantitative information on how disease can affect biochemical distribution and composition. This study has demonstrated that FTIRI is useful in quantitatively assessing pathology-related changes in the composition and distribution of primary macromolecular components of human osteoarthritic cartilage.

  6. Expression of NGF, Trka and p75 in human cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Gigante

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Nerve growth factor (NGF exerts its action through two types of receptor: high-affinity tyrosine kinase A receptor (trkA and low-affinity p75 receptor. NGF has a neurotrophic role in central and peripheral nervous system development, but there is also clear evidence of its involvement in the developing skeleton. The aim of the present immunohistochemical study was to investigate the expression and distribution of NGF, trkA, and p75 in normal cartilaginous tissues from adult subjects: articular and meniscal cartilage of the knee, cartilage from the epiglottis, and intervertebral disc tissue. Detection of NGF mRNA was also performed by in situ hybridization. Immunoreaction for NGF and the two receptors in articular chondrocytes, chondrocyte-like cells of meniscus and annulus fibrosus, and chondrocytes of the epiglottis demonstrated that they are all expressed in hyaline, fibrous and elastic cartilaginous tissues, suggesting that they could be involved in cartilage physio-pathology.

  7. Cartilage tissue engineering using pre-aggregated human articular chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Wolf

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we first aimed at determining whether human articular chondrocytes (HAC proliferate in aggregates in the presence of strong chondrocyte mitogens. We then investigated if the aggregated cells have an enhanced chondrogenic capacity as compared to cells cultured in monolayer. HAC from four donors were cultured in tissue culture dishes either untreated or coated with 1% agarose in the presence of TGFb-1, FGF-2 and PDGF-BB. Proliferation and stage of differentiation were assessed by measuring respectively DNA contents and type II collagen mRNA. Expanded cells were induced to differentiate in pellets or in Hyaff®-11 meshes and the formed tissues were analysed biochemically for glycosaminoglycans (GAG and DNA, and histologically by Safranin O staining. The amount of DNA in aggregate cultures increased significantly from day 2 to day 6 (by 3.2-fold, but did not further increase with additional culture time. Expression of type II collagen mRNA was about two orders of magnitude higher in aggregated HAC as compared to monolayer expanded cells. Pellets generated by aggregated HAC were generally more intensely stained for GAG than those generated by monolayer-expanded cells. Scaffolds seeded with aggregates accumulated more GAG (1.3-fold than scaffolds seeded with monolayer expanded HAC. In conclusion, this study showed that HAC culture in aggregates does not support a relevant degree of expansion. However, aggregation of expanded HAC prior to loading into a porous scaffold enhances the quality of the resulting tissues and could thus be introduced as an intermediate culture phase in the manufacture of engineered cartilage grafts.

  8. Synthesis of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 in vitro in human articular cartilage cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eviatar, Tamar; Kauffman, Hannah; Maroudas, Alice

    2003-02-01

    To quantify the rate of synthesis of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) by in vitro cultures of normal and osteoarthritic (OA) human articular cartilage. Levels of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 in media from in vitro cultures of human cartilage were determined by radioimmunoassay (RIA). IGFBPs were characterized by immunoblots and ligand blots. Ultrafiltration and RIA analysis of synovial fluid (SF) samples and washings of cartilage samples ex vivo were used to calculate partition coefficients and to estimate the amount of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 in cartilage in vivo. OA cartilage synthesized 150 ng of IGFBP-3 per gm of cartilage per day, compared with 50 ng synthesized by normal cartilage. The surface zone of normal cartilage produced more IGFBP-3 than did the deep zone. Immunoblots and ligand blots confirmed the presence of IGFBP-3. IGFBP-3 synthesis was stimulated by exogenous IGF-1. No freshly synthesized IGF-1 was detected. The quantities of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 present ex vivo were 11.3 and 78.7 ng/gm of cartilage in normal cartilage and 21.6 and 225.4 ng/gm in OA cartilage. The results show that while IGFBP-3 is synthesized in explant cultures, IGF-1 is not. The rate of IGFBP-3 synthesis is 3 times higher in OA than in normal cartilage. Both IGFBP-3 and IGF-1 penetrate into cartilage from SF in vivo. We estimate that the quantities of IGFBP-3 produced in culture by human cartilage are small compared with the amount supplied in the form of "small complexes" from the circulation. The high value of the partition coefficient of IGFBP-3 implies binding to the matrix.

  9. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry-based molecular distribution distinguishing healthy and osteoarthritic human cartilage

    CERN Document Server

    Cillero-Pastor, Berta; Kiss, Andras; Blanco, Francisco J; Heeren, Ron M A

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a pathology that ultimately causes joint destruction. The cartilage is one of the principal affected tissues. Alterations in the lipid mediators and an imbalance in the metabolism of cells that form the cartilage (chondrocytes) have been described as contributors to the OA development. In this study, we have studied the distribution of lipids and chemical elements in healthy and OA human cartilage. Time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) allows us to study the spatial distribution of molecules at a high resolution on a tissue section. TOF-SIMS revealed a specific peak profile that distinguishes healthy from OA cartilages. The spatial distribution of cholesterol-related peaks exhibited a remarkable difference between healthy and OA cartilages. A distinctive colocalization of cholesterol and other lipids in the superficial area of the cartilage was found. A higher intensity of oleic acid and other fatty acids in the OA cartilages exhibited a similar localization. On the ...

  10. Latent Transforming Growth Factor-beta1 Functionalised Electrospun Scaffolds Promote Human Cartilage Differentiation: Towards an Engineered Cartilage Construct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erh-Hsuin Lim

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundTo overcome the potential drawbacks of a short half-life and dose-related adverse effects of using active transforming growth factor-beta 1 for cartilage engineering, a cell-mediated latent growth factor activation strategy was developed incorporating latent transforming growth factor-β1 (LTGF into an electrospun poly(L-lactide scaffold.MethodsThe electrospun scaffold was surface modified with NH3 plasma and biofunctionalised with LTGF to produce both random and orientated biofunctionalised electrospun scaffolds. Scaffold surface chemical analysis and growth factor bioavailability assays were performed. In vitro biocompatibility and human nasal chondrocyte gene expression with these biofunctionalised electrospun scaffold templates were assessed. In vivo chondrogenic activity and chondrocyte gene expression were evaluated in athymic rats.ResultsChemical analysis demonstrated that LTGF anchored to the scaffolds was available for enzymatic, chemical and cell activation. The biofunctionalised scaffolds were non-toxic. Gene expression suggested chondrocyte re-differentiation after 14 days in culture. By 6 weeks, the implanted biofunctionalised scaffolds had induced highly passaged chondrocytes to re-express Col2A1 and produce type II collagen.ConclusionsWe have demonstrated a proof of concept for cell-mediated activation of anchored growth factors using a novel biofunctionalised scaffold in cartilage engineering. This presents a platform for development of protein delivery systems and for tissue engineering.

  11. X-ray dark field imaging of human articular cartilage: Possible clinical application to orthopedic surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunisada, Toshiyuki [Department of Medical Materials for Musculoskeletal Reconstruction, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan)], E-mail: toshi-kunisada@umin.ac.jp; Shimao, Daisuke [Department of Radiological Sciences, Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Sciences, Ibaraki 300-2394 (Japan); Sugiyama, Hiroshi [Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Takeda, Ken; Ozaki, Toshifumi [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Ando, Masami [Research Institute for Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)

    2008-12-15

    Despite its convenience and non-invasiveness on daily clinical use, standard X-ray radiography cannot show articular cartilage. We developed a novel type of X-ray dark field imaging (DFI), which forms images only by a refracted beam with very low background illumination. We examined a disarticulated distal femur and a shoulder joint with surrounding soft tissue and skin, both excised from a human cadaver at the BL20B2 synchrotron beamline at SPring-8. The field was 90 mm wide and 90 mm high. Articular cartilage of the disarticulated distal femur was obvious on DFI, but not on standard X-ray images. Furthermore, DFI allowed visualization in situ of articular cartilage of the shoulder while covered with soft tissue and skin. The gross appearance of the articular cartilage on the dissected section of the proximal humerus was identical to the cartilage shown on the DFI image. These results suggested that DFI could provide a clinically accurate method of assessing articular cartilage. Hence, DFI would be a useful imaging tool for diagnosing joint disease such as osteoarthritis.

  12. Analysis of human knee osteoarthritic cartilage using polarization sensitive second harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Grønhaug, Kirsten M.; Romijn, Elisabeth I.; Drogset, Jon O.; Lilledahl, Magnus B.

    2014-05-01

    Osteoarthritis is one of the most prevalent joint diseases in the world. Although the cause of osteoarthritis is not exactly clear, the disease results in a degradation of the quality of the articular cartilage including collagen and other extracellular matrix components. We have investigated alterations in the structure of collagen fibers in the cartilage tissue of the human knee using mulitphoton microscopy. Due to inherent high nonlinear susceptibility, ordered collagen fibers present in the cartilage tissue matrix produces strong second harmonic generation (SHG) signals. Significant morphological differences are found in different Osteoarthritic grades of cartilage by SHG microscopy. Based on the polarization analysis of the SHG signal, we find that a few locations of hyaline cartilage (mainly type II collagen) is being replaced by fibrocartilage (mainly type I cartilage), in agreement with earlier literature. To locate the different types and quantify the alteration in the structure of collagen fiber, we employ polarization-SHG microscopic analysis, also referred to as _-tensor imaging. The image analysis of p-SHG image obtained by excitation polarization measurements would represent different tissue constituents with different numerical values at pixel level resolution.

  13. YKL-40, a mammalian member of the chitinase family, is a matrix protein of specific granules in human neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volck, B; Price, P A; Johansen, J S;

    1998-01-01

    YKL-40, also called human cartilage glycoprotein-39 (HC gp-39), is a member of family 18 glycosyl hydrolases. YKL-40 is secreted by chondrocytes, synovial cells, and macrophages, and recently it has been reported that YKL-40 has a role as an autoantigen in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The function...... of YKL-40 is unknown, but the pattern of its expression in normal and disease states suggests that it could function in remodeling or degradation of the extracellular matrix. High levels of YKL-40 are found in synovial fluid from patients with active RA. Neutrophils are abundant in synovial fluid...

  14. 3D Human cartilage surface characterization by optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brill, Nicolai; Riedel, Jörn; Schmitt, Robert; Tingart, Markus; Truhn, Daniel; Pufe, Thomas; Jahr, Holger; Nebelung, Sven

    2015-10-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of cartilage degeneration is of high clinical interest. Loss of surface integrity is considered one of the earliest and most reliable signs of degeneration, but cannot currently be evaluated objectively. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is an arthroscopically available light-based non-destructive real-time imaging technology that allows imaging at micrometre resolutions to millimetre depths. As OCT-based surface evaluation standards remain to be defined, the present study investigated the diagnostic potential of 3D surface profile parameters in the comprehensive evaluation of cartilage degeneration. To this end, 45 cartilage samples of different degenerative grades were obtained from total knee replacements (2 males, 10 females; mean age 63.8 years), cut to standard size and imaged using a spectral-domain OCT device (Thorlabs, Germany). 3D OCT datasets of 8  ×  8, 4  ×  4 and 1  ×  1 mm (width  ×  length) were obtained and pre-processed (image adjustments, morphological filtering). Subsequent automated surface identification algorithms were used to obtain the 3D primary profiles, which were then filtered and processed using established algorithms employing ISO standards. The 3D surface profile thus obtained was used to calculate a set of 21 3D surface profile parameters, i.e. height (e.g. Sa), functional (e.g. Sk), hybrid (e.g. Sdq) and segmentation-related parameters (e.g. Spd). Samples underwent reference histological assessment according to the Degenerative Joint Disease classification. Statistical analyses included calculation of Spearman’s rho and assessment of inter-group differences using the Kruskal Wallis test. Overall, the majority of 3D surface profile parameters revealed significant degeneration-dependent differences and correlations with the exception of severe end-stage degeneration and were of distinct diagnostic value in the assessment of surface integrity. None of the 3D

  15. In situ measurements of human articular cartilage stiffness by means of a scanning force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imer, Raphael [Institute of Microtechnology, University of Neuchatel, Jaquet-Droz 1, 2007 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Akiyama, Terunobu [Institute of Microtechnology, University of Neuchatel, Jaquet-Droz 1, 2007 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Rooij, Nico F de [Institute of Microtechnology, University of Neuchatel, Jaquet-Droz 1, 2007 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Stolz, Martin [Maurice E. Mueller Institute, University of Basel, Klingelbergstr. 70, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Aebi, Ueli [Maurice E. Mueller Institute, University of Basel, Klingelbergstr. 70, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Kilger, Robert [Clinics for Orthopedic Surgery and Traumatology, Kantonsspital, 4101 Bruderholz (Switzerland); Friederich, Niklaus F [Clinics for Orthopedic Surgery and Traumatology, Kantonsspital, 4101 Bruderholz (Switzerland); Wirz, Dieter [Lab. for Orthopaedic Biomechanics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstr. 50-70, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Daniels, A U [Lab. for Orthopaedic Biomechanics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstr. 50-70, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Staufer, Urs [Institute of Microtechnology, University of Neuchatel, Jaquet-Droz 1, 2007 Neuchatel (Switzerland)

    2007-03-15

    Osteoarthritis is a painful and disabling progressive joint disease, characterized by degradation of articular cartilage. In order to study this disease at early stages, we have miniaturized and integrated a complete scanning force microscope into a standard arthroscopic device fitting through a standard orthopedic canula. This instrument will allow orthopedic surgeons to measure the mechanical properties of articular cartilage at the nanometer and micrometer scale in-vivo during a standard arthroscopy. An orthopedic surgeon assessed the handling of the instrument. First measurements of the elasticity-modulus of human cartilage were recorded in a cadaver knee non minimal invasive. Second, minimally invasive experiments were performed using arthroscopic instruments. Load-displacement curves were successfully recorded.

  16. Regeneration of human-ear-shaped cartilage by co-culturing human microtia chondrocytes with BMSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; He, Aijuan; Yin, Zongqi; Yu, Zheyuan; Luo, Xusong; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Wenjie; Cao, Yilin; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Guangdong

    2014-06-01

    Previously, we had addressed the issues of shape control/maintenance of in vitro engineered human-ear-shaped cartilage. Thus, lack of applicable cell source had become a major concern that blocks clinical translation of this technology. Autologous microtia chondrocytes (MCs) and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were both promising chondrogenic cells that did not involve obvious donor site morbidity. However, limited cell availability of MCs and ectopic ossification of chondrogenically induced BMSCs in subcutaneous environment greatly restricted their applications in external ear reconstruction. The current study demonstrated that MCs possessed strong proliferation ability but accompanied with rapid loss of chondrogenic ability during passage, indicating a poor feasibility to engineer the entire ear using expanded MCs. Fortunately, the co-transplantation results of MCs and BMSCs (25% MCs and 75% BMSCs) demonstrated a strong chondroinductive ability of MCs to promote stable ectopic chondrogenesis of BMSCs in subcutaneous environment. Moreover, cell labeling demonstrated that BMSCs could transform into chondrocyte-like cells under the chondrogenic niche provided by co-cultured MCs. Most importantly, a human-ear-shaped cartilaginous tissue with delicate structure and proper elasticity was successfully constructed by seeding the mixed cells (MCs and BMSCs) into the pre-shaped biodegradable ear-scaffold followed by 12 weeks of subcutaneous implantation in nude mouse. These results may provide a promising strategy to construct stable ectopic cartilage with MCs and stem cells (BMSCs) for autologous external ear reconstruction.

  17. Human conchal cartilage and temporal fascia: an evidence-based roadmap from rhinoplasty to an in vivo study and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimpean, Anca Maria; Crăiniceanu, Zorin; Mihailovici, Dorina; Bratu, Tiberiu; Raica, Marius

    2014-01-01

    Conchal cartilage or cartilage/ temporal fascia composite grafting (DC-F) used for rhinoplasty is applied by plastic surgeons for reconstructive purposes. Previous studies on experimental models such as mice or rabbits have elucidated on the late events following grafting, with tissue specimens being harvested two months after implantation. Early microscopic and molecular events following DC-F grafting are completely unknown. We designed a chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane model for human grafts study, regarding the dynamic observation of graft survival and its mutual interrelation with the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane microenvironment. The DC-F graft preserved its cartilage component in a normal state compared to cartilage graft-only because of protective factors provided by temporal fascia. Its strong adherence to the cartilage, lack of angiogenic factors and high content of collagen IV-derived fragments with anti-angiogenic effects make the temporal fascia a good protective tissue to prevent implanted cartilage degeneration. The cartilage graft produced high inflammation, stromal fibrosis and activated angiogenic cascade through VEGF-mediated pathways followed by cartilage degeneration. Also, high content of podoplanin from conchal cartilage chondrocytes exerted a major role in inflammation accompanying cartilage graft. The presently employed experimental model allowed us to characterize the early histological and molecular events triggered by temporal fascia, cartilage or composite graft DC-F implanted on chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane. Our microscopic and molecular observations may help explain some post-surgical complications generated after using cartilage alone as biomaterial for nasal augmentation, supporting the use of DC-F composite graft, with the aim to reduce unwanted post-surgical events. Copyright © 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  18. Projection Stereolithographic Fabrication of Human Adipose Stem Cell-incorporated Biodegradable Scaffolds for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron X Sun

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Poor self-healing ability of cartilage necessitates the development of methods for cartilage regeneration. Scaffold construction with live stem cell incorporation and subsequent differentiation presents a promising route. Projection stereolithography (PSL offers high resolution and processing speed as well as the ability to fabricate scaffolds that precisely fit the anatomy of cartilage defects using medical imaging as the design template. We report here the use of a visible-light based PSL (VL-PSL system to encapsulate human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs into a biodegradable polymer (poly-D,L-lactic acid/polyethylene glycol/ poly-D,L-lactic acid (PDLLA-PEG/hyaluronic acid (HA matrix to produce live cell constructs with customized architectures. After fabrication, hASCs showed high viability (84% and were uniformly distributed throughout the constructs, which possessed high mechanical property with a compressive modulus of 780 kPa. The hASC-seeded constructs were then cultured in Control or TGF-β3-containing chondrogenic medium for up to 28 days. In chondrogenic medium treated group (TGF-β3 group hASCs maintained 77% viability and expressed chondrogenic genes Sox9, collagen type II, and aggrecan at 11, 232, and 2.29 x 10(5 fold increases, respectively, compared to levels at day 0 in non-chondrogenic medium. The TGF-β3 group also produced a collagen type II and glycosaminoglycan (GAG-rich extracellular matrix, detected by immunohistochemistry, and Alcian blue and Safranin O staining suggesting robust chondrogenesis within the scaffold. Without chondroinductive addition (Control group, cell viability decreased with time (65% at 28 days and showed poor cartilage matrix deposition. After 28 days, mechanical strength of the TGF-β3 group remained high at 240 kPa. Thus, the PSL- and PLLA-PEG/HA based fabrication method using adult stem cells is a promising approach in producing mechanically competent engineered cartilage for joint cartilage

  19. Effect of Human Adipose Tissue Mesenchymal Stem Cells on the Regeneration of Ovine Articular Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Alessandro R; Amstalden, Eliane M I; Plepis, Ana Maria G; Martins, Virginia C A; Ferretti, Mario; Antonioli, Eliane; Duarte, Adriana S S; Luzo, Angela C M; Miranda, João B

    2015-11-09

    Cell therapy is a promising approach to improve cartilage healing. Adipose tissue is an abundant and readily accessible cell source. Previous studies have demonstrated good cartilage repair results with adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells in small animal experiments. This study aimed to examine these cells in a large animal model. Thirty knees of adult sheep were randomly allocated to three treatment groups: CELLS (scaffold seeded with human adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells), SCAFFOLD (scaffold without cells), or EMPTY (untreated lesions). A partial thickness defect was created in the medial femoral condyle. After six months, the knees were examined according to an adaptation of the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS 1) score, in addition to a new Partial Thickness Model scale and the ICRS macroscopic score. All of the animals completed the follow-up period. The CELLS group presented with the highest ICRS 1 score (8.3 ± 3.1), followed by the SCAFFOLD group (5.6 ± 2.2) and the EMPTY group (5.2 ± 2.4) (p = 0.033). Other scores were not significantly different. These results suggest that human adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells promoted satisfactory cartilage repair in the ovine model.

  20. Standardized butanol fraction of WIN-34B suppresses cartilage destruction via inhibited production of matrix metalloproteinase and inflammatory mediator in osteoarthritis human cartilage explants culture and chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huh Jeong-Eun

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background WIN-34B is a novel Oriental medicine, which represents the n-butanol fraction prepared from dried flowers of Lonicera japonica Thunb and dried roots of Anemarrhena asphodeloides BUNGE. The component herb of WIN-34B is used for arthritis treatment in East Asian countries. The aim of this study was to determine the cartilage-protective effects and mechanisms of WIN-34B and its major phenolic compounds, chlorogenic acid and mangiferin, in osteoarthritis (OA human cartilage explants culture and chondrocytes. Methods The investigation focused on whether WIN-34B and its standard compounds protected cartilage in interleukin (IL-1β-stimulated cartilage explants culture and chondrocytes derived from OA patients. Also, the mechanisms of WIN-34B on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs, inflammatory mediators, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs pathways were assessed. Results WIN-34B was not cytotoxic to cultured cartilage explants or chondrocytes. WIN-34B dose-dependently inhibited the release of glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen, increased the mRNA expression of aggrecan and type II collagen, and recovered the intensity of proteoglycan and collagen by histological analysis in IL-1β-stimulated human cartilage explants culture. The cartilage protective effect of WIN-34B was similar to or better than that of chlorogenic acid and mangiferin. Compared to chlorogenic acid and mangiferin, WIN-34B displayed equal or greater decreases in the levels of MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-13, ADAMTS-4, and ADAMTS-5, and markedly up-regulated TIMP-1 and TIMP-3. WIN-34B inhibited inflammatory mediators involved in cartilage destruction, such as prostaglandin E2, nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and IL-1β. The phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, and p38 was significantly reduced by WIN-34B treatment, while phosphorylation of JNK was only

  1. Standardized butanol fraction of WIN-34B suppresses cartilage destruction via inhibited production of matrix metalloproteinase and inflammatory mediator in osteoarthritis human cartilage explants culture and chondrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background WIN-34B is a novel Oriental medicine, which represents the n-butanol fraction prepared from dried flowers of Lonicera japonica Thunb and dried roots of Anemarrhena asphodeloides BUNGE. The component herb of WIN-34B is used for arthritis treatment in East Asian countries. The aim of this study was to determine the cartilage-protective effects and mechanisms of WIN-34B and its major phenolic compounds, chlorogenic acid and mangiferin, in osteoarthritis (OA) human cartilage explants culture and chondrocytes. Methods The investigation focused on whether WIN-34B and its standard compounds protected cartilage in interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated cartilage explants culture and chondrocytes derived from OA patients. Also, the mechanisms of WIN-34B on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs), inflammatory mediators, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathways were assessed. Results WIN-34B was not cytotoxic to cultured cartilage explants or chondrocytes. WIN-34B dose-dependently inhibited the release of glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen, increased the mRNA expression of aggrecan and type II collagen, and recovered the intensity of proteoglycan and collagen by histological analysis in IL-1β-stimulated human cartilage explants culture. The cartilage protective effect of WIN-34B was similar to or better than that of chlorogenic acid and mangiferin. Compared to chlorogenic acid and mangiferin, WIN-34B displayed equal or greater decreases in the levels of MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-13, ADAMTS-4, and ADAMTS-5, and markedly up-regulated TIMP-1 and TIMP-3. WIN-34B inhibited inflammatory mediators involved in cartilage destruction, such as prostaglandin E2, nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and IL-1β. The phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 was significantly reduced by WIN-34B treatment, while phosphorylation of JNK was only inhibited by chlorogenic

  2. Volumetric characterization of human patellar cartilage matrix on phase contrast x-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, Anas Z.; Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Checefsky, Walter A.; Coan, Paola; Diemoz, Paul C.; Hobbs, Susan K.; Huber, Markus B.; Wismüller, Axel

    2015-03-01

    Phase contrast X-ray computed tomography (PCI-CT) has recently emerged as a novel imaging technique that allows visualization of cartilage soft tissue, subsequent examination of chondrocyte patterns, and their correlation to osteoarthritis. Previous studies have shown that 2D texture features are effective at distinguishing between healthy and osteoarthritic regions of interest annotated in the radial zone of cartilage matrix on PCI-CT images. In this study, we further extend the texture analysis to 3D and investigate the ability of volumetric texture features at characterizing chondrocyte patterns in the cartilage matrix for purposes of classification. Here, we extracted volumetric texture features derived from Minkowski Functionals and gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) from 496 volumes of interest (VOI) annotated on PCI-CT images of human patellar cartilage specimens. The extracted features were then used in a machine-learning task involving support vector regression to classify ROIs as healthy or osteoarthritic. Classification performance was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). The best classification performance was observed with GLCM features correlation (AUC = 0.83 +/- 0.06) and homogeneity (AUC = 0.82 +/- 0.07), which significantly outperformed all Minkowski Functionals (p GLCM-derived statistical features can distinguish between healthy and osteoarthritic tissue with high accuracy.

  3. Reconstruction of Hyaline Cartilage Deep Layer Properties in 3-Dimensional Cultures of Human Articular Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanduri, Vibudha; Tattikota, Surendra Mohan; T, Avinash Raj; Sriramagiri, Vijaya Rama Rao; Kantipudi, Suma; Pande, Gopal

    2014-06-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) injuries and malformations are commonly noticed because of trauma or age-related degeneration. Many methods have been adopted for replacing or repairing the damaged tissue. Currently available AC repair methods, in several cases, fail to yield good-quality long-lasting results, perhaps because the reconstructed tissue lacks the cellular and matrix properties seen in hyaline cartilage (HC). To reconstruct HC tissue from 2-dimensional (2D) and 3-dimensional (3D) cultures of AC-derived human chondrocytes that would specifically exhibit the cellular and biochemical properties of the deep layer of HC. Descriptive laboratory study. Two-dimensional cultures of human AC-derived chondrocytes were established in classical medium (CM) and newly defined medium (NDM) and maintained for a period of 6 weeks. These cells were suspended in 2 mm-thick collagen I gels, placed in 24-well culture inserts, and further cultured up to 30 days. Properties of chondrocytes, grown in 2D cultures and the reconstructed 3D cartilage tissue, were studied by optical and scanning electron microscopic techniques, immunohistochemistry, and cartilage-specific gene expression profiling by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and were compared with those of the deep layer of native human AC. Two-dimensional chondrocyte cultures grown in NDM, in comparison with those grown in CM, showed more chondrocyte-specific gene activity and matrix properties. The NDM-grown chondrocytes in 3D cultures also showed better reproduction of deep layer properties of HC, as confirmed by microscopic and gene expression analysis. The method used in this study can yield cartilage tissue up to approximately 1.6 cm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness that satisfies the very low cell density and matrix composition properties present in the deep layer of normal HC. This study presents a novel and reproducible method for long-term culture of AC-derived chondrocytes and reconstruction of cartilage

  4. Fetal mesenchymal stromal cells differentiating towards chondrocytes acquire a gene expression profile resembling human growth plate cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy A van Gool

    Full Text Available We used human fetal bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hfMSCs differentiating towards chondrocytes as an alternative model for the human growth plate (GP. Our aims were to study gene expression patterns associated with chondrogenic differentiation to assess whether chondrocytes derived from hfMSCs are a suitable model for studying the development and maturation of the GP. hfMSCs efficiently formed hyaline cartilage in a pellet culture in the presence of TGFβ3 and BMP6. Microarray and principal component analysis were applied to study gene expression profiles during chondrogenic differentiation. A set of 232 genes was found to correlate with in vitro cartilage formation. Several identified genes are known to be involved in cartilage formation and validate the robustness of the differentiating hfMSC model. KEGG pathway analysis using the 232 genes revealed 9 significant signaling pathways correlated with cartilage formation. To determine the progression of growth plate cartilage formation, we compared the gene expression profile of differentiating hfMSCs with previously established expression profiles of epiphyseal GP cartilage. As differentiation towards chondrocytes proceeds, hfMSCs gradually obtain a gene expression profile resembling epiphyseal GP cartilage. We visualized the differences in gene expression profiles as protein interaction clusters and identified many protein clusters that are activated during the early chondrogenic differentiation of hfMSCs showing the potential of this system to study GP development.

  5. Changes in the stiffness of the human tibial cartilage-bone complex in early-stage osteoarthrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Dalstra, M; Linde, F

    1998-01-01

    Cylindrical human tibial cartilage-bone unit specimens were removed from 9 early-stage medial osteoarthrotic (OA) tibiae (mean age 74 years) and 10 normal age-matched tibiae (mean age 73 years). These specimens were divided into 4 groups: OA, lateral comparison, medial age-matched, and lateral ag...... and bone remained significant in the three control groups. Our findings suggest that both cartilage and bone in early-stage OA are mechanically inferior to normal, and that OA cartilage and bone have lost their unit function to mechanical loading....

  6. Expression of caspase-3 and -9 relevant to cartilage destruction and chondrocyte apoptosis in human osteoarthritic cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsuo M

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available To clarify the involvement of the caspase family in the pathway of NO-induced chondrocyte apoptosis, osteoarthritis (OA cartilage obtained from 8 patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty were used for histopathological study. Cartilage samples taken from non-fibrillated areas of femoral head resected during surgery for femoral neck fracture were used for comparison. DNA fragmentation of chondrocytes was detected by the nick end-labeling (TUNEL method. Apoptosis was further confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. The distributions of nitrotyrosine (NT, caspase-3, and -9 were examined immunohistochemically. The populations of apoptotic as well as NT-, caspase-3-, and -9-positive cells were quantified by counting the number of cells in the superficial, middle, and deep layers, respectively. The TUNEL-positive cells were observed primarily in superficial proliferating chondrocytes, clustering chondrocytes, and deep-layer chondrocytes of OA cartilage. Few positive cells were seen in the proliferating chondrocytes in the middle layer. Positive reactions for caspase-3 and -9 were observed in chondrocytes in similar areas. Histological OA grade showed significant correlations with the mean populations of apoptotic chondrocytes (% apoptosis over the 3 areas. The populations of NT-positive cells (% NT over the same areas also showed significant correlation with OA grade. Positivity for caspase-3 closely correlated with the OA grade, % apoptosis and %NT. It was concluded that caspase-3 and -9 could play a role in NO-induced chondrocyte apoptosis in OA cartilage.

  7. Electromechanical Assessment of Human Knee Articular Cartilage with Compression-Induced Streaming Potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becher, Christoph; Ricklefs, Marcel; Willbold, Elmar; Hurschler, Christof; Abedian, Reza

    2016-01-01

    To assess the electromechanical properties of human knee articular cartilage with compression-induced streaming potentials for reliability among users and correlation with macroscopic and histological evaluation tools and sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content. Streaming potentials are induced in cartilage in response to loading when mobile positive ions in the interstitial fluid temporarily move away from negatively charged proteoglycans. Streaming potential integrals (SPIs) were measured with an indentation probe on femoral condyles of 10 human knee specimens according to a standardized location scheme. Interobserver reliability was measured using an interclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The learning curves of 3 observers were evaluated by regression analysis. At each SPI measurement location the degradation level of the tissue was determined by means of the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) score, Mankin score, and sGAG content. The computed ICC was 0.77 (0.70-0.83) indicating good to excellent linear agreement of SPI values among the 3 users. A significant positive linear correlation of the learning index values was observed for 2 of the 3 users. Statistically significant negative correlations between SPI and both ICRS and Mankin scores were observed (r = 0.502, P < 0.001, and r = 0.255, P = 0.02, respectively). No correlation was observed between SPI and sGAG content (r = 0.004, P = 0.973). SPI values may be used as a quantitative means of cartilage evaluation with sufficient reliability among users. Due to the significant learning curve, adequate training should be absolved before routine use of the technique.

  8. The cytotoxicity of bupivacaine, ropivacaine, and mepivacaine on human chondrocytes and cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breu, Anita; Rosenmeier, Katharina; Kujat, Richard; Angele, Peter; Zink, Wolfgang

    2013-08-01

    Intraarticular injections of local anesthetics are frequently used as part of multimodal pain regimens. However, recent data suggest that local anesthetics affect chondrocyte viability. In this study, we assessed the chondrotoxic effects of mepivacaine, ropivacaine, and bupivacaine. We hypothesized that specific cytotoxic potencies directly correlate with analgesic potencies, and that cytotoxic effects in intact cartilage are different than in osteoarthritic tissue. Human articular chondrocytes were exposed to equal and equipotent concentrations of bupivacaine, ropivacaine, and mepivacaine for 1 hour. Cell viability, apoptosis, and necrosis were determined at predefined time points using flow cytometry, live-dead staining, and caspase detection. Intact and osteoarthritic human cartilage explants were treated with equipotent concentrations of named drugs to determine cell viability applying fluorescence microscopy. Chondrotoxic effects increased from ropivacaine to mepivacaine to bupivacaine in a time-dependent and concentration-dependent manner. Compared with control, bupivacaine 0.5% decreased chondrocyte viability to 78% ± 9% (P = 0.0183) 1 hour and 16% ± 10% (P mepivacaine 2%, viable cells were scored 36% ± 6% (P mepivacaine exposure (P = 0.0059). Exposure to concentrations up to 0.25% of bupivacaine, 0.5% of ropivacaine, and 0.5% of mepivacaine did not reveal significant chondrotoxicity in flow cytometry. However, chondrotoxicity did not correlate with potency of local anesthetics. Immediate cell death was mainly due to necrosis followed by apoptosis. Cellular death rates were clearly higher in osteoarthritic compared with intact cartilage after bupivacaine, mepivacaine, and ropivacaine treatment in a decreasing order. Bupivacaine, ropivacaine, and mepivacaine are chondrotoxic in a time-dependent, concentration-dependent, and drug-dependent manner. Chondrotoxic and analgesic potencies do not directly correlate. Cellular death rates were higher in

  9. The normal human chondro-osseous junctional region: evidence for contact of uncalcified cartilage with subchondral bone and marrow spaces

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    Stoddart Robert W

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chondro-osseous junctional region of diarthrodial joints is peculiarly complex and may be considered to consist of the deepest layer of non-calcified cartilage, the tidemark, the layer of calcified cartilage, a thin cement line (between the calcified cartilage and the subchondral bone and the subchondral bone. A detailed knowledge of the structure, function and pathophysiology of the normal chondro-osseous junction is essential for an understanding of the pathogenesis of osteoarthrosis. Methods Full thickness samples from human knee joints were processed and embedded in paraffin wax. One hundred serial sections (10 μm thick were taken from the chondro-osseous junctional region of a block from the medial tibial plateau of a normal joint. They were stained with haematoxylin and eosin and photographed. For a simple physical reconstruction images of each 10th sequential tissue section were printed and the areas of the photomicrographs containing the chondro-osseous junctional region were cut out and then overlaid so as to create a three-dimensional (3D model of this region. A 3D reconstruction was also made using computer modelling. Results Histochemical staining revealed some instances where prolongations of uncalcified cartilage, delineated by the tidemark, dipped into the calcified cartilage and, in places, abutted onto subchondral bone and marrow spaces. Small areas of uncalcified cartilage containing chondrocytes (virtual islands were seen, in two-dimensional (2D sections, to be apparently entombed in calcified matrix. The simple physical 3D reconstruction confirmed that these prolongations of uncalcified cartilage were continuous with the cartilage of zone IV and demonstrated that the virtual islands of uncalcified cartilage were cross-sections of these prolongations. The computer-generated 3D reconstructions clearly demonstrated that the uncalcified prolongations ran through the calcified cartilage to touch bone and

  10. A superficial hyperechoic band in human articular cartilage on ultrasonography with histological correlation: preliminary observations

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    Tae Sun Han

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To demonstrate the superficial hyperechoic band (SHEB in articular cartilage by using ultrasonography (US and to assess its correlation with histological images. Methods: In total, 47 regions of interest (ROIs were analyzed from six tibial osteochondral specimens (OCSs that were obtained after total knee arthroplasty. Ultrasonograms were obtained for each OCS. Then, matching histological sections from all specimens were obtained for comparison with the ultrasonograms. Two types of histological staining were used: Safranin-O stain (SO to identify glycosaminoglycans (GAG and Masson’s trichrome stain (MT to identify collagen. In step 1, two observers evaluated whether there was an SHEB in each ROI. In step 2, the two observers evaluated which histological staining method correlated better with the SHEB by using the ImageJ software. Results: In step 1 of the analysis, 20 out of 47 ROIs showed an SHEB (42.6%, kappa=0.579. Step 2 showed that the SHEB correlated significantly better with the topographical variation in stainability in SO staining, indicating the GAG distribution, than with MT staining, indicating the collagen distribution (P<0.05, kappa=0.722. Conclusion: The SHEB that is frequently seen in human articular cartilage on high-resolution US correlated better with variations in SO staining than with variations in MT staining. Thus, we suggest that a SHEB is predominantly related to changes in GAG. Identifying an SHEB by US is a promising method for assessing the thickness of articular cartilage or for monitoring early osteoarthritis.

  11. Analysis of the Mineral Composition of the Human Calcified Cartilage Zone

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    Ying Zhang, Fuyou Wang, Hongbo Tan, Guangxing Chen, Lin Guo, Liu Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As the connecting tissue between the hyaline articular cartilage and the subchondral bone, calcified cartilage zone (CCZ plays a great role in the force transmission and materials diffusion. However, the questions that remain to be resolved are its mineral composition and organization. In this study, 40 healthy human knee specimens were harvested; first the CCZ was dissected and observed by Safranin O/fast green staining, then CCZ chemical characteristics were measured by using amino acid assay and X-ray diffraction. The percentage of dry weight of type II collagen as an organic compound of CCZ was 20.16% ± 0.96%, lower than that of the hyaline cartilage layer (61.39% ± 0.38%; the percentage of dry weight of hydroxyapatite as an inorganic compound was 65.09% ± 2.31%, less than that of subchondral bone (85.78% ± 3.42%. Our study provides the accurate data for the reconstruction of the CCZ in vitro and the elucidation of CCZ structure and function.

  12. Iron oxide labelling of human mesenchymal stem cells in collagen hydrogels for articular cartilage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymer, Andrea; Haddad, Daniel; Weber, Meike; Gbureck, Uwe; Jakob, Peter M; Eulert, Jochen; Nöth, Ulrich

    2008-04-01

    For the development of new therapeutical cell-based strategies for articular cartilage repair, a reliable cell monitoring technique is required to track the cells in vivo non-invasively and repeatedly. We present a systematic and detailed study on the performance and biological impact of a simple and efficient labelling protocol for human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Commercially available very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (VSOPs) were used as magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent. Iron uptake via endocytosis was confirmed histologically with prussian blue staining and quantified by mass spectrometry. Compared with unlabelled cells, VSOP-labelling did neither influence the viability nor the proliferation potential of hMSCs. Furthermore, iron incorporation did not affect hMSCs in undergoing adipogenic, osteogenic or chondrogenic differentiation, as demonstrated histologically and by gene expression analyses. The efficiency of the labelling protocol was assessed with high-resolution MR imaging at 11.7T. VSOP-labelled hMSCs were visualised in a collagen type I hydrogel, which is in clinical use for matrix-based articular cartilage repair. The presence of VSOP-labelled hMSCs was indicated by distinct hypointense spots in the MR images, as a result of iron specific loss of signal intensity. In summary, this labelling technique has great potential to visualise hMSCs and track their migration after transplantation for articular cartilage repair with MR imaging.

  13. Mechanical Stimulation Protocols of Human Derived Cells in Articular Cartilage Tissue Engineering - A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khozoee, Baktash; Mafi, Pouya; Mafi, Reza; Khan, Wasim S

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical stimulation is a key factor in articular cartilage generation and maintenance. Bioreactor systems have been designed and built in order to deliver specific types of mechanical stimulation. The focus has been twofold, applying a type of preconditioning in order to stimulate cell differentiation, and to simulate in vivo conditions in order to gain further insight into how cells respond to different stimulatory patterns. Due to the complex forces at work within joints, it is difficult to simulate mechanical conditions using a bioreactor. The aim of this review is to gain a deeper understanding of the complexities of mechanical stimulation protocols by comparing those employed in bioreactors in the context of tissue engineering for articular cartilage, and to consider their effects on cultured cells. Allied and Complementary Medicine 1985 to 2016, Ovid MEDLINE[R] 1946 to 2016, and Embase 1974 to 2016 were searched using key terms. Results were subject to inclusion and exclusion criteria, key findings summarised into a table and subsequently discussed. Based on this review it is overwhelmingly clear that mechanical stimulation leads to increased chondrogenic properties in the context of bioreactor articular cartilage tissue engineering using human cells. However, given the variability and lack of controlled factors between research articles, results are difficult to compare, and a standardised method of evaluating stimulation protocols proved challenging. With improved standardisation in mechanical stimulation protocol reporting, bioreactor design and building processes, along with a better understanding of joint behaviours, we hope to perform a meta-analysis on stimulation protocols and methods.

  14. Histological examinations of bone and cartilage in the axial skeleton of human triploidy fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolting, Dorrit; Hansen, Birgit Fischer; Keeling, Jean W; Kjaer, Inger

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine histologically bone and cartilage in vertebral corpora of axial skeletons of eight human triploid fetuses, gestational ages 14-25 weeks, CRL 100-200 mm. The results were compared to earlier studies on vertebral development in trisomies 21, 18, 13, and to normal corpora development. After radiography in frontal and lateral projections, the vertebral column was sectioned into cervical, thoracic and lumbar segments, decalcified, dehydrated, and embedded in paraffin. The blocks were serially sectioned in the vertical plane and stained with Toluidine blue and Alcian blue/van Gieson. The radiographic characteristics of the vertebral corpora observed in frontal and lateral projection varied from small cleft vertebral corpora to fusions between the individual corpora. Histological examination of the vertebral corpora confirmed the abnormal pattern of ossification seen radiographically. As a new finding abnormal metachromasia of the ground substance was observed in the cartilage. Marked borderlines were registered in the cartilage between regions with differences in metachromasia. These borderlines were similar but more extensive than borderlines observed previously in trisomies 21, 18 and 13.

  15. Effects of tenoxicam and aspirin on the metabolism of proteoglycans and hyaluronan in normal and osteoarthritic human articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manicourt, D H; Druetz-Van Egeren, A; Haazen, L; Nagant de Deuxchaisnes, C

    1994-01-01

    1. As nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may impair the ability of the chondrocyte to repair its damaged extracellular matrix, we explored the changes in the metabolism of newly synthesized proteoglycan (PG) and hyaluronan (HA) molecules produced by tenoxicam and aspirin in human normal cartilage explants and in osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage from age-matched donors. 2. Explants were sampled from the medial femoral condyle and were classified by use of Mankin's histological-histochemical grading system. Cartilage specimens were normal in 10 subjects, exhibited moderate OA (MOA) in 10 and had severe OA (SOA) in 10. 3. Cartilage explants were pulsed with [3H]-glucosamine and chased in the absence and in the presence of either aspirin (190 micrograms ml-1) or tenoxicam (4-16 micrograms ml-1). After papain digestion, the labelled chondroitin sulphate ([3H]-PGs) and HA([3H]-HA) molecules present in the tissue and media were purified by anion-exchange chromatography. 4. In normal cartilage as well as in explants with MOA and SOA aspirin reduced more strongly PG and HA synthesis than the loss of [3H]-HA and [3H]-PGs. 5. In normal cartilage, tenoxicam did not affect PG metabolism whereas it reduced HA synthesis in a dose-dependent manner and did not change or even increased the net loss of [3H]-HA. In contrast, in OA cartilage, tenoxicam produced a stronger reduction in the loss of [3H]-PGs than in PG synthesis and this decrease occurred at lower concentrations in cartilage with SOA (4-8 micrograms ml-1) than in cartilage with MOA (8-16 micrograms ml-1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7889262

  16. Growth activity in human septal cartilage: age-dependent incorporation of labeled sulfate in different anatomic locations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetter, U.; Pirsig, W.; Heinze, E.

    1983-02-01

    Growth activity in different areas of human septal cartilage was measured by the in vitro incorporation of /sup 35/S-labeled NaSO/sub 4/ into chondroitin sulfate. Septal cartilage without perichondrium was obtained during rhinoplasty from 36 patients aged 6 to 35 years. It could be shown that the anterior free end of the septum displays high growth activity in all age groups. The supra-premaxillary area displayed its highest growth activity during prepuberty, showing thereafter a continuous decline during puberty and adulthood. A similar age-dependent pattern in growth activity was found in the caudal prolongation of the septal cartilage. No age-dependent variations could be detected in the posterior area of the septal cartilage.

  17. Collagen metabolism of human osteoarthritic articular cartilage as modulated by bovine collagen hydrolysates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia Schadow

    Full Text Available Destruction of articular cartilage is a characteristic feature of osteoarthritis (OA. Collagen hydrolysates are mixtures of collagen peptides and have gained huge public attention as nutriceuticals used for prophylaxis of OA. Here, we evaluated for the first time whether different bovine collagen hydrolysate preparations indeed modulate the metabolism of collagen and proteoglycans from human OA cartilage explants and determined the chemical composition of oligopeptides representing collagen fragments. Using biophysical techniques, like MALDI-TOF-MS, AFM, and NMR, the molecular weight distribution and aggregation behavior of collagen hydrolysates from bovine origin (CH-Alpha®, Peptan™ B 5000, Peptan™ B 2000 were determined. To investigate the metabolism of human femoral OA cartilage, explants were obtained during knee replacement surgery. Collagen synthesis of explants as modulated by 0-10 mg/ml collagen hydrolysates was determined using a novel dual radiolabeling procedure. Proteoglycans, NO, PGE(2, MMP-1, -3, -13, TIMP-1, collagen type II, and cell viability were determined in explant cultures. Groups of data were analyzed using ANOVA and the Friedman test (n = 5-12. The significance was set to p≤0.05. We found that collagen hydrolysates obtained from different sources varied with respect to the width of molecular weight distribution, average molecular weight, and aggregation behavior. None of the collagen hydrolysates tested stimulated the biosynthesis of collagen. Peptan™ B 5000 elevated NO and PGE(2 levels significantly but had no effect on collagen or proteoglycan loss. All collagen hydrolysates tested proved not to be cytotoxic. Together, our data demonstrate for the first time that various collagen hydrolysates differ with respect to their chemical composition of collagen fragments as well as by their pharmacological efficacy on human chondrocytes. Our study underscores the importance that each collagen hydrolysate

  18. Scaffold-free cartilage tissue engineering with a small population of human nasoseptal chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Loraine L Y; To, William T H; Lee, John M; Waldman, Stephen D

    2017-03-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering is a promising approach to provide suitable materials for nasal reconstruction; however, it typically requires large numbers of cells. We have previously shown that a small number of chondrocytes cultivated within a continuous flow bioreactor can elicit substantial tissue growth, but translation to human chondrocytes is not trivial. Here, we aimed to demonstrate the application of the bioreactor to generate large-sized tissues from a small population of primary human nasoseptal chondrocytes. Experimental study. Chondrocytes were cultured in the bioreactor using different medium compositions, with varying amounts of serum and with or without growth factors. Resulting engineered tissues were analyzed for physical properties, biochemical composition, tissue microstructure, and protein localization. Bioreactor-cultivated constructs grown with serum and growth factors (basic fibroblast growth factor and transforming growth factor beta 2) had greater thickness, as well as DNA and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) contents, compared to low serum and no growth factor controls. These constructs also showed the most intense proteoglycan and collagen II staining. The combination of bioreactor conditions, serum, and growth factors allowed the generation of large, thick scaffold-free human cartilaginous tissues that resembled the native nasoseptal cartilage. There also may be implications for patient selection in future clinical applications of these engineered tissues because their GAG content decreased with donor age. NA. Laryngoscope, 127:E91-E99, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  19. The acute effect of bipolar radiofrequency energy thermal chondroplasty on intrinsic biomechanical properties and thickness of chondromalacic human articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutcheshen, Nicholas; Maerz, Tristan; Rabban, Patrick; Haut, Roger C; Button, Keith D; Baker, Kevin C; Guettler, Joseph

    2012-08-01

    Radio frequency energy (RFE) thermal chondroplasty has been a widely-utilized method of cartilage debridement in the past. Little is known regarding its effect on tissue mechanics. This study investigated the acute biomechanical effects of bipolar RFE treatment on human chondromalacic cartilage. Articular cartilage specimens were extracted (n = 50) from femoral condyle samples of patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. Chondromalacia was graded with the Outerbridge classification system. Tissue thicknesses were measured using a needle punch test. Specimens underwent pretreatment load-relaxation testing using a spherical indenter. Bipolar RFE treatment was applied for 45 s and the indentation protocol was repeated. Structural properties were derived from the force-time data. Mechanical properties were derived using a fibril-reinforced biphasic cartilage model. Statistics were performed using repeated measures ANOVA. Cartilage thickness decreased after RFE treatment from a mean of 2.61 mm to 2.20 mm in Grade II, II-III, and III specimens (P resistance to shear and tension could be compromised due to removal of the superficial layer and decreased fibril modulus, RFE treatment increases matrix modulus and decreases tissue permeability which may restore the load- bearing capacity of the cartilage.

  20. Cartilage tissue engineering of nasal septal chondrocyte-macroaggregates in human demineralized bone matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liese, Juliane; Marzahn, Ulrike; El Sayed, Karym; Pruss, Axel; Haisch, Andreas; Stoelzel, Katharina

    2013-06-01

    Tissue Engineering is an important method for generating cartilage tissue with isolated autologous cells and the support of biomaterials. In contrast to various gel-like biomaterials, human demineralized bone matrix (DBM) guarantees some biomechanical stability for an application in biomechanically loaded regions. The present study combined for the first time the method of seeding chondrocyte-macroaggregates in DBM for the purpose of cartilage tissue engineering. After isolating human nasal chondrocytes and creating a three-dimensional macroaggregate arrangement, the DBM was cultivated in vitro with the macroaggregates. The interaction of the cells within the DBM was analyzed with respect to cell differentiation and the inhibitory effects of chondrocyte proliferation. In contrast to chondrocyte-macroaggregates in the cell-DBM constructs, morphologically modified cells expressing type I collagen dominated. The redifferentiation of chondrocytes, characterized by the expression of type II collagen, was only found in low amounts in the cell-DBM constructs. Furthermore, caspase 3, a marker for apoptosis, was detected in the chondrocyte-DBM constructs. In another experimental setting, the vitality of chondrocytes as related to culture time and the amount of DBM was analyzed with the BrdU assay. Higher amounts of DBM tended to result in significantly higher proliferation rates of the cells within the first 48 h. After 96 h, the vitality decreased in a dose-dependent fashion. In conclusion, this study provides the proof of concept of chondrocyte-macroaggregates with DBM as an interesting method for the tissue engineering of cartilage. The as-yet insufficient redifferentiation of the chondrocytes and the sporadic initiation of apoptosis will require further investigations.

  1. The relationship between ultra-short telomeres, aging of articular cartilage and the development of human hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harbo, M; Delaisse, J M; Kjaersgaard-Andersen, P;

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-short telomeres caused by stress-induced telomere shortening are suggested to induce chondrocyte senescence in human osteoarthritic knees. Here we have further investigated the role of ultra-short telomeres in the development of osteoarthritis (OA) and in aging of articular cartilage in human...

  2. Effects of radiofrequency energy on human chondromalacic cartilage: an assessment of insulation material properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Marie L; Lu, Yan; Markel, Mark D

    2005-04-01

    The objective of this study was to establish guidelines for the selection of an insulation material used to surround the electrode of radiofrequency energy (RFE) probes used for thermal chondroplasty. These guidelines were established by identifying which insulation materials resulted in the least amount of chondrocyte death while smoothing the surface of chondromalacic cartilage. RFE causes electrolyte oscillation and molecular friction in the tissue to heat it and subsequently smooth the surface. Material properties investigated included the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), thermal conductivity (TC), and volume resistivity (VR). Fresh human chondromalacic cartilage samples of Outerbridge grades II and III were obtained from patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. Stiffness measurements were taken pretreatment and posttreatment. RFE was applied to a 1-cm2 area for 15 s in a paintbrush treatment pattern. The insulation materials evaluated included Macor (decrease CTE, decrease TC, increase VR; in relation to CTE = 10 x 10(-6)/degrees C at 20 degrees C, TC = 3 W/mK, VR=1 x 10(14) ohm x cm), zirconia toughened alumina (ZTA) and 99.5% alumina (decrease CTE, increase TC, increase VR), aluminum nitride (decrease CTE, increase TC, decrease VR), Teflon (PTFE) (increase CTE, decrease TC, increase VR), partially stabilized zirconia (YTZP) (decrease CTE, decrease TC, decrease VR), and Ultem (increase CTE, decrease TC, decrease VR). There were no significant differences between pretreatment and posttreatment stiffness of the cartilage for any material investigated. Subjectively scored scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images revealed that the surfaces of all samples treated with RFE were relatively smooth with melted fronds. Prototype probes made with Macor, 99.5% alumina, and ZTA had TC or = 1 x 10(14) ohm x cm and resulted in a mean 37% less cell death than aluminum nitride or YTZP. There was no apparent relationship between CTE and the depth of chondrocyte

  3. Rotating three-dimensional dynamic culture of adult human bone marrow-derived cells for tissue engineering of hyaline cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Shinsuke; Mishima, Hajime; Ishii, Tomoo; Akaogi, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Tomokazu; Ohyabu, Yoshimi; Chang, Fei; Ochiai, Naoyuki; Uemura, Toshimasa

    2009-04-01

    The method of constructing cartilage tissue from bone marrow-derived cells in vitro is considered a valuable technique for hyaline cartilage regenerative medicine. Using a rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor developed in a NASA space experiment, we attempted to efficiently construct hyaline cartilage tissue from human bone marrow-derived cells without using a scaffold. Bone marrow aspirates were obtained from the iliac crest of nine patients during orthopedic operation. After their proliferation in monolayer culture, the adherent cells were cultured in the RWV bioreactor with chondrogenic medium for 2 weeks. Cells from the same source were cultured in pellet culture as controls. Histological and immunohistological evaluations (collagen type I and II) and quantification of glycosaminoglycan were performed on formed tissues and compared. The engineered constructs obtained using the RWV bioreactor showed strong features of hyaline cartilage in terms of their morphology as determined by histological and immunohistological evaluations. The glycosaminoglycan contents per microg DNA of the tissues were 10.01 +/- 3.49 microg/microg DNA in the case of the RWV bioreactor and 6.27 +/- 3.41 microg/microg DNA in the case of the pellet culture, and their difference was significant. The RWV bioreactor could provide an excellent environment for three-dimensional cartilage tissue architecture that can promote the chondrogenic differentiation of adult human bone marrow-derived cells.

  4. Human articular chondrocytes express multiple gap junction proteins: differential expression of connexins in normal and osteoarthritic cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayan, Maria D; Carpintero-Fernandez, Paula; Gago-Fuentes, Raquel; Martinez-de-Ilarduya, Oskar; Wang, Hong-Zhang; Valiunas, Virginijus; Brink, Peter; Blanco, Francisco J

    2013-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease and involves progressive degeneration of articular cartilage. The aim of this study was to investigate if chondrocytes from human articular cartilage express gap junction proteins called connexins (Cxs). We show that human chondrocytes in tissue express Cx43, Cx45, Cx32, and Cx46. We also find that primary chondrocytes from adults retain the capacity to form functional voltage-dependent gap junctions. Immunohistochemistry experiments in cartilage from OA patients revealed significantly elevated levels of Cx43 and Cx45 in the superficial zone and down through the next approximately 1000 μm of tissue. These zones corresponded with regions damaged in OA that also had high levels of proliferative cell nuclear antigen. An increased number of Cxs may help explain the increased proliferation of cells in clusters that finally lead to tissue homeostasis loss. Conversely, high levels of Cxs in OA cartilage reflect the increased number of adjacent cells in clusters that are able to interact directly by gap junctions as compared with hemichannels on single cells in normal cartilage. Our data provide strong evidence that OA patients have a loss of the usual ordered distribution of Cxs in the damaged zones and that the reductions in Cx43 levels are accompanied by the loss of correct Cx localization in the nondamaged areas. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Phase contrast imaging X-ray computed tomography: quantitative characterization of human patellar cartilage matrix with topological and geometrical features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Coan, Paola; Huber, Markus B.; Diemoz, Paul C.; Wismüller, Axel

    2014-03-01

    Current assessment of cartilage is primarily based on identification of indirect markers such as joint space narrowing and increased subchondral bone density on x-ray images. In this context, phase contrast CT imaging (PCI-CT) has recently emerged as a novel imaging technique that allows a direct examination of chondrocyte patterns and their correlation to osteoarthritis through visualization of cartilage soft tissue. This study investigates the use of topological and geometrical approaches for characterizing chondrocyte patterns in the radial zone of the knee cartilage matrix in the presence and absence of osteoarthritic damage. For this purpose, topological features derived from Minkowski Functionals and geometric features derived from the Scaling Index Method (SIM) were extracted from 842 regions of interest (ROI) annotated on PCI-CT images of healthy and osteoarthritic specimens of human patellar cartilage. The extracted features were then used in a machine learning task involving support vector regression to classify ROIs as healthy or osteoarthritic. Classification performance was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). The best classification performance was observed with high-dimensional geometrical feature vectors derived from SIM (0.95 ± 0.06) which outperformed all Minkowski Functionals (p analysis of chondrocyte patterns in human patellar cartilage matrix involving SIM-derived geometrical features can distinguish between healthy and osteoarthritic tissue with high accuracy.

  6. Working conditions of bipolar radiofrequency on human articular cartilage repair following thermal injury during arthroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Yuelong; Zhang Yujun; Ding Xiaoquan; Liu Songyang; Sun Tiezheng

    2014-01-01

    Background The thermal injury during bipolar radiofrequercy results in chondrocyte death that limits cartilage repair.The purpose was to determine the effects of various factors of bipolar radiofrequency on human articular cartilage after thermal injury,offering suitable working conditions for bipolar radiofrequency during arthroscopy.Methods Osteochondral explants from 28 patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in Department of Orthopaedic,Peking University Reople's Hospital from October 2013 to May 2014,were harvested and treated using bipolar radiofrequency in a light contact mode under the following conditions:various power setting of levels 2,4 and 6; different durations of 2 seconds,5 seconds and 10 seconds; irrigation with fluids of different temperatures of 4℃,22℃,and 37℃; two different bipolar radiofrequency probes ArthroCare TriStar 50 and Paragon T2.The percentage of cell death and depth of cell death were quantified with laser confocal microscopy.The content of proteoglycan elution at different temperatures was determined by spectrophotometer at 530 nm.Results Chondrocyte mortality during the treatment time of 2 seconds and power setting of level 2 was significantly lower than that with long duration or in higher level groups (time:P=0.001; power:P=0.001).The percentage of cell death after thermal injury was gradually reduced by increasing the temperature of the irrigation solutions (P=0.003),the depth of dead chondrocytes in the 37℃ solution group was significantly less than those in the 4℃ and 22℃ groups (P=0.001).The proteoglycan elution was also gradually reduced by increasing the temperature (P=0.004).Compared with the ArthroCare TriStar 50 group,the percentage of cell death in the Paragon T2 group was significantly decreased (P=0.046).Conclusions Thermal chondroplasty with bipolar radiofrequency resulted in defined margins of chondrocyte death under controlled conditions.The least cartilage damage during thermal chondroplasty

  7. Metabolic Response of Human Osteoarthritic Cartilage to Biochemically Characterized Collagen Hydrolysates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadow, Saskia; Simons, Viktor S.; Lochnit, Guenter; Kordelle, Jens; Gazova, Zuzana; Siebert, Hans-Christian; Steinmeyer, Juergen

    2017-01-01

    The most frequent disease of the locomotor system is osteoarthritis (OA), which, as a chronic joint disease, might benefit more from nutrition than acute illnesses. Collagen hydrolysates (CHs) are peptidic mixtures that are often used as nutraceuticals for OA. Three CHs were characterized biochemically and pharmacologically. Our biophysical (MALDI-TOF-MS, NMR, AFM) and fluorescence assays revealed marked differences between CHs of fish (Peptan® F 5000, Peptan® F 2000) and porcine (Mobiforte®) origin with respect to the total number of peptides and common peptides between them. Using a novel dual radiolabeling procedure, no CH modulated collagen biosynthesis in human knee cartilage explants. Peptan® F 2000 enhanced the activities of the aggrecanase ADMATS4 and ADMATS5 in vitro without loss of proteoglycan from cartilage explants; the opposite effect was observed with Mobiforte®. Interleukin (IL)-6, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, -3 and -13 levels were elevated in explants that were treated with Mobiforte® and Peptan® F 5000, but not with Peptan® F 2000. In conclusion, the heterogeneous peptide composition and disparate pharmacological effects between CHs suggest that the effect of a CH preparation cannot be extrapolated to other formulations. Thus, the declaration of a CH as a safe and effective nutraceutical requires a thorough examination of its pleiotropic effects. PMID:28117674

  8. A low percentage of autologous serum can replace bovine serum to engineer human nasal cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Wolf

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available For the generation of cell-based therapeutic products, it would be preferable to avoid the use of animal-derived components. Our study thus aimed at investigating the possibility to replace foetal bovine serum (FBS with autologous serum (AS for the engineering of cartilage grafts using expanded human nasal chondrocytes (HNC. HNC isolated from 7 donors were expanded in medium containing 10% FBS or AS at different concentrations (2%, 5% and 10% and cultured in pellets using serum-free medium or in Hyaff®-11 meshes using medium containing FBS or AS. Tissue forming capacity was assessed histologically (Safranin O, immunohistochemically (type II collagen and biochemically (glycosaminoglycans -GAG- and DNA. Differences among experimental groups were assessed by Mann Whitney tests. HNC expanded under the different serum conditions proliferated at comparable rates and generated cartilaginous pellets with similar histological appearance and amounts of GAG. Tissues generated by HNC from different donors cultured in Hyaff®-11 had variable quality, but the accumulated GAG amounts were comparable among the different serum conditions. Staining intensity for collagen type II was consistent with GAG deposition. Among the different serum conditions tested, the use of 2% AS resulted in the lowest variability in the GAG contents of generated tissues. In conclusion, a low percentage of AS can replace FBS both during the expansion and differentiation of HNC and reduce the variability in the quality of the resulting engineered cartilage tissues.

  9. Metabolic Response of Human Osteoarthritic Cartilage to Biochemically Characterized Collagen Hydrolysates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia Schadow

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The most frequent disease of the locomotor system is osteoarthritis (OA, which, as a chronic joint disease, might benefit more from nutrition than acute illnesses. Collagen hydrolysates (CHs are peptidic mixtures that are often used as nutraceuticals for OA. Three CHs were characterized biochemically and pharmacologically. Our biophysical (MALDI-TOF-MS, NMR, AFM and fluorescence assays revealed marked differences between CHs of fish (Peptan® F 5000, Peptan® F 2000 and porcine (Mobiforte® origin with respect to the total number of peptides and common peptides between them. Using a novel dual radiolabeling procedure, no CH modulated collagen biosynthesis in human knee cartilage explants. Peptan® F 2000 enhanced the activities of the aggrecanase ADMATS4 and ADMATS5 in vitro without loss of proteoglycan from cartilage explants; the opposite effect was observed with Mobiforte®. Interleukin (IL-6, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-1, -3 and -13 levels were elevated in explants that were treated with Mobiforte® and Peptan® F 5000, but not with Peptan® F 2000. In conclusion, the heterogeneous peptide composition and disparate pharmacological effects between CHs suggest that the effect of a CH preparation cannot be extrapolated to other formulations. Thus, the declaration of a CH as a safe and effective nutraceutical requires a thorough examination of its pleiotropic effects.

  10. Reference genes for normalization of gene expression studies in human osteoarthritic articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomez-Reino Juan J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Assessment of gene expression is an important component of osteoarthritis (OA research, greatly improved by the development of quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR. This technique requires normalization for precise results, yet no suitable reference genes have been identified in human articular cartilage. We have examined ten well-known reference genes to determine the most adequate for this application. Results Analyses of expression stability in cartilage from 10 patients with hip OA, 8 patients with knee OA and 10 controls without OA were done with classical statistical tests and the software programs geNorm and NormFinder. Results from the three methods of analysis were broadly concordant. Some of the commonly used reference genes, GAPDH, ACTB and 18S RNA, performed poorly in our analysis. In contrast, the rarely used TBP, RPL13A and B2M genes were the best. It was necessary to use together several of these three genes to obtain the best results. The specific combination depended, to some extent, on the type of samples being compared. Conclusion Our results provide a satisfactory set of previously unused reference genes for qPCR in hip and knee OA This confirms the need to evaluate the suitability of reference genes in every tissue and experimental situation before starting the quantitative assessment of gene expression by qPCR.

  11. Differences in Cartilage-Forming Capacity of Expanded Human Chondrocytes From Ear and Nose and Their Gene Expression Profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellingman, C.A.; Verwiel, E.T.P.; Slagt, I.; Koevoet, W.; Poublon, R.M.L.; Nolst-Trenite, G.J.; de Jong, R.J.B.; Jahr, H.; van Osch, G.J.V.M.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of culture-expanded human auricular and nasoseptal chondrocytes as cell source for regeneration of stable cartilage and to analyze the differences in gene expression profile of expanded chondrocytes from these specific locations. Auricular chondroc

  12. Arthroscopic airbrush assisted cell implantation for cartilage repair in the knee: a controlled laboratory and human cadaveric study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windt, de T.S.; Vonk, L.A.; Buskermolen, J.K.; Visser, J.; Karperien, H.B.J.; Bleys, R.L.A.W.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Saris, D.B.F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of arthroscopic airbrush assisted cartilage repair. Methods An airbrush device (Baxter) was used to spray both human expanded osteoarthritic chondrocytes and choncrocytes with their pericellular matrix (chondrons) at 1

  13. Arthroscopic airbrush assisted cell implantation for cartilage repair in the knee : a controlled laboratory and human cadaveric study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Windt, T S; Vonk, L A; Buskermolen, J K; Visser, J.; Karperien, M; Bleys, R L A W; Dhert, W J A; Saris, D B F

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of arthroscopic airbrush assisted cartilage repair. METHODS: An airbrush device (Baxter) was used to spray both human expanded osteoarthritic chondrocytes and choncrocytes with their pericellular matrix (chondrons) at 1 × 10(6

  14. Arthroscopic airbrush assisted cell implantation for cartilage repair in the knee : A controlled laboratory and human cadaveric study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Windt, T. S.; Vonk, L. A.; Buskermolen, J. K.; Visser, J.; Karperien, M.; Bleys, R. L A W; Dhert, W. J A; Saris, D. B F

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of arthroscopic airbrush assisted cartilage repair. Methods: An airbrush device (Baxter) was used to spray both human expanded osteoarthritic chondrocytes and choncrocytes with their pericellular matrix (chondrons) at 1×106cel

  15. Radiocarbon dating reveals minimal collagen turnover in both healthy and osteoarthritic human cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinemeier, Katja M.; Schjerling, Peter; Heinemeier, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The poor regenerative capacity of articular cartilage presents a major clinical challenge and may relate to a limited turnover of the cartilage collagen matrix. However, the collagen turnover rate during life is not clear, and it is debated whether osteoarthritis (OA) can influence it. Using...... the carbon-14 ((14)C) bomb-pulse method, life-long replacement rates of collagen were measured in tibial plateau cartilage from 23 persons born between 1935 and1997 (15 and 8 persons with OA and healthy cartilage, respectively). The (14)C levels observed in cartilage collagen showed that, virtually......, no replacement of the collagen matrix happened after skeletal maturity and that neither OA nor tissue damage, per se, influenced collagen turnover. Regional differences in (14)C content across the joint surface showed that cartilage collagen located centrally on the joint surface is formed several years earlier...

  16. [Microdurimetric and biochemical study of human articular cartilage. Comparison of different joints].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignon, E; Arlot, M; Hartman, D; Noyer, D

    1980-12-01

    The micro-hardness and the density of fixed negative charges in cartilage of the shoulders, hips and knees of 6 subjects were studied. These two parameters were narrowly correlated. The resistance and proteoglycan concentration of the cartilage of the femoral head were greater than those of the knee and of the shoulder. They did not vary on each side. There is a significant correlation between the hardness of the cartilage of the femoral head and of the external femoral condyle. The histologically normal cartilage of the femoral head in arthrosis is at the lower limit of control values for hardness.

  17. MORPHOLOGY AND MORPHOMETRY OF ADULT HUMAN CRICOID CARTILAGE: A CADAVERIC STUDY IN NORTH INDIAN POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajan Kumar Singla

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Out of different cartilages of larynx, cricoid is the strongest cartilage. It is the only cartilage which extends completely around the air passage. It is smaller but stronger and thicker than the thyroid cartilage. Though a lot of work has been done on thyroid cartilage it is not so for cricoid cartilage. This give us a impetus to design this study. Material and method: The material for present study comprised of 30 adult (M:F::25:5 apparently normal cadaveric larynges, obtained from the Anatomy Department of Govt. Medical College, Amritsar. Different morphometric diameters of the cricoid cartilage were measured with help of vernier caliper with least count 0.01 mm and these were noted on a predesigned proforma. All the data thus obtained was tabulated, analysed, scrutinized and compared with the earlier studies available in the literature. An attempt has been done to provide a base line data for this region. Result and Conclusion: Cricoid cartilage was oval in shape in all the specimens. Outer and inner transverse diameters and outer and inner anteroposterior diameters of cricoid cartilage were larger in males as compared to females. As we compare both diameters in males and females, outer transverse diameter was found to be larger than outer anteroposterior diameter, while inner anteroposterior diameter was larger than inner transverse diameter. Height and thickness of cricoid arch and lamina were observed to be larger in males as compared to females.

  18. Genipin-crosslinked cartilage-derived matrix as a scaffold for human adipose-derived stem cell chondrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Nai-Chen; Estes, Bradley T; Young, Tai-Horng; Guilak, Farshid

    2013-02-01

    Autologous cell-based tissue engineering using three-dimensional scaffolds holds much promise for the repair of cartilage defects. Previously, we reported on the development of a porous scaffold derived solely from native articular cartilage, which can induce human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) to differentiate into a chondrogenic phenotype without exogenous growth factors. However, this ASC-seeded cartilage-derived matrix (CDM) contracts over time in culture, which may limit certain clinical applications. The present study aimed to investigate the ability of chemical crosslinking using a natural biologic crosslinker, genipin, to prevent scaffold contraction while preserving the chondrogenic potential of CDM. CDM scaffolds were crosslinked in various genipin concentrations, seeded with ASCs, and then cultured for 4 weeks to evaluate the influence of chemical crosslinking on scaffold contraction and ASC chondrogenesis. At the highest crosslinking degree of 89%, most cells failed to attach to the scaffolds and resulted in poor formation of a new extracellular matrix. Scaffolds with a low crosslinking density of 4% experienced cell-mediated contraction similar to our original report on noncrosslinked CDM. Using a 0.05% genipin solution, a crosslinking degree of 50% was achieved, and the ASC-seeded constructs exhibited no significant contraction during the culture period. Moreover, expression of cartilage-specific genes, synthesis, and accumulation of cartilage-related macromolecules and the development of mechanical properties were comparable to the original CDM. These findings support the potential use of a moderately (i.e., approximately one-half of the available lysine or hydroxylysine residues being crosslinked) crosslinked CDM as a contraction-free biomaterial for cartilage tissue engineering.

  19. Brief report: reconstruction of joint hyaline cartilage by autologous progenitor cells derived from ear elastic cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Shinji; Takebe, Takanori; Kan, Hiroomi; Yabuki, Yuichiro; Matsuzaki, Takahisa; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y; Nakabayashi, Seiichiro; Ik, Lee Jeong; Maegawa, Jiro; Taniguchi, Hideki

    2014-03-01

    In healthy joints, hyaline cartilage covering the joint surfaces of bones provides cushioning due to its unique mechanical properties. However, because of its limited regenerative capacity, age- and sports-related injuries to this tissue may lead to degenerative arthropathies, prompting researchers to investigate a variety of cell sources. We recently succeeded in isolating human cartilage progenitor cells from ear elastic cartilage. Human cartilage progenitor cells have high chondrogenic and proliferative potential to form elastic cartilage with long-term tissue maintenance. However, it is unknown whether ear-derived cartilage progenitor cells can be used to reconstruct hyaline cartilage, which has different mechanical and histological properties from elastic cartilage. In our efforts to develop foundational technologies for joint hyaline cartilage repair and reconstruction, we conducted this study to obtain an answer to this question. We created an experimental canine model of knee joint cartilage damage, transplanted ear-derived autologous cartilage progenitor cells. The reconstructed cartilage was rich in proteoglycans and showed unique histological characteristics similar to joint hyaline cartilage. In addition, mechanical properties of the reconstructed tissues were higher than those of ear cartilage and equal to those of joint hyaline cartilage. This study suggested that joint hyaline cartilage was reconstructed from ear-derived cartilage progenitor cells. It also demonstrated that ear-derived cartilage progenitor cells, which can be harvested by a minimally invasive method, would be useful for reconstructing joint hyaline cartilage in patients with degenerative arthropathies.

  20. A morphometric study of age-related changes in adult human epiglottis using quantitative digital analysis of cartilage calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Mitsuhiro; Shimizu, Yoshinaka; Okayama, Keisuke; Igari, Toshirou; Kikuchi, Masayoshi

    2005-01-01

    The epiglottis plays an important role in deglutition in humans. The present study investigated age-related changes in the epiglottis using macroscopic and microscopic measurements. Epiglottic specimens from 281 Japanese adult cadavers (177 males, 104 females) were obtained. Specimens were divided into three groups according to age: group I: 20-39 years old (32 males, 26 females), group II: 50-69 years old (82 males, 36 females), and group III: 80-98 years old (63 males, 42 females). Width, height, and thickness were measured macroscopically. To evaluate the degree of calcium deposition, the calcium volume in digitalized von Kossa-stained sections was assessed using a quantitative analysis. An elemental analysis of the area detected with von Kossa staining was done using energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (EDX). Measurements of the thickness and cell density in the superficial and deep layers of epiglottic cartilage were performed in horizontal histological sections. No significant differences in macroscopic width or height were found across the age groups in either sex. A series of three measurements in males was significantly larger than in females (p<0.05). The volume of the calcium deposit area was greater in males than in females (p<0.05) and was significantly increased in group III in males (p<0.05). The lower level of the epiglottic cartilage showed a greater calcium deposit area than the upper level. In the scanning image by line and surface analysis using EDX, the calcium deposit areas detected with von Kossa staining indicated a close association of calcium and phosphorus ions. The mean Ca/P molar ratio in the calcium deposit area was 1.32+/-0.12. Microscopic cartilage thickness increased significantly with age (p<0.05), and was greater in males than in females (p<0.05). Cartilage cell density in the superficial cartilage layer was higher than in the deep layer and was decreased in group III (p<0.05). Cartilage cell density was lower in

  1. The Relationship between MR Parameters and Biomechanical Quantities of Loaded Human Articular Cartilage in Osteoarthritis: An In-Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juráš, V.; Szomolányi, P.; Gäbler, S.; Frollo, I.; Trattnig, S.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the changes in MRI parameters during applied load directly in MR scanner and correlate these changes with biomechanical parameters of human articular cartilage. Cartilage explants from patients who underwent total knee replacement were examined in the micro-imaging system in 3T scanner. Respective MRI parameters (T1 without- and T1 with contrast agent as a marker of proteoglycan content, T2 as a marker of collagen network anisotropy and ADC as a measure of diffusivity) were calculated in pre- and during compression state. Subsequently, these parameters were compared to the biomechanical properties of articular cartilage, instantaneous modulus (I), equilibrium modulus (Eq) and time of tissue relaxation (τ). Significant load-induced changes of T2 and ADC were recorded. High correlation between T1Gd and I (r = 0.6324), and between ADC and Eq (r = -0.4884) was found. Multi-parametric MRI may have great potential in analyzing static and dynamic biomechanical behavior of articular cartilage in early stages of osteoarthritis (OA).

  2. Cartilage repair by human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells with different hydrogels in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong-Beom; Song, Minjung; Lee, Choong-Hee; Kim, Jin-A; Ha, Chul-Won

    2015-11-01

    This study was carried out to assess the feasibility of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) in articular cartilage repair and to further determine a suitable delivering hydrogel in a rat model. Critical sized full thickness cartilage defects were created. The hUCB-MSCs and three different hydrogel composites (hydrogel A; 4% hyaluronic acid/30% pluronic (1:1, v/v), hydrogel B; 4% hyaluronic acid, and hydrogel C; 4% hyaluronic acid/30% pluronic/chitosan (1:1:2, v/v)) were implanted into the experimental knee (right knee) and hydrogels without hUCB-MSCs were implanted into the control knee (left knee). Defects were evaluated after 8 weeks. The hUCB-MSCs with hydrogels composites resulted in a better repair as seen by gross and histological evaluation compared with hydrogels without hUCB-MSCs. Among the three different hydrogels, the 4% hyaluronic acid hydrogel composite (hydrogel B) showed the best result in cartilage repair as seen by the histological evaluation compared with the other hydrogel composites (hydrogel A and C). The results of this study suggest that hUCB-MSCs may be a promising cell source in combination with 4% hyaluronic acid hydrogels in the in vivo repair of cartilage defects.

  3. 3D Bioprinting Human Chondrocytes with Nanocellulose-Alginate Bioink for Cartilage Tissue Engineering Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markstedt, Kajsa; Mantas, Athanasios; Tournier, Ivan; Martínez Ávila, Héctor; Hägg, Daniel; Gatenholm, Paul

    2015-05-11

    The introduction of 3D bioprinting is expected to revolutionize the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The 3D bioprinter is able to dispense materials while moving in X, Y, and Z directions, which enables the engineering of complex structures from the bottom up. In this study, a bioink that combines the outstanding shear thinning properties of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) with the fast cross-linking ability of alginate was formulated for the 3D bioprinting of living soft tissue with cells. Printability was evaluated with concern to printer parameters and shape fidelity. The shear thinning behavior of the tested bioinks enabled printing of both 2D gridlike structures as well as 3D constructs. Furthermore, anatomically shaped cartilage structures, such as a human ear and sheep meniscus, were 3D printed using MRI and CT images as blueprints. Human chondrocytes bioprinted in the noncytotoxic, nanocellulose-based bioink exhibited a cell viability of 73% and 86% after 1 and 7 days of 3D culture, respectively. On the basis of these results, we can conclude that the nanocellulose-based bioink is a suitable hydrogel for 3D bioprinting with living cells. This study demonstrates the potential use of nanocellulose for 3D bioprinting of living tissues and organs.

  4. First ex vivo study demonstrating that {sup 99m}Tc-NTP 15-5 radiotracer binds to human articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cachin, Florent; Culot, Damien [Jean Perrin Cancer Centre, Nuclear Medicine Department, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Universite d' Auvergne, UMR 990 INSERM, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Boisgard, Stephane [Gabriel Montpied University Hospital, Orthopaedic Surgery, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Universite d' Auvergne, UMR 990 INSERM, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Vidal, Aurelien; Auzeloux, Philippe; Madelmont, Jean-Claude; Chezal, Jean-Michel; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth [Universite d' Auvergne, UMR 990 INSERM, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Filaire, Marc [Universite d' Auvergne, Anatomy Laboratory, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Askienazy, Serge [Cyclopharma Laboratoire, Saint-Beauzire (France)

    2011-11-15

    Preclinical data pointed to {sup 99m}Tc-NTP 15-5 as a good candidate for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of cartilaginous disease. We set out to investigate and quantify {sup 99m}Tc-NTP 15-5 ex vivo uptake by human articular cartilage relative to bone {sup 99m}Tc-hydroxymethylene diphosphonate (HMDP) radiotracer. Three osteoarthritic human tibial plateaux and four tibiofemoral joints were incubated with {sup 99m}Tc-NTP 15-5 and {sup 99m}Tc-HMDP for 2 h. Affinity of tracers for cartilage was determined by visual analysis of SPECT/CT acquisitions and measurement of cartilage to cortical bone uptake ratios. Cartilage to cortical bone uptake ratios were 3.90 {+-} 2.35 and 0.76 {+-} 0.24, respectively, for {sup 99m}Tc-NTP 15-5 and {sup 99m}Tc-HMDP radiotracers. Visual analysis of fused SPECT/CT slices showed selective, intense {sup 99m}Tc-NTP 15-5 accumulation in articular cartilage, whereas {sup 99m}Tc-HMDP binding was low. Interestingly, a cartilage defect visualized on CT was clearly associated with focal decreased uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-NTP 15-5. The tracer {sup 99m}Tc-NTP 15-5 is of major interest for human cartilage molecular imaging and could find clinical applications in osteoarthritis staging and monitoring. (orig.)

  5. High seeding density of human chondrocytes in agarose produces tissue-engineered cartilage approaching native mechanical and biochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigan, Alexander D; Roach, Brendan L; Nims, Robert J; Tan, Andrea R; Albro, Michael B; Stoker, Aaron M; Cook, James L; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2016-06-14

    Animal cells have served as highly controllable model systems for furthering cartilage tissue engineering practices in pursuit of treating osteoarthritis. Although successful strategies for animal cells must ultimately be adapted to human cells to be clinically relevant, human chondrocytes are rarely employed in such studies. In this study, we evaluated the applicability of culture techniques established for juvenile bovine and adult canine chondrocytes to human chondrocytes obtained from fresh or expired osteochondral allografts. Human chondrocytes were expanded and encapsulated in 2% agarose scaffolds measuring ∅3-4mm×2.3mm, with cell seeding densities ranging from 15 to 90×10(6)cells/mL. Subsets of constructs were subjected to transient or sustained TGF-β treatment, or provided channels to enhance nutrient transport. Human cartilaginous constructs physically resembled native human cartilage, and reached compressive Young's moduli of up to ~250kPa (corresponding to the low end of ranges reported for native knee cartilage), dynamic moduli of ~950kPa (0.01Hz), and contained 5.7% wet weight (%/ww) of glycosaminoglycans (≥ native levels) and 1.5%/ww collagen. We found that the initial seeding density had pronounced effects on tissue outcomes, with high cell seeding densities significantly increasing nearly all measured properties. Transient TGF-β treatment was ineffective for adult human cells, and tissue construct properties plateaued or declined beyond 28 days of culture. Finally, nutrient channels improved construct mechanical properties, presumably due to enhanced rates of mass transport. These results demonstrate that our previously established culture system can be successfully translated to human chondrocytes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cells Stimulate Cartilage Regeneration and Are Safe for Single-Stage Cartilage Repair in Humans upon Mixture with Recycled Autologous Chondrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Windt, Tommy S; Vonk, Lucienne A; Slaper-Cortenbach, Ineke C M; van den Broek, Marcel P H; Nizak, Razmara; van Rijen, Mattie H P; de Weger, Roel A; Dhert, Wouter J A; Saris, Daniel B F

    Traditionally, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from adult bone marrow were described as being capable of differentiating to various lineages including cartilage. Despite increasing interest in these MSCs, concerns regarding their safety, in vivo behavior and clinical effectiveness have

  7. Growth plate regulation and osteochondroma formation: insights from tracing proteoglycans in zebrafish models and human cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrea, Carlos E; Prins, Frans A; Wiweger, Malgorzata I; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W

    2011-06-01

    Proteoglycans are secreted into the extracellular matrix of virtually all cell types and function in several cellular processes. They consist of a core protein onto which glycosaminoglycans (e.g., heparan or chondroitin sulphates), are attached. Proteoglycans are important modulators of gradient formation and signal transduction. Impaired biosynthesis of heparan sulphate glycosaminoglycans causes osteochondroma, the most common bone tumour to occur during adolescence. Cytochemical staining with positively charged dyes (e.g., polyethyleneimine-PEI) allows, visualisation of proteoglycans and provides a detailed description of how proteoglycans are distributed throughout the cartilage matrix. PEI staining was studied by electron and reflection contrast microscopy in human growth plates, osteochondromas and five different proteoglycan-deficient zebrafish mutants displaying one of the following skeletal phenotypes: dackel (dak/ext2), lacking heparan sulphate and identified as a model for human multiple osteochondromas; hi307 (β3gat3), deficient for most glycosaminoglycans; pinscher (pic/slc35b2), presenting with defective sulphation of glycosaminoglycans; hi954 (uxs1), lacking most glycosaminoglycans; and knypek (kny/gpc4), missing the protein core of the glypican-4 proteoglycan. The panel of genetically well-characterized proteoglycan-deficient zebrafish mutants serves as a convincing and comprehensive study model to investigate proteoglycan distribution and the relation of this distribution to the model mutation status. They also provide insight into the distributions and gradients that can be expected in the human homologue. Human growth plate, wild-type zebrafish and fish mutants with mild proteoglycan defects (hi307 and kny) displayed proteoglycans distributed in a gradient throughout the matrix. Although the mutants pic and hi954, which had severely impaired proteoglycan biosynthesis, showed no PEI staining, dak mutants demonstrated reduced PEI staining and no

  8. Imaging of irradiated human costal cartilage birefringence by PS-OCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinho Junior, Antonio C.; Freitas, Anderson Z.; Santin, Stefany P.; Soares, Fernando A.N.; Mosca, Rodrigo C.; Bringel, Fabiana A.; Mathor, Monica B., E-mail: freitas.az@ipen.b, E-mail: rmosca@usp.b, E-mail: mathor@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Sterilization by ionizing radiation is a technique used for tissue banks around the world to avoid transmission of infectious diseases by human allografts. However, high doses of ionizing radiation may cause undesirable changes in tissue structure, decreasing its mechanical properties, for example. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a non destructive, non ionizing and real time method to investigate biological tissues without promote any change in tissue structure. Polarization Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography (PS-OCT) is an OCT technique that combines polarimetry with low coherence reflectometry to provide depth resolved measurements from birefringent structures as collagen. Costal cartilages from 15 cadaveric donors were preserved in high concentration glycerol and each individual sample was divided in 6 fragments. One of them was kept as a control group and the others were irradiated with gamma radiation from a Co-60 source with doses of 15, 25, 50, 75 and 100 kGy. OCT and PS-OCT images of the same region of the samples were obtained from a device OCS 1300 SS (Thorlabs, USA) with a coupling polarization module PSOCT 1300 (Thorlabs, USA). According with our results, birefringence may be visualized in all test groups as well in the control group, suggesting that sterilization by ionizing radiation does not affect the collagen structure significantly to cause total loss of birefringence, even if high doses as 75 and 100 kGy are used. The next step of our work is to develop a new method to quantify the birefringence using the optical properties of the tissue. (author)

  9. Characterization of human primary chondrocytes of osteoarthritic cartilage at varying severity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Jing; YANG Zheng; CAO Yong-ping; GE Zi-gang

    2011-01-01

    Background There is a difficulty in evaluating the in vivo functionality of individual chondrocytes,and there is much heterogeneity among cartilage affected by osteoarthritis (OA).In this study,in vitro cultured chondrocytes harvested from varying stages of degeneration were studied as a projective model to further understand the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis.Methods Cartilage of varying degeneration of end-stage OA was harvested,while cell yield and matrix glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content were measured.Cell morphology,proliferation,and gene expression of collagen type Ⅰ,Ⅱ,and Ⅹ,aggrecan,matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP-13),and ADAMTS5 of the acquired chondrocytes were measured during subsequent in vitro culture.Results Both the number of cells and the GAG content increased with increasing severity of OA.Cell spreading area increased and gradually showed spindle-like morphology during in vitro culture.Gene expression of collagen type Ⅱ,collagen type X as well as GAG decreased with severity of cartilage degeneration,while expression of collagen type Ⅰ increased.Expression of MMP-13 increased with severity of cartilage degeneration,while expression of ADAMTS-5 remained stable.Expression of collagen type Ⅱ,X,GAG,and MMP-13 substantially decreased with in vitro culture.Expression of collagen type Ⅰ increased with in vitro cultures,while expression of ADAMTS 5 remained stable.Conclusions Expression of functional genes such as collagen type Ⅱ and GAG decreased during severe degeneration of OA cartilage and in vitro dedifferentiation.Gene expression of collagen Ⅰ and MMP-13 increased with severity of cartilage degeneration.

  10. Conserving Cartilage In Microtia Repair: The Modular Component Assembly Approach To Rebuilding A Human Ear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandy, Jessica R.; Lemieux, Bryan; Foulad, Allen; Wong, Brian J.F.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Current methods of microtia repair include carving an auricular framework from the costal synchondrosis. This requires considerable skill and may create a substantial donor site defect. Here, we present a modular component assembly (MCA) approach that minimizes the procedural difficulty and reduces the amount of cartilage to a single rib. Study Design Ex vivo study and survey Methods A single porcine rib was sectioned into multiple slices using a cartilage guillotine, cut into components outlined by 3D-printed templates, and assembled into an auricular scaffold. Electromechanical reshaping (EMR) was used to bend cartilage slices for creation of the helical rim. Chondrocyte viability was confirmed using confocal imaging. Ten surgeons reviewed the scaffold constructed with the MCA approach to evaluate aesthetics, relative stability, and clinical feasibility. Results An auricular framework with projection and curvature was fashioned from one rib. Surgeons found the MCA scaffold to meet minimal aesthetic and anatomic acceptability. When embedded under a covering, the region of the helix and anti-helix of the scaffold scored significantly higher on the assessment survey than that of an embedded alloplast implant (t-value=0.01). Otherwise, no difference was found between the embedded MCA and alloplast implants (t-value >0.05). EMR treated cartilage was found to be viable. Conclusion This study demonstrates that one rib can be used to create an aesthetic and durable framework for microtia repair. Precise assembly and the ability to obtain thin, uniform slices of cartilage were essential. This cartilage-sparing MCA approach may be an alternative to classic techniques. PMID:26720326

  11. Expression of BMP-receptor type 1A correlates with progress of osteoarthritis in human knee joints with focal cartilage lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, Hagen; Pilz, Ingo H; Mehlhorn, Alexander T;

    2012-01-01

    was significantly higher in cartilage biopsies taken in type 3 lesions with intact subchondral layer compared with type 4 defects (P ...BACKGROUND AIMS: Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and its receptor type 1A (BMPR-1A) play significant roles in cartilage metabolism. The aim of this study was to evaluate a possible correlation between intra-articular expression of these proteins and the degree of osteoarthritis (OA) in human...... knees. METHODS: Biopsies of synovia and debrided cartilage were taken in 15 patients undergoing autologous chondrocyte implantation. Expression of BMP-2 and BMPR-1A was evaluated semi-quantitatively by immunohistologic staining. These data were complemented by grading of cartilage lesions according...

  12. Age-related accumulation of Maillard reaction products in human articular cartilage collagen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verzijl, N.; Groot, J. de; Oldehinkel, E.; Bank, R.A.; Thorpe, S.R.; Baynes, J.W.; Bayliss, M.T.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Lafeber, F.P.J.G.; TeKoppele, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    Non-enzymic modification of tissue proteins by reducing sugars, the so-called Maillard reaction, is a prominent feature of aging. In articular cartilage, relatively high levels of the advanced glycation end product (AGE) pentosidine accumulate with age. Higher pentosidine levels have been associated

  13. Quantitative in vivo CT arthrography of the human osteoarthritic knee to estimate cartilage sulphated glycosaminoglycan content : correlation with ex-vivo reference standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tiel, J; Siebelt, M; Reijman, M; Bos, P.K.; Waarsing, J H; Zuurmond, A-M; Nasserinejad, K; van Osch, G J V M; Verhaar, J A N; Krestin, G P; Weinans, H; Oei, E H G

    OBJECTIVE: Recently, computed tomography arthrography (CTa) was introduced as quantitative imaging biomarker to estimate cartilage sulphated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content in human cadaveric knees. Our aim was to assess the correlation between in vivo CTa in human osteoarthritis (OA) knees and ex

  14. Quantitative in vivo CT arthrography of the human osteoarthritic knee to estimate cartilage sulphated glycosaminoglycan content: correlation with ex-vivo reference standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiel, J. van; Siebelt, M.; Reijman, M.; Bos, P.K.; Waarsing, J.H.; Zuurmond, A.M.; Nasserinejad, K.; Osch, G.J.V.M. van; Verhaar, J.A.N.; Krestin, G.P.; Weinans, H.; Oei, E.H.G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Recently, computed tomography arthrography (CTa) was introduced as quantitative imaging biomarker to estimate cartilage sulphated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content in human cadaveric knees. Our aim was to assess the correlation between in vivo CTa in human osteoarthritis (OA) knees and ex

  15. Biomaterial and Cell Based Cartilage Repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, X

    2015-01-01

    Injuries to human native cartilage tissue are particularly troublesome because cartilage has little ability to heal or regenerate itself. The reconstruction, repair, and regeneration of cartilage tissue continue to be one of the greatest clinical challenges, especially in orthopaedic and plastic sur

  16. Biomaterial and Cell Based Cartilage Repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, X

    2015-01-01

    Injuries to human native cartilage tissue are particularly troublesome because cartilage has little ability to heal or regenerate itself. The reconstruction, repair, and regeneration of cartilage tissue continue to be one of the greatest clinical challenges, especially in orthopaedic and plastic

  17. Characterization of human adipose-derived stem cells and expression of chondrogenic genes during induction of cartilage differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adila A Hamid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Understanding the changes in chondrogenic gene expression that are involved in the differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells to chondrogenic cells is important prior to using this approach for cartilage repair. The aims of the study were to characterize human adipose-derived stem cells and to examine chondrogenic gene expression after one, two, and three weeks of induction. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Human adipose-derived stem cells at passage 4 were evaluated by flow cytometry to examine the expression of surface markers. These adipose-derived stem cells were tested for adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation capacity. Ribonucleic acid was extracted from the cells for quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis to determine the expression levels of chondrogenic genes after chondrogenic induction. RESULTS: Human adipose-derived stem cells were strongly positive for the mesenchymal markers CD90, CD73, CD44, CD9, and histocompatibility antigen and successfully differentiated into adipogenic and osteogenic lineages. The human adipose-derived stem cells aggregated and formed a dense matrix after chondrogenic induction. The expression of chondrogenic genes (collagen type II, aggrecan core protein, collagen type XI, COMP, and ELASTIN was significantly higher after the first week of induction. However, a significantly elevated expression of collagen type X was observed after three weeks of chondrogenic induction. CONCLUSION: Human adipose-derived stem cells retain stem cell characteristics after expansion in culture to passage 4 and serve as a feasible source of cells for cartilage regeneration. Chondrogenesis in human adiposederived stem cells was most prominent after one week of chondrogenic induction.

  18. Regeneration of Cartilage in Human Knee Osteoarthritis with Autologous Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells and Autologous Extracellular Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaewoo Pak

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This clinical case series demonstrates that percutaneous injections of autologous adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs and homogenized extracellular matrix (ECM in the form of adipose stromal vascular fraction (SVF, along with hyaluronic acid (HA and platelet-rich plasma (PRP activated by calcium chloride, could regenerate cartilage-like tissue in human knee osteoarthritis (OA patients. Autologous lipoaspirates were obtained from adipose tissue of the abdominal origin. Afterward, the lipoaspirates were minced to homogenize the ECM. These homogenized lipoaspirates were then mixed with collagenase and incubated. The resulting mixture of ADSCs and ECM in the form of SVF was injected, along with HA and PRP activated by calcium chloride, into knees of three Korean patients with OA. The same affected knees were reinjected weekly with additional PRP activated by calcium chloride for 3 weeks. Pretreatment and post-treatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data, functional rating index, range of motion (ROM, and pain score data were then analyzed. All patients' MRI data showed cartilage-like tissue regeneration. Along with MRI evidence, the measured physical therapy outcomes in terms of ROM, subjective pain, and functional status were all improved. This study demonstrates that percutaneous injection of ADSCs with ECM contained in autologous adipose SVF, in conjunction with HA and PRP activated by calcium chloride, is a safe and potentially effective minimally invasive therapy for OA of human knees.

  19. Human adult chondrocytes express hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) isoforms but not HgF: potential implication of osteoblasts on the presence of HGF in cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guévremont, Melanie; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Massicotte, Frédéric; Tardif, Ginette; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Ranger, Pierre; Lajeunesse, Daniel; Reboul, Pascal

    2003-06-01

    HGF is increased in human OA cartilage, possibly from Ob's. RT-PCR shows HGF isoforms are differently regulated between chondrocytes and Ob. A paracrine cross-talk between subchondral bone and cartilage may occur during OA. Recently, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) has been identified by immunohistochemistry in cartilage and more particularly in the deep zone of human osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage. By investigating HGF expression in cartilage, we found that chondrocytes did not express HGF; however, they expressed the two truncated isoforms, namely HGF/NK1 and HGF/NK2. Because the only other cells localized near the deep zone are osteoblasts from the subchondral bone plate, we hypothesized that they were expressing HGF. Indeed, we found that HGF was synthesized by osteoblasts from the subchondral bone plate. Moreover, OA osteoblasts produced five times more HGF than normal osteoblasts and almost no HGF/NK1, unlike normal osteoblasts. Because prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6 are involved in OA progression, we investigated whether these factors impact HGF produced by normal osteoblasts. PGE2 was the only factor tested that was able to stimulate HGF synthesis. However, the addition of NS398, a selective inhibitor of cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) had no effect on HGF produced by OA osteoblasts. HGF/NK2 had a moderate stimulating effect on HGF production by normal osteoblasts, whereas osteocalcin was not modulated by either HGF or HGF/NK2. When investigating signaling routes that might be implicated in OA osteoblast-produced HGF, we found that protein kinase A was at least partially involved. In summary, this study raises the hypothesis that the HGF found in articular cartilage is produced by osteoblasts, diffuses into the cartilage, and may be implicated in the OA process.

  20. An RGD-restricted substrate interface is sufficient for the adhesion, growth and cartilage forming capacity of human chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Vonwil

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at testing whether an RGD-restricted substrate interface is sufficient for adhesion and growth of human articular chondrocytes (HAC, and whether it enhances their post expansion chondrogenic capacity. HAC/substrate interaction was restricted to RGD by modifying tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS with a poly(ethylene glycol (PEG based copolymer system that renders the surface resistant to protein adsorption while at the same time presenting the bioactive RGD-containing peptide GCRGYGRGDSPG (RGD. As compared to TCPS, HAC cultured on RGD spread faster (1.9-fold, maintained higher type II collagen mRNA expression (4.9-fold and displayed a 19% lower spreading area. On RGD, HAC attachment efficiency (66±10% and proliferation rate (0.56±0.04 doublings/day, as well as type II collagen mRNA expression in the subsequent chondrogenic differentiation phase, were similar to those of cells cultured on TCPS. In contrast, cartilaginous matrix deposition by HAC expanded on RGD was slightly but consistently higher (15% higher glycosaminoglycan-to-DNA ratio. RDG (bioinactive peptide and PEG (no peptide ligand controls yielded drastically reduced attachment efficiency (lower than 11% and proliferation (lower than 0.20 doublings/day. Collectively, these data indicate that restriction of HAC interaction with a substrate through RGD peptides is sufficient to support their adhesion, growth and maintenance of cartilage forming capacity. The concept could thus be implemented in materials for cartilage repair, whereby in situ recruited/infiltrated chondroprogenitor cells would proliferate while maintaining their ability to differentiate and generate cartilage tissue.

  1. Articular cartilage repair with recombinant human type II collagen/polylactide scaffold in a preliminary porcine study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhonen, Virpi; Salonius, Eve; Haaparanta, Anne-Marie; Järvinen, Elina; Paatela, Teemu; Meller, Anna; Hannula, Markus; Björkman, Mimmi; Pyhältö, Tuomo; Ellä, Ville; Vasara, Anna; Töyräs, Juha; Kellomäki, Minna; Kiviranta, Ilkka

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of a novel recombinant human type II collagen/polylactide scaffold (rhCo-PLA) in the repair of full-thickness cartilage lesions with autologous chondrocyte implantation technique (ACI). The forming repair tissue was compared to spontaneous healing (spontaneous) and repair with a commercial porcine type I/III collagen membrane (pCo). Domestic pigs (4-month-old, n = 20) were randomized into three study groups and a circular full-thickness chondral lesion with a diameter of 8 mm was created in the right medial femoral condyle. After 3 weeks, the chondral lesions were repaired with either rhCo-PLA or pCo together with autologous chondrocytes, or the lesion was only debrided and left untreated for spontaneous repair. The repair tissue was evaluated 4 months after the second operation. Hyaline cartilage formed most frequently in the rhCo-PLA treatment group. Biomechanically, there was a trend that both treatment groups resulted in better repair tissue than spontaneous healing. Adverse subchondral bone reactions developed less frequently in the spontaneous group (40%) and the rhCo-PLA treated group (50%) than in the pCo control group (100%). However, no statistically significant differences were found between the groups. The novel rhCo-PLA biomaterial showed promising results in this proof-of-concept study, but further studies will be needed in order to determine its effectiveness in articular cartilage repair. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:745-753, 2016. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Hyaline cartilage tissue is formed through the co-culture of passaged human chondrocytes and primary bovine chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Drew W; Ahmed, Nazish; Hayes, Anthony J; Ferguson, Peter; Gross, Allan E; Caterson, Bruce; Kandel, Rita A

    2012-08-01

    To circumvent the problem of a sufficient number of cells for cartilage engineering, the authors previously developed a two-stage culture system to redifferentiate monolayer culture-expanded dedifferentiated human articular chondrocytes by co-culture with primary bovine chondrocytes (bP0). The aim of this study was to analyze the composition of the cartilage tissue formed in stage 1 and compare it with bP0 grown alone to determine the optimal length of the co-culture stage of the system. Biochemical data show that extracellular matrix accumulation was evident after 2 weeks of co-culture, which was 1 week behind the bP0 control culture. By 3 to 4 weeks, the amounts of accumulated proteoglycans and collagens were comparable. Expression of chondrogenic genes, Sox 9, aggrecan, and collagen type II, was also at similar levels by week 3 of culture. Immunohistochemical staining of both co-culture and control tissues showed accumulation of type II collagen, aggrecan, biglycan, decorin, and chondroitin sulfate in appropriate zonal distributions. These data indicate that co-cultured cells form cartilaginous tissue that starts to resemble that formed by bP0 after 3 weeks, suggesting that the optimal time to terminate the co-culture stage, isolate the now redifferentiated cells, and start stage 2 is just after 3 weeks.

  3. Articular cartilage defect detectability in human knees with MR-arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, A. [Orthopaedic Clinic, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Kramer, J. [MR-Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Stiglbauer, R. [MR-Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Hajek, P.C. [MR-Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Imhof, H. [MR-Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria)

    1993-04-01

    One hundred and thirteen knee joints were examined, of which 48 showed damage of the hyaline cartilage in one or more locations. For the evaluation of the magnetic resonance (MR) arthrographic images we used the macroscopic staging according to Outerbridge, the defect staging according to Bauer, as well as a new MR-arthrographic staging. The results of the evaluation were compared with the surgical findings in 61 knee joints. This revealed a sensitivity of 86 %, a specificity of 100 % and accuracy of 90 %. All lesions that could not be classified on MR-arthrography were of stage-I chondromalacia. (orig.)

  4. Reliability of cut mark analysis in human costal cartilage: the effects of blade penetration angle and intra- and inter-individual differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puentes, K; Cardoso, H F V

    2013-09-10

    Identification of tool class characteristics from cut marks in either bone or cartilage is a valuable source of data for the forensic scientist. Various animal models have been used in experimental studies for the analysis of individual and class characteristics. However, human tissue has seldom been used and it is likely to differ from that of non-humans in key aspects. This study wishes to assess how the knife's blade angle, and both intra- and inter-individual variation in cartilage samples affect the ability of costal cartilage to retain the original class characteristics of the knife, as measured microscopically by the distance between consecutive striations. The 120 cartilaginous samples used in this study originated from the ribcage of 6 male cadavers which were submitted to autopsy at the North Branch of the National Institute of Legal Medicine, in Portugal. Three different serrated knives were purchased from a large department store, and were used in the experimental cuts. Samples of costal cartilage from 2 individuals were assigned to each knife. Each individual provided 20 cartilage samples. Cartilage samples were manually cut using each of the three knives, following two motions: one straight up-and-down cutting motion and parallel and one perpendicular to the blade's teeth long axis forward cutting motion. Casts of the samples were made with Mikrosil(®). Image capture and processing were performed with an Olympus stereomicroscope and its software. The blade's penetration angle and inter-individual variation were shown to affect the identification of the tool class characteristics from the striation pattern observed in a kerf wall, although this seems to be related only to the degree of calcification of the costal cartilage. Intra-individual variation does not seem to significantly affect the identification of the tool class characteristics from the striation pattern observed in a kerf wall, for the same knife following the same motion. Although this

  5. Shear loading of costal cartilage

    CERN Document Server

    Subit, Damien

    2014-01-01

    A series of tests were performed on a single post-mortem human subject at various length scales. First, tabletop tests were performed. Next, the ribs and intercostal muscles were tested with the view to characterize the load transfer between the ribs. Finally, the costal cartilage was tested under shear loading, as it plays an important in the transfer of the load between the ribs and the sternum. This paper reports the results of dynamic shear loading tests performed on three samples of costal cartilage harvested from a single post-mortem human subject, as well as the quantification of the effective Young's modulus estimated from the amount of cartilage calcification.

  6. Cartilage-selective genes identified in genome-scale analysis of non-cartilage and cartilage gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohn Zachary A

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cartilage plays a fundamental role in the development of the human skeleton. Early in embryogenesis, mesenchymal cells condense and differentiate into chondrocytes to shape the early skeleton. Subsequently, the cartilage anlagen differentiate to form the growth plates, which are responsible for linear bone growth, and the articular chondrocytes, which facilitate joint function. However, despite the multiplicity of roles of cartilage during human fetal life, surprisingly little is known about its transcriptome. To address this, a whole genome microarray expression profile was generated using RNA isolated from 18–22 week human distal femur fetal cartilage and compared with a database of control normal human tissues aggregated at UCLA, termed Celsius. Results 161 cartilage-selective genes were identified, defined as genes significantly expressed in cartilage with low expression and little variation across a panel of 34 non-cartilage tissues. Among these 161 genes were cartilage-specific genes such as cartilage collagen genes and 25 genes which have been associated with skeletal phenotypes in humans and/or mice. Many of the other cartilage-selective genes do not have established roles in cartilage or are novel, unannotated genes. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the unique pattern of gene expression observed by microarray analysis. Conclusion Defining the gene expression pattern for cartilage has identified new genes that may contribute to human skeletogenesis as well as provided further candidate genes for skeletal dysplasias. The data suggest that fetal cartilage is a complex and transcriptionally active tissue and demonstrate that the set of genes selectively expressed in the tissue has been greatly underestimated.

  7. Regeneration of human bones in hip osteonecrosis and human cartilage in knee osteoarthritis with autologous adipose-tissue-derived stem cells: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pak Jaewoo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction This is a series of clinical case reports demonstrating that a combination of percutaneously injected autologous adipose-tissue-derived stem cells, hyaluronic acid, platelet rich plasma and calcium chloride may be able to regenerate bones in human osteonecrosis, and with addition of a very low dose of dexamethasone, cartilage in human knee osteoarthritis. Case reports Stem cells were obtained from adipose tissue of abdominal origin by digesting lipoaspirate tissue with collagenase. These stem cells, along with hyaluronic acid, platelet rich plasma and calcium chloride, were injected into the right hip of a 29-year-old Korean woman and a 47-year-old Korean man. They both had a history of right hip osteonecrosis of the femoral head. For cartilage regeneration, a 70-year-old Korean woman and a 79-year-old Korean woman, both with a long history of knee pain due to osteoarthritis, were injected with stem cells along with hyaluronic acid, platelet rich plasma, calcium chloride and a nanogram dose of dexamethasone. Pre-treatment and post-treatment MRI scans, physical therapy, and pain score data were then analyzed. Conclusions The MRI data for all the patients in this series showed significant positive changes. Probable bone formation was clear in the patients with osteonecrosis, and cartilage regeneration in the patients with osteoarthritis. Along with MRI evidence, the measured physical therapy outcomes, subjective pain, and functional status all improved. Autologous mesenchymal stem cell injection, in conjunction with hyaluronic acid, platelet rich plasma and calcium chloride, is a promising minimally invasive therapy for osteonecrosis of femoral head and, with low-dose dexamethasone, for osteoarthritis of human knees.

  8. An in vitro comparative study of T2 and T2* mappings of human articular cartilage at 3-Tesla MRI using histology as the standard of reference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Taehee; Park, Sunghoon [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Ajou University Medical Center, Musculoskeletal Imaging Laboratory, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Min, Byoung-Hyun [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Ajou University School of Medicine, Cartilage Regeneration Center, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Seung-Hyun [Ajou University School of Medicine, Cartilage Regeneration Center, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hakil [INHA University, School of Information and Communication Engineering, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyun Young [Ajou University Medical Center, Regional Clinical Trial Center, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Biostatistics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwack, Kyu-Sung [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Ajou University Medical Center, Musculoskeletal Imaging Laboratory, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Ajou University School of Medicine, Cartilage Regeneration Center, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlations between T2 value, T2* value, and histological grades of degenerated human articular cartilage. T2 mapping and T2* mapping of nine tibial osteochondral specimens were obtained using a 3-T MRI after total knee arthroplasty. A total of 94 ROIs were analyzed. Histological grades were assessed using the David-Vaudey scale. Spearman's rho correlation analysis and Pearson's correlation analysis were performed. The mean relaxation values in T2 map with different histological grades (0, 1, 2) of the cartilage were 51.9 ± 9.2 ms, 55.8 ± 12.8 ms, and 59.6 ± 10.2 ms, respectively. The mean relaxation values in T2* map with different histological grades (0, 1, 2) of the cartilage were 20.3 ± 10.3 ms, 21.1 ± 12.4 ms, and 15.4 ± 8.5 ms, respectively. Spearman's rho correlation analysis confirmed a positive correlation between T2 value and histological grade (ρ = 0.313, p < 0.05). Pearson's correlation analysis revealed a significant negative correlation between T2 and T2* (r = -0.322, p < 0.05). Although T2* values showed a decreasing trend with an increase in cartilage degeneration, this correlation was not statistically significant in this study (ρ = -0.192, p = 0.129). T2 mapping was correlated with histological degeneration, and it may be a good biomarker for osteoarthritis in human articular cartilage. However, the strength of the correlation was weak (ρ = 0.313). Although T2* values showed a decreasing trend with an increase in cartilage degeneration, the correlation was not statistically significant. Therefore, T2 mapping may be more appropriate for the initial diagnosis of articular cartilage degeneration in the knee joint. Further studies on T2* mapping are needed to confirm its reliability and mechanism in cartilage degeneration. (orig.)

  9. Shark cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sarcoma, that is more common in people with HIV infection. Shark cartilage is also used for arthritis, psoriasis, ... Neovastat) by mouth seems to increase survival in patients with advanced kidney cancer (renal cell carcinoma). This product has FDA “Orphan Drug ...

  10. Human rheumatoid arthritis tissue production of IL-17A drives matrix and cartilage degradation: synergy with tumour necrosis factor-alpha, Oncostatin M and response to biologic therapies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, Ellen M

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to examine IL-17A in patients, following anti-TNF-alpha therapy and the effect of IL-17A on matrix turnover and cartilage degradation. METHODS: IL-17A expression was examined by ELISA and immunohistology in the rheumatoid arthritis (RA) joints. RA whole synovial tissue explant (RA ST), primary synovial fibroblasts (RASFC), human cartilage and chondrocyte cultures were stimulated with IL-17A +\\/- TNF-alpha and Oncostatin M (OSM). Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and tissue inhibitor (TIMP-1) were assessed by ELISA and zymography. Cartilage proteoglycan release was assessed histologically by Safranin-O staining. Clinical parameters, IL-17A, MMP\\/TIMP were assessed in patients pre\\/post biologic therapy. RESULTS: IL-17A levels were higher in RA vs osteoarthritis (OA)\\/normal joints (P < 0.05). IL-17A up-regulated MMP-1, -2, -9, and -13 in RA ST, RASFC, cartilage and chondrocyte cultures (P < 0.05). In combination with TNF-alpha and OSM, IL-17A shifted the MMP:TIMP-1 ratio in favor of matrix degradation (all P < 0.05). Cartilage proteoglycan depletion in response to IL-17A was mild; however, in combination with TNF-alpha or OSM showed almost complete proteoglycan depletion. Serum IL-17A was detected in 28% of patients commencing biologic therapy. IL-17A negative patients demonstrated reductions post therapy in serum MMP1\\/TIMP4, MMP3\\/TIMP1 and MMP3\\/TIMP4 ratios and an increase in CS846 (all P < 0.05). No significant changes were observed in IL-17A positive patients. CONCLUSIONS: IL-17A is produced locally in the inflamed RA joint. IL-17A promotes matrix turnover and cartilage destruction, especially in the presence of other cytokines, mimicking the joint environment. IL-17A levels are modulated in vivo, following anti-TNF therapy, and may reflect changes in matrix turnover.

  11. Computer-aided diagnosis in phase contrast imaging X-ray computed tomography for quantitative characterization of ex vivo human patellar cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B; Coan, Paola; Huber, Markus B; Diemoz, Paul C; Glaser, Christian; Wismuller, Axel

    2013-10-01

    Visualization of ex vivo human patellar cartilage matrix through the phase contrast imaging X-ray computed tomography (PCI-CT) has been previously demonstrated. Such studies revealed osteoarthritis-induced changes to chondrocyte organization in the radial zone. This study investigates the application of texture analysis to characterizing such chondrocyte patterns in the presence and absence of osteoarthritic damage. Texture features derived from Minkowski functionals (MF) and gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) were extracted from 842 regions of interest (ROI) annotated on PCI-CT images of ex vivo human patellar cartilage specimens. These texture features were subsequently used in a machine learning task with support vector regression to classify ROIs as healthy or osteoarthritic; classification performance was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). The best classification performance was observed with the MF features perimeter (AUC: 0.94 ±0.08 ) and "Euler characteristic" (AUC: 0.94 ±0.07 ), and GLCM-derived feature "Correlation" (AUC: 0.93 ±0.07). These results suggest that such texture features can provide a detailed characterization of the chondrocyte organization in the cartilage matrix, enabling classification of cartilage as healthy or osteoarthritic with high accuracy.

  12. Neonatal Desensitization Supports Long-Term Survival and Functional Integration of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Rat Joint Cartilage Without Immunosuppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shufang; Jiang, Yang Zi; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Longkun; Tong, Tong; Liu, Wanlu; Mu, Qin; Liu, Hua; Ji, Junfeng; Ouyang, Hong Wei

    2013-01-01

    Immunological response hampers the investigation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or their derivates for tissue regeneration in vivo. Immunosuppression is often used after surgery, but exhibits side effects of significant weight loss and allows only short-term observation. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether neonatal desensitization supports relative long-term survival of hESC-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hESC-MSCs) and promotes cartilage regeneration. hESC-MSCs were injected on the day of birth in rats. Six weeks after neonatal injection, a full-thickness cylindrical cartilage defect was created and transplanted with a hESC-MSC-seeded collagen bilayer scaffold (group d+s+c) or a collagen bilayer scaffold (group d+s). Rats without neonatal injection were transplanted with the hESC-MSC-seeded collagen bilayer scaffold to serve as controls (group s+c). Cartilage regeneration was evaluated by histological analysis, immunohistochemical staining, and biomechanical test. The role of hESC-MSCs in cartilage regeneration was analyzed by CD4 immunostaining, cell death detection, and visualization of human cells in regenerated tissues. hESC-MSCs expressed CD105, CD73, CD90, CD29, and CD44, but not CD45 and CD34, and possessed trilineage differentiation potential. Group d+s+c exhibited greater International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) scores than group d+s or group s+c. Abundant collagen type II and improved mechanical properties were detected in group d+s+c. There were less CD4+ inflammatory cell infiltration and cell death at week 1, and hESC-MSCs were found to survive as long as 8 weeks after transplantation in group d+s+c. Our study suggests that neonatal desensitization before transplantation may be an efficient way to develop a powerful tool for preclinical study of human cell-based therapies in animal models. PMID:22788986

  13. Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells: A New Path in Articular Cartilage Defect Management?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Philipp Stromps

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to data published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, over 6 million people undergo a variety of medical procedures for the repair of articular cartilage defects in the U.S. each year. Trauma, tumor, and age-related degeneration can cause major defects in articular cartilage, which has a poor intrinsic capacity for healing. Therefore, there is substantial interest in the development of novel cartilage tissue engineering strategies to restore articular cartilage defects to a normal or prediseased state. Special attention has been paid to the expansion of chondrocytes, which produce and maintain the cartilaginous matrix in healthy cartilage. This review summarizes the current efforts to generate chondrocytes from adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs and provides an outlook on promising future strategies.

  14. Enhanced human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell functions in novel 3D cartilage scaffolds with hydrogen treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Benjamin; Castro, Nathan J; Li, Jian; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2013-09-13

    Cartilage tissue is a nanostructured tissue which is notoriously hard to regenerate due to its extremely poor inherent regenerative capacity and complex stratified architecture. Current treatment methods are highly invasive and may have many complications. Thus, the goal of this work is to use nanomaterials and nano/microfabrication methods to create novel biologically inspired tissue engineered cartilage scaffolds to facilitate human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) chondrogenesis. To this end we utilized electrospinning to design and fabricate a series of novel 3D biomimetic nanostructured scaffolds based on hydrogen (H2) treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and biocompatible poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) polymers. Specifically, a series of electrospun fibrous PLLA scaffolds with controlled fiber dimension were fabricated in this study. In vitro MSC studies showed that stem cells prefer to attach in the scaffolds with smaller fiber diameter. More importantly, the MWCNT embedded scaffolds showed a drastic increase in mechanical strength and a compressive Young's modulus matching to natural cartilage. Furthermore, our MSC differentiation results demonstrated that incorporation of the H2 treated carbon nanotubes and poly-L-lysine coating can induce more chondrogenic differentiations of MSCs than controls. After two weeks of culture, PLLA scaffolds with H2 treated MWCNTs and poly-L-lysine can achieve the highest glycosaminoglycan synthesis, making them promising for further exploration for cartilage regeneration.

  15. Enhanced human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell functions in novel 3D cartilage scaffolds with hydrogen treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Benjamin; Castro, Nathan J.; Li, Jian; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2013-09-01

    Cartilage tissue is a nanostructured tissue which is notoriously hard to regenerate due to its extremely poor inherent regenerative capacity and complex stratified architecture. Current treatment methods are highly invasive and may have many complications. Thus, the goal of this work is to use nanomaterials and nano/microfabrication methods to create novel biologically inspired tissue engineered cartilage scaffolds to facilitate human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) chondrogenesis. To this end we utilized electrospinning to design and fabricate a series of novel 3D biomimetic nanostructured scaffolds based on hydrogen (H2) treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and biocompatible poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) polymers. Specifically, a series of electrospun fibrous PLLA scaffolds with controlled fiber dimension were fabricated in this study. In vitro MSC studies showed that stem cells prefer to attach in the scaffolds with smaller fiber diameter. More importantly, the MWCNT embedded scaffolds showed a drastic increase in mechanical strength and a compressive Young’s modulus matching to natural cartilage. Furthermore, our MSC differentiation results demonstrated that incorporation of the H2 treated carbon nanotubes and poly-L-lysine coating can induce more chondrogenic differentiations of MSCs than controls. After two weeks of culture, PLLA scaffolds with H2 treated MWCNTs and poly-L-lysine can achieve the highest glycosaminoglycan synthesis, making them promising for further exploration for cartilage regeneration.

  16. Adeno-Associated Vector mediated gene transfer of Transforming Growth Factor-beta1 to normal and osteoarthritic human chondrocytes stimulates cartilage anabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich-Vinther M.

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate whether cartilage anabolism in human primary osteoarthritic chondrocytes could be improved by adeno-associated virus (AAV vector-mediated gene transduction of transforming growth factor TGF-beta1 (TGF-beta1. A bi-cistronic AAV-TGF-beta1-IRES-eGFP (AAV-TGF-beta1 vector was generated and used for transduction of a normal human articular chondrocyte cell line (tsT/AC62 and primary human osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes harvested from 8 patients receiving total knee joint arthroplasty. Transduction efficiency was detected by fluorescent microscopy for gene expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP. TGF-beta1 synthesis was determined by ELISA. To assess the influence of TGF-beta1 gene therapy on chondrocyte cartilage metabolism, mRNA expressions of type II collagen, aggrecan, and matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3 were determined by quantitative real-time PCR. AAV-TGF-beta1 transduction resulted in increased synthesis of TGF-beta1 in both osteoarthritic chondrocytes and the normal articular chondrocyte cell line. The expression levels of the transduced genes were correlated to "multiplicity of infection" (MOI and post-infectious time. In both osteoarthritic chondrocytes and the normal articular chondrocyte cell line, AAV-TGF-beta1 treatment increased mRNA expression of both type II collagen and aggrecan, but decreased MMP-3 mRNA expression. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes and the normal articular chondrocyte cell line could be transduced with equal efficiencies. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that AAV-TGF-beta1 gene transfer stimulates cartilage anabolism and decreases expression of enzymes responsible for cartilage degradation in human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. The results indicate that the AAV vector is an efficient mediator of growth factors to human articular chondrocytes, and that it might be useful in future chondrocyte gene therapy.

  17. MRI quantification of human spine cartilage endplate geometry: Comparison with age, degeneration, level, and disc geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLucca, John F; Peloquin, John M; Smith, Lachlan J; Wright, Alexander C; Vresilovic, Edward J; Elliott, Dawn M

    2016-08-01

    Geometry is an important indicator of disc mechanical function and degeneration. While the geometry and associated degenerative changes in the nucleus pulposus and the annulus fibrosus are well-defined, the geometry of the cartilage endplate (CEP) and its relationship to disc degeneration are unknown. The objectives of this study were to quantify CEP geometry in three dimensions using an MRI FLASH imaging sequence and evaluate relationships between CEP geometry and age, degeneration, spinal level, and overall disc geometry. To do so, we assessed the MRI-based measurements for accuracy and repeatability. Next, we measured CEP geometry across a larger sample set and correlated CEP geometric parameters to age, disc degeneration, level, and disc geometry. The MRI-based measures resulted in thicknesses (0.3-1 mm) that are comparable to prior measurements of CEP thickness. CEP thickness was greatest at the anterior/posterior (A/P) margins and smallest in the center. The CEP A/P thickness, axial area, and lateral width decreased with age but were not related to disc degeneration. Age-related, but not degeneration-related, changes in geometry suggest that the CEP may not follow the progression of disc degeneration. Ultimately, if the CEP undergoes significant geometric changes with aging and if these can be related to low back pain, a clinically feasible translation of the FLASH MRI-based measurement of CEP geometry presented in this study may prove a useful diagnostic tool. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1410-1417, 2016.

  18. Optical properties of nasal septum cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagratashvili, Nodar V.; Sviridov, Alexander P.; Sobol, Emil N.; Kitai, Moishe S.

    1998-05-01

    Optical parameters (scattering coefficient s, absorption coefficient k and scattering anisotropy coefficient g) of hyaline cartilage were studied for the first time. Optical properties of human and pig nasal septum cartilage, and of bovine ear cartilage were examined using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere, and an Optical Multi-Channel Analyser. We measured total transmission Tt, total reflection Rt, and on-axis transmission Ta for light propagating through cartilage sample, over the visible spectral range (14000 - 28000 cm-1). It is shown that transmission and reflection spectra of human, pig and bovine cartilage are rather similar. It allows us to conclude that the pig cartilage can be used for in-vivo studies instead of human cartilage. The data obtained were treated by means of the one-dimensional diffusion approximation solution of the optical transport equation. We have found scattering coefficient s, absorption coefficient k and scattering anisotropy coefficient g by the iterative comparison of measured and calculated Tt, Rt and Ta values for human and pig cartilage. We found, in particular, that for 500 nm irradiation s equals 37,6 plus or minus 3.5 cm-1, g equals 0,56 plus or minus 0.05, k approximately equals 0,5 plus or minus 0.3 cm-1. The above data were used in Monte Carlo simulation for spatial intensity profile of light scattered by a cartilage sample. The computed profile was very similar to the profile measured using an Optical Multi-Channel Analyzer (OMA).

  19. Deferoxamine Suppresses Collagen Cleavage and Protease, Cytokine, and COL10A1 Expression and Upregulates AMPK and Krebs Cycle Genes in Human Osteoarthritic Cartilage

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    Elena V. Tchetina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the effects of the iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO on collagen cleavage, inflammation, and chondrocyte hypertrophy in relation to energy metabolism-related gene expression in osteoarthritic (OA articular cartilage. Full-depth explants of human OA knee articular cartilage from arthroplasty were cultured with exogenous DFO (1–50 μM. Type II collagen cleavage and phospho-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (pAMPK concentrations were measured using ELISAs. Gene expression studies employed real-time PCR and included AMPK analyses in PBMCs. In OA explants collagen cleavage was frequently downregulated by 10–50 μM DFO. PCR analysis of 7 OA patient cartilages revealed that 10 μM DFO suppressed expression of MMP-1, MMP-13, IL-1β, and TNFα and a marker of chondrocyte hypertrophy, COL10A1. No changes were observed in the expression of glycolysis-related genes. In contrast, expressions of genes associated with the mitochondrial Krebs cycle (TCA, AMPK, HIF1α, and COL2A1 were upregulated. AMPK gene expression was reduced in OA cartilage and increased in PBMCs from the same patients compared to healthy controls. Our studies demonstrate that DFO is capable of suppressing excessive collagenase-mediated type II collagen cleavage in OA cartilage and reversing phenotypic changes. The concomitant upregulation of proanabolic TCA-related gene expressions points to a potential for availability of energy generating substrates required for matrix repair by end-stage OA chondrocytes. This might normally be prevented by high whole-body energy requirements indicated by elevated AMPK expression in PBMCs of OA patients.

  20. Deferoxamine Suppresses Collagen Cleavage and Protease, Cytokine, and COL10A1 Expression and Upregulates AMPK and Krebs Cycle Genes in Human Osteoarthritic Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchetina, Elena V; Markova, Galina A; Poole, A Robin; Zukor, David J; Antoniou, John; Makarov, Sergey A; Kuzin, Aleksandr N

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the effects of the iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO) on collagen cleavage, inflammation, and chondrocyte hypertrophy in relation to energy metabolism-related gene expression in osteoarthritic (OA) articular cartilage. Full-depth explants of human OA knee articular cartilage from arthroplasty were cultured with exogenous DFO (1-50 μM). Type II collagen cleavage and phospho-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (pAMPK) concentrations were measured using ELISAs. Gene expression studies employed real-time PCR and included AMPK analyses in PBMCs. In OA explants collagen cleavage was frequently downregulated by 10-50 μM DFO. PCR analysis of 7 OA patient cartilages revealed that 10 μM DFO suppressed expression of MMP-1, MMP-13, IL-1β, and TNFα and a marker of chondrocyte hypertrophy, COL10A1. No changes were observed in the expression of glycolysis-related genes. In contrast, expressions of genes associated with the mitochondrial Krebs cycle (TCA), AMPK, HIF1α, and COL2A1 were upregulated. AMPK gene expression was reduced in OA cartilage and increased in PBMCs from the same patients compared to healthy controls. Our studies demonstrate that DFO is capable of suppressing excessive collagenase-mediated type II collagen cleavage in OA cartilage and reversing phenotypic changes. The concomitant upregulation of proanabolic TCA-related gene expressions points to a potential for availability of energy generating substrates required for matrix repair by end-stage OA chondrocytes. This might normally be prevented by high whole-body energy requirements indicated by elevated AMPK expression in PBMCs of OA patients.

  1. Incorporation of exudates of human platelet-rich fibrin gel in biodegradable fibrin scaffolds for tissue engineering of cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Chi-Sheng; Ho, Hsiu-O; Liang, Yu-Chih; Ko, Pai-Hung; Sheu, Ming-Thau; Chen, Chien-Ho

    2012-05-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the incorporation of exudates of human platelet-rich fibrin (hPRF) that is abundant in platelet cytokines and growth factors into biodegradable fibrin (FB) scaffolds as a regeneration matrix for promoting chondrocyte proliferation and re-differentiation. hPRF was obtained from human blood by centrifugation without an anticoagulant, and the exudate of hPRF was collected and mixed with bovine fibrinogen, and then thrombin was added to form the FB scaffold. Proliferation and differentiation of human primary chondrocytes and a human chondrosarcoma cell line, the SW-1353, embedded in the three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds and on the two-dimensional (2D) surface of the FB scaffolds so produced were evaluated in comparison with an agarose (AG) scaffold serving as the control. Results demonstrated that the amounts of these cytokines and growth factors in hPRF exudates were higher than those in the blood-derived products except for TGF-β1. Chondrocytes and SW1353 cells on the 2D and 3D FB scaffolds with the addition of the exudates of PRF exhibited more-available proliferation and differentiation than cells on 2D and 3D FB and AG scaffolds. It was concluded that FB scaffolds can provide an appropriate environment for chondrocyte proliferation and re-differentiation, and it could be improved by adding exudates of hPRF. These 3D scaffolds have great promise for cartilage tissue engineering. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Imaging of Osteoarthritic Human Articular Cartilage using Fourier Transform Infrared Microspectroscopy Combined with Multivariate and Univariate Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oinas, J; Rieppo, L; Finnilä, M A J; Valkealahti, M; Lehenkari, P; Saarakkala, S

    2016-07-21

    The changes in chemical composition of human articular cartilage (AC) caused by osteoarthritis (OA) were investigated using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR-MS). We demonstrate the sensitivity of FTIR-MS for monitoring compositional changes that occur with OA progression. Twenty-eight AC samples from tibial plateaus were imaged with FTIR-MS. Hyperspectral images of all samples were combined for K-means clustering. Partial least squares regression (PLSR) analysis was used to compare the spectra with the OARSI grade (histopathological grading of OA). Furthermore, the amide I and the carbohydrate regions were used to estimate collagen and proteoglycan contents, respectively. Spectral peak at 1338 cm(-1) was used to estimate the integrity of the collagen network. The layered structure of AC was revealed using the carbohydrate region for clustering. Statistically significant correlation was observed between the OARSI grade and the collagen integrity in the superficial (r = -0.55) and the deep (r = -0.41) zones. Furthermore, PLSR models predicted the OARSI grade from the superficial (r = 0.94) and the deep (r = 0.77) regions of the AC with high accuracy. Obtained results suggest that quantitative and qualitative changes occur in the AC composition during OA progression, and these can be monitored by the use of FTIR-MS.

  3. Nanoparticulate Mineralized Collagen Scaffolds and BMP-9 Induce a Long-Term Bone Cartilage Construct in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaoyan; Weisgerber, Daniel W; Bischoff, David; Lewis, Michael S; Reid, Russell R; He, Tong-Chuan; Yamaguchi, Dean T; Miller, Timothy A; Harley, Brendan A C; Lee, Justine C

    2016-07-01

    Engineering the osteochondral junction requires fabrication of a microenvironment that supports both osteogenesis and chondrogenesis. Multiphasic scaffold strategies utilizing a combination of soluble factors and extracellular matrix components are ideally suited for such applications. In this work, the contribution of an osteogenic nanoparticulate mineralized glycosaminoglycan scaffold (MC-GAG) and a dually chondrogenic and osteogenic growth factor, BMP-9, in the differentiation of primary human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) is evaluated. Although 2D cultures demonstrate alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization of hMSCs induced by BMP-9, MC-GAG scaffolds do not demonstrate significant differences in the collagen I expression, osteopontin expression, or mineralization. Instead, BMP-9 increases expression of collagen II, Sox9, aggrecan (ACAN), and cartilage oligomeric protein. However, the hypertrophic chondrocyte marker, collagen X, is not elevated with BMP-9 treatment. In addition, histologic analyses demonstrate that while BMP-9 does not increase mineralization, BMP-9 treatment results in an increase of sulfated glycosaminoglycans. Thus, the combination of BMP-9 and MC-GAG stimulates chondrocytic and osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs.

  4. ARG098, a novel anti-human Fas antibody, suppresses synovial hyperplasia and prevents cartilage destruction in a severe combined immunodeficient-HuRAg mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsubara Tsukasa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The anti-human Fas/APO-1/CD95 (Fas mouse/human chimeric monoclonal IgM antibody ARG098 (ARG098 targets the human Fas molecule. The cytotoxic effects of ARG098 on cells isolated from RA patients, on normal cells in vitro, and on RA synovial tissue and cartilage in vivo using implanted rheumatoid tissues in an SCID mouse model (SCID-HuRAg were investigated to examine the potential of ARG098 as a therapy for RA. Methods ARG098 binding to each cell was analyzed by cytometry. The effects of ARG098 on several cells were assessed by a cell viability assay in vitro. Effects on the RA synovium, lymphocytes, and cartilage were assessed in vivo using the SCID-HuRAg mouse model. Results ARG098 bound to cell surface Fas molecules, and induced apoptosis in Fas-expressing RA synoviocytes and infiltrating lymphocytes in the RA synovium in a dose-dependent manner. However, ARG098 did not affect the cell viability of peripheral blood mononuclear cells of RA patients or normal chondrocytes. ARG098 also induced apoptosis in RA synoviocytes and infiltrating lymphocytes in the RA synovium in vivo. The destruction of cartilage due to synovial invasion was inhibited by ARG098 injection in the modified SCID-HuRAg mouse model. Conclusions ARG098 treatment suppressed RA synovial hyperplasia through the induction of apoptosis and prevented cartilage destruction in vivo. These results suggest that ARG098 might become a new therapy for RA.

  5. Lubrication of Articular Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Sabrina; Seror, Jasmine; Klein, Jacob

    2016-07-11

    The major synovial joints such as hips and knees are uniquely efficient tribological systems, able to articulate over a wide range of shear rates with a friction coefficient between the sliding cartilage surfaces as low as 0.001 up to pressures of more than 100 atm. No human-made material can match this. The means by which such surfaces maintain their very low friction has been intensively studied for decades and has been attributed to fluid-film and boundary lubrication. Here, we focus especially on the latter: the reduction of friction by molecular layers at the sliding cartilage surfaces. In particular, we discuss such lubrication in the light of very recent advances in our understanding of boundary effects in aqueous media based on the paradigms of hydration lubrication and of the synergism between different molecular components of the synovial joints (namely hyaluronan, lubricin, and phospholipids) in enabling this lubrication.

  6. Enhancing FTIR imaging capabilities with two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS): A study of concentration gradients of collagen and proteoglycans in human patellar cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Eric Y.; Rieppo, Jarno

    2006-11-01

    This paper explores a new application of two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS) in FTIR spectroscopic imaging analysis of biological samples. A particular example demonstrated in this paper is the characterization of concentration gradients of collagen and proteoglycans in human patellar cartilage. A focal plane array detector-based FTIR imaging system has been proven to be an efficient tool to detect early collagen and proteoglycans degradation in developing osteoarthrosis through evaluating compositional changes of osteoarthritic cartilage along the depth. However, the closely overlapped bands of collagen and proteoglycans make normal spectral and spatial analysis difficult. With 2DCOS analysis of the imaging data, it is possible to enhance the spectral resolution and reveal distinctive compositional changes that are normally hidden with conventional approaches. The combined technique, FTIR imaging enhanced with 2DCOS, provides new possibilities to solve challenging problems in the analysis of complex biological systems.

  7. Quantitative analysis of the mRNA expression levels of BCL2 and BAX genes in human osteoarthritis and normal articular cartilage: An investigation into their differential expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaliotas, Georgios I; Mavridis, Konstantinos; Scorilas, Andreas; Babis, George C

    2015-09-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is primarily characterized by articular cartilage degeneration and chondrocyte loss. Although the role of apoptosis in cartilage pathobiology remains to be elucidated, the apoptotic B‑cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (BCL2) gene family is considered to be involved in OA. The purpose of the present study was to quantitatively analyze the mRNA expression profiles of the BCL2‑associated X protein (BAX) and BCL2 genes in human OA and in normal cartilage. Cartilage tissue samples were obtained from 78 patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty for OA (OA group) and orthopedic interventions for causes other than OA (control group). Total RNA was isolated from the cartilage tissue specimens and reverse transcribed into cDNA. A highly sensitive and specific reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay was developed for quantification of the mRNA levels of BAX and BCL2, using beta‑2 microglobulin as an endogenous control for normalization purposes. Gene expression analysis was performed using the comparative Ct (2(‑ΔΔCt)) method. The mRNA expression of BAX presented an increasing trend in the OA group compared with the control group, although without statistically significace (P=0.099). By contrast, the expression ratio of BCL2/BAX was found to be significantly decreased (2.76‑fold) in the OA group compared with the normal cartilage control group (P=0.022). A notable 4.6‑fold overexpression of median mRNA levels of BAX was also observed in patients with stage III OA compared with the control (P=0.034), while the BCL2/BAX ratio was markedly (2.5‑fold) decreased (P=0.024). A marked positive correlation was observed between the mRNA levels of BAX and BCL2 in the control group (r(s)=0.728; P<0.001), which was also present in the OA group, although to a lesser degree (r(s)=0.532; P<0.001). These results further implicate apoptosis in the pathogenesis of OA, through molecular mechanisms, which include the aberrant expression of the

  8. Unsupervised definition of the tibia-femoral joint regions of the human knee and its applications to cartilage analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamez-Peña, José G.; Barbu-McInnis, Monica; Totterman, Saara

    2006-03-01

    Abnormal MR findings including cartilage defects, cartilage denuded areas, osteophytes, and bone marrow edema (BME) are used in staging and evaluating the degree of osteoarthritis (OA) in the knee. The locations of the abnormal findings have been correlated to the degree of pain and stiffness of the joint in the same location. The definition of the anatomic region in MR images is not always an objective task, due to the lack of clear anatomical features. This uncertainty causes variance in the location of the abnormality between readers and time points. Therefore, it is important to have a reproducible system to define the anatomic regions. This works present a computerized approach to define the different anatomic knee regions. The approach is based on an algorithm that uses unique features of the femur and its spatial relation in the extended knee. The femur features are found from three dimensional segmentation maps of the knee. From the segmentation maps, the algorithm automatically divides the femur cartilage into five anatomic regions: trochlea, medial weight bearing area, lateral weight bearing area, posterior medial femoral condyle, and posterior lateral femoral condyle. Furthermore, the algorithm automatically labels the medial and lateral tibia cartilage. The unsupervised definition of the knee regions allows a reproducible way to evaluate regional OA changes. This works will present the application of this automated algorithm for the regional analysis of the cartilage tissue.

  9. The in vitro and in vivo capacity of culture-expanded human cells from several sources encapsulated in alginate to form cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MM Pleumeekers

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage has limited self-regenerative capacity. Tissue engineering can offer promising solutions for reconstruction of missing or damaged cartilage. A major challenge herein is to define an appropriate cell source that is capable of generating a stable and functional matrix. This study evaluated the performance of culture-expanded human chondrocytes from ear (EC, nose (NC and articular joint (AC, as well as bone-marrow-derived and adipose-tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells both in vitro and in vivo. All cells (≥ 3 donors per source were culture-expanded, encapsulated in alginate and cultured for 5 weeks. Subsequently, constructs were implanted subcutaneously for 8 additional weeks. Before and after implantation, glycosaminoglycan (GAG and collagen content were measured using biochemical assays. Mechanical properties were determined using stress-strain-indentation tests. Hypertrophic differentiation was evaluated with qRT-PCR and subsequent endochondral ossification with histology. ACs had higher chondrogenic potential in vitro than the other cell sources, as assessed by gene expression and GAG content (p < 0.001. However, after implantation, ACs did not further increase their matrix. In contrast, ECs and NCs continued producing matrix in vivo leading to higher GAG content (p < 0.001 and elastic modulus. For NC-constructs, matrix-deposition was associated with the elastic modulus (R2 = 0.477, p = 0.039. Although all cells – except ACs – expressed markers for hypertrophic differentiation in vitro, there was no bone formed in vivo. Our work shows that cartilage formation and functionality depends on the cell source used. ACs possess the highest chondrogenic capacity in vitro, while ECs and NCs are most potent in vivo, making them attractive cell sources for cartilage repair.

  10. Chondroitin sulphate and heparan sulphate sulphation motifs and their proteoglycans are involved in articular cartilage formation during human foetal knee joint development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melrose, James; Isaacs, Marc D; Smith, Susan M; Hughes, Clare E; Little, Christopher B; Caterson, Bruce; Hayes, Anthony J

    2012-09-01

    Novel sulphation motifs within the glycosaminoglycan chain structure of chondroitin sulphate (CS) containing proteoglycans (PGs) are associated with sites of growth, differentiation and repair in many biological systems and there is compelling evidence that they function as molecular recognition sites that are involved in the binding, sequestration or presentation of soluble signalling molecules (e.g. morphogens, growth factors and cytokines). Here, using monoclonal antibodies 3B3(-), 4C3 and 7D4, we examine the distribution of native CS sulphation motifs within the developing connective tissues of the human foetal knee joint, both during and after joint cavitation. We show that the CS motifs have broad, overlapping distributions within the differentiating connective tissues before the joint has fully cavitated; however, after cavitation, they all localise very specifically to the presumptive articular cartilage tissue. Comparisons with the labelling patterns of heparan sulphate (HS), HS-PGs (perlecan, syndecan-4 and glypican-6) and FGF-2, molecules with known signalling roles in development, indicate that these also become localised to the future articular cartilage tissue after joint cavitation. Furthermore, they display interesting, overlapping distributions with the CS motifs, reflective of early tissue zonation. The overlapping expression patterns of these molecules at this site suggests they are involved, or co-participate, in early morphogenetic events underlying articular cartilage formation; thus having potential clinical relevance to mechanisms involved in its repair/regeneration. We propose that these CS sulphation motifs are involved in modulating the signalling gradients responsible for the cellular behaviours (proliferation, differentiation, matrix turnover) that shape the zonal tissue architecture present in mature articular cartilage.

  11. Assessment of chemical species of lead accumulated in tidemarks of human articular cartilage by X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meirer, Florian [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, 1020 Wien (Austria); MiNALab, CMM-Irst, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Via Sommarive 18, 38123 Trento (Italy); Pemmer, Bernhard, E-mail: bpemmer@ati.ac.at [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, 1020 Wien (Austria); Pepponi, Giancarlo [MiNALab, CMM-Irst, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Via Sommarive 18, 38123 Trento (Italy); Zoeger, Norbert; Wobrauschek, Peter [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, 1020 Wien (Austria); Sprio, Simone; Tampieri, Anna [Istituto di Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali Ceramici CNR, Faenca (Italy); Goettlicher, Joerg; Steininger, Ralph; Mangold, Stefan [Institute for Synchrotron Radiation, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Campus South, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Roschger, Paul [Ludwig Boltzmann Institute of Osteology, Hanusch Hospital of WGKK and AUVA Trauma Centre Meidling, 4th Medical Department, Hanusch Hospital, Vienna (Austria); Berzlanovich, Andrea [Department of Forensic Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Hofstaetter, Jochen G. [Ludwig Boltzmann Institute of Osteology, Hanusch Hospital of WGKK and AUVA Trauma Centre Meidling, 4th Medical Department, Hanusch Hospital, Vienna (Austria); Department of Orthopaedics, Vienna General Hospital, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Streli, Christina [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, 1020 Wien (Austria)

    2011-03-01

    Lead is a toxic trace element that shows a highly specific accumulation in the transition zone between calcified and non-calcified articular cartilage, the so-called ‘tidemark’. Excellent agreement has been found between XANES spectra of synthetic Pb-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite and spectra obtained in the tidemark region and trabecular bone of normal human samples, confirming that in both tissues Pb is incorporated into the hydroxyapatite crystal structure of bone. During this study the µ-XANES set-up at the SUL-X beamline at ANKA was tested and has proven to be well suited for speciation of lead in human mineralized tissue samples. A highly specific accumulation of the toxic element lead was recently measured in the transition zone between non-calcified and calcified normal human articular cartilage. This transition zone, the so-called ‘tidemark’, is considered to be an active calcification front of great clinical importance. However, little is known about the mechanisms of accumulation and the chemical form of Pb in calcified cartilage and bone. Using spatially resolved X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis (µ-XANES) at the Pb L{sub 3}-edge, the chemical state of Pb in the osteochondral region was investigated. The feasibility of the µ-XANES set-up at the SUL-X beamline (ANKA synchrotron light source) was tested and confirmed by comparing XANES spectra of bulk Pb-reference compounds recorded at both the XAS and the SUL-X beamline at ANKA. The µ-XANES set-up was then used to investigate the tidemark region of human bone (two patella samples and one femoral head sample). The spectra recorded at the tidemark and at the trabecular bone were found to be highly correlated with the spectra of synthetic Pb-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite, suggesting that in both of these very different tissues Pb is incorporated into the hydroxyapatite structure.

  12. Imaging of articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhawan K Paunipagar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We tried to review the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in understanding microscopic and morphologic structure of the articular cartilage. The optimal protocols and available spin-echo sequences in present day practice are reviewed in context of common pathologies of articular cartilage. The future trends of articular cartilage imaging have been discussed with their appropriateness. In diarthrodial joints of the body, articular cartilage is functionally very important. It is frequently exposed to trauma, degeneration, and repetitive wear and tear. MRI has played a vital role in evaluation of articular cartilage. With the availability of advanced repair surgeries for cartilage lesions, there has been an increased demand for improved cartilage imaging techniques. Recent advances in imaging strategies for native and postoperative articular cartilage open up an entirely new approach in management of cartilage-related pathologies.

  13. Cartilage constructs from human cord blood stem cells seeded in structurally-graded polycaprolactone scaffolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munir, Samir; Koch, Thomas Gadegaard; Foldager, Casper Bindzus

    stimulation. This study demonstrated the chondrogenic potential of human cord blood-derived Multi-Lineage Progenitor Cells (MLPCs) under normoxic and hypoxic culture conditions. Second, MLPCs were seeded in a novel, structurally graded polycaprolactone (SGS-PCL) scaffold and chondrogenesis was evaluated....... MLPCs obtained from BioE Inc (St. Paul, MN, USA) were expanded, and subsequently cultured in a standard micromass pellet system. Pellets were cultured for 21 days in control or chondrogenic induction medium under 5% or 21% oxygen tension. Chondrogenic potential was evaluated by histology (alcian blue......Nano (Aarhus University, Denmark). Micromass pellets cultured in induction medium were larger with a more dense and well-defined spherical structure. GAG production in induced pellets was shown by alcian blue and safranin O staining with most GAG observed centrally in 21%-, and peripherally in 5%-oxygen...

  14. Human Suprapatellar Fat Pad-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induce Chondrogenesis and Cartilage Repair in a Model of Severe Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Muñoz-Criado

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage degeneration is associated with degenerative bone and joint processes in severe osteoarthritis (OA. Spontaneous cartilage regeneration is extremely limited. Often the treatment consists of a partial or complete joint implant. Adipose-derived stem cell (ASC transplantation has been shown to restore degenerated cartilage; however, regenerative differences of ASC would depend on the source of adipose tissue. The infra- and suprapatellar fat pads surrounding the knee offer a potential autologous source of ASC for patients after complete joint substitution. When infrapatellar- and suprapatellar-derived stromal vascular fractions (SVF were compared, a significantly higher CD105 (+ population was found in the suprapatellar fat. In addition, the suprapatellar SVF exhibited increased numbers of colony formation units and a higher population doubling in culture compared to the infrapatellar fraction. Both the suprapatellar- and infrapatellar-derived ASC were differentiated in vitro into mature adipocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes. However, the suprapatellar-derived ASC showed higher osteogenic and chondrogenic efficiency. Suprapatellar-derived ASC transplantation in a severe OA mouse model significantly diminished the OA-associated knee inflammation and cartilage degenerative grade, significantly increasing the production of glycosaminoglycan and inducing endogenous chondrogenesis in comparison with the control group. Overall, suprapatellar-derived ASC offer a potential autologous regenerative treatment for patients with multiple degenerative OA.

  15. A histomorphometric and scanning electron microscopy study of human condylar cartilage and bone tissue changes in relation to age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Hans Ulrik; Thomsen, J.S.; Hougen, Hans Petter

    1999-01-01

    . EXPERIMENTAL SETTING AND DESIGN: A histomorphometric and scanning electron microscopic analysis of cartilage characteristics and bone remodelling activity. The Departments of Orthodontics and Cell Biology at Aarhus University, Denmark. An autopsy sample of condyles from 20 individuals, 18-31 years of age...

  16. Kinematic biomechanical assessment of human articular cartilage transplants in the knee using 3-T MRI: an in vivo reproducibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juras, Vladimir; Szomolanyi, Pavol [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiodiagnostics, MR Centre of Excellence, Vienna (Austria); Slovak Academy of Sciences, Department of Imaging Methods, Institute of Measurement Science, Bratislava (Slovakia); Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Clinical and Experimental Traumatology, Austrian Cluster for Tissue Regeneration, Vienna (Austria); Welsch, Goetz H.; Pinker, Katja; Trattnig, Siegfried [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiodiagnostics, MR Centre of Excellence, Vienna (Austria); Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Clinical and Experimental Traumatology, Austrian Cluster for Tissue Regeneration, Vienna (Austria); Millington, Steven [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, London, Stanmore (United Kingdom); Mamisch, Tallal C. [Inselspital, Orthopedic Surgery Department, Berne (Switzerland)

    2009-05-15

    The aims of this study were to examine the clinical feasibility and reproducibility of kinematic MR imaging with respect to changes in T{sub 2} in the femoral condyle articular cartilage. We used a flexible knee coil, which allows acquisition of data in different positions from 40 flexion to full extension during MR examinations. The reproducibility of T{sub 2} measurements was evaluated for inter-rater and inter-individual variability and determined as a coefficient of variation (CV) for each volunteer and rater. Three different volunteers were measured twice and regions of interest (ROIs) were selected by three raters at different time points. To prove the clinical feasibility of this method, 20 subjects (10 patients and 10 age- and sex-matched volunteers) were enrolled in the study. Inter-rater variability ranged from 2 to 9 and from 2 to 10% in the deep and superficial zones, respectively. Mean inter-individual variability was 7% for both zones. Different T{sub 2} values were observed in the superficial cartilage zone of patients compared with volunteers. Since repair tissue showed a different behavior in the contact zone compared with healthy cartilage, a possible marker for improved evaluation of repair tissue quality after matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) may be available and may allow biomechanical assessment of cartilage transplants. (orig.)

  17. Footprint-free human induced pluripotent stem cells from articular cartilage with redifferentiation capacity: a first step toward a clinical-grade cell source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreström, Cecilia; Simonsson, Stina; Enochson, Lars; Bigdeli, Narmin; Brantsing, Camilla; Ellerström, Catharina; Hyllner, Johan; Lindahl, Anders

    2014-04-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are potential cell sources for regenerative medicine; however, clinical applications of iPSCs are restricted because of undesired genomic modifications associated with most reprogramming protocols. We show, for the first time, that chondrocytes from autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) donors can be efficiently reprogrammed into iPSCs using a nonintegrating method based on mRNA delivery, resulting in footprint-free iPSCs (no genome-sequence modifications), devoid of viral factors or remaining reprogramming molecules. The search for universal allogeneic cell sources for the ACI regenerative treatment has been difficult because making chondrocytes with high matrix-forming capacity from pluripotent human embryonic stem cells has proven challenging and human mesenchymal stem cells have a predisposition to form hypertrophic cartilage and bone. We show that chondrocyte-derived iPSCs can be redifferentiated in vitro into cartilage matrix-producing cells better than fibroblast-derived iPSCs and on par with the donor chondrocytes, suggesting the existence of a differentiation bias toward the somatic cell origin and making chondrocyte-derived iPSCs a promising candidate universal cell source for ACI. Whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphism array and karyotyping were used to verify the genomic integrity and stability of the established iPSC lines. Our results suggest that RNA-based technology eliminates the risk of genomic integrations or aberrations, an important step toward a clinical-grade cell source for regenerative medicine such as treatment of cartilage defects and osteoarthritis.

  18. The epidermal growth factor-like domain of the human cartilage large aggregating proteoglycan, aggrecan: increased serum concentration in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, H J; Ingemann-Hansen, T; Poulsen, J H

    1994-01-01

    The large aggregating proteoglycan from human cartilage, aggrecan, has recently been shown to possess an immunologically detectable domain with close homology to epidermal growth factor (EGF), that is variably expressed by alternative mRNA splicing. Using a competitive ELISA we detected this domain...... in sera from both patients with RA and normal controls. The EGF-like domain could only be detected after digestion of sera with chondroitinase ABC, which demonstrates its proteoglycan origin. The concentration of the aggrecan EGF-like domain was considerably elevated in sera from patients with RA...

  19. Hyaline cartilage degenerates after autologous osteochondral transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibesku, C O; Szuwart, T; Kleffner, T O; Schlegel, P M; Jahn, U R; Van Aken, H; Fuchs, S

    2004-11-01

    Autologous osteochondral grafting is a well-established clinical procedure to treat focal cartilage defects in patients, although basic research on this topic remains sparse. The aim of the current study was to evaluate (1) histological changes of transplanted hyaline cartilage of osteochondral grafts and (2) the tissue that connects the transplanted cartilage with the adjacent cartilage in a sheep model. Both knee joints of four sheep were opened surgically and osteochondral grafts were harvested and simultaneously transplanted to the contralateral femoral condyle. The animals were sacrificed after three months and the received knee joints were evaluated histologically. Histological evaluation showed a complete ingrowth of the osseous part of the osteochondral grafts. A healing or ingrowth at the level of the cartilage could not be observed. Histological evaluation of the transplanted grafts according to Mankin revealed significantly more and more severe signs of degeneration than the adjacent cartilage, such as cloning of chondrocytes and irregularities of the articular surface. We found no connecting tissue between the transplanted and the adjacent cartilage and histological signs of degeneration of the transplanted hyaline cartilage. In the light of these findings, long-term results of autologous osteochondral grafts in human beings have to be followed critically.

  20. Studies on YKL-40 in knee joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Involvement of YKL-40 in the joint pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volck, B; Johansen, J S; Stoltenberg, M;

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The presence of YKL-40 (human cartilage glycoprotein 39) in synovium, cartilage and synovial fluid (SF) from knee joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis (OA) were related to histopathological changes in synovium and cartilage and to serum YKL-40 and other bioch...

  1. Cartilage and soft tissue imaging using X-rays: propagation-based phase-contrast computed tomography of the human knee in comparison with clinical imaging techniques and histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horng, Annie; Brun, Emmanuel; Mittone, Alberto; Gasilov, Sergei; Weber, Loriane; Geith, Tobias; Adam-Neumair, Silvia; Auweter, Sigrid D; Bravin, Alberto; Reiser, Maximilian F; Coan, Paola

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluates high-resolution tomographic x-ray phase-contrast imaging in whole human knee joints for the depiction of soft tissue with emphasis on hyaline cartilage. The method is compared with conventional computed tomography (CT), synchrotron radiation absorption-based CT, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). After approval of the institutional review board, 2 cadaveric human knees were examined at an synchrotron institution using a monochromatic x-ray beam of 60 keV, a detector with a 90-mm field of view, and a pixel size of 46 × 46 μm. Images of phase-contrast imaging CT were reconstructed with the filtered back projection algorithm and the equally sloped tomography method. Image quality and tissue contrast were evaluated and compared in all modalities and with histology. Phase-contrast imaging provides visualization of altered cartilage regions invisible in absorption CT with simultaneous high detail of the underlying bony abnormalities. The delineation of surface changes is similar to 3-T MRI using cartilage-dedicated sequences. Phase-contrast imaging CT presents soft tissue contrast surpassing that of conventional CT with a clear discrimination of ligamentous, muscular, neural, and vascular structures. In addition, phase-contrast imaging images show cartilage and meniscal calcifications that are not perceptible on conventional CT or on MRI. Phase-contrast imaging CT may facilitate a more complete evaluation of the human knee joint by providing concurrent comprehensive information about cartilage, the underlying subchondral bone, and their changes in osteoarthritic conditions.

  2. Biochemical markers of type II collagen breakdown and synthesis are positioned at specific sites in human osteoarthritic knee cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne-Christine Bay; Levin Andersen, Thomas; Charni-Ben Tabassi, N;

    2007-01-01

    as for type IIA N propeptide (PIIANP), a biochemical marker reflecting synthesis of type IIA collagen. RESULTS: Helix-II and CTX-II were detected in areas where collagen damage was reported previously, most frequently around chondrocytes, but also frequently in regions not previously investigated......OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether type II collagen turnover markers used for osteoarthritis (OA) activity evaluation in body fluids can be detected at the level of specific histological features of OA cartilage tissue, as well as how they relate with each other at this level. METHODS: Adjacent...... sections were obtained from full-depth cartilage biopsies from 32 OA knees. Immunohistochemistry was performed for Helix-II and CTX-II, which are type II collagen fragments originating from the triple helix and the telopeptide region, respectively, and believed to reflect distinct breakdown events, as well...

  3. Moderate loading of the human osteoarthritic knee joint leads to lowering of intraarticular cartilage oligomeric matrix protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helmark, Ida C; Petersen, Marie C H; Christensen, Helle E

    2012-01-01

    osteoarthritic joint determined by biochemical markers of cartilage turnover and inflammation in the synovial fluid (SF), serum and urine. Eleven subjects with OA of the knee(s), but with no other joint- or inflammatory disorders, volunteered for the study and had samples of blood, urine and synovial fluid drawn...... both at baseline and following 30-min one-legged knee-extension exercise. Workload: 60% of 1 RM (Repetition Maximum). Determination of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), aggrecan, C-terminal collagen II peptide (CTX-II) and interleukin (IL)-6 were performed in synovial fluid (SF), serum...... and urine. A significant decrease was found in SF concentration of COMP following exercise, whereas aggrecan, CTX-II and IL-6 remained unchanged. No differences in any of the tested markers were found in serum and urine between baseline and post-exercise. Thirty minutes of mechanical loading of a single...

  4. Chondrogenic Differentiation Capacity of Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Platelet Rich Fibrin Scaffold in Cartilage Regeneration (In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Putu Mira Sumarta

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell is a promising source of allogenous MSC with great chondrogenic differentiation capacity. Meanwhile, platelet rich fibrin (PRF is a natural fibrin matrix, rich in growth factors, forming a smooth and flexible fibrin network, supporting cytokines and cell migration, thus can be used as a scaffold that facilitate the differentiation of MSC. However, the differential capability of MSC cultured in PRF was still poorly understood. Method: We studied in vitro differentiation potential of MSC cultured in PRF by evaluating several markers such as FGF 18, Sox 9, type II collagen, aggrecan in 3 different culture medium. Result: The result showed that there was positive expression of FGF 18, Sox 9, type II collagen, aggrecan in all medium of in vitro culture. Conclusion: MSC cultured from human umbilical cord had the capacity of chondrogenic differentiation and able to produce cartilage extracellular matrix in vitro which means that hUCMSC is a potential allogeneic MSC for cartilage regeneration.

  5. Discovery of highly potent and selective small molecule ADAMTS-5 inhibitors that inhibit human cartilage degradation via encoded library technology (ELT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hongfeng; O'Keefe, Heather; Davie, Christopher P; Lind, Kenneth E; Acharya, Raksha A; Franklin, G Joseph; Larkin, Jonathan; Matico, Rosalie; Neeb, Michael; Thompson, Monique M; Lohr, Thomas; Gross, Jeffrey W; Centrella, Paolo A; O'Donovan, Gary K; Bedard, Katie L Sargent; van Vloten, Kurt; Mataruse, Sibongile; Skinner, Steven R; Belyanskaya, Svetlana L; Carpenter, Tiffany Y; Shearer, Todd W; Clark, Matthew A; Cuozzo, John W; Arico-Muendel, Christopher C; Morgan, Barry A

    2012-08-23

    The metalloprotease ADAMTS-5 is considered a potential target for the treatment of osteoarthritis. To identify selective inhibitors of ADAMTS-5, we employed encoded library technology (ELT), which enables affinity selection of small molecule binders from complex mixtures by DNA tagging. Selection of ADAMTS-5 against a four-billion member ELT library led to a novel inhibitor scaffold not containing a classical zinc-binding functionality. One exemplar, (R)-N-((1-(4-(but-3-en-1-ylamino)-6-(((2-(thiophen-2-yl)thiazol-4-yl)methyl)amino)-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)pyrrolidin-2-yl)methyl)-4-propylbenzenesulfonamide (8), inhibited ADAMTS-5 with IC(50) = 30 nM, showing >50-fold selectivity against ADAMTS-4 and >1000-fold selectivity against ADAMTS-1, ADAMTS-13, MMP-13, and TACE. Extensive SAR studies showed that potency and physicochemical properties of the scaffold could be further improved. Furthermore, in a human osteoarthritis cartilage explant study, compounds 8 and 15f inhibited aggrecanase-mediated (374)ARGS neoepitope release from aggrecan and glycosaminoglycan in response to IL-1β/OSM stimulation. This study provides the first small molecule evidence for the critical role of ADAMTS-5 in human cartilage degradation.

  6. Study of physical, chemical and structural effects caused by ionizing radiation and preservation on human costal cartilage; Estudo dos efeitos fisicos, quimicos e estruturais ocasionados pela radiacao ionizante e preservacao em cartilagem costal humana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinho Junior, Antonio Carlos

    2008-07-01

    Tissue Banks around the world have stored human cartilages obtained from cadaver donors for use in several kinds of reconstructive surgeries. To ensure that such tissues are not contaminated, they have been sterilized with ionizing radiation. However, high doses of gamma radiation may cause undesirable changes in the tissues, decreasing the mechanical properties of the grafts. In this work, we evaluate physical/chemical and structural changes in deep-frozen (-70 deg C) or high concentration of glycerol (> 98%) preserved costal cartilage, before and after sterilization by ionizing radiation at 3 different doses (15, 25 and 50 kGy). Samples of human costal cartilage were obtained from 20 cadaver donors ranging between 18 and 55 years old. A {sup 60}Co irradiator was used as irradiation source. Thermogravimetry (TG), Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and mechanical tension and compression tests were carried out to evaluate the changes in the cartilage. Regarding the thermogravimetric results, the obtained data has shown that the TG curves have the same pattern independently of the sample irradiated or not. On the other hand, non-irradiated samples showed great variability of thermogravimetric curves among different donors and for the same donor. Concerning the mechanical tests, when cartilages were irradiated with 15 kGy, their mechanical strength to tension was increased about 24%, in both deep-froze and preserved in glycerol samples. Samples deep-frozen, when irradiated with 25 and 50 kGy, presented a decrease of their mechanical behavior smaller than those preserved in high concentrations of glycerol and irradiated with the same dose. Therefore, deep-frozen cartilages can be sterilized with doses until 50 kGy and cartilages preserved in high concentrations of glycerol can be sterilized with doses until 25 kGy without significant changes in their bio-mechanical properties.(author)

  7. Human Articular Cartilage Progenitor Cells Are Responsive to Mechanical Stimulation and Adenoviral-Mediated Overexpression of Bone-Morphogenetic Protein 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J Neumann

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage progenitor cells (ACPCs represent a new and potentially powerful alternative cell source to commonly used cell sources for cartilage repair, such as chondrocytes and bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. This is particularly due to the apparent resistance of ACPCs to hypertrophy. The current study opted to investigate whether human ACPCs (hACPCs are responsive towards mechanical stimulation and/or adenoviral-mediated overexpression of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2. hACPCs were cultured in fibrin-polyurethane composite scaffolds. Cells were cultured in a defined chondro-permissive medium, lacking exogenous growth factors. Constructs were cultured, for 7 or 28 days, under free-swelling conditions or with the application of complex mechanical stimulation, using a custom built bioreactor that is able to generate joint-like movements. Outcome parameters were quantification of BMP-2 and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1 concentration within the cell culture medium, biochemical and gene expression analyses, histology and immunohistochemistry. The application of mechanical stimulation alone resulted in the initiation of chondrogenesis, demonstrating the cells are mechanoresponsive. This was evidenced by increased GAG production, lack of expression of hypertrophic markers and a promising gene expression profile (significant up-regulation of cartilaginous marker genes, specifically collagen type II, accompanied by no increase in the hypertrophic marker collagen type X or the osteogenic marker alkaline phosphatase. To further investigate the resistance of ACPCs to hypertrophy, overexpression of a factor associated with hypertrophic differentiation, BMP-2, was investigated. A novel, three-dimensional, transduction protocol was used to transduce cells with an adenovirus coding for BMP-2. Over-expression of BMP-2, independent of load, led to an increase in markers associated with hypertropy. Taken together ACPCs

  8. PGE2 And Its Cognate EP Receptors Control Human Adult Articular Cartilage Homeostasis and Are Linked to the Pathophysiology of Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Ellman, Michael; Muddasani, Prasuna; Wang, James H-C; Cs-Szabo, Gabriella; van Wijnen, Andre J; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2009-01-01

    Objective To elucidate the pathophysiologic links between prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and osteoarthritis by characterizing the catabolic effects of PGE2 and its unique receptors in human adult articular chondrocytes. Methods Human adult articular chondrocytes were cultured in monolayer or alginate beads with and without PGE2 and/or agonist, antagonist of EP receptors and cytokines. Cell survival, proliferation, and total proteoglycan synthesis and accumulation were measured in alginate beads. Chondrocyte-related gene expression and PI3k/Akt signaling were assessed by real-time PCR and western blotting, respectively, using a monolayer cell culture model. Results Stimulation of human articular chondrocytes with PGE2 through the EP2 receptor (i) suppresses proteoglycan accumulation and synthesis, (ii) suppresses aggrecan gene expression, (iii) does not appreciably affect expression of matrix-degrading enzymes; and (iv) decreases the collagen II:I ratio. EP2 and EP4 receptors are expressed at higher levels in knee compared to ankle cartilage, and in a grade-dependent fashion. PGE2 titration combined with IL-1 synergistically accelerates expression of pain-associated molecules such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and IL-6. Finally, stimulation with exogenous PGE2 or an EP2 agonist inhibits activation of Akt that is induced by insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1). Conclusion PGE2 exerts an anti-anabolic effect on human adult articular cartilage in vitro, and EP2/4 receptor antagonists may represent effective therapeutic agents for the treatment of osteoarthritis. PMID:19180509

  9. Platelet rich plasma (PRP) induces chondroprotection via increasing autophagy, anti-inflammatory markers, and decreasing apoptosis in human osteoarthritic cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Mayssam; Lajeunesse, Daniel; Hilal, George; El Atat, Oula; Haykal, Gaby; Serhal, Rim; Chalhoub, Antonio; Khalil, Charbel; Alaaeddine, Nada

    2017-03-01

    Autophagy constitutes a defense mechanism to overcome aging and apoptosis in osteoarthritic cartilage. Several cytokines and transcription factors are linked to autophagy and play an important role in the degradative cascade in osteoarthritis (OA). Cell therapy such as platelet rich plasma (PRP) has recently emerged as a promising therapeutic tool for many diseases including OA. However, its mechanism of action on improving cartilage repair remains to be determined. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of PRP on osteoarthritic chondrocytes and to elucidate the mechanism by which PRP contributes to cartilage regeneration. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes were co-cultured with an increasing concentration of PRP obtained from healthy donors. The effect of PRP on the proliferation of chondrocytes was performed using cell counting and WST8 proliferation assays. Autophagy, apoptosis and intracellular level of IL-4, IL-10, and IL-13 were determined using flow cytometry analyses. Autophagy markers BECLIN and LC3II were also determined using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). qPCR and ELISA were used to measure the expression of ADAMDTS-5, MMP3, MMP13, TIMP-1-2-3, aggregan, Collagen type 2, TGF-β, Cox-2, Il-6, FOXO1, FOXO3, and HIF-1 in tissues and co-cultured media. PRP increased significantly the proliferation of chondrocytes, decreased apoptosis and increased autophagy and its markers along with its regulators FOXO1, FOXO3 and HIF-1 in osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Furthermore, PRP caused a dose-dependent significant decrease in MMP3, MMP13, and ADAMTS-5, IL-6 and COX-2 while increasing TGF-β, aggregan, and collagen type 2, TIMPs and intracellular IL-4, IL-10, IL-13. These results suggest that PRP could be a potential therapeutic tool for the treatment of OA. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Crosslinking by advanced glycation end products increases the stiffness of the collagen network in human articular cartilage: A possible mechanism through which age is a risk factor for osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verzijl, N.; Groot, J. de; Zaken, C.B.; Braun-Benjamin, O.; Maroudas, A.; Bank, R.A.; Mizrahi, J.; Schalkwijk, C.G.; Thorpe, S.R.; Baynes, J.W.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Lafeber, F.P.J.G.; TeKoppele, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective. Age is an important risk factor for osteoarthritis (OA). During aging, nonenzymatic glycation results in the accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in cartilage collagen. We studied the effect of AGE crosslinking on the stiffness of the collagen network in human articular

  11. Crosslinking by advanced glycation end products increases the stiffness of the collagen network in human articular cartilage: A possible mechanism through which age is a risk factor for osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verzijl, N.; Groot, J. de; Zaken, C.B.; Braun-Benjamin, O.; Maroudas, A.; Bank, R.A.; Mizrahi, J.; Schalkwijk, C.G.; Thorpe, S.R.; Baynes, J.W.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Lafeber, F.P.J.G.; TeKoppele, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective. Age is an important risk factor for osteoarthritis (OA). During aging, nonenzymatic glycation results in the accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in cartilage collagen. We studied the effect of AGE crosslinking on the stiffness of the collagen network in human articular

  12. Study of ionizing radiation effects in human costal cartilage by thermogravimetry and optical coherence tomography; Estudo dos efeitos da radiacao ionizante em cartilagem costal humana por meio de termogravimetria e tomografia por coerencia optica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinho Junior, Antonio Carlos

    2012-07-01

    Tissue Banks around the world have stored human cartilages obtained from post mortem donors for use in several kinds of reconstructive surgeries. To ensure that such tissues are not contaminated, they have been sterilized with ionizing radiation. However, high doses of gamma radiation may cause undesirable changes in the tissues. In this work, we evaluated the possibility of use Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) to identify possible structural modifications caused by both preservation methods of cartilage and gamma irradiation doses. Cartilages were obtained from cadaveric donors and were frozen at -70 deg C or preserved in glycerol. Irradiation was performed by {sup 60}Co source with doses of 15, 25 and 50 kGy. Our TGA results showed that glycerolized cartilages irradiated with different doses of radiation does not presented statistical differences when compared to the control group for the dehydration rate. However, the same was not observed for deep-frozen cartilages irradiated with 15 kGy. The results of OCT associated to total optical attenuation coefficient showed that doses of 15 kGy promote cross-link between collagen fibrils, corroborating the results obtained from TGA. Moreover, total optical attenuation coefficient values are proportional to stress at break of cartilages, what will be very useful in a near future to predict the quality of the allografts, without unnecessary loss of biological tissue, once OCT is a nondestructive technique. By PS-OCT images, we found that high doses of ionizing radiation does not promote sufficient impairments to promote complete loss of tissue birefringence. Thus, TGA and OCT are techniques that can be used for tissue banks to verify tissue quality before its transplant. (author)

  13. Cartilage Tissue Engineering via Avocado/Soybean Unsaponifible and Human Adipose Derived Stem Cells on Poly (lactide-co–glycolide /Hyaluronic acid composite scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zynolabedin Sharifian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Growth factors and chemical stimulants have key role in stem cell to chondrocyte differentiation in cartilage tissue engineering, but this agents have adverse effects on cells as well as they are expensive and they have short half time. Todays there is great interest in the application of herbal agent for treatment of diseases.Avocado/soybean unsaponifiable (ASU with herbal components has chondroprotective, anti-inflammatory and pro-anabolic effects that it causes stimulate of deposition of extracellular matrix in chondrocytes and relief of osteoarthritis. The aim of this study was an investigation of the chondrogenic effect of ASU in human adipose derived stem cells (hADSCs on PLGA/HA scaffold. Materials and Methods: The 3-D scaffold of Poly lactide-co –glycolide acid (PLGA prepared via solvent/casting leaching method and impregnated with hyaluronic acid to produce composite scaffold. The characterizations of the scaffold, such as surfaces morphology were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and the degradation behaviour of the composite scaffold were evaluated. hADSCs seeded in PLGA/HA scaffold and cultured in chondrogenic media with and without ASU. The expression of chondrogenic related genes (Sox9, type II collagen, Aggrecan and hypertrophic marker (type X collagen were quantified by real time PCR and viability of cells in different groups were assessed by MTT. Results: Our results showed that the expression of genes related chondrogenesis markers Sox9 and type II collagen and aggrecan in differentiated cells in the presence of ASU were significantly increased compared with the control groups (P<0.05, on the other hand, type X collagen expression was not significantly increased. Conclusions: Our results indicated that ASU could be as an appropriate inducer for chondrogenesis of hADSCs and cartilage tissue engineering.

  14. The in vitro and in vivo capacity of culture-expanded human cells from several sources encapsulated in alginate to form cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Pleumeekers (Mieke); L. Nimeskern (Luc); J.L.M. Koevoet (Wendy); N. Kops (Nicole); R.M.L. Poublon (René); K.S. Stok (Kathryn); G.J.V.M. van Osch (Gerjo)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractAbstract Cartilage has limited self-regenerative capacity. Tissue engineering can offer promising solutions for reconstruction of missing or damaged cartilage. A major challenge herein is to define an appropriate cell source that is capable of generating a stable and functional matrix. T

  15. Human adipose stromal cells (ASC for the regeneration of injured cartilage display genetic stability after in vitro culture expansion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Neri

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells are emerging as an extremely promising therapeutic agent for tissue regeneration due to their multi-potency, immune-modulation and secretome activities, but safety remains one of the main concerns, particularly when in vitro manipulation, such as cell expansion, is performed before clinical application. Indeed, it is well documented that in vitro expansion reduces replicative potential and some multi-potency and promotes cell senescence. Furthermore, during in vitro aging there is a decrease in DNA synthesis and repair efficiency thus leading to DNA damage accumulation and possibly inducing genomic instability. The European Research Project ADIPOA aims at validating an innovative cell-based therapy where autologous adipose stromal cells (ASCs are injected in the diseased articulation to activate regeneration of the cartilage. The primary objective of this paper was to assess the safety of cultured ASCs. The maintenance of genetic integrity was evaluated during in vitro culture by karyotype and microsatellite instability analysis. In addition, RT-PCR array-based evaluation of the expression of genes related to DNA damage signaling pathways was performed. Finally, the senescence and replicative potential of cultured cells was evaluated by telomere length and telomerase activity assessment, whereas anchorage-independent clone development was tested in vitro by soft agar growth. We found that cultured ASCs do not show genetic alterations and replicative senescence during the period of observation, nor anchorage-independent growth, supporting an argument for the safety of ASCs for clinical use.

  16. MRI of the cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhof, H.; Noebauer-Huhmann, I.-M.; Krestan, C.; Gahleitner, A.; Marlovits, S.; Trattnig, S. [Department of Osteology, Universitaetklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, AKH-Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Sulzbacher, I. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Pathologie Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2002-11-01

    With the introduction of fat-suppressed gradient-echo and fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences in clinical routine MR visualization of the hyaline articular cartilage is routinely possible in the larger joints. While 3D gradient-echo with fat suppression allows exact depiction of the thickness and surface of cartilage, FSE outlines the normal and abnormal internal structures of the hyaline cartilage; therefore, both sequences seem to be necessary in a standard MRI protocol for cartilage visualization. In diagnostically ambiguous cases, in which important therapeutic decisions are required, direct MR arthrography is the established imaging standard as an add-on procedure. Despite the social impact and prevalence, until recent years there was a paucity of knowledge about the pathogenesis of cartilage damage. With the introduction of high-resolution MRI with powerful surface coils and fat-suppression techniques, visualization of the articular cartilage is now routinely possible in many joints. After a short summary of the anatomy and physiology of the hyaline cartilage, the different MR imaging methods are discussed and recommended standards are suggested. (orig.)

  17. Elastic energy storage in human articular cartilage: estimation of the elastic modulus for type II collagen and changes associated with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Frederick H; Bradica, Gino; Tria, Alfred

    2002-03-01

    The viscoelastic mechanical properties of normal and osteoarthritic articular were analyzed based on data reported by Kempson [in: Adult Articular Cartilage (1973)] and Silver et al. (Connect. Tissue Res., 2001b). Results of the analysis of tensile elastic stress-strain curves suggest that the elastic modulus of cartilage from the superficial zone is approximately 7.0 GPa parallel and 2.21 GPa perpendicular to the cleavage line pattern. Collagen fibril lengths in the superficial zone were found to be approximately 1265 microm parallel and 668 microm perpendicular to the cleavage line direction. The values for the elastic modulus and fibril lengths decreased with increased extent of osteoarthritis. The elastic modulus of type II collagen parallel to the cleavage line pattern in the superficial zone approaches that of type I collagen in tendon, suggesting that elastic energy storage occurs in the superficial zone due to the tensile pre-tension that exists in this region. Decreases in the elastic modulus associated with osteoarthritis reflect decreased ability of cartilage to store elastic energy, which leads to cartilage fibrillation and fissure formation. We hypothesize that under normal physiological conditions, collagen fibrils in cartilage function to store elastic energy associated with weight bearing and locomotion. Enzymatic cleavage of cartilage proteoglycans and collagen observed in osteoarthritis may lead to fibrillation and fissure formation as a result of impaired energy storage capability of cartilage.

  18. Induction of advanced glycation end products and alterations of the tensile properties of articular cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, A.C.; Temple, M.M.; Ng, D.M.; Verzijl, N.; Groot, J. de; TeKoppele, J.M.; Sah, R.L.

    2002-01-01

    Objective. To determine whether increasing advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in bovine articular cartilage to levels present in aged human cartilage modulates the tensile biomechanical properties of the tissue. Methods. Adult bovine articular cartilage samples were incubated in a buffer solutio

  19. Induction of advanced glycation end products and alterations of the tensile properties of articular cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, A C; Temple, M.M.; Ng, D.M.; Verzijl, N; de Groot, J.; TeKoppele, J.M.; Sah, R.L.

    2002-01-01

    Objective. To determine whether increasing advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in bovine articular cartilage to levels present in aged human cartilage modulates the tensile biomechanical properties of the tissue. Methods. Adult bovine articular cartilage samples were incubated in a buffer solution with ribose to induce the formation of AGEs or in a control solution. Portions of cartilage samples were assayed for biochemical indices of AGEs and tested to assess their tensile biomechanical p...

  20. From gristle to chondrocyte transplantation: treatment of cartilage injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This review addresses the progress in cartilage repair technology over the decades with an emphasis on cartilage regeneration with cell therapy. The most abundant cartilage is the hyaline cartilage that covers the surface of our joints and, due to avascularity, this tissue is unable to repair itself. The cartilage degeneration seen in osteoarthritis causes patient suffering and is a huge burden to society. The surgical approach to cartilage repair was non-existing until the 1950s when new surgical techniques emerged. The use of cultured cells for cell therapy started as experimental studies in the 1970s that developed over the years to a clinical application in 1994 with the introduction of the autologous chondrocyte transplantation technique (ACT). The technology is now spread worldwide and has been further refined by combining arthroscopic techniques with cells cultured on matrix (MACI technology). The non-regenerating hypothesis of cartilage has been revisited and we are now able to demonstrate cell divisions and presence of stem-cell niches in the joint. Furthermore, cartilage derived from human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells could be the base for new broader cell treatments for cartilage injuries and the future technology base for prevention and cure of osteoarthritis. PMID:26416680

  1. The identification of CD163 expressing phagocytic chondrocytes in joint cartilage and its novel scavenger role in cartilage degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Jiao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cartilage degradation is a typical characteristic of arthritis. This study examined whether there was a subset of phagocytic chondrocytes that expressed the specific macrophage marker, CD163, and investigated their role in cartilage degradation. METHODS: Cartilage from the knee and temporomandibular joints of Sprague-Dawley rats was harvested. Cartilage degradation was experimentally-induced in rat temporomandibular joints, using published biomechanical dental methods. The expression levels of CD163 and inflammatory factors within cartilage, and the ability of CD163(+ chondrocytes to conduct phagocytosis were investigated. Cartilage from the knees of patients with osteoarthritis and normal cartilage from knee amputations was also investigated. RESULTS: In the experimentally-induced degrading cartilage from temporomandibular joints, phagocytes were capable of engulfing neighboring apoptotic and necrotic cells, and the levels of CD163, TNF-α and MMPs were all increased (P0.05. CD163(+ chondrocytes were found in the cartilage mid-zone of temporomandibular joints and knee from healthy, three-week old rats. Furthermore, an increased number of CD163(+ chondrocytes with enhanced phagocytic activity were present in Col-II(+ chondrocytes isolated from the degraded cartilage of temporomandibular joints in the eight-week experimental group compared with their age-matched controls. Increased number with enhanced phagocytic activity of CD163(+ chondrocytes were also found in isolated Col-II(+ chondrocytes stimulated with TNF-α (P<0.05. Mid-zone distribution of CD163(+ cells accompanied with increased expression of CD163 and TNF-α were further confirmed in the isolated Col-II(+ chondrocytes from the knee cartilage of human patients with osteoarthritis, in contrast to the controls (both P<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: An increased number of CD163(+ chondrocytes with enhanced phagocytic activity were discovered within degraded joint cartilage, indicating a

  2. The identification of CD163 expressing phagocytic chondrocytes in joint cartilage and its novel scavenger role in cartilage degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Kai; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Mian; Wei, Yuying; Wu, Yaoping; Qiu, Zhong Ying; He, Jianjun; Cao, Yunxin; Hu, Jintao; Zhu, Han; Niu, Li-Na; Cao, Xu; Yang, Kun; Wang, Mei-Qing

    2013-01-01

    Cartilage degradation is a typical characteristic of arthritis. This study examined whether there was a subset of phagocytic chondrocytes that expressed the specific macrophage marker, CD163, and investigated their role in cartilage degradation. Cartilage from the knee and temporomandibular joints of Sprague-Dawley rats was harvested. Cartilage degradation was experimentally-induced in rat temporomandibular joints, using published biomechanical dental methods. The expression levels of CD163 and inflammatory factors within cartilage, and the ability of CD163(+) chondrocytes to conduct phagocytosis were investigated. Cartilage from the knees of patients with osteoarthritis and normal cartilage from knee amputations was also investigated. In the experimentally-induced degrading cartilage from temporomandibular joints, phagocytes were capable of engulfing neighboring apoptotic and necrotic cells, and the levels of CD163, TNF-α and MMPs were all increased (P0.05). CD163(+) chondrocytes were found in the cartilage mid-zone of temporomandibular joints and knee from healthy, three-week old rats. Furthermore, an increased number of CD163(+) chondrocytes with enhanced phagocytic activity were present in Col-II(+) chondrocytes isolated from the degraded cartilage of temporomandibular joints in the eight-week experimental group compared with their age-matched controls. Increased number with enhanced phagocytic activity of CD163(+) chondrocytes were also found in isolated Col-II(+) chondrocytes stimulated with TNF-α (PCD163(+) cells accompanied with increased expression of CD163 and TNF-α were further confirmed in the isolated Col-II(+) chondrocytes from the knee cartilage of human patients with osteoarthritis, in contrast to the controls (both PCD163(+) chondrocytes with enhanced phagocytic activity were discovered within degraded joint cartilage, indicating a role in eliminating degraded tissues. Targeting these cells provides a new strategy for the treatment of arthritis.

  3. Potentialities of the {sup 99m}Tc-N.T.P. 15-5 for imaging of cartilage pathologies: situation of in vivo studies in animal and ex vivo on human specimens; Potentialites du 99mTc-NTP 15-5 pour l'imagerie des pathologies du cartilage: bilan des etudes in vivo chez l'animal et ex vivo sur specimens humains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miot-Noirault, E.; Cachin, F.; Vidal, A.; Auzeloux, P.; Boisgard, S.; Moins, N.; Chezal, J.M. [Inserm, EA4231, UMR 990, 63 - Clermont-Ferrand (France); Gouin, F.; Redini, F. [Inserm, EA3822, UMR 957, 44 - Nantes (France); Askienazy, S. [Cyclopharma laboratoires, 63 - Saint-Beauzire (France)

    2010-07-01

    The strategy we develop is the use of quaternary ammonium function to vectorize a technetium macrocycle towards proteoglycans, in order to offer an innovative diagnostic strategy of degenerative and tumoral diseases of cartilage in nuclear medicine. The results got in relevant animal models demonstrate the importance of {sup 99}Tc-NTP15-5, (N-(triethylammonium)-3-propyl-[15]ane-N5 radiolabeled with {sup 99m}Tc ({sup 99m}Tc-NTP 15-5)), as cartilage radiotracer in nuclear medicine. The results obtained from human specimens encourage us to a clinical transfer. (N.C.)

  4. Effect of a Herbal-Leucine mix on the IL-1β-induced cartilage degradation and inflammatory gene expression in human chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haqqi Tariq M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conventional treatments for the articular diseases are often effective for symptom relief, but can also cause significant side effects and do not slow the progression of the disease. Several natural substances have been shown to be effective at relieving the symptoms of osteoarthritis (OA, and preliminary evidence suggests that some of these compounds may exert a favorable influence on the course of the disease. The objective of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory/chondroprotective potential of a Herbal and amino acid mixture containing extract of the Uncaria tomentosa, Boswellia spp., Lepidium meyenii and L-Leucine on the IL-1β-induced production of nitric oxide (NO, glycosaminoglycan (GAG, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, aggrecan (ACAN and type II collagen (COL2A1 in human OA chondrocytes and OA cartilage explants. Methods Primary OA chondrocytes or OA cartilage explants were pretreated with Herbal-Leucine mixture (HLM, 1-10 μg/ml and then stimulated with IL-1β (5 ng/ml. Effect of HLM on IL-1β-induced gene expression of iNOS, MMP-9, MMP-13, ACAN and COL2A1 was verified by real time-PCR. Estimation of NO and GAG release in culture supernatant was done using commercially available kits. Results HLM tested in these in vitro studies was found to be an effective anti-inflammatory agent, as evidenced by strong inhibition of iNOS, MMP-9 and MMP-13 expression and NO production in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes (p Leucine mixture (HLM up-regulation of ACAN and COL2A1 expression in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes was also noted (p Conclusion Our data suggests that HLM could be chondroprotective and anti-inflammatory agent in arthritis, switching chondrocyte gene expression from catabolic direction towards anabolic and regenerative, and consequently this approach may be potentially useful as a new adjunct therapeutic/preventive agent for OA or injury recovery.

  5. Small RNAs derived from lncRNA RNase MRP have gene-silencing activity relevant to human cartilage-hair hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogler, Leslie E; Kosmyna, Brian; Moskowitz, David; Bebawee, Remon; Rahimzadeh, Joseph; Kutchko, Katrina; Laederach, Alain; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Giliani, Silvia; Bouhassira, Eric; Frenette, Paul; Roy-Chowdhury, Jayanta; Rogler, Charles E

    2014-01-15

    Post-transcriptional processing of some long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) reveals that they are a source of miRNAs. We show that the 268-nt non-coding RNA component of mitochondrial RNA processing endoribonuclease, (RNase MRP), is the source of at least two short (∼20 nt) RNAs designated RMRP-S1 and RMRP-S2, which function as miRNAs. Point mutations in RNase MRP cause human cartilage-hair hypoplasia (CHH), and several disease-causing mutations map to RMRP-S1 and -S2. SHAPE chemical probing identified two alternative secondary structures altered by disease mutations. RMRP-S1 and -S2 are significantly reduced in two fibroblast cell lines and a B-cell line derived from CHH patients. Tests of gene regulatory activity of RMRP-S1 and -S2 identified over 900 genes that were significantly regulated, of which over 75% were down-regulated, and 90% contained target sites with seed complements of RMRP-S1 and -S2 predominantly in their 3' UTRs. Pathway analysis identified regulated genes that function in skeletal development, hair development and hematopoietic cell differentiation including PTCH2 and SOX4 among others, linked to major CHH phenotypes. Also, genes associated with alternative RNA splicing, cell proliferation and differentiation were highly targeted. Therefore, alterations RMRP-S1 and -S2, caused by point mutations in RMRP, are strongly implicated in the molecular mechanism of CHH.

  6. Physical mechanisms underlying the strain-rate-dependent mechanical behavior of kangaroo shoulder cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibbotuwawa, Namal; Oloyede, Adekunle; Li, Tong; Singh, Sanjleena; Senadeera, Wijitha; Gu, YuanTong

    2015-09-01

    Due to anatomical and biomechanical similarities to human shoulder, kangaroo was chosen as a model to study shoulder cartilage. Comprehensive enzymatic degradation and indentation tests were applied on kangaroo shoulder cartilage to study mechanisms underlying its strain-rate-dependent mechanical behavior. We report that superficial collagen plays a more significant role than proteoglycans in facilitating strain-rate-dependent behavior of the kangaroo shoulder cartilage. By comparing the mechanical properties of degraded and normal cartilages, it was noted that proteoglycan and collagen degradation significantly compromised strain-rate-dependent mechanical behavior of the cartilage. Superficial collagen contributed equally to the tissue behavior at all strain-rates. This is different to the studies reported on knee cartilage and confirms the importance of superficial collagen on shoulder cartilage mechanical behavior. A porohyperelastic numerical model also indicated that collagen disruption would lead to faster damage of the shoulder cartilage than when proteoglycans are depleted.

  7. Enzyme replacement in a human model of mucopolysaccharidosis IVA in vitro and its biodistribution in the cartilage of wild type mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melita Dvorak-Ewell

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA; Morquio A syndrome is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS, an enzyme that degrades keratan sulfate (KS. Currently no therapy for MPS IVA is available. We produced recombinant human (rhGALNS as a potential enzyme replacement therapy for MPS IVA. Chinese hamster ovary cells stably overexpressing GALNS and sulfatase modifying factor-1 were used to produce active ( approximately 2 U/mg and pure (>or=97% rhGALNS. The recombinant enzyme was phosphorylated and was dose-dependently taken up by mannose-6-phosphate receptor (K(uptake = 2.5 nM, thereby restoring enzyme activity in MPS IVA fibroblasts. In the absence of an animal model with a skeletal phenotype, we established chondrocytes isolated from two MPS IVA patients as a disease model in vitro. MPS IVA chondrocyte GALNS activity was not detectable and the cells exhibited KS storage up to 11-fold higher than unaffected chondrocytes. MPS IVA chondrocytes internalized rhGALNS into lysosomes, resulting in normalization of enzyme activity and decrease in KS storage. rhGALNS treatment also modulated gene expression, increasing expression of chondrogenic genes Collagen II, Collagen X, Aggrecan and Sox9 and decreasing abnormal expression of Collagen I. Intravenous administration of rhGALNS resulted in biodistribution throughout all layers of the heart valve and the entire thickness of the growth plate in wild-type mice. We show that enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human GALNS results in clearance of keratan sulfate accumulation, and that such treatment ameliorates aberrant gene expression in human chondrocytes in vitro. Penetration of the therapeutic enzyme throughout poorly vascularized, but clinically relevant tissues, including growth plate cartilage and heart valve, as well as macrophages and hepatocytes in wild-type mouse, further supports development of rhGALNS as enzyme replacement therapy for

  8. Enzyme replacement in a human model of mucopolysaccharidosis IVA in vitro and its biodistribution in the cartilage of wild type mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak-Ewell, Melita; Wendt, Dan; Hague, Chuck; Christianson, Terri; Koppaka, Vish; Crippen, Danielle; Kakkis, Emil; Vellard, Michel

    2010-08-16

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA; Morquio A syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS), an enzyme that degrades keratan sulfate (KS). Currently no therapy for MPS IVA is available. We produced recombinant human (rh)GALNS as a potential enzyme replacement therapy for MPS IVA. Chinese hamster ovary cells stably overexpressing GALNS and sulfatase modifying factor-1 were used to produce active ( approximately 2 U/mg) and pure (>or=97%) rhGALNS. The recombinant enzyme was phosphorylated and was dose-dependently taken up by mannose-6-phosphate receptor (K(uptake) = 2.5 nM), thereby restoring enzyme activity in MPS IVA fibroblasts. In the absence of an animal model with a skeletal phenotype, we established chondrocytes isolated from two MPS IVA patients as a disease model in vitro. MPS IVA chondrocyte GALNS activity was not detectable and the cells exhibited KS storage up to 11-fold higher than unaffected chondrocytes. MPS IVA chondrocytes internalized rhGALNS into lysosomes, resulting in normalization of enzyme activity and decrease in KS storage. rhGALNS treatment also modulated gene expression, increasing expression of chondrogenic genes Collagen II, Collagen X, Aggrecan and Sox9 and decreasing abnormal expression of Collagen I. Intravenous administration of rhGALNS resulted in biodistribution throughout all layers of the heart valve and the entire thickness of the growth plate in wild-type mice. We show that enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human GALNS results in clearance of keratan sulfate accumulation, and that such treatment ameliorates aberrant gene expression in human chondrocytes in vitro. Penetration of the therapeutic enzyme throughout poorly vascularized, but clinically relevant tissues, including growth plate cartilage and heart valve, as well as macrophages and hepatocytes in wild-type mouse, further supports development of rhGALNS as enzyme replacement therapy for MPS IVA.

  9. Fabrication of cartilage in predetermined shapes from human nasoseptal chondrocytes with tissue engineering method%鼻中隔软骨细胞组织工程法构建预定形态软骨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔鹏程; 陈文弦; 罗家胜

    2001-01-01

    目的探讨利用人鼻中隔软骨细胞组织工程方法构建预定形态软骨的可能性。方法将人鼻中隔软骨细胞播种在聚乙醇酸(polyglycolic acid, PGA)无纺网支架材料上,制成片状和管状结构,埋入裸鼠体内,经4、6、8周后取材作大体及组织学观察。结果大体观察见裸鼠体内形成了预定的片状和管状软骨。组织学观察:6周时软骨细胞基本成熟, Masson 三色染色显示胶原形成,番红花-“O”染色证实其基质中存在糖氨多糖。对照组于6周时PGA纤维基本消失。结论人鼻中隔软骨细胞与PGA无纺网复合可在裸鼠体内形成预定形态软骨。%Objective To investigate the feasibility of fabricating a new cartilage in predetermined shapes with tissue engineering methods. Methods Human nasoseptal chondrocytes were seeded onto a nonwoven mesh of polyglycolic acid(PGA) to form a cell-PGA construct. The construction was then configured in sheet and tube shapes, and implanted subcutaneously into the dorsa of 11 athymic mice. The specimens were harvested 4,6,8 weeks after implantation and subjected to gross morphologic and histologic analysis. Results Gross observation showed that the predetermined sheet and tube shapes of new cartilage were formed. Histological observation demonstrated that new mature cartilages were formed in 6-week. A Masson's trichrome stain showed the interwining bands of collagen at the periphery of the cartilage. Staining of Safranin O evaluated that the new cartilage was bound of glycosaminoglycan. In the control group, the PGA of the specimens were completely absorbed at 6 weeks. Conclusion Human nasoseptal chondrocytes-PGA construct could develop into a new cartilage in predetermined shapes in athymic mice.

  10. Use of non-degenerate human osteochondral tissue and confocal laser scanning microscopy for the study of chondrocyte death at cartilage surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huntley J. S.

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Although autologous osteochondral grafting has been widely applied in humans, most in vitro work has been on animal models. The aims of this study were to: (i elaborate a full thickness human femoral condylar model using discard material from knee arthroplasty resections, and (ii use this model to assess chondrocyte viability in response to surgical trauma. Homogeneous regions of human lateral femoral condyle bone-cartilage were procured from knee arthroplasty resections. These were graded prospectively, firstly by visual inspection, and then by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. Samples were subjected to tests of tissue hydration, including analysis of water content and swelling after excision from underlying bone. Surgical cuts were made in explants that were macroscopically and microscopically normal (i.e. Grade 0. Associated margins of death were assessed from both transverse and surface perspectives. Thirty-nine samples were obtained from anterior and distal femoral cuts (16 knees from 13 patients for (1 macroscopic grading, (2 microscopic analysis, (3 analyses of water content as cut and on re-equilibration after excision from bone. Thirteen were Grade 0 on macroscopic viewing - however one showed fibrillation on microscopy and was therefore reassigned Grade 1. Grade 0 tissue had a water content of 73.8±0.38%, in agreement with control values from the literature. Tissues of Grades 2 and 3 were significantly (P=0.03, and P=0.004 more hydrated (76.0±0.59%, 76.7±0.99% than Grade 0 tissue. Grade 0 tissue from the anterior cut did not swell significantly following excision from subchondral bone. However Grade 0 tissue from the distal cut showed a small but statistically significant (P=0.019 increase in water content (1.68±0.39% following excision. With increasing grade there was increased tendency to swell off the bone (P<0.0001. Transverse imaging showed that the Acufex MP surgical harvester caused a greater margin of cell death

  11. Fetal Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Differentiating towards Chondrocytes Acquire a Gene Expression Profile Resembling Human Growth Plate Cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gool, S.A.; Emons, J.A.M.; Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; Decker, E.; Sticht, C.; van Houwelingen, J.C.; Goeman, J.J.; Kleijburg, C.; Scherjon, S.; Gretz, N.; Wit, J.M.; Rappold, G.; Post, Janine Nicole; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We used human fetal bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hfMSCs) differentiating towards chondrocytes as an alternative model for the human growth plate (GP). Our aims were to study gene expression patterns associated with chondrogenic differentiation to assess whether

  12. Lubricin is expressed in chondrocytes derived from osteoarthritic cartilage encapsulated in poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, G; Loreto, C; Carnazza, M L; Coppolino, F; Cardile, V; Leonardi, R

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by degenerative changes within joints that involved quantitative and/or qualitative alterations of cartilage and synovial fluid lubricin, a mucinous glycoprotein secreted by synovial fibroblasts and chondrocytes. Modern therapeutic methods, including tissue-engineering techniques, have been used to treat mechanical damage of the articular cartilage but to date there is no specific and effective treatment. This study aimed at investigating lubricin immunohistochemical expression in cartilage explant from normal and OA patients and in cartilage constructions formed by Poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) based hydrogels (PEG-DA) encapsulated OA chondrocytes. The expression levels of lubricin were studied by immunohistochemistry: i) in tissue explanted from OA and normal human cartilage; ii) in chondrocytes encapsulated in hydrogel PEGDA from OA and normal human cartilage. Moreover, immunocytochemical and western blot analysis were performed in monolayer cells from OA and normal cartilage. The results showed an increased expression of lubricin in explanted tissue and in monolayer cells from normal cartilage, and a decreased expression of lubricin in OA cartilage. The chondrocytes from OA cartilage after 5 weeks of culture in hydrogels (PEGDA) showed an increased expression of lubricin compared with the control cartilage. The present study demonstrated that OA chondrocytes encapsulated in PEGDA, grown in the scaffold and were able to restore lubricin biosynthesis. Thus our results suggest the possibility of applying autologous cell transplantation in conjunction with scaffold materials for repairing cartilage lesions in patients with OA to reduce at least the progression of the disease.

  13. Anti-cartilage antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbury, C L; Skingle, J

    1979-08-01

    Antibody to cartilage has been demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence on rat trachea in the serum of about 3% of 1126 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Titres ranged from 1:20 to 1:640. The antibody was not found in 284 patients with primary or secondary osteoarthritis or in 1825 blood donors, nor, with the exception of two weak reactors, in 1314 paraplegic patients. In most cases the antibody appears to be specific for native type II collagen. Using this as an antigen in a haemagglutination test 94% of anti-cartilage sera were positive, whereas among 100 rheumatoid control sera there were only three weak positives. More than 80% of patients with antibody had some erosion of articular cartilage, but there was no correlation with age, sex, duration of disease, nor any recognisable clinical event or change.

  14. MORPHOMETRIC STUDY OF THYROID CARTILAGES IN WESTERN INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohini M.Joshi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Morphometrical evaluation of the larynx has always been interesting for both morphologists and the physicians. A good understanding of the anatomy and the knowledge of variations in the laryngeal cartilages is important Objective: Objective of the present study was to collect exact and reliable morphometric data of thyroid cartilage in adult human larynx of regional population. Methods: The totals of 50 thyroid cartilage specimens were studied. The cartilages were preserved in 5% formalin. The measurements were taken with the help of Digital Vernier Caliper. The cartilages were weighed on Single pan electronic balance. For each of the parameters, the mean, standard deviation (S.D. and range was calculated. Results: Mean depth of superior thyroid notch was 9.7± 3.36 mm. Asymmetry between the length of superior horn of thyroid cartilages in left and right sides can be seen, but difference was not statistically significant (p>0.05. It is observed that inner thyroid angle varies from 55 to 1040 and outer thyroid angle varies from 53 to 990. In present study mean weight of thyroid cartilage was 6.70±1.55 grams. Conclusions: A fair amount of intersubject variability in the dimensions was observed. Bilateral asymmetry, though present in majority of specimens, was insignificant. Various dimensions of thyroid cartilages are smaller as compared to the western population.

  15. Principles of cartilage repair

    CERN Document Server

    Erggelet, Christoph; Mandelbaum, Bert R

    2008-01-01

    Cartilage defects affect patients of all age groups. Surgeons, teamdoctors, general practitioners and physiotherapists alike are expected to provide adequate care. Only individual treatment plans combining a well balanced choice of various options will be successful. Background knowledge, operative and non-operative therapies are described in concise chapters: Articular cartilage biology - Diagnostics - Surgical techniques - Symptomatic and alternative medications - Physiotherapy. Diagnostic findings and surgical procedures are generously illustrated by aquarelles and colour photographs. Recommendations for additional reading, description of important clinical scoring systems and a listing of analytic tools are added for further information.

  16. The junction between hyaline cartilage and engineered cartilage in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komura, Makoto; Komura, Hiroko; Otani, Yushi; Kanamori, Yutaka; Iwanaka, Tadashi; Hoshi, Kazuto; Tsuyoshi, Takato; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2013-06-01

    Tracheoplasty using costal cartilage grafts to enlarge the tracheal lumen was performed to treat congenital tracheal stenosis. Fibrotic granulomatous tissue was observed at the edge of grafted costal cartilage. We investigated the junction between the native hyaline cartilage and the engineered cartilage plates that were generated by auricular chondrocytes for fabricating the airway. Controlled, prospecive study. In group 1, costal cartilage from New Zealand white rabbits was collected and implanted into a space created in the cervical trachea. In group 2, chondrocytes from auricular cartilages were seeded on absorbable scaffolds. These constructs were implanted in the subcutaneous space. Engineered cartilage plates were then implanted into the trachea after 3 weeks of implantation of the constructs. The grafts in group 1 and 2 were retrieved after 4 weeks. In group 1, histological studies of the junction between the native hyaline cartilage and the implanted costal cartilage demonstrated chondrogenic tissue in four anastomoses sides out of the 10 examined. In group 2, the junction between the native trachea and the engineered cartilage showed neocartilage tissue in nine anastomoses sides out of 10. Engineered cartilage may be beneficial for engineered airways, based on the findings of the junction between the native and engineered grafts. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  17. Green fluorescent protein as marker in chondrocytes overexpressing human insulin-like growth factor-1 for repair of articular cartilage defects in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Shao-kun; LIU Yi; SONG Zhi-ming; FU Chang-feng; XU Xin-xiang

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To label the primary articular chondrocytes overexpressing human insulin-like growth factor ( hIGF-1 ) with green fluorescent protein (GFP) for repair of articular cartilage defects in rabbits. Methods:GFP cDNA was inserted into pcDNA3.1-hIGF-1 to label the expression vector.The recombinant vector,pcGI,a mammalian expression vector with multiple cloning sites under two respective cytomegalovirus promoters/enhancers,was transfected into the primary articular chondrocytes with the help of lipofectamine.After the positive cell clones were selected by G418,G418-resistant chondrocytes were cultured in medium for 4 weeks.The stable expression of hIGF-1 in the articular chondrocytes was determined by in situ hybridization and immunocytochemical analysis and the GFP was confirmed under a fluorescence microscope. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) and flow cytometer methods were employed to determine the effect of transfection on proliferation of chondrocytes. Gray value was used to analyze quantitatively the expression of type Ⅱ collagen. Results:The expression of hIGF-1 and GFP was confirmed in transfected chondrocytes by in situ hybridization, immunocytochemical analysis and fluorescence microscope observation. Green articular chondrocytes overexpressing hIGF-1 could expand and maintain their chondrogenic phenotypes for more than 4 weeks.After the transfection of IGF-1,the proliferation of chondrocytes was enhanced and the chondrocytes could effectively maintain the expression of type Ⅱ collagen. Conclusions:The hIGF-1 eukaryotic expression vector containing GFP marker gene has been successfully constructed.GFP,which can be visualized in real time and in situ, is stably expressed in articular chondrocytes overexpressing hIGF-1.The labeled articular chondrocytes overexpressing hIGF-1 can be applied in cell-mediated gene therapy as well as for other biomedical purposes of transgenic chondrocytes.

  18. Cartilage differentiation in cephalopod molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Alison G; Hall, Brian K

    2009-01-01

    Amongst the various metazoan lineages that possess cartilage, tissues most closely resembling vertebrate hyaline cartilage in histological section are those of cephalopod molluscs. Although elements of the adult skeleton have been described, the development of these cartilages has not. Using serial histology of sequential developmental stages of the European cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis, we investigate these skeletal elements and offer the first description of the formation of any cellular invertebrate cartilage. Our data reveal that cuttlefish cartilage most often differentiates from uncondensed mesenchymal cells near the end of embryonic development, but that the earliest-forming cartilages differentiate from a cellular condensation which goes through a protocartilage stage in a manner typical of vertebrate primary cartilage formation. We further investigate the distribution and degree of differentiation of cartilages at the time of hatching in an additional four cephalopod species. We find that the timing of cartilage development varies between elements within a single species, as well as between species. We identify a tendency towards cartilage differentiation from uncondensed connective tissue in elements that form at the end of embryogenesis or after hatching. These data suggest a form of metaplasia from connective tissue is the ancestral mode of cartilage formation in this lineage.

  19. INJURED ARTICULAR CARTILAGE REPAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariana Barlič

    2008-02-01

    Surveys show that the most frequently used surgical methods are mosaicplasty and bonemarrow stimulation with microfracturing. The efficacy of the autologous chondrocyte implantationmethod should be superior to microfracturing on a long run. Especially when(regeneration of the hyaline cartilage instead of fibrous tissue (fibrocartilage is concerned.However, it has not been scientifically proved yet

  20. Characterisation of a divergent progenitor cell sub-populations in human osteoarthritic cartilage: the role of telomere erosion and replicative senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellows, Christopher R.; Williams, Rebecca; Davies, Iwan R.; Gohil, Kajal; Baird, Duncan M.; Fairclough, John; Rooney, Paul; Archer, Charles W.; Khan, Ilyas M.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years it has become increasingly clear that articular cartilage harbours a viable pool of progenitor cells and interest has focussed on their role during development and disease. Analysis of progenitor numbers using fluorescence-activated sorting techniques has resulted in wide-ranging estimates, which may be the result of context-dependent expression of cell surface markers. We have used a colony-forming assay to reliably determine chondroprogenitor numbers in normal and osteoarthritic cartilage where we observed a 2-fold increase in diseased tissue (P  < 0.0001). Intriguingly, cell kinetic analysis of clonal isolates derived from single and multiple donors of osteoarthritic cartilage revealed the presence of a divergent progenitor subpopulation characterised by an early senescent phenotype. Divergent sub-populations displayed increased senescence-associated β–galactosidase activity, lower average telomere lengths but retained the capacity to undergo multi-lineage differentiation. Osteoarthritis is an age-related disease and cellular senescence is predicted to be a significant component of the pathological process. This study shows that although early senescence is an inherent property of a subset of activated progenitors, there is also a pool of progenitors with extended viability and regenerative potential residing within osteoarthritic cartilage. PMID:28150695

  1. Experimental articular cartilage repair in the Göttingen minipig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bjørn Borsøe; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Olesen, Morten Lykke;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A gold standard treatment for articular cartilage injuries is yet to be found, and a cost-effective and predictable large animal model is needed to bridge the gap between in vitro studies and clinical studies. Ideally, the animal model should allow for testing of clinically relevant...... treatments and the biological response should be reproducible and comparable to humans. This allows for a reliable translation of results to clinical studies.This study aimed at verifying the Göttingen minipig as a pre-clinical model for articular cartilage repair by testing existing clinical cartilage...

  2. Advances in cartilage tissue engineering : in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.W. Mandl (Erik)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractWithin the body three subtypes of cartilage can be distinguished: hyaline cartilage, elastic cartilage and fibrocartilage. Hyaline cartilage is the predominant subtype and is mainly located in articular joints and in less extent in the nasal septum and cricoid. Elastic cartilage can be

  3. Label-free characterization of articular cartilage in osteoarthritis model mice by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Yusuke; Akehi, Mayu; Kiyomatsu, Hiroshi; Miura, Hiromasa

    2017-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is very common joint disease in the aging population. Main symptom of OA is accompanied by degenerative changes of articular cartilage. Cartilage contains mostly type II collagen and proteoglycans, so it is difficult to access the quality and morphology of cartilage tissue in situ by conventional diagnostic tools (X-ray, MRI and echography) directly or indirectly. Raman spectroscopy is a label-free technique which enables to analyze molecular composition in degenerative cartilage. In this study, we generated an animal OA model surgically induced by knee joint instability, and the femurs were harvested at two weeks after the surgery. We performed Raman spectroscopic analysis for the articular cartilage of distal femurs in OA side and unaffected side in each mouse. In the result, there is no gross findings in the surface of the articular cartilage in OA. On the other hand, Raman spectral data of the articular cartilage showed drastic changes in comparison between OA and control side. The major finding of this study is that the relative intensity of phosphate band (960 cm-1) increases in the degenerative cartilage. This may be the result of exposure of subchondral bone due to thinning of the cartilage layer. In conclusion, Raman spectroscopic technique is sufficient to characterize articular cartilage in OA as a pilot study for Raman application in cartilage degeneration and regeneration using animal models and human subjects.

  4. Generating cartilage repair from pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Aixin; Hardingham, Timothy E; Kimber, Susan J

    2014-08-01

    The treatment of degeneration and injury of articular cartilage has been very challenging for scientists and surgeons. As an avascular and hypocellular tissue, cartilage has a very limited capacity for self-repair. Chondrocytes are the only cell type in cartilage, in which they are surrounded by the extracellular matrix that they secrete and assemble. Autologous chondrocyte implantation for cartilage defects has achieved good results, but the limited resources and complexity of the procedure have hindered wider application. Stem cells form an alternative to chondrocytes as a source of chondrogenic cells due to their ability to proliferate extensively while retaining the potential for differentiation. Adult stem cells such as mesenchymal stem cells have been differentiated into chondrocytes, but the limitations in their proliferative ability and the heterogeneous cell population hinder their adoption as a prime alternative source for generating chondrocytes. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are attractive as candidates for cell replacement therapy because of their unlimited self-renewal and ability for differentiation into mesodermal derivatives as well as other lineages. In this review, we focus on current protocols for chondrogenic differentiation of ESCs, in particular the chemically defined culture system developed in our lab that could potentially be adapted for clinical application.

  5. PRP and Articular Cartilage: A Clinical Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Roberto; Castoldi, Filippo; Michielon, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    The convincing background of the recent studies, investigating the different potentials of platelet-rich plasma, offers the clinician an appealing alternative for the treatment of cartilage lesions and osteoarthritis. Recent evidences in literature have shown that PRP may be helpful both as an adjuvant for surgical treatment of cartilage defects and as a therapeutic tool by intra-articular injection in patients affected by osteoarthritis. In this review, the authors introduce the trophic and anti-inflammatory properties of PRP and the different products of the available platelet concentrates. Then, in a complex scenario made of a great number of clinical variables, they resume the current literature on the PRP applications in cartilage surgery as well as the use of intra-articular PRP injections for the conservative treatment of cartilage degenerative lesions and osteoarthritis in humans, available as both case series and comparative studies. The result of this review confirms the fascinating biological role of PRP, although many aspects yet remain to be clarified and the use of PRP in a clinical setting has to be considered still exploratory. PMID:26075244

  6. PRP and Articular Cartilage: A Clinical Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Marmotti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The convincing background of the recent studies, investigating the different potentials of platelet-rich plasma, offers the clinician an appealing alternative for the treatment of cartilage lesions and osteoarthritis. Recent evidences in literature have shown that PRP may be helpful both as an adjuvant for surgical treatment of cartilage defects and as a therapeutic tool by intra-articular injection in patients affected by osteoarthritis. In this review, the authors introduce the trophic and anti-inflammatory properties of PRP and the different products of the available platelet concentrates. Then, in a complex scenario made of a great number of clinical variables, they resume the current literature on the PRP applications in cartilage surgery as well as the use of intra-articular PRP injections for the conservative treatment of cartilage degenerative lesions and osteoarthritis in humans, available as both case series and comparative studies. The result of this review confirms the fascinating biological role of PRP, although many aspects yet remain to be clarified and the use of PRP in a clinical setting has to be considered still exploratory.

  7. Scaffolding Biomaterials for Cartilage Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Cao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Completely repairing of damaged cartilage is a difficult procedure. In recent years, the use of tissue engineering approach in which scaffolds play a vital role to regenerate cartilage has become a new research field. Investigating the advances in biological cartilage scaffolds has been regarded as the main research direction and has great significance for the construction of artificial cartilage. Native biological materials and synthetic polymeric materials have their advantages and disadvantages. The disadvantages can be overcome through either physical modification or biochemical modification. Additionally, developing composite materials, biomimetic materials, and nanomaterials can make scaffolds acquire better biocompatibility and mechanical adaptability.

  8. Repair of Torn Avascular Meniscal Cartilage Using Undifferentiated Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells: From In Vitro Optimization to a First?in?Human Study

    OpenAIRE

    Whitehouse, Michael; Howells, Nicholas; Parry, Michael; Austin, Eric; Kafienah, Wael; Brady, Kyla; Goodship, Allen; Eldridge, Jonathan; Blom, Ashley; Hollander, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Meniscal cartilage tears are common and predispose to osteoarthritis (OA). Most occur in the avascular portion of the meniscus where current repair techniques usually fail. We described previously the use of undifferentiated autologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) seeded onto a collagen scaffold (MSC/collagen?scaffold) to integrate meniscal tissues in vitro. Our objective was to translate this method into a cell therapy for patients with torn meniscus, with the long?term goal of del...

  9. Superior results with continuous passive motion compared to active motion after periosteal transplantation. A retrospective study of human patella cartilage defect treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfredson, H; Lorentzon, R

    1999-01-01

    Fifty-seven consecutive patients (33 men and 24 women), with a mean age of 32 years (range 16-53 years), who suffered from an isolated full-thickness cartilage defect of the patella and disabling knee pain of long duration, were treated by autologous periosteal transplantation to the cartilage defect. The first 38 consecutive patients (group A) were postoperatively treated with continuous passive motion (CPM), and the next 19 consecutive patients (group B) were treated with active motion for the first 5 days postoperatively. In both groups, the initial regimens were followed by active motion, slowly progressive strength training, and slowly progressive weight bearing. In group A, after a mean follow-up of 51 months (range 33-92 months), 29 patients (76%) were graded as excellent or good, 7 patients (19%) were graded as fair, and 2 patients (5%) were graded as poor. In group B, after a mean follow-up of 21 months (range 14-28 months), 10 patients (53%) were graded as excellent or good, 6 patients (32%) were graded as fair, and 3 patients (15%) were graded as poor. Altogether, nine of the fair or poor cases (50%) were diagnosed with chondromalacia of the patella. Our results, after performing autologous periosteal transplantation in patients with full-thickness cartilage defects of the patella and disabling knee pain, are good if CPM is used postoperatively. The clinical results using active motion postoperatively are not acceptable, especially not in patients with chondromalacia of the patella.

  10. Lubricin is expressed in chondrocytes derived from osteoarthritic cartilage encapsulated in poly(ethylene glycol diacrylate scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Musumeci

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is characterized by degenerative changes within joints that involved quantitative and/or qualitative alterations of cartilage and synovial fluid lubricin, a mucinous glycoprotein secreted by synovial fibroblasts and chondrocytes. Modern therapeutic methods, including tissue-engineering techniques, have been used to treat mechanical damage of the articular cartilage but to date there is no specific and effective treatment. This study aimed at investigating lubricin immunohistochemical expression in cartilage explant from normal and OA patients and in cartilage constructions formed by Poly (ethylene glycol (PEG based hydrogels (PEG-DA encapsulated OA chondrocytes. The expression levels of lubricin were studied by immunohistochemistry: i in tissue explanted from OA and normal human cartilage; ii in chondrocytes encapsulated in hydrogel PEGDA from OA and normal human cartilage. Moreover, immunocytochemical and western blot analysis were performed in monolayer cells from OA and normal cartilage. The results showed an increased expression of lubricin in explanted tissue and in monolayer cells from normal cartilage, and a decreased expression of lubricin in OA cartilage. The chondrocytes from OA cartilage after 5 weeks of culture in hydrogels (PEGDA showed an increased expression of lubricin compared with the control cartilage. The present study demonstrated that OA chondrocytes encapsulated in PEGDA, grown in the scaffold and were able to restore lubricin biosynthesis. Thus our results suggest the possibility of applying autologous cell transplantation in conjunction with scaffold materials for repairing cartilage lesions in patients with OA to reduce at least the progression of the disease.

  11. New technique for preparing cartilage for intracordal injection: the freezing and grinding method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young Min; Lee, Won Yong; Lim, Yun-Sung; Lee, Jin-Choon; Lee, Byung-Joo; Wang, Soo-Geun

    2014-07-01

    We developed a technique for preparing harvested cartilage that creates finer, more uniform pieces by freezing with liquid nitrogen and grinding with a mortar and pestle. Herein, we report the application of this new technique for intracordal cartilage injection. Experimental study. Human cartilage was obtained from surgical cases. In the standard method, harvested cartilage was prepared with scissors and a knife. In the experimental group, harvested cartilage was frozen with liquid nitrogen and ground with a mortar and pestle. It took an average of 60 minutes to manipulate cartilage using the standard technique, whereas it took an average of 10 minutes using the freezing and grinding method (P<0.001). The average size of cartilage flakes generated by the standard and new techniques were 727 and 48.6 μm, respectively. The cartilage flakes produced using scissors and a knife were able to pass through a 19-gauge needle, whereas those created using the freezing and grinding method were able to pass through a 24-gauge needle. Using the freezing and grinding method, cartilage was broken into fine, uniform pieces that could pass through a 24-gauge needle. This new technique will facilitate the production of commercial cartilage material for intracordal injection. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. All rights reserved.

  12. Histological Analysis of Failed Cartilage Repair after Marrow Stimulation for the Treatment of Large Cartilage Defect in Medial Compartmental Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakata,Kenichiro

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow-stimulating techniques such as microfracture and subchondral drilling are valuable treatments for full-thickness cartilage defects. However, marrow stimulation-derived reparative tissues are not histologically well-documented in human osteoarthritis. We retrospectively investigated cartilage repairs after marrow stimulation for the treatment of large cartilage defects in osteoarthritic knees. Tissues were obtained from patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty (TKA after arthroscopic marrow stimulation in medial compartmental osteoarthritis. Clinical findings and cartilage repair were assessed. Sections of medial femoral condyles were histologically investigated by safranin O staining and anti-type II collagen antibody. Marrow stimulation decreased the knee pain in the short term. However, varus leg alignment gradually progressed, and TKA conversions were required. The grade of cartilage repair was not improved. Marrow stimulations resulted in insufficient cartilage regeneration on medial femoral condyles. Safranin O-stained proteoglycans and type II collagen were observed in the deep zone of marrow-stimulated holes. This study demonstrated that marrow stimulation resulted in failed cartilage repair for the treatment of large cartilage defects in osteoarthritic knees. Our results suggest that arthroscopic marrow stimulation might not improve clinical symptoms for the long term in patients suffering large osteoarthritic cartilage defects.

  13. [The anatomical structure similarity research on auricular cartilage and nasal alar cartilage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changyong; Fan, Fei; Li, Wenzhi; Li, Binbin; You, Jianjun; Wang, Huan

    2015-09-01

    There are many scaffold materials of repairing nasal alar cartilage defects. Auricuiar cartilage was used extensively in terms of its abundant tissues, good elasticity, little donor-site malformation, good plasticity etc. The authors dissected auricular cartilage and nasal alar cartilage, measured cartilage's morphous data and found some similar territories with nasal alar cartilage in the structure of auricular cartilage. An anatomical study was performed using 10 adult cadavers acquired through Plastic Surgery Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China. Seven male and three female cadav-ers were included in the study. Harvest 20 auricular cartilage specimens and 20 nasal alar cartilage specimens. Then, Computed Tomography Scan on the auricular cartilage and nasal alar cartilage were performed. The datas were imported into mimics and three-dimensional reconstructions of the auricular cartilage and nasal alar cartilage were carried on. Parts of the auricular cartilage, such as conchal fossa, tragus, intertragic notch, and cymba of auricular concha, curs of helix and curs of helix, triangular fossa, are ana-tomically similar to nasal alar cartilage. This study reports the anatomy of auricular cartilage and nasal alar cartilage, found some territories in the auricular cartilage, such as conchal fossa, tragus, intertragic notch, and cymba of auricular concha, curs of helix and curs of helix, triangular fossa, are anatomically similar to nasal alar cartilage. This research provides the anatomical basis that auricular cartilage was used to repair the nasal cartilage defect.

  14. Articular cartilage collagen: an irreplaceable framework?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D R Eyre

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Adult articular cartilage by dry weight is two-thirds collagen. The collagen has a unique molecular phenotype. The nascent type II collagen fibril is a heteropolymer, with collagen IX molecules covalently linked to the surface and collagen XI forming the filamentous template of the fibril as a whole. The functions of collagens IX and XI in the heteropolymer are far from clear but, evidently, they are critically important since mutations in COLIX and COLXI genes can result in chondrodysplasia syndromes. Here we review what is known of the collagen assembly and present new evidence that collagen type III becomes covalently added to the polymeric fabric of adult human articular cartilage, perhaps as part of a matrix repair or remodelling process.

  15. An amidated carboxymethylcellulose hydrogel for cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Gemma; Fini, Milena; Torricelli, Paola; Giardino, Roberto; Barbucci, Rolando

    2008-08-01

    An amidic derivative of carboxymethylcellulose was synthesized (CMCA). The new polysaccharide was obtained by converting a large percentage of carboxylic groups ( approximately 50%) of carboxymethylcellulose into amidic groups rendering the macromolecule quite similar to hyaluronan. Then, the polysaccharide (CMCA) was crosslinked. The behavior of CMCA hydrogel towards normal human articular chondrocytes (NHAC) was in vitro studied monitoring the cell proliferation and synthesis of extra cellular matrix (ECM) components and compared with a hyaluronan based hydrogel (Hyal). An extracellular matrix rich in cartilage-specific collagen and proteoglycans was secreted in the presence of hydrogels. The injectability of the new hydrogels was also analysed. An experimental in vivo model was realized to study the effect of CMCA and Hyal hydrogels in the treatment of surgically created partial thickness chondral defects in the rabbit knee. The preliminary results pointed out that CMCA hydrogel could be considered as a potential compound for cartilage regeneration.

  16. Altered Knee Joint Mechanics in Simple Compression Associated with Early Cartilage Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Dabiri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The progression of osteoarthritis can be accompanied by depth-dependent changes in the properties of articular cartilage. The objective of the present study was to determine the subsequent alteration in the fluid pressurization in the human knee using a three-dimensional computer model. Only a small compression in the femur-tibia direction was applied to avoid numerical difficulties. The material model for articular cartilages and menisci included fluid, fibrillar and nonfibrillar matrices as distinct constituents. The knee model consisted of distal femur, femoral cartilage, menisci, tibial cartilage, and proximal tibia. Cartilage degeneration was modeled in the high load-bearing region of the medial condyle of the femur with reduced fibrillar and nonfibrillar elastic properties and increased hydraulic permeability. Three case studies were implemented to simulate (1 the onset of cartilage degeneration from the superficial zone, (2 the progression of cartilage degeneration to the middle zone, and (3 the progression of cartilage degeneration to the deep zone. As compared with a normal knee of the same compression, reduced fluid pressurization was observed in the degenerated knee. Furthermore, faster reduction in fluid pressure was observed with the onset of cartilage degeneration in the superficial zone and progression to the middle zone, as compared to progression to the deep zone. On the other hand, cartilage degeneration in any zone would reduce the fluid pressure in all three zones. The shear strains at the cartilage-bone interface were increased when cartilage degeneration was eventually advanced to the deep zone. The present study revealed, at the joint level, altered fluid pressurization and strains with the depth-wise cartilage degeneration. The results also indicated redistribution of stresses within the tissue and relocation of the loading between the tissue matrix and fluid pressure. These results may only be qualitatively interesting

  17. Mechanical overloading causes mitochondrial superoxide and SOD2 imbalance in chondrocytes resulting in cartilage degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Masato; Nojiri, Hidetoshi; Ozawa, Yusuke; Watanabe, Kenji; Muramatsu, Yuta; Kaneko, Haruka; Morikawa, Daichi; Kobayashi, Keiji; Saita, Yoshitomo; Sasho, Takahisa; Shirasawa, Takuji; Yokote, Koutaro; Kaneko, Kazuo; Shimizu, Takahiko

    2015-06-25

    Mechanical stress and aging are major risk factors of cartilage degeneration. Human studies have previously reported that oxidative damage increased, while SOD2 protein was reciprocally downregulated in osteoarthritic degenerated cartilage. However, it remains unclear whether mitochondrial superoxide imbalance in chondrocytes causes cartilage degeneration. We herein demonstrate that mechanical loading promoted mitochondrial superoxide generation and selective Sod2 downregulation in chondrocytes in vivo and that mitochondrial superoxide inducer also downregulated Sod2 expression in chondrocytes in vitro. A genetically manipulated model revealed that Sod2 deficiency in chondrocytes also resulted in mitochondrial superoxide overproduction and dysfunction, thus leading to cartilage degeneration. Intra-articular injection of a permeable antioxidant effectively suppressed the mechanical loading-induced mitochondrial superoxide generation and cartilage degeneration in mice. Our findings demonstrate that mitochondrial superoxide plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of osteoarthritis, and the mitochondrial superoxide balance may therefore be a promising target for the treatment of cartilage degeneration.

  18. 13C NMR relaxation studies on cartilage and cartilage components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naji, L; Kaufmann, J; Huster, D; Schiller, J; Arnold, K

    2000-08-07

    We have investigated the molecular motions of polysaccharides of bovine nasal and pig articular cartilage by measuring the 13C NMR relaxation times (T1 and T2). Both types of cartilage differ significantly towards their collagen/glycosaminoglycan ratio, leading to different NMR spectra. As chondroitin sulfate is the main constituent of cartilage, aqueous solutions of related poly- and monosaccharides (N-acetylglucosamine and glucuronic acid) were also investigated. Although there are only slight differences in T1 relaxation of the mono- and the polysaccharides, T2 decreases about one order of magnitude, when glucuronic acid or N-acetylglucosamine and chondroitin sulfate are compared. It is concluded that the ring carbons are motion-restricted primarily by the embedment in the rigid pyranose structure and, thus, additional limitations of mobility do not more show a major effect. Significant differences were observed between bovine nasal and pig articular cartilage, resulting in a considerable line-broadening and a lower signal to noise ratio in the spectra of pig articular cartilage. This is most likely caused by the higher collagen content of articular cartilage in comparison to the polysaccharide-rich bovine nasal cartilage.

  19. Quantitative imaging of excised osteoarthritic cartilage using spectral CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajendran, Kishore; Bateman, Christopher J.; Younis, Raja Aamir; De Ruiter, Niels J.A.; Ramyar, Mohsen; Anderson, Nigel G. [University of Otago - Christchurch, Department of Radiology, Christchurch (New Zealand); Loebker, Caroline [University of Otago, Christchurch Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Christchurch (New Zealand); University of Twente, Department of Developmental BioEngineering, Enschede (Netherlands); Schon, Benjamin S.; Hooper, Gary J.; Woodfield, Tim B.F. [University of Otago, Christchurch Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Christchurch (New Zealand); Chernoglazov, Alex I. [University of Canterbury, Human Interface Technology Laboratory New Zealand, Christchurch (New Zealand); Butler, Anthony P.H. [University of Otago - Christchurch, Department of Radiology, Christchurch (New Zealand); European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); MARS Bioimaging, Christchurch (New Zealand)

    2017-01-15

    To quantify iodine uptake in articular cartilage as a marker of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content using multi-energy spectral CT. We incubated a 25-mm strip of excised osteoarthritic human tibial plateau in 50 % ionic iodine contrast and imaged it using a small-animal spectral scanner with a cadmium telluride photon-processing detector to quantify the iodine through the thickness of the articular cartilage. We imaged both spectroscopic phantoms and osteoarthritic tibial plateau samples. The iodine distribution as an inverse marker of GAG content was presented in the form of 2D and 3D images after applying a basis material decomposition technique to separate iodine in cartilage from bone. We compared this result with a histological section stained for GAG. The iodine in cartilage could be distinguished from subchondral bone and quantified using multi-energy CT. The articular cartilage showed variation in iodine concentration throughout its thickness which appeared to be inversely related to GAG distribution observed in histological sections. Multi-energy CT can quantify ionic iodine contrast (as a marker of GAG content) within articular cartilage and distinguish it from bone by exploiting the energy-specific attenuation profiles of the associated materials. (orig.)

  20. Changes in articular cartilage in experimentally induced patellar subluxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, J.; Saito, S.; Yamamoto, K.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Patellar subluxation was experimentally induced in young rabbits and the resulting cartilaginous changes were observed over a prolonged period of time to determine histological changes in the subluxated patellar cartilage.
METHODS—The tibial tuberosity in 12 week old rabbits was laterally displaced and fixed to the tibia with wire to induce lateral patellar subluxation. Pathological changes in patellar cartilage were examined for 120 weeks after surgery using computed tomography and stereoscopic microscopy.
RESULTS—Eight weeks after surgery, changes in articular cartilage consisting of horizontal splitting of the matrix were observed in the intermediate zone and were presumed to have been caused by shearing stress applied to the patellar cartilage. The cartilaginous changes caused by patellar subluxation progressed very little over the 120 weeks. Very few rabbits presented with osteoarthritic changes in the patellofemoral joint, most probably because the stress resulting from the malalignment of the patellofemoral joint was mild enough to permit recovery.
CONCLUSION—The mild, non-progressive pathological changes, in particular, basal degeneration, induced in this experiment in patellar cartilage were quite similar to the changes in articular cartilage seen in human chondromalacia patellae.

 PMID:9462171

  1. Co-Expression and Co-Localization of Cartilage Glycoproteins CHI3L1 and Lubricin in Osteoarthritic Cartilage: Morphological, Immunohistochemical and Gene Expression Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Di Rosa, Michelino; Malaguarnera, Lucia; Puzzo, Lidia; Leonardi, Rosy; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Musumeci, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common human arthritis characterized by degeneration of articular cartilage. Several studies reported that levels of human cartilage glycoprotein chitinase 3-like-1 (CHI3L1) are known as a potential marker for the activation of chondrocytes and the progression of Osteoarthritis (OA), whereas lubricin appears to be chondroprotective. The aim of this study was to investigate the co-expression and co-localization of CHI3L1 and lubricin in normal and osteoarthritic rat articular cartilage to correlate their modified expression to a specific grade of OA. Samples of normal and osteoarthritic rat articular cartilage were analyzed by the Kellgren-Lawrence OA severity scores, the Kraus' modified Mankin score and the Histopathology Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) system for histomorphometric evaluations, and through CHI3L1 and lubricin gene expression, immunohistochemistry and double immuno-staining analysis. The immunoexpression and the mRNA levels of lubricin increased in normal cartilage and decreased in OA cartilage (normal vs. OA, p < 0.01). By contrast, the immunoexpression and the mRNA levels of CHI3L1 increased in OA cartilage and decreased in normal cartilage (normal vs. OA, p < 0.01). Our findings are consistent with reports suggesting that these two glycoproteins are functionally associated with the development of OA and in particular with grade 2/3 of OA, suggesting that in the future they could be helpful to stage the severity and progression of the disease.

  2. Co-Expression and Co-Localization of Cartilage Glycoproteins CHI3L1 and Lubricin in Osteoarthritic Cartilage: Morphological, Immunohistochemical and Gene Expression Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Anna Szychlinska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is the most common human arthritis characterized by degeneration of articular cartilage. Several studies reported that levels of human cartilage glycoprotein chitinase 3-like-1 (CHI3L1 are known as a potential marker for the activation of chondrocytes and the progression of Osteoarthritis (OA, whereas lubricin appears to be chondroprotective. The aim of this study was to investigate the co-expression and co-localization of CHI3L1 and lubricin in normal and osteoarthritic rat articular cartilage to correlate their modified expression to a specific grade of OA. Samples of normal and osteoarthritic rat articular cartilage were analyzed by the Kellgren–Lawrence OA severity scores, the Kraus’ modified Mankin score and the Histopathology Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI system for histomorphometric evaluations, and through CHI3L1 and lubricin gene expression, immunohistochemistry and double immuno-staining analysis. The immunoexpression and the mRNA levels of lubricin increased in normal cartilage and decreased in OA cartilage (normal vs. OA, p < 0.01. By contrast, the immunoexpression and the mRNA levels of CHI3L1 increased in OA cartilage and decreased in normal cartilage (normal vs. OA, p < 0.01. Our findings are consistent with reports suggesting that these two glycoproteins are functionally associated with the development of OA and in particular with grade 2/3 of OA, suggesting that in the future they could be helpful to stage the severity and progression of the disease.

  3. Tensorial electrokinetics in articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaud, Boris; Quinn, Thomas M

    2006-09-15

    Electrokinetic phenomena contribute to biomechanical functions of articular cartilage and underlie promising methods for early detection of osteoarthritic lesions. Although some transport properties, such as hydraulic permeability, are known to become anisotropic with compression, the direction-dependence of cartilage electrokinetic properties remains unknown. Electroosmosis experiments were therefore performed on adult bovine articular cartilage samples, whereby fluid flows were driven by electric currents in directions parallel and perpendicular to the articular surface of statically compressed explants. Magnitudes of electrokinetic coefficients decreased slightly with compression (from approximately -7.5 microL/As in the range of 0-20% compression to -6.0 microL/As in the 35-50% range) consistent with predictions of microstructure-based models of cartilage material properties. However, no significant dependence on direction of the electrokinetic coupling coefficient was detected, even for conditions where the hydraulic permeability tensor is known to be anisotropic. This contrast may also be interpreted using microstructure-based models, and provides insights into structure-function relationships in cartilage extracellular matrix and physical mediators of cell responses to tissue compression. Findings support the use of relatively simple isotropic modeling approaches for electrokinetic phenomena in cartilage and related materials, and indicate that measurement of electrokinetic properties may provide particularly robust means for clinical evaluation of cartilage matrix integrity.

  4. Articular cartilage generation applying PEG-LA-DM/PEGDM copolymer hydrogels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Xing; Papadopoulos, Anestis; Ibusuki, Shinichi; Bichara, David A; Saris, Daniel B; Malda, Jos|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412461099; Anseth, Kristi S; Gill, Thomas J; Randolph, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Injuries to the human native cartilage tissue are particularly problematic because cartilage has little to no ability to heal or regenerate itself. Employing a tissue engineering strategy that combines suitable cell sources and biomimetic hydrogels could be a promising alternative to

  5. Articular cartilage generation applying PEG-LA-DM/PEGDM copolymer hydrogels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Xing; Papadopoulos, Anestis; Ibusuki, Shinichi; Bichara, David A.; Saris, Daniel B.; Malda, J; Anseth, Kristi S.; Gill, Thomas J.; Randolph, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Injuries to the human native cartilage tissue are particularly problematic because cartilage has little to no ability to heal or regenerate itself. Employing a tissue engineering strategy that combines suitable cell sources and biomimetic hydrogels could be a promising alternative to

  6. Biotribology :articular cartilage friction, wear, and lubrication

    OpenAIRE

    Schroeder, Matthew O

    1995-01-01

    This study developed, explored, and refined techniques for the in vitro study of cartilage-on-cartilage friction, deformation, and wear. Preliminary results of in vitro cartilage-on- cartilage experiments with emphasis on wear and biochemistry are presented. Cartilage-bone specimens were obtained from the stifle joints of steers from a separate controlled study. The load, sliding speed, and traverse of the lower specimens were held constant as lubricant and test length were varied. Lubric...

  7. 3D Printing of Cytocompatible Water-Based Light-Cured Polyurethane with Hyaluronic Acid for Cartilage Tissue Engineering Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shie, Ming-You; Chang, Wen-Ching; Wei, Li-Ju; Huang, Yu-Hsin; Chen, Chien-Han; Shih, Cheng-Ting; Chen, Yi-Wen; Shen, Yu-Fang

    2017-01-01

    Diseases in articular cartilages have affected millions of people globally. Although the biochemical and cellular composition of articular cartilages is relatively simple, there is a limitation in the self-repair ability of the cartilage. Therefore, developing strategies for cartilage repair is very important. Here, we report on a new liquid resin preparation process of water-based polyurethane based photosensitive materials with hyaluronic acid with application of the materials for 3D printed customized cartilage scaffolds. The scaffold has high cytocompatibility and is one that closely mimics the mechanical properties of articular cartilages. It is suitable for culturing human Wharton’s jelly mesenchymal stem cells (hWJMSCs) and the cells in this case showed an excellent chondrogenic differentiation capacity. We consider that the 3D printing hybrid scaffolds may have potential in customized tissue engineering and also facilitate the development of cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:28772498

  8. STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF ARTICULAR CARTILAGE OF THE HIP JOINT USING FINITE ELEMENT METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Karpiński

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of a preliminary study on the structural analysis of the hip joint, taking into account changes in the mechanical properties of the articular cartilage of the joint. Studies have been made due to the need to determine the tension distribution occurring in the cartilage of the human hip. These distribution are the starting point for designing custom made human hip prosthesis. Basic anatomy, biomechanical analysis of the hip joint and articular cartilage are introduced. The mechanical analysis of the hip joint model is conducted. Final results of analysis are presented. Main conclusions of the study are: the capability of absorbing loads by articular cartilage of the hip joint is preliminary determined as decreasing with increasing degenerations of the cartilage and with age of a patient. Without further information on changes of cartilage’s mechanical parameters in time it is hard to determine the nature of relation between mentioned capability and these parameters.

  9. Endoscopic laser reshaping of rabbit tracheal cartilage: preliminary investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Walter; Lam, Anthony; Protsenko, Dmitry; Wong, Brian J.

    2005-04-01

    Background: Tracheal cartilage deformities due to trauma, prolonged endotracheal intubation or infection are difficult to correct. Current treatment options such as dilation, laser ablation, stent placement, and segmental resection are only temporary or carry significant risks. The objectives of this project were to design and test a laser activated endotracheal stent system that can actively modify the geometry of tracheal cartilage, leading to permanent retention of a new and desirable tracheal geometry. Methods: Ex vivo rabbit tracheal cartilage (simulating human neonate trachea) were irradiated with an Er: Glass laser, (λ= 1.54um, 0.5W-2.5W, 1 sec to 5 sec). Shape change and gross thermal injury were assessed visually to determine the best laser power parameters for reshaping. A rigid endoscopic telescope and hollow bronchoscope were used to record endoscopic images. The stent was constructed from nitinol wire, shaped into a zigzag configuration. An ex vivo testing apparatus was also constructed. Results: The best laser power parameter to produce shape change was 1 W for 6-7 seconds. At this setting, there was significant shape change with only minimal thermal injury to the tracheal mucosa, as assessed by visual inspection. The bronchoscopy system functioned adequately during testing in the ex vivo testing apparatus. Conclusion: We have successfully designed instrumentation and created the capability to endoscopically reshape tracheal cartilage in an ex vivo rabbit model. The results obtained in ex vivo tracheal cartilage indicated that reshaping using Er: Glass laser can be accomplished.

  10. Does Radio Frequency Ablation (RFA) Epiphysiodesis Affect Joint Cartilage?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiguetomi Medina, Juan Manuel; Abood, Ahmed Abdul-Hussein; Rahbek, Ole;

    Background: Epiphysiodesis made with RFA has resulted, in animal models, an effective procedure that disrupts the growth plate and induces LLD. This procedure involves an increase of temperature (>92°C) of the targeted region causing thermal damage. To our knowledge, no study that investigates...... the effect of this procedure in the adjacent joint articular cartilage has been reported Purpose / Aim of Study: Proof of concept that epiphysiodesis made with RFA is a safe procedure that disrupts the growth plate without damaging the adjacent joint articular cartilage Materials and Methods: RFA...... articular joint cartilage. This study resembles possible results of RFA epiphysiodesis on humans. Previous studies suggest that an 8 min ablation is enough to disrupt the growth plate. This study shows that RFA can be done safely in the growing physis even on triple-long procedures. It is important...

  11. Contrast Agent-Enhanced Computed Tomography of Articular Cartilage: Association with Tissue Composition and Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvast, T.S.; Jurvelin, J.S.; Aula, A.S.; Lammi, M.J.; Toeyraes, J. (Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology, Kuopio Univ. Hospital, Kuopio (Finland))

    2009-01-15

    Background: Contrast agent-enhanced computed tomography may enable the noninvasive quantification of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content of articular cartilage. It has been reported that penetration of the negatively charged contrast agent ioxaglate (Hexabrix) increases significantly after enzymatic degradation of GAGs. However, it is not known whether spontaneous degradation of articular cartilage can be quantitatively detected with this technique. Purpose: To investigate the diagnostic potential of contrast agent-enhanced cartilage tomography (CECT) in quantification of GAG concentration in normal and spontaneously degenerated articular cartilage by means of clinical peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). Material and Methods: In this in vitro study, normal and spontaneously degenerated adult bovine cartilage (n=32) was used. Bovine patellar cartilage samples were immersed in 21 mM contrast agent (Hexabrix) solution for 24 hours at room temperature. After immersion, the samples were scanned with a clinical pQCT instrument. From pQCT images, the contrast agent concentration in superficial as well as in full-thickness cartilage was calculated. Histological and functional integrity of the samples was quantified with histochemical and mechanical reference measurements extracted from our earlier study. Results: Full diffusion of contrast agent into the deep cartilage was found to take over 8 hours. As compared to normal cartilage, a significant increase (11%, P<0.05) in contrast agent concentration was seen in the superficial layer of spontaneously degenerated samples. Significant negative correlations were revealed between the contrast agent concentration and the superficial or full-thickness GAG content of tissue (|R|>0.5, P<0.01). Further, pQCT could be used to measure the thickness of patellar cartilage. Conclusion: The present results suggest that CECT can be used to diagnose proteoglycan depletion in spontaneously degenerated articular cartilage with a

  12. Transcriptomic signatures in cartilage ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Age is an important factor in the development of osteoarthritis. Microarray studies provide insight into cartilage aging but do not reveal the full transcriptomic phenotype of chondrocytes such as small noncoding RNAs, pseudogenes, and microRNAs. RNA-Seq is a powerful technique for the interrogation of large numbers of transcripts including nonprotein coding RNAs. The aim of the study was to characterise molecular mechanisms associated with age-related changes in gene signatures. Methods RNA for gene expression analysis using RNA-Seq and real-time PCR analysis was isolated from macroscopically normal cartilage of the metacarpophalangeal joints of eight horses; four young donors (4 years old) and four old donors (>15 years old). RNA sequence libraries were prepared following ribosomal RNA depletion and sequencing was undertaken using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. Differentially expressed genes were defined using Benjamini-Hochberg false discovery rate correction with a generalised linear model likelihood ratio test (P ageing cartilage. Conclusion There was an age-related dysregulation of matrix, anabolic and catabolic cartilage factors. This study has increased our knowledge of transcriptional networks in cartilage ageing by providing a global view of the transcriptome. PMID:23971731

  13. Platelet-rich plasma plus human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage repair%富血小板血浆及脐带间充质干细胞修复软骨损伤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐静; 王黎明; 周立冬; 吴美; 崔辉; 赵璟; 曾独娟; 张仲文; 刘爱兵

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Chondrocytes co-cultured with bone marrow stromal stem cells on the scaffold of platelet-rich plasma are found to proliferate, and besides proliferative growth, bone marrow stromal cells exhibit a tendency of differentiating into chondrocytes. OBJECTIVE:To study the effect of platelet-rich plasma and human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) on cartilage repair. METHODS:Forty healthy New Zealand white rabbits were selected to establish models of cartilage defects, and then randomly divided into normal saline group, platelet-rich plasma group, hUCMSCs group and combination group. Platelet-rich plasma was prepared by using double centrifugations to prepare passage 3 hUCMSCs. After modeling, intra-articular injection of normal saline (0.5 mL), 12.5%platelet-rich plasma (0.5 mL), 1×107 hUCMSCs (0.5 mL), 12.5%platelet-rich plasma+1×107 hUCMSCs (total y 0.5 mL) was done in corresponding groups, respectively. After 12 weeks of modeling, the injured cartilage was grossly observed, and hematoxylin-eosin staining was used to observe cartilage repair under light microscope;according to the O'Driscol histologic standard, histological examination was performed. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:The repair effect in the normal saline group was significantly better that in the platelet-rich plasma group, hUCMSCs group, combination group (P<0.05), while the platelet-rich plasma group and combination group also exhibit better outcomes than the hUCMSCs group (P<0.05). These findings indicate that both platelet-rich plasma and hUCMSCs can promote cartilage repair;moreover, platelet-rich plasma with or without hUCMSCs is superior to hUCMSCs alone in the cartilage repair.%背景:研究者直接将富血小板血浆作为支架材料与骨髓基质干细胞、软骨细胞等复合后体外培养发现软骨细胞在富血小板血浆三维支架呈现增殖生长,骨髓基质干细胞在增殖的同时有向软骨细胞分化的倾向。目的:观察富血小板

  14. Transcriptomic profiling of cartilage ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandy Jayne Peffers

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The musculoskeletal system is severely affected by the ageing process, with many tissues undergoing changes that lead to loss of function and frailty. Articular cartilage is susceptible to age related diseases, such as osteoarthritis. Applying RNA-Seq to young and old equine cartilage, we identified an over-representation of genes with reduced expression relating to extracellular matrix, degradative proteases, matrix synthetic enzymes, cytokines and growth factors in cartilage from older donors. Here we describe the contents and quality controls in detail for the gene expression and related results published by Peffers and colleagues in Arthritis Research and Therapy 2013 associated with the data uploaded to ArrayExpress (E-MTAB-1386.

  15. PHOTOCROSSLINKABLE HYDROGELS FOR CARTILAGE TISSUE ENGINEERING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levett, Peter Andrew

    2015-01-01

    For millions of people, damaged cartilage is a major source of pain and disability. As those people often discover upon seeking medical treatment, once damaged, cartilage is very difficult to repair. Finding better clinical therapies for damaged cartilage has generated a huge amount of research inte

  16. 35SULPHATE INCORPORATION ASSAY AS A NEW TOOL FOR MEASURING EARLY CARTILAGE DEGRADATION FOLLOWING BLOOD EXPOSURE IN VITRO AND IN VIVO IN F8 KO RATS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pulles, A. E.; Christensen, K. R.; Coeleveld, K.

    2017-01-01

    of radioactive 35Sulphate (35SO42-) in cartilage, is a sensitive method to detect early cellular changes in cartilage previously applied in human and larger animal models. Isolating cartilage of small animals can be challenging, so a technique to shave off rat’s cartilage was developed and the 35Sulphate...... with and approved by the Danish Animal Experiments Council, Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Fisheries, Denmark. Results: On average, a total of 1.6mg (0.8–3.1mg) cartilage per tibia could be obtained. The proteoglycan synthesis rate of healthy cartilage determined after four days of culturing in vitro...

  17. Cartilage Derived from Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Expresses Lubricin In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Nakagawa

    Full Text Available Lubricin expression in the superficial cartilage will be a crucial factor in the success of cartilage regeneration. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are an attractive cell source and the use of aggregates of MSCs has some advantages in terms of chondrogenic potential and efficiency of cell adhesion. Lubricin expression in transplanted MSCs has not been fully elucidated so far. Our goals were to determine (1 whether cartilage pellets of human MSCs expressed lubricin in vitro chondrogenesis, (2 whether aggregates of human MSCs promoted lubricin expression, and (3 whether aggregates of MSCs expressed lubricin in the superficial cartilage after transplantation into osteochondral defects in rats.For in vitro analysis, human bone marrow (BM MSCs were differentiated into cartilage by pellet culture, and also aggregated using the hanging drop technique. For an animal study, aggregates of BM MSCs derived from GFP transgenic rats were transplanted to the osteochondral defect in the trochlear groove of wild type rat knee joints. Lubricin expression was mainly evaluated in differentiated and regenerated cartilages.In in vitro analysis, lubricin was detected in the superficial zone of the pellets and conditioned medium. mRNA expression of Proteoglycan4 (Prg4, which encodes lubricin, in pellets was significantly higher than that of undifferentiated MSCs. Aggregates showed different morphological features between the superficial and deep zone, and the Prg4 mRNA expression increased after aggregate formation. Lubricin was also found in the aggregate. In a rat study, articular cartilage regeneration was significantly better in the MSC group than in the control group as shown by macroscopical and histological analysis. The transmission electron microscope showed that morphology of the superficial cartilage in the MSC group was closer to that of the intact cartilage than in the control group. GFP positive cells remained in the repaired tissue and expressed lubricin in

  18. Strategies for Stratified Cartilage Bioprinting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, W.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple materials, cells and growth factors can be combined into one construct by the use of a state–of-the-art bioprinter. This technique may in the future make the fabrication of complete tissues or organs possible. In this thesis the feasibility of the bioprinting of cartilage and the difference

  19. Postnatal development of articular cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turnhout, van M.C.

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) is the thin layer of tissue that covers the ends of the bones in the synovial joints in mammals. Functional adult AC has depth-dependent mechanical properties that are not yet present at birth. These depth-dependent mechanical properties in adult life are the result of a

  20. Postnatal development of articular cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turnhout, van M.C.

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) is the thin layer of tissue that covers the ends of the bones in the synovial joints in mammals. Functional adult AC has depth-dependent mechanical properties that are not yet present at birth. These depth-dependent mechanical properties in adult life are the result of a dep

  1. Effect of shark cartilage on the cytotoxic activity of NK cells immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshar Bargahi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: On the basis of traditional medicine Shark cartilage have been used in the treatment of cancer especially immune related cancers. Then, we hypotheses that shark cartilage contains immune stimulatory ingredients. Methods: The immune stimulatory effect of shark cartilage derived proteins on the cytotoxic activity of natural killer cells(NK cells from healthy human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMN was studied. Shark cartilage proteins were purified by ion-exchange chromatography and ultra filtration. The effect of each protein fraction on the modulation of cytotoxicity of NK cells, as effectors, against K562, as target cells, was assayed by enzymatic LDH test. Results: The results from cytotoxic assay of NK cells and SDS- Polyacrylamide gell electrophoresis of shark cartilage protein fractions indicated that AR10 fraction, containing proteins with molecular weight of about 14.5 KDa is the most active ingredients of shark cartilage. Conclusion: Shark cartilage contains a 14.5 KDa protein that modulates NK cells activity of human immune system.

  2. Estudo Morfológico do desenvolvimento da cartilagem quadrangular do nariz e implicações nas cirurgias septoplásticas Morphologic study of the development of the human nose quadrilateral cartilage and implications in the septoplastic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo S. G. Pereira

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Introdução: Este trabalho é um estudo morfológico do desenvolvimento da cartilagem quadrangular humana ao longo da vida. Para tal retiramos cartilagens quadrangulares em bloco com as demais cartilagens do nariz, utilizando a técnica de rinoplastia aberta, em cadáveres autopsiados no Serviço de Patologia do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto - USP e no serviço de verificação de óbitos do interior, em Ribeirão Preto. Forma de estudo: Experimental. Métodos: As peças anatômicas foram cortadas em dois pontos dividindo-as em três partes, com relação ao eixo caudo-cefálico correspondendo à borda livre da cartilagem, terço caudal (posição 1, médio (posição 2 e cefálico (posição 3. Tem relação com a placa perpendicular do etmóide e volmer. As amostras foram fixadas em formol a 10% e incluídas em parafina. Foram examinados cortes histológicos de 7 µm de espessura e corados por hematoxilina e eosina (HE e Alcian Blue. Em cada posição, três diferentes locais, em relação ao eixo ântero-posterior do nariz: Terço superior (local 1, terço médio (local 2 e terço inferior (local 3 foram estudados sobre Microscopia Óptica, com métodos fotométricos, histológicos e morfométricos. Resultado: Mostra que o tecido cartilaginoso apresenta maior velocidade de crescimento até cinco anos de idade. A menor velocidade de crescimento ocorre a partir dos oito anos de idade. Não ocorreu diferença de atividade metabólica entre as diversas regiões estudadas. Conclusões: As intervenções cirúrgicas no septo cartilaginoso podem ser realizadas após os cinco anos de idade. A idade inicial mais adequada para as cirurgias do septo nasal ocorreria aos oito anos.Introduction: The present paper is a morphological study of human quadrilateral cartilage including 0 to 66 years old subjects. The quadrilateral cartilage was removed in block with the others nasal cartilages. The open rhinoplasty was the

  3. Up-regulated expression of cartilage intermediate-layer protein and ANK in articular hyaline cartilage from patients with calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Jun; Ryan, Lawrence M; Masuda, Ikuko

    2002-12-01

    Excess accumulation of extracellular inorganic pyrophosphate (ePPi) in aged human cartilage is crucial in calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal formation in cartilage matrix. Two sources of ePPi are ePPi-generating ectoenzymes (NTPPPH) and extracellular transport of intracellular PPi by ANK. This study was undertaken to evaluate the role of NTPPPH and ANK in ePPi elaboration, by investigating expression of NTPPPH enzymes (cartilage intermediate-layer protein [CILP] and plasma cell membrane glycoprotein 1 [PC-1]) and ANK in human chondrocytes from osteoarthritic (OA) articular cartilage containing CPPD crystals and without crystals. Chondrocytes were harvested from knee cartilage at the time of arthroplasty (OA with CPPD crystals [CPPD], n = 8; OA without crystals [OA], n = 10). Normal adult human chondrocytes (n = 1) were used as a control. Chondrocytes were cultured with transforming growth factor beta1 (TGFbeta1), which stimulates ePPi elaboration, and/or insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), which inhibits ePPi elaboration. NTPPPH and ePPi were measured in the media at 48 hours. Media CILP, PC-1, and ANK were determined by dot-immunoblot analysis. Chondrocyte messenger RNA (mRNA) was extracted for reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction to study expression of mRNA for CILP, PC-1, and ANK. NTPPPH and ANK mRNA and protein were also studied in fresh frozen cartilage. Basal ePPi elaboration and NTPPPH activity in conditioned media from CPPD chondrocytes were elevated compared with normal chondrocytes, and tended to be higher compared with OA chondrocytes. Basal expression of mRNA for CILP (chondrocytes) and ANK (cartilage) was higher in both CPPD chondrocytes and CPPD cartilage extract than in OA or normal samples. PC-1 mRNA was less abundant in CPPD chondrocytes and cartilage extract than in OA chondrocytes and extract, although the difference was not significant. CILP, PC-1, and ANK protein levels were similar in CPPD, OA, and normal chondrocytes

  4. Distribution of Basement Membrane Molecules, Laminin and Collagen Type IV, in Normal and Degenerated Cartilage Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Wei Seong; Gomoll, Andreas H.; Olsen, Bjørn Reino; Spector, Myron

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the present study was to investigate the presence and distribution of 2 basement membrane (BM) molecules, laminin and collagen type IV, in healthy and degenerative cartilage tissues. Design: Normal and degenerated tissues were obtained from goats and humans, including articular knee cartilage, the intervertebral disc, and meniscus. Normal tissue was also obtained from patella-tibial enthesis in goats. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed using anti-laminin and anti–collagen type IV antibodies. Human and goat skin were used as positive controls. The percentage of cells displaying the pericellular presence of the protein was graded semiquantitatively. Results: When present, laminin and collagen type IV were exclusively found in the pericellular matrix, and in a discrete layer on the articulating surface of normal articular cartilage. In normal articular (hyaline) cartilage in the human and goat, the proteins were found co-localized pericellularly. In contrast, in human osteoarthritic articular cartilage, collagen type IV but not laminin was found in the pericellular region. Nonpathological fibrocartilaginous tissues from the goat, including the menisci and the enthesis, were also positive for both laminin and collagen type IV pericellularly. In degenerated fibrocartilage, including intervertebral disc, as in degenerated hyaline cartilage only collagen type IV was found pericellularly around chondrocytes but with less intense staining than in non-degenerated tissue. In calcified cartilage, some cells were positive for laminin but not type IV collagen. Conclusions: We report differences in expression of the BM molecules, laminin and collagen type IV, in normal and degenerative cartilaginous tissues from adult humans and goats. In degenerative tissues laminin is depleted from the pericellular matrix before collagen type IV. The findings may inform future studies of the processes underlying cartilage degeneration and the functional

  5. Investigation of polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography towards the study of microstructure of articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasaragod, Deepa; Lu, Zenghai; Le Maitre, Christine; Wilkinson, J. Mark; Matcher, Stephen

    2013-03-01

    This paper highlights the extended Jones matrix calculus based multi-angle study carried out to understand the depth dependent structural orientation of the collagen fibers in articular cartilage using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT). A 3D lamellar model for the collagen fiber orientation, with a quadratic profile for the arching of the collagen fibers in transitional zone which points towards an ordered arrangement of fibers in that zone is the basis of the organization architecture of collagen fibers in articular cartilage. Experimental data for both ex-vivo bovine fetlock and human patellar cartilage samples are compared with theoretical predictions, with a good quantitative agreement for bovine and a reasonable qualitative agreement for human articular cartilage samples being obtained

  6. Ontogeny of rat chondrocyte proliferation: studies in embryo, adult and osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Madaí A GóMEZ-CAMARILLO; Juan B.KOURI

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the ontogeny of chondrocyte cell division using embryo, adult and osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage. We searched for mitosis phases and performed a comparative evaluation of mitotic index, basic fibroblast growth factor b (FGFb), transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) receptors, cyclin dependent kinase (CDK1)and Cyclin-B expression in fetal, neonate, 3, 5, 8 weeks old rats and experimental OA. Our results showed that mitosis phases were observed in all normal cartilage studied, although, we found a decrease in mitotic index in relation to tissue development. No mitosis was detected in OA cartilage. We also found a statistical significant reduction in cell number in OA cartilage, compared with the normal tissue. Furthermore, FGFb and TGF-β1 receptors diminished in relation to tissue development, and were very scarce in experimental OA. Western blot assays showed CDK-1 expression in all cases, including human-OA cartilage. Similar results were observed for Cyclin-B, except for 8 weeks, when it was not expressed. Our results suggest that cell division seems to be scarce, if not absent within the OA cartilage studied.Nevertheless, the existence of factors essential for cell division leaves open the question concerning chondrocyte proliferation in OA cartilage, which is likely to be present in the early stages of the disease.

  7. Jellyfish collagen scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Birgit; Bernhardt, Anne; Lode, Anja; Heinemann, Sascha; Sewing, Judith; Klinger, Matthias; Notbohm, Holger; Gelinsky, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Porous scaffolds were engineered from refibrillized collagen of the jellyfish Rhopilema esculentum for potential application in cartilage regeneration. The influence of collagen concentration, salinity and temperature on fibril formation was evaluated by turbidity measurements and quantification of fibrillized collagen. The formation of collagen fibrils with a typical banding pattern was confirmed by atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analysis. Porous scaffolds from jellyfish collagen, refibrillized under optimized conditions, were fabricated by freeze-drying and subsequent chemical cross-linking. Scaffolds possessed an open porosity of 98.2%. The samples were stable under cyclic compression and displayed an elastic behavior. Cytotoxicity tests with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) did not reveal any cytotoxic effects of the material. Chondrogenic markers SOX9, collagen II and aggrecan were upregulated in direct cultures of hMSCs upon chondrogenic stimulation. The formation of typical extracellular matrix components was further confirmed by quantification of sulfated glycosaminoglycans.

  8. Mechanobiology and Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Céline; HUSELSTEIN; Natalia; de; ISLA; Sylvaine; MULLER; Jean-Franois; STOLTZ

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionThe cartilage is a hydrated connective tissue in joints that withstands and distributes mechanical forces. Chondrocytes utilize mechanical signals to maintain tissue homeostasis. They regulate their metabolic activity through complex biological and biophysical interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM). Although some of the mechanisms of mechanotransduction are known today, there are certainly many others left unrevealed. Different topics of chondrocytes mechanobiology have led to the de...

  9. Dorsal Augmentation with Septal Cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    Murrell, George L.

    2008-01-01

    Deficiency of nasal dorsal projection may be inherent or acquired. Repair is most commonly performed with an onlay graft. When nasal septal cartilage is available, it is the author's preferred source for graft material. It is important to realize that dorsal augmentation is an operation performed for aesthetic not functional reasons. As such, patients understandably scrutinize their postoperative result, and attention to detail in all aspects of the surgery is critical in achieving a favorabl...

  10. Resident mesenchymal progenitors of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Maria Elena; Yasuhara, Rika; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2014-10-01

    Articular cartilage has poor capacity of self-renewal and repair. Insufficient number and activity of resident mesenchymal (connective tissue) progenitors is likely one of the underlying reasons. Chondroprogenitors reside not only in the superficial zone of articular cartilage but also in other zones of articular cartilage and in the neighboring tissues, including perichondrium (groove of Ranvier), synovium and fat pad. These cells may respond to injury and contribute to articular cartilage healing. In addition, marrow stromal cells can migrate through subchondral bone when articular cartilage is damaged. We should develop drugs and methods that correctly stimulate resident progenitors for improvement of repair and inhibition of degenerative changes in articular cartilage. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Diode laser (980nm) cartilage reshaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kharbotly, A.; El Tayeb, T.; Mostafa, Y.; Hesham, I.

    2011-03-01

    Loss of facial or ear cartilage due to trauma or surgery is a major challenge to the otolaryngologists and plastic surgeons as the complicated geometric contours are difficult to be animated. Diode laser (980 nm) has been proven effective in reshaping and maintaining the new geometric shape achieved by laser. This study focused on determining the optimum laser parameters needed for cartilage reshaping with a controlled water cooling system. Harvested animal cartilages were angulated with different degrees and irradiated with different diode laser powers (980nm, 4x8mm spot size). The cartilage specimens were maintained in a deformation angle for two hours after irradiation then released for another two hours. They were serially measured and photographed. High-power Diode laser irradiation with water cooling is a cheep and effective method for reshaping the cartilage needed for reconstruction of difficult situations in otorhinolaryngologic surgery. Key words: cartilage,diode laser (980nm), reshaping.

  12. Harnessing Biomechanics to Develop Cartilage Regeneration Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Athanasiou, KA; Responte, DJ; Brown, WE; Hu, JC

    2015-01-01

    Copyright © 2015 by ASME. As this review was prepared specifically for the American Society of Mechanical Engineers H.R. Lissner Medal, it primarily discusses work toward cartilage regeneration performed in Dr. Kyriacos A. Athanasiou's laboratory over the past 25 years. The prevalence and severity of degeneration of articular cartilage, a tissue whose main function is largely biomechanical, have motivated the development of cartilage tissue engineering approaches informed by biomechanics. Thi...

  13. Nanofibrous poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate) scaffolds provide a functional microenvironment for cartilage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Kuan Y; Andriotis, Orestis G; Li, Siwei; Basnett, Pooja; Su, Bo; Roy, Ipsita; Tare, Rahul S; Sengers, Bram G; Stolz, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Articular cartilage defects, when repaired ineffectively, often lead to further deterioration of the tissue, secondary osteoarthritis and, ultimately, joint replacement. Unfortunately, current surgical procedures are unable to restore normal cartilage function. Tissue engineering of cartilage provides promising strategies for the regeneration of damaged articular cartilage. As yet, there are still significant challenges that need to be overcome to match the long-term mechanical stability and durability of native cartilage. Using electrospinning of different blends of biodegradable poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate), we produced polymer scaffolds and optimised their structure, stiffness, degradation rates and biocompatibility. Scaffolds with a poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate) ratio of 1:0.25 exhibit randomly oriented fibres that closely mimic the collagen fibrillar meshwork of native cartilage and match the stiffness of native articular cartilage. Degradation of the scaffolds into products that could be easily removed from the body was indicated by changes in fibre structure, loss of molecular weight and a decrease in scaffold stiffness after one and four months. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis after three weeks of culture with human articular chondrocytes revealed a hyaline-like cartilage matrix. The ability to fine tune the ultrastructure and mechanical properties using different blends of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate) allows to produce a cartilage repair kit for clinical use to reduce the risk of developing secondary osteoarthritis. We further suggest the development of a toolbox with tailor-made scaffolds for the repair of other tissues that require a 'guiding' structure to support the body's self-healing process.

  14. Imaging Bone–Cartilage Interactions in Osteoarthritis Using [18F]-NaF PET-MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Savic MSc

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Simultaneous positron emission tomography–magnetic resonance imaging (PET-MRI is an emerging technology providing both anatomical and functional images without increasing the scan time. Compared to the traditional PET/computed tomography imaging, it also exposes the patient to significantly less radiation and provides better anatomical images as MRI provides superior soft tissue characterization. Using PET-MRI, we aim to study interactions between cartilage composition and bone function simultaneously, in knee osteoarthritis (OA. Procedures: In this article, bone turnover and remodeling was studied using [18F]-sodium fluoride (NaF PET data. Quantitative MR-derived T1ρ relaxation times characterized the biochemical cartilage degeneration. Sixteen participants with early signs of OA of the knee received intravenous injections of [18F]-NaF at the onset of PET-MR image acquisition. Regions of interest were identified, and kinetic analysis of dynamic PET data provided the rate of uptake (Ki and the normalized uptake (standardized uptake value of [18F]-NaF in the bone. Morphological MR images and quantitative voxel-based T1ρ maps of cartilage were obtained using an atlas-based registration technique to segment cartilage automatically. Voxel-by-voxel statistical parameter mapping was used to investigate the relationship between bone and cartilage. Results: Increases in cartilage T1ρ, indicating degenerative changes, were associated with increased turnover in the adjoining bone but reduced turnover in the nonadjoining compartments. Associations between pain and increased bone uptake were seen in the absence of morphological lesions in cartilage, but the relationship was reversed in the presence of incident cartilage lesions. Conclusion: This study shows significant cartilage and bone interactions in OA of the knee joint using simultaneous [18F]-NaF PET-MR, the first in human study. These observations highlight the complex biomechanical and

  15. Can Glucosamine Supplements Protect My Knee Cartilage from Osteoarthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can glucosamine supplements protect my knee cartilage from osteoarthritis? Answers from Brent A. Bauer, M.D. Study results on this question have ... build cartilage. The most common type of arthritis, osteoarthritis wears away the slick cartilage that covers the ...

  16. Cartilage collagen damage in hip osteoarthritis similar to that seen in knee osteoarthritis; a case–control study of relationship between collagen, glycosaminoglycan and cartilage swelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosseininia Shahrzad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It remains to be shown whether OA shares molecular similarities between different joints in humans. This study provides evidence for similarities in cartilage molecular damage in osteoarthritic (OA joints. Methods Articular cartilage from osteoarthritic hip joints were analysed and compared to non-OA controls regarding collagen, glycosaminoglycan and water content. Femoral heads from 16 osteoarthritic (OA and 20 reference patients were obtained from hip replacement surgery due to OA and femoral neck fracture, respectively. Cartilage histological changes were assessed by Mankin grading and denatured collagen type II immunostaining and cartilage was extracted by α-chymotrypsin. Hydroxyproline and Alcian blue binding assays were used to measure collagen and glycosaminoglycan (GAG content, respectively. Results Mankin and immunohistology scores were significantly higher in hip OA samples than in reference samples. Cartilage water content was 6% higher in OA samples than in references. 2.5 times more collagen was extracted from OA than from reference samples. There was a positive association between water content and percentage of extractable collagen pool (ECP in both groups. The amounts of collagen per wet and dry weights did not differ statistically between OA and reference cartilage. % Extractable collagen was not related to collagen per dry weight in either group. However when collagen was expressed by wet weight there was a negative correlation between % extractable and collagen in OA cartilage. The amount of GAG per wet weight was similar in both groups but the amount of GAG per dry weight was higher in OA samples compared to reference samples, which suggests a capacity for GAG biosynthesis in hip OA cartilage. Neither of the studied parameters was related to age in either group. Conclusions Increased collagen extractability and water content in human hip cartilage is associated with OA pathology and can be observed at

  17. {mu}-PIXE and SAXS studies at the bone-cartilage interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaabar, W. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: w.kaabar@surrey.ac.uk; Gundogdu, O. [Umuttepe Campus, University of Kocaeli, 41380, Kocaeli (Turkey); Laklouk, A. [Food Science Department, Al-Fateh Unversity, Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya); Bunk, O. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Pfeiffer, F. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Farquharson, M.J. [Department of Radiography, City University, London EC1V OHB (United Kingdom); Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    Micro Proton Induced X-ray Emission ({mu}-PIXE) analysis has been employed herein in investigating and quantifying the distribution of a number of essential elements in thin human diseased articular cartilage sections affected by osteoarthritis (OA). Various cations Ca, P and Zn have been reported to play an important role both in the normal growth and remodelling of articular cartilage and subchondral bone as well as in the degenerative and inflammatory processes associated with the disease; they act as co-factors of a class of enzymes known as metalloproteinases which are believed to be active during the initiation, progress and remodelling processes associated with osteoarthritis. Other important enzymes such as alkaline phosphatase are associated with cartilage mineralization. Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) for mapping of elemental distributions in bone and cartilage has also been employed by the present group and others. In the current investigations using the cSAXS beamline at the Swiss light source, Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) was carried out on decalcified human articular cartilage to explore the structural and organizational changes of collagen networks in diseased articular cartilage.

  18. Tamarind Seed (Tamarindus indica) Extract Ameliorates Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis via Regulating the Mediators of Cartilage/Bone Degeneration, Inflammation and Oxidative Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Mahalingam S Sundaram; Mahadevappa Hemshekhar; Santhosh, Martin S.; Manoj Paul; Kabburahalli Sunitha; Ram M. Thushara; NaveenKumar, Somanathapura K.; Shivanna Naveen; Sannaningaiah Devaraja; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S.; Kempaiah Kemparaju; Girish, Kesturu S.

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal plants are employed in the treatment of human ailments from time immemorial. Several studies have validated the use of medicinal plant products in arthritis treatment. Arthritis is a joint disorder affecting subchondral bone and cartilage. Degradation of cartilage is principally mediated by enzymes like matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), hyaluronidases (HAase), aggrecanases and exoglycosidases. These enzymes act upon collagen, hyaluronan and aggrecan of cartilage respectively, which ...

  19. Which cartilage is regenerated, hyaline cartilage or fibrocartilage? Non-invasive ultrasonic evaluation of tissue-engineered cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, K; Takakura, Y; Ohgushi, H; Habata, T; Uematsu, K; Takenaka, M; Ikeuchi, K

    2004-09-01

    To investigate ultrasonic evaluation methods for detecting whether the repair tissue is hyaline cartilage or fibrocartilage in new cartilage regeneration therapy. We examined four experimental rabbit models: a spontaneous repair model (group S), a large cartilage defect model (group L), a periosteal graft model (group P) and a tissue-engineered cartilage regeneration model (group T). From the resulting ultrasonic evaluation, we used %MM (the maximum magnitude of the measurement area divided by that of the intact cartilage) as a quantitative index of cartilage regeneration. The results of the ultrasonic evaluation were compared with the histological findings and histological score. The %MM values were 61.1 +/- 16.5% in group S, 29.8 +/- 15.1% in group L, 36.3 +/- 18.3% in group P and 76.5 +/- 18.7% in group T. The results showed a strong similarity to the histological scoring. The ultrasonic examination showed that all the hyaline-like cartilage in groups S and T had a high %MM (more than 60%). Therefore, we could define the borderline between the two types of regenerated cartilage by the %MM.

  20. Articular Cartilage Changes in Maturing Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria, Ayala; Chu, Constance R.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Articular cartilage has a unique functional architecture capable of providing a lifetime of pain-free joint motion. This tissue, however, undergoes substantial age-related physiologic, mechanical, biochemical, and functional changes that reduce its ability to overcome the effects of mechanical stress and injury. Many factors affect joint function in the maturing athlete—from chondrocyte survival and metabolism to structural composition and genetic/epigenetic factors governing cartilage and synovium. An evaluation of age-related changes for joint homeostasis and risk for osteoarthritis is important to the development of new strategies to rejuvenate aging joints. Objective: This review summarizes the current literature on the biochemical, cellular, and physiologic changes occurring in aging articular cartilage. Data Sources: PubMed (1969-2013) and published books in sports health, cartilage biology, and aging. Study Selection: Keywords included aging, athlete, articular cartilage, epigenetics, and functional performance with age. Study Design: Systematic review. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Data Extraction: To be included, research questions addressed the effect of age-related changes on performance, articular cartilage biology, molecular mechanism, and morphology. Results: The mature athlete faces challenges in maintaining cartilage health and joint function due to age-related changes to articular cartilage biology, morphology, and physiology. These changes include chondrocyte loss and a decline in metabolic response, alterations to matrix and synovial tissue composition, and dysregulation of reparative responses. Conclusion: Although physical decline has been regarded as a normal part of aging, many individuals maintain overall fitness and enjoy targeted improvement to their athletic capacity throughout life. Healthy articular cartilage and joints are needed to maintain athletic performance and general activities. Genetic and potentially reversible

  1. 骨形态发生蛋白与碱性成纤维细胞生长因子联合修复软骨缺损的效果评价%Effects of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein combined with basic fibroblast growth factor on the repair of articular cartilage defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱国华; 蔡建平; 郭翠玲; 廖家新; 刘勇; 罗洪涛; 许国华; 胡红涛

    2012-01-01

    背景:多种细胞生长因子在骨软骨代谢过程中的协同作用越来越受到重视,但目前复合细胞生长因子修复软骨缺损报道较少,且修复效果尚无定论.目的:探讨骨形态发生蛋白和碱性成纤维细胞生长因子联合应用修复关节软骨缺损的效果.方法:24 只日本大耳白兔建立骨软骨缺损模型后随机等分为4 组,对照组缺损处仅填塞明胶海绵,其他3 组在对照组基础上,缺损处分别注射骨形态发生蛋白和碱性成纤维细胞生长因子、骨形态发生蛋白、碱性成纤维细胞生长因子.结果与结论:大体观察显示联合应用2 种细胞因子后,软骨缺损面基本修复但稍不平整,单独使用其中1 种细胞因子缺损面未完全修复,对照组无明显修复.联合应用2 种细胞因子缺损部位软骨细胞数多于其他3 组(P < 0.05),且Ⅱ型胶原免疫组化染色深于其他组.提示联合应用骨形态发生蛋白和碱性成纤维细胞生长因子可以促进关节软骨损伤的修复,疗效优于单独应用骨形态发生蛋白或碱性成纤维细胞生长因子.%BACKGROUND: The synergy of various cell growth factors attracts more and more attention in the course of cartilage metabolism.However, there are few reports of repairing cartilage defects with combined cell growth factors, and the effect remains unknown atpresent.OBJECTIVE: To study the repairing effect of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP) combined with basicfibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on articular cartilage defects.METHODS: After the model of articular cartilage defects was made, 24 Japan big-eared white rabbits were randomly divided intofour groupsforintervention: rhBMP combined with bFGF (group A), single rhBMP (group B), single bFGF (group C), the fourthgroup was without injection and just filled with gelatin sponge (group D).RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: In general observation, articular cartilage defects were basically repaired but slightly

  2. Environmental neurotoxins β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) and mercury in shark cartilage dietary supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondo, Kiyo; Broc Glover, W; Murch, Susan J; Liu, Guangliang; Cai, Yong; Davis, David A; Mash, Deborah C

    2014-08-01

    Shark cartilage products are marketed as dietary supplements with claimed health benefits for animal and human use. Shark fin and cartilage products sold as extracts, dry powders and in capsules are marketed based on traditional Chinese medicine claims that it nourishes the blood, enhances appetite, and energizes multiple internal organs. Shark cartilage contains a mixture of chondroitin and glucosamine, a popular nutritional supplement ingested to improve cartilage function. Sharks are long-lived apex predators, that bioaccumulate environmental marine toxins and methylmercury from dietary exposures. We recently reported detection of the cyanobacterial toxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) in the fins of seven different species of sharks from South Florida coastal waters. Since BMAA has been linked to degenerative brain diseases, the consumption of shark products may pose a human risk for BMAA exposures. In this report, we tested sixteen commercial shark cartilage supplements for BMAA by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-FD) with fluorescence detection and ultra performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). Total mercury (Hg) levels were measured in the same shark cartilage products by cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVAFS). We report here that BMAA was detected in fifteen out of sixteen products with concentrations ranging from 86 to 265μg/g (dry weight). All of the shark fin products contained low concentrations of Hg. While Hg contamination is a known risk, the results of the present study demonstrate that shark cartilage products also may contain the neurotoxin BMAA. Although the neurotoxic potential of dietary exposure to BMAA is currently unknown, the results demonstrate that shark cartilage products may contain two environmental neurotoxins that have synergistic toxicities.

  3. Anatomical study of nasal cartilage in buffalo (Bubalus bubulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Yeganehzad

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This study used ten heads of adult buffalo taken from slaughterhouse. After transferring the samples to the anatomy hall, a split was carefully created on skin of muzzle and the skin was slowly separated from muscles and hypodermal connective tissue. Place of connection of cartilages to bone, cartilages to each other and shape of the cartilages were specified. In buffalo, nose apex has two nostrils fixed by bone and cartilage. After identifying and separating the cartilages, it was found that nasal cartilages in buffalo consisted of: 1 septum nasal located between two nostrils and reinforces it from inside. 2 dorso-lateral nasal cartilage constituting dorsal and lateral parts of the nostril. 3 ventro-lateral nasal cartilage constituting ventral and lateral parts of the nostril. 4 lateral accessory cartilage constituting lateral and ventral parts of the nostril. 5 medial accessory nasal cartilage located at Alar fold and connected to ventro-lateral nasal cartilage.

  4. Strategies for Zonal Cartilage Repair using Hydrogels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Travis J.; Rizzi, Simone C.; Reichert, Johannes C.; Georgi, Nicole; Malda, Jos; Schuurman, Wouter; Crawford, Ross W.; Hutmacher, Dietmar W.

    2009-01-01

    Articular cartilage is a highly hydrated tissue with depth-dependent cellular and matrix properties that provide low-friction load bearing in joints. However, the structure and function are frequently lost and there is insufficient repair response to regenerate high-quality cartilage. Several hydrog

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trattnig, Siegfried; Winalski, Carl S.; Marlovits, Stephan; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Welsch, Goetz H.; Potter, Hollis G.

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions are a common pathology of the knee joint, and many patients may benefit from cartilage repair surgeries that offer the chance to avoid the development of osteoarthritis or delay its progression. Cartilage repair surgery, no matter the technique, requires a noninvasive, standardized, and high-quality longitudinal method to assess the structure of the repair tissue. This goal is best fulfilled by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The present article provides an overview of the current state of the art of MRI of cartilage repair. In the first 2 sections, preclinical and clinical MRI of cartilage repair tissue are described with a focus on morphological depiction of cartilage and the use of functional (biochemical) MR methodologies for the visualization of the ultrastructure of cartilage repair. In the third section, a short overview is provided on the regulatory issues of the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) regarding MR follow-up studies of patients after cartilage repair surgeries. PMID:26069565

  6. Deformation of articular cartilage during static loading of a knee joint--experimental and finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halonen, K S; Mononen, M E; Jurvelin, J S; Töyräs, J; Salo, J; Korhonen, R K

    2014-07-18

    Novel conical beam CT-scanners offer high resolution imaging of knee structures with i.a. contrast media, even under weight bearing. With this new technology, we aimed to determine cartilage strains and meniscal movement in a human knee at 0, 1, 5, and 30 min of standing and compare them to the subject-specific 3D finite element (FE) model. The FE model of the volunteer׳s knee, based on the geometry obtained from magnetic resonance images, was created to simulate the creep. The effects of collagen fibril network stiffness, nonfibrillar matrix modulus, permeability and fluid flow boundary conditions on the creep response in cartilage were investigated. In the experiment, 80% of the maximum strain in cartilage developed immediately, after which the cartilage continued to deform slowly until the 30 min time point. Cartilage strains and meniscus movement obtained from the FE model matched adequately with the experimentally measured values. Reducing the fibril network stiffness increased the mean strains substantially, while the creep rate was primarily influenced by an increase in the nonfibrillar matrix modulus. Changing the initial permeability and preventing fluid flow through noncontacting surfaces had a negligible effect on cartilage strains. The present results improve understanding of the mechanisms controlling articular cartilage strains and meniscal movements in a knee joint under physiological static loading. Ultimately a validated model could be used as a noninvasive diagnostic tool to locate cartilage areas at risk for degeneration.

  7. Elemental and structural studies at the bone-cartilage interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaabar, W., E-mail: w.kaabar@surrey.ac.uk [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Daar, E. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Bunk, O. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Farquharson, M.J. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4K1 (Canada); Laklouk, A. [Al-Fateh University, Tripoli (Libya); Bailey, M.; Jeynes, C. [Surrey Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Gundogdu, O. [Umuttepe Campus, University of Kocaeli, 41380 Kocaeli (Turkey); Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-01

    Micro-Proton Induced X-ray Emission ({mu}-PIXE) and Proton Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE) techniques were employed in the investigation of trace and essential elements distribution in normal and diseased human femoral head sections affected by osteoarthritis (OA). PIGE was exploited in the determination of elements of low atomic number z<15 such as Na and F whereas elements with z>15 viz Ca, Z, P and S were determined by PIXE. Accumulations of key elements in the bone and cartilage sections were observed, significant S and Na concentrations being found in the cartilage region particularly in normal tissues. Zn showed enhanced concentrations at the bone-cartilage interface. At a synchrotron facility, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) was utilized on a decalcified human femoral head section affected by OA, direct measurements being made of spatial alterations of collagen fibres. The SAXS results showed a slight decrease in the axial periodicity between normal collagen type I and that in diseased tissue in various sites, in contrast with the findings of others.

  8. Elemental and structural studies at the bone-cartilage interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, D. A.; Kaabar, W.; Gundogdu, O.

    2012-02-01

    The techniques μProton-Induced X-and γ-ray Emission, μ-PIXE and μ-PIGE, were used to investigate trace and essential element distributions in sections of normal and osteoarthritic (OA) human femoral head. μ-PIGE yielded 2-D mappings of Na and F while Ca, Z, P and S were mapped by μ-PIXE. The concentration of chondroitin sulphate supporting functionality in healthy cartilage is significantly reduced in OA samples. Localised Zn points to osteoblastic/osteoclastic activity at the bone-cartilage interface. Small-angle X-ray scattering applied to decalcified OA-affected tissue showed spatial alterations of collagen fibres of decreased axial periodicity compared to normal collagen type I.

  9. 人脂肪基质干细胞复合藻酸钙体外构建工程软骨的实验研究%Construction of tissue engineered cartilage using human adipose derived stem cells and calcium alginate in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵大庆; 马钰; 李青; 韩宇; 邱建华

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the feasibility of constructing tissue engineered canilage using human adipose derived stem cells (hADSC) and calcium alginate in vitro. Methods Human adult adipose tissues were obtained by liposuction procedures under local anesthesia, and then digested to isolate the hADSC. After cultured in the cartilage induction medium, the final concentration was adjusted to 5 × 106/mL. The cells were then mixed with 200 mmol/L calcium alginate gels to creale tissue engineered cartilage in a centrifuge tube. After 8 weeks of culture in citro, hematoxylin-eosin (HE) and Masson trichrome staining were performed to observe the construction of tissue engineered cartilage. Resujts Tissue engineered cartilaSe was constructed in vitro using hADSC in combination with calcium alginate gels after cultured in cartilage induction medium. The tissue engineered cartilage contained collagen and mucopolysaccharide. Conclusion It is demonstrated that hADSC could be used as a seed cell in cartilage tissue engineering and might provide a new way of repairing cartilage defect for clinical rehabilitation.%目的 观察人脂肪基质干细胞(hADSC)复合藻酸钙凝胶体外构建工程软骨的可行性.方法 取临床整形外科超声乳化的成人脂肪组织溶液,经消化、分离、培养得到hADSC,经成软骨诱导培养后与藻酸钠凝胶复合,使细胞终浓度为5×10/mL,然后滴入浓度200mmol/L CaCl溶液中,固化15min形成藻酸钙凝珠,将其在离心管中悬浮培养8周,行大体、苏木精-伊红(HE)染色、Masson's三色染色等组织学检测,观察组织工程软骨形成情况.结果 hADSC经成软骨诱导培养后复合藻酸钙凝胶可于体外较好地构建出组织工程软骨,形成软骨中有胶原及黏多糖等软骨特有基质成分.结论 hADSC可以作为软骨组织工程较理想的种子细胞,为软骨缺损的临床修复治疗提供了新的治疗方法.

  10. International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) Recommended Guidelines for Histological Endpoints for Cartilage Repair Studies in Animal Models and Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoemann, Caroline; Kandel, Rita; Roberts, Sally; Saris, Daniel B F; Creemers, Laura; Mainil-Varlet, Pierre; Méthot, Stephane; Hollander, Anthony P; Buschmann, Michael D

    2011-04-01

    Cartilage repair strategies aim to resurface a lesion with osteochondral tissue resembling native cartilage, but a variety of repair tissues are usually observed. Histology is an important structural outcome that could serve as an interim measure of efficacy in randomized controlled clinical studies. The purpose of this article is to propose guidelines for standardized histoprocessing and unbiased evaluation of animal tissues and human biopsies. Methods were compiled from a literature review, and illustrative data were added. In animal models, treatments are usually administered to acute defects created in healthy tissues, and the entire joint can be analyzed at multiple postoperative time points. In human clinical therapy, treatments are applied to developed lesions, and biopsies are obtained, usually from a subset of patients, at a specific time point. In striving to standardize evaluation of structural endpoints in cartilage repair studies, 5 variables should be controlled: 1) location of biopsy/sample section, 2) timing of biopsy/sample recovery, 3) histoprocessing, 4) staining, and 5) blinded evaluation with a proper control group. Histological scores, quantitative histomorphometry of repair tissue thickness, percentage of tissue staining for collagens and glycosaminoglycan, polarized light microscopy for collagen fibril organization, and subchondral bone integration/structure are all relevant outcome measures that can be collected and used to assess the efficacy of novel therapeutics. Standardized histology methods could improve statistical analyses, help interpret and validate noninvasive imaging outcomes, and permit cross-comparison between studies. Currently, there are no suitable substitutes for histology in evaluating repair tissue quality and cartilaginous character.

  11. In vitro observation of cartilage-degeneration progression by Fourier-domain OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Ulrich; Schmitt, Robert; Nebelung, Sven; Tingart, Markus; Lüring, Christian; Rath, Björn

    2012-03-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) as emerging clinical diagnostic imaging technology for dermatology and other semitransparent tissues has shown high potential in monitoring and evaluating the inner structure of articular cartilages. Since novel therapies for the limitation of cartilage degeneration in early stages of osteoarthritis are available, the early minimal invasive diagnosis of cartilage degradation is clinically essential for further treatment options. With the advancing performance and thus diagnostic opportunities of 3D-OCT devices, we carried out a systematic study by monitoring arthrotic alterations of porcine osteochondral explants that are mechanically induced under traumatic impaction. As for in-vitro tomographic imaging we utilized two OCT devices, a Thorlabs FD-OCT device with 92KHz A-scan rate and 1310nm as central wavelength and a self-developed FD-OCT device at 840nm central wavelength. This allows the comparison in image contrast and optical penetration of cartilage tissue between these two spectral bandwidths. Further we analyzed human biopsies of articular cartilages with various degrees of osteoarthritis. The 2D and 3D OCT tomograms are characterized qualitatively regarding the inner tissue structure and quantitatively regarding the tissue absorption parameters. Therefore, we are developing image processing algorithms for the automated monitoring of cartilage tissue. A scoring system for 3D-monitoring allows the characterization of the probe volume regarding the morphological structure and tissue compactness by processing the C - scan data.

  12. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Modified Electrospun Scaffolds with Embedded Microspheres for Improved Cartilage Regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhu

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage is prone to degeneration and possesses extremely poor self-healing capacity due to inherent low cell density and the absence of a vasculature network. Tissue engineered cartilage scaffolds show promise for cartilage repair. However, there still remains a lack of ideal biomimetic tissue scaffolds which effectively stimulate cartilage regeneration with appropriate functional properties. Therefore, the objective of this study is to develop a novel biomimetic and bioactive electrospun cartilage substitute by integrating cold atmospheric plasma (CAP treatment with sustained growth factor delivery microspheres. Specifically, CAP was applied to a poly(ε-caprolactone electrospun scaffold with homogeneously distributed bioactive factors (transforming growth factor-β1 and bovine serum albumin loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres. We have shown that CAP treatment renders electrospun scaffolds more hydrophilic thus facilitating vitronectin adsorption. More importantly, our results demonstrate, for the first time, CAP and microspheres can synergistically enhance stem cell growth as well as improve chondrogenic differentiation of human marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (such as increased glycosaminoglycan, type II collagen, and total collagen production. Furthermore, CAP can substantially enhance 3D cell infiltration (over two-fold increase in infiltration depth after 1 day of culture in the scaffolds. By integrating CAP, sustained bioactive factor loaded microspheres, and electrospinning, we have fabricated a promising bioactive scaffold for cartilage regeneration.

  13. Osteoarthritis-derived chondrocytes are a potential source of multipotent progenitor cells for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Tomoyuki; Sakai, Tadahiro; Hiraiwa, Hideki; Hamada, Takashi; Ono, Yohei; Nakashima, Motoshige; Ishizuka, Shinya; Matsukawa, Tetsuya; Yamashita, Satoshi; Tsuchiya, Saho; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2016-10-21

    The natural healing capacity of damaged articular cartilage is poor, rendering joint surface injuries a prime target for regenerative medicine. While autologous chondrocyte or mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) implantation can be applied to repair cartilage defects in young patients, no appropriate long-lasting treatment alternative is available for elderly patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Multipotent progenitor cells are reported to present in adult human articular cartilage, with a preponderance in OA cartilage. These facts led us to hypothesize the possible use of osteoarthritis-derived chondrocytes as a cell source for cartilage tissue engineering. We therefore analyzed chondrocyte- and stem cell-related markers, cell growth rate, and multipotency in OA chondrocytes (OACs) and bone marrow-derived MSCs, along with normal articular chondrocytes (ACs) as a control. OACs demonstrated similar phenotype and proliferation rate to MSCs. Furthermore, OACs exhibited multilineage differentiation ability with a greater chondrogenic differentiation ability than MSCs, which was equivalent to ACs. We conclude that chondrogenic capacity is not significantly affected by OA, and OACs could be a potential source of multipotent progenitor cells for cartilage tissue engineering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Elastic cartilage reconstruction by transplantation of cultured hyaline cartilage-derived chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, M; Takebe, T; Kobayashi, S; Kimura, S; Masutani, M; Lee, S; Jo, Y H; Lee, J I; Taniguchi, H

    2014-05-01

    Current surgical intervention of craniofacial defects caused by injuries or abnormalities uses reconstructive materials, such as autologous cartilage grafts. Transplantation of autologous tissues, however, places a significant invasiveness on patients, and many efforts have been made for establishing an alternative graft. Recently, we and others have shown the potential use of reconstructed elastic cartilage from ear-derived chondrocytes or progenitors with the unique elastic properties. Here, we examined the differentiation potential of canine joint cartilage-derived chondrocytes into elastic cartilage for expanding the cell sources, such as hyaline cartilage. Articular chondrocytes are isolated from canine joint, cultivated, and compared regarding characteristic differences with auricular chondrocytes, including proliferation rates, gene expression, extracellular matrix production, and cartilage reconstruction capability after transplantation. Canine articular chondrocytes proliferated less robustly than auricular chondrocytes, but there was no significant difference in the amount of sulfated glycosaminoglycan produced from redifferentiated chondrocytes. Furthermore, in vitro expanded and redifferentiated articular chondrocytes have been shown to reconstruct elastic cartilage on transplantation that has histologic characteristics distinct from hyaline cartilage. Taken together, cultured hyaline cartilage-derived chondrocytes are a possible cell source for elastic cartilage reconstruction. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Knee cartilage extraction and bone-cartilage interface analysis from 3D MRI data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamez-Pena, Jose G.; Barbu-McInnis, Monica; Totterman, Saara

    2004-05-01

    This works presents a robust methodology for the analysis of the knee joint cartilage and the knee bone-cartilage interface from fused MRI sets. The proposed approach starts by fusing a set of two 3D MR images the knee. Although the proposed method is not pulse sequence dependent, the first sequence should be programmed to achieve good contrast between bone and cartilage. The recommended second pulse sequence is one that maximizes the contrast between cartilage and surrounding soft tissues. Once both pulse sequences are fused, the proposed bone-cartilage analysis is done in four major steps. First, an unsupervised segmentation algorithm is used to extract the femur, the tibia, and the patella. Second, a knowledge based feature extraction algorithm is used to extract the femoral, tibia and patellar cartilages. Third, a trained user corrects cartilage miss-classifications done by the automated extracted cartilage. Finally, the final segmentation is the revisited using an unsupervised MAP voxel relaxation algorithm. This final segmentation has the property that includes the extracted bone tissue as well as all the cartilage tissue. This is an improvement over previous approaches where only the cartilage was segmented. Furthermore, this approach yields very reproducible segmentation results in a set of scan-rescan experiments. When these segmentations were coupled with a partial volume compensated surface extraction algorithm the volume, area, thickness measurements shows precisions around 2.6%

  16. Hyaline cartilage cells outperform mandibular condylar cartilage cells in a TMJ fibrocartilage tissue engineering application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Lazebnik, M; Detamore, M S

    2009-03-01

    To compare temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condylar cartilage cells in vitro to hyaline cartilage cells cultured in a three-dimensional (3D) environment for tissue engineering of mandibular condylar cartilage. Mandibular condylar cartilage and hyaline cartilage cells were harvested from pigs and cultured for 6 weeks in polyglycolic acid (PGA) scaffolds. Both types of cells were treated with glucosamine sulfate (0.4 mM), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) (100 ng/ml) and their combination. At weeks 0 and 6, cell number, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen content were determined, types I and II collagen were visualized by immunohistochemistry and GAGs were visualized by histology. Hyaline cartilage cells produced from half an order to a full order of magnitude more GAGs and collagen than mandibular condylar cartilage cells in 3D culture. IGF-I was a highly effective signal for biosynthesis with hyaline cartilage cells, while glucosamine sulfate decreased cell proliferation and biosynthesis with both types of cells. In vitro culture of TMJ condylar cartilage cells produced a fibrous tissue with predominantly type I collagen, while hyaline cartilage cells formed a fibrocartilage-like tissue with types I and II collagen. The combination of IGF and glucosamine had a synergistic effect on maintaining the phenotype of TMJ condylar cells to generate both types I and II collagen. Given the superior biosynthetic activity by hyaline cartilage cells and the practical surgical limitations of harvesting cells from the TMJ of a patient requiring TMJ reconstruction, cartilage cells from elsewhere in the body may be a potentially better alternative to cells harvested from the TMJ for TMJ tissue engineering. This finding may also apply to other fibrocartilages such as the intervertebral disc and knee meniscus in applications where a mature cartilage cell source is desired.

  17. Cartilage T2 assessment: differentiation of normal hyaline cartilage and reparative tissue after arthroscopic cartilage repair in equine subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Lawrence M; Sussman, Marshall S; Hurtig, Mark; Probyn, Linda; Tomlinson, George; Kandel, Rita

    2006-11-01

    To prospectively assess T2 mapping characteristics of normal articular cartilage and of cartilage at sites of arthroscopic repair, including comparison with histologic results and collagen organization assessed at polarized light microscopy (PLM). Study protocol was compliant with the Canadian Council on Animal Care Guidelines and approved by the institutional animal care committee. Arthroscopic osteochondral autograft transplantation (OAT) and microfracture arthroplasty (MFx) were performed in knees of 10 equine subjects (seven female, three male; age range, 3-5 years). A site of arthroscopically normal cartilage was documented in each joint as a control site. Joints were harvested at 12 (n = 5) and 24 (n = 5) weeks postoperatively and were imaged at 1.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) with a 10-echo sagittal fast spin-echo acquisition. T2 maps of each site (21 OAT harvest, 10 MFx, 12 OAT plug, and 10 control sites) were calculated with linear least-squares curve fitting. Cartilage T2 maps were qualitatively graded as "organized" (normal transition of low-to-high T2 signal from deep to superficial cartilage zones) or "disorganized." Quantitative mean T2 values were calculated for deep, middle, and superficial cartilage at each location. Results were compared with histologic and PLM assessments by using kappa analysis. T2 maps were qualitatively graded as organized at 20 of 53 sites and as disorganized at 33 sites. Perfect agreement was seen between organized T2 and histologic findings of hyaline cartilage and between disorganized T2 and histologic findings of fibrous reparative tissue (kappa = 1.0). Strong agreement was seen between organized T2 and normal PLM findings and between disorganized T2 and abnormal PLM findings (kappa = .92). Quantitative assessment of the deep, middle, and superficial cartilage, respectively, showed mean T2 values of 53.3, 58.6, and 54.9 msec at reparative fibrous tissue sites and 40.7, 53.6, and 61.6 msec at hyaline cartilage sites. A

  18. A cartilage-inspired lubrication system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, George W; Olszewska, Anna; Osterberg, Monika; Zhu, Haijin; Horn, Roger

    2014-01-14

    Articular cartilage is an example of a highly efficacious water-based, natural lubrication system that is optimized to provide low friction and wear protection at both low and high loads and sliding velocities. One of the secrets of cartilage's superior tribology comes from a unique, multimodal lubrication strategy consisting of both a fluid pressurization mediated lubrication mechanism and a boundary lubrication mechanism supported by surface bound macromolecules. Using a reconstituted network of highly interconnected cellulose fibers and simple modification through the immobilization of polyelectrolytes, we have recreated many of the mechanical and chemical properties of cartilage and the cartilage lubrication system to produce a purely synthetic material system that exhibits some of the same lubrication mechanisms, time dependent friction response, and high wear resistance as natural cartilage tissue. Friction and wear studies demonstrate how the properties of the cellulose fiber network can be used to control and optimize the lubrication and wear resistance of the material surfaces and highlight what key features of cartilage should be duplicated in order to produce a cartilage-mimetic lubrication system.

  19. Regulatory Challenges for Cartilage Repair Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Kevin B; Stiegman, Glenn

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, few Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved options exist for the treatment of focal cartilage and osteochondral lesions. Developers of products for cartilage repair face many challenges to obtain marketing approval from the FDA. The objective of this review is to discuss the necessary steps for FDA application and approval for a new cartilage repair product. FDA Guidance Documents, FDA Panel Meetings, scientific organization recommendations, and clinicaltrials.gov were reviewed to demonstrate the current thinking of FDA and the scientific community on the regulatory process for cartilage repair therapies. Cartilage repair therapies can receive market approval from FDA as medical devices, drugs, or biologics, and the specific classification of product can affect the nonclinical, clinical, and regulatory strategy to bring the product to market. Recent FDA guidance gives an outline of the required elements to bring a cartilage repair product to market, although these standards are often very general. As a result, companies have to carefully craft their study patient population, comparator group, and clinical endpoint to best showcase their product's attributes. In addition, regulatory strategy and manufacturing process validation need to be considered early in the clinical study process to allow for timely product approval following the completion of clinical study. Although the path to regulatory approval for a cartilage repair therapy is challenging and time-consuming, proper clinical trial planning and attention to the details can eventually save companies time and money by bringing a product to the market in the most expeditious process possible.

  20. NMR Studies of Cartilage Dynamics, Diffusion, Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huster, Daniel; Schiller, Jurgen; Naji, Lama; Kaufmann Jorn; Arnold, Klaus

    An increasing number of people is suffering from rheumatic diseases, and, therefore, methods of early diagnosis of joint degeneration are urgently required. For their establishment, however, an improved knowledge about the molecular organisation of cartilage would be helpful. Cartilage consists of three main components: Water, collagen and chondroitin sulfate (CS) that is (together with further polysaccharides and proteins) a major constituent of the proteoglycans of cartilage. 1H and 13C MAS (magic-angle spinning) NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) opened new perspectives for the study of the macromolecular components in cartilage. We have primarily studied the mobilities of CS and collagen in bovine nasal and pig articular cartilage (that differ significantly in their collagen/polysaccharide content) by measuring 13C NMR relaxation times as well as the corresponding 13C CP (cross polarisation) MAS NMR spectra. These data clearly indicate that the mobility of cartilage macromolecules is broadly distributed from almost completely rigid (collagen) to highly mobile (polysaccharides), which lends cartilage its mechanical strength and shock-absorbing properties.

  1. The anatomical and histological features of the area between the upper and lower lateral nasal cartilages: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Yazar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Nasal alar retraction deformities occasionally require both soft tissue release and large cartilage grafts. The structure between the upper lateral cartilage and the lateral crus of the lower lateral cartilage has been described as fibrous tissue, intercartilaginous ligament, ligament-like arrangement or connective tissue. Despite its importance, no anatomical and histological examination has been conducted on this structure. Therefore, the present study aimed to identify the area between the upper and lower lateral cartilages by histological examination. Methods: Eleven hemi-facial human cadaver dissections were performed. Initially, the gross dissection of all specimens was conducted. The cutaneous-subcutaneous division of the skin was elevated and was removed. The upper and lower lateral cartilages were removed en bloc together with the area among these cartilages from six specimens and were divided from its midline. The obtained twelve specimens were fixed in formalin, processed and embedded in paraffin. 4 μm sections were obtained. Other five specimens were examined to outline under a stereomicroscope. This approach allowed free access to the structure extending from the area between the upper and lower lateral cartilages to the skin. The full-thickness biopsy was taken from the structure extending from the area between the upper and lower lateral cartilages to the skin. All specimens were fixed in formalin, processed and embedded in paraffin. 4 μm sections were obtained and prepared for microscopic examination. All the sections were stained with hematoxylin & eosin, Mowry’s colloidal iron, Verhoff’s elastic stain, and Masson’s trichrome stain for histological examination. The contents were determined. Results: A single dense longitudinal collagenous bundle between the cartilages and a structure extending from the area between the cartilages to the skin were found. Conclusion: The knowledge of this area in terms of

  2. Does intraarticular inflammation predict biomechanical cartilage properties?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldstein, Wenzel; Perino, Giorgio; Jawetz, Shari T; Gilbert, Susannah L; Boettner, Friedrich

    2014-07-01

    Intact cartilage in the lateral compartment is an important requirement for medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). Progression of cartilage degeneration in the lateral compartment is a common failure mode of medial UKA. Little is known about factors that influence the mechanical properties of lateral compartment cartilage. The purposes of this study were to answer the following questions: (1) Does the synovial fluid white blood cell count predict the biomechanical properties of macroscopically intact cartilage of the distal lateral femur? (2) Is there a correlation between MRI grading of synovitis and the biomechanical properties of macroscopically intact cartilage? (3) Is there a correlation between the histopathologic assessment of the synovium and the biomechanical properties of macroscopically intact cartilage? The study included 84 patients (100 knees) undergoing primary TKA for varus osteoarthritis between May 2010 and January 2012. All patients underwent preoperative MRI to assess the degree of synovitis. During surgery, the cartilage of the distal lateral femur was assessed macroscopically using the Outerbridge grading scale. In knees with an Outerbridge grade of 0 or 1, osteochondral plugs were harvested from the distal lateral femur for biomechanical and histologic assessment. The synovial fluid was collected to determine the white blood cell count. Synovial tissue was taken for histologic evaluation of the degree of synovitis. The mean aggregate modulus and the mean dynamic modulus were significantly greater in knees with 150 or less white blood cells/mL synovial fluid compared with knees with greater than 150 white blood cells/mL synovial fluid. There was no correlation among MRI synovitis grades, histopathologic synovitis grades, and biomechanical cartilage properties. The study suggests that lateral compartment cartilage in patients with elevated synovial fluid white blood cell counts has a reduced ability to withstand compressive loads

  3. Studies on YKL-40 in knee joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Involvement of YKL-40 in the joint pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volck, B; Johansen, J S; Stoltenberg, M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The presence of YKL-40 (human cartilage glycoprotein 39) in synovium, cartilage and synovial fluid (SF) from knee joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis (OA) were related to histopathological changes in synovium and cartilage and to serum YKL-40 and other......, which increased again at clinical relapse. CONCLUSIONS: YKL-40 in SF is derived from cells in the inflamed synovium, chondrocytes and SF neutrophils. Joint derived YKL-40 influences serum YKL-40. YKL-40 may be involved in the pathophysiology of the arthritic processes and reflect local disease activity....

  4. Limitations and sources of bias in clinical knee cartilage research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthen, Jamie; Waterman, Brian R; Davidson, Philip A; Lubowitz, James H

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically review the limitations and biases inherent to surgical trials on the management of knee chondral defects. A literature search of PubMed/Medline, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials was conducted in September 2010 and updated in August 2011 to identify all English-language, Level I evidence, prospective, randomized controlled trials published from 1996 to present. The keyword search included the following: "autologous chondrocyte," "cartilage graft," "cartilage repair," "chondroplasty," "microfracture," "mosaicplasty," and/or "osteochondral." Nonoperative studies, nonhuman studies, ex vivo studies, non-knee studies, and/or studies with follow-up of less than 1 year were excluded. A systematic review was performed on all included studies, and limitations and/or biases were identified and quantitated. Of 15,311 citations, 33 abstracts were reviewed and 11 prospective, randomized controlled trials were included. We identified 9 major limitations (subject age, subject prior surgery, subject duration of symptoms, lesion location, lesion size, lesion number, procedure selection, procedure standardization, and limited histologic analysis) and 7 common biases (selection, performance, transfer, nonresponder, detection, publication, and study design). Level I therapeutic studies investigating the surgical management of human knee cartilage defects have substantial identified biases and limitations. This review has limitations because other classifications of bias or limitation exist. Optimal management of cartilage defects is controversial, and future rigorous research methods could minimize common biases through strict study design and patient selection criteria, larger patient enrollment, more extended follow-up, and standardization of clinical treatment pathways. Level I, systematic review of Level I studies. Copyright © 2012

  5. First and second order stereology of hyaline cartilage: Application on mice femoral cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorafshan, Ali; Niazi, Behnam; Mohamadpour, Masoomeh; Hoseini, Leila; Hoseini, Najmeh; Owji, Ali Akbar; Rafati, Ali; Sadeghi, Yasaman; Karbalay-Doust, Saied

    2016-11-01

    Stereological techniques could be considered in research on cartilage to obtain quantitative data. The present study aimed to explain application of the first- and second-order stereological methods on articular cartilage of mice and the methods applied on the mice exposed to cadmium (Cd). The distal femoral articular cartilage of BALB/c mice (control and Cd-treated) was removed. Then, volume and surface area of the cartilage and number of chondrocytes were estimated using Cavalieri and optical dissector techniques on isotropic uniform random sections. Pair-correlation function [g(r)] and cross-correlation function were calculated to express the spatial arrangement of chondrocytes-chondrocytes and chondrocytes-matrix (chondrocyte clustering/dispersing), respectively. The mean±standard deviation of the cartilage volume, surface area, and thickness were 1.4±0.1mm(3), 26.2±5.4mm(2), and 52.8±6.7μm, respectively. Besides, the mean number of chondrocytes was 680±200 (×10(3)). The cartilage volume, cartilage surface area, and number of chondrocytes were respectively reduced by 25%, 27%, and 27% in the Cd-treated mice in comparison to the control animals (pcartilage components carried potential advantages for investigating the cartilage in different joint conditions. Chondrocyte clustering/dispersing and cellularity can be evaluated in cartilage assessment in normal or abnormal situations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. A history of the understanding of cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, T G

    2006-03-01

    To review the historic development of the understanding of articular cartilage from the earliest comment in the fourth century BCE until about 2000. The history up to 1900 is told chronologically, divided into (1) recognition of the tissue, (2) structure, and (3) chemistry. The twentieth century is sketched with a timeline of discoveries that at the time were important and a bibliography of journal review articles. By 1900 the avascular, aneural state and fibrillar composition have been accepted. The nutrition of articular cartilage remained in dispute. The composition of the binding substance and its relation to collagen remained unknown. Research in the first half of the twentieth century continued to be impeded by lack of technology. The advent of electron microscopy, isotopic tracer technics and enzymology rapidly accelerated the understanding of hyaline cartilage beginning in the 1950s. The history of research on hyaline cartilage illustrates the dependence of scientific progress on technologic innovation.

  7. The minor collagens in articular cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yunyun

    2017-01-01

    Articular cartilage is a connective tissue consisting of a specialized extracellular matrix (ECM) that dominates the bulk of its wet and dry weight. Type II collagen and aggrecan are the main ECM proteins in cartilage. However, little attention has been paid to less abundant molecular components......, especially minor collagens, including type IV, VI, IX, X, XI, XII, XIII, and XIV, etc. Although accounting for only a small fraction of the mature matrix, these minor collagens not only play essential structural roles in the mechanical properties, organization, and shape of articular cartilage, but also...... fulfil specific biological functions. Genetic studies of these minor collagens have revealed that they are associated with multiple connective tissue diseases, especially degenerative joint disease. The progressive destruction of cartilage involves the degradation of matrix constituents including...

  8. Materials science: Like cartilage, but simpler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2015-01-01

    The properties of articular cartilage, which lines bones in joints, depend partlyon repulsion between components of the material. A new synthetic gel that mimics this feature has rare, direction-dependent properties.......The properties of articular cartilage, which lines bones in joints, depend partlyon repulsion between components of the material. A new synthetic gel that mimics this feature has rare, direction-dependent properties....

  9. The structure and function of cartilage proteoglycans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P J Roughley

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage contains a variety of proteoglycans that are essential for its normal function. These include aggrecan, decorin, biglycan, fibromodulin and lumican. Each proteoglycan serves several functions that are determined by both its core protein and its glycosaminoglycan chains. This review discusses the structure/function relationships of the cartilage proteoglycans, and the manner in which perturbations in proteoglycan structure or abundance can adversely affect tissue function.

  10. Cartilage proteoglycans inhibit fibronectin-mediated adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, A. M.; Pearlstein, E.; Weissmann, G.; Hoffstein, S. T.

    1981-09-01

    Normal tissues and organs show, on histological examination, a pattern of cellular and acellular zones that is characteristic and unique for each organ or tissue. This pattern is maintained in health but is sometimes destroyed by disease. For example, in mobile joints, the articular surfaces consist of relatively acellular hyaline cartilage, and the joint space is enclosed by a capsule of loose connective tissue with a lining of fibroblasts and macrophages. In the normal joint these cells are confined to the synovial lining and the articular surface remains acellular. In in vitro culture, macrophages and their precursor monocytes are very adhesive, and fibroblasts can migrate and overgrow surfaces such as collagen or plastic used for tissue culture. The fibroblasts adhere to collagen by means of fibronectin, which they synthesize and secrete1. Because the collagen of cartilage is capable of binding serum fibronectin2 and fibronectin is present in cartilage during its development3, these cells should, in theory, slowly migrate from the synovial lining to the articular surface. It is their absence from the articular cartilage in normal circumstances, and then presence in such pathological states as rheumatoid arthritis, that is striking. We therefore set out to determine whether a component of cartilage could prevent fibroblast adherence in a defined adhesion assay. As normal cartilage is composed of 50% proteoglycans and 50% collagen by dry weight4, we tested the possibility that the proteoglycans in cartilage inhibit fibroblast adhesion to collagen. We present here evidence that fibroblast spreading and adhesion to collagenous substrates is inhibited by cartilage proteoglycans.

  11. Immunohistological Localization of BMP-2, BMP-7, and Their Receptors in Knee Joints with Focal Cartilage Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen Schmal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Although it is well known that BMP-2 and BMP-7 play significant roles in cartilage metabolism, data about intra-articular expression and localization of these proteins and their receptors in humans are rare. Methods. Biopsies of synovia and debrided cartilage were taken in patients undergoing autologous chondrocyte implantation. Expression of BMP-2, BMP-7, and their receptors BMPR-1A, BMPR-1B and BMPR-2 were semiquantitatively evaluated by immunohistological staining. Results. BMP-7 was equally highly expressed in all cartilage and synovial biopsies. Increased levels of BMPR-1A, but not of BMPR-1B, and BMPR-2, were found in all synovial and 47% of all cartilage samples (P=0.002. BMP-2 was positively scored in 47% of all cartilage and 40% of all synovial specimens. Defect size, KOSS, Henderson or Kellgren-Lawrence score did not statistically significant correlate with the expression of the analyzed proteins or Mankin and Pritzker scores. Duration of symptoms and localization of lesions were associated with KOSS (P<0.02, but there was no influence of these parameters on protein expression. Conclusions. BMP-2, BMP-7, and BMPR-1A were expressed in cartilage and synovia of knees with focal cartilage lesions. Although defect localization and duration of symptoms decisively influence KOSS, there was no associated alteration of protein expression observed.

  12. Priming Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Hyaluronan Alters Growth Kinetics and Increases Attachment to Articular Cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Succar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Biological therapeutics such as adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC therapy are gaining acceptance for knee-osteoarthritis (OA treatment. Reports of OA-patients show reductions in cartilage defects and regeneration of hyaline-like-cartilage with MSC-therapy. Suspending MSCs in hyaluronan commonly occurs in animals and humans, usually without supporting data. Objective. To elucidate the effects of different concentrations of hyaluronan on MSC growth kinetics. Methods. Using a range of hyaluronan concentrations, we measured MSC adherence and proliferation on culture plastic surfaces and a novel cartilage-adhesion assay. We employed time-course and dispersion imaging to assess MSC binding to cartilage. Cytokine profiling was also conducted on the MSC-secretome. Results. Hyaluronan had dose-dependent effects on growth kinetics of MSCs at concentrations of entanglement point (1 mg/mL. At higher concentrations, viscosity effects outweighed benefits of additional hyaluronan. The cartilage-adhesion assay highlighted for the first time that hyaluronan-primed MSCs increased cell attachment to cartilage whilst the presence of hyaluronan did not. Our time-course suggested patients undergoing MSC-therapy for OA could benefit from joint-immobilisation for up to 8 hours. Hyaluronan also greatly affected dispersion of MSCs on cartilage. Conclusion. Our results should be considered in future trials with MSC-therapy using hyaluronan as a vehicle, for the treatment of OA.

  13. The Inhibitory Effect of Salmon Calcitonin on Tri-Iodothyronine Induction of Early Hypertrophy in Articular Cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    Pingping Chen-An; Kim Vietz Andreassen; Kim Henriksen; Yadong Li; Morten Asser Karsdal; Anne-Christine Bay-Jensen

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Salmon calcitonin has chondroprotective effect both in vitro and in vivo, and is therefore being tested as a candidate drug for cartilage degenerative diseases. Recent studies have indicated that different chondrocyte phenotypes may express the calcitonin receptor (CTR) differentially. We tested for the presence of the CTR in chondrocytes from tri-iodothyronin (T3)-induced bovine articular cartilage explants. Moreover, investigated the effects of human and salmon calcitonin on the ...

  14. Precision of hyaline cartilage thickness measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, K.; Buckwalter, K.; Helvie, M.; Niklason, L.; Martel, W. (Univ. of Michigan Hospitals, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Radiology)

    1992-05-01

    Measurement of cartilage thickness in vivo is an important indicator of the status of a joint as the various degenerative and inflammatory arthritides directly affect the condition of the cartilage. In order to assess the precision of thickness measurements of hyaline articular cartilage, we undertook a pilot study using MR imaging, plain radiography, and ultrasonography (US). We measured the cartilage of the hip and knee joints in 10 persons (4 healthy volunteers and 6 patients). The joints in each patient were examined on two separate occasions using each modality. In the hips a swell as the knee joints, the most precise measuring method was plain film radiography. For radiographs of the knees obtained in the standing position, the coefficient of variation was 6.5%; in the hips this figure was 6.34%. US of the knees and MR imaging of the hips were the second best modalities in the measurement of cartilage thickness. In addition, MR imaging enabled the most complete visualization of the joint cartilage. (orig.).

  15. Layering PLGA-based electrospun membranes and cell sheets for engineering cartilage-bone transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouthuy, P-A; El-Sherbini, Y; Cui, Z; Ye, H

    2016-04-01

    It is now widely acknowledged that implants that have been designed with an effort towards reconstructing the transition between tissues might improve their functionality and integration in vivo. This paper contributes to the development of improved treatment for articular cartilage repair by exploring the potential of the combination of electrospinning technology and cell sheet engineering to create cartilage tissue. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) was used to create the electrospun membranes. The focus being on the cartilage-bone transition, collagen type I and hydroxyapatite (HA) were also added to the scaffolds to increase the histological biocompatibility. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were cultured in thermoresponsive dishes to allow non-enzymatic removal of an intact cell layer after reaching confluence. The tissue constructs were created by layering electrospun membranes with sheets of hMSCs and were cultured under chondrogenic conditions for up to 21 days. High viability was found to be maintained in the multilayered construct. Under chondrogenic conditions, reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry have shown high expression levels of collagen type X, a form of collagen typically found in the calcified zone of articular cartilage, suggesting an induction of chondrocyte hypertrophy in the PLGA-based scaffolds. To conclude, this paper suggests that layering electrospun scaffolds and cell sheets is an efficient approach for the engineering of tissue transitions, and in particular the cartilage-bone transition. The use of PLGA-based scaffold might be particularly useful for the bone-cartilage reconstruction, since the differentiated tissue constructs seem to show characteristics of calcified cartilage. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Stimulation of proteoglycan synthesis by glucuronosyltransferase-I gene delivery: a strategy to promote cartilage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, N; Barré, L; Benani, A; Netter, P; Magdalou, J; Fournel-Gigleux, S; Ouzzine, M

    2004-12-28

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease characterized by a progressive loss of articular cartilage components, mainly proteoglycans (PGs), leading to destruction of the tissue. We investigate a therapeutic strategy based on stimulation of PG synthesis by gene transfer of the glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-synthesizing enzyme, beta1,3-glucuronosyltransferase-I (GlcAT-I) to promote cartilage repair. We previously reported that IL-1beta down-regulated the expression and activity of GlcAT-I in primary rat chondrocytes. Here, by using antisense oligonucleotides, we demonstrate that GlcAT-I inhibition impaired PG synthesis and deposition in articular cartilage explants, emphasizing the crucial role of this enzyme in PG anabolism. Thus, primary chondrocytes and cartilage explants were engineered by lipid-mediated gene delivery to efficiently overexpress a human GlcAT-I cDNA. Interestingly, GlcAT-I overexpression significantly enhanced GAG synthesis and deposition as evidenced by (35)S-sulfate incorporation, histology, estimation of GAG content, and fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis analysis. Metabolic labeling and Western blot analyses further suggested that GlcAT-I expression led to an increase in the abundance rather than in the length of GAG chains. Importantly, GlcAT-I delivery was able to overcome IL-1beta-induced PG depletion and maintain the anabolic activity of chondrocytes. Moreover, GlcAT-I also restored PG synthesis to a normal level in cartilage explants previously depleted from endogenous PGs by IL-1beta-treatment. In concert, our investigations strongly indicated that GlcAT-I was able to control and reverse articular cartilage defects in terms of PG anabolism and GAG content associated with IL-1beta. This study provides a basis for a gene therapy approach to promote cartilage repair in degenerative joint diseases.

  17. Improved cartilage integration and interfacial strength after enzymatic treatment in a cartilage transplantation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. van de Breevaart Bravenboer; C.D. in der Maur; L. Feenstra (Louw); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); H.H. Weinans (Harrie); G.J.V.M. van Osch (Gerjo); P.K. Bos (Koen)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe objective of the present study was to investigate whether treatment of articular cartilage with hyaluronidase and collagenase enhances histological and mechanical integration of a cartilage graft into a defect. Discs of 3 mm diameter were taken from 8-mm diameter bo

  18. Cartilage repair surgery: outcome evaluation by using noninvasive cartilage biomarkers based on quantitative MRI techniques?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungmann, Pia M; Baum, Thomas; Bauer, Jan S; Karampinos, Dimitrios C; Erdle, Benjamin; Link, Thomas M; Li, Xiaojuan; Trattnig, Siegfried; Rummeny, Ernst J; Woertler, Klaus; Welsch, Goetz H

    2014-01-01

    New quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are increasingly applied as outcome measures after cartilage repair. To review the current literature on the use of quantitative MRI biomarkers for evaluation of cartilage repair at the knee and ankle. Using PubMed literature research, studies on biochemical, quantitative MR imaging of cartilage repair were identified and reviewed. Quantitative MR biomarkers detect early degeneration of articular cartilage, mainly represented by an increasing water content, collagen disruption, and proteoglycan loss. Recently, feasibility of biochemical MR imaging of cartilage repair tissue and surrounding cartilage was demonstrated. Ultrastructural properties of the tissue after different repair procedures resulted in differences in imaging characteristics. T2 mapping, T1rho mapping, delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC), and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) are applicable on most clinical 1.5 T and 3 T MR scanners. Currently, a standard of reference is difficult to define and knowledge is limited concerning correlation of clinical and MR findings. The lack of histological correlations complicates the identification of the exact tissue composition. A multimodal approach combining several quantitative MRI techniques in addition to morphological and clinical evaluation might be promising. Further investigations are required to demonstrate the potential for outcome evaluation after cartilage repair.

  19. Cartilage Repair Surgery: Outcome Evaluation by Using Noninvasive Cartilage Biomarkers Based on Quantitative MRI Techniques?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia M. Jungmann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. New quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques are increasingly applied as outcome measures after cartilage repair. Objective. To review the current literature on the use of quantitative MRI biomarkers for evaluation of cartilage repair at the knee and ankle. Methods. Using PubMed literature research, studies on biochemical, quantitative MR imaging of cartilage repair were identified and reviewed. Results. Quantitative MR biomarkers detect early degeneration of articular cartilage, mainly represented by an increasing water content, collagen disruption, and proteoglycan loss. Recently, feasibility of biochemical MR imaging of cartilage repair tissue and surrounding cartilage was demonstrated. Ultrastructural properties of the tissue after different repair procedures resulted in differences in imaging characteristics. T2 mapping, T1rho mapping, delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC, and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI are applicable on most clinical 1.5 T and 3 T MR scanners. Currently, a standard of reference is difficult to define and knowledge is limited concerning correlation of clinical and MR findings. The lack of histological correlations complicates the identification of the exact tissue composition. Conclusions. A multimodal approach combining several quantitative MRI techniques in addition to morphological and clinical evaluation might be promising. Further investigations are required to demonstrate the potential for outcome evaluation after cartilage repair.

  20. Limited integrative repair capacity of native cartilage autografts within cartilage defects in a sheep model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelse, Kolja; Riedel, Dominic; Pachowsky, Milena; Hennig, Friedrich F; Trattnig, Siegfried; Welsch, Götz H

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate integration and cellular outgrowth of native cartilage autografts transplanted into articular cartilage defects. Native cartilage autografts were applied into chondral defects in the femoral condyle of adult sheep. Within the defects, the calcified cartilage layer was either left intact or perforated to induce bone marrow stimulation. Empty defects served as controls. The joints were analyzed after 6 and 26 weeks by macroscopic and histological analysis using the ICRS II Score and Modified O'Driscoll Scores. Non-treated defects did not show any endogenous regenerative response and bone marrow stimulation induced fibrous repair tissue. Transplanted native cartilage grafts only insufficiently integrated with the defect borders. Cell death and loss of proteoglycans were present at the margins of the grafts at 6 weeks, which was only partially restored at 26 weeks. Significant cellular outgrowth from the grafts or defect borders could not be observed. Bonding of the grafts could be improved by additional bone marrow stimulation providing ingrowing cells that formed a fibrous interface predominantly composed of type I collagen. Transplanted native cartilage grafts remain as inert structures within cartilage defects and fail to induce integrative cartilage repair which rather demands additional cells provided by additional bone marrow stimulation. © 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. OA cartilage derived chondrocytes encapsulated in poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) for the evaluation of cartilage restoration and apoptosis in an in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, G; Loreto, C; Carnazza, M L; Strehin, I; Elisseeff, J

    2011-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by cartilage attrition, subchondral bone remodeling, osteophyte formation and synovial inflammation. Perturbed homeostasis caused by inflammation, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and proapoptotic/antiapoptotic dysregulation is known to impair chondrocyte survival in joint microenvironments and contribute to OA pathogenesis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the programmed cell death (apoptosis) of chondral cells are not yet well defined. The present study was conducted to evaluate apoptosis of chondrocytes from knee articular cartilage of patients with OA. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the apoptosis through the expression of caspase-3 in tissue explants, in cells cultured in monolayer, and in cells encapsulated in a hydrogel (PEGDA) scaffold. Chondrocytes were also studied following cell isolation and encapsulation in poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels. Specifically, articular cartilage specimens were assessed by histology (Hematoxlyn and Eosin) and histochemistry (Safranin-O and Alcian Blue). The effector of apoptosis caspase-3 was studied through immunohistochemistry, immunocytochemistry and immunofluorescence. DNA strand breaks were evaluated in freshly isolated chondrocytes from human OA cartilage using the TUNEL assay, and changes in nuclear morphology of apoptotic cells were detected by staining with Hoechst 33258. The results showed an increased expression of caspase-3 in tissue explants, in pre-confluent cells and after four passages in culture, and a decreased expression of caspase-3 comparable to control cartilage in cells encapsulated in hydrogels (PEGDA) after 5 weeks in culture. The freshly isolated chondrocytes were TUNEL positive. The chondrocytes after 5 weeks of culture in hydrogels (PEGDA) showed the formation of new hyaline cartilage with increased cell growth, cellular aggregations and extracellular matrix (ECM) production. This is of particular

  2. Tissue engineering strategies to study cartilage development, degeneration and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Maumita; Coburn, Jeannine; Centola, Matteo; Murab, Sumit; Barbero, Andrea; Kaplan, David L; Martin, Ivan; Ghosh, Sourabh

    2015-04-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering has primarily focused on the generation of grafts to repair cartilage defects due to traumatic injury and disease. However engineered cartilage tissues have also a strong scientific value as advanced 3D culture models. Here we first describe key aspects of embryonic chondrogenesis and possible cell sources/culture systems for in vitro cartilage generation. We then review how a tissue engineering approach has been and could be further exploited to investigate different aspects of cartilage development and degeneration. The generated knowledge is expected to inform new cartilage regeneration strategies, beyond a classical tissue engineering paradigm.

  3. Biomechanical properties of the mandibular condylar cartilage and their relevance to the TMJ disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M; Detamore, M S

    2009-03-11

    Mandibular condylar cartilage plays a crucial role in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) function, which includes facilitating articulation with the TMJ disc, reducing loads on the underlying bone, and contributing to bone remodeling. To improve our understanding of the TMJ function in normal and pathological situations, accurate and validated three-dimensional (3-D) finite element models (FEMs) of the human TMJ may serve as valuable diagnostic tools as well as predictors of thresholds for tissue damage resulting from parafunctional activities and trauma. In this context, development of reliable biomechanical standards for condylar cartilage is crucial. Moreover, biomechanical characteristics of the native tissue are important design parameters for creating functional tissue-engineered replacements. Towards these goals, biomechanical characteristics of the condylar cartilage have been reviewed here, highlighting the structure-function correlations. Structurally, condylar cartilage, like the TMJ disc, exhibits zonal and topographical heterogeneity. Early structural investigations of the condylar cartilage have suggested that the tissue possesses a somewhat transversely isotropic orientation of collagen fibers in the fibrous zone. However, recent tensile and shear evaluations have reported a higher stiffness of the tissue in the anteroposterior direction than in the mediolateral direction, corresponding to an anisotropic fiber orientation comparable to the TMJ disc. In a few investigations, condylar cartilage under compression was found to be stiffer anteriorly than posteriorly. As with the TMJ disc, further compressive characterization is warranted. To draw inferences for human tissue using animal models, establishing stiffness-thickness correlations and regional evaluation of proteoglycan/glycosaminoglycan content may be essential. Efforts directed from the biomechanics community for the characterization of TMJ tissues will facilitate the development of reliable and

  4. Fetal Cartilage-Derived Cells Have Stem Cell Properties and Are a Highly Potent Cell Source for Cartilage Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woo Hee; Kim, Hwal Ran; Lee, Su Jeong; Jeong, Nayoung; Park, So Ra; Choi, Byung Hyune; Min, Byoung-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Current strategies for cartilage cell therapy are mostly based on the use of autologous chondrocytes or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). However, these cells have limitations of a small number of cells available and of low chondrogenic ability, respectively. Many studies now suggest that fetal stem cells are more plastic than adult stem cells and can therefore more efficiently differentiate into target tissues. However, the characteristics and the potential of progenitor cells from fetal tissue remain poorly defined. In this study, we examined cells from human fetal cartilage at 12 weeks after gestation in comparison with bone marrow-derived MSCs or cartilage chondrocytes from young donors (8-25 years old). The fetal cartilage-derived progenitor cells (FCPCs) showed higher yields by approximately 24 times than that of chondrocytes from young cartilage. The morphology of the FCPCs was polygonal at passage 0, being similar to that of the young chondrocytes, but it changed later at passage 5, assuming a fibroblastic shape more akin to that of MSCs. As the passages advanced, the FCPCs showed a much greater proliferation ability than the young chondrocytes and MSCs, with the doubling times ranging from 2∼4 days until passage 15. The surface marker profile of the FCPCs at passage 2 was quite similar to that of the MSCs, showing high expressions of CD29, CD90, CD105, and Stro-1. When compared to the young chondrocytes, the FCPCs showed much less staining of SA-β-gal, a senescence indicator, at passage 10 and no decrease in SOX9 expression until passage 5. They also showed a much greater chondrogenic potential than the young chondrocytes and the MSCs in a three-dimensional pellet culture in vitro and in polyglycolic acid (PGA) scaffolds in vivo. In addition, they could differentiate into adipogenic and osteogenic lineages as efficiently as MSCs in vitro. These results suggest that FCPCs have stem cell properties to some extent and that they are more active in terms of

  5. 微球化人脐带Wharton胶间充质干细胞移植裸鼠皮下构建异位软骨%Cartilage construction in nude mice with microencapsulated stem cells derived from human umbilical cord Wharton’s jelly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨建华; 刘舒云; 赵鹏; 卢世璧; 张莉; 黄靖香; 赵斌; 许文静; 郭全义

    2014-01-01

    背景:软骨细胞外基质具有众多的信号分子蛋白和因子,其成分和特性最接近天然软骨组织,因而其很可能是构建组织工程软骨的最理想原料。  目的:探讨海藻酸钙-软骨细胞外基质混合凝胶微球复合人脐带Wharton胶间充质干细胞在裸鼠皮下异位构建组织工程软骨的可行性。  方法:制备软骨细胞外基质微丝悬液,将人脐带Wharton胶间充质干细胞接种于海藻酸钙-软骨细胞外基质混合凝胶微球中体外培养后植入裸鼠背部皮下(实验组),以人脐带 Wharton 胶间充质干细胞混合于单纯藻酸盐凝胶微球作为对照组,于4周后取材进行大体和组织学苏木精-伊红、甲苯胺蓝、番红O及Ⅱ型胶原免疫组化观察。结果与结论:体外培养时微球中干细胞呈球形软骨细胞样形态,生长、增殖情况良好;实验组术后第4周取材可见外形呈类软骨样组织块,甲苯胺蓝、番红O及Ⅱ型胶原免疫组化染色阳性,镜下观察可见大量类软骨样细胞及类软骨陷窝样结构,植入的混合凝胶微球周围组织无明显炎症反应;对照组显示微球部分降解,周围仅有少量炎症细胞及淋巴细胞。结果可见海藻酸钙-软骨细胞外基质具有良好的组织相容性,复合干细胞形成的微球植入裸鼠皮下可以构建为类软骨样组织。%BACKGROUND:Cartilage extracelular matrix with a large number of signaling molecule proteins and factors is likely to be an ideal material for tissue engineering cartilage. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the possibility of calcium alginate and cartilage extracelular matrix combined with microencapsulated stem cels derived from human umbilical cord Wharton’s jely to construct ectopic tissue-engineered cartilage in nude mice. METHODS: Microfilament suspension of the cartilage extracelular matrix was prepared. Human stem cels derived from Wharton’s jely of the umbilical cord

  6. Calcium/Cobalt Alginate Beads as Functional Scaffolds for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Focaroli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage is a highly organized tissue with complex biomechanical properties. However, injuries to the cartilage usually lead to numerous health concerns and often culminate in disabling symptoms, due to the poor intrinsic capacity of this tissue for self-healing. Although various approaches are proposed for the regeneration of cartilage, its repair still represents an enormous challenge for orthopedic surgeons. The field of tissue engineering currently offers some of the most promising strategies for cartilage restoration, in which assorted biomaterials and cell-based therapies are combined to develop new therapeutic regimens for tissue replacement. The current study describes the in vitro behavior of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hADSCs encapsulated within calcium/cobalt (Ca/Co alginate beads. These novel chondrogenesis-promoting scaffolds take advantage of the synergy between the alginate matrix and Co+2 ions, without employing costly growth factors (e.g., transforming growth factor betas (TGF-βs or bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs to direct hADSC differentiation into cartilage-producing chondrocytes.

  7. The secreted glycoprotein lubricin protects cartilage surfaces and inhibits synovial cell overgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, David K.; Marcelino, Jose; Baker, MacArthur; Gong, Yaoqin; Smits, Patrick; Lefebvre, Véronique; Jay, Gregory D.; Stewart, Matthew; Wang, Hongwei; Warman, Matthew L.; Carpten, John D.

    2005-01-01

    The long-term integrity of an articulating joint is dependent upon the nourishment of its cartilage component and the protection of the cartilage surface from friction-induced wear. Loss-of-function mutations in lubricin (a secreted glycoprotein encoded by the gene PRG4) cause the human autosomal recessive disorder camptodactyly-arthropathy-coxa vara-pericarditis syndrome (CACP). A major feature of CACP is precocious joint failure. In order to delineate the mechanism by which lubricin protects joints, we studied the expression of Prg4 mRNA during mouse joint development, and we created lubricin-mutant mice. Prg4 began to be expressed in surface chondrocytes and synoviocytes after joint cavitation had occurred and remained strongly expressed by these cells postnatally. Mice lacking lubricin were viable and fertile. In the newborn period, their joints appeared normal. As the mice aged, we observed abnormal protein deposits on the cartilage surface and disappearance of underlying superficial zone chondrocytes. In addition to cartilage surface changes and subsequent cartilage deterioration, intimal cells in the synovium surrounding the joint space became hyperplastic, which further contributed to joint failure. Purified or recombinant lubricin inhibited the growth of these synoviocytes in vitro. Tendon and tendon sheath involvement was present in the ankle joints, where morphologic changes and abnormal calcification of these structures were observed. We conclude that lubricin has multiple functions in articulating joints and tendons that include the protection of surfaces and the control of synovial cell growth. PMID:15719068

  8. SHP2-Deficiency in Chondrocytes Deforms Orofacial Cartilage and Ciliogenesis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Nobuhiro; Shen, Jingling; Noda, Kazuo; Kitami, Megumi; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Chen, Di; Komatsu, Yoshihiro

    2015-11-01

    Congenital orofacial abnormalities are clinically seen in human syndromes with SHP2 germline mutations such as LEOPARD and Noonan syndrome. Recent studies demonstrate that SHP2-deficiency leads to skeletal abnormalities including scoliosis and cartilaginous benign tumor metachondromatosis, suggesting that growth plate cartilage is a key tissue regulated by SHP2. The role and cellular mechanism of SHP2 in the orofacial cartilage, however, remains unknown. Here, we investigated the postnatal craniofacial development by inducible disruption of Shp2 in chondrocytes. Shp2 conditional knockout (cKO) mice displayed severe deformity of the mandibular condyle accompanied by disorganized, expanded cartilage in the trabecular bone region, enhanced type X collagen, and reduced Erk production. Interestingly, the length of primary cilia, an antenna like organelle sensing environmental signaling, was significantly shortened, and the number of primary cilia was reduced in the cKO mice. The expression levels of intraflagellar transports (IFTs), essential molecules in the assembly and function of primary cilia, were significantly decreased. Taken together, lack of Shp2 in orofacial cartilage led to severe defects of ciliogenesis through IFT reduction, resulting in mandibular condyle malformation and cartilaginous expansion. Our study provides new insights into the molecular pathogenesis of SHP2-deficiency in cartilage and helps to understand orofacial and skeletal manifestations seen in patients with SHP2 mutations.

  9. Induration of the cricoid cartilage complicates prosthetic laryngoplasty in a horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatarniuk, Dane M; Carmalt, James L; Allen, Andrew L

    2010-01-01

    To report intraoperative complications during needle penetration and suture placement through the cricoid cartilage during a prosthetic laryngoplasty procedure. Case report. An 11-year-old American Paint gelding with grade IV left laryngeal hemiplegia underwent a terminal prosthetic laryngoplasty for teaching purposes. Passage of the needle through the cricoid cartilage was difficult and resulted in needle breakage before eventual success using a new needle. The larynx was examined postmortem. Palpation of the larynx revealed hardening of the cricoid cartilage. Radiographic examination indicated the presence of diffuse radiopaque speckling. Histologic examination did not find accumulations of calcium salts, rather it revealed a loss of proteoglycans within the cricoid cartilage. Laryngeal mineralization occurs in the horse and human with advancing age. The loss of proteoglycan and subsequent stiffening of the cricoid cartilage likely resulted in the intraoperative complications noted in this report. Radiographic examination of the larynx before performing a prosthetic laryngoplasty may reveal the presence of areas of increased radiodensity. The interpretation of this is to be made with caution as it may represent mineralization, or hardening due to the changes in proteoglycan concentration, monomer size or charge.

  10. New resource for the computation of cartilage biphasic material properties with the interpolant response surface method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Kathryn E; Kourtis, Lampros C; Besier, Thor F; Lindsey, Derek P; Gold, Garry E; Delp, Scott L; Beaupre, Gary S

    2009-08-01

    Cartilage material properties are important for understanding joint function and diseases, but can be challenging to obtain. Three biphasic material properties (aggregate modulus, Poisson's ratio and permeability) can be determined using an analytical or finite element model combined with optimisation to find the material properties values that best reproduce an experimental creep curve. The purpose of this study was to develop an easy-to-use resource to determine biphasic cartilage material properties. A Cartilage Interpolant Response Surface was generated from interpolation of finite element simulations of creep indentation tests. Creep indentation tests were performed on five sites across a tibial plateau. A least-squares residual search of the Cartilage Interpolant Response Surface resulted in a best-fit curve for each experimental condition with corresponding material properties. These sites provided a representative range of aggregate moduli (0.48-1.58 MPa), Poisson's ratio (0.00-0.05) and permeability (1.7 x 10(- 15)-5.4 x 10(- 15) m(4)/N s) values found in human cartilage. The resource is freely available from https://simtk.org/home/va-squish.

  11. Anti-Angiogenesis and Anti-Tumor Effect of Shark Cartilage Extract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王锋; 王漪涛; 谢莉萍; 张荣庆

    2001-01-01

    The effect of shark cartilage extract (SCE), purified in this laboratory, on angiogenesis in chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM), on the activity of collagenase IV and on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (ECV-304) proliferation and apoptosis was investigated in vitro. The results showed that SCE caused a decline in CAM blood vessels and significantly prevented collagenase-induced collagenolysis. Moreover, SCE produced a dose-dependent decline in ECV-304 proliferation and altered its normal cell cycle. These results suggest that the anti-angiogenesis and anti-tumor effects of shark cartilage may be due to inhibition of endothelial cells as well as collagenolysis.

  12. Enhanced cartilage repair in 'healer' mice-New leads in the search for better clinical options for cartilage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Jamie

    2017-02-01

    Adult articular cartilage has a poor capacity to undergo intrinsic repair. Current strategies for the repair of large cartilage defects are generally unsatisfactory because the restored cartilage does not have the same resistance to biomechanical loading as authentic articular cartilage and degrades over time. Recently, an exciting new research direction, focused on intrinsic cartilage regeneration rather than fibrous repair by external means, has emerged. This review explores the new findings in this rapidly moving field as they relate to the clinical goal of restoration of structurally robust, stable and non-fibrous articular cartilage following injury.

  13. Species-Independent Modeling of High-Frequency Ultrasound Backscatter in Hyaline Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Männicke, Nils; Schöne, Martin; Liukkonen, Jukka; Fachet, Dominik; Inkinen, Satu; Malo, Markus K; Oelze, Michael L; Töyräs, Juha; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Raum, Kay

    2016-06-01

    Apparent integrated backscatter (AIB) is a common ultrasound parameter used to assess cartilage matrix degeneration. However, the specific contributions of chondrocytes, proteoglycan and collagen to AIB remain unknown. To reveal these relationships, this work examined biopsies and cross sections of human, ovine and bovine cartilage with 40-MHz ultrasound biomicroscopy. Site-matched estimates of collagen concentration, proteoglycan concentration, collagen orientation and cell number density were employed in quasi-least-squares linear regression analyses to model AIB. A positive correlation (R(2) = 0.51, p 70°) to the sound beam direction. These findings indicate causal relationships between AIB and cartilage structural parameters and could aid in more sophisticated future interpretations of ultrasound backscatter. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. First realisation of a labelling kit of N.T.P. 15-5 ligand by {sup 99m}Tc in view of a clinical application in cartilage functional imaging; Premiere realisation d'une trousse de marquage du ligand NTP 15-5 par le 99mTc en vue d'une application clinique en imagerie fonctionnelle du cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miot-Noirault, E.; Cachin, F.; Vidal, A.; Auzeloux, P.; Chezal, J.M.; Gaumet, V.; Askienazy, S. [Inserm, EA4231, UMR 990, 63 - Clermont-Ferrand (France); Guenu, S. [UFR de pharmacie, laboratoire de chimie analytique, 63 - Clermont-Ferrand (France); Askienazy, S. [Laboratoires Cyclopharma, 63 - Saint-Beauzire (France)

    2010-07-01

    We are working on a SPECT tracer for functional imaging of articular cartilage, the {sup 99m}Tc-NTP 15-5. This molecule has its application in degenerative diseases of cartilage (arthrosis, arthritis and chondrosarcoma). Excellent reports of cartilage versus tissues fixing ratios are obtained in different animal models as well as human anatomical parts. For clinical application, we present the development of a labelling kit by the technetium of the ligand NTP 15-5. (N.C.)

  15. Repair of osteochondral defects in rabbits with ectopically produced cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emans, PJ; Hulsbosch, M; Wetzels, GMR; Bulstra, SK; Kuijer, R

    2005-01-01

    Cartilage has poor regenerative capacity. Donor site morbidity and interference with joint homeostasis should be considered when applying the autologous chondrocyte transplantation technique. The use of ectopically produced cartilage, derived from periosteum, might be a novel method to heal

  16. In-vitro and in-vivo imaging of MMP activity in cartilage and joint injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, Tomoaki; Tenborg, Elizabeth; Yik, Jasper H.N.; Haudenschild, Dominik R., E-mail: DRHaudenschild@ucdavis.edu

    2015-05-08

    Non-destructive detection of cartilage-degrading activities represents an advance in osteoarthritis (OA) research, with implications in studies of OA pathogenesis, progression, and intervention strategies. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are principal cartilage degrading enzymes that contribute to OA pathogenesis. MMPSense750 is an in-vivo fluorimetric imaging probe with the potential to continuously and non-invasively trace real-time MMP activities, but its use in OA-related research has not been reported. Our objective is to detect and characterize the early degradation activities shortly after cartilage or joint injury with MMPSense750. We determined the appropriate concentration, assay time, and linear range using various concentrations of recombinant MMPs as standards. We then quantified MMP activity from cartilage explants subjected to either mechanical injury or inflammatory cytokine treatment in-vitro. Finally, we performed in-vivo MMP imaging of a mouse model of post-traumatic OA. Our in-vitro results showed that the optimal assay time was highly dependent on the MMP enzyme. In cartilage explant culture media, mechanical impact or cytokine treatment increased MMP activity. Injured knees of mice showed significantly higher fluorescent signal than uninjured knees. We conclude that MMPSense750 detects human MMP activities and can be used for in-vitro study with cartilage, as well as in-vivo studies of knee injury, and can offering real-time insight into the degradative processes that occurring within the joint before structural changes become evident radiographically. - Highlights: • MMPSense750 is near-infrared fluorescent probe which can detect MMP activity. • MMPSense750 can detect human MMP-3, -9, and -13. • The reaction kinetics with MMPSense750 were different for the three MMPs. • MMPSense750 can visualized real time MMP activity in mouse injured knees. • MMPSense750 is convenient tool to evaluate real-time MMP activity non-invasively.

  17. In vivo deformation of thin cartilage layers: Feasibility and applicability of T2* mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ginckel, Ans; Witvrouw, Erik E

    2016-05-01

    The objectives of this study were as follows: (i) to assess segmentation consistency and scan precision of T2* mapping of human tibio-talar cartilage, and (ii) to monitor changes in T2* relaxation times of ankle cartilage immediately following a clinically relevant in vivo exercise and during recovery. Using multi-echo gradient recalled echo sequences, averaged T2* values were calculated for tibio-talar cartilage layers in 10 healthy volunteers. Segmentation consistency and scan precision were determined from two repeated segmentations and two repeated acquisitions with repositioning, respectively. Subsequently, acute in vivo cartilage loading responses were monitored by calculating averaged tibio-talar T2* values at rest, immediately after (i.e., deformation) and at 15 min (i.e., recovery) following a 30-repetition knee bending exercise. Precision errors attained 4-6% with excellent segmentation consistency point estimates (i.e., intra-rater ICC of 0.95) and acceptable limits of confidence. At deformation, T2* values were increased in both layers [+16.1 (10.7)%, p = 0.004 and +17.3 (15.3)%, p = 0.023, for the talus and tibia, respectively] whereas during recovery no significant changes could be established when comparing to baseline [talar cartilage: +5.2 (8.2)%, p = 0.26 and tibial cartilage: +6.6 (10.4)%, p = 0.23]. T2* mapping is a viable method to monitor deformational behavior in thin cartilage layers such as ankle cartilage. Longitudinal changes in T2* can be reliably appraised and require at least 4-6% differences to ascertain statistical significance. The ability to detect considerable change even after non-strenuous loading events, endorses T2* mapping as an innovative method to evaluate the effects of therapeutic exercise on thin cartilage layers. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:771-778, 2016.

  18. Cartilage Integration: Evaluation of the reasons for failure of integration during cartilage repair. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IM Khan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage is a challenging tissue to reconstruct or replace principally because of its avascular nature; large chondral lesions in the tissue do not spontaneously heal. Where lesions do penetrate the bony subchondral plate, formation of hematomas and the migration of mesenchymal stem cells provide an inferior and transient fibrocartilagenous replacement for hyaline cartilage. To circumvent the poor intrinsic reparative response of articular cartilage several surgical techniques based on tissue transplantation have emerged. One characteristic shared by intrinsic reparative processes and the new surgical therapies is an apparent lack of lateral integration of repair or graft tissue with the host cartilage that can lead to poor prognosis. Many factors have been cited as impeding cartilage:cartilage integration including; chondrocyte cell death, chondrocyte dedifferentiation, the nature of the collagenous and proteoglycan networks that constitute the extracellular matrix, the type of biomaterial scaffold employed in repair and the origin of the cells used to repopulate the defect or lesion. This review addresses the principal intrinsic and extrinsic factors that impede integration and describe how manipulation of these factors using a host of strategies can positively influence cartilage integration.

  19. Harvesting split thickness costal cartilage graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Gaba

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: There are few complications associated with harvesting of full thickness coastal cartilage grafts i.e., pneumothorax (0.9%, contour deformities and prolonged post-operative pain. To address these issues, authors devised special scalpel to harvest split-thickness costal cartilage grafts. Materials and Methods: Standard inframammary incision was used for harvesting rib. Incision was made directly over the desired rib. Specially designed scalpel was used to cut through the rib cartilage to the half of the thickness. The study was conducted in two parts – cadaveric and clinical. Results: There was significantly less pain and no pneumothorax in the patients in whom the split thickness graft was harvested. Wounds healed without any complication. Discussion: Thus, newly devised angulated scalpel used in the current study, showed the potential to supply the reconstructive surgeon with split thickness rib graft without risk of complications such as pneumothorax or warping contour deformities and post-operative pain.

  20. Development of artificial articular cartilage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biswajit Bera

    2009-10-01

    The present study describes the development of artificial articular cartilage on the basis of mimicking structural gel properties and mechanical gel properties of natural articular cartilage. It is synthesized from PVA/Si nanocomposite containing 20% Tetra ethoxy silane (TEOS) by sol–gel method. Mechanical strength of Poly(vinyl alcohol), PVA is improved up to 35 MPa. Manufacturing method is adopted considering colloidal stability of nano silica particle in PVA sol at specific pH = 1. An adhesive is also prepared from PVA/Si nanocomposite containing 40% TEOS for firm attachment of artificial articular cartilage on underlying bone with high bond strength.

  1. Tissue engineering of cartilages using biomatrices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melrose, J.; Chuang, C.; Whitelock, J.

    2008-01-01

    Tissue engineering is an exciting new cross-disciplinary methodology which applies the principles of engineering and structure-function relationships between normal and pathological tissues to develop biological substitute to restore, maintain or improve tissue function. Tissue engineering...... therefore involves a melange of approaches encompassing developmental biology, tissue mechanics, medicine, cell differentiation and survival biology, mechanostransduction and nano-fabrication technology. The central tissue of interest in this review is cartilage. Traumatic injuries, congenital abnormalities...... and age-related degenerative diseases can all lead to cartilage loss; however, the low cell density and very limited self-renewal capacity of cartilage necessitate the development of effective therapeutic repair strategies for this tissue. The ontogeny of the chondrocyte, which is the cell that provides...

  2. Joint homeostasis in tissue engineering for cartilage repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saris, D.B.F.

    2002-01-01

    Traumatic joint damage, articular cartilage and the research into methods of restoring the articulation are not new topics of interest. For centuries, clinicians have recognized the importance of cartilage damage and sought ways of learning about the normal form and function of hyaline cartilage as

  3. Preparation of Articular Cartilage Specimens for Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupina, T A

    2016-08-01

    We developed and adapted a technology for preparation of articular cartilage specimens for scanning electron microscopy. The method includes prefixation processing, fixation, washing, and dehydration of articular cartilage specimens with subsequent treatment in camphene and air-drying. The technological result consists in prevention of deformation of the articular cartilage structures. The method is simpler and cheaper than the known technologies.

  4. Spectrocolorimetric evaluation of repaired articular cartilage after a microfracture

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    Dohi Yoshihiro

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In clinical practice, surgeons differentiate color changes in repaired cartilage compared with surrounding intact cartilage, but cannot quantify these color changes. Objective assessments are required. A spectrocolorimeter was used to evaluate whether intact and repaired cartilage can be quantified. Findings We investigated the use of a spectrocolorimeter and the application of two color models (L* a* b* colorimetric system and spectral reflectance distribution to describe and quantify articular cartilage. In this study, we measured the colors of intact and repaired cartilage after a microfracture. Histologically, the repaired cartilage was a mixture of fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage. In the L* a* b* colorimetric system, the L* and a* values recovered to close to the values of intact cartilage, whereas the b* value decreased over time after the operation. Regarding the spectral reflectance distribution at 12 weeks after the operation, the repaired cartilage had a higher spectral reflectance ratio than intact cartilage between wavelengths of 400 to 470 nm. Conclusion This study reports the first results regarding the relationship between spectrocolorimetric evaluation and the histological findings of repair cartilage after a microfracture. Our findings demonstrate the ability of spectrocolorimetric measurement to judge the repair cartilage after treatment on the basis of objective data such as the L*, a* and b* values and the SRP as a coincidence index of the spectral reflectance curve.

  5. Repairing articular cartilage defects with tissue-engineering cartilage in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Hong-xing; LI Fo-bao; SHEN Hui-liang; LIAO Wei-ming; LIU Miao; WANG Min; CAO Jun-ling

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of cancellous bone matrix gelatin (BMG) engineered with allogeneic chondrocytes in repairing articular cartilage defects in rabbits.Methods: Chondrocytes were seeded onto three-dimensional cancellous BMG and cultured in vitro for 12 days to prepare BMG-chondrocyte complexes. Under anesthesia with 2.5% pentobarbital sodium (1 ml/kg body weight), articular cartilage defects were made on the right knee joints of 38 healthy New Zealand white rabbits (regardless of sex, aged 4-5 months and weighing 2.5-3 kg) and the defects were then treated with 2.5 % trypsin.Then BMG-chondrocyte complex (Group A, n=18 ),BMG ( Group B, n=10), and nothing ( Group C, n=10)were implanted into the cartilage defects, respectively. The repairing effects were assessed by macroscopic, histologic,transmission electron microscopic (TEM) observation,immunohistochemical examination and in situ hybridization detection, respectively, at 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 weeks after operation.Results: Cancellous BMG was degraded within 8 weeks after operation. In Group A, lymphocyte infiltration was observed around the graft. At 24 weeks after operation, the cartilage defects were repaired by cartilage tissues and the articular cartilage and subchondral bone were soundly healed. Proteoglycan and type Ⅱ collagen were detected in the matrix of the repaired tissues by Safranin-O staining and immunohistochemical staining,respectively. In situ hybridization proved gene expression of type Ⅱ collagen in the cytoplasm of chondrocytes in the repaired tissues. TEM observation showed that chondrocytes and cartilage matrix in repaired tissues were almost same as those in the normal articular cartilage. In Group B, the defects were repaired by cartilage-fibrous tissues. In Group C, the defects were repaired only by fibrous tissues.Conclusions : Cancellous BMG can be regarded as the natural cell scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.Articular cartilage defects can be repaired by

  6. Semi-automatic knee cartilage segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, Erik B.; Folkesson, Jenny; Pettersen, Paola C.; Christiansen, Claus

    2006-03-01

    Osteo-Arthritis (OA) is a very common age-related cause of pain and reduced range of motion. A central effect of OA is wear-down of the articular cartilage that otherwise ensures smooth joint motion. Quantification of the cartilage breakdown is central in monitoring disease progression and therefore cartilage segmentation is required. Recent advances allow automatic cartilage segmentation with high accuracy in most cases. However, the automatic methods still fail in some problematic cases. For clinical studies, even if a few failing cases will be averaged out in the overall results, this reduces the mean accuracy and precision and thereby necessitates larger/longer studies. Since the severe OA cases are often most problematic for the automatic methods, there is even a risk that the quantification will introduce a bias in the results. Therefore, interactive inspection and correction of these problematic cases is desirable. For diagnosis on individuals, this is even more crucial since the diagnosis will otherwise simply fail. We introduce and evaluate a semi-automatic cartilage segmentation method combining an automatic pre-segmentation with an interactive step that allows inspection and correction. The automatic step consists of voxel classification based on supervised learning. The interactive step combines a watershed transformation of the original scan with the posterior probability map from the classification step at sub-voxel precision. We evaluate the method for the task of segmenting the tibial cartilage sheet from low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of knees. The evaluation shows that the combined method allows accurate and highly reproducible correction of the segmentation of even the worst cases in approximately ten minutes of interaction.

  7. Rhinoplasty: congenital deficiencies of the alar cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosins, Aaron M; Daniel, Rollin K; Sajjadian, Ali; Helms, Jill

    2013-08-01

    Congenital deficiencies of the alar cartilages are rare and often visible at birth but can occasionally present later. The authors review the anatomical development and discuss the incidence and treatment of congenital defects within the alar cartilages seen in rhinoplasty cases. The charts of 869 consecutive patients who underwent open rhinoplasty were retrospectively reviewed, and 8 cases of congenital defects of the alar cartilage within the middle crura were identified. Intraoperative photographs were taken of the alar deformities, and each patient underwent surgical correction. To simplify analysis, a classification of the defects was developed. A division was a cleft in the continuity of the alar cartilage with the 2 ends separate. A gap was a true absence of cartilage ranging from 1 to 4 mm, which can be accurately assessed in unilateral cases. A segmental loss was a defect greater than 4 mm. The 8 cases of deformity could be classified as 4 divisions, 3 gaps, and 1 segmental loss. None of the patients had a history of prior nasal trauma or nasal surgery. Six patients were women and 2 patients were men. In all cases, adequate projection and stability were achieved with a columellar strut. Asymmetry was minimized through concealer or tip grafts. There were no complications. Surgeons performing rhinoplasty surgery will encounter and should be prepared to deal with unexpected congenital defects of the alar cartilage. These defects within the middle crura will require stabilization with a columellar strut and, often, coverage with a concealer tip graft. We speculate that the cause of these defects is a disruption of the hedgehog signals that may arrest the condensation or block the differentiation of the underlying neural crest cells.

  8. The inhibitory effect of salmon calcitonin on tri-iodothyronine induction of early hypertrophy in articular cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingping Chen-An

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Salmon calcitonin has chondroprotective effect both in vitro and in vivo, and is therefore being tested as a candidate drug for cartilage degenerative diseases. Recent studies have indicated that different chondrocyte phenotypes may express the calcitonin receptor (CTR differentially. We tested for the presence of the CTR in chondrocytes from tri-iodothyronin (T3-induced bovine articular cartilage explants. Moreover, investigated the effects of human and salmon calcitonin on the explants. METHODS: Early chondrocyte hypertrophy was induced in bovine articular cartilage explants by stimulation over four days with 20 ng/mL T3. The degree of hypertrophy was investigated by molecular markers of hypertrophy (ALP, IHH, COLX and MMP13, by biochemical markers of cartilage turnover (C2M, P2NP and AGNxII and histology. The expression of the CTR was detected by qPCR and immunohistochemistry. T3-induced explants were treated with salmon or human calcitonin. Calcitonin down-stream signaling was measured by levels of cAMP, and by the molecular markers. RESULTS: Compared with untreated control explants, T3 induction increased expression of the hypertrophic markers (p<0.05, of cartilage turnover (p<0.05, and of CTR (p<0.01. Salmon, but not human, calcitonin induced cAMP release (p<0.001. Salmon calcitonin also inhibited expression of markers of hypertrophy and cartilage turnover (p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: T3 induced early hypertrophy of chondrocytes, which showed an elevated expression of the CTR and was thus a target for salmon calcitonin. Molecular marker levels indicated salmon, but not human, calcitonin protected the cartilage from hypertrophy. These results confirm that salmon calcitonin is able to modulate the CTR and thus have chondroprotective effects.

  9. [Chondrocyte mecanobiology. Application in cartilage tissue engineering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltz, Jean François; Netter, Patrick; Huselstein, Céline; de Isla, Natalia; Wei Yang, Jing; Muller, Sylvaine

    2005-11-01

    Cartilage is a hydrated connective tissue that withstands and distributes mechanical forces within joints. Chondrocytes utilize mechanical signals to maintain cartilaginous tissue homeostasis. They regulate their metabolic activity through complex biological and biophysical interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM). Some mechanotransduction mechanisms are known, while many others no doubt remain to be discovered. Various aspects of chondrocyte mechanobiology have been applied to tissue engineering, with the creation of replacement tissue in vitro from bioresorbable or non-bioresorbable scaffolds and harvested cells. The tissues are maintained in a near-physiologic mechanical and biochemical environment. This paper is an overview of both chondrocyte mechanobiology and cartilage tissue engineering

  10. Body weight independently affects articular cartilage catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, W Matt; Winward, Jason G; Pardo, Michael Becker; Hopkins, J Ty; Seeley, Matthew K

    2015-06-01

    Although obesity is associated with osteoarthritis, it is unclear whether body weight (BW) independently affects articular cartilage catabolism (i.e., independent from physiological factors that also accompany obesity). The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the independent effect of BW on articular cartilage catabolism associated with walking. A secondary purpose was to determine how decreased BW influenced cardiovascular response due to walking. Twelve able-bodied subjects walked for 30 minutes on a lower-body positive pressure treadmill during three sessions: control (unadjusted BW), +40%BW, and -40%BW. Serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) was measured immediately before (baseline) and after, and 15 and 30 minutes after the walk. Heart rate (HR) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured every three minutes during the walk. Relative to baseline, average serum COMP concentration was 13% and 5% greater immediately after and 15 minutes after the walk. Immediately after the walk, serum COMP concentration was 14% greater for the +40%BW session than for the -40%BW session. HR and RPE were greater for the +40%BW session than for the other two sessions, but did not differ between the control and -40%BW sessions. BW independently influences acute articular cartilage catabolism and cardiovascular response due to walking: as BW increases, so does acute articular cartilage catabolism and cardiovascular response. These results indicate that lower-body positive pressure walking may benefit certain individuals by reducing acute articular cartilage catabolism, due to walking, while maintaining cardiovascular response. Key pointsWalking for 30 minutes with adjustments in body weight (normal body weight, +40% and -40% body weight) significantly influences articular cartilage catabolism, measured via serum COMP concentration.Compared to baseline levels, walking with +40% body weight and normal body weight both elicited significant increases in

  11. Repair of Cartilage injuries using in vitro engineered 3D cartilage tissue- Preliminary Results of Our Animal Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arumugam S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The cartilage injuries demand novel therapeutic approaches as the success rates of the current conventional strategies for the repair of injured articular cartilages are not that encouraging. Earlier we have reported that the Thermoreversible Gelation Polymer (TGP is an ideal scaffold for human chondrocyte expansion in vitro. In this study, we report the preliminary results of the in vitro expansion, characterization and experimental in vivo transplantation of chondrocytes in a rabbit model of cartilage injury Materials & Methods: Nine rabbits were included in this study scheduled for two years, after approval by the ethics committee. In the first animal, Chondrocytes were isolated from the weight bearing area of patellar groove in the left hindlimb and cultured in TGP Scaffold and maintained at 37°C in 5% carbon dioxide incubator for 64 days without growth factors. Then the TGP-Chondrocyte construct was transplanted into an experimental defect created in the knee of the right forelimb of the same rabbit. After a period of 10 weeks, a biopsy was taken from the transplanted region and subjected to morphological analysis, characterization by histopathology (H&E stain and Immunohistochemistry (S-100 staining.Results: The chondrocytes in the 3D TGP culture had round to oval shaped morphology without any de-differentiation which is otherwise observed in Conventional 2D cultures. A macroscopic structure which resembled cartilage was appreciated in the TGP construct in vitro after 64 days which was then transplanted to the rabbit. The H&E and Immunohistochemistry studies confirmed the presence of chondrocytes in the biopsy tissue. Conclusion: Based on the results, we conclude that the TGP significantly supports the in vitro expansion of chondrocytes for a longer period and the 3D culture using TGP preserves the phenotype of the articular chondrocytes. The tissue thus grown when implanted with the TGP has engrafted well without any

  12. Overexpression of hsa-miR-148a promotes cartilage production and inhibits cartilage degradation by osteoarthritic chondrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, Lucienne A.; Kragten, Angela H.M.; Dhert, Wouter J.; Saris, Daniël B.F.; Creemers, Laura B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Hsa-miR-148a expression is decreased in OA cartilage, but its functional role in cartilage has never been studied. Therefore, our aim was to investigate the effects of overexpressing hsa-miR-148a on cartilage metabolism of OA chondrocytes. Design OA chondrocytes were transfected with a

  13. Overexpression of hsa-miR-148a promotes cartilage production and inhibits cartilage degradation by osteoarthritic chondrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, L A; Kragten, A H M; Dhert, W J A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/10261847X; Saris, D B F; Creemers, L B

    OBJECTIVE: Hsa-miR-148a expression is decreased in Osteoarthritis (OA) cartilage, but its functional role in cartilage has never been studied. Therefore, our aim was to investigate the effects of overexpressing hsa-miR-148a on cartilage metabolism of OA chondrocytes. DESIGN: OA chondrocytes were

  14. Prefabrication of 3D cartilage contructs: towards a tissue engineered auricle--a model tested in rabbits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achim von Bomhard

    Full Text Available The reconstruction of an auricle for congenital deformity or following trauma remains one of the greatest challenges in reconstructive surgery. Tissue-engineered (TE three-dimensional (3D cartilage constructs have proven to be a promising option, but problems remain with regard to cell vitality in large cell constructs. The supply of nutrients and oxygen is limited because cultured cartilage is not vascular integrated due to missing perichondrium. The consequence is necrosis and thus a loss of form stability. The micro-surgical implantation of an arteriovenous loop represents a reliable technology for neovascularization, and thus vascular integration, of three-dimensional (3D cultivated cell constructs. Auricular cartilage biopsies were obtained from 15 rabbits and seeded in 3D scaffolds made from polycaprolactone-based polyurethane in the shape and size of a human auricle. These cartilage cell constructs were implanted subcutaneously into a skin flap (15 × 8 cm and neovascularized by means of vascular loops implanted micro-surgically. They were then totally enhanced as 3D tissue and freely re-implanted in-situ through microsurgery. Neovascularization in the prefabricated flap and cultured cartilage construct was analyzed by microangiography. After explantation, the specimens were examined by histological and immunohistochemical methods. Cultivated 3D cartilage cell constructs with implanted vascular pedicle promoted the formation of engineered cartilaginous tissue within the scaffold in vivo. The auricles contained cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM components, such as GAGs and collagen even in the center oft the constructs. In contrast, in cultivated 3D cartilage cell constructs without vascular pedicle, ECM distribution was only detectable on the surface compared to constructs with vascular pedicle. We demonstrated, that the 3D flaps could be freely transplanted. On a microangiographic level it was evident that all the skin flaps

  15. Comparative analysis of gene expression profiles of hip articular cartilage between non-traumatic necrosis and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenyu; Liu, Yang; Hao, Jingcan; Zheng, Shuyu; Wen, Yan; Xiao, Xiao; He, Awen; Fan, Qianrui; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Ruiyu

    2016-10-10

    Hip cartilage destruction is consistently observed in the non-traumatic osteonecrosis of femoral head (NOFH) and accelerates its bone necrosis. The molecular mechanism underlying the cartilage damage of NOFH remains elusive. In this study, we conducted a systematically comparative study of gene expression profiles between NOFH and osteoarthritis (OA). Hip articular cartilage specimens were collected from 12 NOFH patients and 12 controls with traumatic femoral neck fracture for microarray (n=4) and quantitative real-time PCR validation experiments (n=8). Gene expression profiling of articular cartilage was performed using Agilent Human 4×44K Microarray chip. The accuracy of microarray experiment was further validated by qRT-PCR. Gene expression results of OA hip cartilage were derived from previously published study. Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM) software was applied for identifying differently expressed genes. Gene ontology (GO) and pathway enrichment analysis were conducted by Gene Set Enrichment Analysis software and DAVID tool, respectively. Totally, 27 differently expressed genes were identified for NOFH. Comparing the gene expression profiles of NOFH cartilage and OA cartilage detected 8 common differently expressed genes, including COL5A1, OGN, ANGPTL4, CRIP1, NFIL3, METRNL, ID2 and STEAP1. GO comparative analysis identified 10 common significant GO terms, mainly implicated in apoptosis and development process. Pathway comparative analysis observed that ECM-receptor interaction pathway and focal adhesion pathway were enriched in the differently expressed genes of both NOFH and hip OA. In conclusion, we identified a set of differently expressed genes, GO and pathways for NOFH articular destruction, some of which were also involved in the hip OA. Our study results may help to reveal the pathogenetic similarities and differences of cartilage damage of NOFH and hip OA.

  16. Iodoacetate and allogenous cartilage particles as models for arthritis induction in equine

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    Ahmed Elmesiry

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Experimental models of osteoarthritis (OA have been widely developed in different animal species, because of the high incidence of osteoarthritis diseases in humans and animals. To date, no ideal OA animal model has been reported. The present study compare different osteoarthritis models to determine which one is suitable for inducing experimental equine OA. Fifteen donkeys were divided into three equal groups (n = 5. The radio carpal joints of the right forelimb of 15 donkeys were injected with 25 mg monoiodoacetate (MIA (group A, 50 mg allogenous cartilage particles (ACP (group B, or vehicle solution (group C over a period of 70 days. Osteoarthritis induction was evaluated weekly through lameness score, carpal circumference, joint flexion angel, synovial fluid analysis (total protein and WBC count, and radiology. Animal were euthanized and joints histopathology were performed at 70 days. Lameness score and joint circumference was increased in both group A and B however joint flexion angel was decreased compared to group C (p < 0.05. Osteophytes were observed in MIA injected joints only accompanied with subchondral bone sclerosis. Cartilage damage was observed grossly and histologically in Group A together with synovial membrane fibrosis. Group B had on cartilage damage grossly however histological examination revealed some cartilage surface discontinuity with synovial membrane edema. Injection of monoiodoacetate in the donkey is a successful model to create the acute clinical signs of joint disease as well as cartilage damage. However, allogenous cartilage particles injection need more investigation to be applied.

  17. "Changes in cartilage of rats after treatment with Quinolone and in Magnesium-deficient diet "

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    Shakibaei M

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Ultrastructural changes in immature articular carilage were studied after treatment of 5-weeks-old rats with ofloxacin, a fluoroquinolone, and in magnesium deficiency.We concluded that quinolone-induced arthropathy is probably due to chelation of functionally available magnesium in joint cartilage as magnesium deficiency in joint cartilage could impair chondrocyte-matrix- interaction which is mediated by cation-dependent integrin-receptors of the β1-subfamily. With immuno-histochemical methods using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies we showed that B1 integrins were expressed in rat joint cartilage. Joint cartilage lesions were detected in ofloxacin-treated and magnesium-deficient rats. Lesions were more pronounced in the quinolone-treated group. Expression of several integrins was reduced in the vicinity of lesions after oral treatment with 2×600 mg ofloxacin/kg body wt for one day. Gross-structural lesions (e.g. cleft formation, unmasked collagen fibres in magnesium deficient rats were very similar but changes in intergrin expression were less pronounced. Alterations observed on the ultrastructural level showed striking similarities in magnesium-deficient rats and in rats treated with single doses of 600 mg ofloxacin per kg body wt.Typical observation were: bundle shaped, electron-dense aggregates on the surface and in the cytoplasm of chondrocytes, detachement of the cell membrance from the matrix and necrotic chondrocytes, reduced synthesis and/or reduced of extracellular matrix and swelling of cell organelles such as mitochondria.The results of this study confirm our previously reported finding that quinolone-induced arthropathy probably is caued by a reduction of functionally available magnesium (ionized Mg2+ in cartilage. Furthermore, they provide a basis for aimed studies with human cartilage samples from quinolone-treated patients which might be available postmortal or after hip replacement surgery

  18. Roles of inflammatory and anabolic cytokines in cartilage metabolism: signals and multiple effectors converge upon MMP-13 regulation in osteoarthritis

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    MB Goldring

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Human cartilage is a complex tissue of matrix proteins that vary in amount and orientation from superficial to deep layers and from loaded to unloaded zones. A major challenge to efforts to repair cartilage by stem cell-based and other tissue engineering strategies is the inability of the resident chondrocytes to lay down new matrix with the same structural and resilient properties that it had upon its original formation. This is particularly true of the collagen network, which is susceptible to cleavage once proteoglycans are depleted. Thus, a thorough understanding of the similarities and particularly the marked differences in mechanisms of cartilage remodeling during development, osteoarthritis, and aging may lead to more effective strategies for preventing cartilage damage and promoting repair. To identify and characterize effectors or regulators of cartilage remodeling in these processes, we are using culture models of primary human and mouse chondrocytes and cell lines and mouse genetic models to manipulate gene expression programs leading to matrix remodeling and subsequent chondrocyte hypertrophic differentiation, pivotal processes which both go astray in OA disease. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-13, the major type II collagen-degrading collagenase, is regulated by stress-, inflammation-, and differentiation-induced signals that not only contribute to irreversible joint damage (progression in OA, but importantly, also to the initiation/onset phase, wherein chondrocytes in articular cartilage leave their natural growth- and differentiation-arrested state. Our work points to common mediators of these processes in human OA cartilage and in early through late stages of OA in surgical and genetic mouse models.

  19. In vitro cartilage production using an extracellular matrix-derived scaffold and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yan-hong; YANG Qiang; XIA Qun; PENG Jiang; LU Shi-bi; GUO Quan-yi; MA Xin-long

    2013-01-01

    Background Cartilage repair is a challenging research area because of the limited healing capacity of adult articular cartilage.We had previously developed a natural,human cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM)-derived scaffold for in vivo cartilage tissue engineering in nude mice.However,before these scaffolds can be used in clinical applications in vivo,the in vitro effects should be further explored.Methods We produced cartilage in vitro using a natural cartilage ECM-derived scaffold.The scaffolds were fabricated by combining a decellularization procedure with a freeze-drying technique and were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM),micro-computed tomography (micro-CT),histological staining,cytotoxicity assay,biochemical and biomechanical analysis.After being chondrogenically induced,the induction results of BMSCs were analyzed by histology and Immunohisto-chemistry.The attachment and viability assessment of the cells on scaffolds were analyzed using SEM and LIVE/DEAD staining.Cell-scaffold constructs cultured in vitro for 1 week and 3 weeks were analyzed using histological and immunohistochemical methods.Results SEM and micro-CT revealed a 3-D interconnected porous structure.The majority of the cartilage ECM was found in the scaffold following the removal of cellular debris,and stained positive for safranin O and collagen Ⅱ.Viability staining indicated no cytotoxic effects of the scaffold.Biochemical analysis showed that collagen content was (708.2±44.7)μg/mg,with GAG (254.7±25.9) μg/mg.Mechanical testing showed the compression moduli (E) were (1.226±0.288) and (0.052±0.007) MPa in dry and wet conditions,respectively.Isolated canine bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs) were induced down a chondrogenic pathway,labeled with PKH26,and seeded onto the scaffold.Immunofluorescent staining of the cell-scaffold constructs indicated that chondrocyte-like cells were derived from seeded BMSCs and excreted ECM.The cell-scaffold constructs contained

  20. Ensemble multivariate analysis to improve identification of articular cartilage disease in noisy Raman spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Wade; Wilkinson, Dan; Wu, Ling; Petrigliano, Frank; Dunn, Bruce; Evseenko, Denis

    2015-07-01

    The development of new methods for the early diagnosis of cartilage disease could offer significant improvement in patient care. Raman spectroscopy is an emerging biomedical technology with unique potential to recognize disease tissues, though difficulty in obtaining the samples needed to train a diagnostic and excessive signal noise could slow its development into a clinical tool. In the current report we detail the use of principal component analysis--linear discriminant analysis (PCA-LDA) on spectra from pairs of materials modeling cartilage disease to create multiple spectral scoring metrics, which could limit the reliance on primary training data for identifying disease in low signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) Raman spectra. Our proof-of-concept experiments show that combinations of these model-metrics has the potential to improve the classification of low-SNR Raman spectra from human normal and osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage over a single metric trained with spectra from the same healthy and OA tissues. Scatter plot showing the PCA-LDA derived human-disease-metric scores versus rat-model-metric scores for 7656 low signal-to-noise spectra from healthy (blue) and osteoarthritic (red) cartilage. Light vertical and horizontal lines represent the optimized single metric classification boundary. Dark diagonal line represents the classification of boundary resulting from the optimized combination of the two metrics. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. MULTIPLE OSSIFIED COSTAL CARTILAGES FOR 1ST RIB

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    Raghavendra D.R.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Costal cartilages are flattened bars of hyaline cartilages. All ribs except the last two, join with the sternum through their respective costal cartilages directly or indirectly. During dissection for 1st MBBS students in the Department of Anatomy, JJMMC, Davangere, variation was found in a male cadaver aged 45 –50 years. Multiple ossified costal cartilages for 1st rib were present on left side. There were 3 costal cartilages connecting 1st rib to manubrium. There were two small intercostal spaces between them. The lower two small costal cartilages fused together to form a common segment which in turn fused with large upper costal cartilage. The large upper costal cartilage forms costochondral joint with 1st rib. All costal cartilages showed features of calcification. The present variation of multiple ossified costal cartilages are due to bifurcation of costal cartilage. It may cause musculoskeletal pain, intercostal nerve entrapment or vascular compression. Awareness of these anomalies are important for radiologists for diagnostic purpose and for surgeons for performing various clinical and surgical procedures.

  2. Advances and Prospects in Stem Cells for Cartilage Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjie Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The histological features of cartilage call attention to the fact that cartilage has a little capacity to repair itself owing to the lack of a blood supply, nerves, or lymphangion. Stem cells have emerged as a promising option in the field of cartilage tissue engineering and regenerative medicine and could lead to cartilage repair. Much research has examined cartilage regeneration utilizing stem cells. However, both the potential and the limitations of this procedure remain controversial. This review presents a summary of emerging trends with regard to using stem cells in cartilage tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In particular, it focuses on the characterization of cartilage stem cells, the chondrogenic differentiation of stem cells, and the various strategies and approaches involving stem cells that have been used in cartilage repair and clinical studies. Based on the research into chondrocyte and stem cell technologies, this review discusses the damage and repair of cartilage and the clinical application of stem cells, with a view to increasing our systematic understanding of the application of stem cells in cartilage regeneration; additionally, several advanced strategies for cartilage repair are discussed.

  3. Oxygen, nitric oxide and articular cartilage

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    B Fermor

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Molecular oxygen is required for the production of nitric oxide (NO, a pro-inflammatory mediator that is associated with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. To date there has been little consideration of the role of oxygen tension in the regulation of nitric oxide production associated with arthritis. Oxygen tension may be particularly relevant to articular cartilage since it is avascular and therefore exists at a reduced oxygen tension. The superficial zone exists at approximately 6% O2, while the deep zone exists at less than 1% O2. Furthermore, oxygen tension can alter matrix synthesis, and the material properties of articular cartilage in vitro.The increase in nitric oxide associated with arthritis can be caused by pro-inflammatory cytokines and mechanical stress. Oxygen tension significantly alters endogenous NO production in articular cartilage, as well as the stimulation of NO in response to both mechanical loading and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mechanical loading and pro-inflammatory cytokines also increase the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. There is a complex interaction between NO and PGE2, and oxygen tension can alter this interaction. These findings suggest that the relatively low levels of oxygen within the joint may have significant influences on the metabolic activity, and inflammatory response of cartilage as compared to ambient levels. A better understanding of the role of oxygen in the production of inflammatory mediators in response to mechanical loading, or pro-inflammatory cytokines, may aid in the development of strategies for therapeutic intervention in arthritis.

  4. Fetal jaw movement affects condylar cartilage development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, H; Hatta, T; Udagawa, J; Zhang, L; Yoshimura, Y; Otani, H

    2005-05-01

    Using a mouse exo utero system to examine the effects of fetal jaw movement on the development of condylar cartilage, we assessed the effects of restraint of the animals' mouths from opening, by suture, at embryonic day (E)15.5. We hypothesized that pre-natal jaw movement is an important mechanical factor in endochondral bone formation of the mandibular condyle. Condylar cartilage was reduced in size, and the bone-cartilage margin was ill-defined in the sutured group at E18.5. Volume, total number of cells, and number of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-positive cells in the mesenchymal zone were lower in the sutured group than in the non-sutured group at E16.5 and E18.5. Hypertrophic chondrocytes were larger, whereas fewer apoptotic chondrocytes and osteoclasts were observed in the hypertrophic zone in the sutured group at E18.5. Analysis of our data revealed that restricted fetal TMJ movement influences the process of endochondral bone formation of condylar cartilage.

  5. Cartilage repair: Generations of autologous chondrocyte transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlovits, Stefan [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: stefan.marlovits@meduniwien.ac.at; Zeller, Philip [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Singer, Philipp [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Resinger, Christoph [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Vecsei, Vilmos [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-01-15

    Articular cartilage in adults has a limited capacity for self-repair after a substantial injury. Surgical therapeutic efforts to treat cartilage defects have focused on delivering new cells capable of chondrogenesis into the lesions. Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) is an advanced cell-based orthobiologic technology used for the treatment of chondral defects of the knee that has been in clinical use since 1987 and has been performed on 12,000 patients internationally. With ACT, good to excellent clinical results are seen in isolated post-traumatic lesions of the knee joint in the younger patient, with the formation of hyaline or hyaline-like repair tissue. In the classic ACT technique, chondrocytes are isolated from small slices of cartilage harvested arthroscopically from a minor weight-bearing area of the injured knee. The extracellular matrix is removed by enzymatic digestion, and the cells are then expanded in monolayer culture. Once a sufficient number of cells has been obtained, the chondrocytes are implanted into the cartilage defect, using a periosteal patch over the defect as a method of cell containment. The major complications are periosteal hypertrophy, delamination of the transplant, arthrofibrosis and transplant failure. Further improvements in tissue engineering have contributed to the next generation of ACT techniques, where cells are combined with resorbable biomaterials, as in matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT). These biomaterials secure the cells in the defect area and enhance their proliferation and differentiation.

  6. In vivo generation of cartilage from periosteum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emans, PJ; Surtel, DAM; Frings, EJJ; Bulstra, SK; Kuijer, R

    Periosteum has chondrogenic and osteogenic potential and plays an important role in fracture healing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reactive tissue formed after damaging the periosteum. Damaging the periosteum may be a way to generate ectopic cartilage or bone, which may be useful

  7. Advanced Strategies for Articular Cartilage Defect Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fergal J. O'Brien

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage is a unique tissue owing to its ability to withstand repetitive compressive stress throughout an individual’s lifetime. However, its major limitation is the inability to heal even the most minor injuries. There still remains an inherent lack of strategies that stimulate hyaline-like articular cartilage growth with appropriate functional properties. Recent scientific advances in tissue engineering have made significant steps towards development of constructs for articular cartilage repair. In particular, research has shown the potential of biomaterial physico-chemical properties significantly influencing the proliferation, differentiation and matrix deposition by progenitor cells. Accordingly, this highlights the potential of using such properties to direct the lineage towards which such cells follow. Moreover, the use of soluble growth factors to enhance the bioactivity and regenerative capacity of biomaterials has recently been adopted by researchers in the field of tissue engineering. In addition, gene therapy is a growing area that has found noteworthy use in tissue engineering partly due to the potential to overcome some drawbacks associated with current growth factor delivery systems. In this context, such advanced strategies in biomaterial science, cell-based and growth factor-based therapies that have been employed in the restoration and repair of damaged articular cartilage will be the focus of this review article.

  8. Nonspecific otalgia: Indication for cartilage tympanoplasty

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    Rauf Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Myringoplasty and tympanoplasty are commonly performed otologic surgical procedures. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of nonspecific otalgia on the successful autologous conchal cartilage and temporalis fascia graft take up in type-1 tympanoplasty. Materials and Methods: A total of 250 adult patients who met the inclusion criteria were enrolled for this study. Patients were placed in two groups (otalgia and nonotalgia group depending upon the history of otalgia. Patients in both groups were operated (type-1 tympanoplasty using randomly either temporalis fascia or conchal cartilage as the graft material. Follow-up of patients was done after 3 weeks, 6 weeks, and 3 months of surgery to check the status of graft take up. Result: Our study shows that patients in otalgia group in which autologous temporalis fascia was used as the graft material, the majority of patients had graft necrosis by 3 months after surgery (9.6% success only. Whereas patients of the same group in which autologous conchal cartilage was used as the graft material, successful graft take up was in 93.5% patients after 3 months of surgery. Our study shows that there was not much difference in using autologous temporalis fascia or autologous conchal cartilage on successful graft take up in nonotolgia group of patients, with success rate of 97.89% and 97.84%, respectively.

  9. Spatially resolved elemental distributions in articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert, T.; Reibetanz, U.; Vogt, J.; Butz, T.; Werner, A.; Gründer, W.

    2001-07-01

    In this study, the nuclear microprobe technique is employed to analyse the chemistry of joint cartilage in order to correlate internal structures of the collagen network with the elemental distribution. The samples were taken from pig's knee joint. 30 μm thick coronar cross-sections were prepared by means of cryosectioning and freeze-drying. We performed simultaneously particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). Thus we obtained spatially resolved distributions of the elements H, C, N, O, P, S, Cl, K and Ca. The main components of the organic matrix are H, C, N and O. It was shown that their relations vary with the cartilage structures. It could be shown that zones with aligned collagen fibrils contain less sulphur and potassium but more chlorine. The higher chlorine concentration is remarkable because newest biochemical studies found that hypochloric acid is involved in cartilage degradation. Furthermore, the calcium distribution is still of great interest. Its correlation to structural changes inside the cartilage is still being discussed. It could be disproved that zones of higher calcium concentration are related to the aligned structures of the collagen network.

  10. Zn deposition at the bone-cartilage interface in equine articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: D.A.Bradley@surrey.ac.uk; Moger, C.J.; Winlove, C.P. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter, EX4 4QL (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-21

    In articular cartilage metalloproteinases, a family of enzymes whose function relies on the presence of divalent cations such as Zn and Ca plays a central role in the normal processes of growth and remodelling and in the degenerative and inflammatory processes of arthritis. Another important enzyme, alkaline phosphatase, involved in cartilage mineralisation also relies on metallic cofactors. The local concentration of divalent cations is therefore of considerable interest in cartilage pathophysiology and several authors have used synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (XRF) to map metal ion distributions in bone and cartilage. We report use of a bench-top XRF analytical microscope, providing spatial resolution of 10 {mu}m and applicable to histological sections, facilitating correlation of the distribution with structural features. The study seeks to establish the elemental distribution in normal tissue as a precursor to investigation of changes in disease. For six samples prepared from equine metacarpophalangeal joint, we observed increased concentration of Zn and Sr ions around the tidemark between normal and mineralised cartilage. This is believed to be an active site of remodelling but its composition has hitherto lacked detailed characterization. We also report preliminary results on two of the samples using Proton-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). This confirms our previous observations using synchrotron-based XRF of enhanced deposition of Sr and Zn at the surface of the subchondral bone and in articular cartilage.

  11. Recent developments in scaffold-guided cartilage tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jinfeng; Shi, Kun; Ding, Qiuxia; Qu, Ying; Luo, Feng; Qian, Zhiyong

    2014-10-01

    Articular cartilage repair is one of the most challenging problems in biomedical engineering because the regenerative capacity of cartilage is intrinsically poor. The lack of efficient treatment modalities motivates researches into cartilage tissue engineering such as combing cells, scaffolds and growth factors. In this review we summarize the current developments on scaffold systems available for cartilage tissue engineering. The factors that are critical to successfully design an ideal scaffold for cartilage regeneration were discussed. Then we present examples of selected material types (natural polymers and synthetic polymers) and fabricated forms of the scaffolds (three-dimensional scaffolds, micro- or nanoparticles, and their composites). In the end of review, we conclude with an overview of the ways in which biomedical nanotechnology is widely applied in cartilage tissue engineering, especially in the design of composite scaffolds. This review attempts to provide recommendations on the combination of qualities that would produce the ideal scaffold system for cartilage tissue engineering.

  12. Arthrosonography and biomarkers in the evaluation of destructive knee cartilage osteoarthrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živanović Sandra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Knee osteoarthrosis (OA is a degenerative disease with progressive loss of cartilage of joints and bone destruction. During this process, the release of fragments of connective tissue matrix is detected in the biological fluids such as human cartilage glycoprotein (YKL-40, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP and collagen type I C terminal telopeptid (CTX-I. Objective. The aim of the study was to determine the degree of connection cartilage thickness measured by ultrasound with serum concentrations of biomarkers YKL-40, COMP and CTX-I in patients with primary knee OA. Methods. The analysis included 88 patients with the diagnosis of knee OA. Ultrasound examination of knees were done by two rheumatologists. The analysis of serum samples determined the concentration of COMP, YKL-40 and CTX-I by the ELISA method. Results. The average age of patients was 69.97±9.37 years and the duration of knee OA 6.46±6.73 years. The average cartilage thickness of the femoral condyle was 1.33±0.20 mm; of the medial condyle (MC (front access 1.30±0.23 mm, (rear access 1.30±0.29 mm and lateral condyli (LC (front access 1.39±0.27 mm. The average cartilage thickness of MC (front access was 1.27 mm (0.98-1.42 mm, (rear access 1.27 mm (0.84-1.46 mm and LC (front access 1.36 mm (1.01-1.57 mm (p=0.002. There was a significant connection in the negative direction between the patients' age and the cartilage thickness of MC (front and rear access and LC (front access (r=-0.253; p=0.017. There was a significant negative direction of interrelationship between the cartilage thickness of MC (front access (r=-0.259; p=0.015 and LC (front access and the disease duration (r=-0.259; p=0.015. In patients with knee OA lasting for 5 years the measured cartilage thickness was 1.27 mm (1.16-1.49 mm, and 0.99 mm (0.94-1.23 mm (p=0.007 in those lasting for 20 years. There was a significant relationship in a negative direction between the concentration of YKL-40 and

  13. Autophagy modulates articular cartilage vesicle formation in primary articular chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Ann K; Gohr, Claudia M; Mitton-Fitzgerald, Elizabeth; Grewal, Rupinder; Ninomiya, James; Coyne, Carolyn B; Jackson, William T

    2015-05-22

    Chondrocyte-derived extracellular organelles known as articular cartilage vesicles (ACVs) participate in non-classical protein secretion, intercellular communication, and pathologic calcification. Factors affecting ACV formation and release remain poorly characterized; although in some cell types, the generation of extracellular vesicles is associated with up-regulation of autophagy. We sought to determine the role of autophagy in ACV production by primary articular chondrocytes. Using an innovative dynamic model with a light scatter nanoparticle counting apparatus, we determined the effects of autophagy modulators on ACV number and content in conditioned medium from normal adult porcine and human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Healthy articular chondrocytes release ACVs into conditioned medium and show significant levels of ongoing autophagy. Rapamycin, which promotes autophagy, increased ACV numbers in a dose- and time-dependent manner associated with increased levels of autophagy markers and autophagosome formation. These effects were suppressed by pharmacologic autophagy inhibitors and short interfering RNA for ATG5. Caspase-3 inhibition and a Rho/ROCK inhibitor prevented rapamycin-induced increases in ACV number. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes, which are deficient in autophagy, did not increase ACV number in response to rapamycin. SMER28, which induces autophagy via an mTOR-independent mechanism, also increased ACV number. ACVs induced under all conditions had similar ecto-enzyme specific activities and types of RNA, and all ACVs contained LC3, an autophagosome-resident protein. These findings identify autophagy as a critical participant in ACV formation, and augment our understanding of ACVs in cartilage disease and repair.

  14. Rate process analysis of thermal damage in cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Sergio H; Nelson, J Stuart; Wong, Brian J F [Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2003-01-07

    Cartilage laser thermoforming (CLT) is a new surgical procedure that allows in situ treatment of deformities in the head and neck with less morbidity than traditional approaches. While some animal and human studies have shown promising results, the clinical feasibility of CLT depends on preservation of chondrocyte viability, which has not been extensively studied. The present paper characterizes cellular damage due to heat in rabbit nasal cartilage. Damage was modelled as a first order rate process for which two experimentally derived coefficients, A=1.2x10{sup 70} s{sup -1} and E{sub a}=4.5x10{sup 5} J mole{sup -1}, were determined by quantifying the decrease in concentration of healthy chondrocytes in tissue samples as a function of exposure time to constant-temperature water baths. After immersion, chondrocytes were enzymatically isolated from the matrix and stained with a two-component fluorescent dye. The dye binds nuclear DNA differentially depending upon chondrocyte viability. A flow cytometer was used to detect differential cell fluorescence to determine the percentage of live and dead cells in each sample. As a result, a damage kinetic model was obtained that can be used to predict the onset, extent and severity of cellular injury to thermal exposure.

  15. Facilitating cartilage volume measurement using MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maataoui, Adel, E-mail: adel.maataoui@gmx.d [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Gurung, Jessen, E-mail: jessen.gurung@gmx.d [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Ackermann, Hanns, E-mail: h.ackermann@add.uni-frankfurt.d [Institute for Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Abolmaali, Nasreddin [Biological and Molecular Imaging, ZIK OncoRay - Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, TU Dresden, Fetscherstrasse 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Kafchitsas, Konstantinos [Department of Orthopedics and Orthopedic Surgery, Johannes Gutenberg University, Langenbeckstrasse 1, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Vogl, Thomas J., E-mail: t.vogl@em.uni-frankfurt.d [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Khan, M. Fawad, E-mail: fawad@gmx.d [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: To compare quantitative cartilage volume measurement (CVM) using different slice thicknesses. Materials and methods: Ten knees were scanned with a 1.5 T MRI (Sonata, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) using a 3D gradient echo sequence (FLASH, fast low-angle shot). Cartilage volume of the medial and lateral tibial plateau was measured by two independent readers in 1.5 mm, 3.0 mm and 5.0 mm slices using the Argus software application. Accuracy and time effectiveness served as control parameters. Results: Determining cartilage volume, time for calculation diminished for the lateral tibial plateau from 384.6 {+-} 127.7 s and 379.1 {+-} 117.6 s to 214.9 {+-} 109.9 s and 213.9 {+-} 102.2 s to 122.1 {+-} 60.1 s and 126.8 {+-} 56.2 s and for the medial tibial plateau from 465.0 {+-} 147.7 s and 461.8 {+-} 142.7 s to 214.0 {+-} 67.9 s and 208.9 {+-} 66.2 s to 132.6 {+-} 41.5 s and 130.6 {+-} 42.0 s measuring 1.5 mm, 3 mm and 5 mm slices, respectively. No statistically significant difference between cartilage volume measurements was observed (p > 0.05) while very good inter-reader correlation was evaluated. Conclusion: CVM using 1.5 mm slices provides no higher accuracy than cartilage volume measurement in 5 mm slices while an overall time saving up to 70% is possible.

  16. 人真皮成纤维细胞体外构建组织工程化软骨的初步探索%Preliminary study on tissue-engineered cartilage with human dermal fibroblasts co-cultured with porcine chondrocytes in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘霞; 周广东; 刘伟; 曹谊林

    2009-01-01

    Objective To explore the feasibility of constructing tissue-engineered cartilage with human dermal fibroblasts(HDFs)in vitro. Methods Porcine articular chondrocytes and HDFs were isolated and in vitro expanded respectively. Then they were mixed at the ratio of 1:1 (chondrocytes: fibroblasts). The mixed cells were seeded onto polyglycolic acid(PGA)scaffold at the ultimate concentration of 5.0×10~7/ml as co-culture group.Chondrocytes and HDFs at the same ultimate concentration were seeded respectively onto the scaffold as chondrocyte group (positive control group)and fibroblast group(negative control group). The specimens were collected after in vitro culture for 8 weeks. Gross observation, histology and immunohistochemistry were used to evaluate the results. Results In chondrocyte group, the cell-scaffold constructs could maintain the original size and shape during in vitro culture. The new formed cartilage-like tissue had typical histological structure and extracellular matrix staining similar to normal cartilage. In co-culture group the constructs shrunk slightly at 8 weeks, cartilage-like tissue formed and GAG could be detected for strong expression by Safranin O staining.Furthermore, using the specific identification, a few HDFs derived cells were found to form lacuna structure at the peripheral area of cartilage-like tissue. In fibroblast group, the constructs deformed and shrunk gradually without mature cartilage lacuna in histology. Conclusion The 3D-co-culture system can effectively induce the differenciation of HDFs to chondrocytes. The tissue-engineered cartilage can be constructed in vitro with the 3D-co-culture system.%目的 利用软骨细胞提供的体外软骨诱导微环境,探讨人真皮成纤维细胞在体外构建软骨的可行性.方法 分别培养猪的软骨细胞与人真皮成纤维细胞,将2种细胞按1:1(软骨细胞:成纤维细胞)比例混匀,以5.0×10~7/ml的终浓度接种于聚羟基乙酸支架(PGA,直径9 mm,高2mm)作为

  17. Accuracy of 3D cartilage models generated from MR images is dependent on cartilage thickness: laser scanner based validation of in vivo cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Seungbum; Giori, Nicholas J; Gold, Garry E; Dyrby, Chris O; Andriacchi, Thomas P

    2009-12-01

    Cartilage morphology change is an important biomarker for the progression of osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of in vivo cartilage thickness measurements from MR image-based 3D cartilage models using a laser scanning method and to test if the accuracy changes with cartilage thickness. Three-dimensional tibial cartilage models were created from MR images (in-plane resolution of 0.55 mm and thickness of 1.5 mm) of osteoarthritic knees of ten patients prior to total knee replacement surgery using a semi-automated B-spline segmentation algorithm. Following surgery, the resected tibial plateaus were laser scanned and made into 3D models. The MR image and laser-scan based models were registered to each other using a shape matching technique. The thicknesses were compared point wise for the overall surface. The linear mixed-effects model was used for statistical test. On average, taking account of individual variations, the thickness measurements in MRI were overestimated in thinner (<2.5 mm) regions. The cartilage thicker than 2.5 mm was accurately predicted in MRI, though the thick cartilage in the central regions was underestimated. The accuracy of thickness measurements in the MRI-derived cartilage models systemically varied according to native cartilage thickness.

  18. Hydrogels as a Replacement Material for Damaged Articular Hyaline Cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte M. Beddoes

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyaline cartilage is a strong durable material that lubricates joint movement. Due to its avascular structure, cartilage has a poor self-healing ability, thus, a challenge in joint recovery. When severely damaged, cartilage may need to be replaced. However, currently we are unable to replicate the hyaline cartilage, and as such, alternative materials with considerably different properties are used. This results in undesirable side effects, including inadequate lubrication, wear debris, wear of the opposing articular cartilage, and weakening of the surrounding tissue. With the number of surgeries for cartilage repair increasing, a need for materials that can better mimic cartilage, and support the surrounding material in its typical function, is becoming evident. Here, we present a brief overview of the structure and properties of the hyaline cartilage and the current methods for cartilage repair. We then highlight some of the alternative materials under development as potential methods of repair; this is followed by an overview of the development of tough hydrogels. In particular, double network (DN hydrogels are a promising replacement material, with continually improving physical properties. These hydrogels are coming closer to replicating the strength and toughness of the hyaline cartilage, while offering excellent lubrication. We conclude by highlighting several different methods of integrating replacement materials with the native joint to ensure stability and optimal behaviour.

  19. NONLINEAR SPECTRAL IMAGING OF ELASTIC CARTILAGE IN RABBIT EARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JING CHEN

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Elastic cartilage in the rabbit external ear is an important animal model with attractive potential value for researching the physiological and pathological states of cartilages especially during wound healing. In this work, nonlinear optical microscopy based on two-photon excited fluorescence and second harmonic generation were employed for imaging and quantifying the intact elastic cartilage. The morphology and distribution of main components in elastic cartilage including cartilage cells, collagen and elastic fibers were clearly observed from the high-resolution two-dimensional nonlinear optical images. The areas of cell nuclei, a parameter related to the pathological changes of normal or abnormal elastic cartilage, can be easily quantified. Moreover, the three-dimensional structure of chondrocytes and matrix were displayed by constructing three-dimensional image of cartilage tissue. At last, the emission spectra from cartilage were obtained and analyzed. We found that the different ratio of collagen over elastic fibers can be used to locate the observed position in the elastic cartilage. The redox ratio based on the ratio of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH over flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD fluorescence can also be calculated to analyze the metabolic state of chondrocytes in different regions. Our results demonstrated that this technique has the potential to provide more accurate and comprehensive information for the physiological states of elastic cartilage.

  20. Mechanical properties of hyaline and repair cartilage studied by nanoindentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, O; Durst, K; Maier, V; Göken, M; Birkholz, T; Schneider, H; Hennig, F; Gelse, K

    2007-11-01

    Articular cartilage is a highly organized tissue that is well adapted to the functional demands in joints but difficult to replicate via tissue engineering or regeneration. Its viscoelastic properties allow cartilage to adapt to both slow and rapid mechanical loading. Several cartilage repair strategies that aim to restore tissue and protect it from further degeneration have been introduced. The key to their success is the quality of the newly formed tissue. In this study, periosteal cells loaded on a scaffold were used to repair large partial-thickness cartilage defects in the knee joint of miniature pigs. The repair cartilage was analyzed 26 weeks after surgery and compared both morphologically and mechanically with healthy hyaline cartilage. Contact stiffness, reduced modulus and hardness as key mechanical properties were examined in vitro by nanoindentation in phosphate-buffered saline at room temperature. In addition, the influence of tissue fixation with paraformaldehyde on the biomechanical properties was investigated. Although the repair process resulted in the formation of a stable fibrocartilaginous tissue, its contact stiffness was lower than that of hyaline cartilage by a factor of 10. Fixation with paraformaldehyde significantly increased the stiffness of cartilaginous tissue by one order of magnitude, and therefore, should not be used when studying biomechanical properties of cartilage. Our study suggests a sensitive method for measuring the contact stiffness of articular cartilage and demonstrates the importance of mechanical analysis for proper evaluation of the success of cartilage repair strategies.

  1. Cartilage issues in football—today's problems and tomorrow's solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mithoefer, Kai; Peterson, Lars; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy; Mandelbaum, Bert R

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage injury is prevalent in football players and results from chronic joint stress or acute traumatic injuries. Articular cartilage injury can often result in progressive painful impairment of joint function and limit sports participation. Management of articular cartilage injury in athletes aims to return the player to competition, and requires effective and durable joint surface restoration that resembles normal hyaline articular cartilage that can withstand the high joint stresses of football. Existing articular cartilage repair techniques can return the athlete with articular cartilage injury to high-impact sports, but treatment does not produce normal articular cartilage, and this limits the success rate and durability of current cartilage repair in athletes. Novel scientific concepts and treatment techniques that apply modern tissue engineering technologies promise further advancement in the treatment of these challenging injuries in the high demand athletic population. We review the current knowledge of cartilage injury pathophysiology, epidemiology and aetiology, and outline existing management algorithms, developing treatment options and future strategies to manage articular cartilage injuries in football players. PMID:25878075

  2. BMP receptor signaling is required for postnatal maintenance of articular cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan B Rountree

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage plays an essential role in health and mobility, but is frequently damaged or lost in millions of people that develop arthritis. The molecular mechanisms that create and maintain this thin layer of cartilage that covers the surface of bones in joint regions are poorly understood, in part because tools to manipulate gene expression specifically in this tissue have not been available. Here we use regulatory information from the mouse Gdf5 gene (a bone morphogenetic protein [BMP] family member to develop new mouse lines that can be used to either activate or inactivate genes specifically in developing joints. Expression of Cre recombinase from Gdf5 bacterial artificial chromosome clones leads to specific activation or inactivation of floxed target genes in developing joints, including early joint interzones, adult articular cartilage, and the joint capsule. We have used this system to test the role of BMP receptor signaling in joint development. Mice with null mutations in Bmpr1a are known to die early in embryogenesis with multiple defects. However, combining a floxed Bmpr1a allele with the Gdf5-Cre driver bypasses this embryonic lethality, and leads to birth and postnatal development of mice missing the Bmpr1a gene in articular regions. Most joints in the body form normally in the absence of Bmpr1a receptor function. However, articular cartilage within the joints gradually wears away in receptor-deficient mice after birth in a process resembling human osteoarthritis. Gdf5-Cre mice provide a general system that can be used to test the role of genes in articular regions. BMP receptor signaling is required not only for early development and creation of multiple tissues, but also for ongoing maintenance of articular cartilage after birth. Genetic variation in the strength of BMP receptor signaling may be an important risk factor in human osteoarthritis, and treatments that mimic or augment BMP receptor signaling should be

  3. Sodium and T1rho MRI for molecular and diagnostic imaging of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borthakur, Arijitt; Mellon, Eric; Niyogi, Sampreet; Witschey, Walter; Kneeland, J Bruce; Reddy, Ravinder

    2006-11-01

    In this article, both sodium magnetic resonance (MR) and T1rho relaxation mapping aimed at measuring molecular changes in cartilage for the diagnostic imaging of osteoarthritis are reviewed. First, an introduction to structure of cartilage, its degeneration in osteoarthritis (OA) and an outline of diagnostic imaging methods in quantifying molecular changes and early diagnostic aspects of cartilage degeneration are described. The sodium MRI section begins with a brief overview of the theory of sodium NMR of biological tissues and is followed by a section on multiple quantum filters that can be used to quantify both bi-exponential relaxation and residual quadrupolar interaction. Specifically, (i) the rationale behind the use of sodium MRI in quantifying proteoglycan (PG) changes, (ii) validation studies using biochemical assays, (iii) studies on human OA specimens, (iv) results on animal models and (v) clinical imaging protocols are reviewed. Results demonstrating the feasibility of quantifying PG in OA patients and comparison with that in healthy subjects are also presented. The section concludes with the discussion of advantages and potential issues with sodium MRI and the impact of new technological advancements (e.g. ultra-high field scanners and parallel imaging methods). In the theory section on T1rho, a brief description of (i) principles of measuring T1rho relaxation, (ii) pulse sequences for computing T1rho relaxation maps, (iii) issues regarding radio frequency power deposition, (iv) mechanisms that contribute to T1rho in biological tissues and (v) effects of exchange and dipolar interaction on T1rho dispersion are discussed. Correlation of T1rho relaxation rate with macromolecular content and biomechanical properties in cartilage specimens subjected to trypsin and cytokine-induced glycosaminoglycan depletion and validation against biochemical assay and histopathology are presented. Experimental T1rho data from osteoarthritic specimens, animal models

  4. Meckel's and condylar cartilages anomalies in achondroplasia result in defective development and growth of the mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biosse Duplan, Martin; Komla-Ebri, Davide; Heuzé, Yann; Estibals, Valentin; Gaudas, Emilie; Kaci, Nabil; Benoist-Lasselin, Catherine; Zerah, Michel; Kramer, Ina; Kneissel, Michaela; Porta, Diana Grauss; Di Rocco, Federico; Legeai-Mallet, Laurence

    2016-07-15

    Activating FGFR3 mutations in human result in achondroplasia (ACH), the most frequent form of dwarfism, where cartilages are severely disturbed causing long bones, cranial base and vertebrae defects. Because mandibular development and growth rely on cartilages that guide or directly participate to the ossification process, we investigated the impact of FGFR3 mutations on mandibular shape, size and position. By using CT scan imaging of ACH children and by analyzing Fgfr3(Y367C/+) mice, a model of ACH, we show that FGFR3 gain-of-function mutations lead to structural anomalies of primary (Meckel's) and secondary (condylar) cartilages of the mandible, resulting in mandibular hypoplasia and dysmorphogenesis. These defects are likely related to a defective chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation and pan-FGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor NVP-BGJ398 corrects Meckel's and condylar cartilages defects ex vivo. Moreover, we show that low dose of NVP-BGJ398 improves in vivo condyle growth and corrects dysmorphologies in Fgfr3(Y367C/+) mice, suggesting that postnatal treatment with NVP-BGJ398 mice might offer a new therapeutic strategy to improve mandible anomalies in ACH and others FGFR3-related disorders. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  5. THE USE OF SHARK CARTILAGE EXTRACTS IN POSSIBLE THERAPIES AGAINST CANCER: AREVIEW

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    Gláuber Fernando Ratzkob

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to discuss the use of extracts derived from shark cartilage in potential cancer therapies. This is a literature review based on literature by consulting the scientific articles selected in the Medline, Scopus and DOAJ database. Twenty-seven articles were included after applying the inclusion and not inclusion criteria established by the authors. The selected studies revealed that ther are some extracts derived from shark cartilage with anticancer properties. These properties are mostly related to the blockade of angiogenesis and some extracts also have action on the immune system and inhibition of metastases. The best known shark cartilage extract is the formulation of Neovastat® (AE-941, which was successful in studies conducted in the laboratory, but failed in clinical trials in humans, and therefore ceased to be developed in 2007. Nevertheless, yetmany extracts are under review, and these studies will be important to confirm or not the feasibility and applicability of the use of shark cartilage extracts in the treatment of cancer.

  6. A cadaveric analysis of contact stress restoration after osteochondral transplantation of a cylindrical cartilage defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, Niels B; Smolders, José M H; van Susante, Job L C; Buma, Pieter; van Kampen, Albert; Verdonschot, Nico

    2008-05-01

    Osteochondral transplantation is a successful treatment for full-thickness cartilage defects, which without treatment would lead to early osteoarthritis. Restoration of surface congruency and stability of the reconstruction may be jeopardized by early mobilization. To investigate the biomechanical effectiveness of osteochondral transplantation, we performed a standardized osteochondral transplantation in eight intact human cadaver knees, using three cylindrical plugs on a full-thickness cartilage defect, bottomed on one condyle, unbottomed on the contralateral condyle. Surface pressure measurements with Tekscan pressure transducers were performed after five conditions. In the presence of a defect the border contact pressure of the articular cartilage defect significantly increased to 192% as compared to the initially intact joint surface. This was partially restored with osteochondral transplantation (mosaicplasty), as the rim stress subsequently decreased to 135% of the preoperative value. Following weight bearing motion two out of eight unbottomed mosaicplasties showed subsidence of the plugs according to Tekscan measurements. This study demonstrates that a three-plug mosaicplasty is effective in restoring the increased border contact pressure of a cartilage defect, which may postpone the development of early osteoarthritis. Unbottomed mosaicplasties may be more susceptible for subsidence below flush level after (unintended) weight bearing motion.

  7. Macrophage phagocytosis alters the MRI signal of ferumoxytol-labeled mesenchymal stromal cells in cartilage defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejadnik, Hossein; Lenkov, Olga; Gassert, Florian; Fretwell, Deborah; Lam, Isaac; Daldrup-Link, Heike E.

    2016-05-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are a promising tool for cartilage regeneration in arthritic joints. hMSC labeling with iron oxide nanoparticles enables non-invasive in vivo monitoring of transplanted cells in cartilage defects with MR imaging. Since graft failure leads to macrophage phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, we evaluated in vitro and in vivo whether nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs show distinct MR signal characteristics before and after phagocytosis by macrophages. We found that apoptotic nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs were phagocytosed by macrophages while viable nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs were not. Serial MRI scans of hMSC transplants in arthritic joints of recipient rats showed that the iron signal of apoptotic, nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs engulfed by macrophages disappeared faster compared to viable hMSCs. This corresponded to poor cartilage repair outcomes of the apoptotic hMSC transplants. Therefore, rapid decline of iron MRI signal at the transplant site can indicate cell death and predict incomplete defect repair weeks later. Currently, hMSC graft failure can be only diagnosed by lack of cartilage defect repair several months after cell transplantation. The described imaging signs can diagnose hMSC transplant failure more readily, which could enable timely re-interventions and avoid unnecessary follow up studies of lost transplants.

  8. Cartilage damage involving extrusion of mineralisable matrix from the articular calcified cartilage and subchondral bone

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    A Boyde

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Arthropathy of the distal articular surfaces of the third metacarpal (Mc3 and metatarsal (Mt3 bones in the Thoroughbred racehorse (Tb is a natural model of repetitive overload arthrosis. We describe a novel pathology that affects the articular calcified cartilage (ACC and subchondral bone (SCB and which is associated with hyaline articular cartilage degeneration.Parasagittal slices cut from the palmar quadrant of the distal condyles of the left Mc3/Mt3 of 39 trained Tbs euthanased for welfare reasons were imaged by point projection microradiography, and backscattered electron (BSE scanning electron microscopy (SEM, light microscopy, and confocal scanning light microscopy. Mechanical properties were studied by nanoindentation. Data on the horses' training and racing career were also collected.Highly mineralised projections were observed extending from cracks in the ACC mineralising front into the hyaline articular cartilage (HAC up to two-thirds the thickness of the HAC, and were associated with focal HAC surface fibrillation directly overlying their site. Nanoindentation identified this extruded matrix to be stiffer than any other mineralised phase in the specimen by a factor of two. The presence of projections was associated with a higher cartilage Mankin histology score (P < 0.02 and increased amounts of gross cartilage loss pathologically on the condyle (P < 0.02. Presence of projections was not significantly associated with: total number of racing seasons, age of horse, amount of earnings, number of days in training, total distance galloped in career, or presence of wear lines.

  9. Modified technique to increase nostril cross-sectional area after using rib and septal cartilage graft over alar nasal cartilages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulkan, Marcelo; Sá, Alvaro Julio de Andrade; Alonso, Nivaldo

    2012-10-01

    Describe a modified technique to increase nostril cross-sectional area using rib and septal cartilage graft over alar nasal cartilages. A modified surgical technique was used to obtain, carve and insert cartilage grafts over alar nasal cartilages. This study used standardized pictures and measured 90 cadaveric nostril cross-sectional area using Autocad(®); 30 were taken before any procedure and 60 were taken after grafts over lateral crura (30 using costal cartilage and 30 using septal cartilage). Statistical analysis were assessed using a model for repeated measures and ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) for the variable "area". There's statistical evidence that rib cartilage graft is more effective than septal cartilage graft. The mean area after the insertion of septal cartilage graft is smaller than the mean area under rib graft treatment (no confidence interval for mean difference contains the zero value and all P-values are below the significance level of 5%). The technique presented is applicable to increase nostril cross section area in cadavers. This modified technique revealed to enhance more nostril cross section area with costal cartilage graft over lateral crura rather than by septal graft.

  10. Cartilage stem cells: regulation of differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solursh, M

    1989-01-01

    The developing limb bud is a useful source of cartilage stem cells for studies on the regulation of chondrogenesis. In high density cultures these cells can progress through all stages of chondrogenesis to produce mineralized hypertrophic cartilage. If the cells are maintained in a spherical shape, single stem cells can progress through a similar sequence. The actin cytoskeleton is implicated in the regulation of chondrogenesis since conditions that favor its disruption promote chondrogenesis and conditions that favor actin assembly inhibit chondrogenesis. Since a number of extracellular matrix receptors mediate effects of the extracellular matrix on cytoskeletal organization and some of these receptors are developmentally regulated, it is proposed that matrix receptor expression plays a central role in the divergence of connective tissue cells during development.

  11. Expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 2 alpha and vascular endothelial growth factor in chondrocytes of articular cartilages in human osteoarthritis%骨关节炎关节软骨细胞中低氧诱导因子2α及血管内皮生长因子的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丰; 彭昊; 周建林; 方洪松; 邓爽; 杨骁; 翁金清

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Studies have found that vascular endothelial growth factor and hypoxia inducible factor are involved in the development process of osteoarthritis, but their correlation is rarely reported. OBJECTIVE:To observe the expression and correlation of hypoxia inducible factor-2α and vascular endothelial growth factor in chondrocytes of articular cartilages in human osteoarthritis. METHODS: Articular cartilage specimens were colected from 50 patients with knee osteoarthritis undergoing total knee joint replacement. According to the joint Kelgren-Lawrance (K-L) X-ray grouping classification standard, there were 18 cases of K-LIII level and 32 cases of K-LIV level. Besides, articular cartilage specimens from 10 patients undergoing amputation for legs tumor or traffic accident served as control group. Hematoxylin-eosin staining, Safranin O-Fast Green staining and Mankin scoring were performed to observe and evaluate the histological characteristics of articular cartilages of each group, immunohistochemical staining was conducted to detect the expression of hypoxia inducible factor-2α and vascular endothelial growth factor in chondrocytes of articular cartilages, and their correlations were analyzed. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:The Mankin score of K-LIV group was significantly higher than those of K-LIII group and control group. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the number of chondrocytes with positive expression of hypoxia inducible factor-2α or vascular endothelial growth factor in K-LIV group was significantly higher than that in K-LIII group and control group (P < 0.05). The expression of hypoxia inducible factor-2α and vascular endothelial growth factor increased in chondrocytes of articular cartilages of osteoarthritis patients, and to up-regulate the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor may be the regulatory mechanism of hypoxia inducible factor-2αinthe pathogenesis of osteoarthritis.%背景:已有研究发现血管内皮生长因子

  12. The Effect of Spaceflight on Cartilage Cell Cycle and Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Stephen B.; Stiner, Dalina; Telford, William G.

    2000-01-01

    In vivo studies have shown that spaceflight results in loss of bone and muscle. In an effort to understand the mechanisms of these changes, cell cultures of cartilage, bone and muscle have been subjected to spaceflight to study the microgravity effects on differentiated cells. However it now seems possible that the cell differentiation process itself may be the event(s) most affected by spaceflight. For example, osteoblast-like cells have been shown to have reduced cellular activity in microgravity due to an underdifferentiated state (Carmeliet, et al, 1997). And reduced human lymphocyte growth in spaceflight was related to increased apoptosis (Lewis, et al, 1998). Which brings us to the question of whether reduced cellular activity in space is due to an effect on the differentiated cell, an effect on the cell cycle and cell proliferation, or an effect on cell death. This question has not been specifically addressed on previous flights and was the question behind die present study.

  13. Inflammatory pseudotumoural endotracheal mucormycosis with cartilage damage

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    L-C. Luo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is a rare opportunistic infection usually associated with immunosuppression, diabetes mellitus or haematological malignancy. Herein, we report an unusual case of mucormycosis in a 46-yr-old male patient with diabetes presenting with an endotracheal mass obstructing the trachea and cartilage damage. Histological examination of the bronchoscopy biopsy specimens revealed invasive mucormycosis. The patient was treated with intravenous amphotericin B followed by removal of the lesion via bronchoscopy.

  14. Lipid Transport and Metabolism in Healthy and Osteoarthritic Cartilage

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    Gabriel Herrero-Beaumont

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage is an avascular tissue and cartilage metabolism depends on molecule diffusion from synovial fluid and subchondral bone. Thus, nutrient availability is limited by matrix permeability according to the size and charge of the molecules. Matrix composition limits the access of molecules to chondrocytes, determining cell metabolism and cartilage maintenance. Lipids are important nutrients in chondrocyte metabolism and are available for these cells through de novo synthesis but also through diffusion from surrounding tissues. Cartilage status and osteoarthritis development depend on lipid availability. This paper reviews lipid transport and metabolism in cartilage. We also analyze signalling pathways directly mediated by lipids and those that involve mTOR pathways, both in normal and osteoarthritic cartilage.

  15. A PURE STRAIN OF CARTILAGE CELLS IN VITRO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, A

    1922-09-30

    1. A strain of cartilage cells, obtained from the pars cartilago sclerae of the eye of chick embryos, has been cultivated for more than 3 months in vitro. 2. The initial growth of the cartilage was possible only on the free surface of the coagulum. 3. The hyaline substance disappeared during cultivation in vitro. The succeeding stages of a transformation from small, lymphocyte-like cells into large, spindle-shaped cells were observed. The cartilage cells were spindle-shaped and grew in close contact, forming thin membranes. In surface-grown cartilage cells, the nucleus, usually containing one large nucleolus, stained less deeply than the cytoplasm. 4. The rate of growth of cartilage was slower than that of fibroblasts and epithelium. After cultivation on the surface of the coagulum, the cartilage cells could multiply even when embedded in the coagulum. But their growth was less extensive and uniform.

  16. Inhomogeneous cartilage properties enhance superficial interstitial fluid support and frictional properties, but do not provide a homogeneous state of stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Park, Seonghun; Eckstein, Felix; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2003-10-01

    It has been well established that articular cartilage is compositionally and mechanically inhomogenous through its depth. To what extent this structural inhomogeneity is a prerequisite for appropriate cartilage function and integrity is not well understood. The first hypothesis to be tested in this study was that the depth-dependent inhomogeneity of the cartilage acts to maximize the interstitial fluid load support at the articular surface, to provide efficient frictional and wear properties. The second hypothesis was that the inhomogeneity produces a more homogeneous state of elastic stress in the matrix than would be achieved with uniform properties. We have, for the first time, simultaneously determined depth-dependent tensile and compressive properties of human patellofemoral cartilage from unconfined compression stress relaxation tests. The results show that the tensile modulus increases significantly from 4.1 +/- 1.9 MPa in the deep zone to 8.3 +/- 3.7 MPa at the superficial zone, while the compressive modulus decreases from 0.73 +/- 0.26 MPa to 0.28 +/- 0.16 MPa. The experimental measurements were then implemented with the finite-element method to compute the response of an inhomogeneous and homogeneous cartilage layer to loading. The finite-element models demonstrate that structural inhomogeneity acts to increase the interstitial fluid load support at the articular surface. However, the state of stress, strain, or strain energy density in the solid matrix remained inhomogeneous through the depth of the articular layer, whether or not inhomogeneous material properties were employed. We suggest that increased fluid load support at the articular surface enhances the frictional and wear properties of articular cartilage, but that the tissue is not functionally adapted to produce homogeneous stress, strain, or strain energy density distributions. Interstitial fluid pressurization, but not a homogeneous elastic stress distribution, appears thus to be a

  17. Technique and results of cartilage shield tympanoplasty

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    Sohil I Vadiya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Use of cartilage for repair of tympanic membrane is recommended by many otologists. The current study aims at evaluating results of cartilage shield tympanoplasty in terms of graft take up and hearing outcomes. Material and Methods: In the current study, cartilage shield tympanoplasty(CST is used in ears with high risk perforations of the tympanic membrane. A total of 40 ears were selected where type I CST was done in 30 ears and type III CST was done in 10 ears. Results: An average of 37.08 dB air bone gap(ABG was present in pre operative time and an average of 19.15 dB of ABG was observed at 6 months after the surgery with hearing gain of 17.28 dB on average was observed. Graft take up rate of 97.5% was observed. The technique is modified to make it easier and to minimize chances of lateralization of graft. Conclusion: The hearing results of this technique are comparable to other methods of tympanic membrane repair.

  18. Cartilage Engineering from Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goepfert, C.; Slobodianski, A.; Schilling, A. F.; Adamietz, P.; Pörtner, R.

    Mesenchymal progenitor cells known as multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells or mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been isolated from various tissues. Since they are able to differentiate along the mesenchymal lineages of cartilage and bone, they are regarded as promising sources for the treatment of skeletal defects. Tissue regeneration in the adult organism and in vitro engineering of tissues is hypothesized to follow the principles of embryogenesis. The embryonic development of the skeleton has been studied extensively with respect to the regulatory mechanisms governing morphogenesis, differentiation, and tissue formation. Various concepts have been designed for engineering tissues in vitro based on these developmental principles, most of them involving regulatory molecules such as growth factors or cytokines known to be the key regulators in developmental processes. Growth factors most commonly used for in vitro cultivation of cartilage tissue belong to the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family, the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) super-family, and the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) family. In this chapter, in vivo actions of members of these growth factors described in the literature are compared with in vitro concepts of cartilage engineering making use of these growth factors.

  19. Irradiated homologous costal cartilage for augmentation rhinoplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefkovits, G. (Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, NY (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Although the ideal reconstructive material for augmentation rhinoplasty continues to challenge plastic surgeons, there exists no report in the literature that confines the use of irradiated homologous costal cartilage, first reported by Dingman and Grabb in 1961, to dorsal nasal augmentation. The purpose of this paper is to present a retrospective analysis of the author's experience using irradiated homologous costal cartilage in augmentation rhinoplasty. Twenty-seven dorsal nasal augmentations were performed in 24 patients between 16 and 49 years of age with a follow-up ranging from 1 to 27 months. Good-to-excellent results were achieved in 83.3% (20 of 24). Poor results requiring revision were found in 16.7% (4 of 24). Complication rates included 7.4% infection (2 of 27) and 14.8% warping (4 of 27). The resorption rate was zero. These results compare favorably with other forms of nasal augmentation. Advantages and disadvantages of irradiated homologous costal cartilage are discussed.

  20. Shock Wave-Stimulated Periosteum for Cartilage Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0914 TITLE: Shock Wave-Stimulated Periosteum for Cartilage Repair PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...30Sep2010 – 1Dec2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Shock Wave-Stimulated Periosteum for Cartilage Repair 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0914 5b. GRANT NUMBER... shock wave (ESW)-stimulated periosteum improves cartilage repair when it is used as an autograft to fill a defect in the articular surface of goats. A

  1. Evaluation of early changes of cartilage biomarkers following arthroscopic meniscectomy in young Egyptian adults

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    Hamdy Khamis Koryem

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Cartilage volume loss by MRI combined with changes in cartilage matrix turnover detected by molecular biomarkers may reflect the initial changes associated with cartilage degeneration that account for early OA.

  2. Fascia versus cartilage graft in type I tympanoplasty: audiological outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo Yeon; Oh, Jung Ho; Lee, Hwan Ho

    2012-11-01

    Various materials such as fascia, perichondrium, and cartilage have been used for reconstruction of the tympanic membrane in middle ear surgery. Because of its stiffness, cartilage is resistant to resorption and retraction. However, cartilage grafts result in increased acoustic impedance, the main limitation to their use. The aim of this study was to compare the hearing results after cartilage tympanoplasty versus fascia tympanoplasty. This study included 114 patients without postoperative tympanic membrane perforation who underwent tympanoplasty type I between 2007 and 2010, 31 with fascia and 83 with cartilage. Preoperative and 1 year postoperative air-bone gap (ABG) and postoperative gain in ABG at frequencies of 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 kHz were assessed. Both groups were statically similar in terms of the severity of middle ear pathology and the preoperative hearing levels. Overall, postoperative successful hearing results showed 77.4% of the fascia group and 77.1% of the cartilage group. Mean postoperative gains in ABG were 9.70 dB for the fascia group and 9.78 dB for the cartilage group. These results demonstrate that hearing after cartilage tympanoplasty is comparable to that after fascia tympanoplasty. Although cartilage is the ideal grafting material in problematic cases, it may be used in less severe cases, such as in type I tympanoplasty, without fear of impairing hearing.

  3. Sonographic evaluation of femoral articular cartilage in the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung Hwan [College of Medicine, Hallym University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kong Keun Young; Chung, Hye Won; Choi, Young Ho; Song, Yeong Wook; Kang, Heung Sik [College of Medicine and the Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-06-01

    To investigate the usefulness of sonography for the evaluation of osteoarthritic articular cartilage. Ten asymptomatic volunteers and 20 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee underwent sonographic evaluation. For this, the knee was maintained of full flexion in order to expose the deep portion of femoral condylar cartilage. Both transverse and longitudinal scans were obtained in standardized planes. Sonographic images of the articular cartilages were analyzed in terms of surface sharpness, echogenicity and thickness, along with associated bone changes. Normal cartilages showed a clearly-defined surface, homogeneously low echogenicity and regular thickness. Among 20 patients, the findings for medial and lateral condyles, respectively, were as follows: poorly defined cartilage surface, 16 (80%) and ten (50%); increased echogenicity of cartilage, 17 (85%) and 16 (80%); cartilage thinning, 16 (80%) and 14 (70%) (two medial condyles demonstrated obvious cartilage thickening); the presence of thick subchondral hyperechoic bands, five (25%) and four (20%); the presence of osteophytes, 13 (65%) and 12 (60%). Sonography is a convenient and accurate modality for the evaluation of femoral articular cartilage. In particular, it can be useful for detecting early degenerative cartilaginous change and for studying such change during clinical follow-up. (author)

  4. Alteration of cartilage glycosaminoglycan protein acceptor by somatomedin and cortisol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgore, B S; McNatt, M L; Meador, S; Lee, J A; Hughes, E R; Elders, M J

    1979-02-01

    The effect of somatomedin and cortisol on embryonic chick cartilage in vitro indicates that somatomedin stimulates 35SO4 uptake while cortisol decreases it with no effect on glycosaminoglycan turnover. Xylosyltransferase activity is increased in crude fractions of somatomedin-treated cartilage but decreased in cortisol-treated cartilage. By using a Smith-degraded proteoglycan as an exogenous acceptor, xylosyltransferase activities from both treatments were equivalent, suggesting that the enzyme was not rate limiting. The results of xylosyltransferase assays conducted by mixing enzyme and endogenous acceptor from control, cortisol-treated and somatomedin-treated cartilage, suggest both effects to be at the level of the acceptor protein.

  5. Secondary cartilage revealed in a non-avian dinosaur embryo.

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    Alida M Bailleul

    Full Text Available The skull and jaws of extant birds possess secondary cartilage, a tissue that arises after bone formation during embryonic development at articulations, ligamentous and muscular insertions. Using histological analysis, we discovered secondary cartilage in a non-avian dinosaur embryo, Hypacrosaurus stebingeri (Ornithischia, Lambeosaurinae. This finding extends our previous report of secondary cartilage in post-hatching specimens of the same dinosaur species. It provides the first information on the ontogeny of avian and dinosaurian secondary cartilages, and further stresses their developmental similarities. Secondary cartilage was found in an embryonic dentary within a tooth socket where it is hypothesized to have arisen due to mechanical stresses generated during tooth formation. Two patterns were discerned: secondary cartilage is more restricted in location in this Hypacrosaurus embryo, than it is in Hypacrosaurus post-hatchlings; secondary cartilage occurs at far more sites in bird embryos and nestlings than in Hypacrosaurus. This suggests an increase in the number of sites of secondary cartilage during the evolution of birds. We hypothesize that secondary cartilage provided advantages in the fine manipulation of food and was selected over other types of tissues/articulations during the evolution of the highly specialized avian beak from the jaws of their dinosaurian ancestors.

  6. Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma with Invasion through Ear Cartilage

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    Julie Boisen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma of the ear represents a high-risk tumor location with an increased risk of metastasis and local tissue invasion. However, it is uncommon for these cancers to invade through nearby cartilage. Cartilage invasion is facilitated by matrix metalloproteases, specifically collagenase 3. We present the unusual case of a 76-year-old man with an auricular squamous cell carcinoma that exhibited full-thickness perforation of the scapha cartilage. Permanent sections through the eroded cartilage confirmed tumor invasion extending to the posterior ear skin.

  7. [Cartilage reshaping by laser in stomatology and maxillofacial surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordon, S

    2004-02-01

    The restoration of congenital and traumatic malformations of the head and neck, together with the defects resulting from the trauma of ablative surgery, continue to pose significant problems to surgeons. The post-operative results are not always satisfactory because of the difficulty of shaping the cartilage and because of the tendency of cartilage to return to its original shape. Better understanding of laser-cartilage interaction and the development of a specific instrumentation Lasers (CO2, Nd: YAG, Ho: YAG) has enabled ex situ and in situ cartilage reshaping. A recent clinical study has demonstrated that nondestructive laser irradiation can reshape septal deviations

  8. A peek into the possible future of management of articular cartilage injuries: gene therapy and scaffolds for cartilage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hubert T; Zaffagnini, Stefano; Mizuno, Shuichi; Abelow, Stephen; Safran, Marc R

    2006-10-01

    Two rapidly progressing areas of research will likely contribute to cartilage repair procedures in the foreseeable future: gene therapy and synthetic scaffolds. Gene therapy refers to the transfer of new genetic information to cells that contribute to the cartilage repair process. This approach allows for manipulation of cartilage repair at the cellular and molecular level. Scaffolds are the core technology for the next generation of autologous cartilage implantation procedures in which synthetic matrices are used in conjunction with chondrocytes. This approach can be improved further using bioreactor technologies to enhance the production of extracellular matrix proteins by chondrocytes seeded onto a scaffold. The resulting "neo-cartilage implant" matures within the bioreactor, and can then be used to fill cartilage defects.

  9. Effect of antibiotics on in vitro and in vivo avian cartilage degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, T L; Fulton, R M; Roberson, K D; Orth, M W

    2002-01-01

    Antibiotics are used in the livestock industry not only to treat disease but also to promote growth and increase feed efficiency in less than ideal sanitary conditions. However, certain antibiotic families utilized in the poultry industry have recently been found to adversely affect bone formation and cartilage metabolism in dogs, rats, and humans. Therefore, the first objective of this study was to determine if certain antibiotics used in the poultry industry would inhibit in vitro cartilage degradation. The second objective was to determine if the antibiotics found to inhibit in vitro cartilage degradation also induced tibial dyschondroplasia in growing broilers. Ten antibiotics were studied by an avian explant culture system that is designed to completely degrade tibiae over 16 days. Lincomycin, tylosin tartrate, gentamicin, erythromycin, and neomycin sulfate did not inhibit degradation at any concentration tested. Doxycycline (200 microg/ml), oxytetracycline (200 microg/ml), enrofloxacin (200 and 400 microg/ml), ceftiofur (400 microg/ml), and salinomycin (10 microg/ml) prevented complete cartilage degradation for up to 30 days in culture. Thus, some of the antibiotics did inhibit cartilage degradation in developing bone. Day-old chicks were then administered the five antibiotics at 25%, 100%, or 400% above their recommended dose levels and raised until 21 days of age. Thiram, a fungicide known to induce experimental tibial dyschondroplasia (TD), was given at 20 ppm. Birds were then killed by cervical dislocation, and each proximal tibiotarsus was visually examined for TD lesions. The results showed that none of these antibiotics significantly induced TD in growing boilers at any concentration tested, whereas birds given 20 ppm thiram had a 92% incidence rate.

  10. IL-1ß and BMPs - Interactive players of cartilage matrix degradation and regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Aigner

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Intact human adult articular cartilage is central for the functioning of the articulating joints. This largely depends on the integrity of its extracellular matrix, given the high loading forces during movements in particular in the weight-bearing joints. Unlike the first impression of a more or less static tissue, articular cartilage shows - albeit in the adult organism a slow - tissue turnover. Thus, one of the most important questions in osteoarthritis research is to understand the balance of catabolic and anabolic factors in articular cartilage as this is the key to understand the biology of cartilage maintenance and degeneration. Anabolic and catabolic pathways are very much intermingled in articular cartilage. The balance between anabolism and catabolism is titrated on numerous levels, starting from the mediator-synthesizing cells which express either catabolic or anabolic factors. Also, on the level of the effector cells (i.e. chondrocytes anabolic and catabolic gene expression compete for a balance of matrix homeostasis, namely the synthesis of matrix components and the expression and activation of matrix-degrading proteases. Also, there are multiple layers of intracellular cross-talks in between the anabolic and catabolic signalling pathways. Maybe the most important lesson from this overview is the notion that the anabolic-catabolic balance as such counts and not so much sufficient net anabolism or limited catabolism alone. Thus, it might be neither the aim of osteoarthritis therapy to foster anabolism nor to knock down catabolism, but the balance of anabolic-catabolic activities as a total might need proper titration and balancing.

  11. Of mice, men and elephants: the relation between articular cartilage thickness and body mass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jos Malda

    Full Text Available Mammalian articular cartilage serves diverse functions, including shock absorption, force transmission and enabling low-friction joint motion. These challenging requirements are met by the tissue's thickness combined with its highly specific extracellular matrix, consisting of a glycosaminoglycan-interspersed collagen fiber network that provides a unique combination of resilience and high compressive and shear resistance. It is unknown how this critical tissue deals with the challenges posed by increases in body mass. For this study, osteochondral cores were harvested post-mortem from the central sites of both medial and lateral femoral condyles of 58 different mammalian species ranging from 25 g (mouse to 4000 kg (African elephant. Joint size and cartilage thickness were measured and biochemical composition (glycosaminoclycan, collagen and DNA content and collagen cross-links densities were analyzed. Here, we show that cartilage thickness at the femoral condyle in the mammalian species investigated varies between 90 µm and 3000 µm and bears a negative allometric relationship to body mass, unlike the isometric scaling of the skeleton. Cellular density (as determined by DNA content decreases with increasing body mass, but gross biochemical composition is remarkably constant. This however need not affect life-long performance of the tissue in heavier mammals, due to relatively constant static compressive stresses, the zonal organization of the tissue and additional compensation by joint congruence, posture and activity pattern of larger mammals. These findings provide insight in the scaling of articular cartilage thickness with body weight, as well as in cartilage biochemical composition and cellularity across mammalian species. They underscore the need for the use of appropriate in vivo models in translational research aiming at human applications.

  12. Age-Independent Cartilage Generation for Synovium-Based Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunziker, Ernst B; Lippuner, Kurt; Keel, Marius J B; Shintani, Nahoko

    2015-07-01

    neoformed cartilage that is deposited after only 1 week within the outer juxtasynovial space would yield sufficient cells for ACI. Since the BMP-2-bearing patches would be implanted transcutaneously in humans, only one surgical or arthroscopic intervention would be called for. Moreover, most importantly, sufficient numbers of cells could be generated in patients of all ages.

  13. In-vivo study and histological examination of laser reshaping of cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sviridov, Alexander P.; Sobol, Emil N.; Bagratashvili, Victor N.; Omelchenko, Alexander I.; Ovchinnikov, Yuriy M.; Shekhter, Anatoliy B.; Svistushkin, Valeriy M.; Shinaev, Andrei A.; Nikiforova, G.; Jones, Nicholas

    1999-06-01

    The results of recent study of cartilage reshaping in vivo are reported. The ear cartilage of piglets of 8-12 weeks old have been reshaped in vivo using the radiation of a holmium laser. The stability of the shape and possible side effects have been examined during four months. Histological investigation shown that the healing of irradiated are could accompany by the regeneration of ear cartilage. Finally, elastic type cartilage has been transformed into fibrous cartilage or cartilage of hyaline type.

  14. The multicomponent phytopharmaceutical SKI306X inhibits in vitro cartilage degradation and the production of inflammatory mediators.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, A.; Hougee, S.; Faber, J.; Sanders, A.; Zuurman, C.; Smit, H.F.; Kraan, P.M. van der; Hoijer, M.A.; Garssen, J.

    2008-01-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that SKI306X, a purified preparation of three medicinal plants, relieves joint pain and improves functionality in osteoarthritis patients. To study the biological action of SKI306X, bovine cartilage explants and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were

  15. Effects of growth factors and glucosamine on porcine mandibular condylar cartilage cells and hyaline cartilage cells for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Limin; Detamore, Michael S

    2009-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condylar cartilage is a distinct cartilage that has both fibrocartilaginous and hyaline-like character, with a thin proliferative zone that separates the fibrocartilaginous fibrous zone at the surface from the hyaline-like mature and hypertrophic zones below. In this study, we compared the effects of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1), and glucosamine sulphate on porcine TMJ condylar cartilage and ankle cartilage cells in monolayer culture. In general, TMJ condylar cartilage cells proliferated faster than ankle cartilage cells, while ankle cells produced significantly greater amounts of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and collagen than TMJ condylar cartilage cells. IGF-I and bFGF were potent stimulators of TMJ cell proliferation, while no signals statistically outperformed controls for ankle cell proliferation. IGF-I was the most effective signal for GAG production with ankle cells, and the most potent upregulator of collagen synthesis for both cell types. Glucosamine sulphate promoted cell proliferation and biosynthesis at specific concentrations and outperformed growth factors in certain instances. In conclusion, hyaline cartilage cells had lower cell numbers and superior biosynthesis compared to TMJ condylar cartilage cells, and we have found IGF-I at 100 ng/mL and glucosamine sulphate at 100 microg/mL to be the most effective signals for these cells under the prescribed conditions.

  16. Cartilage Regeneration by Chondrogenic Induced Adult Stem Cells in Osteoarthritic Sheep Model: e98770

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chinedu C Ude; Shamsul B Sulaiman; Ng Min-Hwei; Chen Hui-Cheng; Johan Ahmad; Norhamdan M Yahaya; Aminuddin B Saim; Ruszymah B H Idrus

    2014-01-01

    ...), multipotent adult cells with the potentials for cartilage regenerations were induced to chondrogenic lineage and used for cartilage regenerations in surgically induced osteoarthritis in sheep model...

  17. Dietary 2-oxoglutarate mitigates gastrectomy-evoked structural changes in cartilage of female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowolski, Piotr; Tomaszewska, Ewa; Kurlak, Paulina; Pierzynowski, Stefan G

    2016-01-01

    Gastrectomy (Gx) leads to osteopenia/osteoporosis in humans and animals. However, little is known about the influence of Gx on the cartilage in this regard. Recent studies have demonstrated a protective effect of 2-oxoglutaric acid (2-Ox) on bone and cartilage. Hence, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether 2-Ox can mitigate eventual Gx-induced cartilage impairment. Twenty female Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to Gx and randomly divided into two groups: Gx + 2-Ox and Gx. Another 20 rats were sham-operated (ShO) and randomly divided into two groups: ShO + 2-Ox and ShO. The daily dose of 2-Ox administered to the rats in the drinking water was 0.43 g per 100 g rat. After eight weeks, rats were euthanized and femora and tibiae were collected. Histology and histomorphometry analyses of the articular cartilage and the growth plate were done. Gx resulted in a 32% (±44.5 femur, ±35.8 tibia) decrease in overall thickness of articular cartilage in both bones (femur: ShO 279.1 ± 48.5 vs. Gx 190.2 ± 38.4 µm, tibia: ShO 222.9 ± 50.3 µm vs. Gx 151.3 ± 52.6 µm) (in some zones up to 58 ± 28.0%), and in the growth plate up to 20% (±22.4) (femur: ShO 243.0 ± 34.0 vs. Gx 207.0 ± 33.7 µm, tibia: ShO 220.0 ± 24.6 µm vs. Gx 171.1 ± 16.1 µm). Gx altered the spatial distribution of thick and thin collagen fibers, and chondrocyte shape and size. 2-Ox administration prevented the reduction in both cartilages thickness (Gx + 2-Ox: articular cartilage 265.2 ± 53.8 µm, 235.6 ± 42.7 µm, growth plate 236.7 ± 39.2 µm, 191.3 ± 16.5 µm in femur and tibia, respectively), and abolished the spatial changes in collagen distribution and structure induced by Gx. Gx affects cartilage structure and thickness, however, 2-Ox administration mitigates these effects and showed protective and stimulatory properties. Our observations suggest that dietary 2-Ox can be used to offset

  18. FT-IR Microspectroscopy of Rat Ear Cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedicto de Campos Vidal

    Full Text Available Rat ear cartilage was studied using Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR microspectroscopy to expand the current knowledge which has been established for relatively more complex cartilage types. Comparison of the FT-IR spectra of the ear cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM with published data on articular cartilage, collagen II and 4-chondroitin-sulfate standards, as well as of collagen type I-containing dermal collagen bundles (CBs with collagen type II, was performed. Ear cartilage ECM glycosaminoglycans (GAGs were revealed histochemically and as a reduction in ECM FT-IR spectral band heights (1140-820 cm-1 after testicular hyaluronidase digestion. Although ear cartilage is less complex than articular cartilage, it contains ECM components with a macromolecular orientation as revealed using polarization microscopy. Collagen type II and GAGs, which play a structural role in the stereo-arrangement of the ear cartilage, contribute to its FT-IR spectrum. Similar to articular cartilage, ear cartilage showed that proteoglycans add a contribution to the collagen amide I spectral region, a finding that does not recommend this region for collagen type II quantification purposes. In contrast to articular cartilage, the symmetric stretching vibration of -SO3- groups at 1064 cm-1 appeared under-represented in the FT-IR spectral profile of ear cartilage. Because the band corresponding to the asymmetric stretching vibration of -SO3- groups (1236-1225 cm-1 overlapped with that of amide III bands, it is not recommended for evaluation of the -SO3- contribution to the FT-IR spectrum of the ear cartilage ECM. Instead, a peak (or shoulder at 1027-1016 cm-1 could be better considered for this intent. Amide I/amide II ratios as calculated here and data from the literature suggest that protein complexes of the ear cartilage ECM are arranged with a lower helical conformation compared to pure collagen II. The present results could motivate further studies on this tissue

  19. FT-IR Microspectroscopy of Rat Ear Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Benedicto de Campos; Mello, Maria Luiza S

    2016-01-01

    Rat ear cartilage was studied using Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy to expand the current knowledge which has been established for relatively more complex cartilage types. Comparison of the FT-IR spectra of the ear cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) with published data on articular cartilage, collagen II and 4-chondroitin-sulfate standards, as well as of collagen type I-containing dermal collagen bundles (CBs) with collagen type II, was performed. Ear cartilage ECM glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) were revealed histochemically and as a reduction in ECM FT-IR spectral band heights (1140-820 cm-1) after testicular hyaluronidase digestion. Although ear cartilage is less complex than articular cartilage, it contains ECM components with a macromolecular orientation as revealed using polarization microscopy. Collagen type II and GAGs, which play a structural role in the stereo-arrangement of the ear cartilage, contribute to its FT-IR spectrum. Similar to articular cartilage, ear cartilage showed that proteoglycans add a contribution to the collagen amide I spectral region, a finding that does not recommend this region for collagen type II quantification purposes. In contrast to articular cartilage, the symmetric stretching vibration of -SO3- groups at 1064 cm-1 appeared under-represented in the FT-IR spectral profile of ear cartilage. Because the band corresponding to the asymmetric stretching vibration of -SO3- groups (1236-1225 cm-1) overlapped with that of amide III bands, it is not recommended for evaluation of the -SO3- contribution to the FT-IR spectrum of the ear cartilage ECM. Instead, a peak (or shoulder) at 1027-1016 cm-1 could be better considered for this intent. Amide I/amide II ratios as calculated here and data from the literature suggest that protein complexes of the ear cartilage ECM are arranged with a lower helical conformation compared to pure collagen II. The present results could motivate further studies on this tissue under

  20. Prevention of Cartilage Degeneration and Restoration of Chondroprotection by Lubricin Tribosupplementation in the Rat Following ACL Transection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Gregory D.; Fleming, Braden C.; Watkins, Bryn A.; McHugh, Karen A.; Anderson, Scott C.; Zhang, Ling X.; Teeple, Erin; Waller, Kimberly A.; Elsaid, Khaled A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether cartilage degeneration is prevented or minimized in an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury rat model following intra-articular injections of lubricin derived from human synoviocytes in culture (HSL), recombinant protein (rhPRG4), or from human synovial fluids (HSFL). Methods Unilateral ACL transection (ACLT) was performed in Lewis rats (n=45). Intra-articular injections (50μl/injection) of PBS (n=9), HSL (n=9; 200μg/ml), rhPRG4 (n=9; 200μg/ml) and HSFL (n=9; 200μg/ml) started on day 7 post-injury and continued twice weekly. Animals were harvested on day 32 post-injury. Histological analysis was performed using Safranin O/Fast green stain and blinded investigators graded articular cartilage degeneration using OARSI modified Mankin criteria. Histological specimens were immunoprobed for lubricin and sulphated glycosaminoglycans. 24 hour urine collection was performed on days 17 and 29 post-injury and urinary CTXII (uCTXII) levels were measured. Results Treatment with HSL resulted in significantly (p<0.05) lower OARSI scores for cartilage degeneration compared to no treatment or PBS treatment. Increased immunostaining for lubricin in the superficial zone chondrocytes and on the surface of cartilage was observed in lubricins-treated but not untreated or PBS-treated joints. On day 17, uCTXII levels of HSL and HSFL-treated animals were significantly lower than untreated (p=0.005; p=0.002) and PBS-treated (p=0.002; p<0.001) animals, respectively. Conclusion Across all types of lubricin evaluated in this study, a reduction in cartilage damage following ACLT was evident, combined with a reduction in collagen type II degradation. Intraarticular lubricin injection following an ACL injury may be beneficial in retarding cartilage degeneration and development of post-traumatic OA. PMID:20506144

  1. Gellan gum: a new biomaterial for cartilage tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, J T; Martins, L; Picciochi, R; Malafaya, P B; Sousa, R A; Neves, N M; Mano, J F; Reis, R L

    2010-06-01

    Gellan gum is a polysaccharide manufactured by microbial fermentation of the Sphingomonas paucimobilis microorganism, being commonly used in the food and pharmaceutical industry. It can be dissolved in water, and when heated and mixed with mono or divalent cations, forms a gel upon lowering the temperature under mild conditions. In this work, gellan gum hydrogels were analyzed as cells supports in the context of cartilage regeneration. Gellan gum hydrogel discs were characterized in terms of mechanical and structural properties. Transmissionelectron microscopy revealed a quite homogeneous chain arrangement within the hydrogels matrix, and dynamic mechanical analysis allowed to characterize the hydrogels discs viscoelastic properties upon compression solicitation, being the compressive storage and loss modulus of approximately 40 kPa and 3 kPa, respectively, at a frequency of 1 Hz. Rheological measurements determined the sol-gel transition started to occur at approximately 36 degrees C, exhibiting a gelation time of approximately 11 s. Evaluation of the gellan gum hydrogels biological performance was performed using a standard MTS cytotoxicity test, which showed that the leachables released are not deleterious to the cells and hence were noncytotoxic. Gellan gum hydrogels were afterwards used to encapsulate human nasal chondrocytes (1 x 10(6) cells/mL) and culture them for total periods of 2 weeks. Cells viability was confirmed using confocal calcein AM staining. Histological observations revealed normal chondrocytes morphology and the obtained data supports the claim that this new biomaterial has the potential to serve as a cell support in the field of cartilage regeneration.

  2. Cartilage-inspired superelastic ultradurable graphene aerogels prepared by the selective gluing of intersheet joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jin-Yong; Yun, Sol; Wie, Jeong Jae; Zhang, Xu; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Kong, Jing; Park, Ho Seok

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we demonstrate a cartilage-inspired superelastic and ultradurable nanocomposite strategy for the selective inclusion of viscoelastic poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) into graphene sheet junctions to create effective stress-transfer pathways within three-dimensional (3D) graphene aerogels (GAs). Inspired by the joint architectures in the human body, where small amounts of soft cartilage connect stiff (or hard) but hollow (and thus lightweight) bones, the 3D internetworked GA@PDMS achieves synergistic toughening. The resulting GA@PDMS nanocomposites exhibit fully reversible structural deformations (99.8% recovery even at a 90% compressive strain) and high compressive mechanical strength (448.2 kPa at a compressive strain of 90%) at repeated compression cycles. Owing to the combination of excellent mechanical and electrical properties, the GA@PDMS nanocomposites are used as signal transducers for strain sensors, showing very short response and recovery times (in the millisecond range) with reliable sensitivity and extreme durability. Furthermore, the proposed system is applied to electronic scales with a large detectable weight of about 4600 times greater than its own weight. Such bio-inspired cartilage architecture opens the door to fabricate new 3D multifunctional and mechanically durable nanocomposites for emerging applications, which include sensors, actuators, and flexible devices.In this study, we demonstrate a cartilage-inspired superelastic and ultradurable nanocomposite strategy for the selective inclusion of viscoelastic poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) into graphene sheet junctions to create effective stress-transfer pathways within three-dimensional (3D) graphene aerogels (GAs). Inspired by the joint architectures in the human body, where small amounts of soft cartilage connect stiff (or hard) but hollow (and thus lightweight) bones, the 3D internetworked GA@PDMS achieves synergistic toughening. The resulting GA@PDMS nanocomposites exhibit fully

  3. THIONIN STAINING OF PARAFFIN AND PLASTIC EMBEDDED SECTIONS OF CARTILAGE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BULSTRA, SK; DRUKKER, J; KUIJER, R; BUURMAN, WA; VANDERLINDEN, AJ

    1993-01-01

    The usefulness of thionin for staining cartilage sections embedded in glycol methacrylate (GMA) and the effect of decalcification on cartilage sections embedded in paraffin and GMA were assessed. Short decalcification periods using 5% formic acid or 10% EDTA did not influence the staining properties

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage Repair: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trattnig, Siegfried; Winalski, Carl S; Marlovits, Stephan; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Welsch, Goetz H; Potter, Hollis G

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions are a common pathology of the knee joint, and many patients may benefit from cartilage repair surgeries that offer the chance to avoid the development of osteoarthritis or delay its progression. Cartilage repair surgery, no matter the technique, requires a noninvasive, standardized, and high-quality longitudinal method to assess the structure of the repair tissue. This goal is best fulfilled by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The present article provides an overview of the current state of the art of MRI of cartilage repair. In the first 2 sections, preclinical and clinical MRI of cartilage repair tissue are described with a focus on morphological depiction of cartilage and the use of functional (biochemical) MR methodologies for the visualization of the ultrastructure of cartilage repair. In the third section, a short overview is provided on the regulatory issues of the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) regarding MR follow-up studies of patients after cartilage repair surgeries.

  5. The Application of Polysaccharide Biocomposites to Repair Cartilage Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to own nature of articular cartilage, it almost has no self-healing ability once damaged. Despite lots of restore technologies having been raised in the past decades, no repair technology has smoothly substituted for damaged cartilage using regenerated cartilage tissue. The approach of tissue engineering opens a door to successfully repairing articular cartilage defects. For instance, grafting of isolated chondrocytes has huge clinical potential for restoration of cartilage tissue and cure of chondral injury. In this paper, SD rats are used as subjects in the experiments, and they are classified into three groups: natural repair (group A, hyaluronic acid repair (group B, and polysaccharide biocomposites repair (hyaluronic acid hydrogel containing chondrocytes, group C. Through the observation of effects of repairing articular cartilage defects, we concluded that cartilage repair effect of polysaccharide biocomposites was the best at every time point, and then the second best was hyaluronic acid repair; both of them were better than natural repair. Polysaccharide biocomposites have good biodegradability and high histocompatibility and promote chondrocytes survival, reproduction, and spliting. Moreover, polysaccharide biocomposites could not only provide the porous network structure but also carry chondrocytes. Consequently hyaluronic acid-based polysaccharide biocomposites are considered to be an ideal biological material for repairing articular cartilage.

  6. THIONIN STAINING OF PARAFFIN AND PLASTIC EMBEDDED SECTIONS OF CARTILAGE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BULSTRA, SK; DRUKKER, J; KUIJER, R; BUURMAN, WA; VANDERLINDEN, AJ

    The usefulness of thionin for staining cartilage sections embedded in glycol methacrylate (GMA) and the effect of decalcification on cartilage sections embedded in paraffin and GMA were assessed. Short decalcification periods using 5% formic acid or 10% EDTA did not influence the staining properties

  7. Particulate cartilage under bioreactor-induced compression and shear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Ning; Grad, Sibylle; Stoddart, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Our aim was to explore the effect of varying in vitro culture conditions on general chondrogenesis of minced cartilage (MC) fragments. METHODS: Minced, fibrin-associated, bovine articular cartilage fragments were cultured in vitro within polyurethane scaffold rings. Constructs were...

  8. Repair of osteochondral defects with allogeneic tissue engineered cartilage implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, R E; Ilten-Kirby, B M; Dunkelman, N S; Symons, K T; Rekettye, L M; Willoughby, J; Ratcliffe, A

    1999-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of allogeneic tissue engineered cartilage implants on healing of osteochondral defects. Rabbit chondrocytes were cultured in monolayer, then seeded onto biodegradable, three-dimensional polyglycolic acid meshes. Cartilage constructs were cultured hydrodynamically to yield tissue with relatively more (mature) or less (immature) hyalinelike cartilage, as compared with adult rabbit articular cartilage. Osteochondral defects in the patellar grooves of both stifle joints either were left untreated or implanted with allogeneic tissue engineered cartilage. Histologic samples from in and around the defect sites were examined 3, 6, 9, and 12, and 24 months after surgery. By 9 months after surgery, defects sites treated with cartilage implants contained significantly greater amounts of hyalinelike cartilage with high levels of proteoglycan, and had a smooth, nonfibrillated articular surface as compared to untreated defects. In contrast, the repair tissue formed in untreated defects had fibrillated articular surfaces, significant amounts of fibrocartilage, and negligible proteoglycan. These differences between treated and untreated defects persisted through 24 months after surgery. The results of this study suggest that the treatment of osteochondral lesions with allogenic tissue engineered cartilage implants may lead to superior repair tissue than that found in untreated osteochondral lesions.

  9. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein specific antibodies are pathogenic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geng, Hui; Nandakumar, Kutty Selva; Pramhed, Anna

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a major non-collagenous component of cartilage. Earlier, we developed a new mouse model for rheumatoid arthritis using COMP. This study was undertaken to investigate the epitope specificity and immunopathogenicity of COMP...

  10. A Novel Approach to Stimulate Cartilage Repair: Targeting Collagen Turnover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.M. Bastiaansen-Jenniskens (Yvonne)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractOA is a complex disease of which the ethiopathology is not completely known and therapies to repair cartilage are still under investigation. The increase of collagen type II expression in osteoarthritic cartilage suggests an activated repair mechanism that is however ineffective in

  11. Combined role of type IX collagen and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in cartilage matrix assembly: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein counteracts type IX collagen-induced limitation of cartilage collagen fibril growth in mouse chondrocyte cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blumbach, K.; Bastiaansen-Jenniskens, Y.M.; Groot, J. de; Paulsson, M.; Osch, G.J.V.M. van; Zaucke, F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Defects in the assembly and composition of cartilage extracellular matrix are likely to result in impaired matrix integrity and increased susceptibility to cartilage degeneration. The aim of this study was to determine the functional interaction of the collagen fibril-associated proteins

  12. Growth factor releasing scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sohier, Jerome

    2006-01-01

    Over the last century, life expectancy has increased at a rapid pace resulting in an increase of articular cartilage disorders. To solve this problem, extensive research is currently performed using tissue engineering approaches. Cartilage tissue engineering aims to reconstruct this tissue both stru

  13. Assessment of hyaline cartilage matrix composition using near infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palukuru, Uday P; McGoverin, Cushla M; Pleshko, Nancy

    2014-09-01

    Changes in the composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM) are characteristic of injury or disease in cartilage tissue. Various imaging modalities and biochemical techniques have been used to assess the changes in cartilage tissue but lack adequate sensitivity, or in the case of biochemical techniques, result in destruction of the sample. Fourier transform near infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy has shown promise for the study of cartilage composition. In the current study NIR spectroscopy was used to identify the contributions of individual components of cartilage in the NIR spectra by assessment of the major cartilage components, collagen and chondroitin sulfate, in pure component mixtures. The NIR spectra were obtained using homogenous pellets made by dilution with potassium bromide. A partial least squares (PLS) model was calculated to predict composition in bovine cartilage samples. Characteristic absorbance peaks between 4000 and 5000 cm(-1) could be attributed to components of cartilage, i.e. collagen and chondroitin sulfate. Prediction of the amount of collagen and chondroitin sulfate in tissues was possible within 8% (w/dw) of values obtained by gold standard biochemical assessment. These results support the use of NIR spectroscopy for in vitro and in vivo applications to assess matrix composition of cartilage tissues, especially when tissue destruction should be avoided. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Integrative studies on cartilage tissue engineering and joint homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, M.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of cartilage injury to the joint is often larger than the initial clinical symptoms suggest. Through an alteration in joint homeostasis and biomechanical loading, cartilage lesions may accelerate osteoarthritis onset. Although good clinical results are achieved in patients treated by the

  15. Autologous chondrocyte implantation: superior biologic properties of hyaline cartilage repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Ian; Lavigne, Patrick; Valenzuela, Herminio; Oakes, Barry

    2007-02-01

    Information regarding the quality of autologous chondrocyte implantation repair is needed to determine whether the current autologous chondrocyte implantation surgical technology and the subsequent biologic repair processes are capable of reliably forming durable hyaline or hyaline-like cartilage in vivo. We report and analyze the properties and qualities of autologous chondrocyte implantation repairs. We evaluated 66 autologous chondrocyte implantation repairs in 57 patients, 55 of whom had histology, indentometry, and International Cartilage Repair Society repair scoring at reoperation for mechanical symptoms or pain. International Knee Documentation Committee scores were used to address clinical outcome. Maximum stiffness, normalized stiffness, and International Cartilage Repair Society repair scoring were higher for hyaline articular cartilage repairs compared with fibrocartilage, with no difference in clinical outcome. Reoperations revealed 32 macroscopically abnormal repairs (Group B) and 23 knees with normal-looking repairs in which symptoms leading to arthroscopy were accounted for by other joint disorders (Group A). In Group A, 65% of repairs were either hyaline or hyaline-like cartilage compared with 28% in Group B. Autologous chondrocyte repairs composed of fibrocartilage showed more morphologic abnormalities and became symptomatic earlier than hyaline or hyaline-like cartilage repairs. The hyaline articular cartilage repairs had biomechanical properties comparable to surrounding cartilage and superior to those associated with fibrocartilage repairs.

  16. Combined role of type IX collagen and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in cartilage matrix assembly: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein counteracts type IX collagen-induced limitation of cartilage collagen fibril growth in mouse chondrocyte cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blumbach, K.; Bastiaansen-Jenniskens, Y.M.; Groot, J. de; Paulsson, M.; Osch, G.J.V.M. van; Zaucke, F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Defects in the assembly and composition of cartilage extracellular matrix are likely to result in impaired matrix integrity and increased susceptibility to cartilage degeneration. The aim of this study was to determine the functional interaction of the collagen fibril-associated proteins

  17. A Novel Approach to Stimulate Cartilage Repair: Targeting Collagen Turnover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.M. Bastiaansen-Jenniskens (Yvonne)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractOA is a complex disease of which the ethiopathology is not completely known and therapies to repair cartilage are still under investigation. The increase of collagen type II expression in osteoarthritic cartilage suggests an activated repair mechanism that is however ineffective in repai

  18. Injectable hydrogels for cartilage and bone tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei; Zeng, Xin; Ma, Chao; Yi, Huan; Ali, Zeeshan; Mou, Xianbo; Li, Song; Deng, Yan; He, Nongyue

    2017-01-01

    Tissue engineering has become a promising strategy for repairing damaged cartilage and bone tissue. Among the scaffolds for tissue-engineering applications, injectable hydrogels have demonstrated great potential for use as three-dimensional cell culture scaffolds in cartilage and bone tissue engineering, owing to their high water content, similarity to the natural extracellular matrix (ECM), porous framework for cell transplantation and proliferation, minimal invasive properties, and ability to match irregular defects. In this review, we describe the selection of appropriate biomaterials and fabrication methods to prepare novel injectable hydrogels for cartilage and bone tissue engineering. In addition, the biology of cartilage and the bony ECM is also summarized. Finally, future perspectives for injectable hydrogels in cartilage and bone tissue engineering are discussed. PMID:28584674

  19. A metrical study of laryngeal cartilages and their ossification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajmani, M L; Jain, S P; Saxena, S K

    1980-01-01

    This study was carried out on the laryngeal cartilages of 150 postmortem/dissection room specimens of adult age groups, ranging from 16 to 55 years in both the sexes. The age, height, sex and profession (in known postmortem cases) were noted. Various measurements of the laryngeal cartilages were taken from the inner surface. From the present study we can conclude that the various measurements in the laryngeal cartilages were more marked in male than the female except of the thyroid angle and the length of the superior horn. The thyroid angle on an average in male was 78 degrees +/- 10 degrees and in female 106 degrees +/- 14 degrees. There was no correlation with total body height. The presence of cuneiform cartilage, cartilago-triticea and corniculate cartilage is not constant, they were seen more commonly in females than in males.

  20. REGENERATION OF ARTICULAR CARTILAGE UNDER THE IMPLANTATION OF BONE MATRIX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri M. Iryanov, Nikolay A. Kiryanov, Olga V. Dyuriagina , Tatiana Yu. Karaseva, Evgenii A. Karasev

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The damage or loss of articular cartilage is costly medical problem. The purpose of this work – morphological analysis of reparative chondrogenesis when implanted in the area of the knee joint cartilage of granulated mineralized bone matrix. Material and Methods: The characteristic features of the knee cartilage regeneration studied experimentally in pubertal Wistar rats after modeling a marginal perforated defect and implantation of granulated mineralized bone matrix obtained according to original technology without heat and demineralizing processing into the injury zone. Results: This biomaterial established to have pronounced chondro- and osteoinductive properties, and to provide prolonged activation of reparative process, accelerated organotypical remodeling and restoration of the articular cartilage injured. Conclusion: The data obtained demonstrate the efficacy of МВМ in clinical practice for the treatment of diseases and injuries of the articular cartilage.

  1. Epiphyseal and Physeal Cartilage: Normal Gadolinium-enhanced MR Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the normal appearance of epiphyseal and physeal cartilage on Gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced MR imaging. The appearance and enhancement ratios of 20 proximal and distal femoral epiphyses in 10 normal piglets were analyzed on Gd-enhanced MR images. The correlation of the MR imaging appearance with corresponding histological findings of immature epiphyses was examined. Our results showed that Gd-enhanced MRI could differentiate the differences in enhancement between physeal and epiphyseal cartilage and show vascular canals within the epiphyseal cartilage. Enhanced ratios in the physeal were greater than those in the epiphyseal cartilage (P<0.005). It is concluded that Gd-enhanced MR imaging reveals epiphyseal vascular canals and shows difference in enhancement of physeal and epiphyseal cartilage.

  2. Sex-Specific Protection of Osteoarthritis by Deleting Cartilage Acid Protein 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianpeng Ge

    Full Text Available Cartilage acidic protein 1 (CRTAC1 was recently identified as an elevated protein in the synovial fluid of patients with osteoarthritis (OA by a proteomic analysis. This gene is also upregulated in both human and mouse OA by transcriptomic analysis. The objective of this study was to characterize the expression and function of CRTAC1 in OA. Here, we first confirm the increase of CRTAC1 in cartilage biopsies from OA patients undergoing joint replacement by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, we report that proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor alpha upregulate CRTAC1 expression in primary human articular chondrocytes and synovial fibroblasts. Genetic deletion of Crtac1 in mice significantly inhibited cartilage degradation, osteophyte formation and gait abnormalities of post-traumatic OA in female, but not male, animals undergoing the destabilization of medial meniscus (DMM surgery. Taken together, CRTAC1 is upregulated in the osteoarthritic joint and directly induced in chondrocytes and synovial fibroblasts by pro-inflammatory cytokines. This molecule is necessary for the progression of OA in female mice after DMM surgery and thus represents a potential therapy for this prevalent disease, especially for women who demonstrate higher rates and more severe OA.

  3. Tissue engineering applications: cartilage lesions repair by the use of autologous chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. De Franceschi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Promising new therapies based on tissue engineering have been recently developed for cartilage repair. The association of biomaterials with autologous chondrocytes expanded in vitro can represent a useful tool to regenerate this tissue. The scaffolds utilised in such therapeutical applications should provide a pre-formed three-dimensional shape, prevent cells from floating out of the defect, have sufficient mechanical strength, facilitate uniform spread of cells and stimulate the phenotype of transplanted cells. Hyaff®-11 is a hyaluronic-acid based biodegradable polymer, that has been shown to provide successful cell carrier for tissue-engineered repair. From our findings we can state that human chondrocytes seeded on Hyaff®-11 are able to maintain in vitro the characteristic of differentiated cells, expressing and producing collagen type II and aggrecan which are the main markers of cartilage phenotype, down-regulating collagen type I. Moreover, it seems to be a useful scaffold for cartilage repair both in animal models and clinical trials in humans, favouring the formation of a hyaline-like tissue. In the light of these data, we can hypothesise, for the future, the use of autologous chondrocyte transplantation together with gene therapy as a treatment for rheumatic diseases such as osteoarthritis.

  4. Sprifermin (rhFGF18) enables proliferation of chondrocytes producing a hyaline cartilage matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigout, A; Guehring, H; Froemel, D; Meurer, A; Ladel, C; Reker, D; Bay-Jensen, A C; Karsdal, M A; Lindemann, S

    2017-08-18

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 18 has been shown to increase cartilage volume when injected intra-articularly in animal models of osteoarthritis (OA) and in patients with knee OA (during clinical development of the recombinant human FGF18, sprifermin). However, the exact nature of this effect is still unknown. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of sprifermin at the cellular level. A combination of different chondrocyte culture systems was used and the effects of sprifermin on proliferation, the phenotype and matrix production were evaluated. The involvement of MAPKs in sprifermin signalling was also studied. In monolayer, we observed that sprifermin promoted a round cell morphology and stimulated both cellular proliferation and Sox9 expression while strongly decreasing type I collagen expression. In 3D culture, sprifermin increased the number of matrix-producing chondrocytes, improved the type II:I collagen ratio and enabled human OA chondrocytes to produce a hyaline extracellular matrix (ECM). Furthermore, we found that sprifermin displayed a 'hit and run' mode of action, with intermittent exposure required for the compound to fully exert its anabolic effect. Finally, sprifermin appeared to signal through activation of ERK. Our results indicate that intermittent exposure to sprifermin leads to expansion of hyaline cartilage-producing chondrocytes. These in vitro findings are consistent with the increased cartilage volume observed in the knees of OA patients after intra-articular injection with sprifermin in clinical studies. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Composite scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutos, Franklin T; Guilak, Farshid

    2008-01-01

    Tissue engineering remains a promising therapeutic strategy for the repair or regeneration of diseased or damaged tissues. Previous approaches have typically focused on combining cells and bioactive molecules (e.g., growth factors, cytokines and DNA fragments) with a biomaterial scaffold that functions as a template to control the geometry of the newly formed tissue, while facilitating the attachment, proliferation, and differentiation of embedded cells. Biomaterial scaffolds also play a crucial role in determining the functional properties of engineered tissues, including biomechanical characteristics such as inhomogeneity, anisotropy, nonlinearity or viscoelasticity. While single-phase, homogeneous materials have been used extensively to create numerous types of tissue constructs, there continue to be significant challenges in the development of scaffolds that can provide the functional properties of load-bearing tissues such as articular cartilage. In an attempt to create more complex scaffolds that promote the regeneration of functional engineered tissues, composite scaffolds comprising two or more distinct materials have been developed. This paper reviews various studies on the development and testing of composite scaffolds for the tissue engineering of articular cartilage, using techniques such as embedded fibers and textiles for reinforcement, embedded solid structures, multi-layered designs, or three-dimensionally woven composite materials. In many cases, the use of composite scaffolds can provide unique biomechanical and biological properties for the development of functional tissue engineering scaffolds.

  6. Management of chest deformity caused by microtia reconstruction: Comparison of autogenous diced cartilage versus cadaver cartilage graft partial filling techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Ju Young; Kang, Bo Young; Hwang, Jin Hee; Oh, Kap Sung

    2017-01-01

    Efforts to prevent chest wall deformity after costal cartilage graft are ongoing. In this study, we introduce a new method to prevent donor site deformation using irradiated cadaver cartilage (ICC) and compare this method to the autogenous diced cartilage (ADC) technique. Forty-two pediatric patients comprised the ADC group (n = 24) and the ICC group (n = 18). After harvesting costal cartilage, the empty perichondrial space was filled with autologous diced cartilage in the ADC group and cadaver cartilage in the ICC group. Digital photographs and rib cartilage three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) data were analyzed to compare the preventive effect of donor site deformity. We compared the pre- and postoperative costal cartilage volumes using 3D-CT and graded the volumes (grade I: 0%-25%, grade II: 25%-50%, grade III: 50%-75%, and grade IV: 75%-100%). The average follow-up period was 20 and 24 months in the ADC and ICC groups, respectively. Grade IV maintenance of previous costal cartilage volume was evident postoperatively in 22% of patients in the ADC group and 82% of patients in the ICC group. Intercostal space narrowing and chest wall depression were less in the ICC group. There were no complications or severe resorption of cadaver cartilage. ICC support transected costal ring and prevented stability loss by acting as a spacer. The ICC technique is more effective in preventing intercostal space narrowing and chest wall depression than the ADC technique. Samsung Medical Center Institution Review Board, Unique protocol ID: 2009-10-006-008. This study is also registered on PRS (ClinicalTrials.gov Record 2009-10-006). Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Integration of Stem Cell to Chondrocyte-Derived Cartilage Matrix in Healthy and Osteoarthritic States in the Presence of Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupak Dua

    Full Text Available We investigated the effectiveness of integrating tissue engineered cartilage derived from human bone marrow derived stem cells (HBMSCs to healthy as well as osteoarthritic cartilage mimics using hydroxyapatite (HA nanoparticles immersed within a hydrogel substrate. Healthy and diseased engineered cartilage from human chondrocytes (cultured in agar gels were integrated with human bone marrow stem cell (HBMSC-derived cartilaginous engineered matrix with and without HA, and evaluated after 28 days of growth. HBMSCs were seeded within photopolymerizable poly (ethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA hydrogels. In addition, we also conducted a preliminary in vivo evaluation of cartilage repair in rabbit knee chondral defects treated with subchondral bone microfracture and cell-free PEGDA with and without HA. Under in vitro conditions, the interfacial shear strength between tissue engineered cartilage derived from HBMSCs and osteoarthritic chondrocytes was significantly higher (p < 0.05 when HA nanoparticles were incorporated within the HBMSC culture system. Histological evidence confirmed a distinct spatial transition zone, rich in calcium phosphate deposits. Assessment of explanted rabbit knees by histology demonstrated that cellularity within the repair tissues that had filled the defects were of significantly higher number (p < 0.05 when HA was used. HA nanoparticles play an important role in treating chondral defects when osteoarthritis is a co-morbidity. We speculate that the calcified layer formation at the interface in the osteoarthritic environment in the presence of HA is likely to have attributed to higher interfacial strength found in vitro. From an in vivo standpoint, the presence of HA promoted cellularity in the tissues that subsequently filled the chondral defects. This higher presence of cells can be considered important in the context of accelerating long-term cartilage remodeling. We conclude that HA nanoparticles play an important role in

  8. Collagen type XII and versican are present in the early stages of cartilage tissue formation by both redifferentating passaged and primary chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Drew W; Ahmed, Nazish; Parreno, Justin; Lunstrum, Gregory P; Gross, Allan E; Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Kandel, Rita A

    2015-02-01

    microenvironment that supports hyaline cartilage formation. Further study is required to determine if these molecules are also accumulated by passaged human chondrocytes and their role in promoting hyaline cartilage formation.

  9. Deginerative changes of femoral articular cartilage in the knee : comparative study of specimen sonography and pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ju Youn; Hong, Sung Hwan; Sohn, Jin Hee; Wee, Young Hoon; Chang, Jun Dong; Park, Hong Seok; Lee, Eil Seoung; Kang Ik Won [Hallym Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-04-01

    To determine the sonographic findings of degenerative change in femoral articular cartilage of the knee by comparative study of specimen sonography and pathology. We obtained 40 specimens of cartilage of the femur (20 medial and 20 lateral condylar) from 20 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee who had undergone total knee replacement. The specimens were placed in a saline-filled container and sonography was performed using a 10-MHz linear transducer. Sonographic abnormalities were evaluated at the cartilage surface, within the cartilage, and at the bone-cartilage interface, and were compared with the corresponding pathologic findings. In addition, cartilage thickness was measured at a representative portion of each femoral cartilage specimen and was compared with the thickness determined by sonography. 'Dot' lesions, irregularity or loss of the hyperechoic line, were demonstrated by sonography at the saline-cartilage interface of 14 cartilages. Pathologic examination showed that these findings corresponded to cleft, detachment, erosion, and degeneration. Irregularities in the hyperechoic line at the bone-cartilage interface were revealed by sonography in eight cartilages and were related to irregularity or loss of tidemark, downward displacement of the cartilage, and subchondral callus formation. Dot lesions, corresponding to cleft and degeneration, were noted within one cartilage. Cartilage thickness measured on specimen and by sonography showed no significant difference (p=0.446). Specimen sonography suggested that articular cartilage underwent degenerative histopathological change. Cartilage thickness measured by sonography exactly reflected real thickness.

  10. Fine-tuning Cartilage Tissue Engineering by Applying Principles from Embryonic Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. Hellingman (Catharine)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractCartilage has a very poor capacity for regeneration in vivo. In head and neck surgery cartilage defects are usually reconstructed with autologous cartilage from for instance the external ear or the ribs. Cartilage tissue engineering may be a promising alternative to supply tissue for

  11. Enhanced cartilage repair in ‘healer’ mice—New leads in the search for better clinical options for cartilage repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Adult articular cartilage has a poor capacity to undergo intrinsic repair. Current strategies for the repair of large cartilage defects are generally unsatisfactory because the restored cartilage does not have the same resistance to biomechanical loading as authentic articular cartilage and degrades over time. Recently, an exciting new research direction, focused on intrinsic cartilage regeneration rather than fibrous repair by external means, has emerged. This review explores the new findings in this rapidly moving field as they relate to the clinical goal of restoration of structurally robust, stable and non-fibrous articular cartilage following injury. PMID:27130635

  12. Non-invasive monitoring of cytokine-based regenerative treatment of cartilage by hyperspectral unmixing (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahbub, Saabah B.; Succer, Peter; Gosnell, Martin E.; Anwaer, Ayad G.; Herbert, Benjamin; Vesey, Graham; Goldys, Ewa M.

    2016-03-01

    Extracting biochemical information from tissue autofluorescence is a promising approach to non-invasively monitor disease treatments at a cellular level, without using any external biomarkers. Our recently developed unsupervised hyperspectral unmixing by Dependent Component Analysis (DECA) provides robust and detailed metabolic information with proper account of intrinsic cellular heterogeneity. Moreover this method is compatible with established methods of fluorescent biomarker labelling. Recently adipose-derived stem cell (ADSC) - based therapies have been introduced for treating different diseases in animals and humans. ADSC have been shown promise in regenerative treatments for osteoarthritis and other bone and joint disorders. One of the mechanism of their action is their anti-inflammatory effects within osteoarthritic joints which aid the regeneration of cartilage. These therapeutic effects are known to be driven by secretions of different cytokines from the ADSCs. We have been using the hyperspectral unmixing techniques to study in-vitro the effects of ADSC-derived cytokine-rich secretions with the cartilage chip in both human and bovine samples. The study of metabolic effects of different cytokine treatment on different cartilage layers makes it possible to compare the merits of those treatments for repairing cartilage.

  13. The Functions of BMP3 in Rabbit Articular Cartilage Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs play important roles in skeletal development and repair. Previously, we found fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2 induced up-regulation of BMP2, 3, 4 in the process of rabbit articular cartilage repair, which resulted in satisfactory repair effects. As BMP2/4 show a clearly positive effect for cartilage repair, we investigated the functions of BMP3 in rabbit articular cartilage repair. In this paper, we find that BMP3 inhibits the repair of partial-thickness defect of articular cartilage in rabbit by inducing the degradation of extracellular matrix, interfering with the survival of chondrocytes surrounding the defect, and directly inhibiting the expression of BMP2 and BMP4. Meanwhile BMP3 suppress the repair of full-thickness cartilage defect by destroying the subchondral bone through modulating the proliferation and differentiation of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs, and directly increasing the expression of BMP4. Although BMP3 has different functions in the repair of partial and full-thickness defects of articular cartilage in rabbit, the regulation of BMP expression is involved in both of them. Together with our previous findings, we suggest the regulation of the BMP signaling pathway by BMP3 is essential in articular cartilage repair.

  14. Multimodal nonlinear optical imaging of cartilage development in mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Sicong; Xue, Wenqian; Sun, Qiqi; Li, Xuesong; Huang, Jiandong; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2017-02-01

    Kinesin-1 is a kind of motor protein responsible for intracellular transportation and has been studied in a variety of tissues. However, its roles in cartilage development are not clear. In this study, a kinesin-1 heavy chain (Kif5b) knockout mouse model is used to study the functions of kinesin-1 in the cartilage development. We developed a multimodal nonlinear optical (NLO) microscope system integrating stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) to investigate the morphological and biomedical characteristics of fresh tibial cartilage from normal and mutant mice at different developmental stages. The combined forward and backward SHG imaging resolved the fine structure of collagen fibrils in the extracellular matrix of cartilage. Meanwhile, the chondrocyte morphology in different zones of cartilage was visualized by label-free SRS and TPEF images. The results show that the fibrillar collagen in the superficial zone of cartilage in postnatal day 10 and 15 (P10 and P15) knockout mice was significantly less than that of control mice. Moreover, we observed distorted morphology and disorganization of columnar arrangement of chondrocytes in the growth plate cartilage of mutant mice. This study reveals the significant roles of kinesin-1 in collagen formation and chondrocyte morphogenesis.

  15. Shark cartilage, cancer and the growing threat of pseudoscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrander, Gary K; Cheng, Keith C; Wolf, Jeffrey C; Wolfe, Marilyn J

    2004-12-01

    The promotion of crude shark cartilage extracts as a cure for cancer has contributed to at least two significant negative outcomes: a dramatic decline in shark populations and a diversion of patients from effective cancer treatments. An alleged lack of cancer in sharks constitutes a key justification for its use. Herein, both malignant and benign neoplasms of sharks and their relatives are described, including previously unreported cases from the Registry of Tumors in Lower Animals, and two sharks with two cancers each. Additional justifications for using shark cartilage are illogical extensions of the finding of antiangiogenic and anti-invasive substances in cartilage. Scientific evidence to date supports neither the efficacy of crude cartilage extracts nor the ability of effective components to reach and eradicate cancer cells. The fact that people think shark cartilage consumption can cure cancer illustrates the serious potential impacts of pseudoscience. Although components of shark cartilage may work as a cancer retardant, crude extracts are ineffective. Efficiencies of technology (e.g., fish harvesting), the power of mass media to reach the lay public, and the susceptibility of the public to pseudoscience amplifies the negative impacts of shark cartilage use. To facilitate the use of reason as the basis of public and private decision-making, the evidence-based mechanisms of evaluation used daily by the scientific community should be added to the training of media and governmental professionals. Increased use of logical, collaborative discussion will be necessary to ensure a sustainable future for man and the biosphere.

  16. Optical coherence tomography enables accurate measurement of equine cartilage thickness for determination of speed of sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhakka, Pia H; Te Moller, Nikae C R; Tanska, Petri; Saarakkala, Simo; Tiitu, Virpi; Korhonen, Rami K; Brommer, Harold; Virén, Tuomas; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha

    2016-08-01

    Background and purpose - Arthroscopic estimation of articular cartilage thickness is important for scoring of lesion severity, and measurement of cartilage speed of sound (SOS)-a sensitive index of changes in cartilage composition. We investigated the accuracy of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in measurements of cartilage thickness and determined SOS by combining OCT thickness and ultrasound (US) time-of-flight (TOF) measurements. Material and methods - Cartilage thickness measurements from OCT and microscopy images of 94 equine osteochondral samples were compared. Then, SOS in cartilage was determined using simultaneous OCT thickness and US TOF measurements. SOS was then compared with the compositional, structural, and mechanical properties of cartilage. Results - Measurements of non-calcified cartilage thickness using OCT and microscopy were significantly correlated (ρ = 0.92; p measurement of articular cartilage thickness. Although SOS measurements lacked accuracy in thin equine cartilage, the concept of SOS measurement using OCT appears promising.

  17. Simple Correction of Alar Retraction by Conchal Cartilage Extension Grafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Jun Jang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAlar retraction is a challenging condition in rhinoplasty marked by exaggerated nostril exposure and awkwardness. Although various methods for correcting alar retraction have been introduced, none is without drawbacks. Herein, we report a simple procedure that is both effective and safe for correcting alar retraction using only conchal cartilage grafting.MethodsBetween August 2007 and August 2009, 18 patients underwent conchal cartilage extension grafting to correct alar retraction. Conchal cartilage extension grafts were fixed to the caudal margins of the lateral crura and covered with vestibular skin advancement flaps. Preoperative and postoperative photographs were reviewed and analyzed. Patient satisfaction was surveyed and categorized into 4 groups (very satisfied, satisfied, moderate, or unsatisfied.ResultsAccording to the survey, 8 patients were very satisfied, 9 were satisfied, and 1 considered the outcome moderate, resulting in satisfaction for most patients. The average distance from the alar rim to the long axis of the nostril was reduced by 1.4 mm (3.6 to 2.2 mm. There were no complications, except in 2 cases with palpable cartilage step-off that resolved without any aesthetic problems.ConclusionsConchal cartilage alar extension graft is a simple, effective method of correcting alar retraction that can be combined with aesthetic rhinoplasty conveniently, utilizing conchal cartilage, which is the most similar cartilage to alar cartilage, and requiring a lesser volume of cartilage harvest compared to previously devised methods. However, the current procedure lacks efficacy for severe alar retraction and a longer follow-up period may be required to substantiate the enduring efficacy of the current procedure.

  18. Simple Correction of Alar Retraction by Conchal Cartilage Extension Grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yong Jun; Kim, Sung Min; Lew, Dae Hyun; Song, Seung Yong

    2016-11-01

    Alar retraction is a challenging condition in rhinoplasty marked by exaggerated nostril exposure and awkwardness. Although various methods for correcting alar retraction have been introduced, none is without drawbacks. Herein, we report a simple procedure that is both effective and safe for correcting alar retraction using only conchal cartilage grafting. Between August 2007 and August 2009, 18 patients underwent conchal cartilage extension grafting to correct alar retraction. Conchal cartilage extension grafts were fixed to the caudal margins of the lateral crura and covered with vestibular skin advancement flaps. Preoperative and postoperative photographs were reviewed and analyzed. Patient satisfaction was surveyed and categorized into 4 groups (very satisfied, satisfied, moderate, or unsatisfied). According to the survey, 8 patients were very satisfied, 9 were satisfied, and 1 considered the outcome moderate, resulting in satisfaction for most patients. The average distance from the alar rim to the long axis of the nostril was reduced by 1.4 mm (3.6 to 2.2 mm). There were no complications, except in 2 cases with palpable cartilage step-off that resolved without any aesthetic problems. Conchal cartilage alar extension graft is a simple, effective method of correcting alar retraction that can be combined with aesthetic rhinoplasty conveniently, utilizing conchal cartilage, which is the most similar cartilage to alar cartilage, and requiring a lesser volume of cartilage harvest compared to previously devised methods. However, the current procedure lacks efficacy for severe alar retraction and a longer follow-up period may be required to substantiate the enduring efficacy of the current procedure.

  19. Polyester type polyHIPE scaffolds with an interconnected porous structure for cartilage regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranda, Jakob; Sušec, Maja; Maver, Uroš; Gradišnik, Lidija; Gorenjak, Mario; Vukasović, Andreja; Ivković, Alan; Rupnik, Marjan Slak; Vogrin, Matjaž; Krajnc, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Development of artificial materials for the facilitation of cartilage regeneration remains an important challenge in orthopedic practice. Our study investigates the potential for neocartilage formation within a synthetic polyester scaffold based on the polymerization of high internal phase emulsions. The fabrication of polyHIPE polymer (PHP) was specifically tailored to produce a highly porous (85%) structure with the primary pore size in the range of 50–170 μm for cartilage tissue engineering. The resulting PHP scaffold was proven biocompatible with human articular chondrocytes and viable cells were observed within the materials as evaluated using the Live/Dead assay and histological analysis. Chondrocytes with round nuclei were organized into multicellular layers on the PHP surface and were observed to grow approximately 300 μm into the scaffold interior. The accumulation of collagen type 2 was detected using immunohistochemistry and chondrogenic specific genes were expressed with favorable collagen type 2 to 1 ratio. In addition, PHP samples are biodegradable and their baseline mechanical properties are similar to those of native cartilage, which enhance chondrocyte cell growth and proliferation.

  20. Cell-based tissue engineering strategies used in the clinical repair of articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Brian J.; Hu, Jerry C.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2016-01-01

    One of the most important issues facing cartilage tissue engineering is the inability to move technologies into the clinic. Despite the multitude of review articles on the paradigm of biomaterials, signals, and cells, it is reported that 90% of new drugs that advance past animal studies fail clinical trials (1). The intent of this review is to provide readers with an understanding of the scientific details of tissue engineered cartilage products that have demonstrated a certain level of efficacy in humans, so that newer technologies may be developed upon this foundation. Compared to existing treatments, such as microfracture or autologous chondrocyte implantation, a tissue engineered product can potentially provide more consistent clinical results in forming hyaline repair tissue and in filling the entirety of the defect. The various tissue engineering strategies (e.g., cell expansion, scaffold material, media formulations, biomimetic stimuli, etc.) used in forming these products, as collected from published literature, company websites, and relevant patents, are critically discussed. The authors note that many details about these products remain proprietary, not all information is made public, and that advancements to the products are continuously made. Nevertheless, by fully understanding the design and production processes of these emerging technologies, one can gain tremendous insight into how to best use them and also how to design the next generation of tissue engineered cartilage products. PMID:27177218

  1. Experimental pharmacological investigation of the antiarthrotic effects of the cartilage and bone marrow extract Rumalon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalbhen, D.A.

    1981-08-05

    On the basis of animal experiments, the authors have developed a model of arthrosis which is compatible in its radiological, macroscopic, biochemical, and histological aspects with the pathophysiology of human arthrosis and has been tried in the testing of the antiarthrotic properties of pharmaceuticals. Biochemically induced gonarthroses of experimental animals were used for studies of the effects of a cartilage and bone marrow extract (Rumalon) and a cartilage extract and its high-molecular component DAK-16 on the frequency and progression of degenerative joint diseases. As test parameters, measurements of the articular space, X-ray findings, and macroscopic findings were quantitatively evaluated. The animal experiments show that the inhibitive effects of steroidal and nonsteroidal antirheumatics on the synthesis of the cartilage matrix can be prevented or reduced by simultaneous administration of chondroprotective pharmaceuticals; this may be important on the clinical sector. This antagonism between antiphlogistic agents and Rumalon, which has been observed also in fibroblast cultures and wound healing experiments, is of interest especially for the treatment of activated arthroses.

  2. Techniques for diced cartilage with deep temporalis fascia graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Jay; Kwon, Edwin

    2015-02-01

    Diced cartilage with deep temporalis fascia (DC-F) graft has become a popular technique for reconstruction of the nasal dorsum. Cartilage can be obtained from the septum, ear, or costal cartilage when employing the DC-F technique. The complications seen with DC-F grafts tend to occur early in the surgeon's implementation of this technique. Management of the complications varies depending on the severity of the problem. This article gives an overview of both the technique and the complications commonly encountered.

  3. Effect of nitric oxide synthase inhibitor on proteoglycan metabolism in repaired articular cartilage in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙炜; 金大地; 王吉兴; 秦立赟; 刘晓霞

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, S-methyl thiocarbamate (SMT), on proteoglycan metabolism in repaired articular cartilage in rabbits. Methods: Twenty-four male New Zealand white rabbits, aged 8 months and weighing 2.5 kg±0.2 kg, were used in this study. Cartilage defects in full thickness were created on the intercondylar articular surface of bilateral femurs of all the rabbits. Then the rabbits were randomly divided into 3 groups (n=8 in each group). The defects in one group were filled with fibrin glue impregnated with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2, BMP group), in one group with fibrin glue impregnated with rhBMP-2 and hypodermic injection with SMT (SMT group) and in the other group with nothing (control group). All the animals were killed at one year postoperatively. The tissue sections were stained with safranine O-fast green and analyzed by Quantiment 500 system to determine the content of glycosaminoglycan through measuring the percentage of safranine O-stained area, the thickness of cartilages and the mean gray scale (average stain intensity). Radiolabelled sodium sulphate (Na235SO4) was used to assess the proteoglycan synthesis. Results: At one year postoperatively, the percentage of safranine O-stained area, the mean gray scale and the cartilage thickness of the repaired tissues in SMT group were significantly higher than those of BMP group (P<0.01) and the control group (P<0.05). Result of incorporation of Na235SO4 showed that the proteoglycan synthesis in SMT group was higher than those of BMP group and the control group (P<0.01). Conclusions: SMT, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, can significantly increase the content of glycosaminoglycan and proteoglycan synthesis, and computer-based image analysis is a reliable method for evaluating proteoglycan metabolism.

  4. Prospective Clinical Trial for Septic Arthritis: Cartilage Degradation and Inflammation Are Associated with Upregulation of Cartilage Metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen Schmal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Intra-articular infections can rapidly lead to osteoarthritic degradation. The aim of this clinical biomarker analysis was to investigate the influence of inflammation on cartilage destruction and metabolism. Methods. Patients with acute joint infections were enrolled in a prospective clinical trial and the cytokine composition of effusions (n=76 was analyzed. Characteristics of epidemiology and disease severity were correlated with levels of cytokines with known roles in cartilage turnover and degradation. Results. Higher synovial IL-1β concentrations were associated with clinical parameters indicating a higher disease severity (p<0.03 excluding the incidence of sepsis. Additionally, intra-articular IL-1β levels correlated with inflammatory serum parameters as leucocyte counts (LC and C-reactive protein concentrations (p<0.05 but not with age or comorbidity. Both higher LC and synovial IL-1β levels were associated with increased intra-articular collagen type II cleavage products (C2C indicating cartilage degradation. Joints with preinfectious lesions had higher C2C levels. Intra-articular inflammation led to increased concentrations of typical cartilage metabolites as bFGF, BMP-2, and BMP-7. Infections with Staphylococcus species induced higher IL-1β expression but less cartilage destruction than other bacteria. Conclusion. Articular infections have bacteria-specific implications on cartilage metabolism. Collagen type II cleavage products reliably mark destruction, which is associated with upregulation of typical cartilage turnover cytokines. This trial is registered with DRKS00003536, MISSinG.

  5. Tissue engineering of cartilages using biomatrices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melrose, J.; Chuang, C.; Whitelock, J.

    2008-01-01

    Tissue engineering is an exciting new cross-disciplinary methodology which applies the principles of engineering and structure-function relationships between normal and pathological tissues to develop biological substitute to restore, maintain or improve tissue function. Tissue engineering...... engineering approaches and many of these are discussed and their in vitro and in vivo applications covered in this review. Tissue engineering is entering an exciting era; significant advances have been made; however, many technical challenges remain to be solved before this technology becomes widely...... therefore involves a melange of approaches encompassing developmental biology, tissue mechanics, medicine, cell differentiation and survival biology, mechanostransduction and nano-fabrication technology. The central tissue of interest in this review is cartilage. Traumatic injuries, congenital abnormalities...

  6. MR imaging and histopathology of cartilage tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizutani, Hirokazu; Ohba, Satoru; Ohtsuka, Takanobu; Matui, Norio; Nakamura, Takaaki (Nagoya City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1994-05-01

    The MR imaging-pathologic correlation of cartilaginous bone tumors and the value of intravenously administered Gd-DTPA enhanced MR imaging was studied. The MR studies were retrospectively reviewed. Thirty-seven cases were examined with 0.5 T and 1.0 T scanner and all cases were pathologically proved. We discussed the following MR findings: signal intensities of tumors, Gd-DTPA features, morphological findings, and associated findings. Hyaline cartilage tumors showed low signal intensity on T[sub 1]-weighted images and very high signal intensity on T[sub 2]-weighted images. Lobulated marginal enhancements were recognized in chondrosarcomas. This may be an important finding to suspect chondrosarcoma. (author).

  7. Numerical Simulation of Mass Transfer and Three-Dimensional Fabrication of Tissue-Engineered Cartilages Based on Chitosan/Gelatin Hybrid Hydrogel Scaffold in a Rotating Bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanxia; Song, Kedong; Jiang, Siyu; Chen, Jinglian; Tang, Lingzhi; Li, Siyuan; Fan, Jiangli; Wang, Yiwei; Zhao, Jiaquan; Liu, Tianqing

    2017-01-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering is believed to provide effective cartilage repair post-injuries or diseases. Biomedical materials play a key role in achieving successful culture and fabrication of cartilage. The physical properties of a chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel scaffold make it an ideal cartilage biomimetic material. In this study, a chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel was chosen to fabricate a tissue-engineered cartilage in vitro by inoculating human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) at both dynamic and traditional static culture conditions. A bioreactor that provides a dynamic culture condition has received greater applications in tissue engineering due to its optimal mass transfer efficiency and its ability to simulate an equivalent physical environment compared to human body. In this study, prior to cell-scaffold fabrication experiment, mathematical simulations were confirmed with a mass transfer of glucose and TGF-β2 both in rotating wall vessel bioreactor (RWVB) and static culture conditions in early stage of culture via computational fluid dynamic (CFD) method. To further investigate the feasibility of the mass transfer efficiency of the bioreactor, this RWVB was adopted to fabricate three-dimensional cell-hydrogel cartilage constructs in a dynamic environment. The results showed that the mass transfer efficiency of RWVB was faster in achieving a final equilibrium compared to culture in static culture conditions. ADSCs culturing in RWVB expanded three times more compared to that in static condition over 10 days. Induced cell cultivation in a dynamic RWVB showed extensive expression of extracellular matrix, while the cell distribution was found much more uniformly distributing with full infiltration of extracellular matrix inside the porous scaffold. The increased mass transfer efficiency of glucose and TGF-β2 from RWVB promoted cellular proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of ADSCs inside chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel scaffolds. The

  8. The development of the collagen fibre network in tissue-engineered cartilage constructs in vivo. Engineered cartilage reorganises fibre network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Paetzold

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available For long term durability of tissue-engineered cartilage implanted in vivo, the development of the collagen fibre network orientation is essential as well as the distribution of collagen, since expanded chondrocytes are known to synthesise collagen type I. Typically, these properties differ strongly between native and tissue-engineered cartilage. Nonetheless, the clinical results of a pilot study with implanted tissue-engineered cartilage in pigs were surprisingly good. The purpose of this study was therefore to analyse if the structure and composition of the artificial cartilage tissue changes in the first 52 weeks after implantation. Thus, collagen network orientation and collagen type distribution in tissue-engineered cartilage-carrier-constructs implanted in the knee joints of Göttinger minipigs for 2, 26 or 52 weeks have been further investigated by processing digitised microscopy images of histological sections. The comparison to native cartilage demonstrated that fibre orientation over the cartilage depth has a clear tendency towards native cartilage with increasing time of implantation. After 2 weeks, the collagen fibres of the superficial zone were oriented parallel to the articular surface with little anisotropy present in the middle and deep zones. Overall, fibre orientation and collagen distribution within the implants were less homogenous than in native cartilage tissue. Despite a relatively low number of specimens, the consistent observation of a continuous approximation to native tissue is very promising and suggests that it may not be necessary to engineer the perfect tissue for implantation but rather to provide an intermediate solution to help the body to heal itself.

  9. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnhart, Birgitte; Juul, Anders; Nielsen, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) has been identified as a prognostic marker of progressive joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis. In this population based study we evaluated associations between plasma concentrations of COMP, disease activity, and growth velocity in patients...

  10. Tailored PVA/ECM Scaffolds for Cartilage Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Stocco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage lesions are a particular challenge for regenerative medicine due to cartilage low self-ability repair in case of damage. Hence, a significant goal of musculoskeletal tissue engineering is the development of suitable structures in virtue of their matrix composition and biomechanical properties. The objective of our study was to design in vitro a supporting structure for autologous chondrocyte growth. We realized a biohybrid composite scaffold combining a novel and nonspecific extracellular matrix (ECM, which is decellularized Wharton’s jelly ECM, with the biomechanical properties of the synthetic hydrogel polyvinyl alcohol (PVA. Wharton’s jelly ECM was tested for its ability in promoting scaffold colonization by chondrocytes and compared with polyvinyl alcohol itself and the more specific decellularized cartilage matrix. Our preliminary evidences highlighted the chance of using Wharton’s jelly ECM in combination with PVA hydrogels as an innovative and easily available scaffold for cartilage restoration.

  11. Starch-modified magnetite nanoparticles for impregnation into cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soshnikova, Yulia M., E-mail: yuliasoshnikova@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute on Laser and Information Technologies (Russian Federation); Roman, Svetlana G.; Chebotareva, Natalia A. [A.N. Bach Institute of Biochemistry (Russian Federation); Baum, Olga I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute on Laser and Information Technologies (Russian Federation); Obrezkova, Mariya V. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry (Russian Federation); Gillis, Richard B.; Harding, Stephen E. [University of Nottingham, National Centre for Macromolecular Hydrodynamics (United Kingdom); Sobol, Emil N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute on Laser and Information Technologies (Russian Federation); Lunin, Valeriy V. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15

    The paper presents preparation and characterization of starch-modified Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous dispersion after impregnation into healthy and damaged types of cartilage. We show that starch-modified dispersion has a narrower size distribution than a non‐stabilized one. The average hydrodynamic radius of magnetite NPs in a dispersion used for impregnation into cartilage is (48 ± 1) nm with the width of the distribution from 5 to 200 nm. We investigate stability of aqueous magnetite NPs dispersions during storage and with increase in temperature (up to 70 °C). We find that polydisperse magnetite NPs can penetrate into cartilage and the size and concentration of impregnated particles depend on the organization of the tissue structure. The results confirm the possibility of application of magnetite NPs in diagnostics and laser treatment of degenerative cartilage deceases.

  12. Cartilage (Bovine and Shark) (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the use of bovine and shark cartilage as a treatment for people with cancer. Note: The information in this summary is no longer being updated and is provided for reference purposes only.

  13. Effects of mechanical stimuli on adaptive remodeling of condylar cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, D; Jones, A; Alatli-Burt, I; Darendeliler, M A

    2009-05-01

    Trabecular bone has been shown to be responsive to low-magnitude, high-frequency mechanical stimuli. This study aimed to assess the effects of these stimuli on condylar cartilage and its endochondral bone. Forty female 12-week-old C3H mice were divided into 3 groups: baseline control (killed at day 0), sham (killed at day 28 without exposure to mechanical stimuli), and experimental (killed following 28 days of exposure to mechanical stimuli). The experimental group was subjected to mechanical vibration of 30 Hz, for 20 minutes per day, 5 days per week, for 28 days. The specimens were analyzed by micro-computed tomography. The experimental group demonstrated a significant decrease in the volume of condylar cartilage and also a significant increase in bone histomorphometric parameters. The results suggest that the low-magnitude, high-frequency mechanical stimuli enhance adaptive remodeling of condylar cartilage, evidenced by the advent of endochondral bone replacing the hypertrophic cartilage.

  14. Starch-modified magnetite nanoparticles for impregnation into cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soshnikova, Yulia M.; Roman, Svetlana G.; Chebotareva, Natalia A.; Baum, Olga I.; Obrezkova, Mariya V.; Gillis, Richard B.; Harding, Stephen E.; Sobol, Emil N.; Lunin, Valeriy V.

    2013-11-01

    The paper presents preparation and characterization of starch-modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous dispersion after impregnation into healthy and damaged types of cartilage. We show that starch-modified dispersion has a narrower size distribution than a non-stabilized one. The average hydrodynamic radius of magnetite NPs in a dispersion used for impregnation into cartilage is (48 ± 1) nm with the width of the distribution from 5 to 200 nm. We investigate stability of aqueous magnetite NPs dispersions during storage and with increase in temperature (up to 70 °C). We find that polydisperse magnetite NPs can penetrate into cartilage and the size and concentration of impregnated particles depend on the organization of the tissue structure. The results confirm the possibility of application of magnetite NPs in diagnostics and laser treatment of degenerative cartilage deceases.

  15. Costal cartilage fractures and disruptions in a rugby football player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Victor; Ma, Richard; Li, Xinning; Steele, John; Allen, Answorth A

    2013-05-01

    Costal cartilage fracture of the rib cage, or costochondral, is a rare sporting injury. For contact athletes, the instability of the rib cage may lead to potential serious complications, similar to rib fractures or thorax disruption. Most authors recommend initial conservative treatment with surgery reserved for only recalcitrant cases. We report a case of an amateur American male rugby football player who sustained a costal cartilage fracture and disruption involving the anterior left fifth and sixth rib costal cartilages. The case highlights the difficulty in establishing the diagnosis based on clinical examination and standard radiographs alone. Computed tomography was used to assist in diagnosing this destabilizing injury to the rib cage. Costal cartilage fractures and disruptions in athletes are rarely reported in the literature and can have serious implications for the athlete's ability to return to play if the rib cage is destabilized.

  16. Surgical correction of joint deformities and hyaline cartilage regeneration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vinokurov, Vyacheslav Alexandrovich; Norkin, Igor Alekseevich

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To determine a method of extra-articular osteochondral fragment formation for the improvement of surgical correction results of joint deformities and optimization of regenerative conditions for hyaline cartilage...