WorldWideScience

Sample records for human cardiovascular system

  1. Patient-specific modeling of human cardiovascular system elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossovich, Leonid Yu.; Kirillova, Irina V.; Golyadkina, Anastasiya A.; Polienko, Asel V.; Chelnokova, Natalia O.; Ivanov, Dmitriy V.; Murylev, Vladimir V.

    2016-03-01

    Object of study: The research is aimed at development of personalized medical treatment. Algorithm was developed for patient-specific surgical interventions of the cardiovascular system pathologies. Methods: Geometrical models of the biological objects and initial and boundary conditions were realized by medical diagnostic data of the specific patient. Mechanical and histomorphological parameters were obtained with the help mechanical experiments on universal testing machine. Computer modeling of the studied processes was conducted with the help of the finite element method. Results: Results of the numerical simulation allowed evaluating the physiological processes in the studied object in normal state, in presence of different pathologies and after different types of surgical procedures.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Cardiorhythmography as a Method of Study of Human's Cardiovascular System Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protasov, E. A.; Ryzhkova, A. V.

    In this article a highly sensitive method for graphic recording of cardiogram by detecting the signal of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of human finger has been developed and signals directly related to movement of blood ejected by the heart into the vessels have been studied. Changes in the behavior of signals depending on the condition of the cardiovascular system of person have been discovered.

  3. Cardiovascular System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    7.1 Heart failure2007175 Effects of recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide on aldosterone and endothelin-1 in treatment of heart failure. FU Yao(付尧),et al. Dept Cardiol, 1st Affili Hosp, China Med Univ, Shenyang 110001. Chin Cir J 2007;22(1):35-37. Obiective To study the efficacy and the effects of recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide(rhBNP) on aldosterone and endothelin-1 in the treatment of congestive heart failure(CHF).Methods A randomized, open, controlled clinical trial was conducted in 35 patients with CHF. Eighteen received rhBNP and 17 were treated with nitroglycerin as controls. The changes hemodynamic indexes, the plasma concentrations of K+, Na+, aldo-sterone(ALD) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) in order to examine the efficacy and mechanism of rhBNP. Results Between experiment and control groups significant differences were found in the decreasing of PCWP, PAP and plasma concentration of Na+, ALD, ET-1, and in the increasing of plasma concentration of K+ (P<0.05~0.01). Conclusion The mechanism of rhBNP may be associated with the overactivation of renin-angiotension-aldosterone system, and the inhibited production of endothelin-1.

  4. cardiovascular system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    6.1 Cardiac arrhythmias 2006037 Electroanatomical systems guided circumferential pulmonary veins ablation for atrial fibrillation: initial experience from comparison between the EnSite -NavX and CARTO system LIU Xu(刘旭 ), et al. Dept Cardiol, Shanghai Chest Hosp, Shanghai, 200030, China. Chin J Cardiol 2005; 33 (22): 975 -978.

  5. [Cardiovascular manifestations of human toxocariasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolívar-Mejía, Adrián; Rodríguez-Morales, Alfonso J; Paniz-Mondolfi, Alberto E; Delgado, Olinda

    2013-01-01

    Toxocariasis is a parasitic infection produced by helminths that cannot reach their adult stage in humans. For their etiological species (Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati), man is a paratenic host. Infection by such helminths can produce a variety of clinical manifestations, such as: visceral larvae migrans syndrome, ocular larvae migrans syndrome and covert toxocariasis. In the visceral larvae migrans syndrome, the organs that are mainly involved include liver, lungs, skin, nervous system, muscles, kidneys and the heart. Regarding the latter, the importance of cardiovascular manifestations in toxocariasis, as well as its clinical relevance, has increasingly begun to be recognized. The current article is based on a systematic information search, focused mainly on the clinical and pathological aspects of cardiovascular manifestations in toxocariasis, including its pathophysiology, laboratory findings, diagnosis and therapeutical options, with the objective of highlighting its importance as a zoonosis and its relevance to the fields of cardiovascular medicine in adults and children.

  6. Patient-specific system for prognosis of surgical treatment outcomes of human cardiovascular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golyadkina, Anastasiya A.; Kalinin, Aleksey A.; Kirillova, Irina V.; Kossovich, Elena L.; Kossovich, Leonid Y.; Menishova, Liyana R.; Polienko, Asel V.

    2015-03-01

    Object of study: Improvement of life quality of patients with high stroke risk ia the main goal for development of system for patient-specific modeling of cardiovascular system. This work is dedicated at increase of safety outcomes for surgical treatment of brain blood supply alterations. The objects of study are common carotid artery, internal and external carotid arteries and bulb. Methods: We estimated mechanical properties of carotid arteries tissues and patching materials utilized at angioplasty. We studied angioarchitecture features of arteries. We developed and clinically adapted computer biomechanical models, which are characterized by geometrical, physical and mechanical similarity with carotid artery in norm and with pathology (atherosclerosis, pathological tortuosity, and their combination). Results: Collaboration of practicing cardiovascular surgeons and specialists in the area of Mathematics and Mechanics allowed to successfully conduct finite-element modeling of surgical treatment taking into account various features of operation techniques and patching materials for a specific patient. Numerical experiment allowed to reveal factors leading to brain blood supply decrease and atherosclerosis development. Modeling of carotid artery reconstruction surgery for a specific patient on the basis of the constructed biomechanical model demonstrated the possibility of its application in clinical practice at approximation of numerical experiment to the real conditions.

  7. Multistructure index in revealing complexity of regulatory mechanisms of human cardiovascular system at rest and orthostatic stress in healthy humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowiec, Danuta; Graff, Beata; Struzik, Zbigniew R.

    2017-02-01

    Biological regulation is sufficiently complex to pose an enduring challenge for characterization of both its equilibrium and transient non-equilibrium dynamics. Two univariate but coupled observables, heart rate and systolic blood pressure, are commonly characterized in the benchmark example of the human cardiovascular regulatory system. Asymmetric distributions of accelerations and decelerations of heart rate, as well as rises and falls in systolic blood pressure, recorded in humans during a head-up tilt test provide insights into the dynamics of cardiovascular response to a rapid, controlled deregulation of the system's homeostasis. The baroreflex feedback loop is assumed to be the fundamental physiological mechanism for ensuring homeostatic blood supply to distant organs at rest and during orthostatic stress, captured in a classical beat-to-beat autoregressive model of baroreflex by de Boer et al. (1987). For model corroboration, a multistructure index statistic is proposed, seamlessly evaluating the size spectrum of magnitudes of neural reflexes such as baroreflex, responsible for maintaining the homeostatic dynamics. The multistructure index exposes a distinctly different dynamics of multiscale asymmetry between results obtained from real-life signals recorded from healthy subjects and those simulated using both the classical and perturbed versions of the model. Nonlinear effects observed suggest the pronounced presence of complex mechanisms resulting from baroreflex regulation when a human is at rest, which is aggravated in the system's response to orthostatic stress. Using our methodology of multistructure index, we therefore show a marked difference between model and real-life scenarios, which we attribute to multiscale asymmetry of non-linear origin in real-life signals, which we are not reproducible by the classical model.

  8. Fundamentals of laser light interaction with human tissue, especially in the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haina, D; Landthaler, M

    1988-06-01

    The absorption of single photons in the molecules of biological tissue can induce various reactions. For the most medical laser applications the transformation from radiation energy into heat is relevant. The laser beam is used for coagulation or vaporization of tissue. The changes in tissue, which are created by light of different wavelengths depends on the thermal and optical properties (absorption and scatting) of tissue but also on the parameters of irradiation. As an example measurements from human skin are discussed. In the cardiovascular system laser light must have a clearly defined effect. Atherosclerotic plaques of different consistence have to be vaporized without damage of the vessel walls. From different reasons the usual medical CW-lasers, Argon-laser, CO2-laser and Nd:YAG-laser, are not optimal for direct ablation of arterial occlusions. In order to mimize reocclusion the walls of the channels have to be completely smooth and free of coagulation necrosis. This can be obtained by short laser pulses. Selection of a light wavelength, which is stronger absorbed in atherosclerotic plaques than in vessel walls and additional selective staining are two ways to reduce the risk of damaging the vessel walls.

  9. Impact of the human circadian system, exercise, and their interaction on cardiovascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Frank A J L; Hu, Kun; Evoniuk, Heather; Kelly, Erin E; Malhotra, Atul; Hilton, Michael F; Shea, Steven A

    2010-11-23

    The risk of adverse cardiovascular events peaks in the morning (≈9:00 AM) with a secondary peak in the evening (≈8:00 PM) and a trough at night. This pattern is generally believed to be caused by the day/night distribution of behavioral triggers, but it is unknown whether the endogenous circadian system contributes to these daily fluctuations. Thus, we tested the hypotheses that the circadian system modulates autonomic, hemodynamic, and hemostatic risk markers at rest, and that behavioral stressors have different effects when they occur at different internal circadian phases. Twelve healthy adults were each studied in a 240-h forced desynchrony protocol in dim light while standardized rest and exercise periods were uniformly distributed across the circadian cycle. At rest, there were large circadian variations in plasma cortisol (peak-to-trough ≈85% of mean, peaking at a circadian phase corresponding to ≈9:00 AM) and in circulating catecholamines (epinephrine, ≈70%; norepinephrine, ≈35%, peaking during the biological day). At ≈8:00 PM, there was a circadian peak in blood pressure and a trough in cardiac vagal modulation. Sympathetic variables were consistently lowest and vagal markers highest during the biological night. We detected no simple circadian effect on hemostasis, although platelet aggregability had two peaks: at ≈noon and ≈11:00 PM. There was circadian modulation of the cardiovascular reactivity to exercise, with greatest vagal withdrawal at ≈9:00 AM and peaks in catecholamine reactivity at ≈9:00 AM and ≈9:00 PM. Thus, the circadian system modulates numerous cardiovascular risk markers at rest as well as their reactivity to exercise, with resultant profiles that could potentially contribute to the day/night pattern of adverse cardiovascular events.

  10. Multiscale model of the human cardiovascular system: Description of heart failure and comparison of contractility indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosta, S; Negroni, J; Lascano, E; Dauby, P C

    2017-02-01

    A multiscale model of the cardiovascular system is presented. Hemodynamics is described by a lumped parameter model, while heart contraction is described at the cellular scale. An electrophysiological model and a mechanical model were coupled and adjusted so that the pressure and volume of both ventricles are linked to the force and length of a half-sarcomere. Particular attention was paid to the extreme values of the sarcomere length, which must keep physiological values. This model is able to reproduce healthy behavior, preload variations experiments, and ventricular failure. It also allows to compare the relevance of standard cardiac contractility indices. This study shows that the theoretical gold standard for assessing cardiac contractility, namely the end-systolic elastance, is actually load-dependent and therefore not a reliable index of cardiac contractility.

  11. Phase synchronization of oscillations in cardiovascular and respiratory systems in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankanag, Arina V.; Grinevich, Andrey A.; Tikhonova, Irina V.; Chaplygina, Alina V.; Chemeris, Nikolay K.

    2017-04-01

    Phase synchronization between blood flow oscillations of left and right forearm skin sites, heart rate variability (HRV) and breath rate were studied from healthy volunteers at rest. The degree of synchronization between the phases of the analyzed signals was estimated from the value of the wavelet phase coherence. High medians of values of phase wavelet coherence function were obtained for the endothelial, neurogenic, myogenic and cardiac intervals. Significant phase synchronization were demonstrated between HRV and skin blood flow oscillations in both left and right forearms in a wide frequency range from 0.04 to 0.4 Hz. Six participants exhibited low phase synchronization (rate and HRV, while nine participants had high phase synchronization (> 0.5). This distribution was not affected by the sex or sympathovagal status of volunteers. Participants with low phase synchronization between breath rate and HRV featured low phase synchronization (rate and blood flow oscillations in both forearms. Contrariwise, in subjects with high phase synchronization between respiratory rhythm and HRV both low and high phase synchronization between breath rate and blood flow oscillations in both forearms was observed. The results obtained allow us to suggest that the organism possesses a mechanism mediating the synchronization of blood flow oscillations in the skin microvasculature with all other periodical processes across the cardiovascular system, in particular, with HRV and breath rate over a wide frequency range.

  12. [Thyroid and cardiovascular system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallowitsch, Hans-Jürgen

    2005-10-01

    The cardiocirculatory changes in hyperthyroidism seem to be an accommodation to the increased metabolic demands and lead to an increased perfusion of the peripheral tissues. Due to the influence of elevated thyroid hormone levels, contractility, stroke volume, resting heart rate, and contraction and relaxation velocity of the left ventricle increase. Caused by direct effect on the smooth vascular muscle, systemic vascular resistance is decreased with the consequence of a diminished afterload and an increased cardiac efficiency. The activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosteron system and the increased production of erythropoietin additionally lead to an increased blood volume, which increases cardiac preload together with the increased venous backflow. Manifest hypothyroidism is characterized by bradycardia and diastolic dysfunction in rest and systolic dysfunction at stress. Despite a slight increase of diastolic blood pressure due to an increased systemic vascular resistance, blood pressure remains nearly stable because of diminished cardiac output. Hypercholesterinaemia and diastolic hypertension in hypothyroid patients can lead to the development of arteriosclerosis and coronary heart disease (CHD). Also subclinical hypothyroidism is associated with a significantly higher risk for arteriosclerosis and CHD, whereas subclinical hyperthyroidism seems to be associated with an increased mortality for all reasons, especially for cardiovascular diseases.

  13. Envejecimiento del sistema cardiovascular Cardiovascular system aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M Ocampo

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available El envejecimiento del sistema cardiovascular está asociado con un número característico de cambios a nivel bioquímico, histológico y morfológico. Sin embargo, no todas las modificaciones presentadas se asocian con deterioro en la función. Entre los cambios a nivel cardiaco se tienen: disminución en el número de miocitos y en las células del sistema de conducción cardiaca, desarrollo de fibrosis, cambios en el transporte de calcio a través de las membranas y disminución del cronotropismo, inotropismo y lusitropismo mediados por estímulo b-adrenérgico. A nivel vascular, hay incremento en la rigidez de la pared de las arterias, con aumento en la velocidad de la onda de pulso, disfunción endotelial y disminución de la vasodilatación mediada por estímulo b-adrenérgico. Durante el reposo el sistema cardiovascular es capaz de desarrollar mecanismos adaptativos eficientes, pero en situaciones de estrés como el ejercicio, los cambios asociados con el envejecimiento se hacen evidentes ya que está disminuida la capacidad para obtener la frecuencia cardiaca máxima, está incrementada la postcarga y hay disminución de la contractilidad intrínseca. Por lo anterior, los ancianos deben utilizar al máximo el mecanismo de Frank-Starling para mantener el gasto cardiaco. Los cambios estructurales y funcionales asociados con el envejecimiento cardiovascular, disminuyen de forma significativa el umbral en el cual las enfermedades cardiacas llegan a ser evidentes, y deben ser conocidos por el personal de salud encargado de cuidar a los ancianos.Cardiovascular aging is associated with characteristic biochemical, histological and morphological changes. Nevertheless, these changes are not necessarily associated to a deterioration in its function. Among the cardiac changes found, there is a reduction in the number of myocytes and of the cardiac conduction system cells, development of fibrosis, changes in the trans-membrane calcium transport and a

  14. Human and equine cardiovascular endocrinology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vekens, Nicky Van Der; Hunter, Ingrid; Gøtze, Jens Peter

    2013-01-01

    important species differences, which can partly be explained by variations in physiology or pathophysiology. Most important are physiological differences in heart rate, cardiovascular response to exercise, food and water intake, and molecular elimination in plasma. Pathological differences are even more...... prominent. In humans, troponins and natriuretic peptides are mostly used for the diagnosis of acute coronary syndromes and heart failure. These cardiac entities, however, are rare in horses. In this species, cardiac biomarkers are rather proposed for the assessment of valvular or myocardial disease...

  15. Human postmortem device retrieval and analysis--orthopaedic, cardiovascular, and dental systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemons, J; Brott, B; Eberhardt, A

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of decades of analyzing implant devices, tissues, and clinical records from revision surgical explants (called device failure), studies now include postmortem donors and in situ conditions (called success). A key issue has been information exchange from an interdisciplinary team where basic physical and biological studies complement details of the clinical conditions for each device. Overall, the summary information has shown that most revisions were based on factors associated with the patient health, disease, and compliance, with few outcomes directly correlated with technology and device-specific factors. However, because of the large numbers of devices implanted annually (millions), any sampling that reveals adverse circumstances could result in a high level of importance and the need for additional studies of this type. Experience from prior retrieval and analysis demonstrates significant value where peer reviewed results from investigations have altered the discipline and have improved the quality and longevity of health care associated with implanted devices. This report summarizes completed and ongoing studies of cardiovascular, dental, and orthopaedic systems. Endovascular stents from autopsies showed damage including fretting and corrosion from overlapping and intersecting conditions, plus some corrosion and element transfers to tissues from individual stents. Studies are proposed to increase numbers to evaluate clinical significance. Dental implants from postmortem donors that functioned more than 10 years provided evaluations of cobalt alloy devices and calcium phosphate bone graft substitutes originally investigated in the 1970s. Tissue integration and stability correlated with data from prior laboratory in vitro and in vivo investigations. Studies of articulation and fixation from orthopaedic total joint arthroplasties showed some limitations related to surface changes of YTZ zirconia, specific damage due to implantation procedures, which

  16. Role of Telomerase in the Cardiovascular System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Zurek

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aging is one major risk factor for the incidence of cardiovascular diseases and the development of atherosclerosis. One important enzyme known to be involved in aging processes is Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (TERT. After the discovery of the enzyme in humans, TERT had initially only been attributed to germ line cells, stem cells and cancer cells. However, over the last few years it has become clear that TERT is also active in cells of the cardiovascular system including cardiac myocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts. Interference with the activity of this enzyme greatly contributes to cardiovascular diseases. This review will summarize the findings on the role of TERT in cardiovascular cells. Moreover, recent findings concerning TERT in different mouse models with respect to cardiovascular diseases will be described. Finally, the extranuclear functions of TERT will be covered within this review.

  17. Thyroid function disorders and cardiovascular system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E A Troshina

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism on cardiovascular system and cardiovascular events mortality risk is reviewed in this article. Also the problems of levothyroxine replacement in hypothyroid patient with cardiovascular diseases are discussed.

  18. Thyroid function disorders and cardiovascular system

    OpenAIRE

    E.A. Troshina; M Y Yukina; N A Ogneva; N V Mazurina

    2010-01-01

    The effects of hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism on cardiovascular system and cardiovascular events mortality risk is reviewed in this article. Also the problems of levothyroxine replacement in hypothyroid patient with cardiovascular diseases are discussed.

  19. Nitric oxide and cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengel, Atiye; Sahinarslan, Asife

    2006-12-01

    Endothelium has many important functions including the control of blood-tissue permeability and vascular tonus, regulation of vascular surface properties for homeostasis and inflammation. Nitric oxide is the chief molecule in regulation of endothelial functions. Nitric oxide deficiency, which is also known as endothelial dysfunction, is the first step for the occurrence of many disease states in cardiovascular system including heart failure, hypertension, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus, hyperhomocysteinemia and smoking. This review deals with the importance of nitric oxide for cardiovascular system. It also includes the latest improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of endothelial dysfunction.

  20. PPAR-gamma in the Cardiovascular System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Sheng Zhong; Ivashchenko, Christine Y; Usher, Michael G; Mortensen, Richard M

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma), an essential transcriptional mediator of adipogenesis, lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity, and glucose homeostasis, is increasingly recognized as a key player in inflammatory cells and in cardiovascular diseases (CVD) such as hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, congestive heart failure, and atherosclerosis. PPAR-gamma agonists, the thiazolidinediones (TZDs), increase insulin sensitivity, lower blood glucose, decrease circulating free fatty acids and triglycerides, lower blood pressure, reduce inflammatory markers, and reduce atherosclerosis in insulin-resistant patients and animal models. Human genetic studies on PPAR-gamma have revealed that functional changes in this nuclear receptor are associated with CVD. Recent controversial clinical studies raise the question of deleterious action of PPAR-gamma agonists on the cardiovascular system. These complex interactions of metabolic responsive factors and cardiovascular disease promise to be important areas of focus for the future.

  1. [Thyroid hormones and cardiovascular system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Límanová, Zdeňka; Jiskra, Jan

    Cardiovascular system is essentially affected by thyroid hormones by way of their genomic and non-genomic effects. Untreated overt thyroid dysfunction is associated with higher cardiovascular risk. Although it has been studied more than 3 decades, in subclinical thyroid dysfunction the negative effect on cardiovascular system is much more controversial. Large meta-analyses within last 10 years have shown that subclinical hyperthyroidism is associated with higher cardiovascular risk than subclinical hypothyroidism. Conversely, in patients of age > 85 years subclinical hypothyroidism was linked with lower mortality. Therefore, subclinical hyperthyroidism should be rather treated in the elderly while subclinical hypothyroidism in the younger patients and the older may be just followed. An important problem on the border of endocrinology and cardiology is amiodarone thyroid dysfunction. Effective and safe treatment is preconditioned by distinguishing of type 1 and type 2 amiodarone induced hyperthyroidism. The type 1 should be treated with methimazol, therapeutic response is prolonged, according to recent knowledge immediate discontinuation of amiodarone is not routinely recommended and patient should be usually prepared to total thyroidectomy, or rather rarely 131I radioiodine ablation may be used if there is appropriate accumulation. In the type 2 there is a promt therapeutic response on glucocorticoids (within 1-2 weeks) with permanent remission or development of hypothyroidism. If it is not used for life-threatening arrhytmias, amiodarone may be discontinuated earlier (after several weeks). Amiodarone induced hypothyroidism is treated with levothyroxine without amiodarone interruption.Key words: amiodarone induced thyroid dysfunction - atrial fibrillation - cardiovascular risk - heart failure - hyperthyroidism - hypothyroidism - thyroid stimulating hormone.

  2. Cardiovascular outcome in systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voilliot, Damien; Magne, Julien; Dulgheru, Raluca; Kou, Seisyou; Henri, Christine; Caballero, Luis; De Sousa, Carla; Sprynger, Muriel; Andre, Béatrice; Pierard, Luc A; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2015-10-01

    Cardiovascular involvement is recognized as a poor prognostic factor in systemic sclerosis (SSc). The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of nailfold video-capillaroscopy (NVC), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) blood level and exercise echocardiography to predict the occurrence of cardiovascular events in SSc. We prospectively enrolled 65 patients with SSc (age 54±14 years, 30% female) followed in CHU Sart-Tilman, Liège, Belgium. All patients underwent graded semi-supine exercise echocardiography. Both baseline resting pulmonary hypertension (PH) and PH during follow-up (FUPH) were defined as systolic pulmonary arterial pressure (sPAP)>35 mmHg, and exercise-induced PH (EIPH) as sPAP>50 mmHg during exercise. EIPH was present in 21 patients. During FU (27±18 months), 13 patients developed FUPH and 9 presented cardiovascular complications. Patients with cardiovascular events were significantly older (63±14 vs 52±13 years; P=0.03), presented more frequently NVC grade>2 (89 vs 43%; P=0.009), had higher resting and exercise sPAP (30±6 vs 24±6; P=0.007 and 57±13 vs 44±13 vs mmHg; P=0.01, respectively), and higher BNP blood level (112±106 vs 26±19 pg/ml; P=0.0001). After adjustment for age and gender, NVC grade>2 (ß=2.4±1.1; P=0.03), EIPH (ß=2.30±1.13; P=0.04), FUPH (ß=0.24±0.09; P=0.01 and ß=3.52±1.16; P=0.002, respectively;) and BNP (ß=0.08±0.04; P=0.02) were independent predictors of CV events. Beyond age, an incremental value of EIPH, BNP and NVC grade>2 was predictive of cardiovascular events (P<0.001). Cardiovascular complications are not rare in SSc (18%). NVC, BNP blood level assessment and exercise echocardiography could be useful tools to identify patients at risk of SSc.

  3. Multifractal heart rate dynamics in human cardiovascular model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotani, Kiyoshi; Takamasu, Kiyoshi; Safonov, Leonid; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2003-05-01

    Human cardiovascular and/or cardio-respiratory systems are shown to exhibit both multifractal and synchronous dynamics, and we recently developed a nonlinear, physiologically plausible model for the synchronization between heartbeat and respiration (Kotani, et al. Phys. Rev. E 65: 051923, 2002). By using the same model, we now show the multifractality in the heart rate dynamics. We find that beat-to-beat monofractal noise (fractional Brownian motion) added to the brain stem cardiovascular areas results in significantly broader singularity spectra for heart rate through interactions between sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems. We conclude that the model proposed here would be useful in studying the complex cardiovascular and/or cardio- respiratory dynamics in humans.

  4. Cardiovascular and fluid volume control in humans in space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norsk, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The human cardiovascular system and regulation of fluid volume are heavily influenced by gravity. When decreasing the effects of gravity in humans such as by anti-orthostatic posture changes or immersion into water, venous return is increased by some 25%. This leads to central blood volume expans...... is of importance for understanding pathophysiology of heart failure, where gravity plays a strong role in fluid and sodium retention.......The human cardiovascular system and regulation of fluid volume are heavily influenced by gravity. When decreasing the effects of gravity in humans such as by anti-orthostatic posture changes or immersion into water, venous return is increased by some 25%. This leads to central blood volume...... on this complex interaction, because it is the only way to completely abolish the effects of gravity over longer periods. Results from space have been unexpected, because astronauts exhibit a fluid and sodium retaining state with activation of the sympathetic nervous system, which subjects during simulations...

  5. Biofluid Dynamics in Cardiovascular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hansol; Yoo, Su Jung; Kyung, Richard

    2011-11-01

    Biofluid dynamics is characterized by the study of fluids in biological systems. Common biofluid systems include blood flow in the cardiovascular system and airflow in the lungs. The mathematical modeling of blood flow through the complex geometry of a prosthetic heart valve is a difficult task. In such a problem the complex geometries of the valve must be modeled properly so that they can be studied numerically. The present analysis is performed on a disk-type prosthetic heart valve. The valve is assumed to be in the aortic position and observed the structure of the valve cage influence the flow field near an aortic valve. For the purpose of mathematical modeling, the laminar incompressible two-dimensional steady flow of a homogeneous Newtonian fluid with constant viscosity is assumed. The flow is considered during the greater part of systole when the valve is fully open. Convergent numerical solutions are obtained for Reynolds numbers of 30, 180, 900 and 4500. Stream function, horizontal velocity, vertical velocity and shear stress solutions are computed at every grid point.

  6. Mental stress and human cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esler, Murray

    2017-03-01

    The London physician and neuroanatomist Thomas Willis in the 17th century correctly attributed the source of emotions to the brain, not the heart as believed in antiquity. Contemporary research documents the phenomenon of "triggered" heart disease, when the autonomic nervous system control of the heart by the brain goes awry, producing heart disease of sudden onset, precipitated by acute emotional upheaval. This can take the form of, variously, cardiac arrhythmias, myocardial infarction, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy and sudden death. Chronic psychological distress also can have adverse cardiovascular consequences, in the causal linkage of depressive illness to heart disease, and in the probable causation of atherosclerosis and hypertension by chronic mental stress. In patients with essential hypertension, stress biomarkers are present. The sympathetic nervous system is the usual mediator between these acute and chronic psychological substrates and cardiovascular disease.

  7. Exercise and the Cardiovascular System

    OpenAIRE

    Saeid Golbidi; Ismail Laher

    2012-01-01

    There are alarming increases in the incidence of obesity, insulin resistance, type II diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. The risk of these diseases is significantly reduced by appropriate lifestyle modifications such as increased physical activity. However, the exact mechanisms by which exercise influences the development and progression of cardiovascular disease are unclear. In this paper we review some important exercise-induced changes in cardiac, vascular, and blood tissues and discuss...

  8. Detection of cardiovascular anomalies: Hybrid systems approach

    KAUST Repository

    Ledezma, Fernando

    2012-06-06

    In this paper, we propose a hybrid interpretation of the cardiovascular system. Based on a model proposed by Simaan et al. (2009), we study the problem of detecting cardiovascular anomalies that can be caused by variations in some physiological parameters, using an observerbased approach. We present the first numerical results obtained. © 2012 IFAC.

  9. Exact Modeling of Cardiovascular System Using Lumped Method

    CERN Document Server

    Ghasemalizadeh, Omid; Firoozabadi, Bahar; Hassani, Kamran

    2014-01-01

    Electrical analogy (Lumped method) is an easy way to model human cardiovascular system. In this paper Lumped method is used for simulating a complete model. It describes a 36-vessel model and cardiac system of human body with details that could show hydrodynamic parameters of cardiovascular system. Also this paper includes modeling of pulmonary, atrium, left and right ventricles with their equivalent circuits. Exact modeling of right and left ventricles pressure increases the accuracy of our simulation. In this paper we show that a calculated pressure for aorta from our complex circuit is near to measured pressure by using advanced medical instruments.

  10. Vitamin D and the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beveridge, L A; Witham, M D

    2013-08-01

    Vitamin D, a secosteroid hormone, affects multiple biological pathways via both genomic and nongenomic signalling. Several pathways have potential benefit to cardiovascular health, including effects on parathyroid hormone, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, vascular endothelial growth factor and cytokine production, as well as direct effects on endothelial cell function and myocyte calcium influx. Observational data supports a link between low vitamin D metabolite levels and cardiovascular health. Cross-sectional data shows associations between low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and stroke, myocardial infarction, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and heart failure. Longitudinal data also suggests a relationship with incident hypertension and new cardiovascular events. However, these associations are potentially confounded by reverse causality and by the effects that other cardiovascular risk factors have on vitamin D metabolite levels. Intervention studies to date suggest a modest antihypertensive effect of vitamin D, no effect on serum lipids, a small positive effect on insulin resistance and fasting glucose, and equivocal actions on arterial stiffness and endothelial function. Analysis of cardiovascular event data collected from osteoporosis trials does not currently show a clear signal for reduced cardiovascular events with vitamin D supplementation, but results may be confounded by the coadministration of calcium, and by the secondary nature of the analyses. Despite mechanistic and observational data that suggest a protective role for vitamin D in cardiovascular disease, intervention studies to date are less promising. Large trials using cardiovascular events as a primary outcome are needed before vitamin D can be recommended as a therapy for cardiovascular disease.

  11. The cardiovascular system, as understood in antiquity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Cilliers

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular concepts in antiquity were primitive up to the early 5th century BC, when Greek philosopher-physicians like Empedocles and Diogenes divorced human physiology from its previous magico-religious base in order to find answers in the natural sciences. The heart was not initially seen as central to the cardiovascular system – blood (containing life-giving pneuma moved through the body in blood vessels (phlebes by way of a spontaneous “ebb and flow” motion. Their perceived anatomical vascular models were quite fanciful, but nevertheless accepted by the Hippocratic doctors, who, except for a single work, The heart (containing a useful description of the heart, added little of significance to the subject. Based on animal dissections, post-Hippocratic authors like Diocles and Praxagoras first distinguished between arteries and veins, confirmed that the heart had two main chambers (ventricles and extended the theory that “innate heat” in the left ventricle produced pneuma which filled the arteries; only veins contained blood, produced in the right ventricle. Basing their theories on human dissections the Alexandrians, Herophilus and Erasistratus (3rd century BC produced the first accurate descriptions of the heart and major components of the vascular system. Erasistratus even postulated minute (normally non-functional peripheral arterio-venous anastomoses. The heart’s pump function was only partially understood – diastole was seen as the active phase of the cardiac cycle (sucking blood into the heart, and the pulse as inherent contraction of the arterial wall. After Herophilus and Erasistratus human dissection ceased, putting an end to further significant developments in unravelling the cardiovascular system. In the 2nd century AD, Celsus consolidated known knowledge, even adding minor contributions (e.g. a description of the coronary vessels based on his own animal dissections. He mainly confirmed the Alexandrians’ findings

  12. [Hormones and the cardiovascular system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacka, Katarzyna; Czyzyk, Adam

    2008-01-01

    Hormones have an influence on many tissues and organs, including the cardio-vascular system (CVS). Depending on their activity on CVS, they can be divided into 4 groups: having hypertensive or hypotensive influence and chronotropic positive or negative action. Endocrine regulation in CVS may occur in many ways. Apart from hormones usually connected with CVS regulation, other more recently, discovered ones can act on it. A few of these act directly through specific receptors in heart or vessel wall cells, whereas some act indirectly - stimulating other neuroendocrine factors. Additionally, novel mechanisms of signal transduction have been discovered for steroid and thyroid hormones, which are independent of gene transcription regulation and are - known as "nongenomic". Hormones which increase blood pressure include: urotensin II, endothelins, angiotensin II, catecholamines, aldosterone, antidiuretic hormone, glucocorticosteroids, thyroid hormones, growth hormone and leptin. On the other hand, blood pressure can be decreased by: natriuretic peptides, the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) family, angiotensin 1-7, substance P, neurokinin A, ghrelin, Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), oxytocin, and, sex hormones. Hormones which when appearing in excess increase the heart rate are: catecholamines, endothelins, glucocorticosteroids, thyroid hormones, leptin and PTHrP. Those which decrease the heart rate include: natriuretic peptides, substance P, neurokinin A, oxytocin, angiotensin 1-7. This paper describes the contemporary view of the functions of hormones which act on the vessel tree and heart. The particular effect of mediator depends on many circumstances i.e.: hormone concentration, receptor type. It may also undergo contraregulation. The majority of those hormones play an important role in the pathogenesis of CVS diseases', which can result in the development of new medicines.

  13. Reintrepreting the cardiovascular system as a mechanical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Diogo; Machado, José; Minas, Graça; Soares, Filomena; Barros, Carla; Leão, Celina Pinto

    2013-10-01

    The simulation of the different physiological systems is very useful as a pedagogical tool, allowing a better understanding of the mechanisms and the functions of the processes. The observation of the physiological phenomena through mechanical simulators represents a great asset. Furthermore, the development of these simulators allows reinterpreting physiological systems, with the advantage of using the same transducers and sensors that are commonly used in diagnostic and therapeutic cardiovascular procedures for the monitoring of system' parameters. The cardiovascular system is one of the most important systems of the human body and has been the target of several biomedical studies. The present work describes a mechanical simulation of the cardiovascular system, in particularly, the systemic circulation, which can be described in terms of its hemodynamic variables. From the mechanical process and parameters, physiological system's behavior was reproduced, as accurately as possible.

  14. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in systemic hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maceira Alicia M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Systemic hypertension is a highly prevalent potentially modifiable cardiovascular risk factor. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of underlying causes for hypertension, in assessing cardiovascular complications of hypertension, and in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease process. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR provides accurate and reproducible measures of ventricular volumes, mass, function and haemodynamics as well as uniquely allowing tissue characterization of diffuse and focal fibrosis. In addition, CMR is well suited for exclusion of common secondary causes for hypertension. We review the current and emerging clinical and research applications of CMR in hypertension.

  15. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in systemic hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Systemic hypertension is a highly prevalent potentially modifiable cardiovascular risk factor. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of underlying causes for hypertension, in assessing cardiovascular complications of hypertension, and in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease process. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) provides accurate and reproducible measures of ventricular volumes, mass, function and haemodynamics as well as uniquely allowing tissue characterization of diffuse and focal fibrosis. In addition, CMR is well suited for exclusion of common secondary causes for hypertension. We review the current and emerging clinical and research applications of CMR in hypertension. PMID:22559053

  16. Thyroid disease and the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danzi, Sara; Klein, Irwin

    2014-06-01

    Thyroid hormones, specifically triiodothyronine (T3), have significant effects on the heart and cardiovascular system. Hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, subclinical thyroid disease, and low T3 syndrome each cause cardiac and cardiovascular abnormalities through both genomic and nongenomic effects on cardiac myocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells. In compromised health, such as occurs in heart disease, alterations in thyroid hormone metabolism may further impair cardiac and cardiovascular function. Diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease may benefit from including analysis of thyroid hormone status, including serum total T3 levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Recent genetic discoveries implicating ion channels in human cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Alfred L

    2014-04-01

    The term 'channelopathy' refers to human genetic disorders caused by mutations in genes encoding ion channels or their interacting proteins. Recent advances in this field have been enabled by next-generation DNA sequencing strategies such as whole exome sequencing with several intriguing and unexpected discoveries. This review highlights important discoveries implicating ion channels or ion channel modulators in cardiovascular disorders including cardiac arrhythmia susceptibility, cardiac conduction phenotypes, pulmonary and systemic hypertension. These recent discoveries further emphasize the importance of ion channels in the pathophysiology of human disease and as important druggable targets.

  18. Cardiovascular pathology in patients with human immune deficiency virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Valenzuela-Rodríguez, Germán; Fellow of the American College of Physicians

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection increases both morbidity and mortality by inducing severe immunosupression that generates opportunistic infections. Following use of high active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in infected patients, infection-related mortality has decreased and both survival and cardiovascular disease have increased. The etiology of cardiovascular disease could be related to either infection itself, proatherogenic conditions associated with antiretroviral therapy or...

  19. Modulation of the cardiovascular system by leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, E Dale; Sweeney, Gary

    2012-10-01

    It is well established that individuals with the metabolic syndrome have a significantly increased risk of cardiovascular disease and much effort has been expended to elicit the underlying mechanisms. Various studies have proposed that excessive or deficient physiological effects mediated by leptin make an important contribution, yet many paradoxical observations often preclude a clear definition of the role of leptin. This review article will briefly discuss principal and most recent evidence on direct and indirect regulation of the cardiovascular system by leptin, focusing on cardiac structural and functional as well as vascular effects.

  20. Thyroid hormone and the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danzi, Sara; Klein, Irwin

    2012-03-01

    Thyroid hormone has profound effects on the heart and cardiovascular system. This article describes the cellular mechanisms by which thyroid hormone acts at the level of the cardiac myocyte and the vascular smooth muscle cell to alter phenotype and physiology. Because it is well established that thyroid hormone, specifically T(3), acts on almost every cell and organ in the body, studies on the regulation of thyroid hormone transport into cardiac and vascular tissue have added clinical significance. The characteristic changes in cardiovascular hemodynamics and metabolism that accompany thyroid disease states can then be best understood at the cellular level. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Testosterone Replacement Therapy and the Cardiovascular System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, Sahar

    2016-04-01

    As testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) has emerged as a commonly prescribed therapy for symptomatic low testosterone, conflicting data have been reported in terms of both its efficacy and potential adverse outcomes. One of the most controversial associations has been that of TRT and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This review briefly provides background on the history of TRT, the indications for TRT, and the data behind TRT for symptomatic low testosterone. It then specifically delves into the rather limited data for cardiovascular outcomes of those with low endogenous testosterone and those who receive TRT. The available body of literature strongly suggests that more work, by way of clinical trials, needs to be done to better understand the impact of testosterone and TRT on the cardiovascular system.

  2. Cardiovascular Deconditioning in Humans: Alteration in Cardiovascular Regulation and Function During Simulated Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Richard

    1999-01-01

    Alterations in cardiovascular regulation and function that occur during and after space flight have been reported. These alterations are manifested, for example, by reduced orthostatic tolerance upon reentry to the earth's gravity from space. However, the precise physiologic mechanisms responsible for these alterations remain to be fully elucidated. Perhaps, as a result, effective countermeasures have yet to be developed. In this project we apply a powerful, new method - cardiovascular system identification (CSI) - for the study of the effects of space flight on the cardiovascular system so that effective countermeasures can be developed. CSI involves the mathematical analysis of second-to-second fluctuations in non-invasively measured heart rate, arterial blood pressure (ABP), and instantaneous lung volume (ILV - respiratory activity) in order to characterize quantitatively the physiologic mechanisms responsible for the couplings between these signals. Through the characterization of all the physiologic mechanisms coupling these signals, CSI provides a model of the closed-loop cardiovascular regulatory state in an individual subject. The model includes quantitative descriptions of the heart rate baroreflex, autonomic function, as well as other important physiologic mechanisms. We are in the process of incorporating beat-to-beat fluctuations of stroke volume into the CSI technique in order to quantify additional physiologic mechanisms such as those involved in control of peripheral vascular resistance and alterations in cardiac contractility. We apply CSI in conjunction with the two general protocols of the Human Studies Core project. The first protocol involves ground-based, human head down tilt bed rest to simulate microgravity and acute stressors - upright tilt, standing and bicycle exercise - to provide orthostatic and exercise challenges. The second protocol is intended to be the same as the first but with the addition of sleep deprivation to determine whether

  3. Cardiovascular implications from untreated human immunodeficiency virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Jason V; Lundgren, Jens D

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) has become an important cause of morbidity and mortality among individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection with access to antiretroviral medications, as the risk for AIDS has fallen and life expectancy improved. Traditional CVD risk...

  4. Early life environment and the developing cardiovascular system

    OpenAIRE

    Idris, N.S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The dynamics of cardiovascular system development in childhood are still largely unknown. Despite its known sensitivity to small perturbations, it has not been fully elucidated how the cardiovascular system evolves and responds to different stimuli and how these impact the future cardiovascular status. This thesis is basically aimed at exploring the effects of several possible postnatal determinantson the developing cardiovascular system. These early life determinants perhaps immed...

  5. Endocannabinoids and the Cardiovascular System in Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Saoirse Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system is widely distributed throughout the cardiovascular system. Endocannabinoids play a minimal role in the regulation of cardiovascular function in normal conditions, but are altered in most cardiovascular disorders. In shock, endocannabinoids released within blood mediate the associated hypotension through CB(1) activation. In hypertension, there is evidence for changes in the expression of CB(1), and CB(1) antagonism reduces blood pressure in obese hypertensive and diabetic patients. The endocannabinoid system is also upregulated in cardiac pathologies. This is likely to be cardioprotective, via CB(2) and CB(1) (lesser extent). In the vasculature, endocannabinoids cause vasorelaxation through activation of multiple target sites, inhibition of calcium channels, activation of potassium channels, NO production and the release of vasoactive substances. Changes in the expression or function of any of these pathways alter the vascular effect of endocannabinoids. Endocannabinoids have positive (CB(2)) and negative effects (CB(1)) on the progression of atherosclerosis. However, any negative effects of CB(1) may not be consequential, as chronic CB(1) antagonism in large scale human trials was not associated with significant reductions in atheroma. In neurovascular disorders such as stroke, endocannabinoids are upregulated and protective, involving activation of CB(1), CB(2), TRPV1 and PPARα. Although most of this evidence is from preclinical studies, it seems likely that cannabinoid-based therapies could be beneficial in a range of cardiovascular disorders.

  6. Cardiovascular system simulation in biomedical engineering education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rideout, V. C.

    1972-01-01

    Use of complex cardiovascular system models, in conjunction with a large hybrid computer, in biomedical engineering courses. A cardiovascular blood pressure-flow model, driving a compartment model for the study of dye transport, was set up on the computer for use as a laboratory exercise by students who did not have the computer experience or skill to be able to easily set up such a simulation involving some 27 differential equations running at 'real time' rate. The students were given detailed instructions regarding the model, and were then able to study effects such as those due to septal and valve defects upon the pressure, flow, and dye dilution curves. The success of this experiment in the use of involved models in engineering courses was such that it seems that this type of laboratory exercise might be considered for use in physiology courses as an adjunct to animal experiments.

  7. Differential Role of Leptin and Adiponectin in Cardiovascular System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Ghantous

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptin and adiponectin are differentially expressed adipokines in obesity and cardiovascular diseases. Leptin levels are directly associated with adipose tissue mass, while adiponectin levels are downregulated in obesity. Although significantly produced by adipocytes, leptin is also produced by vascular smooth muscle cells and cardiomyocytes. Plasma leptin concentrations are elevated in cases of cardiovascular diseases, such as hypertension, congestive heart failure, and myocardial infarction. As for the event of left ventricular hypertrophy, researchers have been stirring controversy about the role of leptin in this form of cardiac remodeling. In this review, we discuss how leptin has been shown to play an antihypertrophic role in the development of left ventricular hypertrophy through in vitro experiments, population-based cross-sectional studies, and longitudinal cohort studies. Conversely, we also examine how leptin may actually promote left ventricular hypertrophy using in vitro analysis and human-based univariate and multiple linear stepwise regression analysis. On the other hand, as opposed to leptin’s generally detrimental effects on the cardiovascular system, adiponectin is a cardioprotective hormone that reduces left ventricular and vascular hypertrophy, oxidative stress, and inflammation. In this review, we also highlight adiponectin signaling and its protective actions on the cardiovascular system.

  8. The vestibulosympathetic reflex in humans: neural interactions between cardiovascular reflexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Chester A.; Monahan, Kevin D.

    2002-01-01

    1. Over the past 5 years, there has been emerging evidence that the vestibular system regulates sympathetic nerve activity in humans. We have studied this issue in humans by using head-down rotation (HDR) in the prone position. 2. These studies have clearly demonstrated increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and calf vascular resistance during HDR. These responses are mediated by engagement of the otolith organs and not the semicircular canals. 3. However, differential activation of sympathetic nerve activity has been observed during HDR. Unlike MSNA, skin sympathetic nerve activity does not increase with HDR. 4. Examination of the vestibulosympathetic reflex with other cardiovascular reflexes (i.e. barorereflexes and skeletal muscle reflexes) has shown an additive interaction for MSNA. 5. The additive interaction between the baroreflexes and vestibulosympathetic reflex suggests that the vestibular system may assist in defending against orthostatic challenges in humans by elevating MSNA beyond that of the baroreflexes. 6. In addition, the further increase in MSNA via otolith stimulation during isometric handgrip, when arterial pressure is elevated markedly, indicates that the vestibulosympathetic reflex is a powerful activator of MSNA and may contribute to blood pressure and flow regulation during dynamic exercise. 7. Future studies will help evaluate the importance of the vestibulosympathetic reflex in clinical conditions associated with orthostatic hypotension.

  9. [Cardiovascular manifestations in progressive systemic sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badui, E; Robles, E; Hernández, C; García Rubí, D; Mintz, G

    1985-01-01

    We studied 20 consecutive patients with progressive systemic sclerosis from the cardiological point of view through non invasive methods. Sixteen (80%) patients had some kind of cardiovascular complications as shown by any of the used methods. a) fourteen (70%) referred some type of cardiac symptoms. b) eleven (55%) had an abnormal cardiac examination and 10 (50%) had arterial hypertension. c) Electrocardiogram: sixteen (80%) were abnormal. Among them, three cases (15%) had bifascicular block, complication considered up till now as rare. d) Cardiac X Ray Series: Fourteen (70%) were abnormal mainly due to pulmonary fibrosis (55%). e) Echocardiogram: 45% of them showed some kind of abnormality.

  10. Air pollution and its impact on the cardiovascular system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie Paris Colombini

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the great medical advances, cardiovascular disease remains one of the major causes of mortality worldwide, especially in industrialized countries. It develops as a result of countless complex interactions between genetic factors such as those related to age, sex, family history, weight, and post-menopausal status in women; and to environment-related factors such as cigarette smoking, alcohol use, eating habits, physical activity, and others. For more than a decade, several epidemiological studies have demonstrated the existence of a consistent association between air pollution and increased risk for cardiovascular events, that is, not only cardiovascular death, but also acute myocardial infarction and arrhythmias. Experimental studies in different animal species, observational studies in humans, as well as in vitro cellular and acellular models attempt to elucidate the probable biological mechanisms that lend plausibility to these associations, but they fail to do it clearly, since the severity and progression of cardiovascular disease are much more affected than is its induction. However, some effects resulting from the exposure to different air pollutants have been evidenced and the most significant of which involve pulmonary and systemic inflammatory response, blood clotting disorders, promotion and potentiation of the atherosclerotic process, and cardiac autonomic dysfunction.

  11. [Thyroid hormone and the cardiovascular system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraczek, Magdalena Maria; Łacka, Katarzyna

    2014-09-01

    It is well established that thyroid hormones affect the cardiovascular system through genomic and nongenomic actions. TRalpha1 is the major thyroid hormone receptor in the heart. T3 suppresses increased mitotic activity of stimulated cardiomyocytes. Hyperthyroidism induces a hyperdynamic cardiovascular state, which is associated with enhanced left ventricular systolic and diastolic function and the chronotropic and inotropic properties of thyroid hormones. Hypothyroidism, however, is characterized by opposite changes. In addition, thyroid hormones decrease peripheral vascular resistance, influence the rennin-angiotensin system (RAS), and increase blood volume and erythropoetin secretion with subsequent increased preload and cardiac output. Thyroid hormones play an important role in cardiac electrophysiology and have both pro- and anti-arrhytmic potential. Thyroid hormone deficiency is associated with a less favorable lipid profile. Selective modulation of the TRbeta1 receptor is considered as a potential therapeutic target to treat dyslipidemia without cardiac side effects. Thyroid hormones have a beneficial effect on limiting myocardial ischemic injury, preventing and reversing cardiac remodeling and improving cardiac hemodynamics in endstage heart failure. This is crucial because a low T3 syndrome accompanies both acute and chronic cardiac diseases.

  12. Exercise protects the cardiovascular system: effects beyond traditional risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Michael J; Green, Daniel J

    2009-12-01

    In humans, exercise training and moderate to high levels of physical activity are protective against cardiovascular disease. In fact they are 40% more protective than predicted based on the changes in traditional risk factors (blood lipids, hypertension, diabetes etc.) that they cause. In this review, we highlight the positive effects of exercise on endothelial function and the autonomic nervous system. We also ask if these effects alone, or in combination, might explain the protective effects of exercise against cardiovascular disease that appear to be independent of traditional risk factor modification. Our goal is to use selected data from our own work and that of others to stimulate debate on the nature and cause of the 'risk factor gap' associated with exercise and physical activity.

  13. Formation of the peak amplitude of blood flow oscillations at a frequency of 0.1 Hz in the human cardiovascular system by the noise effect on the heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinevich, Andrey A.; Tankanag, Arina V.; Chemeris, Nikolay K.

    2017-04-01

    In the framework of our previous hypothesis about the participation of structural and hydrodynamic properties of the vascular bed in the formation of the 0.1-Hz component of blood flow oscillations in the human cardiovascular system and on the basis of the reduced hydrodynamic model, the role of additive stochastic perturbations of the operation of the single-chamber pump that simulates the heart was investigated. It was shown that aperiodic noise modulation of the rigidity of the walls of the pump or its valves generates low-frequency oscillations of pressure of arterial vascular bed with the spectral components at a frequency close to 0.1 Hz.

  14. Space weather and cardiovascular system. New findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurfinkel, Yury; Breus, Tamara

    2014-05-01

    Researches of last two decades have shown that the cardiovascular system represents the most probable target for influence of helio - and geomagnetic activity. Both cardiovascular system and system of blood are connected very closely: one system cannot exist without another. For the same reason the effects perceived by one system, are easily transferred to another. Laboratory tests such as blood coagulation, platelet aggregation, and capillary blood velocity (CBV) performed in Scientific Clinical Center JSC "Russian Railways in patients suffering from coronary heart disease (CHD) revealed a high dependence with a level of geomagnetic activity. Results of these and other findings allow to assume that blood itself can be a sensor of geomagnetic fields variations because erythrocytes, platelets, and leucocytes bearing electric charge on membranes, and in a comparable magnetic field can change as own properties and properties of blood flow. It is interesting that not only geomagnetic disturbances, but also the periods of very quiet geomagnetic conditions affect a capillary blood velocity, slowing down it. It was shown during long-term experiment with isolation named 'MARS-500' in spatial facility of the Institute of Biomedical Problems in Moscow as imitation of an extended space mission to Mars. Using digital capillaroscope 'Russia', two crewmembers - medical doctors made records of microcirculation parameters at themselves and other four participants of 'Martian' team. Capillary records were performed before, during, and after period of isolation in medical module of MARS-500 facility. At the period of experiment nobody of crewmembers knew about real geomagnetic conditions. In days of active geomagnetic conditions average CBV has registered as 389 ± 167 μm/s, that statistically significant (p

  15. Functional food science and the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornstra, G; Barth, C A; Galli, C; Mensink, R P; Mutanen, M; Riemersma, R A; Roberfroid, M; Salminen, K; Vansant, G; Verschuren, P M

    1998-08-01

    components as the various n-3 and n-6 fatty acids and their combination, antioxidants, fibre, etc. for their effect on processes participating in arterial thrombus formation. Long-chain polyenes of the n-3 family and antioxidants can modify the activity of immunocompetent cells, but we are at an early stage of examining the role of immune function on the development of atherosclerotic plaques. Actually, there is little, if any, evidence that dietary modulation of immune system responses of cells participating in atherogenesis exerts beneficial effects. Although it seems feasible to modulate insulin sensitivity and subsequent cardiovascular risk factors by decreasing the total amount of dietary fat and increasing the proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids, additional studies on the efficacy of specific fatty acids, dietary fibre, and low-energy diets, as well as on the mechanisms involved are required to understand the real function of these dietary components. Finally, dietary supplements containing folate and vitamins B6 and/or B12 should be tested for their potential to reduce cardiovascular risk by lowering the plasma level of homocysteine.

  16. Credit scores, cardiovascular disease risk, and human capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Salomon; Caspi, Avshalom; Belsky, Daniel W; Harrington, HonaLee; Hogan, Sean; Houts, Renate; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Sanders, Seth; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E

    2014-12-02

    Credit scores are the most widely used instruments to assess whether or not a person is a financial risk. Credit scoring has been so successful that it has expanded beyond lending and into our everyday lives, even to inform how insurers evaluate our health. The pervasive application of credit scoring has outpaced knowledge about why credit scores are such useful indicators of individual behavior. Here we test if the same factors that lead to poor credit scores also lead to poor health. Following the Dunedin (New Zealand) Longitudinal Study cohort of 1,037 study members, we examined the association between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk and the underlying factors that account for this association. We find that credit scores are negatively correlated with cardiovascular disease risk. Variation in household income was not sufficient to account for this association. Rather, individual differences in human capital factors—educational attainment, cognitive ability, and self-control—predicted both credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk and accounted for ∼45% of the correlation between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk. Tracing human capital factors back to their childhood antecedents revealed that the characteristic attitudes, behaviors, and competencies children develop in their first decade of life account for a significant portion (∼22%) of the link between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk at midlife. We discuss the implications of these findings for policy debates about data privacy, financial literacy, and early childhood interventions.

  17. Credit scores, cardiovascular disease risk, and human capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Salomon; Caspi, Avshalom; Belsky, Daniel W.; Harrington, HonaLee; Hogan, Sean; Houts, Renate; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Sanders, Seth; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2014-01-01

    Credit scores are the most widely used instruments to assess whether or not a person is a financial risk. Credit scoring has been so successful that it has expanded beyond lending and into our everyday lives, even to inform how insurers evaluate our health. The pervasive application of credit scoring has outpaced knowledge about why credit scores are such useful indicators of individual behavior. Here we test if the same factors that lead to poor credit scores also lead to poor health. Following the Dunedin (New Zealand) Longitudinal Study cohort of 1,037 study members, we examined the association between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk and the underlying factors that account for this association. We find that credit scores are negatively correlated with cardiovascular disease risk. Variation in household income was not sufficient to account for this association. Rather, individual differences in human capital factors—educational attainment, cognitive ability, and self-control—predicted both credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk and accounted for ∼45% of the correlation between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk. Tracing human capital factors back to their childhood antecedents revealed that the characteristic attitudes, behaviors, and competencies children develop in their first decade of life account for a significant portion (∼22%) of the link between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk at midlife. We discuss the implications of these findings for policy debates about data privacy, financial literacy, and early childhood interventions. PMID:25404329

  18. The brain norepinephrine system, stress and cardiovascular vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Susan K; Valentino, Rita J

    2017-03-01

    Chronic exposure to psychosocial stress has adverse effects on cardiovascular health, however the stress-sensitive neurocircuitry involved remains to be elucidated. The anatomical and physiological characteristics of the locus coeruleus (LC)-norepinephrine (NE) system position it to contribute to stress-induced cardiovascular disease. This review focuses on cardiovascular dysfunction produced by social stress and a major theme highlighted is that differences in coping strategy determine individual differences in social stress-induced cardiovascular vulnerability. The establishment of different coping strategies and cardiovascular vulnerability during repeated social stress has recently been shown to parallel a unique plasticity in LC afferent regulation, resulting in either excitatory or inhibitory input to the LC. This contrasting regulation of the LC would translate to differences in cardiovascular regulation and may serve as the basis for individual differences in the cardiopathological consequences of social stress. The advances described suggest new directions for developing treatments and/or strategies for decreasing stress-induced cardiovascular vulnerability.

  19. Early life environment and the developing cardiovascular system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Idris, N.S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The dynamics of cardiovascular system development in childhood are still largely unknown. Despite its known sensitivity to small perturbations, it has not been fully elucidated how the cardiovascular system evolves and responds to different stimuli and how these impact the future cardiov

  20. Early life environment and the developing cardiovascular system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Idris, N.S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The dynamics of cardiovascular system development in childhood are still largely unknown. Despite its known sensitivity to small perturbations, it has not been fully elucidated how the cardiovascular system evolves and responds to different stimuli and how these impact the future

  1. Grape Polyphenols’ Effects in Human Cardiovascular Diseases and Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuriñe Rasines-Perea

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The consumption of fruits and vegetables, as well as foods enriched in bioactive compounds and nutraceuticals, has increased due to consumers’ interest in the relevance of food composition for human health. Considerable recent interest has focused on bioactive phenolic compounds in grape, as they possess many biological activities, such as antioxidant, cardioprotective, anticancer, anti-inflammation, anti-ageing and antimicrobial properties. Observational studies indicate that the intake of polyphenol-rich foods improves vascular health, thereby significantly reducing the risk of hypertension, and cardiovascular disease (CVD. Other researchers have described the benefits of a grape polyphenol-rich diet for other types of maladies such as diabetes mellitus. This is a comprehensive review on the consumption of polyphenolic grape compounds, concerning their potential benefits for human health in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes.

  2. Grape Polyphenols' Effects in Human Cardiovascular Diseases and Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasines-Perea, Zuriñe; Teissedre, Pierre-Louis

    2017-01-01

    The consumption of fruits and vegetables, as well as foods enriched in bioactive compounds and nutraceuticals, has increased due to consumers' interest in the relevance of food composition for human health. Considerable recent interest has focused on bioactive phenolic compounds in grape, as they possess many biological activities, such as antioxidant, cardioprotective, anticancer, anti-inflammation, anti-ageing and antimicrobial properties. Observational studies indicate that the intake of polyphenol-rich foods improves vascular health, thereby significantly reducing the risk of hypertension, and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Other researchers have described the benefits of a grape polyphenol-rich diet for other types of maladies such as diabetes mellitus. This is a comprehensive review on the consumption of polyphenolic grape compounds, concerning their potential benefits for human health in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes.

  3. Endocannabinoid system in cardiovascular disorders - new pharmacotherapeutic opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Cunha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The long history of Cannabis sativa had its development stimulated and oriented for medicine after the discovery and chemical characterization of its main active ingredient, the 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (9-THC. Consequently, a binding site for 9-THC was identified in rat brains and the first cannabinoid receptor (CB1 was cloned, followed by the CB2 and by the discover of two endogenous agonists: anandamide and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol. Cannabinoid receptors, endocannabinoids and the enzymes that catalyze its synthesis and degradation constitute the endocannabinoid system (ECS, which plays an important role in the cardiovascular system. In vivo experiments with rats have demonstrated the action of anandamide and 2-AG on the development of atherosclerotic plaque, as well as an effect on heart rate, blood pressure, vasoactivity and energy metabolism (action in dyslipidemia and obesity. Recent studies with an antagonist of CB1 receptors showed that the modulation of ECS can play an important role in reducing cardiovascular risk in obese and dyslipidemic patients. Similarly, studies in rats have demonstrated the action of CB2 receptors in adhesion, migration, proliferation and function of immune cells involved in the atherosclerotic plaque formation process. The evidence so far gathered shows that the modulation of ECS (as agonism or antagonism of its receptors is an enormous potential field for research and intervention in multiple areas of human pathophysiology. The development of selective drugs for the CB1 and CB2 receptors may open a door to new therapeutic regimens.This review article aims to address the key findings and evidences on the modulation of ECS, in order to prospect future forms of therapeutic intervention at the cardiovascular level. A recent, emerging, controversial and of undoubted scientific interest subject, which states as a potential therapeutic target to reach in the 21 st century.

  4. [Affection of cardiovascular system in diabetic patients with thyroid dysfunctions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroner, Z; Lazúrová, I

    2006-11-01

    Affection of cardiovascular system is one of the most frequent and--especially in higher age groups--the most serious clinical manifestations of thyroid dysfunction. Moreover, diabetics, mainly type 2 diabetes patients, have a marked predisposition to cardiovascular diseases, especially to atherosclerosis and its visceral complications. Simultaneous occurrence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and thyroid dysfunctions involves a very high risk of development and progression of various forms of cardiovascular diseases. There are two basal aspects of the influence of hypothyreosis on cardiovascular system. Decreasing basal metabolism in the whole organism reduces requirements on the cardiovsuclar system. The second aspect of the influence of hypothyreosis on the cardiovascular system is its atherogenic effect. Hypothyreosis in diabetics accelerates the development of chronic, primarily macroangiopathic complications. As opposed to hypothyreosis, the clinical picture of which is not characterised by cardiovascular system disorders, cardiac involvement in patients with hyperthyreosis is more pronounced. In older diabetics hyperthyreosis is often manifested only by cardiovascular symptomatology. Subclinical hyperthyreosis in DM patients may stimulate cardiac function and increase the risk of atrial fibrillation.

  5. Update: Systemic Diseases and the Cardiovascular System (II). The endocrine system and the heart: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Soo S; Pearce, Elizabeth N

    2011-03-01

    Normal endocrine function is essential for cardiovascular health. Disorders of the endocrine system, consisting of hormone hyperfunction and hypofunction, have multiple effects on the cardiovascular system. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of disorders of the pituitary, thyroid, parathyroid, and adrenal glands, with respect to the impact of endocrine dysfunction on the cardiovascular system. We also review the cardiovascular benefits of restoring normal endocrine function. Copyright © 2010 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Cardiovascular effects of recombinant human erythropoietin in predialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portolés, J; Torralbo, A; Martin, P; Rodrigo, J; Herrero, J A; Barrientos, A

    1997-04-01

    have on the cardiovascular system.

  7. Coconut oil consumption and cardiovascular risk factors in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyres, Laurence; Eyres, Michael F; Chisholm, Alexandra; Brown, Rachel C

    2016-04-01

    Coconut oil is being heavily promoted as a healthy oil, with benefits that include support of heart health. To assess the merits of this claim, the literature on the effect of coconut consumption on cardiovascular risk factors and outcomes in humans was reviewed. Twenty-one research papers were identified for inclusion in the review: 8 clinical trials and 13 observational studies. The majority examined the effect of coconut oil or coconut products on serum lipid profiles. Coconut oil generally raised total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol to a greater extent than cis unsaturated plant oils, but to a lesser extent than butter. The effect of coconut consumption on the ratio of total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was often not examined. Observational evidence suggests that consumption of coconut flesh or squeezed coconut in the context of traditional dietary patterns does not lead to adverse cardiovascular outcomes. However, due to large differences in dietary and lifestyle patterns, these findings cannot be applied to a typical Western diet. Overall, the weight of the evidence from intervention studies to date suggests that replacing coconut oil with cis unsaturated fats would alter blood lipid profiles in a manner consistent with a reduction in risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

  8. Urgent need for human resources to promote global cardiovascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedanthan, Rajesh; Fuster, Valentin

    2011-02-01

    The World Health Organization estimates the existence of a global shortage of over 4 million health-care workers. Given the growing global burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD), the shortfall in global human resources for health (HRH) is probably even greater than predicted. A critical challenge going forward is to determine how to integrate CVD-related human resource needs into the overall global HRH agenda. We describe the CVD implications of core HRH objectives, including coverage, motivation, and competence, in addition to issues such as health-care worker migration and the need for input from multiple stakeholders to successfully address the current problems. We emphasize gaps in knowledge regarding HRH for global CVD-related care and research opportunities. In light of the current global epidemiologic transition from communicable to noncommunicable diseases, now is the time for the global health community to focus on CVD-related human resource needs.

  9. Neurophysiological aspects of musical auditory stimulation on the cardiovascular system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Lima Ferreira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The literature has shown that musical stimulation can influence the cardiovascular system, however, the neurophysiological aspects of this influence are not yet fully elucidated. Objective: This study describes the influence of music on the neurophysiological mechanisms in the human body, specifically the variable blood pressure, as well as the neural mechanisms of music processing. Methods: Searches were conducted in Medline, PEDro, Lilacs and SciELO using the intersection of the keyword “music” with the keyword descriptors “blood pressure” and “neurophysiology”. Results: There were selected 11 articles, which indicated that music interferes in some aspects of physiological variables. Conclusion: Studies have indicated that music interferes on the control of blood pressure, heart and respiratory rate, through possible involvement of limbic brain areas which modulate hypothalamic-pituitary functions. Further studies are needed in order to identify the mechanisms by which this influence occurs.

  10. Cardiovascular Events in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; Rúa-Figueroa, Íñigo; López-Longo, Francisco J.; Galindo-Izquierdo, María; Calvo-Alén, Jaime; Olivé-Marqués, Alejandro; Ordóñez-Cañizares, Carmen; Martín-Martínez, María A.; Blanco, Ricardo; Melero-González, Rafael; Ibáñez-Rúan, Jesús; Bernal-Vidal, José Antonio; Tomero-Muriel, Eva; Uriarte-Isacelaya, Esther; Horcada-Rubio, Loreto; Freire-González, Mercedes; Narváez, Javier; Boteanu, Alina L.; Santos-Soler, Gregorio; Andreu, José L.; Pego-Reigosa, José M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This article estimates the frequency of cardiovascular (CV) events that occurred after diagnosis in a large Spanish cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and investigates the main risk factors for atherosclerosis. RELESSER is a nationwide multicenter, hospital-based registry of SLE patients. This is a cross-sectional study. Demographic and clinical variables, the presence of traditional risk factors, and CV events were collected. A CV event was defined as a myocardial infarction, angina, stroke, and/or peripheral artery disease. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate the possible risk factors for atherosclerosis. From 2011 to 2012, 3658 SLE patients were enrolled. Of these, 374 (10.9%) patients suffered at least a CV event. In 269 (7.4%) patients, the CV events occurred after SLE diagnosis (86.2% women, median [interquartile range] age 54.9 years [43.2–66.1], and SLE duration of 212.0 months [120.8–289.0]). Strokes (5.7%) were the most frequent CV event, followed by ischemic heart disease (3.8%) and peripheral artery disease (2.2%). Multivariate analysis identified age (odds ratio [95% confidence interval], 1.03 [1.02–1.04]), hypertension (1.71 [1.20–2.44]), smoking (1.48 [1.06–2.07]), diabetes (2.2 [1.32–3.74]), dyslipidemia (2.18 [1.54–3.09]), neurolupus (2.42 [1.56–3.75]), valvulopathy (2.44 [1.34–4.26]), serositis (1.54 [1.09–2.18]), antiphospholipid antibodies (1.57 [1.13–2.17]), low complement (1.81 [1.12–2.93]), and azathioprine (1.47 [1.04–2.07]) as risk factors for CV events. We have confirmed that SLE patients suffer a high prevalence of premature CV disease. Both traditional and nontraditional risk factors contribute to this higher prevalence. Although it needs to be verified with future studies, our study also shows—for the first time—an association between diabetes and CV events in SLE patients. PMID:26200625

  11. Global dynamical model of the cardiovascular system

    CERN Document Server

    Kholodov, A S; Kholodov, Y A; Nadolsky, A A; Shushlebin, A N

    2007-01-01

    Blood system functions are very diverse and important for most processes in human organism. One of its primary functions is matter transport among different parts of the organism including tissue supplying with oxygen, carbon dioxide excretion, drug propagation etc. Forecasting of these processes under normal conditions and in the presence of different pathologies like atherosclerosis, loss of blood, anatomical abnormalities, pathological changing in chemical transformations and others is significant issue for many physiologists. In this connection should be pointed out that global processes are of special interest as they include feedbacks and interdependences among different regions of the organism. Thus the main goal of this work is to develop the model allowing to describe effectively blood flow in the whole organism. As we interested in global processes the models of the four vascular trees (arterial and venous parts of systemic and pulmonary circulation) must be closed with heart and peripheral circulat...

  12. Endothelins and NADPH oxidases in the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammanahalli, Karigowda J; Sun, Zhongjie

    2008-01-01

    1. The endothelin (ET) system and NADPH oxidase play important roles in the regulation of cardiovascular function, as well as in the pathogenesis of hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases. 2. Endothelins activate NADPH oxidases and thereby increase superoxide production, resulting in oxidative stress and cardiovascular dysfunction. Thus, NADPH oxidases may mediate the role of endothelins in some cardiovascular diseases. However, the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mediating ET-induced vasoconstriction and cardiovascular disease remains under debate, as evidenced by conflicting reports from different research teams. Conversely, activation of NADPH oxidase can stimulate ET secretion via ROS generation, which further enhances the cardiovascular effects of NADPH oxidase. However, little is known about how ROS activate the endothelin system. It seems that the relationship between ET-1 and ROS may vary with cardiovascular disorders. 3. Endothelins activate NADPH oxidase via the ET receptor-proline-rich tyrosine kinase-2 (Pyk2)-Rac1 pathway. Rac1 is an important regulator of NADPH oxidase. There is ample evidence supporting direct stimulation by Rac1 of NADPH oxidase activity. In addition, Rac1-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy is mediated by the generation of ROS.

  13. Application of Hybrid Dynamical Theory to the Cardiovascular System

    KAUST Repository

    Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem

    2014-10-14

    In hybrid dynamical systems, the state evolves in continuous time as well as in discrete modes activated by internal conditions or by external events. In the recent years, hybrid systems modeling has been used to represent the dynamics of biological systems. In such systems, discrete behaviors might originate from unexpected changes in normal performance, e.g., a transition from a healthy to an abnormal condition. Simplifications, model assumptions, and/or modeled (and ignored) nonlinearities can be represented by sudden changes in the state. Modeling cardiovascular system (CVS), one of the most fascinating but most complex human physiological systems, with a hybrid approach, is the focus of this chapter. The hybrid property appears naturally in the CVS thanks to the presence of valves which, depending on their state (closed or open), divide the cardiac cycle into four phases. This chapter shows how hybrid models can be used for modeling the CVS. In addition, it describes a preliminary study on the detection of some cardiac anomalies based on the hybrid model and using the standard observer-based approach.

  14. Radiological features of uncommon aneurysms of the cardiovascular system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kevin Kalisz; Prabhakar Rajiah

    2016-01-01

    Although aortic aneurysms are the most common type encountered clinically, they do not span the entire spectrum of possible aneurysms of the cardiovascular system. As cross sectional imaging techniques with cardiac computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging continue to improve and becomes more commonplace, once rare cardiovascular aneurysms are being encountered at higher rates. In this review, a series of uncommon, yet clinically important, cardiovascular aneurysms will be presented with review of epidemiology, clinical presentation and complications, imaging features and relevant differential diagnoses, and aneurysm management.

  15. Kinect system in home-based cardiovascular rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Ágata; Gabriel, Joaquim; Melo, Cristina; Machado, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases lead to a high consumption of financial resources. An important part of the recovery process is the cardiovascular rehabilitation. This study aimed to present a new cardiovascular rehabilitation system to 11 outpatients with coronary artery disease from a Hospital in Porto, Portugal, later collecting their opinions. This system is based on a virtual reality game system, using the Kinect sensor while performing an exercise protocol which is integrated in a home-based cardiovascular rehabilitation programme, with a duration of 6 months and at the maintenance phase. The participants responded to a questionnaire asking for their opinion about the system. The results demonstrated that 91% of the participants (n = 10) enjoyed the artwork, while 100% (n = 11) agreed on the importance and usefulness of the automatic counting of the number of repetitions, moreover 64% (n = 7) reported motivation to continue performing the programme after the end of the study, and 100% (n = 11) recognized Kinect as an instrument with potential to be an asset in cardiovascular rehabilitation. Criticisms included limitations in motion capture and gesture recognition, 91% (n = 10), and the lack of home space, 27% (n = 3). According to the participants' opinions, the Kinect has the potential to be used in cardiovascular rehabilitation; however, several technical details require improvement, particularly regarding the motion capture and gesture recognition.

  16. A novel approach to modeling and diagnosing the cardiovascular system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, P.E.; Kangas, L.J.; Hashem, S.; Kouzes, R.T. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Allen, P.A. [Life Link, Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-07-01

    A novel approach to modeling and diagnosing the cardiovascular system is introduced. A model exhibits a subset of the dynamics of the cardiovascular behavior of an individual by using a recurrent artificial neural network. Potentially, a model will be incorporated into a cardiovascular diagnostic system. This approach is unique in that each cardiovascular model is developed from physiological measurements of an individual. Any differences between the modeled variables and the variables of an individual at a given time are used for diagnosis. This approach also exploits sensor fusion to optimize the utilization of biomedical sensors. The advantage of sensor fusion has been demonstrated in applications including control and diagnostics of mechanical and chemical processes.

  17. Impact of Hyperuricemia on Cardiovascular System in ESRD Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mostafa Kamel, Magdy El-Sharkawy, Essam Afifi, Medhat Ali, Ahmed Ramadan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hyperuricemia was found to be associated with hypertension, coronary heart disease, metabolic syndrome and chronic kidney disease. However there are no specific data about the relationship of uric acid to cardiovascular disease and mortality in ESRD patients on chronic hemodialysis.So, we aimed to study the impact of hyperuricemia on cardiovascular system in chronic kidney disease and in ESRD patients on regular hemodialysisPatients and methods: This study included 100 patients in...

  18. [Changes in the cardiovascular system in selected endocrinopathies in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeran, Kornel; Bossowski, Artur

    2011-01-01

    Hormones have influence on many tissues and organs including the cardiovascular system. This article analyzes fluctuations that happen in a child's cardiovascular system in selected endocrinopathies. We are pointing out the higher risk, in the course of diabetes, of development of arterial hypertension and atherosclerosis including participating mechanisms in their pathogenesis - disorders of the lipid metabolism, hiperinsulinaemia, insulin resistance or/and autonomic neuropathy. We are describing how the increased and reduced action of thyroid hormones on certain molecular pathways in the heart and vasculature causes relevant cardiovascular derangement. In the article, we are signaling also that the cardiovascular consequences of cortisol excess are elevation of blood pressure, obesity, hyperinsulinemia and/or dyslipidemia. This review analyzes the relationship of cortisol excess to these cardiovascular risk factors and to putative mechanisms for hypertension. In reference to clinical studies we are describing how the deficiency of the growth hormone is connected with a development of risk factors of cardiovascular diseases. In conclusion we underlined that early diagnosis and proper treatment of illnesses of the endocrine system can protect our pediatric patients from serious cardiac complications in later years.

  19. Cardiovascular and nervous system changes during meditation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven R Steinhubl

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: A number of benefits have been described for the long-term practice of meditation, yet little is known regarding the immediate neurological and cardiovascular responses to meditation. Wireless sensor technology allows, for the first time, multi-parameter and quantitative monitoring of an individual’s responses during meditation. The present study examined inter-individual variations to meditation through continuous monitoring of EEG, blood pressure, heart rate and its variability (HRV in novice and experienced meditators. Methods: Participants were 20 experienced and 20 novice meditators involved in a week-long wellness retreat. Monitoring took place during meditation sessions on the first and last full days of the retreat. All participants wore a patch that continuously streamed ECG data, while half of them also wore a wireless EEG headset plus a non-invasive continuous blood pressure monitor. Results: Meditation produced variable but characteristic EEG changes, significantly different from baseline, even among novice meditators on the first day. In addition, although participants were predominately normotensive, the mean arterial blood pressure fell a small (2-3 mmHg but significant (p<0.0001 amount during meditation. The effect of meditation on HRV was less clear and influenced by calculation technique and respiration. No clear relationship between EEG changes, HRV alterations or mean blood pressure during meditation was found.Conclusion: This is the first study to investigate neurological and cardiovascular responses during meditation in both novice and experienced meditators using novel, wearable, wireless devices. Meditation produced varied inter-individual physiologic responses. These results support the need for further investigation of the short- and long-term cardiovascular effects of mental calm and individualized ways to achieve it.

  20. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes Afford New Opportunities in Inherited Cardiovascular Disease Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R. Bayzigitov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental studies of molecular and cellular mechanisms of cardiovascular disease pathogenesis are required to create more effective and safer methods of their therapy. The studies can be carried out only when model systems that fully recapitulate pathological phenotype seen in patients are used. Application of laboratory animals for cardiovascular disease modeling is limited because of physiological differences with humans. Since discovery of induced pluripotency generating induced pluripotent stem cells has become a breakthrough technology in human disease modeling. In this review, we discuss a progress that has been made in modeling inherited arrhythmias and cardiomyopathies, studying molecular mechanisms of the diseases, and searching for and testing drug compounds using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

  1. Cardiovascular responses to voluntary and nonvoluntary static exercise in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, D B; Peel, C; Mitchell, J H

    1992-11-01

    We have measured the cardiovascular responses during voluntary and nonvoluntary (electrically induced) one-leg static exercise in humans. Eight normal subjects were studied at rest and during 5 min of static leg extension at 20% of maximal voluntary contraction performed voluntarily and nonvoluntarily in random order. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and cardiac output (CO) were determined, and peripheral vascular resistance (PVR) and stroke volume (SV) were calculated. HR increased from approximately 65 +/- 3 beats/min at rest to 80 +/- 4 and 78 +/- 6 beats/min (P voluntary and nonvoluntary contractions, respectively. CO increased from 5.1 +/- 0.7 to 6.0 +/- 0.8 and 6.2 +/- 0.8 l/min (P voluntary and nonvoluntary contractions, respectively. PVR and SV did not change significantly during voluntary or nonvoluntary contractions. Thus the cardiovascular responses were not different between voluntary and electrically induced contractions. These results suggest that the increases in CO, HR, SV, MAP, and PVR during 5 min of static contractions can be elicited without any contribution from a central neural mechanism (central command). However, central command could still have an important role during voluntary static exercise.

  2. Effects of thyroid hormone on the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Serafino; Palmieri, Emiliano A; Lombardi, Gaetano; Biondi, Bernadette

    2004-01-01

    Increased or reduced action of thyroid hormone on certain molecular pathways in the heart and vasculature causes relevant cardiovascular derangements. It is well established that overt hyperthyroidism induces a hyperdynamic cardiovascular state (high cardiac output with low systemic vascular resistance), which is associated with a faster heart rate, enhanced left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic function, and increased prevalence of supraventricular tachyarrhythmias - namely, atrial fibrillation - whereas overt hypothyroidism is characterized by the opposite changes. However, whether changes in cardiac performance associated with overt thyroid dysfunction are due mainly to alterations of myocardial contractility or to loading conditions remains unclear. Extensive evidence indicates that the cardiovascular system responds to the minimal but persistent changes in circulating thyroid hormone levels, which are typical of individuals with subclinical thyroid dysfunction. Subclinical hyperthyroidism is associated with increased heart rate, atrial arrhythmias, increased LV mass, impaired ventricular relaxation, reduced exercise performance, and increased risk of cardiovascular mortality. Subclinical hypothyroidism is associated with impaired LV diastolic function and subtle systolic dysfunction and an enhanced risk for atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction. Because all cardiovascular abnormalities are reversed by restoration of euthyroidism ("subclinical hypothyroidism") or blunted by beta-blockade and L-thyroxine (L-T4) dose tailoring ("subclinical hyperthyroidism"), timely treatment is advisable in an attempt to avoid adverse cardiovascular effects. Interestingly, some data indicate that patients with acute and chronic cardiovascular disorders and those undergoing cardiac surgery may have altered peripheral thyroid hormone metabolism that, in turn, may contribute to altered cardiac function. Preliminary clinical investigations suggest that administration of

  3. Physiological interdependence of the cardiovascular and postural control systems under orthostatic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Amanmeet; Xu, Da; Laurin, Alexandre; Blaber, Andrew P

    2014-07-15

    The cardiovascular system has been observed to respond to changes in human posture and the environment. On the same lines, frequent fallers have been observed to suffer from cardiovascular deficits. The present article aims to demonstrate the existence of interactions between the cardiovascular and postural control systems. The behavior of the two systems under orthostatic challenge was studied through novel adaptations of signal processing techniques. To this effect, the interactions between the two systems were assessed with two metrics, coherence and phase lock value, based on the wavelet transform. Measurements from the cardiovascular system (blood pressure), lower limb muscles (surface electromyography), and postural sway (center of pressure) were acquired from young healthy adults (n = 28, men = 12, age = 20-28 yr) during quiet stance. The continuous wavelet transform was applied to decompose the representative signals on a time-scale basis in a frequency region of 0.01 to 0.1 Hz. Their linear coupling was quantified through a coherence metric, and the synchrony was characterized via the phase information. The outcomes of this study present evidence that the cardiovascular and postural control systems work together to maintain homeostasis under orthostatic challenge. The inferences open a new direction of study for effects under abnormalities and extreme environmental conditions.

  4. Imaging Assessment of Cardiovascular Disease in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara C. Croca

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus is a multisystem, autoimmune disease known to be one of the strongest risk factors for atherosclerosis. Patients with SLE have an excess cardiovascular risk compared with the general population, leading to increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although the precise explanation for this is yet to be established, it seems to be associated with the presence of an accelerated atherosclerotic process, arising from the combination of traditional and lupus-specific risk factors. Moreover, cardiovascular-disease associated mortality in patients with SLE has not improved over time. One of the main reasons for this is the poor performance of standard risk stratification tools on assessing the cardiovascular risk of patients with SLE. Therefore, establishing alternative ways to identify patients at increased risk efficiently is essential. With recent developments in several imaging techniques, the ultimate goal of cardiovascular assessment will shift from assessing symptomatic patients to diagnosing early cardiovascular disease in asymptomatic patients which will hopefully help us to prevent its progression. This review will focus on the current status of the imaging tools available to assess cardiac and vascular function in patients with SLE.

  5. Effect of zero magnetic field on cardiovascular system and microcirculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurfinkel, Yu. I.; At'kov, O. Yu.; Vasin, A. L.; Breus, T. K.; Sasonko, M. L.; Pishchalnikov, R. Yu.

    2016-02-01

    The effects of zero magnetic field conditions on cardiovascular system of healthy adults have been studied. In order to generate zero magnetic field, the facility for magnetic fields modeling "ARFA" has been used. Parameters of the capillary blood flow, blood pressure, and the electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring were measured during the study. All subjects were tested twice: in zero magnetic field and, for comparison, in sham condition. The obtained results during 60 minutes of zero magnetic field exposure demonstrate a clear effect on cardiovascular system and microcirculation. The results of our experiments can be used in studies of long-term stay in hypo-magnetic conditions during interplanetary missions.

  6. Summarization of teaching experience of cardiovascular system integrated course

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-dong ZU; Jing-long WANG; Lei ZHAO; Shen CAI; Shao-bo LI; Guo-hui FU

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular system plays an important role in the medical curriculum.How to enable medical students better learn and grasp this part of knowledge is a task and mission faced by teachers.In recent years,with the development and reform of medical teaching,the application of integrated teaching is more and more popular in domestic medical schools.Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine has also adopted the integrated teaching.As pathology teachers,we take the integrated teaching of cardiovascular system course as an example to introduce our experience.

  7. Cardiovascular system state of the first year students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosynskyi E. О.

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Approaches to definition of a level of state of health of students are shown. 94 students (48 girls and 46 youths of basic medical group took part in an experiment. The state of the cardiovascular system was probed on indexes by frequencies of heart-throbs, arteriotony, index of Robinson, adaptation potential of circulation of blood. It is marked that at the beginning of school year students have a low level of functioning of the cardiovascular system. At 73,5 % girls and 62,2 % youth is expose tachycardia. At 8,2 % girls and 26,7 % youth is expose the enhanceable norm of systole arteriotony.

  8. Gravitational effects on human cardiovascular responses to isometric muscle contractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonde-Petersen, Flemmig; Suzuki, Yoji; Sadamoto, Tomoko

    Isometric exercise induces profound cardiovascular adaptations increasing mean arterial pressure and heart rate. We investigated effects of simulated +Gz and -Gz respectively on the central and peripheral cardiovascular system. Sustained handgrip exercise was performed at 40% of maximum for 2 minutes in five subjects. This maneuver increased mean arterial pressure by 40-45 mm Hg both during head out water immersion which simulates weightlessness, as well as bedrest during -25, 0, and +25 degrees tilt from the horizontal. Lower body negative pressure (-60 mm Hg for 10 min) attenuated the response to handgrip exercise to 30 mm Hg. It also increased the heart rate minimally by about 20 beats per minute while the water immersion, as well as head up, head down and horizontal bedrest showed increments of about 50 beats per min. It was concluded that the response to isometric contraction is mediated through the high pressure baroreceptors, because similar responses were seen during stresses producing a wide variation in central venous pressure. During lower body negative pressure the increased sympathetic nervous activity itself increased resting heart rate and mean arterial pressure. The responses to static exercise were, therefore, weaker.

  9. cardiovasculares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Guerrero

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Uno de los aspectos que más discusión ha suscitado en los últimos tiempos entre quienes nos dedicamos al estudio de la emoción tiene que ver con la eventual asociación entre percepción, valoración y respuesta fisiológica. Esto es, siguiendo la máxima aristotélica, cabría cuestionar si las cosas son como son o son como cada quien las percibe. El objetivo de este experimento ha sido establecer la existencia de una conexión entre percepción de control y responsividad cardiovascular. La muestra estudiada ha estado conformada por estudiantes de la Universidad de Castellón; todos ellos han participado de forma voluntaria. La prueba de estrés ha consistido en un examen real de una asignatura troncal de la titulación que cursaban los participantes. Así pues, utilizando una situación de estrés real, hipotetizamos que las respuestas cardiovasculares (medidas a través de la tasa cardiaca, la presión sanguínea sistólica y la presión sanguínea diastólica dependen de la percepción de control que el individuo tiene, o cree tener, sobre la situación.

  10. A simple ballistocardiographic system for a medical cardiovascular physiology course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eblen-Zajjur, Antonio

    2003-12-01

    Ballistocardiography is an old, noninvasive technique used to record the movements of the body synchronous with the heartbeat due to left ventricular pump activity. Despite the fact that this technique to measure cardiac output has been superseded by more advanced and precise techniques, it is useful for teaching cardiac cycle physiology in an undergraduate practical course because of its noninvasive application in humans, clear physiological and physiopathological analysis, and practical approach to considering cardiac output issues. In the present report, a simple, low cost, easy-to-build ballistocardiography system is implemented together with a theoretical and practical session that includes Newton's laws, cardiac output, cardiac pump activity, anatomy and physiology of the vessel circulation, vectorial composition, and signal transduction, which makes cardiovascular physiology easy to understand and focuses on the study of cardiac output otherwise seen only with the help of computer simulation or echocardiography. The proposed system is able to record body displacement or force as ballistocardiography traces and its changes caused by different physiological factors. The ballistocardiography session was included in our medical physiology course six years ago with very high acceptance and approval rates from the students.

  11. Association between the kinin-forming system and cardiovascular pathophysiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jagdish Narain Sharma

    2012-01-01

    All the components of the kallikrein-kinin system are located in the cardiac muscle, and its deficiency may lead to cardiac dysfunction. In recent years, numerous observations obtained from clinical and experimental models of diabetes, hypertension, cardiac failure, ischaemia, myocardial infarction and left ventricular hypertrophy, have suggested that the reduced activity of the local kallikrein-kinin system may be instrumental for the induction of cardiovascular -related diseases. The cardioprotective property of the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors is primarily mediated via kinin releasing pathway, which may cause regression of the left ventricular hypertrophy in hypertensive situations. The ability of kallikrein gene delivery to produce a wide spectrum of beneficial effects makes it an excellent candidate in treating hypertension, cardiovascular and renal diseases. In addition, stable kinin agonists may also be available in the future as therapeutic agents for cardiovascular and renal disorders.

  12. Metal ions affecting the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradi, Massimo; Mutti, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Some metals, such as copper and manganese, are essential to life and play irreplaceable roles in, e.g., the functioning of important enzyme systems. Other metals are xenobiotics, i.e., they have no useful role in human physiology and, even worse, as in the case of lead, may be toxic even at trace levels of exposure. Even those metals that are essential, however, have the potential to turn harmful at very high levels of exposure, a reflection of a very basic tenet of toxicology--"the dose makes the poison." Toxic metal exposure may lead to serious risks to human health. As a result of the extensive use of toxic metals and their compounds in industry and consumer products, these agents have been widely disseminated in the environment. Because metals are not biodegradable, they can persist in the environment and produce a variety of adverse effects. Exposure to metals can lead to damage in a variety of organ systems and, in some cases, metals also have the potential to be carcinogenic. Even though the importance of metals as environmental health hazards is now widely appreciated, the specific mechanisms by which metals produce their adverse effects have yet to be fully elucidated. The unifying factor in determining toxicity and carcinogenicity for most metals is the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Metal-mediated formation of free radicals causes various modifications to nucleic acids, enhanced lipid peroxidation, and altered calcium and sulfhydryl homeostasis. Whilst copper, chromium, and cobalt undergo redox-cycling reactions, for metals such as cadmium and nickel the primary route for their toxicity is depletion of glutathione and bonding to sulfhydryl groups of proteins. This chapter attempts to show that the toxic effects of different metallic compounds may be manifested in the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems. The knowledge of health effects due to metal exposure is necessary for practising physicians, and should be assessed by inquiring

  13. Effect of repetitive mckenzie lumbar spine exercises on cardiovascular system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agrawal Sonal S

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background & Purpose: McKenzie exercises for the lumbar spine, which are done repeatedly, such as flexion in standing (FIS, extension in standing flexion in lying (FIL & extension in lying (EIL have been used in the management of low back pain for over three decades. The cardiovascular effects of exercises that involve postural stabilization, arm exercises and of exercises performed in lying are well known, but there are seldom studies performed to assess the cardiovascular effects of these commonly used McKenzie exercises. Therefore the study focused on evaluating the effects of 4 commonly used McKenzie exercises on the cardiovascular system. Methods: 80 subjects in the age group of 20-59 years were randomly assigned into 4 groups according to their age, such that such that each group comprised of an equal number of subjects & equal number of males & females. Each subject performed all the 4 exercises (FIS, EIS, FIL & EIL for 10, 15 & 20 repetitions respectively. Heart rate, blood pressure & rate pressure product were recorded before & after each set of repetitions & after each type of exercise. Results: Repetitive McKenzie lumbar spine exercises had cardiovascular effects in apparently healthy subjects (both male & female. Exercises performed in lying were hemodynamically more demanding than that performed in standing, also exercises involving flexion of the lumbar spine elicited greater cardiovascular demand as compared to extension exercises i.e. FIL>EIL>FIS>EIS irrespective of the number of repetitions, 10, 15 or 20. The cardiovascular demand for a given subject increased as the number of repetitions increased, for all the 4 exercises. Conclusion: McKenzie exercises when done repetitively have cardiovascular effects in healthy subjects.

  14. The emerging role of the endocannabinoid system in cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacher, Pál; Steffens, Sabine

    2009-06-01

    Endocannabinoids are endogenous bioactive lipid mediators present both in the brain and various peripheral tissues, which exert their biological effects via interaction with specific G-protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors, the CB(1) and CB(2). Pathological overactivation of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) in various forms of shock and heart failure may contribute to the underlying pathology and cardiodepressive state by the activation of the cardiovascular CB(1) receptors. Furthermore, tonic activation of CB(1) receptors by endocannabinoids has also been implicated in the development of various cardiovascular risk factors in obesity/metabolic syndrome and diabetes, such as plasma lipid alterations, abdominal obesity, hepatic steatosis, inflammation, and insulin and leptin resistance. In contrast, activation of CB(2) receptors in immune cells exerts various immunomodulatory effects, and the CB(2) receptors in endothelial and inflammatory cells appear to limit the endothelial inflammatory response, chemotaxis, and inflammatory cell adhesion and activation in atherosclerosis and reperfusion injury. Here, we will overview the cardiovascular actions of endocannabinoids and the growing body of evidence implicating the dysregulation of the ECS in a variety of cardiovascular diseases. We will also discuss the therapeutic potential of the modulation of the ECS by selective agonists/antagonists in various cardiovascular disorders associated with inflammation and tissue injury, ranging from myocardial infarction and heart failure to atherosclerosis and cardiometabolic disorders.

  15. Toxic Effects of Mercury on the Cardiovascular and Central Nervous Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Fernandes Azevedo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental contamination has exposed humans to various metal agents, including mercury. This exposure is more common than expected, and the health consequences of such exposure remain unclear. For many years, mercury was used in a wide variety of human activities, and now, exposure to this metal from both natural and artificial sources is significantly increasing. Many studies show that high exposure to mercury induces changes in the central nervous system, potentially resulting in irritability, fatigue, behavioral changes, tremors, headaches, hearing and cognitive loss, dysarthria, incoordination, hallucinations, and death. In the cardiovascular system, mercury induces hypertension in humans and animals that has wide-ranging consequences, including alterations in endothelial function. The results described in this paper indicate that mercury exposure, even at low doses, affects endothelial and cardiovascular function. As a result, the reference values defining the limits for the absence of danger should be reduced.

  16. Toxic Effects of Mercury on the Cardiovascular and Central Nervous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes Azevedo, Bruna; Barros Furieri, Lorena; Peçanha, Franck Maciel; Wiggers, Giulia Alessandra; Frizera Vassallo, Paula; Ronacher Simões, Maylla; Fiorim, Jonaina; Rossi de Batista, Priscila; Fioresi, Mirian; Rossoni, Luciana; Stefanon, Ivanita; Alonso, María Jesus; Salaices, Mercedes; Valentim Vassallo, Dalton

    2012-01-01

    Environmental contamination has exposed humans to various metal agents, including mercury. This exposure is more common than expected, and the health consequences of such exposure remain unclear. For many years, mercury was used in a wide variety of human activities, and now, exposure to this metal from both natural and artificial sources is significantly increasing. Many studies show that high exposure to mercury induces changes in the central nervous system, potentially resulting in irritability, fatigue, behavioral changes, tremors, headaches, hearing and cognitive loss, dysarthria, incoordination, hallucinations, and death. In the cardiovascular system, mercury induces hypertension in humans and animals that has wide-ranging consequences, including alterations in endothelial function. The results described in this paper indicate that mercury exposure, even at low doses, affects endothelial and cardiovascular function. As a result, the reference values defining the limits for the absence of danger should be reduced. PMID:22811600

  17. SISTEMA ENDOCANABINOIDE: MODIFICANDO LOS FACTORES DE RIESGO CARDIOVASCULAR Endocannabinoid system: modifying cardiovascular risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Edwin Feliciano Alfonso

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available La necesidad de alcanzar un tratamiento óptimo para el tabaquismo, la obesidad y sus comorbilidades, conocidos factores de riesgo cardiovascular, ha fomentado la búsqueda de objetivos terapéuticos novedosos. Es el caso del sistema endocanabinoide, involucrado en diversos fenómenos fisiológicos entre los que se encuentran el refuerzo de ciertos comportamientos y la regulación del apetito. La sobreactivación de este sistema altera la homeostasis corporal predisponiendo a dependencias o a un aumento en la ingesta alimentaria, lo que puede traducirse en tabaquismo u obesidad. La intervención farmacológica sobre el sistema endocanabinoide puede contribuir al manejo de estos factores de riesgo cardiovascular, teniendo en cuenta que a tales beneficios se suman otros independientes de la suspensión del tabaquismo o la reducción de peso, como el aumento del colesterol de alta densidad, la disminución de triglicéridos y la mejoría del control glucémico en pacientes con diabetes. Ensayos clínicos controlados aleatorizados adelantados en poblaciones con diferentes características, han evaluado la utilidad de la regulación farmacológica del sistema endocanabinoide; confirmando su eficacia en personas con factores de riesgo cardiovascular establecidos.The need for an optimal treatment for smoking, obesity and their comorbidities, well-known cardiovascular risk factors; has prompted the search for novel therapeutic targets. This is the case of the endocannabinoid system, involved in several physiological phenomena including the reinforcement of certain behaviors and the regulation of appetite.

  18. The effects of cardiovascular exercise on human memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roig, Marc; Nordbrandt, Sasja; Geertsen, Svend Sparre

    2013-01-01

    We reviewed the evidence for the use of cardiovascular exercise to improve memory and explored potential mechanisms. Data from 29 and 21 studies including acute and long-term cardiovascular interventions were retrieved. Meta-analyses revealed that acute exercise had moderate (SMD=0.26; 95% CI=0.0...

  19. [Systemic cardiovascular risk assessment. Conventional or eye fundus-based?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, A; Kernt, M; Kampik, A; Neubauer, A S

    2010-09-01

    Several systemic cardiovascular (CV) risk assessment algorithms exist, of which the ESC HeartScore, Framingham and PROCAM are the most frequently applied in Germany. The risk estimates generated differ and take a number of different risk factors into consideration. Due to existing homology of retinal vessels and brain vessels, eye fundus examination is a promising approach to improving risk prediction. Large cohort studies investigated retinal vascular changes, including arteriovenous ratio, as well as signs of retinopathy such as cotton-wool spots, microaneurysms, or retinal hemorrhages for their ability to predict systemic cardiovascular events. While signs of retinopathy proved to have high predictive power (but are rarely diagnosed,) the retinal vascular changes investigated could contribute little to enhancing systemic CV risk prediction. A number of new and promising approaches based on static and dynamic retinal analysis exist, but still need to be validated prospectively.

  20. Therapeutic applications of circadian rhythms for the cardiovascular system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V Tsimakouridze

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The cardiovascular system exhibits dramatic time-of-day dependent rhythms, for example the diurnal variation of heart rate, blood pressure, and timing of onset of adverse cardiovascular events such as heart attack and sudden cardiac death. Over the past decade, the circadian clock mechanism has emerged as a crucial factor regulating these daily fluctuations. Most recently, these studies have led to a growing clinical appreciation that targeting circadian biology offers a novel therapeutic approach towards cardiovascular (and other diseases. Here we describe leading-edge therapeutic applications of circadian biology including 1 timing of therapy to maximize efficacy in treating heart disease (chronotherapy; 2 novel biomarkers discovered by testing for genomic, proteomic, metabolomic or other factors at different times of day and night (chronobiomarkers; and 3 novel pharmacologic compounds that target the circadian mechanism with potential clinical applications (new chronobiology drugs. Cardiovascular disease remains a leading cause of death worldwide and new approaches in the management and treatment of heart disease are clearly warranted and can benefit patients clinically.

  1. Cardiovascular parasympathetic nervous system dysfunction in female rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswathi, P V; Neelambikai, N; Mahesh, Arjun; Govindarajan, K

    2013-01-01

    The autonomic dysfunction has been reported in patients with (rheumatoid arthritis) RA and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) like connective tissue disorders and it may be due to the vasculitis of vasa nervorum and secondary amyloidosis. The pathogenesis may also have an immune component that affects autonomic functions. In the present study, three standard cardiovascular parasympathetic function tests were performed in 207 RA patients and in 106 healthy controls. 14.45% patients were presented with symptoms related to cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction. Heart rate variation to deep breathing (DBD), standing (30:15 ratio), Valsalva ratio (VR) were found to be significantly reduced in RA patients and was weakly associated with female RA patients (r = 0.165, p = 0.018) and was not correlated to disease duration, RF positivity & severity of the disease. In conclusion, this study has confirmed the presence of significant subclinical cardiovascular parasympathetic nervous dysfunction in RA patients and its positive association with female gender. Hence, inclusion of cardiovascular autonomic function tests in the routine clinical examination may be helpful in the early detection of autonomic dysfunction in RA.

  2. A novel signal acquisition platform of human cardiovascular information with noninvasive method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Longcong; Cai, Shaoxi; Li, Bo; Jiang, Qifeng; Ke, Ming; Zhao, Yi; Chen, Sijia; Zou, Misha

    2017-05-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are considered the major cause of death worldwide, so more researchers pay more and more attention to the development of a non-invasive method to obtain as much cardiovascular information (CVI) as possible for early screening and diagnosing. It is known that considerable brain information could be probed by a variety of stimuli (such as video, light, and sound). Therefore, it is quite possible that much more CVI could be extracted via giving the human body some special interrelated stimulus. Based on this hypothesis, we designed a novel signal platform to acquire more CVI with a special stimulus, which is to give a gradual decrease and a different settable constant pressure to six air belts placed on two-side brachia, wrists, and ankles, respectively. During the stimulating process, the platform is able to collect 24-channel dynamic signals related with CVI synchronously. Moreover, to improve the measurement accuracy of signal acquisition, a high precision reference chip and a software correction are adopted in this platform. Additionally, we have also shown some collection instances and analysis results in this paper for its reliability. The results suggest that our platform can not only be applied on study in a deep-going way of relationship between collected signals and CVDs but can also serve as the basic tool for developing a new noninvasive cardiovascular function detection instrument and system that can be used both at home and in the hospital.

  3. Influence of subclinical hyperthyroidism on the cardiovascular system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Y Demidova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Subclinical hyperthyroidism occurs when the serum TSH is below the lower limit of the reference range and the free T4 and T3 concentrations are normal. Тhe clinical significance of subclinical hyperthyroidism is much debated. Subclinical hyperthyroidism has been associated with several biological effects on cardiovascular system, such as increased heart rate, left ventricular mass. Observational studies have reported an association between subclinical hyperthyroidism and coronary heart disease, incident atrial fibrillation, and cardiac dysfunction.

  4. Influence of subclinical hyperthyroidism on the cardiovascular system

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Subclinical hyperthyroidism occurs when the serum TSH is below the lower limit of the reference range and the free T4 and T3 concentrations are normal. Тhe clinical significance of subclinical hyperthyroidism is much debated. Subclinical hyperthyroidism has been associated with several biological effects on cardiovascular system, such as increased heart rate, left ventricular mass. Observational studies have reported an association between subclinical hyperthyroidism and coronary heart diseas...

  5. A forward model-based validation of cardiovascular system identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukkamala, R.; Cohen, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    We present a theoretical evaluation of a cardiovascular system identification method that we previously developed for the analysis of beat-to-beat fluctuations in noninvasively measured heart rate, arterial blood pressure, and instantaneous lung volume. The method provides a dynamical characterization of the important autonomic and mechanical mechanisms responsible for coupling the fluctuations (inverse modeling). To carry out the evaluation, we developed a computational model of the cardiovascular system capable of generating realistic beat-to-beat variability (forward modeling). We applied the method to data generated from the forward model and compared the resulting estimated dynamics with the actual dynamics of the forward model, which were either precisely known or easily determined. We found that the estimated dynamics corresponded to the actual dynamics and that this correspondence was robust to forward model uncertainty. We also demonstrated the sensitivity of the method in detecting small changes in parameters characterizing autonomic function in the forward model. These results provide confidence in the performance of the cardiovascular system identification method when applied to experimental data.

  6. [Radionuclide evaluation of the cardiovascular system in arterial hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oganesian, N M; Babaian, A S; Mikaelian, R S; Mnatsakanian, E L

    1986-08-01

    Proceeding from a study of the nature of changes in hemodynamics during development of hypertensive disease (HD) at its different stages it was shown that hemodynamic changes in 42.1% of the patients with Stage I-IIA HD were of hypertensive type, in the patients with Stage IIB-III HD normal and hypokinetic types of the blood circulation prevailed. After bicycle ergometry exercise the reactivity of the cardiovascular system was revealed more completely. The transition of one hemodynamic type into another and its detection acquired a great importance. The definition of the types of hemodynamics at rest and of effort was very important in terms of adequate antihypertensive therapy and the prediction of a subsequent course of disease. The most complete information on function of the cardiovascular system and myocardial contractility can be obtained with the help of radio-angiocardiography and radionuclide ventriculography. However in the absence of a gamma-chamber radiocardiography can provide necessary information on function of the cardiovascular system in case it is used in one and the same patient over time using bicycle ergometry testing.

  7. Perspectives of induced pluripotent stem cells for cardiovascular system regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csöbönyeiová, Mária; Polák, Štefan

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold great promise for basic research and regenerative medicine. They offer the same advantages as embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and moreover new perspectives for personalized medicine. iPSCs can be generated from adult somatic tissues by over-expression of a few defined transcription factors, including Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-myc. For regenerative medicine in particular, the technology provides great hope for patients with incurable diseases or potentially fatal disorders such as heart failure. The endogenous regenerative potentials of adult hearts are extremely limited and insufficient to compensate for myocardial loss occurring after myocardial infarction. Recent discoveries have demonstrated that iPSCs have the potential to significantly advance future cardiovascular regenerative therapies. Moreover, iPSCs can be generated from somatic cells of patients with genetic basis for their disease. This human iPSC derivates offer tremendous potential for new disease models. This paper reviews current applications of iPSCs in cardiovascular regenerative medicine and discusses progress in modeling cardiovascular diseases using iPSCs-derived cardiac cells. PMID:25595188

  8. Isolated heart models: cardiovascular system studies and technological advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejnickova, Veronika; Novakova, Marie; Provaznik, Ivo

    2015-07-01

    Isolated heart model is a relevant tool for cardiovascular system studies. It represents a highly reproducible model for studying broad spectrum of biochemical, physiological, morphological, and pharmaceutical parameters, including analysis of intrinsic heart mechanics, metabolism, and coronary vascular response. Results obtained in this model are under no influence of other organ systems, plasma concentration of hormones or ions and influence of autonomic nervous system. The review describes various isolated heart models, the modes of heart perfusion, and advantages and limitations of various experimental setups. It reports the improvements of perfusion setup according to Langendorff introduced by the authors.

  9. Effects of artificial gravity on the cardiovascular system: Computational approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz Artiles, Ana; Heldt, Thomas; Young, Laurence R.

    2016-09-01

    Artificial gravity has been suggested as a multisystem countermeasure against the negative effects of weightlessness. However, many questions regarding the appropriate configuration are still unanswered, including optimal g-level, angular velocity, gravity gradient, and exercise protocol. Mathematical models can provide unique insight into these questions, particularly when experimental data is very expensive or difficult to obtain. In this research effort, a cardiovascular lumped-parameter model is developed to simulate the short-term transient hemodynamic response to artificial gravity exposure combined with ergometer exercise, using a bicycle mounted on a short-radius centrifuge. The model is thoroughly described and preliminary simulations are conducted to show the model capabilities and potential applications. The model consists of 21 compartments (including systemic circulation, pulmonary circulation, and a cardiac model), and it also includes the rapid cardiovascular control systems (arterial baroreflex and cardiopulmonary reflex). In addition, the pressure gradient resulting from short-radius centrifugation is captured in the model using hydrostatic pressure sources located at each compartment. The model also includes the cardiovascular effects resulting from exercise such as the muscle pump effect. An initial set of artificial gravity simulations were implemented using the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Compact-Radius Centrifuge (CRC) configuration. Three centripetal acceleration (artificial gravity) levels were chosen: 1 g, 1.2 g, and 1.4 g, referenced to the subject's feet. Each simulation lasted 15.5 minutes and included a baseline period, the spin-up process, the ergometer exercise period (5 minutes of ergometer exercise at 30 W with a simulated pedal cadence of 60 RPM), and the spin-down process. Results showed that the cardiovascular model is able to predict the cardiovascular dynamics during gravity changes, as well as the expected

  10. Human Resource Accounting System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerullo, Michael J.

    1974-01-01

    Main objectives of human resource accounting systems are to satisfy the informational demands made by investors and by operating managers. The paper's main concern is with the internal uses of a human asset system. (Author)

  11. Glucocorticoids and the cardiovascular system: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussinovitch, Udi; de Carvalho, Jozélio Freire; Pereira, Rosa Maria R; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2010-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are drugs commonly used, by approximately 1% of the total adult population as anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive therapies for asthma, inflammatory bowel disease, dermatological, ophthalmic, neurological, and rheumatic autoimmune diseases. Supporting evidence exists of GC use in both immune mediated and non-immune mediated heart disease. The molecular mechanisms by which GC induces immune-modulation and direct cardioprotection, are complex and not fully understood. We review herein, the current knowledge of GC use in various immune-mediated or non-immune mediated cardiovascular conditions. GC have been investigated in autoimmune, inflammatory and idiopathic heart diseases such as atrio-ventricular conduction abnormalities, rheumatic fever, myocarditis, dilated cardiomyopathy, Churg-Strauss syndrome, Kawasaki disease and sarcoidosis. GC therapy has been studied in non-autoimmune and non-inflammatory indications such as acute myocardial infarction, angina, postpericardiotomy syndrome and other pericardial diseases, endocarditis and cardiac amyloidosis, as well as in invasive cardiology, coronary interventions, and cardiopulmonary-bypass surgery. Despite GC's role as natural, physiologic regulators of the immune system, cardiovascular adverse outcomes may occur. Some of the well-known side effects of GC therapy involve bone, metabolic, and cardiovascular systems and include osteoporosis, fractures, dyslipidemia, diabetes, obesity, and hypertension.

  12. Impact of Hyperuricemia on Cardiovascular System in ESRD Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Kamel, Magdy El-Sharkawy, Essam Afifi, Medhat Ali, Ahmed Ramadan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hyperuricemia was found to be associated with hypertension, coronary heart disease, metabolic syndrome and chronic kidney disease. However there are no specific data about the relationship of uric acid to cardiovascular disease and mortality in ESRD patients on chronic hemodialysis.So, we aimed to study the impact of hyperuricemia on cardiovascular system in chronic kidney disease and in ESRD patients on regular hemodialysisPatients and methods: This study included 100 patients in Ashmoun hospital, nephrology department. Patients were chosen and divided into two groups: Group A, 50cases with chronic kidney disease and Group B, 50cases of ESRD on regular hemodialysis. All cases were subjected to full clinical examination, measurement of eGFR, laboratory tests for blood urea, serum creatinine and serum uric acid and ECG.Results: Serum uric acid was significantly higher in dialysis group than CKD group (p0.05.Conclusion: In cases of CKD uric acid is involved in the pathogenesis of renal failure and hypertension. In patients with ESRD, hyperuricemia is not a risk factor for the development of cardiac disease; but it shows reversed epidemiology and becomes a marker of good nutritious status. Further studies should be done on wider scales to evaluate the impact of hyperuricemia on cardiovascular system in hemodialysis patients.

  13. Molecular mechanism of vitamin D in the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan Chun

    2011-08-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is a global health problem that has various adverse consequences. Vitamin D is mainly synthesized in the skin by sunlight (UV light) irradiation; therefore, vitamin D status is influenced by geographic locations, seasonal changes, and skin pigmentations. The kidney is involved in the biosynthesis of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and the reuptake of filtered 25-hydroxyvitamin D from the proximal tubules, thus, vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent in patients with kidney disease who have renal insufficiency. There is a growing body of epidemiological and clinical evidence in the literature that links vitamin D deficiency to cardiovascular disease. The discovery of the vitamin D hormone functioning as an endocrine inhibitor of the renin-angiotensin system provides an explanation for this association. This review will discuss the mechanism underlying the connection between vitamin D and cardiovascular disease and its physiological and therapeutic implications.

  14. Human Resource Management System

    OpenAIRE

    Navaz, A. S. Syed; Fiaz, A. S. Syed; Prabhadevi, C.; V.Sangeetha; Gopalakrishnan,S.

    2013-01-01

    The paper titled HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM is basically concerned with managing the Administrator of HUMAN RESOURCE Department in a company. A Human Resource Management System, refers to the systems and processes at the intersection between human resource management and information technology. It merges HRM as a discipline and in particular its basic HR activities and processes with the information technology field, whereas the programming of data processing systems evolved into standa...

  15. Energy Drinks and Their Impact on the Cardiovascular System: Potential Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasser, Erik Konrad; Miles-Chan, Jennifer Lynn; Charrière, Nathalie; Loonam, Cathríona R; Dulloo, Abdul G; Montani, Jean-Pierre

    2016-09-01

    Globally, the popularity of energy drinks is steadily increasing. Scientific interest in their effects on cardiovascular and cerebrovascular systems in humans is also expanding and with it comes a growing number of case reports of adverse events associated with energy drinks. The vast majority of studies carried out in the general population report effects on blood pressure and heart rate. However, inconsistencies in the current literature render it difficult to draw firm conclusions with regard to the effects of energy drinks on cardiovascular and cerebrovascular variables. These inconsistencies are due, in part, to differences in methodologies, volume of drink ingested, and duration of postconsumption measurements, as well as subject variables during the test. Recent well-controlled, randomized crossover studies that used continuous beat-to-beat measurements provide evidence that cardiovascular responses to the ingestion of energy drinks are best explained by the actions of caffeine and sugar, with little influence from other ingredients. However, a role for other active constituents, such as taurine and glucuronolactone, cannot be ruled out. This article reviews the potentially adverse hemodynamic effects of energy drinks, particularly on blood pressure and heart rate, and discusses the mechanisms by which their active ingredients may interact to adversely affect the cardiovascular system. Research areas and gaps in the literature are discussed with particular reference to the use of energy drinks among high-risk individuals.

  16. Allometric Relations and Scaling Laws for the Cardiovascular System of Mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas H. Dawson

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The modeling of the cardiovascular system of mammals is discussed within the framework of governing allometric relations and related scaling laws for mammals. An earlier theory of the writer for resting-state cardiovascular function is reviewed and standard solutions discussed for reciprocal quarter-power relations for heart rate and cardiac output per unit body mass. Variation in the basic cardiac process controlling heart beat is considered and shown to allow alternate governing relations. Results have potential application in explaining deviations from the noted quarter-power relations. The work thus indicates that the cardiovascular systems of all mammals are designed according to the same general theory and, accordingly, that it provides a quantitative means to extrapolate measurements of cardiovascular form and function from small mammals to the human. Various illustrations are included. Work described here also indicates that the basic scaling laws from the theory apply to children and adults, with important applications such as the extrapolation of therapeutic drug dosage requirements from adults to children.

  17. Cell Systems to Investigate the Impact of Polyphenols on Cardiovascular Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Grootaert

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Polyphenols are a diverse group of micronutrients from plant origin that may serve as antioxidants and that contribute to human health in general. More specifically, many research groups have investigated their protective effect against cardiovascular diseases in several animal studies and human trials. Yet, because of the excessive processing of the polyphenol structure by human cells and the residing intestinal microbial community, which results in a large variability between the test subjects, the exact mechanisms of their protective effects are still under investigation. To this end, simplified cell culture systems have been used to decrease the inter-individual variability in mechanistic studies. In this review, we will discuss the different cell culture models that have been used so far for polyphenol research in the context of cardiovascular diseases. We will also review the current trends in cell culture research, including co-culture methodologies. Finally, we will discuss the potential of these advanced models to screen for cardiovascular effects of the large pool of bioactive polyphenols present in foods and their metabolites.

  18. The effects of phthalates in the cardiovascular and reproductive systems: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariana, Melissa; Feiteiro, Joana; Verde, Ignacio; Cairrao, Elisa

    2016-09-01

    Every year millions of tons of plastic are produced around the world and humans are increasingly exposed to them. This constant exposure to plastics has raised some concerns against human health, particularly when it comes to phthalates. These compounds have endocrine-disrupting properties, as they have the ability to bind molecular targets in the body and interfere with hormonal function and quantity. The main use of phthalates is to give flexibility to polyvinyl chloride (PVC) polymers. Phthalates are found in a variety of industrial and consumer products, and as they are not covalently bound to the plastic, phthalates contaminate the environment from which human exposure occurs. Studies in human and animal populations suggest a correlation between phthalate exposure and adverse health outcomes, particularly at the reproductive and cardiovascular systems, however there is much less information about the phthalate toxicity of the later. Thus, the main purpose of this review is to present the studies relating the effects already stated of phthalates on the cardiovascular and reproductive systems, and also present the link between these two systems.

  19. Compensation of human cardiovascular system with negative pressure of the lower body%下身负压下人体心血管系统的代偿功能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩文强; 胡文东; 马瑞山

    2004-01-01

    背景:下体负压是模拟重力-惯性力场对人体循环功能影响的有效研究方法之一,在一定程度上可模拟正加速度对人体的影响.目的:探讨坐位下身负压暴露时人体心血管系统的代偿功能的变化,为高G值致空中意识丧失(G-LOC)的预防和监控提供生理学参数.设计:随机自身对照实验研究.地点和对象:实验地点在本系脑功能实验室,实验对象为15名健康自愿者青年男性,均系本校大学二年级学员.干预:采用坐位下身负压舱,每名被试者均要受到-4.00 kPa、-6.67 kPa下身负压的作用.主要观察指标:分别测试负压前、下身负压暴露于-4.00 kPa,-6.67 kPa的0.5,1,2,3,4,5 min和卸压后1,3,5 min的血压、心率及主观症状和客观体征等.在-4.00 kPa下身负压作用时,收缩压与舒张压与负压前对照差别无显著性意义;心率在下身负压作用3,4,5 min时,显著增快(P<0.05).结果:在-6.67 kPa下身负压作用时,心率在负压作用各时间点与负压作用前比较均显著增快(P<0.01);收缩压与负压前对照无明显改变,舒张压显著升高(P<0.05).结论:坐位下身负压造成血液在下肢积聚,大脑供血量减少,心血管系统通过加强代偿功能,使大部分被试未发生晕厥前症状.随着下身负压值的进一步增大和作用时间的延长,机体出现失代偿现象,导致出现晕厥前症状.为高G值致空中意识丧失(G-LOC)的预防和监控提供生理学参数.%BACKGROUND: Lower body negative pressure(LBNP) is one of the effective methods to simulate the influence of gravito-inertial force on human circulation. It can simulate the effects of positive accelerate on human body to a certain extent.OBJECTIVE: To explore the changes of compensation of cardiovascular system with lower body negative pressure in upright seated position (U-LBNP) . To provide physiological parameters for the prevention and monitoring of G-induced loss of conciousness (G

  20. The Importence of Urotensin and Urotensin Receptors in Cardiovascular System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duygu Kose

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Urotensin 2 (UT 2 which is a cyclic peptid was first identified about 45 years ago and due to its potent vasoconstrictor effect it has attracted the attention of the scientific community. UT 2 binds to a class of G protein-coupled receptor known as GPR14. Receptors for UT 2 are located on peripheral vascular smooth muscle, heart and kidney. In healthy people it has minor role, while in patients with disease it has a more prominent role. Main positive effects of UT 2 in cardiovasculer system are positive inotropic effect, vasoconsctruction, vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, vasodilatation which related the state of endothelin and vascular bed. Recent investigations have showed that UT 2 plays an important role in cardiovascular diseases. Although the effects of UT 2 and UT 2 receptors on cardiovascular system is a quite extensively studied subject. The studies and the results obtained from these studies are somewhat complex. Previous studies in heart failure has demonstrated that these receptors do not play a major role in heart failure but in later studies it has been shown that these receptors have a potential role in the pathophysiology of this disease. In addition, the level of UT 2 has increased in coronary heart disease, ischemic heart disease and atherosclerosis. It is an important research topic whether these receptors play a role in pathophysiology or they are very important part of defense mechanism. Therefoore, these receptors are regarded as a promising target in the scientific community. As a result, we think that in future these receptors will gain a seat and more importence in the pathophysiology in many diseases especially in cardiovascular diseases as well as in the defense mechanism of these diseases.

  1. Endothelin converting-enzyme-1 mRNA expression in human cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohnemeier, H; Pinto, YM; Horkay, F; Toth, M; Juhasz-Nagy, A; Orzechowski, HD; Bohm, M; Paul, M

    1998-01-01

    Endothelin-1 converting-enzyme (ECE-1) cleaves the precursor, big-endothelin-1, to the active peptide endothelin-1. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ECE-1 mRNA expression is modified in human cardiovascular disease. Tissue samples from the left human atrium were analyzed for ECE-1 ex

  2. Thyroid hormones and the cardiovascular system: pathophysiology and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cini, G; Carpi, A; Mechanick, J; Cini, L; Camici, M; Galetta, F; Giardino, R; Russo, M A; Iervasi, G

    2009-12-01

    Thyroid dysfunction, however mild, can significantly affect the cardiovascular (CV) system. The effects of thyroid hormones may be viewed as genomic and non-genomic, with the former occurring over a longer time scale and both affecting structural and functional proteins in CV tissue. As the interplay between thyroid function and the CV system becomes elucidated, particularly in the context of a system biology approach, the heart failure phenotype is better understood. Symptomatology is related to disturbance in inotropic and chronotropic function. Moreover, biochemical changes reflected by thyroid function testing with the non-thyroidal illness syndrome can prognosticate and guide therapy in heart failure. In addition, empiric treatment with thyroid hormone analogues or T3 represent emergent and highly controversial interventions.

  3. Guidance Receptors in the Nervous and Cardiovascular Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubina, K A; Tkachuk, V A

    2015-10-01

    Blood vessels and nervous fibers grow in parallel, for they express similar receptors for chemokine substances. Recently, much attention is being given to studying guidance receptors and their ligands besides the growth factors, cytokines, and chemokines necessary to form structures in the nervous and vascular systems. Such guidance molecules determine trajectory for growing axons and vessels. Guidance molecules include Ephrins and their receptors, Neuropilins and Plexins as receptors for Semaphorins, Robos as receptors for Slit-proteins, and UNC5B receptors binding Netrins. Apart from these receptors and their ligands, urokinase and its receptor (uPAR) and T-cadherin are also classified as guidance molecules. The urokinase system mediates local proteolysis at the leading edge of cells, thereby providing directed migration. T-cadherin is a repellent molecule that regulates the direction of growing axons and blood vessels. Guidance receptors also play an important role in the diseases of the nervous and cardiovascular systems.

  4. Aspirin and lipid mediators in the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrör, Karsten; Rauch, Bernhard H

    2015-09-01

    Aspirin is an unique compound because it bears two active moieties within one and the same molecule: a reactive acetyl group and the salicylate metabolite. Salicylate has some effects similar to aspirin, however only at higher concentrations, usually in the millimolar range, which are not obtained at conventional antiplatelet aspirin doses of 100-300 mg/day. Pharmacological actions of aspirin in the cardiovascular system at these doses are largely if not entirely due to target structure acetylation. Several classes of lipid mediators become affected: Best known is the cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) in platelets with subsequent inhibition of thromboxane and, possibly, thrombin formation. By this action, aspirin also inhibits paracrine thromboxane functions on other lipid mediators, such as the platelet storage product sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), an inflammatory mediator. Acetylation of COX-2 allows for generation of 15-(R)HETE and subsequent formation of "aspirin-triggered lipoxin" (ATL) by interaction with white cell lipoxygenases. In the cardiovascular system, aspirin also acetylates eNOS with subsequent upregulation of NO formation and enhanced expression of the antioxidans heme-oxygenase-1. This action is possibly also COX-2/ATL mediated. Many more acetylation targets have been identified in live cells by quantitative acid-cleavable activity-based protein profiling and might result in discovery of even more aspirin targets in the near future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Heart Rate, Life Expectancy and the Cardiovascular System: Therapeutic Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudoulas, Konstantinos Dean; Borer, Jeffrey S; Boudoulas, Harisios

    2015-01-01

    It has long been known that life span is inversely related to resting heart rate in most organisms. This association between heart rate and survival has been attributed to the metabolic rate, which is greater in smaller animals and is directly associated with heart rate. Studies have shown that heart rate is related to survival in apparently healthy individuals and in patients with different underlying cardiovascular diseases. A decrease in heart rate due to therapeutic interventions may result in an increase in survival. However, there are many factors regulating heart rate, and it is quite plausible that these may independently affect life expectancy. Nonetheless, a fast heart rate itself affects the cardiovascular system in multiple ways (it increases ventricular work, myocardial oxygen consumption, endothelial stress, aortic/arterial stiffness, decreases myocardial oxygen supply, other) which, in turn, may affect survival. In this brief review, the effects of heart rate on the heart, arterial system and survival will be discussed. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Handbook of the diagnostic radiology. The cardiovascular system; Handbuch der diagnostishen Radiologie. Kardiovaskulaeres System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, D. (ed.) [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik

    2007-07-01

    Cardiovascular system diseases are the most common causes for death besides the progress in medical sciences. The book contains the following contributions within two main chapters: The heart, normal anatomy and important variants, cardiac diseases, thoracic aorta and pulmonal vascular system, abdominal vascular system, peripheric vascular system, veins, supraaortal vascular system, thoracic and abdominal aorta, abdomial vascular system, kidney arteries, mesenterial vascular system, abdominopelvic vascular system, peripheric arteries, hemodialysis shunt, transjugular portosystemic shunt.

  7. Noisy fluctuation of heart rate indicates cardiovascular system instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortrat, Jacques-Olivier; Baum, Charlotte; Jeanguillaume, Christian; Custaud, Marc-Antoine

    2013-09-01

    Heart rate spontaneously fluctuates despite homeostatic regulatory mechanisms to stabilize it. Harmonic and fractal fluctuations have been described. Non-harmonic non-fractal fluctuation has not been studied because it is usually thought that it is caused by apparatus noise. We hypothesized that this fluctuation looking like apparatus noise (that we call "noisy fluctuation") is linked to challenged blood pressure stabilization and not to apparatus noise. We assessed noisy fluctuation by quantifying the small and fastest beat-to-beat fluctuation of RR-interval by means of spectral analysis (Nyquist power of heart rate variability: nyHRV) after filtering out its fractal component. We observed nyHRV in healthy supine subjects and in patients with vasovagal symptoms. We challenged stabilization of blood pressure by upright posture (by means of a head-up tilt table test). Head-up position on the tilt table dramatically decreased nyHRV (0.128 ± 0.063 vs. 0.004 ± 0.002, p system is challenged (upright posture). It also indicates cardiovascular instability because it does not disappear in upright patients before vasovagal syncope, a transient failure of cardiovascular regulation.

  8. Clinical perspectives and fundamental aspects of local cardiovascular and renal renin-angiotensin systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walmor eDe Mello

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Evidence for the potential role of organ specific cardiovascular renin-angiotensin systems (RAS has been demonstrated experimentally and clinically with respect to certain cardiovascular and renal diseases. These findings have been supported by studies involving pharmacological inhibition during ischemic heart disease, myocardial infarction, cardiac failure; hypertension associated with left ventricular (LV ischemia, myocardial fibrosis and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH; structural and functional changes of the target organs associated with prolonged dietary salt excess; and intrarenal vascular disease associated with end-stage renal disease (ESRD. Moreover, the severe structural and functional changes induced by these pathological conditions, can be prevented and reversed by agents producing RAS inhibition (even when not necessarily coincident with alterations in arterial pressure.In this review, we discuss specific fundamental and clinical aspects and mechanisms related to the activation or inhibition of local renin angiotensin systems and their implications for cardiovascular and renal diseases. Fundamental aspects involving the role of angiotensins on cardiac and renal functions including the expression of RAS components in the heart and kidney and the controversial role of ACE2 on angiotensin peptide metabolism in humans, were discussed.

  9. National Vital Statistics System (NVSS) - National Cardiovascular Disease Surveillance Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2001 to 2013. NVSS is a secure, web-based data management system that collects and disseminates the Nation's official vital statistics. Data for this dataset has...

  10. State of cardiovascular system during exercise in sportsmen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usanov D.A.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to study the state of cardiovascular system of sportsmen involved in rowing and canoeing, both before and after training. Material et methods: The research has been performed by means of the developed mobile devices that allow non-invasive screening assessment of the potential risk of collapse complications. Results: The article outlines the results of the survey carried out to determine the presence of vagotonic tone with deficient activity supply and abnormal pulse wave that may lead to circulatory collapse in exercise. Conclusion: The technique of pulse wave and vegetative regulation assessment before and after training enables to prevent the circulatory collapse development in stressful physical exertion in sportsmen.

  11. Cardiovascular Risk Reduction with Renin-Angiotensin Aldosterone System Blockade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Houston Miller

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the evidence supporting treatments within the renin-angiotensin aldosterone system (RAS, the role cardioprotection plays within the management of hypertension, considerations around medication adherence, and the role of the nurse or nurse practitioner in guiding patients to achieve higher hypertension control rates. A large body of data now exists to support the use of angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs which act on RAS, in the management of hypertension and their effect on cardiovascular risk reduction. Current evidence suggests that inhibition of the RAS is an important target for cardioprotection. RAS inhibition controls blood pressure and also reduces target-organ damage. This is especially important in populations at high-risk for damage including patients with diabetes and those with chronic kidney disease. Both ARBs and ACEIs target the RAS offering important reductions in both BP and target organ damage.

  12. Nano-analytical electron microscopy reveals fundamental insights into human cardiovascular tissue calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertazzo, Sergio; Gentleman, Eileen; Cloyd, Kristy L; Chester, Adrian H; Yacoub, Magdi H; Stevens, Molly M

    2013-06-01

    The accumulation of calcified material in cardiovascular tissue is thought to involve cytochemical, extracellular matrix and systemic signals; however, its precise composition and nanoscale architecture remain largely unexplored. Using nano-analytical electron microscopy techniques, we examined valves, aortae and coronary arteries from patients with and without calcific cardiovascular disease and detected spherical calcium phosphate particles, regardless of the presence of calcific lesions. We also examined lesions after sectioning with a focused ion beam and found that the spherical particles are composed of highly crystalline hydroxyapatite that crystallographically and structurally differs from bone mineral. Taken together, these data suggest that mineralized spherical particles may play a fundamental role in calcific lesion formation. Their ubiquitous presence in varied cardiovascular tissues and from patients with a spectrum of diseases further suggests that lesion formation may follow a common process. Indeed, applying materials science techniques to ectopic and orthotopic calcification has great potential to lend critical insights into pathophysiological processes underlying calcific cardiovascular disease.

  13. The risk of cardiovascular morbidity and cardiovascular mortality in systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Marie-Louise; Lindhardsen, Jesper; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the role of LN as a risk factor for myocardial infarction (MI), stroke and cardiovascular mortality (CVM) in patients with SLE. METHODS: The study was conducted using individual-level data from multiple nationwide registers. We identified a cohort of patients diagnosed with S...

  14. Effects of supine, prone, and lateral positions on cardiovascular and renal variables in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pump, Bettina; Talleruphuus, Ulrik; Christensen, Niels Juel

    2002-01-01

    The hypothesis was tested that changing the direction of the transverse gravitational stress in horizontal humans modulates cardiovascular and renal variables. On different study days, 14 healthy males were placed for 6 h in either the horizontal supine or prone position following 3 h of being...... ml, P variables, whereas left atrial diameter increased (32 +/- 1 to 35 +/- 1 mm, P

  15. The Impact of Environmental Factors in Influencing Epigenetics Related to Oxidative States in the Cardiovascular System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Angelini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative states exert a significant influence on a wide range of biological and molecular processes and functions. When their balance is shifted towards enhanced amounts of free radicals, pathological phenomena can occur, as the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in tissue microenvironment or in the systemic circulation can be detrimental. Epidemic chronic diseases of western societies, such as cardiovascular disease, obesity, and diabetes correlate with the imbalance of redox homeostasis. Current advances in our understanding of epigenetics have revealed a parallel scenario showing the influence of oxidative stress as a major regulator of epigenetic gene regulation via modification of DNA methylation, histones, and microRNAs. This has provided both the biological link and a potential molecular explanation between oxidative stress and cardiovascular/metabolic phenomena. Accordingly, in this review, we will provide current insights on the physiological and pathological impact of changes in oxidative states on cardiovascular disorders, by specifically focusing on the influence of epigenetic regulation. A special emphasis will highlight the effect on epigenetic regulation of human’s current life habits, external and environmental factors, including food intake, tobacco, air pollution, and antioxidant-based approaches. Additionally, the strategy to quantify oxidative states in humans in order to determine which biological marker could best match a subject’s profile will be discussed.

  16. Deciphering the Molecular Basis of Human Cardiovascular Disease through Network Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Stephen Y.; White, Kevin; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review This review introduces the fundamental concepts of network medicine and explores the feasibility and potential impact of network-based methods on predicting and ameliorating individual manifestations of human cardiovascular disease. Recent findings Complex cardiovascular diseases rarely result from an abnormality in a single molecular effector, but, rather, nearly always are the net result of multiple pathobiological pathways that interact through an interconnected network. In the post-genomic era, a framework has emerged of the potential complexity of the interacting pathways that govern molecular actions in the human cell. As a result, network approaches have been developed to understand more comprehensively those interconnections that influence human disease. “Network medicine” has already led to tangible discoveries of novel disease genes and pathways as well as improved mechanisms for rational drug development. Summary As methodologies evolve, network medicine may better capture the complexity of human pathogenesis and, thus, re-define personalized disease classification and therapies. PMID:22382498

  17. Human Emotion Recognition System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilbag Singh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the application of feature extraction of facial expressions with combination of neural network for the recognition of different facial emotions (happy, sad, angry, fear, surprised, neutral etc... Humans are capable of producing thousands of facial actions during communication that vary in complexity, intensity, and meaning. This paper analyses the limitations with existing system Emotion recognition using brain activity. In this paper by using an existing simulator I have achieved 97 percent accurate results and it is easy and simplest way than Emotion recognition using brain activity system. Purposed system depends upon human face as we know face also reflects the human brain activities or emotions. In this paper neural network has been used for better results. In the end of paper comparisons of existing Human Emotion Recognition System has been made with new one.

  18. National Training Course. Emergency Medical Technician. Paramedic. Instructor's Lesson Plans. Module VI. Cardiovascular System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This instructor's lesson plan guide on the cardiovascular system is one of fifteen modules designed for use in the training of emergency medical technicians (paramedics). Seven units of study are presented: (1) the anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system; (2) patient assessment for the cardiac patient; (3) pathophysiology; (4) reading…

  19. Prospective isolation of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiovascular progenitors that integrate into human fetal heart tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardehali, Reza; Ali, Shah R; Inlay, Matthew A; Abilez, Oscar J; Chen, Michael Q; Blauwkamp, Timothy A; Yazawa, Masayuki; Gong, Yongquan; Nusse, Roeland; Drukker, Micha; Weissman, Irving L

    2013-02-26

    A goal of regenerative medicine is to identify cardiovascular progenitors from human ES cells (hESCs) that can functionally integrate into the human heart. Previous studies to evaluate the developmental potential of candidate hESC-derived progenitors have delivered these cells into murine and porcine cardiac tissue, with inconclusive evidence regarding the capacity of these human cells to physiologically engraft in xenotransplantation assays. Further, the potential of hESC-derived cardiovascular lineage cells to functionally couple to human myocardium remains untested and unknown. Here, we have prospectively identified a population of hESC-derived ROR2(+)/CD13(+)/KDR(+)/PDGFRα(+) cells that give rise to cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro at a clonal level. We observed rare clusters of ROR2(+) cells and diffuse expression of KDR and PDGFRα in first-trimester human fetal hearts. We then developed an in vivo transplantation model by transplanting second-trimester human fetal heart tissues s.c. into the ear pinna of a SCID mouse. ROR2(+)/CD13(+)/KDR(+)/PDGFRα(+) cells were delivered into these functioning fetal heart tissues: in contrast to traditional murine heart models for cell transplantation, we show structural and functional integration of hESC-derived cardiovascular progenitors into human heart.

  20. Cardiovascular disease due to accelerated atherosclerosis in systemic vasculitides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen Tervaert, Jan Willem

    2013-02-01

    Patients with different forms of systemic vasculitis experience long-term morbidity and mortality caused by cardiovascular disease due to premature atherosclerosis. Epidemiologic reports of patients with GCA suggest that long-term mortality in this disease is not increased compared with the general population of the same age. The risk of a stroke, however, in particular in the vertebrobasilar territory, is increased. In addition, the occurrence of aortic aneurysmal disease and aortic dissection is also clearly increased in GCA. Mortality due to ischaemic heart disease, however, is not increased. In Takayasu arteritis accelerated atherosclerosis has been clearly documented both clinically and in autopsy reports. Atherosclerotic plaques in the carotid artery may be present in the carotid arteries especially in patients with a documented history of arteritis involving the carotid artery. It is controversial whether Kawasaki disease is associated with accelerated atherosclerosis. Young adults with a history of Kawasaki disease may have abnormal brachial artery reactivity, increased carotid IMT values and increased arterial stiffness. At autopsy examinations of KD patients, however, no significant atherosclerotic lesions are detected and carotid IMT measurements were found to be clearly different from those in young adults with familiar hypercholesterolaemia, suggesting that the remodeling process in KD is different from atherosclerosis. In ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV), an increased mortality as a consequence of cardiovascular disease is well-documented. In these patients the relative risk for coronary heart disease is two- to fourfold that in control subjects. In addition, a similar relative risk has been found for stroke. Diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, abdominal obesity (metabolic syndrome), impaired renal function, persistent proteinuria and increased production of C-reactive protein are common risk factors for premature atherosclerosis in patients with

  1. Endothelin-1 supports clonal derivation and expansion of cardiovascular progenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, Boon-Seng; Ng, Shi-Yan; Wu, Hao; Buac, Kristina; Park, Joo-Hye C; Lian, Xiaojun; Xu, Jiejia; Foo, Kylie S; Felldin, Ulrika; He, Xiaobing; Nichane, Massimo; Yang, Henry; Bu, Lei; Li, Ronald A; Lim, Bing; Chien, Kenneth R

    2016-03-08

    Coronary arteriogenesis is a central step in cardiogenesis, requiring coordinated generation and integration of endothelial cell and vascular smooth muscle cells. At present, it is unclear whether the cell fate programme of cardiac progenitors to generate complex muscular or vascular structures is entirely cell autonomous. Here we demonstrate the intrinsic ability of vascular progenitors to develop and self-organize into cardiac tissues by clonally isolating and expanding second heart field cardiovascular progenitors using WNT3A and endothelin-1 (EDN1) human recombinant proteins. Progenitor clones undergo long-term expansion and differentiate primarily into endothelial and smooth muscle cell lineages in vitro, and contribute extensively to coronary-like vessels in vivo, forming a functional human-mouse chimeric circulatory system. Our study identifies EDN1 as a key factor towards the generation and clonal derivation of ISL1(+) vascular intermediates, and demonstrates the intrinsic cell-autonomous nature of these progenitors to differentiate and self-organize into functional vasculatures in vivo.

  2. Influence of mitochondrion-toxic agents on the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Ohnsorge, Peter

    2013-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease may be induced or worsened by mitochondrion-toxic agents. Mitochondrion-toxic agents may be classified as those with or without a clinical effect, those which induce cardiac disease only in humans or animals or both, as prescribed drugs, illicit drugs, exotoxins, or nutritiants, as those which affect the heart exclusively or also other organs, as those which are effective only in patients with a mitochondrial disorder or cardiac disease or also in healthy subjects, or as solid, liquid, or volatile agents. In humans, cardiotoxic agents due to mitochondrial dysfunction include anthracyclines (particularly doxorubicin), mitoxantrone, cyclophosphamide, cisplatin, fluorouracil, imatinib, bortezomib, trastuzumab, arsenic trioxide, cyclosporine-A, zidovudine, lamotrigine, glycosides, lidocain, isoproterenol, nitroprusside, pivalic acid, alcohol, cocaine, pesticides, cadmium, mycotoxins, cyanotoxins, meat meal, or carbon monoxide. Even more agents exhibit cardiac abnormalities due to mitochondrion-toxicity only in animals or tissue cultures. The mitochondrion-toxic effect results from impairment of the respiratory chain, the oxidative phosphorylation, the Krebs cycle, or the β-oxidation, from decrease of the mitochondrion-membrane potential, from increased oxidative stress, reduced anti-oxidative capacity, or from induction of apoptosis. Cardiac abnormalities induced via these mechanisms include cardiomyopathy, myocarditis, coronary heart disease, arrhythmias, heart failure, or Takotsubo syndrome. Discontinuation of the cardiotoxic agent results in complete recovery in the majority of the cases. Antioxidants and nutritiants may be of additional help. Particularly coenzyme-Q, riboflavin, vitamin-E, vitamin-C, L-carnitine, vitamin-D, thiamin, folic acid, omega-3 fatty acids, and D-ribose may alleviate mitochondrial cardiotoxic effects.

  3. Human immune system variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, Petter; Davis, Mark M

    2017-01-01

    The human immune system is highly variable between individuals but relatively stable over time within a given person. Recent conceptual and technological advances have enabled systems immunology analyses, which reveal the composition of immune cells and proteins in populations of healthy individuals. The range of variation and some specific influences that shape an individual's immune system is now becoming clearer. Human immune systems vary as a consequence of heritable and non-heritable influences, but symbiotic and pathogenic microbes and other non-heritable influences explain most of this variation. Understanding when and how such influences shape the human immune system is key for defining metrics of immunological health and understanding the risk of immune-mediated and infectious diseases.

  4. Metabolic Effects of Dietary Proteins, Amino Acids and The Other Amine Consisting Compounds on Cardiovascular System.

    OpenAIRE

    Elif Uğur; Reyhan Nergiz Ünal

    2017-01-01

    During the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases, first cause of deaths in the world, diet has a vital role. While nutrition programs for the cardiovascular health generally focus on lipids and carbohydrates, effects of proteins are not well concerned. Thus this review is written in order to examine effect of proteins, amino acids, and the other amine consisting compounds on cardiovascular system. Because of that animal or plant derived proteins have different protein compositio...

  5. Chemokines and Heart Disease: A Network Connecting Cardiovascular Biology to Immune and Autonomic Nervous Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Veronica Dusi; Alice Ghidoni; Alice Ravera; De Ferrari, Gaetano M.; Laura Calvillo

    2016-01-01

    Among the chemokines discovered to date, nineteen are presently considered to be relevant in heart disease and are involved in all stages of cardiovascular response to injury. Chemokines are interesting as biomarkers to predict risk of cardiovascular events in apparently healthy people and as possible therapeutic targets. Moreover, they could have a role as mediators of crosstalk between immune and cardiovascular system, since they seem to act as a “working-network” in deep linkage with the a...

  6. Discovery of the cardiovascular system: from Galen to William Harvey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aird, W C

    2011-07-01

    The goal of this review is to examine the events that led to discovery of blood circulation. The Ancient Greeks, including Hippocrates and Galen viewed the cardiovascular system as comprising two distinct networks of arteries and veins. Galen claimed that the liver produced blood that was then distributed to the body in a centrifugal manner, whereas air or pneuma was absorbed from the lung into the pulmonary veins and carried by arteries to the various tissues of the body. Arteries also contained blood, which passed from the venous side via invisible pores in the interventricular septum and peripheral anastomoses. This was an open-ended system in which blood and air simply dissipated at the ends of veins and arteries according to the needs of the local tissue. Blood was not seen to circulate but rather to slowly ebb and flow. This view would hold sway for 15 centuries until 1628 when William Harvey published his momentous 72-page book, On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals. Harvey employed experiment and deductive logic to show that arteries and veins are functionally, if not structurally, connected in the lung and the peripheral tissues, and that blood circulates. The mechanical force of the heart replaced Galen's elusive attractive powers. Ultimately, Galenism would collapse under the weight of Harvey's evidence, and a new paradigm of blood circulation would prevail.

  7. Alternative pathways for angiotensin II generation in the cardiovascular system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Becari

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The classical renin-angiotensin system (RAS consists of enzymes and peptides that regulate blood pressure and electrolyte and fluid homeostasis. Angiotensin II (Ang II is one of the most important and extensively studied components of the RAS. The beneficial effects of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors in the treatment of hypertension and heart failure, among other diseases, are well known. However, it has been reported that patients chronically treated with effective doses of these inhibitors do not show suppression of Ang II formation, suggesting the involvement of pathways alternative to ACE in the generation of Ang II. Moreover, the finding that the concentration of Ang II is preserved in the kidney, heart and lungs of mice with an ACE deletion indicates the important role of alternative pathways under basal conditions to maintain the levels of Ang II. Our group has characterized the serine protease elastase-2 as an alternative pathway for Ang II generation from Ang I in rats. A role for elastase-2 in the cardiovascular system was suggested by studies performed in heart and conductance and resistance vessels of normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive rats. This mini-review will highlight the pharmacological aspects of the RAS, emphasizing the role of elastase-2, an alternative pathway for Ang II generation.

  8. Technological innovations in the development of cardiovascular clinical information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Nan-Chen; Chang, Chung-Yi; Lee, Kuo-Chen; Chen, Jeen-Chen; Chan, Chien-Hui

    2012-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that computerized clinical case management and decision support systems can be used to assist surgeons in the diagnosis of disease, optimize surgical operation, aid in drug therapy and decrease the cost of medical treatment. Therefore, medical informatics has become an extensive field of research and many of these approaches have demonstrated potential value for improving medical quality. The aim of this study was to develop a web-based cardiovascular clinical information system (CIS) based on innovative techniques, such as electronic medical records, electronic registries and automatic feature surveillance schemes, to provide effective tools and support for clinical care, decision-making, biomedical research and training activities. The CIS developed for this study contained monitoring, surveillance and model construction functions. The monitoring layer function provided a visual user interface. At the surveillance and model construction layers, we explored the application of model construction and intelligent prognosis to aid in making preoperative and postoperative predictions. With the use of the CIS, surgeons can provide reasonable conclusions and explanations in uncertain environments.

  9. The role of the apelinergic and vasopressinergic systems in the regulation of the cardiovascular system and the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarzasta, Katarzyna; Cudnoch-Jedrzejewska, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Research studies indicate a role of the apelinergic and vasopressinergic systems both in the regulation of the cardiovascular system and the pathogenesis of CVD, including in such settings as obesity and stress. Based on these data, it may be suggested that interactions between these systems underlie numerous physiological and pathophysiological processes, some of them related to the cardiovascular system. Better understanding of the role of these systems and their interactions, both physiological and related to the pathogenesis of CVD, will allow further advances in prevention and drug therapy.

  10. Human Systems Design Criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    1982-01-01

    the necessary functional qualities but also the needed human qualities. The author's main argument is, that the design process should be a dialectical synthesis of the two points of view: Man as a System Component, and System as Man's Environment. Based on a man's presentation of the state of the art a set...... of design criteria is suggested and their relevance discussed. The point is to focus on the operator rather than on the computer. The crucial question is not to program the computer to work on its own conditions, but to “program” the operator to function on human conditions.......This paper deals with the problem of designing more humanised computer systems. This problem can be formally described as the need for defining human design criteria, which — if used in the design process - will secure that the systems designed get the relevant qualities. That is not only...

  11. Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: case series and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, S; Margiotta, D P; Navarini, L; Pierro, L; Pantano, I; Riccardi, A; Afeltra, A; Valentini, G

    2017-01-01

    Background Systemic lupus erythematosus is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Low-dose aspirin, hydroxychloroquine and statins have been suggested to play a prophylactic role of cardiovascular events. This study is devoted to reviewing the literature on the topic and assessing the effects of these drugs in preventing a first cardiovascular event in a two-centre Italian series. Methods A PubMed search on cardiovascular prevention in systemic lupus erythematosus was performed. Moreover, systemic lupus erythematosus patients admitted to two centres from 2000-2015, who at admission had not experienced any cardiovascular event, were investigated. Aspirin, hydroxychloroquine and statin use, and the occurrence of any cardiovascular event, were recorded at each visit. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were performed to evaluate the role of traditional, disease-related cardiovascular risk factors and of each of the three drugs in the occurrence of new cardiovascular events. Results The literature search produced conflicting results. Two hundred and ninety-one systemic lupus erythematosus patients were included in the study and followed for a median of eight years. During follow-up, 16 cardiovascular events occurred. At multivariate analysis, taking aspirin (hazard ratio: 0.24) and hydroxychloroquine for more than five years (hazard ratio: 0.27) reduced, while antiphospholipid antibody positivity (hazard ratio: 4.32) increased, the risk of a first cardiovascular event. No effect of statins emerged. Conclusion Our study confirms an additive role of aspirin and hydroxychloroquine in the primary prophylaxis of cardiovascular events in Italian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. The lack of any detected effect in previous reports may depend on the design of studies and their short follow-up period.

  12. An Integrated Model of the Cardiovascular and Central Nervous Systems for Analysis of Microgravity Induced Fluid Redistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, R.; Gady, S.; Heinemann, K.; Nelson, E. S.; Mulugeta, L.; Ethier, C. R.; Samuels, B. C.; Feola, A.; Vera, J.; Myers, J. G.

    2015-01-01

    A recognized side effect of prolonged microgravity exposure is visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. The medical understanding of this phenomenon is at present preliminary, although it is hypothesized that the headward shift of bodily fluids in microgravity may be a contributor. Computational models can be used to provide insight into the origins of VIIP. In order to further investigate this phenomenon, NASAs Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) is developing an integrated computational model of the human body which is divided into the eye, the cerebrovascular system, and the cardiovascular system. This presentation will focus on the development and testing of the computational model of an integrated model of the cardiovascular system (CVS) and central nervous system (CNS) that simulates the behavior of pressures, volumes, and flows within these two physiological systems.

  13. Alcohol’s Effects on the Cardiovascular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piano, Mariann R.

    2017-01-01

    Alcohol use has complex effects on cardiovascular (CV) health. The associations between drinking and CV diseases such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, and cardiomyopathy have been studied extensively and are outlined in this review. Although many behavioral, genetic, and biologic variants influence the interconnection between alcohol use and CV disease, dose and pattern of alcohol consumption seem to modulate this most. Low-to-moderate alcohol use may mitigate certain mechanisms such as risk and hemostatic factors affecting atherosclerosis and inflammation, pathophysiologic processes integral to most CV disease. But any positive aspects of drinking must be weighed against serious physiological effects, including mitochondrial dysfunction and changes in circulation, inflammatory response, oxidative stress, and programmed cell death, as well as anatomical damage to the CV system, especially the heart itself. Both the negative and positive effects of alcohol use on particular CV conditions are presented here. The review concludes by suggesting several promising avenues for future research related to alcohol use and CV disease. These include using direct biomarkers of alcohol to confirm self-report of alcohol consumption levels; studying potential mediation of various genetic, socioeconomic, and racial and ethnic factors that may affect alcohol use and CV disease; reviewing alcohol–medication interactions in cardiac patients; and examining CV effects of alcohol use in young adults and in older adults.

  14. Primary study of muscone's effect on cardiovascular system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Xue-jing; WU Qi-biao; LI Hai-tao

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of muscone on cardiovascular system. Methods Experimental animals to divide muscone high、middle、low dose group(the mouse is 20 mg·kg-1, 10 mg·kg-1, 5.0 mg·kg-1; the rat is 10 mg·kg-1, 5.0 mg·kg-1, 2.5 mg·kg-1), GT group( the mouse is 1/12 mg·kg-1; the rat is 1/24 mg·kg-1) and NS group. Intragastrie administration in a week, do the mouse ant-hypoxia experiment,the drug (Pit.) produce the rat myocardial ischemia experiment and obstruct coronary artery to produce the rat myocardial ischemia experiment. The mice's survival time (t), the rat's variation of T in electrocardiogram, creatinkinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were recorded, respectively. Results The effect of Muscone is significant difference between GT and NS in a dose variation manner. Conclusions Muscone has the effect of ant-hypoxia, cutting down T peak value, reducing CK and LDH. The muscone has effect to inhibiting myocardial ischemia.

  15. Chemoreceptors and cardiovascular control in acute and chronic systemic hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Marshall

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available This review describes the ways in which the primary bradycardia and peripheral vasoconstriction evoked by selective stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors can be modified by the secondary effects of a chemoreceptor-induced increase in ventilation. The evidence that strong stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors can evoke the behavioural and cardiovascular components of the alerting or defence response which is characteristically evoked by novel or noxious stimuli is considered. The functional significance of all these influences in systemic hypoxia is then discussed with emphasis on the fact that these reflex changes can be overcome by the local effects of hypoxia: central neural hypoxia depresses ventilation, hypoxia acting on the heart causes bradycardia and local hypoxia of skeletal muscle and brain induces vasodilatation. Further, it is proposed that these local influences can become interdependent, so generating a positive feedback loop that may explain sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS. It is also argued that a major contributor to these local influences is adenosine. The role of adenosine in determining the distribution of O2 in skeletal muscle microcirculation in hypoxia is discussed, together with its possible cellular mechanisms of action. Finally, evidence is presented that in chronic systemic hypoxia, the reflex vasoconstrictor influences of the sympathetic nervous system are reduced and/or the local dilator influences of hypoxia are enhanced. In vitro and in vivo findings suggest this is partly explained by upregulation of nitric oxide (NO synthesis by the vascular endothelium which facilitates vasodilatation induced by adenosine and other NO-dependent dilators and attenuates noradrenaline-evoked vasoconstriction.

  16. Contracepção hormonal e sistema cardiovascular Contracepción hormonal y sistema cardiovascular Hormonal contraception and cardiovascular system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Bastos Brito

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A contracepção hormonal é o método mais utilizado para prevenção de gestações não planejadas. A literatura tem demonstrado associação entre risco cardiovascular e uso de hormonioterapia. A fim de melhorar a orientação contraceptiva para mulheres com fatores de risco para doença cardiovascular, realizamos uma revisão da literatura em relação ao assunto. Esta revisão descreve os dados mais recentes da literatura científica acerca da influência dos contraceptivos hormonais em relação a trombose venosa, arterial e hipertensão arterial sistêmica, doenças cada dia mais prevalentes na população feminina jovem.La contracepción hormonal es el método más utilizado para la prevención de los embarazos no planificados. La literatura ha venido demostrando la asociación que existe entre el riesgo cardiovascular y el uso de la hormonoterapia. Con el objetivo de mejorar la orientación en la contracepción en mujeres con factores de riesgo para el desarrollo de enfermedad cardiovascular, realizamos una revisión de la literatura con relación a ese asunto. Esa revisión describe los datos más recientes de la literatura científica acerca de la influencia de los anticonceptivos hormonales con relación a la trombosis venosa, arterial e hipertensión arterial sistémica, enfermedades cada día más prevalentes en la población femenina joven.Hormonal contraception is the most widely used method to prevent unplanned pregnancies. The literature has shown an association between cardiovascular risk and use of hormone therapy. With the purpose of providing better guidelines on contraception methods for women with risk factors for cardiovascular disease, we have reviewed the literature on the subject. This review describes the latest data from the scientific literature concerning the influence of hormonal contraceptives on arterial thrombosis, venous thrombosis and systemic high blood pressure, which are diseases that have become

  17. SISTEMA ENDOCANABINOIDE: MODIFICANDO LOS FACTORES DE RIESGO CARDIOVASCULAR Endocannabinoid system: modifying cardiovascular risk factors

    OpenAIRE

    John Edwin Feliciano Alfonso; Carlos Olimpo Mendivil Anaya; Iván Darío Sierra Ariza

    2006-01-01

    La necesidad de alcanzar un tratamiento óptimo para el tabaquismo, la obesidad y sus comorbilidades, conocidos factores de riesgo cardiovascular, ha fomentado la búsqueda de objetivos terapéuticos novedosos. Es el caso del sistema endocanabinoide, involucrado en diversos fenómenos fisiológicos entre los que se encuentran el refuerzo de ciertos comportamientos y la regulación del apetito. La sobreactivación de este sistema altera la homeostasis corporal predisponiendo a dependencias o a un aum...

  18. Cardiovascular outcomes and systemic anti-inflammatory drugs in patients with severe psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlehoff, O; Skov, L; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is a common disease and is associated with cardiovascular diseases. Systemic anti-inflammatory drugs may reduce risk of cardiovascular events. We therefore examined the rate of cardiovascular events, i.e. cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction and stroke, in patients...... with severe psoriasis treated with systemic anti-inflammatory drugs. METHODS: Individual-level linkage of administrative registries was used to perform a longitudinal nationwide cohort study. Time-dependent multivariable adjusted Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence...... factor inhibitors (HR 0.46; CI 0.22-0.98) were linked to reduced event rates, whereas the interleukin-12/23 inhibitor ustekinumab (HR 1.52; CI 0.47-4.94) was not. CONCLUSION: Systemic anti-inflammatory treatment with methotrexate was associated with significantly lower rates of cardiovascular events...

  19. SIRPA, VCAM1 and CD34 identify discrete lineages during early human cardiovascular development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhys J.P. Skelton

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The study of human cardiogenesis would benefit from a detailed cell lineage fate map akin to that established for the haematopoietic lineages. Here we sought to define cell lineage relationships based on the expression of NKX2-5 and the cell surface markers VCAM1, SIRPA and CD34 during human cardiovascular development. Expression of NKX2-5GFP was used to identify cardiac progenitors and cardiomyocytes generated during the differentiation of NKX2-5GFP/w human embryonic stem cells (hESCs. Cardiovascular cell lineages sub-fractionated on the basis of SIRPA, VCAM1 and CD34 expression were assayed for differentiation potential and gene expression. The NKX2-5posCD34pos population gave rise to endothelial cells that rapidly lost NKX2-5 expression in culture. Conversely, NKX2-5 expression was maintained in myocardial committed cells, which progressed from being NKX2-5posSIRPApos to NKX2-5posSIRPAposVCAM1pos. Up-regulation of VCAM1 was accompanied by the expression of myofilament markers and reduced clonal capacity, implying a restriction of cell fate potential. Combinatorial expression of NKX2-5, SIRPA, VCAM1 and CD34 can be used to define discrete stages of cardiovascular cell lineage differentiation. These markers identify specific stages of cardiomyocyte and endothelial lineage commitment and, thus provide a scaffold for establishing a fate map of early human cardiogenesis.

  20. A literature review on cardiovascular risk in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: implications for clinical management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansueto Gomes Neto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In recent years, there has been growing concern about an increasing rate of cardiovascular diseases in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, which could be associated with side effects of highly active antiretroviral therapy. It is likely that the metabolic disorders related to anti-human immunodeficiency virus treatment will eventually translate into a increased cardiovascular risk in patients submitted to such regimens. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate if human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy are at higher risk of cardiovascular diseases than human immunodeficiency virus infected patients not receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy, or the general population. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We conducted a computer-based search in representative databases, and also performed manual tracking of citations in selected articles. RESULT: The available evidence suggests an excess risk of cardiovascular events in human immunodeficiency virus-infected persons compared to non-human immunodeficiency virus infected individuals. The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy is associated with increased levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein and morphological signs of cardiovascular diseases. Some evidence suggested that human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals on highly active antiretroviral therapy regimens are at increased risk of dyslipidemia, ischemic heart disease, and myocardial infarction, particularly if the highly active antiretroviral therapy regimen contains a protease inhibitor. CONCLUSION: Physicians must weigh the cardiovascular risk against potential benefits when prescribing highly active antiretroviral therapy. Careful cardiac screening is warranted for patients who are being evaluated for, or who are receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy regimens, particularly for those with known underlying cardiovascular risk

  1. Cardiovascular risk protection from the Mediterranean diet and olive oil. A transcriptomic update in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Carrión

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights the human studies that explore the benefits of the Mediterranean diet and olive oil, based on gene expression analysis. We summarized consistent human transcriptomic studies on cardiovascular risk, based on TMD and olive oil interventions, with real life doses and conditions. A literature review was carried out leading up to February 2016. The results show that the TMD, specially supplemented with virgin olive oil, produces beneficial changes in the transcriptomic response of relevant genes in cardiovascular risk such as CAT, GPX1 and SIRT2. p65 and MCP-1, IL1B, IL6, CXCL1, INF-γ, ARHGAP15 and IL7R, which are involved in inflammation; and ABCA1, SR-B1, PPARBP, PPARα, PPARγ, PPARδ, CD-36 and COX-1, which play an important role in cholesterol efflux. The available data illustrate a transcriptomic effect on atherosclerosis, inflammation and oxidative stress pathways as well as the mentioned genes.

  2. Dendritic Cells and Their Role in Cardiovascular Diseases: A View on Human Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja-Theresa Dieterlen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs are key to the immunological response, with different functions ascribed ranging from cellular immune activation to induction of tolerance. Such immunological responses are involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms of cardiovascular diseases, with DCs shown to play a role in atherosclerosis, hypertension, and heart failure and most notably following heart transplantation. A better understanding of the interplay between the immune system and cardiovascular diseases will therefore be critical for developing novel therapeutic treatments as well as innovative monitoring tools for disease progression. As such, the present review will provide an overview of DCs involvement in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases and how targeting these cells may have beneficial effects for the prognosis of patients.

  3. Advances in the study on endogenous sulfur dioxide in the cardiovascular system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian Hong

    2014-01-01

    Objective This review summarized the current advances in understanding the role of the novel gasotransmitter,sulfur dioxide (SO2),in the cardiovascular system.Data sources Articles on the advances in the study of the role of endogenous sulfur dioxide in the cardiovascular system were accessed from PubMed and CNKI from 2003 to 2013,using keywords such as "endogenous sulfur dioxide" and "cardiovascular system".Study selection Articles with regard to the role of SO2 in the regulation of cardiovascular system were selected.Results Recently,scientists discovered that an endogenous SO2 pathway is present in the cardiovascular system and exerts physiologically significant effects,such as regulation of the cardiac function and the pathogenesis of various cardiopulmonary diseases such as hypoxic pulmonary hypertension,hypertension,coronary atherosclerosis,and cardiac ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury,in the cardiovascular system.Conclusions Endogenous SO2 is a novel member of the gasotransmitter family in addition to the nitric oxide (NO),carbon monoxide (CO),and hydrogen sulfide (H2S).Studies indicated that it has a role in regulating the cardiovascular disease.

  4. Histamine H3 receptors--general characterization and their function in the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowska, B; Godlewski, G; Schlicker, E

    1998-06-01

    The histamine H3 receptor was initially identified as a presynaptic autoreceptor controlling histamine release and synthesis in the brain. It belongs to the superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors. The existence of the H3 receptor which has not yet been cloned was definitely established by the design of highly potent and selective agonists (R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine, imetit) and antagonists (thioperamide, clobenpropit). These receptors also occur as heteroreceptors both in the central nervous system and on peripheral neurons of the gastrointestinal and bronchial tract, where they regulate the release of a variety of neurotransmitters. In the cardiovascular system, histamine H3 receptors are mainly located presynaptically on the postganglionic sympathetic nerve fibers innervating the blood vessels and the heart. Their activation leads to the inhibition of noradrenaline release and consequently to the reduction of the neurogenic vasopressor and cardiostimulatory responses. The presence of such receptors has been shown both in vitro (human, pig, guinea-pig, rabbit, rat isolated tissues) and in vivo (rat, guinea-pig). The vascular and cardiac presynaptic H3 receptors may be activated by endogenous histamine. The vascular H3 receptors appear to be operative in hypertension and interact with presynaptic alpha 2-adrenoceptors. Postsynaptic vasodilatatory H3 receptors have been detected in several vascular beds as well. H3 receptor ligands affect basal cardiovascular parameters in conscious and anesthetized guinea-pigs but not rats. Presynaptic H3 receptors may play a role in the pathophysiology of headache and cardiac ischemia.

  5. Role of the endocannabinoid system in abdominal obesity and the implications for cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenson, Robert S

    2009-01-01

    Several cardiometabolic factors present in obese and insulin-resistant individuals represent a continuum of increasing risk for the development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The importance of abdominal obesity as an independent risk factor is underscored by its association with adverse endocrine function. Recent evidence from animal and human studies has shown a role for the endocannabinoid system in maintaining energy balance and glucose and lipoprotein metabolism, with overactivity linked to aberrant glycemic and lipoprotein control, and a link to adiposity. Modulation of this system through endocannabinoid-receptor blockade has resulted in an improvement in a number of important risk factors in clinical trials, including visceral and subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue, glucose tolerance, dyslipidemia and measures of inflammation. These findings may have significant implications for the management of patients at risk of developing cardiovascular and metabolic disease; however, the occurrence of psychiatric adverse events with rimonabant may preclude further development of centrally active endocannabinoid receptor antagonists for the treatment of cardiometabolic disorders. Future research is needed to explore the role of selective peripheral CB(1) receptor antagonists in the treatment of patients at high cardiometabolic risk.

  6. Impact of gestational risk factors on maternal cardiovascular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perales, María; Santos-Lozano, Alejandro; Luaces, María; Pareja-Galeano, Helios; Garatachea, Nuria; Barakat, Rubén; Lucia, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Background Scarce evidence is available on the potential cardiovascular abnormalities associated with some common gestational complications. We aimed to analyze the potential maternal cardiac alterations related to gestational complications, including body mass index (BMI) >25 kg/m2, gaining excessive weight, or developing antenatal depression. Methods The design of this study was a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial. Echocardiography was performed to assess cardiovascular indicators of maternal hemodynamic, cardiac remodeling and left ventricular (LV) function in 59 sedentary pregnant women at 20 and 34 weeks of gestation. Results Starting pregnancy with a BMI >25 kg/m2, gaining excessive weight, and developing antenatal depression had no cardiovascular impact on maternal health (P value >0.002). Depressed women were more likely to exceed weight gain recommendations than non-depressed women (P value <0.002). Conclusions The evaluated gestational complications seem not to induce cardiovascular alterations in hemodynamic, remodeling and LV function indicators. However, developing antenatal depression increases the risk of an excessive weight gain. This finding is potentially important because excessive weight gain during pregnancy associates with a higher risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) later in life. PMID:27500154

  7. Hábito de fumar: Repercusión sobre el aparato cardiovascular Smoking: Repercussion on the cardiovascular system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Fadragas Fernández

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Nos propusimos revisar la literatura más actualizada, para dar a conocer la magnitud de este nocivo hábito, alarmados ante la terrible realidad de saber que el tabaco causa 1 muerte cada 10 s, según un informe publicado recientemente por la Organización Mundial de la Salud. El tabaquismo provoca 3 500 000 muertes anuales y ocasiona enfermedades cardiovasculares y cerebrovasculares. El objetivo de esta revisión bibliográfica es realizar una actualización de este tema, haciendo mayor énfasis en la repercusión del hábito de fumar en el aparato cardiovascular. Como resultado de esta revisión encontramos que el hábito de fumar constituye un factor de riesgo de enfermedades cardiovasculares, donde las lesiones ateroscleróticas se presentan en un porcentaje elevado de los pacientes que fallecen por esta causa, y es a su vez, factor importante en la aparición de otras enfermedades, como son: la hipertensión arterial, la cardiopatía isquémica y las enfermedades cerebrovasculares.Summary We propose ourselves to review the most updated literature to make known the magnitude of this harmful habit, alarmed by the terrible reality to know that tobbaco causes a death per 10 s, according to a report recently published by the World Health Organization. Smoking produces 3 500 000 deaths a year and brings about cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. The purpose of this bibliographic review is to update this topic, making emphasis on the repercussion of smoking on the cardiovascular system. As a result of this review, we found that smoking is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, where the atherosclerotic lesions are present in an elevated percentage of the patients dying for this cause, and that it is at the same time an important factor in the appearance of other diseases, such as arterial hypertension, ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular diseases.

  8. [State of the immune system in children with tonsillitis-induced lesions of the cardiovascular system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiian, O I; Mozhova, Iu A; Bynda, T P; Sichnenko, P I; Romaniuk, O K; Slyva, V V

    2013-03-01

    Purpose of work was study the state of the immune system in children with non-inflammatory tonzillogenic lesions of the cardiovascular system. The article describes the main features of the immune status of children 6-18 years with chronic tonsillitis with lesions of the cardiovascular system. We analyzed the content of serum lymphocytes, T-lymphocytes, T-helper cells, T-suppressor, null cells, B-cells, the concentration of immunoglobulin (Ig) A, G, M, immunoregulatory index. Found that children with chronic tonsillitis and tonzillogenic heart disease immune status changes were more significant in contrast to children with chronic tonsillitis without cardiac complications and manifested significant increase in T-suppressor cells, Ig M and decreased T-lymphocytes (P < 0.01).

  9. The renin-angiotensin system in thyroid disorders and its role in cardiovascular and renal manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Félix; Rodríguez-Gómez, Isabel; Vargas-Tendero, Pablo; Jimenez, Eugenio; Montiel, Mercedes

    2012-04-01

    Thyroid disorders are among the most common endocrine diseases and affect virtually all physiological systems, with an especially marked impact on cardiovascular and renal systems. This review summarizes the effects of thyroid hormones on the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and the participation of the RAS in the cardiovascular and renal manifestations of thyroid disorders. Thyroid hormones are important regulators of cardiac and renal mass, vascular function, renal sodium handling, and consequently blood pressure (BP). The RAS acts globally to control cardiovascular and renal functions, while RAS components act systemically and locally in individual organs. Various authors have implicated the systemic and local RAS in the mediation of functional and structural changes in cardiovascular and renal tissues due to abnormal thyroid hormone levels. This review analyzes the influence of thyroid hormones on RAS components and discusses the role of the RAS in BP, cardiac mass, vascular function, and renal abnormalities in thyroid disorders.

  10. FoxO proteins: cunning concepts and considerations for the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiese, Kenneth; Chong, Zhao Zhong; Shang, Yan Chen; Hou, Jinling

    2009-02-01

    Dysfunction in the cardiovascular system can lead to the progression of a number of disease entities that can involve cancer, diabetes, cardiac ischaemia, neurodegeneration and immune system dysfunction. In order for new therapeutic avenues to overcome some of the limitations of present clinical treatments for these disorders, future investigations must focus upon novel cellular processes that control cellular development, proliferation, metabolism and inflammation. In this respect, members of the mammalian forkhead transcription factors of the O class (FoxOs) have increasingly become recognized as important and exciting targets for disorders of the cardiovascular system. In the present review, we describe the role of these transcription factors in the cardiovascular system during processes that involve angiogenesis, cardiovascular development, hypertension, cellular metabolism, oxidative stress, stem cell proliferation, immune system regulation and cancer. Current knowledge of FoxO protein function combined with future studies should continue to lay the foundation for the successful translation of these transcription factors into novel and robust clinical therapies.

  11. Cutaneous lupus erythematosus and systemic lupus erythematosus are associated with clinically significant cardiovascular risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselvig, J Halskou; Ahlehoff, O; Dreyer, L

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a well-known cardiovascular risk factor. Less is known about cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) and the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). Therefore, we investigated the risk of mortality and adverse cardiovascular events in patients diagnosed....... The corresponding HRs for all-cause mortality were 1.32 (95% CI 1.20-1.45) for CLE and 2.21 (95% CI 2.03-2.41) for SLE. CLE and SLE were associated with a significantly increased risk of CVD and all-cause mortality. Local and chronic inflammation may be the driver of low-grade systemic inflammation....

  12. Physical exercise and epigenetic adaptations of the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, P; Bloch, W

    2015-05-01

    During the last decade, epigenetics became one of the fastest growing research fields in numerous clinical and basic science disciplines. Evidence suggests that chromatin modifications (e.g., histone modifications and DNA methylation) as well as the expression of micro-RNA molecules play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of several cardiovascular diseases. On the one hand, they are involved in the development of general risk factors like chronic inflammation, but on the other hand, epigenetic modifications are conducive to smooth muscle cell, cardiomyocyte, and endothelial progenitor cell proliferation/differentiation as well as to extracellular matrix processing and endothelial function (e.g., endothelial nitric oxide synthase regulation). Therefore, epigenetic medical drugs have gained increased attention and provided the first promising results in the context of cardiovascular malignancies. Beside other lifestyle factors, physical activity and sports essentially contribute to cardiovascular health and regeneration. In this review we focus on recent research proposing physical activity as a potent epigenetic regulator that has the potential to counteract pathophysiological alterations in almost all the aforementioned cardiovascular cells and tissues. As with epigenetic medical drugs, more knowledge about the molecular mechanisms and dose-response relationships of exercise is needed to optimize the outcome of preventive and rehabilitative exercise programs and recommendations.

  13. Evaluating the systemic right ventricle by cardiovascular magnetic resonance: short axis or axial slices?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bom, T. van der; Romeih, S.; Groenink, M.; Pieper, P.G.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Helbing, W.A.; Zwinderman, A.H.; Mulder, B.J.; Bouma, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate differences in functional parameters and reproducibility between short axis and axial slice orientation in the quantitative evaluation of the systemic right ventricle by cardiovascular magnetic resonance. DESIGN: Cross-sectional evaluation comparing two methods (Bland-Altman).

  14. Climate Changes and Human Health: A Review of the Effect of Environmental Stressors on Cardiovascular Diseases Across Epidemiology and Biological Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgini, Paolo; Di Giosia, Paolo; Petrarca, Marco; Lattanzio, Francesco; Stamerra, Cosimo Andrea; Ferri, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Climate change is rapidly affecting all the regions of our planet. The most relevant example is global warming, which impacts on the earth's ecosystems, threatening human health. Other effects include extreme variations in temperature and increases in air pollution. These events may negatively impact mortality and morbidity for cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we discuss the main effects of climate changes on cardiovascular diseases, reporting the epidemiological evidences and the biological mechanisms linking climate change consequences to hypertension, diabetes, ischemic heart diseases, heart failure and stroke. Up to now, findings suggest that humans acclimate under different weather conditions, even though extreme temperatures and higher levels of air pollution can influence health-related outcomes. In these cases, climate change adversely affects cardiovascular system and the high-risk subjects for cardiovascular diseases are those more exposed. Finally, we examine climate change implications on publich health and suggest adaptation strategies to monitor the high-risk population, and reduce the amount of hospital admissions associated to these events. Such interventions may minimize the costs of public health and reduce the mortality for cardiovascular diseases. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Emprego de sistemas robóticos na cirurgia cardiovascular Robotic systems in cardiovascular surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto T. Sant'Anna

    2004-06-01

    field hospitals with surgeons in a distant location (tele-presence. But the first human application of robotic surgery occurred years later in a transurethral resection for benign prostatic hyperplasia. Cardiac surgeons were attracted to the robotic techniques because of the potential reduction in the invasive character of the procedures. This results in reduced trauma, a reduction of pain and morbidity, a faster recovery and lower cost of surgery. Robotic systems were developed, allowing totally thoracoscopic cardiac surgery for myocardial revascularization and multi-site pacemaker implantation in selected cases. Video-thoracoscopic support systems for internal thoracic artery harvesting, mitral valve reconstruction and correction of congenital heart defects also exist. We used the AESOP® system with HERMES® voice control to harvest the internal thoracic artery, trans-thoracic implantation of the left ventricular electrode and as an approach to congenital heart defects for surgical repair. In spite of scientific enthusiasm related to robotic surgery, there is no clear evidence of superiority of this technique when compared to conventional procedures in terms of results. The same is true with the cost of the procedures, and even if a single robotic surgery is less expensive, the initial investment for a complete robotic system (console, video control, instruments can be compensated only with many procedures over the long term. But there is no doubt that robotic surgery will have a place in the future of surgery, providing tele-presence of the surgeon, enabling teaching and training and performing less invasive surgical procedures.

  16. Exogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism: effect on the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federico Moreno, Karol; Paoli de Valeri, Mariela; Odreman, Rodolfo; Núñez, Tulio; Arata-Bellabarba, Gabriela

    2008-06-01

    To evaluate the effects of exogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism on left ventricular structure and function. Twenty-three patients of both sexes, aged 27 to 70 years, with a diagnosis of exogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism (serum thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH] ≤ 0.4mU/ml and normal free thyroxine [FT4]) were evaluated. The patients had been taking levothyroxine in suppressive doses for an average of 6.7 years (1 to 35 years). Twenty euthyroid individuals matched for age, sex and body mass index were selected as controls. A medical history was obtained and symptoms of thyrotoxicosis were quantified in all subjects. To evaluate left ventricular structure and function, as well as atrial conduction time, a two-dimensional echocardiogram and pulsed echo and tissue echo Doppler with electrocardiography monitoring were performed. The index of hemodynamic compensation of the left ventricular mass was calculated. Hyperthyroid symptom scores were significantly higher in patients than in controls (p=0.0001). A positive correlation was found between hyperthyroidism scores and FT4 (p=0.005) and ejection fraction (p=0.04) and a negative correlation was found with TSH levels (p=0.03). End-diastolic volume, stroke volume, cardiac output and stroke work were significantly higher in patients with SH (p=0.04, p=0.02, p=0.05 and p=0.01, respectively). A positive correlation was found between fractional shortening and FT4 level (p=0.022) and levothyroxine dose (p=0.016) and between stroke work and FT4 level (p=0.034). Left ventricular mass, diastolic function and atrial conduction time were similar in patients and controls. Our study suggests that patients with exogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism have hemodynamic changes resulting from adaptation to the biological effects of levothyroxine on the cardiovascular system. However, structural changes are not produced. Copyright © 2008 Sociedad Española de Endocrinología y Nutrición. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights

  17. Endogenous Sulfur Dioxide: A New Member of Gasotransmitter Family in the Cardiovascular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yaqian; Tang, Chaoshu; Du, Junbao; Jin, Hongfang

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) was previously regarded as a toxic gas in atmospheric pollutants. But it has been found to be endogenously generated from metabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids in mammals through transamination by aspartate aminotransferase (AAT). SO2 could be produced in cardiovascular tissues catalyzed by its synthase AAT. In recent years, studies revealed that SO2 had physiological effects on the cardiovascular system, including vasorelaxation and cardiac function regulation. In addition, the pathophysiological effects of SO2 were also determined. For example, SO2 ameliorated systemic hypertension and pulmonary hypertension, prevented the development of atherosclerosis, and protected against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury and isoproterenol-induced myocardial injury. These findings suggested that endogenous SO2 was a novel gasotransmitter in the cardiovascular system and provided a new therapy target for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26839635

  18. The effects of music on the cardiovascular system and cardiovascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trappe, Hans-Joachim

    2010-12-01

    Music may not only improve quality of life but may also effect changes in heart rate and heart rate variability. It has been shown that cerebral flow was significantly lower when listening to 'Va pensiero' from Verdi's 'Nabucco' (70.4±3.3 cm/s) compared with 'Libiam nei lieti calici' from Verdi's 'La Traviata' (70.2±3.1 cm/s) (pmusic significantly decreases the level of anxiety of patients in a preoperative setting (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI)-X-1 score 34)-to a greater extent even than orally administered midazolam (STAI-X-1 score 36) (pmusic group (STAI-X-1 score 30) compared with the midazolam group (STAI-X-1 score 34) (peffectiveness and absence of apparent adverse effects make relaxing, preoperative music a useful alternative to midazolam for premedication. In addition, there is sufficient practical evidence of stress reduction suggesting that a proposed regimen of listening to music while resting in bed after open-heart surgery is important in clinical use. After 30 min of bed rest, there was a significant difference in cortisol levels between the music (484.4 mmol/l) and the non-music group (618.8 mmol/l) (pmusic produce significantly better correlations between cardiovascular or respiratory signals compared with music with a more uniform emphasis (pmusic and meditation music, whereas heavy metal music or techno are not only ineffective but possibly dangerous and can lead to stress and/or life-threatening arrhythmias. The music of many composers most effectively improves quality of life, will increase health and probably prolong life, particularly music by Bach, Mozart or Italian composers.

  19. Sleep, sleep deprivation, autonomic nervous system and cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobaldini, Eleonora; Costantino, Giorgio; Solbiati, Monica; Cogliati, Chiara; Kara, Tomas; Nobili, Lino; Montano, Nicola

    2017-03-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) has become a relevant health problem in modern societies. We can be sleep deprived due to lifestyle habits or due to sleep disorders, such as insomnia, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and neurological disorders. One of the common element of sleep disorders is the condition of chronic SD, which has complex biological consequences. SD is capable of inducing different biological effects, such as neural autonomic control changes, increased oxidative stress, altered inflammatory and coagulatory responses and accelerated atherosclerosis. All these mechanisms links SD and cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. Epidemiological studies have shown that short sleep duration is associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular diseases, such as coronary artery disease, hypertension, arrhythmias, diabetes and obesity, after adjustment for socioeconomic and demographic risk factors and comorbidities. Thus, an early assessment of a condition of SD and its treatment is clinically relevant to prevent the harmful consequences of a very common condition in adult population.

  20. Human Plasma Lipidome Is Pleiotropically Associated with Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamtani, Manju; Kent, Jack W.; Wong, Gerard; Weir, Jacquelyn M.; Barlow, Christopher K.; Diego, Vincent; Almeida, Marcio; Dyer, Thomas D.; Göring, Harald H.H.; Almasy, Laura; Mahaney, Michael C.; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Williams-Blangero, Sarah; Meikle, Peter J.; Blangero, John; Curran, Joanne E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most common cause of death in the United States and is associated with a high economic burden. Prevention of CVD focuses on controlling or improving the lipid profile of patients at risk. The human lipidome is made up of thousands of ubiquitous lipid species. By studying biologically simple canonical lipid species, we investigated whether the lipidome is genetically redundant and whether its genetic influences can provide clinically relevant clues of CVD risk. Methods and Results We performed a genetic study of the human lipidome in 1,212 individuals from 42 extended Mexican American families. High-throughput mass spectrometry enabled rapid capture of precise lipidomic profiles, providing 319 unique species. Using variance-component based heritability analyses and bivariate trait analyses, we detected significant genetic influences on each lipid assayed. Median heritability of the plasma lipid species was 0.37. Hierarchical clustering based on complex genetic correlation patterns identified 12 genetic clusters that characterized the plasma lipidome. These genetic clusters were differentially but consistently associated with risk factors of CVD, including central obesity, obesity, type 2 diabetes, raised serum triglycerides and metabolic syndrome. Also these clusters consistently predicted occurrence of cardiovascular deaths during follow-up. Conclusions The human plasma lipidome is heritable. Shared genetic influences reduce the dimensionality of the human lipidome into clusters that are associated with risk factors of CVD. PMID:25363705

  1. Aerobic vs anaerobic exercise training effects on the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Harsh; Alkhawam, Hassan; Madanieh, Raef; Shah, Niel; Kosmas, Constantine E; Vittorio, Timothy J

    2017-02-26

    Physical exercise is one of the most effective methods to help prevent cardiovascular (CV) disease and to promote CV health. Aerobic and anaerobic exercises are two types of exercise that differ based on the intensity, interval and types of muscle fibers incorporated. In this article, we aim to further elaborate on these two categories of physical exercise and to help decipher which provides the most effective means of promoting CV health.

  2. Aerobic vs anaerobic exercise training effects on the cardiovascular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Harsh; Alkhawam, Hassan; Madanieh, Raef; Shah, Niel; Kosmas, Constantine E; Vittorio, Timothy J

    2017-01-01

    Physical exercise is one of the most effective methods to help prevent cardiovascular (CV) disease and to promote CV health. Aerobic and anaerobic exercises are two types of exercise that differ based on the intensity, interval and types of muscle fibers incorporated. In this article, we aim to further elaborate on these two categories of physical exercise and to help decipher which provides the most effective means of promoting CV health. PMID:28289526

  3. Development of the Digital Astronaut Project for the analysis of the mechanisms of physiologic adaptation to microgravity: Validation of the cardiovascular system module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Richard; Coleman, Thomas; Meck, Janice

    The physiologic adaptation of humans to the microgravity environment is complex and requires an integrative perspective to fully understand the mechanisms involved. A large computer model of human systems physiology provides the framework for the development of the Digital Astronaut to be used by NASA in the analysis of adaptive mechanisms. While project expansion is ongoing to include all relevant systems, we describe the validation results of the cardiovascular phase of model development. The cardiovascular aspects of the model were validated by benchmark comparisons to published literature findings of changes in left ventricular mass, right atrial pressure and plasma volumes. Computer simulations using the model predicted microgravity induced changes in the target endpoints within statistical validity of experimental findings. Therefore, the current cardiovascular portion of the Digital Astronaut Project computer model appears to accurately predict observed microgravity induced physiologic adaptations. The ongoing process of model development to include all spaceflight relevant systems will require similar validations.

  4. Aging: Molecular Pathways and Implications on the Cardiovascular System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur José Pontes Oliveira de Almeida

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The world’s population over 60 years is growing rapidly, reaching 22% of the global population in the next decades. Despite the increase in global longevity, individual healthspan needs to follow this growth. Several diseases have their prevalence increased by age, such as cardiovascular diseases, the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Understanding the aging biology mechanisms is fundamental to the pursuit of cardiovascular health. In this way, aging is characterized by a gradual decline in physiological functions, involving the increased number in senescent cells into the body. Several pathways lead to senescence, including oxidative stress and persistent inflammation, as well as energy failure such as mitochondrial dysfunction and deregulated autophagy, being ROS, AMPK, SIRTs, mTOR, IGF-1, and p53 key regulators of the metabolic control, connecting aging to the pathways which drive towards diseases. In addition, senescence can be induced by cellular replication, which resulted from telomere shortening. Taken together, it is possible to draw a common pathway unifying aging to cardiovascular diseases, and the central point of this process, senescence, can be the target for new therapies, which may result in the healthspan matching the lifespan.

  5. Dendritic Cells and Their Role in Cardiovascular Diseases: A View on Human Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Maja-Theresa Dieterlen; Katja John; Hermann Reichenspurner; Mohr, Friedrich W.; Barten, Markus J.

    2016-01-01

    The antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) are key to the immunological response, with different functions ascribed ranging from cellular immune activation to induction of tolerance. Such immunological responses are involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms of cardiovascular diseases, with DCs shown to play a role in atherosclerosis, hypertension, and heart failure and most notably following heart transplantation. A better understanding of the interplay between the immune system and car...

  6. The role of the autonomic nervous system in diabetes and cardiovascular disease: an epidemiological approach

    OpenAIRE

    Hillebrand, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis was to study the role of autonomic nervous system (ANS) function in the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease using an epidemiological approach. Based on earlier studies it has remained unclear whether impaired ANS function is a risk factor for the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease, or merely a consequence of pre-existing disease. The main conclusions of this thesis are that excess body fat, in particular visceral fat, is associa...

  7. A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease 17 in the Cardiovascular and Central Nervous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiaxi; Mukerjee, Snigdha; Silva-Alves, Cristiane R. A.; Carvalho-Galvão, Alynne; Cruz, Josiane C.; Balarini, Camille M.; Braga, Valdir A.; Lazartigues, Eric; França-Silva, Maria S.

    2016-01-01

    ADAM17 is a metalloprotease and disintegrin that lodges in the plasmatic membrane of several cell types and is able to cleave a wide variety of cell surface proteins. It is somatically expressed in mammalian organisms and its proteolytic action influences several physiological and pathological processes. This review focuses on the structure of ADAM17, its signaling in the cardiovascular system and its participation in certain disorders involving the heart, blood vessels, and neural regulation of autonomic and cardiovascular modulation. PMID:27803674

  8. Impact of Bisphenol A on the Cardiovascular System — Epidemiological and Experimental Evidence and Molecular Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqian Gao

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA is a ubiquitous plasticizing agent used in the manufacturing of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. There is well-documented and broad human exposure to BPA. The potential risk that BPA poses to the human health has attracted much attention from regulatory agencies and the general public, and has been extensively studied. An emerging and rapidly growing area in the study of BPA’s toxicity is its impact on the cardiovascular (CV system. Recent epidemiological studies have shown that higher urinary BPA concentration in humans is associated with various types of CV diseases, including angina, hypertension, heart attack and coronary and peripheral arterial disease. Experimental studies have demonstrated that acute BPA exposure promotes the development of arrhythmias in female rodent hearts. Chronic exposure to BPA has been shown to result in cardiac remodeling, atherosclerosis, and altered blood pressure in rodents. The underlying mechanisms may involve alteration of cardiac Ca2+ handling, ion channel inhibition/activation, oxidative stress, and genome/transcriptome modifications. In this review, we discuss these recent findings that point to the potential CV toxicity of BPA, and highlight the knowledge gaps in this growing research area.

  9. Modeling Cardiovascular Diseases with Patient-Specific Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burridge, Paul W.; Diecke, Sebastian; Matsa, Elena; Sharma, Arun; Wu, Haodi; Wu, Joseph C.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of cardiomyocytes from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) provides a source of cells that accurately recapitulate the human cardiac pathophysiology. The application of these cells allows for modeling of cardiovascular diseases, providing a novel understanding of human disease mechanisms and assessment of therapies. Here, we describe a stepwise protocol developed in our laboratory for the generation of hiPSCs from patients with a specific disease phenotype, long-term hiPSC culture and cryopreservation, differentiation of hiPSCs to cardiomyocytes, and assessment of disease phenotypes. Our protocol combines a number of innovative tools that include a codon-optimized mini intronic plasmid (CoMiP), chemically defined culture conditions to achieve high efficiencies of reprogramming and differentiation, and calcium imaging for assessment of cardiomyocyte phenotypes. Thus, this protocol provides a complete guide to use a patient cohort on a testable cardiomyocyte platform for pharmacological drug assessment. PMID:25690476

  10. Introduction: Cardiovascular physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Niels; Kurths, Jürgen; Ditto, William; Bauernschmitt, Robert

    2007-03-01

    The number of patients suffering from cardiovascular diseases increases unproportionally high with the increase of the human population and aging, leading to very high expenses in the public health system. Therefore, the challenge of cardiovascular physics is to develop high-sophisticated methods which are able to, on the one hand, supplement and replace expensive medical devices and, on the other hand, improve the medical diagnostics with decreasing the patient's risk. Cardiovascular physics-which interconnects medicine, physics, biology, engineering, and mathematics-is based on interdisciplinary collaboration of specialists from the above scientific fields and attempts to gain deeper insights into pathophysiology and treatment options. This paper summarizes advances in cardiovascular physics with emphasis on a workshop held in Bad Honnef, Germany, in May 2005. The meeting attracted an interdisciplinary audience and led to a number of papers covering the main research fields of cardiovascular physics, including data analysis, modeling, and medical application. The variety of problems addressed by this issue underlines the complexity of the cardiovascular system. It could be demonstrated in this Focus Issue, that data analyses and modeling methods from cardiovascular physics have the ability to lead to significant improvements in different medical fields. Consequently, this Focus Issue of Chaos is a status report that may invite all interested readers to join the community and find competent discussion and cooperation partners.

  11. Cardiovascular disease in human immunodeficiency virus infected patients: A true or perceived risk?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shima; Shahbaz; Marcella; Manicardi; Giovanni; Guaraldi; Paolo; Raggi

    2015-01-01

    After the successful introduction of highly active antiretroviral agents the survival of patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus(HIV) in developed countries has increased substantially. This has allowed the surfacing of several chronic diseases among which cardiovascular disease(CVD) is prominent. The pathogenesis of CVD in HIV is complex and involves a combination of traditional and HIV related factors. An accurate assessment of risk of CVD in these patients is still elusive and as a consequence the most appropriate preventive and therapeutic interventions remain controversial.

  12. Nonlinear effects of respiration on the crosstalk between cardiovascular and cerebrovascular control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bari, Vlasta; Marchi, Andrea; De Maria, Beatrice; Rossato, Gianluca; Nollo, Giandomenico; Faes, Luca; Porta, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular regulatory systems are vital control mechanisms responsible for guaranteeing homeostasis and are affected by respiration. This work proposes the investigation of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular control systems and the nonlinear influences of respiration on both regulations through joint symbolic analysis (JSA), conditioned or unconditioned on respiration. Interactions between cardiovascular and cerebrovascular regulatory systems were evaluated as well by performing correlation analysis between JSA indexes describing the two control systems. Heart period, systolic and mean arterial pressure, mean cerebral blood flow velocity and respiration were acquired on a beat-to-beat basis in 13 subjects experiencing recurrent syncope episodes (SYNC) and 13 healthy individuals (non-SYNC) in supine resting condition and during head-up tilt test at 60° (TILT). Results showed that JSA distinguished conditions and groups, whereas time domain parameters detected only the effect of TILT. Respiration affected cardiovascular and cerebrovascular regulatory systems in a nonlinear way and was able to modulate the interactions between the two control systems with different outcome in non-SYNC and SYNC groups, thus suggesting that the analysis of the impact of respiration on cardiovascular and cerebrovascular regulatory systems might improve our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning the development of postural-related syncope.

  13. Nonlinear effects of respiration on the crosstalk between cardiovascular and cerebrovascular control systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bari, Vlasta; Marchi, Andrea; De Maria, Beatrice; Rossato, Gianluca; Nollo, Giandomenico; Faes, Luca; Porta, Alberto

    2016-05-13

    Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular regulatory systems are vital control mechanisms responsible for guaranteeing homeostasis and are affected by respiration. This work proposes the investigation of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular control systems and the nonlinear influences of respiration on both regulations through joint symbolic analysis (JSA), conditioned or unconditioned on respiration. Interactions between cardiovascular and cerebrovascular regulatory systems were evaluated as well by performing correlation analysis between JSA indexes describing the two control systems. Heart period, systolic and mean arterial pressure, mean cerebral blood flow velocity and respiration were acquired on a beat-to-beat basis in 13 subjects experiencing recurrent syncope episodes (SYNC) and 13 healthy individuals (non-SYNC) in supine resting condition and during head-up tilt test at 60° (TILT). Results showed that JSA distinguished conditions and groups, whereas time domain parameters detected only the effect of TILT. Respiration affected cardiovascular and cerebrovascular regulatory systems in a nonlinear way and was able to modulate the interactions between the two control systems with different outcome in non-SYNC and SYNC groups, thus suggesting that the analysis of the impact of respiration on cardiovascular and cerebrovascular regulatory systems might improve our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning the development of postural-related syncope.

  14. Metabolic Effects of Dietary Proteins, Amino Acids and The Other Amine Consisting Compounds on Cardiovascular System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Uğur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases, first cause of deaths in the world, diet has a vital role. While nutrition programs for the cardiovascular health generally focus on lipids and carbohydrates, effects of proteins are not well concerned. Thus this review is written in order to examine effect of proteins, amino acids, and the other amine consisting compounds on cardiovascular system. Because of that animal or plant derived proteins have different protein composition in different foods such as dairy products, egg, meat, chicken, fish, pulse and grains, their effects on blood pressure and regulation of lipid profile are unlike. In parallel amino acids made up proteins have different effect on cardiovascular system. From this point, sulfur containing amino acids, branched chain amino acids, aromatic amino acids, arginine, ornithine, citrulline, glycine, and glutamine may affect cardiovascular system in different metabolic pathways. In this context, one carbon metabolism, synthesis of hormone, stimulation of signaling pathways and effects of intermediate and final products that formed as a result of amino acids metabolism is determined. Despite the protein and amino acids, some other amine consisting compounds in diet include trimethylamine N-oxide, heterocyclic aromatic amines, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and products of Maillard reaction. These amine consisting compounds generally increase the risk for cardiovascular diseases by stimulating oxidative stress, inflammation, and formation of atherosclerotic plaque.

  15. Space physiology IV: mathematical modeling of the cardiovascular system in space exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith Sharp, M; Batzel, Jerry Joseph; Montani, Jean-Pierre

    2013-08-01

    Mathematical modeling represents an important tool for analyzing cardiovascular function during spaceflight. This review describes how modeling of the cardiovascular system can contribute to space life science research and illustrates this process via modeling efforts to study postflight orthostatic intolerance (POI), a key issue for spaceflight. Examining this application also provides a context for considering broader applications of modeling techniques to the challenges of bioastronautics. POI, which affects a large fraction of astronauts in stand tests upon return to Earth, presents as dizziness, fainting and other symptoms, which can diminish crew performance and cause safety hazards. POI on the Moon or Mars could be more critical. In the field of bioastronautics, POI has been the dominant application of cardiovascular modeling for more than a decade, and a number of mechanisms for POI have been investigated. Modeling approaches include computational models with a range of incorporated factors and hemodynamic sophistication, and also physical models tested in parabolic and orbital flight. Mathematical methods such as parameter sensitivity analysis can help identify key system mechanisms. In the case of POI, this could lead to more effective countermeasures. Validation is a persistent issue in modeling efforts, and key considerations and needs for experimental data to synergistically improve understanding of cardiovascular responses are outlined. Future directions in cardiovascular modeling include subject-specific assessment of system status, as well as research on integrated physiological responses, leading, for instance, to assessment of subject-specific susceptibility to POI or effects of cardiovascular alterations on muscular, vision and cognitive function.

  16. The Learning Healthcare System and Cardiovascular Care: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, Thomas M; Albert, Nancy M; Borden, William B; Curtis, Lesley H; Ferguson, T Bruce; Kao, David P; Marcus, Gregory M; Peterson, Eric D; Redberg, Rita; Rumsfeld, John S; Shah, Nilay D; Tcheng, James E

    2017-04-04

    The learning healthcare system uses health information technology and the health data infrastructure to apply scientific evidence at the point of clinical care while simultaneously collecting insights from that care to promote innovation in optimal healthcare delivery and to fuel new scientific discovery. To achieve these goals, the learning healthcare system requires systematic redesign of the current healthcare system, focusing on 4 major domains: science and informatics, patient-clinician partnerships, incentives, and development of a continuous learning culture. This scientific statement provides an overview of how these learning healthcare system domains can be realized in cardiovascular disease care. Current cardiovascular disease care innovations in informatics, data uses, patient engagement, continuous learning culture, and incentives are profiled. In addition, recommendations for next steps for the development of a learning healthcare system in cardiovascular care are presented. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. HYPERACTIVE TISSUE RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEMS IN CARDIOVASCULAR DYSFUNCTION - EXPERIMENTAL-EVIDENCE AND CLINICAL HYPOTHESES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PINTO, YM; BUIKEMA, H; VANGILST, WH

    1995-01-01

    In this review, hypotheses are discussed with regard to the role of local, tissue renin-angiotensin systems in the progression of cardiovascular dysfunction. After local renin-anglotensin systems had been described as functionally distinct systems, recent experimental studies have suggested an assoc

  18. Individual differences in the locus coeruleus-norepinephrine system: Relevance to stress-induced cardiovascular vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Christopher S; Valentino, Rita J; Wood, Susan K

    2017-04-01

    Repeated exposure to psychosocial stress is a robust sympathomimetic stressor and as such has adverse effects on cardiovascular health. While the neurocircuitry involved remains unclear, the physiological and anatomical characteristics of the locus coeruleus (LC)-norepinephrine (NE) system suggest that it is poised to contribute to stress-induced cardiovascular vulnerability. A major theme throughout is to review studies that shed light on the role that the LC may play in individual differences in vulnerability to social stress-induced cardiovascular dysfunction. Recent findings are discussed that support a unique plasticity in afferent regulation of the LC, resulting in either excitatory or inhibitory input to the LC during establishment of different stress coping strategies. This contrasting regulation of the LC by either afferent regulation, or distinct differences in stress-induced neuroinflammation would translate to differences in cardiovascular regulation and may serve as the basis for individual differences in the cardiopathological consequences of social stress. The goal of this review is to highlight recent developments in the interplay between the LC-NE and cardiovascular systems during repeated stress in an effort to advance therapeutic treatments for the development of stress-induced cardiovascular vulnerability.

  19. Management of cardiovascular risk in systemic lupus erythematosus: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrades, C; Fuego, C; Manrique-Arija, S; Fernández-Nebro, A

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and increased risk of cardiovascular complications. The aim of this study was to review the effectiveness of interventions for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events and mortality and to review the effectiveness of interventions for cardiovascular risk factor reduction in systemic lupus erythematosus patients. A systematic review was conducted. Electronic databases Medline and Embase (1961-2015) were searched. Nineteen articles met the inclusion criteria and were selected. Low-calorie and/or low glycaemic index calories may be a useful option for secondary prevention in obese patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, and exercise would be useful in improving the endothelial function measured by flow-mediated dilation in this group of patients. The use of lipid-lowering drugs may improve the lipid profile in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and hyperlipidaemia, but the effect of this treatment on overall cardiovascular mortality remains unknown. Antiplatelets, anticoagulants, antimalarials and lipid-lowering drugs may be effective in the primary and secondary prevention of major cardiovascular events, such as acute myocardial infarction or stroke. Similarly, lipid-lowering drugs and antimalarial drugs appear to reduce the serum levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, glucose, diastolic blood pressure and calcium deposition at the coronary arteries. They may also improve insulin resistance and the level of high-density lipoproteins. It appears that treatment with antihypertensive drugs reduces blood pressure in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, but the available studies are of low quality.

  20. Human Research Program Human Health Countermeasures Element Cardiovascular Risks Standing Review Panel (SRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The Cardiovascular Risk Standing Review Panel (SRP) evaluated several cardiovascular risks associated with space flight along with the ongoing and emerging plans to study these issues and potentially propose and/or develop countermeasures. The areas of focus included: 1) The risk of cardiac rhythm problems during prolonged space flight, and 2) Issues related to the risk of orthostatic intolerance during re-exposure to gravity. An emerging area of concern is radiation associated vascular injury. The risk of cardiac rhythm disturbances has emerged based on case reports only. No systematic study of this risk has been published. However, concerns about this risk are heightened by the age range of astronauts, the structural changes in the heart that occur during space flight, and the potential shifts in fluids and electrolytes. The current plan is to use prolonged Holter monitor EKG records made as part of the "Integrated Cardiovascular SMO" in space to determine more about the frequency and magnitude of this problem and to link this data to complementary data from the nutrition group on electrolytes. The SRP was supportive of this approach. The SRP also felt that any data related to cardiovascular risk in space should be better coordinated with the medical screening data that all astronauts undergo at regular intervals. Additionally, while there are potential privacy issues related to this suggestion, many of the current barriers to better coordination of experimental and clinical data appear to reflect longstanding cultural traditions at NASA that need rethinking. The risk of orthostatic intolerance during re-exposure to gravity was seen by the SRP as an area supported by a wealth of published physiological evidence. The SRP also felt that moving forward with the planned approach to countermeasures was reasonable and that extensive additional hypothesis testing on the physiology of orthostatic intolerance was not needed at this time. There was support for developing

  1. Cardiovascular Deconditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, John B.; Fritsch-Yelle, Janice M.; Whitson, Peggy A.; Wood, Margie L.; Brown, Troy E.; Fortner, G. William

    1999-01-01

    Spaceflight causes adaptive changes in cardiovascular function that may deleteriously affect crew health and safety. Over the last three decades, symptoms of cardiovascular changes have ranged from postflight orthostatic tachycardia and decreased exercise capacity to serious cardiac rhythm disturbances during extravehicular activities (EVA). The most documented symptom of cardiovascular dysfunction, postflight orthostatic intolerance, has affected a significant percentage of U.S. Space Shuttle astronauts. Problems of cardiovascular dysfunction associated with spaceflight are a concern to NASA. This has been particularly true during Shuttle flights where the primary concern is the crew's physical health, including the pilot's ability to land the Orbiter, and the crew's ability to quickly egress and move to safety should a dangerous condition arise. The study of astronauts during Shuttle activities is inherently more difficult than most human research. Consequently, sample sizes have been small and results have lacked consistency. Before the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP), there was a lack of normative data on changes in cardiovascular parameters during and after spaceflight. The EDOMP for the first time allowed studies on a large enough number of subjects to overcome some of these problems. There were three primary goals of the Cardiovascular EDOMP studies. The first was to establish, through descriptive studies, a normative data base of cardiovascular changes attributable to spaceflight. The second goal was to determine mechanisms of cardiovascular changes resulting from spaceflight (particularly orthostatic hypotension and cardiac rhythm disturbances). The third was to evaluate possible countermeasures. The Cardiovascular EDOMP studies involved parallel descriptive, mechanistic, and countermeasure evaluations.

  2. Autonomic Modulation by Electrical Stimulation of the Parasympathetic Nervous System: An Emerging Intervention for Cardiovascular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bo; Lu, Zhibing; He, Wenbo; Huang, Bing; Jiang, Hong

    2016-06-01

    The cardiac autonomic nervous system has been known to play an important role in the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases. Autonomic modulation by electrical stimulation of the parasympathetic nervous system, which increases the parasympathetic activity and suppresses the sympathetic activity, is emerging as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Here, we review the recent literature on autonomic modulation by electrical stimulation of the parasympathetic nervous system, including vagus nerve stimulation, transcutaneous auricular vagal stimulation, spinal cord stimulation, and ganglionated plexi stimulation, in the treatment of heart failure, atrial fibrillation, and ventricular arrhythmias.

  3. Endogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism and cardiovascular system: time to reconsider?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patanè, Salvatore; Marte, Filippo; Sturiale, Mauro

    2011-05-19

    Subclinical hyperthyroidism is an increasingly recognized entity that is defined as a normal serum free thyroxine and free triiodothyronine levels with a thyroid-stimulating hormone level suppressed below the normal range and usually undetectable. Exogenous sublinical hyperthyroidism is a thyroid metabolic state caused by L-thyroxine administration. Endogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism is a thyroid metabolic state in patients with autonomously functioning thyroid nodule or multinodular goiter, various forms of thyroiditis, in areas with endemic goiter and particularly in elderly subjects. Endogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism is currently the subject of numerous studies and it yet remains controversial particularly as it relates to its treatment and to cardiovascular impact nevertheless established effects have been demonstrated. Recently, acute myocardial infarction without significant coronary stenoses and recurrent acute pulmonary embolism have been reported associated with subclinical hyperthyroidism without L-thyroxine administration. So, it is very important to recognize and to treat promptly also endogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Maximal heart rate does not limit cardiovascular capacity in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, G D W; Svendsen, J H; Damsgaard, R

    2014-01-01

    In humans, maximal aerobic power (VO2 max ) is associated with a plateau in cardiac output (Q), but the mechanisms regulating the interplay between maximal heart rate (HRmax) and stroke volume (SV) are unclear. To evaluate the effect of tachycardia and elevations in HRmax on cardiovascular function...... and capacity during maximal exercise in healthy humans, 12 young male cyclists performed incremental cycling and one-legged knee-extensor exercise (KEE) to exhaustion with and without right atrial pacing to increase HR. During control cycling, Q and leg blood flow increased up to 85% of maximal workload (WLmax...... and RAP (P exercise, suggesting that HRmax and myocardial work capacity do not limit VO2 max in healthy...

  5. Cross-spectral coherence between geomagnetic disturbance and human cardiovascular variables at non-societal frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Y; Hillman, D C; Otsuka, K; Bingham, C; Breus, T K; Cornélissen, G; Halberg, F

    1994-01-01

    A 35-year-old cardiologist monitored himself with an automatic ABPM-630 (Colin Electronics) monitor, mostly at 15-minute intervals around-the-clock for three years with a few interruptions. In this subject with a family history of high blood pressure and stroke, a cross-spectral analysis revealed a statistically significant coherence at 27.7 days between systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate vs. the geomagnetic disturbance index, Kp. A lesser peak in coherence was found for systolic blood pressure with Kp at a trial period of 4.16 days (P = 0.046). These results suggest that changes in geomagnetism may influence the human circulation, at least in the presence of familial cardiovascular disease risk, and they may do so at frequencies that have no precise human-made cyclic worldwide match.

  6. Using a human cardiovascular-respiratory model to characterize cardiac tamponade and pulsus paradoxus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Deepa; Luo, Chuan; Ma, Tony S; Clark, John W

    2009-01-01

    Background Cardiac tamponade is a condition whereby fluid accumulation in the pericardial sac surrounding the heart causes elevation and equilibration of pericardial and cardiac chamber pressures, reduced cardiac output, changes in hemodynamics, partial chamber collapse, pulsus paradoxus, and arterio-venous acid-base disparity. Our large-scale model of the human cardiovascular-respiratory system (H-CRS) is employed to study mechanisms underlying cardiac tamponade and pulsus paradoxus. The model integrates hemodynamics, whole-body gas exchange, and autonomic nervous system control to simulate pressure, volume, and blood flow. Methods We integrate a new pericardial model into our previously developed H-CRS model based on a fit to patient pressure data. Virtual experiments are designed to simulate pericardial effusion and study mechanisms of pulsus paradoxus, focusing particularly on the role of the interventricular septum. Model differential equations programmed in C are solved using a 5th-order Runge-Kutta numerical integration scheme. MATLAB is employed for waveform analysis. Results The H-CRS model simulates hemodynamic and respiratory changes associated with tamponade clinically. Our model predicts effects of effusion-generated pericardial constraint on chamber and septal mechanics, such as altered right atrial filling, delayed leftward septal motion, and prolonged left ventricular pre-ejection period, causing atrioventricular interaction and ventricular desynchronization. We demonstrate pericardial constraint to markedly accentuate normal ventricular interactions associated with respiratory effort, which we show to be the distinct mechanisms of pulsus paradoxus, namely, series and parallel ventricular interaction. Series ventricular interaction represents respiratory variation in right ventricular stroke volume carried over to the left ventricle via the pulmonary vasculature, whereas parallel interaction (via the septum and pericardium) is a result of

  7. An Implantable Cardiovascular Pressure Monitoring System with On-Chip Antenna and RF Energy Harvesting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chun Liu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available An implantable wireless system with on-chip antenna for cardiovascular pressure monitor is studied. The implantable device is operated in a batteryless manner, powered by an external radio frequency (RF power source. The received RF power level can be sensed and wirelessly transmitted along with blood pressure signal for feedback control of the external RF power. The integrated electronic system, consisting of a capacitance-to-voltage converter, an adaptive RF powering system, an RF transmitter and digital control circuitry, is simulated using a TSMC 0.18 μm CMOS technology. The implanted RF transmitter circuit is combined with a low power voltage-controlled oscillator resonating at 5.8 GHz and a power amplifier. For the design, the simulation model is setup using ADS and HFSS software. The dimension of the antenna is 1 × 0.6 × 4.8 mm3 with a 1 × 0.6 mm2 on-chip circuit which is small enough to place in human carotid artery.

  8. The complement system in human cardiometabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertle, E; Stehouwer, C D A; van Greevenbroek, M M J

    2014-10-01

    The complement system has been implicated in obesity, fatty liver, diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Complement factors are produced in adipose tissue and appear to be involved in adipose tissue metabolism and local inflammation. Thereby complement links adipose tissue inflammation to systemic metabolic derangements, such as low-grade inflammation, insulin resistance and dyslipidaemia. Furthermore, complement has been implicated in pathophysiological mechanisms of diet- and alcohol induced liver damage, hyperglycaemia, endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and fibrinolysis. In this review, we summarize current evidence on the role of the complement system in several processes of human cardiometabolic disease. C3 is the central component in complement activation, and has most widely been studied in humans. C3 concentrations are associated with insulin resistance, liver dysfunction, risk of the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and CVD. C3 can be activated by the classical, the lectin and the alternative pathway of complement activation; and downstream activation of C3 activates the terminal pathway. Complement may also be activated via extrinsic proteases of the coagulation, fibrinolysis and the kinin systems. Studies on the different complement activation pathways in human cardiometabolic disease are limited, but available evidence suggests that they may have distinct roles in processes underlying cardiometabolic disease. The lectin pathway appeared beneficial in some studies on type 2 diabetes and CVD, while factors of the classical and the alternative pathway were related to unfavourable cardiometabolic traits. The terminal complement pathway was also implicated in insulin resistance and liver disease, and appears to have a prominent role in acute and advanced CVD. The available human data suggest a complex and potentially causal role for the complement system in human cardiometabolic disease. Further, preferably longitudinal studies are needed to

  9. Development of Anatomophysiologic Knowledge Regarding the Cardiovascular System: From Egyptians to Harvey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinaldo Bulgarelli Bestetti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Our knowledge regarding the anatomophysiology of the cardiovascular system (CVS has progressed since the fourth millennium BC. In Egypt (3500 BC, it was believed that a set of channels are interconnected to the heart, transporting air, urine, air, blood, and the soul. One thousand years later, the heart was established as the center of the CVS by the Hippocratic Corpus in the medical school of Kos, and some of the CVS anatomical characteristics were defined. The CVS was known to transport blood via the right ventricle through veins and the pneuma via the left ventricle through arteries. Two hundred years later, in Alexandria, following the development of human anatomical dissection, Herophilus discovered that arteries were 6 times thicker than veins, and Erasistratus described the semilunar valves, emphasizing that arteries were filled with blood when ventricles were empty. Further, 200 years later, Galen demonstrated that arteries contained blood and not air. With the decline of the Roman Empire, Greco-Roman medical knowledge about the CVS was preserved in Persia, and later in Islam where, Ibn Nafis inaccurately described pulmonary circulation. The resurgence of dissection of the human body in Europe in the 14th century was associated with the revival of the knowledge pertaining to the CVS. The main findings were the description of pulmonary circulation by Servetus, the anatomical discoveries of Vesalius, the demonstration of pulmonary circulation by Colombo, and the discovery of valves in veins by Fabricius. Following these developments, Harvey described blood circulation.

  10. Development of Anatomophysiologic Knowledge Regarding the Cardiovascular System: From Egyptians to Harvey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bestetti, Reinaldo Bulgarelli, E-mail: rbestetti44@gmail.com; Restini, Carolina Baraldi A.; Couto, Lucélio B. [Universidade de Ribeirão Preto - UNAERP, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2014-12-15

    Our knowledge regarding the anatomophysiology of the cardiovascular system (CVS) has progressed since the fourth millennium BC. In Egypt (3500 BC), it was believed that a set of channels are interconnected to the heart, transporting air, urine, air, blood, and the soul. One thousand years later, the heart was established as the center of the CVS by the Hippocratic Corpus in the medical school of Kos, and some of the CVS anatomical characteristics were defined. The CVS was known to transport blood via the right ventricle through veins and the pneuma via the left ventricle through arteries. Two hundred years later, in Alexandria, following the development of human anatomical dissection, Herophilus discovered that arteries were 6 times thicker than veins, and Erasistratus described the semilunar valves, emphasizing that arteries were filled with blood when ventricles were empty. Further, 200 years later, Galen demonstrated that arteries contained blood and not air. With the decline of the Roman Empire, Greco-Roman medical knowledge about the CVS was preserved in Persia, and later in Islam where, Ibn Nafis inaccurately described pulmonary circulation. The resurgence of dissection of the human body in Europe in the 14th century was associated with the revival of the knowledge pertaining to the CVS. The main findings were the description of pulmonary circulation by Servetus, the anatomical discoveries of Vesalius, the demonstration of pulmonary circulation by Colombo, and the discovery of valves in veins by Fabricius. Following these developments, Harvey described blood circulation.

  11. The cardiovascular system in growth hormone excess and growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, G; Di Somma, C; Grasso, L F S; Savanelli, M C; Colao, A; Pivonello, R

    2012-12-01

    The clinical conditions associated with GH excess and GH deficiency (GHD) are known to be associated with an increased risk for the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, suggesting that either an excess or a deficiency in GH and/or IGF-I is deleterious for cardiovascular system. In patients with acromegaly, chronic GH and IGF-I excess commonly causes a specific cardiomyopathy characterized by a concentric cardiac hypertrophy associated with diastolic dysfunction and, in later stages, with systolic dysfunction ending in heart failure if GH/IGF-I excess is not controlled. Abnormalities of cardiac rhythm and anomalies of cardiac valves can also occur. Moreover, the increased prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and insulin resistance, as well as dyslipidemia, confer an increased risk for vascular atherosclerosis. Successful control of the disease is accompanied by a decrease of the cardiac mass and improvement of cardiac function and an improvement in cardiovascular risk factors. In patients with hypopituitarism, GHD has been considered the under- lying factor of the increased mortality when appropriate standard replacement of the pituitary hormones deficiencies is given. Either childhood-onset or adulthood-onset GHD are characterized by a cluster of abnormalities associated with an increased cardiovascular risk, including altered body composition, unfavorable lipid profile, insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction and vascular atherosclerosis, a decrease in cardiac mass together with an impairment of systolic function mainly after exercise. Treatment with recombinant GH in patients with GHD is followed by an improvement of the cardiovascular risk factors and an increase in cardiac mass together with an improvement in cardiac performance. In conclusion, acromegaly and GHD are associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, but the control of GH/IGF-I secretion reverses cardiovascular

  12. Sympathetic nervous system behavior in human obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, Kevin P; Orr, Jeb S

    2009-02-01

    The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) plays an essential role in the regulation of metabolic and cardiovascular homeostasis. Low SNS activity has been suggested to be a risk factor for weight gain and obesity development. In contrast, SNS activation is characteristic of a number of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases that occur more frequently in obese individuals. Until recently, the relation between obesity and SNS behavior has been controversial because previous approaches for assessing SNS activity in humans have produced inconsistent findings. Beginning in the early 1990s, many studies using state of the art neurochemical and neurophysiological techniques have provided important insight. The purpose of the present review is to provide an overview of our current understanding of the region specific alterations in SNS behavior in human obesity. We will discuss findings from our own laboratory which implicate visceral fat as an important depot linking obesity with skeletal muscle SNS activation. The influence of weight change on SNS behavior and the potential mechanisms and consequences of region specific SNS activation in obesity will also be considered.

  13. Complementary role of cardiovascular imaging and laboratory indices in early detection of cardiovascular disease in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrogeni, S; Koutsogeorgopoulou, L; Dimitroulas, T; Markousis-Mavrogenis, G; Kolovou, G

    2017-03-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been documented in >50% of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, due to a complex interplay between traditional risk factors and SLE-related factors. Various processes, such as coronary artery disease, myocarditis, dilated cardiomyopathy, vasculitis, valvular heart disease, pulmonary hypertension and heart failure, account for CVD complications in SLE. Methods Electrocardiogram (ECG), echocardiography (echo), nuclear techniques, cardiac computed tomography (CT), cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) and cardiac catheterization (CCa) can detect CVD in SLE at an early stage. ECG and echo are the cornerstones of CVD evaluation in SLE. The routine use of cardiac CT and nuclear techniques is limited by radiation exposure and use of iodinated contrast agents. Additionally, nuclear techniques are also limited by low spatial resolution that does not allow detection of sub-endocardial and sub-epicardial lesions. CCa gives definitive information about coronary artery anatomy and pulmonary artery pressure and offers the possibility of interventional therapy. However, it carries the risk of invasive instrumentation. Recently, CMR was proved of great value in the evaluation of cardiac function and the detection of myocardial inflammation, stress-rest perfusion defects and fibrosis. Results An algorithm for CVD evaluation in SLE includes clinical, laboratory, ECG and echo assessment as well as CMR evaluation in patients with inconclusive findings, persistent cardiac symptoms despite normal standard evaluation, new onset of life-threatening arrhythmia/heart failure and/or as a tool to select SLE patients for CCa. Conclusions A non-invasive approach including clinical, laboratory and imaging evaluation is key for early CVD detection in SLE.

  14. Human Exposure Database System (HEDS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Human Exposure Database System (HEDS) provides public access to data sets, documents, and metadata from EPA on human exposure. It is primarily intended for...

  15. System identification of closed-loop cardiovascular control: effects of posture and autonomic blockade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, T. J.; Appel, M. L.; Mukkamala, R.; Mathias, J. M.; Cohen, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    We applied system identification to the analysis of fluctuations in heart rate (HR), arterial blood pressure (ABP), and instantaneous lung volume (ILV) to characterize quantitatively the physiological mechanisms responsible for the couplings between these variables. We characterized two autonomically mediated coupling mechanisms [the heart rate baroreflex (HR baroreflex) and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (ILV-HR)] and two mechanically mediated coupling mechanisms [the blood pressure wavelet generated with each cardiac contraction (circulatory mechanics) and the direct mechanical effects of respiration on blood pressure (ILV-->ABP)]. We evaluated the method in humans studied in the supine and standing postures under control conditions and under conditions of beta-sympathetic and parasympathetic pharmacological blockades. Combined beta-sympathetic and parasympathetic blockade abolished the autonomically mediated couplings while preserving the mechanically mediated coupling. Selective autonomic blockade and postural changes also altered the couplings in a manner consistent with known physiological mechanisms. System identification is an "inverse-modeling" technique that provides a means for creating a closed-loop model of cardiovascular regulation for an individual subject without altering the underlying physiological control mechanisms.

  16. Adaptive life simulator: A novel approach to modeling the cardiovascular system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kangas, L.J.; Keller, P.E.; Hashem, S. [and others

    1995-06-01

    In this paper, an adaptive life simulator (ALS) is introduced. The ALS models a subset of the dynamics of the cardiovascular behavior of an individual by using a recurrent artificial neural network. These models are developed for use in applications that require simulations of cardiovascular systems, such as medical mannequins, and in medical diagnostic systems. This approach is unique in that each cardiovascular model is developed from physiological measurements of an individual. Any differences between the modeled variables and the actual variables of an individual can subsequently be used for diagnosis. This approach also exploits sensor fusion applied to biomedical sensors. Sensor fusion optimizes the utilization of the sensors. The advantage of sensor fusion has been demonstrated in applications including control and diagnostics of mechanical and chemical processes.

  17. Adaptive life simulator: A novel approach to modeling the cardiovascular system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kangas, L.J.; Keller, P.E.; Hashem, S. [and others

    1995-06-01

    In this paper, an adaptive life simulator (ALS) is introduced. The ALS models a subset of the dynamics of the cardiovascular behavior of an individual by using a recurrent artificial neural network. These models are developed for use in applications that require simulations of cardiovascular systems, such as medical mannequins, and in medical diagnostic systems. This approach is unique in that each cardiovascular model is developed from physiological measurements of an individual. Any differences between the modeled variables and the actual variables of an individual can subsequently be used for diagnosis. This approach also exploits sensor fusion applied to biomedical sensors. Sensor fusion optimizes the utilization of the sensors. The advantage of sensor fusion has been demonstrated in applications including control and diagnostics of mechanical and chemical processes.

  18. The Spleen: A Hub Connecting Nervous and Immune Systems in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Lori

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic disorders have been identified as major health problems affecting a large portion of the world population. In addition, obesity and insulin resistance are principal risk factors for the development of cardiovascular diseases. Altered immune responses are common features of both hypertension and obesity and, moreover, the involvement of the nervous system in the modulation of immune system is gaining even more attention in both pathophysiological contexts. For these reasons, during the last decades, researches focused their efforts on the comprehension of the molecular mechanisms connecting immune system to cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. On the other hand, it has been reported that in these pathological conditions, central neural pathways modulate the activity of the peripheral nervous system, which is strongly involved in onset and progression of the disease. It is interesting to notice that neural reflex can also participate in the modulation of immune functions. In this scenario, the spleen becomes the crucial hub allowing the interaction of different systems differently involved in metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Here, we summarize the major findings that dissect the role of the immune system in disorders related to metabolic and cardiovascular dysfunctions, and how this could also be influenced by neural reflexes.

  19. Cardiovascular and autonomic modulation by the central nervous system after aerobic exercise training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Martins-Pinge

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The autonomic nervous system plays a key role in maintaining homeostasis under normal and pathological conditions. The sympathetic tone, particularly for the cardiovascular system, is generated by sympathetic discharges originating in specific areas of the brainstem. Aerobic exercise training promotes several cardiovascular adjustments that are influenced by the central areas involved in the output of the autonomic nervous system. In this review, we emphasize the studies that investigate aerobic exercise training protocols to identify the cardiovascular adaptations that may be the result of central nervous system plasticity due to chronic exercise. The focus of our study is on some groups of neurons involved in sympathetic regulation. They include the nucleus tractus solitarii, caudal ventrolateral medulla and the rostral ventrolateral medulla that maintain and regulate the cardiac and vascular autonomic tonus. We also discuss studies that demonstrate the involvement of supramedullary areas in exercise training modulation, with emphasis on the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, an important area of integration for autonomic and neuroendocrine responses. The results of these studies suggest that the beneficial effects of physical activity may be due, at least in part, to reductions in sympathetic nervous system activity. Conversely, with the recent association of physical inactivity with chronic disease, these data may also suggest that increases in sympathetic nervous system activity contribute to the increased incidence of cardiovascular diseases associated with a sedentary lifestyle.

  20. Nutritional Genomics and the Mediterranean Diet’s Effects on Human Cardiovascular Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Fitó

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The synergies and cumulative effects among different foods and nutrients are what produce the benefits of a healthy dietary pattern. Diets and dietary patterns are a major environmental factor that we are exposed to several times a day. People can learn how to control this behavior in order to promote healthy living and aging, and to prevent diet-related diseases. To date, the traditional Mediterranean diet has been the only well-studied pattern. Stroke incidence, a number of classical risk factors including lipid profile and glycaemia, emergent risk factors such as the length of telomeres, and emotional eating behavior can be affected by genetic predisposition. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet could exert beneficial effects on these risk factors. Our individual genetic make-up should be taken into account to better prevent these traits and their subsequent consequences in cardiovascular disease development. In the present work, we review the results of nutritional genomics explaining the role of the Mediterranean diet in human cardiovascular disease. A multidisciplinary approach is necessary to extract knowledge from large-scale data.

  1. Nutritional Genomics and the Mediterranean Diet’s Effects on Human Cardiovascular Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitó, Montserrat; Konstantinidou, Valentini

    2016-01-01

    The synergies and cumulative effects among different foods and nutrients are what produce the benefits of a healthy dietary pattern. Diets and dietary patterns are a major environmental factor that we are exposed to several times a day. People can learn how to control this behavior in order to promote healthy living and aging, and to prevent diet-related diseases. To date, the traditional Mediterranean diet has been the only well-studied pattern. Stroke incidence, a number of classical risk factors including lipid profile and glycaemia, emergent risk factors such as the length of telomeres, and emotional eating behavior can be affected by genetic predisposition. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet could exert beneficial effects on these risk factors. Our individual genetic make-up should be taken into account to better prevent these traits and their subsequent consequences in cardiovascular disease development. In the present work, we review the results of nutritional genomics explaining the role of the Mediterranean diet in human cardiovascular disease. A multidisciplinary approach is necessary to extract knowledge from large-scale data. PMID:27089360

  2. Impact of resistance to thyroid hormone on the cardiovascular system in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulcrano, Melania; Palmieri, Emiliano Antonio; Mannavola, Deborah; Ciulla, Michele; Campi, Irene; Covelli, Danila; Lombardi, Gaetano; Biondi, Bernadette; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo

    2009-08-01

    The clinical manifestations of resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) are highly variable, and the impact of RTH on the cardiovascular system has been poorly investigated. The objective of the study was to evaluate the cardiovascular characteristics of 16 untreated and asymptomatic patients with RTH compared with 16 euthyroid healthy controls to define the cardiovascular involvement in RTH syndrome. Sixteen untreated and asymptomatic RTH patients (eight males; aged 33 +/- 12 yr, range 21-45 yr) and 16 controls (nine males; aged 33 +/- 5 yr, range 24-42 yr) were enrolled. Clinical data, thyroid status, and echocardiographic results were recorded. Heart rate was comparable with that of controls, whereas arterial pressure was higher than controls. Mean interventricular septum diastolic thickness and mean left ventricular (LV) posterior wall diastolic thickness were significantly lower in RTH patients than controls with a consequent significant decrease of the mean LV mass and LV mass indexed by body surface area. Patients also had abnormalities of myocardial relaxation as indicated by a significant increase of peak A and consequent reduction of the early to late ratio. Finally, systemic vascular resistance was significantly higher in RTH patients than controls. Our results suggest the presence of cardiovascular alterations in asymptomatic and untreated RTH patients similar to those reported in hypothyroid patients. Our strict selection likely created a bias in the inclusion of a particular type of RTH patients, who could represent a minority of patients with RTH. However, no correlation was found between the type of mutation and cardiovascular characteristics of RTH patients.

  3. In Vitro Epigenetic Reprogramming of Human Cardiac Mesenchymal Stromal Cells into Functionally Competent Cardiovascular Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecellio, Matteo; Meraviglia, Viviana; Nanni, Simona; Barbuti, Andrea; Scavone, Angela; DiFrancesco, Dario; Farsetti, Antonella; Pompilio, Giulio; Colombo, Gualtiero I.; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.

    2012-01-01

    Adult human cardiac mesenchymal-like stromal cells (CStC) represent a relatively accessible cell type useful for therapy. In this light, their conversion into cardiovascular precursors represents a potential successful strategy for cardiac repair. The aim of the present work was to reprogram CStC into functionally competent cardiovascular precursors using epigenetically active small molecules. CStC were exposed to low serum (5% FBS) in the presence of 5 µM all-trans Retinoic Acid (ATRA), 5 µM Phenyl Butyrate (PB), and 200 µM diethylenetriamine/nitric oxide (DETA/NO), to create a novel epigenetically active cocktail (EpiC). Upon treatment the expression of markers typical of cardiac resident stem cells such as c-Kit and MDR-1 were up-regulated, together with the expression of a number of cardiovascular-associated genes including KDR, GATA6, Nkx2.5, GATA4, HCN4, NaV1.5, and α-MHC. In addition, profiling analysis revealed that a significant number of microRNA involved in cardiomyocyte biology and cell differentiation/proliferation, including miR 133a, 210 and 34a, were up-regulated. Remarkably, almost 45% of EpiC-treated cells exhibited a TTX-sensitive sodium current and, to a lower extent in a few cells, also the pacemaker If current. Mechanistically, the exposure to EpiC treatment introduced global histone modifications, characterized by increased levels of H3K4Me3 and H4K16Ac, as well as reduced H4K20Me3 and H3s10P, a pattern compatible with reduced proliferation and chromatin relaxation. Consistently, ChIP experiments performed with H3K4me3 or H3s10P histone modifications revealed the presence of a specific EpiC-dependent pattern in c-Kit, MDR-1, and Nkx2.5 promoter regions, possibly contributing to their modified expression. Taken together, these data indicate that CStC may be epigenetically reprogrammed to acquire molecular and biological properties associated with competent cardiovascular precursors. PMID:23284745

  4. In vitro epigenetic reprogramming of human cardiac mesenchymal stromal cells into functionally competent cardiovascular precursors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Vecellio

    Full Text Available Adult human cardiac mesenchymal-like stromal cells (CStC represent a relatively accessible cell type useful for therapy. In this light, their conversion into cardiovascular precursors represents a potential successful strategy for cardiac repair. The aim of the present work was to reprogram CStC into functionally competent cardiovascular precursors using epigenetically active small molecules. CStC were exposed to low serum (5% FBS in the presence of 5 µM all-trans Retinoic Acid (ATRA, 5 µM Phenyl Butyrate (PB, and 200 µM diethylenetriamine/nitric oxide (DETA/NO, to create a novel epigenetically active cocktail (EpiC. Upon treatment the expression of markers typical of cardiac resident stem cells such as c-Kit and MDR-1 were up-regulated, together with the expression of a number of cardiovascular-associated genes including KDR, GATA6, Nkx2.5, GATA4, HCN4, NaV1.5, and α-MHC. In addition, profiling analysis revealed that a significant number of microRNA involved in cardiomyocyte biology and cell differentiation/proliferation, including miR 133a, 210 and 34a, were up-regulated. Remarkably, almost 45% of EpiC-treated cells exhibited a TTX-sensitive sodium current and, to a lower extent in a few cells, also the pacemaker I(f current. Mechanistically, the exposure to EpiC treatment introduced global histone modifications, characterized by increased levels of H3K4Me3 and H4K16Ac, as well as reduced H4K20Me3 and H3s10P, a pattern compatible with reduced proliferation and chromatin relaxation. Consistently, ChIP experiments performed with H3K4me3 or H3s10P histone modifications revealed the presence of a specific EpiC-dependent pattern in c-Kit, MDR-1, and Nkx2.5 promoter regions, possibly contributing to their modified expression. Taken together, these data indicate that CStC may be epigenetically reprogrammed to acquire molecular and biological properties associated with competent cardiovascular precursors.

  5. Research on Cardiovascular System Simulation Model%心血管系统仿真模型的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈泓

    2014-01-01

    为了深入研究心血管系统的生理机制以及探讨心血管系统的血流动力学参数与心血管疾病之间的关系,文中基于流体力学与电气网络的相关基础理论,根据人体心血管循环系统的解剖模型,提出一种基于集总参数的由体循环、肺循环和心脏组成的心血管系统仿真模型。重点分析了体循环子模型,并利用MATLAB 工具进行数学仿真,得出正常生理状况下的心血管参数,给出收缩压、舒张压、心室血容量等血流动力学参数。根据临床诊断参数调整体循环模型的各个参数,利用计算机仿真出高血压和心衰状况下的血流动力学仿真结果。仿真结果与临床的症状相一致,证明文中提出的模型具有一定的可行性。%In order to study the physiological mechanism of cardiovascular system in depth,and discuss the relationship between the hemo-dynamic parameters of cardiovascular system and cardiovascular disease,a lumped-parameter human cardiovascular circulation system has been put forward based on the relative basic theories of fluid mechanics and electrical network,which is divided into three parts:systemic circulation,pulmonary circulation,and the heart model. The systemic sub models has been emphatically analyzed and the mathematical simulation has been conducted by MATLAB to obtain cardiovascular parameters of the normal physiological conditions,giving the ven-tricular hemodynamic parameters such as systolic pressure,diastolic pressure,blood capacity. According to the clinical diagnosis to adjust each parameter of systemic model,use the computer to simulate the blood flow dynamics simulation results under the conditions of hyper-tension and heart failure. The simulation result is consistent with the clinical symptoms,which verifies the feasibility of the model.

  6. Cardiovascular responses to intravenous administration of human hemokinin-1 and its truncated form hemokinin-1(4-11) in anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Zi-Qing; Fu, Cai-Yun; Chen, Qiang; Wang, Rui

    2008-08-20

    Human hemokinin-1 and its carboxy-terminal fragment human hemokinin-1(4-11) have been recently identified as the members of the tachykinin family. The peripheral cardiovascular effects of these two tachykinin peptides were investigated in anesthetized rats. Lower doses of human hemokinin-1 (0.1-3 nmol/kg) injected intravenously (i.v.) induced depressor response, whereas higher doses (10 and 30 nmol/kg) caused biphasic (depressor and pressor) responses. The depressor response is primarily due to the action on endothelial tachykinin NK(1) receptor to release endothelium-derived relaxing factor (NO) and vagal reflex was absent in this modulation. The pressor response is mediated through the activation of tachykinin NK(1) receptor to release catecholamines from sympathetic ganglia and adrenal medulla. Moreover, human hemokinin-1 injected i.v. produced a dose-dependent tachycardia response along with blood pressure responses and the activation of sympathetic ganglia and adrenal medulla are involved in the tachycardia response. Human hemokinin-1(4-11) only lowered mean arterial pressure dose-dependently (0.1-30 nmol/kg) and the mechanisms involved in the depressor response are similar to that of human hemokinin-1. Additionally, human hemokinin-1(4-11) could also produce tachycardia response dose-dependently and the mechanisms involved in the tachycardia response are similar to that of human hemokinin-1 except that bilateral adrenalectomy could not affect the tachycardia markedly, indicating that the tachycardia induced by human hemokinin-1(4-11) is primarily due to the stimulation of sympathetic ganglia. In a word, to a certain extent, human hemokinin-1(4-11) is the active fragment of human hemokinin-1, however, the differences between human hemokinin-1 and hemokinin-1(4-11) involved in the effects of cardiovascular system suggest that the divergent amino acid residues at the N-terminus of human hemokinin-1 produced different activation properties for tachykinin NK(1

  7. Coffee and cardiovascular disease: in vitro, cellular, animal, and human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonita, Jennifer Stella; Mandarano, Michael; Shuta, Donna; Vinson, Joe

    2007-03-01

    Coffee is a commonly consumed beverage with potential health benefits. This review will focus on cardiovascular disease. There are three preparations of coffee that are commonly consumed and thus worthy of examination; boiled unfiltered coffee, filtered coffee, and decaffeinated coffee. Coffee has over a thousand chemicals, many formed during the roasting process. From a physiological point of view, the potential bioactives are caffeine, the diterpenes cafestol and kahweol found in the oil, and the polyphenols, most notably chlorogenic acid. We will examine coffee and its bioactives and their connection with and effect on the risk factors which are associated with heart disease such as lipids, blood pressure, inflammation, endothelial function, metabolic syndrome and potentially protective in vivo antioxidant activity. These will be critically examined by means of in vitro studies, cell experiments, animal supplementation, epidemiology, and the most definitive evidence, human trials.

  8. Systems biology approaches and pathway tools for investigating cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wheelock, C.E.; Wheelock, A.M.; Kawashima, S.; Diez, D.; Kanehisa, M.; Erk, M. van; Kleemann, R.; Haeggström, J.Z.; Goto, S.

    2009-01-01

    Systems biology aims to understand the nonlinear interactions of multiple biomolecular components that characterize a living organism. One important aspect of systems biology approaches is to identify the biological pathways or networks that connect the differing elements of a system, and examine ho

  9. Interactions between immune, stress-related hormonal and cardiovascular systems following strenuous physical exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menicucci, Danilo; Piarulli, Andrea; Mastorci, Francesca; Sebastiani, Laura; Laurino, Marco; Garbella, Erika; Castagnini, Cinzia; Pellegrini, Silvia; Lubrano, Valter; Bernardi, Giulio; Metelli, Maria; Bedini, Remo; L'abbate, Antonio; Pingitore, Alessandro; Gemignani, Angelo

    2013-09-01

    Physical exercise represents a eustress condition that promotes rapid coordinated adjustments in the immune, stress-related hormonal and cardiovascular systems, for maintaining homeostasis in response to increased metabolic demands. Compared to the tight multisystem coordination during exercise, evidence of between-systems cross talk in the early post exercise is still lacking. This study was aimed at identifying possible interactions between multiple systems following strenuous physical exercise (Ironman race) performed by twenty well-trained triathletes. Cardiac hemodynamics, left ventricle systolic and diastolic function and heart rate variability were measured along with plasma concentrations of immune messengers (cytokines and C-reactive protein) and stress-related hormones (catecholamines and cortisol) both 24h before and within 20 min after the race. Observed changes in antiinflammatory pathways, stress-related hormones and cardiovascular function were in line with previous findings; moreover, correlating parameters' changes (post versus pre-race) highlighted a dependence of cardiovascular function on the post-race biohumoral milieu: in particular, individual post-race variations of heart rate and diastolic function were strongly correlated with individual variations of anti-inflammatory cytokines, while individual baroreflex sensitivity changes were linked to IL-8 increase. Multiple correlations between anti-inflammatory cytokines and catecholamines were also found according with the autonomic regulation of immune function. Observed post-race cytokine and hormone levels were presumptively representative of the increases reached at the effort end while the cardiovascular parameters after the race were measured during the cardiovascular recovery; thus, results suggest that sustained strenuous exercise produced a stereotyped cardiovascular early recovery, whose speed could be conditioned by the immune and stress-related hormonal milieu.

  10. Vascular hyperpolarization in human physiology and cardiovascular risk conditions and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinzari, F; Tesauro, M; Cardillo, C

    2017-01-01

    Hyperpolarization causing smooth muscle relaxation contributes to the maintenance of vascular homeostasis, particularly in small-calibre arteries and arterioles. It may also become a compensatory vasodilator mechanism upregulated in states with impaired nitric oxide (NO) availability. Bioassay of vascular hyperpolarization in the human circulation has been hampered by the complexity of mechanisms involved and the limited availability of investigational tools. Firm evidence, however, supports the notion that hyperpolarization participates in the regulation of resting vasodilator tone and vascular reactivity in healthy subjects. In addition, an enhanced endothelium-derived hyperpolarization contributes to both resting and agonist-stimulated vasodilation in a variety of cardiovascular risk conditions and disease. Thus, hyperpolarization mediated by epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and H2 O2 has been observed in coronary arterioles of patients with coronary artery disease. Similarly, ouabain-sensitive and EETs-mediated hyperpolarization has been observed to compensate for NO deficiency in patients with essential hypertension. Moreover, in non-hypertensive patients with multiple cardiovascular risk factors and in hypercholesterolaemia, KCa channel-mediated vasodilation appears to be activated. A novel paradigm establishes that perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) is an additional regulator of vascular tone/function and endothelium is not the only agent in vascular hyperpolarization. Indeed, some PVAT-derived relaxing substances, such as adiponectin and angiotensin 1-7, may exert anticontractile and vasodilator actions by the opening of KCa channels in smooth muscle cells. Conversely, PVAT-derived factors impair coronary vasodilation via differential inhibition of some K(+) channels. In view of adipose tissue abnormalities occurring in human obesity, changes in PVAT-dependent hyperpolarization may be relevant for vascular dysfunction also in this condition.

  11. The role of the histaminergic system in the central cardiovascular regulation in haemorrhagic hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochem, Jerzy; Kasperska-Zajac, Alicja

    2012-01-01

    The histaminergic system consists of neurons located in tuberomammillary nucleus of the posterior hypothalamus. It affects many functions of the central nervous system, including regulation of the brainstem cardiovascular center. In this paper, we present current review of the literature concerning the role of the histaminergic system in the cardiovascular regulation in haemorrhagic hypotension. Experimental studies demonstrate that in both, normotension and critical hemorrhagic hypotension, histamine, acting as a central neurotransmitter, evokes the pressor effect. Interestingly, increases in mean arterial pressure are significantly higher in hypovolaemic than in normovolaemic animals. Many lines of evidence support the hypothesis that in haemorrhagic shock, the histaminergic system is able to activate neural and humoral compensatory mechanisms involving the sympathetic nervous and renin-angiotensin systems, arginine vasopressin and proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides. We suggest that the histaminergic system could be a new target for treatment of hemorrhagic hypotension.

  12. Evaluating the Systemic Right Ventricle by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance : Short Axis or Axial Slices?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Bom, Teun; Romeih, Soha; Groenink, Maarten; Pieper, Petronella G.; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Helbing, Willem A.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; Bouma, Berto J.

    2015-01-01

    ObjectiveTo evaluate differences in functional parameters and reproducibility between short axis and axial slice orientation in the quantitative evaluation of the systemic right ventricle by cardiovascular magnetic resonance. DesignCross-sectional evaluation comparing two methods (Bland-Altman).

  13. On the track of syncope induced by orthostatic stress - feedback mechanisms regulating the cardiovascular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2009-01-01

    A physiological realistic model of the controlled cardiovascular system is constructed and validated against clinical data. Special attention is paid to the heart rate control. Both sit-to-stand and head-up-tilt experiments are encapsulated by the model. The model may be used in studies of syncop...

  14. [Assessment of adaptive response of the cardiovascular system in a patient with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibisov, S M; Zotova, T Iu; Zotov, A K; Skrylev, D S

    2010-01-01

    This study showed that monitoring arterial pressure and heart rate during a few consecutive days allows for early diagnosis of cardiovascular disorders long before manifestation of its clinical symptoms. It is maintained that atrial fibrillation and fluttering are preceded by systemic disturbances of systolic pressure regulation.

  15. Cardiac involvement in primary systemic vasculitis and potential drug therapies to reduce cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Durga Prasanna; Shenoy, Sajjan N

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac involvement is common in primary systemic vasculitides and may be due to direct effect of the disease on the heart or due to therapy. We shall review involvement of the heart in the various forms of primary systemic vasculitis. Among anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis (AAV), eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis most commonly involves the heart. Involvement of the heart confers poorer prognosis in AAV, which is also complicated by increased risk of cardiovascular events. Kawasaki's disease (KD) is the most common form of medium-vessel vasculitis to affect the heart, with coronary artery aneurysms being the most common manifestation. These predispose patients with KD to develop premature ischemic heart disease. Takayasu's arteritis is the most common large-vessel vasculitis to involve the heart and can result in aortic incompetence, myocarditis, or coronary heart disease. Involvement of the heart in Behcet's disease is usually in the form of intracardiac mass lesions, thrombosis, or endomyocardial fibrosis. Drugs used in the treatment of systemic vasculitis influence the risk of developing cardiovascular events. Corticosteroid therapy has been shown to increase the risk of myocardial infarction, whereas methotrexate, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, rituximab, and anti-tumor necrosis alpha agents favorably modulate the risk of cardiovascular events, predominantly by dampening systemic inflammation. Awareness of cardiac involvement in vasculitis and accelerated cardiovascular risk in these patients should help clinicians to maximize the modulation of modifiable risk factors for heart disease in these individuals.

  16. The role of the autonomic nervous system in diabetes and cardiovascular disease : an epidemiological approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillebrand, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis was to study the role of autonomic nervous system (ANS) function in the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease using an epidemiological approach. Based on earlier studies it has remained unclear whether impaired ANS function is a risk factor for the

  17. The role of the autonomic nervous system in diabetes and cardiovascular disease : an epidemiological approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillebrand, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis was to study the role of autonomic nervous system (ANS) function in the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease using an epidemiological approach. Based on earlier studies it has remained unclear whether impaired ANS function is a risk factor for the deve

  18. A Follow-Up Study of Medical Students' Biomedical Understanding and Clinical Reasoning Concerning the Cardiovascular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahopelto, Ilona; Mikkila-Erdmann, Mirjamaija; Olkinuora, Erkki; Kaapa, Pekka

    2011-01-01

    Novice medical students usually hold initial conceptions concerning medical domains, such as the cardiovascular system, which may contradict scientific explanations and thus hinder learning. The purpose of this study was to investigate which kinds of biomedical representations medical students constructed of the central cardiovascular system in…

  19. Effects of placental protein 13 on the cardiovascular system in gravid and non-gravid rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizurarson, Sveinbjorn; Huppertz, Berthold; Osol, George; Skarphedinsson, Jon Olafur; Mandala, Maurizio; Meiri, Hamutal

    2013-01-01

    Here, we performed a pathophysiological examination of the vascular function of rodent in the presence of placental protein 13 (PP13) and its implication to regulate the development of preeclampsia. Single i.v. injection and prolonged in vivo exposure to PP13 via osmotic pumps were performed in gravid and non-gravid rats to examine the influence of PP13 on blood pressure and heart rate in animals. The effect of PP13 was also examined in isolated uterine and mesenteric arteries, along with the examination of placental blood supply. Human PP13 has a major impact on the maternal cardiovascular system of rodents by reducing blood pressure, either at single or prolonged exposure, and causing significant vasodilatation in isolated arteries. Prolonged exposure was followed by increased elaboration and angiogenesis of the uteroplacental arteries supplying the placenta. This is the first study describing effects of PP13 on vasodilatation and uterine artery remodeling. The results imply that PP13 may have a physiological role in improving uteroplacental blood flow. The findings of this study make it tempting to speculate that keeping PP13 levels within a certain 'therapeutic window' during pregnancy may facilitate proper adaptation of the maternal vasculature to pregnancy. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Identification of genes encoding zinc finger motifs in the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R; Hwang, D M; Cukerman, E; Liew, C C

    1997-01-01

    The Zn2+-finger DNA-binding domain has been identified in several developmental control proteins, transcription factors and gene products associated with diseases, as well as in several RNA-binding proteins. We applied library screening, expressed sequence tagging (EST sequencing), Zn2+-binding assays and Northern blot hybridization, in order to characterize novel cDNA clones of the human cardiovascular system which contain Zn2+-finger motifs. An embryonic (8-10 weeks gestation) heart lambda ZAP Express cDNA library was screened with an oligonucleotide probe deduced from a consensus amino acid sequence which is highly conserved for Zn2+-finger proteins, and approximately 350 positive clones were isolated from 1 x 10(4) plaque-forming units (pfu) initially plated. The isolated clones were classified as known and novel following single pass automated DNA sequencing. Analysis of Northern blot hybridization delineated the tissue specificity of these clones, as well as their association with cardiac growth and development. Existence of Zn2+-finger motifs in the novel clones was confirmed by Zn2+-binding assay. In this report, we present the characterization of eight novel clones, including the complete cDNA sequences of one of these clones (HHZ-123).

  1. CARDIOVASCULAR RISK IN PATIENTS WITH ANKYLOSING SPONDYLITIS: THE ROLE OF SYSTEMIC INFLAMMATION AND ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Poddubnyy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the role of systemic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction as factors of cardiovascular risk in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.Material andMethods. 100 patients with ankylosing spondylitis were included into the study. Screening for arterial hypertension (HT and conventional cardiovascular risk factors (smoking, hyper- and dislipoproteinemia, body overweight, heredity and diabetes mellitus was performed in all patients. 10-year coronary disease risk (Framingham scale and 10-year risk of fatal cardiovascular event (SCORE scale was calculated. Additionally the follows cardiovascular risk factors were assessed: C-reactive protein level (CRP, fibrinogen level, platelet count, antithrombin III activity, plasma fibrinolytic activity, vonWillebrand factor (vWF activity, circulating endothelial cells (CEC count. Besides, endothelial functionwas evaluated by Doppler-ultrasonography of brachial artery in testswith reactive (endothelium-dependent or flow-mediated dilation and nitroglycerine (endotheliumindependent dilation hyperemia. 30 healthy patients were included into control group and were comparable with patients of studied group on sex and age.Results. 10-year coronary disease risk in patients with ankylosing spondylitis was significantly lower than this in patients of control group 4.0%(3,0; 7,5 vs 5.0%(3,0; 11,0, respectively (p<0,05. 10-year risk of fatal cardiovascular event in studied group was relatively low 1.0% (1.0; 2.0. However, analysis of the additional risk factors shown increased thrombogenic potential of blood, which was related to systemic inflammation activity: high platelets count, high fibrinogen activity, increased vWF activity, and decreased fibrinolytic activity. Moreover, signs of endothelial injury (increased level of CEC and vWF activity and endothelial dysfunction were found in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.Conclusion. Cardiovascular risk in patientswith ankylosing spondylitis estimated

  2. A role for the central histaminergic system in the leptin-mediated increase in cardiovascular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Sumangala P; Dunbar, Joseph C

    2005-01-15

    The central nervous system (CNS) histaminergic neurons have been shown to regulate feeding behavior and are a target of leptin in the brain. The present study aimed to examine the involvement of the histaminergic system in the leptin-mediated regulation of cardiovascular dynamics. We investigated the cardiovascular responses to the CNS administration of histamine, leptin and alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) both in the presence and absence of the histamine H1 antagonist, chlorpheniramine. The intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of histamine resulted in an immediate increase in both mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) and vasoconstricted the iliac, renal and superior mesenteric vessels. The i.c.v. pretreatment with chlorpheniramine attenuated the histamine-induced increase in MAP, HR and decreased vascular conductance. The i.c.v. administration of leptin increased MAP and HR and decreased vascular conductance. The i.c.v. pretreatment with chlorpheniramine decreased the leptin-induced increase in MAP and the leptin-mediated iliac vasoconstriction. The i.c.v. administration of alpha-MSH also increased MAP, HR and decreased vascular conductance. However, pretreatment with chlorpheniramine did not influence the central alpha-MSH-mediated increase in MAP, HR and decreased vascular conductance. These results indicate that the central histaminergic system mediated by H1 receptors have a role in the central signaling pathway and is involved in leptin's regulation of cardiovascular dynamics. It appears that leptin directly or indirectly stimulates histaminergic neurons that lead to increased cardiovascular activity.

  3. Cardiovascular Disease and Cancer: Student Awareness Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, James H., Comp.

    Awareness activities pertaining to cancer and cardiovascular disease are presented as a supplement for high school science classes. The exercises can be used to enrich units of study dealing with the circulatory system, the cell, or human diseases. Eight activities deal with the following topics: (1) cardiovascular disease risk factors; (2)…

  4. Advances in Modern Capacitive ECG Systems for Continuous Cardiovascular Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schommartz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The technique of capacitive electrocardiography (cECG is very promising in a flexible manner. Already integrated into several everyday objects, the single lead cECG system has shown that easy-to-use measurements of electrocardiograms are possible without difficult preparation of the patients. Multi-channel cECG systems enable the extraction of ECG signals even in the presence of coupled interferences, due to the additional redundant information. Thus, this paper presents challenges for electronic hardware design to build on developments in recent years, going from the one-lead cECG system to multi-channel systems in order to provide robust measurements - e.g. even while driving an automobile.

  5. Disorder in Complex Human System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdeniz, K. Gediz

    2011-11-01

    Since the world of human and whose life becomes more and more complex every day because of the digital technology and under the storm of knowledge (media, internet, governmental and non-governmental organizations, etc...) the simulation is rapidly growing in the social systems and in human behaviors. The formation of the body and mutual interactions are left to digital technological, communication mechanisms and coding the techno genetics of the body. Deconstruction begins everywhere. The linear simulation mechanism with modern realities are replaced by the disorder simulation of human behaviors with awareness realities. In this paper I would like to introduce simulation theory of "Disorder Sensitive Human Behaviors". I recently proposed this theory to critique the role of disorder human behaviors in social systems. In this theory the principle of realty is the chaotic awareness of the complexity of human systems inside of principle of modern thinking in Baudrillard's simulation theory. Proper examples will be also considered to investigate the theory.

  6. Non-analgesic effects of opioids: cardiovascular effects of opioids and their receptor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headrick, John P; Pepe, Salvatore; Peart, Jason N

    2012-01-01

    Opioid peptides and their G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are important regulators within the cardiovascular system, implicated in modulation of electrophysiological function, heart rate, myocardial inotropy, vascular function, and cellular stress resistance. The opioid system is also involved in cardiovascular development, adaptation to injury and effects of advanced age. The significant roles of opioids are emphasized by the observation that the heart produces prodynorphin and proenkephalin, which are enzymatically processed from small to large active polypeptides. Indeed, depending on species, cardiac preproenkephalin mRNA levels are comparable to or higher than those found in the central nervous system. This review highlights and discusses current knowledge and recent findings regarding physiological and pathophysiological modulation of the heart and vessels by the opioid receptor system.

  7. The effect of liver disease on the cardiovascular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik; Møller, Søren

    2007-01-01

    and clinical practice discussed by the best authors.It includes unique sections on: Symptoms and signs in liver diseaseIndustrial diseases affecting the liverThe effects of diseases of other systems on the liverThe effects of liver diseases on other systemsIt 's bigger and more extensive than other books...... into the practical applications to benefit people).Edited by ten leading experts in the liver and biliary tract and their diseases, along with outstanding contributions from over 200 international clinicians, this text has global references, evidence and extensive subject matter - giving you the best science...

  8. Human neutrophil alloantigens systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elyse Moritz

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophil alloantigens are involved in a variety of clinical conditions including immune neutropenias, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI, refractoriness to granulocyte transfusions and febrile transfusion reactions. In the last decade, considerable progress has been made in the characterization of the implicated antigens. Currently, seven antigens are assigned to five human neutrophil antigen (HNA systems. The HNA-1a, HNA-1b and HNA-1c antigens have been identified as polymorphic forms of the neutrophil Fcγ receptor IIIb (CD16b, encoded by three alleles. Recently, the primary structure of the HNA-2a antigen was elucidated and the HNA-2a-bearing glycoprotein was identified as a member of the Ly-6/uPAR superfamily, which has been clustered as CD177. The HNA-3a antigen is located on a 70-95 kDa glycoprotein; however, its molecular basis is still unknown. Finally, the HNA-4a and HNA-5a antigens were found to be caused by single nucleotide mutations in the αM (CD11b and αL (CD11a subunits of the leucocyte adhesion molecules (β2 integrins. Molecular and biochemical characterization of neutrophil antigenshave expanded our diagnostic tools by the introduction of genotyping techniques and immunoassays for antibody identification. Further studies in the field of neutrophil immunology will facilitate the prevention and management of transfusion reactions and immune diseases caused by neutrophil antibodies.Os aloantígenos de neutrófilos estão associados a várias condições clínicas como neutropenias imunes, insuficiência pulmonar relacionada à transfusão (TRALI, refratariedade à transfusão de granulócitos, e reações transfusionais febris. Na última década, foi observado considerável progresso na caracterização dos aloantígenos envolvidos nestas condições clínicas. Atualmente sete antígenos estão incluídos em cinco sistemas de antígenos de neutrófilo humano (HNA. Os antígenos HNA-1a, HNA-1b e HNA-1c foram

  9. Subclinical Cardiovascular System Changes in Obese Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Głowińska-Olszewska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We aimed to determine the prevalence of excess body mass in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA children and to investigate the influence of obesity into the early, subclinical changes in cardiovascular system in these patients. Methods. Fifty-eight JIA patients, aged median 13 years, were compared to 36 healthy controls. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors and inflammatory markers (hsCRP, IL-6, TNFα, adiponectin were studied together with IMT (intima-media thickness, FMD (flow mediated dilation, and LVMi (left ventricle mass index as surrogate markers of subclinical atherosclerosis. Results. Thirteen JIA children (22% were obese and had increased systolic blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin, HOMA, hsCRP, and IL-6 compared to nonobese JIA and controls. FMD was decreased compared to nonobese JIA and controls, whereas IMT and LVMi were increased. In multivariate regression analysis, TNFα, SDS-BMI, and systolic blood pressure were independent predictors of early CV changes in JIA. Conclusions. Coincident obesity is common in JIA children and is associated with insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and increased levels of inflammatory markers leading to early changes in cardiovascular system. Thus, medical care of children with JIA should include strategies preventing cardiovascular disease by maintenance of adequate body weight.

  10. HEART RATE VARIABILITY AS THE ADAPTATION RESERVE INDICATOR OF CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aksana Kotava

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The efectiveness of the vegetative regulation action might be controlled by the method of heart rate variability (HRV, which has been very popularly used over the last 10 years worldwide. The analysis of many clinical studies indicates that the severity of the disease might be controlled using the method of HRV. Material and methods: All the experimental and controlled group participants, which consisted of healthy students with none sports experience, underwent the examination according to the 5-minute standard protocol of HRV. In addition, all the examinees performed a bicycle stress test. After the bicycle stress test, some additional tests of HRV were also carried out. Results: It was found that some signifcant diferences, between the group of sportsmen and the group of patients, exist. The parasympathetic activity of LF is maximum in athletes and tends to decrease in patients with cardiovascular pathologies. The decreases of the activity of the vasomotor centre was noticed in both study groups. The sympathetic system activity was the lowest in athletes. Conclusions: At the high depression of the vegetative regulation, any signifcant load (physical or psycho-emotional indicates cardiovascular instability which remains beyond the capacity of adaptation. The higher the variability, the more stable the CVS is to the external loads. A sharp decrease of the variability, such as the heart vegetative innervations, causes deteriorating quality of the regulatory mechanisms and, as a result, the risk of cardiovascular diseases increases. Keywords: heart rate variability, deterministic and stochastic loads, cardiovascular system

  11. Subclinical cardiovascular system changes in obese patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Głowińska-Olszewska, Barbara; Bossowski, Artur; Dobreńko, Elżbieta; Hryniewicz, Andrzej; Konstantynowicz, Jerzy; Milewski, Robert; Łuczyński, Włodzimierz; Piotrowska-Jastrzębska, Janina; Kowal-Bielecka, Otylia

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to determine the prevalence of excess body mass in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) children and to investigate the influence of obesity into the early, subclinical changes in cardiovascular system in these patients. Fifty-eight JIA patients, aged median 13 years, were compared to 36 healthy controls. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors and inflammatory markers (hsCRP, IL-6, TNF α, adiponectin) were studied together with IMT (intima-media thickness), FMD (flow mediated dilation), and LVMi (left ventricle mass index) as surrogate markers of subclinical atherosclerosis. Thirteen JIA children (22%) were obese and had increased systolic blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin, HOMA, hsCRP, and IL-6 compared to nonobese JIA and controls. FMD was decreased compared to nonobese JIA and controls, whereas IMT and LVMi were increased. In multivariate regression analysis, TNF α, SDS-BMI, and systolic blood pressure were independent predictors of early CV changes in JIA. Coincident obesity is common in JIA children and is associated with insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and increased levels of inflammatory markers leading to early changes in cardiovascular system. Thus, medical care of children with JIA should include strategies preventing cardiovascular disease by maintenance of adequate body weight.

  12. Drug targeting of estrogen receptor signaling in the cardiovascular system: preclinical and clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-González, Silvia M; Cano, Antonio; Valverde, M A; Hermenegildo, Carlos; Andrés, Vicente

    2004-04-01

    Atherosclerosis and associated coronary heart disease events have lower prevalence in women than in men, especially during young adult years. Although multiple lines of evidence suggest that estrogens contribute to this difference, the efficacy of hormone replacement therapy for the prevention of cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women is controversial. The protective action of estrogen in the cardiovascular system appears to be mediated indirectly by an effect on serum lipoprotein and triglyceride profiles and on the expression of coagulant and fibrinolytic proteins, and by a direct effect on the vessel wall itself. Estrogen has both rapid effects involving alteration of membrane ionic permeability and activation of membrane-bound enzymes and increases in endothelial cell nitric oxide synthase activity, as well as longer-term effects on gene expression that are mediated, at least in part, by the ligand-activated transcription factors, estrogen receptor alpha and beta. Compounds with pure antiestrogenic activity and selective estrogen receptor modulators that regulate estrogen receptor function in a tissue-specific manner have been developed in an attempt to achieve the cardioprotective effects of estrogens while minimizing the undesirable risks associated with hormone replacement therapy (e.g., endometrial and breast cancer). In this review, we will discuss recent developments on the mechanisms of estrogen action in the cardiovascular system. The results of clinical trials testing the long-term efficacy of hormone replacement therapy for the treatment of cardiovascular disease will also be discussed.

  13. A Unified Bond Graph Modeling Approach for the Ejection Phase of the Cardiovascular System

    OpenAIRE

    LUBNA MOIN; VALI UDDIN

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the unified Bond Graph model of the left ventricle ejection phase is presented, simulated and validated. The integro-differential and ordinary differential equations obtained from the bond graph models are simulated using ODE45 (Ordinary Differential Equation Solver) on MATLAB and Simulink. The results, thus, obtained are compared with CVS (Cardiovascular System) physiological data present in Simbiosys (a software for simulating biological systems) and also with the CVS Wigge...

  14. Effects of Chinese Liquors on Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Healthy Young Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Sheng Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To elucidate whether consumption of two Chinese liquors, tea-flavor liquor (TFL and traditional Chinese liquor (TCL have protective effects on cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors in healthy human subjects. Methods. Forty-five healthy subjects (23 men, 22 women, aged 23–28, were recruited and randomized into two groups: TFL and TCL, and consumed 30 mL/day (45% (v/v alcohol of either liquor for 28 days. Results. Serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol/low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C/LDL-C and apolipoprotein A1 were significantly increased, and total cholesterol (TC and TC/HDL-C were significantly decreased after the intervention in both groups (P<0.05. Serum uric acid (P=0.004 for TFL, P=0.001 for TCL, glucose (P<0.001 for TFL, P<0.001 for TCL and endothelial adhesion molecules (P<0.05 were significantly decreased after the intervention. ADP-induced whole blood platelet aggregation was also significantly decreased after the intervention in both TFL and TCL groups (P<0.05. Conclusions. TFL and TCL consumption had protective effects on CVD risk factors in young humans. However, the results were valid only for 28 days, and that the possibility of adverse effect (liver, kidney of chronic alcohol consumption should be considered.

  15. Human Systems Roadmap Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-09

    areas produce life long disability Problem: The combination of jet fuel and high noise environment can exacerbate hearing loss Objective: Expose...Personalized Assessment, Education , and Training Systems Interfaces and Cognitive Processes Protection, Sustainment, and Warfighter...Infrastructure, & Information Distribution Statement A: Approved for Public Release 4 Personalized Assessment, Education , and Training System

  16. Minimizing Risk of Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiter Theresa

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis is a rare condition appearing only in patients with severe renal impairment or failure and presents with dermal lesions and involvement of internal organs. Although many cases are mild, an estimated 5 % have a progressive debilitating course. To date, there is no known effective treatment thus stressing the necessity of ample prevention measures. An association with the use of Gadolinium based contrast agents (GBCA makes Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis a potential side effect of contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and offers the opportunity for prevention by limiting use of gadolinium based contrast agents in renal failure patients. In itself toxic, Gadolinium is embedded into chelates that allow its safe use as a contrast agent. One NSF theory is that Gadolinium chelates distribute into the extracellular fluid compartment and set Gadolinium ions free, depending on multiple factors among which the duration of chelates exposure is directly related to the renal function. Major medical societies both in Europe and in North America have developed guidelines for the usage of GBCA. Since the establishment of these guidelines and the increased general awareness of this condition, the occurrence of NSF has been nearly eliminated. Giving an overview over the current knowledge of NSF pathobiochemistry, pathogenesis and treatment options this review focuses on the guidelines of the European Medicines Agency, the European Society of Urogenital Radiology, the FDA and the American College of Radiology from 2008 up to 2011 and the transfer of this knowledge into every day practice.

  17. The potential application and challenge of powerful CRISPR/Cas9 system in cardiovascular research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yangxin; Song, Yao-Hua; Liu, Bin; Yu, Xi-Yong

    2017-01-15

    CRISPR/Cas9 is a precision-guided munition found in bacteria to fight against invading viruses. This technology has enormous potential applications, including altering genes in both somatic and germ cells, as well as generating knockout animals. Compared to other gene editing techniques such as zinc finger nucleases and TALENS, CRISPR/Cas9 is much easier to use and highly efficient. Importantly, the multiplex capacity of this technology allows multiple genes to be edited simultaneously. CRISPR/Cas9 also has the potential to prevent and cure human diseases. In this review, we wish to highlight some key points regarding the future prospect of using CRISPR/Cas9 as a powerful tool for cardiovascular research, and as a novel therapeutic strategy to treat cardiovascular diseases.

  18. System identification: a multi-signal approach for probing neural cardiovascular regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xinshu; Mullen, Thomas J; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2005-06-01

    Short-term, beat-to-beat cardiovascular variability reflects the dynamic interplay between ongoing perturbations to the circulation and the compensatory response of neurally mediated regulatory mechanisms. This physiologic information may be deciphered from the subtle, beat-to-beat variations by using digital signal processing techniques. While single signal analysis techniques (e.g., power spectral analysis) may be employed to quantify the variability itself, the multi-signal approach of system identification permits the dynamic characterization of the neural regulatory mechanisms responsible for coupling the variability between signals. In this review, we provide an overview of applications of system identification to beat-to-beat variability for the quantitative characterization of cardiovascular regulatory mechanisms. After briefly summarizing the history of the field and basic principles, we take a didactic approach to describe the practice of system identification in the context of probing neural cardiovascular regulation. We then review studies in the literature over the past two decades that have applied system identification for characterizing the dynamical properties of the sinoatrial node, respiratory sinus arrhythmia, and the baroreflex control of sympathetic nerve activity, heart rate and total peripheral resistance. Based on this literature review, we conclude by advocating specific methods of practice and that future research should focus on nonlinear and time-varying behaviors, validation of identification methods, and less understood neural regulatory mechanisms. Ultimately, we hope that this review stimulates such future investigations by both new and experienced system identification researchers.

  19. [Current concepts of the origin of circadian changes in the cardiovascular system under normal and pathological conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arushanyan, E B

    2012-01-01

    The importance of circadian rhythms for the function of the cardiovascular system and its pharmacotherapy is discussed The central mechanisms regulating these rhythms at the level of suprachiasmatic hypothalamic nucleus and pineal gland are considered in conjunction with the approaches to modulating their activity for optimization of chronopharmnacotherapy of cardiovascular diseases.

  20. EFFECTS OF EXERCISE TRAINING ON CARDIOVASCULAR ADRENERGIC SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario eLeosco

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In heart failure (HF, exercise has been shown to modulate cardiac sympathetic hyperactivation which is one of the earliest features of neurohormonal derangement in this syndrome and correlates with adverse outcome. An important molecular alteration related to chronic sympathetic overstimulation in HF is represented by cardiac β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR dysfunction . It has been demonstrated that exercise reverses β-AR dysfunction by restoring cardiac receptor membrane density and G-protein-dependent adenylyl cyclase activation. In particular, several evidence indicate that exercise reduces levels of cardiac G-protein coupled receptor kinase-2 (GRK2 which is known to be involved in both β1-AR and β2-AR dysregulation in HF. Similar alterations of β-AR system have been described also in the senescent heart. It has also been demonstrated that exercise training restores adrenal GRK2/α-2AR/cathecolamine (CA production axis. At vascular level, exercise shows a therapeutic effect on age-related impairment of vascular reactivity to adrenergic stimulation and restores β-AR-dependent vasodilatation by increasing vascular β-AR responsiveness and reducing endothelial GRK2 activity. Sympathetic nervous system overdrive is thought to account for >50 % of all cases of hypertension and a lack of balance between parasympathetic and sympathetic modulation has been observed in hypertensive subjects. Non-pharmacological, lifestyle interventions have been associated with reductions in SNS overactivity and blood pressure in hypertension. Several evidence have highlighted the blood pressure lowering effects of aerobic endurance exercise in patients with hypertension and the significant reduction in sympathetic neural activity has been reported as one of the main mechanisms explaining the favourable effects of exercise on blood pressure control.

  1. Human-System task integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schraagen, J.M.C.

    2005-01-01

    The Dutch Ministry of Defence research programme Human-System Task Integration aims at acquiring knowledge for the optimal cooperation between human and computer, under the following constraints: freedom of choice in decisions to automate and multiple, dynamic task distributions. This paper describe

  2. Nano-constructed Carriers Loaded With Antioxidant: Boon For Cardiovascular System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ashay; Kesharwani, Prashant; Garg, Neeraj Kumar; Jain, Atul; Nirbhavane, Pradip; Dwivedi, Nitin; Banerjee, Sanjeev; Iyer, Arun K; Iqbal Mohd Amin, Mohd Cairul

    2015-01-01

    In the last couple of decades antioxidant agents have entered the health market as an easy and attractive means of managing diseases. These agents are of enormous interest for an increasingly health-concerned society, and may be particularly relevant for prophylaxis of a number of diseases i.e. arthritis, cancer, metabolic and cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, cataracts, brain disorders, etc. Antioxidants are also favorable to vascular healthiness and symbolize useful compounds because they are able to diminish overall cardiovascular risk by acting analogous to first line therapy or as adjuvants in case of failure or in situations where first line therapy cannot be used. Furthermore, well-designed trials are indeed needed to improve the therapeutic efficacy and health benefits of antioxidants. Numerous in vivo proof-of-concepts studies are offered to underline the feasibility of nanostructure system in order to optimizing the delivery of cardiovascular drugs. The present review highlights the recent approaches for management of cardiovascular disease using different vesicular and particulate carriers, including liposomes, nanoparticles, and nanoemulsions, with a primary emphasis on those which are expected to enhance the antioxidants level.

  3. Computational Models of the Cardiovascular System and Its Response to Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamm, Roger D.

    1999-01-01

    Computational models of the cardiovascular system are powerful adjuncts to ground-based and in-flight experiments. We will provide NSBRI with a model capable of simulating the short-term effects of gravity on cardiovascular function. The model from this project will: (1) provide a rational framework which quantitatively defines interactions among complex cardiovascular parameters and which supports the critical interpretation of experimental results and testing of hypotheses. (2) permit predictions of the impact of specific countermeasures in the context of various hypothetical cardiovascular abnormalities induced by microgravity. Major progress has been made during the first 18 months of the program: (1) We have developed an operational first-order computer model capable of simulating the cardiovascular response to orthostatic stress. The model consists of a lumped parameter hemodynamic model and a complete reflex control system. The latter includes cardiopulmonary and carotid sinus reflex limbs and interactions between the two. (2) We have modeled the physiologic stress of tilt table experiments and lower body negative pressure procedures (LBNP). We have verified our model's predictions by comparing them with experimental findings from the literature. (3) We have established collaborative efforts with leading investigators interested in experimental studies of orthostatic intolerance, cardiovascular control, and physiologic responses to space flight. (4) We have established a standardized method of transferring data to our laboratory from the ongoing NSBRI bedrest studies. We use this data to estimate input parameters to our model and compare our model predictions to actual data to further verify our model. (5) We are in the process of systematically simulating current hypotheses concerning the mechanism underlying orthostatic intolerance by matching our simulations to stand test data from astronauts pre- and post-flight. (6) We are in the process of developing a

  4. Human System Risk Management for Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    2004 of evaluating the tolerance limits and safe operating bands called for in the Bioastronautics Strategy. Over the next several years, the concept of the "operating bands" were turned into Space Flight Human System Standards (SFHSS), developed by the technical resources of the SLSD at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). These standards were developed and reviewed at the SLSD and then presented to the OCHMO for acceptance. The first set of standards was published in 2007 as the NASA-STD-3001, Volume 1, Crew Health that elaborated standards for several physiological areas such as cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, radiation exposure and nutrition. Volume 2, Human Factors, Habitability and Human Health was published in 2011, along with development guidance in the Human Integration Design Handbook (HIDH). Taken together, the SFHSS Volumes 1 and 2, and the HIDH replaced the NASA-STD-3000 with new standards and revisions of the older document. Three other changes were also taking place that facilitated the development of the human system risk management approach. In 2005, the life sciences research and development portfolio underwent a comprehensive review through the Exploration Systems Architecture Study (ESAS) that resulted in the reformulation of the Bioastronautics Program into Human Research Program (HRP) that was focused on appropriate mitigation results for high priority human health risks. The baseline HRP budget was established in August 2005. In addition, the OCHMO formulated the Health and Medical Technical Authority (HMTA) in 2006 that established the position of the Chief Medical Officer (CMO) at the NASA JSC along with other key technical disciplines, and the OCHMO became the responsible office for the SFHSS as noted above. The final change was the establishment in 2008 of the Human System Risk Board (HSRB), chaired by the CMO with representation from the HRP, SLSD management and technical experts. The HSRB then began to review all human system risks

  5. Skeletal Muscle Pump Drives Control of Cardiovascular and Postural Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ajay K.; Garg, Amanmeet; Xu, Da; Bruner, Michelle; Fazel-Rezai, Reza; Blaber, Andrew P.; Tavakolian, Kouhyar

    2017-01-01

    The causal interaction between cardio-postural-musculoskeletal systems is critical in maintaining postural stability under orthostatic challenge. The absence or reduction of such interactions could lead to fainting and falls often experienced by elderly individuals. The causal relationship between systolic blood pressure (SBP), calf electromyography (EMG), and resultant center of pressure (COPr) can quantify the behavior of cardio-postural control loop. Convergent cross mapping (CCM) is a non-linear approach to establish causality, thus, expected to decipher nonlinear causal cardio-postural-musculoskeletal interactions. Data were acquired simultaneously from young participants (25 ± 2 years, n = 18) during a 10-minute sit-to-stand test. In the young population, skeletal muscle pump was found to drive blood pressure control (EMG → SBP) as well as control the postural sway (EMG → COPr) through the significantly higher causal drive in the direction towards SBP and COPr. Furthermore, the effect of aging on muscle pump activation associated with blood pressure regulation was explored. Simultaneous EMG and SBP were acquired from elderly group (69 ± 4 years, n = 14). A significant (p = 0.002) decline in EMG → SBP causality was observed in the elderly group, compared to the young group. The results highlight the potential of causality to detect alteration in blood pressure regulation with age, thus, a potential clinical utility towards detection of fall proneness. PMID:28345674

  6. Skeletal Muscle Pump Drives Control of Cardiovascular and Postural Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ajay K.; Garg, Amanmeet; Xu, Da; Bruner, Michelle; Fazel-Rezai, Reza; Blaber, Andrew P.; Tavakolian, Kouhyar

    2017-03-01

    The causal interaction between cardio-postural-musculoskeletal systems is critical in maintaining postural stability under orthostatic challenge. The absence or reduction of such interactions could lead to fainting and falls often experienced by elderly individuals. The causal relationship between systolic blood pressure (SBP), calf electromyography (EMG), and resultant center of pressure (COPr) can quantify the behavior of cardio-postural control loop. Convergent cross mapping (CCM) is a non-linear approach to establish causality, thus, expected to decipher nonlinear causal cardio-postural-musculoskeletal interactions. Data were acquired simultaneously from young participants (25 ± 2 years, n = 18) during a 10-minute sit-to-stand test. In the young population, skeletal muscle pump was found to drive blood pressure control (EMG → SBP) as well as control the postural sway (EMG → COPr) through the significantly higher causal drive in the direction towards SBP and COPr. Furthermore, the effect of aging on muscle pump activation associated with blood pressure regulation was explored. Simultaneous EMG and SBP were acquired from elderly group (69 ± 4 years, n = 14). A significant (p = 0.002) decline in EMG → SBP causality was observed in the elderly group, compared to the young group. The results highlight the potential of causality to detect alteration in blood pressure regulation with age, thus, a potential clinical utility towards detection of fall proneness.

  7. Urotensin II in cardiovascular regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraser D Russell

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Fraser D RussellSchool of Health and Sport Sciences, Faculty of Science, Health and Education, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, Queensland, AustraliaAbstract: Cardiovascular function is modulated by neuronal transmitters, circulating hormones, and factors that are released locally from tissues. Urotensin II (UII is an 11 amino acid peptide that stimulates its’ obligatory G protein coupled urotensin II receptors (UT to modulate cardiovascular function in humans and in other animal species, and has been implicated in both vasculoprotective and vasculopathic effects. For example, tissue and circulating concentrations of UII have been reported to increase in some studies involving patients with atherosclerosis, heart failure, hypertension, preeclampsia, diabetes, renal disease and liver disease, raising the possibility that the UT receptor system is involved in the development and/or progression of these conditions. Consistent with this hypothesis, administration of UT receptor antagonists to animal models of cardiovascular disease have revealed improvements in cardiovascular remodelling and hemodynamics. However, recent studies have questioned this contributory role of UII in disease, and have instead postulated a protective effect on the cardiovascular system. For example, high concentrations of circulating UII correlated with improved clinical outcomes in patients with renal disease or myocardial infarction. The purpose of this review is to consider the regulation of the cardiovascular system by UII, giving consideration to methodologies for measurement of plasma concentrations, sites of synthesis and triggers for release.Keywords: urotensin II, cardiovascular disease, heart failure, hypertension

  8. Interaction of Hydrogen Sulfide with Nitric Oxide in the Cardiovascular System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpure, B V; Bian, Jin-Song

    2016-01-01

    Historically acknowledged as toxic gases, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and nitric oxide (NO) are now recognized as the predominant members of a new family of signaling molecules, "gasotransmitters" in mammals. While H2S is biosynthesized by three constitutively expressed enzymes (CBS, CSE, and 3-MST) from L-cysteine and homocysteine, NO is generated endogenously from L-arginine by the action of various isoforms of NOS. Both gases have been transpired as the key and independent regulators of many physiological functions in mammalian cardiovascular, nervous, gastrointestinal, respiratory, and immune systems. The analogy between these two gasotransmitters is evident not only from their paracrine mode of signaling, but also from the identical and/or shared signaling transduction pathways. With the plethora of research in the pathophysiological role of gasotransmitters in various systems, the existence of interplay between these gases is being widely accepted. Chemical interaction between NO and H2S may generate nitroxyl (HNO), which plays a specific effective role within the cardiovascular system. In this review article, we have attempted to provide current understanding of the individual and interactive roles of H2S and NO signaling in mammalian cardiovascular system, focusing particularly on heart contractility, cardioprotection, vascular tone, angiogenesis, and oxidative stress.

  9. Interaction of Hydrogen Sulfide with Nitric Oxide in the Cardiovascular System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. V. Nagpure

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Historically acknowledged as toxic gases, hydrogen sulfide (H2S and nitric oxide (NO are now recognized as the predominant members of a new family of signaling molecules, “gasotransmitters” in mammals. While H2S is biosynthesized by three constitutively expressed enzymes (CBS, CSE, and 3-MST from L-cysteine and homocysteine, NO is generated endogenously from L-arginine by the action of various isoforms of NOS. Both gases have been transpired as the key and independent regulators of many physiological functions in mammalian cardiovascular, nervous, gastrointestinal, respiratory, and immune systems. The analogy between these two gasotransmitters is evident not only from their paracrine mode of signaling, but also from the identical and/or shared signaling transduction pathways. With the plethora of research in the pathophysiological role of gasotransmitters in various systems, the existence of interplay between these gases is being widely accepted. Chemical interaction between NO and H2S may generate nitroxyl (HNO, which plays a specific effective role within the cardiovascular system. In this review article, we have attempted to provide current understanding of the individual and interactive roles of H2S and NO signaling in mammalian cardiovascular system, focusing particularly on heart contractility, cardioprotection, vascular tone, angiogenesis, and oxidative stress.

  10. A simplified computer model of cardiovascular system with an arm branch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baoming; Song, Tianyi; Guo, Tao; Xiang, Haiyan; Liu, Yanyong; Qin, Yufei; Cao, Zhengtao; Yu, Mengsun

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive pressure simulators that regenerate oscillometric waveforms promise an alternative to expensive clinical trials for validating oscillometric noninvasive blood pressure devices. However, existing simulators only provide oscillometric pressure in cuff and thus have a limited accuracy. It is promising to build a physical simulator that contains a synthetic arm with a built-in brachial artery and an affiliated hydraulic model of cardiovascular system. To guide the construction of this kind of simulator, this paper presents a computer model of cardiovascular system with a relatively simple structure, where the distribution of pressures and flows in aorta root and brachial artery can be simulated, and the produced waves are accordant with the physical data. This model can be used to provide the parameters and structure that will be needed to build the new simulator.

  11. Cardiac Structure and Function in Humans: A New Cardiovascular Physiology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Su; Burleson, Paul D.; Passo, Stanley; Messina, Edward J.; Levine, Norman; Thompson, Carl I.; Belloni, Francis L.; Recchia, Fabio A.; Ojaimi, Caroline; Kaley, Gabor; Hintze, Thomas H.

    2009-01-01

    As the traditional cardiovascular control laboratory has disappeared from the first-year medical school curriculum, we have recognized the need to develop another "hands-on" experience as a vehicle for wide-ranging discussions of cardiovascular control mechanisms. Using an echocardiograph, an automatic blood pressure cuff, and a reclining bicycle,…

  12. Cardiac Structure and Function in Humans: A New Cardiovascular Physiology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Su; Burleson, Paul D.; Passo, Stanley; Messina, Edward J.; Levine, Norman; Thompson, Carl I.; Belloni, Francis L.; Recchia, Fabio A.; Ojaimi, Caroline; Kaley, Gabor; Hintze, Thomas H.

    2009-01-01

    As the traditional cardiovascular control laboratory has disappeared from the first-year medical school curriculum, we have recognized the need to develop another "hands-on" experience as a vehicle for wide-ranging discussions of cardiovascular control mechanisms. Using an echocardiograph, an automatic blood pressure cuff, and a reclining bicycle,…

  13. Human resources in innovation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, René Nesgaard

    2007-01-01

    Human resources in innovation systems: With focus on introduction of highly educated labour in small Danish firms This thesis has two purposes: (1) a ‘general' purpose to enhance our knowledge on the relationship between innovation, technological and organisational change, and human resources......, including knowledge and skills embodied in human resources, and (2) a more ‘specific' purpose to enhance our knowledge on introduction of highly educated labour, innovation, and upgrading changes in small Danish firms. Chapter 1 establishes the relevance of this research interest, and it also states...... stemming from human resources - such as insight, understanding, creativity, and action - are inherently important to all innovation processes. The chapter also suggests a tentative conceptual and analytical framework for studying human resources and their development within a system of innovation approach...

  14. Association between Floods and Acute Cardiovascular Diseases: A Population-Based Cohort Study Using a Geographic Information System Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Vanasse

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Floods represent a serious threat to human health beyond the immediate risk of drowning. There is few data on the potential link between floods and direct consequences on health such as on cardiovascular health. This study aimed to explore the impact of one of the worst floods in the history of Quebec, Canada on acute cardiovascular diseases (CVD. Methods: A cohort study with a time series design with multiple control groups was built with the adult population identified in the Quebec Integrated Chronic Disease Surveillance System. A geographic information system approach was used to define the study areas. Logistic regressions were performed to compare the occurrence of CVD between groups. Results: The results showed a 25%–27% increase in the odds in the flooded population in spring 2011 when compared with the population in the same area in springs 2010 and 2012. Besides, an increase up to 69% was observed in individuals with a medical history of CVD. Conclusion: Despite interesting results, the association was not statistically significant. A possible explanation to this result can be that the population affected by the flood was probably too small to provide the statistical power to answer the question, and leaves open a substantial possibility for a real and large effect.

  15. Association between Floods and Acute Cardiovascular Diseases: A Population-Based Cohort Study Using a Geographic Information System Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanasse, Alain; Cohen, Alan; Courteau, Josiane; Bergeron, Patrick; Dault, Roxanne; Gosselin, Pierre; Blais, Claudia; Bélanger, Diane; Rochette, Louis; Chebana, Fateh

    2016-01-28

    Floods represent a serious threat to human health beyond the immediate risk of drowning. There is few data on the potential link between floods and direct consequences on health such as on cardiovascular health. This study aimed to explore the impact of one of the worst floods in the history of Quebec, Canada on acute cardiovascular diseases (CVD). A cohort study with a time series design with multiple control groups was built with the adult population identified in the Quebec Integrated Chronic Disease Surveillance System. A geographic information system approach was used to define the study areas. Logistic regressions were performed to compare the occurrence of CVD between groups. The results showed a 25%-27% increase in the odds in the flooded population in spring 2011 when compared with the population in the same area in springs 2010 and 2012. Besides, an increase up to 69% was observed in individuals with a medical history of CVD. Despite interesting results, the association was not statistically significant. A possible explanation to this result can be that the population affected by the flood was probably too small to provide the statistical power to answer the question, and leaves open a substantial possibility for a real and large effect.

  16. Could a high-fat diet rich in unsaturated fatty acids impair the cardiovascular system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medei, Emiliano; Lima-Leopoldo, Ana Paula; Pereira-Junior, Pedro Paulo; Leopoldo, André Soares; Campos, Dijon Henrique Salomé; Raimundo, Juliana Montani; Sudo, Roberto Takashi; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele; Bruder-Nascimento, Thiago; Cordellini, Sandra; Nascimento, José Hamilton Matheus; Cicogna, Antonio Carlos

    2010-12-01

    Dyslipidemia results from consumption of a diet rich in saturated fatty acids and is usually associated with cardiovascular disease. A diet rich in unsaturated fatty acids is usually associated with improved cardiovascular condition. To investigate whether a high-fat diet rich in unsaturated fatty acids (U-HFD) - in which fatty acid represents approximately 45% of the total calories - impairs the cardiovascular system. Male, 30-day-old Wistar rats were fed a standard (control) diet or a U-HFD containing 83% unsaturated fatty acid for 19 weeks. The in vivo electrocardiogram, the spectral analysis of heart rate variability, and the vascular reactivity responses to phenylephrine, acetylcholine, noradrenaline and prazosin in aortic ring preparations were analyzed to assess the cardiovascular parameters. After 19 weeks, the U-HFD rats had increased total body fat, baseline glucose levels and feed efficiency compared with control rats. However, the final body weight, systolic blood pressure, area under the curve for glucose, calorie intake and heart weight⁄final body weight ratio were similar between the groups. In addition, both groups demonstrated no alteration in the electrocardiogram or cardiac sympathetic parameters. There was no difference in the responses to acetylcholine or the maximal contractile response of the thoracic aorta to phenylephrine between groups, but the concentration necessary to produce 50% of maximal response showed a decrease in the sensitivity to phenylephrine in U-HFD rats. The cumulative concentration- effect curve for noradrenaline in the presence of prazosin was shifted similarly in both groups. The present work shows that U-HFD did not impair the cardiovascular parameters analyzed.

  17. Could a high-fat diet rich in unsaturated fatty acids impair the cardiovascular system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medei, Emiliano; Lima-Leopoldo, Ana Paula; Pereira-Junior, Pedro Paulo; Leopoldo, André Soares; Campos, Dijon Henrique Salomé; Raimundo, Juliana Montani; Sudo, Roberto Takashi; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele; Bruder-Nascimento, Thiago; Cordellini, Sandra; Nascimento, José Hamilton Matheus; Cicogna, Antonio Carlos

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dyslipidemia results from consumption of a diet rich in saturated fatty acids and is usually associated with cardiovascular disease. A diet rich in unsaturated fatty acids is usually associated with improved cardiovascular condition. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether a high-fat diet rich in unsaturated fatty acids (U-HFD) – in which fatty acid represents approximately 45% of the total calories – impairs the cardiovascular system. METHODS: Male, 30-day-old Wistar rats were fed a standard (control) diet or a U-HFD containing 83% unsaturated fatty acid for 19 weeks. The in vivo electrocardiogram, the spectral analysis of heart rate variability, and the vascular reactivity responses to phenylephrine, acetylcholine, noradrenaline and prazosin in aortic ring preparations were analyzed to assess the cardiovascular parameters. RESULTS: After 19 weeks, the U-HFD rats had increased total body fat, baseline glucose levels and feed efficiency compared with control rats. However, the final body weight, systolic blood pressure, area under the curve for glucose, calorie intake and heart weight/final body weight ratio were similar between the groups. In addition, both groups demonstrated no alteration in the electrocardiogram or cardiac sympathetic parameters. There was no difference in the responses to acetylcholine or the maximal contractile response of the thoracic aorta to phenylephrine between groups, but the concentration necessary to produce 50% of maximal response showed a decrease in the sensitivity to phenylephrine in U-HFD rats. The cumulative concentration-effect curve for noradrenaline in the presence of prazosin was shifted similarly in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: The present work shows that U-HFD did not impair the cardiovascular parameters analyzed. PMID:21165364

  18. Influence of pneumoperitoneum and postural change on the cardiovascular and respiratory systems in dogs

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the influence of pneumoperitoneum#(PP) and postural change under inhalation anesthesia with isoflurane, which is routinely used in dogs, on the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. As test animals, 6 adult beagles were used. To induce anesthesia, atropine, butorphanol and propofol were intravenously injected. Anesthesia was maintained with 1.3 MAC (1.7%) isoflurane. The following were the experiment conditions: I:E ratio, 1:1.9; tidal air exchange, 20 ml/kg; and ventilation...

  19. Nonlinear systems dynamics in cardiovascular physiology: The heart rate delay map and lower body negative pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, John C.

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary study of the applicability of nonlinear dynamic systems analysis techniques to low body negative pressure (LBNP) studies. In particular, the applicability of the heart rate delay map is investigated. It is suggested that the heart rate delay map has potential as a supplemental tool in the assessment of subject performance in LBNP tests and possibly in the determination of susceptibility to cardiovascular deconditioning with spaceflight.

  20. Prevalence and associated factors of resting electrocardiogram abnormalities among systemic lupus erythematosus patients without cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Al Rayes, Hanan; Harvey, Paula J; Gladman, Dafna D; Su, Jiandong; Sabapathy, Arthy; Urowitz, Murray B.; Touma, Zahi

    2017-01-01

    Background Electrocardiogram (ECG) cardiovascular disease (CVD) abnormalities (ECG-CVD) are predictive of subsequent CVD events in the general population. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients are vulnerable to CVD. We aimed to determine the prevalence of ECG-CVD in SLE patients and to examine the risk factors associated with ECG-CVD. Methods A 12-lead resting supine ECG was performed on consecutive adult patients attending the clinic. One cardiologist interpreted the ECGs. ECG-CVD were...

  1. Towards human exploration of space: the THESEUS review series on cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal research priorities

    OpenAIRE

    Aubert, André E.; André E. Larina, Irina; Momken, Iman; Blanc, Stéphane; White, Olivier; Prisk, Kim; Linnarsson, Dag

    2016-01-01

    International audience; The THESEUS project (Towards Human Exploration of Space: aEUropean Strategy) was initiated within the seventh FrameworkProgramme by the European Commission. This project aimed toprovide a cross-cutting, life science-based roadmap for Europe’sstrategy towards human exploration of space, especially for deepspace missions and its relevance to applications on Earth. Toaddress these challenges, relevance of space research on thecardiovascular system, the lungs and kidneys, ...

  2. Human resources in innovation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, René Nesgaard

    2007-01-01

    the research questions which are studied in the thesis.      Chapter 2 reviews relevant literature on systems of innovation, human capital, and skill-biased technological and organisational change. It is stated in the chapter that this thesis primarily refers to a system of innovation approach as its......Human resources in innovation systems: With focus on introduction of highly educated labour in small Danish firms This thesis has two purposes: (1) a ‘general' purpose to enhance our knowledge on the relationship between innovation, technological and organisational change, and human resources......, including knowledge and skills embodied in human resources, and (2) a more ‘specific' purpose to enhance our knowledge on introduction of highly educated labour, innovation, and upgrading changes in small Danish firms. Chapter 1 establishes the relevance of this research interest, and it also states...

  3. [Cardiovascular manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus in Dakar: Descriptive study about 50 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngaïdé, A A; Ly, F; Ly, K; Diao, M; Kane, Ad; Mbaye, A; Lèye, M; Aw, F; Sarr, S A; Dioum, M; Ndao, C T; Gaye, N D; Ndiaye, M B; Bodian, M; Bah, M B; Ndiaye, M; Cissé, A F; Kouamé, I; Tabane, A; Mingou, J S; Thiombiano, P; Kane, A; Bâ, S A

    2016-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a non-specific inflammatory disorder of an organ of unknown cause and autoimmune origin. Visceral injuries, including those cardiovascular, determine the prognosis of this disease primarily affecting women. The objectives of this study were to determine the frequency and describe the cardiovascular manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus in a lupus population of the Dakar region. This is a multicenter prospective study descriptive and analytical conducted in the region of Dakar (Senegal) from 14 February 2011 to 2 July 2012. Patients were either hospitalized or monitored as outpatients. Included were all patients with lupus and meeting at least four criteria of the American College of Rheumatology of lupus disease classification 1997. All patients underwent physical examination, an electrocardiogram and an echocardiogram looking for cardiovascular damage. The collected data were entered into the Epi Info version 3.5.1 and processed with SPSS 16.0 software. Quantitative variables are described in the median and the qualitative workforce, percentage and frequency. We have included 50 patients. The average age of the population was 36.18 years. A female predominance is noted with a sex ratio man/woman of 0.09. Cardiovascular functional symptoms were dominated by dyspnea stage II to IV NYHA (26%) and palpitations (22%). The physical signs we have found were mainly tachycardia (40%), spontaneous turgor of the jugular veins (29%), a muffling of the heart sounds (29%) and a infandibulopulmonairy shock (18%). The frequency of cardiovascular events was 46%. Electrical cardiac events were dominated by sinus tachycardia (40%) of repolarization disorders (16.3%) type of ischemia, injury, ischemia injury, necrosis and hypertrophy with 18% atrial and left ventricular hypertrophy each. Furthermore, one case of BAV first degree at 280 ms was recorded. We found 19 cases of pericarditis including 2 tamponade, 3 cases of dilated cardiomyopathy

  4. Active games in physical education students of special medical group with limited capacity of cardiovascular system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovaleva M.V.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available It is considered the directions of the development an effective methods of usage moving elements of sports and games in exercises. The experiment involved students of special medical groups that have various abnormalities of the cardiovascular system. The study was conducted in four stages: a search, the first experimental, the second experimental, final. We used questioning and education registry books of academic work. Found that the use of sports and outdoor games is students' interest, and increasing motivation for physical activity. Justified by the possibility of using games and exercises performed their adaptation by changing the pulse value. The resulting modification of gaming exercises are divided into three groups: the game in the area of heart rate to 110, 110-130 and 130-150 beats per minute. The first version of the experimental procedure at a heart rate of 110 and 110-130 beats per minute was ineffective for the emergence of significant positive changes in the functional state of the cardiovascular system students. Recommended experimental procedure based on the alternation and equivalence ratio of mobile elements and sports games and increases the heart rate to 130-150 beats per minute. Application of the method increases the overall level of physical health, improves the functional state of the cardiovascular system, health, activity and mood of the students.

  5. Laboratory model of the cardiovascular system for experimental demonstration of pulse wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojadinović, Bojana; Nestorović, Zorica; Djurić, Biljana; Tenne, Tamar; Zikich, Dragoslav; Žikić, Dejan

    2017-03-01

    The velocity by which a disturbance moves through the medium is the wave velocity. Pulse wave velocity is among the key parameters in hemodynamics. Investigation of wave propagation through the fluid-filled elastic tube has a great importance for the proper biophysical understanding of the nature of blood flow through the cardiovascular system. Here, we present a laboratory model of the cardiovascular system. We have designed an experimental setup which can help medical and nursing students to properly learn and understand basic fluid hemodynamic principles, pulse wave and the phenomenon of wave propagation in blood vessels. Demonstration of wave propagation allowed a real time observation of the formation of compression and expansion waves by students, thus enabling them to better understand the difference between the two waves, and also to measure the pulse wave velocity for different fluid viscosities. The laboratory model of the cardiovascular system could be useful as an active learning methodology and a complementary tool for understanding basic principles of hemodynamics.

  6. Novel Molecular Aspects of Ghrelin and Leptin in the Control of Adipobiology and the Cardiovascular System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaia Rodríguez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ghrelin and leptin show opposite effects on energy balance. Ghrelin constitutes a gut hormone that is secreted to the bloodstream in two major forms, acylated and desacyl ghrelin. The isoforms of ghrelin not only promote adiposity by the activation of hypothalamic orexigenic neurons but also directly stimulate the expression of several fat storage-related proteins in adipocytes, including ACC, FAS, LPL and perilipin, thereby stimulating intracytoplasmic lipid accumulation. Moreover, both acylated and desacyl ghrelin reduce TNF-α-induced apoptosis and autophagy in adipocytes, suggesting an anti-inflammatory role of ghrelin in human adipose tissue. On the other hand, leptin is an adipokine with lipolytic effects. In this sense, leptin modulates via PI3K/Akt/mTOR the expression of aquaglyceroporins such as AQP3 and AQP7 that facilitate glycerol efflux from adipocytes in response to the lipolytic stimuli via its translocation from the cytosolic fraction (AQP3 or lipid droplets (AQP7 to the plasma membrane. Ghrelin and leptin also participate in the homeostasis of the cardiovascular system. Ghrelin operates as a cardioprotective factor with increased circulating acylated ghrelin concentrations in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH causally related to LV remodeling during the progression to LVH. Additionally, leptin induces vasodilation by inducible NO synthase expression (iNOS in the vascular wall. In this sense, leptin inhibits the angiotensin II-induced Ca2+ increase, contraction and proliferation of VSMC through NO-dependent mechanisms. Together, dysregulation of circulating ghrelin isoforms and leptin resistance associated to obesity, type 2 diabetes, or the metabolic syndrome contribute to cardiometabolic derangements observed in these pathologies.

  7. Human thermal bioclimatic conditions associated with acute cardiovascular syndromes in Crete Island, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleta, Anastasia G.; Nastos, Panagiotis T.

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify the association between bioclimatic conditions and daily counts of admissions for non-fatal acute cardiovascular (acute coronary syndrome, arrhythmia, decompensation of heart failure) syndromes (ACS) registered by the two main hospitals in Heraklion, Crete Island, during a five-year period 2008-2012. The bioclimatic conditions analyzed are based on human thermal bioclimatic indices such as the Physiological Equivalent Temperature (PET) and the Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI). Mean daily meteorological parameters, such as air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and cloudiness, were acquired from the meteorological station of Heraklion (Hellenic National Meteorological Service). These parameters were used as input variables in modeling the aforementioned thermal indices, in order to interpret the grade of the thermo-physiological stress. The PET and UTCI analysis was performed by the use of the radiation and bioclimate model, "RayMan", which is well-suited to calculate radiation fluxes and human biometeorological indices. Generalized linear models (GLM) were applied to time series of daily numbers of outpatients with ACS against bioclimatic variations, after controlling for possible confounders and adjustment for season and trends. The interpretation of the results of this analysis suggests a significant association between cold weather and increased coronary heart disease incidence, especially in the elderly and males. Additionally, heat stress plays an important role in the configuration of daily ACS outpatients, even in temperate climate, as that in Crete Island. In this point it is worth mentioning that Crete Island is frequently affected by Saharan outbreaks, which are associated in many cases with miscellaneous phenomena, such as Föhn winds - hot and dry winds - causing extreme bioclimatic conditions (strong heat stress). Taking into consideration the projected increased ambient temperature in the future, ACS

  8. Simulated Microgravity Exerts an Age-Dependent Effect on the Differentiation of Cardiovascular Progenitors Isolated from the Human Heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania I Fuentes

    Full Text Available Microgravity has a profound effect on cardiovascular function, however, little is known about the impact of microgravity on progenitors that reside within the heart. We investigated the effect of simulated microgravity exposure on progenitors isolated from the neonatal and adult human heart by quantifying changes in functional parameters, gene expression and protein levels after 6-7 days of 2D clinorotation. Utilization of neonatal and adult cardiovascular progenitors in ground-based studies has provided novel insight into how microgravity may affect cells differently depending on age. Simulated microgravity exposure did not impact AKT or ERK phosphorylation levels and did not influence cell migration, but elevated transcripts for paracrine factors were identified in neonatal and adult cardiovascular progenitors. Age-dependent responses surfaced when comparing the impact of microgravity on differentiation. Endothelial cell tube formation was unchanged or increased in progenitors from adults whereas neonatal cardiovascular progenitors showed a decline in tube formation (p<0.05. Von Willebrand Factor, an endothelial differentiation marker, and MLC2v and Troponin T, markers for cardiomyogenic differentiation, were elevated in expression in adult progenitors after simulated microgravity. DNA repair genes and telomerase reverse transcriptase which are highly expressed in early stem cells were increased in expression in neonatal but not adult cardiac progenitors after growth under simulated microgravity conditions. Neonatal cardiac progenitors demonstrated higher levels of MESP1, OCT4, and brachyury, markers for early stem cells. MicroRNA profiling was used to further investigate the impact of simulated microgravity on cardiovascular progenitors. Fifteen microRNAs were significantly altered in expression, including microRNAs-99a and 100 (which play a critical role in cell dedifferentiation. These microRNAs were unchanged in adult cardiac progenitors

  9. Cardiovascular System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    2009428 Association between smoking status at follow-up and clinical outcomes in patients undergoing successful percutaneous coronary intervention. ZHU Zhongyu,et al.Dept Cardiol,Henan Prov People’s Hosp,Zhengzhou 450003.Chin J Cardiol 2009;37(9):777-780. Objective To assess the association between smoking

  10. Cardiovascular System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    2009049 A 10 years review of the characteristics of in-hospital ventricular fibrillation victim in a single center. WANG Jing(王靖), et al. Clin Electrophysiol Lab & Arrhythmia Center, Cardiovasc Instit & Fuwai Hosp, PUMC & CAMS, Beijing 100037. Chin J Intern Med 2009;48(3):201-204. Objective To study the factors influencing the outcome of patients suffering from inhospital ventricular fibrillation (IHVF), as there have been few studies focusing on this topic. Methods Patients with IHVF collected in a single cardiac center were classified into a successful group and a failure group. Data relevant to the predicting factors of the two groups were compared. Results There were 206 events in the analysis.

  11. CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    6.1 Cardiac arrhythmias2004337 Expression and function changes of ryan-odine receptors and inostol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptors of atrial myocytes during atrial fibrillation GuoJihong (郭继鸿),et al. Dept Cardiol,People’s Hosp,

  12. Cardiovascular System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    2011315 The efficacy and safety of transradial versus transfemoral approach for percutaneous coronary intervention in acute myocardial infarction. XIA Kun(夏昆),et al.Heart Center,Beijing Chaoyang Hosp,Capital Med Univ,Beijing 100020.Abstract:Objective To compare the safety and efficacy of radial artery access versus femoral artery access for percutaneous coronary intervention in acute myocardial

  13. CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    2004474 Clinical efficacy and safety of torasemide in congestive heart failure patients. Li Yishi (李一石), et al. Dept Clin Pharmacol, Cardiovasc Instit & Fuwai Hosp, CAMS & PUMC,Beijing 100037. Chin Cir J 2004;19(4):290-293.

  14. CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    6.1 Heart failure2003409 The diagnostic value of plasma Nt-proANP and Nt-proBNP in patients with congestive heart failure. HUANG Chenjun(黄陈军), et al. Dept Cardiol, PUMC Hosp, CAMS, Beijing 100730. Chin J Cardiol 2003; 31 (6) :405-407.

  15. CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    8.1 Heart failure2003191 Carvedilol in chronic heart failure:a single-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. ZHU Wen-ling(朱文玲).Dept Cardiol, PUMC Hosp, PUMC & CAMS, Beijing 100730. Chin J Cardiol 2003;31(1):7 -10.

  16. Cardiovascular System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    6.1.Heart failure2005329 Early impairment of renal function inchronic heart failure and its clinical significance.JINZhengming(金争鸣),et al.Dept Cardiol,The 1st AffiliHosp,Med Coll,Zhejiang Univ,Hangzhou 310003.Chin J Intern Med 2005;44(4):262-264

  17. CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    6.1 Cardiac Arrhythmias2007037 Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor improves the effect of amiodarone on maintaining sinus rhythm of patients with persistent atrial fibrillation. JIA Xinwei(贾新未), et al. Dept Cardiol, Affili Hosp, Hebei Univ Baoding 071000. Chin Cir J 2006; 21(57):379-381. Objective To investigate whether angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) can improve the effect of amiodarone on maintaining sinus rhythm of patients with persistent atrial fibrillation and to elucidate its mechanism.

  18. Cardiovascular System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    2010191 Randomized study on T stenting and small protrusion technique versus simple stenting for patients with coronary artery bifurcation lesions and with big size side branch.CHENG Wanjun(成万钧),et al. Beijing Anzhen Hosp,Capital Med Univ,Beijing 100029.Chin J Cardiol 2010;38(2):131-134.

  19. Cardiovascular System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008515 Clinical effect of coronary artery stenting on 12 patients with coronary artery stenosis and spasm.CHU Guang(储光),et al.Dept Cardiol,Shanghai Jiaotong Univ,1st People’s,Shanghai 20008. Chin Cir J 2008;23(5):347-349. Objective To evaluate the clinical effect of stenting on drug refractory variant angina

  20. CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    2006181 Percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation in hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy. QIAO Shubin (乔树宾) ,et al. Dept Cardiol,Car diovasc Instit & Fuwai Hosp, Beijingl00037 . Chin J Intern Med 2006;45(3) :210 -212. Objective: Gauging the acute effect of percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation ( PTSMA) as a treatment for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy

  1. Cardiovascular System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    2011189 Vulnerable plaque burden post pharmaco-logical and interventional treatments in patients with acute coronary syndrome and borderline lesion: intravascular ultrasound follow up results. YU Danqing (余丹青)

  2. [Effects of the 520-day isolation on the functional state of the cardiovascular system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, G P; Buĭlov, S P; Eshchenko, A I; Skedina, M A; Voronkov, Iu I

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the work was to study the cardiovascular effects of simulated factors in a 520-day crewed mission to Mars, and to validate the diagnostic value of the ultrasonic investigation of microcirculation and endothelium-dependent dilation of the right brachial artery in 6 male volunteers at the age of 28 to 39 years. It appears that 520-d isolation affected intracardiac hemodynamics and endothelium function more dramatically compared with 105-d isolation, increasing the risk of atherosclerosis. These findings add insight into the "cost of human adaptation" to very long isolation.

  3. Cardiovascular disease in haemodialysis: role of the intravascular innate immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekdahl, Kristina N; Soveri, Inga; Hilborn, Jöns; Fellström, Bengt; Nilsson, Bo

    2017-02-27

    Haemodialysis is a life-saving renal replacement modality for end-stage renal disease, but this therapy also represents a major challenge to the intravascular innate immune system, which is comprised of the complement, contact and coagulation systems. Chronic inflammation is strongly associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients on haemodialysis. Biomaterial-induced contact activation of proteins within the plasma cascade systems occurs during haemodialysis and initially leads to local generation of inflammatory mediators on the biomaterial surface. The inflammation is spread by soluble activation products and mediators that are generated during haemodialysis and transported in the extracorporeal circuit back into the patient together with activated leukocytes and platelets. The combined effect is activation of the endothelium of the cardiovascular system, which loses its anti-thrombotic and anti-inflammatory properties, leading to atherogenesis and arteriosclerosis. This concept suggests that maximum suppression of the intravascular innate immune system is needed to minimize the risk of CVD in patients on haemodialysis. A potential approach to achieve this goal is to treat patients with broad-specificity systemic drugs that target more than one of the intravascular cascade systems. Alternatively, 'stealth' biomaterials that cause minimal cascade system activation could be used in haemodialysis circuits.

  4. Glutamatergic systems in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, effects on cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatam, Masoumeh; Nasimi, Ali

    2007-04-01

    The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) is a part of the limbic system. Two studies have shown that microinjection of L: -glutamate in the BST elicited cardiovascular depressive and bradycardic responses, but in one study, both pressor and depressor responses were observed in the chemical stimulation of BST by glutamate in the urethane-anesthetized rats. Also, the roles of glutamate receptor subtypes have not been investigated yet. The aim of this study was to find the effects of glutamate and its receptors on the blood pressure and heart rate in the BST of urethane-anesthetized rats. The drugs (50 nl) were microinjected into the BST of anaesthetized rats. The blood pressure and heart rate were recorded throughout each experiment. The average changes in the mean arterial pressure and heart rate at different intervals were compared both within each case group and between the case and the control groups, using repeated measures ANOVA. Microinjection of L: -glutamate (0.25 M) into the BST resulted in the decrease of the mean arterial pressure (-18.85 +/- 3.84 mmHg) and heart rate (-18 +/- 4 beats/min). Injection of AP5, antagonist of glutamate NMDA receptor (2.5 , 5 mM) and CNQX, antagonist of glutamate AMPA receptor (0.5, 1 mM) had no significant effect on the mean arterial pressure and heart rate. Either Ap5 or CNQX, when co-injected with glutamate, abolished the depressor and bradycardic effects of glutamate, suggesting that simultaneous activation of both glutamate receptors is necessary for the effect of glutamate system to emerge.

  5. Clustering of cardiovascular risk factors mimicking the human metabolic syndrome X in eNOS null mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, S; Hugli, O; Egli, M; Vollenweider, P.; Burcelin, R.; Nicod, P; Thorens, B.; Scherrer, U

    2003-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The metabolic syndrome comprises a clustering of cardiovascular risk factors but the underlying mechanism is not known. Mice with targeted disruption of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) are hypertensive and insulin resistant. We wondered, whether eNOS deficiency in mice is associated with a phenotype mimicking the human metabolic syndrome. METHODS AND RESULTS: In addition to arterial pressure and insulin sensitivity (euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamp), we measured t...

  6. [Age characteristics of the cardiovascular system, depending on the thyroid function in type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignateva, P A; Ballyuzek, M F; Shpakov, A O

    2015-01-01

    To study the features of cardiovascular system in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 considering the thyroid pathology and age, 264 patients were examined. They were divided into three groups: 1st - patients with diffuse-nodular changes in the thyroid gland, 2nd - patients with autoimmune thyroid disease, 3rd - a control group of patients without thyroid disease. The patients of different ages were examined in each of these groups. All patients were in euthyroid state. It was established that identified in diabetes mellitus type 2 thyroid pathology and the thyroid disease contribute special features to the clinical picture for combined diabetic and cardiovascular pathology even in a euthyroid state including the age features. The laboratory and instrumental researches showed that the patients with combined diabetes and thyroid pathology have a higher incidence of atrial fibrillation, ischemic heart disease, and ventricular arrhythmias of high grades. They also were noticed to have a more adverse form of the left ventricle remodeling, also the combination of diastolic and systolic dysfunctions were found to be more frequent. It was concluded about the necessity of early diagnosis and correction of the cardiovascular disorders and thyroid systems in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients, including euthyroid patients.

  7. PHYSIOLAB: a new laboratory for the study of the cardio-vascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsal, O; Andre-Deshays, C; Cauquil, D; Kotovskaya, A; Gratchev, V; Noskin, A

    1995-01-01

    On the basis of the experience gained during the previous french-russian missions on board MIR about the adaptation processes of the cardio-vascular system, a new laboratory has been designed. The objective of this "PHYSIOLAB" is to have a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the changes in the cardio-vascular system, with a special emphasis on the phenomenon of cardio-vascular deconditioning after landing. Beyond these scientific objectives, it is also intended to use PHYSIOLAB to help in the medical monitoring on-board MIR, during functional tests such as LBNP. PHYSIOLAB will be set up in MIR by the French cosmonaut during the next french-russian CASSIOPEE mission in 1996. Its architecture is based on a central unit, which controls the experimental protocols, records the results and provides an interface for transmission to the ground via telemetry. Different specific modules are used for the acquisition of various physiological parameters. This PHYSIOLAB under development for the CASSIOPEE mission should evolve towards a more ambitious laboratory, whose definition would take into account the results obtained with the first version of PHYSIOLAB. This "second generation" laboratory should be developed in the frame of wide International cooperation.

  8. Injected nanoparticles: the combination of experimental systems to assess cardiovascular adverse effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasova, Maria A; Tarasova, Olga S; Riikonen, Joakim; Raula, Janne; Lobach, Anatoly S; Borzykh, Anna A; Smirin, Boris V; Kauppinen, Esko I; Eletskii, Alexander V; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Salonen, Jarno; Tavi, Pasi; Lehto, Vesa-Pekka; Järvinen, Kristiina

    2014-05-01

    When nanocarriers are used for drug delivery they can often achieve superior therapeutic outcomes over standard drug formulations. However, concerns about their adverse effects are growing due to the association between exposure to certain nanosized particles and cardiovascular events. Here we examine the impact of intravenously injected drug-free nanocarriers on the cardiovasculature at both the systemic and organ levels. We combine in vivo and in vitro methods to enable monitoring of hemodynamic parameters in conscious rats, assessments of the function of the vessels after sub-chronic systemic exposure to nanocarriers and evaluation of the direct effect of nanocarriers on vascular tone. We demonstrate that nanocarriers can decrease blood pressure and increase heart rate in vivo via various mechanisms. Depending on the type, nanocarriers induce the dilation of the resistance arteries and/or change the responses induced by vasoconstrictor or vasodilator drugs. No direct correlation between physicochemical properties and cardiovascular effects of nanoparticles was observed. The proposed combination of methods empowers the studies of cardiovascular adverse effects of the nanocarriers.

  9. Risk of solid cancer, cardiovascular disease, anaphylaxis, osteoporosis and fractures in patients with systemic mastocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broesby-Olsen, Sigurd; Farkas, Dóra Körmendiné; Vestergaard, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    In patients with systemic mastocytosis (SM), several aspects of morbidity remain poorly understood. We assessed the risk of solid cancers, cardiovascular disease, anaphylaxis, osteoporosis, and fractures in SM patients. Using Danish medical registries, we conducted a nationwide population......-based cohort study including 687 adult (≥15 years) SM patients diagnosed during 1997-2012. A comparison cohort of 68,700 subjects from the general Danish population who were alive and without SM at the given SM subject's diagnosis were age- and gender-matched. Outcomes were a new diagnosis of solid cancer...... 0.9-1.6) and the 10-year AR was 5.9% (95% CI 3.9-8.4). SM patients are at increased risk of solid cancers - especially melanoma and NMSC-and cardiovascular disease. The risk of anaphylaxis and osteoporosis is clearly increased in SM, though absolute risk was low in this population-based study...

  10. Cardiovascular disease event rates in patients with severe psoriasis treated with systemic anti-inflammatory drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlehoff, Ole; Skov, L; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar

    2012-01-01

    with use of biological agents, methotrexate or other therapies, including retinoids, cyclosporine and phototherapy, in Denmark from 2007 to 2009. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Death, myocardial infarction and stroke. RESULTS: A total of 2400 patients with severe psoriasis, including 693 patients treated......OBJECTIVES: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disorder associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Systemic anti-inflammatory drugs, including biological agents, are widely used in the treatment of patients with moderate to severe psoriasis and may attenuate the risk of cardiovascular...... and other therapies, respectively. Age- and sex-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were 0.28 (95% CI 0.12-0.64) and 0.65 (95% CI 0.42-1.00) for patients treated with biological agents and methotrexate, respectively, using other therapies as the reference cohort. Corresponding HRs for a secondary composite...

  11. Investigating properties of the cardiovascular system using innovative analysis algorithms based on ensemble empirical mode decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Jia-Rong; Lin, Tzu-Yu; Chen, Yun; Sun, Wei-Zen; Abbod, Maysam F; Shieh, Jiann-Shing

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular system is known to be nonlinear and nonstationary. Traditional linear assessments algorithms of arterial stiffness and systemic resistance of cardiac system accompany the problem of nonstationary or inconvenience in practical applications. In this pilot study, two new assessment methods were developed: the first is ensemble empirical mode decomposition based reflection index (EEMD-RI) while the second is based on the phase shift between ECG and BP on cardiac oscillation. Both methods utilise the EEMD algorithm which is suitable for nonlinear and nonstationary systems. These methods were used to investigate the properties of arterial stiffness and systemic resistance for a pig's cardiovascular system via ECG and blood pressure (BP). This experiment simulated a sequence of continuous changes of blood pressure arising from steady condition to high blood pressure by clamping the artery and an inverse by relaxing the artery. As a hypothesis, the arterial stiffness and systemic resistance should vary with the blood pressure due to clamping and relaxing the artery. The results show statistically significant correlations between BP, EEMD-based RI, and the phase shift between ECG and BP on cardiac oscillation. The two assessments results demonstrate the merits of the EEMD for signal analysis.

  12. A New Approach to Teaching Human Cardiovascular Physiology Using Doppler Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looker, T.

    1985-01-01

    Explains the principles of the Doppler ultrasound technique and reviews its potential applications to the teaching of cardiovascular physiology. Identifies the instrumentation needed for this technique; provides examples and illustrations of the waveforms from the ultrasound blood velocimeter. (ML)

  13. Examining human-system interactions: The HSYS (Human SYStem) methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, S.G.; Harbour, J.L.; Sullivan, C.; Hallbert, B.P. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1990-01-01

    HSYS is a model-based methodology developed to examine the many factors which influence Human-SYStem interactions. HSYS is built around a linear model of human performance, called the Input-Action model, which describes five sequential steps: Input Detection, Input Understanding, Action Selection, Action Planning, and Action Execution. HSYS is structured in an hierarchical tree which presents a logical structure for examining potential areas where human performance, hardware or other system components are less than adequate. The HSYS tree consists of five major branches which correspond to the five major components of the Input-Action model. Initial validation was begun by studying accident reports via HSYS and identifying sources of error. The validation process has continued with accident investigations in operational settings. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Cardiovascular pharmacogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myburgh, Renier; Hochfeld, Warren E; Dodgen, Tyren M; Ker, James; Pepper, Michael S

    2012-03-01

    Human genetic variation in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms as well as more complex structural variations such as insertions, deletions and copy number variants, is partially responsible for the clinical variation seen in response to pharmacotherapeutic drugs. This affects the likelihood of experiencing adverse drug reactions and also of achieving therapeutic success. In this paper, we review key studies in cardiovascular pharmacogenetics that reveal genetic variations underlying the outcomes of drug treatment in cardiovascular disease. Examples of genetic associations with drug efficacy and toxicity are described, including the roles of genetic variability in pharmacokinetics (e.g. drug metabolizing enzymes) and pharmacodynamics (e.g. drug targets). These findings have functional implications that could lead to the development of genetic tests aimed at minimizing drug toxicity and optimizing drug efficacy in cardiovascular medicine.

  15. [Consensus statement on metabolic disorders and cardiovascular risks in patients with human immunodeficiency virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo Rodríguez, Rosa; Galindo Puerto, María José; Dueñas, Carlos; Gómez Candela, Carmen; Estrada, Vicente; Villar, Noemí G P; Locutura, Jaime; Mariño, Ana; Pascua, Javier; Palacios, Rosario; von Wichmman, Miguel Ángel; Álvarez, Julia; Asensi, Victor; Lopez Aldeguer, José; Lozano, Fernando; Negredo, Eugenia; Ortega, Enrique; Pedrol, Enric; Gutiérrez, Félix; Sanz Sanz, Jesús; Martínez Chamorro, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    This consensus document is an update of metabolic disorders and cardiovascular risk (CVR) guidelines for HIV-infected patients. This document has been approved by an expert panel of GEAM, SPNS and GESIDA after reviewing the results of efficacy and safety of clinical trials, cohort and pharmacokinetic studies published in biomedical journals (PubMed and Embase) or presented in medical scientific meetings. Recommendation strength and the evidence in which they are supported are based on the GRADE system. A healthy lifestyle is recommended, no smoking and at least 30min of aerobic exercise daily. In diabetic patients the same treatment as non-HIV infected patients is recommended. HIV patients with dyslipidemia should be considered as high CVR, thus its therapeutic objective is an LDL less than 100mg/dL. The antihypertensive of ACE inhibitors and ARAII families are better tolerated and have a lower risk of interactions. In HIV-patients with diabetes or metabolic syndrome and elevated transaminases with no defined etiology, the recommended is to rule out a hepatic steatosis Recommendations for action in hormone alterations are also updated. These new guidelines update previous recommendations regarding all those metabolic disorders involved in CVR. Hormone changes and their management and the impact of metabolic disorders on the liver are also included. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  16. Human epicardial adipose tissue expresses a pathogenic profile of adipocytokines in patients with cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Sudhesh

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Inflammation contributes to cardiovascular disease and is exacerbated with increased adiposity, particularly omental adiposity; however, the role of epicardial fat is poorly understood. Methods For these studies the expression of inflammatory markers was assessed in epicardial fat biopsies from coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG patients using quantitative RT-PCR. Further, the effects of chronic medications, including statins, as well as peri-operative glucose, insulin and potassium infusion, on gene expression were also assessed. Circulating resistin, CRP, adiponectin and leptin levels were determined to assess inflammation. Results The expression of adiponectin, resistin and other adipocytokine mRNAs were comparable to that in omental fat. Epicardial CD45 expression was significantly higher than control depots (p Conclusion Epicardial and omental fat exhibit a broadly comparable pathogenic mRNA profile, this may arise in part from macrophage infiltration into the epicardial fat. This study highlights that chronic inflammation occurs locally as well as systemically potentially contributing further to the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease.

  17. Activity and relationships of muscular and cardiovascular systems in different states during muscular activity in athletes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pryimakov A.A.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Revealed that the performance of high-power exercise on a bicycle ergometer to failure athletes skilled cyclists (15 men increases the activity and relationship of muscular and cardiovascular systems. At rest and fatigue manifests linear relationship between the two systems, during commissioning with stable condition - is exponential. The development of fatigue compensated without changing leadership of the quadriceps, biceps and calf muscles of the lower extremities in the efforts to change the relationship and partial role in various areas of cyclic motion, increasing their electrical activity. With the development of decompensated fatigue decreases the electrical activity and disturbed coordination of major muscles in the relationship right and left limbs.

  18. Ozone and cardiovascular injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainaldi Giuseppe

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Air pollution is increasingly recognized as an important and modifiable determinant of cardiovascular diseases in urban communities. The potential detrimental effects are both acute and chronic having a strong impact on morbidity and mortality. The acute exposure to pollutants has been linked to adverse cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction, heart failure and life-threatening arrhythmias. The long-terms effects are related to the lifetime risk of death from cardiac causes. The WHO estimates that air pollution is responsible for 3 million premature deaths each year. The evidence supporting these data is very strong nonetheless, epidemiologic and observational data have the main limitation of imprecise measurements. Moreover, the lack of clinical experimental models makes it difficult to demonstrate the individual risk. The other limitation is related to the lack of a clear mechanism explaining the effects of pollution on cardiovascular mortality. In the present review we will explore the epidemiological, clinical and experimental evidence of the effects of ozone on cardiovascular diseases. The pathophysiologic consequences of air pollutant exposures have been extensively investigated in pulmonary systems, and it is clear that some of the major components of air pollution (e.g. ozone and particulate matter can initiate and exacerbate lung disease in humans 1. It is possible that pulmonary oxidant stress mediated by particulate matter and/or ozone (O3 exposure can result in downstream perturbations in the cardiovasculature, as the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems are intricately associated, and it is well documented that specific environmental toxins (such as tobacco smoke 2 introduced through the lungs can initiate and/or accelerate cardiovascular disease development. Indeed, several epidemiologic studies have proved that there is an association between PM and O3 and the increased incidence of cardiovascular morbidity

  19. A Comprehensive TALEN-Based Knockout Library for Generating Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Based Models for Cardiovascular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakikes, Ioannis; Termglinchan, Vittavat; Cepeda, Diana A; Lee, Jaecheol; Diecke, Sebastian; Hendel, Ayal; Itzhaki, Ilanit; Ameen, Mohamed; Shrestha, Rajani; Wu, Haodi; Ma, Ning; Shao, Ning-Yi; Seeger, Timon; Woo, Nicole A; Wilson, Kitchener D; Matsa, Elena; Porteus, Matthew H; Sebastiano, Vittorio; Wu, Joseph C

    2017-02-28

    Rationale: Targeted genetic engineering using programmable nucleases such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) is a valuable tool for precise, site-specific genetic modification in the human genome. Objective: The emergence of novel technologies such as human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and nuclease-mediated genome editing represent a unique opportunity for studying cardiovascular diseases in vitro. Methods and Results: By incorporating extensive literature and database searches, we designed a collection of TALEN constructs to knockout (KO) eighty-eight human genes that are associated with cardiomyopathies and congenital heart diseases. The TALEN pairs were designed to induce double-strand DNA break near the starting codon of each gene that either disrupted the start codon or introduced a frameshift mutation in the early coding region, ensuring faithful gene KO. We observed that all the constructs were active and disrupted the target locus at high frequencies. To illustrate the general utility of the TALEN-mediated KO technique, six individual genes (TNNT2, LMNA/C, TBX5, MYH7, ANKRD1, and NKX2.5) were knocked out with high efficiency and specificity in human iPSCs. By selectively targeting a dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM)-causing mutation (TNNT2 p.R173W) in patient-specific iPSC-derived cardiac myocytes (iPSC-CMs), we demonstrated that the KO strategy ameliorates the DCM phenotype in vitro. In addition, we modeled the Holt-Oram syndrome (HOS) in iPSC-CMs in vitro and uncovered novel pathways regulated by TBX5 in human cardiac myocyte development. Conclusions: Collectively, our study illustrates the powerful combination of iPSCs and genome editing technology for understanding the biological function of genes and the pathological significance of genetic variants in human cardiovascular diseases. The methods, strategies, constructs and iPSC lines developed in this study provide a validated, readily available resource for cardiovascular

  20. Studies of nontarget-mediated distribution of human full-length IgG1 antibody and its FAb fragment in cardiovascular and metabolic-related tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidsson, Pia; Söderling, Ann-Sofi; Svensson, Lena; Ahnmark, Andrea; Flodin, Christine; Wanag, Ewa; Screpanti-Sundqvist, Valentina; Gennemark, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Tissue distribution and pharmacokinetics (PK) of full-length nontargeted antibody and its antigen-binding fragment (FAb) were evaluated for a range of tissues primarily of interest for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Mice were intravenously injected with a dose of 10 mg/kg of either human IgG1or its FAb fragment; perfused tissues were collected at a range of time points over 3 weeks for the human IgG1 antibody and 1 week for the human FAb antibody. Tissues were homogenized and antibody concentrations were measured by specific immunoassays on the Gyros system. Exposure in terms of maximum concentration (Cmax ) and area under the curve was assessed for all nine tissues. Tissue exposure of full-length antibody relative to plasma exposure was found to be between 1% and 10%, except for brain (0.2%). Relative concentrations of FAb antibody were the same, except for kidney tissue, where the antibody concentration was found to be ten times higher than in plasma. However, the absolute tissue uptake of full-length IgG was significantly higher than the absolute tissue uptake of the FAb antibody. This study provides a reference PK state for full-length whole and FAb antibodies in tissues related to cardiovascular and metabolic diseases that do not include antigen or antibody binding. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  1. Neurotrophin presence in human coronary atherosclerosis and metabolic syndrome: a role for NGF and BDNF in cardiovascular disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaldakov, George N; Fiore, Marco; Stankulov, Ivan S; Manni, Luigi; Hristova, Mariyana G; Antonelli, Alessia; Ghenev, Peter I; Aloe, Luigi

    2004-01-01

    The development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is a common comorbidity in patients with the metabolic syndrome, a concurrence of cardiovascular risk factors in one individual. While multiple growth factors and adipokines are identified in atherosclerotic lesions, as well as neurotrophins implicated in both cardiac ischemia and lipid and glucose metabolism, the potential role of neurotrophins in human coronary atherosclerosis and in the metabolic syndrome still remains to be elucidated. Here we describe and discuss our results that represent a novel attempt to study the cardiovascular and metabolic biology of nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and mast cells (MC). The local amount of NGF, the immunolocalization of p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) and the number of MC were correlatively examined in coronary vascular wall and in the surrounding subepicardial adipose tissue, obtained from autopsy cases in humans with advanced coronary atherosclerosis. We also analyzed the plasma levels of NGF, BDNF and leptin and the number of MC in biopsies from abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue in patients with a severe form of the metabolic syndrome. The results demonstrate that NGF levels are decreased in atherosclerotic coronary vascular tissue but increased in the subepicardial adipose tissue, whereas both tissues express a greater number of MC and a stronger p75NTR immunoreactivity, compared to controls. Metabolic syndrome patients display a significant hyponeurotrophinemia and an increased number of adipose MC; the later correlates with elevated plasma leptin levels. In effect, we provide the first evidence for (i) an altered presence of NGF, p75NTR and MC in both coronary vascular and subepicardial adipose tissue in human coronary atherosclerosis, and (ii) a significant decrease in plasma NGF and BDNF levels and an elevated amount of plasma leptin and adipose MC in metabolic syndrome patients. Together our findings suggest that

  2. Community-Based ECG Monitoring System for Patients with Cardiovascular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bor-Shyh; Wong, Alice M; Tseng, Kevin C

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to develop a community-based electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring system for cardiac outpatients to wirelessly detect heart rate, provide personalized healthcare, and enhance interactive social contact because of the prevalence of deaths from cardiovascular disease and the growing problem of aging in the world. The system not only strengthens the performance of the ECG monitoring system but also emphasizes the ergonomic design of wearable devices and user interfaces. In addition, it enables medical professionals to diagnose cardiac symptoms remotely and electronically manage medical reports and suggestions. The experimental result shows high performance of the dry electrode, even in dynamic conditions. The comparison result with different ECG healthcare systems shows the essential factors that the system should possess and the capability of the proposed system. Finally, a user survey was conducted based on the unified theory of acceptance and users of technology (UTAUT) model.

  3. Activation of the central histaminergic system mediates arachidonic-acid-induced cardiovascular effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinbas, Burcin; Topuz, Bora Burak; İlhan, Tuncay; Yilmaz, Mustafa Sertac; Erdost, Hatice; Yalcin, Murat

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explain the involvement of the central histaminergic system in arachidonic acid (AA)-induced cardiovascular effects in normotensive rats using hemodynamic, immunohistochemistry, and microdialysis studies. Intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered AA (0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 μmol) induced dose- and time-dependent increases in mean arterial pressure and decreased heart rate in conscious normotensive Sprague-Dawley rats. Central injection of AA (0.5 μmol) also increased posterior hypothalamic extracellular histamine levels and produced strong COX-1 but not COX-2 immunoreactivity in the posterior hypothalamus of rats. Moreover, the cardiovascular effects and COX-1 immunoreactivity in the posterior hypothalamus induced by AA (0.5 μmol; i.c.v.) were almost completely blocked by the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine (50 and 100 nmol; i.c.v.) and partially blocked by the H1 receptor blocker chlorpheniramine (100 nmol; i.c.v.) and the H3-H4 receptor antagonist thioperamide (50 and 100 nmol; i.c.v.). In conclusion, these results indicate that centrally administered AA induces pressor and bradycardic responses in conscious rats. Moreover, we suggest that AA may activate histaminergic neurons and increase extracellular histamine levels, particularly in the posterior hypothalamus. Acting as a neurotransmitter, histamine is potentially involved in AA-induced cardiovascular effects under normotensive conditions.

  4. Human pharmacology of ayahuasca: subjective and cardiovascular effects, monoamine metabolite excretion, and pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riba, Jordi; Valle, Marta; Urbano, Gloria; Yritia, Mercedes; Morte, Adelaida; Barbanoj, Manel J

    2003-07-01

    The effects of the South American psychotropic beverage ayahuasca on subjective and cardiovascular variables and urine monoamine metabolite excretion were evaluated, together with the drug's pharmacokinetic profile, in a double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial. This pharmacologically complex tea, commonly obtained from Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis, combines N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), an orally labile psychedelic agent showing 5-hydroxytryptamine2A agonist activity, with monoamine oxidase (MAO)-inhibiting beta-carboline alkaloids (harmine, harmaline, and tetrahydroharmine). Eighteen volunteers with prior experience in the use of psychedelics received single oral doses of encapsulated freeze-dried ayahuasca (0.6 and 0.85 mg of DMT/kg of body weight) and placebo. Ayahuasca produced significant subjective effects, peaking between 1.5 and 2 h, involving perceptual modifications and increases in ratings of positive mood and activation. Diastolic blood pressure showed a significant increase at the high dose (9 mm Hg at 75 min), whereas systolic blood pressure and heart rate were moderately and nonsignificantly increased. Cmax values for DMT after the low and high ayahuasca doses were 12.14 ng/ml and 17.44 ng/ml, respectively. Tmax (median) was observed at 1.5 h after both doses. The Tmax for DMT coincided with the peak of subjective effects. Drug administration increased urinary normetanephrine excretion, but, contrary to the typical MAO-inhibitor effect profile, deaminated monoamine metabolite levels were not decreased. This and the negligible harmine plasma levels found suggest a predominantly peripheral (gastrointestinal and liver) site of action for harmine. MAO inhibition at this level would suffice to prevent first-pass metabolism of DMT and allow its access to systemic circulation and the central nervous system.

  5. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and obstructive sleep apnea: overlaps in pathophysiology, systemic inflammation, and cardiovascular disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNicholas, Walter T

    2012-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome represent two of the most prevalent chronic respiratory disorders in clinical practice, and cardiovascular diseases represent a major comorbidity in each disorder. The two disorders coexist (overlap syndrome) in approximately 1% of adults but asymptomatic lower airway obstruction together with sleep-disordered breathing is more prevalent. Although obstructive sleep apnea syndrome has similar prevalence in COPD as the general population, and vice versa, factors such as body mass index and smoking influence relationships. Nocturnal oxygen desaturation develops in COPD, independent of apnea\\/hypopnea, and is more severe in the overlap syndrome, thus predisposing to pulmonary hypertension. Furthermore, upper airway flow limitation contributes to nocturnal desaturation in COPD without apnea\\/hypopnea. Evidence of systemic inflammation in COPD and sleep apnea, involving C-reactive protein and IL-6, in addition to nuclear factor-kappaB-dependent pathways involving tumor necrosis factor-alpha and IL-8, provides insight into potential basic interactions between both disorders. Furthermore, oxidative stress develops in each disorder, in addition to activation and\\/or dysfunction of circulating leukocytes. These findings are clinically relevant because systemic inflammation may contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases and the cell\\/molecular pathways involved are similar to those identified in COPD and sleep apnea. However, the pathophysiological and clinical significance of systemic inflammation in COPD and sleep apnea is not proven, and thus, studies of patients with the overlap syndrome should provide insight into the mechanisms of systemic inflammation in COPD and sleep apnea, in addition to potential relationships with cardiovascular disease.

  6. Effects of 50-Hz magnetic field on the cardiovascular system in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAI Jin-sheng; WAN Bao-quan; LIU Xing-fa; ZHANG Ye-mao; RUAN Guo-ran; HE Meng-ying; CHEN Chen; WANG Dao-wen

    2016-01-01

    AIM:The 50-Hz magnetic field (MF) is a potential health-risk factor.Its effects on the cardiovascular system have not been fully investigated .This study was conducted to explore the effects of long-term exposure to 50-Hz MF on the cardiovascular system . METHODS:In the study , an exposure system was constructed and the distribution of 50-Hz MF was detected .Sixty-four Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were exposed to 50-Hz MF at 100 μT for 24 weeks, 20 hours per day, while another 64 rats were sham exposed. During the exposure, blood pressure was measured every 4 weeks, and 24 weeks later, echocardiography, cardiac catheterisation and electrocardiography were performed .Moreover , heart and body weight were recorded , while haematoxylin-eosin staining and real-time PCR were conducted .RESULTS:The results showed that compared with the sham group , exposure to 50-Hz MF did not exert any effect on blood pressure, pulse rate, heart rate and cardiac rhythm.Further, echocardiography and cardiac catheterisation showed that there were no significant differences in the cardiac morphology and haemodynamics .In addition , histopathological examination showed that 50-Hz MF exposure had no effect on the structure of hearts .Finally, the expression of the cardiac hypertrophic relative genes did not show any significant differences between 50-Hz MF exposure group and the sham group .CONCLUSION: Taken together , in SD rats, exposure to 50-Hz/100-μT MF for 24 weeks did not show any obvious effects on the cardiovascular system .

  7. [Evaluation of the effects of occupational noxae on the cardiovascular system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzi, G; Locati, Emanuela H; Murgia, N; Ambrosio, G; Abbritti, G

    2004-01-01

    Working conditions and the environment may contribute to the multi-factorial aetiology of cardiovascular disease. To provide a critical assessment of epidemiological and clinical methods and tools for evaluating the effects of occupational pathogenic noxae on the cardiovascular system. A review was made of epidemiological and clinical studies published in the main scientific journals of occupational medicine and cardiology, in the period 1980-2003. Data sources were electronic medical data bases and conference proceedings. Collecting case histories by means of free or questionnaire-structured interviews, observing specific physical signs, detecting changes in blood chemistry parameters and identifying morphological or functional abnormalities in the heart and vessels are all useful approaches. Some blood chemistry parameters that may be modified by occupational exposure or by particular conditions arising from work organization are cholesterol, triglycerides, apolipoproteins A and B, platelets, fibrinogen, factor VIIc, fibrinolysis products, plasminogen tissue activating factor, complement and glycated hemoglobin. They can all be measured easily and quickly and provide an estimate of the risk of cardiovascular disease. As high blood pressure is closely correlated to heart disease, blood pressure levels can be monitored in a working population using a standard mercury sphygmomanometer. Electronic measurement before and after a work shift and 24 hour Holter monitoring help reduce the "white coat effect" and provide further useful information. Occupational risk factors such as toxins (metals, solvents, pesticides), electromagnetic fields, extreme temperatures, noise, radiation and psychophysical stress can affect the cardiac neuro-autonomic balance of the exposed workers and cause cardiovascular abnormalities. These can be detected by long-term ECG monitoring, and are revealed as reduced heart rate variability and prolonged QT interval. Recently non-invasive systems

  8. The influence of whole body vibration on the central and peripheral cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Dan; Yoganathan, Priya; Goss-Sampson, Mark

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the physiological changes of the cardiovascular system in response to whole body vibration during quiet standing and identify whether there is a greater influence on the central or peripheral cardiovascular system. Twenty healthy participants (12 male and 8 female) were assessed over two separate testing sessions for changes in peripheral skin temperature, peripheral venous function, blood flow velocity in the dorsalis pedis artery, blood pressure and heart rate during quiet standing with 40 Hz 1·9 mm synchronous vibration. Vibration exposure totalled 5 min in 1 min increments with 5 min recovery during each testing session. There were no significant changes in heart rate, blood pressure or peripheral skin temperature. Significant results were obtained for blood flow velocity with increases from 0·5 + 0·2 cm·s(-1) at baseline to 1 + 0·2 cm·s(-1) during vibration, returning to baseline levels during the recovery period. Due to the absence of changes in heart rate, blood pressure or lower leg and foot temperature, the change in blood flow velocity can be attributed to changes in peripheral vascular function. The results suggest a high level of sensitivity of the peripheral vascular system to vibration exposure; therefore, further studies should be completed to ascertain the physiological mechanisms underlying the effects of vibration on the peripheral vascular system.

  9. Human Factors Considerations in System Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, C. M. (Editor); Vanbalen, P. M. (Editor); Moe, K. L. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    Human factors considerations in systems design was examined. Human factors in automated command and control, in the efficiency of the human computer interface and system effectiveness are outlined. The following topics are discussed: human factors aspects of control room design; design of interactive systems; human computer dialogue, interaction tasks and techniques; guidelines on ergonomic aspects of control rooms and highly automated environments; system engineering for control by humans; conceptual models of information processing; information display and interaction in real time environments.

  10. Wearable Wireless Cardiovascular Monitoring Using Textile-Based Nanosensor and Nanomaterial Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Shyamkumar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Wearable and ultraportable electronics coupled with pervasive computing are poised to revolutionize healthcare services delivery. The potential cost savings in both treatment, as well as preventive care are the focus of several research efforts across the globe. In this review, we describe the motivations behind wearable solutions to real-time cardiovascular monitoring from a perspective of current healthcare services, as well as from a systems design perspective. We identify areas where emerging research is underway, namely: nanotechnology in textile-based wearable monitors and healthcare solutions targeted towards smart devices, like smartphones and tablets.

  11. The circadian organization of the cardiovascular system in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portaluppi, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    In normal conditions, the temporal organization of blood pressure (BP) is mainly controlled by neuroendocrine mechanisms. Above all, the monoaminergic systems (including variations in activity of the autonomous nervous system, and in secretion of biogenic amines) appear to integrate the major driving factors of temporal variability, but evidence is available also for a role of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal, hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid, opioid, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone, and endothelial systems, as well as other vasoactive peptides. Many hormones with established actions on the cardiovascular system (arginine vasopressin, vasoactive intestinal peptide, melatonin, somatotropin, insulin, steroids, serotonin, CRF, ACTH, TRH, endogenous opioids, and prostaglandin E2) are also involved in sleep induction or arousal, which in turn affects BP regulation. Hence, physical, mental, and pathological stimuli which may drive activation or inhibition of these neuroendocrine effectors of biological rhythmicity, may also interfere with the temporal BP structure. On the other hand, the immediate adaptation of the exogenous components of BP rhythms to the demands of the environment are modulated by the circadian-time-dependent responsiveness of the biological oscillators and their neuroendocrine effectors. These notions may contribute to a better understanding of the pathophysiology and therapeutics of hypertension, myocardial ischemia and infarction, cardiac arrhythmias and all kind of acute cardiovascular accidents. For instance, the normal temporal balance between external stimuli and neurohumoral influences with endogenous rhythmicity is preserved in uncomplicated, essential hypertension, whereas it is frequently lost in complicated and secondary forms of hypertension where gross alterations are found in the circadian profile of BP. When all the gates of the critical physiologic functions are aligned at the same time, the susceptibility, and thus risk, of adverse

  12. Comparison of sevoflurane and isoflurane effects on cardiovascular andrespiratory system during spontaneous ventilation in Angora goats

    OpenAIRE

    KUMANDAŞ, ALİ; ELMA, ERTUĞRUL

    2015-01-01

    Seven healthy Angora goats were used to compare the effects of isoflurane and sevoflurane on the cardiovascular and respiratory systems during anesthesia periods. Once anesthesia was induced with propofol at 5.1 ± 0.9 mg/kg, it was maintained with isoflurane at 1%-3% in the first treatment period and sevoflurane at 2%-4% in the second treatment period after a 15-day interval. Heart rates measured immediately after anesthesia induction and 5 min later were found to be statistically significant...

  13. System analysis of changes in cardiovascular circulatory dynamics in experimental diphtheria in rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotov, A K; Frolov, V A; Zotova, T J

    2009-09-01

    Trivariate correlation analysis of hemodynamic indices of the cardiovascular system in rabbits with diphtheria showed that adaptation of this system to direct action of diphtherin can be visualized by analysis of trivariate correlation tightness for indices of intraventricular pressure in the left and right ventricles and indices of systemic blood pressure. Using empirical production functions for systemic blood pressure indices we found that the contribution of intraventricular pressure in the left and right ventricles on blood pressure values is changed in diphtheria compared to the control. Basing on entropy analysis we established that the regimen of control over values of working intraventricular pressure in both left and right ventricles in diphtheria is changed from quasidetermined to stochastic.

  14. Study of nanosensor systems for hypertension associated cerebrovascular and cardiovascular disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Mouli; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2015-04-01

    Hypertension and hypertension associated cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases are on a rise. At-least 970 million people in the world and Seventy percent of the American adults are affected by high blood pressure, also known as hypertension. Even though blood pressure monitoring systems are readily available, the number of people being affected has been increasing. Most of the blood pressure monitoring systems require cumbersome approaches. Even the noninvasive techniques have not lowered the number of people affected nor did at-least increase the user base of these systems. Uncontrolled or untreated hypertension may lead to various cerebrovascular disorders including stroke, hypertensive crisis, lacunar infarcts intracerebral damage, microaneurysm, and cardiovascular disorders including heart failure, myocardial infraction, and ischemic heart disease. Hypertension is rated as the one of the most important causes of premature death in spite of the technical advances in biomedical technology. This paper briefs a review of the widely adopted blood pressure monitoring methods, research techniques, and finally, proposes a concept of implementing nanosensors and wireless communication for real time non-invasive blood pressure monitoring.

  15. Functional analysis of cardiovascular renin-angiotensin system using a gain or loss of function approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, R; Aoki, M; Ogihara, T

    2000-03-01

    The study of the effect of autocrine-paracrine vasoactive modulators on cardiovascular biology is very difficult in vivo, because in vivo studies are limited. In particular, characterization of the role of components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in vivo is limited by the difficulty in manipulating individual components of the RAS as well as by methodological limitations in studying the function of a local RAS in the absence of any contribution by the circulatory system. Recent progress in in vivo gene transfer technologies has provided us with the opportunity to study cellular responses to the manipulation of the individual components (i.e., by overexpression or inhibition). Many researchers have recently developed various in vivo gene transfer techniques for cardiovascular applications. Using in vivo gene transfer approaches, the roles of various tissues in the RAS, such as cardiac angiotensin, have been identified. Such an approach may increase our understanding of the biology and pathobiology of the autocrine-paracrine system. This review discusses the potential utility of in vivo gene transfer methods.

  16. Human-system Interfaces for Automatic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OHara, J.M.; Higgins,J. (BNL); Fleger, S.; Barnes V. (NRC)

    2010-11-07

    Automation is ubiquitous in modern complex systems, and commercial nuclear- power plants are no exception. Automation is applied to a wide range of functions including monitoring and detection, situation assessment, response planning, and response implementation. Automation has become a 'team player' supporting personnel in nearly all aspects of system operation. In light of its increasing use and importance in new- and future-plants, guidance is needed to conduct safety reviews of the operator's interface with automation. The objective of this research was to develop such guidance. We first characterized the important HFE aspects of automation, including six dimensions: levels, functions, processes, modes, flexibility, and reliability. Next, we reviewed literature on the effects of all of these aspects of automation on human performance, and on the design of human-system interfaces (HSIs). Then, we used this technical basis established from the literature to identify general principles for human-automation interaction and to develop review guidelines. The guidelines consist of the following seven topics: automation displays, interaction and control, automation modes, automation levels, adaptive automation, error tolerance and failure management, and HSI integration. In addition, our study identified several topics for additional research.

  17. Cardiovascular autonomic nervous system function and aerobic capacity in type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet eHägglund

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Impaired cardiovascular autonomic nervous system (ANS function has been reported in type 1 diabetes patients. ANS function, evaluated by heart rate variability (HRV, systolic blood pressure variability (SBPV and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS, has been linked to aerobic capacity (VO2peak in healthy subjects, but relationship is unknown in type 1 diabetes. We examined cardiovascular ANS function at rest and during function tests, and its relations to VO2peak in type 1 diabetes individuals. Ten type 1 diabetes patients (T1D (34 ± 7 years and 11 healthy control (CON (31 ± 6 years age and leisure-time physical activity-matched men were studied. Autonomic nervous system function was recorded at rest and during active standing and handgrip. Determination of VO2peak was obtained with graded cycle ergometer test. During ANS recordings SBPV, BRS, and resting HRV did not differ between groups, but alpha1 responses to manoeuvres in detrended fluctuation analyses were smaller in T1D (active standing; 32%, handgrip; 20%, medians than in CON (active standing; 71%, handgrip; 54%, p < 0.05. VO2peak was lower in T1D (36 ± 4 ml ∙ kg-1 ∙ min-1 than in CON (45 ± 9 ml ∙ kg-1 ∙ min-1, p < 0.05. Resting HRV measures, RMSSD, HF and SD1 correlated with VO2peak in CON (p < 0.05 and when analysing groups together. These results suggest that T1D had lower VO2peak, weaker HRV response to manoeuvres, but not impaired cardiovascular ANS function at rest compared with CON. Resting parasympathetic cardiac activity correlated with VO2peak in CON but not in T1D. Detrended fluctuation analysis could be a sensitive detector of changes in cardiac ANS function in type 1 diabetes.

  18. [Air pollution and cardiovascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Guy; Witberg, Guy; Danenberg, Haim

    2007-10-01

    Cardiovascular atherothrombosis is the most common cause of death globally, with several well-known risk factors. Air pollution is a byproduct of fuel combustion by motor vehicles, power plants and industrial factories. It is composed of gases, fluids and particulate matter (PM) of different sizes, which include basic carbon, organic carbonic molecules and metals such as vanadium, nickel, zinc and iron. These particles are subdivided by their median size, a major contributing factor for their capability to enter the human body through the respiratory system. Most of the epidemiological studies have shown correlation between acute and long-term exposure to air pollution elements and cardiovascular morbidity in general, and angina pectoris and acute myocardial infarction specifically. Physiological studies have found different arrhythmias as the etiologic cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality following exposure to air pollution. A major finding was a decline in heart rate variability, a phenomenon known as endangering for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, especially in patients after acute myocardial infarction. To date, several pathways have been proposed, including a hypercoagulable state following an inflammatory response, cardiac nervous autonomic disequilibrium, endothelial dysfunction with blood vessel contraction and direct toxic impact on cardiac muscle. Additional research is needed for clarifying the pathophysiological pathways by which air pollution affects the cardiovascular system. That might allow forthcoming with preventive measures and correct treatment, and hence a decrease in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Another important target is dose-outcome correlation curves for safety threshold calculation as a basis for air pollution regulations.

  19. Developmental origins of cardiovascular disease: Impact of early life stress in humans and rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, M O; Cohn, D M; Loria, A S

    2017-03-01

    The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) hypothesizes that environmental insults during childhood programs the individual to develop chronic disease in adulthood. Emerging epidemiological data strongly supports that early life stress (ELS) given by the exposure to adverse childhood experiences is regarded as an independent risk factor capable of predicting future risk of cardiovascular disease. Experimental animal models utilizing chronic behavioral stress during postnatal life, specifically maternal separation (MatSep) provides a suitable tool to elucidate molecular mechanisms by which ELS increases the risk to develop cardiovascular disease, including hypertension. The purpose of this review is to highlight current epidemiological studies linking ELS to the development of cardiovascular disease and to discuss the potential molecular mechanisms identified from animal studies. Overall, this review reveals the need for future investigations to further clarify the molecular mechanisms of ELS in order to develop more personalized therapeutics to mitigate the long-term consequences of chronic behavioral stress including cardiovascular and heart disease in adulthood.

  20. Human microbiome as therapeutic intervention target to reduce cardiovascular disease risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopen, Annefleur M.; Groen, Albert K.; Nieuwdorp, Max

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The absolute burden of cardiovascular risk remains high despite currently available preventive and therapeutic options. In search for novel therapeutic leads, mounting evidence has linked the gut microbiota as well as their metabolites to the development of cardiometabolic diseases

  1. Human microbiome as therapeutic intervention target to reduce cardiovascular disease risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopen, Annefleur M.; Groen, Albert K.; Nieuwdorp, Max

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The absolute burden of cardiovascular risk remains high despite currently available preventive and therapeutic options. In search for novel therapeutic leads, mounting evidence has linked the gut microbiota as well as their metabolites to the development of cardiometabolic diseases

  2. Effect of sex on the cardiovascular response to adrenaline in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouwenberg, B.J.J.W.; Rietjens, S.J.; Smits, P.; Galan, B.E. de

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular responsiveness to stress conditions differs between men and women. It is not known to what extent this observation is explained by differences in the release of stress hormones like adrenaline, or by differences in the response to adrenaline. Therefore, we quantified the hemodynamic r

  3. Exercise training and artery function in humans: nonresponse and its relationship to cardiovascular risk factors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Green, D.J.; Eijsvogels, T.M.; Bouts, Y.M.; Maiorana, A.J.; Naylor, L.H.; Scholten, R.R.; Spaanderman, M.E.; Pugh, C.J.; Sprung, V.S.; Schreuder, T.H.; Jones, H.; Cable, T.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Thijssen, D.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of our study were to examine 1) the proportion of responders and nonresponders to exercise training in terms of vascular function; 2) a priori factors related to exercise training-induced changes in conduit artery function, and 3) the contribution of traditional cardiovascular risk fa

  4. Advances in Experimental Pharmacological Studies of Effects of Astragalus on Cardiovascular System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    han; ling

    2001-01-01

    Astragalus (AS), a traditional Chinese tonic medicine, refers to the dry root of perenial herbaceous plants Astragalus membranaceus (Fisch) and Astragalus mongolicus Bge of leguminosae family, which was first recorded in "Shen Nong's Herbal Classic" (神农本草经). The herb is sweet in flavor, slightly warm in nature and acts on the Spleen and Lung channels. It was described that AS possesses the effects of "invigorating Qi to elevate Yang,consolidating superficies to stop sweating, inducing diuresis to remove edema and promoting healing of sore to regenerate tissue". Its chemical components have been discovered to be AS-saponins (ASS), AS-general flavone (AGF), AS-polysaccharides (APS), amino acid and microelements. During the past two decades, the effects of AS, the prescriptions containing AS and its active components on cardiovascular system have been widely studied(1,2). Its effects of positive inotropic action,reducing blood pressure, and in protecting myocardia against injuries caused by ischemia and ischemia/reperfusion or virus infection have been well documented. The underlying mechanisms of the effects have also been deeply studied. This paper summarizes the pharmacological studies on the effects of AS on cardiovascular system conducted in recent years.……

  5. Advances in Experimental Pharmacological Studies of Effects of Astragalus on Cardiovascular System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩玲; 陈可冀

    2001-01-01

    @@Astragalus (AS), a traditional Chinese tonic medicine, refers to the dry root of perenial herbaceous plants Astragalus membranaceus (Fisch) and Astragalus mongolicus Bge of leguminosae family, which was first recorded in "Shen Nong's Herbal Classic" (神农本草经). The herb is sweet in flavor, slightly warm in nature and acts on the Spleen and Lung channels. It was described that AS possesses the effects of "invigorating Qi to elevate Yang,consolidating superficies to stop sweating, inducing diuresis to remove edema and promoting healing of sore to regenerate tissue". Its chemical components have been discovered to be AS-saponins (ASS), AS-general flavone (AGF), AS-polysaccharides (APS), amino acid and microelements. During the past two decades, the effects of AS, the prescriptions containing AS and its active components on cardiovascular system have been widely studied(1,2). Its effects of positive inotropic action,reducing blood pressure, and in protecting myocardia against injuries caused by ischemia and ischemia/reperfusion or virus infection have been well documented. The underlying mechanisms of the effects have also been deeply studied. This paper summarizes the pharmacological studies on the effects of AS on cardiovascular system conducted in recent years.

  6. [Hydrogen sulfide as a biologically active mediator in the cardiovascular system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bełtowski, Jerzy

    2004-07-19

    Recent studies suggest that apart from nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is another inorganic gaseous mediator in the cardiovascular system. H2S is synthesized from L-cysteine by either cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) or cystathionin gamma--lyase (CSE), both using pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (vitamin B6) as a cofactor. CBS is the main H2S-producing enzyme in the brain and CSE is involved in H2S formation in the cardiovascular system. H2S induces hypotension in vivo and vasodilation vitro by opening KATP channels in vascular smooth muscle cells. Chronic administration of CSE inhibitor induces arterial hypertension in the rat. In addition, decreased H2S generation has been demonstrated in the vasculature of spontaneously hypertensive rat, in experimental hypertension induced by NO synthase blockade, and in hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension, and administration of exogenous H2S donor has significant therapeutic effects in these models. Deficiency of H2S may contribute to atherogenesis in some patients with hyperhomocysteinemia, in whom the metabolism of homocysteine to cysteine and H2S is compromised by vitamin B6 deficiency. Reduced H2S production in the brain was observed in patients with Alzheimer's disease. On the other hand, excess of H2S may lead to mental retardation in patients with Down's syndrome and may be involved in the pathogenesis of hypotension associated with septic shock.

  7. Women with cardiovascular risk after preeclampsia: is there follow-up within the Unified Health System in Brazil?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes Costa da Silva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to identify women with cardiovascular risk, five years after a preeclampsic episode (PE, and identify the follow-up of these women within the Unified Health System (Sistema Único de Saúde - SUS, in the city of Natal/RN. METHODS: a quantitative and exploratory study conducted at the Januário Cicco University Maternity Ward/RN. The sample consisted of 130 women, 65 with a PE episode and 65 who were normotensive. RESULTS: we found statistical significance with regard to body mass index, weight, family history of cardiovascular disease (CVD and cardiovascular complications when comparing women with previous PE to normotensive women. The groups were unaware of their cardiovascular risk factors and, in addition, they reported difficulties in accessing primary health care (PHC services. CONCLUSIONS: women with a PE history are at increased risk of developing CVD, unaware of late PE complications, and lacked customized care when compared to normotensive patients.

  8. Women with cardiovascular risk after preeclampsia: is there follow-up within the Unified Health System in Brazil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Maria de Lourdes Costa da; Galvão, Ana Cristina Araújo de Andrade; Souza, Nilba Lima de; Azevedo, George Dantas de; Jerônimo, Selma Maria Bezerra; Araújo, Ana Cristina Pinheiro Fernandes de

    2014-01-01

    to identify women with cardiovascular risk, five years after a pre-eclampsic episode (PE), and identify the follow-up of these women within the Unified Health System (Sistema Único de Saúde--SUS), in the city of Natal/RN. a quantitative and exploratory study conducted at the Januário Cicco University Maternity Ward/RN. The sample consisted of 130 women, 65 with a PE episode and 65 who were normotensive. we found statistical significance with regard to body mass index, weight, family history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cardiovascular complications when comparing women with previous PE to normotensive women. The groups were unaware of their cardiovascular risk factors and, in addition, they reported difficulties in accessing primary health care (PHC) services. women with a PE history are at increased risk of developing CVD, unaware of late PE complications, and lacked customized care when compared to normotensive patients.

  9. Critical analysis of autoregressive and fast Fourier transform markers of cardiovascular variability in rats and humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.J.J. Silva

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The autonomic nervous system plays an important role in physiological and pathological conditions, and has been extensively evaluated by parametric and non-parametric spectral analysis. To compare the results obtained with fast Fourier transform (FFT and the autoregressive (AR method, we performed a comprehensive comparative study using data from humans and rats during pharmacological blockade (in rats, a postural test (in humans, and in the hypertensive state (in both humans and rats. Although postural hypotension in humans induced an increase in normalized low-frequency (LFnu of systolic blood pressure, the increase in the ratio was detected only by AR. In rats, AR and FFT analysis did not agree for LFnu and high frequency (HFnu under basal conditions and after vagal blockade. The increase in the LF/HF ratio of the pulse interval, induced by methylatropine, was detected only by FFT. In hypertensive patients, changes in LF and HF for systolic blood pressure were observed only by AR; FFT was able to detect the reduction in both blood pressure variance and total power. In hypertensive rats, AR presented different values of variance and total power for systolic blood pressure. Moreover, AR and FFT presented discordant results for LF, LFnu, HF, LF/HF ratio, and total power for pulse interval. We provide evidence for disagreement in 23% of the indices of blood pressure and heart rate variability in humans and 67% discordance in rats when these variables are evaluated by AR and FFT under physiological and pathological conditions. The overall disagreement between AR and FFT in this study was 43%.

  10. Human nervous system function emulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenger, P

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a modular, extensible, open-systems design for a multiprocessor network which emulates the major functions of the human nervous system. Interchangeable hardware/software components, a socketed software bus with plug-and-play capability and self diagnostics are included. The computer hardware is based on IEEE P996.1 bus cards. Its operating system utilizes IEEE 1275 standard software. Object oriented design techniques and programming are featured. A machine-independent high level script-based command language was created for this project. Neural anatomical structures which were emulated include the cortex, brainstem, cerebellum, spinal cord, autonomic and peripheral nervous systems. Motor, sensory, autoregulatory, and higher cognitive artificial intelligence, behavioral and emotional functions are provided. The author discusses how he has interfaced this emulator to machine vision, speech recognition/speech synthesis, an artificial neural network and a dexterous hand to form an android robotic platform.

  11. Risk stratification in cardiovascular disease primary prevention - scoring systems, novel markers, and imaging techniques.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zannad, Faiez

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to review and discuss current methods of risk stratification for cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention, emerging biomarkers, and imaging techniques, and their relative merits and limitations. This report is based on discussions that took place among experts in the area during a special CardioVascular Clinical Trialists workshop organized by the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Drug Therapy in September 2009. Classical risk factors such as blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels remain the cornerstone of risk estimation in primary prevention but their use as a guide to management is limited by several factors: (i) thresholds for drug treatment vary with the available evidence for cost-effectiveness and benefit-to-risk ratios; (ii) assessment may be imprecise; (iii) residual risk may remain, even with effective control of dyslipidemia and hypertension. Novel measures include C-reactive protein, lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A(2) , genetic markers, and markers of subclinical organ damage, for which there are varying levels of evidence. High-resolution ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging to assess carotid atherosclerotic lesions have potential but require further validation, standardization, and proof of clinical usefulness in the general population. In conclusion, classical risk scoring systems are available and inexpensive but have a number of limitations. Novel risk markers and imaging techniques may have a place in drug development and clinical trial design. However, their additional value above and beyond classical risk factors has yet to be determined for risk-guided therapy in CVD prevention.

  12. Cardiovascular effects of thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangster, Jodi K; Panciera, David L; Abbott, Jonathan A

    2013-07-01

    Thyroid hormones have many effects on cardiovascular function, and deficiency or excess of thyroid hormones can result in cardiac dysfunction. Abnormalities of the cardiovascular system are often identified during examination of hyperthyroid and hypothyroid patients. This article addresses the effects of thyroid hormones on the cardiovascular system and the clinical relevance of the cardiovascular response to thyroid dysfunction. In addition, treatment recommendations are presented.

  13. Fetal cardiovascular physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rychik, J

    2004-01-01

    The cardiovascular system of the fetus is physiologically different than the adult, mature system. Unique characteristics of the myocardium and specific channels of blood flow differentitate the physiology of the fetus from the newborn. Conditions of increased preload and afterload in the fetus, such as sacrococcygeal teratoma and twin-twin transfusion syndrome, result in unique and complex pathophysiological states. Echocardiography has improved our understanding of human fetal cadiovasvular physiology in the normal and diseased states, and has expanded our capability to more effectively treat these disease processes.

  14. Hydra: A web-based system for cardiovascular analysis, diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novo, J; Hermida, A; Ortega, M; Barreira, N; Penedo, M G; López, J E; Calvo, C

    2017-02-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) risk stratification is a highly complex process involving an extensive set of clinical trials to support the clinical decision-making process. There are many clinical conditions (e.g. diabetes, obesity, stress, etc.) that can lead to the early diagnosis or establishment of cardiovascular disease. In order to determine all these clinical conditions, a complete set of clinical patient analyses is typically performed, including a physical examination, blood analysis, electrocardiogram, blood pressure (BP) analysis, etc. This article presents a web-based system, called Hydra, which integrates a full and detailed set of services and functionalities for clinical decision support in order to help and improve the work of clinicians in cardiovascular patient diagnosis, risk assessment, treatment and monitoring over time. Hydra integrates a number of different services: a service for inputting all the information gathered by specialists (physical examination, habits, BP, blood analysis, electrocardiogram, etc.); a tool to automatically determine the CV risk stratification, including well-known standard risk stratification tables; and, finally, various tools to incorporate, analyze and graphically present the records of the ambulatory BP monitoring that provides BP analysis over a given period of time (24 or 48 hours). In addition, the platform presents a set of reports derived from all the information gathered from the patient in order to support physicians in their clinical decisions. Hydra was tested and validated in a real domain. In particular, internal medicine specialists at the Hypertension Unit of the Santiago de Compostela University Hospital (CHUS) validated the platform and used it in different clinical studies to demonstrate its utility. It was observed that the platform increased productivity and accuracy in the assessment of patient data yielding a cost reduction in clinical practice. This paper proposes a complete platform that includes

  15. A Human Body Analysis System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girondel Vincent

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a system for human body analysis (segmentation, tracking, face/hands localisation, posture recognition from a single view that is fast and completely automatic. The system first extracts low-level data and uses part of the data for high-level interpretation. It can detect and track several persons even if they merge or are completely occluded by another person from the camera's point of view. For the high-level interpretation step, static posture recognition is performed using a belief theory-based classifier. The belief theory is considered here as a new approach for performing posture recognition and classification using imprecise and/or conflicting data. Four different static postures are considered: standing, sitting, squatting, and lying. The aim of this paper is to give a global view and an evaluation of the performances of the entire system and to describe in detail each of its processing steps, whereas our previous publications focused on a single part of the system. The efficiency and the limits of the system have been highlighted on a database of more than fifty video sequences where a dozen different individuals appear. This system allows real-time processing and aims at monitoring elderly people in video surveillance applications or at the mixing of real and virtual worlds in ambient intelligence systems.

  16. A simplified state-space model of biventricular assist device-cardiovascular system interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Vivian C A; Einly Lim; Boon Chiang Ng; Yong Kuen Ho; Lovell, Nigel H

    2016-08-01

    A simplified state-space model of biventricular assist device (BiVAD)-cardiovascular system (CVS) interaction is presented. The state-space equations includes a six-compartments CVS model incorporating the ventricles, the pulmonary and systemic circulations as well as the non-linear behavior of the valve flow, together with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) and a right ventricular assist device (RVAD) component. The left and right pump speeds serve as the input variables for the state-space model. The model is simulated with three operational modes, i.e. (i) RVAD speed state hemodynamics is also studied with and without an outflow banding restriction. Our simulated results are validated with experimental data obtained from clinical, in vivo and in vitro studies provided in the literatures. We observed that despite its simplicity, the model is able to reproduce the observed trends in the reported studies, thus making it feasible for the development of robust yet practical control algorithms.

  17. Mathematical modeling and validation in physiology applications to the cardiovascular and respiratory systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bachar, Mostafa; Kappel, Franz

    2013-01-01

    This volume synthesizes theoretical and practical aspects of both the mathematical and life science viewpoints needed for modeling of the cardiovascular-respiratory system specifically and physiological systems generally.  Theoretical points include model design, model complexity and validation in the light of available data, as well as control theory approaches to feedback delay and Kalman filter applications to parameter identification. State of the art approaches using parameter sensitivity are discussed for enhancing model identifiability through joint analysis of model structure and data. Practical examples illustrate model development at various levels of complexity based on given physiological information. The sensitivity-based approaches for examining model identifiability are illustrated by means of specific modeling  examples. The themes presented address the current problem of patient-specific model adaptation in the clinical setting, where data is typically limited.

  18. Positive correlation between pesticide sales and central nervous system and cardiovascular congenital abnormalities in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froes Asmus, Carmen I R; Camara, Volney M; Raggio, Ronir; Landrigan, Philip J; Claudio, Luz

    2017-10-01

    This study investigated the association between pesticide exposure in Brazil (2005-2013) with rates of central nervous system (CNS) and cardiovascular system (CVS) congenital abnormalities in 2014. An exposure variable was established from data on production and sales of pesticides (kg) per crop area (ha) for 2012 and 2013 years. The Brazilian states were divided into three categories: high, medium, and low pesticide use and rate ratios were estimated for each group of states (CI: 95 %). In 2013 and 2014, the high use group presented a 100 and a 75 % increase, and the medium group a 65 and 23 % increase, respectively, in the risk of CNS and CVS congenital abnormalities at birth, compared to the low use group. These findings suggest that pesticide exposure could be associated with increased risk of congenital malformations at birth in Brazil.

  19. Systems-Pharmacology Dissection of Traditional Chinese Medicine Compound Saffron Formula Reveals Multi-scale Treatment Strategy for Cardiovascular Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianling; Mu, Jiexin; Zheng, Chunli; Chen, Xuetong; Guo, Zihu; Huang, Chao; Fu, Yingxue; Tian, Guihua; Shang, Hongcai; Wang, Yonghua

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) have been regarding as “the world’s first killer” of human beings in recent years owing to the striking morbidity and mortality, the involved molecular mechanisms are extremely complex and remain unclear. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) adheres to the aim of combating complex diseases from an integrative and holistic point of view, which has shown effectiveness in CVDs therapy. However, system-level understanding of such a mechanism of multi-scale treatment strategy for CVDs is still difficult. Here, we developed a system pharmacology approach with the purpose of revealing the underlying molecular mechanisms exemplified by a famous compound saffron formula (CSF) in treating CVDs. First, by systems ADME analysis combined with drug targeting process, 103 potential active components and their corresponding 219 direct targets were retrieved and some key interactions were further experimentally validated. Based on this, the network relationships among active components, targets and diseases were further built to uncover the pharmacological actions of the drug. Finally, a “CVDs pathway” consisted of several regulatory modules was incorporated to dissect the therapeutic effects of CSF in different pathological features-relevant biological processes. All this demonstrates CSF has multi-scale curative activity in regulating CVD-related biological processes, which provides a new potential way for modern medicine in the treatment of complex diseases. PMID:26813334

  20. The influence of the human microbiome and probiotics on cardiovascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Grace; MacDonald, Kyle; Reid, Gregor; Burton, Jeremy P

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of death worldwide. Of the many etiological factors, microorganisms constitute one. From the local impact of the gut microbiota on energy metabolism and obesity, to the distal association of periodontal disease with coronary heart disease, microbes have a significant impact on cardiovascular health. In terms of the ability to modulate or influence the microbes, probiotic applications have been considered. These are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a benefit on the host. While a number of reports have established the beneficial abilities of certain probiotic bacterial strains to reduce cholesterol and hypertension, recent research suggests that their use could be more widely applied. This review presents an up-to-date summary of the known associations of the microbiome with CVD, and potential applications of probiotic therapy.

  1. Cardiovascular manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus. Prospective study of 100 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badui, E; Garcia-Rubi, D; Robles, E; Jimenez, J; Juan, L; Deleze, M; Diaz, A; Mintz, G

    1985-07-01

    One hundred consecutive female patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were studied from the cardiovascular point of view by means of non invasive methods. Seventy percent of the cases presented some type of cardiovascular anomaly. Seventy four percent of the resting electrocardiograms were abnormal as well as 72% of the M mode echocardiograms and 55% of the cardiac X ray series. The most frequent observed complications were: pericarditis and or pericardial effusion (39%), arterial hypertension (22%), ischemic heart disease (16%), myocarditis (14%), congestive heart failure (10%), pulmonary hypertension (9%), valvular heart disease (9%), pleural effusion (7%) and cerebro vascular accident (3%). We analyzed each one of these complications and found of special interest the high incidence of ischemic heart disease which is more frequent than has been hitherto reported. Ischemic heart disease was observed in two types of patients: a) Those with long term steroid therapy. In these, the mechanism seems to be an atherosclerotic disease probably induced by the chronic use of steroids. The management of these cases do not differ from other types of coronary heart disease due to atherosclerosis. b) Those with frank episodes of vasculitis in whom the basic mechanism is an inflammatory process of the coronary arteries and its treatment is fundamentally that of the vasculitis. We consider necessary to study routinely all patients with SLE through non invasive cardiological methods.

  2. Modeling the cardiovascular system using a nonlinear additive autoregressive model with exogenous input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedl, M.; Suhrbier, A.; Malberg, H.; Penzel, T.; Bretthauer, G.; Kurths, J.; Wessel, N.

    2008-07-01

    The parameters of heart rate variability and blood pressure variability have proved to be useful analytical tools in cardiovascular physics and medicine. Model-based analysis of these variabilities additionally leads to new prognostic information about mechanisms behind regulations in the cardiovascular system. In this paper, we analyze the complex interaction between heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and respiration by nonparametric fitted nonlinear additive autoregressive models with external inputs. Therefore, we consider measurements of healthy persons and patients suffering from obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), with and without hypertension. It is shown that the proposed nonlinear models are capable of describing short-term fluctuations in heart rate as well as systolic blood pressure significantly better than similar linear ones, which confirms the assumption of nonlinear controlled heart rate and blood pressure. Furthermore, the comparison of the nonlinear and linear approaches reveals that the heart rate and blood pressure variability in healthy subjects is caused by a higher level of noise as well as nonlinearity than in patients suffering from OSAS. The residue analysis points at a further source of heart rate and blood pressure variability in healthy subjects, in addition to heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and respiration. Comparison of the nonlinear models within and among the different groups of subjects suggests the ability to discriminate the cohorts that could lead to a stratification of hypertension risk in OSAS patients.

  3. System identification of closed-loop cardiovascular control mechanisms: diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukkamala, R.; Mathias, J. M.; Mullen, T. J.; Cohen, R. J.; Freeman, R.

    1999-01-01

    We applied cardiovascular system identification (CSI) to characterize closed-loop cardiovascular regulation in patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN). The CSI method quantitatively analyzes beat-to-beat fluctuations in noninvasively measured heart rate, arterial blood pressure (ABP), and instantaneous lung volume (ILV) to characterize four physiological coupling mechanisms, two of which are autonomically mediated (the heart rate baroreflex and the coupling of respiration, measured in terms of ILV, to heart rate) and two of which are mechanically mediated (the coupling of ventricular contraction to the generation of the ABP wavelet and the coupling of respiration to ABP). We studied 37 control and 60 diabetic subjects who were classified as having minimal, moderate, or severe DAN on the basis of standard autonomic tests. The autonomically mediated couplings progressively decreased with increasing severity of DAN, whereas the mechanically mediated couplings were essentially unchanged. CSI identified differences between the minimal DAN and control groups, which were indistinguishable based on the standard autonomic tests. CSI may provide a powerful tool for assessing DAN.

  4. Triiodothyronine (T3) effects on cardiovascular system in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingitore, Alessandro; Iervasi, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    Interest in the role of thyroid hormones (TH) in heart failure is steadily increasing due to evidence for a physiological, homeostatic role of TH and the effects of altered TH metabolism on the cardiovascular system, particularly in presence of heart failure. Experimental studies have shown that altered TH metabolism modifies cardiovascular homeostasis by inducing alterations of cardiac histology, cardiomyocyte morphology and gene expression and consequently, of diastolic and systolic myocardial function. Clinical studies have shown that mild forms of thyroid dysfunction, both primary (subclinical hypothyroidism and subclinical hyperthyroidism) and secondary (low T(3) syndrome) have negative prognostic impact in patients with heart failure. In these patients, the administration of synthetic triiodothyronine (T(3)) was well tolerated and induced significant improvement in cardiac function without increased heart rate and metabolic demand. Large multicenter, placebo-controlled prospective studies are necessary to evaluate the safety and prognostic effects of chronic treatment with TH replacement therapy in patients with heart failure. The article also discusses recent patents in this field.

  5. Spontaneous lesions of the cardiovascular system in purpose-bred laboratory nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamanza, Ronnie; Parry, Nicola M A; Rogerson, Petrina; Nicol, Jen R; Bradley, Alys E

    2006-01-01

    This retrospective study was performed to determine the range, occurrence and incidence of spontaneously arising histopathological findings of the cardiovascular system in purpose-bred laboratory nonhuman primates. Data were collected from 84 controlled toxicological studies with equal numbers of male and female animals and full tissue lists. Attempts were also made to standardize pathological terms used by various original pathologists. Tissue sections from 2464 animals, which included 2050 cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis), 284 common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) and 130 rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were examined. The most common cardiac finding was focal myocardial inflammation, subcategorized as either "inflammatory cell infiltration" (339) or "focal myocarditis" (131). Other cardiac findings included mineralization (29), endocarditis (16), pericarditis (10), squamous cysts (6) and ectopic thyroid tissue (5). Perivasculitis/vasculitis in the kidney, lung, meninges, sciatic nerve, and other tissues (206) was the most common vascular lesion. Focal myocarditis was more common in male (60%) than female (40%) animals. Cardiac mineralization and extramedullary hematopoiesis were more common in marmosets than other species while ectopic thyroid tissue was present in marmosets and cynomolgus monkeys. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate the range and incidence of spontaneous cardiovascular lesions in laboratory nonhuman primates.

  6. [Heme oxygenase and carbon monoxide in the physiology and pathology of the cardiovascular system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bełtowski, Jerzy; Jamroz, Anna; Borkowska, Ewelina

    2004-03-03

    Heme oxygenase (HO) degrades heme to carbon monoxide (CO), ferrous ions, and the bile pigment biliverdin, which is subsequently reduced to the other important bile pigment, bilirubin, by biliverdin reductase. Fe2+ liberated from the heme molecule upregulates ferritin production, and bile pigments are potent endogenous antioxidants. The HO enzyme exists in three isophorms: HO-1 is expressed at low levels under physiological conditions, but is induced by numerous factors, including oxidative stress, inflammation, nitric oxide, an elevated level of substrate, and hypoxia. HO-2 is a constitutive enzyme involved in the baseline production of CO in the cardiovascular and nervous systems, whereas HO-3 is also ubiquitously expressed, but possesses low catalytic activity. Like nitric oxide, CO activates soluble guanylate cyclase and elevates cGMP in target tissues, which dilates blood vessels. It also does this by directly activating potassium channels in vascular smooth muscle cells. In addition, CO inhibits platelet aggregation and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells, inhibits apoptosis, and stimulates angiogenesis. Both deficiency, and excess of HO-1 may be involved in the pathogenesis of arterial hypertension. Induction of HO-1 attenuates atherosclerosis and myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. Pharmacological and genetic induction of HO-1 as well as the delivery of exogenous CO are promising therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  7. Low-grade systemic inflammation connects aging, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarner, Verónica; Rubio-Ruiz, Maria Esther

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with immunosenescence and accompanied by a chronic inflammatory state which contributes to metabolic syndrome, diabetes and their cardiovascular consequences. Risk factors for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and diabetes overlap, leading to the hypothesis that both share an inflammatory basis. Obesity is increased in the elderly population, and adipose tissue induces a state of systemic inflammation partially induced by adipokines. The liver plays a pivotal role in the metabolism of nutrients and exhibits alterations in the expression of genes associated with inflammation, cellular stress and fibrosis. Hepatic steatosis and its related inflammatory state (steatohepatitis) are the main hepatic complications of obesity and metabolic diseases. Aging-linked declines in expression and activity of endoplasmic reticulum molecular chaperones and folding enzymes compromise proper protein folding and the adaptive response of the unfolded protein response. These changes predispose aged individuals to CVDs. CVDs and endothelial dysfunction are characterized by a chronic alteration of inflammatory function and markers of inflammation and the innate immune response, including C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, TNF-α, and several cell adhesion molecules are linked to the occurrence of myocardial infarction and stroke in healthy elderly populations and patients with metabolic diseases.

  8. Protective actions of melatonin and growth hormone on the aged cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Sergio D; Forman, Katherine A; García, Cruz; Vara, Elena; Escames, Germaine; Tresguerres, Jesús A F

    2014-05-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that certain aspects of lifestyle and genetics act as risk factors for a variety of cardiovascular disorders, including coronary disease, hypertension, heart failure and stroke. Aging, however, appears to be the major contributor for morbidity and mortality of the impaired cardiovascular system. Growth hormone (GH) and melatonin seem to prevent cardiac aging, as they contribute to the recovery of several physiological parameters affected by age. These hormones exhibit antioxidant properties and decrease oxidative stress and apoptosis. This paper summarizes a set of studies related to the potential role that therapy with GH and melatonin may play in the protection of the altered cardiac function due to aging, with a focus on experiments performed in our laboratory using the senescence-accelerated mouse as an aging model. In general, we observed significantly increased inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis markers in hearts from senescence-accelerated prone 10-month-old animals compared to 2-month-old controls, while anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic markers as well as endothelial nitric oxide synthase were decreased. Senescence-accelerated resistant animals showed no significant changes with age. GH or melatonin treatment prevented the age-dependent cardiac alterations observed in the senescence-accelerated prone group. Combined administration of GH plus melatonin reduced the age-related changes in senescence-accelerated prone hearts in an additive fashion that was different to that displayed when administered alone. GH and melatonin may be potential agents for counteracting oxidative stress, apoptosis and inflammation in the aging heart.

  9. Patterns of Senescence in Human Cardiovascular Fitness: VO2max in Subsistence and Industrialized Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisor, Anne C.; Gurven, Michael; Blackwell, Aaron D.; Kaplan, Hillard; Yetish, Gandhi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study explores whether cardiovascular fitness levels and senescent decline are similar in the Tsimane of Bolivia and Canadians, as well as other subsistence and industrialized populations. Among Tsimane, we examine whether morbidity predicts lower levels and faster decline of cardiovascular fitness, or whether their lifestyle (e.g., high physical activity) promotes high levels and slow decline. Alternatively, high activity levels and morbidity might counterbalance such that Tsimane fitness levels and decline are similar to those in industrialized populations. Methods Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) was estimated using a step test heart rate method for 701 participants. We compared these estimates to the Canadian Health Measures Survey and previous studies in industrialized and subsistence populations. We evaluated whether health indicators and proxies for market integration were associated with VO2max levels and rate of decline for the Tsimane. Results The Tsimane have significantly higher levels of VO2max and slower rates of decline than Canadians; initial evidence suggests differences in VO2max levels between other subsistence and industrialized populations. Low hemoglobin predicts low VO2max for Tsimane women while helminth infection predicts high VO2max for Tsimane men, though results might be specific to the VO2max scaling parameter used. No variables tested interact with age to moderate decline. Conclusions The Tsimane demonstrate higher levels of cardiovascular fitness than industrialized populations, but levels similar to other subsistence populations. The high VO2max of Tsimane is consistent with their high physical activity and few indicators of cardiovascular disease, measured in previous studies. PMID:24022886

  10. Role of MicroRNAs in Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System-Mediated Cardiovascular Inflammation and Remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricica Pacurari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are endogenous regulators of gene expression either by inhibiting translation or protein degradation. Recent studies indicate that microRNAs play a role in cardiovascular disease and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system- (RAAS- mediated cardiovascular inflammation, either as mediators or being targeted by RAAS pharmacological inhibitors. The exact role(s of microRNAs in RAAS-mediated cardiovascular inflammation and remodeling is/are still in early stage of investigation. However, few microRNAs have been shown to play a role in RAAS signaling, particularly miR-155, miR-146a/b, miR-132/122, and miR-483-3p. Identification of specific microRNAs and their targets and elucidating microRNA-regulated mechanisms associated RAS-mediated cardiovascular inflammation and remodeling might lead to the development of novel pharmacological strategies to target RAAS-mediated vascular pathologies. This paper reviews microRNAs role in inflammatory factors mediating cardiovascular inflammation and RAAS genes and the effect of RAAS pharmacological inhibition on microRNAs and the resolution of RAAS-mediated cardiovascular inflammation and remodeling. Also, this paper discusses the advances on microRNAs-based therapeutic approaches that may be important in targeting RAAS signaling.

  11. EFFECT OF CHIA SEED (SALVIA HISPANICA L.) CONSUMPTION ON CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTORS IN HUMANS: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Ferreira, Cynthia; dd Sousa Fomes, Lucilia de Fátima; da Silva, Gilze Espirito Santo; Rosa, Glorimar

    2015-11-01

    chia is a seed rich in such nutrients as proteins, n-3 fatty acids and especially alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), minerals, fibers and antioxidants. Efforts have been made to assess whether human consumption of chia can reduce cardiovascular risk factors; however, it has not been established as effective and the findings of the few studies to have looked into the matter are inconsistent. to systematize the findings of studies assessing the effect the consumption of chia seed, either milled or whole, has in the prevention/control of cardiovascular risk factors in humans. this is a systematic literature review (SLR) with no meta-analysis. The articles scrutinizedwere identified in the electronic databases Lilacs, Medline (Pub- Med version), Cochrane, Scielo, Scopus, and Web of Science under the keywords"dyslipidemia" or "dislipidemia", "hyperlipidemia" or "hiperlipidemia", "obesity" or "obesidade", "salvia"or"salviahispanica", "Lamiaceae" or "chia", "hypertension" or "hipertensão", "hypertrygliceridemia" or "hipertrigliceridemia", and "riscocardiovascular" or "cardiovascularrisk." We chose for our selection English-, Portuguese- or Spanish-language articles about clinical trials on humans and published within the last ten years. The biases of risk analysis were carried out considering 6 of the 8 criteria of the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions Version 5.1. seven studies (n = 200) fit our inclusion criteria. Of the chosen clinical trials, only one was not randomized. Five of the studies were blind experiments. Two of the studies were acute trials, both of them randomized. Of the chia seed interventions, one study showed a significant drop in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and inflammatory markers, yet there was no change in body mass, lipid profile or blood sugar. In four of the studies reviewed there was a significant spike in ALA and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), with no significant change to other parameters. In the acute trials, post

  12. Exercise training and artery function in humans: nonresponse and its relationship to cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Daniel J; Eijsvogels, Thijs; Bouts, Yvette M; Maiorana, Andrew J; Naylor, Louise H; Scholten, Ralph R; Spaanderman, Marc E A; Pugh, Christopher J A; Sprung, Victoria S; Schreuder, Tim; Jones, Helen; Cable, Tim; Hopman, Maria T E; Thijssen, Dick H J

    2014-08-15

    The objectives of our study were to examine 1) the proportion of responders and nonresponders to exercise training in terms of vascular function; 2) a priori factors related to exercise training-induced changes in conduit artery function, and 3) the contribution of traditional cardiovascular risk factors to exercise-induced changes in artery function. We pooled data from our laboratories involving 182 subjects who underwent supervised, large-muscle group, endurance-type exercise training interventions with pre-/posttraining measures of flow-mediated dilation (FMD%) to assess artery function. All studies adopted an identical FMD protocol (5-min ischemia, distal cuff inflation), contemporary echo-Doppler methodology, and observer-independent automated analysis. Linear regression analysis was used to identify factors contributing to changes in FMD%. We found that cardiopulmonary fitness improved, and weight, body mass index (BMI), cholesterol, and mean arterial pressure (MAP) decreased after training, while FMD% increased in 76% of subjects (P cardiovascular risk factors were not significantly related to changes in FMD% (P > 0.05). In conclusion, we found that, while some subjects do not demonstrate increases following exercise training, improvement in FMD% is present in those with lower pretraining body weight and endothelial function. Moreover, exercise training-induced change in FMD% did not correlate with changes in traditional cardiovascular risk factors, indicating that some cardioprotective effects of exercise training are independent of improvement in risk factors.

  13. Cardiovascular system identification: Simulation study using arterial and central venous pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamolegkos, Nikolaos; Vicario, Francesco; Chbat, Nicolas W

    2015-08-01

    The paper presents a study of the identifiability of a lumped model of the cardiovascular system. The significance of this work from the existing literature is in the potential advantage of using both arterial and central venous (CVP) pressures, two signals that are frequently monitored in the critical care unit. The analysis is done on the system's state-space representation via control theory and system identification techniques. Non-parametric state-space identification is preferred over other identification techniques as it optimally assesses the order of a model, which best describes the input-output data, without any prior knowledge about the system. In particular, a recent system identification algorithm, namely Observer Kalman Filter Identification with Deterministic Projection, is used to identify a simplified version of an existing cardiopulmonary model. The outcome of the study highlights the following two facts. In the deterministic (noiseless) case, the theoretical indicators report that the model is fully identifiable, whereas the stochastic case reveals the difficulty in determining the complete system's dynamics. This suggests that even with the use of CVP as an additional pressure signal, the identification of a more detailed (high order) model of the circulatory system remains a challenging task.

  14. Fibulins and Their Role in Cardiovascular Biology and Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cangemi, Claudia; Hansen, Maria Lyck; Argraves, William Scott

    2014-01-01

    Fibulins are a group of extracellular matrix proteins of which many are present in high amounts in the cardiovascular system. They share common biochemical properties and are often found in relation to basement membranes or elastic fibers. Observations in humans with specific mutations in fibulin...... as a cardiovascular disease marker....

  15. Examing nursing students' understanding of the cardiovascular system in a BSN program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Parker Emerson

    This study investigated the alignment of important cardiovascular system (CVS) concepts identified by expert nurses with nursing student's knowledge. Specifically, it focused on the prevalence of nursing students' alternative conceptions for these important concepts as a potential reason for a theory-practice gap in nursing (Corlett, 2000; Jordan, 1994). This is the first study to target nursing student alternative conceptions exclusively whereas other studies focused on diverse groups of undergraduates' CVS knowledge (Michael et al., 2002). The study was divided into two phases and used a case study approach with each phase of the study representing a single case. The first phase of the study sought to understand what CVS concepts expert nurses deemed relevant to their daily practice and how these experts used these concepts. The second phase identified nursing student alternative conceptions through the use of open-ended scenarios based on the results of phase I. For the first phase of the study involved four CVS expert nurses practicing in emergency rooms and cardiac intensive care units at two local hospitals. Interviews were used to elicit important CVS concepts. The expert nurses identified five broad concepts as important to their practice. These concepts were a) cardiovascular anatomical concepts; b) cardiovascular physiological concepts; c) homeostasis and diseases of the CVS; d) the interdependence and interaction of the CVS with other organ systems and e) the intersection of the CVS and technology in patient diagnosis and treatment. These finding reinforce concepts already being taught to nursing students but also suggest that instruction should focus more on how the CVS interacts with other organ systems and how technology and the CVS interact. The presence of alternative conceptions in the nursing students was examined through the use of open-ended questions. A total of 17 students fully completed the scenario questions. Results indicate that this

  16. Nongenomic signaling pathways triggered by thyroid hormones and their metabolite 3-iodothyronamine on the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelband, F; Dias, J; Ferrão, F M; Einicker-Lamas, M

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid hormones play a wide range of important physiological activities in almost all organism. As changes in these hormones levels-observed in hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism-promote serious derangements of the cardiovascular system, it is important to know their mechanisms of action. Although the classic genomic actions which are dependent on interaction with nuclear receptors to modulate cardiac myocytes genes expression, there is growing evidence about T(3) and T(4)-triggered nongenomic pathways, resulted from their binding to plasma membrane, cytoplasm, or mitocondrial receptors that leads to a rapidly regulation of cardiac functions. Interestingly both actions converge to amplify thyroid hormone effects on cardiovascular system. T(3) and T(4) nongenomic actions modify inotropic and chronotropic effects, cardiac action potential duration, cardiac growth, and myocyte shape by protein translation through protein kinases-dependent signaling cascades, which include PKA, PKC, PI3K, and MAPK, and changes on ion channels and pumps activity. In respect to the decreased systemic vascular resistance seen in hyperthyroidism, T(3) appears to activate NOS or ATP-sensitive K(+) channels. In addition, a novel biologically active T(4)-derived metabolite has been described, 3-iodothyronamine, T(1)AM, which also acts through membrane receptors to mediate nongenomic cardiac effects. This metabolite influences the physiological manifestations of thyroid hormone actions by inducing opposite effects from those stimulated by T(3) and T(4), such as negative inotropic and chronotropic effects. Therefore, beyond genomic and nongenomic effects of thyroid hormones, it is crucial for there to be an equilibrium between T(3) or T(4) and T(1)AM levels for maintaining cardiac homeostasis.

  17. Efficacy of Female Rat Models in Translational Cardiovascular Aging Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Rice

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women in the United States. Aging is a primary risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease as well as cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality. Aging is a universal process that all humans undergo; however, research in aging is limited by cost and time constraints. Therefore, most research in aging has been done in primates and rodents; however it is unknown how well the effects of aging in rat models translate into humans. To compound the complication of aging gender has also been indicated as a risk factor for various cardiovascular diseases. This review addresses the systemic pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system associated with aging and gender for aging research with regard to the applicability of rat derived data for translational application to human aging.

  18. Participation of the pituitary-thyroid axis in the cardiovascular system in elderly patients with congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, T; Kanda, T; Kuwabara, A; Shinohara, H; Kobayashi, I

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between the pituitary-thyroid axis and the cardiovascular system in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) remains unknown. Therefore, we attempted to determine serum levels of thyroid hormones in relation to plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) levels and left ventricular (LV) function in patients with CHF. The echocardiographic ejection fraction significantly correlated with the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) (p thyroid hormones may participate in regulatory mechanisms of the cardiovascular system and altered thyroid hormone metabolism, which was characterized by a euthyroid sick syndrome.

  19. System of psycho-therapeutics influences in patients admitted to hospital with cardiovascular diseases. Sistema de influencias psicoterapéuticas en pacientes con afecciones cardiovasculares hospitalizados.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Rodríguez Rodríguez

    Full Text Available Fundaments: Within the restricted field of the patients' psychological environment, anxiety and depression seem ti play an important role although it is still pending how to clear it up definitely in the case of ischemic cardiopathy and coronary diseases. However, it isostensible that the patients who suffer from cardiovascular diseases frequently present psychological disorders, mainly emotional ones. Objective: To assess the effectiveness of a system of psychotherapy influences in patients with cardiovasular diseases. Method: Intervention study witha cuasi experimental design in patients with cardiovascular urgencies hospitalized at the Integral Care Unit of the Heart of the ¨Dr. Gustavo A. Lima¨ Hospital from June 1st 2002 to june 1st 2003 and who received relaxing, stimulating and sleeping treatment. Psychological and physiological modifications were assessed after having received treatment with these psychological techniques. Result: Acute Myocardial infarction and Angina pectoris were the most common causes of admission. The variation of respiratory and cardiac frequency as well as blood pressure tend tomaintain, diminish or keep normal values. The psychological state of the patient was favoured after treatment. Conclusion: The effect of the system of psychotherapy influences were beneficial both organically and psychologically.
    Fundamento: Dentro del campo estricto del entorno psicológico de los pacientes, la ansiedad y la depresión parecen jugar un papel importante, aunque todavía queda por dilucidar de forma definitiva en el determinismo de la cardiopatía isquemica y las enfermedades coronarias, sin embargo, es ostensible que los pacientes portadores de enfermedades cardiovasculares presenten con marcada frecuencia alteraciones de índole psicológica, fundamentalmente alteraciones emocionales.

  20. Role of the Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System and Its Pharmacological Inhibitors in Cardiovascular Diseases: Complex and Critical Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, Claudio; Rossi, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    Hypertension is one of the major risk factor able to promote development and progression of several cardiovascular diseases, including left ventricular hypertrophy and dysfunction, myocardial infarction, stroke, and congestive heart failure. Also, it is one of the major driven of high cardiovascular risk profile in patients with metabolic complications, including obesity, metabolic syndrome and diabetes, as well as in those with renal disease. Thus, effective control of hypertension is a key factor for any preventing strategy aimed at reducing the burden of hypertension-related cardiovascular diseases in the clinical practice. Among various regulatory and contra-regulatory systems involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and renal diseases, renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a major role. However, despite the identification of renin and the availability of various assays for measuring its plasma activity, the specific pathophysiological role of RAS has not yet fully characterized. In the last years, however, several notions on the RAS have been improved by the results of large, randomized clinical trials, performed in different clinical settings and in different populations treated with RAS inhibiting drugs, including angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and antagonists of the AT1 receptor for angiotensin II (ARBs). These findings suggest that the RAS should be considered to have a central role in the pathogenesis of different cardiovascular diseases, for both therapeutic and preventive purposes, without having to measure its level of activation in each patient. The present document will discuss the most critical issues of the pathogenesis of different cardiovascular diseases with a specific focus on RAS blocking agents, including ACE inhibitors and ARBs, in the light of the most recent evidence supporting the use of these drugs in the clinical management of hypertension and hypertension-related cardiovascular diseases.

  1. Differential protection against oxidative stress and nitric oxide overproduction in cardiovascular and pulmonary systems by propofol during endotoxemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yen-Chin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both overproduction of nitric oxide (NO and oxidative injury of cardiovascular and pulmonary systems contribute to fatal cardiovascular depression during endotoxemia. We investigated in the present study the relative contribution of oxidative stress and NO to cardiovascular depression during different stages of endotoxemia, and delineated their roles in cardiovascular protective effects of a commonly used anesthetic propofol during endotoxemia. Methods Experimental endotoxemia was induced by systemic injection of E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 15 mg/kg to Sprague-Dawley rats that were maintained under propofol (15 or 30 mg/kg/h, i.v. anesthesia. Mean systemic arterial pressure (MSAP and heart rate (HR were monitored for 6 h after the endotoxin. Tissue level of NO was measured by chemical reduction-linked chemiluminescence and oxidative burst activity was determined using dihydroethidium method. Expression of NO synthase (NOS was determined by immunoblotting. The Scheffé multiple range test was used for post hoc statistical analysis. Results Systemic injection of LPS (15 mg/kg induced biphasic decreases in MSAP and HR. In the heart, lung and aorta, an abrupt increase in lipid peroxidation, our experimental index of oxidative tissue injury, was detected in early stage and sustained during late stage cardiovascular depression. LPS injection, on the other hand, induced a gradual increase in tissue nitrite and nitrate levels in the same organs that peaked during late stage endotoxemia. Propofol infusion (15 or 30 mg/kg/h, i.v. significantly attenuated lipid peroxidation in the heart, lung and aorta during early and late stage endotoxemia. High dose (30 mg/kg/h, i.v. propofol also reversed the LPS-induced inducible NO synthase (iNOS upregulation and NO production in the aorta, alongside a significant amelioration of late stage cardiovascular depression and increase in survival time during endotoxemia. Conclusion Together these

  2. The Cardiovascular Research Grid (CVRG)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CardioVascular Research Grid (CVRG) project is creating an infrastructure for sharing cardiovascular data and data analysis tools. CVRG tools are developed using...

  3. Impact of atrial fibrillation on the cardiovascular system through a lumped-parameter approach

    CERN Document Server

    Scarsoglio, Stefania; Camporeale, Carlo; Ridolfi, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia affecting millions of people in the Western countries and, due to the widespread impact on the population and its medical relevance, is largely investigated in both clinical and bioengineering sciences. However, some important feedback mechanisms are still not clearly established. The present study aims at understanding the global response of the cardiovascular system during paroxysmal AF through a lumped-parameter approach, which is here performed paying particular attention to the stochastic modeling of the irregular heartbeats and the reduced contractility of the heart. AF can be here analyzed by means of a wide number of hemodynamic parameters and avoiding the presence of other pathologies, which usually accompany AF. Reduced cardiac output with correlated drop of ejection fraction and decreased amount of energy converted to work by the heart during blood pumping, as well as higher left atrial volumes and pressures are some of the most representative ...

  4. Increased proteoglycan synthesis by the cardiovascular system of coarctation hypertensive rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lipke, D W; Couchman, J R

    1991-01-01

    Proteoglycan (PG) synthesis in the cardiovascular system of coarctation hypertensive rats was examined by in vivo and in vitro labeling of glycosaminoglycans with 35SO4 in rats made hypertensive for short (4 days) and longer (14 days) durations. With in vivo labeling, only tissues directly exposed...... indicate that: 1) coarctation hypertension stimulates PG production that is dependent initially on increased pressure and later, on additional non-pressure related factors, 2) these other factors are responsible for enhanced PG production in tissues not directly exposed to pressure overload, 3) pressure...... and/or these other factors are essential for enhanced PG production in coarctation hypertension, and 4) synthesis of all GAG types appears to be affected....

  5. Labview Based ECG Patient Monitoring System for Cardiovascular Patient Using SMTP Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Om Prakash; Mekonnen, Dawit; Malarvili, M B

    2015-01-01

    This paper leads to developing a Labview based ECG patient monitoring system for cardiovascular patient using Simple Mail Transfer Protocol technology. The designed device has been divided into three parts. First part is ECG amplifier circuit, built using instrumentation amplifier (AD620) followed by signal conditioning circuit with the operation amplifier (lm741). Secondly, the DAQ card is used to convert the analog signal into digital form for the further process. Furthermore, the data has been processed in Labview where the digital filter techniques have been implemented to remove the noise from the acquired signal. After processing, the algorithm was developed to calculate the heart rate and to analyze the arrhythmia condition. Finally, SMTP technology has been added in our work to make device more communicative and much more cost-effective solution in telemedicine technology which has been key-problem to realize the telediagnosis and monitoring of ECG signals. The technology also can be easily implemented over already existing Internet.

  6. Health system barriers and facilitators to medication adherence for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Amitava; Khandelwal, Shweta; Nambiar, Lavanya; Saxena, Malvika; Peck, Victoria; Moniruzzaman, Mohammed; Faria Neto, Jose Rocha; Quinto, Katherine Curi; Smyth, Andrew; Leong, Darryl; Werba, José Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Background Secondary prevention is cost-effective for cardiovascular disease (CVD), but uptake is suboptimal. Understanding barriers and facilitators to adherence to secondary prevention for CVD at multiple health system levels may inform policy. Objectives To conduct a systematic review of barriers and facilitators to adherence/persistence to secondary CVD prevention medications at health system level. Methods Included studies reported effects of health system level factors on adherence/persistence to secondary prevention medications for CVD (coronary artery or cerebrovascular disease). Studies considered at least one of β blockers, statins, angiotensin–renin system blockers and aspirin. Relevant databases were searched from 1 January 1966 until 1 October 2015. Full texts were screened for inclusion by 2 independent reviewers. Results Of 2246 screened articles, 25 studies were included (12 trials, 11 cohort studies, 1 cross-sectional study and 1 case–control study) with 132 140 individuals overall (smallest n=30, largest n=63 301). 3 studies included upper middle-income countries, 1 included a low middle-income country and 21 (84%) included high-income countries (9 in the USA). Studies concerned established CVD (n=4), cerebrovascular disease (n=7) and coronary heart disease (n=14). Three studies considered persistence and adherence. Quantity and quality of evidence was limited for adherence, persistence and across drug classes. Studies were concerned with governance and delivery (n=19, including 4 trials of fixed-dose combination therapy, FDC), intellectual resources (n=1), human resources (n=1) and health system financing (n=4). Full prescription coverage, reduced copayments, FDC and counselling were facilitators associated with higher adherence. Conclusions High-quality evidence on health system barriers and facilitators to adherence to secondary prevention medications for CVD is lacking, especially for low-income settings. Full prescription coverage

  7. Haemodynamic responses to exercise, ATP infusion and thigh compression in humans: insight into the role of muscle mechanisms on cardiovascular function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Alonso, J.; Mortensen, S.P.; Jeppesen, Tina Dysgaard

    2008-01-01

    increased blood flow (DeltaLBF 0.5-0.7 l min(-1)) without altering (.)Q, MAP or (.)VO2. These findings suggest that the skeletal muscle pump is not obligatory for sustaining venous return, central venous pressure,stroke volume and (.)Q or maintaining muscle blood flow during one-legged exercise in humans......The muscle pump and muscle vasodilatory mechanism are thought to play important roles in increasing and maintaining muscle perfusion and cardiac output ((.)Q) during exercise, but their actual contributions remain uncertain. To evaluate the role of the skeletal muscle pump and vasodilatation...... on cardiovascular function during exercise, we determined leg and systemic haemodynamic responses in healthy men during (1) incremental one-legged knee-extensor exercise, (2) step-wise femoral artery ATP infusion at rest, (3) passive exercise (n=10), (4)femoral vein or artery ATP infusion (n=6), and (5) cyclic...

  8. The Structure of Fats and Fatty Acid Consumption in Elderly People with Cardiovascular System Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skop-Lewandowska, Agata; Kolarzyk, Emilia; Zając, Joanna; Jaworska, Jagoda; Załęska-Żyłka, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Patients with cardiovascular system diseases having their origin in arteriosclerosis require special dietetic treatment. Among many nutritional components, fats in the diet (both their quantity and quality) play a very important role in primary and secondary prevention of these diseases. The aim of the study was the estimation of total fats participation (saturated fatty acids, mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids and cholesterol) in the Daily Nutritional Ration (DNR) of elderly people with cardiovascular system diseases. The study included 128 persons (66 women and 62 men, mean age 73.2 ± 6.9) hospitalized in the 1st Clinic of Cardiology and Hypertension, UJCM in Kraków. Daily intakes of energy were estimated using the 24-h nutritional recall and Food Frequency Questionnaire. A higher consumption of fats and fatty acids was observed in men's diet than in women's diet. The percentage of energy from saturated fatty acids (10.6% M and W) was higher than dietary recommendations. The consumption of monounsaturated fatty acids was in accordance with nutritional recommendations. The participation in the diet of polyunsaturated fatty acids was insufficient versus the newest nutritional recommendations and was determined as 4.6% of energy in DNR in men and 4.1% of energy of DNR in women. The excessive amount of saturated fatty acids together with the insufficient amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids in the diet are the result of the excessive consumption of products which are a source of animal fat and insufficient consumption of plant fat, fish and seafood.

  9. Effects of intrauterine growth restriction on sleep and the cardiovascular system: The use of melatonin as a potential therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiallourou, Stephanie R; Wallace, Euan M; Miller, Suzanne L; Horne, Rosemary S C

    2016-04-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) complicates 5-10% of pregnancies and is associated with increased risk of preterm birth, mortality and neurodevelopmental delay. The development of sleep and cardiovascular control are closely coupled and IUGR is known to alter this development. In the long-term, IUGR is associated with altered sleep and an increased risk of hypertension in adulthood. Melatonin plays an important role in the sleep-wake cycle. Experimental animal studies have shown that melatonin therapy has neuroprotective and cardioprotective effects in the IUGR fetus. Consequently, clinical trials are currently underway to assess the short and long term effects of antenatal melatonin therapy in IUGR pregnancies. Given melatonin's role in sleep regulation, this hormone could affect the developing infants' sleep-wake cycle and cardiovascular function after birth. In this review, we will 1) examine the role of melatonin as a therapy for IUGR pregnancies and the potential implications on sleep and the cardiovascular system; 2) examine the development of sleep-wake cycle in fetal and neonatal life; 3) discuss the development of cardiovascular control during sleep; 4) discuss the effect of IUGR on sleep and the cardiovascular system and 5) discuss the future implications of melatonin therapy in IUGR pregnancies.

  10. Verification of a computational cardiovascular system model comparing the hemodynamics of a continuous flow to a synchronous valveless pulsatile flow left ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohean, Jeffrey R; George, Mitchell J; Pate, Thomas D; Kurusz, Mark; Longoria, Raul G; Smalling, Richard W

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to use a computational model to compare a synchronized valveless pulsatile left ventricular assist device with continuous flow left ventricular assist devices at the same level of device flow, and to verify the model with in vivo porcine data. A dynamic system model of the human cardiovascular system was developed to simulate the support of a healthy or failing native heart from a continuous flow left ventricular assist device or a synchronous pulsatile valveless dual-piston positive displacement pump. These results were compared with measurements made during in vivo porcine experiments. Results from the simulation model and from the in vivo counterpart show that the pulsatile pump provides higher cardiac output, left ventricular unloading, cardiac pulsatility, and aortic valve flow as compared with the continuous flow model at the same level of support. The dynamic system model developed for this investigation can effectively simulate human cardiovascular support by a synchronous pulsatile or continuous flow ventricular assist device.

  11. Cardiovascular performance with E. coli challenges in a canine model of human sepsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natanson, C.; Danner, R.L.; Fink, M.P.; MacVittie, T.J.; Walker, R.I.; Conklin, J.J.; Parrillo, J.E. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA) Naval Medical Research Institute and Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA) Univ. of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester (USA))

    1988-03-01

    The authors investigated cardiovascular dysfunction by injecting lethal and nonlethal bacterial challenges into conscious dogs. E coli bacteria of varying numbers were placed in a peritoneal clot. Cardiovascular function was studied with simultaneous radionuclide scans and thermodilution cardiac outputs. In surviving animals, the number of bacteria in the clot increased as the corresponding systolic cardiac function decreased. Cardiac function was measured by left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) and LV function curves. Furthermore, the diastolic volume-pressure relationship of survivors shifted progressively to the right. This increase in LV size was associated with maintenance of measures of cardiac performance at similar levels. Death occurred only in the group with the highest bacterial dose. Compared with survivors receiving the same number of bacterial, nonsurvivors had a decrease in LV size, a leftward shift in LV diastolic volume-pressure relationship, and a decrease in both LVSWI and SVI. Data from survivors suggest that increasing the number of bacteria produces changes in myocardial compliance and contractility. These changes increase LV size (preload), a major determinant of cardiac performance that possibility enhances survival.

  12. Effects of bioactive constituents in functional cocoa products on cardiovascular health in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarriá, Beatriz; Martínez-López, Sara; Sierra-Cinos, José Luis; Garcia-Diz, Luis; Goya, Luis; Mateos, Raquel; Bravo, Laura

    2015-05-01

    Cocoa manufacturers are producing novel products increasing polyphenols, methylxanthines or dietary fibre to improve purported health benefits. We attempt to explain the contribution of cocoa bioactive compounds to cardiovascular effects observed in previous studies, placing particular emphasis on methylxanthines. We focused on a soluble cocoa product rich in dietary fibre (DFCP) and a product rich in polyphenols (PPCP). Effects of regularly consuming DFCP (providing daily 10.17 g, 43.8 mg and 168.6 mg of total-dietary-fibre, flavanols and methylxanthines, respectively) as well as PPCP (providing daily 3.74 g, 45.3 mg and 109.8 mg of total-dietary-fibre, flavanols and methylxanthines, respectively) on cardiovascular health were assessed in two controlled, cross-over studies in free-living normocholesterolemic and moderately hypercholesterolemic subjects. Both products increased HDL-cholesterol concentrations, whereas only DFCP decreased glucose and IL-1β levels in all subjects. Flavanols appeared to be responsible for the increase in HDL-cholesterol, whereas insoluble-dietary-fibre and theobromine in DFCP were associated with the hypoglycemic and anti-inflammatory effects observed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The effects of exercise and training on human cardiovascular reflex control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, S E; Bell, C

    2000-07-01

    During physical activity, there is a graded withdrawal of vagal cardiac tone and a graded increase in sympathetic cardiac and vasomotor tone, initiated through both central command from the somatic motor cortex and muscle chemoreceptive and mechanoreceptive inputs. In parallel, there is an upward resetting of the operating point of the arterial baroreflex, with preserved reflex sensitivity. In contrast to the traditional interpretation that blood flow through exercising muscle is independent of vasomotor neural influences because of the dominance of local dilator metabolites, recent evidence suggests that both constrictor and dilator sympathetic neural influences may be involved in determining absolute levels of perfusion. Post-exercise, there is a period of relative hypotension that is associated with decreased peripheral resistance. Some, but not all, evidence indicates a causal role for reduced sympathetic drive. Chronic exercise training appears to reduce resting sympathetic activity, with parallel changes in the gain of a variety of cardiovascular autonomic reflexes initiated from cardiovascular sites. These changes may be attributable at least partly to masking of arterial baroreflexes by the impact of elevated blood volume on low-pressure baroreceptors. The reductions in sympathetic drive that follow training are more pronounced in patients with essential hypertension than in normotensive individuals and are likely to underlie the anti-hypertensive effect of exercise.

  14. A Unified Bond Graph Modeling Approach for the Ejection Phase of the Cardiovascular System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUBNA MOIN

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the unified Bond Graph model of the left ventricle ejection phase is presented, simulated and validated. The integro-differential and ordinary differential equations obtained from the bond graph models are simulated using ODE45 (Ordinary Differential Equation Solver on MATLAB and Simulink. The results, thus, obtained are compared with CVS (Cardiovascular System physiological data present in Simbiosys (a software for simulating biological systems and also with the CVS Wiggers diagram of heart cycle. As the cardiac activity is a multi domain process that includes mechanical, hydraulic, chemical and electrical events; therefore, for modeling such systems a unified modeling approach is needed. In this paper the unified Bond Graph model of the left ventricle ejection phase is proposed. The Bond Graph conventionalism approach is a graphical method principally powerful to portray multi-energy systems, as it is formulated on the portrayal of power exchanges. The model takes into account a simplified description of the left ventricle which is close to the medical investigation promoting the apperception and the dialogue between engineers and physiologists.

  15. [Pathophysiological and clinical correlations between endocrine and cardiovascular systems. An inter-systemic model of internal medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli, Mario

    2006-12-01

    This review focuses on the mechanisms by which thyroid hormones affect the regulation of the cardiovascular system and the thermogenic and hemodynamic variation induced by thyroid disfunction. It is also stressed the hormonal role of the cardiac myocytes realising natriuretic peptides, involved in plasma volume homeostasis and cardiovascular remodelling; its rapid measurement is a useful clinical tool, in the diagnostic and prognostic of left ventricular dysfunction, correlating with the degree of the clinical symptoms. The endothelial layer is a receptor-effector endocrine organ that produces substances that maintain vasomotor balance and vascular-tissue homeostasis. Cardiovascular risk factors causes oxidative stress that alter endothelial function and leads to endothelial dysfunction. On the basis of the present body of evidence there is no doubt that endothelial dysfunction contributes to the initiation, and progression, of atherosclerotic disease and that it could be considered an independent vascular risk factor for the micro- and macrovascular damages in the diabetes disease. In several extrathyroidal pathological condition, as well as in heart failure, the main alteration of the thyroid function is referred to as "low T3 syndrome". This syndrome is due to an adaptative reaction of the metabolic pathway of thyroxine, producing an increased amount of rT3, metabolically inactive, thus decreasing the detrimental metabolic effects of T3, in conditions of critically impaired hemodynamic and metabolic efficiency. Preliminary clinical trials, in heart failure, suggest the prognostic value of the level of circulating T3, as well as usefulness of T3, or of thyromimetic derivatives (DITPA), in chronic treatment of the heart ventricular dysfunction.

  16. [The environment and human respiratory system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikodemowicz, Marian

    2008-01-01

    The process of gas exchange that is breathing is an important element of any person's relation with the environment. What decides about our health and life are the respiratory systems responsible for the breathing process and the quality of the air we breathe. On an average through a person's life 400 millions liters of air flows which carries pollution in the form of constant gases and liquid particles. Particles of about PM-2.5 size get into the deepest structures of the respiratory system from which they are being spread into the whole organism through circulation exerting thier toxic effect on all tissues and organs. The outdoor pollution diffuses but in certain local circumstances it increases. It was so in big ecological disasters such as in 1930 in the Mozy valley in Belgium, in 1948 in the Donory region in the USA and in 1952 smog pollution in London. On an average any human being spends indoors about 60-80% of his time. The increased concentration of pollution occurs indoors and there is a possibility of exposing oneself to ETS- Environmental Tobacco Smoke. The biggest concentration of inhaled pollution takes place when smoking tobacco. Pollution of air causes diseases of the respiratory system, cardiovascular system, tumours and others. Frequent occurrence of COPD in certain areas correlates with the level of air pollution and it significantly increases in tobacco smokers. The number and frequency of bronchial asthma and the need for hospitalization depends on air pollution. Lung cancer cases were rarely described in literature before the area of industrialization and wide spread custom of tobacco smoking. Now it is the most frequently occurred cancer in the whole world. There is an interdependence of the density of population, of the number of smoked cigarettes and of density of pollution with the number lung cancer cases. It is hoped that in the future, smoking habits will be eliminated, the use of crude oil and coal will be replaced by hydroelectric

  17. Fabrication of polyurethane and polyurethane based composite fibres by the electrospinning technique for soft tissue engineering of cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucinska-Lipka, J; Gubanska, I; Janik, H; Sienkiewicz, M

    2015-01-01

    Electrospinning is a unique technique, which provides forming of polymeric scaffolds for soft tissue engineering, which include tissue scaffolds for soft tissues of the cardiovascular system. Such artificial soft tissues of the cardiovascular system may possess mechanical properties comparable to native vascular tissues. Electrospinning technique gives the opportunity to form fibres with nm- to μm-scale in diameter. The arrangement of obtained fibres and their surface determine the biocompatibility of the scaffolds. Polyurethanes (PUs) are being commonly used as a prosthesis of cardiovascular soft tissues due to their excellent biocompatibility, non-toxicity, elasticity and mechanical properties. PUs also possess fine spinning properties. The combination of a variety of PU properties with an electrospinning technique, conducted at the well tailored conditions, gives unlimited possibilities of forming novel polyurethane materials suitable for soft tissue scaffolds applied in cardiovascular tissue engineering. This paper can help researches to gain more widespread and deeper understanding of designing electrospinable PU materials, which may be used as cardiovascular soft tissue scaffolds. In this paper we focus on reagents used in PU synthesis designed to increase PU biocompatibility (polyols) and biodegradability (isocyanates). We also describe suggested surface modifications of electrospun PUs, and the direct influence of surface wettability on providing enhanced biocompatibility of scaffolds. We indicate a great influence of electrospinning parameters (voltage, flow rate, working distance) and used solvents (mostly DMF, THF and HFIP) on fibre alignment and diameter - what impacts the biocompatibility and hemocompatibility of such electrospun PU scaffolds. Moreover, we present PU modifications with natural polymers with novel approach applied in electrospinning of PU scaffolds. This work may contribute with further developing of novel electrospun PUs, which may be

  18. Positive influence of Centchroman on cardiovascular system and tissue lipid peroxidation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatwa, Rameshwar; Kar, Anand

    2007-11-01

    Centchroman, a nonsteroidal oral contraceptive, was evaluated for its hitherto unstudied effect on cardiovascular system, thyroid function and tissue lipid peroxidation in rats. Wistar sperm-positive female rats were treated with Centchroman (1.5 mg/kg per day, po) for 10 days and the alterations in serum concentration of thyroid hormones [triiodothyronine (T(3)) and thyroxine (T(4))], insulin, glucose, total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C), triglycerides (TG), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and alkaline phospahatase (ALP) activity, hepatic type-1 iodothyronine 5'-monodeiodinase (5'D) enzyme activity and hepatic, renal, cardiac and serum lipid peroxidation (LPO) were studied. Simultaneously, alterations in endogenous antioxidants [superoxide dismutase (SOD); catalase (CAT) and reduced glutathione (GSH)], relative risk ratio (RR), atherogenic index (AI) and daily rate of food and water consumption were also investigated as supportive parameters. Centchroman administration resulted in the complete inhibition of pregnancy. It increased serum T(4) marginally and HDL-C levels, hepatic SOD, CAT and GSH; cardiac SOD and GSH and renal SOD and CAT activity significantly. However, it reduced LPO in all tissues; concentrations of other serum lipids; AI; RR and activity of ALP. As Centchroman administration did not alter the concentrations of most active thyroid hormone, T(3), serum insulin and glucose, it appears that the drug has no side effect on thyroid function and glucose metabolism. Rather, it possesses cardiovascular and anti-peroxidative benefits.

  19. LC-MS/MS method for the determination of several drugs used in combined cardiovascular therapy in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Oskar; Iriarte, Gorka; Rico, Estitxu; Ferreirós, Nerea; Maguregui, Miren Itxaso; Alonso, Rosa Maria; Jiménez, Rosa Maria

    2010-10-15

    A simple, fast and validated method is reported for the simultaneous analysis, in human plasma, of several drugs usually combined in cardiovascular therapy (atenolol, bisoprolol, hydrochlorothiazide, chlorthalidone, salicylic acid, enalapril and its active metabolite enalaprilat, valsartan and fluvastatin) using high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) with electrospray ionization (ESI), working in multiple reaction monitoring mode (MRM). Separation of analytes and internal standard (pravastatin) was performed on a Luna C18(2) (150mm×4.6mm, 3μm) column using a gradient elution mode with a run time of 15min. The mobile phase consisted of a mixture of acetonitrile and water containing 0.01% formic acid and 10mM ammonium formate at pH 4.1. Sample treatment consisted of a simple protein precipitation with acetonitrile, enabling a fast analysis. The method showed good linearity, precision (RSD% values between 0.7% and 12.7%) and accuracy (relative error values between 0.9% and 14.0%). Recoveries were within 68-106% range and the ion-suppression was not higher than 22% for any analyte. The method was successfully applied to plasma samples obtained from patients under combined cardiovascular treatment.

  20. [Significance of endogenous sulfur dioxide in the regulation of cardiovascular system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hong Fang; DU, Shu Xu; Zhao, Xia; Zhang, Su Qing; Tian, Yue; Bu, Ding Fang; Tang, Chao Shu; DU, Jun Bao

    2007-08-18

    Since the 1980's nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), the endogenous gas molecules produced from metabolic pathway, have been realized as signal molecules to be involved in the regulation of body homeostasis and to play important roles under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. The researches on these endogenous gas signal molecules opened a new avenue in life science. To explore the new member of gasotransmitter family, other endogenous gas molecules which have been regarded as metabolic waste up to date, and their biological regulatory effects have been paid close attention to in the current fields of life science and medicine. Sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) can be produced endogenously from normal metabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids. L-cysteine is oxidized via cysteine dioxygenase to L-cysteinesulfinate, and the latter can proceed through transamination by glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT) to beta-sulfinyl pyruvate which decomposes spontaneously to pyruvate and SO(2). In mammals, activated neutrophils by oxidative stress can convert H(2)S to sulfite through a reduced form of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase-dependent process. The authors detected endogenous production of SO(2) in all cardiovascular tissues, including in heart, aorta, pulmonary artery, mesenteric artery, renal artery, tail artery and the plasma SO(2) content. As the key enzyme producing SO(2), GOT mRNA in cardiovascular system was detected and found to be located enriched in endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells near the endothelial layer. When the normal rats were treated with hydroxamate(HDX), a GOT inhibitor, at a dose of 3.7 mg/kg body weight, the blood pressure (BP) went high markedly, the ratio of wall thickness to lumen radius was increased by 18.34%, and smooth muscle cell proliferation was enhanced. The plasma SO(2) level in the rats injected with 125 micromol/kg body weight SO(2) donor was

  1. [CKD-MBD (Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder). Effect of vitamin D on kidney and cardiovascular system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Hideki

    2010-07-01

    Recently, many investigators have reported that treatment with vitamin D improves outcomes of patients with chronic kidney disease. Though the detailed mechanisms have remained unclear, it has been speculated that such a treatment may prevent progression of chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease. It has been reported that Vitamin D may attenuate renal injury and ameliorate renal function and proteinuria. In addition, several studies have shown that vitamin D may prevent progression of atherosclerosis, vascular calcification and left ventricular hypertrophy. The emerging experimental and clinical evidence has suggested that vitamin D may protect kidney and cardiovascular system.

  2. [Age-related features of neurohumoral effects of dopamine activity on the cardiovascular system in elderly people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyzohub, V H; Dolynna, O V; Zaval's'ka, T V

    2012-12-01

    Determined the decrease in dopamine activity with age, that contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension, abdominal obesity, the development of left ventricular hypertrophy. The article presents information describing the age-sensitive regulation of the cardiovascular system in elderly people, confirming the influence of the activity of dopamine receptors in the development of age pathology.

  3. Angiotensin II in the paraventricular nucleus stimulates sympathetic outflow to the cardiovascular system and make vasopressin release in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanmoradi, Mehrangiz; Nasimi, Ali

    2016-10-06

    The hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) plays essential roles in neuroendocrine and autonomic functions, including cardiovascular regulation. It was shown that microinjection of angiotensin II (AngII) into the PVN produced a pressor response. In this study, we explored the probable mechanisms of this pressor response. AngII was microinjected into the PVN and cardiovascular responses were recorded. Then, the responses were re-tested after systemic injection of a ganglionic blocker, Hexamethonium, or a vasopressin V1 receptor blocker. Hexamethonium pretreatment (i.v.) greatly and significantly attenuated the pressor response to AngII, with no significant effect on heart rate, indicating that the sympathetic system is involved in the cardiovascular effect of AngII in the PVN. Systemic pretreatment (i.v.) with V1 antagonist greatly and significantly attenuated the pressor response to AngII, with no significant effect on heart rate, indicating that vasopressin release is involved in the cardiovascular effect of AngII in the PVN. Overall, we found that AngII microinjected into the PVN produced a pressor response mediated by the sympathetic system and vasopressin release, indicating that other than circulating AngII, endogenous AngII of the PVN increases the vasopressin release from the PVN. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Food Consumption and its Impact on Cardiovascular Disease: Importance of Solutions Focused on the Globalized Food System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anand, Sonia S.; Hawkes, Corinna; Souza, De Russell J.; Mente, Andrew; Dehghan, Mahshid; Nugent, Rachel; Zulyniak, Michael A.; Weis, Tony; Bernstein, Adam M.; Krauss, Ronald M.; Kromhout, Daan; Jenkins, David J.A.; Malik, Vasanti; Martinez-Gonzalez, Miguel A.; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Yusuf, Salim; Willett, Walter C.; Popkin, Barry M.

    2015-01-01

    Major scholars in the field, on the basis of a 3-day consensus, created an in-depth review of current knowledge on the role of diet in cardiovascular disease (CVD), the changing global food system and global dietary patterns, and potential policy solutions. Evidence from different countries and a

  5. An Investigation of the Potential for a Computer-based Tutorial Program Covering the Cardiovascular System to Replace Traditional Lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhurst, D. G.; Williams, A. D.

    1998-01-01

    Presents the results of a comparative study to evaluate the effectiveness of two interactive computer-based learning (CBL) programs, covering the cardiovascular system, as an alternative to lectures for first year undergraduate students at a United Kingdom University. Discusses results in relation to the design of evaluative studies and the future…

  6. Effect of a botanical composition, UP446, on respiratory, cardiovascular and central nervous systems in beagle dogs and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yimam, Mesfin; Lee, Young Chul; Jia, Qi

    2016-06-01

    Extensive safety evaluation of UP446, a botanical composition comprised of standardized extracts from roots of Scutellaria baicalensis and heartwoods of Acacia catechu, has been reported previously. Here we carried out additional studies to assess the effect of UP446 on respiratory, cardiovascular and central nervous (CNS) systems. A Functional observational battery (FOB) and whole body plethysmography system in rats and implanted telemetry in dogs were utilized to evaluate the potential CNS, respiratory and cardiovascular toxicity, respectively. UP446 was administered orally at dose levels of 800, 2000 and 5000 mg/kg to SpragueDawley rats and at 4 ascending dose levels (0, 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg) to beagle dogs. No abnormal effects were observed on the cage side, open field, hand held, and sensori-motor observations suggestive of toxicity in respiratory, cardiovascular and central nervous (CNS) systems. Rectal temperatures were comparable for each treatment groups. Similarly, respiratory rate, tidal volume and minute volume were unaffected by any of the treatment groups. No UP446 related changes were observed on blood pressure, heart rate and electrocardiogram in beagle dogs at dose levels of 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg. Some minor incidental, non-dose correlated changes were observed in the FOB assessment. These data suggest that UP446 has minimal or no pharmaco-toxicological effect on the respiratory, cardiovascular and central nervous systems.

  7. Allopurinol Reduces Oxidative Stress in the Ovine Fetal Cardiovascular System After Repeated Episodes of Ischemia-Reperfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derks, Jan B.; Oudijk, Martijn A.; Torrance, Helen L.; Rademaker, Carin M. A.; Benders, Manon J.; Rosen, Karl G.; Cindrova-Davies, Tereza; Thakor, Avnesh S.; Visser, Gerard H. A.; Burton, Graham J.; van Bel, Frank; Giussani, Dino A.

    2010-01-01

    In complicated labor, neonatal outcome may depend not only on the extent of fetal asphyxia and acidosis but also on the effects on the fetal cardiovascular system of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during the ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) associated with repeated compressions of the umbilical c

  8. Exercise aggravates cardiovascular risks and mortality in rats with disrupted nitric oxide pathway and treated with recombinant human erythropoietin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meziri, Fayçal; Binda, Delphine; Touati, Sabeur; Pellegrin, Maxime; Berthelot, Alain; Touyz, Rhian M; Laurant, Pascal

    2011-08-01

    Chronic administration of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) can generate serious cardiovascular side effects such as arterial hypertension (HTA) in clinical and sport fields. It is hypothesized that nitric oxide (NO) can protect from noxious cardiovascular effects induced by chronic administration of rHuEPO. On this base, we studied the cardiovascular effects of chronic administration of rHuEPO in exercise-trained rats treated with an inhibitor of NO synthesis (L-NAME). Rats were treated or not with rHuEPO and/or L-NAME during 6 weeks. During the same period, rats were subjected to treadmill exercise. The blood pressure was measured weekly. Endothelial function of isolated aorta and small mesenteric arteries were studied and the morphology of the latter was investigated. L-NAME induced hypertension (197 ± 6 mmHg, at the end of the protocol). Exercise prevented the rise in blood pressure induced by L-NAME (170 ± 5 mmHg). However, exercise-trained rats treated with both rHuEPO and L-NAME developed severe hypertension (228 ± 9 mmHg). Furthermore, in these exercise-trained rats treated with rHuEPO/L-NAME, the acetylcholine-induced relaxation was markedly impaired in isolated aorta (60% of maximal relaxation) and small mesenteric arteries (53%). L-NAME hypertension induced an internal remodeling of small mesenteric arteries that was not modified by exercise, rHuEPO or both. Vascular ET-1 production was not increased in rHuEPO/L-NAME/training hypertensive rats. Furthermore, we observed that rHuEPO/L-NAME/training hypertensive rats died during the exercise or the recovery period (mortality 51%). Our findings suggest that the use of rHuEPO in sport, in order to improve physical performance, represents a high and fatal risk factor, especially with pre-existing cardiovascular risk.

  9. Nitrergic system and plasmatic methylarginines: Evidence of their role in the perinatal programming of cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassareo, Pier Paolo; Mussap, Michele; Bassareo, Valentina; Flore, Giovanna; Mercuro, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    Atherosclerosis, in turn preceded by endothelial dysfunction, underlies a series of important cardiovascular diseases. Reduced bioavailability of endothelial nitric oxide, by increasing vascular tone and promoting platelet aggregation, leukocyte adhesion, and smooth muscle cell proliferation, plays a key role in the onset of the majority of cardiovascular diseases. In addition, high blood levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine, a potent inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis, are associated with future development of adverse cardiovascular events and cardiac death. Recent reports have demonstrated that another methylarginine, i.e., symmetric dimethylarginine, is also involved in the onset of endothelial dysfunction and hypertension. Almost a decade ago, prematurity at birth and intrauterine growth retardation were first associated with a potential negative influence on the cardiovascular apparatus, thus constituting risk factors or leading to early onset of cardiovascular diseases. This condition is referred to as cardiovascular perinatal programming. Accordingly, cardiovascular morbidity and mortality are higher among former preterm adults than in those born at term. The aim of this paper was to undertake a comprehensive literature review focusing on cellular and biochemical mechanisms resulting in both reduced nitric oxide bioavailability and increased methylarginine levels in subjects born preterm. Evidence of the involvement of these compounds in the perinatal programming of cardiovascular risk are also discussed.

  10. Systems Pharmacology Dissection of the Integrated Treatment for Cardiovascular and Gastrointestinal Disorders by Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Tao, Qin; Guo, Zihu; Fu, Yingxue; Chen, Xuetong; Shar, Piar Ali; Shahen, Mohamed; Zhu, Jinglin; Xue, Jun; Bai, Yaofei; Wu, Ziyin; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xiao, Wei; Wang, Yonghua

    2016-09-01

    Though cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and gastrointestinal disorders (GIDs) are different diseases associated with different organs, they are highly correlated clinically. Importantly, in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), similar treatment strategies have been applied in both diseases. However, the etiological mechanisms underlying them remain unclear. Here, an integrated systems pharmacology approach is presented for illustrating the molecular correlations between CVDs and GIDs. Firstly, we identified pairs of genes that are associated with CVDs and GIDs and found that these genes are functionally related. Then, the association between 115 heart meridian (HM) herbs and 163 stomach meridian (SM) herbs and their combination application in Chinese patent medicine was investigated, implying that both CVDs and GIDs can be treated by the same strategy. Exemplified by a classical formula Sanhe Decoration (SHD) treating chronic gastritis, we applied systems-based analysis to introduce a drug-target-pathway-organ network that clarifies mechanisms of different diseases being treated by the same strategy. The results indicate that SHD regulated several pathological processes involved in both CVDs and GIDs. We experimentally confirmed the predictions implied by the effect of SHD for myocardial ischemia. The systems pharmacology suggests a novel integrated strategy for rational drug development for complex associated diseases.

  11. Imaging of systemic lupus erythematosus. Part I: CNS, cardiovascular, and thoracic manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Y P; Naidoo, P; Ngian, G S

    2013-02-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disease that has a relapsing and remitting course. It has a wide range of non-specific symptoms with various organ manifestations. In 1982, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) published the revised criteria for the classification of SLE. The diagnosis of SLE may be made if four or more of the 11 ACR criteria are present, either serially or simultaneously, during any interval of observation. Whilst the diagnosis of SLE is based on clinical and laboratory features, with no universally accepted radiological diagnostic criteria, imaging is nonetheless useful for diagnosing specific organ manifestations, monitoring disease progression, and identifying complications secondary to immunosuppressive therapy. In this review, we describe the spectrum of radiological findings of SLE in various organ systems and compile a list of organ manifestations including the most frequently occurring diseases as well as the rare but not-to-be-missed diseases. This review aims to serve as a concise reference tool in an endeavour to assist clinicians and radiologists in the diagnosis and monitoring of this disease. This pictorial review presents the various radiological findings of CNS, cardiovascular and thoracic manifestation of SLE. The gastrointestinal, renal and musculoskeletal systems will be covered in part II.

  12. Systems Pharmacology Dissection of the Integrated Treatment for Cardiovascular and Gastrointestinal Disorders by Traditional Chinese Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Tao, Qin; Guo, Zihu; Fu, Yingxue; Chen, Xuetong; Shar, Piar Ali; Shahen, Mohamed; Zhu, Jinglin; Xue, Jun; Bai, Yaofei; Wu, Ziyin; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xiao, Wei; Wang, Yonghua

    2016-09-06

    Though cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and gastrointestinal disorders (GIDs) are different diseases associated with different organs, they are highly correlated clinically. Importantly, in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), similar treatment strategies have been applied in both diseases. However, the etiological mechanisms underlying them remain unclear. Here, an integrated systems pharmacology approach is presented for illustrating the molecular correlations between CVDs and GIDs. Firstly, we identified pairs of genes that are associated with CVDs and GIDs and found that these genes are functionally related. Then, the association between 115 heart meridian (HM) herbs and 163 stomach meridian (SM) herbs and their combination application in Chinese patent medicine was investigated, implying that both CVDs and GIDs can be treated by the same strategy. Exemplified by a classical formula Sanhe Decoration (SHD) treating chronic gastritis, we applied systems-based analysis to introduce a drug-target-pathway-organ network that clarifies mechanisms of different diseases being treated by the same strategy. The results indicate that SHD regulated several pathological processes involved in both CVDs and GIDs. We experimentally confirmed the predictions implied by the effect of SHD for myocardial ischemia. The systems pharmacology suggests a novel integrated strategy for rational drug development for complex associated diseases.

  13. Vasopressin and sympathetic systems mediate the cardiovascular effects of the GABAergic system in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatam, Masoumeh; Kharazmi, Fatemeh; Nasimi, Ali

    2009-12-01

    The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) is an important part of the limbic system. It has been shown that chemical stimulation of the BST elicited cardiovascular depressive and bradycardic responses. It was also demonstrated that GABA is present in the BST, though its role in cardiovascular control is not yet understood. This study was performed to find the effects of GABA receptor subtypes in the BST on cardiovascular responses and to find the possible mechanisms that mediate these responses in urethane-anesthetized rats. Microinjection of muscimol (500 pmol/100 nl), a GABA(A) agonist, into the BST produced a weak unsignificant decrease in the mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR). Injection of bicuculline methiodide (BMI, 100 pmol/100 nl), a GABA(A) antagonist, caused a significant increase in the MAP (41.3+/-5.1 mmHg) as well as in the HR (33.2+/-5.6 beats/min). Injection of two doses (500 and 1000 pmol/100 nl) of phaclofen, a GABA(B) antagonist, produced no significant change in either MAP or HR. Administration (i.v.) of the muscarinic receptor blocker, homatropine methyl bromide had no effect on the magnitude of mean arterial pressure or heart rate responses to BMI. This suggests that the parasympathetic system is not involved in these responses. However, administration (i.v.) of the nicotinic receptor blocker, hexamethonium bromide had no effect on the magnitude of mean arterial pressure response but abolished heart rate response to BMI. This suggests that the sympathetic system is involved in the bradycardic effect of GABA. On the other hand, administration (i.v.) of a selective vasopressin V(1) receptor antagonist abolished the pressor effect of BMI, which indicates that the GABAergic system of the BST decreases the arterial pressure via tonic inhibition of vasopressin release. In summary, we demonstrated, for the first time, that GABA exerts its influence in the BST through the activation of GABA(A), but not GABA(B), receptors that, in

  14. Light Microscopic Evaluation of Cardio-vasculare System in Alloksan-induced Diabetic Rats in Acute Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selen Bahçeci

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic cardiomyopathy is one of the chronic complication of diabetes and acute effects of diabetes on heart and aorta is not clear. We aimed to determine acute effects of diabetes on cardio-vasculare system with light microscopy. We used 20 Spraque-Dawley rats and applied 150 mg/kg alloxan, intraperitoneally for inducing diabetes and 1 ml SF in control group. After 24 hours, venous blood samples were measured. Blood glucose levels higher than 250 mg/dl were accepted as DM and treated with 4 IU/d human insülin. After 7 days rats were sacrified under ketamin anaesthesia. Heart and aorta were fixed in 10 % buffered formalin. The sectiones were embedded in paraffin and were serially sectioned at 5 m thickness, then stained with Hematoxyline-Eosine (H&E and Heidenhein’s Azan modification.There was no histopathological changes in cardiac muscle cells in control group. But there was a heterogen appearance in cardiac muscle cells and we determined some hydropic degenerations in some of the cardiac muscle cells and a minimal fibrosis in perivasculare and interstitial area in diabetic group. All histological stratums of aorta were seen normally in control group. In diabetic group, there was a clear anisostosis in smooth muscle cells and decreased in nucleus of smooth muscle cells in tunica media. We concluted that DM is caused degeneration and fibrosis in cardiac muscle cells and effective on smooth muscle cells in aorta in acute period.

  15. The quantum human central neural system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiou, Athanasios; Rekkas, John

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter we present Excess Entropy Production for human aging system as the sum of their respective subsystems and electrophysiological status. Additionally, we support the hypothesis of human brain and central neural system quantumness and we strongly suggest the theoretical and philosophical status of human brain as one of the unknown natural Dirac magnetic monopoles placed in the center of a Riemann sphere.

  16. Effects of ritanserin on the behavioral, neuroendocrine, and cardiovascular responses to meta-chlorophenylpiperazine in healthy human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibyl, J P; Krystal, J H; Price, L H; Woods, S W; D'Amico, C; Heninger, G R; Charney, D S

    1991-09-01

    Ten healthy male subjects were administered i.v. meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (MCPP) (0.1 mg/kg) after oral ritanserin (5-10 mg), a putative 5HT1c/5HT2 (serotonin) antagonist, or placebo. Behavioral responses, cardiovascular effects, and neuroendocrine responses (cortisol, growth hormone, and prolactin) were measured serially for 4 hours after MCPP infusion. Premedication with ritanserin attenuated the MCPP-induced increases in self-rated anxiety and prolactin, and completely antagonized MCPP cortisol elevations. In contrast, ritanserin did not significantly alter growth hormone response to MCPP. These findings suggest a role for 5-HT1c/5-HT2 receptors in the endocrine and behavioral responses to the mixed serotonin agonist MCPP in humans.

  17. Effect of cocoa/chocolate ingestion on brachial artery flow-mediated dilation and its relevance to cardiovascular health and disease in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, Kevin D

    2012-11-15

    Prospective studies indicate that high intake of dietary flavanols, such as those contained in cocoa/chocolate, are associated with reduced rates of cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality in humans. Numerous mechanisms may underlie these associations such as favorable effects of flavanols on blood pressure, platelet aggregation, thrombosis, inflammation, and the vascular endothelium. The brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) technique has emerged as a robust method to quantify endothelial function in humans. Collectively, the preponderance of evidence indicates that FMD is a powerful surrogate measure for firm cardiovascular endpoints, such as cardiovascular-related mortality, in humans. Thus, literally thousands of studies have utilized this technique to document group differences in FMD, as well as to assess the effects of various interventions on FMD. In regards to the latter, numerous studies indicate that both acute and chronic ingestion of cocoa/chocolate increases FMD in humans. Increases in FMD after cocoa/chocolate ingestion appear to be dose-dependent such that greater increases in FMD are observed after ingestion of larger quantities. The mechanisms underlying these responses are likely diverse, however most data suggest an effect of increased nitric oxide bioavailability. Thus, positive vascular effects of cocoa/chocolate on the endothelium may underlie (i.e., be linked mechanistically to) reductions in cardiovascular risk in humans.

  18. A method to construct a points system to predict cardiovascular disease considering repeated measures of risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbayo-Herencia, Julio Antonio; Vigo, Maria Isabel; Gil-Guillén, Vicente Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Current predictive models for cardiovascular disease based on points systems use the baseline situation of the risk factors as independent variables. These models do not take into account the variability of the risk factors over time. Predictive models for other types of disease also exist that do consider the temporal variability of a single biological marker in addition to the baseline variables. However, due to their complexity these other models are not used in daily clinical practice. Bearing in mind the clinical relevance of these issues and that cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide we show the properties and viability of a new methodological alternative for constructing cardiovascular risk scores to make predictions of cardiovascular disease with repeated measures of the risk factors and retaining the simplicity of the points systems so often used in clinical practice (construction, statistical validation by simulation and explanation of potential utilization). We have also applied the system clinically upon a set of simulated data solely to help readers understand the procedure constructed. PMID:26893963

  19. Protective actions of progesterone in the cardiovascular system: potential role of membrane progesterone receptors (mPRs) in mediating rapid effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Peter; Pang, Yefei

    2013-06-01

    The protective functions of progesterone in the cardiovascular system have received little attention even though evidence has accumulated that progesterone lowers blood pressure, inhibits coronary hyperactivity and has powerful vasodilatory and natriuretic effects. One possible reason why potential beneficial actions of progesterone on cardiovascular functions have not been extensively studied is that divergent effects to those of progesterone have been observed in many clinical trials with synthetic progestins such as medroxyprogesterone acetate which are associated with increased risk of coronary disease. Evidence that progesterone exerts protective effects on cardiovascular functions is briefly reviewed. The finding that progesterone administration decreases blood vessel vasoconstriction in several animal models within a few minutes suggests that rapid, nongenomic progesterone mechanisms are of physiological importance in regulating vascular tone. Rapid activation of second messenger pathways by progesterone has been observed in vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells, resulting in alterations in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and calcium influx, respectively. Both nuclear progesterone receptors (PRs) and novel membrane progesterone receptors (mPRs) are candidates for the intermediaries in these rapid, cell-surface initiated progesterone actions in endothelial and smooth muscle vascular cells. PRs have been detected in both cell types. New data are presented showing mPRα, mPRβ and mPRγ are also present in human endothelial and smooth muscle vascular cells. Preliminary evidence suggests mPRs mediate rapid progestin signaling in these endothelial cells, resulting in down-regulation of cAMP production and increased nitric oxide synthesis. The role of mPRs in progesterone regulation of cardiovascular functions warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Vitamin D and cardiovascular risk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Otto

    2012-05-01

    The pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease is without any doubt multifactorial, and it is generally accepted, that conventional risk factors determined only about 80% of cardiovascular risk. There is accumulating evidence that vitamin D exerts important pathophysiological effects on cardiovascular system. Low vitamin D was associated with increased cardiovascular risk in several reports. This review summarizes recent epidemiological evidence and possible pathophysiological mechanism for a role of low vitamin D in cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, available data concerning vitamin D supplementation are depicted.

  1. Estimation of the Adaptive Capacities of the Cardiovascular System in Pregnant Females by Active Orthostatic Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Struk

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The investigation was undertaken to study the adaptive capacities of the cardiovascular system (CVS in physiological full-term pregnancy, by using the active orthostatic test (AOT and to analyze cardiac rhythm variability (CRV. The study covered 49 low-risk group females during 38—39-week physiological pregnancy, who had indications for planned surgery -cesarean section. Before surgery, during an anesthesiological examination, all the pregnant females performed AOT during which ECG was continuously recorded. For CRV estimation, 5-min ECG fragments recorded in the standing and lying positions. AOT could reveal a normal orthostatic response (NOR in 37 pregnant females, postural orthostatic tachycardia (POT in 8 and orthostatic hypotension in 4. No relationship was found between the clinical characteristics and the types of responses to AOT. At the same time, comparison of CVS demonstrated that the baseline enhanced activity of the sympathetic portion of the autonomic nervous system was typical of females with POT as compared with females showing a NOR. Thus, estimation of CRV parameters in pregnant females permits predetermination of adaptive CVS capacities, which is important to be taken into account in choosing an anesthesiological support and modes of hemodynamic correction when cesarean section is performed.

  2. Redox regulation of cGMP-dependent protein kinase Iα in the cardiovascular system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandra ePrysyazhna

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Elevated levels of oxidants in biological systems have been historically referred to as oxidative stress, a choice of words that perhaps conveys an imbalanced view of reactive oxygen species in cell and tissues. The term stress suggests a harmful role, whereas a contemporary view is that oxidants are also crucial for the maintenance of homeostasis or adaptive signaling that can actually limit injury. This regulatory role for oxidants is achieved in part by them inducing oxidative post-translational modifications of proteins which may alter their function or interactions. Such mechanisms allow changes in cell oxidant levels to be coupled to regulated alterations in enzymatic function (i.e. signal transduction, which enables redox signaling. In this review we focus on the role of cGMP-dependent protein kinase Iα (PKG disulfide dimerisation, an oxidative modification that is induced by oxidants that directly activates the enzyme, discussing how this impacts on the cardiovascular system. Additionally, how this oxidative activation of PKG may coordinate with or differ from classical activation of this kinase by cGMP will also be considered.

  3. On the integration of the baroreflex control mechanism in a heterogeneous model of the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, P J; Trenhago, P R; Fernandes, L G; Feijóo, R A

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the present work is to describe the integration of a mathematical model for the baroreceptor reflex mechanism to provide regulatory action into a dimensionally heterogeneous (3D-1D-0D) closed-loop model of the cardiovascular system. Such heterogeneous model comprises a 1D description of the arterial tree, a 0D network for the venous, cardiac and pulmonary circulations and 3D patient-specific geometries for vascular districts of interest. Thus, the detailed topological description of the arterial network allows us to perform vasomotor control actions in a differentiated way, while gaining insight about the effects of the baroreflex regulation over hemodynamic quantities of interest throughout the entire network. Two examples of application are presented. Firstly, we simulate the hemorrhage in the abdominal aorta artery and analyze the action of the baroreflex over the system. Secondly, the self-regulated closed-loop model is applied to study the influence of the control action in the hemodynamic environment that determines the blood flow pattern in a cerebral aneurism in the presence of a regurgitating aortic valve.

  4. The Impact of Hypoglycemia on the Cardiovascular System: Physiology and Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shi-Wei; Park, Kyoung-Ha; Zhou, Yu-Jie

    2016-10-01

    Intensive glycemic control may increase cardiovascular (CV) risk and mortality due to hypoglycemia. The pathophysiology of glucose counter-regulation in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes for over 15 years is characterized by impairment of the defense mechanisms against hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia causes pronounced physiological and pathophysiological effects on the CV system as consequences of autonomic system activation and counter regulatory hormones release. These effects provoke a series of hemodynamic changes that include an increase in heart rate and peripheral systolic blood pressure, a decrease in central blood pressure, reduced peripheral arterial resistance, and increased myocardial contractility and cardiac output. Cardiac electrophysiological changes including flattening or inversion of T waves, QT prolongation, and ST segment depression were observed in both insulin-induced and spontaneous hypoglycemia. Sympathoadrenal activation is the main cause of these changes through mechanisms that involve, but are not limited to, catecholamine-mediated hypokalemia. Hypoglycemia is also involved in platelet activation. There is growing concern about the long-term effects of hypoglycemia, especially as related to inflammation and atherogenesis.

  5. Fundamentals of systems ergonomics/human factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John R

    2014-01-01

    Ergonomics/human factors is, above anything else, a systems discipline and profession, applying a systems philosophy and systems approaches. Many things are labelled as system in today's world, and this paper specifies just what attributes and notions define ergonomics/human factors in systems terms. These are obviously a systems focus, but also concern for context, acknowledgement of interactions and complexity, a holistic approach, recognition of emergence and embedding of the professional effort involved within organization system. These six notions are illustrated with examples from a large body of work on rail human factors.

  6. Cloned human neuropeptide Y receptor couples to two different second messenger systems.

    OpenAIRE

    Herzog, H.; Hort, Y J; Ball, H J; Hayes, G; Shine, J; Selbie, L A

    1992-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most abundant neuropeptides in the mammalian nervous system and exhibits a diverse range of important physiological activities, including effects on psychomotor activity, food intake, regulation of central endocrine secretion, and potent vasoactive effects on the cardiovascular system. Two major subtypes of NPY receptor (Y1 and Y2) have been defined by pharmacological criteria. We report here the molecular cloning of a cDNA sequence encoding a human NPY rece...

  7. Human Factors Interface with Systems Engineering for NASA Human Spaceflights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Douglas T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the past and present successes of the Habitability and Human Factors Branch (HHFB) at NASA Johnson Space Center s Space Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) in including the Human-As-A-System (HAAS) model in many NASA programs and what steps to be taken to integrate the Human-Centered Design Philosophy (HCDP) into NASA s Systems Engineering (SE) process. The HAAS model stresses systems are ultimately designed for the humans; the humans should therefore be considered as a system within the systems. Therefore, the model places strong emphasis on human factors engineering. Since 1987, the HHFB has been engaging with many major NASA programs with much success. The HHFB helped create the NASA Standard 3000 (a human factors engineering practice guide) and the Human Systems Integration Requirements document. These efforts resulted in the HAAS model being included in many NASA programs. As an example, the HAAS model has been successfully introduced into the programmatic and systems engineering structures of the International Space Station Program (ISSP). Success in the ISSP caused other NASA programs to recognize the importance of the HAAS concept. Also due to this success, the HHFB helped update NASA s Systems Engineering Handbook in December 2007 to include HAAS as a recommended practice. Nonetheless, the HAAS model has yet to become an integral part of the NASA SE process. Besides continuing in integrating HAAS into current and future NASA programs, the HHFB will investigate incorporating the Human-Centered Design Philosophy (HCDP) into the NASA SE Handbook. The HCDP goes further than the HAAS model by emphasizing a holistic and iterative human-centered systems design concept.

  8. Effects of Sweet Bee Venom on cardiovascular system in the conscious telemetered Beagle Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Chung-San

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives:This study was performed to analyse the effects of Sweet Bee Venom(Sweet BV on cardiovascular system in the conscious telemetered Beagle Dogs. Methods:All experiments were conducted at Biotoxtech Company, a non-clinical studies authorized institution, under the regulations of Good Laboratory Practice (GLP. Male Beagle dogs of 13-19 months old were chosen for the pilot study and surgical implantation was performed for conscious telemetered Beagle dogs. And after confirming condition of Beagle dogs was stable, Sweet BV was administered 4 times(first: 0.0 ㎎/㎏, 2nd: 0.01 ㎎/㎏, 3rd: 0.1 ㎎/㎏, and forth: 0.5 ㎎/㎏, one time/week in thigh muscle of Beagle dogs. And blood pressure, heart rate, electrocardiography and clinical responses were measured. Equal amount of normal saline to the Sweet BV experiment groups was administered to the control group. 1. In the analysis of body weight and taking amount, Beagle dogs did not show significant changes. 2. In the clinical observation, responses of pain and edema were showed depend on dosage of Sweet BV. 3. In the analysis of blood pressure, treatment with Sweet BV did not show significant changes in the dosage of 0.01 ㎎/㎏, but in the dosage of 0.1 ㎎/㎏ and 0.5 ㎎/㎏, treatment with Sweet BV increased blood pressure significantly. 4. In the analysis of heart rate, treatment of Sweet BV did not show significant changes in all dosage and period. 5. In the analysis of electrocardiography, treatment of Sweet BV was not showed significant changes in all dosage and period. Conclusion:Above findings suggest that Sweet BV is relatively safe treatment in the cardiovascular system. But in the using of over dosage, Sweet BV may the cause of increasing blood pressure. Further studies on the subject should be conducted to yield more concrete evidences.

  9. Wnt/β-Catenin Stimulation and Laminins Support Cardiovascular Cell Progenitor Expansion from Human Fetal Cardiac Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Månsson-Broberg, Agneta; Rodin, Sergey; Bulatovic, Ivana; Ibarra, Cristián; Löfling, Marie; Genead, Rami; Wärdell, Eva; Felldin, Ulrika; Granath, Carl; Alici, Evren; Le Blanc, Katarina; Smith, C I Edvard; Salašová, Alena; Westgren, Magnus; Sundström, Erik; Uhlén, Per; Arenas, Ernest; Sylvén, Christer; Tryggvason, Karl; Corbascio, Matthias; Simonson, Oscar E; Österholm, Cecilia; Grinnemo, Karl-Henrik

    2016-04-12

    The intrinsic regenerative capacity of human fetal cardiac mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) has not been fully characterized. Here we demonstrate that we can expand cells with characteristics of cardiovascular progenitor cells from the MSC population of human fetal hearts. Cells cultured on cardiac muscle laminin (LN)-based substrata in combination with stimulation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway showed increased gene expression of ISL1, OCT4, KDR, and NKX2.5. The majority of cells stained positive for PDGFR-α, ISL1, and NKX2.5, and subpopulations also expressed the progenitor markers TBX18, KDR, c-KIT, and SSEA-1. Upon culture of the cardiac MSCs in differentiation media and on relevant LNs, portions of the cells differentiated into spontaneously beating cardiomyocytes, and endothelial and smooth muscle-like cells. Our protocol for large-scale culture of human fetal cardiac MSCs enables future exploration of the regenerative functions of these cells in the context of myocardial injury in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Wnt/β-Catenin Stimulation and Laminins Support Cardiovascular Cell Progenitor Expansion from Human Fetal Cardiac Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agneta Månsson-Broberg

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The intrinsic regenerative capacity of human fetal cardiac mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs has not been fully characterized. Here we demonstrate that we can expand cells with characteristics of cardiovascular progenitor cells from the MSC population of human fetal hearts. Cells cultured on cardiac muscle laminin (LN-based substrata in combination with stimulation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway showed increased gene expression of ISL1, OCT4, KDR, and NKX2.5. The majority of cells stained positive for PDGFR-α, ISL1, and NKX2.5, and subpopulations also expressed the progenitor markers TBX18, KDR, c-KIT, and SSEA-1. Upon culture of the cardiac MSCs in differentiation media and on relevant LNs, portions of the cells differentiated into spontaneously beating cardiomyocytes, and endothelial and smooth muscle-like cells. Our protocol for large-scale culture of human fetal cardiac MSCs enables future exploration of the regenerative functions of these cells in the context of myocardial injury in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Role of neurons and glia in the CNS actions of the renin-angiotensin system in cardiovascular control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kloet, Annette D; Liu, Meng; Rodríguez, Vermalí; Krause, Eric G; Sumners, Colin

    2015-09-01

    Despite tremendous research efforts, hypertension remains an epidemic health concern, leading often to the development of cardiovascular disease. It is well established that in many instances, the brain plays an important role in the onset and progression of hypertension via activation of the sympathetic nervous system. Further, the activity of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and of glial cell-mediated proinflammatory processes have independently been linked to this neural control and are, as a consequence, both attractive targets for the development of antihypertensive therapeutics. Although it is clear that the predominant effector peptide of the RAS, ANG II, activates its type-1 receptor on neurons to mediate some of its hypertensive actions, additional nuances of this brain RAS control of blood pressure are constantly being uncovered. One of these complexities is that the RAS is now thought to impact cardiovascular control, in part, via facilitating a glial cell-dependent proinflammatory milieu within cardiovascular control centers. Another complexity is that the newly characterized antihypertensive limbs of the RAS are now recognized to, in many cases, antagonize the prohypertensive ANG II type 1 receptor (AT1R)-mediated effects. That being said, the mechanism by which the RAS, glia, and neurons interact to regulate blood pressure is an active area of ongoing research. Here, we review the current understanding of these interactions and present a hypothetical model of how these exchanges may ultimately regulate cardiovascular function.

  12. Cutaneous lupus erythematosus and systemic lupus erythematosus are associated with clinically significant cardiovascular risk: a Danish nationwide cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselvig, J Halskou; Ahlehoff, O; Dreyer, L; Gislason, G; Kofoed, K

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a well-known cardiovascular risk factor. Less is known about cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) and the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). Therefore, we investigated the risk of mortality and adverse cardiovascular events in patients diagnosed with SLE and CLE. We conducted a cohort study of the entire Danish population aged ≥ 18 and ≤ 100 years, followed from 1997 to 2011 by individual-level linkage of nationwide registries. Multivariable adjusted Cox regression models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) for a composite cardiovascular endpoint and all-cause mortality, for patients with SLE and CLE. A total of 3282 patients with CLE and 3747 patients with SLE were identified and compared with 5,513,739 controls. The overall HR for the composite CVD endpoint was 1.31 (95% CI 1.16-1.49) for CLE and 2.05 (95% CI 1.15-3.44) for SLE. The corresponding HRs for all-cause mortality were 1.32 (95% CI 1.20-1.45) for CLE and 2.21 (95% CI 2.03-2.41) for SLE. CLE and SLE were associated with a significantly increased risk of CVD and all-cause mortality. Local and chronic inflammation may be the driver of low-grade systemic inflammation.

  13. Effects of growth hormone-releasing hormone on visceral fat, metabolic, and cardiovascular indices in human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Takara L; Grinspoon, Steven K

    2015-04-01

    Increased visceral adipose tissue (VAT) is associated with reductions in endogenous GH secretion, possibly as a result of hyperinsulinemia, increased circulating free fatty acid, increased somatostatin tone, and reduced ghrelin. Reduced GH may, in turn, further exacerbate visceral fat accumulation because of decreased hormone-sensitive lipolysis in this depot. Data from multiple populations demonstrate that both reduced GH and increased VAT appear to contribute independently to dyslipidemia, increased systemic inflammation, and increased cardiovascular risk. The reductions in GH in states of visceral adiposity are characterized by reduced basal and pulsatile GH secretion with intact pulse frequency. Treatment with GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) provides a means to reverse these abnormalities, increasing endogenous basal and pulsatile GH secretion without altering pulse frequency. This review describes data from HIV-infected individuals and individuals with general obesity showing that treatment with GHRH significantly reduces visceral fat, ameliorates dyslipidemia, and reduces markers of cardiovascular risk. Further research is needed regarding the long-term efficacy and safety of this treatment modality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cardiovascular determinants of maximal oxygen consumption in upright and supine posture at the end of prolonged bed rest in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringard, Aurélien; Pogliaghi, Silvia; Adami, Alessandra; De Roia, Gabriela; Lador, Frédéric; Lucini, Daniela; Pizzinelli, Paolo; Capelli, Carlo; Ferretti, Guido

    2010-06-30

    We tested the hypothesis that, after bed rest, maximal oxygen consumption ( VO₂max ) decreases more upright than supine, because of adequate cardiovascular response supine, but not upright. On 9 subjects, we determined VO₂max and maximal cardiac output (Q ) upright and supine, before and after (reambulation day upright, the following day supine) 35-day bed rest, by classical steady state protocol. Oxygen consumption, heart rate (f(H)) and stroke volume (Q(st)) were measured by a metabolic cart, electrocardiography and Modelflow from pulse pressure profiles, respectively. We computed Q as f(H) times Q(st), and systemic oxygen flow ( QaO₂) as Q. times arterial oxygen concentration, obtained after haemoglobin and arterial oxygen saturation measurements. Before bed rest, all parameters at maximal exercise were similar upright and supine. After bed rest, VO₂max was lower (pcardiovascular response (i) did not affect VO₂max supine, (ii) partially explained the VO₂max decrease upright, and (iii) caused the VO₂max differences between postures. We speculate that impaired peripheral oxygen transfer and/or utilisation may explain the VO₂max decrease supine and the fraction of VO₂max decrease upright unexplained by cardiovascular responses.

  15. Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Oxidative Stress, and Cardiovascular Disease: Evidence from Human Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Joachim Eisele

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a frequent disease mainly affecting obese people and caused by repetitive collapse of the upper airways during sleep. The increased morbidity and mortality of OSA are mainly thought to be the consequence of its adverse effects on cardiovascular (CV health. In this context, oxidative stress induced by nocturnal intermittent hypoxia has been identified to play a major role. This is suggested by biomarker studies in OSA patients showing excessively generated reactive oxygen species from leukocytes, reduced plasma levels of nitrite and nitrate, increased lipid peroxidation, and reduced antioxidant capacity. Biopsy studies complement these findings by demonstrating reduced endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression and increased nitrotyrosine immunofluorescence in the vasculature of these patients. Furthermore, oxidative stress in OSA correlates with surrogate markers of CV disease such as endothelial function, intima-media thickness, and high blood pressure. Continuous positive airway pressure therapy reverses oxidative stress in OSA. The same may be true for antioxidants; however, more studies are needed to clarify this issue.

  16. The implication of protein malnutrition on cardiovascular control systems in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Fernanda C.; de Menezes, Rodrigo C.; Chianca, Deoclécio A.

    2015-01-01

    The malnutrition in early life is associated with metabolic changes and cardiovascular impairment in adulthood. Deficient protein intake-mediated hypertension has been observed in clinical and experimental studies. In rats, protein malnutrition also increases the blood pressure and enhances heart rate and sympathetic activity. In this review, we discuss the effects of post-weaning protein malnutrition on the resting mean arterial pressure and heart rate and their variabilities, cardiovascular...

  17. Heart and aortic baroreceptors: operation in providing hemodynamic processes in cardiovascular system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Y. Rudenko

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Aims Up to the present, ECGs have been classified on the basis of the analysis of the ECG curve shape. But this made impossible to classify many ECG shapes. The most promising methods for the classification must evaluate each of the 10 cardiac cycle phases both by their functions and hemodynamic parameters. The aim hereof is to develop the new classification principles for all possible ECG shape variations. Materials and methods The heart cycle phase analysis method is used to calculate the hemodynamic parameters in each of 10 phases, like the phase-related blood volumes and the level of contraction of the corresponding cardiovascular musculature determining its function dynamics in the cardiac cycle phase structure related to the compensation mechanism for maintaining normal hemodynamics. Results An ECG phase changes periodic table consisting of 10 groups of the actual ECG curves typical for the corresponding pathologies is proposed. Each group contains 4 levels of characteristic phase changes. Conclusion The ECG phase changes periodic table is the first attempt to classify the great variety of the ECG shapes. In this case the proposed system requires further investigations. It has been demonstrated that the theoretical concept of the table is in compliance with practice. Further it is planned to improve characteristics of every group and every level.

  18. Biological role of Interleukin 33 and its importance in pathophysiology of cardiovascular system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Czyżewska-Buczyńska

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin 33 (IL-33 is a member of the IL-1 cytokin family. It is expressed by various cells and tissues, mainly epithelial and endothelial cells. It is a cytokine with dual function. It may act both as a traditional cytokine and as intracellular nuclear factor, functioning as transcription regulator. Its biological effect via interaction with membrane-bound ST2 receptor and IL-1 receptor accessory protein (IL-1RAcP is associated with the induction of Th2-type immune response and IL-5 and IL-13 synthesis. IL-33 has a strong immunoregulatory properties. Depending on the type of activated cells, microenvironment, and costimulatory factors, IL-33 can act either as a pro- or anti-inflammatory cytokine. Recent studies indicate various protective effect of IL-33/ST2 sygnaling in atherosclerosis, obesity, disorders in glucose homeostasis and in heart diseases. The paper presents current state of knowledge about the structure and biological function of IL-33 and its receptor ST2, with particular emphasis on its role in pathophysiology of cardiovascular system.

  19. Involvement of the histaminergic system in renal sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to leptin and ghrelin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanida, Mamoru; Kaneko, Hidekazu; Shen, Jiao; Nagai, Katsuya

    2007-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that histamine affects blood pressure (BP) in anesthetized rats. Here, we examined the effects of lateral cerebral ventricular (LCV) injection of various doses of histamine on renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and BP in anesthetized rats. LCV injection of a low dose of histamine (0.0001nmol) suppressed RSNA and BP. Conversely, a high dose of histamine (100nmol) elevated both RSNA and BP. Moreover, inhibiting effects of a low dose of histamine were eliminated by LCV pre-injection of thioperamide, an antagonist of histaminergic H3-receptor, and accelerating effects of a high dose of histamine were abolished by LCV pre-injection of diphenhydramine, an antagonist of histaminergic H1-receptor. Thus, these evidences suggest that central histamine affects RSNA and BP via histaminergic receptors. In addition, we examined a role for histaminergic system in cardiovascular modulators such as leptin and ghrelin. The LCV pre-injection of thioperamide clearly blocked suppressing effects of ghrelin on RSNA and BP. The LCV pre-injection of diphenhydramine also blocked elevating effects of leptin. Therefore, these results suggest that leptin and ghrelin might affect RSNA and BP by mediating central histaminegic H1- and H3-receptors, respectively.

  20. A Systems Biology Approach to Uncovering Pharmacological Synergy in Herbal Medicines with Applications to Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Clinical trials reveal that multiherb prescriptions of herbal medicine often exhibit pharmacological and therapeutic superiority in comparison to isolated single constituents. However, the synergistic mechanisms underlying this remain elusive. To address this question, a novel systems biology model integrating oral bioavailability and drug-likeness screening, target identification, and network pharmacology method has been constructed and applied to four clinically widely used herbs Radix Astragali Mongolici, Radix Puerariae Lobatae, Radix Ophiopogonis Japonici, and Radix Salviae Miltiorrhiza which exert synergistic effects of combined treatment of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Results. The results show that the structural properties of molecules in four herbs have substantial differences, and each herb can interact with significant target proteins related to CVD. Moreover, the bioactive ingredients from different herbs potentially act on the same molecular target (multiple-drug-one-target and/or the functionally diverse targets but with potentially clinically relevant associations (multiple-drug-multiple-target-one-disease. From a molecular/systematic level, this explains why the herbs within a concoction could mutually enhance pharmacological synergy on a disease. Conclusions. The present work provides a new strategy not only for the understanding of pharmacological synergy in herbal medicine, but also for the rational discovery of potent drug/herb combinations that are individually subtherapeutic.

  1. Thyroid hormone and cardiovascular system: from basic concepts to clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iervasi, Giorgio; Nicolini, Giuseppina

    2013-04-01

    Experimental and clinical findings strongly support the concept that thyroid hormone (TH) plays a fundamental role in the cardiovascular (CV) homeostasis. CV diseases represent a major public health care and economic problem being one of the principal causes of morbidity, mortality and hospitalization. In particular, chronic heart failure (HF) is one of the most common reasons for general practitioners consultations in people >65-70 years old. TH derangement may have a key role in the evolution process of HF. In HF, the main and earlier alteration of the thyroid function is referred to as "low-T3" syndrome characterized by the reduction in serum total T3 and free T3 with normal levels of thyroxine (T4) and thyrotropin (TSH). This syndrome may affect till one-third of advanced HF patients. The main goal of this mini-review is to examine the main pathophysiological and clinical links between an altered thyroid metabolism and CV diseases, namely HF during progression of disease from organ specific to systemic disorder.

  2. Increased proteoglycan synthesis by the cardiovascular system of coarctation hypertensive rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipke, D.W.; Couchman, J.R. (Hypertension Program, University of Alabama, Birmingham (USA))

    1991-06-01

    Proteoglycan (PG) synthesis in the cardiovascular system of coarctation hypertensive rats was examined by in vivo and in vitro labeling of glycosaminoglycans with 35SO4 in rats made hypertensive for short (4 days) and longer (14 days) durations. With in vivo labeling, only tissues directly exposed to elevated pressure (left ventricle, LV and aorta above the clip, AOR increases) exhibited elevated PG synthesis after 4 days of hypertension. By 14 days, tissues both exposed to (LV and AOR increases) and protected from elevated pressure (right ventricle and kidney) exhibited elevated PG synthetic rates. Slight elevations in the proportion of galactosaminoglycans were observed with a concurrent proportional decrease in heparan sulfate PGs. Using the in vitro labeling procedure, no significant increases in PG synthesis were observed in any tissue at either 4 days or 14 days of hypertension. These data indicate that: (1) coarctation hypertension stimulates PG production that is dependent initially on increased pressure and later, on additional non-pressure related factors, (2) these other factors are responsible for enhanced PG production in tissues not directly exposed to pressure overload, (3) pressure and/or these other factors are essential for enhanced PG production in coarctation hypertension, and (4) synthesis of all GAG types appears to be affected.

  3. Labview Based ECG Patient Monitoring System for Cardiovascular Patient Using SMTP Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om Prakash Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper leads to developing a Labview based ECG patient monitoring system for cardiovascular patient using Simple Mail Transfer Protocol technology. The designed device has been divided into three parts. First part is ECG amplifier circuit, built using instrumentation amplifier (AD620 followed by signal conditioning circuit with the operation amplifier (lm741. Secondly, the DAQ card is used to convert the analog signal into digital form for the further process. Furthermore, the data has been processed in Labview where the digital filter techniques have been implemented to remove the noise from the acquired signal. After processing, the algorithm was developed to calculate the heart rate and to analyze the arrhythmia condition. Finally, SMTP technology has been added in our work to make device more communicative and much more cost-effective solution in telemedicine technology which has been key-problem to realize the telediagnosis and monitoring of ECG signals. The technology also can be easily implemented over already existing Internet.

  4. Labview Based ECG Patient Monitoring System for Cardiovascular Patient Using SMTP Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Om Prakash; Mekonnen, Dawit; Malarvili, M. B.

    2015-01-01

    This paper leads to developing a Labview based ECG patient monitoring system for cardiovascular patient using Simple Mail Transfer Protocol technology. The designed device has been divided into three parts. First part is ECG amplifier circuit, built using instrumentation amplifier (AD620) followed by signal conditioning circuit with the operation amplifier (lm741). Secondly, the DAQ card is used to convert the analog signal into digital form for the further process. Furthermore, the data has been processed in Labview where the digital filter techniques have been implemented to remove the noise from the acquired signal. After processing, the algorithm was developed to calculate the heart rate and to analyze the arrhythmia condition. Finally, SMTP technology has been added in our work to make device more communicative and much more cost-effective solution in telemedicine technology which has been key-problem to realize the telediagnosis and monitoring of ECG signals. The technology also can be easily implemented over already existing Internet. PMID:27006940

  5. Bionic cardiology: exploration into a wealth of controllable body parts in the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimachi, Masaru; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Bionic cardiology is the medical science of exploring electronic control of the body, usually via the neural system. Mimicking or modifying biological regulation is a strategy used to combat diseases. Control of ventricular rate during atrial fibrillation by selective vagal stimulation, suppression of ischemia-related ventricular fibrillation by vagal stimulation, and reproduction of neurally commanded heart rate are some examples of bionic treatment for arrhythmia. Implantable radio-frequency-coupled on-demand carotid sinus stimulators succeeded in interrupting or preventing anginal attacks but were replaced later by coronary revascularization. Similar but fixed-intensity carotid sinus stimulators were used for hypertension but were also replaced by drugs. Recently, however, a self-powered implantable device has been reappraised for the treatment of drug-resistant hypertension. Closed-loop spinal cord stimulation has successfully treated severe orthostatic hypotension in a limited number of patients. Vagal nerve stimulation is effective in treating heart failure in animals, and a small-size clinical trial has just started. Simultaneous corrections of multiple hemodynamic abnormalities in an acute decompensated state are accomplished simply by quantifying fundamental cardiovascular parameters and controlling these parameters. Bionic cardiology will continue to promote the development of more sophisticated device-based therapies for otherwise untreatable diseases and will inspire more intricate applications in the twenty-first century.

  6. Computational modeling as part of alternative testing strategies in the respiratory and cardiovascular systems: inhaled nanoparticle dose modeling based on representative aerosol measurements and corresponding toxicological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilou, Marika; Mavrofrydi, Olga; Housiadas, Christos; Eleftheriadis, Kostas; Papazafiri, Panagiota

    2015-05-01

    The objectives of modeling in this work were (a) the integration of two existing numerical models in order to connect external exposure to nanoparticles (NPs) with internal dose through inhalation, and (b) to use computational fluid-particle dynamics (CFPD) to analyze the behavior of NPs in the respiratory and the cardiovascular system. Regarding the first objective, a lung transport and deposition model was combined with a lung clearance/retention model to estimate NPs dose in the different regions of the human respiratory tract and some adjacent tissues. On the other hand, CFPD was used to estimate particle transport and deposition of particles in a physiologically based bifurcation created by the third and fourth lung generations (respiratory system), as well as to predict the fate of super-paramagnetic particles suspended in a liquid under the influence of an external magnetic field (cardiovascular system). All the above studies showed that, with proper refinement, the developed computational models and methodologies may serve as an alternative testing strategy, replacing transport/deposition experiments that are expensive both in time and resources and contribute to risk assessment.

  7. General Pharmacology of Artesunate, a Commonly used Antimalarial Drug:Effects on Central Nervous, Cardiovascular, and Respiratory System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyang-Ae; Kim, Ki-Suk; Kim, Eun-Joo

    2010-09-01

    Artesunate, a semi-synthetic derivative of artemisinin, is used primarily as a treatment for malaria. Its effects on the central nervous system, general behavior, and cardiovascular, respiratory, and other organ systems were studied using mice, rats, guinea pigs, and dogs. Artesunate was administered orally to mice at doses of 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg and to rats and guinea pigs at 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg. In dogs, test drugs were administered orally in gelatin capsules at doses of 50, 100, and 150 mg/kg. Artesunate induced insignificant changes in general pharmacological studies, including general behavior, motor coordination, body temperature, analgesia, convulsion modulation, blood pressure, heart rate (HR) , and electrocardiogram (ECG) in dogs in vivo; respiration in guinea pigs; and gut motility or direct effects on isolated guinea pig ileum, contractile responses, and renal function. On the other hand, artesunate decreased the HR and coronary flow rate (CFR) in the rat in vitro; however, the extent of the changes was small and they were not confirmed in in vivo studies in the dog. Artesunate increased hexobarbital-induced sleeping time in a dose-related manner. Artesunate induced dose-related decreases in the volume of gastric secretions and the total acidity of gastric contents, and induced increases in pH at a dose of 400 mg/kg. However, all of these changes were observed at doses much greater than clinical therapeutic doses (2.4 mg/kg in humans, when used as an anti-malarial) . Thus, it can be concluded that artesunate is safe at clinical therapeutic doses.

  8. Influences of hydration on post-exercise cardiovascular control in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charkoudian, Nisha; Halliwill, John R; Morgan, Barbara J; Eisenach, John H; Joyner, Michael J

    2003-10-15

    Dehydration is known to decrease orthostatic tolerance and cause tachycardia, but little is known about the cardiovascular control mechanisms involved. To test the hypothesis that arterial baroreflex sensitivity increases during exercise-induced dehydration, we assessed arterial baroreflex responsiveness in 13 healthy subjects (protocol 1) at baseline (PRE-EX) and 1 h after (EX-DEH) 90 min of exercise to cause dehydration, and after subsequent intravenous rehydration with saline (EX-REH). Six of these subjects were studied a second time (protocol 2) with intravenous saline during exercise to prevent dehydration. We measured heart rate, central venous pressure and arterial pressure during all trials, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during the post-exercise trials. Baroreflex responses were assessed using sequential boluses of nitroprusside and phenylephrine (modified Oxford technique). After exercise in protocol 1 (EX-DEH), resting blood pressure was decreased and resting heart rate was increased. Cardiac baroreflex gain, assessed as the responsiveness of heart rate or R-R interval to changes in systolic pressure, was diminished in the EX-DEH condition (9.17 +/- 1.06 ms mmHg-1 vs. PRE-EX: 18.68 +/- 2.22 ms mmHg-1, P exercise did not alter the increase in HR post-exercise or the decrease in baroreflex gain (EX-REH: 10.20 +/- 1.43 ms mmHg-1; P > 0.10 vs. EX-DEH). Saline infusion during exercise (protocol 2) resulted in less of a post-exercise decrease in blood pressure and a smaller change in cardiac baroreflex sensitivity. Saline infusion caused a decrease in MSNA in protocol 1. We conclude that exercise-induced dehydration causes post-exercise changes in the baroreflex control of blood pressure that may contribute to, rather than offset, orthostatic intolerance.

  9. Inactivation of endothelial proprotein convertase 5/6 decreases collagen deposition in the cardiovascular system: role of fibroblast autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesi, Chiara; Essalmani, Rachid; Lemarié, Catherine A; Leibovitz, Eyal; Ebrahimian, Talin; Paradis, Pierre; Seidah, Nabil G; Schiffrin, Ernesto L; Prat, Annik

    2011-11-01

    Proprotein convertase (PC) 5/6 belongs to a family of secretory proteases involved in proprotein proteolysis. Several studies suggest a role for PC5/6 in cardiovascular disease. Because lethality at birth of mice lacking PC5/6 precluded elucidation of its function in the adult, we generated mice in which the gene of PC5/6 (pcsk5) is specifically inactivated in endothelial cells (ecKO), which are viable and do not exhibit overt abnormalities. In order to uncover the function of PC5/6 in the cardiovascular system, the effect of ecKO was studied in aging mice. In 16 to 18-month-old ecKO mice, the left ventricle (LV) mass, media cross-sectional area of aorta and coronary arteries, and media-to-lumen ratio of mesenteric arteries were decreased. The LV presented decreased diastolic function, and mesenteric arteries showed decreased stiffness. Collagen was decreased in the LV myocardial interstitium and perivascularly in coronary arteries and aorta. Cardiovascular hypotrophy likely develops with aging, since no significant changes were observed in 2-month-old ecKO mice. Fibroblasts, as a source of collagen in myocardium and vasculature, may play a role in the decrease in collagen deposition. Fibroblasts co-cultured with ecKO endothelial cells showed decreased collagen production, decreased insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1/Akt/mTOR signaling, and enhanced autophagic activation. PC5/6 inactivation in endothelial cells results in cardiovascular hypotrophy associated with decreased collagen deposition, decreased LV diastolic function, and vascular stiffness, suggesting a trophic role of endothelial PC5/6 in the cardiovascular system, likely mediated by IGF-1/Akt/mTOR signaling and control of autophagy.

  10. Cardiovascular Disease, Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms; and the Renin Angiotensin System: Is There a MicroRNA Connection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry S. Elton

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential hypertension is a complex disorder, caused by the interplay between many genetic variants, gene-gene interactions, and environmental factors. Given that the renin-angiotensin system (RAS plays an important role in blood pressure (BP control, cardiovascular regulation, and cardiovascular remodeling, special attention has been devoted to the investigation of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP harbored in RAS genes that may be associated with hypertension and cardiovascular disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a family of small, ∼21-nucleotide long, and nonprotein-coding RNAs that recognize target mRNAs through partial complementary elements in the 3-untranslated region (3-UTR of mRNAs and inhibit gene expression by targeting mRNAs for translational repression or destabilization. Since miRNA SNPs (miRSNPs can create, destroy, or modify miRNA binding sites, this review focuses on the hypothesis that transcribed target SNPs harbored in RAS mRNAs, that alter miRNA gene regulation and consequently protein expression, may contribute to cardiovascular disease susceptibility.

  11. [Microalbuminuria and associated cardiovascular risk factors in patients with arterial systemic hypertension. A subanalysis of the I-Search study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomelí, Catalina; Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Lorenzo, Antonio; Saucedo, Néstor

    2012-01-01

    To establish the prevalence of microalbuminuria in a group of patients with systemic arterial hypertension (SAH) to analyze the association between this parameter and cardiovascular risk factors as well as with SAH treatment. This is a sub-analysis of 564 patients of Mexico, extracted from an international, observational, and cross-sectional study followed by specialists, The study included patients with SAH without any other causes of microalbuminuria. Microalbuminuria in these patients had a prevalence of 63.8% (95% IC 58.4, 69,3) and correlated with a wide variety of risk factors and concomitant cardiovascular diseases Most patients with microalbuminuria already received treatment with angiotensin II receptor antagonists (50%), without pretending to establish the impact of the drugs on the microalbuminuria values. The prevalence of patients with SAH and high cardiovascular risk is high in this study and justifies their management and care with multifactorial strategies aimed to adequately control their blood pressure and to modify other current cardiovascular risk factors.

  12. Maximal heart rate does not limit cardiovascular capacity in healthy humans: insight from right atrial pacing during maximal exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munch, G D W; Svendsen, J H; Damsgaard, R; Secher, N H; González-Alonso, J; Mortensen, S P

    2014-01-15

    In humans, maximal aerobic power (VO2 max ) is associated with a plateau in cardiac output (Q), but the mechanisms regulating the interplay between maximal heart rate (HRmax) and stroke volume (SV) are unclear. To evaluate the effect of tachycardia and elevations in HRmax on cardiovascular function and capacity during maximal exercise in healthy humans, 12 young male cyclists performed incremental cycling and one-legged knee-extensor exercise (KEE) to exhaustion with and without right atrial pacing to increase HR. During control cycling, Q and leg blood flow increased up to 85% of maximal workload (WLmax) and remained unchanged until exhaustion. SV initially increased, plateaued and then decreased before exhaustion (P rate pressure product and RAP (P heart can be paced to a higher HR than observed during maximal exercise, suggesting that HRmax and myocardial work capacity do not limit VO2 max in healthy individuals. A limited left ventricular filling and possibly altered contractility reduce SV during atrial pacing, whereas a plateau in LVFP appears to restrict Q close to VO2 max .

  13. Human Adaptive Mechatronics and Human-System Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Suzuki

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Several topics in projects for mechatronics studies, which are 'Human Adaptive Mechatronics (HAM' and 'Human-System Modelling (HSM', are presented in this paper. The main research theme of the HAM project is a design strategy for a new intelligent mechatronics system, which enhances operators' skills during machine operation. Skill analyses and control system design have been addressed. In the HSM project, human modelling based on hierarchical classification of skills was studied, including the following five types of skills: social, planning, cognitive, motion and sensory-motor skills. This paper includes digests of these research topics and the outcomes concerning each type of skill. Relationships with other research activities, knowledge and information that will be helpful for readers who are trying to study assistive human-mechatronics systems are also mentioned.

  14. The renin angiotensin system in the development of cardiovascular disease: role of aliskiren in risk reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Verdecchia

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Paolo Verdecchia1, Fabio Angeli1, Giovanni Mazzotta1, Giorgio Gentile2, Gianpaolo Reboldi21Department of Cardiology, Clinical Research Unit ‘Preventive Cardiology’, Hospital ‘Santa Maria della Misericordia’, and Fondazione Umbra Cuore e Ipertensione – AUCI Onlus, Perugia, Italy; 2Department of Internal Medicine University of Perugia, ItalyAbstract: An association has been shown between plasma renin activity (PRA and the risk of cardiovascular disease. There is also evidence that angiotensin II exerts detrimental effects on progression and instabilization of atherosclerotic plaque. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS can be inhibited through inhibition of angiotensin I (Ang I generation from angiotensinogen by direct renin inhibitors, inhibition of angiotensin II (Ang II generation from angiotensin I by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and finally by direct inhibition of the action of Ang II receptor level. Aliskiren, the first direct renin inhibitor to reach the market, is a lowmolecular-weight, orally active, hydrophilic nonpeptide. Aliskiren blocks Ang I generation, while plasma renin concentration increases because the drugs blocks the negative feed-back exerted by Ang II on renin synthesis. Because of its long pharmacological half-life, aliskiren is suitable for once-daily administration. Its through-to-peak ratio approximates 98% for the 300 mg/day dose. Because of its mechanism of action, aliskiren might offer the additional opportunity to inhibit progression of atherosclerosis at tissue level. Hypertension is an approved indication for this drug, which is also promising for the treatment of heart failure. The efficacy of this drug in reducing major clinical events is being tested in large ongoing clinical trials.Keywords: plasma renin activity, renin angiotensin system, aliskiren, angiotensinogen, renin, hypertension, heart failure, diabetes

  15. Vitamin D and the cardiovascular system: an overview of the recent literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messa, Piergiorgio; Curreri, Manuela; Regalia, Anna; Alfieri, Carlo Maria

    2014-02-01

    Since the discovery that the enzyme catalyzing the synthesis of the most active natural vitamin D metabolite(calcitriol) and the vitamin D-specific receptor (VDR)were expressed in a wide range of tissues and organs, not only involved in the mineral metabolism (MM), there has been increasing interest on the putative ‘non classical’ roles of vitamin D metabolites, particularly on their possible effects on the cardiovascular (CV) system. These hypothetical CV effects of vitamin D gained particular interesting the nephrology field, given the high prevalence of CV disease in patients affected by either acute or chronic kidney diseases. However, notwithstanding a huge amount of experimental data suggesting a possible protective role of vitamin D on the CV system, the conclusions of two recent meta-analyses from the Cochrane group and a recent statement from the Institute of Medicine, based on a complete revision of the available data, concluded that there is no clear evidence for a role of vitamin D other than that strictly associated with bone health. However, a continuous and increasing flow of new studies still continues to add information on this topic. In the present review, we have tried to critically address the data added on this topicin the last 2 years, considering separately the experimental,observational, and intervention studies that have appeared in PubMed in the last 2 years, discussing the data providing proof, pro or contra, the involvement of vitamin D in CV disease, both in the absence or presence of kidney function impairment.

  16. Cardiovascular disease in human immunodeficiency virus-infection as a cause of hospitalization: a case-series in a General Hospital in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela-Rodríguez, Germán; Mezones-Holguín, Edward; Mendo-Urbina, Fernando; Rodríguez-Morales, Alfonso J

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease in the context of human immunodeficiency virus infection has become a major clinical concern in recent years. In the current report we assess hospitalizations due to cardiovascular disease in human immunodeficiency virus patients in a Social Security reference hospital in Peru. A retrospective study was carried out between January 1996 and December 2012 in a General Hospital in Lima, Peru. We included 26 patients hospitalized due to cardiovascular disease. Mean age was 46.3 years (SD 12.5), predominantly male (57.7%). Ten patients (38.4%) were in Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome stages. Seventeen (65.4%) received high-active-antiretroviral therapy. Eleven (42.3%) had cardiac involvement and 15 (57.7%) had non-cardiac vascular involvement. The most frequent causes of cardiac involvement were pericardial effusion and myocardial infarction. On the other hand, deep vein thrombosis and stroke were the most frequent for non-cardiac vascular involvement. Cardiovascular disease is an important cause of hospitalization in Peruvian human immunodeficiency virus patients, with differences between immunosuppression stages. Further studies analyzing associated factors are warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Sequential use of human-derived medium supplements favours cardiovascular tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, Paul W. Riem; Sluijter, Joost P. G.; Soekhradj-Soechit, R. Sarita; van Herwerden, Lex A.; Kluin, Jolanda; Bouten, Carlijn V. C.

    2012-01-01

    For clinical application of tissue engineering strategies, the use of animal-derived serum in culture medium is not recommended, because it can evoke immune responses in patients. We previously observed that human platelet-lysate (PL) is favourable for cell expansion, but generates weaker tissue as

  18. Sequential use of human-derived medium supplements favours cardiovascular tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, Paul W. Riem; Sluijter, Joost P. G.; Soekhradj-Soechit, R. Sarita; van Herwerden, Lex A.; Kluin, Jolanda; Bouten, Carlijn V. C.

    2012-01-01

    For clinical application of tissue engineering strategies, the use of animal-derived serum in culture medium is not recommended, because it can evoke immune responses in patients. We previously observed that human platelet-lysate (PL) is favourable for cell expansion, but generates weaker tissue as

  19. The Human-Robot Interaction Operating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Terrence; Kunz, Clayton; Hiatt, Laura M.; Bugajska, Magda

    2006-01-01

    In order for humans and robots to work effectively together, they need to be able to converse about abilities, goals and achievements. Thus, we are developing an interaction infrastructure called the "Human-Robot Interaction Operating System" (HRI/OS). The HRI/OS provides a structured software framework for building human-robot teams, supports a variety of user interfaces, enables humans and robots to engage in task-oriented dialogue, and facilitates integration of robots through an extensible API.

  20. Modeling of short-term mechanism of arterial pressure control in the cardiovascular system: object-oriented and acausal approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulhánek, Tomáš; Kofránek, Jiří; Mateják, Marek

    2014-11-01

    This letter introduces an alternative approach to modeling the cardiovascular system with a short-term control mechanism published in Computers in Biology and Medicine, Vol. 47 (2014), pp. 104-112. We recommend using abstract components on a distinct physical level, separating the model into hydraulic components, subsystems of the cardiovascular system and individual subsystems of the control mechanism and scenario. We recommend utilizing an acausal modeling feature of Modelica language, which allows model variables to be expressed declaratively. Furthermore, the Modelica tool identifies which are the dependent and independent variables upon compilation. An example of our approach is introduced on several elementary components representing the hydraulic resistance to fluid flow and the elastic response of the vessel, among others. The introduced model implementation can be more reusable and understandable for the general scientific community.

  1. Is testosterone treatment dangerous for the cardiovascular system in older hypogonadal men?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Aversa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between testosterone deficiency syndrome (TDS and men's vascular health has a great impact in the modern approach to the aging male. There is good evidence that low testosterone (T is associated with erectile dysfunction (ED and that ED is a strong marker for cardiovascular risk; also, TDS is frequently associated with increased cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Noteworthy, the occurrence of increased levels of glucose, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and myointimal carotid thickness may be associated with reduced T levels especially in cardiac older frail men. Screening for low T should be mandatory in high risk groups including those with type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome and obesity. The rising demand from patients to be treated for ED associated with TDS will increase the prescribing of T and facilitate future long-term studies on its impact on cardiovascular disease (CVD. Recent studies suggest warnings with regard to T prescription in older frail men, but we regret that these studies had consistent bias in inclusion criteria and statistical evaluation. Data from studies conducted in more selected populations suggest that T replacement therapy may improve multiple surrogate markers for CVD as well as reducing cardiovascular mortality. After analyzing the most important studies' limitation, we can conclude that at present there is insufficient evidence of a causal relationship between T therapy and adverse cardiovascular outcomes to support against T supplementation in older hypogonadal frail men.

  2. Characteristics and popular topics of latest researches into the effects of air particulate matter on cardiovascular system by bibliometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiaofeng; Guo, Xinbiao; Li, Haicun; An, Xinying; Zhao, Yingguang

    2013-03-01

    In recent years, many epidemiological and toxicological studies have investigated the adverse effects of air particulate matter (PM) on the cardiovascular system. However, it is difficult for the researchers to have a timely and effective overall command of the latest characteristics and popular topics in such a wide field. Different from the previous reviews, in which the research characteristics and trends are empirically concluded by experts, we try to have a comprehensive evaluation of the above topics for the first time by bibliometric analysis, a quantitative tool in information exploration. This study aims to introduce the bibliometric method into the field of PM and cardiovascular system. The articles were selected by searching PubMed/MEDLINE (from 2007 to 2012) using Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms "particulate matter" and "cardiovascular system". A total of 935 eligible articles and 1895 MeSH terms were retrieved and processed by the software Thomson Data Analyzer (TDA). The bibliographic information and the MeSH terms of these articles were classified and analyzed to summarize the research characteristics. The top 200 high-frequency MeSH terms (the cumulative frequency percentage was 74.2%) were clustered for popular-topic conclusion. We summarized the characteristics of published articles, of researcher collaborations and of the contents. Ten clusters of MeSH terms are presented. Six popular topics are concluded and elaborated for reference. Our study presents an overview of the characteristics and popular topics in the field of PM and cardiovascular system in the past five years by bibliometric tools, which may provide a new perspective for future researchers.

  3. Rosuvastatin increases extracellular adenosine formation in humans in vivo: a new perspective on cardiovascular protection.

    OpenAIRE

    Meijer, P; Oyen, W.J.G.; Dekker, D.; Broek, P.H.H. van den; Wouters, C.W.; Boerman, O.C.; Scheffer, G. J.; Smits, P; Rongen, G.A.P.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Statins may increase extracellular adenosine formation from adenosine monophosphate by enhancing ecto-5'-nucleotidase activity. This theory was tested in humans using dipyridamole-induced vasodilation as a read-out for local adenosine formation. Dipyridamole inhibits the transport of extracellular adenosine into the cytosol resulting in increased extracellular adenosine and subsequent vasodilation. In addition, we studied the effect of statin therapy in a forearm model of ischemia-...

  4. A module of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell transcriptional network containing primitive and differentiation markers is related to specific cardiovascular health variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, Leni; Anghelina, Mirela; Kantor, Taylor; Jones, Desiree; Ramadan, Enass; Xiang, Yang; Huang, Kun; Kolipaka, Arunark; Malarkey, William; Ghasemzadeh, Nima; Mohler, Peter J; Quyyumi, Arshed; Moldovan, Nicanor I

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), including rare circulating stem and progenitor cells (CSPCs), have important yet poorly understood roles in the maintenance and repair of blood vessels and perfused organs. Our hypothesis was that the identities and functions of CSPCs in cardiovascular health could be ascertained by analyzing the patterns of their co-expressed markers in unselected PBMC samples. Because gene microarrays had failed to detect many stem cell-associated genes, we performed quantitative real-time PCR to measure the expression of 45 primitive and tissue differentiation markers in PBMCs from healthy and hypertensive human subjects. We compared these expression levels to the subjects' demographic and cardiovascular risk factors, including vascular stiffness. The tested marker genes were expressed in all of samples and organized in hierarchical transcriptional network modules, constructed by a bottom-up approach. An index of gene expression in one of these modules (metagene), defined as the average standardized relative copy numbers of 15 pluripotency and cardiovascular differentiation markers, was negatively correlated (all ptranscriptional network. Furthermore, the coordinated gene expression in these modules can be linked to cardiovascular risk factors and subclinical cardiovascular disease; thus, this measure may be useful for their diagnosis and prognosis.

  5. Naltrexone but Not Ketanserin Antagonizes the Subjective, Cardiovascular, and Neuroendocrine Effects of Salvinorin-A in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqueda, Ana Elda; Valle, Marta; Addy, Peter H.; Antonijoan, Rosa Maria; Puntes, Montserrat; Coimbra, Jimena; Ballester, Maria Rosa; Garrido, Maite; González, Mireia; Claramunt, Judit; Barker, Steven; Lomnicka, Izabela; Waguespack, Marian; Johnson, Matthew W.; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Salvinorin-A is a terpene found in the leaves of the plant Salvia divinorum. When administered to humans, salvinorin-A induces an intense but short-lasting modified state of awareness, sharing features with those induced by the classical serotonin-2A receptor agonist psychedelics. However, unlike substances such as psilocybin or mescaline, salvinorin-A shows agonist activity at the kappa-opioid receptor rather than at the serotonin-2A receptor. Here, we assessed the involvement of kappa-opioid receptor and serotonin-2A agonism in the subjective, cardiovascular, and neuroendocrine effects of salvinorin-A in humans. Methods: We conducted a placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind study with 2 groups of 12 healthy volunteers with experience with psychedelic drugs. There were 4 experimental sessions. In group 1, participants received the following treatment combinations: placebo+placebo, placebo+salvinorin-A, naltrexone+placebo, and naltrexone+salvinorin-A. Naltrexone, a nonspecific opioid receptor antagonist, was administered at a dose of 50mg orally. In group 2, participants received the treatment combinations: placebo+placebo, placebo+salvinorin-A, ketanserin+placebo, and ketanserin+salvinorin-A. Ketanserin, a selective serotonin-2A antagonist, was administered at a dose of 40mg orally. Results: Inhalation of 1mg of vaporized salvinorin-A led to maximum plasma concentrations at 1 and 2 minutes after dosing. When administered alone, salvinorin-A severely reduced external sensory perception and induced intense visual and auditory modifications, increased systolic blood pressure, and cortisol and prolactin release. These effects were effectively blocked by naltrexone, but not by ketanserin. Conclusions: Results support kappa opioid receptor agonism as the mechanism of action underlying the subjective and physiological effects of salvinorin-A in humans and rule out the involvement of a serotonin-2A-mediated mechanism. PMID:26874330

  6. Nimesulide (Nise influence on blood serum prostaglandin E2 concentration and cardiovascular system function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B F Nemtsov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of the current study was to investigate nimesulide effects on prostaglandin E 2 concentration in blood serum and some parameters of the cardiovascular system in pts with RA during a 6-month period. Materials and methods. 40 RA pts were studied, 20 of them took 200 mg of nimesulide per day (24 hours in combination with low doses of metatrexate (7.5-10.0 mg per week. The pts were studied for 6 months. The content of E2 prostaglandin in blood serum was evaluated and estimated by means of the immuneenzymic method in 20 pts who took 200 mg of nimesulide per day (24 hours in comparison with 20 pts who took 100 mg of sodium diclofenac per day. The cardiovascular system was evaluated and estimated by means of screening examinations and after the 6-month treatment period by means of 24-hour monitoring of arterial blood pressure, ECG-monitoring and echocardioscopy. Results. In case of the nimesulide treatment the above RA pts did not show reliable reduction of PGE- 2 in blood serum as compared with sodium dicofenac after a 5 day and the 6-month treatment. This showed the selective effect of nimesulide in relation to COX-2. As far as the parameters of the cardiovascular system are concerned, no negative dynamics were revealed at the background of nimesulide treatment . It was revealed that nimesulide is quite effective and has good tolerance.

  7. Critical Analysis of Cardiovascular and Central Nervous System Fixed Dose Combinations Available in Indian Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Krunal; Shah, Samidh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Fixed Dose Combinations (FDCs) are being increasingly used to improve compliance and achieve greater benefits of the two or more active ingredients given together than the corresponding individual drug components given separately. Aim To analyse the rationality of Cardiovascular (CV) and Central Nervous System (CNS) FDCs available in Indian market. Materials and Methods CVS and CNS FDCs, enlisted in Indian Drug Review, 2014, were analysed by a pretested validated eight point criteria tool. Each FDC was assessed for number of active pharmacological ingredients, approval by regulatory authority, listing in WHO Essential Medicine List. While efficacy, safety, pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic interactions and advantages of each FDC were analysed by literature search. The total score of the tool was 12 and score ≥7 was considered rational. FDCs were divided in four groups as per rationality and DCGI approval. ANOVA was used for statistical analysis and p45 belonged to CNS group and 40 had documented evidence of efficacy and safety. Majority of FDCs showed advantage of being convenient by reducing pill count and only 32 showed reducing adverse drug reactions. Out of 107 CV FDCs, 46 were rational and 61 were irrational with a mean rationality score of 6.72±2.82 (CI– 95 %, 3.90 - 9.54). While out of 45 CNS FDCs, 8 were rational and 37 were irrational with a mean rationality score of 6.22±2.08 (CI – 95 %, 4.14 - 8.30). A significant difference in mean rationality score of group A (DCGI approved + rational) was observed as compared to group B (DCGI approved + irrational) and group C (DCGI unapproved + rational) as compared to group D (DCGI unapproved + irrational) (p<0.05). Conclusion The absence of watertight pre-requisite, critical analysis of the scientific validity of the formulations and ‘convenience’ category has resulted into proliferation of irrational FDCs. This calls for strict regulatory approval process to avoid miserable FDC scenario in

  8. Systems Pharmacogenomics Finds RUNX1 Is an Aspirin-Responsive Transcription Factor Linked to Cardiovascular Disease and Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Voora, MD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aspirin prevents cardiovascular disease and colon cancer; however aspirin's inhibition of platelet COX-1 only partially explains its diverse effects. We previously identified an aspirin response signature (ARS in blood consisting of 62 co-expressed transcripts that correlated with aspirin's effects on platelets and myocardial infarction (MI. Here we report that 60% of ARS transcripts are regulated by RUNX1 – a hematopoietic transcription factor - and 48% of ARS gene promoters contain a RUNX1 binding site. Megakaryocytic cells exposed to aspirin and its metabolite (salicylic acid, a weak COX-1 inhibitor showed up regulation in the RUNX1 P1 isoform and MYL9, which is transcriptionally regulated by RUNX1. In human subjects, RUNX1 P1 expression in blood and RUNX1-regulated platelet proteins, including MYL9, were aspirin-responsive and associated with platelet function. In cardiovascular disease patients RUNX1 P1 expression was associated with death or MI. RUNX1 acts as a tumor suppressor gene in gastrointestinal malignancies. We show that RUNX1 P1 expression is associated with colon cancer free survival suggesting a role for RUNX1 in aspirin's protective effect in colon cancer. Our studies reveal an effect of aspirin on RUNX1 and gene expression that may additionally explain aspirin's effects in cardiovascular disease and cancer.

  9. Systems Pharmacogenomics Finds RUNX1 Is an Aspirin-Responsive Transcription Factor Linked to Cardiovascular Disease and Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voora, Deepak; Rao, A Koneti; Jalagadugula, Gauthami S; Myers, Rachel; Harris, Emily; Ortel, Thomas L; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S

    2016-09-01

    Aspirin prevents cardiovascular disease and colon cancer; however aspirin's inhibition of platelet COX-1 only partially explains its diverse effects. We previously identified an aspirin response signature (ARS) in blood consisting of 62 co-expressed transcripts that correlated with aspirin's effects on platelets and myocardial infarction (MI). Here we report that 60% of ARS transcripts are regulated by RUNX1 - a hematopoietic transcription factor - and 48% of ARS gene promoters contain a RUNX1 binding site. Megakaryocytic cells exposed to aspirin and its metabolite (salicylic acid, a weak COX-1 inhibitor) showed up regulation in the RUNX1 P1 isoform and MYL9, which is transcriptionally regulated by RUNX1. In human subjects, RUNX1 P1 expression in blood and RUNX1-regulated platelet proteins, including MYL9, were aspirin-responsive and associated with platelet function. In cardiovascular disease patients RUNX1 P1 expression was associated with death or MI. RUNX1 acts as a tumor suppressor gene in gastrointestinal malignancies. We show that RUNX1 P1 expression is associated with colon cancer free survival suggesting a role for RUNX1 in aspirin's protective effect in colon cancer. Our studies reveal an effect of aspirin on RUNX1 and gene expression that may additionally explain aspirin's effects in cardiovascular disease and cancer.

  10. Risk factors for diseases of the cardiovascular system among Catholics living in areas of southern Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Majda

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Cardiovascular diseases (CVD are the most frequent cause of mortality of Polish residents. In Poland, there are few publications regarding research on the influence of people’s religiosity on their health. Aim of the research : To determine some factors of cardiovascular risk and the risk of cardiovascular events among Catholics. Material and methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted among 134 randomly selected Catholics and based on the results of: questionnaire survey, anthropometric measurements, physical examination, the SCORE scale, laboratory tests (CRP, homocysteine. glucose, total cholesterol, HDL, and triglycerides and assessing the risk of cardiovascular events based on the SCORE scale. Statistical analysis was based on the χ 2 test. Founded significance level was 0.05. Results: More than half of the respondents were diagnosed delevated homocysteine level and gluteal-femoral obesity. A little more than half of those surveyed had elevated total cholesterol levels and increased blood pressure, a little more than one-quarter of the respondents had raised triglyceride levels, and one-tenth had heightened glucose and C-reactive protein levels. The higher the age of the respondents, the more often the results of their biochemical exceed standards. Over half of those examined were diagnosed with overweight or obesity. Among examined gynoid obesity prevailed over android obesity. The risk assessment of CVD Catholics revealed that among the modifiable factors, biochemical levels of homocysteine proved to be the most important new risk factor, but among the classic factors it was blood pressure value. More than half of the respondents had moderate risk of cardiovascular events in the study group. Conclusions : Nurses should promote pro-health attitudes, and should encourage the elimination of risk factors and biochemical testing and measurement among Catholics, who are a religious group at higher risk of cardiovascular

  11. Mathematical multi-scale model of the cardiovascular system including mitral valve dynamics. Application to ischemic mitral insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moonen Marie

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Valve dysfunction is a common cardiovascular pathology. Despite significant clinical research, there is little formal study of how valve dysfunction affects overall circulatory dynamics. Validated models would offer the ability to better understand these dynamics and thus optimize diagnosis, as well as surgical and other interventions. Methods A cardiovascular and circulatory system (CVS model has already been validated in silico, and in several animal model studies. It accounts for valve dynamics using Heaviside functions to simulate a physiologically accurate "open on pressure, close on flow" law. However, it does not consider real-time valve opening dynamics and therefore does not fully capture valve dysfunction, particularly where the dysfunction involves partial closure. This research describes an updated version of this previous closed-loop CVS model that includes the progressive opening of the mitral valve, and is defined over the full cardiac cycle. Results Simulations of the cardiovascular system with healthy mitral valve are performed, and, the global hemodynamic behaviour is studied compared with previously validated results. The error between resulting pressure-volume (PV loops of already validated CVS model and the new CVS model that includes the progressive opening of the mitral valve is assessed and remains within typical measurement error and variability. Simulations of ischemic mitral insufficiency are also performed. Pressure-Volume loops, transmitral flow evolution and mitral valve aperture area evolution follow reported measurements in shape, amplitude and trends. Conclusions The resulting cardiovascular system model including mitral valve dynamics provides a foundation for clinical validation and the study of valvular dysfunction in vivo. The overall models and results could readily be generalised to other cardiac valves.

  12. Stupid Tutoring Systems, Intelligent Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Ryan S.

    2016-01-01

    The initial vision for intelligent tutoring systems involved powerful, multi-faceted systems that would leverage rich models of students and pedagogies to create complex learning interactions. But the intelligent tutoring systems used at scale today are much simpler. In this article, I present hypotheses on the factors underlying this development,…

  13. The impact of haemodialysis arteriovenous fistula on haemodynamic parameters of the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, Carlo; Vernaglione, Luigi; Casucci, Francesco; Libutti, Pasquale; Lisi, Piero; Rossi, Luigi; Vigo, Valentina; Lomonte, Carlo

    2016-10-01

    Satisfactory vascular access flow (Qa) of an arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is necessary for haemodialysis (HD) adequacy. The aim of the present study was to further our understanding of haemodynamic modifications of the cardiovascular system of HD patients associated with an AVF. The main objective was to calculate using real data in what way an AVF influences the load of the left ventricle (LLV). All HD patients treated in our dialysis unit and bearing an AVF were enrolled into the present observational cross-sectional study. Fifty-six patients bore a lower arm AVF and 30 an upper arm AVF. Qa and cardiac output (CO) were measured by means of the ultrasound dilution Transonic Hemodialysis Monitor HD02. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was calculated; total peripheral vascular resistance (TPVR) was calculated as MAP/CO; resistance of AVF (AR) and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) are connected in parallel and were respectively calculated as AR = MAP/Qa and SVR = MAP/(CO - Qa). LLV was calculated on the principle of a simple physical model: LLV (watt) = TPVR·CO(2). The latter was computationally divided into the part spent to run Qa through the AVF (LLVAVF) and that part ensuring the flow (CO - Qa) through the vascular system. The data from the 86 AVFs were analysed by categorizing them into lower and upper arm AVFs. Mean Qa, CO, MAP, TPVR, LLV and LLVAVF of the 86 AVFs were, respectively, 1.3 (0.6 SD) L/min, 6.3 (1.3) L/min, 92.7 (13.9) mmHg, 14.9 (3.9) mmHg·min/L, 1.3 (0.6) watt and 19.7 (3.1)% of LLV. A statistically significant increase of Qa, CO, LLV and LLVAVF and a statistically significant decrease of TPVR, AR and SVR of upper arm AVFs compared with lower arm AVFs was shown. A third-order polynomial regression model best fitted the relationship between Qa and LLV for the entire cohort (R (2) = 0.546; P polynomial regression model, but only in lower arm AVFs. On the contrary, no statistically significant relationship was found between the two parameters in upper

  14. Epidermal mechano-acoustic sensing electronics for cardiovascular diagnostics and human-machine interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuhao; Norton, James J. S.; Qazi, Raza; Zou, Zhanan; Ammann, Kaitlyn R.; Liu, Hank; Yan, Lingqing; Tran, Phat L.; Jang, Kyung-In; Lee, Jung Woo; Zhang, Douglas; Kilian, Kristopher A.; Jung, Sung Hee; Bretl, Timothy; Xiao, Jianliang; Slepian, Marvin J.; Huang, Yonggang; Jeong, Jae-Woong; Rogers, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Physiological mechano-acoustic signals, often with frequencies and intensities that are beyond those associated with the audible range, provide information of great clinical utility. Stethoscopes and digital accelerometers in conventional packages can capture some relevant data, but neither is suitable for use in a continuous, wearable mode, and both have shortcomings associated with mechanical transduction of signals through the skin. We report a soft, conformal class of device configured specifically for mechano-acoustic recording from the skin, capable of being used on nearly any part of the body, in forms that maximize detectable signals and allow for multimodal operation, such as electrophysiological recording. Experimental and computational studies highlight the key roles of low effective modulus and low areal mass density for effective operation in this type of measurement mode on the skin. Demonstrations involving seismocardiography and heart murmur detection in a series of cardiac patients illustrate utility in advanced clinical diagnostics. Monitoring of pump thrombosis in ventricular assist devices provides an example in characterization of mechanical implants. Speech recognition and human-machine interfaces represent additional demonstrated applications. These and other possibilities suggest broad-ranging uses for soft, skin-integrated digital technologies that can capture human body acoustics. PMID:28138529

  15. Hybrid Battery Ultracapacitor System For Human Robotic Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this proposal is to develop a hybrid battery-ultra capacitor storage system that powers human-robotic systems in space missions. Space missions...

  16. Dose-response study of N,N-dimethyltryptamine in humans. I. Neuroendocrine, autonomic, and cardiovascular effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassman, R J; Qualls, C R

    1994-02-01

    To begin applying basic neuropharmacological hypotheses of hallucinogenic drug actions to humans, we generated dose-response data for intravenously administered dimethyltryptamine fumarate's (DMT) neuroendocrine, cardiovascular, autonomic, and subjective effects in a group of experienced hallucinogen users. Dimethyltryptamine, an endogenous mammalian hallucinogen and drug of abuse, was administered intravenously at 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 mg/kg to 11 experienced hallucinogen users, in a double-blind, saline placebo-controlled, randomized design. Treatments were separated by at least 1 week. Peak DMT blood levels and subjective effects were seen within 2 minutes after drug administration, and were negligible at 30 minutes. Dimethyltryptamine dose dependently elevated blood pressure, heart rate, pupil diameter, and rectal temperature, in addition to elevating blood concentrations of beta-endorphin, corticotropin, cortisol, and prolactin. Growth hormone blood levels rose equally in response to all doses of DMT, and melatonin levels were unaffected. Threshold doses for significant effects relative to placebo were also hallucinogenic (0.2 mg/kg and higher). Subjects with five or more exposures to 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine demonstrated less robust pupil diameter effects than those with two or fewer exposures. Dimethyltryptamine can be administered safely to experienced hallucinogen users and dose-response data generated for several measures hypothesized under serotonergic modulatory control. Additional studies characterizing the specific mechanisms mediating DMT's biological effects may prove useful in psychopharmacological investigations of drug-induced and endogenous alterations in brain function.

  17. Correlation of Endostatin and Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinases 2 (TIMP2 Serum Levels With Cardiovascular Involvement in Systemic Sclerosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozena Dziankowska-Bartkowiak

    2005-01-01

    pathogenesis of SSc. Heart fibrosis is one of the most important prognostic factors in SSc patients. So, the aim of our study was to examine cardiovascular dysfunction in SSc patients and its correlation with serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, endostatin, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2 (TIMP2. The study group comprised 34 patients (19 with limited scleroderma (lSSc and 15 with diffuse scleroderma (dSSc. The control group consisted of 20 healthy persons, age and sex matched. Internal organ involvement was assessed on the basis of specialist procedures. Serum VEGF, endostatin, and TIMP2 levels were evaluated by ELISA. We found cardiovascular changes in 15 patients with SSc (8 with lSSc and 7 with dSSc. The observed symptoms were of different characters and also coexisted with each other. Higher endostatin serum levels in all systemic sclerosis patients in comparison to the control group were demonstrated (P<.05. Also higher serum levels of endostatin and TIMP2 were observed in patients with cardiovascular changes in comparison to the patients without such changes (P<.05. The obtained results support the notion that angiogenesis and fibrosis disturbances may play an important role in SSc. Evaluation of endostatin and TIMP2 serum levels seems to be one of the noninvasive, helpful examinations of heart involvement in the course of systemic sclerosis.

  18. NASA Human System Risk Assessment Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, D.; Romero, E.

    2016-01-01

    NASA utilizes an evidence based system to perform risk assessments for the human system for spaceflight missions. The center of this process is the multi-disciplinary Human System Risk Board (HSRB). The HSRB is chartered from the Chief Health and Medical Officer (OCHMO) at NASA Headquarters. The HSRB reviews all human system risks via an established comprehensive risk and configuration management plan based on a project management approach. The HSRB facilitates the integration of human research (terrestrial and spaceflight), medical operations, occupational surveillance, systems engineering and many other disciplines in a comprehensive review of human system risks. The HSRB considers all factors that influence human risk. These factors include pre-mission considerations such as screening criteria, training, age, sex, and physiological condition. In mission factors such as available countermeasures, mission duration and location and post mission factors such as time to return to baseline (reconditioning), post mission health screening, and available treatments. All of the factors influence the total risk assessment for each human risk. The HSRB performed a comprehensive review of all potential inflight medical conditions and events and over the course of several reviews consolidated the number of human system risks to 30, where the greatest emphasis is placed for investing program dollars for risk mitigation. The HSRB considers all available evidence from human research and, medical operations and occupational surveillance in assessing the risks for appropriate mitigation and future work. All applicable DRMs (low earth orbit for 6 and 12 months, deep space for 30 days and 1 year, a lunar mission for 1 year, and a planetary mission for 3 years) are considered as human system risks are modified by the hazards associated with space flight such as microgravity, exposure to radiation, distance from the earth, isolation and a closed environment. Each risk has a summary

  19. Interaction of selected vasodilating beta-blockers with adrenergic receptors in human cardiovascular tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monopoli, A.; Forlani, A.; Bevilacqua, M.; Vago, T.; Norbiato, G.; Bertora, P.; Biglioli, P.; Alamanni, F.; Ongini, E. (Essex Italia, Subsidiary of Schering-Plough, Milan)

    1989-07-01

    beta- And alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist properties of bufuralol, carvedilol, celiprolol, dilevalol, labetalol, and pindolol were investigated in human myocardium and mammary artery using binding techniques and functional studies. In myocardial membranes, beta-adrenoceptor antagonists showed monophasic competition isotherms for (125I)pindolol binding with high affinity (Ki from 1-100 nM), except for celiprolol which displayed a biphasic competition isotherm (pKi = 6.4 +/- 0.06 for beta 1- and 4.8 +/- 0.07 for beta 2-adrenoceptors). Drug interactions with alpha 1-adrenoceptors were evaluated in human mammary artery by (3H)prazosin binding and by measuring contractile responses to norepinephrine (NE). Labetalol and carvedilol showed a moderate affinity for alpha 1-adrenoceptors (pKi = 6.2 +/- 0.01 and 6.1 +/- 0.06, respectively), and inhibited NE-induced contractions (pA2 = 6.93 +/- 0.23 and 8.64 +/- 0.24, respectively). Dilevalol, bufuralol, and pindolol displayed weak effect both in binding (Ki in micromolar range) and functional experiments (pA2 = 5.98, 5.54, and 6.23, respectively). Celiprolol did not show antagonist properties up to 100 microM in functional studies, but displayed a slight affinity for alpha 1-adrenoceptors in binding studies. The data indicate that the vasodilating activity of these beta-adrenoceptor antagonists is caused in some instances by an alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonism (labetalol, carvedilol), whereas for the others alternative mechanisms should be considered.

  20. The psychobiology of strained breathing and its cardiovascular implications : A functional system review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkema, DS

    1999-01-01

    Strained breathing is a natural respiratory pattern, with cardiovascular implications. It is associated with social factors, attention, expectation, and anxiety and with defense behavior in animals. An inhibition of active behavior is characteristic. Strained breathing is based on the functional het

  1. Effects of calcium intake on the cardiovascular system in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challoumas, D; Cobbold, C; Dimitrakakis, G

    2013-11-01

    The use of calcium supplements for the prevention of complications of osteoporosis has significantly increased during the last years. The effects of calcium intake in postmenopausal women on cardiovascular parameters such as blood pressure, serum lipids and cardiovascular events are controversial. Even though transient beneficial effects of calcium supplementation have been reported, especially in women with low dietary calcium intake, their long-term outcomes are inconclusive. Only a very few studies investigating serum lipids in postmenopausal women have been described and these showed significant increases in high-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein to low-density lipoprotein ratio. With regards to cardiovascular events in this population group adverse effects have been reported on the rates of myocardial infarction and stroke with increased calcium intake by some authors, however, others described no effects or even beneficial outcomes. We present a review of the current literature which provides a balanced summary of the possible beneficial and adverse effects of calcium intake in postmenopausal women on cardiovascular parameters. Taking into account the modest effect of calcium supplementation in reducing fracture rates, a reassessment of the role, benefits and adverse effects of calcium supplements should be conducted in postmenopausal women. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. CARDIO-VASCULAR RISK FACTORS IN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH DISEASES OF THE STOMATOGNATHIC SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botez C

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The association between dental and cardio-vascular diseases is essential as both are highly prevalent. Finding a possible causal relation between cardiovascular disease and chronic periodontal pathology, known to cause tooth loss, is therefore essential. The existence of some risk factors, such as smoking, bacterial infections, malnutrition and nutritional deficiencies, may explain the associations observed between cardio-vascular and oral pathologies. In the case of dental diseases, acceleration of atherosclerosis is supported by the role played by infections. The study – performed between 2008-2009 – analyzed 45 cases, selected from the patients hospitalized in the Medical Clinics of the Military Hospital of Ia[i. The patients included in the study suffered from arterial hypertension (HTA, cardiac insufficiency, ischemic cardiopathy, pectoral angina and subacute infectious endocarditis. All were subjected to a stomatological examination, for establishing their dental hygiene, the stomatological diseases they had had and the treatments performed. There are several ways in which infections of the oral cavity lead to cardiovascular disease. These include: transitory bacteriemia; inflammation and vascular lesions; diet and smoking.

  3. The effects of short-chain fatty acids on the cardiovascular system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richards, L.B.; Li, M.; van Esch, B.C.A.M.; Garssen, J.; Folkerts, G.

    2016-01-01

    The development of cardiovascular diseases is often attributable to loss of endothelial functions of the vascular tissue or to decreased contractile function of the heart muscle. These disturbances are often caused by imbalances in lipid and glucose metabolism. For instance, these imbalances can res

  4. Role of the Sympathetic Nervous System in Stress-Mediated Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering, Dagmara; Lachowska, Kamila; Schlaich, Markus

    2015-10-01

    A high incidence of acute cardiovascular events and sudden cardiac death following unexpected acute emotional stress or a natural catastrophic disaster has been well-documented over the past decades. Chronic psychosocial factors have been shown to be directly linked to the development of hypertension, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Activation of various neurogenic pathways is an important mediator of acute and chronic stress-induced hypertension and heart disease. Heightened sympathetic activation has been shown to be a critical contributor linking psychogenic effects on cardiovascular regulation to serious and often fatal CV outcomes. Accordingly, several therapeutic approaches that attenuate autonomic imbalance via modulation of increased sympathetic outflow by either non-pharmacological or interventional means have been shown to alleviate clinical symptoms. Likewise stress reduction per se achieved with transcendental medicine has been linked to improved patient outcomes. Therapies that oppose adrenergic activity and/or have the potential to attenuate negative emotions are likely to reduce cardiovascular risk and its adverse consequences attributable to chronic mental stress.

  5. Urinary albumin excretion and the renin-angiotensin system in cardiovascular risk management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Wal, R. M. A.; Voors, A. A.; Gansevoort, R. T.

    2006-01-01

    Microalbuminuria has been shown to be a strong predictor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in diabetic and hypertensive patients, but also in the general population. Moreover, several reports suggest that reduction of urinary albumin excretion (UAE) is associated with improvement of cardiova

  6. Study on Virtual Human Skeleton System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭巧; 李亦

    2004-01-01

    A solution of virtual human skeleton system is proposed. Some issues on integration of anatomical geometry, biodynamics and computer animation are studied. The detailed skeleton system model that incorporates the biodynamic and geometric characteristics of a human skeleton system allows some performance studies in greater detail than that performed before. It may provide an effective and convenient way to analyze and evaluate the movement performance of a human body when the personalized anatomical data are used in the models. An example shows that the proposed solution is effective for the stated problems.

  7. The human cutaneous chemokine system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard eMoser

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Irrespective of the immune status, the vast majority of all lymphocytes reside in peripheral tissues whereas those present in blood only amount to a small fraction of the total. It has been estimated that T cells in healthy human skin outnumber those present in blood by at least a factor of two. How lymphocytes within these two compartments relate to each other is not well understood. However, mounting evidence suggest that the study of T cell subsets present in peripheral blood does not reflect the function of their counterparts at peripheral sites. This is especially true under steady-state conditions whereby long-lived memory T cells in healthy tissues, notably those in epithelial tissues at body surfaces, are thought to fulfil a critical immune surveillance function by contributing to the first line of defence against a series of local threats, including microbes, tumours and toxins, and by participating in wound healing. The relative scarcity of information regarding peripheral T cells and the factors regulating their localization is primarily due to inherent difficulties in obtaining healthy tissue for the extraction and study of immune cells on a routine basis. This is most certainly true for humans. Here, we review our current understanding of T cell homing to human skin and discuss candidate chemokines that may account for the tissue selectivity in this process.

  8. The NATO Unmanned Aircraft System Human Systems Integration Guidebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    High level indicators of where human system interactions may occur • Textual descriptions of the overall human component of the system • Use cases...for specific team tasks  Type of interaction – i.e., collaborate, coordinate, supervise, etc.  Team cohesiveness indicators – i.e., trust

  9. Effect of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the cardiovascular system after oral administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhangjian; Wang, Yun; Zhuo, Lin; Chen, Shi; Zhao, Lin; Luan, Xianguo; Wang, Haifang; Jia, Guang

    2015-12-03

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) have been widely used in various consumer products, especially food and personal care products. Compared to the well-characterized adverse cardiovascular effect of inhaled ambient ultrafine particles, research on the health response to orally administrated TiO2 NPs is still limited. In our study, we performed an in vivo study in Sprague-Dawley rats to understand the cardiovascular effect of TiO2 NPs after oral intake. After daily gastrointestinal administration of TiO2 NPs at 0, 2, 10, 50 mg/kg for 30 and 90 days, heart rate (HR), blood pressure, blood biochemical parameters and histopathology of cardiac tissues was assessed to quantify cardiovascular damage. Mild and temporary reduction of HR and systolic blood pressure as well as an increase of diastolic blood pressure was observed after daily oral administration of TiO2 NPs for 30 days. Injury of cardiac function was observed after daily oral administration of TiO2 NPs for 90 days as reflected in decreased activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alpha-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (HBDH) and creatine kinase (CK). Increased white blood cells count (WBC) and granulocytes (GRN) in blood as well as increased concentrations of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) in the serum indicated inflammatory response initiated by TiO2 NPs exposure. It was hypothesize that cardiac damage and inflammatory response are the possible mechanisms of the adverse cardiovascular effects induced by orally administrated TiO2 NPs. Data from our study suggested that even at low dose of TiO2 NPs can induce adverse cardiovascular effects after 30 days or 90 days of oral exposure, thus warranting concern for the dietary intake of TiO2 NPs for consumers.

  10. CRESST Human Performance Knowledge Mapping System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-12-01

    team processes and team outcomes. Computers in Human Behavior , 15, 463-494. 0 Herl, H. E. (1995). Construct validation of an approach to modeling...system to measure content understanding. Computers in Human Behavior , 15, 315-334. Johnson, R.F. (2001). Statistical measures of marksmanship (ARI...problem-solving. Computers in Human Behavior , 15, 403-418. West, C. D., Pomeroy, J. R., Park, J. K., Gerstenberger, E. A., & Sandoval, J. (2000

  11. Prospective association between a dietary quality index based on a nutrient profiling system and cardiovascular disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriouch, Solia; Julia, Chantal; Kesse-Guyot, Emmanuelle; Méjean, Caroline; Ducrot, Pauline; Péneau, Sandrine; Donnenfeld, Mathilde; Deschasaux, Mélanie; Menai, Mehdi; Hercberg, Serge; Touvier, Mathilde; Fezeu, Léopold K

    2016-10-01

    Public health strategies are essential to guide consumers' choices and produce a substantial population impact on cardiovascular disease risk prevention through nutrition. Our aim was to investigate the prospective association between the Food Standards Agency nutrient profiling system dietary index (FSA-NPS DI) and cardiovascular disease risk. The FSA-NPS has been proposed to serve as a basis for a five-colour nutrition label suggested in France to be put on the front of pack of food products. A total of 6515 participants to the SU.VI.MAX cohort (1994-2007), who completed at least six 24-hour dietary records during the first two years of the study, were followed for a median of 12.4 years (25th-75th percentiles: 11.0-12.6). Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to characterise the associations between FSA-NPS DI (continuous and sex-specific quartiles) and the incidence of cardiovascular diseases. Interactions with individual characteristics were tested; 181 major cardiovascular events were reported (59 myocardial infarctions, 43 strokes, 79 anginas). A higher FSA-NPS DI, characterising poorer food choices, was associated with an overall increase in cardiovascular disease risk (HRfor a 1-point increment = 1.14 (1.03-1.27); HRQ4vs.Q1 = 1.61 (1.05-2.47), Ptrend Q4-Q1 = 0.03). This association tended to be stronger in smokers (HRfor a 1-point increment = 1.39 (1.11-1.73); Pinteraction = 0.01) and those less physically active (HRfor a 1-point increment = 1.26 (1.08-1.46); Pinteraction = 0.04). Our results suggest that poorer food choices, as reflected by a higher FSA-NPS DI, may be associated with a significant increase in cardiovascular risk, especially in at-risk individuals (smokers and physically inactive persons). This score could be a useful tool for public health prevention strategies. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00272428. © The European Society of Cardiology 2016.

  12. Modeling human operator involvement in robotic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wewerinke, P.H.

    1991-01-01

    A modeling approach is presented to describe complex manned robotic systems. The robotic system is modeled as a (highly) nonlinear, possibly time-varying dynamic system including any time delays in terms of optimal estimation, control and decision theory. The role of the human operator(s) is modeled

  13. Age, gender, and cancer but not neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases strongly modulate systemic effect of the Apolipoprotein E4 allele on lifespan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulminski, Alexander M; Arbeev, Konstantin G; Culminskaya, Irina

    2014-01-01

    cohorts and the Long Life Family Study (LLFS) to investigate gender-specific effects of the ApoE4 allele on human survival in a wide range of ages from midlife to extreme old ages, and the sensitivity of these effects to cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders (ND...... by 150% (p = 5.3 × 10(-8)) compared to the non-carriers. This risk explains the 4.2 year shorter life expectancy of the e4 carriers compared to the non-carriers in this sample. The analyses suggest the existence of age- and gender-sensitive systemic mechanisms linking the e4 allele to lifespan which can...... non-additively interfere with cancer-related mechanisms....

  14. Open Marriage: Implications for Human Service Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Nena; O'Neill, George

    1973-01-01

    The authors of Open Marriage reiterate the meaning and possibilities of the open marriage concept and advance suggestions for change in the areas of residence, work, child care, and educational patterns. Human service systems must search out the universal values to be maintained in all human relationships. (Editor)

  15. Systems biology of human atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalhoub, Joseph; Sikkel, Markus B; Davies, Kerry J; Vorkas, Panagiotis A; Want, Elizabeth J; Davies, Alun H

    2014-01-01

    Systems biology describes a holistic and integrative approach to understand physiology and pathology. The "omic" disciplines include genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolic profiling (metabonomics and metabolomics). By adopting a stance, which is opposing (yet complimentary) to conventional research techniques, systems biology offers an overview by assessing the "net" biological effect imposed by a disease or nondisease state. There are a number of different organizational levels to be understood, from DNA to protein, metabolites, cells, organs and organisms, even beyond this to an organism's context. Systems biology relies on the existence of "nodes" and "edges." Nodes are the constituent part of the system being studied (eg, proteins in the proteome), while the edges are the way these constituents interact. In future, it will be increasingly important to collaborate, collating data from multiple studies to improve data sets, making them freely available and undertaking integrative analyses.

  16. Human-Systems Integration Processes (HSIP) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In FY12, this project removed the commercial-specific content from the Commercial Human-Systems Integration Design Processes (CHSIP), identified gaps in the...

  17. NASA'S Standard Measures During Bed Rest: Adaptations in the Cardiovascular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stuart M. C.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Martin, David S.; Cromwell, Roni L.; Platts, Steven H.; Stenger, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Bed rest is a well-accepted analog of space flight that has been used extensively to investigate physiological adaptations in a larger number of subjects in a shorter amount of time than can be studied with space flight and without the confounding effects associated with normal mission operations. However, comparison across studies of different bed rest durations, between sexes, and between various countermeasure protocols have been hampered by dissimilarities in bed rest conditions, measurement protocols, and testing schedules. To address these concerns, NASA instituted standard bed rest conditions and standard measures for all physiological disciplines participating in studies conducted at the Flight Analogs Research Unit (FARU) at the University of Texas-Medical Branch. Investigators for individual studies employed their own targeted study protocols to address specific hypothesis-driven questions, but standard measures tests were conducted within these studies on a non-interference basis to maximize data availability while reducing the need to implement multiple bed rest studies to understand the effects of a specific countermeasure. When possible, bed rest standard measures protocols were similar to tests nominally used for medically-required measures or research protocols conducted before and after Space Shuttle and International Space Station missions. Specifically, bed rest standard measures for the cardiovascular system implemented before, during, and after bed rest at the FARU included plasma volume (carbon monoxide rebreathing), cardiac mass and function (2D, 3D and Doppler echocardiography), and orthostatic tolerance testing (15- or 30-minutes of 80 degree head-up tilt). Results to-date indicate that when countermeasures are not employed, plasma volume decreases and the incidence of presyncope during head-up tilt is more frequent even after short-duration bed rest while reductions in cardiac function and mass are progressive as bed rest duration

  18. Effects of air pollution caused by sugarcane burning in Western São Paulo on the cardiovascular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestana, Paula Roberta da Silva; Braga, Alfésio Luís Ferreira; Ramos, Ercy Mara Cipulo; de Oliveira, Ariadna Ferraz; Osadnik, Christian Robert; Ferreira, Aline Duarte; Ramos, Dionei

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effects of acute exposure to air pollutants (NO2 and PM10) on hospitalization of adults and older people with cardiovascular diseases in Western São Paulo. METHODS Daily cardiovascular-related hospitalization data (CID10 – I00 to I99) were acquired by the Department of Informatics of the Brazilian Unified Health System (DATASUS) from January 2009 to December 2012. Daily levels of NO2 and PM10 and weather data were obtained from Companhia Ambiental do Estado de São Paulo (CETESB – São Paulo State Environmental Agency). To estimate the effects of air pollutants exposure on hospital admissions, generalized linear Poisson regression models were used. RESULTS During the study period, 6,363 hospitalizations were analysed. On the day of NO2 exposure, an increase of 1.12% (95%CI 0.05–2.20) was observed in the interquartile range along with an increase in hospital admissions. For PM10, a pattern of similar effect was observed; however, results were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS Even though with values within established limits, NO2 is an important short-term risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity. PMID:28273230

  19. Effects of air pollution caused by sugarcane burning in Western São Paulo on the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestana, Paula Roberta da Silva; Braga, Alfésio Luís Ferreira; Ramos, Ercy Mara Cipulo; Oliveira, Ariadna Ferraz de; Osadnik, Christian Robert; Ferreira, Aline Duarte; Ramos, Dionei

    2017-03-02

    To evaluate the effects of acute exposure to air pollutants (NO2 and PM10) on hospitalization of adults and older people with cardiovascular diseases in Western São Paulo. Daily cardiovascular-related hospitalization data (CID10 - I00 to I99) were acquired by the Department of Informatics of the Brazilian Unified Health System (DATASUS) from January 2009 to December 2012. Daily levels of NO2 and PM10 and weather data were obtained from Companhia Ambiental do Estado de São Paulo (CETESB - São Paulo State Environmental Agency). To estimate the effects of air pollutants exposure on hospital admissions, generalized linear Poisson regression models were used. During the study period, 6,363 hospitalizations were analysed. On the day of NO2 exposure, an increase of 1.12% (95%CI 0.05-2.20) was observed in the interquartile range along with an increase in hospital admissions. For PM10, a pattern of similar effect was observed; however, results were not statistically significant. Even though with values within established limits, NO2 is an important short-term risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity.

  20. [Cardiovascular risk study in patients with renin-angiotensin system blockade by means of the proteone of circulating extracellular vesicles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Cuesta, F; Baldan-Martin, M; Mourino-Alvarez, L; Sastre-Oliva, T; Alvarez-Llamas, G; Gonzalez-Calero, L; Ruiz-Hurtado, G; Segura, J; Vivanco, F; Ruilope, L M; Barderas, M G

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are released to the bloodstream by certain cell types due to transport, activation and cell death processes. Blood count of EVs from platelet and endothelial origin has been proved to be a cardiovascular risk biomarker. Thus, EVs proteome might reflect the underlying cellular processes in hypertensive patients with albuminuria. Protein content of circulating EVs was analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. EVs were isolated by an ultracentrifugation protocol optimized in order to avoid contamination by blood plasma proteins. Purity of the isolated fraction was verified by electronic and confocal microscopy, and by flow cytometry. We hereby show a method to isolate circulating EVs from hypertensive patients with/without albuminuria with high yield and purity. Besides, we provide a reference proteome of the EVs of these patients, composed of 2,463 proteins, and prove that the proteins carried by these vesicles are associated with crucial processes involved in the inherent cardiovascular risk. The proteome of circulating EVs is an interesting source of indicators in the evaluation of cardiovascular risk in hypertensive patients with renin-angiotensin system blockage. Copyright © 2015 SEHLELHA. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.