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Sample records for human cardiomyocytes compared

  1. Consensus comparative analysis of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

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    Shaohong Zhang

    Full Text Available Global transcriptional analyses have been performed with human embryonic stem cells (hESC derived cardiomyocytes (CMs to identify molecules and pathways important for human CM differentiation, but variations in culture and profiling conditions have led to greatly divergent results among different studies. Consensus investigation to identify genes and gene sets enriched in multiple studies is important for revealing differential gene expression intrinsic to human CM differentiation independent of the above variables, but reliable methods of conducting such comparison are lacking. We examined differential gene expression between hESC and hESC-CMs from multiple microarray studies. For single gene analysis, we identified genes that were expressed at increased levels in hESC-CMs in seven datasets and which have not been previously highlighted. For gene set analysis, we developed a new algorithm, consensus comparative analysis (CSSCMP, capable of evaluating enrichment of gene sets from heterogeneous data sources. Based on both theoretical analysis and experimental validation, CSSCMP is more efficient and less susceptible to experimental variations than traditional methods. We applied CSSCMP to hESC-CM microarray data and revealed novel gene set enrichment (e.g., glucocorticoid stimulus, and also identified genes that might mediate this response. Our results provide important molecular information intrinsic to hESC-CM differentiation. Data and Matlab codes can be downloaded from S1 Data.

  2. The human adult cardiomyocyte phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bird, SD; Doevendans, PA; van Rooijen, MA; de la Riviere, AB; Hassink, RJ; Passier, R; Mummery, CL

    2003-01-01

    Aim: Determination of the phenotype of adult human atrial and ventricular myocytes based on gene expression and morphology. Methods: Atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes were obtained from patients undergoing cardiac surgery using a modified isolation procedure. Myocytes were isolated and cultured

  3. Evidence for Cardiomyocyte Renewal in Humans

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    Bergmann, O; Bhardwaj, R D; Bernard, S; Zdunek, S; Barnabe-Heider, F; Walsh, S; Zupicich, J; Alkass, K; Buchholz, B A; Druid, H; Jovinge, S; Frisen, J

    2008-10-14

    It has been difficult to establish whether we are limited to the heart muscle cells we are born with or if cardiomyocytes are generated also later in life. We have taken advantage of the integration of {sup 14}C, generated by nuclear bomb tests during the Cold War, into DNA to establish the age of cardiomyocytes in humans. We report that cardiomyocytes renew, with a gradual decrease from 1% turning over annually at the age of 20 to 0.3% at the age of 75. Less than 50% of cardiomyocytes are exchanged during a normal lifespan. The capacity to generate cardiomyocytes in the adult human heart suggests that it may be rational to work towards the development of therapeutic strategies aiming to stimulate this process in cardiac pathologies.

  4. Human Stem Cell Derived Cardiomyocytes: An Alternative ...

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    Chemical spills and associated deaths in the US has increased 2.6-fold and 16-fold from 1983 to 2012, respectfully. In addition, the number of chemicals to which humans are exposed to in the environment has increased almost 10-fold from 2001 to 2013 within the US. Internationally, a WHO report on the global composite impact of chemicals on health reported that 16% of the total burden of cardiovascular disease was attributed to environmental chemical exposure with 2.5 million deaths per year. Clearly, the cardiovascular system, at all its various developmental and life stages, represents a critical target organ system that can be adversely affected by existing and emerging chemicals (e.g., engineered nanomaterials) in a variety of environmental media. The ability to assess chemical cardiac risk and safety is critically needed but extremely challenging due to the number and categories of chemicals in commerce, as indicated. This presentation\\session will evaluate the use of adult human stem cell derived cardiomyocytes, and existing platforms, as an alternative model to evaluate environmental chemical cardiac toxicity as well as provide key information for the development of predictive adverse outcomes pathways associated with environmental chemical exposures. (This abstract does not represent EPA policy) Rapid and translatable chemical safety screening models for cardiotoxicity current status for informing regulatory decisions, a workshop sponsored by the Society

  5. Enhancement of cardiomyocyte differentiation from human embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Several approaches have been used to encourage the differentiation of cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells.However,the differentiation efficiency is low,and appropriate culture protocols are needed to produce adequate numbers of cardiomyocytes for therapeutic cell transplantation.This study investigated the effects of serum on cardiomyocyte differentiation in suspension culture medium during embryoid body(EB) formation by human embryonic stem cells.The addition of ascorbic acid,dimethylsulfoxide and 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine during days 5-7 at the EB-forming stage resulted in an increase in the numbers of rhythmically contracting clusters of derived cardiomyocytes.Treatment with 0.1 mmol L-1 ascorbic acid alone,or more notably in combination with 10 μmol L-1 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine,induced the formation of beating cells within EBs.Most of the beating clusters had spontaneous contraction rates similar to those found in human adults,and their contractile ac-tivity lasted for up to 194 days.

  6. Endothelin-1 downregulates Mas receptor expression in human cardiomyocytes.

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    Chen, Zhiheng; Tang, Yamei; Yang, Zuocheng; Liu, Shaojun; Liu, Yong; Li, Yan; He, Wei

    2013-09-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) are involved in the pathogenesis of cardiac dysfunction. The Mas receptor is a functional binding site for angiotensin (Ang)‑(1-7), which is now considered a critical component of the RAS and exerts cardioprotective effects. To the best of our knowledge, the present study aimed to examine, for the first time, the effects of ET-1 on Mas expression in cultured human cardiomyocytes. Human cardiomyocytes were treated with ET-1 at different concentrations (1, 5, 10, 20 and 30 nM) for varied time periods (0.5, 1.5, 3, 4.5 or 6 h) with or without the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D, endothelin A (ETA) receptor blocker BQ123 and ETB receptor blocker BQ788, or different kinase inhibitors. ET-1 decreased the Mas mRNA level in a statistically significant dose- and time-dependent manner within 4.5 h, which was reflected in the dose-dependent downregulation of Mas promoter activity, Mas protein levels and Ang-(1-7) binding on the cell membrane. Actinomycin D (1 mg/ml), BQ123 (1 µM), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) siRNA and inhibitor PD169316 (25 µM), completely eliminated the inhibitory effects of ET-1 on Mas expression in human cardiomyocytes. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that ET-1 downregulates Mas expression at the transcription level in human cardiomyocytes via the ETA receptor by a p38 MAPK‑dependent mechanism. This study provides novel insights into the function of ET-1 and the Ang‑(1-7)/Mas axis in cardiac pathophysiology.

  7. Understanding greater cardiomyocyte functions on aligned compared to random carbon nanofibers in PLGA

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    Asiri AM

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Abdullah M Asiri,1 Hadi M Marwani,1 Sher Bahadar Khan,1 Thomas J Webster1,2 1Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Previous studies have demonstrated greater cardiomyocyte density on carbon nanofibers (CNFs aligned (compared to randomly oriented in poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA composites. Although such studies demonstrated a closer mimicking of anisotropic electrical and mechanical properties for such aligned (compared to randomly oriented CNFs in PLGA composites, the objective of the present in vitro study was to elucidate a deeper mechanistic understanding of how cardiomyocyte densities recognize such materials to respond more favorably. Results showed lower wettability (greater hydrophobicity of CNFs embedded in PLGA compared to pure PLGA, thus providing evidence of selectively lower wettability in aligned CNF regions. Furthermore, the results correlated these changes in hydrophobicity with increased adsorption of fibronectin, laminin, and vitronectin (all proteins known to increase cardiomyocyte adhesion and functions on CNFs in PLGA compared to pure PLGA, thus providing evidence of selective initial protein adsorption cues on such CNF regions to promote cardiomyocyte adhesion and growth. Lastly, results of the present in vitro study further confirmed increased cardiomyocyte functions by demonstrating greater expression of important cardiomyocyte biomarkers (such as Troponin-T, Connexin-43, and α-sarcomeric actin when CNFs were aligned compared to randomly oriented in PLGA. In summary, this study provided evidence that cardiomyocyte functions are improved on CNFs aligned in PLGA compared to randomly oriented in PLGA since CNFs are more hydrophobic than PLGA and attract the adsorption of key proteins (fibronectin, laminin, and vironectin that are known to promote cardiomyocyte adhesion

  8. Ghrelin promotes differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into cardiomyocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin YANG; Guo-qiang LIU; Rui WEI; Wen-fang HOU; Mei-juan GAO; Ming-xia ZHU; Hai-ning WANG; Gui-an CHEN; Tian-pei HONG

    2011-01-01

    Aim:Ghrelin is involved in regulating the differentiation of mesoderm-derived precursor cells.The aim of this study was to investigate whether ghrelin modulated the differentiation of human embryonic stem (hES) cells into cardiomyocytes and,if so,whether the effect was mediated by growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1α (GHS-R1α).Methods:Cardiomyocyte differentiation from hES cells was performed according to an embryoid body (EB)-based protocol.The cumulative percentage of beating EBs was calculated.The expression of cardiac-specific markers including cardiac troponin Ⅰ (cTnl) and α-myosin heavy chain (α-MHC) was detected using RT-PCR,real-time PCR and Western blot.The dispersed beating EBs were examined using immunofluorescent staining.Results:The percentage of beating EBs and the expression of cTnl were significantly increased after ghrelin (0.1 and 1 nmol/L) added into the differentiation medium.From 6 to 18 d of differentiation,the increased expression of cTnl and α-MHC by ghrelin (1 nmol/L)was time-dependent,and in line with the alteration of the percentages of beating EBs.Furthermore,the dispersed beating EBs were double-positively immunostained with antibodies against cTnl and α-actinin.However,blockage of GHS-R1α with its specific antagonist D-[lys3]-GHRP-6 (1 μmol/L) did not alter the effects of ghrelin on cardiomyocyte differentiation.Conclusion:Our data show that ghrelin enhances the generation of cardiomyocytes from hES cells,which is not mediated via GHS-R1α.

  9. Identification and characterization of calcium sparks in cardiomyocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

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    Guang Qin Zhang

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Ca2+ spark constitutes the elementary units of cardiac excitation-contraction (E-C coupling in mature cardiomyocytes. Human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes are known to have electrophysiological properties similar to mature adult cardiomyocytes. However, it is unclear if they share similar calcium handling property. We hypothesized that Ca2+ sparks in human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSCs-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs may display unique structural and functional properties than mature adult cardiomyocytes. METHODS AND RESULTS: Ca2+ sparks in hiPSC-CMs were recorded with Ca2+ imaging assay with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Those sparks were stochastic with a tendency of repetitive occurrence at the same site. Nevertheless, the spatial-temporal properties of Ca2+ spark were analogous to that of adult CMs. Inhibition of L-type Ca2+ channels by nifedipine caused a 61% reduction in calcium spark frequency without affecting amplitude of those sparks and magnitude of caffeine releasable sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR Ca2+ content. In contrast, high extracellular Ca2+ and ryanodine increased the frequency, full width at half maximum (FWHM and full duration at half maximum (FDHM of spontaneous Ca2+ sparks. CONCLUSIONS: For the first time, spontaneous Ca2+ sparks were detected in hiPSC-CMs. The Ca2+ sparks are predominately triggered by L-type Ca2+ channels mediated Ca2+ influx, which is comparable to sparks detected in adult ventricular myocytes in which cardiac E-C coupling was governed by a Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR mechanism. However, focal repetitive sparks originated from the same intracellular organelle could reflect an immature status of the hiPSC-CMs.

  10. Production of De Novo Cardiomyocytes: Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Differentiation and Direct Reprogramming

    OpenAIRE

    Burridge, Paul W.; Keller, Gordon; Gold, Joseph D.; Wu, Joseph C

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death worldwide. The limited capability of heart tissue to regenerate has prompted method developments for creating de novo cardiomyocytes, both in vitro and in vivo. Beyond uses in cell replacement therapy, patient-specific cardiomyocytes may find applications in drug testing, drug discovery, and disease modeling. Recently, approaches for generating cardiomyocytes have expanded to encompass three major sources of starting cells: human pluripotent ...

  11. Cardiac protein kinases: the cardiomyocyte kinome and differential kinase expression in human failing hearts

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    Fuller, Stephen J.; Osborne, Sally A.; Leonard, Sam J.; Hardyman, Michelle A.; Vaniotis, George; Allen, Bruce G.; Sugden, Peter H.; Clerk, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Aims. Protein kinases are potential therapeutic targets for heart failure, but most studies of cardiac protein kinases derive from other systems, an approach that fails to account for specific kinases expressed in the heart and the contractile cardiomyocytes. We aimed to define the cardiomyocyte kinome (i.e. the protein kinases expressed in cardiomyocytes) and identify kinases with altered expression in human failing hearts. Methods and Results. Expression profiling (Affymetrix microarrays) d...

  12. Myeloperoxidase impairs the contractile function in isolated human cardiomyocytes.

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    Kalász, Judit; Pásztor, Enikő T; Fagyas, Miklós; Balogh, Ágnes; Tóth, Attila; Csató, Viktória; Édes, István; Papp, Zoltán; Borbély, Attila

    2015-07-01

    We set out to characterize the mechanical effects of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in isolated left-ventricular human cardiomyocytes. Oxidative myofilament protein modifications (sulfhydryl (SH)-group oxidation and carbonylation) induced by the peroxidase and chlorinating activities of MPO were additionally identified. The specificity of the MPO-evoked functional alterations was tested with an MPO inhibitor (MPO-I) and the antioxidant amino acid Met. The combined application of MPO and its substrate, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), largely reduced the active force (Factive), increased the passive force (Fpassive), and decreased the Ca(2+) sensitivity of force production (pCa50) in permeabilized cardiomyocytes. H2O2 alone had significantly smaller effects on Factive and Fpassive and did not alter pCa50. The MPO-I blocked both the peroxidase and the chlorinating activities, whereas Met selectively inhibited the chlorinating activity of MPO. All of the MPO-induced functional effects could be prevented by the MPO-I and Met. Both H2O2 alone and MPO + H2O2 reduced the SH content of actin and increased the carbonylation of actin and myosin-binding protein C to the same extent. Neither the SH oxidation nor the carbonylation of the giant sarcomeric protein titin was affected by these treatments. MPO activation induces a cardiomyocyte dysfunction by affecting Ca(2+)-regulated active and Ca(2+)-independent passive force production and myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity, independent of protein SH oxidation and carbonylation. The MPO-induced deleterious functional alterations can be prevented by the MPO-I and Met. Inhibition of MPO may be a promising therapeutic target to limit myocardial contractile dysfunction during inflammation.

  13. Global expression profile of highly enriched cardiomyocytes derived from human embryonic stem cells.

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    Xu, Xiu Qin; Soo, Set Yen; Sun, William; Zweigerdt, Robert

    2009-09-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESC), with their ability to differentiate into cardiomyocytes in culture, hold great potential for cell replacement therapies and provide an in vitro model of human heart development. A genomewide characterization of the molecular phenotype of hESC-derived cardiomyocytes is important for their envisioned applications. We have employed a lineage selection strategy to generate a pure population of cardiomyocytes (>99%) from transgenic hESC lines. Global gene expression profiling showed that these cardiomyocytes are distinct from pluripotent and differentiated hESC cultures. Pure cardiomyocytes displayed similarities with heart tissue, but in many aspects presented an individual transcriptome pattern. A subset of 1,311 cardiac-enriched transcripts was identified, which were significantly overpresented (p human heart development.

  14. Altered calcium handling and increased contraction force in human embryonic stem cell derived cardiomyocytes following short term dexamethasone exposure.

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    Kosmidis, Georgios; Bellin, Milena; Ribeiro, Marcelo C; van Meer, Berend; Ward-van Oostwaard, Dorien; Passier, Robert; Tertoolen, Leon G J; Mummery, Christine L; Casini, Simona

    2015-11-27

    One limitation in using human pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs) for disease modeling and cardiac safety pharmacology is their immature functional phenotype compared with adult cardiomyocytes. Here, we report that treatment of human embryonic stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) with dexamethasone, a synthetic glucocorticoid, activated glucocorticoid signaling which in turn improved their calcium handling properties and contractility. L-type calcium current and action potential properties were not affected by dexamethasone but significantly faster calcium decay, increased forces of contraction and sarcomeric lengths, were observed in hESC-CMs after dexamethasone exposure. Activating the glucocorticoid pathway can thus contribute to mediating hPSC-CMs maturation.

  15. Modeling Cardiovascular Diseases with Patient-Specific Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

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    Burridge, Paul W.; Diecke, Sebastian; Matsa, Elena; Sharma, Arun; Wu, Haodi; Wu, Joseph C.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of cardiomyocytes from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) provides a source of cells that accurately recapitulate the human cardiac pathophysiology. The application of these cells allows for modeling of cardiovascular diseases, providing a novel understanding of human disease mechanisms and assessment of therapies. Here, we describe a stepwise protocol developed in our laboratory for the generation of hiPSCs from patients with a specific disease phenotype, long-term hiPSC culture and cryopreservation, differentiation of hiPSCs to cardiomyocytes, and assessment of disease phenotypes. Our protocol combines a number of innovative tools that include a codon-optimized mini intronic plasmid (CoMiP), chemically defined culture conditions to achieve high efficiencies of reprogramming and differentiation, and calcium imaging for assessment of cardiomyocyte phenotypes. Thus, this protocol provides a complete guide to use a patient cohort on a testable cardiomyocyte platform for pharmacological drug assessment. PMID:25690476

  16. Generation and characterization of functional cardiomyocytes derived from human T cell-derived induced pluripotent stem cells.

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    Tomohisa Seki

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have been proposed as novel cell sources for genetic disease models and revolutionary clinical therapies. Accordingly, human iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes are potential cell sources for cardiomyocyte transplantation therapy. We previously developed a novel generation method for human peripheral T cell-derived iPSCs (TiPSCs that uses a minimally invasive approach to obtain patient cells. However, it remained unknown whether TiPSCs with genomic rearrangements in the T cell receptor (TCR gene could differentiate into functional cardiomyocyte in vitro. To address this issue, we investigated the morphology, gene expression pattern, and electrophysiological properties of TiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes differentiated by floating culture. RT-PCR analysis and immunohistochemistry showed that the TiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes properly express cardiomyocyte markers and ion channels, and show the typical cardiomyocyte morphology. Multiple electrode arrays with application of ion channel inhibitors also revealed normal electrophysiological responses in the TiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes in terms of beating rate and the field potential waveform. In this report, we showed that TiPSCs successfully differentiated into cardiomyocytes with morphology, gene expression patterns, and electrophysiological features typical of native cardiomyocytes. TiPSCs-derived cardiomyocytes obtained from patients by a minimally invasive technique could therefore become disease models for understanding the mechanisms of cardiac disease and cell sources for revolutionary cardiomyocyte therapies.

  17. Effects of Substrate Mechanics on Contractility of Cardiomyocytes Generated from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Laurie B. Hazeltine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC- derived cardiomyocytes have potential applications in drug discovery, toxicity testing, developmental studies, and regenerative medicine. Before these cells can be reliably utilized, characterization of their functionality is required to establish their similarity to native cardiomyocytes. We tracked fluorescent beads embedded in 4.4–99.7 kPa polyacrylamide hydrogels beneath contracting neonatal rat cardiomyocytes and cardiomyocytes generated from hPSCs via growth-factor-induced directed differentiation to measure contractile output in response to changes in substrate mechanics. Contraction stress was determined using traction force microscopy, and morphology was characterized by immunocytochemistry for α-actinin and subsequent image analysis. We found that contraction stress of all types of cardiomyocytes increased with substrate stiffness. This effect was not linked to beating rate or morphology. We demonstrated that hPSC-derived cardiomyocyte contractility responded appropriately to isoprenaline and remained stable in culture over a period of 2 months. This study demonstrates that hPSC-derived cardiomyocytes have appropriate functional responses to substrate stiffness and to a pharmaceutical agent, which motivates their use in further applications such as drug evaluation and cardiac therapies.

  18. Experimental research on recombinant human endostatin-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis in rats

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    Jing QIN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the recombinant human endostatin (rh-ES-induced cardiotoxicity in rats and its mechanism. Methods Twenty four female Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups (6 each. Rats in low, moderate and high dose group received rh-ES with a dosage of 3, 6 and 12mg/(kg·d, respectively, by intraperitoneal injection, and rats in control group received the same amount of normal saline alone. Half of rats in each group were sacrificed by spinal dislocation after 4 weeks and 8 weeks of the treatment. Pathomorphologic and ultrastructural changes in rat's myocardial tissue were evaluated by light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis was detected with TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL assay. Microvessel density (MVD in myocardial tissue was measured by immunohistochemically marking endothelial cell with CD34. Results No pathomorphologic and ultrastrucural changes were found under light microscope and transmission electron microscope in the low dose and moderate dose groups, but cardiomyocyte damage were found in the high dose group. TUNEL assay revealed more apoptotic cells in high and moderate (only 8 weeks dose groups than in control group (P=0.033, P=0.000, and the apoptosis index was highest in the high dose group at 8 weeks. In addition, compared with the control group, MVD significantly increased in high dose groups at 4 weeks and 8 weeks (P<0.05. Conclusions rh-ES induces the cardiotoxicity in rats, and cardiomyocyte apoptosis is involved in the pathological course of cardiac toxicity. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.01.02

  19. Alignment of human cardiomyocytes on laser patterned biphasic core/shell nanowire assemblies

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    Kiefer, Karin; Lee, Juseok; Haidar, Ayman; Martinez Miró, Marina; Akkan, Cagri Kaan; Veith, Michael; Cenk Aktas, Oral; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim

    2014-12-01

    The management of end stage heart failure patients is only possible by heart transplantation or by the implantation of artificial hearts as a bridge for later transplantation. However, these therapeutic strategies are limited by a lack of donor hearts and by the associated complications, such as coagulation and infection, due to the used artificial mechanical circulatory assist devices. Therefore, new strategies for myocardial regenerative approaches are under extensive research to produce contractile myocardial tissue in the future to replace non-contractile myocardial ischemic and scarred tissue. Different approaches, such as cell transplantation, have been studied intensively. Although successful approaches have been observed, there are still limitations to the application. It is envisaged that myocardial tissue engineering can be used to help replace infarcted non-contractile tissue. The developed tissue should later mimic the aligned fibrillar structure of the extracellular matrix and provide important guidance cues for the survival, function and the needed orientation of cardiomyocytes. Nanostructured surfaces have been tested to provide a guided direction that cells can follow. In the present study, the cellular adhesion/alignment of human cardiomyocytes and the biocompatibility have been investigated after cultivation on different laser-patterned nanowires compared with unmodified nanowires. As a result, the nanostructured surfaces possessed good biocompatibility before and after laser modification. The laser-induced scalability of the pattern enabled the growth and orientation of the adhered myocardial tissue. Such approaches may be used to modify the surface of potential scaffolds to develop myocardial contractile tissue in the future.

  20. Human Embryonic Stem Cell derived Cardiomyocytes self-arrange with areas of different subtypes during differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Maj Linea; Grubb, Søren J; Rasmussen, Karen Koefod

    2017-01-01

    The derivation of functional cardiomyocytes (CMs) from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) represents a unique way of studying human cardiogenesis, including the development of CM subtypes. In this study, we investigated the development and organization of CMs derived from hESCs (h...

  1. PGC-1α and reactive oxygen species regulate human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Birket (Matthew); S. Casini (Simona); G. Kosmidis (Georgios); D.J. Elliott (David); A.A. Gerencser (Akos); A. Baartscheer (Antonius); C. Schumacher (Cees); P.G. Mastroberardino (Pier); A.G. Elefanty (Andrew); E.G. Stanley (Ed); C.L. Mummery (Christine)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractDiminished mitochondrial function is causally related to some heart diseases. Here, we developed a human disease model based on cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), in which an important pathway of mitochondrial gene expression was inactivated. Repression of PGC-1α, wh

  2. Integrated Analysis of Contractile Kinetics, Force Generation, and Electrical Activity in Single Human Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kijlstra, Jan David; Hu, Dongjian; Mittal, Nikhil; Kausel, Eduardo; van der Meer, Peter; Garakani, Arman; Domian, Ibrahim J.

    2015-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of cardiomyocyte function is essential for stem cell-based approaches for the in vitro study of human cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. We present a method to comprehensively assess the function of single human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte (hPSC-CMs) th

  3. Integrated Analysis of Contractile Kinetics, Force Generation, and Electrical Activity in Single Human Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kijlstra, Jan David; Hu, Dongjian; Mittal, Nikhil; Kausel, Eduardo; van der Meer, Peter; Garakani, Arman; Domian, Ibrahim J.

    2015-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of cardiomyocyte function is essential for stem cell-based approaches for the in vitro study of human cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. We present a method to comprehensively assess the function of single human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte (hPSC-CMs)

  4. Structural differentiation, proliferation, and association of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes in vitro and in their extracardiac tissues.

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    Cui, Li; Johkura, Kohei; Takei, Shunsuke; Ogiwara, Naoko; Sasaki, Katsunori

    2007-06-01

    The proliferation, structural differentiation, and capacity of association of human ES cell-derived cardiomyocytes were assessed in culture and in extracardiac graft tissues. Embryoid body (EB) outgrowths having cardiomyocytes, and their transplants in mice retroperitoneum or renal subcapsular region were analyzed mainly by immunochemistry. During the culture of EB outgrowths, colonies of cardiomyocytes grew in size exhibiting synchronized beatings. Subcellular structures of those cardiomyocytes involved in the contraction, hormone production, and intercellular integration differentiated with distinct immunoreactivity for constituent proteins/peptides. Judging from PCNA staining, proliferation potential was maintained in part for more than 70 days. In teratoma tissues on post-transplantation Day 7, cardiomyocytes maintained their integration with connexin 43 and cadherin at their junctions. They partly exhibited strong PCNA reactivity. On Day 28, large part of the cardiomyocytes lost their association, dispersing among non-cardiac cells without discernible cadherin reactivity. Proliferation potential was generally low irrespective of their tissue diversity. From these results, structural differentiation and active proliferation of human ES cell-derived cardiomyocytes occurred in vitro, maintaining their association. When developed in extracardiac tissues, however, the cardiomyocytes showed low proliferation potential and reduced cellular integration. This leads to the proposal that some procedure will be necessary to accelerate or maintain the proliferation of cardiomyocytes in vivo.

  5. Hsp60 and p70S6K form a complex in human cardiomyocytes

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    Kroupskaya I. V.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Molecular chaperon Hsp60 and protein kinase p70S6K play an important functional role in the regulation of cardiomyocytes vital function or apoptosis. Aim. To study a possibility of in vivo complex formation between Hsp60 and p70S6K in cardiomyocytes. Methods. Co-immunoprecipitation, Western-blot analysis. Results. We have identified in vivo interaction between molecular chaperone Hsp60 and two isoforms of proteinkinase p70S6K in human myocardium, normal and affected by cardiomyopathy. Conclusions. The results obtained suggest a possible participation of molecular chaperon Hsp60 in regulation of p70S6K activity in stressinduced apoptotic signaling pathway in cardiomyocytes.

  6. Determination of the human cardiomyocyte mRNA and miRNA differentiation network by fine-scale profiling.

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    Babiarz, Joshua E; Ravon, Morgane; Sridhar, Sriram; Ravindran, Palanikumar; Swanson, Brad; Bitter, Hans; Weiser, Thomas; Chiao, Eric; Certa, Ulrich; Kolaja, Kyle L

    2012-07-20

    To gain insight into the molecular regulation of human heart development, a detailed comparison of the mRNA and miRNA transcriptomes across differentiating human-induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes and biopsies from fetal, adult, and hypertensive human hearts was performed. Gene ontology analysis of the mRNA expression levels of the hiPSCs differentiating into cardiomyocytes revealed 3 distinct groups of genes: pluripotent specific, transitional cardiac specification, and mature cardiomyocyte specific. Hierarchical clustering of the mRNA data revealed that the transcriptome of hiPSC cardiomyocytes largely stabilizes 20 days after initiation of differentiation. Nevertheless, analysis of cells continuously cultured for 120 days indicated that the cardiomyocytes continued to mature toward a more adult-like gene expression pattern. Analysis of cardiomyocyte-specific miRNAs (miR-1, miR-133a/b, and miR-208a/b) revealed an miRNA pattern indicative of stem cell to cardiomyocyte specification. A biostatistitical approach integrated the miRNA and mRNA expression profiles revealing a cardiomyocyte differentiation miRNA network and identified putative mRNAs targeted by multiple miRNAs. Together, these data reveal the miRNA network in human heart development and support the notion that overlapping miRNA networks re-enforce transcriptional control during developmental specification.

  7. Altered calcium handling and increased contraction force in human embryonic stem cell derived cardiomyocytes following short term dexamethasone exposure

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    Kosmidis, Georgios; Bellin, Milena; Ribeiro, Marcelo C.; Meer, Berend van; Ward-van Oostwaard, Dorien [Department of Anatomy and Embryology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Passier, Robert [Department of Anatomy and Embryology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); MIRA, University of Twente (Netherlands); Tertoolen, Leon G.J.; Mummery, Christine L. [Department of Anatomy and Embryology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Casini, Simona, E-mail: s.casini@amc.uva.nl [Department of Anatomy and Embryology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2015-11-27

    One limitation in using human pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs) for disease modeling and cardiac safety pharmacology is their immature functional phenotype compared with adult cardiomyocytes. Here, we report that treatment of human embryonic stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) with dexamethasone, a synthetic glucocorticoid, activated glucocorticoid signaling which in turn improved their calcium handling properties and contractility. L-type calcium current and action potential properties were not affected by dexamethasone but significantly faster calcium decay, increased forces of contraction and sarcomeric lengths, were observed in hESC-CMs after dexamethasone exposure. Activating the glucocorticoid pathway can thus contribute to mediating hPSC-CMs maturation. - Highlights: • Dexamethasone accelerates Ca{sup 2+} transient decay in hESC-CMs. • Dexamethasone enhances SERCA and NCX function in hESC-CMs. • Dexamethasone increases force of contraction and sarcomere length in hESC-CMs. • Dexamethasone does not alter I{sub Ca,L} and action potential characteristics in hESC-CMs.

  8. Generation of highly purified human cardiomyocytes from peripheral blood mononuclear cell-derived induced pluripotent stem cells.

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    Fuerstenau-Sharp, Maya; Zimmermann, Martina E; Stark, Klaus; Jentsch, Nico; Klingenstein, Melanie; Drzymalski, Marzena; Wagner, Stefan; Maier, Lars S; Hehr, Ute; Baessler, Andrea; Fischer, Marcus; Hengstenberg, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have an enormous potential for physiological studies. A novel protocol was developed combining the derivation of iPS from peripheral blood with an optimized directed differentiation to cardiomyocytes and a subsequent metabolic selection. The human iPS cells were retrovirally dedifferentiated from activated T cells. The subsequent optimized directed differentiation protocol yielded 30-45% cardiomyocytes at day 16 of differentiation. The derived cardiomyocytes expressed appropriate structural markers like cardiac troponin T, α-actinin and myosin light chain 2 (MLC2V). In a subsequent metabolic selection with lactate, the cardiomyocytes content could be increased to more than 90%. Loss of cardiomyocytes during metabolic selection were less than 50%, whereas alternative surface antibody-based selection procedures resulted in loss of up to 80% of cardiomyocytes. Electrophysiological characterization confirmed the typical cardiac features and the presence of ventricular, atrial and nodal-like action potentials within the derived cardiomyocyte population. Our combined and optimized protocol is highly robust and applicable for scalable cardiac differentiation. It provides a simple and cost-efficient method without expensive equipment for generating large numbers of highly purified, functional cardiomyocytes. It will further enhance the applicability of iPS cell-derived cardiomyocytes for disease modeling, drug discovery, and regenerative medicine.

  9. Generation of highly purified human cardiomyocytes from peripheral blood mononuclear cell-derived induced pluripotent stem cells.

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    Maya Fuerstenau-Sharp

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells have an enormous potential for physiological studies. A novel protocol was developed combining the derivation of iPS from peripheral blood with an optimized directed differentiation to cardiomyocytes and a subsequent metabolic selection. The human iPS cells were retrovirally dedifferentiated from activated T cells. The subsequent optimized directed differentiation protocol yielded 30-45% cardiomyocytes at day 16 of differentiation. The derived cardiomyocytes expressed appropriate structural markers like cardiac troponin T, α-actinin and myosin light chain 2 (MLC2V. In a subsequent metabolic selection with lactate, the cardiomyocytes content could be increased to more than 90%. Loss of cardiomyocytes during metabolic selection were less than 50%, whereas alternative surface antibody-based selection procedures resulted in loss of up to 80% of cardiomyocytes. Electrophysiological characterization confirmed the typical cardiac features and the presence of ventricular, atrial and nodal-like action potentials within the derived cardiomyocyte population. Our combined and optimized protocol is highly robust and applicable for scalable cardiac differentiation. It provides a simple and cost-efficient method without expensive equipment for generating large numbers of highly purified, functional cardiomyocytes. It will further enhance the applicability of iPS cell-derived cardiomyocytes for disease modeling, drug discovery, and regenerative medicine.

  10. Exposure to phthalates affects calcium handling and intercellular connectivity of human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

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    Nikki Gillum Posnack

    Full Text Available The pervasive nature of plastics has raised concerns about the impact of continuous exposure to plastic additives on human health. Of particular concern is the use of phthalates in the production of flexible polyvinyl chloride (PVC products. Di-2-ethylhexyl-phthalate (DEHP is a commonly used phthalate ester plasticizer that imparts flexibility and elasticity to PVC products. Recent epidemiological studies have reported correlations between urinary phthalate concentrations and cardiovascular disease, including an increased risk of high blood pressure and coronary risk. Yet, there is little direct evidence linking phthalate exposure to adverse effects in human cells, including cardiomyocytes.The effect of DEHP on calcium handling was examined using monolayers of gCAMP3 human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes, which contain an endogenous calcium sensor. Cardiomyocytes were exposed to DEHP (5 - 50 μg/mL, and calcium transients were recorded using a Zeiss confocal imaging system. DEHP exposure (24 - 72 hr had a negative chronotropic and inotropic effect on cardiomyocytes, increased the minimum threshold voltage required for external pacing, and modified connexin-43 expression. Application of Wy-14,643 (100 μM, an agonist for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, did not replicate DEHP's effects on calcium transient morphology or spontaneous beating rate.Phthalates can affect the normal physiology of human cardiomyocytes, including DEHP elicited perturbations in cardiac calcium handling and intercellular connectivity. Our findings call for additional studies to clarify the extent by which phthalate exposure can alter cardiac function, particularly in vulnerable patient populations who are at risk for high phthalate exposure.

  11. Engineered Microenvironments for the Maturation and Observation of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Cardiomyocytes

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    Salick, Max R.

    The human heart is a dynamic system that undergoes substantial changes as it develops and adapts to the body's growing needs. To better understand the physiology of the heart, researchers have begun to produce immature heart muscle cells, or cardiomyocytes, from pluripotent stem cell sources with remarkable efficiency. These stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes hold great potential in the understanding and treatment of heart disease; however, even after prolonged culture, these cells continue to exhibit an immature phenotype, as indicated by poor sarcomere organization and calcium handling, among other features. The lack of maturation that is observed in these cardiomyocytes greatly limits their applicability towards drug screening, disease modeling, and cell therapy applications. The mechanical environment surrounding a cell has been repeatedly shown to have a large impact on that cell's behavior. For this reason, we have implemented micropatterning methods to mimic the level of alignment that occurs in the heart in vivo in order to study how this alignment may help the cells to produce a more mature sarcomere phenotype. It was discovered that the level of sarcomere organization of a cardiomyocyte can be strongly influenced by the micropattern lane geometry on which it adheres. Steps were taken to optimize this micropattern platform, and studies of protein organization, gene expression, and myofibrillogenesis were conducted. Additionally, a set of programs was developed to provide quantitative analysis of the level of sarcomere organization, as well as to assist with several other tissue engineering applications.

  12. Exogenous Nitric Oxide Protects Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes against Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

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    János Pálóczi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. Human embryonic stem cell- (hESC- derived cardiomyocytes are one of the useful screening platforms of potential cardiocytoprotective molecules. However, little is known about the behavior of these cardiomyocytes in simulated ischemia/reperfusion conditions. In this study, we have tested the cytoprotective effect of an NO donor and the brain type natriuretic peptide (BNP in a screening platform based first on differentiated embryonic bodies (EBs, 6 + 4 days and then on more differentiated cardiomyocytes (6 + 24 days, both derived from hESCs. Methods. Both types of hESC-derived cells were exposed to 150 min simulated ischemia, followed by 120 min reperfusion. Cell viability was assessed by propidium iodide staining. The following treatments were applied during simulated ischemia in differentiated EBs: the NO-donor S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP (10−7, 10−6, and 10−5 M, BNP (10−9, 10−8, and 10−7 M, and the nonspecific NO synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA, 10−5 M. Results. SNAP (10−6, 10−5 M significantly attenuated cell death in differentiated EBs. However, simulated ischemia/reperfusion-induced cell death was not affected by BNP or by L-NNA. In separate experiments, SNAP (10−6 M also protected hESC-derived cardiomyocytes. Conclusions. We conclude that SNAP, but not BNP, protects differentiated EBs or cardiomyocytes derived from hESCs against simulated ischemia/reperfusion injury. The present screening platform is a useful tool for discovery of cardiocytoprotective molecules and their cellular mechanisms.

  13. Integrated Analysis of Contractile Kinetics, Force Generation, and Electrical Activity in Single Human Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

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    Jan David Kijlstra; Dongjian Hu; Nikhil Mittal; Eduardo Kausel; Peter van der Meer; Arman Garakani; Ibrahim J. Domian

    2015-01-01

    Summary The quantitative analysis of cardiomyocyte function is essential for stem cell-based approaches for the in vitro study of human cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. We present a method to comprehensively assess the function of single human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte (hPSC-CMs) through simultaneous quantitative analysis of contraction kinetics, force generation, and electrical activity. We demonstrate that statistical analysis of movies of contracting hPSC-CMs can b...

  14. Enhanced engraftment, proliferation, and therapeutic potential in heart using optimized human iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes

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    Funakoshi, Shunsuke; Miki, Kenji; Takaki, Tadashi; Okubo, Chikako; Hatani, Takeshi; Chonabayashi, Kazuhisa; Nishikawa, Misato; Takei, Ikue; Oishi, Akiko; Narita, Megumi; Hoshijima, Masahiko; Kimura, Takeshi; Yamanaka, Shinya; Yoshida, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (CMs) are a promising tool for cardiac cell therapy. Although transplantation of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived CMs have been reported in several animal models, the treatment effect was limited, probably due to poor optimization of the injected cells. To optimize graft cells for cardiac reconstruction, we compared the engraftment efficiency of intramyocardially-injected undifferentiated-iPSCs, day4 mesodermal cells, and day8, day20, and day30 purified iPSC-CMs after initial differentiation by tracing the engraftment ratio (ER) using in vivo bioluminescence imaging. This analysis revealed the ER of day20 CMs was significantly higher compared to other cells. Transplantation of day20 CMs into the infarcted hearts of immunodeficient mice showed good engraftment, and echocardiography showed significant functional improvement by cell therapy. Moreover, the imaging signal and ratio of Ki67-positive CMs at 3 months post injection indicated engrafted CMs proliferated in the host heart. Although this graft growth reached a plateau at 3 months, histological analysis confirmed progressive maturation from 3 to 6 months. These results suggested that day20 CMs had very high engraftment, proliferation, and therapeutic potential in host mouse hearts. They also demonstrate this model can be used to track the fate of transplanted cells over a long time. PMID:26743035

  15. Anti-aging effects of vitamin C on human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

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    Kim, Yoon Young; Ku, Seung-Yup; Huh, Yul; Liu, Hung-Ching; Kim, Seok Hyun; Choi, Young Min; Moon, Shin Yong

    2013-10-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have arisen as a source of cells for biomedical research due to their developmental potential. Stem cells possess the promise of providing clinicians with novel treatments for disease as well as allowing researchers to generate human-specific cellular metabolism models. Aging is a natural process of living organisms, yet aging in human heart cells is difficult to study due to the ethical considerations regarding human experimentation as well as a current lack of alternative experimental models. hPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (CMs) bear a resemblance to human cardiac cells and thus hPSC-derived CMs are considered to be a viable alternative model to study human heart cell aging. In this study, we used hPSC-derived CMs as an in vitro aging model. We generated cardiomyocytes from hPSCs and demonstrated the process of aging in both human embryonic stem cell (hESC)- and induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived CMs. Aging in hESC-derived CMs correlated with reduced membrane potential in mitochondria, the accumulation of lipofuscin, a slower beating pattern, and the downregulation of human telomerase RNA (hTR) and cell cycle regulating genes. Interestingly, the expression of hTR in hiPSC-derived CMs was not significantly downregulated, unlike in hESC-derived CMs. In order to delay aging, vitamin C was added to the cultured CMs. When cells were treated with 100 μM of vitamin C for 48 h, anti-aging effects, specifically on the expression of telomere-related genes and their functionality in aging cells, were observed. Taken together, these results suggest that hPSC-derived CMs can be used as a unique human cardiomyocyte aging model in vitro and that vitamin C shows anti-aging effects in this model.

  16. Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes as Research and Therapeutic Tools

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    Ivana Acimovic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs, namely, embryonic stem cells (ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, with their ability of indefinite self-renewal and capability to differentiate into cell types derivatives of all three germ layers, represent a powerful research tool in developmental biology, for drug screening, disease modelling, and potentially cell replacement therapy. Efficient differentiation protocols that would result in the cell type of our interest are needed for maximal exploitation of these cells. In the present work, we aim at focusing on the protocols for differentiation of hPSCs into functional cardiomyocytes in vitro as well as achievements in the heart disease modelling and drug testing on the patient-specific iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs.

  17. Stimulation of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes on thin-film microelectrodes.

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    Viitanen, Jouko; Heimala, Päivi; Hokkanen, Ari; Iljin, Kristiina; Kerkelä, Erja; Kolari, Kai; Kattelus, Hannu

    2011-05-01

    We describe successful long-term stimulation of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte clusters on thin-film microelectrode structures in vitro. Interdigitated electrode structures were constructed using plain titanium on glass as the electrode material. Titanium rapidly oxidizes in atmospheric conditions to produce an insulating TiO(χ) layer with high relative permittivity. Capacitive coupling to the incubation medium and to the cells adherent to the electrodes was still efficient, and the dielectric layer prevented electrolysis, allowing a wider window of possible stimulation amplitudes to be used, relative to conducting surfaces. A common hypothesis suggests that to achieve proper differentiation of electroactive cells from the stem cells electrical stimuli are also needed. Spontaneously beating cardiomyocyte clusters were seeded on the glass-electrode surfaces, and we successfully altered and resynchronized a clearly different beat interval. The new pace was reliably maintained for extended periods of several tens of minutes.

  18. Myocardial regeneration strategies using human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

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    Capi, Oren; Gepstein, Lior

    2006-11-28

    Regenerative medicine is a new biomedicine discipline that takes advantage of the recent advancements in the fields of stem cell biology, molecular biology, and tissue engineering to derive tissue substitutes, in an attempt to replace or modify the function of diseased organs. The heart represents an attractive candidate for these emerging technologies since adult cardiac tissue has limited regenerative capacity. Consequentially, myocardial cell replacement therapy has emerged as a novel therapeutic paradigm for restoration of the myocardial electromechanical function. This innovative strategy has been significantly hampered, however, by the paucity of cell sources for human cardiomyocytes. The recent establishment of the human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines may provide a possible solution for this cell-sourcing problem. These unique pluripotent cell lines can be propagated in the undifferentiated state in culture and coaxed to differentiate into cell derivatives of all three germ layers, including cardiomyocytes. This review will describe the hESC system, their differentiation into cardiomyocytes, and the structural and functional characterization of these cardiac lineage derivatives. The potential applications of this unique differentiating system in several research areas will be discussed with special emphasis on the steps required to fully harness their unique potential in the emerging field of cardiovascular regenerative medicine.

  19. Rapid Cellular Phenotyping of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes using a Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Voltage Sensor

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    Jordan S. Leyton-Mange

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In addition to their promise in regenerative medicine, pluripotent stem cells have proved to be faithful models of many human diseases. In particular, patient-specific stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes recapitulate key features of several life-threatening cardiac arrhythmia syndromes. For both modeling and regenerative approaches, phenotyping of stem cell-derived tissues is critical. Cellular phenotyping has largely relied upon expression of lineage markers rather than physiologic attributes. This is especially true for cardiomyocytes, in part because electrophysiological recordings are labor intensive. Likewise, most optical voltage indicators suffer from phototoxicity, which damages cells and degrades signal quality. Here we present the use of a genetically encoded fluorescent voltage indicator, ArcLight, which we demonstrate can faithfully report transmembrane potentials in human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. We demonstrate the application of this fluorescent sensor in high-throughput, serial phenotyping of differentiating cardiomyocyte populations and in screening for drug-induced cardiotoxicity.

  20. Identification and purification of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived atrial-like cardiomyocytes based on sarcolipin expression.

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    Rebecca Josowitz

    Full Text Available The use of human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes to study atrial biology and disease has been restricted by the lack of a reliable method for stem cell-derived atrial cell labeling and purification. The goal of this study was to generate an atrial-specific reporter construct to identify and purify human stem cell-derived atrial-like cardiomyocytes. We have created a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC reporter construct in which fluorescence is driven by expression of the atrial-specific gene sarcolipin (SLN. When purified using flow cytometry, cells with high fluorescence specifically express atrial genes and display functional calcium handling and electrophysiological properties consistent with atrial cardiomyocytes. Our data indicate that SLN can be used as a marker to successfully monitor and isolate hiPSC-derived atrial-like cardiomyocytes. These purified cells may find many applications, including in the study of atrial-specific pathologies and chamber-specific lineage development.

  1. 'Working' cardiomyocytes exhibiting plateau action potentials from human placenta-derived extraembryonic mesodermal cells.

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    Okamoto, Kazuma; Miyoshi, Shunichiro; Toyoda, Masashi; Hida, Naoko; Ikegami, Yukinori; Makino, Hatsune; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Tsuji, Hiroko; Cui, Chang-Hao; Segawa, Kaoru; Uyama, Taro; Kami, Daisuke; Miyado, Kenji; Asada, Hironori; Matsumoto, Kenji; Saito, Hirohisa; Yoshimura, Yasunori; Ogawa, Satoshi; Aeba, Ryo; Yozu, Ryohei; Umezawa, Akihiro

    2007-07-15

    The clinical application of cell transplantation for severe heart failure is a promising strategy to improve impaired cardiac function. Recently, an array of cell types, including bone marrow cells, endothelial progenitors, mesenchymal stem cells, resident cardiac stem cells, and embryonic stem cells, have become important candidates for cell sources for cardiac repair. In the present study, we focused on the placenta as a cell source. Cells from the chorionic plate in the fetal portion of the human placenta were obtained after delivery by the primary culture method, and the cells generated in this study had the Y sex chromosome, indicating that the cells were derived from the fetus. The cells potentially expressed 'working' cardiomyocyte-specific genes such as cardiac myosin heavy chain 7beta, atrial myosin light chain, cardiac alpha-actin by gene chip analysis, and Csx/Nkx2.5, GATA4 by RT-PCR, cardiac troponin-I and connexin 43 by immunohistochemistry. These cells were able to differentiate into cardiomyocytes. Cardiac troponin-I and connexin 43 displayed a discontinuous pattern of localization at intercellular contact sites after cardiomyogenic differentiation, suggesting that the chorionic mesoderm contained a large number of cells with cardiomyogenic potential. The cells began spontaneously beating 3 days after co-cultivation with murine fetal cardiomyocytes and the frequency of beating cells reached a maximum on day 10. The contraction of the cardiomyocytes was rhythmical and synchronous, suggesting the presence of electrical communication between the cells. Placenta-derived human fetal cells may be useful for patients who cannot supply bone marrow cells but want to receive stem cell-based cardiac therapy.

  2. Aberrant α-Adrenergic Hypertrophic Response in Cardiomyocytes from Human Induced Pluripotent Cells

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    Gabor Földes

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells (hESC-CMs and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC-CMs represent new models for drug discovery. Although hypertrophy is a high-priority target, we found that hiPSC-CMs were systematically unresponsive to hypertrophic signals such as the α-adrenoceptor (αAR agonist phenylephrine (PE compared to hESC-CMs. We investigated signaling at multiple levels to understand the underlying mechanism of this differential responsiveness. The expression of the normal α1AR gene, ADRA1A, was reversibly silenced during differentiation, accompanied by ADRA1B upregulation in either cell type. ADRA1B signaling was intact in hESC-CMs, but not in hiPSC-CMs. We observed an increased tonic activity of inhibitory kinase pathways in hiPSC-CMs, and inhibition of antihypertrophic kinases revealed hypertrophic increases. There is tonic suppression of cell growth in hiPSC-CMs, but not hESC-CMs, limiting their use in investigation of hypertrophic signaling. These data raise questions regarding the hiPSC-CM as a valid model for certain aspects of cardiac disease.

  3. Labeling human embryonic stem-cell-derived cardiomyocytes for tracking with MR imaging

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    Castaneda, Rosalinda T.; Daldrup-Link, Heike [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Stanford School of Medicine, Pediatric Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Boddington, Sophie; Wendland, Mike; Mandrussow, Lydia [University of California, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, UCSF Medical Center, San Francisco, CA (United States); Henning, Tobias D. [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Cologne (Germany); Liu, Siyuan [National Institutes of Health, Language Section, Voice, Speech and Language Branch, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) can generate cardiomyocytes (CM), which offer promising treatments for cardiomyopathies in children. However, challenges for clinical translation result from loss of transplanted cell from target sites and high cell death. An imaging technique that noninvasively and repetitively monitors transplanted hESC-CM could guide improvements in transplantation techniques and advance therapies. To develop a clinically applicable labeling technique for hESC-CM with FDA-approved superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO) by examining labeling before and after CM differentiation. Triplicates of hESC were labeled by simple incubation with 50 {mu}g/ml of ferumoxides before or after differentiation into CM, then imaged on a 7T MR scanner using a T2-weighted multi-echo spin-echo sequence. Viability, iron uptake and T2-relaxation times were compared between groups using t-tests. hESC-CM labeled before differentiation demonstrated significant MR effects, iron uptake and preserved function. hESC-CM labeled after differentiation showed no significant iron uptake or change in MR signal (P < 0.05). Morphology, differentiation and viability were consistent between experimental groups. hESC-CM should be labeled prior to CM differentiation to achieve a significant MR signal. This technique permits monitoring delivery and engraftment of hESC-CM for potential advancements of stem cell-based therapies in the reconstitution of damaged myocardium. (orig.)

  4. Sphingosine-1-phosphate promotes the differentiation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells into cardiomyocytes under the designated culturing conditions

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    Zhang Henggui

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is of growing interest to develop novel approaches to initiate differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs into cardiomyocytes. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P, a native circulating bioactive lipid metabolite, plays a role in differentiation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSCs into cardiomyocytes. We also developed an engineered cell sheet from these HUMSCs derived cardiomyocytes by using a temperature-responsive polymer, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide (PIPAAm cell sheet technology. Methods Cardiomyogenic differentiation of HUMSCs was performed by culturing these cells with either designated cardiomyocytes conditioned medium (CMCM alone, or with 1 μM S1P; or DMEM with 10% FBS + 1 μM S1P. Cardiomyogenic differentiation was determined by immunocytochemical analysis of expression of cardiomyocyte markers and patch clamping recording of the action potential. Results A cardiomyocyte-like morphology and the expression of α-actinin and myosin heavy chain (MHC proteins can be observed in both CMCM culturing or CMCM+S1P culturing groups after 5 days' culturing, however, only the cells in CMCM+S1P culture condition present cardiomyocyte-like action potential and voltage gated currents. A new approach was used to form PIPAAm based temperature-responsive culture surfaces and this successfully produced cell sheets from HUMSCs derived cardiomyocytes. Conclusions This study for the first time demonstrates that S1P potentiates differentiation of HUMSCs towards functional cardiomyocytes under the designated culture conditions. Our engineered cell sheets may provide a potential for clinically applicable myocardial tissues should promote cardiac tissue engineering research.

  5. Human embryonic stem cell derived mesenchymal progenitors express cardiac markers but do not form contractile cardiomyocytes.

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    Christophe M Raynaud

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal progenitors or stromal cells have shown promise as a therapeutic strategy for a range of diseases including heart failure. In this context, we explored the growth and differentiation potential of mesenchymal progenitors (MPs derived in vitro from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs. Similar to MPs isolated from bone marrow, hESC derived MPs (hESC-MPs efficiently differentiated into archetypical mesenchymal derivatives such as chondrocytes and adipocytes. Upon treatment with 5-Azacytidine or TGF-β1, hESC-MPs modified their morphology and up-regulated expression of key cardiac transcription factors such as NKX2-5, MEF2C, HAND2 and MYOCD. Nevertheless, NKX2-5+ hESC-MP derivatives did not form contractile cardiomyocytes, raising questions concerning the suitability of these cells as a platform for cardiomyocyte replacement therapy. Gene profiling experiments revealed that, although hESC-MP derived cells expressed a suite of cardiac related genes, they lacked the complete repertoire of genes associated with bona fide cardiomyocytes. Our results suggest that whilst agents such as TGF-β1 and 5-Azacytidine can induce expression of cardiac related genes, but treated cells retain a mesenchymal like phenotype.

  6. Hybrid mathematical model of cardiomyocyte turnover in the adult human heart.

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    Jeremy A Elser

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: The capacity for cardiomyocyte regeneration in the healthy adult human heart is fundamentally relevant for both myocardial homeostasis and cardiomyopathy therapeutics. However, estimates of cardiomyocyte turnover rates conflict greatly, with a study employing C14 pulse-chase methodology concluding 1% annual turnover in youth declining to 0.5% with aging and another using cell population dynamics indicating substantial, age-increasing turnover (4% increasing to 20%. OBJECTIVE: Create a hybrid mathematical model to critically examine rates of cardiomyocyte turnover derived from alternative methodologies. METHODS AND RESULTS: Examined in isolation, the cell population analysis exhibited severe sensitivity to a stem cell expansion exponent (20% variation causing 2-fold turnover change and apoptosis rate. Similarly, the pulse-chase model was acutely sensitive to assumptions of instantaneous incorporation of atmospheric C14 into the body (4-fold impact on turnover in young subjects while numerical restrictions precluded otherwise viable solutions. Incorporating considerations of primary variable sensitivity and controversial model assumptions, an unbiased numerical solver identified a scenario of significant, age-increasing turnover (4-6% increasing to 15-22% with age that was compatible with data from both studies, provided that successive generations of cardiomyocytes experienced higher attrition rates than predecessors. CONCLUSIONS: Assignment of histologically-observed stem/progenitor cells into discrete regenerative phenotypes in the cell population model strongly influenced turnover dynamics without being directly testable. Alternatively, C14 trafficking assumptions and restrictive models in the pulse-chase model artificially eliminated high-turnover solutions. Nevertheless, discrepancies among recent cell turnover estimates can be explained and reconciled. The hybrid mathematical model provided herein permits further examination of

  7. ISL1 protein transduction promotes cardiomyocyte differentiation from human embryonic stem cells.

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    Hananeh Fonoudi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs have the potential to provide an unlimited source of cardiomyocytes, which are invaluable resources for drug or toxicology screening, medical research, and cell therapy. Currently a number of obstacles exist such as the insufficient efficiency of differentiation protocols, which should be overcome before hESC-derived cardiomyocytes can be used for clinical applications. Although the differentiation efficiency can be improved by the genetic manipulation of hESCs to over-express cardiac-specific transcription factors, these differentiated cells are not safe enough to be applied in cell therapy. Protein transduction has been demonstrated as an alternative approach for increasing the efficiency of hESCs differentiation toward cardiomyocytes. METHODS: We present an efficient protocol for the differentiation of hESCs in suspension by direct introduction of a LIM homeodomain transcription factor, Islet1 (ISL1 recombinant protein into the cells. RESULTS: We found that the highest beating clusters were derived by continuous treatment of hESCs with 40 µg/ml recombinant ISL1 protein during days 1-8 after the initiation of differentiation. The treatment resulted in up to a 3-fold increase in the number of beating areas. In addition, the number of cells that expressed cardiac specific markers (cTnT, CONNEXIN 43, ACTININ, and GATA4 doubled. This protocol was also reproducible for another hESC line. CONCLUSIONS: This study has presented a new, efficient, and reproducible procedure for cardiomyocytes differentiation. Our results will pave the way for scaled up and controlled differentiation of hESCs to be used for biomedical applications in a bioreactor culture system.

  8. Robust Generation of Cardiomyocytes from Human iPS Cells Requires Precise Modulation of BMP and WNT Signaling.

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    Kadari, Asifiqbal; Mekala, SubbaRao; Wagner, Nicole; Malan, Daniela; Köth, Jessica; Doll, Katharina; Stappert, Laura; Eckert, Daniela; Peitz, Michael; Matthes, Jan; Sasse, Philipp; Herzig, Stefan; Brüstle, Oliver; Ergün, Süleyman; Edenhofer, Frank

    2015-08-01

    Various strategies have been published enabling cardiomyocyte differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. However the complex nature of signaling pathways involved as well as line-to-line variability compromises the application of a particular protocol to robustly obtain cardiomyocytes from multiple iPS lines. Hence it is necessary to identify optimized protocols with alternative combinations of specific growth factors and small molecules to enhance the robustness of cardiac differentiation. Here we focus on systematic modulation of BMP and WNT signaling to enhance cardiac differentiation. Moreover, we improve the efficacy of cardiac differentiation by enrichment via lactate. Using our protocol we show efficient derivation of cardiomyocytes from multiple human iPS lines. In particular we demonstrate cardiomyocyte differentiation within 15 days with an efficiency of up to 95 % as judged by flow cytometry staining against cardiac troponin T. Cardiomyocytes derived were functionally validated by alpha-actinin staining, transmission electron microscopy as well as electrophysiological analysis. We expect our protocol to provide a robust basis for scale-up production of functional iPS cell-derived cardiomyocytes that can be used for cell replacement therapy and disease modeling.

  9. Late Sodium Current in Human Atrial Cardiomyocytes from Patients in Sinus Rhythm and Atrial Fibrillation.

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    Poulet, Claire; Wettwer, Erich; Grunnet, Morten; Jespersen, Thomas; Fabritz, Larissa; Matschke, Klaus; Knaut, Michael; Ravens, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Slowly inactivating Na+ channels conducting "late" Na+ current (INa,late) contribute to ventricular arrhythmogenesis under pathological conditions. INa,late was also reported to play a role in chronic atrial fibrillation (AF). The objective of this study was to investigate INa,late in human right atrial cardiomyocytes as a putative drug target for treatment of AF. To activate Na+ channels, cardiomyocytes from transgenic mice which exhibit INa,late (ΔKPQ), and right atrial cardiomyocytes from patients in sinus rhythm (SR) and AF were voltage clamped at room temperature by 250-ms long test pulses to -30 mV from a holding potential of -80 mV with a 100-ms pre-pulse to -110 mV (protocol I). INa,late at -30 mV was not discernible as deviation from the extrapolated straight line IV-curve between -110 mV and -80 mV in human atrial cells. Therefore, tetrodotoxin (TTX, 10 μM) was used to define persistent inward current after 250 ms at -30 mV as INa,late. TTX-sensitive current was 0.27±0.06 pA/pF in ventricular cardiomyocytes from ΔKPQ mice, and amounted to 0.04±0.01 pA/pF and 0.09±0.02 pA/pF in SR and AF human atrial cardiomyocytes, respectively. With protocol II (holding potential -120 mV, pre-pulse to -80 mV) TTX-sensitive INa,late was always larger than with protocol I. Ranolazine (30 μM) reduced INa,late by 0.02±0.02 pA/pF in SR and 0.09±0.02 pA/pF in AF cells. At physiological temperature (37°C), however, INa,late became insignificant. Plateau phase and upstroke velocity of action potentials (APs) recorded with sharp microelectrodes in intact human trabeculae were more sensitive to ranolazine in AF than in SR preparations. Sodium channel subunits expression measured with qPCR was high for SCN5A with no difference between SR and AF. Expression of SCN8A and SCN10A was low in general, and lower in AF than in SR. In conclusion, We confirm for the first time a TTX-sensitive current (INa,late) in right atrial cardiomyocytes from SR and AF patients at room

  10. Late Sodium Current in Human Atrial Cardiomyocytes from Patients in Sinus Rhythm and Atrial Fibrillation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Poulet

    Full Text Available Slowly inactivating Na+ channels conducting "late" Na+ current (INa,late contribute to ventricular arrhythmogenesis under pathological conditions. INa,late was also reported to play a role in chronic atrial fibrillation (AF. The objective of this study was to investigate INa,late in human right atrial cardiomyocytes as a putative drug target for treatment of AF. To activate Na+ channels, cardiomyocytes from transgenic mice which exhibit INa,late (ΔKPQ, and right atrial cardiomyocytes from patients in sinus rhythm (SR and AF were voltage clamped at room temperature by 250-ms long test pulses to -30 mV from a holding potential of -80 mV with a 100-ms pre-pulse to -110 mV (protocol I. INa,late at -30 mV was not discernible as deviation from the extrapolated straight line IV-curve between -110 mV and -80 mV in human atrial cells. Therefore, tetrodotoxin (TTX, 10 μM was used to define persistent inward current after 250 ms at -30 mV as INa,late. TTX-sensitive current was 0.27±0.06 pA/pF in ventricular cardiomyocytes from ΔKPQ mice, and amounted to 0.04±0.01 pA/pF and 0.09±0.02 pA/pF in SR and AF human atrial cardiomyocytes, respectively. With protocol II (holding potential -120 mV, pre-pulse to -80 mV TTX-sensitive INa,late was always larger than with protocol I. Ranolazine (30 μM reduced INa,late by 0.02±0.02 pA/pF in SR and 0.09±0.02 pA/pF in AF cells. At physiological temperature (37°C, however, INa,late became insignificant. Plateau phase and upstroke velocity of action potentials (APs recorded with sharp microelectrodes in intact human trabeculae were more sensitive to ranolazine in AF than in SR preparations. Sodium channel subunits expression measured with qPCR was high for SCN5A with no difference between SR and AF. Expression of SCN8A and SCN10A was low in general, and lower in AF than in SR. In conclusion, We confirm for the first time a TTX-sensitive current (INa,late in right atrial cardiomyocytes from SR and AF patients at room

  11. Factors Involved in Extracellular Matrix Turnover in Human Derived Cardiomyocytes

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    Gregori Casals

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The molecular mechanisms by which myocardial ischemia translates into ventricular remodeling remain unclear. Methods: We investigated whether hypoxia and proinflammatory cytokines are specific inducers of remodeling signals in an in vitro model of cultured adult human ventricular myocytes (AC16 cells. Results:Hypoxia modified the ratio of matrix remodeling factors by increasing the aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP and reducing tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase type 1 (TIMP-1 secretion in AC16 cells. These effects, however, were not associated with either modifications in expression of matrix metalloproteinase type 2, collagen-I or metalloproteinase activity. Hypoxia does, actually increase the production of the cardiac antifibrogenic growth factors, Apelin and VEGF, through an Hypoxia Inducible Factor type 1-dependent mechanism. Concerning proinflammatory signaling pathways, IL1β emerged as a powerful inducer of matrix turnover, since it significantly enhanced PIIINP, TIMP-1 and hyaluronic acid production and increased metalloproteinase activity. In contrast, TNFα did not modify matrix turnover but markedly induced the production of Apelin and VEGF. Conclusion: Hypoxia and increased TNFα activity likely exert cardioprotective actions by activating the cardiac antifibrogenic factors Apelin and VEGF. In contrast, IL1β is a strong promoter of interstitial collagen remodeling that may contribute to ventricular dilation and heart failure in the ischemic myocardium.

  12. Differentiation of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells to cardiomyocytes: a methods overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mummery, Christine L; Zhang, Jianhua; Ng, Elizabeth S; Elliott, David A; Elefanty, Andrew G; Kamp, Timothy J

    2012-07-20

    Since human embryonic stem cells were first differentiated to beating cardiomyocytes a decade ago, interest in their potential applications has increased exponentially. This has been further enhanced over recent years by the discovery of methods to induce pluripotency in somatic cells, including those derived from patients with hereditary cardiac diseases. Human pluripotent stem cells have been among the most challenging cell types to grow stably in culture, but advances in reagent development now mean that most laboratories can expand both embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells robustly using commercially available products. However, differentiation protocols have lagged behind and in many cases only produce the cell types required with low efficiency. Cardiomyocyte differentiation techniques were also initially inefficient and not readily transferable across cell lines, but there are now a number of more robust protocols available. Here, we review the basic biology underlying the differentiation of pluripotent cells to cardiac lineages and describe current state-of-the-art protocols, as well as ongoing refinements. This should provide a useful entry for laboratories new to this area to start their research. Ultimately, efficient and reliable differentiation methodologies are essential to generate desired cardiac lineages to realize the full promise of human pluripotent stem cells for biomedical research, drug development, and clinical applications.

  13. Modeling Electrophysiological Coupling and Fusion between Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Cardiomyocytes.

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    Joshua Mayourian

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC delivery has demonstrated promise in preclinical and clinical trials for myocardial infarction therapy; however, broad acceptance is hindered by limited understanding of hMSC-human cardiomyocyte (hCM interactions. To better understand the electrophysiological consequences of direct heterocellular connections between hMSCs and hCMs, three original mathematical models were developed, representing an experimentally verified triad of hMSC families with distinct functional ion channel currents. The arrhythmogenic risk of such direct electrical interactions in the setting of healthy adult myocardium was predicted by coupling and fusing these hMSC models to the published ten Tusscher midcardial hCM model. Substantial variations in action potential waveform-such as decreased action potential duration (APD and plateau height-were found when hCMs were coupled to the two hMSC models expressing functional delayed rectifier-like human ether à-go-go K+ channel 1 (hEAG1; the effects were exacerbated for fused hMSC-hCM hybrid cells. The third family of hMSCs (Type C, absent of hEAG1 activity, led to smaller single-cell action potential alterations during coupling and fusion, translating to longer tissue-level mean action potential wavelength. In a simulated 2-D monolayer of cardiac tissue, re-entry vulnerability with low (5% hMSC insertion was approximately eight-fold lower with Type C hMSCs compared to hEAG1-functional hMSCs. A 20% decrease in APD dispersion by Type C hMSCs compared to hEAG1-active hMSCs supports the claim of reduced arrhythmogenic potential of this cell type with low hMSC insertion. However, at moderate (15% and high (25% hMSC insertion, the vulnerable window increased independent of hMSC type. In summary, this study provides novel electrophysiological models of hMSCs, predicts possible arrhythmogenic effects of hMSCs when directly coupled to healthy hCMs, and proposes that isolating a subset of hMSCs absent

  14. Late Sodium Current in Human Atrial Cardiomyocytes from Patients in Sinus Rhythm and Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulet, Claire; Wettwer, Erich; Grunnet, Morten

    2015-01-01

    -pulse to -80 mV) TTX-sensitive INa,late was always larger than with protocol I. Ranolazine (30 μM) reduced INa,late by 0.02±0.02 pA/pF in SR and 0.09±0.02 pA/pF in AF cells. At physiological temperature (37°C), however, INa,late became insignificant. Plateau phase and upstroke velocity of action potentials...... to -30 mV from a holding potential of -80 mV with a 100-ms pre-pulse to -110 mV (protocol I). INa,late at -30 mV was not discernible as deviation from the extrapolated straight line IV-curve between -110 mV and -80 mV in human atrial cells. Therefore, tetrodotoxin (TTX, 10 μM) was used to define...... persistent inward current after 250 ms at -30 mV as INa,late. TTX-sensitive current was 0.27±0.06 pA/pF in ventricular cardiomyocytes from ΔKPQ mice, and amounted to 0.04±0.01 pA/pF and 0.09±0.02 pA/pF in SR and AF human atrial cardiomyocytes, respectively. With protocol II (holding potential -120 mV, pre...

  15. CardioNet: A human metabolic network suited for the study of cardiomyocyte metabolism

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    Karlstädt Anja

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Availability of oxygen and nutrients in the coronary circulation is a crucial determinant of cardiac performance. Nutrient composition of coronary blood may significantly vary in specific physiological and pathological conditions, for example, administration of special diets, long-term starvation, physical exercise or diabetes. Quantitative analysis of cardiac metabolism from a systems biology perspective may help to a better understanding of the relationship between nutrient supply and efficiency of metabolic processes required for an adequate cardiac output. Results Here we present CardioNet, the first large-scale reconstruction of the metabolic network of the human cardiomyocyte comprising 1793 metabolic reactions, including 560 transport processes in six compartments. We use flux-balance analysis to demonstrate the capability of the network to accomplish a set of 368 metabolic functions required for maintaining the structural and functional integrity of the cell. Taking the maintenance of ATP, biosynthesis of ceramide, cardiolipin and further important phospholipids as examples, we analyse how a changed supply of glucose, lactate, fatty acids and ketone bodies may influence the efficiency of these essential processes. Conclusions CardioNet is a functionally validated metabolic network of the human cardiomyocyte that enables theorectical studies of cellular metabolic processes crucial for the accomplishment of an adequate cardiac output.

  16. Integrated Analysis of Contractile Kinetics, Force Generation, and Electrical Activity in Single Human Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

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    Jan David Kijlstra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The quantitative analysis of cardiomyocyte function is essential for stem cell-based approaches for the in vitro study of human cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. We present a method to comprehensively assess the function of single human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte (hPSC-CMs through simultaneous quantitative analysis of contraction kinetics, force generation, and electrical activity. We demonstrate that statistical analysis of movies of contracting hPSC-CMs can be used to quantify changes in cellular morphology over time and compute contractile kinetics. Using a biomechanical model that incorporates substrate stiffness, we calculate cardiomyocyte force generation at single-cell resolution and validate this approach with conventional traction force microscopy. The addition of fluorescent calcium indicators or membrane potential dyes allows the simultaneous analysis of contractility and calcium handling or action potential morphology. Accordingly, our approach has the potential for broad application in the study of cardiac disease, drug discovery, and cardiotoxicity screening.

  17. Evaluation of Changes in Morphology and Function of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Cardiomyocytes (HiPSC-CMs Cultured on an Aligned-Nanofiber Cardiac Patch.

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    Mahmood Khan

    Full Text Available Dilated cardiomyopathy is a major cause of progressive heart failure. Utilization of stem cell therapy offers a potential means of regenerating viable cardiac tissue. However, a major obstacle to stem cell therapy is the delivery and survival of implanted stem cells in the ischemic heart. To address this issue, we have developed a biomimetic aligned nanofibrous cardiac patch and characterized the alignment and function of human inducible pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs cultured on this cardiac patch. This hiPSC-CMs seeded patch was compared with hiPSC-CMs cultured on standard flat cell culture plates.hiPSC-CMs were cultured on; 1 a highly aligned polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA nanofiber scaffold (~50 microns thick and 2 on a standard flat culture plate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used to determine alignment of PLGA nanofibers and orientation of the cells on the respective surfaces. Analysis of gap junctions (Connexin-43 was performed by confocal imaging in both the groups. Calcium cycling and patch-clamp technique were performed to measure calcium transients and electrical coupling properties of cardiomyocytes.SEM demonstrated >90% alignment of the nanofibers in the patch which is similar to the extracellular matrix of decellularized rat myocardium. Confocal imaging of the cardiomyocytes demonstrated symmetrical alignment in the same direction on the aligned nanofiber patch in sharp contrast to the random appearance of cardiomyocytes cultured on a tissue culture plate. The hiPSC-CMs cultured on aligned nanofiber cardiac patches showed more efficient calcium cycling compared with cells cultured on standard flat surface culture plates. Quantification of mRNA with qRT-PCR confirmed that these cardiomyocytes expressed α-actinin, troponin-T and connexin-43 in-vitro.Overall, our results demonstrated changes in morphology and function of human induced pluripotent derived cardiomyocytes cultured in an anisotropic

  18. Efficient and scalable purification of cardiomyocytes from human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells by VCAM1 surface expression.

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    Hideki Uosaki

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (hESCs/hiPSCs are promising cell sources for cardiac regenerative medicine. To realize hESC/hiPSC-based cardiac cell therapy, efficient induction, purification, and transplantation methods for cardiomyocytes are required. Though marker gene transduction or fluorescent-based purification methods have been reported, fast, efficient and scalable purification methods with no genetic modification are essential for clinical purpose but have not yet been established. In this study, we attempted to identify cell surface markers for cardiomyocytes derived from hESC/hiPSCs. METHOD AND RESULT: We adopted a previously reported differentiation protocol for hESCs based on high density monolayer culture to hiPSCs with some modification. Cardiac troponin-T (TNNT2-positive cardiomyocytes appeared robustly with 30-70% efficiency. Using this differentiation method, we screened 242 antibodies for human cell surface molecules to isolate cardiomyocytes derived from hiPSCs and identified anti-VCAM1 (Vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 antibody specifically marked cardiomyocytes. TNNT2-positive cells were detected at day 7-8 after induction and 80% of them became VCAM1-positive by day 11. Approximately 95-98% of VCAM1-positive cells at day 11 were positive for TNNT2. VCAM1 was exclusive with CD144 (endothelium, CD140b (pericytes and TRA-1-60 (undifferentiated hESCs/hiPSCs. 95% of MACS-purified cells were positive for TNNT2. MACS purification yielded 5-10×10(5 VCAM1-positive cells from a single well of a six-well culture plate. Purified VCAM1-positive cells displayed molecular and functional features of cardiomyocytes. VCAM1 also specifically marked cardiomyocytes derived from other hESC or hiPSC lines. CONCLUSION: We succeeded in efficiently inducing cardiomyocytes from hESCs/hiPSCs and identifying VCAM1 as a potent cell surface marker for robust, efficient and scalable purification of cardiomyocytes from h

  19. Cardiomyocytes from human pluripotent stem cells: From laboratory curiosity to industrial biomedical platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, Chris; Borgdorff, Viola; Crutchley, James; Firth, Karl S A; George, Vinoj; Kalra, Spandan; Kondrashov, Alexander; Hoang, Minh Duc; Mosqueira, Diogo; Patel, Asha; Prodanov, Ljupcho; Rajamohan, Divya; Skarnes, William C; Smith, James G W; Young, Lorraine E

    2016-07-01

    Cardiomyocytes from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs-CMs) could revolutionise biomedicine. Global burden of heart failure will soon reach USD $90bn, while unexpected cardiotoxicity underlies 28% of drug withdrawals. Advances in hPSC isolation, Cas9/CRISPR genome engineering and hPSC-CM differentiation have improved patient care, progressed drugs to clinic and opened a new era in safety pharmacology. Nevertheless, predictive cardiotoxicity using hPSC-CMs contrasts from failure to almost total success. Since this likely relates to cell immaturity, efforts are underway to use biochemical and biophysical cues to improve many of the ~30 structural and functional properties of hPSC-CMs towards those seen in adult CMs. Other developments needed for widespread hPSC-CM utility include subtype specification, cost reduction of large scale differentiation and elimination of the phenotyping bottleneck. This review will consider these factors in the evolution of hPSC-CM technologies, as well as their integration into high content industrial platforms that assess structure, mitochondrial function, electrophysiology, calcium transients and contractility. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  20. Automated Electrophysiological and Pharmacological Evaluation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajamohan, Divya; Kalra, Spandan; Duc Hoang, Minh; George, Vinoj; Staniforth, Andrew; Russell, Hugh; Yang, Xuebin

    2016-01-01

    Automated planar patch clamp systems are widely used in drug evaluation studies because of their ability to provide accurate, reliable, and reproducible data in a high-throughput manner. Typically, CHO and HEK tumorigenic cell lines overexpressing single ion channels are used since they can be harvested as high-density, homogenous, single-cell suspensions. While human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs) are physiologically more relevant, these cells are fragile, have complex culture requirements, are inherently heterogeneous, and are expensive to produce, which has restricted their use on automated patch clamp (APC) devices. Here, we used high efficiency differentiation protocols to produce cardiomyocytes from six different hPSC lines for analysis on the Patchliner (Nanion Technologies GmbH) APC platform. We developed a two-step cell preparation protocol that yielded cell catch rates and whole-cell breakthroughs of ∼80%, with ∼40% of these cells allowing electrical activity to be recorded. The protocol permitted formation of long-lasting (>15 min), high quality seals (>2 GΩ) in both voltage- and current-clamp modes. This enabled density of sodium, calcium, and potassium currents to be evaluated, along with dose–response curves to their respective channel inhibitors, tetrodotoxin, nifedipine, and E-4031. Thus, we show the feasibility of using the Patchliner platform for automated evaluation of the electrophysiology and pharmacology of hPSC-CMs, which will enable considerable increase in throughput for reliable and efficient drug evaluation. PMID:26906236

  1. Mapping Human Pluripotent-to-Cardiomyocyte Differentiation: Methylomes, Transcriptomes, and Exon DNA Methylation “Memories”

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    Joshua D. Tompkins

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The directed differentiation of human cardiomyocytes (CMs from pluripotent cells provides an invaluable model for understanding mechanisms of cell fate determination and offers considerable promise in cardiac regenerative medicine. Here, we utilize a human embryonic stem cell suspension bank, produced according to a good manufacturing practice, to generate CMs using a fully defined and small molecule-based differentiation strategy. Primitive and cardiac mesoderm purification was used to remove non-committing and multi-lineage populations and this significantly aided the identification of key transcription factors, lncRNAs, and essential signaling pathways that define cardiomyogenesis. Global methylation profiles reflect CM development and we report on CM exon DNA methylation “memories” persisting beyond transcription repression and marking the expression history of numerous developmentally regulated genes, especially transcription factors.

  2. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes Afford New Opportunities in Inherited Cardiovascular Disease Modeling

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    Daniel R. Bayzigitov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental studies of molecular and cellular mechanisms of cardiovascular disease pathogenesis are required to create more effective and safer methods of their therapy. The studies can be carried out only when model systems that fully recapitulate pathological phenotype seen in patients are used. Application of laboratory animals for cardiovascular disease modeling is limited because of physiological differences with humans. Since discovery of induced pluripotency generating induced pluripotent stem cells has become a breakthrough technology in human disease modeling. In this review, we discuss a progress that has been made in modeling inherited arrhythmias and cardiomyopathies, studying molecular mechanisms of the diseases, and searching for and testing drug compounds using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

  3. Three-dimensional cardiac microtissues composed of cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells co-differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meer, Berend J.; Tertoolen, Leon G. J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells in the heart are in close proximity and in constant dialogue. Endothelium regulates the size of the heart, supplies oxygen to the myocardium and secretes factors that support cardiomyocyte function. Robust and predictive cardiac disease models that faithfully recapitulate native human physiology in vitro would therefore ideally incorporate this cardiomyocyte-endothelium crosstalk. Here, we have generated and characterized human cardiac microtissues in vitro that integrate both cell types in complex 3D structures. We established conditions for simultaneous differentiation of cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells from human pluripotent stem cells following initial cardiac mesoderm induction. The endothelial cells expressed cardiac markers that were also present in primary cardiac microvasculature, suggesting cardiac endothelium identity. These cell populations were further enriched based on surface markers expression, then recombined allowing development of beating 3D structures termed cardiac microtissues. This in vitro model was robustly reproducible in both embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. It thus represents an advanced human stem cell-based platform for cardiovascular disease modelling and testing of relevant drugs. PMID:28279973

  4. MiR-155 inhibits cell migration of human cardiomyocyte progenitor cells (hCMPCs) via targeting of MMP-16

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Jia; van Mil, Alain; Aguor, Eissa N. E.; Siddiqi, Sailay; Vrijsen, Krijn; Jaksani, Sridevi; Metz, Corina; Zhao, Jiajun; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Sluijter, Joost P. G.

    2012-01-01

    Undesired cell migration after targeted cell transplantation potentially limits beneficial effects for cardiac regeneration. MicroRNAs are known to be involved in several cellular processes, including cell migration. Here, we attempt to reduce human cardiomyocyte progenitor cell (hCMPC) migration vi

  5. Contractile Defect Caused by Mutation in MYBPC3 Revealed under Conditions Optimized for Human PSC-Cardiomyocyte Function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Birket (Matthew J.); M.C. Ribeiro (Marcelo C.); G. Kosmidis (Georgios); D. Ward (Dorien); A.R. Leitoguinho (Ana Rita); V. van de Pol (Vera); C. Dambrot (Cheryl); H.D. Devalla (Harsha D.); R.P. Davis (Richard P.); P.G. Mastroberardino (Pier); D.E. Atsma (Douwe); R. Passier (Robert); C.L. Mummery (Christine)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractMaximizing baseline function of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs) is essential for their effective application in models of cardiac toxicity and disease. Here, we aimed to identify factors that would promote an adequate level of function to permit robust singl

  6. Human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes survive and mature in the mouse heart and transiently improve function after myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Laake, Linda W.; Passier, Robert; Monshouwer-Kloots, Jantine; Verkleij, Arie J.; Lips, Daniel J.; Freund, Christian; den Ouden, Krista; Ward-van Oostwaard, Dorien; Korving, Jeroen; Tertoolen, Leon G.; van Echteld, Cees J.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Mummery, Christine L.

    2007-01-01

    Regeneration of the myocardium by transplantation of cardiomyocytes is an emerging therapeutic strategy. Human embryonic stem cells (HESC) form cardiomyocytes readily but until recently at low efficiency, so that preclinical studies on transplantation in animals are only just beginning. Here, we sho

  7. TASK-1 and TASK-3 may form heterodimers in human atrial cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinné, Susanne; Kiper, Aytug K; Schlichthörl, Günter; Dittmann, Sven; Netter, Michael F; Limberg, Sven H; Silbernagel, Nicole; Zuzarte, Marylou; Moosdorf, Rainer; Wulf, Hinnerk; Schulze-Bahr, Eric; Rolfes, Caroline; Decher, Niels

    2015-04-01

    TASK-1 channels have emerged as promising drug targets against atrial fibrillation, the most common arrhythmia in the elderly. While TASK-3, the closest relative of TASK-1, was previously not described in cardiac tissue, we found a very prominent expression of TASK-3 in right human auricles. Immunocytochemistry experiments of human right auricular cardiomyocytes showed that TASK-3 is primarily localized at the plasma membrane. Single-channel recordings of right human auricles in the cell-attached mode, using divalent-cation-free solutions, revealed a TASK-1-like channel with a single-channel conductance of about 30pS. While homomeric TASK-3 channels were not found, we observed an intermediate single-channel conductance of about 55pS, possibly reflecting the heteromeric channel formed by TASK-1 and TASK-3. Subsequent experiments with TASK-1/TASK-3 tandem channels or with co-expressed TASK-1 and TASK-3 channels in HEK293 cells or Xenopus oocytes, supported that the 55pS channels observed in right auricles have electrophysiological characteristics of TASK-1/TASK-3 heteromers. In addition, co-expression experiments and single-channel recordings suggest that heteromeric TASK-1/TASK-3 channels have a predominant surface expression and a reduced affinity for TASK-1 blockers. In summary, the evidence for heteromeric TASK-1/TASK-3 channel complexes together with an altered pharmacologic response to TASK-1 blockers in vitro is likely to have further impact for studies isolating ITASK-1 from cardiomyocytes and for the development of drugs specifically targeting TASK-1 in atrial fibrillation treatment.

  8. Multi-parameter in vitro toxicity testing of crizotinib, sunitinib, erlotinib, and nilotinib in human cardiomyocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doherty, Kimberly R., E-mail: kimberly.doherty@quintiles.com [Quintiles, 777 Oakmont Lane Suite 100, Westmont, IL 60559 (United States); Wappel, Robert L.; Talbert, Dominique R.; Trusk, Patricia B.; Moran, Diarmuid M. [Quintiles, 777 Oakmont Lane Suite 100, Westmont, IL 60559 (United States); Kramer, James W.; Brown, Arthur M. [ChanTest Corporation, 14656 Neo Parkway, Cleveland, OH 44128 (United States); Shell, Scott A.; Bacus, Sarah [Quintiles, 777 Oakmont Lane Suite 100, Westmont, IL 60559 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKi) have greatly improved the treatment and prognosis of multiple cancer types. However, unexpected cardiotoxicity has arisen in a subset of patients treated with these agents that was not wholly predicted by pre-clinical testing, which centers around animal toxicity studies and inhibition of the human Ether-à-go-go-Related Gene (hERG) channel. Therefore, we sought to determine whether a multi-parameter test panel assessing the effect of drug treatment on cellular, molecular, and electrophysiological endpoints could accurately predict cardiotoxicity. We examined how 4 FDA-approved TKi agents impacted cell viability, apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, metabolic status, impedance, and ion channel function in human cardiomyocytes. The 3 drugs clinically associated with severe cardiac adverse events (crizotinib, sunitinib, nilotinib) all proved to be cardiotoxic in our in vitro tests while the relatively cardiac-safe drug erlotinib showed only minor changes in cardiac cell health. Crizotinib, an ALK/MET inhibitor, led to increased ROS production, caspase activation, cholesterol accumulation, disruption in cardiac cell beat rate, and blockage of ion channels. The multi-targeted TKi sunitinib showed decreased cardiomyocyte viability, AMPK inhibition, increased lipid accumulation, disrupted beat pattern, and hERG block. Nilotinib, a second generation Bcr-Abl inhibitor, led to increased ROS generation, caspase activation, hERG block, and an arrhythmic beat pattern. Thus, each drug showed a unique toxicity profile that may reflect the multiple mechanisms leading to cardiotoxicity. This study demonstrates that a multi-parameter approach can provide a robust characterization of drug-induced cardiomyocyte damage that can be leveraged to improve drug safety during early phase development. - Highlights: • TKi with known adverse effects show unique cardiotoxicity profiles in this panel. • Crizotinib increases ROS, apoptosis, and

  9. Cryopreservation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived Cardiomyocytes: Strategies, Challenges, and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preininger, Marcela K.; Singh, Monalisa; Xu, Chunhui

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs) have emerged as a vital cell source for in vitro modeling of genetic cardiovascular disorders, drug screening, and in vivo cardiac regeneration research. Looking forward, the ability to efficiently cryopreserve hPSC-CMs without compromising their normal biochemical and physiologic functions will dramatically facilitate their various biomedical applications. Although working protocols for freezing, storing, and thawing hPSC-CMs have been established, the question remains as to whether they are optimal. In this chapter, we discuss our current understanding of cryopreservation appertaining to hPSC-CMs, and proffer key questions regarding the mechanical, contractile, and regenerative properties of cryopreserved hPSC-CMs. PMID:27837559

  10. Dystrophin-deficient cardiomyocytes derived from human urine: New biologic reagents for drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Guan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability to extract somatic cells from a patient and reprogram them to pluripotency opens up new possibilities for personalized medicine. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have been employed to generate beating cardiomyocytes from a patient's skin or blood cells. Here, iPSC methods were used to generate cardiomyocytes starting from the urine of a patient with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. Urine was chosen as a starting material because it contains adult stem cells called urine-derived stem cells (USCs. USCs express the canonical reprogramming factors c-myc and klf4, and possess high telomerase activity. Pluripotency of urine-derived iPSC clones was confirmed by immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR and teratoma formation. Urine-derived iPSC clones generated from healthy volunteers and a DMD patient were differentiated into beating cardiomyocytes using a series of small molecules in monolayer culture. Results indicate that cardiomyocytes retain the DMD patient's dystrophin mutation. Physiological assays suggest that dystrophin-deficient cardiomyocytes possess phenotypic differences from normal cardiomyocytes. These results demonstrate the feasibility of generating cardiomyocytes from a urine sample and that urine-derived cardiomyocytes retain characteristic features that might be further exploited for mechanistic studies and drug discovery.

  11. Anti-addiction Drug Ibogaine Prolongs the Action Potential in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubi, Lena; Eckert, Daniel; Boehm, Stefan; Hilber, Karlheinz; Koenig, Xaver

    2017-04-01

    Ibogaine is a plant alkaloid used as anti-addiction drug in dozens of alternative medicine clinics worldwide. Recently, alarming reports of life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias and cases of sudden death associated with the ingestion of ibogaine have accumulated. Using whole-cell patch clamp recordings, we assessed the effects of ibogaine and its main metabolite noribogaine on action potentials in human ventricular-like cardiomyocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells. Therapeutic concentrations of ibogaine and its long-lived active metabolite noribogaine significantly retarded action potential repolarization in human cardiomyocytes. These findings represent the first experimental proof that ibogaine application entails a cardiac arrhythmia risk for humans. In addition, they explain the clinically observed delayed incidence of cardiac adverse events several days after ibogaine intake. We conclude that therapeutic concentrations of ibogaine retard action potential repolarization in the human heart. This may give rise to a prolongation of the QT interval in the electrocardiogram and cardiac arrhythmias.

  12. Predictive lethal proarrhythmic risk evaluation using a closed-loop-circuit cell network with human induced pluripotent stem cells derived cardiomyocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Fumimasa; Hattori, Akihiro; Terazono, Hideyuki; Kim, Hyonchol; Odaka, Masao; Sugio, Yoshihiro; Yasuda, Kenji

    2016-06-01

    For the prediction of lethal arrhythmia occurrence caused by abnormality of cell-to-cell conduction, we have developed a next-generation in vitro cell-to-cell conduction assay, i.e., a quasi in vivo assay, in which the change in spatial cell-to-cell conduction is quantitatively evaluated from the change in waveforms of the convoluted electrophysiological signals from lined-up cardiomyocytes on a single closed loop of a microelectrode of 1 mm diameter and 20 µm width in a cultivation chip. To evaluate the importance of the closed-loop arrangement of cardiomyocytes for prediction, we compared the change in waveforms of convoluted signals of the responses in the closed-loop circuit arrangement with that of the response of cardiomyocyte clusters using a typical human ether a go-go related gene (hERG) ion channel blocker, E-4031. The results showed that (1) waveform prolongation and fluctuation both in the closed loops and clusters increased depending on the E-4031 concentration increase. However, (2) only the waveform signals in closed loops showed an apparent temporal change in waveforms from ventricular tachycardia (VT) to ventricular fibrillation (VF), which is similar to the most typical cell-to-cell conductance abnormality. The results indicated the usefulness of convoluted waveform signals of a closed-loop cell network for acquiring reproducible results acquisition and more detailed temporal information on cell-to-cell conduction.

  13. Ca2+-currents in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes - effects of two different culture conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Umur Uzun

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CM provide a unique opportunity to study human heart physiology and pharmacology and repair injured hearts. The suitability of hiPSC-CM critically depends on how closely they share physiological properties of human adult cardiomyocytes (CM. Here we investigated whether a 3D engineered heart tissue (EHT culture format favors maturation and addressed the L-type Ca2+-current (ICa,L as a readout. The results were compared with hiPSC-CM cultured in conventional monolayer (ML and to our previous data from human adult atrial and ventricular CM obtained when identical patch-clamp protocols were used. HiPSC-CM were 2-3 fold smaller than adult CM, independently of culture format (capacitance ML 45±1 pF (n=289, EHT 45±1 pF (n=460, atrial CM 87±3 pF (n=196, ventricular CM 126±8 pF (n=50. Only 88% of ML cells showed ICa, but all EHT. Basal ICa density was 10±1 pA/pF (n=207 for ML and 12±1 pA/pF (n=361 for EHT and was larger than in adult CM (7±1 pA/pF (p<0.05, n=196 for atrial CM and 6±1 pA/pF (p<0.05, n=47 for ventricular CM. However, ML and EHT showed robust T-type Ca2+-currents (ICa,T. While (--Bay K 8644, that activates ICa,L directly, increased ICa,L to the same extent in ML and EHT, β1- and β2-adrenoceptor effects were marginal in ML, but of same size as (--Bay K 8644 in EHT. The opposite was true for serotonin receptors. Sensitivity to β1 and β2-adrenoceptor stimulation was the same in EHT as in adult CM (-logEC50: 5.9 and 6.1 for norepinephrine (NE and epinephrine (Epi, respectively, but very low concentrations of Rp-8-Br-cAMPS were sufficient to suppress effects (-logEC50: 5.3 and 5.3 respectively for NE and Epi. Taken together, hiPSC-CM express ICa,L at the same density as human adult CM, but, in contrast, possess robust ICa,T. Increased effects of catecholamines in EHT suggest more efficient maturation.

  14. Defined MicroRNAs Induce Aspects of Maturation in Mouse and Human Embryonic-Stem-Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desy S. Lee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent-cell-derived cardiomyocytes have great potential for use in research and medicine, but limitations in their maturity currently constrain their usefulness. Here, we report a method for improving features of maturation in murine and human embryonic-stem-cell-derived cardiomyocytes (m/hESC-CMs. We found that coculturing m/hESC-CMs with endothelial cells improves their maturity and upregulates several microRNAs. Delivering four of these microRNAs, miR-125b-5p, miR-199a-5p, miR-221, and miR-222 (miR-combo, to m/hESC-CMs resulted in improved sarcomere alignment and calcium handling, a more negative resting membrane potential, and increased expression of cardiomyocyte maturation markers. Although this could not fully phenocopy all adult cardiomyocyte characteristics, these effects persisted for two months following delivery of miR-combo. A luciferase assay demonstrated that all four miRNAs target ErbB4, and siRNA knockdown of ErbB4 partially recapitulated the effects of miR-combo. In summary, a combination of miRNAs induced via endothelial coculture improved ESC-CM maturity, in part through suppression of ErbB4 signaling.

  15. Use of human stem cell derived cardiomyocytes to examine sunitinib mediated cardiotoxicity and electrophysiological alterations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, J.D., E-mail: jennifer.cohen@roche.com [Early and Investigative Safety, Nonclinical Safety, Hoffmann-La Roche, 340 Kingsland Street, Nutley, NJ 07110 (United States); Babiarz, J.E., E-mail: joshua.babiarz@roche.com [Early and Investigative Safety, Nonclinical Safety, Hoffmann-La Roche, 340 Kingsland Street, Nutley, NJ 07110 (United States); Abrams, R.M., E-mail: rory.abrams@roche.com [Early and Investigative Safety, Nonclinical Safety, Hoffmann-La Roche, 340 Kingsland Street, Nutley, NJ 07110 (United States); Guo, L., E-mail: liang.guo@roche.com [Early and Investigative Safety, Nonclinical Safety, Hoffmann-La Roche, 340 Kingsland Street, Nutley, NJ 07110 (United States); Kameoka, S., E-mail: sei.kameoka@roche.com [Early and Investigative Safety, Nonclinical Safety, Hoffmann-La Roche, 340 Kingsland Street, Nutley, NJ 07110 (United States); Chiao, E., E-mail: eric.chiao@roche.com [Early and Investigative Safety, Nonclinical Safety, Hoffmann-La Roche, 340 Kingsland Street, Nutley, NJ 07110 (United States); Taunton, J., E-mail: taunton@cmp.ucsf.edu [Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, University California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94158 (United States); Kolaja, K.L., E-mail: kyle.kolaja@roche.com [Early and Investigative Safety, Nonclinical Safety, Hoffmann-La Roche, 340 Kingsland Street, Nutley, NJ 07110 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Sunitinib, an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor approved to treat advanced renal cell carcinoma and gastrointestinal stroma tumor, is associated with clinical cardiac toxicity. Although the precise mechanism of sunitinib cardiotoxicity is not known, both the key metabolic energy regulator, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and ribosomal S 6 kinase (RSK) have been hypothesized as causative, albeit based on rodent models. To study the mechanism of sunitinib-mediated cardiotoxicity in a human model, induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) having electrophysiological and contractile properties of native cardiac tissue were investigated. Sunitinib was cardiotoxic in a dose-dependent manner with an IC{sub 50} in the low micromolar range, observed by a loss of cellular ATP, an increase in oxidized glutathione, and induction of apoptosis in iPSC-CMs. Pretreatment of iPSC-CMs with AMPK activators AICAR or metformin, increased the phosphorylation of pAMPK-T172 and pACC-S79, but only marginally attenuated sunitinib mediated cell death. Furthermore, additional inhibitors of AMPK were not directly cytotoxic to iPSC-CMs up to 250 {mu}M concentrations. Inhibition of RSK with a highly specific, irreversible, small molecule inhibitor (RSK-FMK-MEA) did not induce cytotoxicity in iPSC-CMs below 250 {mu}M. Extensive electrophysiological analysis of sunitinib and RSK-FMK-MEA mediated conduction effects were performed. Taken together, these findings suggest that inhibition of AMPK and RSK are not a major component of sunitinib-induced cardiotoxicity. Although the exact mechanism of cardiotoxicity of sunitinib is not known, it is likely due to inhibition of multiple kinases simultaneously. These data highlight the utility of human iPSC-CMs in investigating the potential molecular mechanisms underlying drug-induced cardiotoxicity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cytoxic effect of sunitinib on human stem cell derived cardiomyocytes Black

  16. Ascorbic acid delivered by mesoporous silica nanoparticles induces the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Mingming; Han, Zhen; Li, Jinglai; Feng, Gang; Ouyang, Shuyuan

    2015-11-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells offer the potential to generate all cell types in the body, which provide a promising approach to repair tissue damage or dysfunction. In the past decade, great efforts have been made to induce the differentiation of ES cells into numerous types of cells, such as adipocytes, neurocytes and cardiomyocytes. However, the low differentiated efficiency and successful rate limit the development of induction of the differentiation of stem cells for tissue engineering. Here, we utilize ascorbic acid (AA)-loaded fluorescent TRITC-mesoporous silica nanoparticles (TMSN-AA) as a potential tool to induce the differentiation of human ES cells into cardiomyocytes. The treatment of human ES cells by TMSN-AA nanoplex arrests cell cycle at G1 phase and decreases the expression of stemness genes octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4) and sex determining region Y-box 2 (SOX2), which exhibits more significant induction efficiency of stem cell differentiation than the treatment by AA alone. Furthermore, we have tested the myocardial marker genes cardiac Troponin I (cTnI) and fetal liver kinase 1 (FLK-1), and found these genes are up-regulated by TMSN-AA nanoplex. Importantly, this work demonstrates the more efficient induction efficiency of human ES cells differentiation by the nanoparticle-drug formulation. Our studies reveal a novel approach based on MSNs as nanocarriers to induce the differentiation of human ES cells into cardiomyocytes efficiently and feasibly, and offer the potential perspectives for tissue engineering, eventually in clinical applications.

  17. Making human cardiomyocytes up to date: Derivation, maturation state and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolanowski, Tomasz J; Antos, Christopher L; Guan, Kaomei

    2017-08-15

    In vitro generation of cardiomyocytes (CMs) from human cells opens the possibility to develop patient-specific therapies to various cardiomyopathies. By establishing the in vitro reprograming methods that produce human CMs, we learn about what is involved in the development of specific CM subtypes. In this review, we summarize the latest achievements in CM generation technologies, emphasizing the differentiation methods of specific CM subtypes. We also relate the biological properties and functions of the in vitro-generated CMs to those of their in vivo counterparts. Furthermore, we describe the main problem of current CM derivation methods - maturation of CMs. We subsequently discuss biochemical and physical stimuli that are used to overcome the maturation problems of in vitro-derived CMs. As a result, a more holistic approach with controllable environment and timing of specific stimuli for creation of more mature engineered heart tissues is described as well. Finally, we propose a novel approach in which enhancing energy transfer mechanisms in the immature CMs might help to overcome the current hurdle of incomplete in vitro differentiation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Functional and Pharmacological Analysis of Cardiomyocytes Differentiated from Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear-Derived Pluripotent Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Summary Advances in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology have set the stage for routine derivation of patient- and disease-specific human iPSC-cardiomyocyte (CM) models for preclinical drug screening and personalized medicine approaches. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) are an advantageous source of somatic cells because they are easily obtained and readily amenable to transduction. Here, we report that the electrophysiological properties and pharmacological responses of ...

  19. Toward label-free Raman-activated cell sorting of cardiomyocytes derived from human embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascut, Flavius C.; Goh, Huey T.; George, Vinoj; Denning, Chris; Notingher, Ioan

    2011-04-01

    Raman micro-spectroscopy (RMS) has been recently proposed for label-free phenotypic identification of human embryonic stem cells (hESC)-derived cardiomyocytes. However, the methods used for measuring the Raman spectra led to acquisition times of minutes per cell, which is prohibitive for rapid cell sorting applications. In this study we evaluated two measurement strategies that could reduce the measurement time by a factor of more than 100. We show that sampling individual cells with a laser beam focused to a line could eliminate the need of cell raster scanning and achieve high prediction accuracies (>95% specificity and >96% sensitivity) with acquisition times ~5 seconds per cell. However, the use of commercially-available higher power lasers could potentially lead to sorting speeds of ~10 cells per s. This would start to progress RMS to the field of cell sorting for applications such as enrichment and purification of hESC-derived cardiomyocytes.

  20. From fetus towards adult : maturation and functional analysis of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Catarino, Ribeiro M.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes research about the differentiation of human stem cells into cardiomyocytes (heart cells). During the differentiation process the stem cells become contractile myocytes that resemble the native heart cells. Nevertheless, the phenotype of these cardiomyocytes is comparable to a s

  1. Excitation-contraction coupling of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher eKane

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs hold enormous potential in many fields of cardiovascular research. Overcoming many of the limitations of their embryonic counterparts, the application of iPSC-CMs ranges from facilitating investigation of familial cardiac disease and pharmacological toxicity screening to personalized medicine and autologous cardiac cell therapies. The main factor preventing the full realization of this potential is the limited maturity of iPSC-CMs, which display a number of substantial differences in comparison to adult cardiomyocytes. Excitation-contraction coupling, a fundamental property of cardiomyocytes, is often described in iPSC-CMs as being more analogous to neonatal than adult cardiomyocytes. With calcium handling linked, directly or indirectly, to almost all other properties of cardiomyocytes, a solid understanding of this process will be crucial to fully realizing the potential of this technology.Here we discuss the implications of differences in excitation-contraction coupling when considering the potential applications of iPSC-CMs in a number of areas as well as detailing the current understanding of this fundamental process in these cells.

  2. Same-Single-Cell Analysis of Pacemaker-Specific Markers in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocyte Subtypes Classified by Electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yechikov, Sergey; Copaciu, Raul; Gluck, Jessica M; Deng, Wenbin; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Chan, James W; Lieu, Deborah K

    2016-07-19

    Insights into the expression of pacemaker-specific markers in human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived cardiomyocyte subtypes can facilitate the enrichment and track differentiation and maturation of hiPSC-derived pacemaker-like cardiomyocytes. To date, no study has directly assessed gene expression in each pacemaker-, atria-, and ventricular-like cardiomyocyte subtype derived from hiPSCs since currently the subtypes of these immature cardiomyocytes can only be identified by action potential profiles. Traditional acquisition of action potentials using patch-clamp recordings renders the cells unviable for subsequent analysis. We circumvented these issues by acquiring the action potential profile of a single cell optically followed by assessment of protein expression through immunostaining in that same cell. Our same-single-cell analysis for the first time revealed expression of proposed pacemaker-specific markers-hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-modulated (HCN)4 channel and Islet (Isl)1-at the protein level in all three hiPSC-derived cardiomyocyte subtypes. HCN4 expression was found to be higher in pacemaker-like hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes than atrial- and ventricular-like subtypes but its downregulation over time in all subtypes diminished the differences. Isl1 expression in pacemaker-like hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes was initially not statistically different than the contractile subtypes but did become statistically higher than ventricular-like cells with time. Our observations suggest that although HCN4 and Isl1 are differentially expressed in hiPSC-derived pacemaker-like relative to ventricular-like cardiomyocytes, these markers alone are insufficient in identifying hiPSC-derived pacemaker-like cardiomyocytes. Stem Cells 2016.

  3. Pharmacoelectrophysiology of viral-free induced pluripotent stem cell-derived human cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Ashish; Chung, YingYing; Sequiera, Glen Lester; Wong, Philip; Liew, Reginald; Shim, Winston

    2013-02-01

    Development of pharmaceutical agents for cardiac indication demands elaborate safety screening in which assessing repolarization of cardiac cells remains a critical path in risk evaluations. An efficient platform for evaluating cardiac repolarization in vitro significantly facilitates drug developmental programs. In a proof of principle study, we examined the effect of antiarrhythmogenic drugs (Vaughan Williams class I-IV) and noncardiac active drugs (terfenadine and cisapride) on the repolarization profile of viral-free human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs). Extracellular field potential (FP) recording using microelectrode arrays demonstrated significant delayed repolarization as prolonged corrected FP durations (cFPDs) by class I (quinidine and flecainide), class III (sotalol and amiodarone), and class IV (verapamil), whereas class II drugs (propranolol and nadolol) had no effects. Consistent with their sodium channel-blocking ability, class I drugs also significantly reduced FPmin and conduction velocity. Although lidocaine (class IB) had no effects on cFPDs, verapamil shortened cFPD and FPmin by 25 and 50%, respectively. Furthermore, verapamil reduced beating frequencies drastically. Importantly, the examined drugs exhibited dose-response curve on prolongation of cFPDs at an effective range that correlated significantly with therapeutic plasma concentrations achieved clinically. Consistent with clinical outcomes, drug-induced arrhythmia of tachycardia and bigeminy-like waveforms by quinidine, flecainide, and sotalol was demonstrated at supraphysiological concentrations. Furthermore, off-target effects of terfenadine and cisapride on cFPD and Na( + ) channel blockage were similarly revealed. These results suggest that hiPSC-CMs may be useful for safety evaluation of cardioactive and noncardiac acting drugs for personalized medicine.

  4. Maturation of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) in 3D collagen matrix: Effects of niche cell supplementation and mechanical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W; Kong, C W; Tong, M H; Chooi, W H; Huang, N; Li, R A; Chan, B P

    2017-02-01

    Cardiomyocytes derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC-CMs) are regarded as a promising source for regenerative medicine, drug testing and disease modeling. Nevertheless, cardiomyocytes are immature in terms of their contractile structure, metabolism and electrophysiological properties. Here, we fabricate cardiac muscle strips by encapsulating hESC-CMs in collagen-based biomaterials. Supplementation of niche cells at 3% to the number of hESC-CMs enhance the maturation of the hESC-CMs in 3D tissue matrix. The benefits of adding mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are comparable to that of adding fibroblasts. These two cell types demonstrate similar effects in promoting the compaction and cell spreading, as well as expression of maturation markers at both gene and protein levels. Mechanical loading, particularly cyclic stretch, produces engineered cardiac tissues with higher maturity in terms of twitch force, elastic modulus, sarcomere length and molecular signature, when comparing to static stretch or non-stretched controls. The current study demonstrates that the application of niche cells and mechanical stretch both stimulate the maturation of hESC-CMs in 3D architecture. Our results therefore suggest that this 3D model can be used for in vitro cardiac maturation study.

  5. Micro-arrayed human embryonic stem cells-derived cardiomyocytes for in vitro functional assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Serena

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The heart is one of the least regenerative organs in the body and any major insult can result in a significant loss of heart cells. The development of an in vitro-based cardiac tissue could be of paramount importance for many aspects of the cardiology research. In this context, we developed an in vitro assay based on human cardiomyocytes (hCMs and ad hoc micro-technologies, suitable for several applications: from pharmacological analysis to physio-phatological studies on transplantable hCMs. We focused on the development of an assay able to analyze not only hCMs viability, but also their functionality. METHODS: hCMs were cultured onto a poly-acrylamide hydrogel with tunable tissue-like mechanical properties and organized through micropatterning in a 20×20 array. Arrayed hCMs were characterized by immunofluorescence, GAP-FRAP analyses and live and dead assay. Their functionality was evaluated monitoring the excitation-contraction coupling. RESULTS: Micropatterned hCMs maintained the expression of the major cardiac markers (cTnT, cTnI, Cx43, Nkx2.5, α-actinin and functional properties. The spontaneous contraction frequency was (0.83±0.2 Hz, while exogenous electrical stimulation lead to an increase up to 2 Hz. As proof of concept that our device can be used for screening the effects of pathological conditions, hCMs were exposed to increasing levels of H(2O(2. Remarkably, hCMs viability was not compromised with exposure to 0.1 mM H(2O(2, but hCMs contractility was dramatically suppressed. As proof of concept, we also developed a microfluidic platform to selectively treat areas of the cell array, in the perspective of performing multi-parametric assay. CONCLUSIONS: Such system could be a useful tool for testing the effects of multiple conditions on an in vitro cell model representative of human heart physiology, thus potentially helping the processes of therapy and drug development.

  6. Maturing human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes in human engineered cardiac tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feric, Nicole T; Radisic, Milica

    2016-01-15

    Engineering functional human cardiac tissue that mimics the native adult morphological and functional phenotype has been a long held objective. In the last 5 years, the field of cardiac tissue engineering has transitioned from cardiac tissues derived from various animal species to the production of the first generation of human engineered cardiac tissues (hECTs), due to recent advances in human stem cell biology. Despite this progress, the hECTs generated to date remain immature relative to the native adult myocardium. In this review, we focus on the maturation challenge in the context of hECTs, the present state of the art, and future perspectives in terms of regenerative medicine, drug discovery, preclinical safety testing and pathophysiological studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cardiomyocyte Clusters Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells Share Similarities with Human Heart Tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Julia Asp; Daniella Steel; Marianne Jonsson; Caroline Améen; Kerstin Dahlenborg; Anders Jeppsson; Anders Lindahl; Peter Sartipy

    2010-01-01

    @@ Cardiotoxicity testing is a key activity in the pharmaceutical industry in order to detect detrimental effects of new drugs.A reliable human in vitro model would both be beneficial in selection of lead compounds and be important for reducing animal experimentation.

  8. Cobalt protoporphyrin pretreatment protects human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes from hypoxia/reoxygenation injury in vitro and increases graft size and vascularization in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jun; Weaver, Matthew S; Cao, Baohong; Dennis, James E; Van Biber, Benjamin; Laflamme, Michael A; Allen, Margaret D

    2014-06-01

    Human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) can regenerate infarcted myocardium. However, when implanted into acutely infarcted hearts, few cells survive the first week postimplant. To improve early graft survival, hESC-CMs were pretreated with cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP), a transcriptional activator of cytoprotective heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). When hESC-CMs were challenged with an in vitro hypoxia/reoxygenation injury, mimicking cell transplantation into an ischemic site, survival was significantly greater among cells pretreated with CoPP versus phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-pretreated controls. Compared with PBS-pretreated cells, CoPP-pretreated hESC-CM preparations exhibited higher levels of HO-1 expression, Akt phosphorylation, and vascular endothelial growth factor production, with reduced apoptosis, and a 30% decrease in intracellular reactive oxygen species. For in vivo translation, 1 × 10(7) hESC-CMs were pretreated ex vivo with CoPP or PBS and then injected intramyocardially into rat hearts immediately following acute infarction (permanent coronary ligation). At 1 week, hESC-CM content, assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction for human Alu sequences, was 17-fold higher in hearts receiving CoPP- than PBS-pretreated cells. On histomorphometry, cardiomyocyte graft size was 2.6-fold larger in hearts receiving CoPP- than PBS-pretreated cells, occupying up to 12% of the ventricular area. Vascular density of host-perfused human-derived capillaries was significantly greater in grafts composed of CoPP- than PBS-pretreated cells. Taken together, these experiments demonstrate that ex vivo pretreatment of hESC-CMs with a single dose of CoPP before intramyocardial implantation more than doubled resulting graft size and improved early graft vascularization in acutely infarcted hearts. These findings open the door for delivery of these, or other, stem cells during acute interventional therapy following myocardial infarction or ischemia.

  9. Adrenergic Stress Protection of Human iPS Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes by Fast Kv7.1 Recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Piccini

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The fight-or-flight response (FFR, a physiological acute stress reaction, involves positive chronotropic and inotropic effects on heart muscle cells mediated through β-adrenoceptor activation. Increased systolic calcium is required to enable stronger heart contractions whereas elevated potassium currents are to limit the duration of the action potentials and prevent arrhythmia. The latter effect is accomplished by an increased functional activity of the Kv7.1 channel encoded by KCNQ1. Current knowledge, however, does not sufficiently explain the full extent of rapid Kv7.1 activation and may hence be incomplete. Using inducible genetic KCNQ1 complementation in KCNQ1-deficient human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs, we here reinvestigate the functional role of Kv7.1 in adapting human CMs to adrenergic stress. Under baseline conditions, Kv7.1 was barely detectable at the plasma membrane of hiPSC-CMs, yet it fully protected these from adrenergic stress-induced beat-to-beat variability of repolarization and torsade des pointes-like arrhythmia. Furthermore, isoprenaline treatment increased field potential durations specifically in KCNQ1-deficient CMs to cause these adverse macroscopic effects. Mechanistically, we find that the protective action by Kv7.1 resides in a rapid translocation of channel proteins from intracellular stores to the plasma membrane, induced by adrenergic signaling. Gene silencing experiments targeting RAB GTPases, mediators of intracellular vesicle trafficking, showed that fast Kv7.1 recycling under acute stress conditions is RAB4A-dependent.Our data reveal a key mechanism underlying the rapid adaptation of human cardiomyocytes to adrenergic stress. These findings moreover aid to the understanding of disease pathology in long QT syndrome and bear important implications for safety pharmacological screening.

  10. Evaluation of the cardiotoxicity of mitragynine and its analogues using human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Lu

    Full Text Available Mitragynine is a major bioactive compound of Kratom, which is derived from the leave extracts of Mitragyna speciosa Korth or Mitragyna speciosa (M. speciosa, a medicinal plant from South East Asia used legally in many countries as stimulant with opioid-like effects for the treatment of chronic pain and opioid-withdrawal symptoms. Fatal incidents with Mitragynine have been associated with cardiac arrest. In this study, we determined the cardiotoxicity of Mitragynine and other chemical constituents isolated using human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs.The rapid delayed rectifier potassium current (IKr, L-type Ca2+ current (ICa,L and action potential duration (APD were measured by whole cell patch-clamp. The expression of KCNH2 and cytotoxicity was determined by real-time PCR and Caspase activity measurements. After significant IKr suppression by Mitragynine (10 µM was confirmed in hERG-HEK cells, we systematically examined the effects of Mitragynine and other chemical constituents in hiPSC-CMs. Mitragynine, Paynantheine, Speciogynine and Speciociliatine, dosage-dependently (0.1∼100 µM suppressed IKr in hiPSC-CMs by 67%∼84% with IC50 ranged from 0.91 to 2.47 µM. Moreover, Mitragynine (10 µM significantly prolonged APD at 50 and 90% repolarization (APD50 and APD90 (439.0±11.6 vs. 585.2±45.5 ms and 536.0±22.6 vs. 705.9±46.1 ms, respectively and induced arrhythmia, without altering the L-type Ca2+ current. Neither the expression, and intracellular distribution of KCNH2/Kv11.1, nor the Caspase 3 activity were significantly affected by Mitragynine.Our study indicates that Mitragynine and its analogues may potentiate Torsade de Pointes through inhibition of IKr in human cardiomyocytes.

  11. Danshen-Enhanced Cardioprotective Effect of Cardioplegia on Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in a Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Liu, Yiwei; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Yangming; Zhang, Xiaoling; Zhang, Hao

    2017-05-01

    Myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury is unavoidable during cardioplegic arrest and open-heart surgery. Danshen is one of the most popular traditional herbal medicines in China, which has entered the Food and Drug Administration-approved phase III clinical trial. This study was aimed to develop a human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs) model to mimic I/R injury and evaluate the cardioprotective effect of regular cardioplegic solution with Danshen. hiPSC-CMs were cultured with the crystalloid cardioplegic solution (Thomas group) and Thomas solution with 2 or 10 µg/mL Danshen (Thomas plus Danshen groups). The cells under normoxic culture condition served as baseline group. Then, the cells were placed in a modular incubator chamber. After 45 min hypoxia and 3 h reoxygenation, hiPSC-CMs subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation resulted in a sharp increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) content in Thomas group versus baseline group. Compared with the Thomas group, ROS accumulation was significant suppressed in Thomas plus Danshen groups, which might result from elevating the content of glutathione and enhanced activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase. The enhanced L-type Ca(2+) current in hiPSC-CMs after I/R injury was also significantly decreased by Danshen, and meanwhile intracellular Ca(2+) level was reduced and calcium overload was suppressed. Thomas plus Danshen groups also presented less irregular transients and lower apoptosis rates. As a result, Danshen could improve antioxidant and calcium handling in cardiomyocytes during I/R and lead to reduced arrhythmia events and apoptosis rates. hiPSC-CMs model offered a platform for the future translational study of the cardioplegia. © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. In vivo differentiation of human amniotic epithelial cells into cardiomyocyte-like cells and cell transplantation effect on myocardial infarction in rats: comparison with cord blood and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Cheng-Hu; Jin, Jiyong; Joe, Jun-Ho; Song, Yi-Sun; So, Byung-Im; Lim, Sang Moo; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Woo, Sang-Keun; Ra, Jeong-Chan; Lee, Young-Yiul; Kim, Kyung-Soo

    2012-01-01

    Human amniotic epithelial cells (h-AECs), which have various merits as a cell source for cell therapy, are known to differentiate into cardiomyocytes in vitro. However, the ability of h-AECs to differentiate into cardiomyocytes in vivo and their cell transplantation effects on myocardial infarction are still unknown. In this study, we assessed whether h-AECs could differentiate into cardiomyocytes in vivo and whether h-AECs transplantation can decrease infarct size and improve cardiac function, in comparison to transplantation of cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or adipose tissue-derived MSCs. For our study, we injected h-AECs, cord blood-derived MSCs, adipose tissue-derived MSCs, and saline into areas of myocardial infarction in athymic nude rats. After 4 weeks, 3% of the surviving h-AECs expressed myosin heavy chain, a marker specific to the myocardium. Compared with the saline group, all cell-implanted groups showed a higher ejection fraction, lower infarct area by positron emission tomography and histology, and more abundant myocardial gene and protein expression in the infarct area. We showed that h-AECs can differentiate into cardiomyocyte-like cells, decrease infarct size, and improve cardiac function in vivo. The beneficial effects of h-AECs were comparable to those of cord blood and adipose tissue-derived MSCs. These results support the need for further studies of h-AECs as a cell source for myocardial regeneration due to their plentiful availability, low immunity, and lack of ethical issues related to their use.

  13. Large-Scale Production of Cardiomyocytes from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Using a Highly Reproducible Small Molecule-Based Differentiation Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonoudi, Hananeh; Ansari, Hassan; Abbasalizadeh, Saeed; Blue, Gillian M; Aghdami, Nasser; Winlaw, David S; Harvey, Richard P; Bosman, Alexis; Baharvand, Hossein

    2016-07-25

    Maximizing the benefit of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) for research, disease modeling, pharmaceutical and clinical applications requires robust methods for the large-scale production of functional cell types, including cardiomyocytes. Here we demonstrate that the temporal manipulation of WNT, TGF-β, and SHH signaling pathways leads to highly efficient cardiomyocyte differentiation of single-cell passaged hPSC lines in both static suspension and stirred suspension bioreactor systems. Employing this strategy resulted in ~ 100% beating spheroids, consistently containing > 80% cardiac troponin T-positive cells after 15 days of culture, validated in multiple hPSC lines. We also report on a variation of this protocol for use with cell lines not currently adapted to single-cell passaging, the success of which has been verified in 42 hPSC lines. Cardiomyocytes generated using these protocols express lineage-specific markers and show expected electrophysiological functionalities. Our protocol presents a simple, efficient and robust platform for the large-scale production of human cardiomyocytes.

  14. Maximum diastolic potential of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes depends critically on I(Kr).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doss, Michael Xavier; Di Diego, José M; Goodrow, Robert J; Wu, Yuesheng; Cordeiro, Jonathan M; Nesterenko, Vladislav V; Barajas-Martínez, Héctor; Hu, Dan; Urrutia, Janire; Desai, Mayurika; Treat, Jacqueline A; Sachinidis, Agapios; Antzelevitch, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CM) hold promise for therapeutic applications. To serve these functions, the hiPSC-CM must recapitulate the electrophysiologic properties of native adult cardiomyocytes. This study examines the electrophysiologic characteristics of hiPSC-CM between 11 and 121 days of maturity. Embryoid bodies (EBs) were generated from hiPS cell line reprogrammed with Oct4, Nanog, Lin28 and Sox2. Sharp microelectrodes were used to record action potentials (AP) from spontaneously beating clusters (BC) micro-dissected from the EBs (n = 103; 37°C) and to examine the response to 5 µM E-4031 (n = 21) or BaCl(2) (n = 22). Patch-clamp techniques were used to record I(Kr) and I(K1) from cells enzymatically dissociated from BC (n = 49; 36°C). Spontaneous cycle length (CL) and AP characteristics varied widely among the 103 preparations. E-4031 (5 µM; n = 21) increased Bazett-corrected AP duration from 291.8±81.2 to 426.4±120.2 msec (pKr) in all (11/11). Consistent with the electrophysiological data, RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry studies showed relatively poor mRNA and protein expression of I(K1) in the majority of cells, but robust expression of I(Kr.) In contrast to recently reported studies, our data point to major deficiencies of hiPSC-CM, with remarkable diversity of electrophysiologic phenotypes as well as pharmacologic responsiveness among beating clusters and cells up to 121 days post-differentiation (dpd). The vast majority have a maximum diastolic potential that depends critically on I(Kr) due to the absence of I(K1). Thus, efforts should be directed at producing more specialized and mature hiPSC-CM for future therapeutic applications.

  15. A review of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes for high-throughput drug discovery, cardiotoxicity screening, and publication standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordwinkin, Nicholas M; Burridge, Paul W; Wu, Joseph C

    2013-02-01

    Drug attrition rates have increased in past years, resulting in growing costs for the pharmaceutical industry and consumers. The reasons for this include the lack of in vitro models that correlate with clinical results and poor preclinical toxicity screening assays. The in vitro production of human cardiac progenitor cells and cardiomyocytes from human pluripotent stem cells provides an amenable source of cells for applications in drug discovery, disease modeling, regenerative medicine, and cardiotoxicity screening. In addition, the ability to derive human-induced pluripotent stem cells from somatic tissues, combined with current high-throughput screening and pharmacogenomics, may help realize the use of these cells to fulfill the potential of personalized medicine. In this review, we discuss the use of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes for drug discovery and cardiotoxicity screening, as well as current hurdles that must be overcome for wider clinical applications of this promising approach.

  16. Contractile Defect Caused by Mutation in MYBPC3 Revealed under Conditions Optimized for Human PSC-Cardiomyocyte Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birket, Matthew J; Ribeiro, Marcelo C; Kosmidis, Georgios; Ward, Dorien; Leitoguinho, Ana Rita; van de Pol, Vera; Dambrot, Cheryl; Devalla, Harsha D; Davis, Richard P; Mastroberardino, Pier G; Atsma, Douwe E; Passier, Robert; Mummery, Christine L

    2015-10-27

    Maximizing baseline function of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs) is essential for their effective application in models of cardiac toxicity and disease. Here, we aimed to identify factors that would promote an adequate level of function to permit robust single-cell contractility measurements in a human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) model of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). A simple screen revealed the collaborative effects of thyroid hormone, IGF-1 and the glucocorticoid analog dexamethasone on the electrophysiology, bioenergetics, and contractile force generation of hPSC-CMs. In this optimized condition, hiPSC-CMs with mutations in MYBPC3, a gene encoding myosin-binding protein C, which, when mutated, causes HCM, showed significantly lower contractile force generation than controls. This was recapitulated by direct knockdown of MYBPC3 in control hPSC-CMs, supporting a mechanism of haploinsufficiency. Modeling this disease in vitro using human cells is an important step toward identifying therapeutic interventions for HCM.

  17. Functional and Pharmacological Analysis of Cardiomyocytes Differentiated from Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear-Derived Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Michael Riedel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Advances in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC technology have set the stage for routine derivation of patient- and disease-specific human iPSC-cardiomyocyte (CM models for preclinical drug screening and personalized medicine approaches. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs are an advantageous source of somatic cells because they are easily obtained and readily amenable to transduction. Here, we report that the electrophysiological properties and pharmacological responses of PBMC-derived iPSC CM are generally similar to those of iPSC CM derived from other somatic cells, using patch-clamp, calcium transient, and multielectrode array (MEA analyses. Distinct iPSC lines derived from a single patient display similar electrophysiological features and pharmacological responses. Finally, we demonstrate that human iPSC CMs undergo acute changes in calcium-handling properties and gene expression in response to rapid electrical stimulation, laying the foundation for an in-vitro-tachypacing model system for the study of human tachyarrhythmias.

  18. Contractile Defect Caused by Mutation in MYBPC3 Revealed under Conditions Optimized for Human PSC-Cardiomyocyte Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Birket

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Maximizing baseline function of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs is essential for their effective application in models of cardiac toxicity and disease. Here, we aimed to identify factors that would promote an adequate level of function to permit robust single-cell contractility measurements in a human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC model of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM. A simple screen revealed the collaborative effects of thyroid hormone, IGF-1 and the glucocorticoid analog dexamethasone on the electrophysiology, bioenergetics, and contractile force generation of hPSC-CMs. In this optimized condition, hiPSC-CMs with mutations in MYBPC3, a gene encoding myosin-binding protein C, which, when mutated, causes HCM, showed significantly lower contractile force generation than controls. This was recapitulated by direct knockdown of MYBPC3 in control hPSC-CMs, supporting a mechanism of haploinsufficiency. Modeling this disease in vitro using human cells is an important step toward identifying therapeutic interventions for HCM.

  19. Functional and pharmacological analysis of cardiomyocytes differentiated from human peripheral blood mononuclear-derived pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Michael; Jou, Chuanchau J; Lai, Shuping; Lux, Robert L; Moreno, Alonso P; Spitzer, Kenneth W; Christians, Elizabeth; Tristani-Firouzi, Martin; Benjamin, Ivor J

    2014-07-08

    Advances in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology have set the stage for routine derivation of patient- and disease-specific human iPSC-cardiomyocyte (CM) models for preclinical drug screening and personalized medicine approaches. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) are an advantageous source of somatic cells because they are easily obtained and readily amenable to transduction. Here, we report that the electrophysiological properties and pharmacological responses of PBMC-derived iPSC CM are generally similar to those of iPSC CM derived from other somatic cells, using patch-clamp, calcium transient, and multielectrode array (MEA) analyses. Distinct iPSC lines derived from a single patient display similar electrophysiological features and pharmacological responses. Finally, we demonstrate that human iPSC CMs undergo acute changes in calcium-handling properties and gene expression in response to rapid electrical stimulation, laying the foundation for an in-vitro-tachypacing model system for the study of human tachyarrhythmias.

  20. Ion channelopathies in human induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes: a dynamic clamp study with virtual IK1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalie M.E. Meijer van Putten

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Human induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs are widely used in studying basic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias that are caused by ion channelopathies. Unfortunately, the action potential profile of hiPSC-CMs—and consequently the profile of individual membrane currents active during that action potential—differs substantially from that of native human cardiomyocytes, largely due to almost negligible expression of the inward rectifier potassium current (IK1.In the present study, we attempted to ‘normalize’ the action potential profile of our hiPSC-CMs by inserting a voltage dependent in silico IK1 into our hiPSC-CMs, using the dynamic clamp configuration of the patch clamp technique. Recordings were made from single hiPSC-CMs, using the perforated patch clamp technique at physiological temperature.We assessed three different models of IK1, with different degrees of inward rectification, and systematically varied the magnitude of the inserted IK1. Also, we modified the inserted IK1 in order to assess the effects of loss- and gain-of-function mutations in the KCNJ2 gene, which encodes the Kir2.1 protein that is primarily responsible for the IK1 channel in human ventricle.For our experiments, we selected spontaneously beating hiPSC-CMs, with negligible IK1 as demonstrated in separate voltage clamp experiments, which were paced at 1 Hz. Upon addition of in silico IK1 with a peak outward density of 4–6 pA/pF, these hiPSC-CMs showed a ventricular-like action potential morphology with a stable resting membrane potential near −80 mV and a maximum upstroke velocity >150 V/s (n=9. Proarrhythmic action potential changes were observed upon injection of both loss-of-function and gain-of-function IK1, as associated with Andersen-Tawil syndrome type 1 and short QT syndrome type 3, respectively (n=6.We conclude that injection of in silico IK1 makes the hiPSC-CM a more reliable model for investigating mechanisms underlying

  1. Transcriptome profiling of patient-specific human iPSC-cardiomyocytes predicts individual drug safety and efficacy responses in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsa, Elena; Burridge, Paul W.; Yu, Kun-Hsing; Ahrens, John H.; Termglinchan, Vittavat; Wu, Haodi; Liu, Chun; Shukla, Praveen; Sayed, Nazish; Churko, Jared M.; Shao, Ningyi; Woo, Nicole A.; Chao, Alexander S.; Gold, Joseph D.; Karakikes, Ioannis; Snyder, Michael P.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Understanding individual susceptibility to drug-induced cardiotoxicity is key to improving patient safety and preventing drug attrition. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) enable the study of pharmacological and toxicological responses in patient-specific cardiomyocytes (CMs), and may serve as preclinical platforms for precision medicine. Transcriptome profiling in hiPSC-CMs from seven individuals lacking known cardiovascular disease-associated mutations, and in three isogenic human heart tissue and hiPSC-CM pairs, showed greater inter-patient variation than intra-patient variation, verifying that reprogramming and differentiation preserve patient-specific gene expression, particularly in metabolic and stress-response genes. Transcriptome-based toxicology analysis predicted and risk-stratified patient-specific susceptibility to cardiotoxicity, and functional assays in hiPSC-CMs using tacrolimus and rosiglitazone, drugs targeting pathways predicted to produce cardiotoxicity, validated inter-patient differential responses. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated pathway correction prevented drug-induced cardiotoxicity. Our data suggest that hiPSC-CMs can be used in vitro to predict and validate patient-specific drug safety and efficacy, potentially enabling future clinical approaches to precision medicine. PMID:27545504

  2. Development of correction formula for field potential duration of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Izumi-Nakaseko

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs have been used in many studies to assess proarrhythmic risks of chemical compounds. In those studies, field potential durations (FPD of hiPSC-CMs have been corrected by clinically used Fridericia's and/or Bazett's formulae, however, the rationale for the use of these formulae has not been well established. In the present study, we developed a correction formula for experiments using hiPSC-CMs. First, we analyzed the effect of beating rate on FPD in the hiPSC-CMs sheets with electrical stimuli and a HCN channel inhibitor zatebradine. Next, we examined the relationship between the electrophysiological properties and the expression levels of ion channel genes in the cell sheets. Zatebradine slowed the beating rate and allowed to analyze FPD changes at various pacing cycle lengths. Rate-dependent change in the repolarization period was smaller in the cell sheets than that reported on the human hearts, which can be partly explained by lower gene expression level of hKCNJ2 and hKCNE1. Thus, non-linear equation for correcting FPD in the cell sheet; FPDc = FPD/RR0.22 with RR given in second was obtained, which may make it feasible to assess net repolarization delay by various chemical compounds with a chronotropic action.

  3. Heterogeneous filament network formation by myosin light chain isoforms effects on contractile energy output of single cardiomyocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeomi Mizutani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiomyocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC-CMs are expected to play an important role in heart therapies, in which hiPSC-CMs should generate sufficient contractile force to pump blood. However, recent studies have shown that the contractility of myocardial mimics composed of hiPSC-CMs is lower than that of adult human myocardium. To examine the mechanism by which contractile force output of hiPSC-CMs is weakened, we measured the contractile force of single hiPSC-CMs and observed the fibrous distribution of myosin II regulatory light chain (MRLC of cardiac (contributes to beating and non-cardiac (does not contribute to beating isoforms. Single hiPSC-CMs were cultured on an extracellular matrix gel, and the contractile force and strain energy exerted on the gel were measured. Strain energy was not uniform between cells and ranged from 0.2 to 5.8 pJ. The combination of contractile force measurement and immunofluorescent microscopy for MRLC isoforms showed that cells with higher strain energy expressed the weakened non-cardiac myosin II fibers compared to those of cells with lower strain energy. Observation of cardiac and non-cardiac MRLC showed that the MRLC isoforms formed heterogeneous filament networks. These results suggest that strain energy output from single hiPSC-CMs depends both cardiac and non-cardiac myosin fibers, which prevent deformation of the cell body.

  4. Maximum diastolic potential of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes depends critically on I(Kr.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Xavier Doss

    Full Text Available Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CM hold promise for therapeutic applications. To serve these functions, the hiPSC-CM must recapitulate the electrophysiologic properties of native adult cardiomyocytes. This study examines the electrophysiologic characteristics of hiPSC-CM between 11 and 121 days of maturity. Embryoid bodies (EBs were generated from hiPS cell line reprogrammed with Oct4, Nanog, Lin28 and Sox2. Sharp microelectrodes were used to record action potentials (AP from spontaneously beating clusters (BC micro-dissected from the EBs (n = 103; 37°C and to examine the response to 5 µM E-4031 (n = 21 or BaCl(2 (n = 22. Patch-clamp techniques were used to record I(Kr and I(K1 from cells enzymatically dissociated from BC (n = 49; 36°C. Spontaneous cycle length (CL and AP characteristics varied widely among the 103 preparations. E-4031 (5 µM; n = 21 increased Bazett-corrected AP duration from 291.8±81.2 to 426.4±120.2 msec (p<0.001 and generated early afterdepolarizations in 8/21 preparations. In 13/21 BC, E-4031 rapidly depolarized the clusters leading to inexcitability. BaCl(2, at concentrations that selectively block I(K1 (50-100 µM, failed to depolarize the majority of clusters (13/22. Patch-clamp experiments revealed very low or negligible I(K1 in 53% (20/38 of the cells studied, but presence of I(Kr in all (11/11. Consistent with the electrophysiological data, RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry studies showed relatively poor mRNA and protein expression of I(K1 in the majority of cells, but robust expression of I(Kr. In contrast to recently reported studies, our data point to major deficiencies of hiPSC-CM, with remarkable diversity of electrophysiologic phenotypes as well as pharmacologic responsiveness among beating clusters and cells up to 121 days post-differentiation (dpd. The vast majority have a maximum diastolic potential that depends critically on I(Kr due to the absence of

  5. Analysis of Calcium Transients and Uniaxial Contraction Force in Single Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes on Microstructured Elastic Substrate with Spatially Controlled Surface Chemistries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grespan, Eleonora; Martewicz, Sebastian; Serena, Elena; Le Houerou, Vincent; Rühe, Jürgen; Elvassore, Nicola

    2016-11-22

    The mechanical activity of cardiomyocytes is the result of a process called excitation-contraction coupling (ECC). A membrane depolarization wave induces a transient cytosolic calcium concentration increase that triggers activation of calcium-sensitive contractile proteins, leading to cell contraction and force generation. An experimental setup capable of acquiring simultaneously all ECC features would have an enormous impact on cardiac drug development and disease study. In this work, we develop a microengineered elastomeric substrate with tailor-made surface chemistry to measure simultaneously the uniaxial contraction force and the calcium transients generated by single human cardiomyocytes in vitro. Microreplication followed by photocuring is used to generate an array consisting of elastomeric micropillars. A second photochemical process is employed to spatially control the surface chemistry of the elastomeric pillar. As result, human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) can be confined in rectangular cell-adhesive areas, which induce cell elongation and promote suspended cell anchoring between two adjacent micropillars. In this end-to-end conformation, confocal fluorescence microscopy allows simultaneous detection of calcium transients and micropillar deflection induced by a single-cell uniaxial contraction force. Computational finite elements modeling (FEM) and 3D reconstruction of the cell-pillar interface allow force quantification. The platform is used to follow calcium dynamics and contraction force evolution in hESC-CMs cultures over the course of several weeks. Our results show how a biomaterial-based platform can be a versatile tool for in vitro assaying of cardiac functional properties of single-cell human cardiomyocytes, with applications in both in vitro developmental studies and drug screening on cardiac cultures.

  6. Adenosine improves cardiomyocyte respiratory efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babsky, A M; Doliba, M M; Doliba, N M; Osbakken, M D

    1998-01-01

    The role of adenosine on the regulation of mitochondrial function has been studied. In order to evaluate this the following experiments were done in isolated rat cardiomyocites and mitochondria using polarographic techniques. Cardiomyocyte oxygen consumption (MVO2) and mitochondrial respiratory function (State 3 and State 4, respiratory control index, and ADP/O ratio) were evaluated after exposure to adenosine. Cardiomyocyte MVO2 was significantly lower in cells previously exposed to adenosine (10 microM, 15 min or 30 min cell incubation) than in cells not exposed to adenosine (control). Addition of dipyridamole (10 microM) or 8-(p-Sulfophenyl) theophylline (50 microM) to cardiomyocytes before adenosine incubation prevented the adenosine-induced changes in MVO2. Mitochondria obtained from isolated perfused beating heart previously perfused with adenosine (10 microM, 30 min heart perfusion) also resulted in significant increases in ADP/O and respiratory control index compared to matching control. Mitochondria isolated from cardiomyocytes previously exposed to adenosine (10 microM, 15 min or 30 min cell incubation) resulted in a significant increase in mitochondrial ADP/O ratio compared to control. Adenosine-induced decrease in cardiomyocyte MVO2 may be related to an increase in efficiency of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, and more economical use of oxygen, which is necessary for survival under ischemic stress.

  7. Cardiomyocytic apoptosis and heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quanzhou Feng

    2008-01-01

    Heart failure is a major disease seriously threatening human health.Once left ventricular dysfunction develops,cardiac function usually deteriorates and progresses to congestive heart failure in several months or years even if no factors which accelerate the deterioration repeatedly exist.Mechanism through which cardiac function continually deteriorates is still unclear.Cardiomyocytic apoptosis can occur in acute stage of ischemic heart diseases and the compensated stage of cardiac dysfunction.In this review,we summarize recent advances in understanding the role of cardiomyocytic apoptosis in heart failure.

  8. Availability of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes in assessment of drug potential for QT prolongation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozaki, Yumiko, E-mail: yumiko-nozaki@ds-pharma.co.jp [Preclinical Research Laboratories, Dainippon Sumitomo Pharma. Co., Ltd., Suita, Osaka 564-0053 (Japan); Honda, Yayoi, E-mail: yayoi-honda@ds-pharma.co.jp [Preclinical Research Laboratories, Dainippon Sumitomo Pharma. Co., Ltd., Suita, Osaka 564-0053 (Japan); Tsujimoto, Shinji, E-mail: shinji-tsujimoto@ds-pharma.co.jp [Regenerative and Cellular Medicine Office, Dainippon Sumitomo Pharma. Co., Ltd., Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0031 (Japan); Watanabe, Hitoshi, E-mail: hitoshi-1-watanabe@ds-pharma.co.jp [Preclinical Research Laboratories, Dainippon Sumitomo Pharma. Co., Ltd., Suita, Osaka 564-0053 (Japan); Kunimatsu, Takeshi, E-mail: takeshi-kunimatsu@ds-pharma.co.jp [Preclinical Research Laboratories, Dainippon Sumitomo Pharma. Co., Ltd., Suita, Osaka 564-0053 (Japan); Funabashi, Hitoshi, E-mail: hitoshi-funabashi@ds-pharma.co.jp [Preclinical Research Laboratories, Dainippon Sumitomo Pharma. Co., Ltd., Suita, Osaka 564-0053 (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    Field potential duration (FPD) in human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CMs), which can express QT interval in an electrocardiogram, is reported to be a useful tool to predict K{sup +} channel and Ca{sup 2+} channel blocker effects on QT interval. However, there is no report showing that this technique can be used to predict multichannel blocker potential for QT prolongation. The aim of this study is to show that FPD from MEA (Multielectrode array) of hiPS-CMs can detect QT prolongation induced by multichannel blockers. hiPS-CMs were seeded onto MEA and FPD was measured for 2 min every 10 min for 30 min after drug exposure for the vehicle and each drug concentration. I{sub Kr} and I{sub Ks} blockers concentration-dependently prolonged corrected FPD (FPDc), whereas Ca{sup 2+} channel blockers concentration-dependently shortened FPDc. Also, the multichannel blockers Amiodarone, Paroxetine, Terfenadine and Citalopram prolonged FPDc in a concentration dependent manner. Finally, the I{sub Kr} blockers, Terfenadine and Citalopram, which are reported to cause Torsade de Pointes (TdP) in clinical practice, produced early afterdepolarization (EAD). hiPS-CMs using MEA system and FPDc can predict the effects of drug candidates on QT interval. This study also shows that this assay can help detect EAD for drugs with TdP potential. - Highlights: • We focused on hiPS-CMs to replace in vitro assays in preclinical screening studies. • hiPS-CMs FPD is useful as an indicator to predict drug potential for QT prolongation. • MEA assay can help detect EAD for drugs with TdP potentials. • MEA assay in hiPS-CMs is useful for accurately predicting drug TdP risk in humans.

  9. Xenotransplantation of Human Cardiomyocyte Progenitor Cells Does Not Improve Cardiac Function in a Porcine Model of Chronic Ischemic Heart Failure. Results from a Randomized, Blinded, Placebo Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne J Jansen of Lorkeers

    Full Text Available Recently cardiomyocyte progenitor cells (CMPCs were successfully isolated from fetal and adult human hearts. Direct intramyocardial injection of human CMPCs (hCMPCs in experimental mouse models of acute myocardial infarction significantly improved cardiac function compared to controls.Here, our aim was to investigate whether xenotransplantation via intracoronary infusion of fetal hCMPCs in a pig model of chronic myocardial infarction is safe and efficacious, in view of translation purposes.We performed a randomized, blinded, placebo controlled trial. Four weeks after ischemia/reperfusion injury by 90 minutes of percutaneous left anterior descending artery occlusion, pigs (n = 16, 68.5 ± 5.4 kg received intracoronary infusion of 10 million fetal hCMPCs or placebo. All animals were immunosuppressed by cyclosporin (CsA. Four weeks after infusion, endpoint analysis by MRI displayed no difference in left ventricular ejection fraction, left ventricular end diastolic and left ventricular end systolic volumes between both groups. Serial pressure volume (PV-loop and echocardiography showed no differences in functional parameters between groups at any timepoint. Infarct size at follow-up, measured by late gadolinium enhancement MRI showed no difference between groups. Intracoronary pressure and flow measurements showed no signs of coronary obstruction 30 minutes after cell infusion. No premature death occurred in cell treated animals.Xenotransplantation via intracoronary infusion of hCMPCs is feasible and safe, but not associated with improved left ventricular performance and infarct size compared to placebo in a porcine model of chronic myocardial infarction.

  10. Protective effects of non-mitogenic human acidic fibroblast growth factor on hydrogen peroxide-induced damage to cardiomyocytes in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhuo-Feng Lin; Xiao-Kun Li; Yuan Lin; Fan Wu; Li-Min Liang; Xiao-Bing Fu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the protective effect of non-mitogenic human acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF) on cardiac oxidative injury in vivo.METHODS: Ventricular cardiomyocytes were isolated from 1- to 3-d-old neonatal SD mice and cultured in Dulbecco's minimum essential medium supplemented with 15% fetal bovine serum under an atmosphere of 50 mL/L CO2-95% air at 37 ℃, as well as assessed by immunocytochemical assay. We constructed the cardiomyocyte injury model by exposure to a certain concentration of H2O2.Cellular viability, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity,leakage of maleic dialdehyde and anti-apoptosis effect were included to evaluate the cardiac protective effect of non-mitogenic human acidic FGF.RESULTS: Over 50% of the cardiomyocytes beat spontaneously on the 2nd d of culture and synchronously beat after being cultured for 3 d. Forty-eight hours after plating was completed, the purity of such cultures was 95% myocytes, assessed b,y an immunocytochemical assay. Cellular viability dramatically decreased with the increasing of the concentration of H2O2. Non-mitogenic human acidic FGF showed significant resistance to the toxic effect of H2O2, significantly increased the cellular viability as well as the activity of SOD, and dramatically decreased the leakage of maleic dialdehyde as well as the cellular apoptosis rate.CONCLUSION: Hydrogen peroxide shows strong cytotoxicity to the cultured cardiac myocytes, and non-mitogenic human acidic FGF shows strong cardio-protective effect when exposed to a certain concentration of H2O2.

  11. Cardiac disease modeling using induced pluripotent stemcell-derived human cardiomyocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patrizia Dell’Era; Patrizia Benzoni; Elisabetta Crescini; Matteo Valle; Er Xia; Antonella Consiglio; Maurizio Memo

    2015-01-01

    Causative mutations and variants associated with cardiacdiseases have been found in genes encoding cardiac ionchannels, accessory proteins, cytoskeletal components,junctional proteins, and signaling molecules. In mostcases the functional evaluation of the genetic alterationhas been carried out by expressing the mutated proteinsin in-vitro heterologous systems. While these studieshave provided a wealth of functional details that havegreatly enhanced the understanding of the pathologicalmechanisms, it has always been clear that heterologousexpression of the mutant protein bears the intrinsiclimitation of the lack of a proper intracellular environmentand the lack of pathological remodeling. The resultsobtained from the application of the next generationsequencing technique to patients suffering from cardiacdiseases have identified several loci, mostly in non-codingDNA regions, which still await functional analysis. Theisolation and culture of human embryonic stem cells hasinitially provided a constant source of cells from whichcardiomyocytes (CMs) can be obtained by differentiation.Furthermore, the possibility to reprogram cellular fateto a pluripotent state, has opened this process to thestudy of genetic diseases. Thus induced pluripotentstem cells (iPSCs) represent a completely new cellularmodel that overcomes the limitations of heterologousstudies. Importantly, due to the possibility to keepspontaneously beating CMs in culture for several months,during which they show a certain degree of maturation/aging, this approach will also provide a system in whichto address the effect of long-term expression of themutated proteins or any other DNA mutation, in termsof electrophysiological remodeling. Moreover, sinceiPSC preserve the entire patients' genetic context, thesystem will help the physicians in identifying the mostappropriate pharmacological intervention to correct thefunctional alteration. This article summarizes the currentknowledge of cardiac genetic

  12. Functional properties of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes: intracellular Ca2+ handling and the role of sarcoplasmic reticulum in the contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolnikov, Katya; Shilkrut, Mark; Zeevi-Levin, Naama; Gerecht-Nir, Sharon; Amit, Michal; Danon, Asaf; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Binah, Ofer

    2006-02-01

    Since cardiac transplantation is limited by the small availability of donor organs, regeneration of the diseased myocardium by cell transplantation is an attractive therapeutic modality. To determine the compatibility of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) (7 to 55 days old) with the myocardium, we investigated their functional properties regarding intracellular Ca2+ handling and the role of the sarcoplasmic reticulum in the contraction. The functional properties of hESC-CMs were investigated by recording simultaneously [Ca2+]i transients and contractions. Additionally, we performed Western blot analysis of the Ca2+-handling proteins SERCA2, calsequestrin, phospholamban, and Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX). Our major findings are, first, that hESC-CMs displayed temporally related [Ca2+]i transients and contractions, negative force-frequency relations, and lack of post-rest potentiation. Second, ryanodine, thapsigargin, and caffeine did not affect the [Ca2+]i transient and contraction, indicating that at this developmental stage, contraction depends on transsarcolemmal Ca2+ influx rather than on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release. Third, in agreement with the notion that a voltage-dependent Ca2+ current is present in hESC-CMs and contributes to the mechanical function, verapamil completely blocked contraction. Fourth, whereas hESC-CMs expressed SERCA2 and NCX at levels comparable to those of the adult porcine myocardium, calsequestrin and phospholamban were not expressed. Our study shows for the first time that functional properties related to intracellular Ca2+ handling of hESC-CMs differ markedly from the adult myocardium, probably due to immature sarcoplasmic reticulum capacity.

  13. Microvesicles derived from hypoxia/reoxygenation-treated human umbilical vein endothelial cells promote apoptosis and oxidative stress in H9c2 cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Shang, Man; Zhang, Mengxiao; Wang, Yao; Chen, Yan; Wu, Yanna; Liu, Minglin; Song, Junqiu; Liu, Yanxia

    2016-06-23

    Vascular endothelial dysfunction is the closely related determinant of ischemic heart disease (IHD). Endothelial dysfunction and ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) have been associated with an increase in microvesicles (MVs) in vivo. However, the potential contribution of endothelial microvesicles (EMVs) to myocardial damage is unclear. Here we aimed to investigate the role of EMVs derived from hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) -treated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) on cultured H9c2 cardiomyocytes. H/R injury model was established to induce HUVECs to release H/R-EMVs. The H/R-EMVs from HUVECs were isolated from the conditioned culture medium and characterized. H9c2 cardiomyocytes were then incubated with 10, 30, 60 μg/mL H/R-EMVs for 6 h. We found that H9c2 cells treated by H/R-EMVs exhibited reduced cell viability, increased cell apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Moreover mechanism studies demonstrated that H/R-EMVs could induce the phosphorylation of p38 and JNK1/2 in H9c2 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, H/R-EMVs contained significantly higher level of ROS than EMVs generated from untreated HUVECs, which might be a direct source to trigger a cascade of myocardial damage. We showed that EMVs released during H/R injury are pro-apoptotic, pro-oxidative and directly pathogenic to cardiomyocytes in vitro. EMVs carry ROS and they may impair myocardium by promoting apoptosis and oxidative stress. These findings provide new insights into the pathogenesis of IRI.

  14. Three Huntington's Disease Specific Mutation-Carrying Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines Have Stable Number of CAG Repeats upon In Vitro Differentiation into Cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquet, Laureen; Neueder, Andreas; Földes, Gabor; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Hobbs, Carl; Jolinon, Nelly; Mioulane, Maxime; Sakai, Takao; Harding, Sian E; Ilic, Dusko

    2015-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD; OMIM 143100), a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is caused by an expanded trinucleotide CAG (polyQ) motif in the HTT gene. Cardiovascular symptoms, often present in early stage HD patients, are, in general, ascribed to dysautonomia. However, cardio-specific expression of polyQ peptides caused pathological response in murine models, suggesting the presence of a nervous system-independent heart phenotype in HD patients. A positive correlation between the CAG repeat size and severity of symptoms observed in HD patients has also been observed in in vitro HD cellular models. Here, we test the suitability of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines carrying HD-specific mutation as in vitro models for understanding molecular mechanisms of cardiac pathology seen in HD patients. We have differentiated three HD-hESC lines into cardiomyocytes and investigated CAG stability up to 60 days after starting differentiation. To assess CAG stability in other tissues, the lines were also subjected to in vivo differentiation into teratomas for 10 weeks. Neither directed differentiation into cardiomyocytes in vitro nor in vivo differentiation into teratomas, rich in immature neuronal tissue, led to an increase in the number of CAG repeats. Although the CAG stability might be cell line-dependent, induced pluripotent stem cells generated from patients with larger numbers of CAG repeats could have an advantage as a research tool for understanding cardiac symptoms of HD patients.

  15. Three Huntington's Disease Specific Mutation-Carrying Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines Have Stable Number of CAG Repeats upon In Vitro Differentiation into Cardiomyocytes.

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    Laureen Jacquet

    Full Text Available Huntington disease (HD; OMIM 143100, a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is caused by an expanded trinucleotide CAG (polyQ motif in the HTT gene. Cardiovascular symptoms, often present in early stage HD patients, are, in general, ascribed to dysautonomia. However, cardio-specific expression of polyQ peptides caused pathological response in murine models, suggesting the presence of a nervous system-independent heart phenotype in HD patients. A positive correlation between the CAG repeat size and severity of symptoms observed in HD patients has also been observed in in vitro HD cellular models. Here, we test the suitability of human embryonic stem cell (hESC lines carrying HD-specific mutation as in vitro models for understanding molecular mechanisms of cardiac pathology seen in HD patients. We have differentiated three HD-hESC lines into cardiomyocytes and investigated CAG stability up to 60 days after starting differentiation. To assess CAG stability in other tissues, the lines were also subjected to in vivo differentiation into teratomas for 10 weeks. Neither directed differentiation into cardiomyocytes in vitro nor in vivo differentiation into teratomas, rich in immature neuronal tissue, led to an increase in the number of CAG repeats. Although the CAG stability might be cell line-dependent, induced pluripotent stem cells generated from patients with larger numbers of CAG repeats could have an advantage as a research tool for understanding cardiac symptoms of HD patients.

  16. Enhanced currents through L-type calcium channels in cardiomyocytes disturb the electrophysiology of the dystrophic heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Xaver; Rubi, Lena; Obermair, Gerald J; Cervenka, Rene; Dang, Xuan B; Lukacs, Peter; Kummer, Stefan; Bittner, Reginald E; Kubista, Helmut; Todt, Hannes; Hilber, Karlheinz

    2014-02-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), induced by mutations in the gene encoding for the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin, is an inherited disease characterized by progressive muscle weakness. Besides the relatively well characterized skeletal muscle degenerative processes, DMD is also associated with cardiac complications. These include cardiomyopathy development and cardiac arrhythmias. The current understanding of the pathomechanisms in the heart is very limited, but recent research indicates that dysfunctional ion channels in dystrophic cardiomyocytes play a role. The aim of the present study was to characterize abnormalities in L-type calcium channel function in adult dystrophic ventricular cardiomyocytes. By using the whole cell patch-clamp technique, the properties of currents through calcium channels in ventricular cardiomyocytes isolated from the hearts of normal and dystrophic adult mice were compared. Besides the commonly used dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse model for human DMD, we also used mdx-utr mice, which are both dystrophin- and utrophin-deficient. We found that calcium channel currents were significantly increased, and channel inactivation was reduced in dystrophic cardiomyocytes. Both effects enhance the calcium influx during an action potential (AP). Whereas the AP in dystrophic mouse cardiomyocytes was nearly normal, implementation of the enhanced dystrophic calcium conductance in a computer model of a human ventricular cardiomyocyte considerably prolonged the AP. Finally, the described dystrophic calcium channel abnormalities entailed alterations in the electrocardiograms of dystrophic mice. We conclude that gain of function in cardiac L-type calcium channels may disturb the electrophysiology of the dystrophic heart and thereby cause arrhythmias.

  17. The first reported generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) and iPS cell-derived cardiomyocytes in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, C; Davis, R P; Gkatzis, K; Ward-van Oostwaard, D; Mummery, C L

    2010-01-01

    One of the recent breakthroughs in stem cell research has been the reprogramming of human somatic cells to an embryonic stem cell (ESC)-like state (induced pluripotent stem cells, iPS cells). Similar to ESCs, iPS cells can differentiate into derivatives of the three germ layers, for example cardiomyocytes, pancreatic cells or neurons. This technique offers a new approach to investigating disease pathogenesis and to the development of novel therapies. It may now be possible to generate iPS cells from somatic cells of patients who suffer from vascular genetic diseases, such as hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). The iPS cells will have a similar genotype to that of the patient and can be differentiated in vitro into the cell type(s) that are affected in the patient. Thus they will serve as excellent models for a better understanding of mechanisms underlying the disease. This, together with the ability to test new drugs, could potentially lead to novel therapeutic concepts in the near future. Here we report the first derivation of three human iPS cell lines from two healthy individuals and one HHT patient in the Netherlands. The iPS cells resembled ESCs in morphology and expressed typical ESC markers. In vitro, iPS cells could be differentiated into cells of the three germ layers, including beating cardiomyocytes and vascular cells. With this technique it will be possible to establish human cardiovascular disease models from patient biopsies provided by the principal hospitals in the Netherlands. (Neth Heart J 2010;18:51-4.).

  18. Simvastatin inhibits leptin-induced hypertrophy in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tai-ping HU; Fang-ping XU; Yuan-jian LI; Jian-dong LUO

    2006-01-01

    Aim:To test the hypothesis that statins inhibit leptin-induced hypertrophy in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes.Methods:Cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were used to evaluate the effects of simvastatin on leptininduced hypertrophy.Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were determined by using 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCF-DA) fluorescence.Total intracellular RNA and cell protein content,which serve as cell proliferative markers,were assayed by using propidium iodide (PI) fluorescence and the Bio-Rad DC protein assay.respectively.The cell surface area,an indicator of cell hypertrophy,was quantified by using Leica image analysis software.Results:After 72 h treatment,1eptin markedly increased RNA 1evels,cell surface area,and total cell protein levels in cardiomyocytes,which were significantly inhibited by simvastatin or catalase treatment.ROS levels were significantly elevated in cardiomyocytes treated with leptin for 4 h compared with those cells without leptin treatment.The increase in ROS levels in cardiomyocytes induced by leptin was reversed by treatment with simvastatin and catalase.Conclusion:Simvastatin inhibits leptin-induced ROS-mediated hyperophy in cultured neonatal rat cardiac myocytes.Statin therapy may provide an effective means of improving cardiac dysfunction in obese humans.

  19. Early Administration of Glutamine Protects Cardiomyocytes from Post-Cardiac Arrest Acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yan-Ren; Li, Chao-Jui; Syu, Shih-Han; Wen, Cheng-Hao; Buddhakosai, Waradee; Wu, Han-Ping; Hsu Chen, Cheng; Lu, Huai-En; Chen, Wen-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Postcardiac arrest acidosis can decrease survival. Effective medications without adverse side effects are still not well characterized. We aimed to analyze whether early administration of glutamine could improve survival and protect cardiomyocytes from postcardiac arrest acidosis using animal and cell models. Forty Wistar rats with postcardiac arrest acidosis (blood pH < 7.2) were included. They were divided into study (500 mg/kg L-alanyl-L-glutamine, n = 20) and control (normal saline, n = 20) groups. Each of the rats received resuscitation. The outcomes were compared between the two groups. In addition, cardiomyocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells were exposed to HBSS with different pH levels (7.3 or 6.5) or to culture medium (control). Apoptosis-related markers and beating function were analyzed. We found that the duration of survival was significantly longer in the study group (p < 0.05). In addition, in pH 6.5 or pH 7.3 HBSS buffer, the expression levels of cell stress (p53) and apoptosis (caspase-3, Bcl-xL) markers were significantly lower in cardiomyocytes treated with 50 mM L-glutamine than those without L-glutamine (RT-PCR). L-glutamine also increased the beating function of cardiomyocytes, especially at the lower pH level (6.5). More importantly, glutamine decreased cardiomyocyte apoptosis and increased these cells' beating function at a low pH level.

  20. Early Administration of Glutamine Protects Cardiomyocytes from Post-Cardiac Arrest Acidosis

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    Yan-Ren Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Postcardiac arrest acidosis can decrease survival. Effective medications without adverse side effects are still not well characterized. We aimed to analyze whether early administration of glutamine could improve survival and protect cardiomyocytes from postcardiac arrest acidosis using animal and cell models. Forty Wistar rats with postcardiac arrest acidosis (blood pH < 7.2 were included. They were divided into study (500 mg/kg L-alanyl-L-glutamine, n=20 and control (normal saline, n=20 groups. Each of the rats received resuscitation. The outcomes were compared between the two groups. In addition, cardiomyocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells were exposed to HBSS with different pH levels (7.3 or 6.5 or to culture medium (control. Apoptosis-related markers and beating function were analyzed. We found that the duration of survival was significantly longer in the study group (p<0.05. In addition, in pH 6.5 or pH 7.3 HBSS buffer, the expression levels of cell stress (p53 and apoptosis (caspase-3, Bcl-xL markers were significantly lower in cardiomyocytes treated with 50 mM L-glutamine than those without L-glutamine (RT-PCR. L-glutamine also increased the beating function of cardiomyocytes, especially at the lower pH level (6.5. More importantly, glutamine decreased cardiomyocyte apoptosis and increased these cells’ beating function at a low pH level.

  1. Functional Differences in Engineered Myocardium from Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived versus Neonatal Cardiomyocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feinberg, Adam W.; Ripplinger, Crystal M.; van der Meer, Peter; Sheehy, Sean P.; Domian, Ibrahim; Chien, Kenneth R.; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes represent unique tools for cell-and tissue-based regenerative therapies, drug discovery and safety, and studies of fundamental heart-failure mechanisms. However, the degree to which stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes compare to mature cardiomyocytes is often debated.

  2. A systemized approach to investigate Ca2+ synchronization in clusters of human induced pluripotent stem-cell derived cardiomyocytes

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    Aled R Jones

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (IPS-CM are considered by many to be the cornerstone of future approaches to repair the diseased heart. However, current methods for producing IPS-CM typically yield highly variable populations with low batch-to-batch reproducibility. The underlying reasons for this are not fully understood. Here we report on a systematized approach to investigate the effect of maturation in embryoid bodies (EB versus ‘on plate’ culture on spontaneous activity and regional Ca2+ synchronization in IPS-CM clusters. A detailed analysis of the temporal and spatial organization of Ca2+ spikes in IPS-CM clusters revealed that the disaggregation of EBs between 0.5 and 2 weeks produced IPS-CM characterized by spontaneous beating and high levels of regional Ca2+ synchronization. These phenomena were typically absent in IPS-CM obtained from older EBs (> 2 weeks. The maintenance of all spontaneously active IPS-CM clusters under ‘on plate’ culture conditions promoted the progressive reduction in regional Ca2+ synchronization and the loss of spontaneous Ca2+ spiking. Raising the extracellular [Ca2+] surrounding these quiescent IPS-CM clusters from approximately 0.4 to 1.8 mM unmasked discrete behaviours typified by either a long-lasting Ca2+ elevation that returned to baseline or b persistent, large-amplitude Ca2+ oscillations around an increased cytoplasmic [Ca2+]. The different responses of IPS-CM to elevated extracellular [Ca2+] could be traced back to their routes of derivation. The data point to the possibility of predictably influencing IPS-CM phenotype and response to external activation via defined interventions at early stages in their maturation.

  3. Fractalkine depresses cardiomyocyte contractility.

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    David Taube

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Our laboratory reported that male mice with cardiomyocyte-selective knockout of the prostaglandin E2 EP4 receptor sub-type (EP4 KO exhibit reduced cardiac function. Gene array on left ventricles (LV showed increased fractalkine, a chemokine implicated in heart failure. We therefore hypothesized that fractalkine is regulated by PGE2 and contributes to depressed contractility via alterations in intracellular calcium. METHODS: Fractalkine was measured in LV of 28-32 week old male EP4 KO and wild type controls (WT by ELISA and the effect of PGE2 on fractalkine secretion was measured in cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts. The effect of fractalkine on contractility and intracellular calcium was determined in Fura-2 AM-loaded, electrical field-paced cardiomyocytes. Cardiomyocytes (AVM from male C57Bl/6 mice were treated with fractalkine and responses measured under basal conditions and after isoproterenol (Iso stimulation. RESULTS: LV fractalkine was increased in EP4 KO mice but surprisingly, PGE2 regulated fractalkine secretion only in fibroblasts. Fractalkine treatment of AVM decreased both the speed of contraction and relaxation under basal conditions and after Iso stimulation. Despite reducing contractility after Iso stimulation, fractalkine increased the Ca(2+ transient amplitude but decreased phosphorylation of cardiac troponin I, suggesting direct effects on the contractile machinery. CONCLUSIONS: Fractalkine depresses myocyte contractility by mechanisms downstream of intracellular calcium.

  4. Beat Rate Variability in Murine Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes: Effect of Antiarrhythmic Drugs

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    Julius Niehoff

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Heart rate variability (HRV refers to the fluctuation of the time interval between consecutive heartbeats in humans. It has recently been discovered that cardiomyocytes derived from human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells show beat rate variability (BRV that is similar to the HRV in humans. In the present study, clinical aspects of HRV were transferred to an in vitro model. The aims of the study were to explore the BRV in murine embryonic stem cell (mESC-derived cardiomyocytes and to demonstrate the influence of antiarrhythmic drugs on BRV as has been shown in clinical trials previously. Methods: The Microelectrode Array (MEA technique was used to perform short-term recordings of extracellular field potentials (FPs of spontaneously beating cardiomyocytes derived from mESCs (D3 cell line, αPig-44. Offline analysis was focused on time domain and nonlinear methods. Results: The Poincaré-Plot analysis of measurements without pharmacological intervention revealed that three different shapes of scatter plots occurred most frequently. Comparable shapes have been described in clinical studies before. The antiarrhythmic drugs Ivabradine, Verapamil and Sotalol augmented BRV, whereas Flecainide decreased BRV parameters at low concentrations (SDSD 79.0 ± 8.7% of control at 10-9 M, p -5 M, p Conclusions: Spontaneously beating cardiomyocytes derived from mESCs showed BRV that appears to be similar to the HRV known from humans. Antiarrhythmic drugs affected BRV parameters similar to clinical observations. Therefore, our study demonstrates that this in vitro model can contribute to a better understanding of electrophysiological properties of mESC-derived cardiomyocytes and might serve as a valuable tool for drug safety screening.

  5. Development of cellular hypertrophy by 8-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid in the human ventricular cardiomyocyte, RL-14 cell line, is implicated by MAPK and NF-κB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maayah, Zaid H; Abdelhamid, Ghada; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies have established the role of mid-chain hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (mid-chain HETEs) in the development of cardiovascular disease. Among these mid-chains, 8-HETE has been reported to have a proliferator and proinflammatory action. However, whether 8-HETE can induce cardiac hypertrophy has never been investigated before. Therefore, the overall objectives of the present study are to elucidate the potential hypertrophic effect of 8-HETE in the human ventricular cardiomyocytes, RL-14 cells, and to explore the mechanism(s) involved. Our results showed that 8-HETE induced cellular hypertrophy in RL-14 cells as evidenced by the induction of cardiac hypertrophy markers ANP, BNP, α-MHC, and β-MHC in a concentration- and time-dependent manner as well as the increase in cell surface area. Mechanistically, 8-HETE was able to induce the NF-κB activity as well as it significantly induced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2. The induction of cellular hypertrophy was associated with a proportional increase in the formation of dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs) parallel to the increase of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) enzyme activity. Blocking the induction of NF-κB, ERK1/2, and sEH signaling pathways significantly inhibited 8-HETE-induced cellular hypertrophy. Our study provides the first evidence that 8-HETE induces cellular hypertrophy in RL-14 cells through MAPK- and NF-κB-dependent mechanism

  6. A comparative study of two clerodane diterpenes from Baccharis trimera (Less.) DC. on the influx and mobilization of intracellular calcium in rat cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Francisca Adilfa de Oliveira; Tanae, Mirtes Midori; Torres, Luce Maria Brandão; Lapa, Antônio José; de Lima-Landman, Maria Teresa Riggio; Souccar, Caden

    2014-01-01

    Baccharis trimera (Less.) D.C. (Asteraceae) is a medicinal species native to South America and used in Brazilian folk medicine to treat gastrointestinal and liver diseases, kidney disorders and diabetes. The aqueous extract (AE) of the aerial parts of this species presented two mainly constituents: the ent-clerodane diterpene (Fig. 1) and the neo-clerodane diterpene (Fig. 2). The objective of this work was to study their activities on the blockade of Ca(2+)-induced contractions in KCL-depolarized rat portal vein preparations, and on the influx and mobilization of cytosolic calcium in rat cardiomyocytes by fluorescence measurements. The results showed that both the neo- and the ent-clerodane diterpenes reduced the maximal contractions induced by CaCl2, in KCl depolarized rat portal vein preparations, without modifying the EC50. The data on the concentration of cytosolic calcium ([Ca(2+)]c) showed that, while the neo-clerodane diterpene stimulates the mobilization of [Ca(2+)]c in rat cardiomyocytes, this effect was not observed with the ent-clerodane diterpene. On the other hand, the influx of calcium was not altered by the neo-clerodane diterpene, but was reduced in the presence of the ent-clerodane diterpene, indicating that this compound induces a blockade of the voltage-dependent calcium channels.

  7. Contractile properties of early human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes: beta-adrenergic stimulation induces positive chronotropy and lusitropy but not inotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillekamp, Frank; Haustein, Moritz; Khalil, Markus; Emmelheinz, Markus; Nazzal, Rewa; Adelmann, Roland; Nguemo, Filomain; Rubenchyk, Olga; Pfannkuche, Kurt; Matzkies, Matthias; Reppel, Michael; Bloch, Wilhelm; Brockmeier, Konrad; Hescheler, Juergen

    2012-08-10

    Human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) provide the unique opportunity to study the very early development of the human heart. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of calcium and beta-adrenergic stimulation on the contractile properties of early hESC-CMs. Beating clusters containing hESC-CMs were co-cultured in vitro with noncontractile slices of neonatal murine ventricles. After 5-7 days, when beating clusters had integrated morphologically into the damaged tissue, isometric force measurements were performed during spontaneous beating as well as during electrical field stimulation. Spontaneous beating stopped when extracellular calcium ([Ca²⁺](ec)) was removed or after administration of the Ca²⁺ channel blocker nifedipine. During field stimulation at a constant rate, the developed force increased with incremental concentrations of [Ca²⁺](ec). During spontaneous beating, rising [Ca²⁺](ec) increased beating rate and developed force up to a [Ca²⁺](ec) of 2.5 mM. When [Ca²⁺](ec) was increased further, spontaneous beating rate decreased, whereas the developed force continued to increase. The beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol induced a dose-dependent increase of the frequency of spontaneous beating; however, it did not significantly change the developed force during spontaneous contractions or during electrical stimulation at a constant rate. Force developed by early hESC-CMs depends on [Ca²⁺](ec) and on the L-type Ca²⁺ channel. The lack of an inotropic reaction despite a pronounced chronotropic response after beta-adrenergic stimulation most likely indicates immaturity of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. For cell-replacement strategies, further maturation of cardiac cells has to be achieved either in vitro before or in vivo after transplantation.

  8. Intracellular diffusion restrictions in isolated cardiomyocytes from rainbow trout

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    Birkedal Rikke

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Restriction of intracellular diffusion of adenine nucleotides has been studied intensively on adult rat cardiomyocytes. However, their cause and role in vivo is still uncertain. Intracellular membrane structures have been suggested to play a role. We therefore chose to study cardiomyocytes from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, which are thinner and have fewer intracellular membrane structures than adult rat cardiomyocytes. Previous studies suggest that trout permeabilized cardiac fibers also have diffusion restrictions. However, results from fibers may be affected by incomplete separation of the cells. This is avoided when studying permeabilized, isolated cardiomyocytes. The aim of this study was to verify the existence of diffusion restrictions in trout cardiomyocytes by comparing ADP-kinetics of mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized fibers, permeabilized cardiomyocytes and isolated mitochondria from rainbow trout heart. Experiments were performed at 10, 15 and 20°C in the absence and presence of creatine. Results Trout cardiomyocytes hypercontracted in the solutions used for mammalian cardiomyocytes. We developed a new solution in which they retained their shape and showed stable steady state respiration rates throughout an experiment. The apparent ADP-affinity of permeabilized cardiomyocytes was different from that of fibers. It was higher, independent of temperature and not increased by creatine. However, it was still about ten times lower than in isolated mitochondria. Conclusions The differences between fibers and cardiomyocytes suggest that results from trout heart fibers were affected by incomplete separation of the cells. However, the lower ADP-affinity of cardiomyocytes compared to isolated mitochondria indicate that intracellular diffusion restrictions are still present in trout cardiomyocytes despite their lower density of intracellular membrane structures. The lack of a creatine effect indicates that

  9. Cardiomyocyte Overexpression of FABP4 Aggravates Pressure Overload-Induced Heart Hypertrophy.

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    Ji Zhang

    Full Text Available Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4 is a member of the intracellular lipid-binding protein family, responsible for the transportation of fatty acids. It is considered to express mainly in adipose tissues, and be strongly associated with inflammation, obesity, diabetes and cardiovasculardiseases. Here we report that FABP4 is also expressed in cardiomyocytes and plays an important role in regulating heart function under pressure overload. We generated heart-specific transgenic FABP4 (FABP4-TG mice using α myosin-heavy chain (α-MHC promoter and human FABP4 sequence, resulting in over-expression of FABP4 in cardiomyocytes. The FABP4-TG mice displayed normal cardiac morphology and contractile function. When they were subjected to the transverse aorta constriction (TAC procedure, the FABP4-TG mice developed more cardiac hypertrophy correlated with significantly increased ERK phosphorylation, compared with wild type controls. FABP4 over-expression in cardiomyocytes activated phosphor-ERK signal and up-regulate the expression of cardiac hypertrophic marker genes. Conversely, FABP4 induced phosphor-ERK signal and hypertrophic gene expressions can be markedly inhibited by an ERK inhibitor PD098059 as well as the FABP4 inhibitor BMS309403. These results suggest that FABP4 over-expression in cardiomyocytes can aggravate the development of cardiac hypertrophy through the activation of ERK signal pathway.

  10. Comparative study of three types of polymer materials co-cultured with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for use as a myocardial patch in cardiomyocyte regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Hongxing; Mu, Junsheng; Zhang, Jianqun; Hu, Ping; Bo, Ping; Wang, Yan

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the most suitable polymer material for supporting stem cell growth as a myocardial patch. After cell isolation and expansion of mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC), the cells were induced to differentiate into cardiomyocytes with 5-azacytidine to determine their differentiation potential. BMSCs were also seeded onto three types of polymer material film, including polyurethane (PU), 3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate [P(3HB-co-4HB)], and polypropylene carbonate (PPC). The results revealed that cell numbers were more abundant on both the PU and P(3HB-co-4HB) material surfaces. Conversely, the surface of PPC was smooth with only cell lysate debris observed. The average cell counts were as follows: 143.78 ± 38.38 (PU group), 159.50 ± 33.07 [P(3HB-co-4HB) group], and 1.40 ± 0.70 (PPC group). There was no statistically significant difference in cell numbers between the PU and P(3HB-co-4HB) groups. A statistically significant difference was identified between the PPC group and both the PU (P1) and P(3HB-co-4HB) groups (P2). Polymer biomaterial patches composed of PU and P(3HB-co-4HB) permit good stem cell growth. P(3HB-co-4HB) has the potential for development as a clinical alternative to current treatment methods for the regeneration of cardiomyocytes in patients with myocardial infarction.

  11. Structural and functional screening in human induced-pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes accurately identifies cardiotoxicity of multiple drug types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doherty, Kimberly R., E-mail: kimberly.doherty@quintiles.com; Talbert, Dominique R.; Trusk, Patricia B.; Moran, Diarmuid M.; Shell, Scott A.; Bacus, Sarah

    2015-05-15

    Safety pharmacology studies that evaluate new drug entities for potential cardiac liability remain a critical component of drug development. Current studies have shown that in vitro tests utilizing human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CM) may be beneficial for preclinical risk evaluation. We recently demonstrated that an in vitro multi-parameter test panel assessing overall cardiac health and function could accurately reflect the associated clinical cardiotoxicity of 4 FDA-approved targeted oncology agents using hiPS-CM. The present studies expand upon this initial observation to assess whether this in vitro screen could detect cardiotoxicity across multiple drug classes with known clinical cardiac risks. Thus, 24 drugs were examined for their effect on both structural (viability, reactive oxygen species generation, lipid formation, troponin secretion) and functional (beating activity) endpoints in hiPS-CM. Using this screen, the cardiac-safe drugs showed no effects on any of the tests in our panel. However, 16 of 18 compounds with known clinical cardiac risk showed drug-induced changes in hiPS-CM by at least one method. Moreover, when taking into account the Cmax values, these 16 compounds could be further classified depending on whether the effects were structural, functional, or both. Overall, the most sensitive test assessed cardiac beating using the xCELLigence platform (88.9%) while the structural endpoints provided additional insight into the mechanism of cardiotoxicity for several drugs. These studies show that a multi-parameter approach examining both cardiac cell health and function in hiPS-CM provides a comprehensive and robust assessment that can aid in the determination of potential cardiac liability. - Highlights: • 24 drugs were tested for cardiac liability using an in vitro multi-parameter screen. • Changes in beating activity were the most sensitive in predicting cardiac risk. • Structural effects add in

  12. 5-, 12- and 15-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids induce cellular hypertrophy in the human ventricular cardiomyocyte, RL-14 cell line, through MAPK- and NF-κB-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maayah, Zaid H; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies have established the role of mid-chain hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs) in the development of cardiovascular disease. Mid-chain HETEs have been reported to have vasoconstrictive and pro-inflammatory effects. However, whether mid-chain HETEs can induce cardiac hypertrophy remains unclear. Therefore, the overall objective of the present study was to elucidate the potential hypertrophic effect of mid-chain HETEs in the human ventricular cardiomyocytes, RL-14 cells, and to explore the mechanisms involved. For this purpose, RL-14 cells were treated with increasing concentrations of mid-chain HETEs (2.5, 5, 10 and 20 µM). Thereafter, the cardiac hypertrophy markers and cell size were determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction and phase contrast imaging, respectively. Phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) level and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) binding activity were determined. Our results showed that mid-chain HETEs induced cellular hypertrophy in RL-14 cells as evidenced by the induction of cardiac hypertrophy markers, α- and β-myocin heavy chain and atrial and brain natriuretic peptide as well as the increase in cell size. Mechanistically, all mid-chain HETEs were able to induce the binding activity of NF-κB to its responsive element in a HETE-dependent manner, and they significantly induced the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2. The induction of cellular hypertrophy was associated with proportional increase in the formation of dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids parallel to the increase of soluble epoxide hydrolase enzyme activity. In conclusion, our study provides the first evidence that mid-chain HETEs induce cellular hypertrophy in RL-14 cells through MAPK- and NF-κB-dependent mechanism.

  13. Ionic mechanisms limiting cardiac repolarization reserve in humans compared to dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Norbert; Virág, László; Comtois, Philippe; Ordög, Balázs; Szuts, Viktória; Seprényi, György; Bitay, Miklós; Kohajda, Zsófia; Koncz, István; Nagy, Norbert; Szél, Tamás; Magyar, János; Kovács, Mária; Puskás, László G; Lengyel, Csaba; Wettwer, Erich; Ravens, Ursula; Nánási, Péter P; Papp, Julius Gy; Varró, András; Nattel, Stanley

    2013-09-01

    The species-specific determinants of repolarization are poorly understood. This study compared the contribution of various currents to cardiac repolarization in canine and human ventricle. Conventional microelectrode, whole-cell patch-clamp, molecular biological and mathematical modelling techniques were used. Selective IKr block (50-100 nmol l(-1) dofetilide) lengthened AP duration at 90% of repolarization (APD90) >3-fold more in human than dog, suggesting smaller repolarization reserve in humans. Selective IK1 block (10 μmol l(-1) BaCl2) and IKs block (1 μmol l(-1) HMR-1556) increased APD90 more in canine than human right ventricular papillary muscle. Ion current measurements in isolated cardiomyocytes showed that IK1 and IKs densities were 3- and 4.5-fold larger in dogs than humans, respectively. IKr density and kinetics were similar in human versus dog. ICa and Ito were respectively ~30% larger and ~29% smaller in human, and Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchange current was comparable. Cardiac mRNA levels for the main IK1 ion channel subunit Kir2.1 and the IKs accessory subunit minK were significantly lower, but mRNA expression of ERG and KvLQT1 (IKr and IKs α-subunits) were not significantly different, in human versus dog. Immunostaining suggested lower Kir2.1 and minK, and higher KvLQT1 protein expression in human versus canine cardiomyocytes. IK1 and IKs inhibition increased the APD-prolonging effect of IKr block more in dog (by 56% and 49%, respectively) than human (34 and 16%), indicating that both currents contribute to increased repolarization reserve in the dog. A mathematical model incorporating observed human-canine ion current differences confirmed the role of IK1 and IKs in repolarization reserve differences. Thus, humans show greater repolarization-delaying effects of IKr block than dogs, because of lower repolarization reserve contributions from IK1 and IKs, emphasizing species-specific determinants of repolarization and the limitations of animal models for

  14. Distinct roles of microRNA-1 and -499 in ventricular specification and functional maturation of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Dong Fu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRs negatively regulate transcription and are important determinants of normal heart development and heart failure pathogenesis. Despite the significant knowledge gained in mouse studies, their functional roles in human (h heart remain elusive. METHODS AND RESULTS: We hypothesized that miRs that figure prominently in cardiac differentiation are differentially expressed in differentiating, developing, and terminally mature human cardiomyocytes (CMs. As a first step, we mapped the miR profiles of human (h embryonic stem cells (ESCs, hESC-derived (hE, fetal (hF and adult (hA ventricular (V CMs. 63 miRs were differentially expressed between hESCs and hE-VCMs. Of these, 29, including the miR-302 and -371/372/373 clusters, were associated with pluripotency and uniquely expressed in hESCs. Of the remaining miRs differentially expressed in hE-VCMs, 23 continued to express highly in hF- and hA-VCMs, with miR-1, -133, and -499 displaying the largest fold differences; others such as miR-let-7a, -let-7b, -26b, -125a and -143 were non-cardiac specific. Functionally, LV-miR-499 transduction of hESC-derived cardiovascular progenitors significantly increased the yield of hE-VCMs (to 72% from 48% of control; p0.05. By contrast, LV-miR-1 transduction did not bias the yield (p>0.05 but decreased APD and hyperpolarized RMP/MDP in hE-VCMs due to increased I(to, I(Ks and I(Kr, and decreased I(f (p<0.05 as signs of functional maturation. Also, LV-miR-1 but not -499 augmented the immature Ca(2+ transient amplitude and kinetics. Molecular pathway analyses were performed for further insights. CONCLUSION: We conclude that miR-1 and -499 play differential roles in cardiac differentiation of hESCs in a context-dependent fashion. While miR-499 promotes ventricular specification of hESCs, miR-1 serves to facilitate electrophysiological maturation.

  15. Traveling Chaucer: Comparative Translation and Cosmopolitan Humanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrington, Candace

    2014-01-01

    Through the comparative study of non-Anglophone translations of Geoffrey Chaucer's "The Canterbury Tales," we can achieve the progressive goals of Emily Apter's "translational transnationalism" and Edward Said's "cosmopolitan humanism." Both translation and humanism were intrinsic to Chaucer's…

  16. Traveling Chaucer: Comparative Translation and Cosmopolitan Humanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrington, Candace

    2014-01-01

    Through the comparative study of non-Anglophone translations of Geoffrey Chaucer's "The Canterbury Tales," we can achieve the progressive goals of Emily Apter's "translational transnationalism" and Edward Said's "cosmopolitan humanism." Both translation and humanism were intrinsic to Chaucer's…

  17. Induction and differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells into functional cardiomyocytes on a compartmented monolayer of gelatin nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yadong; Liu, Li; Li, Junjun; Yu, Leqian; Wang, Li; Shi, Jian; Chen, Yong

    2016-07-01

    Extensive efforts have been devoted to develop new substrates for culture and differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) toward cardiac cell-based assays. A more exciting prospect is the construction of cardiac tissue for robust drug screening and cardiac tissue repairing. Here, we developed a patch method by electrospinning and crosslinking of monolayer gelatin nanofibers on a honeycomb frame made of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA). The monolayer of the nanofibrous structure can support cells with minimal exogenous contact and a maximal efficiency of cell-medium exchange whereas a single hiPSC colony can be uniformly formed in each of the honeycomb compartments. By modulating the treatment time of the ROCK inhibitor Y-27632, the shape of the hiPSC colony could be controlled from a flat layer to a hemisphere. Afterwards, the induction and differentiation of hiPSCs were achieved on the same patch, leading to a uniform cardiac layer with homogeneous contraction. This cardiac layer could then be used for extracellular recording with a commercial multi-electrode array, showing representative field potential waveforms of matured cardiac tissues with appropriate drug responses.Extensive efforts have been devoted to develop new substrates for culture and differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) toward cardiac cell-based assays. A more exciting prospect is the construction of cardiac tissue for robust drug screening and cardiac tissue repairing. Here, we developed a patch method by electrospinning and crosslinking of monolayer gelatin nanofibers on a honeycomb frame made of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA). The monolayer of the nanofibrous structure can support cells with minimal exogenous contact and a maximal efficiency of cell-medium exchange whereas a single hiPSC colony can be uniformly formed in each of the honeycomb compartments. By modulating the treatment time of the ROCK inhibitor Y-27632, the shape

  18. The Use of Ratiometric Fluorescence Measurements of the Voltage Sensitive Dye Di-4-ANEPPS to Examine Action Potential Characteristics and Drug Effects on Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortigon-Vinagre, M. P.; Zamora, V.; Burton, F. L.; Green, J.; Gintant, G. A.; Smith, G. L.

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CM) and higher throughput platforms have emerged as potential tools to advance cardiac drug safety screening. This study evaluated the use of high bandwidth photometry applied to voltage-sensitive fluorescent dyes (VSDs) to assess drug-induced changes in action potential characteristics of spontaneously active hiPSC-CM. Human iPSC-CM from 2 commercial sources (Cor.4U and iCell Cardiomyocytes) were stained with the VSD di-4-ANEPPS and placed in a specialized photometry system that simultaneously monitors 2 wavebands of emitted fluorescence, allowing ratiometric measurement of membrane voltage. Signals were acquired at 10 kHz and analyzed using custom software. Action potential duration (APD) values were normally distributed in cardiomyocytes (CMC) from both sources though the mean and variance differed significantly (APD90: 229 ± 15 ms vs 427 ± 49 ms [mean ± SD, P < 0.01]; average spontaneous cycle length: 0.99 ± 0.02 s vs 1.47 ± 0.35 s [mean ± SD, P < 0.01], Cor.4U vs iCell CMC, respectively). The 10–90% rise time of the AP (Trise) was ∼6 ms and was normally distributed when expressed as 1/Trise2 in both cell preparations. Both cell types showed a rate dependence analogous to that of adult human cardiac cells. Furthermore, nifedipine, ranolazine, and E4031 had similar effects on cardiomyocyte electrophysiology in both cell types. However, ranolazine and E4031 induced early after depolarization-like events and high intrinsic firing rates at lower concentrations in iCell CMC. These data show that VSDs provide a minimally invasive, quantitative, and accurate method to assess hiPSC-CM electrophysiology and detect subtle drug-induced effects for drug safety screening while highlighting a need to standardize experimental protocols across preparations. PMID:27621282

  19. Comparative Analysis of Telomerase Activity in CD117+CD34+ Cardiac Telocytes with Bone Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Cardiac Fibroblasts and Cardiomyocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-Yuan Li; Shan-Shan Lu; Ting Xu; Hong-Qi Zhang; Hua Li

    2015-01-01

    Background:This study characterized the cardiac telocyte (TC) population both in vivo and in vitro,and investigated its telomerase activity related to mitosis.Methods:Using transmission electron microscopy and a phase contrast microscope,the typical morphological features of cardiac TCs were observed;by targeting the cell surface proteins CD 1 17 and CD34,CD 117+CD34+ cardiac TCs were sorted via flow cytometry and validated by immunofluorescence based on the primary cell culture.Then the optimized basal nutrient medium for selected population was examined with the cell counting kit 8.Under this conditioned medium,the process of cell division was captured,and the telomerase activity ofCD 117+CD34+ cardiac TCs was detected in comparison with bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs),cardiac fibroblasts (CFBs),cardiomyocytes (CMs).Results:Cardiac TCs projected characteristic telopodes with thin segments (podomers) in alternation with dilation (podoms).In addition,64% of the primary cultured cardiac TCs were composed of CD 117+CD34+ cardiac TCs;which was verified by immunofluorescence.In a live cell imaging system,CD 117+CD34+ cardiac TCs were observed to enter into cell division in a short time,followed by an significant invagination forming across the middle of the cell body.Using a real-time quantitative telomeric-repeat amplification assay,the telomerase concentration in CD117+CD34+ cardiac TCs was obviously lower than in BMSCs and CFBs,and significantly higher than in CMs.Conclusions:Cardiac TCs represent a unique cell population and CD117+CD34+ cardiac TCs have relative low telomerase activity that differs from BMSCs,CFBs and CMs and thus they might play an important role in maintaining cardiac homeostasis.

  20. Comparative Analysis of Telomerase Activity in CD117+CD34+ Cardiac Telocytes with Bone Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Cardiac Fibroblasts and Cardiomyocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Lu, Shan-Shan; Xu, Ting; Zhang, Hong-Qi; Li, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study characterized the cardiac telocyte (TC) population both in vivo and in vitro, and investigated its telomerase activity related to mitosis. Methods: Using transmission electron microscopy and a phase contrast microscope, the typical morphological features of cardiac TCs were observed; by targeting the cell surface proteins CD117 and CD34, CD117+CD34+ cardiac TCs were sorted via flow cytometry and validated by immunofluorescence based on the primary cell culture. Then the optimized basal nutrient medium for selected population was examined with the cell counting kit 8. Under this conditioned medium, the process of cell division was captured, and the telomerase activity of CD117+CD34+ cardiac TCs was detected in comparison with bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), cardiac fibroblasts (CFBs), cardiomyocytes (CMs). Results: Cardiac TCs projected characteristic telopodes with thin segments (podomers) in alternation with dilation (podoms). In addition, 64% of the primary cultured cardiac TCs were composed of CD117+CD34+ cardiac TCs; which was verified by immunofluorescence. In a live cell imaging system, CD117+CD34+ cardiac TCs were observed to enter into cell division in a short time, followed by an significant invagination forming across the middle of the cell body. Using a real-time quantitative telomeric-repeat amplification assay, the telomerase concentration in CD117+CD34+ cardiac TCs was obviously lower than in BMSCs and CFBs, and significantly higher than in CMs. Conclusions: Cardiac TCs represent a unique cell population and CD117+CD34+ cardiac TCs have relative low telomerase activity that differs from BMSCs, CFBs and CMs and thus they might play an important role in maintaining cardiac homeostasis. PMID:26168836

  1. Soft Biometrics; Human Identification Using Comparative Descriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Daniel A; Nixon, Mark S; Stevenage, Sarah V

    2014-06-01

    Soft biometrics are a new form of biometric identification which use physical or behavioral traits that can be naturally described by humans. Unlike other biometric approaches, this allows identification based solely on verbal descriptions, bridging the semantic gap between biometrics and human description. To permit soft biometric identification the description must be accurate, yet conventional human descriptions comprising of absolute labels and estimations are often unreliable. A novel method of obtaining human descriptions will be introduced which utilizes comparative categorical labels to describe differences between subjects. This innovative approach has been shown to address many problems associated with absolute categorical labels-most critically, the descriptions contain more objective information and have increased discriminatory capabilities. Relative measurements of the subjects' traits can be inferred from comparative human descriptions using the Elo rating system. The resulting soft biometric signatures have been demonstrated to be robust and allow accurate recognition of subjects. Relative measurements can also be obtained from other forms of human representation. This is demonstrated using a support vector machine to determine relative measurements from gait biometric signatures-allowing retrieval of subjects from video footage by using human comparisons, bridging the semantic gap.

  2. AMPK and substrate availability regulate creatine transport in cultured cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrabie, Marcus D; Arciniegas, Antonio Jose Luis; Mishra, Rajashree; Bowles, Dawn E; Jacobs, Danny O; Santacruz, Lucia

    2011-05-01

    Profound alterations in myocellular creatine and phosphocreatine levels are observed during human heart failure. To maintain its intracellular creatine stores, cardiomyocytes depend upon a cell membrane creatine transporter whose regulation is not clearly understood. Creatine transport capacity in the intact heart is modulated by substrate availability, and it is reduced in the failing myocardium, likely adding to the energy imbalance that characterizes heart failure. AMPK, a key regulator of cellular energy homeostasis, acts by switching off energy-consuming pathways in favor of processes that generate energy. Our objective was to determine the effects of substrate availability and AMPK activation on creatine transport in cardiomyocytes. We studied creatine transport in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes and HL-1 cardiac cells expressing the human creatine transporter cultured in the presence of varying creatine concentrations and the AMPK activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-d-ribonucleoside (AICAR). Transport was enhanced in cardiomyocytes following incubation in creatine-depleted medium or AICAR. The changes in transport were due to alterations in V(max) that correlated with changes in total and cell surface creatine transporter protein content. Our results suggest a positive role for AMPK in creatine transport modulation for cardiomyocytes in culture.

  3. Comparative genomics of emerging human ehrlichiosis agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie C Dunning Hotopp

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Anaplasma (formerly Ehrlichia phagocytophilum, Ehrlichia chaffeensis, and Neorickettsia (formerly Ehrlichia sennetsu are intracellular vector-borne pathogens that cause human ehrlichiosis, an emerging infectious disease. We present the complete genome sequences of these organisms along with comparisons to other organisms in the Rickettsiales order. Ehrlichia spp. and Anaplasma spp. display a unique large expansion of immunodominant outer membrane proteins facilitating antigenic variation. All Rickettsiales have a diminished ability to synthesize amino acids compared to their closest free-living relatives. Unlike members of the Rickettsiaceae family, these pathogenic Anaplasmataceae are capable of making all major vitamins, cofactors, and nucleotides, which could confer a beneficial role in the invertebrate vector or the vertebrate host. Further analysis identified proteins potentially involved in vacuole confinement of the Anaplasmataceae, a life cycle involving a hematophagous vector, vertebrate pathogenesis, human pathogenesis, and lack of transovarial transmission. These discoveries provide significant insights into the biology of these obligate intracellular pathogens.

  4. Isolation and culture of neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehler, Elisabeth; Moore-Morris, Thomas; Lange, Stephan

    2013-09-06

    Cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes have long been used to study myofibrillogenesis and myofibrillar functions. Cultured cardiomyocytes allow for easy investigation and manipulation of biochemical pathways, and their effect on the biomechanical properties of spontaneously beating cardiomyocytes. The following 2-day protocol describes the isolation and culture of neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes. We show how to easily dissect hearts from neonates, dissociate the cardiac tissue and enrich cardiomyocytes from the cardiac cell-population. We discuss the usage of different enzyme mixes for cell-dissociation, and their effects on cell-viability. The isolated cardiomyocytes can be subsequently used for a variety of morphological, electrophysiological, biochemical, cell-biological or biomechanical assays. We optimized the protocol for robustness and reproducibility, by using only commercially available solutions and enzyme mixes that show little lot-to-lot variability. We also address common problems associated with the isolation and culture of cardiomyocytes, and offer a variety of options for the optimization of isolation and culture conditions.

  5. Comparing crowding in human and ideal observers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Ronald; Johnson, Addie; Martinez Anton, Angela; Schepers, Anne L; Cornelissen, Frans W

    2012-06-12

    A visual target is more difficult to recognize when it is surrounded by other, similar objects. This breakdown in object recognition is known as crowding. Despite a long history of experimental work, computational models of crowding are still sparse. Specifically, few studies have examined crowding using an ideal-observer approach. Here, we compare crowding in ideal observers with crowding in humans. We derived an ideal-observer model for target identification under conditions of position and identity uncertainty. Simulations showed that this model reproduces the hallmark of crowding, namely a critical spacing that scales with viewing eccentricity. To examine how well the model fits quantitatively to human data, we performed three experiments. In Experiments 1 and 2, we measured observers' perceptual uncertainty about stimulus positions and identities, respectively, for a target in isolation. In Experiment 3, observers identified a target that was flanked by two distractors. We found that about half of the errors in Experiment 3 could be accounted for by the perceptual uncertainty measured in Experiments 1 and 2. The remainder of the errors could be accounted for by assuming that uncertainty (i.e., the width of internal noise distribution) about stimulus positions and identities depends on flanker proximity. Our results provide a mathematical restatement of the crowding problem and support the hypothesis that crowding behavior is a sign of optimality rather than a perceptual defect.

  6. The characteristics of action potential and nonselective cation current of cardiomyocytes in rabbit superior vena cava

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Pan; YANG XinChun; LIU XiuLan; BAO RongFeng; LIU TaiFeng

    2008-01-01

    As s special focus in initiating and maintaining atrial fibrillation (AF), cardiomyocytes in superior vena cavs (SVC) have distinctive electrophysiological characters. In this study, we found that comparing with the right atrial (RA) cardiomyoctyes, the SVC cardiomyoctyes had longer APD90 at the different basic cycle lengths; the conduction block could be observed on both RA and SVC cardiomyoctyes. A few of SVC cardiomyoctyes showed slow response action potentials with automatic activity and some others showed early afterdepolarization (EAD) spontaneously. Further more, we found that there are nonselective cation current (INs) in both SVC and RA cardiomyocytes. The peak density of INs in SVC cardiomyocytes was smaller than that in RA cardiomyocytes. Removal of extracellular divalent cation and glucose could increase INs in SVC cardiomyocytes. The agonist or the antagonist of INs may increase or decrease APD. To sum up, some SVC cardiomyocytes possess the ability of spontaneous activity; the difference of transmembrane action potentials between SVC and RA cardiomyocytes is partly because of the different density of INs between them; the agonist or the antagonist of INs can increase or decrease APD leading to the enhancement or reduction of EAD genesis in SVC cardiomyocytes. INs in rabbit myocytes is fairly similar to TRPC3 current in electrophysiological property, which might play an important role in the mechanisms of AF.

  7. Inhibition of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 activity enhances antimycin-induced rat cardiomyocytes apoptosis through activation of MAPK signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Xu, Danling; Wang, Shijun; Fu, Han; Wang, Keqiang; Zou, Yunzeng; Sun, Aijun; Ge, Junbo

    2011-12-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), a mitochondrial-specific enzyme, has been proved to be involved in oxidative stress-induced cell apoptosis, while little is known in cardiomyocytes. This study was aimed at investigating the role of ALDH2 in antimycin A-induced cardiomyocytes apoptosis by suppressing ALDH2 activity with a specific ALDH2 inhibitor Daidzin. Antimycin A (40μg/ml) was used to induce neonatal cardiomyocytes apoptosis. Daidzin (60μM) effectively inhibited ALDH2 activity by 50% without own effect on cell apoptosis, and significantly enhanced antimycin A-induced cardiomyocytes apoptosis from 33.5±4.4 to 56.5±6.4% (Hochest method, pdaidzin treated cardiomyocytes compared to the cells treated with antimycin A alone. These findings indicated that modifying mitochondrial ALDH2 activity/expression might be a potential therapeutic option on reducing oxidative insults induced cardiomyocytes apoptosis.

  8. Human Sperm Competition: A Comparative Evolutionary Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael N. Pham

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Sperm competition occurs when a female copulates with two or more males within a sufficiently brief time period, resulting in sperm of the different males competing to fertilize ova. Sperm competition has been documented or inferred to occur across several species. We address the evidence for sperm competition in humans by reviewing literature indicating apparently convergent adaptations to sperm competition in humans and non-humans. We discuss future research directions, and conclude that the evidence for anatomical, biological, physiological, and behavioral adaptations to human sperm competition provides compelling evidence that sperm competition has been a recurrent feature of human evolutionary history.

  9. Comparative proteomics analysis of human gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Li; Jian-Fang Li; Ying Qu; Xue-Hua Chen; Jian-Min Qin; Qin-Long Gu; Min Yan; Zheng-Gang Zhu; Bing-Ya Liu

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To isolate and identify differentially expressed proteins between cancer and normal tissues of gastric cancer by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS).METHODS: Soluble fraction proteins of gastric cancer tissues and paired normal tissues were separated by 2-DE.The differentially expressed proteins were selected and identified by MALDI-TOF-MS and database search.RESULTS: 2-DE profiles with high resolution and reproducibility were obtained.Twenty-three protein spots were excised from sliver staining gel and digested in gel by trypsin,in which fifteen protein spots were identified successfully.Among the identified proteins,there were ten over-expressed and five under-expressed proteins in stomach cancer tissues compared with normal tissues.CONCLUSION: In this study,the well-resolved,reproducible 2-DE patterns of human gastric cancer tissue and paired normal tissue were established and optimized and certain differentially-expressed proteins were identified.The combined use of 2-DE and MS provides an effective approach to screen for potential tumor markers.

  10. Role of nuclear Lamin A/C in cardiomyocyte functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmosino, Monica; Torretta, Silvia; Procino, Giuseppe; Gerbino, Andrea; Forleo, Cinzia; Favale, Stefano; Svelto, Maria

    2014-10-01

    Lamin A/C is a structural protein of the nuclear envelope (NE) and cardiac involvement in Lamin A/C mutations was one of the first phenotypes to be reported in humans, suggesting a crucial role of this protein in the cardiomyocytes function. Mutations in LMNA gene cause a class of pathologies generically named 'Lamanopathies' mainly involving heart and skeletal muscles. Moreover, the well-known disease called Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome due to extensive mutations in LMNA gene, in addition to the systemic phenotype of premature aging, is characterised by the death of patients at around 13 typically for a heart attack or stroke, suggesting again the heart as the main site sensitive to Lamin A/C disfunction. Indeed, the identification of the roles of the Lamin A/C in cardiomyocytes function is a key area of exploration. One of the primary biological roles recently conferred to Lamin A/C is to affect contractile cells lineage determination and senescence. Then, in differentiated adult cardiomyocytes both the 'structural' and 'gene expression hypothesis' could explain the role of Lamin A in the function of cardiomyocytes. In fact, recent advances in the field propose that the structural weakness/stiffness of the NE, regulated by Lamin A/C amount in NE, can 'consequently' alter gene expression. © 2014 Société Française des Microscopies and Société de Biologie Cellulaire de France. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Cardiomyocyte proliferation in cardiac development and regeneration: a guide to methodologies and interpretations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Marina; Magadum, Ajit; Engel, Felix B

    2015-10-01

    The newt and the zebrafish have the ability to regenerate many of their tissues and organs including the heart. Thus, a major goal in experimental medicine is to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the regenerative capacity of these species. A wide variety of experiments have demonstrated that naturally occurring heart regeneration relies on cardiomyocyte proliferation. Thus, major efforts have been invested to induce proliferation of mammalian cardiomyocytes in order to improve cardiac function after injury or to protect the heart from further functional deterioration. In this review, we describe and analyze methods currently used to evaluate cardiomyocyte proliferation. In addition, we summarize the literature on naturally occurring heart regeneration. Our analysis highlights that newt and zebrafish heart regeneration relies on factors that are also utilized in cardiomyocyte proliferation during mammalian fetal development. Most of these factors have, however, failed to induce adult mammalian cardiomyocyte proliferation. Finally, our analysis of mammalian neonatal heart regeneration indicates experiments that could resolve conflicting results in the literature, such as binucleation assays and clonal analysis. Collectively, cardiac regeneration based on cardiomyocyte proliferation is a promising approach for improving adult human cardiac function after injury, but it is important to elucidate the mechanisms arresting mammalian cardiomyocyte proliferation after birth and to utilize better assays to determine formation of new muscle mass.

  12. Human Capital Development: Comparative Analysis of BRICs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardichvili, Alexandre; Zavyalova, Elena; Minina, Vera

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this article is to conduct macro-level analysis of human capital (HC) development strategies, pursued by four countries commonly referred to as BRICs (Brazil, Russia, India, and China). Design/methodology/approach: This analysis is based on comparisons of macro indices of human capital and innovativeness of the economy and a…

  13. Human Capital Development: Comparative Analysis of BRICs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardichvili, Alexandre; Zavyalova, Elena; Minina, Vera

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this article is to conduct macro-level analysis of human capital (HC) development strategies, pursued by four countries commonly referred to as BRICs (Brazil, Russia, India, and China). Design/methodology/approach: This analysis is based on comparisons of macro indices of human capital and innovativeness of the economy and a…

  14. Comparing future options for human space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Brent

    2011-09-01

    The paper analyzes the "value proposition" for government-funded human space flight, a vexing question that persistently dogs efforts to justify its $10 10/year expense in the US. The original Mercury/Gemini/Apollo value proposition is not valid today. Neither was it the value proposition actually promoted by von Braun, which the post-Apollo 80% of human space flight history has persistently attempted to fulfill. Divergent potential objectives for human space flight are captured in four strategic options— Explore Mars; accelerate Space Passenger Travel; enable Space Power for Earth; and Settle the Moon—which are then analyzed for their purpose, societal myth, legacy benefits, core needs, and result as measured by the number and type of humans they would fly in space. This simple framework is proposed as a way to support productive dialog with public and other stakeholders, to determine a sustainable value proposition for human space flight.

  15. Nerves Regulate Cardiomyocyte Proliferation and Heart Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Ahmed I; O'Meara, Caitlin C; Gemberling, Matthew; Zhao, Long; Bryant, Donald M; Zheng, Ruimao; Gannon, Joseph B; Cai, Lei; Choi, Wen-Yee; Egnaczyk, Gregory F; Burns, Caroline E; Burns, C Geoffrey; MacRae, Calum A; Poss, Kenneth D; Lee, Richard T

    2015-08-24

    Some organisms, such as adult zebrafish and newborn mice, have the capacity to regenerate heart tissue following injury. Unraveling the mechanisms of heart regeneration is fundamental to understanding why regeneration fails in adult humans. Numerous studies have revealed that nerves are crucial for organ regeneration, thus we aimed to determine whether nerves guide heart regeneration. Here, we show using transgenic zebrafish that inhibition of cardiac innervation leads to reduction of myocyte proliferation following injury. Specifically, pharmacological inhibition of cholinergic nerve function reduces cardiomyocyte proliferation in the injured hearts of both zebrafish and neonatal mice. Direct mechanical denervation impairs heart regeneration in neonatal mice, which was rescued by the administration of neuregulin 1 (NRG1) and nerve growth factor (NGF) recombinant proteins. Transcriptional analysis of mechanically denervated hearts revealed a blunted inflammatory and immune response following injury. These findings demonstrate that nerve function is required for both zebrafish and mouse heart regeneration.

  16. Excitation model of pacemaker cardiomyocytes of cardiac conduction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, M.; Babich, L.

    2015-11-01

    Myocardium includes typical and atypical cardiomyocytes - pacemakers, which form the cardiac conduction system. Excitation from the atrioventricular node in normal conditions is possible only in one direction. Retrograde direction of pulses is impossible. The most important prerequisite for the work of cardiomyocytes is the anatomical integrity of the conduction system. Changes in contractile force of the cardiomyocytes, which appear periodically, are due to two mechanisms of self-regulation - heterometric and homeometric. Graphic course of the excitation pulse propagation along the heart muscle more accurately reveals the understanding of the arrhythmia mechanism. These models have the ability to visualize the essence of excitation dynamics. However, they do not have the proper forecasting function for result estimation. Integrative mathematical model enables further investigation of general laws of the myocardium active behavior, allows for determination of the violation mechanism of electrical and contractile function of cardiomyocytes. Currently, there is no full understanding of the topography of pacemakers and ionic mechanisms. There is a need for the development of direction of mathematical modeling and comparative studies of the electrophysiological arrangement of cells of atrioventricular connection and ventricular conduction system.

  17. EXPERIMENT STUDY OF CARDIOMYOCYTE APOPTOSIS AND CARDIOMYOCYTE PROLIFERATION DURING THE DEVELOPMENT OF CARDIAC HYPERTROPHY IN SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江立生; 方宁远; 高天; 孟超

    2005-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect and significance of cardiomyocyte apoptosis and cardiomyocyte proliferation on cardiac hypertrophy by observing the dynamic changes of them during the development of cardiac hypertrophy in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Methods Hearts were excised from SHR and Wistar-Kyoto rats(WKY) at different ages. Cardiac hypertrophic index (CHI) was calculated as the radio of heart weight to body weight; Cardiomyocyte apoptosis was identified by in situ TDT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL); Localization and expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were examined by immunohistochemistry. Results Compared with age-matched WKY, CHI in SHR was significantly increased at 12 weeks old and 24 weeks old (3. 604 ± 0. 089 vs 2. 997 ± 0. 166, P<0.01; 4. 156 ± 0. 385 vs 3. 119 ± 0. 208, P < 0. 01 ) ,and CHI in SHR was increased little by little with the age increasing and attained plaiform since 20 weeks old. In contrast with age-matched WKY, cardiomyocyte apoptotic index (APOI) in SHR at 12 weeks was not increased significantly (4. 248 ± 1. 592 vs 3. 678 ± 0. 856, P > 0. 05 ), but decreased markedly when their age were 24 weeks (3. 207 ± 1. 794 vs 5. 494 ± 1. 372, P <0. 05); APOI in SHR at 12 weeks old, 16 weeks old, 20 weeks old and 24weeks old were 4. 248 ± 1. 592, 5. 707 ± 1. 322, 7. 436 ± 1. 128, 3. 207 ± 1. 794, respectively. On the other hand,APOI in SHR from 12 weeks old to 20 weeks old increased gradually, and attained peak at 20 weeks old, but decreased markedly after 20 weeks old ( P <0. 01 ). Compared with age-matched WKY, the rate of cardiomyocyte PCNA positive labeling (PCNAR) in SHR at 12 weeks old and 24 weeks old didn' t have obvious difference. Conclusion Imbalance of cardiomyocyte apoptosis and cardiomyocyte proliferation existed during the development of cardiac hypertrophy in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

  18. Comparing bird and human soaring strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ákos, Zsuzsa; Nagy, Máté; Vicsek, Tamás

    2008-01-01

    Gliding saves much energy, and to make large distances using only this form of flight represents a great challenge for both birds and people. The solution is to make use of the so-called thermals, which are localized, warmer regions in the atmosphere moving upwards with a speed exceeding the descent rate of bird and plane. Whereas birds use this technique mainly for foraging, humans do it as a sporting activity. Thermalling involves efficient optimization including the skilful localization of thermals, trying to guess the most favorable route, estimating the best descending rate, etc. In this study, we address the question whether there are any analogies between the solutions birds and humans find to handle the above task. High-resolution track logs were taken from thermalling falcons and paraglider pilots to determine the essential parameters of the flight patterns. We find that there are relevant common features in the ways birds and humans use thermals. In particular, falcons seem to reproduce the MacCready formula widely used by gliders to calculate the best slope to take before an upcoming thermal. PMID:18316724

  19. Human cumulative culture: a comparative perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Lewis G; Vale, Gill L; Laland, Kevin N; Flynn, Emma; Kendal, Rachel L

    2014-05-01

    Many animals exhibit social learning and behavioural traditions, but human culture exhibits unparalleled complexity and diversity, and is unambiguously cumulative in character. These similarities and differences have spawned a debate over whether animal traditions and human culture are reliant on homologous or analogous psychological processes. Human cumulative culture combines high-fidelity transmission of cultural knowledge with beneficial modifications to generate a 'ratcheting' in technological complexity, leading to the development of traits far more complex than one individual could invent alone. Claims have been made for cumulative culture in several species of animals, including chimpanzees, orangutans and New Caledonian crows, but these remain contentious. Whilst initial work on the topic of cumulative culture was largely theoretical, employing mathematical methods developed by population biologists, in recent years researchers from a wide range of disciplines, including psychology, biology, economics, biological anthropology, linguistics and archaeology, have turned their attention to the experimental investigation of cumulative culture. We review this literature, highlighting advances made in understanding the underlying processes of cumulative culture and emphasising areas of agreement and disagreement amongst investigators in separate fields.

  20. Comparing bird and human soaring strategies

    CERN Document Server

    Akos, Zsuzsa; Vicsek, Tamas; 10.1073/pnas.0707711105

    2009-01-01

    Gliding saves much energy, and to make large distances using only this form of flight represents a great challenge for both birds and people. The solution is to make use of the so-called thermals, which are localized, warmer regions in the atmosphere moving upwards with a speed exceeding the descent rate of bird and plane. Whereas birds use this technique mainly for foraging, humans do it as a sporting activity. Thermalling involves efficient optimization including the skilful localization of thermals, trying to guess the most favorable route, estimating the best descending rate, etc. In this study, we address the question whether there are any analogies between the solutions birds and humans find to handle the above task. High-resolution track logs were taken from thermalling falcons and paraglider pilots to determine the essential parameters of the flight patterns. We find that there are relevant common features in the ways birds and humans use thermals. In particular, falcons seem to reproduce the MacCread...

  1. integrative humanism and complementary reflection a comparative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GODFREY OZUMBA

    2011-12-01

    Dec 1, 2011 ... that could emerge as far as this comparative analysis is concerned. ... What I have written is my opinion and critical judgment of my ... Using Socrates dialectical method of thesis, antithesis and synthesis, we ..... discourse.

  2. Electrophysiological properties and calcium handling of embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Boum Youm

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (ESC-CMs hold great interest in many fields of research including clinical applications such as stem cell and gene therapy for cardiac repair or regeneration. ESC-CMs are also used as a platform tool for pharmacological tests or for investigations of cardiac remodeling. ESC-CMs have many different aspects of morphology, electrophysiology, calcium handling, and bioenergetics compared with adult cardiomyocytes. They are immature in morphology, similar to sinus nodal-like in the electrophysiology, higher contribution of trans-sarcolemmal Ca2+ influx to Ca2+ handling, and higher dependence on anaerobic glycolysis. Here, I review a detailed electrophysiology and Ca2+ handling features of ESC-CMs during differentiation into adult cardiomyocytes to gain insights into how all the developmental changes are related to each other to display cardinal features of developing cardiomyocytes.

  3. The antiapoptotic effect of insulin against anoxia/reoxygenation injury in cultured cardiomyocyte of neonatal rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study protective effect of insulin against cardiomyocyte apoptosis in anoxia/reoxygenation (A/R)injury of neonatal rat. Methods: The model of A/R injury was finished through receiving anoxia for 2 h and reoxygenation for 4 h in cultured cardiomyocytes of neonatal rat. The cardiomyocytes were divided randomly into 3 groups: control group (CON), anoxia/reoxygenation group (A/R) and insulin-treated group (INS). At the end of reoxygenation of 4 hours, activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH),contents of malondialdehyde (MDA) were assessed through spectrophotometric procedures, myocyte apoptosis were detected through TUNEL and DNA Ladder. Results: MDA, LDH, and Apoptosis Index were significantly decreased in INS group compared with A/R group (P<0.01). Conclusion: Insulin has a protective effect against A/R injury in cultured cardiomyocyte of neonatal rat; the protective mechanism may contribute to antiapoptosis of insulin.

  4. Clinical Potentials of Cardiomyocytes Derived from Patient-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwong-Man Ng

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The lack of appropriate human cardiomyocyte-based experimental platform has largely hindered the study of cardiac diseases and the development of therapeutic strategies. To date, somatic cells isolated from human subjects can be reprogramed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs and subsequently differentiated into functional cardiomyocytes. This powerful reprogramming technology provides a novel in vitro human cell-based platform for the study of human hereditary cardiac disorders. The clinical potential of using iPSCs derived from patients with inherited cardiac disorders for therapeutic studies have been increasingly highlighted. In this review, the standard procedures for generating patient-specific iPSCs and the latest commonly used cardiac differentiation protocols will be outlined. Furthermore, the progress and limitations of current applications of iPSCs and iPSCs-derived cardiomyocytes in cell replacement therapy, disease modeling, drug-testing and toxicology studies will be discussed in detail.

  5. Group B streptococcal beta-hemolysin/cytolysin directly impairs cardiomyocyte viability and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E Hensler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Group B Streptococcus (GBS is a leading cause of neonatal sepsis where myocardial dysfunction is an important contributor to poor outcome. Here we study the effects of the GBS pore-forming beta-hemolysin/cytolysin (Bh/c exotoxin on cardiomyocyte viability, contractility, and calcium transients. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HL-1 cardiomyocytes exposed to intact wild-type (WT or isogenic Deltabeta h/c mutant GBS, or to cell-free extracts from either strain, were assessed for viability by trypan blue exclusion and for apoptosis by TUNEL staining. Functionality of exposed cardiomyocytes was analyzed by visual quantitation of the rate and extent of contractility. Mitochondrial membrane polarization was measured in TMRE-loaded cells exposed to GBS beta h/c. Effects of GBS beta h/c on calcium transients were studied in fura-2AM-loaded primary rat ventricular cardiomyocytes. Exposure of HL-1 cardiomyocytes to either WT GBS or beta h/c extracts significantly reduced both rate and extent of contractility and later induced necrotic and apoptotic cell death. No effects on cardiomyocyte viability or function were observed after treatment with Deltabeta h/c mutant bacteria or extracts. The beta h/c toxin was associated with complete and rapid loss of detectable calcium transients in primary neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes and induced a loss of mitochondrial membrane polarization. These effects on viability and function were abrogated by the beta h/c inhibitor, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data show a rapid loss of cardiomyocyte viability and function induced by GBS beta h/c, and these deleterious effects are inhibited by DPPC, a normal constituent of human pulmonary surfactant.. These findings have clinical implications for the cardiac dysfunction observed in neonatal GBS infections.

  6. The characteristics of action potential and nonselec-tive cation current of cardiomyocytes in rabbit superior vena cava

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    As a special focus in initiating and maintaining atrial fibrillation (AF), cardiomyocytes in superior vena cava (SVC) have distinctive electrophysiological characters. In this study, we found that comparing with the right atrial (RA) cardiomyoctyes, the SVC cardiomyoctyes had longer APD90 at the different basic cycle lengths; the conduction block could be observed on both RA and SVC cardiomyoctyes. A few of SVC cardiomyoctyes showed slow response action potentials with automatic activity and some others showed early afterdepolarization (EAD) spontaneously. Further more, we found that there are nonselective cation current (INs) in both SVC and RA cardiomyocytes. The peak density of INs in SVC cardiomyocytes was smaller than that in RA cardiomyocytes. Removal of extracellular divalent cation and glucose could increase INs in SVC cardiomyocytes. The agonist or the antagonist of INs may in-crease or decrease APD. To sum up, some SVC cardiomyocytes possess the ability of spontaneous activity; the difference of transmembrane action potentials between SVC and RA cardiomyocytes is partly because of the different density of INs between them; the agonist or the antagonist of INs can in-crease or decrease APD leading to the enhancement or reduction of EAD genesis in SVC cardiomyo-cytes. INs in rabbit myocytes is fairly similar to TRPC3 current in electrophysiological property, which might play an important role in the mechanisms of AF.

  7. Regulation of cardiomyocyte autophagy by calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Soni; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Criollo, Alfredo; Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; García, Lorena; Morselli, Eugenia; Cifuentes, Mariana; Quest, Andrew F G; Hill, Joseph A; Lavandero, Sergio

    2016-04-15

    Calcium signaling plays a crucial role in a multitude of events within the cardiomyocyte, including cell cycle control, growth, apoptosis, and autophagy. With respect to calcium-dependent regulation of autophagy, ion channels and exchangers, receptors, and intracellular mediators play fundamental roles. In this review, we discuss calcium-dependent regulation of cardiomyocyte autophagy, a lysosomal mechanism that is often cytoprotective, serving to defend against disease-related stress and nutrient insufficiency. We also highlight the importance of the subcellular distribution of calcium and related proteins, interorganelle communication, and other key signaling events that govern cardiomyocyte autophagy. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Cardiomyocyte differentiation induced in cardiac progenitor cells by cardiac fibroblast-conditioned medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Shen, Man-Ru; Xu, Zhen-Dong; Hu, Zhe; Chen, Chao; Chi, Ya-Li; Kong, Zhen-Dong; Li, Zi-Fu; Li, Xiao-Tong; Guo, Shi-Lei; Xiong, Shao-Hu; Zhang, Chuan-Sen

    2014-05-01

    Our previous study showed that after being treated with 5-azacytidine, Nkx2.5(+) human cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) derived from embryonic heart tubes could differentiate into cardiomyocytes. Although 5-azacytidine is a classical agent that induces myogenic differentiation in various types of cells, the drug is toxic and unspecific for myogenic differentiation. To investigate the possibility of inducing CPCs to differentiate into cardiomyocytes by a specific and non-toxic method, CPCs of passage 15 and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were treated with cardiac ventricular fibroblast-conditioned medium (CVF-conditioned medium). Following this treatment, the Nkx2.5(+) CPCs underwent cardiomyogenic differentiation. Phase-contrast microscopy showed that the morphology of the treated CPCs gradually changed. Ultrastructural observation confirmed that the cells contained typical sarcomeres. The expression of cardiomyocyte-associated genes, such as alpha-cardiac actin, cardiac troponin T, and beta-myosin heavy chain (MHC), was increased in the CPCs that had undergone cardiomyogenic differentiation compared with untreated cells. In contrast, the MSCs did not exhibit changes in morphology or molecular expression after being treated with CVF-conditioned medium. The results indicated that Nkx2.5(+) CPCs treated with CVF-conditioned medium were capable of differentiating into a cardiac phenotype, whereas treated MSCs did not appear to undergo cardiomyogenic differentiation. Subsequently, following the addition of Dkk1 and the blocking of Wnt signaling pathway, CVF-conditioned medium-induced morphological changes and expression of cardiomyocyte-associated genes of Nkx2.5(+) CPCs were inhibited, which indicates that CVF-conditioned medium-induced cardiomyogenic differentiation of Nkx2.5(+) CPCs is associated with Wnt signaling pathway. In addition, we also found that the activation of Wnt signaling pathway was accompanied by higher expression of GATA-4 and the blocking of the

  9. The assessment of electrophysiological activity in human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes exposed to dimethyl sulfoxide and ethanol by manual patch clamp and multi-electrode array system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Soo-Wang; Kim, Bo-Ram; Hyun, Sung-Ae; Seo, Joung-Wook

    2017-09-01

    Recently, electrophysiological activity has been effectively measured in human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs) to predict drug-induced arrhythmia. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and ethanol have been used as diluting agents in many experiments. However, the maximum DMSO and ethanol concentrations that can be effectively used in the measurement of electrophysiological parameters in hiPSC-CMs-based patch clamp and multi-electrode array (MEA) have not been fully elucidated. We investigated the effects of varying concentrations of DMSO and ethanol used as diluting agents on several electrophysiological parameters in hiPSC-CMs using patch clamp and MEA. Both DMSO and ethanol at concentrations>1% in external solution resulted in osmolality >400mOsmol/kg, but pH was not affected by either agent. Neither DMSO nor ethanol led to cell death at the concentrations examined. However, resting membrane potential, action potential amplitude, action potential duration at 90% and 40%, and corrected field potential duration were decreased significantly at 1% ethanol concentration. DMSO at 1% also significantly decreased the sodium spike amplitude. In addition, the waveform of action potential and field potential was recorded as irregular at 3% concentrations of both DMSO and ethanol. Concentrations of up to 0.3% of either agent did not affect osmolality, pH, cell death, or electrophysiological parameters in hiPSC-CMs. Our findings suggest that 0.3% is the maximum concentration at which DMSO or ethanol should be used for dilution purposes in hiPSC-CMs-based patch clamp and MEA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Human Stem Cell Derived Cardiomyocytes: An Alternative Model to Evaluate Environmental Chemical Cardiac Safety and Development of Predictive Adverse Outcome Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical spills and associated deaths in the US has increased 2.6-fold and 16-fold from 1983 to 2012, respectfully. In addition, the number of chemicals to which humans are exposed to in the environment has increased almost 10-fold from 2001 to 2013 within the US. Internationally...

  11. Human Stem Cell Derived Cardiomyocytes: An Alternative Model to Evaluate Environmental Chemical Cardiac Safety and Development of Predictive Adverse Outcome Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical spills and associated deaths in the US has increased 2.6-fold and 16-fold from 1983 to 2012, respectfully. In addition, the number of chemicals to which humans are exposed to in the environment has increased almost 10-fold from 2001 to 2013 within the US. Internationally...

  12. RAGE modulates hypoxia/reoxygenation injury in adult murine cardiomyocytes via JNK and GSK-3beta signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linshan Shang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs have been implicated in diverse pathological settings including diabetes, inflammation and acute ischemia/reperfusion injury in the heart. AGEs interact with the receptor for AGEs (RAGE and transduce signals through activation of MAPKs and proapoptotic pathways. In the current study, adult cardiomyocytes were studied in an in vitro ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury model to delineate the molecular mechanisms underlying RAGE-mediated injury due to hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cardiomyocytes isolated from adult wild-type (WT, homozygous RAGE-null (RKO, and WT mice treated with soluble RAGE (sRAGE were subjected to hypoxia for 30 minutes alone or followed by reoxygenation for 1 hour. In specific experiments, RAGE ligand carboxymethyllysine (CML-AGE (termed "CML" in this manuscript was evaluated in vitro. LDH, a marker of cellular injury, was assayed in the supernatant in the presence or absence of signaling inhibitor-treated cardiomyocytes. Cardiomyocyte levels of heterogeneous AGEs were measured using ELISA. A pronounced increase in RAGE expression along with AGEs was observed in H/R vs. normoxia in WT cardiomyocytes. WT cardiomyocytes after H/R displayed increased LDH release compared to RKO or sRAGE-treated cardiomyocytes. Our results revealed significant increases in phospho-JNK in WT cardiomyocytes after H/R. In contrast, neither RKO nor sRAGE-treated cardiomyocytes exhibited increased phosphorylation of JNK after H/R stress. The impact of RAGE deletion on GSK-3beta phosphorylation in the cardiomyocytes subjected to H/R revealed significantly higher levels of phospho-GSK-3beta/total GSK-3beta in RKO, as well as in sRAGE-treated cardiomyocytes versus WT cardiomyocytes after H/R. Further investigation established a key role for Akt, which functions upstream of GSK-3beta, in modulating H/R injury in adult cardiomyocytes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data illustrate

  13. Comparative primate neuroimaging: insights into human brain evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rilling, James K

    2014-01-01

    Comparative neuroimaging can identify unique features of the human brain and teach us about human brain evolution. Comparisons with chimpanzees, our closest living primate relative, are critical in this endeavor. Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used to compare brain size development, brain structure proportions and brain aging. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been used to compare resting brain glucose metabolism. Functional MRI (fMRI) has been used to compare auditory and visual system pathways, as well as resting-state networks of connectivity. Finally, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has been used to compare structural connectivity. Collectively, these methods have revealed human brain specializations with respect to development, cortical organization, connectivity, and aging. These findings inform our knowledge of the evolutionary changes responsible for the special features of the modern human mind.

  14. Overexpression of KCNJ2 in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes for the assessment of QT-prolonging drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes hold great potentials to predict pro-arrhythmic risks in preclinical cardiac safety screening, although the hiPSC cardiomyocytes exhibit rather immature functional and structural characteristics, including spontaneous activity. Our physiological characterization and mathematical simulation showed that low expression of the inward-rectifier potassium (IK1 channel is a determinant of spontaneous activity. To understand impact of the low IK1 expression on the pharmacological properties, we tested if transduction of hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes with KCNJ2, which encodes the IK1 channel, alters pharmacological response to cardiac repolarization processes. The transduction of KCNJ2 resulted in quiescent hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes, which need pacing to elicit action potentials. Significant prolongation of paced action potential duration in KCNJ2-transduced hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes was stably measured at 0.1 μM E-4031, although the same concentration of E-4031 ablated firing of non-treated hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes. These results in single cells were confirmed by mathematical simulations. Using the hiPSC-derived cardiac sheets with KCNJ2-transduction, we also investigated effects of a range of drugs on field potential duration recorded at 1 Hz. The KCNJ2 overexpression in hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes may contribute to evaluate a part of QT-prolonging drugs at toxicological concentrations with high accuracy.

  15. Teacher Leader Human Relations Skills: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roby, Douglas E.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, 142 graduate school teachers working in schools throughout southwestern Ohio assessed their human relation skills. A human relations survey was used for the study, and results were compared with colleagues assessing the teachers in the study. The survey was developed using a Likert-type scale, and was based on key elements affecting…

  16. Teacher Leader Human Relations Skills: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roby, Douglas E.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, 142 graduate school teachers working in schools throughout southwestern Ohio assessed their human relation skills. A human relations survey was used for the study, and results were compared with colleagues assessing the teachers in the study. The survey was developed using a Likert-type scale, and was based on key elements affecting…

  17. A PGC-1α-Mediated Transcriptional Network Maintains Mitochondrial Redox and Bioenergetic Homeostasis against Doxorubicin-Induced Toxicity in Human Cardiomyocytes: Implementation of TT21C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Haitao; Zhang, Qiang; Guo, Jiabin; Zhang, Tingfen; Zhao, Jun; Li, Jin; White, Andrew; Carmichael, Paul L; Westmoreland, Carl; Peng, Shuangqing

    2016-04-01

    Chemical toxicity testing is fast moving in a direction that relies increasingly on cell-basedin vitroassays anchored on toxicity pathways according to the toxicity testing in the 21st century vision. Identifying points of departure (POD) via these assays and revealing their mechanistic underpinnings via computational modeling of the relevant pathways are critical and challenging steps. Here we used doxorubicin (DOX) as a prototype chemical to study mitochondrial toxicity in human AC16 cells. Mitochondrial toxicity has been linked to cardiovascular risk of DOX, which has limited its clinical use as an antitumor drug. Ourin vitrostudy revealed a well-defined POD concentration of DOX below which adaptive induction of proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) -mediated mitochondrial genes, including NRF-1, MnSOD, UCP2, and COX1, concurred with negligible changes in mitochondrial superoxide and cytotoxicity. At higher DOX concentrations adversity became significant with elevated superoxide and suppressed ATP levels. A computational model was formulated to simulate the PGC-1α-mediated transcriptional network comprising multiple negative feedback loops that underlie redox and bioenergetics homeostasis in the mitochondrion. The model recapitulated the transition phase from adaptive to adverse responses, supporting the notion that saturated induction of PGC-1α-mediated gene network underpins POD. The model further predicts (follow-up experiments verified) that silencing PGC-1α compromises the adaptive function of the transcriptional network, leading to disruption of mitochondria and cytotoxicity at lower DOX concentrations. In summary, our study demonstrates that combining pathway-focusedin vitroassays and computational simulation of relevant biochemical network is synergistic for understanding dose-response behaviors in the low-dose region and identifying POD.

  18. Comparing the face inversion effect in crows and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecht, Katharina F; Wagener, Lysann; Ostojić, Ljerka; Clayton, Nicola S; Nieder, Andreas

    2017-09-13

    Humans show impaired recognition of faces that are presented upside down, a phenomenon termed face inversion effect, which is thought to reflect the special relevance of faces for humans. Here, we investigated whether a phylogenetically distantly related avian species, the carrion crow, with similar socio-cognitive abilities to human and non-human primates, exhibits a face inversion effect. In a delayed matching-to-sample task, two crows had to differentiate profiles of crow faces as well as matched controls, presented both upright and inverted. Because crows can discriminate humans based on their faces, we also assessed the face inversion effect using human faces. Both crows performed better with crow faces than with human faces and performed worse when responding to inverted pictures in general compared to upright pictures. However, neither of the crows showed a face inversion effect. For comparative reasons, the tests were repeated with human subjects. As expected, humans showed a face-specific inversion effect. Therefore, we did not find any evidence that crows-like humans-process faces as a special visual stimulus. Instead, individual recognition in crows may be based on cues other than a conspecific's facial profile, such as their body, or on processing of local features rather than holistic processing.

  19. Comparative developmental psychology: how is human cognitive development unique?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Alexandra G; Wobber, Victoria; Hughes, Kelly; Santos, Laurie R

    2014-04-29

    The fields of developmental and comparative psychology both seek to illuminate the roots of adult cognitive systems. Developmental studies target the emergence of adult cognitive systems over ontogenetic time, whereas comparative studies investigate the origins of human cognition in our evolutionary history. Despite the long tradition of research in both of these areas, little work has examined the intersection of the two: the study of cognitive development in a comparative perspective. In the current article, we review recent work using this comparative developmental approach to study non-human primate cognition. We argue that comparative data on the pace and pattern of cognitive development across species can address major theoretical questions in both psychology and biology. In particular, such integrative research will allow stronger biological inferences about the function of developmental change, and will be critical in addressing how humans come to acquire species-unique cognitive abilities.

  20. Comparative Developmental Psychology: How is Human Cognitive Development Unique?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra G. Rosati

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The fields of developmental and comparative psychology both seek to illuminate the roots of adult cognitive systems. Developmental studies target the emergence of adult cognitive systems over ontogenetic time, whereas comparative studies investigate the origins of human cognition in our evolutionary history. Despite the long tradition of research in both of these areas, little work has examined the intersection of the two: the study of cognitive development in a comparative perspective. In the current article, we review recent work using this comparative developmental approach to study non-human primate cognition. We argue that comparative data on the pace and pattern of cognitive development across species can address major theoretical questions in both psychology and biology. In particular, such integrative research will allow stronger biological inferences about the function of developmental change, and will be critical in addressing how humans come to acquire species-unique cognitive abilities.

  1. Antifungal miconazole induces cardiotoxicity via inhibition of APE/Ref-1-related pathway in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Kyung-Jong; Lin, Hai Yue; Jung, Soohyun; Cho, Soo Min; Shin, Ho-Chul; Bae, Young Min; Lee, Seung Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Jeon, Byeong Hwa; Kim, Bokyung

    2012-04-01

    Effects of miconazole, an azole antifungal, have not been fully determined in cardiomyocytes. We therefore identified the transcriptome in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes responding to miconazole using DNA microarray analysis and selected a gene and investigated its role in cardiomyocytes. Miconazole dose-dependently increased the levels of superoxide (O(2)(-)) and apoptosis in cardiomyocytes; these increases were inhibited by treatment with antioxidants. The DNA microarray revealed that 4163 genes were upregulated and 4829 genes downregulated by more than threefold in miconazole-treated cardiomyocytes compared with the vehicle-treated control. Moreover, redox homeostasis-, oxidative stress-, and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-related categories of genes were strongly affected by miconazole treatment. Among genes overlapped in all these categories, apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease-1/redox factor-1 (APE/Ref-1), a redox-related gene, was prominent and was diminished in the miconazole-treated group. Changes in the O(2)(-) production and apoptosis induction in response to miconazole were inhibited in cardiomyocytes transfected with adenoviral APE/Ref-1. Overexpression of APE/Ref-1 reversed the reduction in beating frequency induced by miconazole. Our results demonstrate that miconazole may induce rat cardiotoxicity via a ROS-mediated pathway, which is initiated by the inhibition of APE/Ref-1 expression. This possible new adverse event in cardiomyocyte function caused by miconazole may provide a basis for the development of novel antifungal agents.

  2. The Adipokine Chemerin Induces Apoptosis in Cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Rodríguez-Penas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The adipokine chemerin has been associated with cardiovascular disease. We investigated the effects of chemerin on viability and intracellular signalling in murine cardiomyocytes, and the effects of insulin and TNF-α on cardiomyocyte chemerin production. Methods: Hoechst dye vital staining and cell cycle analysis were used to analyse the viability of murine cardiac cells in culture. Western blot was used to explore the phosphorylation of AKT and caspase-9 activity in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes and HL-1 cells. Finally, RT-qPCR, ELISA and western blot were performed to examine chemerin and CMKLR1 expression after insulin and TNF-α treatment in cardiac cells. Results: Chemerin treatment increased apoptosis, reduced phosphorylation of AKT at Thr308 and increased caspase-9 activity in murine cardiomyocytes. Insulin treatment lowered chemerin and CMKLR1 mRNA and protein levels, and the amount of chemerin in the cell media, while TNF-α treatment increased chemerin mRNA and protein levels but decreased expression of the CMKLR1 gene. Conclusion: Chemerin induces apoptosis, reduces AKT phosphorylation and increases the cleavage of caspase-9 in murine cardiomyocytes. The expression of chemerin is regulated by important metabolic (insulin and inflammatory (TNF-α mediators at cardiac level. Our results suggest that chemerin could play a role in the physiopathology of cardiac diseases.

  3. Safflor yellow A protects neonatal rat cardiomyocytes against anoxia/reoxygenation injury in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-lin DUAN; Jing-wen WANG; Yue GUAN; Ying YIN; Guo WEI; Jia CUI; Dan ZHOU

    2013-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the effects of safflor yellow A (SYA),a flavonoid extracted from Carthamus tinctorius L,on cultured rat cardiomyocytes exposed to anoxia/reoxygenation (A/R).Methods:Primary cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were exposed to anoxia for 3 h followed by reoxygenation for 6 h.The cell viability was measured using MTT assay.The releases of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK),level of malondialdehyde (MDA),and activities of glutathione (GSH),superoxide dismutase (SOD),catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were analyzed.Hoechst 33258 staining and changes in Bcl-2/Bax ratio and caspase 3 activity were used to examine A/R-induced apoptosis.Results:The A/R exposure markedly decreased the viability of cardiomyocytes,suppressed the activities of SOD,GSH,CAT and GSH-Px,and Bcl-2 protein expression.Meanwhile,the A/R exposure markedly increased the release of LDH and CK,and MDA production in the cardiomyocytes,and increased the rate of apoptosis,caspase 3 activity,Bax protein expression.Pretreatment with SYA (40,60 and 80 nmol/L) concentration-dependently blocked the A/R-induced changes in the cardiomyocytes.Pretreatment of the cardiomyocytes with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC,200 μmol/L) produced protective effects that were comparable to those caused by SYA (80nmol/L).Conclusion:SYA protects cultured rat cardiomyocytes against A/R injury,maybe via inhibiting cellular oxidative stress and apoptosis.

  4. Comparative Developmental Psychology: How is Human Cognitive Development Unique?

    OpenAIRE

    Rosati, Alexandra G.; Victoria Wobber; Kelly Hughes; Santos, Laurie R

    2014-01-01

    The fields of developmental and comparative psychology both seek to illuminate the roots of adult cognitive systems. Developmental studies target the emergence of adult cognitive systems over ontogenetic time, whereas comparative studies investigate the origins of human cognition in our evolutionary history. Despite the long tradition of research in both of these areas, little work has examined the intersection of the two: the study of cognitive development in a comparative perspective. In th...

  5. Rat Cardiomyocytes Express a Classical Epithelial Beta-Defensin

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    Annika Linde

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Beta-defensins (BDs are classical epithelial antimicrobial peptides of immediate importance in innate host defense. Since recent studies have suggested that certain BDs are also expressed in non-traditional tissues, including whole heart homogenate and because effector molecules of innate immunity and inflammation can influence the development of certain cardiovascular disease processes, we hypothesized that BDs are produced by cardiomyocytes as a local measure of cardioprotection against danger signals. Here we report that at least one rat beta-defensin, rBD1, is expressed constitutively in cardiomyocytes specifically isolated using position-ablation-laser-microdissection (P.A.L.M. Microlaser Technologies. RT-PCR analysis showed expression of a single 318 bp transcript in adult rat heart (laser-excised cardiomyocytes and H9c2 cells (neonatal rat heart myoblasts. Moreover, the full length cDNA of rBD1 was established and translated into a putative peptide with 69 amino acid residues. The predicted amino acid sequence of the adult rat cardiac BD-1 peptide displayed 99% identity with the previously reported renal rBD1 and 88, 53, 53 and 50% identity with mouse, human, gorilla and rhesus monkey BD1 respectively. Furthermore, structural analysis of the cardiac rBD1 showed the classical six-cysteine conserved motif of the BD family with an alpha-helix and three beta-sheets. Additionally, rBD1 displayed a significantly greater number of amphoteric residues than any of the human analogs, indicating a strong pH functional dependence in the rat. We suggest that rBD1, which was initially believed to be a specific epithelium-derived peptide, may be also involved in local cardiac innate immune defense mechanisms.

  6. Dataset of integrin-linked kinase protein: Protein interactions in cardiomyocytes identified by mass spectrometry

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    Alexandra Traister

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Using hearts from mice overexpressing integrin linked kinase (ILK behind the cardiac specific promoter αMHC, we have performed immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry to identify novel ILK protein:protein interactions that regulate cardiomyocyte activity and calcium flux. Integrin linked kinase complexes were captured from mouse heart lysates using a commercial antibody, with subsequent liquid chromatography tandem mass spectral analysis. Interacting partners were identified using the MASCOT server, and important interactions verified using reverse immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry. All ILK interacting proteins were identified in a non-biased manner, and are stored in the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository (reference ID PRIDE: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD001053. The functional role of identified ILK interactions in cardiomyocyte function and arrhythmia were subsequently confirmed in human iPSC-cardiomyocytes.

  7. What Horses and Humans See: A Comparative Review

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    Jack Murphy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Adaptations of the mammalian eye have tailored each to its own particular ecological niche. On the one hand, it would appear that the horse is best served by a system that can keep “half an eye” on everything, while the human benefits from focussing on more specific aspects of the visual array. By adapting a range of techniques, originally used to assess human visual ability, it has been possible to compare the human visual experience with that of the horse. In general, the results of the majority of these comparative studies indicate that the visual capabilities of the horse are broadly inferior to the human equivalents in acuity, accommodation, and colour vision. However, both the horse and human abilities to judge distance and depth perception may be quite comparable while equine vision is certainly superior to that of human's under scotopic conditions. Individual variation in visual ability, which is routinely taken for granted in humans, is also likely to occur in the horse. Such variation would undoubtedly affect equine performance, particularly in terms of expectation of athletic competitive outcomes in modern equitation. In addition to such considerations as conformation and athletic ability, a detailed assessment of the visual ability might contribute to a more accurate prediction of future performance characteristics in the horse. Although further investigation is required in order to appreciate fully both the capabilities and limitations of the equine visual system, the information currently available should now be considered and applied more rigorously both in the design of the equine environment and in the implementation of contemporary equine training methods. This need is the greatest in areas of equestrian sport where the outcomes of either or both equine and human visual judgements can be critical, the cost of failure often high and occasionally results in fatal consequences for both parties of the horse-human dyad.

  8. Comparative genomics of human stem cell factor (SCF

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    Moein Dehbashi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell factor (SCF is a critical protein with key roles in the cell such as hematopoiesis, gametogenesis and melanogenesis. In the present study a comparative analysis on nucleotide sequences of SCF was performed in Humanoids using bioinformatics tools including NCBI-BLAST, MEGA6, and JBrowse. Our analysis of nucleotide sequences to find closely evolved organisms with high similarity by NCBI-BLAST tools and MEGA6 showed that human and Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes were placed into the same cluster. By using JBrowse, we found that SCF in Neanderthal had a single copy number similar to modern human and partly conserved nucleotide sequences. Together, the results approved the gene flow and genetics similarity of SCF among human and P. troglodytes. This may suggest that during evolution, SCF gene transferred partly intact either on the basis of sequence or function from the same ancestors to P. troglodytes, the ancient human like Neanderthal, and then to the modern human.

  9. Geometry-dependent functional changes in iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes probed by functional imaging and RNA sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaublomme, Jellert; Shekhar, Karthik; Butty, Vincent; Yi, B. Alexander; Kralj, Joel M.; Bloxham, William; Boyer, Laurie A.; Regev, Aviv

    2017-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CM) are a promising platform for cardiac studies in vitro, and possibly for tissue repair in humans. However, hiPSC-CM cells tend to retain morphology, metabolism, patterns of gene expression, and electrophysiology similar to that of embryonic cardiomyocytes. We grew hiPSC-CM in patterned islands of different sizes and shapes, and measured the effect of island geometry on action potential waveform and calcium dynamics using optical recordings of voltage and calcium from 970 islands of different sizes. hiPSC-CM in larger islands showed electrical and calcium dynamics indicative of greater functional maturity. We then compared transcriptional signatures of the small and large islands against a developmental time course of cardiac differentiation. Although island size had little effect on expression of most genes whose levels differed between hiPSC-CM and adult primary CM, we identified a subset of genes for which island size drove the majority (58%) of the changes associated with functional maturation. Finally, we patterned hiPSC-CM on islands with a variety of shapes to probe the relative contributions of soluble factors, electrical coupling, and direct cell-cell contacts to the functional maturation. Collectively, our data show that optical electrophysiology is a powerful tool for assaying hiPSC-CM maturation, and that island size powerfully drives activation of a subset of genes involved in cardiac maturation. PMID:28333933

  10. 人生长素对雌性大鼠心力衰竭心脏重塑及心肌细胞凋亡的影响%Effect of Human Ghrelin on the Cardiac Remodeling and Cardiomyocytes Apoptosis in Heart Failure Female Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙宇泽; 李艳丽; 赵勇; 袁寰; 田国忠; 李梅秀

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of human ghrelin on morphosis and cardiomyocytes apoptosis in heart failure ( HF) rats derived from acute myocardial infarction ( AMI) , so as to explore the cardioprotective activity mechanism of growth hormone releasing-peptides( GHRPs) .Methods Under the monitoring of the electrocardiogram ( ECG) by the multichannel physiological signal collection management system to confirm successfully permanent ligation the left anterior descending coronary artery(LAD) to set up AMI model and then by ultrasound B system to rule out the rats without HF or to make the sham group rats which merely pass through the stylolite beneeth LAD;HF model group rats accept three weeks human ghrelin through tail vein injection, using HE stain technique to analyze the changes of morphosis , the cardiomyocytes apoptosis in HF rats were assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling( TUNEL) .Results TUNEL staining results showed that the cardiomyocytes in rats after permanent LAD ligation aligned ex-tremely irregularly, granular degeneration,swelling,much karyopyknosis and severe interstitial fibrosis,inflammatory cell infiltrate,while in human ghrelin intervention rats, cardiaomyocytes aligned irregularly,swelling and granular degeneration also could be found but without typical karyopyknosis or severe interstitial fibrosis.The cardiomyocytes apoptotic index in HF group rats is significantly higher than that in ghrelin intervention group rats(P<0.05).Conclusion Extrinsic human ghrelin exerted the cardioprotective activities by reducing the cardiomyocytes apoptosis and inhabitting the cardiac remodeling.%目的:研究人ghrelin对急性心肌梗死( acute myocardial infarction,AMI)致心力衰竭( heart failure,HF)大鼠心肌形态结构变化和心肌细胞凋亡的影响,探索生长素释放肽( growth hormone releasing-peptides,GHRPs)心脏保护活性机制。方法经心电图监测成功永久结

  11. Comparative energetics of mammalian locomotion: humans are not different.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, L G; White, C R

    2012-11-01

    Debates about the evolution of human bipedality sometimes include discussion on the energy costs of terrestrial locomotion of extinct and extant hominins. However, comparative analyses of hominin transport costs conducted to date have been limited and potentially misinforming, in part because they fail to consider phylogenetic history. In the present study, we compare the measured costs of pedestrian locomotion in humans and the estimated costs for Australopithecus afarensis (an early bipedal hominin), to a database of locomotory costs for mammals. Using data for 81 species of mammal, we demonstrate significant phylogenetic signal in both log-transformed body mass (logMass) and log-transformed net cost of transport (logNCOT), but no phylogenetic signal in residuals of the relationship between logNCOT and logMass. We then used this relationship to generate a prediction line for NCOT based on body mass, and compared this prediction with published measured data for NCOT of running and walking in humans, and estimated NCOT of walking in A. afarensis. The cost of human walking was 25% lower than predicted, while the cost of running was 27% higher. The cost of A. afarensis walking was 32% lower than predicted. However, all of these data points fall within the 95% prediction interval for mammals, indicating that they are not significantly lower or higher than predicted for other mammals of similar mass. Moreover, the difference between humans and our closest living relative the common chimpanzee is comparable to differences between other similarly closely related species. We therefore conclude that there is no evidence from metabolic data that humans, or A. afarensis, have/had a reduced energy cost of pedestrian locomotion compared to other mammals in general. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of thermal acclimation on action potentials and sarcolemmal K+ channels from Pacific bluefin tuna cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, G L J; Lipnick, M S; Block, B A

    2009-08-01

    To sustain cardiac muscle contractility relatively independent of temperature, some fish species are capable of temporarily altering excitation-contraction coupling processes to meet the demands of their environment. The Pacific bluefin tuna, Thunnus orientalis, is a partially endothermic fish that inhabits a wide range of thermal niches. The present study examined the effects of temperature and thermal acclimation on sarcolemmal K(+) currents and their role in action potential (AP) generation in bluefin tuna cardiomyocytes. Atrial and ventricular myocytes were enzymatically isolated from cold (14 degrees C)- and warm (24 degrees C)-acclimated bluefin tuna. APs and current-voltage relations of K(+) channels were measured using the whole cell current and voltage clamp techniques, respectively. Data were collected either at the cardiomyocytes' respective acclimation temperature of 14 or 24 degrees C or at a common test temperature of 19 degrees C (to reveal the effects of acclimation). AP duration (APD) was prolonged in cold-acclimated (CA) cardiomyocytes tested at 14 degrees C compared with 19 degrees C and in warm-acclimated (WA) cardiomyocytes tested at 19 degrees C compared with 24 degrees C. This effect was mirrored by a decrease in the density of the delayed-rectifier current (I(Kr)), whereas the density of the background inward-rectifier current (I(K1)) was unchanged. When CA and WA cardiomyocytes were tested at a common temperature of 19 degrees C, no significant effects of temperature acclimation on AP shape or duration were observed, whereas I(Kr) density was markedly increased in CA cardiomyocytes. I(K1) density was unaffected in CA ventricular myocytes but was significantly reduced in CA atrial myocytes, resulting in a depolarization of atrial resting membrane potential. Our results indicate the bluefin AP is relatively short compared with other teleosts, which may allow the bluefin heart to function at cold temperatures without the necessity for thermal

  13. The Comparative Diagnostic Features of Canine and Human Lymphoma

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    Davis M. Seelig

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs are a heterogeneous family of lymphoid malignancies that are among the most common neoplasms of both dogs and humans. Owing to shared molecular, signaling, incidence, and pathologic features, there is a strong framework supporting the utilization of canine lymphoma as a comparative, large animal model of human NHL. In alignment with the biologic similarities, the current approach towards the diagnosis and classification of canine lymphoma is based upon the human World Health Organization guidelines. While this approach has contributed to an increasing appreciation of the potential biological scope of canine lymphoma, it has also become apparent that the most appropriate diagnostic philosophy must be multimodal, namely by requiring knowledge of microscopic, immunophenotypic, and clinical features before establishing a final disease diagnosis. This review seeks to illustrate the comparative similarities and differences in the diagnosis of canine lymphoma through the presentation of the microscopic and immunophenotypic features of its most common forms.

  14. Comparative analysis of human and bovine teeth: radiographic density

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    Jefferson Luis Oshiro Tanaka

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Since bovine teeth have been used as substitutes for human teeth in in vitro dental studies, the aim of this study was to compare the radiographic density of bovine teeth with that of human teeth to evaluate their usability for radiographic studies. Thirty bovine and twenty human teeth were cut transversally in 1 millimeter-thick slices. The slices were X-rayed using a digital radiographic system and an intraoral X-ray machine at 65 kVp and 7 mA. The exposure time (0.08 s and the target-sensor distance (40 cm were standardized for all the radiographs. The radiographic densities of the enamel, coronal dentin and radicular dentin of each slice were obtained separately using the "histogram" tool of Adobe Photoshop 7.0 software. The mean radiographic densities of the enamel, coronal dentin and radicular dentin were calculated by the arithmetic mean of the slices of each tooth. One-way ANOVA demonstrated statistically significant differences for the densities of bovine and human enamel (p 0.05. Based on the results, the authors concluded that: a the radiographic density of bovine enamel is significantly higher than that of human enamel; b the radiodensity of bovine coronal dentin is statistically lower than the radiodensity of human coronal dentin; bovine radicular dentin is also less radiodense than human radicular dentin, although this difference was not statistically significant; c bovine teeth should be used with care in radiographic in vitro studies.

  15. Decreased inward rectifier potassium current IK1 in dystrophin-deficient ventricular cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubi, Lena; Koenig, Xaver; Kubista, Helmut; Todt, Hannes; Hilber, Karlheinz

    2017-03-04

    Kir2.x channels in ventricular cardiomyocytes (most prominently Kir2.1) account for the inward rectifier potassium current IK1, which controls the resting membrane potential and the final phase of action potential repolarization. Recently it was hypothesized that the dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC) is important in the regulation of Kir2.x channels. To test this hypothesis, we investigated potential IK1 abnormalities in dystrophin-deficient ventricular cardiomyocytes derived from the hearts of Duchenne muscular dystrophy mouse models. We found that IK1 was substantially diminished in dystrophin-deficient cardiomyocytes when compared to wild type myocytes. This finding represents the first functional evidence for a significant role of the DAPC in the regulation of Kir2.x channels.

  16. Cardiomyocyte Marker Expression in Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts by Cell-Free Cardiomyocyte Extract and Epigenetic Manipulation

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    Tahereh Talaei-Khozani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The regenerative capacity of the mammalian heart is quite limited. Recent reports have focused on reprogramming mesenchymal stem cells into cardiomyocytes. We investigated whether fibroblasts could transdifferentiate into myocardium. Methods: Mouse embryonic fibroblasts were treated with Trichostatin A (TSA and 5-Aza-2-Deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC. The treated cells were permeabilized with streptolysin O and exposed to the mouse cardiomyocyte extract and cultured for 1, 10, and 21 days. Cardiomyocyte markers were detected by immunohistochemistry. Alkaline phosphatase activity and OCT4 were also detected in cells treated by chromatin-modifying agents. Results: The cells exposed to a combination of 5-aza-dC and TSA and permeabilized in the presence of the cardiomyocyte extract showed morphological changes. The cells were unable to express cardiomyocyte markers after 24 h. Immunocytochemical assays showed a notable degree of myosin heavy chain and α-actinin expressions after 10 days. The expression of the natriuretic factor and troponin T occurred after 21 days in these cells. The cells exposed to chromatin-modifying agents also expressed cardiomyocyte markers; however, the proportion of reprogrammed cells was clearly smaller than that in the cultures exposed to 5-aza-dC , TSA, and extract. Conclusion: It seems that the fibroblasts were able to eliminate the previous epigenetic markers and form new ones according to the factors existing in the extract. Since no beating was observed, at least up to 21 days, the cells may need an appropriate extracellular matrix for their function.

  17. ADAM10 modulates calcitriol-regulated RAGE in cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ting-Wei; Kao, Yu-Hsun; Lee, Ting-I; Chen, Yi-Jen

    2017-09-01

    Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) signalling plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Calcitriol modulates cardiac RAGE expression. This study explored the mechanisms underlying the effect of calcitriol on RAGE and soluble RAGE (sRAGE) expression in cardiomyocytes. Western blot, ELISA, fluorometric assay and PCR analyses were used to evaluate the RAGE, sRAGE, endogenous secretory RAGE (esRAGE), Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10) expression and enzyme activity in HL-1 atrial myocytes without and with calcitriol (10 and 100 nM), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) inhibitor (50 μg/mL), or ADAM10 inhibitor (5 μM) incubation for 48 h. Calcitriol (10 nM) significantly reduced RAGE protein expression and increased sRAGE concentrations in HL-1 cardiomyocytes compared with control cells. These changes were associated with increased protein expression and enzyme activity of ADAM10 and higher mRNA expression of esRAGE. In the presence of ADAM10 inhibitor, however, the suppressive effect of calcitriol on RAGE was diminished. Methylglyoxal (500 μM for 10 min)-mediated JNK phosphorylation was attenuated in the presence of calcitriol (10 nM). Moreover, control and NF-κB inhibitor-treated HL-1 cells had similar RAGE and sRAGE expression, suggesting that calcitriol-mediated RAGE modulation was independent of NF-κB signalling. We showed that RAGE downregulation and increased sRAGE production by calcitriol were mediated through ADAM10 activation in cardiomyocytes. The results suggest that calcitriol has therapeutic potential in treating RAGE-mediated cardiovascular complications. © 2017 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  18. Comparative Aspects of Osteosarcoma Pathogenesis in Humans and Dogs

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    Timothy M. Fan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma (OS is a primary and aggressive bone sarcoma affecting the skeleton of two principal species, human beings and canines. The biologic behavior of OS is conserved between people and dogs, and evidence suggests that fundamental discoveries in OS biology can be facilitated through detailed and comparative studies. In particular, the relative genetic homogeneity associated with specific dog breeds can provide opportunities to facilitate the discovery of key genetic drivers involved in OS pathogenesis, which, to-date, remain elusive. In this review, known causative factors that predispose to the development OS in human beings and dogs are summarized in detail. Based upon the commonalities shared in OS pathogenesis, it is likely that foundational discoveries in one species will be translationally relevant to the other and emphasizes the unique opportunities that might be gained through comparative scientific approaches.

  19. Fructose modulates cardiomyocyte excitation-contraction coupling and Ca²⁺ handling in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, Kimberley M; Bell, James R; Wendt, Igor R; Davidoff, Amy J; Ritchie, Rebecca H; Delbridge, Lea M D

    2011-01-01

    High dietary fructose has structural and metabolic cardiac impact, but the potential for fructose to exert direct myocardial action is uncertain. Cardiomyocyte functional responsiveness to fructose, and capacity to transport fructose has not been previously demonstrated. The aim of the present study was to seek evidence of fructose-induced modulation of cardiomyocyte excitation-contraction coupling in an acute, in vitro setting. The functional effects of fructose on isolated adult rat cardiomyocyte contractility and Ca²⁺ handling were evaluated under physiological conditions (37°C, 2 mM Ca²⁺, HEPES buffer, 4 Hz stimulation) using video edge detection and microfluorimetry (Fura2) methods. Compared with control glucose (11 mM) superfusate, 2-deoxyglucose (2 DG, 11 mM) substitution prolonged both the contraction and relaxation phases of the twitch (by 16 and 36% respectively, pfructose supplementation (11 mM). Similarly, fructose prevented the Ca²⁺ transient delay induced by exposure to 2 DG (time to peak Ca²⁺ transient: 2 DG: 29.0±2.1 ms vs. glucose: 23.6±1.1 ms vs. fructose +2 DG: 23.7±1.0 ms; pfructose transporter, GLUT5 (Slc2a5) was demonstrated in ventricular cardiomyocytes using real time RT-PCR and this was confirmed by conventional RT-PCR. This is the first demonstration of an acute influence of fructose on cardiomyocyte excitation-contraction coupling. The findings indicate cardiomyocyte capacity to transport and functionally utilize exogenously supplied fructose. This study provides the impetus for future research directed towards characterizing myocardial fructose metabolism and understanding how long term high fructose intake may contribute to modulating cardiac function.

  20. Fructose modulates cardiomyocyte excitation-contraction coupling and Ca²⁺ handling in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberley M Mellor

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High dietary fructose has structural and metabolic cardiac impact, but the potential for fructose to exert direct myocardial action is uncertain. Cardiomyocyte functional responsiveness to fructose, and capacity to transport fructose has not been previously demonstrated. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to seek evidence of fructose-induced modulation of cardiomyocyte excitation-contraction coupling in an acute, in vitro setting. METHODS AND RESULTS: The functional effects of fructose on isolated adult rat cardiomyocyte contractility and Ca²⁺ handling were evaluated under physiological conditions (37°C, 2 mM Ca²⁺, HEPES buffer, 4 Hz stimulation using video edge detection and microfluorimetry (Fura2 methods. Compared with control glucose (11 mM superfusate, 2-deoxyglucose (2 DG, 11 mM substitution prolonged both the contraction and relaxation phases of the twitch (by 16 and 36% respectively, p<0.05 and this effect was completely abrogated with fructose supplementation (11 mM. Similarly, fructose prevented the Ca²⁺ transient delay induced by exposure to 2 DG (time to peak Ca²⁺ transient: 2 DG: 29.0±2.1 ms vs. glucose: 23.6±1.1 ms vs. fructose +2 DG: 23.7±1.0 ms; p<0.05. The presence of the fructose transporter, GLUT5 (Slc2a5 was demonstrated in ventricular cardiomyocytes using real time RT-PCR and this was confirmed by conventional RT-PCR. CONCLUSION: This is the first demonstration of an acute influence of fructose on cardiomyocyte excitation-contraction coupling. The findings indicate cardiomyocyte capacity to transport and functionally utilize exogenously supplied fructose. This study provides the impetus for future research directed towards characterizing myocardial fructose metabolism and understanding how long term high fructose intake may contribute to modulating cardiac function.

  1. Uptake of triiodothyronine and triiodothyroacetic acid in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes: effects of metabolites and analogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.A. Verhoeven; H.H. van der Putten; G. Hennemann; J.M.J. Lamers (Jos); T.J. Visser (Theo); M.E. Everts (Maria)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractCellular and nuclear uptake of [125I]tri-iodothyronine (T3) and [125I]triiodothyroacetic acid (Triac) were compared in cardiomyocytes of 2-3 day old rats, and the effect of thyroid hormone analogs on cellular T(3) uptake was measured. Cells (5-10 x 10(5) per well) were

  2. Analysis of cardiomyocyte movement in the developing murine heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Hisayuki [Department of Cardiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Yuasa, Shinsuke, E-mail: yuasa@a8.keio.jp [Department of Cardiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Tabata, Hidenori [Department of Anatomy, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Tohyama, Shugo; Seki, Tomohisa; Egashira, Toru; Hayashiji, Nozomi; Hattori, Fumiyuki; Kusumoto, Dai; Kunitomi, Akira; Takei, Makoto; Kashimura, Shin; Yozu, Gakuto; Shimojima, Masaya; Motoda, Chikaaki; Muraoka, Naoto [Department of Cardiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Nakajima, Kazunori [Department of Anatomy, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Miyawaki, Atsushi [Life Function and Dynamics, ERATO, JST, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Laboratory for Cell Function and Dynamics, Advanced Technology Development Group, Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Fukuda, Keiichi [Department of Cardiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-09-04

    The precise assemblage of several types of cardiac precursors controls heart organogenesis. The cardiac precursors show dynamic movement during early development and then form the complicated heart structure. However, cardiomyocyte movements inside the newly organized mammalian heart remain unclear. We previously established the method of ex vivo time-lapse imaging of the murine heart to study cardiomyocyte behavior by using the Fucci (fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator) system, which can effectively label individual G1, S/G2/M, and G1/S-transition phase nuclei in living cardiomyocytes as red, green, and yellow, respectively. Global analysis of gene expression in Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes confirmed that cell cycle regulatory genes expressed in G1/S, S, G2/M, and M phase transitions were upregulated. Interestingly, pathway analysis revealed that many genes related to the cell cycle were significantly upregulated in the Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes, while only a small number of genes related to cell motility were upregulated. Time-lapse imaging showed that murine proliferating cardiomyocytes did not exhibit dynamic movement inside the heart, but stayed on site after entering the cell cycle. - Highlights: • We directly visualized cardiomyocyte movement inside the developing murine heart. • Cell cycle related genes were upregulated in the proliferating cardiomyocytes. • Time-lapse imaging revealed that proliferating murine cardiomyocytes stayed in place. • Murine ventricular cardiomyocytes proliferate on site during development.

  3. Comparative expression pathway analysis of human and canine mammary tumors

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    Marconato Laura

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spontaneous tumors in dog have been demonstrated to share many features with their human counterparts, including relevant molecular targets, histological appearance, genetics, biological behavior and response to conventional treatments. Mammary tumors in dog therefore provide an attractive alternative to more classical mouse models, such as transgenics or xenografts, where the tumour is artificially induced. To assess the extent to which dog tumors represent clinically significant human phenotypes, we performed the first genome-wide comparative analysis of transcriptional changes occurring in mammary tumors of the two species, with particular focus on the molecular pathways involved. Results We analyzed human and dog gene expression data derived from both tumor and normal mammary samples. By analyzing the expression levels of about ten thousand dog/human orthologous genes we observed a significant overlap of genes deregulated in the mammary tumor samples, as compared to their normal counterparts. Pathway analysis of gene expression data revealed a great degree of similarity in the perturbation of many cancer-related pathways, including the 'PI3K/AKT', 'KRAS', 'PTEN', 'WNT-beta catenin' and 'MAPK cascade'. Moreover, we show that the transcriptional relationships between different gene signatures observed in human breast cancer are largely maintained in the canine model, suggesting a close interspecies similarity in the network of cancer signalling circuitries. Conclusion Our data confirm and further strengthen the value of the canine mammary cancer model and open up new perspectives for the evaluation of novel cancer therapeutics and the development of prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers to be used in clinical studies.

  4. Advanced Ring-Shaped Microelectrode Assay Combined with Small Rectangular Electrode for Quasi-In vivo Measurement of Cell-to-Cell Conductance in Cardiomyocyte Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Fumimasa; Kaneko, Tomoyuki; Hamada, Tomoyo; Hattori, Akihiro; Yasuda, Kenji

    2013-06-01

    To predict the risk of fatal arrhythmia induced by cardiotoxicity in the highly complex human heart system, we have developed a novel quasi-in vivo electrophysiological measurement assay, which combines a ring-shaped human cardiomyocyte network and a set of two electrodes that form a large single ring-shaped electrode for the direct measurement of irregular cell-to-cell conductance occurrence in a cardiomyocyte network, and a small rectangular microelectrode for forced pacing of cardiomyocyte beating and for acquiring the field potential waveforms of cardiomyocytes. The advantages of this assay are as follows. The electrophysiological signals of cardiomyocytes in the ring-shaped network are superimposed directly on a single loop-shaped electrode, in which the information of asynchronous behavior of cell-to-cell conductance are included, without requiring a set of huge numbers of microelectrode arrays, a set of fast data conversion circuits, or a complex analysis in a computer. Another advantage is that the small rectangular electrode can control the position and timing of forced beating in a ring-shaped human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPS)-derived cardiomyocyte network and can also acquire the field potentials of cardiomyocytes. First, we constructed the human iPS-derived cardiomyocyte ring-shaped network on the set of two electrodes, and acquired the field potential signals of particular cardiomyocytes in the ring-shaped cardiomyocyte network during simultaneous acquisition of the superimposed signals of whole-cardiomyocyte networks representing cell-to-cell conduction. Using the small rectangular electrode, we have also evaluated the response of the cell network to electrical stimulation. The mean and SD of the minimum stimulation voltage required for pacing (VMin) at the small rectangular electrode was 166+/-74 mV, which is the same as the magnitude of amplitude for the pacing using the ring-shaped electrode (179+/-33 mV). The results showed that the

  5. Comparative histology of mouse, rat, and human pelvic ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaga, Ritsuko; Orlicky, David J; Arnett, Jameson; Guess, Marsha K; Hurt, K Joseph; Connell, Kathleen A

    2016-11-01

    The uterosacral (USL) and cardinal ligaments (CL) provide support to the uterus and pelvic organs, and the round ligaments (RL) maintain their position in the pelvis. In women with pelvic organ prolapse (POP), the connective tissue, smooth muscle, vasculature, and innervation of the pelvic support structures are altered. Rodents are commonly used animal models for POP research. However, the pelvic ligaments have not been defined in these animals. In this study, we hypothesized that the gross anatomy and histological composition of pelvic ligaments in rodents and humans are similar. We performed an extensive literature search for anatomical and histological descriptions of the pelvic support ligaments in rodents. We also performed anatomical dissections of the pelvis to define anatomical landmarks in relation to the ligaments. In addition, we identified the histological components of the pelvic ligaments and performed quantitative analysis of the smooth muscle bundles and connective tissue of the USL and RL. The anatomy of the USL, CL, and RL and their anatomical landmarks are similar in mice, rats, and humans. All species contain the same cellular components and have similar histological architecture. However, the cervical portion of the mouse USL and RL contain more smooth muscle and less connective tissue compared with rat and human ligaments. The pelvic support structures of rats and mice are anatomically and histologically similar to those of humans. We propose that both mice and rats are appropriate, cost-effective models for directed studies in POP research.

  6. Elastic interactions synchronize beating in cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Ohad; Safran, Samuel A

    2016-07-13

    Motivated by recent experimental results, we study theoretically the synchronization of the beating phase and frequency of two nearby cardiomyocyte cells. Each cell is represented as an oscillating force dipole in an infinite, viscoelastic medium and the propagation of the elastic signal within the medium is predicted. We examine the steady-state beating of two nearby cells, and show that elastic interactions result in forces that synchronize the phase and frequency of beating in a manner that depends on their mutual orientation. The theory predicts both in-phase and anti-phase steady-state beating depending on the relative cell orientations, as well as how synchronized beating varies with substrate elasticity and the inter-cell distance. These results suggest how mechanics plays a role in cardiac efficiency, and may be relevant for the design of cardiomyocyte based micro devices and other biomedical applications.

  7. The impact of caffeine on connexin expression in the embryonic chick cardiomyocyte micromass culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahir, Bhavesh K; Pratten, Margaret K

    2016-07-01

    Cardiomyocytes are electrically coupled by gap junctions, defined as clusters of low-resistance multisubunit transmembrane channels composed of connexins (Cxs). The expression of Cx40, Cx43 and Cx45, which are present in cardiomyocytes, is known to be developmentally regulated. This study investigates the premise that alterations in gap junction proteins are one of the mechanisms by which teratogens may act. Specifically, those molecules known to be teratogenic in humans could cause their effects via disruption of cell-to-cell communication pathways, resulting in an inability to co-ordinate tissue development. Caffeine significantly inhibited contractile activity at concentrations above and including 1500 μm (P caffeine on key cardiac gap junction protein (Cx40, Cx43 and Cx45) expression were analysed using immunocytochemistry and in-cell Western blotting. The results indicated that caffeine altered the expression pattern of Cx40, Cx43 and Cx45 at non-cytotoxic concentrations (≥2000 μm), i.e., at concentrations that did not affect total cell protein and cell viability. In addition the effects of caffeine on cardiomyocyte formation and function (contractile activity score) were correlated with modulation of Cxs (Cx40, Cx43 and Cx45) expression, at above and including 2000 μm caffeine concentrations (P < 0.05). These experiments provide evidence that embryonic chick cardiomyocyte micromass culture may be a useful in vitro method for mechanistic studies of perturbation of embryonic heart development. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. 2D and 3D Self-Assembling Nanofiber Hydrogels for Cardiomyocyte Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liisa Ikonen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Collagen is a widely used biomaterial in cardiac tissue engineering studies. However, as a natural material, it suffers from variability between batches that can complicate the standardization of culture conditions. In contrast, synthetic materials are modifiable, have well-defined structures and more homogeneous batches can be produced. In this study, several collagen-like synthetic self-assembling nanofiber hydrogels were examined for their suitability for cardiomyocyte culture in 2D and 3D. Six different nanofiber coatings were used in the 2D format with neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCs and human embryonic stem-cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs. The viability, growth, and functionality of the 2D-cultured cardiomyocytes were evaluated. The best-performing nanofiber coatings were selected for 3D experiments. Hydrophilic pH-sensitive nanofiber hydrogel coassembled with hyaluronic acid performed best with both NRCs and hESC-CMs. Hydrophilic non-pH-sensitive nanofiber hydrogels supported the growth of NRCs; however, their ability to promote attachment and growth of hESC-CMs was limited. NRCs also grew on hydrophobic nanofiber hydrogels; however, the cell-supporting capacity of these hydrogels was inferior to that of the hydrophilic hydrogel materials. This is the first study demonstrating that hydrophilic self-assembling nanofiber hydrogels support the culture of both NRCs and hESC-CMs, which suggests that these biomaterials hold promise for cardiac tissue engineering.

  9. Human-mouse comparative genomics: successes and failures to reveal functional regions of the human genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Baroukh, Nadine; Rubin, Edward M.

    2003-05-15

    Deciphering the genetic code embedded within the human genome remains a significant challenge despite the human genome consortium's recent success at defining its linear sequence (Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001). While useful strategies exist to identify a large percentage of protein encoding regions, efforts to accurately define functional sequences in the remaining {approx}97 percent of the genome lag. Our primary interest has been to utilize the evolutionary relationship and the universal nature of genomic sequence information in vertebrates to reveal functional elements in the human genome. This has been achieved through the combined use of vertebrate comparative genomics to pinpoint highly conserved sequences as candidates for biological activity and transgenic mouse studies to address the functionality of defined human DNA fragments. Accordingly, we describe strategies and insights into functional sequences in the human genome through the use of comparative genomics coupled wit h functional studies in the mouse.

  10. Metabolites of Hypoxic Cardiomyocytes Induce the Migration of Cardiac Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Huairui; Zhang, Xuehong; He, Zekun; Wu, Zhiyong; Rao, Liya; Li, Yushu

    2017-01-01

    The migration of cardiac fibroblasts to the infarct region plays a major role in the repair process after myocardial necrosis or damage. However, few studies investigated whether early hypoxia in cardiomyocytes induces the migration of cardiac fibroblasts. The purpose of this study was to assess the role of metabolites of early hypoxic cardiomyocytes in the induction of cardiac fibroblast migration. Neonatal rat heart tissue was digested with a mixture of trypsin and collagenase at an appropriate ratio. Cardiomyocytes and cardiac fibroblasts were cultured via differential adhesion. The cardiomyocyte cultures were subjected to hypoxia for 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 h. The supernatants of the cardiomyocyte cultures were collected to determine the differences in cardiac fibroblast migration induced by hypoxic cardiomyocyte metabolites at various time points using a Transwell apparatus. Meanwhile, ELISA was performed to measure TNF-α, IL-1β and TGF-β expression levels in the cardiomyocyte metabolites at various time points. The metabolites of hypoxic cardiomyocytes significantly induced the migration of cardiac fibroblasts. The induction of cardiac fibroblast migration was significantly enhanced by cardiomyocyte metabolites in comparison to the control after 2, 4, and 6 h of hypoxia, and the effect was most significant after 2 h. The expression levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and TGF-β were substantially increased in the metabolites of cardiomyocytes, and neutralization with anti-TNF-α and anti-IL-1β antibodies markedly reduced the induction of cardiac fibroblast migration by the metabolites of hypoxic cardiomyocytes. The metabolites of early hypoxic cardiomyocytes can induce the migration of cardiac fibroblasts, and TNF-α and IL-1β may act as the initial chemotactic inducers. © 2017 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

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  6. Highly efficient derivation of ventricular cardiomyocytes from induced pluripotent stem cells with a distinct epigenetic signature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huansheng Xu; Ibrahim J Domian; Erding Hu; Robert Willette; John Lepore; Alexander Meissner; Zhong Wang; Kenneth R Chien; B Alexander Yi; Hao Wu; Christoph Bock; Hongcang Gu; Kathy O Lui; Joo-Hye C Park; Ying Shao; Alyssa K Riley

    2012-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes derived from pluripotent stem cells can be applied in drug testing,disease modeling and cellbased therapy.However,without procardiogenic growth factors,the efficiency of cardiomyogenesis from pluripotent stem cells is usually low and the resulting cardiomyocyte population is heterogeneous.Here,we demonstrate that induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be derived from murine ventricular myocytes (VMs),and consistent with other reports of iPSCs derived from various somatic cell types,VM-derived iPSCs (ViPSCs) exhibit a markedly higher propensity to spontaneously differentiate into beating cardiomyocytes as compared to genetically matched embryonic stem cells (ESCs) or iPSCs derived from tail-tip fibroblasts.Strikingly,the majority of ViPSC-derived cardiomyocytes display a ventricular phenotype.The enhanced ventricular myogenesis in ViPSCs is mediated via increased numbers of cardiovascular progenitors at early stages of differentiation.In order to investigate the mechanism of enhanced ventricular myogenesis from ViPSCs,we performed global gene expression and DNA methylation analysis,which revealed a distinct epigenetic signature that may be involved in specifying the VM fate in pluripotent stem cells.

  7. Human Rights and Education. Comparative & International Education Series, Volume 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrow, Norma Bernstein, Ed.

    This book discusses the relationship between human rights and education. Education is discussed both within the context of human rights, and as the ultimate sanction and guarantee of all human rights. Part 1, "Education as a Human Right," is comprised of the following chapters: (1) "Human Rights and Education: An Overview" (D.…

  8. Role of microRNA-195 in cardiomyocyte apoptosis induced by myocardial ischaemia–reperfusion injury

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chang-Kui Gao; Hui Liu; Cheng-Ji Cui; Zhao-Guang Liang; Hong Yao; Ye Tian

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to investigate microRNA-195 (miR-195) expression in myocardial ischaemia–reperfusion (I/R) injury and the roles of miR-195 in cardiomyocyte apoptosis though targeting Bcl-2. A mouse model of I/R injury was established. MiR-195 expression levels were detected by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR), and the cardiomyocyte apoptosis was detected by TUNEL assay. After cardiomyocytes isolated from neonatal rats and transfected with miR-195 mimic or inhibitor, the hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) injury model was established. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis and mitochondrial membrane potential were evaluated using flow cytometry. Bcl-2 and Bax mRNA expressions were detected by RT-PCR. Bcl-2, Bax and cytochrome c (Cyt-c) protein levels were determined by Western blot. Caspase-3 and caspase-9 activities were assessed by luciferase assay. Compared with the sham group, miR-195 expression levels and rate of cardiomyocyte apoptosis increased significantly in I/R group (both < 0.05). Compared to H/R + negative control (NC) group, rate of cardiomyocyte apoptosis increased in H/R + miR-195 mimic group while decreased in H/R + miR-195 inhibitor group (both < 0.05). MiR-195 knockdown alleviated the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential ( < 0.05). MiR-195 overexpression decreased Bcl-2 mRNA and protein expression, increased BaxmRNA and protein expression, Cyt-c protein expression and caspase-3 and caspase-9 activities (all < 0.05). While, downregulated MiR-195 increased Bcl-2 mRNA and protein expression, decreased Bax mRNA and protein expression, Cyt-c protein expression and caspase-3 and caspase-9 activities (all < 0.05). Our study identified that miR-195 expression was upregulated in myocardial I/R injury, and miR-195 overexpression may promote cardiomyocyte apoptosis by targeting Bcl-2 and inducing mitochondrial apoptotic pathway.

  9. High throughput physiological screening of iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Álamo, Juan C; Lemons, Derek; Serrano, Ricardo; Savchenko, Alex; Cerignoli, Fabio; Bodmer, Rolf; Mercola, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac drug discovery is hampered by the reliance on non-human animal and cellular models with inadequate throughput and physiological fidelity to accurately identify new targets and test novel therapeutic strategies. Similarly, adverse drug effects on the heart are challenging to model, contributing to costly failure of drugs during development and even after market launch. Human induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiac tissue represents a potentially powerful means to model aspects of heart physiology relevant to disease and adverse drug effects, providing both the human context and throughput needed to improve the efficiency of drug development. Here we review emerging technologies for high throughput measurements of cardiomyocyte physiology, and comment on the promises and challenges of using iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes to model disease and introduce the human context into early stages of drug discovery. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  10. TGF-β receptor type II costameric localization in cardiomyocytes and host cell TGF-β response is disrupted by Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, Claudia Magalhães; Silva, Tatiana Araújo; DE Melo, Tatiana Galvão; DE Araújo-Jorge, Tânia Cremonini; Pereira, Mirian Claudia DE Souza

    2016-05-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) cytokine is involved in Chagas disease establishment and progression. Since Trypanosoma cruzi can modulate host cell receptors, we analysed the TGF-β receptor type II (TβRII) expression and distribution during T. cruzi - cardiomyocyte interaction. TβRII immunofluorescent staining revealed a striated organization in cardiomyocytes, which was co-localized with vinculin costameres and enhanced (38%) after TGF-β treatment. Cytochalasin D induced a decrease of 45·3% in the ratio of cardiomyocytes presenting TβRII striations, demonstrating an association of TβRII with the cytoskeleton. Western blot analysis showed that cytochalasin D significantly inhibited Smad 2 phosphorylation and fibronectin stimulation after TGF-β treatment in cardiomyocytes. Trypanosoma cruzi infection elicited a decrease of 79·8% in the frequency of cardiomyocytes presenting TβRII striations, but did not interfere significantly in its expression. In addition, T. cruzi-infected cardiomyocytes present a lower response to exogenous TGF-β, showing no enhancement of TβRII striations and a reduction of phosphorylated Smad 2, with no significant difference in TβRII expression when compared to uninfected cells. Together, these results suggest that the co-localization of TβRII with costameres is important in activating the TGF-β signalling cascade, and that T. cruzi-derived cytoskeleton disorganization could result in altered or low TGF-β response in infected cardiomyocytes.

  11. Comparative Proteome Analysis of Human Lung Squamous Carcinoma Tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Cui; TANG Can'e; DUAN Chaojun; YI Hong; XIAO Zhiqiang; CHEN Zhuchu

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To establish the two-dimensional electrophoresis profiles with high resolution and reproducibility from human lung squamous carcinoma tissue and paired normal tumor-adjacent bronchial epithelial tissue, and to identify differential expression tumor-associated proteins by using proteome analysis. Methods: Comparative proteome analysis with 20 human lung squamous carcinoma tissues and the paired normal bronchial epithelial tissues adjacent to tumors was carried out. The total proteins of human lung squamous carcinoma tissue and paired normal tumor-adjacent bronchial epithelial tissue were separated by means of immobilized pH gradient-based two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and silver staining. The differential expression proteins were analyzed and then identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Results: (1) Well-resolved, reproducible 2-DE patterns of human lung squamous carcinoma and adjacent normal bronchial epithelial tissues were obtained. For tumor tissue, average spots of 3 gels were 1567±46, and 1436±54 spots were matched with an average matching rate of 91.6%. For control, average spots of 3 gels were 1349±58, and 1228±35 spots were matched with an average matching rate of 91.03%. The average position deviation of matched spots was 0.924±0.128 mm in IEF direction, and 1.022±0.205 mm in SDS-PAGE direction; (2)A total of 1178±56 spots were matched between the electrophoretic maps of 20 human lung squamous carcinoma tissues and paired normal tumor-adjacent bronchial epithelial tissues. Seventy-six differentially expressed proteins were screened; (3) Sixty-eight differential proteins were identified by PMF, some proteins were the products of oncogenes, and others involved in the regulation of cell cycle and signal transduction;(4) In order to validate the reliability of the identified results, the expression of 3 proteins mdm2, c-jun and EGFR, which was correlated with lung

  12. SarcOptiM for ImageJ: high-frequency online sarcomere length computing on stimulated cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualin, Côme; Gannier, François; Yu, Angèle; Malécot, Claire O; Bredeloux, Pierre; Maupoil, Véronique

    2016-08-01

    Accurate measurement of cardiomyocyte contraction is a critical issue for scientists working on cardiac physiology and physiopathology of diseases implying contraction impairment. Cardiomyocytes contraction can be quantified by measuring sarcomere length, but few tools are available for this, and none is freely distributed. We developed a plug-in (SarcOptiM) for the ImageJ/Fiji image analysis platform developed by the National Institutes of Health. SarcOptiM computes sarcomere length via fast Fourier transform analysis of video frames captured or displayed in ImageJ and thus is not tied to a dedicated video camera. It can work in real time or offline, the latter overcoming rotating motion or displacement-related artifacts. SarcOptiM includes a simulator and video generator of cardiomyocyte contraction. Acquisition parameters, such as pixel size and camera frame rate, were tested with both experimental recordings of rat ventricular cardiomyocytes and synthetic videos. It is freely distributed, and its source code is available. It works under Windows, Mac, or Linux operating systems. The camera speed is the limiting factor, since the algorithm can compute online sarcomere shortening at frame rates >10 kHz. In conclusion, SarcOptiM is a free and validated user-friendly tool for studying cardiomyocyte contraction in all species, including human.

  13. Garlic extracts prevent oxidative stress, hypertrophy and apoptosis in cardiomyocytes: a role for nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Xavier Lieben; Murphy, Ryan; Thandapilly, Sijo Joseph; Yu, Liping; Netticadan, Thomas

    2012-08-29

    In ancient times, plants were recognized for their medicinal properties. Later, the arrival of synthetic drugs pushed it to the backstage. However, from being merely used for food, plants are now been widely explored for their therapeutic value. The current study explores the potential of skin and flesh extracts from a hard-necked Rocambole variety of purple garlic in preventing cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and cell death. Norepinephrine (NE) was used to induce hypertrophy in adult rat cardiomyocytes pretreated with garlic skin and flesh extracts. Cell death was measured as ratio of rod to round shaped cardiomyocytes. Fluorescent probes were used to measure apoptosis and oxidative stress in cardiomyocytes treated with and without extracts and NE. Pharmacological blockade of nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H₂S) were used to elucidate the mechanism of action of garlic extracts. Garlic extract samples were also tested for alliin and allicin concentrations. Exposure of cardiomyocytes to NE induced an increase in cell size and cell death; this increase was significantly prevented upon treatment with garlic skin and flesh extracts. Norepinephrine increased apoptosis and oxidative stress in cardiomyocytes which was prevented upon pretreatment with skin and flesh extracts; NO, and H₂S blockers significantly inhibited this beneficial effect. Allicin and alliin concentration were significantly higher in garlic flesh extract when compared to the skin extract. These results suggest that both skin and flesh garlic extracts are effective in preventing NE induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and cell death. Reduction in oxidative stress may also play an important role in the anti-hypertrophic and anti-apoptotic properties of garlic extracts. These beneficial effects may in part be mediated by NO and H₂S.

  14. Comparative in Vitro Research of the Human Aortic Bioprosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawidowska K.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Evaluate of the usefulness and reliability of structures based on the analysis of recorded parameters determining the flow through the Human Aortic Bioprosthesis (HAB have been dealt with. By flow parameters changes determining the performance environment of prosthesis analyzed change of the motion dynamics of the valve leaflets as a function of pressure, thereby determining the degree of alignment of the prosthesis to the performance conditions. Based on the gathered measurement data a comparative analysis of flow rate valve prostheses for different frequency values of the piston pump imitating the heart, different ejection capacity and pressure conditioning work environment prosthesis were studied. Interpretation of the recorded image gave the basis for determining the Effective Orifice Area (EOC.

  15. The soluble guanylyl cyclase activator bay 58-2667 selectively limits cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer C Irvine

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although evidence now suggests cGMP is a negative regulator of cardiac hypertrophy, the direct consequences of the soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC activator BAY 58-2667 on cardiac remodeling, independent of changes in hemodynamic load, has not been investigated. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the NO(•-independent sGC activator BAY 58-2667 inhibits cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in vitro. Concomitant impact of BAY 58-2667 on cardiac fibroblast proliferation, and insights into potential mechanisms of action, were also sought. Results were compared to the sGC stimulator BAY 41-2272. METHODS: Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were incubated with endothelin-1 (ET(1, 60nmol/L in the presence and absence of BAY 41-2272 and BAY 58-2667 (0.01-0.3 µmol/L. Hypertrophic responses and its triggers, as well as cGMP signaling, were determined. The impact of both sGC ligands on basal and stimulated cardiac fibroblast proliferation in vitro was also determined. RESULTS: We now demonstrate that BAY 58-2667 (0.01-0.3 µmol/L elicited concentration-dependent antihypertrophic actions, inhibiting ET(1-mediated increases in cardiomyocyte 2D area and de novo protein synthesis, as well as suppressing ET(1-induced cardiomyocyte superoxide generation. This was accompanied by potent increases in cardiomyocyte cGMP accumulation and activity of its downstream signal, vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP, without elevating cardiomyocyte cAMP. In contrast, submicromolar concentrations of BAY 58-2667 had no effect on basal or stimulated cardiac fibroblast proliferation. Indeed, only at concentrations ≥10 µmol/L was inhibition of cardiac fibrosis seen in vitro. The effects of BAY 58-2667 in both cell types were mimicked by BAY 41-2272. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that BAY 58-2667 elicits protective, cardiomyocyte-selective effects in vitro. These actions are associated with sGC activation and are evident in the absence of confounding

  16. A non-destructive culturing and cell sorting method for cardiomyocytes and neurons using a double alginate layer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyuki Terazono

    Full Text Available A non-destructive method of collecting cultured cells after identifying their in situ functional characteristics is proposed. In this method, cells are cultivated on an alginate layer in a culture dish and released by spot application of a calcium chelate buffer that locally melts the alginate layer and enables the collection of cultured cells at the single-cell level. Primary hippocampal neurons, beating human embryonic stem (hES cell-derived cardiomyocytes, and beating hES cell-derived cardiomyocyte clusters cultivated on an alginate layer were successfully released and collected with a micropipette. The collected cells were recultured while maintaining their physiological function, including beating, and elongated neurites. These results suggest that the proposed method may eventually facilitate the transplantation of ES- or iPS-derived cardiomyocytes and neurons differentiated in culture.

  17. Intrinsic-mediated caspase activation is essential for cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putinski, Charis; Abdul-Ghani, Mohammad; Stiles, Rebecca; Brunette, Steve; Dick, Sarah A.; Fernando, Pasan; Megeney, Lynn A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiomyocyte hypertrophy is the cellular response that mediates pathologic enlargement of the heart. This maladaptation is also characterized by cell behaviors that are typically associated with apoptosis, including cytoskeletal reorganization and disassembly, altered nuclear morphology, and enhanced protein synthesis/translation. Here, we investigated the requirement of apoptotic caspase pathways in mediating cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Cardiomyocytes treated with hypertrophy agonists displayed rapid and transient activation of the intrinsic-mediated cell death pathway, characterized by elevated levels of caspase 9, followed by caspase 3 protease activity. Disruption of the intrinsic cell death pathway at multiple junctures led to a significant inhibition of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy during agonist stimulation, with a corresponding reduction in the expression of known hypertrophic markers (atrial natriuretic peptide) and transcription factor activity [myocyte enhancer factor-2, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)]. Similarly, in vivo attenuation of caspase activity via adenoviral expression of the biologic effector caspase inhibitor p35 blunted cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in response to agonist stimulation. Treatment of cardiomyocytes with procaspase 3 activating compound 1, a small-molecule activator of caspase 3, resulted in a robust induction of the hypertrophy response in the absence of any agonist stimulation. These results suggest that caspase-dependent signaling is necessary and sufficient to promote cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. These results also confirm that cell death signal pathways behave as active remodeling agents in cardiomyocytes, independent of inducing an apoptosis response. PMID:24101493

  18. Integrin Based Isolation Enables Purification of Murine Lineage Committed Cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Tarnawski

    Full Text Available In contrast to mature cardiomyocytes which have limited regenerative capacity, pluripotent stem cells represent a promising source for the generation of new cardiomyocytes. The tendency of pluripotent stem cells to form teratomas and the heterogeneity from various differentiation stages and cardiomyocyte cell sub-types, however, are major obstacles to overcome before this type of therapy could be applied in a clinical setting. Thus, the identification of extracellular markers for specific cardiomyocyte progenitors and mature subpopulations is of particular importance. The delineation of cardiomyocyte surface marker patterns not only serves as a means to derive homogeneous cell populations by FACS, but is also an essential tool to understand cardiac development. By using single-cell expression profiling in early mouse embryonic hearts, we found that a combination of integrin alpha-1, alpha-5, alpha-6 and N-cadherin enables isolation of lineage committed murine cardiomyocytes. Additionally, we were able to separate trabecular cardiomyocytes from solid ventricular myocardium and atrial murine cells. These cells exhibit expected subtype specific phenotype confirmed by electrophysiological analysis. We show that integrin expression can be used for the isolation of living, functional and lineage-specific murine cardiomyocytes.

  19. Embryonic template-based generation and purification of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes for heart repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dierickx, P.; Doevendans, P.A.; Geijsen, N.; van Laake, L.W.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains a leading cause of death in Western countries. Many types of cardiovascular diseases are due to a loss of functional cardiomyocytes, which can result in irreversible cardiac failure. Since the adult human heart has limited regenerative potential, cardiac transplantatio

  20. Comparative study of clinical grade human tolerogenic dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Cáceres E

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of tolerogenic DCs is a promising therapeutic strategy for transplantation and autoimmune disorders. Immunomodulatory DCs are primarily generated from monocytes (MDDCs for in vitro experiments following protocols that fail to fulfil the strict regulatory rules of clinically applicable products. Here, we compared the efficacy of three different tolerance-inducing agents, dexamethasone, rapamycin and vitamin D3, on DC biology using GMP (Good Manufacturing Practice or clinical grade reagents with the aim of defining their use for human cell therapy. Methods Tolerogenic MDDCs were generated by adding tolerogenic agents prior to the induction of maturation using TNF-α, IL-β and PGE2. We evaluated the effects of each agent on viability, efficiency of differentiation, phenotype, cytokine secretion and stability, the stimulatory capacity of tol-DCs and the T-cell profiles induced. Results Differences relevant to therapeutic applicability were observed with the cellular products that were obtained. VitD3-induced tol-DCs exhibited a slightly reduced viability and yield compared to Dexa-and Rapa-tol-DCs. Phenotypically, while Dexa-and VitD3-tol-DCs were similar to immature DCs, Rapa-tol-DCs were not distinguishable from mature DCs. In addition, only Dexa-and moderately VitD3-tol-DCs exhibited IL-10 production. Interestingly, in all cases, the cytokine secretion profiles of tol-DCs were not modified by a subsequent TLR stimulation with LPS, indicating that all products had stable phenotypes. Functionally, clearly reduced alloantigen T cell proliferation was induced by tol-DCs obtained using any of these agent. Also, total interferon-gamma (IFN-γ secretion by T cells stimulated with allogeneic tol-DCs was reduced in all three cases, but only T cells co-cultured with Rapa-tol-DCs showed impaired intracellular IFN-γ production. In addition, Rapa-DCs promoted CD4+ CD127 low/negative CD25high and Foxp3+ T cells. Conclusions Our

  1. Comparative biogeochemistry-ecosystem-human interactions on dynamic continental margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Lisa A.; Liu, Kon-Kee; Emeis, Kay-Christian; Breitburg, Denise L.; Cloern, James; Deutsch, Curtis; Giani, Michele; Goffart, Anne; Hofmann, Eileen E.; Lachkar, Zouhair; Limburg, Karin; Liu, Su-Mei; Montes, Enrique; Naqvi, Wajih; Ragueneau, Olivier; Rabouille, Christophe; Sarkar, Santosh Kumar; Swaney, Dennis P.; Wassman, Paul; Wishner, Karen F.

    2014-01-01

    The ocean’s continental margins face strong and rapid change, forced by a combination of direct human activity, anthropogenic CO2-induced climate change, and natural variability. Stimulated by discussions in Goa, India at the IMBER IMBIZO III, we (1) provide an overview of the drivers of biogeochemical variation and change on margins, (2) compare temporal trends in hydrographic and biogeochemical data across different margins (3) review ecosystem responses to these changes, (4) highlight the importance of margin time series for detecting and attributing change and (5) examine societal responses to changing margin biogeochemistry and ecosystems. We synthesize information over a wide range of margin settings in order to identify the commonalities and distinctions among continental margin ecosystems. Key drivers of biogeochemical variation include long-term climate cycles, CO2-induced warming, acidification, and deoxygenation, as well as sea level rise, eutrophication, hydrologic and water cycle alteration, changing land use, fishing, and species invasion. Ecosystem responses are complex and impact major margin services including primary production, fisheries production, nutrient cycling, shoreline protection, chemical buffering, and biodiversity. Despite regional differences, the societal consequences of these changes are unarguably large and mandate coherent actions to reduce, mitigate and adapt to multiple stressors on continental margins.

  2. Hydrogel-coated microfluidic channels for cardiomyocyte culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annabi, Nasim; Selimović, Šeila; Cox, Juan Pablo Acevedo; Ribas, João; Bakooshli, Mohsen Afshar; Heintze, Déborah; Weiss, Anthony S.; Cropek, Donald; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    The research areas of tissue engineering and drug development have displayed increased interest in organ-on-a-chip studies, in which physiologically or pathologically relevant tissues can be engineered to test pharmaceutical candidates. Microfluidic technologies enable the control of the cellular microenvironment for these applications through the topography, size, and elastic properties of the microscale cell culture environment, while delivering nutrients and chemical cues to the cells through continuous media perfusion. Traditional materials used in the fabrication of microfluidic devices, such as poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), offer high fidelity and high feature resolution, but do not facilitate cell attachment. To overcome this challenge, we have developed a method for coating microfluidic channels inside a closed PDMS device with a cell-compatible hydrogel layer. We have synthesized photocrosslinkable gelatin and tropoelastin-based hydrogel solutions that were used to coat the surfaces under continuous flow inside 50 μm wide, straight microfluidic channels to generate a hydrogel layer on the channel walls. Our observation of primary cardiomyocytes seeded on these hydrogel layers showed preferred attachment as well as higher spontaneous beating rates on tropoelastin coatings compared to gelatin. In addition, cellular attachment, alignment and beating were stronger on 5 % (w/v) hydrogel-coated devices than on 10 % (w/v) gel-coated channels. Our results demonstrate that cardiomyocytes respond favorably to the elastic, soft tropoelastin culture substrates, indicating that tropoelastin-based hydrogels may be a suitable coating choice for some organ-on-a-chip applications. We anticipate that the proposed hydrogel coating method and tropoelastin as a cell culture substrate may be useful for the generation of elastic tissues, e.g. blood vessels, using microfluidic approaches. PMID:23728018

  3. The cardiomyocyte molecular clock, regulation of Scn5a, and arrhythmia susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroder, Elizabeth A; Lefta, Mellani; Zhang, Xiping; Bartos, Daniel C; Feng, Han-Zhong; Zhao, Yihua; Patwardhan, Abhijit; Jin, Jian-Ping; Esser, Karyn A; Delisle, Brian P

    2013-05-15

    The molecular clock mechanism underlies circadian rhythms and is defined by a transcription-translation feedback loop. Bmal1 encodes a core molecular clock transcription factor. Germline Bmal1 knockout mice show a loss of circadian variation in heart rate and blood pressure, and they develop dilated cardiomyopathy. We tested the role of the molecular clock in adult cardiomyocytes by generating mice that allow for the inducible cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of Bmal1 (iCSΔBmal1). ECG telemetry showed that cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of Bmal1 (iCSΔBmal1(-/-)) in adult mice slowed heart rate, prolonged RR and QRS intervals, and increased episodes of arrhythmia. Moreover, isolated iCSΔBmal1(-/-) hearts were more susceptible to arrhythmia during electromechanical stimulation. Examination of candidate cardiac ion channel genes showed that Scn5a, which encodes the principle cardiac voltage-gated Na(+) channel (Na(V)1.5), was circadianly expressed in control mouse and rat hearts but not in iCSΔBmal1(-/-) hearts. In vitro studies confirmed circadian expression of a human Scn5a promoter-luciferase reporter construct and determined that overexpression of clock factors transactivated the Scn5a promoter. Loss of Scn5a circadian expression in iCSΔBmal1(-/-) hearts was associated with decreased levels of Na(V)1.5 and Na(+) current in ventricular myocytes. We conclude that disruption of the molecular clock in the adult heart slows heart rate, increases arrhythmias, and decreases the functional expression of Scn5a. These findings suggest a potential link between environmental factors that alter the cardiomyocyte molecular clock and factors that influence arrhythmia susceptibility in humans.

  4. The alteration of protein prenylation induces cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through Rheb-mTORC1 signalling and leads to chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Na; Guan, Shan; Chen, Zhong; Yu, Yang; Xie, Jun; Pan, Fei-Yan; Zhao, Ning-Wei; Liu, Li; Yang, Zhong-Zhou; Gao, Xiang; Xu, Biao; Li, Chao-Jun

    2015-04-01

    G protein-regulated cell function is crucial for cardiomyocytes, and any deregulation of its gene expression or protein modification can lead to pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Herein, we report that protein prenylation, a lipidic modification of G proteins that facilitates their association with the cell membrane, might control the process of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. We found that geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (GGPPS), a key enzyme involved in protein prenylation, played a critical role in postnatal heart growth by regulating cardiomyocyte size. Cardiac-specific knockout of GGPPS in mice led to spontaneous cardiac hypertrophy, beginning from week 4, accompanied by the persistent enlargement of cardiomyocytes. This hypertrophic effect occurred by altered prenylation of G proteins. Evaluation of the prenylation, membrane association and hydrophobicity showed that Rheb was hyperactivated and increased mTORC1 signalling pathway after GGPPS deletion. Protein farnesylation or mTORC1 inhibition blocked GGPPS knockdown-induced mTORC1 activation and suppressed the larger neonatal rat ventricle myocyte size and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in vivo, demonstrating a central role of the FPP-Rheb-mTORC1 axis for GGPPS deficiency-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. The sustained cardiomyocyte hypertrophy progressively provoked cardiac decompensation and dysfunction, ultimately causing heart failure and adult death. Importantly, GGPPS was down-regulated in the hypertrophic hearts of mice subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and in failing human hearts. Moreover, HPLC-MS/MS detection revealed that the myocardial farnesyl diphosphate (FPP):geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) ratio was enhanced after pressure overload. Our observations conclude that the alteration of protein prenylation promotes cardiomyocyte hypertrophic growth, which acts as a potential cause for pathogenesis of heart failure and may provide a new molecular target for hypertrophic heart disease

  5. Rapid genetic algorithm optimization of a mouse computational model: Benefits for anthropomorphization of neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Teodora Bot

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available While the mouse presents an invaluable experimental model organism in biology, its usefulness in cardiac arrhythmia research is limited in some aspects due to major electrophysiological differences between murine and human action potentials (APs. As previously described, these species-specific traits can be partly overcome by application of a cell-type transforming clamp (CTC to anthropomorphize the murine cardiac AP. CTC is a hybrid experimental-computational dynamic clamp technique, in which a computationally calculated time-dependent current is inserted into a cell in real time, to compensate for the differences between sarcolemmal currents of that cell (e.g., murine and the desired species (e.g., human. For effective CTC performance, mismatch between the measured cell and a mathematical model used to mimic the measured AP must be minimal. We have developed a genetic algorithm (GA approach that rapidly tunes a mathematical model to reproduce the AP of the murine cardiac myocyte under study. Compared to a prior implementation that used a template-based model selection approach, we show that GA optimization to a cell-specific model results in a much better recapitulation of the desired AP morphology with CTC. This improvement was more pronounced when anthropomorphizing neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes to human-like APs than to guinea pig APs. CTC may be useful for a wide range of applications, from screening effects of pharmaceutical compounds on ion channel activity, to exploring variations in the mouse or human genome. Rapid GA optimization of a cell-specific mathematical model improves CTC performance and may therefore expand the applicability and usage of the CTC technique.

  6. Endocannabinoid metabolism in human glioblastomas and meningiomas compared to human non-tumour brain tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, G.; Moesgaard, B.; Hansen, Harald S.

    2005-01-01

    The endogenous levels of the two cannabinoid receptor ligands 2-arachidonoyl glycerol and anandamide, and their respective congeners, monoacyl glycerols and N-acylethanolamines, as well as the phospholipid precursors of N-acylethanolamines, were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in...... in glioblastoma (WHO grade IV) tissue and meningioma (WHO grade I) tissue and compared with human non-tumour brain tissue. Furthermore, the metabolic turnover of N-acylethanolamines was compared by measurements of the enzymatic activity of N-acyltransferase, N...

  7. BRG1 and BRM function antagonistically with c-MYC in adult cardiomyocytes to regulate conduction and contractility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Monte S; Holley, Darcy Wood; Wang, Zhongjing; Chen, Xin; Quintana, Megan; Jensen, Brian C; Tannu, Manasi; Parker, Joel; Jeyaraj, Darwin; Jain, Mukesh K; Wolfram, Julie A; Lee, Hyoung-Gon; Bultman, Scott J

    2017-04-01

    The contractile dysfunction that underlies heart failure involves perturbations in multiple biological processes ranging from metabolism to electrophysiology. Yet the epigenetic mechanisms that are altered in this disease state have not been elucidated. SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes are plausible candidates based on mouse knockout studies demonstrating a combined requirement for the BRG1 and BRM catalytic subunits in adult cardiomyocytes. Brg1/Brm double mutants exhibit metabolic and mitochondrial defects and are not viable although their cause of death has not been ascertained. To determine the cause of death of Brg1/Brm double-mutant mice, to test the hypothesis that BRG1 and BRM are required for cardiac contractility, and to identify relevant downstream target genes. A tamoxifen-inducible gene-targeting strategy utilizing αMHC-Cre-ERT was implemented to delete both SWI/SNF catalytic subunits in adult cardiomyocytes. Brg1/Brm double-mutant mice were monitored by echocardiography and electrocardiography, and they underwent rapidly progressive ventricular dysfunction including conduction defects and arrhythmias that culminated in heart failure and death within 3weeks. Mechanistically, BRG1/BRM repressed c-Myc expression, and enforced expression of a DOX-inducible c-MYC trangene in mouse cardiomyocytes phenocopied the ventricular conduction defects observed in Brg1/Brm double mutants. BRG1/BRM and c-MYC had opposite effects on the expression of cardiac conduction genes, and the directionality was consistent with their respective loss- and gain-of-function phenotypes. To support the clinical relevance of this mechanism, BRG1/BRM occupancy was diminished at the same target genes in human heart failure cases compared to controls, and this correlated with increased c-MYC expression and decreased CX43 and SCN5A expression. BRG1/BRM and c-MYC have an antagonistic relationship regulating the expression of cardiac conduction genes that maintain contractility

  8. Stretch reflex instability compared in three different human muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbaba, R; Taylor, A; Manu, C A; Buonajuti, M

    2005-06-01

    The possibility of causing instability in the stretch reflex has been examined in three different human muscles: biceps, first dorsal interosseous (FDI) of the hand and digastric. Tremor recorded as fluctuation of isometric force was compared with that occurring during contraction against a spring load. The spring compliance was selected to make the natural frequency of the part in each case appropriate for oscillations in the short latency stretch reflex. A computer model of the whole system was used to predict the frequency at which oscillations should be expected and to estimate the reflex gain required in each case to cause sustained oscillations. Estimates were computed of the autospectra of the force records and of the rectified surface EMG signals and of the coherence functions. Normal subjects showed no evidence of a distinct spectral peak during isometric recording from any of the three muscles. However, in anisometric conditions regular oscillations in force occurred in biceps, but not in FDI or digastric. The oscillations in biceps at 8-9 Hz were accompanied by similar oscillations in the EMG which were highly coherent with the force signal. The results are consistent with the presence of a strong segmental stretch reflex effect in biceps and weak or absent reflex in FDI. Digastric is known to contain no muscle spindles and therefore to lack a stretch reflex. In two subjects who volunteered that they had more tremor than normal, but had no known neurological abnormality, there was a distinct peak in the force spectrum at 8-9 Hz in biceps and FDI in isometric conditions with coherent EMG activity. The peak increased in size in anisometric conditions in biceps but not in FDI. This component appears to be of central rather than of reflex origin. No equivalent component was found in digastric records. The results are discussed in relation to the possible role of the short latency stretch reflex in the genesis of physiological tremor in different muscles.

  9. Adipose stromal cells primed with hypoxia and inflammation enhance cardiomyocyte proliferation rate in vitro through STAT3 and Erk1/2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przybyt Ewa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimental clinical stem cell therapy has been used for more than a decade to alleviate the adverse aftermath of acute myocardial infarction (aMI. The post-infarcted myocardial microenvironment is characterized by cardiomyocyte death, caused by ischemia and inflammation. These conditions may negatively affect administered stem cells. As postnatal cardiomyocytes have a poor proliferation rate, while induction of proliferation seems even more rare. Thus stimulation of their proliferation rate is essential after aMI. In metaplastic disease, the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6 has been identified as potent mediators of the proliferation rate. We hypothesized that IL-6 could augment the proliferation rate of (slow-dividing cardiomyocytes. Methods To mimic the behavior of therapeutic cells in the post-infarct cardiac microenvironment, human Adipose Derived Stromal Cells (ADSC were cultured under hypoxic (2% O2 and pro-inflammatory conditions (IL-1β for 24h. Serum-free conditioned medium from ADSC primed with hypoxia and/or IL-1β was added to rat neonatal cardiomyocytes and adult cardiomyocytes (HL-1 to assess paracrine-driven changes in cardiomyocyte proliferation rate and induction of myogenic signaling pathways. Results We demonstrate that ADSC enhance the proliferation rate of rat neonatal cardiomyocytes and adult HL-1 cardiomyocytes in a paracrine fashion. ADSC under hypoxia and inflammation in vitro had increased the interleukin-6 (IL-6 gene and protein expression. Similar to conditioned medium of ADSC, treatment of rat neonatal cardiomyocytes and HL-1 with recombinant IL-6 alone also stimulated their proliferation rate. This was corroborated by a strong decrease of cardiomyocyte proliferation after addition of IL-6 neutralizing antibody to conditioned medium of ADSC. The stimulatory effect of ADSC conditioned media or IL-6 was accomplished through activation of both Janus Kinase-Signal Transducer and

  10. Anti-inflammatory effect of erythropoietin pretreatment on cardiomyocytes with hypoxia/reoxygenation injury and the possible mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Chuan; XIAO Ying-bin; ZHONG Qian-jin; CHEN Lin; WANG Xue-feng

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of erythropoietin (EPO) pretreatment on cardiomyocytes ex-posed to hypoxia/reoxygenation injury (H/R) and explore the possible mechanism. Methods: The cultured neonatal rats' ventricular cardiomyocytes were divided randomly into 4 groups, con-trol group (C group), EPO pretreatment group (E group), EPO and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) pretreatment group (EP group) and PDTC pretreatment group (P group). After 24 hours' pretreatment, the cardiomyocytes were exposed to H/R. After pretreatment and H/R, the expression of tumor necrosis factor- α (TNF- α ) gene in all the groups was detected by RT-PCR and Western blot. The nuclear factor- KB (NF- kB) activity was detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and the inhibitor-kBα (I- kBα)protein level was detected by Western blot. Results: The decrement of I- K B α protein and the in-creasing NF- kB activity were found in cardiomyocytes pre-treated with EPO before H/R compared to other groups (t=-3.321,4.183, P<0.01). However, after H/R, NF- kB activity and ex-pression of TNF- α gene were significantly reduced, I- k B α protein expression was increased in cardiomyocytes of E group compared to other groups (t=-3.425, 3.687, 3.454, P<0.01). All theses changes caused by EPO pretreatment were eliminated by the intervention of PDTC (an antagonist to NF- kB) dur-ing pretreatment. Conclusions: EPO pretreatment can inhibit the activa-tion of NF- kB and upregulation of TNF- α gene in cardiomyocytes exposed to H/R through a negative feed-back of NF- k B signaling pathway, and thus produces the anti-inflammatory effect. This might be one of the ways EPO produces the anti-inflammatory effect.

  11. Comparative anatomical dimensions of the complete human and porcine spine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, Iris; Ploegmakers, Joris J. W.; Verkerke, Gijsbertus J.; Veldhuizen, Albert G.

    2010-01-01

    New spinal implants and surgical procedures are often tested pre-clinically on human cadaver spines. However, the availability of fresh frozen human cadaver material is very limited and alternative animal spines are more easily available in all desired age groups, and have more uniform geometrical a

  12. Comparative anatomical dimensions of the complete human and porcine spine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, Iris; Ploegmakers, Joris J. W.; Verkerke, Gijsbertus J.; Veldhuizen, Albert G.

    New spinal implants and surgical procedures are often tested pre-clinically on human cadaver spines. However, the availability of fresh frozen human cadaver material is very limited and alternative animal spines are more easily available in all desired age groups, and have more uniform geometrical

  13. The bonobo genome compared with the chimpanzee and human genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prüfer, Kay; Munch, Kasper; Hellmann, Ines; Akagi, Keiko; Miller, Jason R.; Walenz, Brian; Koren, Sergey; Sutton, Granger; Kodira, Chinnappa; Winer, Roger; Knight, James R.; Mullikin, James C.; Meader, Stephen J.; Ponting, Chris P.; Lunter, Gerton; Higashino, Saneyuki; Hobolth, Asger; Dutheil, Julien; Karakoç, Emre; Alkan, Can; Sajjadian, Saba; Catacchio, Claudia Rita; Ventura, Mario; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Eichler, Evan E.; André, Claudine; Atencia, Rebeca; Mugisha, Lawrence; Junhold, Jörg; Patterson, Nick; Siebauer, Michael; Good, Jeffrey M.; Fischer, Anne; Ptak, Susan E.; Lachmann, Michael; Symer, David E.; Mailund, Thomas; Schierup, Mikkel H.; Andrés, Aida M.; Kelso, Janet; Pääbo, Svante

    2012-01-01

    Two African apes are the closest living relatives of humans: the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) and the bonobo (Pan paniscus). Although they are similar in many respects, bonobos and chimpanzees differ strikingly in key social and sexual behaviours1–4, and for some of these traits they show more similarity with humans than with each other. Here we report the sequencing and assembly of the bonobo genome to study its evolutionary relationship with the chimpanzee and human genomes. We find that more than three per cent of the human genome is more closely related to either the bonobo or the chimpanzee genome than these are to each other. These regions allow various aspects of the ancestry of the two ape species to be reconstructed. In addition, many of the regions that overlap genes may eventually help us understand the genetic basis of phenotypes that humans share with one of the two apes to the exclusion of the other. PMID:22722832

  14. The bonobo genome compared with the chimpanzee and human genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prüfer, Kay; Munch, Kasper; Hellmann, Ines; Akagi, Keiko; Miller, Jason R; Walenz, Brian; Koren, Sergey; Sutton, Granger; Kodira, Chinnappa; Winer, Roger; Knight, James R; Mullikin, James C; Meader, Stephen J; Ponting, Chris P; Lunter, Gerton; Higashino, Saneyuki; Hobolth, Asger; Dutheil, Julien; Karakoç, Emre; Alkan, Can; Sajjadian, Saba; Catacchio, Claudia Rita; Ventura, Mario; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Eichler, Evan E; André, Claudine; Atencia, Rebeca; Mugisha, Lawrence; Junhold, Jörg; Patterson, Nick; Siebauer, Michael; Good, Jeffrey M; Fischer, Anne; Ptak, Susan E; Lachmann, Michael; Symer, David E; Mailund, Thomas; Schierup, Mikkel H; Andrés, Aida M; Kelso, Janet; Pääbo, Svante

    2012-06-28

    Two African apes are the closest living relatives of humans: the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) and the bonobo (Pan paniscus). Although they are similar in many respects, bonobos and chimpanzees differ strikingly in key social and sexual behaviours, and for some of these traits they show more similarity with humans than with each other. Here we report the sequencing and assembly of the bonobo genome to study its evolutionary relationship with the chimpanzee and human genomes. We find that more than three per cent of the human genome is more closely related to either the bonobo or the chimpanzee genome than these are to each other. These regions allow various aspects of the ancestry of the two ape species to be reconstructed. In addition, many of the regions that overlap genes may eventually help us understand the genetic basis of phenotypes that humans share with one of the two apes to the exclusion of the other.

  15. EFFECTS OF AEROBIC TRAINING ON THE CARDIOMYOCYTES OF THE RIGHT ATRIUM OF MICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Gonçalves Coutinho de Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Polypeptide hormones (natriuretic peptides, NPs are secreted by the cardiac atria and play an important role in the regulation of blood pressure. Objective: To evaluate the effects of aerobic training on the secretory apparatus of NPs in cardiomyocytes of the right atrium. Methods: Nine-month-old mice were divided in two groups (n=10: control group (CG and trained group (TG. The training protocol was performed on a motor treadmill for 8 weeks. Systolic blood pressure was measured at the beginning of the experiment (9 months of age and at moment of the sacrifice (11 months of age. Electron micrographs were used to quantify the following variables: the quantitative density and area of NP granules, the relative volumes of the mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, and Golgi complex and the relative volume of euchromatin in the nucleus and the number of pores per 10 µm of the nuclear membrane. The results were compared by Student's t test (p< 0.05. Results: The cardiomyocytes obtained from TG mice showed increased density and sectional area of secretory granules of NP, higher relative volume of endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, and Golgi complex compared with the CG mice. Furthermore, the quantitative density of nuclear pores and the relative volume of euchromatin in the nucleus were significantly higher compared with the CG mice. Conclusion: Aerobic training caused hypertrophy of the secretory apparatus in the cardiomyocytes of right atrium, which could explain the intense synthesis of natriuretic peptides in trained mice with respect to the untrained mice.

  16. Mitochondrial activity and oxidative stress functions are influenced by the activation of AhR-induced CYP1A1 overexpression in cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bing; Wang, Xi; Li, Feng; Wang, Yingting; Yang, Lei; Zhen, Xiaolong; Tan, Wuhong

    2017-07-01

    There is an endemic cardiomyopathy currently occurring in China, termed, Keshan disease (KD). The authors previously compared mitochondrial‑associated gene expression profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) derived from KD patients and normal controls, using mitochondria‑focused cDNA microarray technology. The results detected an upregulation of the enzyme‑associated CYP1A1 gene, (ratios ≥2.0). The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) regulates the expression of numerous cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes including members of the CYP1 family; CYP1A1 and CYP1A2. Several previous studies have suggested roles for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and the genes that it regulates. An example involves cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1), in the pathogenesis of heart failure, cardiac hypertrophy and other cardiomyopathies. Mitochondria comprise ~30% of the intracellular volume in mammalian cardiomyocytes, and subtle alterations in mitochondria can markedly influence cardiomyopathies. The present study investigated alterations in the activity and functions of mitochondria following AhR‑induced overexpression of CYP1A1. AC16 cells were treated with the CYP1A1 inducer 2,3,7,8‑tetrachlorodibenzo‑p‑dioxin (TCDD), and cytotoxicity was then evaluated in MTT assays. Reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reactions, western blot analysis and 7‑ethoxyresorufin O‑deacylase assays were performed to analyze the mRNA and protein levels, and the enzymatic activity of CYP1A1. Mitochondrial activity and mass were analyzed using an inverted fluorescence microscope and a fluorescence microplate reader. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) activity was analyzed using flow cytometry. The results of the current study demonstrated that TCDD gradually increased mRNA and protein levels of AhR and CYP1A1, in addition to the enzymatic activity. Mitochondrial activity and the quality of mitochondrial membranes were also significantly attenuated, and mitochondrial ROS

  17. Mechanisms of greater cardiomyocyte functions on conductive nanoengineered composites for cardiovascular applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stout DA

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available David A Stout,1,2 Jennie Yoo,2 Adriana Noemi Santiago-Miranda,3 Thomas J Webster1,41School of Engineering, 2Division of Biology and Medicine, Brown University, Providence, RI, 3Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagües, PR, 4Department of Orthopedics, Brown University, Providence, RI, USABackground: Recent advances in nanotechnology (materials with at least one dimension between 1 nm and 100 nm have led to the use of nanomaterials in numerous medical device applications. Recently, nanomaterials have been used to create innovative biomaterials for cardiovascular applications. Specifically, carbon nanofibers (CNF embedded in poly(lactic-co-glycolic-acid (PLGA have been shown to promote cardiomyocyte growth compared with conventional polymer substrates, but the mechanisms involved in such events remain unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the basic mechanism of cell growth on these novel nanocomposites.Methods: CNF were added to biodegradable PLGA (50:50 PGA:PLA weight ratio to increase the conductivity, mechanical and cytocompatibility properties of pure PLGA. For this reason, different PLGA to CNF ratios (100:0, 75:25, 50:50, 25:75, and 0:100 wt% with different PLGA densities (0.1, 0.05, 0.025, and 0.0125 g/mL were used, and their compatibility with cardiomyocytes was assessed.Results: Throughout all the cytocompatibility experiments, cardiomyocytes were viable and expressed important biomarkers, including cardiac troponin T, connexin-43, and alpha-sarcomeric actin (α-SCA. Adhesion and proliferation experiments indicated that a PLGA density of 0.025 g/mL with a PLGA to CNF ratio of 75:25 and 50:50 (wt% promoted the best overall cell growth, ie, a 55% increase in cardiomyocyte density after 120 hours compared with pure PLGA and a 75% increase compared with the control at the same time point for 50:50 (wt%. The PLGA:CNF materials were conductive, and their conductivity increased as greater amounts of CNF

  18. Newborn hypoxia/anoxia inhibits cardiomyocyte proliferation and decreases cardiomyocyte endowment in the developing heart: role of endothelin-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra N Paradis

    Full Text Available In the developing heart, cardiomyocytes undergo terminal differentiation during a critical window around birth. Hypoxia is a major stress to preterm infants, yet its effect on the development and maturation of the heart remains unknown. We tested the hypothesis in a rat model that newborn anoxia accelerates cardiomyocyte terminal differentiation and results in reduced cardiomyocyte endowment in the developing heart via an endothelin-1-dependent mechanism. Newborn rats were exposed to anoxia twice daily from postnatal day 1 to 3, and hearts were isolated and studied at postnatal day 4 (P4, 7 (P7, and 14 (P14. Anoxia significantly increased HIF-1α protein expression and pre-proET-1 mRNA abundance in P4 neonatal hearts. Cardiomyocyte proliferation was significantly decreased by anoxia in P4 and P7, resulting in a significant reduction of cardiomyocyte number per heart weight in the P14 neonates. Furthermore, the expression of cyclin D2 was significantly decreased due to anoxia, while p27 expression was increased. Anoxia has no significant effect on cardiomyocyte binucleation or myocyte size. Consistently, prenatal hypoxia significantly decreased cardiomyocyte proliferation but had no effect on binucleation in the fetal heart. Newborn administration of PD156707, an ETA-receptor antagonist, significantly increased cardiomyocyte proliferation at P4 and cell size at P7, resulting in an increase in the heart to body weight ratio in P7 neonates. In addition, PD156707 abrogated the anoxia-mediated effects. The results suggest that hypoxia and anoxia via activation of endothelin-1 at the critical window of heart development inhibits cardiomyocyte proliferation and decreases myocyte endowment in the developing heart, which may negatively impact cardiac function later in life.

  19. Comparative biogeochemistry–ecosystem–human interactions on dynamic continental margins..

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Levin, L.A.; Liu, K-K.; Emeis, K.-C.; Breitburg, D.L.; Cloern, J.; Deutsch, C.; Giani, M.; Goffart, A.; Hofmann, E.E.; Lachkar, Z.; Limburg, K.; Liu, Su-Mei; Montes, E.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Ragueneau, O.; Rabouille, C.; Sarkar, S.K.; Swaney, D.P.; Wassman, P.; Wishner, K.F.

    The oceans' continental margins face strong and rapid change, forced by a combination of direct human activity, anthropogenic CO2-induced climate change, and natural variability. Stimulated by discussions in Goa, India at the IMBER IMBIZO III, we (1...

  20. Human myelin proteome and comparative analysis with mouse myelin

    OpenAIRE

    Ishii, Akihiro; Dutta, Ranjan; Wark, Greg M.; Hwang, Sun-Il; Han, David K.; Trapp, Bruce D.; Pfeiffer, Steven E.; Bansal, Rashmi

    2009-01-01

    Myelin, formed by oligodendrocytes (OLs) in the CNS, is critical for axonal functions, and its damage leads to debilitating neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of myelination and the pathogenesis of human myelin disease has been limited partly by the relative lack of identification and functional characterization of the repertoire of human myelin proteins. Here, we present a large-scale analysis of the myelin proteome, using the shotgun ap...

  1. Peptidomic Analysis of Cultured Cardiomyocytes Exposed to Acute Ischemic-Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijie Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI is a life-threatening cardiovascular disease involving disruption of blood flow to the heart, consequent tissue damage, and sometimes death. Peptidomics, an emerging branch of proteomics, has attracted wide attention. Methods: A comparative peptidomic profiling was used to explore changes induced by acute ischemic-hypoxia in primary cultured neonatal rat myocardial cells. Analysis of six-plex tandem mass tag (TMT labelled peptides was performed using nanoflow liquid chromatography coupled online with an LTQ-Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometer. Results: A total of 220 differentially expressed peptides originating from 119 proteins were identified, of which 37 were upregulated and 183 were downregulated in cardiomyocytes exposed to hypoxia/ischemia conditions. Many of the identified peptides were derived from functional domains of proteins closely associated with cardiomyocyte structure or AMI. Conclusion: Numerous peptides may be involved in process of AMI. These results pave the way for future functional studies of the identified peptides.

  2. Fibroblast growth factor 23 dysregulates late sodium current and calcium homeostasis with enhanced arrhythmogenesis in pulmonary vein cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Yu; Chen, Yao-Chang; Kao, Yu-Hsun; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiung; Lin, Yung-Kuo; Chung, Cheng-Chih; Lee, Ting-I; Tsai, Wen-Chin; Chen, Shih-Ann; Chen, Yi-Jen

    2016-10-25

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), elevated in chronic renal failure, increases atrial arrhythmogenesis and dysregulates calcium homeostasis. Late sodium currents (INa-Late) critically induces ectopic activity of pulmoanry vein (the most important atrial fibrillation trigger). This study was to investigate whether FGF23 activates the INa-Late leading to calcium dysregulation and increases PV arrhythmogenesis. Patch clamp, western blot, and confocal microscopy were used to evaluate the electrical activities, calcium homeostasis, and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) in PV cardiomyocytes with or without FGF23 (0.1 or 1 ng/mL) incubation for 4~6 h. Compared to the control, FGF23 (1 ng/mL, but not 0.1 ng/mL)-treated PV cardiomyocytes had a faster beating rate. FGF23 (1 ng/mL)-treated PV cardiomyocytes had larger INa-Late, calcium transients, and mitochondrial ROS than controls. However, ranolazine (an inhibitor of INa-Late) attenuated FGF23 (1 ng/mL)-increased beating rates, calcium transients and mitochondrial ROS. FGF23 (1 ng/mL)-treated PV cardiomyocytes exhibited larger phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). Chelerythrine chloride (an inhibitor of protein kinase C) decreased INa-Late in FGF23 (1 ng/mL)-treated PV cardiomyocytes. However, KN93 (a selective CaMKII blocker) decreased INa-Late in control and FGF23 (1 ng/mL)-treated PV cardiomyocytes to a similar extent. In conclusion, FGF23 increased PV arrhythmogenesis through sodium and calcium dysregulation by acting protein kinase C signaling.

  3. Gap junction reduction in cardiomyocytes following transforming growth factor-β treatment and Trypanosoma cruzi infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana C Waghabi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Gap junction connexin-43 (Cx43 molecules are responsible for electrical impulse conduction in the heart and are affected by transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β. This cytokine increases during Trypanosoma cruzi infection, modulating fibrosis and the parasite cell cycle. We studied Cx43 expression in cardiomyocytes exposed or not to TGF-β T. cruzi, or SB-431542, an inhibitor of TGF-β receptor type I (ALK-5. Cx43 expression was also examined in hearts with dilated cardiopathy from chronic Chagas disease patients, in which TGF-β signalling had been shown previously to be highly activated. We demonstrated that TGF-β treatment induced disorganised gap junctions in non-infected cardiomyocytes, leading to a punctate, diffuse and non-uniform Cx43 staining. A similar pattern was detected in T. cruzi-infected cardiomyocytes concomitant with high TGF-β secretion. Both results were reversed if the cells were incubated with SB-431542. Similar tests were performed using human chronic chagasic patients and we confirmed a down-regulation of Cx43 expression, an altered distribution of plaques in the heart and a significant reduction in the number and length of Cx43 plaques, which correlated negatively with cardiomegaly. We conclude that elevated TGF-β levels during T. cruzi infection promote heart fibrosis and disorganise gap junctions, possibly contributing to abnormal impulse conduction and arrhythmia that characterise severe cardiopathy in Chagas disease.

  4. Gap junction reduction in cardiomyocytes following transforming growth factor-beta treatment and Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waghabi, Mariana C; Coutinho-Silva, Robson; Feige, Jean-Jacques; Higuchi, Maria de Lourdes; Becker, David; Burnstock, Geoffrey; Araújo-Jorge, Tânia C de

    2009-12-01

    Gap junction connexin-43 (Cx43) molecules are responsible for electrical impulse conduction in the heart and are affected by transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). This cytokine increases during Trypanosoma cruzi infection, modulating fibrosis and the parasite cell cycle. We studied Cx43 expression in cardiomyocytes exposed or not to TGF-beta T. cruzi, or SB-431542, an inhibitor of TGF-beta receptor type I (ALK-5). Cx43 expression was also examined in hearts with dilated cardiopathy from chronic Chagas disease patients, in which TGF-beta signalling had been shown previously to be highly activated. We demonstrated that TGF-beta treatment induced disorganised gap junctions in non-infected cardiomyocytes, leading to a punctate, diffuse and non-uniform Cx43 staining. A similar pattern was detected in T. cruzi-infected cardiomyocytes concomitant with high TGF-beta secretion. Both results were reversed if the cells were incubated with SB-431542. Similar tests were performed using human chronic chagasic patients and we confirmed a down-regulation of Cx43 expression, an altered distribution of plaques in the heart and a significant reduction in the number and length of Cx43 plaques, which correlated negatively with cardiomegaly. We conclude that elevated TGF-beta levels during T. cruzi infection promote heart fibrosis and disorganise gap junctions, possibly contributing to abnormal impulse conduction and arrhythmia that characterise severe cardiopathy in Chagas disease.

  5. Chronic intermittent hypoxia aggravates cardiomyocyte apoptosis in rat ovariectomized model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Ying-hui; CHEN Lin; MA Yan-liang; HE Quan-ying

    2012-01-01

    Background The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) increases after menopause in women,but remains under diagnosed because of social or lifestyle factors.It is important to evaluate the hazards of OSA on cardiovascular disease in menopausal women.We tested the hypothesis that chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) may aggravate cardiomyocyte apoptosis in ovariectomized (OVX) Sprague Dawley (SD) rats; the changes of anti-oxidation ability in cardiac muscles may be one of the reasons for cardiomyocyte apoptosis.Methods Forty-eight 60-day old female SD rats were randomly divided into a CIH group,OVX group,OVX+CIH (OC)group,and handled control (HC) group,and the rats were exposed either to CIH (nadir O2 6%) or handled normoxic controls.The changes of body weight and whole heart weight were measured.Super oxide dismutase (SOD) and malonaldehyde (MDA) were used to evaluate the level of oxidative stress.TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) was used to measure apoptosis in each rat.Western blotting was used to measure apoptosis associated proteins in cardiac muscle samples from each rat.Results When compared with the HC and CIH groups,the levels of oxidative stress in the OC and OVX groups were significantly higher.The levels of SOD in the HC,CIH,OC,and OVX groups were (47.99±4.89),(53.60±4.47),(20.99±2.72),and (30.64±3.79) mmol/mg protein; significantly increased in the CIH group (P <0.05) and significantly decreased in the OC (P <0.01) and OVX (P <0.05) groups.The levels of MDA in the HC,CIH,OVX,and OC groups were (1.63±0.20),(1.93±0.77),(3.30±0.39),and (1.95±0.20) mmol/mg protein; it significantly increased in the CIH (P <0.05),OC (P<0.01),and OVX (P<0.05) groups compared with the HC group.Bax protein expression was significantly increased and bcl-2 protein expression was significantly reduced after CIH compared with HC rats (P <0.05).The protein expression of bax and bcl-2 in the OC group was not significantly different from the CIH

  6. In vitro differentiation of rat embryonic stem cells into functional cardiomyocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan Cao; Jing Liao; Zumei Liu; Wen min Zhu; Jia Wang; Lijun Liu; Lili Yu

    2011-01-01

    The recent breakthrough in the generation of rat embryonic stem cells (rESCs) opens the door to application of gene targeting to create models for the study of human diseases.In addition,the in vitro differentiation system from rESCs into derivatives of three germ layers will serve as a powerful tool and resource for the investigation of mammalian development,cell function,tissue repair,and drug discovery.However,these uses have been limited by the difficulty of in vitro differentiation.The aims of this study were to establish an in vitro differentiation system from rESCs and to investigate whether rESCs are capable of forming terminal-differentiated cardiomyocytes.Using newly established rESCs,we found that embryoid body (EB)-based method used in mouse ESC (mESC) differentiation failed to work for the serum-free cultivated rESCs.We then developed a protocol by combination of three chemical inhibitors and feeder-conditioned medium.Under this condition,rESCs formed EBs,propagated and differentiated into three embryonic germ layers.Moreover,rESC-formed EBs could differentiate into spontaneously beating cardiomyocytes after plating.Analyses of molecular,structural,and functional properties revealed that rESC-derived cardiomyocytes were similar to those derived from fetal rat hearts and mESCs.In conclusion,we successfully developed an in vitro differentiation system for rESCs through which functional myocytes were generated and displayed phenotypes of rat fetal cardiomyocytes.This unique cellular system will provide a new approach to study the early development and cardiac function,and serve as an important tool in pharmacological testing and cell therapy.

  7. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase interacts with proapoptotic kinase mst1 to promote cardiomyocyte apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei You

    Full Text Available Mammalian sterile 20-like kinase 1 (Mst1 is a critical component of the Hippo signaling pathway, which regulates a variety of biological processes ranging from cell contact inhibition, organ size control, apoptosis and tumor suppression in mammals. Mst1 plays essential roles in the heart disease since its activation causes cardiomyocyte apoptosis and dilated cardiomyopathy. However, the mechanism underlying Mst1 activation in the heart remains unknown. In a yeast two-hybrid screen of a human heart cDNA library with Mst1 as bait, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH was identified as an Mst1-interacting protein. The interaction of GAPDH with Mst1 was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation in both co-transfected HEK293 cells and mouse heart homogenates, in which GAPDH interacted with the kinase domain of Mst1, whereas the C-terminal catalytic domain of GAPDH mediated its interaction with Mst1. Moreover, interaction of Mst1 with GAPDH caused a robust phosphorylation of GAPDH and markedly increased the Mst1 activity in cells. Chelerythrine, a potent inducer of apoptosis, substantially increased the nuclear translocation and interaction of GAPDH and Mst1 in cardiomyocytes. Overexpression of GAPDH significantly augmented the Mst1 mediated apoptosis, whereas knockdown of GAPDH markedly attenuated the Mst1 activation and cardiomyocyte apoptosis in response to either chelerythrine or hypoxia/reoxygenation. These findings reveal a novel function of GAPDH in Mst1 activation and cardiomyocyte apoptosis and suggest that disruption of GAPDH interaction with Mst1 may prevent apoptosis related heart diseases such as heart failure and ischemic heart disease.

  8. Calcium and mitochondrial metabolism in ceramide-induced cardiomyocyte death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Valentina; Moraga, Francisco; Kuzmicic, Jovan; López-Crisosto, Camila; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Torrealba, Natalia; Criollo, Alfredo; Díaz-Elizondo, Jessica; Rothermel, Beverly A; Quest, Andrew F G; Lavandero, Sergio

    2013-08-01

    Ceramides are important intermediates in the biosynthesis and degradation of sphingolipids that regulate numerous cellular processes, including cell cycle progression, cell growth, differentiation and death. In cardiomyocytes, ceramides induce apoptosis by decreasing mitochondrial membrane potential and promoting cytochrome-c release. Ca(2+) overload is a common feature of all types of cell death. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of ceramides on cytoplasmic Ca(2+) levels, mitochondrial function and cardiomyocyte death. Our data show that C2-ceramide induces apoptosis and necrosis in cultured cardiomyocytes by a mechanism involving increased Ca(2+) influx, mitochondrial network fragmentation and loss of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) buffer capacity. These biochemical events increase cytosolic Ca(2+) levels and trigger cardiomyocyte death via the activation of calpains. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Endocrine and other physiologic modulators of perinatal cardiomyocyte endowment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonker, S S; Louey, S

    2015-01-01

    Immature contractile cardiomyocytes proliferate to rapidly increase cell number, establishing cardiomyocyte endowment in the perinatal period. Developmental changes in cellular maturation, size and attrition further contribute to cardiac anatomy. These physiological processes occur concomitant with a changing hormonal environment as the fetus prepares itself for the transition to extrauterine life. There are complex interactions between endocrine, hemodynamic and nutritional regulators of cardiac development. Birth has been long assumed to be the trigger for major differences between the fetal and postnatal cardiomyocyte growth patterns, but investigations in normally growing sheep and rodents suggest this may not be entirely true; in sheep, these differences are initiated before birth, while in rodents they occur after birth. The aim of this review is to draw together our understanding of the temporal regulation of these signals and cardiomyocyte responses relative to birth. Further, we consider how these dynamics are altered in stressed and suboptimal intrauterine environments. PMID:26432905

  10. CSAHi study: Validation of multi-electrode array systems (MEA60/2100) for prediction of drug-induced proarrhythmia using human iPS cell-derived cardiomyocytes -assessment of inter-facility and cells lot-to-lot-variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Yumiko; Honda, Yayoi; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Saiki, Shota; Koyabu, Kiyotaka; Itoh, Tetsuji; Nagasawa, Chiho; Nakamori, Chiaki; Nakayama, Chiaki; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Shinobu; Washio, Ikumi; Takahashi, Etsushi; Miyamoto, Kaori; Yamanishi, Atsuhiro; Endo, Hiroko; Shinozaki, Junko; Nogawa, Hisashi; Kunimatsu, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    In vitro screening of hERG channels are recommended under ICH S7B guidelines to predict drug-induced QT prolongation and Torsade de Pointes (TdP), whereas proarrhythmia is known to be evoked by blockage of other ion channels involved in cardiac contraction and compensation mechanisms. A consortium for drug safety assessment using human iPS cells-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CMs), CSAHi, has been organized to establish a novel in vitro test system that would enable better prediction of drug-induced proarrhythmia and QT prolongation. Here we report the inter-facility and cells lot-to-lot variability evaluated with FPDc (corrected field potential duration), FPDc10 (10% FPDc change concentration), beat rate and incidence of arrhythmia-like waveform or arrest on hiPS-CMs in a multi-electrode array system. Arrhythmia-like waveforms were evident for all test compounds, other than chromanol 293B, that evoked FPDc prolongation in this system and are reported to induce TdP in clinical practice. There was no apparent cells lot-to-lot variability, while inter-facility variabilities were limited within ranges from 3.9- to 20-folds for FPDc10 and about 10-folds for the minimum concentration inducing arrhythmia-like waveform or arrests. In conclusion, the new assay model reported here would enable accurate prediction of a drug potential for proarrhythmia.

  11. Cardiomyocyte-specific expression of lamin a improves cardiac function in Lmna-/- mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard L Frock

    Full Text Available Lmna(-/- mice display multiple tissue defects and die by 6-8 weeks of age reportedly from dilated cardiomyopathy with associated conduction defects. We sought to determine whether restoration of lamin A in cardiomyocytes improves cardiac function and extends the survival of Lmna(-/- mice. We observed increased total desmin protein levels and disorganization of the cytoplasmic desmin network in ~20% of Lmna(-/- ventricular myocytes, rescued in a cell-autonomous manner in Lmna(-/- mice expressing a cardiac-specific lamin A transgene (Lmna(-/-; Tg. Lmna(-/-; Tg mice displayed significantly increased contractility and preservation of myocardial performance compared to Lmna(-/- mice. Lmna(-/-; Tg mice attenuated ERK1/2 phosphorylation relative to Lmna(-/- mice, potentially underlying the improved localization of connexin43 to the intercalated disc. Electrocardiographic recordings from Lmna(-/- mice revealed arrhythmic events and increased frequency of PR interval prolongation, which is partially rescued in Lmna(-/-; Tg mice. These findings support our observation that Lmna(-/-; Tg mice have a 12% median extension in lifespan compared to Lmna(-/- mice. While significant, Lmna(-/-; Tg mice only have modest improvement in cardiac function and survival likely stemming from the observation that only 40% of Lmna(-/-; Tg cardiomyocytes have detectable lamin A expression. Cardiomyocyte-specific restoration of lamin A in Lmna(-/- mice improves heart-specific pathology and extends lifespan, demonstrating that the cardiac pathology of Lmna(-/- mice limits survival. The expression of lamin A is sufficient to rescue certain cellular defects associated with loss of A-type lamins in cardiomyocytes in a cell-autonomous fashion.

  12. Comparative proteomic analysis of human pancreatic juice : Methodological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Lu; Lu, ZhaoHui; Yang, AiMing; Deng, RuiXue; Mai, CanRong; Sang, XinTing; Faber, Klaas Nico; Lu, XingHua

    Pancreatic cancer is the most lethal of all the common malignancies. Markers for early detection of this disease are urgently needed. Here, we optimized and applied a proteome analysis of human pancreatic juice to identify biomarkers for pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic juice samples, devoid of blood

  13. comparative analysis of mercury content in human hair and cosmetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Total mercury (T-Hg) concentrations were analysed in human hairs and cosmetic .... (SDE = Standard Error; d.l. = detection limit of 0.001 ppm; ** Mean was calculated ... Hotel attendants. 23. 1. 2. 350.0 ± 4.5. 18. 1. 2. 360.0 ± 8.5. Hair saloon.

  14. Comparative mutagenesis of human cells in vivo and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thilly, W.G.

    1992-05-01

    This report discusses measuring methods of point mutations; high density cell cultures for low dose studies; measurement and sequence determination of mutations in DNA; the mutational spectra of styrene oxide and ethlyene oxide in TK-6 cells; mutational spectrum of Cr in human lymphoblast cells; mutational spectra of radon in TK-6 cells; and the mutational spectra of smokeless tobacco. (CBS)

  15. Comparative proteomic analysis of human pancreatic juice : Methodological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Lu; Lu, ZhaoHui; Yang, AiMing; Deng, RuiXue; Mai, CanRong; Sang, XinTing; Faber, Klaas Nico; Lu, XingHua

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the most lethal of all the common malignancies. Markers for early detection of this disease are urgently needed. Here, we optimized and applied a proteome analysis of human pancreatic juice to identify biomarkers for pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic juice samples, devoid of blood o

  16. Comparative proteomic analysis of human pancreatic juice : Methodological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Lu; Lu, ZhaoHui; Yang, AiMing; Deng, RuiXue; Mai, CanRong; Sang, XinTing; Faber, Klaas Nico; Lu, XingHua

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the most lethal of all the common malignancies. Markers for early detection of this disease are urgently needed. Here, we optimized and applied a proteome analysis of human pancreatic juice to identify biomarkers for pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic juice samples, devoid of blood o

  17. Comparative proteomic analysis of human pancreatic juice: Methodological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Lu; Lu, Z.H.; Yang, A.M.; Deng, R.X.; Mai, C.R.; Sang, X.T.; Faber, Klaas Nico; Lu, X.H.

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the most lethal of all the common malignancies. Markers for early detection of this disease are urgently needed. Here, we optimized and applied a proteome analysis of human pancreatic juice to identify biomarkers for pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic juice samples, devoid of blood o

  18. Comparative mutagenesis of human cells in vivo and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thilly, W.G.

    1992-05-01

    This report discusses measuring methods of point mutations; high density cell cultures for low dose studies; measurement and sequence determination of mutations in DNA; the mutational spectra of styrene oxide and ethlyene oxide in TK-6 cells; mutational spectrum of Cr in human lymphoblast cells; mutational spectra of radon in TK-6 cells; and the mutational spectra of smokeless tobacco. (CBS)

  19. Human and mouse genome analysis using array comparative genomic hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, Antoine Maria

    2004-01-01

    Almost all human cancers as well as developmental abnormalities are characterized by the presence of genetic alterations, most of which target a gene or a particular genomic locus resulting in altered gene expression and ultimately an altered phenotype. Different types of genetic alterations include

  20. Basal autophagy protects cardiomyocytes from doxorubicin-induced toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Marcela; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Martínez, Gonzalo J; Chiong, Mario; Castro, Pablo F; Lavandero, Sergio

    2016-08-31

    Doxorubicin (Doxo) is one of the most effective anti-neoplastic agents but its cardiotoxicity has been an important clinical limitation. The major mechanism of Doxo-induced cardiotoxicity is associated to its oxidative capacity. However, other processes are also involved with significant consequences for the cardiomyocyte. In recent years, a number of studies have investigated the role of autophagy on Doxo-induced cardiotoxicity but to date it is not clear how Doxo alters that process and its consequence on cardiomyocytes viability. Here we investigated the effect of Doxo 1uM for 24h of stimulation on cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. We showed that Doxo inhibits basal autophagy. This inhibition is due to both Akt/mTOR signaling pathway activation and Beclin 1 level decrease. To assess the role of autophagy on Doxo-induced cardiomyocyte death, we evaluated the effects 3-methyladenine (3-MA), bafilomycin A1 (BafA), siRNA Beclin 1 (siBeclin 1) and rapamycin (Rapa) on cell viability. Inhibition of autophagy with 3-MA, BafA and siBeclin 1 increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release but, when autophagy was induced by Rapa, Doxo-induced cardiomyocyte death was decreased. These results suggest that Doxo inhibits basal autophagy and contributes to cardiomyocyte death. Activation of autophagy could be used as a strategy to protect the heart against Doxo toxicity.

  1. Comparative Advantage, Relative Wages, and the Accumulation of Human Capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teulings, Coen N.

    2005-01-01

    I apply Ricardo's principle of comparative advantage to a theory of factor substitutability in a model with a continuum of worker and job types. Highly skilled workers have a comparative advantage in complex jobs. The model satisfies the distance-dependent elasticity of substitution (DIDES) characteristic: substitutability between types declines…

  2. The DNA Sequence And Comparative Analysis Of Human Chromosome5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmutz, Jeremy; Martin, Joel; Terry, Astrid; Couronne, Olivier; Grimwood, Jane; Lowry, Steve; Gordon, Laurie A.; Scott, Duncan; Xie,Gary; Huang, Wayne; Hellsten, Uffe; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; She, Xinwei; Prabhakar, Shyam; Aerts, Andrea; Altherr, Michael; Bajorek, Eva; Black,Stacey; Branscomb, Elbert; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chan,Yee Man; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C.; Escobar, Julio; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Kadner,Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Lopez, Frederick; Lou,Yunian; Martinez, Diego; Medina, Catherine; Morgan, Jenna; Nandkeshwar,Richard; Noonan, James P.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Priest, James; Ramirez, Lucia; Retterer, James; Rodriguez, Alex; Rogers,Stephanie; Salamov, Asaf; Salazar, Angelica; Thayer, Nina; Tice, Hope; Tsai, Ming; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; Wheeler, Jeremy; Wu, Kevin; Yang,Joan; Dickson, Mark; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Eichler, Evan E.; Olsen, Anne; Pennacchio, Len A.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Richardson, Paul; Lucas, SusanM.; Myers, Richard M.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2004-08-01

    Chromosome 5 is one of the largest human chromosomes and contains numerous intrachromosomal duplications, yet it has one of the lowest gene densities. This is partially explained by numerous gene-poor regions that display a remarkable degree of noncoding conservation with non-mammalian vertebrates, suggesting that they are functionally constrained. In total, we compiled 177.7 million base pairs of highly accurate finished sequence containing 923 manually curated protein-coding genes including the protocadherin and interleukin gene families. We also completely sequenced versions of the large chromosome-5-specific internal duplications. These duplications are very recent evolutionary events and probably have a mechanistic role in human physiological variation, as deletions in these regions are the cause of debilitating disorders including spinal muscular atrophy.

  3. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Human Fungal Pathogens Causing Paracoccidioidomycosis

    OpenAIRE

    Desjardins, Christopher A; Champion, Mia D.; Holder, Jason W.; Muszewska, Anna; Goldberg, Jonathan; Bailao, Alexandre M.; Brigido, Marcelo de Macedo; Silva Ferreira, Marcia Eliana da; Garcia, Ana Maria; Grynberg, Marcin; Gujja, Sharvari; Heiman, David I.; Henn, Matthew R.; Kodira, Chinnappa D.; Leon-Narvaez, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Paracoccidioides is a fungal pathogen and the cause of paracoccidioidomycosis, a health-threatening human systemic mycosis endemic to Latin America. Infection by Paracoccidioides, a dimorphic fungus in the order Onygenales, is coupled with a thermally regulated transition from a soil-dwelling filamentous form to a yeast-like pathogenic form. To better understand the genetic basis of growth and pathogenicity in Paracoccidioides, we sequenced the genomes of two strains of Paracoccidioides brasi...

  4. Age-related changes in lamin A/C expression in cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afilalo, Jonathan; Sebag, Igal A; Chalifour, Lorraine E; Rivas, Daniel; Akter, Rahima; Sharma, Kamal; Duque, Gustavo

    2007-09-01

    Lamin A and C (A/C) are type V intermediate filaments that form the nuclear lamina. Lamin A/C mutations lead to reduced expression of lamin A/C and diverse phenotypes such as familial cardiomyopathies and accelerated aging syndromes. Normal aging is associated with reduced expression of lamin A/C in osteoblasts and dermal fibroblasts but has never been assessed in cardiomyocytes. Our objective was to compare the expression of lamin A/C in cardiomyocytes of old (24 mo) versus young (4 mo) C57Bl/6J mice using a well-validated mouse model of aging. Lamin B1 was used as a control. Immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence analyses showed reduced expression of lamin A/C in cardiomyocyte nuclei of old mice (proportion of nuclei expressing lamin A/C, 9% vs. 62%, P < 0.001). Lamin A/C distribution was scattered peripherally and perinuclear in old mice, whereas it was homogeneous throughout the nuclei in young mice. Western blot analyses confirmed reduced expression of lamin A/C in nuclear extracts of old mice (ratio of lamin A/C to B1, 0.6 vs. 1.2, P < 0.01). Echocardiographic studies showed increased left ventricular wall thickness with preserved cavity size (concentric remodeling), increased left ventricular mass, and a slight reduction in fractional shortening in old mice. This is the first study to show that normal aging is associated with reduced expression and altered distribution of lamin A/C in nuclei of cardiomyocytes.

  5. Angiotensin II stimulates hyperplasia but not hypertrophy in immature ovine cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundgren, N C; Giraud, G D; Stork, P J S; Maylie, J G; Thornburg, K L

    2003-05-01

    Rat and sheep cardiac myocytes become binucleate as they complete the 'terminal differentiation' process soon after birth and are not able to divide thereafter. Angiotensin II (Ang II) is known to stimulate hypertrophic changes in rodent cardiomyocytes under both in vivo and in vitro conditions via the AT1 receptor and intracellular extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) signalling cascade. We sought to develop culture methods for immature sheep cardiomyocytes in order to test the hypothesis that Ang II is a hypertrophic agent in the immature myocardium of the sheep. We isolated fetal sheep cardiomyocytes and cultured them for 96 h, added Ang II and phenylephrine (PE) for 48 h, and measured footprint area and proliferation (5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) uptake) separately in mono- vs. binucleate myocytes. We found that neither Ang II nor PE changed the footprint area of mononucleated cells. PE stimulated an increase in footprint area of binucleate cells but Ang II did not. Ang II increased myocyte BrdU uptake compared to serum free conditions, but PE did not affect BrdU uptake. The MAP kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor UO126 prevented BrdU uptake in Ang II-stimulated cells and prevented cell hypertrophy in PE-stimulated cells. This paper establishes culture methods for immature sheep cardiomyocytes and reports that: (1) Ang II is not a hypertrophic agent; (2) Ang II stimulates hyperplastic growth among mononucleate myocytes; (3) PE is a hypertrophic agent in binucleate myocytes; and (4) the ERK cascade is required for the proliferation effect of Ang II and the hypertrophic effect of PE.

  6. Cardiomyocyte microvesicles contain DNA/RNA and convey biological messages to target cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Waldenström

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Shedding microvesicles are membrane released vesicles derived directly from the plasma membrane. Exosomes are released membrane vesicles of late endosomal origin that share structural and biochemical characteristics with prostasomes. Microvesicles/exosomes can mediate messages between cells and affect various cell-related processes in their target cells. We describe newly detected microvesicles/exosomes from cardiomyocytes and depict some of their biological functions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Microvesicles/exosomes from media of cultured cardiomyocytes derived from adult mouse heart were isolated by differential centrifugation including preparative ultracentrifugation and identified by transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry. They were surrounded by a bilayered membrane and flow cytometry revealed presence of both caveolin-3 and flotillin-1 while clathrin and annexin-2 were not detected. Microvesicle/exosome mRNA was identified and out of 1520 detected mRNA, 423 could be directly connected in a biological network. Furthermore, by a specific technique involving TDT polymerase, 343 different chromosomal DNA sequences were identified in the microvesicles/exosomes. Microvesicle/exosomal DNA transfer was possible into target fibroblasts, where exosomes stained for DNA were seen in the fibroblast cytosol and even in the nuclei. The gene expression was affected in fibroblasts transfected by microvesicles/exosomes and among 333 gene expression changes there were 175 upregulations and 158 downregulations compared with controls. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study suggests that microvesicles/exosomes released from cardiomyocytes, where we propose that exosomes derived from cardiomyocytes could be denoted "cardiosomes", can be involved in a metabolic course of events in target cells by facilitating an array of metabolism-related processes including gene expression changes.

  7. Cardiomyocyte microvesicles contain DNA/RNA and convey biological messages to target cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldenström, Anders; Gennebäck, Nina; Hellman, Urban; Ronquist, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    Shedding microvesicles are membrane released vesicles derived directly from the plasma membrane. Exosomes are released membrane vesicles of late endosomal origin that share structural and biochemical characteristics with prostasomes. Microvesicles/exosomes can mediate messages between cells and affect various cell-related processes in their target cells. We describe newly detected microvesicles/exosomes from cardiomyocytes and depict some of their biological functions. Microvesicles/exosomes from media of cultured cardiomyocytes derived from adult mouse heart were isolated by differential centrifugation including preparative ultracentrifugation and identified by transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry. They were surrounded by a bilayered membrane and flow cytometry revealed presence of both caveolin-3 and flotillin-1 while clathrin and annexin-2 were not detected. Microvesicle/exosome mRNA was identified and out of 1520 detected mRNA, 423 could be directly connected in a biological network. Furthermore, by a specific technique involving TDT polymerase, 343 different chromosomal DNA sequences were identified in the microvesicles/exosomes. Microvesicle/exosomal DNA transfer was possible into target fibroblasts, where exosomes stained for DNA were seen in the fibroblast cytosol and even in the nuclei. The gene expression was affected in fibroblasts transfected by microvesicles/exosomes and among 333 gene expression changes there were 175 upregulations and 158 downregulations compared with controls. Our study suggests that microvesicles/exosomes released from cardiomyocytes, where we propose that exosomes derived from cardiomyocytes could be denoted "cardiosomes", can be involved in a metabolic course of events in target cells by facilitating an array of metabolism-related processes including gene expression changes.

  8. Comparative genomics of the neglected human malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, Jane M.; Adams, John H.; Silva, Joana C.; Bidwell, Shelby L.; Lorenzi, Hernan; Caler, Elisabet; Crabtree, Jonathan; Angiuoli, Samuel V.; Merino, Emilio F.; Amedeo, Paolo; Cheng, Qin; Coulson, Richard M. R.; Crabb, Brendan S.; del Portillo, Hernando A.; Essien, Kobby; Feldblyum, Tamara V.; Fernandez-Becerra, Carmen; Gilson, Paul R.; Gueye, Amy H.; Guo, Xiang; Kang’a, Simon; Kooij, Taco W. A.; Korsinczky, Michael; Meyer, Esmeralda V.-S.; Nene, Vish; Paulsen, Ian; White, Owen; Ralph, Stuart A.; Ren, Qinghu; Sargeant, Tobias J.; Salzberg, Steven L.; Stoeckert, Christian J.; Sullivan, Steven A.; Yamamoto, Marcio Massao; Hoffman, Stephen L.; Wortman, Jennifer R.; Gardner, Malcolm J.; Galinski, Mary R.; Barnwell, John W.; Fraser-Liggett, Claire M.

    2008-01-01

    The human malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax is responsible for 25-40% of the ~515 million annual cases of malaria worldwide. Although seldom fatal, the parasite elicits severe and incapacitating clinical symptoms and often relapses months after a primary infection has cleared. Despite its importance as a major human pathogen, P. vivax is little studied because it cannot be propagated in the laboratory except in non-human primates. We determined the genome sequence of P. vivax in order to shed light on its distinctive biologic features, and as a means to drive development of new drugs and vaccines. Here we describe the synteny and isochore structure of P. vivax chromosomes, and show that the parasite resembles other malaria parasites in gene content and metabolic potential, but possesses novel gene families and potential alternate invasion pathways not recognized previously. Completion of the P. vivax genome provides the scientific community with a valuable resource that can be used to advance scientific investigation into this neglected species. PMID:18843361

  9. Endothelin-1 induces connective tissue growth factor expression in cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recchia, Anna Grazia; Filice, Elisabetta; Pellegrino, Daniela; Dobrina, Aldo; Cerra, Maria Carmela; Maggiolini, Marcello

    2009-03-01

    Endothelin (ET)-1 is a vasoconstrictor involved in cardiovascular diseases. Connective tissue growth factor/CCN2 (CTGF) is a fibrotic mediator overexpressed in human atherosclerotic lesions, myocardial infarction, and hypertension. In different cell types CTGF regulates cell proliferation/apoptosis, migration, and extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation and plays important roles in angiogenesis, chondrogenesis, osteogenesis, tissue repair, cancer and fibrosis. In the present study, we investigated the ET-1 signaling which triggers CTGF expression in cultured adult mouse atrial-muscle HL-1 cells used as a model system. ET-1 activated the CTGF promoter and induced CTGF expression at both mRNA and protein levels. Real-time PCR analysis revealed CTGF induction also in isolated rat heart preparations perfused with ET-1. Several intracellular signals elicited by ET-1 via ET receptors and even Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) contributed to the up-regulation of CTGF, including ERK activation and induction of the AP-1 components c-fos and c-jun, as also evaluated by ChIP analysis. Moreover, in cells treated with ET-1 the expression of ECM component decorin was abolished by CTGF silencing, indicating that CTGF is involved in ET-1 induced ECM accumulation not only in a direct manner but also through downstream effectors. Collectively, our data indicate that CTGF could be a mediator of the profibrotic effects of ET-1 in cardiomyocytes. CTGF inhibitors should be considered in setting a comprehensive pharmacological approach towards ET-1 induced cardiovascular diseases.

  10. Comparing biological motion perception in two distinct human societies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Pica

    Full Text Available Cross cultural studies have played a pivotal role in elucidating the extent to which behavioral and mental characteristics depend on specific environmental influences. Surprisingly, little field research has been carried out on a fundamentally important perceptual ability, namely the perception of biological motion. In this report, we present details of studies carried out with the help of volunteers from the Mundurucu indigene, a group of people native to Amazonian territories in Brazil. We employed standard biological motion perception tasks inspired by over 30 years of laboratory research, in which observers attempt to decipher the walking direction of point-light (PL humans and animals. Do our effortless skills at perceiving biological activity from PL animations, as revealed in laboratory settings, generalize to people who have never before seen representational depictions of human and animal activity? The results of our studies provide a clear answer to this important, previously unanswered question. Mundurucu observers readily perceived the coherent, global shape depicted in PL walkers, and experienced the classic inversion effects that are typically found when such stimuli are turned upside down. In addition, their performance was in accord with important recent findings in the literature, in the abundant ease with which they extracted direction information from local motion invariants alone. We conclude that the effortless, veridical perception of PL biological motion is a spontaneous and universal perceptual ability, occurring both inside and outside traditional laboratory environments.

  11. Comparing Individual Instruction & Lecture Formats in Human Anatomy & Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Fred H.

    1989-01-01

    Provides a description of and information about an individualized program in science at Central Community College. Reports on a study which compares lecture with individualized instruction. Concludes that there were no significant differences between heterogeneous groups, and there are advantages and disadvantages to each method. Diagrams and…

  12. A piezoelectric electrospun platform for in situ cardiomyocyte contraction analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beringer, Laura Toth

    hyperpolarized state, proving their potential use as contractile analysis microdevices. The third and final aim of this dissertation was to be able to measure contraction events from both cultured cardiomyocytes and whole tissues in situ. Rat neonatal cardiomyocytes grew on the prepared collagen/PVDF-TrFe nanogenerators and yielded a distinct signal after 8 days of growth. These contractions were verified with live cell imaging and video recording. In addition, cardiomyocyte exposure to the drug isoproterenol increased contraction strength and frequency, which was reflected in the nanogenerator recordings. Frog whole heart and heart tissue slices also were interfaced with the fabricated nanogenerators and signals were recorded. The same held true for heart slices from male Sprague-Dawley rats. These signals were determined to be statistically different compared to the control baseline nanogenerator recordings in media in the absence of cell culture. Overall the fabricated nanogenerators have demonstrated their potential to be used as in situ analysis tools for contractile events and have potential in the field of personalized medicine and drug diagnostic assays. The facile fabrication and ease of setup to obtain the electrical voltage signal corresponding to the contractile events are what sets the nanogenerator apart from any polymer based sensor available today.

  13. COMPARATIVE GENOTOXIC RESPONSES TO ARSENITE IN GUINEA PIG, MOUSE, RAT AND HUMAN LYMPHOCYTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparative genotoxic responses to arsenite in guinea pig, mouse, rat and human lymphocytes.Inorganic arsenic is a known human carcinogen causing skin, lung, and bladder cancer following chronic exposures. Yet, long-term laboratory animal carcinogenicity studies have ...

  14. Comparative digital cartilage histology for human and common osteoarthritis models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedersen DR

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Douglas R Pedersen, Jessica E Goetz, Gail L Kurriger, James A MartinDepartment of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USAPurpose: This study addresses the species-specific and site-specific details of weight-bearing articular cartilage zone depths and chondrocyte distributions among humans and common osteoarthritis (OA animal models using contemporary digital imaging tools. Histological analysis is the gold-standard research tool for evaluating cartilage health, OA severity, and treatment efficacy. Historically, evaluations were made by expert analysts. However, state-of-the-art tools have been developed that allow for digitization of entire histological sections for computer-aided analysis. Large volumes of common digital cartilage metrics directly complement elucidation of trends in OA inducement and concomitant potential treatments.Materials and methods: Sixteen fresh human knees, 26 adult New Zealand rabbit stifles, and 104 bovine lateral plateaus were measured for four cartilage zones and the cell densities within each zone. Each knee was divided into four weight-bearing sites: the medial and lateral plateaus and femoral condyles.Results: One-way analysis of variance followed by pairwise multiple comparisons (Holm–Sidak method at a significance of 0.05 clearly confirmed the variability between cartilage depths at each site, between sites in the same species, and between weight-bearing articular cartilage definitions in different species.Conclusion: The present study clearly demonstrates multisite, multispecies differences in normal weight-bearing articular cartilage, which can be objectively quantified by a common digital histology imaging technique. The clear site-specific differences in normal cartilage must be taken into consideration when characterizing the pathoetiology of OA models. Together, these provide a path to consistently analyze the volume and variety of histologic slides necessarily generated

  15. Comparative view on risk factor of human death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Atsuhiko; Sugahara, Tsutomu [Health Research Foundation, Kyoto (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    Human being, namely. 'living' get involved in risk factor. Even if risk is limited to lethal danger, human history is coresponding with numberless risks from ancient up to today. For example, there is increase in risk of death by car-crash owing to get high efficiency in transfer. In Japan, the death toll by car-accident is about ten thousands per year constantly. State of deaths by car-accident not only include driver itself but cyclist and pedestrian. Death rate of both the cyclist and pedestrian amounts to 40% of all. In the age, rate of fracture as result of fall-down while walking is very high. It shows that the aged who give up driving and get out of danger car-crush are attacked the another accident as walkers. On type of danger, the decrease in risk of one-side come to increase in risk of other side. That is 'risk trade-off'. Examples of risk trade-off as above are numerous in environment. Acceptable death rate of various causes is about 10{sup -4} per year in generally. Flight accident happens on rare occasions (10{sup -7} per year in Japan, usually). Spite of insignificant probability, people fear by both reasons that the possibility of rescue is very few and the size of accident is enormous. In the cases of flight and nuclear power plant, estimated accidents is sever, but its probability is very small. Therefore, risk of annual deaths by accident must be considered as multiplication of size of risk (deaths per year) by probability (frequency per year). Obtained result by such analysis shall conduct to right risk perception and stable 'risk acceptance'. (author)

  16. Comparative Evaluation of the Practical Areas of Human Resource Management in Lithuania and Latvia

    OpenAIRE

    Lobanova, L; Ozoliņa-Ozola, I

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to identify the significant aspects of human resource management practices. The article discusses significant aspects of human resource management practices in the context of the high performance human resource management. The authors carried out a comparative theoretical analysis of the various functional areas of human resource management practices. This paper presents the results of experts’ evaluation of human resource management in organizations of Latvia and Lith...

  17. Comparative Evaluation of the Practical Areas of Human Resource Management in Lithuania and Latvia

    OpenAIRE

    Lobanova, L; Ozoliņa-Ozola, I

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to identify the significant aspects of human resource management practices. The article discusses significant aspects of human resource management practices in the context of the high performance human resource management. The authors carried out a comparative theoretical analysis of the various functional areas of human resource management practices. This paper presents the results of experts’ evaluation of human resource management in organizations of Latvia and Lith...

  18. Substance P Receptor Signaling Mediates Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiomyocyte Apoptosis and Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Chemoresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Prema; Kasembeli, Moses; Bharadwaj, Uddalak; Engineer, Nikita; Eckols, Kris T; Tweardy, David J

    2016-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX), an anthracycline, is broadly considered the most active single agent available for treating breast cancer but has been known to induce cardiotoxicity. Although DOX is highly effective in treating triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), DOX can have poor outcomes owing to induction of chemoresistance. There is an urgent need to develop new therapies for TNBC aimed at improving DOX outcome and DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. Substance P (SP), a neuropeptide involved in pain transmission is known to stimulate production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Elevated cardiac ROS is linked with heart injury and failure. We investigated the role of SP in chemotherapy-associated death of cardiomyocytes and chemoresistance. We showed that pretreating a cardiomyocyte cell line (H9C2) and a TNBC cell line (MDA-MB 231) with aprepitant, a SP receptor antagonist that is routinely used to treat chemotherapy-associated associated nausea, decreased DOX-induced reduction of cell viability, apoptotic cell death, and ROS production in cardiomyocytes and increased DOX-induced reduction of cell viability, apoptotic cell death, and ROS production in TNBC cells compared with cells treated with DOX alone. Our findings demonstrate the ability of aprepitant to decrease DOX-induced killing of cardiomyocytes and to increase cancer cell sensitivity to DOX, which has tremendous clinical significance.

  19. Ginsenoside-Rb1 Protects Hypoxic- and Ischemic-Damaged Cardiomyocytes by Regulating Expression of miRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Yan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ginsenoside (GS-Rb1 is one of the most important active compounds of ginseng, with extensive evidence of its cardioprotective properties. However, the miRNA mediated mechanism of GS-Rb1 on cardiomyocytes remains unclear. Here, the roles of miRNAs in cardioprotective activity of GS-Rb1 were investigated in hypoxic- and ischemic-damaged cardiomyocytes. Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCMs were first isolated, cultured, and then incubated with or without GS-Rb1 (2.5–40 μM in vitro under conditions of hypoxia and ischemia. Cell growth, proliferation, and apoptosis were detected by MTT and flow cytometry. Expressions of various microRNAs were analyzed by real-time PCR. Compared with that of the control group, GS-Rb1 significantly decreased cell death in a dose-dependent manner and expressions of mir-1, mir-29a, and mir-208 obviously increased in the experimental model groups. In contrast, expressions of mir-21 and mir-320 were significantly downregulated and GS-Rb1 could reverse the differences in a certain extent. The miRNAs might be involved in the protective effect of GS-Rb1 on the hypoxia/ischemia injuries in cardiomyocytes. The effect might be based on the upregulation of mir-1, mir-29a, and mir-208 and downregulation of mir-21 and mir-320. This might provide us a new target to explore the novel strategy for ischemic cardioprotection.

  20. Role of nonmuscle myosin IIB and N-RAP in cell spreading and myofibril assembly in primary mouse cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shajia; Horowits, Robert

    2008-09-01

    We investigated the role of nonmuscle myosin heavy chain (NMHC) IIB in cultured embryonic mouse cardiomyocytes by specific knockdown using RNA interference. NMHC IIB protein levels decreased 90% compared with mock-transfected cells by 3 days post transfection. NMHC IIB knockdown resulted in a slow decrease in N-RAP protein levels over 6 days with no change in N-RAP transcript levels. N-RAP is a scaffold for alpha-actinin and actin assembly during myofibrillogenesis, and we quantitated myofibril accumulation by morphometric analysis of alpha-actinin organization. Between 3 and 6 days, NMHC IIB knockdown was accompanied by the abolishment of cardiomyocyte spreading. During this period the rate of myofibril accumulation steadily decreased, correlating with the slowly decreasing levels of N-RAP. Between 6 and 8 days NMHC IIB and N-RAP protein levels recovered, and cardiomyocyte spreading and myofibril accumulation resumed. Inhibition of proteasome function using MG132 led to accumulation of excess N-RAP, and the secondary decrease in N-RAP that otherwise accompanied NMHC IIB knockdown was abolished. The results show that NMHC IIB knockdown led to decreased N-RAP levels through proteasome-mediated degradation. Furthermore, these proteins have distinct functional roles, with NMHC IIB playing a role in cardiomyocyte spreading and N-RAP functioning in myofibril assembly.

  1. MicroRNA-34a regulates high glucose-induced apoptosis in H9c2 cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fang; Li, Bo; Wei, Yin-zhi; Zhou, Bin; Wang, Han; Chen, Ming; Gan, Xue-dong; Wang, Zhao-hui; Xiong, Shi-xi

    2013-12-01

    Hyperglycemia is an important initiator of cardiovascular disease, contributing to the development of cardiomyocyte death and diabetic complications. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether high glucose state could induce apoptosis of rat cardiomyocyte cell line H9c2 through microRNA-mediated Bcl-2 signaling pathway. The expression of miR-34a and Bcl-2 mRNA was detected by using real-time PCR. Western blotting was used to examine the changes in apoptosis-associated protein Bcl-2. Apoptosis of H9c2 cells was tested by using flow cytometry. The results showed that the expression of miR-34a was significantly elevated and that of Bcl-2 was strongly reduced, and apoptosis of cardiomyocytes was apparently increased in the high-glucose-treated H9c2 cells as compared with normal-glucose-treated controls. In addition, we identified Bcl-2 gene was the target of miR-34a. miR-34a mimics reduced the expression of Bcl-2 and increased glucose-induced apoptosis, but miR-34a inhibitor acted as the opposite mediator. Our data demonstrate that miR-34a contributes to high glucose-induced decreases in Bcl-2 expression and subsequent cardiomyocyte apoptosis.

  2. Substance P Receptor Signaling Mediates Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiomyocyte Apoptosis and Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Chemoresistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prema Robinson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Doxorubicin (DOX, an anthracycline, is broadly considered the most active single agent available for treating breast cancer but has been known to induce cardiotoxicity. Although DOX is highly effective in treating triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC, DOX can have poor outcomes owing to induction of chemoresistance. There is an urgent need to develop new therapies for TNBC aimed at improving DOX outcome and DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. Substance P (SP, a neuropeptide involved in pain transmission is known to stimulate production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Elevated cardiac ROS is linked with heart injury and failure. We investigated the role of SP in chemotherapy-associated death of cardiomyocytes and chemoresistance. We showed that pretreating a cardiomyocyte cell line (H9C2 and a TNBC cell line (MDA-MB 231 with aprepitant, a SP receptor antagonist that is routinely used to treat chemotherapy-associated associated nausea, decreased DOX-induced reduction of cell viability, apoptotic cell death, and ROS production in cardiomyocytes and increased DOX-induced reduction of cell viability, apoptotic cell death, and ROS production in TNBC cells compared with cells treated with DOX alone. Our findings demonstrate the ability of aprepitant to decrease DOX-induced killing of cardiomyocytes and to increase cancer cell sensitivity to DOX, which has tremendous clinical significance.

  3. Transplantation of neonatal cardiomyocytes plus fibrin sealant restores myocardial function in a rat model of myocardial infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yong-shun; GAO Bing-ren

    2007-01-01

    Background Most cardiac regenerative approaches can restore injured heart muscles. In this study, we investigated if fibrin sealant could help neonatal cardiomyocytes restore myocardial function in a rat model of myocardial infarction.Methods The left anterior descending artery in adult female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats was ligated to make a myocardial infarction model. Neonatal ventricular cardiomyocytes from one-day male SD rats were isolated, labeled and cultured. The cells were injected into the infarcted area three weeks later. The animals were randomized into four recipient groups: (1) cardiomyocytes plus fibrin sealant (group CF, n=10); (2) cardiomyocytes alone (group C, n=10); (3)fibrin sealant recipients alone (group F, n=10); (4) control group (n=10). Four weeks after transplantation,echocardiography and Langerdoff model were used to assess heart function. Immunohistochemical staining and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were performed to track the implanted cardiomyocytes and detect the sex-determining region Y gene on Y chromosome.Results Echocardiography showed the fraction shortening (FS) in groups CF, C, F and control group was (27.80±6.32)%, (22.29±4.54)%, (19.24±6.29)% and (20.36±3.29)% respectively with statistically significant differences in group CF compared with the other groups (P<0.05). The Langendoff model revealed that the left ventricular development of peak pressure (LVDPmax, mmHg) in groups CF, C, F and control group was 104.81±17.05, 80.97±21.60, 72.07±26.17 and 71.42±17.55 respectively with statistically significant differences in group CF compared with the other groups (P<0.05). Pathological examination and PCR indicated that transplanted cardiomyocytes in group CF survived better than those in the other groups.Conclusion Transplanted neonatal cardiomyocytes plus fibrin sealant can survive in myocardial infarctioned area and improve heart function greatly in rat models.

  4. Bioavailability of natural carotenoids in human skin compared to blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinke, Martina C; Darvin, Maxim E; Vollert, Henning; Lademann, Jürgen

    2010-10-01

    Skin functions and structure are significantly influenced by nutrients. Antioxidants protect the supportive layer of the skin against any damaging irradiation effects and the action of free radicals. A lack of suitable methods means that the pharmacokinetic properties of systemically applied carotenoids transferred into the skin remain poorly understood. In this study, a natural kale extract or placebo oil were given orally to 22 healthy volunteers for 4 weeks. Carotenoid bioaccessibility was evaluated using non-invasive resonance Raman spectroscopy on the palm and forehead skin. For the analysis of the blood serum, the standard HPLC method was used. The blood and skin levels of the carotenoids increased significantly during the study but compared to the blood serum values, increases in skin were delayed and depended on the dermal area as well as on the carotenoid. Lycopene, measured as being low in the extract, increases more in the skin compared to the blood indicating that the natural mixture of the extract stabilizes the antioxidative network in the skin. After supplementation had ended, the carotenoids decreased much faster in the blood than in the skin. The delayed decrease in the skin may indicate a peripheral buffer function of the skin for carotenoids.

  5. Comparative abuse liability of sertraline, alprazolam, and dextroamphetamine in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawertailo, L A; Busto, U; Kaplan, H L; Sellers, E M

    1995-04-01

    Sertraline is an effective antidepressant acting as a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. The subjective and behavioral effects of sertraline were studied and compared with the effects of alprazolam and dextroamphetamine in a within-subject, randomized, double-blind study in 20 volunteers aged 18 to 46 years. These subjects were experienced but nondependent users of central nervous system depressants who had the ability to reliably distinguish secobarbital, 150 mg, from placebo and to report positive subjective effects of secobarbital in an experimental setting. The following drug conditions were tested: sertraline, 100 and 200 mg; alprazolam, 1 mg; dextroamphetamine, 10 mg; and placebo. Drug effects were assessed with an objective test of psychomotor performance, subject-rated questionnaires, and observer-rated scales. Both alprazolam and dextroamphetamine were distinguishable from placebo on most measures, but sertraline produced effects discernable from placebo on only a few measures. At 1 hour postdrug administration, dextroamphetamine and alprazolam produced positive effects on several measures of elation, euphoria, and drug liking greater than placebo and both doses of sertraline. In contrast, sertraline produced higher scores on measures of dysphoria and physical unpleasantness than did the other drug conditions. Observer ratings of satisfaction with the drug and other pharmacologic effects were consistent with these findings. Results from this study indicate that sertraline, at the doses tested, does not possess the behavioral effects profile considered to be indicative of abuse potential when compared with alprazolam and dextroamphetamine.

  6. Acute heart failure with cardiomyocyte atrophy induced in adult mice by ablation of cardiac myosin light chain kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massengill, Michael T; Ashraf, Hassan M; Chowdhury, Rajib R; Chrzanowski, Stephen M; Kar, Jeena; Warren, Sonisha A; Walter, Glenn A; Zeng, Huadong; Kang, Byung-Ho; Anderson, Robert H; Moss, Richard L; Kasahara, Hideko

    2016-07-01

    Under pressure overload, initial adaptive hypertrophy of the heart is followed by cardiomyocyte elongation, reduced contractile force, and failure. The mechanisms governing the transition to failure are not fully understood. Pressure overload reduced cardiac myosin light chain kinase (cMLCK) by ∼80% within 1 week and persists. Knockdown of cMLCK in cardiomyocytes resulted in reduced cardiac contractility and sarcomere disorganization. Thus, we hypothesized that acute reduction of cMLCK may be causative for reduced contractility and cardiomyocyte remodelling during the transition from compensated to decompensated cardiac hypertrophy. To mimic acute cMLCK reduction in adult hearts, the floxed-Mylk3 gene that encodes cMLCK was inducibly ablated in Mylk3(flox/flox)/merCremer mice (Mylk3-KO), and compared with two control mice (Mylk3(flox/flox) and Mylk3(+/+)/merCremer) following tamoxifen injection (50 mg/kg/day, 2 consecutive days). In Mylk3-KO mice, reduction of cMLCK protein was evident by 4 days, with a decline to below the level of detection by 6 days. By 7 days, these mice exhibited heart failure, with reduction of fractional shortening compared with those in two control groups (19.8 vs. 28.0% and 27.7%). Severely convoluted cardiomyocytes with sarcomeric disorganization, wavy fibres, and cell death were demonstrated in Mylk3-KO mice. The cardiomyocytes were also unable to thicken adaptively to pressure overload. Our results, using a new mouse model mimicking an acute reduction of cMLCK, suggest that cMLCK plays a pivotal role in the transition from compensated to decompensated hypertrophy via sarcomeric disorganization. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Human Fungal Pathogens Causing Paracoccidioidomycosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Christopher A.; Champion, Mia D.; Holder, Jason W.; Muszewska, Anna; Goldberg, Jonathan; Bailão, Alexandre M.; Brigido, Marcelo Macedo; Ferreira, Márcia Eliana da Silva; Garcia, Ana Maria; Grynberg, Marcin; Gujja, Sharvari; Heiman, David I.; Henn, Matthew R.; Kodira, Chinnappa D.; León-Narváez, Henry; Longo, Larissa V. G.; Ma, Li-Jun; Malavazi, Iran; Matsuo, Alisson L.; Morais, Flavia V.; Pereira, Maristela; Rodríguez-Brito, Sabrina; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Salem-Izacc, Silvia M.; Sykes, Sean M.; Teixeira, Marcus Melo; Vallejo, Milene C.; Walter, Maria Emília Machado Telles; Yandava, Chandri; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Zucker, Jeremy; Felipe, Maria Sueli; Goldman, Gustavo H.; Haas, Brian J.; McEwen, Juan G.; Nino-Vega, Gustavo; Puccia, Rosana; San-Blas, Gioconda; Soares, Celia Maria de Almeida; Birren, Bruce W.; Cuomo, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    Paracoccidioides is a fungal pathogen and the cause of paracoccidioidomycosis, a health-threatening human systemic mycosis endemic to Latin America. Infection by Paracoccidioides, a dimorphic fungus in the order Onygenales, is coupled with a thermally regulated transition from a soil-dwelling filamentous form to a yeast-like pathogenic form. To better understand the genetic basis of growth and pathogenicity in Paracoccidioides, we sequenced the genomes of two strains of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb03 and Pb18) and one strain of Paracoccidioides lutzii (Pb01). These genomes range in size from 29.1 Mb to 32.9 Mb and encode 7,610 to 8,130 genes. To enable genetic studies, we mapped 94% of the P. brasiliensis Pb18 assembly onto five chromosomes. We characterized gene family content across Onygenales and related fungi, and within Paracoccidioides we found expansions of the fungal-specific kinase family FunK1. Additionally, the Onygenales have lost many genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism and fewer genes involved in protein metabolism, resulting in a higher ratio of proteases to carbohydrate active enzymes in the Onygenales than their relatives. To determine if gene content correlated with growth on different substrates, we screened the non-pathogenic onygenale Uncinocarpus reesii, which has orthologs for 91% of Paracoccidioides metabolic genes, for growth on 190 carbon sources. U. reesii showed growth on a limited range of carbohydrates, primarily basic plant sugars and cell wall components; this suggests that Onygenales, including dimorphic fungi, can degrade cellulosic plant material in the soil. In addition, U. reesii grew on gelatin and a wide range of dipeptides and amino acids, indicating a preference for proteinaceous growth substrates over carbohydrates, which may enable these fungi to also degrade animal biomass. These capabilities for degrading plant and animal substrates suggest a duality in lifestyle that could enable pathogenic species of

  8. Comparative genomic analysis of human fungal pathogens causing paracoccidioidomycosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Desjardins

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioides is a fungal pathogen and the cause of paracoccidioidomycosis, a health-threatening human systemic mycosis endemic to Latin America. Infection by Paracoccidioides, a dimorphic fungus in the order Onygenales, is coupled with a thermally regulated transition from a soil-dwelling filamentous form to a yeast-like pathogenic form. To better understand the genetic basis of growth and pathogenicity in Paracoccidioides, we sequenced the genomes of two strains of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb03 and Pb18 and one strain of Paracoccidioides lutzii (Pb01. These genomes range in size from 29.1 Mb to 32.9 Mb and encode 7,610 to 8,130 genes. To enable genetic studies, we mapped 94% of the P. brasiliensis Pb18 assembly onto five chromosomes. We characterized gene family content across Onygenales and related fungi, and within Paracoccidioides we found expansions of the fungal-specific kinase family FunK1. Additionally, the Onygenales have lost many genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism and fewer genes involved in protein metabolism, resulting in a higher ratio of proteases to carbohydrate active enzymes in the Onygenales than their relatives. To determine if gene content correlated with growth on different substrates, we screened the non-pathogenic onygenale Uncinocarpus reesii, which has orthologs for 91% of Paracoccidioides metabolic genes, for growth on 190 carbon sources. U. reesii showed growth on a limited range of carbohydrates, primarily basic plant sugars and cell wall components; this suggests that Onygenales, including dimorphic fungi, can degrade cellulosic plant material in the soil. In addition, U. reesii grew on gelatin and a wide range of dipeptides and amino acids, indicating a preference for proteinaceous growth substrates over carbohydrates, which may enable these fungi to also degrade animal biomass. These capabilities for degrading plant and animal substrates suggest a duality in lifestyle that could enable pathogenic

  9. Glucocorticoid Induced Leucine Zipper inhibits apoptosis of cardiomyocytes by doxorubicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar, David; Strom, Joshua; Chen, Qin M., E-mail: qchen@email.arizona.edu

    2014-04-01

    Doxorubicin (Dox) is an indispensable chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of various forms of neoplasia such as lung, breast, ovarian, and bladder cancers. Cardiotoxicity is a major concern for patients receiving Dox therapy. Previous work from our laboratory indicated that glucocorticoids (GCs) alleviate Dox-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. Here we have found Glucocorticoid-Induced Leucine Zipper (GILZ) to be a mediator of GC-induced cytoprotection. GILZ was found to be induced in cardiomyocytes by GC treatment. Knocking down of GILZ using siRNA resulted in cancelation of GC-induced cytoprotection against apoptosis by Dox treatment. Overexpressing GILZ by transfection was able to protect cells from apoptosis induced by Dox as measured by caspase activation, Annexin V binding and morphologic changes. Western blot analyses indicate that GILZ overexpression prevented cytochrome c release from mitochondria and cleavage of caspase-3. When bcl-2 family proteins were examined, we found that GILZ overexpression causes induction of the pro-survival protein Bcl-xL. Since siRNA against Bcl-xL reverses GC induced cytoprotection, Bcl-xL induction represents an important event in GILZ-induced cytoprotection. Our data suggest that GILZ functions as a cytoprotective gene in cardiomyocytes. - Highlights: • Corticosteroids act as a cytoprotective agent in cardiomyocytes • Corticosteroids induce GILZ expression in cardiomyocytes • Elevated GILZ results in resistance against apoptosis induced by doxorubicin • GILZ induces Bcl-xL protein without inducing Bcl-xL mRNA.

  10. Proteome of human colon cancer stem cells: A comparative analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Zou; Xiao-Feng Yu; Zhi-Jun Bao; Jie Dong

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To isolate and identify the biological characteristics of human colon cancer stem cells (SW1116 cells) and further study their proteome. METHODS: SW1116 cells were isolated and cultured with a serum-free medium (SFM). Sphere formation was assayed to observe the formation of colon cancer stem cell spheres. SW1116 cells were inoculated into a serum-containing medium for observing their differentiation characteristics. Proliferation curve and cross-resistance of SW1116 cells to different drugs were detected by MTT. Percentage of SP cells in SW1116 cells was detected with Hoechst33342 staining. Telomerase activity in SW1116cells was checked by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Expressions of stem cell relevant genes and proteins were detected by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Total protein was isolated from SW1116 cells by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and differentially expressed proteins were identified by tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF). RESULTS: The isolated SW1116 cells presented as spheroid and suspension growths in SFM with a strong self-renewal, proliferation, differentiation and drug-resistance ability. The percentage of SP cells in SW1116 cells was 38.9%. The SW1116 cells co-expressed the CD133 and CD29 proteins. The telomerase activity in SW1116 cells was increased. The expressions of different stem cell relevant genes and proteins were detected. The proteomic analysis showed that the 26 protein spots were differently expressed in SW1116 cells and 10 protein spots were identified as ubiquitin fusiondegradation 1-like protein, nuclear chloride channel protein, tubulin b, Raichu404X, stratifin, F-actin capping protein a-1 subunit, eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 delta isoform 2, hypothetical protein, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and guanine nucleotide binding protein b polypeptide 2-like 1, respectively. CONCLUSION: SW1116 cells are biologically

  11. Functional abnormalities in iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes generated from CPVT1 and CPVT2 patients carrying ryanodine or calsequestrin mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Atara; Barad, Lili; Lorber, Avraham; Gherghiceanu, Mihaela; Reiter, Irina; Eisen, Binyamin; Eldor, Liron; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Eldar, Michael; Arad, Michael; Binah, Ofer

    2015-08-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is an inherited arrhythmia characterized by syncope and sudden death occurring during exercise or acute emotion. CPVT is caused by abnormal intracellular Ca(2+) handling resulting from mutations in the RyR2 or CASQ2 genes. Because CASQ2 and RyR2 are involved in different aspects of the excitation-contraction coupling process, we hypothesized that these mutations are associated with different functional and intracellular Ca(²+) abnormalities. To test the hypothesis we generated induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CM) from CPVT1 and CPVT2 patients carrying the RyR2(R420Q) and CASQ2(D307H) mutations, respectively, and investigated in CPVT1 and CPVT2 iPSC-CM (compared to control): (i) The ultrastructural features; (ii) the effects of isoproterenol, caffeine and ryanodine on the [Ca(2+) ]i transient characteristics. Our major findings were: (i) Ultrastructurally, CASQ2 and RyR2 mutated cardiomyocytes were less developed than control cardiomyocytes. (ii) While in control iPSC-CM isoproterenol caused positive inotropic and lusitropic effects, in the mutated cardiomyocytes isoproterenol was either ineffective, caused arrhythmias, or markedly increased diastolic [Ca(2+) ]i . Importantly, positive inotropic and lusitropic effects were not induced in mutated cardiomyocytes. (iii) The effects of caffeine and ryanodine in mutated cardiomyocytes differed from control cardiomyocytes. Our results show that iPSC-CM are useful for investigating the similarities/differences in the pathophysiological consequences of RyR2 versus CASQ2 mutations underlying CPVT1 and CPVT2 syndromes.

  12. Comparative abuse liability of GHB and ethanol in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew W; Griffiths, Roland R

    2013-04-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB; sodium oxybate) is approved for narcolepsy symptom treatment, and it is also abused. This study compared the participant-rated, observer-rated effects, motor/cognitive, physiological, and reinforcing effects of GHB and ethanol in participants with histories of sedative (including alcohol) abuse. Fourteen participants lived on a residential unit for ∼1 month. Sessions were conducted Monday through Friday. Measures were taken before and repeatedly up to 24 hours after drug administration. Participants were administered GHB (1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 g/70 kg), ethanol (12, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 g/70 kg), or placebo in a double-blind, within-subjects design. For safety, GHB and ethanol were administered in an ascending dose sequence, with placebos and both drugs intermixed across sessions. The sequence for each drug was stopped if significant impairment or intolerable effects occurred. Only 9 and 10 participants received the full dose range for GHB and ethanol, respectively. The highest doses of GHB and ethanol showed onset within 30 minutes, with peak effects at 60 minutes. GHB effects dissipated between 4 and 6 hours, whereas ethanol effects dissipated between 6 and 8 hours. Dose-related effects were observed for both drugs on a variety of measures assessing sedative drug effects, abuse liability, performance impairment, and physiological effects. Within-session measures of abuse liability were similar between the two drugs. However, postsession measures of abuse liability, including a direct preference test between the highest tolerated doses of each drug, suggested somewhat greater abuse liability for GHB, most likely as a result of the delayed aversive ethanol effects (e.g., headache).

  13. Dietary levels of acrylamide affect rat cardiomyocyte properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Brandan; Hariharan, Venkatesh; Huang, Hayden

    2014-09-01

    The toxic effects of acrylamide on cytoskeletal integrity and ion channel balance is well-established in many cell types, but there has been little examination regarding the effects of acrylamide on primary cardiomyocytes, despite the importance of such components in their function. Furthermore, acrylamide toxicity is generally examined using concentrations higher than those found in vivo under starch-rich diets. Accordingly, we sought to characterize the dose-dependent effects of acrylamide on various properties, including cell morphology, contraction patterns, and junctional connexin 43 staining, in primary cardiomyocytes. We show that several days exposure to 1-100 μM acrylamide resulted in altered morphology, irregular contraction patterns, and an increase in the amount of immunoreactive signal for connexin 43 at cell junctions. We conclude that dietary levels of acrylamide may alter cellular function with prolonged exposure, in primary cardiomyocytes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction in the APPswe/PS1dE9 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subat Turdi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Ample clinical and experimental evidence indicated that patients with Alzheimer's disease display a high incidence of cardiovascular events. This study was designed to examine myocardial histology, cardiomyocyte shortening, intracellular Ca(2+ homeostasis and regulatory proteins, electrocardiogram, adrenergic response, endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and protein carbonyl formation in C57 wild-type (WT mice and an APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic (APP/PS1 model for Alzheimer's disease. METHODS: Cardiomyocyte mechanical properties were evaluated including peak shortening (PS, time-to-PS (TPS, time-to-relengthening (TR, maximal velocity of shortening and relengthening (+/-dL/dt, intracellular Ca(2+ transient rise and decay. RESULTS: Little histological changes were observed in APP/PS1 myocardium. Cardiomyocytes from APP/PS1 but not APP or PS1 single mutation mice exhibited depressed PS, reduced+/-dL/dt, normal TPS and TR compared with WT mice(. Rise in intracellular Ca(2+ was lower accompanied by unchanged resting/peak intracellular Ca(2+ levels and intracellular Ca(2+ decay in APP/PS1 mice. Cardiomyocytes from APP/PS1 mice exhibited a steeper decline in PS at high frequencies. The responsiveness to adrenergic agonists was dampened although beta(1-adrenergic receptor expression was unchanged in APP/PS1 hearts. Expression of the Ca(2+ regulatory protein phospholamban and protein carbonyl formation were downregulated and elevated, respectively, associated with unchanged SERCA2a, Na(+-Ca(2+ exchanger and ER stress markers in APP/PS1 hearts. Our further study revealed that antioxidant N-acetylcysteine attenuated the contractile dysfunction in APP/PS1 mice. CONCLUSIONS: Our results depicted overt cardiomyocyte mechanical dysfunction in the APP/PS1 Alzheimer's disease model, possibly due to oxidative stress.

  15. File list: His.CDV.05.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  1. File list: ALL.CDV.05.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. NOX2 amplifies acetaldehyde-mediated cardiomyocyte mitochondrial dysfunction in alcoholic cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Moritz; Garlapati, Venkata; Oelze, Matthias; Sotiriou, Efthymios; Knorr, Maike; Kröller-Schön, Swenja; Kossmann, Sabine; Schönfelder, Tanja; Morawietz, Henning; Schulz, Eberhard; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Daiber, Andreas; Münzel, Thomas; Wenzel, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholic cardiomyopathy (ACM) resulting from excess alcohol consumption is an important cause of heart failure (HF). Although it is assumed that the cardiotoxicity of the ethanol (EtOH)-metabolite acetaldehyde (ACA) is central for its development and progression, the exact mechanisms remain obscure. Murine cardiomyocytes (CMs) exposed to ACA or EtOH showed increased superoxide (O2•−) levels and decreased mitochondrial polarization, both being normalized by NADPH oxidase (NOX) inhibition. C57BL/6 mice and mice deficient for the ACA-degrading enzyme mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-2−/−) were fed a 2% EtOH diet for 5 weeks creating an ACA-overload. 2% EtOH-fed ALDH-2−/− mice exhibited a decreased cardiac function, increased heart-to-body and lung-to-body weight ratios, increased cardiac levels of the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde (MDA) as well as increased NOX activity and NOX2/glycoprotein 91phox (NOX2/gp91phox) subunit expression compared to 2% EtOH-fed C57BL/6 mice. Echocardiography revealed that ALDH-2−/−/gp91phox−/− mice were protected from ACA-overload-induced HF after 5 weeks of 2% EtOH-diet, demonstrating that NOX2-derived O2•− contributes to the development of ACM. Translated to human pathophysiology, we found increased gp91phox expression in endomyocardial biopsies of ACM patients. In conclusion, ACM is promoted by ACA-driven mitochondrial dysfunction and can be improved by ablation of NOX2/gp91phox. NOX2/gp91phox therefore might be a potential pharmacological target to treat ACM. PMID:27624556

  3. Direct differentiation of atrial and ventricular myocytes from human embryonic stem cells by alternating retinoid signals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiangzhe Zhang; Li Chen; Tian Tian; Xin Wang; Pu Li; Jurgen Hescheler; Guangju Ji; Yue Ma; Junjie Jiang; Pengcheng Han; Qi Yuan; Jing Zhang; Xiaoqian Zhang; Yanyan Xu; Henghua Cao; Qingzhang Meng

    2011-01-01

    Although myocyte cell transplantation studies have suggested a promising therapeutic potential for myocardial infarction, a major obstacle to the development of clinical therapies for myocardial repair is the difficulties associated with obtaining relatively homogeneous ventricular myocytes for transplantation. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs)are a promising source of cardiomyocytes. Here we report that retinoid signaling regulates the fate specification of atrial versus ventricular myocytes during cardiac differentiation of hESCs. We found that both Noggin and the panretinoic acid receptor antagonist BMS-189453 (RAi) significantly increased the cardiac differentiation efficiency of hESCs. To investigate retinoid functions, we compared Noggin+RAi-treated cultures with Noggin+RA-treated cultures. Our results showed that the expression levels of the ventricular-specific gene IRX-4 were radically elevated in Noggin+RAi-treated cultures. MLC-2V, another ventricular-specific marker, was expressed in the majority of the cardiomyocytes in Noggin+RAi-treated cultures, hut not in the cardiomyocytes of Noggin+RA-treated cultures. Flow cytometry analysis and electrophysiologicai studies indicated that with 64.7 ± 0.88% (mean ± s.e.m) cardiac differentiation efficiency, 83% of the cardiomyocytes in Noggin+RAi-treated cultures had embryonic ventricular-like action potentials (APs). With 50.7 ± 1.76% cardiac differentiation efficiency, 94% of the cardiomyocytes in Noggin+RA-treated cultures had embryonic atrial-like APs. These results were further confirmed by imaging studies that assessed the patterns and properties of the Ca2+ sparks of the cardiomyocytes from the two cultures. These findings demonstrate that retinoid signaling specifies the atrial versus ventricular differentiation of hESCs. This study also shows that relatively homogeneous embryonic atrial- and ventricular-like myocyte populations can be efficiently derived from hESCs by specifically regulating Noggin

  4. Comparative expression analysis of isolated human adipocytes and the human adipose cell lines LiSa-2 and PAZ6

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, van E.A.; Bakker, A.H.; Kruyt, P.M.; Vink, C.; Saris, W.H.; Keijer, J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To obtain insight in the extent to which the human cell lines LiSa-2 and PAZ6 resemble isolated primary human adipocytes. Design: A combination of cDNA subtraction (representative difference analysis; RDA) and cDNA microarray analysis was used to select adipose specific genes to compare i

  5. Assessment of the Effect of Cardiomyocyte Transplantation on Left Ventricular Remodeling and Function in Post-Infarction Wister Rats by Using High-frequency Ultrasound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jing; XIE Mingxing; WANG Xinfang; L(U) Qing; LANG Mingjian; DENG Binhua

    2007-01-01

    The effects of cardiomyocyte grafting on left ventricular (LV) remodeling and function in rats with chronic myocardial infarction were evaluated using high-frequency ultrasound. Chronic myocardial infarction was induced in 50 Wister rats by ligating the left anterior descending artery. They were randomized into two groups: a trial group that received neonatal rat cardiomyocyte trans- plantation (n=25) and a control group which were given intramyocardial injection of culture medium (n=25). The left ventricular (LV) geometry and function were evaluated by high-frequency ultrasound before and 4 weeks after the cell transplantation. After the final evaluation, all rats were sacrificed for histological study. The results showed that 4 weeks after the cell transplantation, as compared with the control group, the LV end-systolic dimension, end-diastolic dimension, end-systolic volume and end-diastolic volume were significantly decreased and the LV anterior wall end-diastolic thickness, LV ejection fraction and fractional shortening were significantly increased in the trial group (P<0.01). Histological study showed that transplanted neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were found in all host hearts and identified by Brdu staining. It was suggested that transplantation of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes can reverse cardiac remodeling and improve heart function in chronic myocardial infarction rats. High-frequency ultrasound can be used as a reliable technique for the non-invasive evaluation of the effect of cardiomyocyte transplantation.

  6. Nemopilema nomurai Jellyfish venom treatment leads to alterations in rat cardiomyocytes proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indu Choudhary

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This data article restrains data associated to the Choudhary et al. [1]. Nemopilema nomurai Jellyfish venom (NnV can lead to cardiac toxicity. Here we analyzed the effect of NnV on rat cardiomyocytes cell line H9c2 at the proteome level using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS. This analysis resulted in 34 proteins with differential expression. Here we provide the dataset for the proteins with amplified or reduced level as compare to control.

  7. Mechanical unloading activates FoxO3 to trigger Bnip3-dependent cardiomyocyte atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dian J; Jiang, Nan; Blagg, Andrew; Johnstone, Janet L; Gondalia, Raj; Oh, Misook; Luo, Xiang; Yang, Kai-Chun; Shelton, John M; Rothermel, Beverly A; Gillette, Thomas G; Dorn, Gerald W; Hill, Joseph A

    2013-04-08

    Mechanical assist device therapy has emerged recently as an important and rapidly expanding therapy in advanced heart failure, triggering in some patients a beneficial reverse remodeling response. However, mechanisms underlying this benefit are unclear. In a model of mechanical unloading of the left ventricle, we observed progressive myocyte atrophy, autophagy, and robust activation of the transcription factor FoxO3, an established regulator of catabolic processes in other cell types. Evidence for FoxO3 activation was similarly detected in unloaded failing human myocardium. To determine the role of FoxO3 activation in cardiac muscle in vivo, we engineered transgenic mice harboring a cardiomyocyte-specific constitutively active FoxO3 mutant (caFoxO3(flox);αMHC-Mer-Cre-Mer). Expression of caFoxO3 triggered dramatic and progressive loss of cardiac mass, robust increases in cardiomyocyte autophagy, declines in mitochondrial biomass and function, and early mortality. Whereas increases in cardiomyocyte apoptosis were not apparent, we detected robust increases in Bnip3 (Bcl2/adenovirus E1B 19-kDa interacting protein 3), an established downstream target of FoxO3. To test the role of Bnip3, we crossed the caFoxO3(flox);αMHC-Mer-Cre-Mer mice with Bnip3-null animals. Remarkably, the atrophy and autophagy phenotypes were significantly blunted, yet the early mortality triggered by FoxO3 activation persisted. Rather, declines in cardiac performance were attenuated by proteasome inhibitors. Consistent with involvement of FoxO3-driven activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, we detected time-dependent activation of the atrogenes program and sarcomere protein breakdown. In aggregate, these data point to FoxO3, a protein activated by mechanical unloading, as a master regulator that governs both the autophagy-lysosomal and ubiquitin-proteasomal pathways to orchestrate cardiac muscle atrophy.

  8. PTRF/Cavin-1 Deficiency Causes Cardiac Dysfunction Accompanied by Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy and Cardiac Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Takehiro; Kasahara, Takeru; Nakanishi, Naohiko; Miyagawa, Kotaro; Naito, Daisuke; Hamaoka, Tetsuro; Nishi, Masahiro; Matoba, Satoaki; Ueyama, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the PTRF/Cavin-1 gene cause congenital generalized lipodystrophy type 4 (CGL4) associated with myopathy. Additionally, long-QT syndrome and fatal cardiac arrhythmia are observed in patients with CGL4 who have homozygous PTRF/Cavin-1 mutations. PTRF/Cavin-1 deficiency shows reductions of caveolae and caveolin-3 (Cav3) protein expression in skeletal muscle, and Cav3 deficiency in the heart causes cardiac hypertrophy with loss of caveolae. However, it remains unknown how loss of PTRF/Cavin-1 affects cardiac morphology and function. Here, we present a characterization of the hearts of PTRF/Cavin-1-null (PTRF−/−) mice. Electron microscopy revealed the reduction of caveolae in cardiomyocytes of PTRF−/− mice. PTRF−/− mice at 16 weeks of age developed a progressive cardiomyopathic phenotype with wall thickening of left ventricles and reduced fractional shortening evaluated by echocardiography. Electrocardiography revealed that PTRF−/− mice at 24 weeks of age had low voltages and wide QRS complexes in limb leads. Histological analysis showed cardiomyocyte hypertrophy accompanied by progressive interstitial/perivascular fibrosis. Hypertrophy-related fetal gene expression was also induced in PTRF−/− hearts. Western blotting analysis and quantitative RT-PCR revealed that Cav3 expression was suppressed in PTRF−/− hearts compared with that in wild-type (WT) ones. ERK1/2 was activated in PTRF−/− hearts compared with that in WT ones. These results suggest that loss of PTRF/Cavin-1 protein expression is sufficient to induce a molecular program leading to cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and cardiomyopathy, which is partly attributable to Cav3 reduction in the heart. PMID:27612189

  9. Zinc-induced cardiomyocyte relaxation in a rat model of hyperglycemia is independent of myosin isoform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Ting

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It has been reported previously that diabetic cardiomyopathy can be inhibited or reverted with chronic zinc supplementation. In the current study, we hypothesized that total cardiac calcium and zinc content is altered in early onset diabetes mellitus characterized in part as hyperglycemia (HG and that exposure of zinc ion (Zn2+ to isolated cardiomyocytes would enhance contraction-relaxation function in HG more so than in nonHG controls. To better control for differential cardiac myosin isoform expression as occurs in rodents after β-islet cell necrosis, hypothyroidism was induced in 16 rats resulting in 100% β-myosin heavy chain expression in the heart. β-Islet cell necrosis was induced in half of the rats by streptozocin administration. After 6 wks of HG, both HG and nonHG controls rats demonstrated similar myofilament performance measured as thin filament calcium sensitivity, native thin filament velocity in the myosin motility assay and contractile velocity and power. Extracellular Zn2+ reduced cardiomyocyte contractile function in both groups, but enhanced relaxation function significantly in the HG group compared to controls. Most notably, a reduction in diastolic sarcomere length with increasing pacing frequencies, i.e., incomplete relaxation, was more pronounced in the HG compared to controls, but was normalized with extracellular Zn2+ application. This is a novel finding implicating that the detrimental effect of HG on cardiomyocyte Ca2+ regulation can be amelioration by Zn2+. Among the many post-translational modifications examined, only phosphorylation of ryanodine receptor (RyR at S-2808 was significantly higher in HG compared to nonHG. We did not find in our hypothyroid rats any differentiating effects of HG on myofibrillar protein phosphorylation, lysine acetylation, O-linked N-acetylglucosamine and advanced glycated end-products, which are often implicated as complicating factors in cardiac performance due to HG. Our

  10. Zinc-induced cardiomyocyte relaxation in a rat model of hyperglycemia is independent of myosin isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ting; Cheema, Yaser; Tremble, Sarah M; Bell, Stephen P; Chen, Zengyi; Subramanian, Meenakumari; LeWinter, Martin M; VanBuren, Peter; Palmer, Bradley M

    2012-11-02

    It has been reported previously that diabetic cardiomyopathy can be inhibited or reverted with chronic zinc supplementation. In the current study, we hypothesized that total cardiac calcium and zinc content is altered in early onset diabetes mellitus characterized in part as hyperglycemia (HG) and that exposure of zinc ion (Zn2+) to isolated cardiomyocytes would enhance contraction-relaxation function in HG more so than in nonHG controls. To better control for differential cardiac myosin isoform expression as occurs in rodents after β-islet cell necrosis, hypothyroidism was induced in 16 rats resulting in 100% β-myosin heavy chain expression in the heart. β-Islet cell necrosis was induced in half of the rats by streptozocin administration. After 6 wks of HG, both HG and nonHG controls rats demonstrated similar myofilament performance measured as thin filament calcium sensitivity, native thin filament velocity in the myosin motility assay and contractile velocity and power. Extracellular Zn2+ reduced cardiomyocyte contractile function in both groups, but enhanced relaxation function significantly in the HG group compared to controls. Most notably, a reduction in diastolic sarcomere length with increasing pacing frequencies, i.e., incomplete relaxation, was more pronounced in the HG compared to controls, but was normalized with extracellular Zn2+ application. This is a novel finding implicating that the detrimental effect of HG on cardiomyocyte Ca2+ regulation can be amelioration by Zn2+. Among the many post-translational modifications examined, only phosphorylation of ryanodine receptor (RyR) at S-2808 was significantly higher in HG compared to nonHG. We did not find in our hypothyroid rats any differentiating effects of HG on myofibrillar protein phosphorylation, lysine acetylation, O-linked N-acetylglucosamine and advanced glycated end-products, which are often implicated as complicating factors in cardiac performance due to HG. Our results suggest that the

  11. Human Capital Quality and Development: An Employers' and Employees' Comparative Insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neagu Olimpia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to compare the employers' and employees' insights on human capital quality defining and human capital development at organisational level, based on a survey carried out in the county of Satu Mare, Romania. Our findings show that as human capital buyers, employers understand by human capital quality professional background and skills, professional behaviour and efficiency and productivity for the organisation. As human capital sellers, for employees human capital quality means health and the ability to learn and to be suitable to the job requirements. Regarding the opportunities to develop the organisational human capital, the views of employers and employees are very different when the level of discussion is international (macro-level. Employees consider that the international environment has a greater impact on human capital development in their organisation as the employers.

  12. Alendronate affects calcium dynamics in cardiomyocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemeny-Suss, Naomi; Kasneci, Amanda; Rivas, Daniel; Afilalo, Jonathan; Komarova, Svetlana V; Chalifour, Lorraine E; Duque, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    Therapy with bisphosphonates, including alendronate (ALN), is considered a safe and effective treatment for osteoporosis. However, recent studies have reported an unexpected increase in serious atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients treated with bisphosphonates. The mechanism that explains this side effect remains unknown. Since AF is associated with an altered sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium load, we studied how ALN affects cardiomyocyte calcium homeostasis and protein isoprenylation in vitro. Acute and long-term (48h) treatment of atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes with ALN (10(-8)-10(-6)M) was performed. Changes in calcium dynamics were determined by both fluorescence measurement of cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration and western blot analysis of calcium-regulating proteins. Finally, effect of ALN on protein farnesylation was also identified. In both atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes, ALN treatment delayed and diminished calcium responses to caffeine. Only in atrial cells, long-term exposure to ALN-induced transitory calcium oscillations and led to the development of oscillatory component in calcium responses to caffeine. Changes in calcium dynamics were accompanied by changes in expression of proteins controlling sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium. In contrast, ALN minimally affected protein isoprenylation in these cells. In summary, treatment of atrial cardiomyocytes with ALN-induced abnormalities in calcium dynamics consistent with induction of a self-stimulatory, pacemaker-like behavior, which may contribute to the development of cardiac side effects associated with these drugs.

  13. Doxorubicin Blocks Cardiomyocyte Autophagic Flux by Inhibiting Lysosome Acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan L; Wang, Zhao V; Ding, Guanqiao; Tan, Wei; Luo, Xiang; Criollo, Alfredo; Xie, Min; Jiang, Nan; May, Herman; Kyrychenko, Viktoriia; Schneider, Jay W; Gillette, Thomas G; Hill, Joseph A

    2016-04-26

    The clinical use of doxorubicin is limited by cardiotoxicity. Histopathological changes include interstitial myocardial fibrosis and the appearance of vacuolated cardiomyocytes. Whereas dysregulation of autophagy in the myocardium has been implicated in a variety of cardiovascular diseases, the role of autophagy in doxorubicin cardiomyopathy remains poorly defined. Most models of doxorubicin cardiotoxicity involve intraperitoneal injection of high-dose drug, which elicits lethargy, anorexia, weight loss, and peritoneal fibrosis, all of which confound the interpretation of autophagy. Given this, we first established a model that provokes modest and progressive cardiotoxicity without constitutional symptoms, reminiscent of the effects seen in patients. We report that doxorubicin blocks cardiomyocyte autophagic flux in vivo and in cardiomyocytes in culture. This block was accompanied by robust accumulation of undegraded autolysosomes. We go on to localize the site of block as a defect in lysosome acidification. To test the functional relevance of doxorubicin-triggered autolysosome accumulation, we studied animals with diminished autophagic activity resulting from haploinsufficiency for Beclin 1. Beclin 1(+/-) mice exposed to doxorubicin were protected in terms of structural and functional changes within the myocardium. Conversely, animals overexpressing Beclin 1 manifested an amplified cardiotoxic response. Doxorubicin blocks autophagic flux in cardiomyocytes by impairing lysosome acidification and lysosomal function. Reducing autophagy initiation protects against doxorubicin cardiotoxicity. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Reduced function and disassembled microtubules of cultured cardiomyocytes in spaceflight

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Fen; DAI ZhongQuan; TAN YingJun; WAN YuMin; LI YingHui; DING Bai; NIE JieLin; WANG HongHui; ZHANG XiaoYou; WANG ChunYan; LING ShuKuan; NI ChengZhi

    2008-01-01

    Lack of gravity during spaceflight has profound effects on cardiovascular system, but little is known about how the cardiomyocytes respond to microgravity. In the present study, the effects of spaceflight on the structure and function of cultured cardiomyocytes were reported. The primary cultures of neo-natal rat cardiomyocytes were carried on Shenzhou-6 spacecraft and activated at 4 h in orbit. 8 samples were fixed respectively at 4, 48 and 96 h after launching for immunofluorescence of cytoskeleton, and 2 samples remained unfixed to analyze contractile and secretory functions of the cultures. Ground sam-ples were treated in our laboratory in parallel. After 115 h spaceflight, video recordings displayed that the number of spontaneous beating sites in flown samples decreased significantly, and the cells in the beating aggregate contracted in fast frequency without synchrony. Radioimmunoassay of the medium showed that the atrial natriuretic peptide secreted from flown cells reduced by 59.6%. Confocal images demonstrated the time-dependant disassembly of mirotubules versus unchanged distribution and or-ganization of microfilaments. In conclusion, above results indicate reduced function and disorganized cytoskeleton of cardiomyocytes in spaceflight, which might provide some cellular basis for further investigations to probe into the mechanisms underlying space cardiovascular dysfunction.

  15. Data on calcium increases depending on stretch in dystrophic cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Aguettaz

    2016-09-01

    Here, the Ca2+ dye fluo-8 was used for [Ca2+]i measurement, in both resting and stretching conditions, using a perfusion protocol starting initially with a calcium free Tyrode solution followed by the perfusion of 1.8 mM Ca2+ Tyrode solution. The variation of [Ca2+]i was found higher in mdx cardiomyocytes.

  16. Combinatorial MicroRNAs Suppress Hypoxia-Induced Cardiomyocytes Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingqi Xu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Our previous in silico analysis revealed potential synergy in the activities of micro(miRNAs in myocardial infarction. The present study investigated whether miR-1 and -21 act synergistically to protect against cardiomyocytes apoptosis. Methods: Cell survival was analyzed with cell viability assay; apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling, and the caspase-3 activity assay; and protein expression level was determined by western blotting. Results: MiR-1:miR-21 and several other miRNA pairs were evaluated for their potentially synergistic effects against myocardial hypoxia in neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes. Lower combination indices suggested that miRNA pairs acted synergistically to inhibit apoptosis; miR-1 and -21 jointly blocked hypoxia-induced cardiomyocytes apoptosis. Moreover, combined application of miR-1 and -21 activated Akt and blocked hypoxia-induced upregulation of p53 in these cells. Conclusion: MiR-1 and -21 exert synergistic effects against hypoxia-induced cardiomyocytes apoptosis. These results provide a basis for the development of combined miRNA-based therapeutics to treat cardiovascular diseases.

  17. Rcan1-1L overexpression induces mitochondrial autophagy and improves cell survival in angiotensin II-exposed cardiomyocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Hongyan; Li, Yongqiang; Yan, Lijie; Yang, Haitao; Wu, Jintao; Qian, Peng; Li, Bing; Wang, Shanling, E-mail: shanglingwang@126.com

    2015-07-01

    Mitochondrial autophagy is an important adaptive stress response and can be modulated by various key molecules. A previous study found that the regulator of calcineurin 1-1L (Rcan1-1L) may regulate mitochondrial autophagy and cause mitochondria degradation in neurocytes. However, the effect of Rcan1-1L on cardiomyocytes has not been determined. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the role of Rcan1-1L in angiotensin II (Ang II)-exposed human cardiomyocytes. Above all, Human adult cardiac myocytes (HACMs) were exposed to 200 nmol/L Ang II for 4 days. Enhanced H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production, cytochrome C release and mitochondrial permeability were observed in these cells, which were blocked by valsartan. Consistently, Ang II exposure significantly reduced cardiomyocyte viability. However, transfection of Rcan1-1L vector promoted cell viability and ameliorated the apoptosis caused by Ang II. Rcan1-1L clearly promoted mitochondrial autophagy in HACMs, with elevated autophagy protein (ATG) 5 and light chain 3 (LC3) expression. Transient mitochondrial biogenesis and reduced cytochrome C release was also induced by Rcan1-1L. Additionally, Rcan1-1L significantly inhibited calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) signaling. We thus conclude that Rcan1-1L may play a protective role in Ang II-treated cardiomyocytes through the induction of mitochondrial autophagy, and may be an alternative method of cardiac protection. - Highlights: • Transfection of Rcan1-1L into HACMs promoted cell viability and reduced apoptosis. • Transfection of Rcan1-1L promoted mitochondrial autophagy in HACMs. • Rcan1-1L inhibited the calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells signaling.

  18. Antioxidant treatment attenuates hyperglycemia-induced cardiomyocyte death in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiordaliso, Fabio; Bianchi, Roberto; Staszewsky, Lidia; Cuccovillo, Ivan; Doni, Mirko; Laragione, Teresa; Salio, Monica; Savino, Costanza; Melucci, Silvia; Santangelo, Francesco; Scanziani, Eugenio; Masson, Serge; Ghezzi, Pietro; Latini, Roberto

    2004-11-01

    Diabetes and oxidative stress concur to cardiac myocyte death in various experimental settings. We assessed whether N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), an antioxidant and glutathione precursor, has a protective role in a rat model of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes and in isolated myocytes exposed to high glucose (HG). Diabetic rats were treated with NAC (0.5 g/kg per day) or vehicle for 3 months. At sacrifice left ventricle (LV) myocyte number and size, collagen deposition and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured by quantitative histological methods. Diabetes reduced LV myocyte number by 29% and increased myocyte volume by 20% compared to non-diabetic controls. NAC protected from myocyte loss (+25% vs. untreated diabetics, P < 0.05) and reduced reactive hypertrophy (-16% vs. untreated diabetics, P < 0.05). Perivascular fibrosis was high in diabetic rats (+88% vs. control, P < 0.001) but prevented by NAC. ROS production and fraction of ROS-positive cardiomyocyte nuclei were drastically raised in diabetic rats (2.4- and 5.1-fold vs. control, P < 0.001) and normalized by NAC. In separate experiments, isolated adult rat ventricular myocytes were incubated in a medium containing high concentrations of glucose (HG, 25 mM) +/- 0.01 mM NAC; myocyte survival (Trypan blue exclusion and apoptosis by TUNEL) and glutathione content were evaluated. The number of dead and apoptotic myocytes increased five and 6.7-fold in HG and glutathione decreased by 48% (P < 0.05). NAC normalized cell death and apoptosis and prevented glutathione loss. NAC effectively protects from hyperglycemia-induced myocyte cell death and compensatory hypertrophy through direct scavenging of ROS and replenishment of the intracellular glutathione content.

  19. Discovery of human inversion polymorphisms by comparative analysis of human and chimpanzee DNA sequence assemblies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available With a draft genome-sequence assembly for the chimpanzee available, it is now possible to perform genome-wide analyses to identify, at a submicroscopic level, structural rearrangements that have occurred between chimpanzees and humans. The goal of this study was to investigate chromosomal regions that are inverted between the chimpanzee and human genomes. Using the net alignments for the builds of the human and chimpanzee genome assemblies, we identified a total of 1,576 putative regions of inverted orientation, covering more than 154 mega-bases of DNA. The DNA segments are distributed throughout the genome and range from 23 base pairs to 62 mega-bases in length. For the 66 inversions more than 25 kilobases (kb in length, 75% were flanked on one or both sides by (often unrelated segmental duplications. Using PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization we experimentally validated 23 of 27 (85% semi-randomly chosen regions; the largest novel inversion confirmed was 4.3 mega-bases at human Chromosome 7p14. Gorilla was used as an out-group to assign ancestral status to the variants. All experimentally validated inversion regions were then assayed against a panel of human samples and three of the 23 (13% regions were found to be polymorphic in the human genome. These polymorphic inversions include 730 kb (at 7p22, 13 kb (at 7q11, and 1 kb (at 16q24 fragments with a 5%, 30%, and 48% minor allele frequency, respectively. Our results suggest that inversions are an important source of variation in primate genome evolution. The finding of at least three novel inversion polymorphisms in humans indicates this type of structural variation may be a more common feature of our genome than previously realized.

  20. Similar to spironolactone, oxymatrine is protective in aldosterone-induced cardiomyocyte injury via inhibition of calpain and apoptosis-inducing factor signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Ting Xiao

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence indicates that oxymatrine (OMT possesses variously pharmacological properties, especially on the cardiovascular system. We previously demonstrated that activated calpain/apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF-mediated pathway was the key molecular mechanism in aldosterone (ALD induces cardiomyocytes apoptosis. In the present study, we extended the experimentation by investigating the effect of OMT on cardiomyocytes exposed to ALD, as compared to spironolactone (Spiro, a classical ALD receptor antagonist. Cardiomyocytes were pre-incubated with OMT, Spiro or vehicle for 1 h, and then, cardiomyocytes were exposed to ALD 24 h. The cell injury was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH leakage ratio. Apoptosis was determined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL assay, annexin V/PI staining, and relative caspase-3 activity assay. Furthermore, expression of pro-apoptotic proteins including truncated Bid (tBid, calpain and AIF were evaluated by western blot analysis. ALD stimulation increased cardiomyocytes apoptosis, caspase-3 activity and protein expression of calpain, tBid and AIF in the cytosol (p<0.05. Pre-incubated with cardiomyocytes injury and increased caspase-3 activity were significantly attenuated (p<0.05. Furthermore, OMT suppressed ALD-induced high expression of calpain and AIF. And these effects of OMT could be comparable to Spiro. These findings indicated that OMT might be a potential cardioprotective-agent against excessive ALD-induced cardiotoxicity, at least in part, mediated through inhibition of calpain/AIF signaling.

  1. Atrial natriuretic peptide regulates Ca channel in early developmental cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Miao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardiomyocytes derived from murine embryonic stem (ES cells possess various membrane currents and signaling cascades link to that of embryonic hearts. The role of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP in regulation of membrane potentials and Ca(2+ currents has not been investigated in developmental cardiomyocytes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the role of ANP in regulating L-type Ca(2+ channel current (I(CaL in different developmental stages of cardiomyocytes derived from ES cells. ANP decreased the frequency of action potentials (APs in early developmental stage (EDS cardiomyocytes, embryonic bodies (EB as well as whole embryo hearts. ANP exerted an inhibitory effect on basal I(CaL in about 70% EDS cardiomyocytes tested but only in about 30% late developmental stage (LDS cells. However, after stimulation of I(CaL by isoproterenol (ISO in LDS cells, ANP inhibited the response in about 70% cells. The depression of I(CaL induced by ANP was not affected by either Nomega, Nitro-L-Arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, a nitric oxide synthetase (NOS inhibitor, or KT5823, a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG selective inhibitor, in either EDS and LDS cells; whereas depression of I(CaL by ANP was entirely abolished by erythro-9-(2-Hydroxy-3-nonyl adenine (EHNA, a selective inhibitor of type 2 phosphodiesterase(PDE2 in most cells tested. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCES: Taken together, these results indicate that ANP induced depression of action potentials and I(CaL is due to activation of particulate guanylyl cyclase (GC, cGMP production and cGMP-activation of PDE2 mediated depression of adenosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophophate (cAMP-cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA in early cardiomyogenesis.

  2. Coordinating cardiomyocyte interactions to direct ventricular chamber morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Peidong; Bloomekatz, Joshua; Ren, Jie; Zhang, Ruilin; Grinstein, Jonathan D; Zhao, Long; Burns, C Geoffrey; Burns, Caroline E; Anderson, Ryan M; Chi, Neil C

    2016-06-29

    Many organs are composed of complex tissue walls that are structurally organized to optimize organ function. In particular, the ventricular myocardial wall of the heart comprises an outer compact layer that concentrically encircles the ridge-like inner trabecular layer. Although disruption in the morphogenesis of this myocardial wall can lead to various forms of congenital heart disease and non-compaction cardiomyopathies, it remains unclear how embryonic cardiomyocytes assemble to form ventricular wall layers of appropriate spatial dimensions and myocardial mass. Here we use advanced genetic and imaging tools in zebrafish to reveal an interplay between myocardial Notch and Erbb2 signalling that directs the spatial allocation of myocardial cells to their proper morphological positions in the ventricular wall. Although previous studies have shown that endocardial Notch signalling non-cell-autonomously promotes myocardial trabeculation through Erbb2 and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling, we discover that distinct ventricular cardiomyocyte clusters exhibit myocardial Notch activity that cell-autonomously inhibits Erbb2 signalling and prevents cardiomyocyte sprouting and trabeculation. Myocardial-specific Notch inactivation leads to ventricles of reduced size and increased wall thickness because of excessive trabeculae, whereas widespread myocardial Notch activity results in ventricles of increased size with a single-cell-thick wall but no trabeculae. Notably, this myocardial Notch signalling is activated non-cell-autonomously by neighbouring Erbb2-activated cardiomyocytes that sprout and form nascent trabeculae. Thus, these findings support an interactive cellular feedback process that guides the assembly of cardiomyocytes to morphologically create the ventricular myocardial wall and more broadly provide insight into the cellular dynamics of how diverse cell lineages organize to create form.

  3. Hypoxia reoxygenation induces premature senescence in neonatal SD rat cardiomyocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng-xiang ZHANG; Ming-long CHEN; Qi-jun SHAN; Jian-gang ZOU; Chun CHEN; Bing YANG; Dong-jie XU; Yu JIN; Ke-jiang CAO

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether hypoxia reoxygenation induces premature senes-cence in neonatal Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat cardiomyocytes. Methods: Cardio-myocytes were isolated from neonatal SD rat heart and identified by immunohisto-chemistry. The control cultures were incubated at 37 ℃ in a humidified atmo-sphere of 5% CO and 95% air. The hypoxic cultures were incubated in a modular incubator chamber filled with 1% O2, 5% CO2, and balance N2 for 6 h. The reoxygen-ated cultures were subjected to 1% O2 and 5% CO2 for 6 h, then 21% oxygen for 4,8, 12, 24, and 48 h, respectively. Cell proliferation was determined using bromo-deoxyuridine labeling. The ultrastructure of cardiomyocytes was observed by using an electron microscope. Β-Galactosidase activity was determined by using a senescence β-galactosidase Staining Kit. P16INK4a and telomerase reverse tran-scriptase (TERT) mRNA levels were measured by real time quantitative PCR. TERT protein expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. Telomerase activi-ties were assayed by using the Telo TAGGG Telomerase PCR ELISApplus kit. Results:The initial cultures consisted of pure cardiomyocytes identified by immunohisto-chemistry. The proportion of BrdU positive cells was reduced significantly in the hypoxia reoxygenation-treated group (P<0.01). Under the condition of hypoxia reoxygenation, mitochondrial dehydration appeared; p16'INK4a and TERT mRNA levels, β-galactosidase activity, TERT protein expression and telomerase activi-ties were all significantly increased (P<0.01 or P<0.05). Conclusion: These data indicate that premature senescence could be induced in neonatal SD rat cardiomyo-cytes exposed to hypoxia reoxygenation. Although TERT significantly increased,it could not block senescence.

  4. Spatiotemporal stability of neonatal rat cardiomyocyte monolayers spontaneous activity is dependent on the culture substrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Boudreau-Béland

    Full Text Available In native conditions, cardiac cells must continuously comply with diverse stimuli necessitating a perpetual adaptation. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS is commonly used in cell culture to study cellular response to changes in the mechanical environment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of using PDMS substrates on the properties of spontaneous activity of cardiomyocyte monolayer cultures. We compared PDMS to the gold standard normally used in culture: a glass substrate. Although mean frequency of spontaneous activity remained unaltered, incidence of reentrant activity was significantly higher in samples cultured on glass compared to PDMS substrates. Higher spatial and temporal instability of the spontaneous rate activation was found when cardiomyocytes were cultured on PDMS, and correlated with decreased connexin-43 and increased CaV3.1 and HCN2 mRNA levels. Compared to cultures on glass, cultures on PDMS were associated with the strongest response to isoproterenol and acetylcholine. These results reveal the importance of carefully selecting the culture substrate for studies involving mechanical stimulation, especially for tissue engineering or pharmacological high-throughput screening of cardiac tissue analog.

  5. Slow conduction in mixed cultured strands of primary ventricular cells and stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Pavel Kucera

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Modern concepts for the treatment of myocardial diseases focus on novel cell therapeutic strategies involving stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (SCMs. However, functional integration of SCMs requires similar electrophysiological properties as primary cardiomyocytes (PCMs and the ability to establish intercellular connections with host myocytes in order to contribute to the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. The aim of this project was to investigate the properties of cardiac conduction in a co-culture approach using SCMs and PCMs in cultured cell strands. Murine embryonic SCMs were pooled with fetal ventricular cells and seeded in predefined proportions on microelectrode arrays to form patterned strands of mixed cells. Conduction velocity (CV was measured during steady state pacing. SCM excitability was estimated from action potentials measured in single cells using the patch clamp technique. Experiments were complemented with computer simulations of conduction using a detailed model of cellular architecture in mixed cell strands.CV was significantly lower in strands composed purely of SCMs (5.5±1.5 cm/s, n=11 as compared to PCMs (34.9±2.9 cm/s, n=21 at similar refractoriness (100% SCMs: 122±25 ms, n=9; 100% PCMs: 139±67 ms, n=14. In mixed strands combining both cell types, CV was higher than in pure SCMs strands, but always lower than in 100% PCM strands. Computer simulations demonstrated that both intercellular coupling and electrical excitability limit CV.These data provide evidence that in cultures of murine ventricular cardiomyocytes, SCMs cannot restore CV to control levels resulting in slow conduction, which may lead to reentry circuits and arrhythmias.

  6. Comparative In Vitro Evaluation of Human Dental Pulp and Follicle Stem Cell Commitment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Razieh Karamzadeh; Mohamadreza Baghaban Eslaminejad; Ali Sharifi-Zarchi

    2017-01-01

    .... In this study, we have compared the expression levels of pluripotency factors along with immunological and developmentally-related markers in the culture of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs...

  7. Comparative Study of Human Liver Ferritin and Chicken Liver by Moessbauer Spectroscopy. Preliminary Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshtrakh, M. I. [Ural State Technical University - UPI, Division of Applied Biophysics, Faculty of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control (Russian Federation); Milder, O. B.; Semionkin, V. A. [Ural State Technical University - UPI, Faculty of Experimental Physics (Russian Federation); Prokopenko, P. G. [Russian State Medical University, Faculty of Biochemistry (Russian Federation); Malakheeva, L. I. [Simbio Holding, Science Consultation Department (Russian Federation)

    2004-12-15

    A comparative study of normal human liver ferritin and livers from normal chicken and chicken with Marek disease was made by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Small differences of quadrupole splitting and isomer shift were found for human liver ferritin and chicken liver. Moessbauer parameters for liver from normal chicken and chicken with Marek disease were the same.

  8. Comparative Study of Human Liver Ferritin and Chicken Liver by Mössbauer Spectroscopy. Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshtrakh, M. I.; Milder, O. B.; Semionkin, V. A.; Prokopenko, P. G.; Malakheeva, L. I.

    2004-12-01

    A comparative study of normal human liver ferritin and livers from normal chicken and chicken with Marek disease was made by Mössbauer spectroscopy. Small differences of quadrupole splitting and isomer shift were found for human liver ferritin and chicken liver. Mössbauer parameters for liver from normal chicken and chicken with Marek disease were the same.

  9. Comparative Analysis of Gene Regulation by the Transcription Factor PPARa between Mouse and Human

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rakhshandehroo, M.; Hooiveld, G.J.E.J.; Müller, M.R.; Kersten, A.H.

    2009-01-01

    Background - Studies in mice have shown that PPARa is an important regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism and the acute phase response. However, little information is available on the role of PPARa in human liver. Here we set out to compare the function of PPARa in mouse and human hepatocytes via ana

  10. Emotion Recognition in Animated Compared to Human Stimuli in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnan, Mark; Johnson, Hilary; Grawmeyer, Beate; Chapman, Emma; Benton, Laura

    2015-01-01

    There is equivocal evidence as to whether there is a deficit in recognising emotional expressions in Autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study compared emotion recognition in ASD in three types of emotion expression media (still image, dynamic image, auditory) across human stimuli (e.g. photo of a human face) and animated stimuli (e.g. cartoon…

  11. Comparative Analysis of OECD Member Countries' Competitive Advantage in National Human Resource Development System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hunseok; Choi, Yeseul; Choi, Myungweon

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess, evaluate, and compare the competitive advantages of the human resource development systems of advanced countries. The Global Human Resource Development Index was utilized for this study, since it has been validated through an expert panel's content review and analytic hierarchy process. Using a sample of 34…

  12. Comparative Analysis of OECD Member Countries' Competitive Advantage in National Human Resource Development System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hunseok; Choi, Yeseul; Choi, Myungweon

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess, evaluate, and compare the competitive advantages of the human resource development systems of advanced countries. The Global Human Resource Development Index was utilized for this study, since it has been validated through an expert panel's content review and analytic hierarchy process. Using a sample of 34…

  13. Comparative Analysis of OECD Member Countries' Competitive Advantage in National Human Resource Development System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hunseok; Choi, Yeseul; Choi, Myungweon

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess, evaluate, and compare the competitive advantages of the human resource development systems of advanced countries. The Global Human Resource Development Index was utilized for this study, since it has been validated through an expert panel's content review and analytic hierarchy process. Using a sample…

  14. Enhanced Electrical Integration of Engineered Human Myocardium via Intramyocardial versus Epicardial Delivery in Infarcted Rat Hearts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaytlyn A Gerbin

    Full Text Available Cardiac tissue engineering is a promising approach to provide large-scale tissues for transplantation to regenerate the heart after ischemic injury, however, integration with the host myocardium will be required to achieve electromechanical benefits. To test the ability of engineered heart tissues to electrically integrate with the host, 10 million human embryonic stem cell (hESC-derived cardiomyocytes were used to form either scaffold-free tissue patches implanted on the epicardium or micro-tissue particles (~1000 cells/particle delivered by intramyocardial injection into the left ventricular wall of the ischemia/reperfusion injured athymic rat heart. Results were compared to intramyocardial injection of 10 million dispersed hESC-cardiomyocytes. Graft size was not significantly different between treatment groups and correlated inversely with infarct size. After implantation on the epicardial surface, hESC-cardiac tissue patches were electromechanically active, but they beat slowly and were not electrically coupled to the host at 4 weeks based on ex vivo fluorescent imaging of their graft-autonomous GCaMP3 calcium reporter. Histologically, scar tissue physically separated the patch graft and host myocardium. In contrast, following intramyocardial injection of micro-tissue particles and suspended cardiomyocytes, 100% of the grafts detected by fluorescent GCaMP3 imaging were electrically coupled to the host heart at spontaneous rate and could follow host pacing up to a maximum of 300-390 beats per minute (5-6.5 Hz. Gap junctions between intramyocardial graft and host tissue were identified histologically. The extensive coupling and rapid response rate of the human myocardial grafts after intramyocardial delivery suggest electrophysiological adaptation of hESC-derived cardiomyocytes to the rat heart's pacemaking activity. These data support the use of the rat model for studying electromechanical integration of human cardiomyocytes, and they

  15. The role of PDI as a survival factor in cardiomyocyte ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toldo, Stefano; Severino, Anna; Abbate, Antonio; Baldi, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) leads to activation of unfolded protein response (UPR) following endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Failing in the restoration of the proper folding activity in the ER can lead to apoptosis and cell death. While it can be easy to detect transcripts and proteins expression alterations during a pathological state, it can be difficult to address the importance of changes in protein expression in the physiopathological context. We found protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) increased expression in human autoptic heart samples correlating with cell survival following AMI. PDI enzymatic activity resulted to be important to achieve cardiomyocyte protection from hypoxic stress, dependent on its ability to relieve ER stress preventing accumulation of nonfolded proteins in the ER, and to enhance superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD-1) activity. Furthermore, adenoviral-mediated PDI overexpression in an in vivo mouse model of AMI prevented adverse cardiac remodeling reducing cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Finally, we suggest a method to detect alterations in normal redox state in PDI (and eventually in the PDI family's proteins) during pathologies in which ER stress is induced. Diabetes pathology correlates with increased risk of AMI and worse cardiac remodeling. We found an alteration in PDI redox state in the diabetic heart and suggest using this system for the detection of the redox state alteration to screen for therapies able to restore the proper redox state.

  16. Cardiomyocyte aldose reductase causes heart failure and impairs recovery from ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni-Huiping Son

    Full Text Available Aldose reductase (AR, an enzyme mediating the first step in the polyol pathway of glucose metabolism, is associated with complications of diabetes mellitus and increased cardiac ischemic injury. We investigated whether deleterious effects of AR are due to its actions specifically in cardiomyocytes. We created mice with cardiac specific expression of human AR (hAR using the α-myosin heavy chain (MHC promoter and studied these animals during aging and with reduced fatty acid (FA oxidation. hAR transgenic expression did not alter cardiac function or glucose and FA oxidation gene expression in young mice. However, cardiac overexpression of hAR caused cardiac dysfunction in older mice. We then assessed whether hAR altered heart function during ischemia reperfusion. hAR transgenic mice had greater infarct area and reduced functional recovery than non-transgenic littermates. When the hAR transgene was crossed onto the PPAR alpha knockout background, another example of greater heart glucose oxidation, hAR expressing mice had increased heart fructose content, cardiac fibrosis, ROS, and apoptosis. In conclusion, overexpression of hAR in cardiomyocytes leads to cardiac dysfunction with aging and in the setting of reduced FA and increased glucose metabolism. These results suggest that pharmacological inhibition of AR will be beneficial during ischemia and in some forms of heart failure.

  17. Functional protein expression of multiple sodium channel alpha- and beta-subunit isoforms in neonatal cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Susann G; Westenbroek, Ruth E; Zechner, Christoph; Maass, Alexander H; Bischoff, Sebastian; Muck, Jenny; Wischmeyer, Erhard; Scheuer, Todd; Maier, Sebastian K G

    2010-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are composed of pore-forming alpha- and auxiliary beta-subunits and are responsible for the rapid depolarization of cardiac action potentials. Recent evidence indicates that neuronal tetrodotoxin (TTX) sensitive sodium channel alpha-subunits are expressed in the heart in addition to the predominant cardiac TTX-resistant Na(v)1.5 sodium channel alpha-subunit. These TTX-sensitive isoforms are preferentially localized in the transverse tubules of rodents. Since neonatal cardiomyocytes have yet to develop transverse tubules, we determined the complement of sodium channel subunits expressed in these cells. Neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes were stained with antibodies specific for individual isoforms of sodium channel alpha- and beta-subunits. alpha-actinin, a component of the z-line, was used as an intracellular marker of sarcomere boundaries. TTX-sensitive sodium channel alpha-subunit isoforms Na(v)1.1, Na(v)1.2, Na(v)1.3, Na(v)1.4 and Na(v)1.6 were detected in neonatal rat heart but at levels reduced compared to the predominant cardiac alpha-subunit isoform, Na(v)1.5. Each of the beta-subunit isoforms (beta1-beta4) was also expressed in neonatal cardiac cells. In contrast to adult cardiomyocytes, the alpha-subunits are distributed in punctate clusters across the membrane surface of neonatal cardiomyocytes; no isoform-specific subcellular localization is observed. Voltage clamp recordings in the absence and presence of 20 nM TTX provided functional evidence for the presence of TTX-sensitive sodium current in neonatal ventricular myocardium which represents between 20 and 30% of the current, depending on membrane potential and experimental conditions. Thus, as in the adult heart, a range of sodium channel alpha-subunits are expressed in neonatal myocytes in addition to the predominant TTX-resistant Na(v)1.5 alpha-subunit and they contribute to the total sodium current.

  18. The cardiac maladaptive ATF3-dependent cross-talk between cardiomyocytes and macrophages is mediated by the IFNγ-CXCL10-CXCR3 axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, L; Barash, U; Zohar, Y; Karin, N; Aronheim, A

    2017-02-01

    Pressure overload induces adaptive and maladaptive cardiac remodeling processes in the heart. Part of the maladaptive process is the cross-talk between cardiomyocytes and macrophages which is dependent on the function of the Activating Transcription Factor 3, ATF3. Yet, the molecular mechanism involved in cardiomyocytes-macrophages communication leading to macrophages recruitment to the heart and cardiac maladaptive remodeling is currently unknown. Isolated peritoneal macrophages from either wild type or ATF3-KO mice were cultured in serum free medium to collect conditioned medium (CM). CM was used to probe an antibody cytokine/chemokine array. The interferon γ induced protein 10kDa, CXCL10, was found to be enriched in wild type macrophages CM. Wild type cardiomyocytes treated with CXCL10 in vitro, resulted in significant increase in cell volume as compared to ATF3-KO cardiomyocytes. In vivo, pressure overload was induced by phenylephrine (PE) infusion using micro-osmotic pumps. Consistently, CXCL11 (CXCL10 competitive agonist) and CXCL10 receptor antagonist (AMG487) attenuated PE-dependent maladaptive cardiac remodeling. Significantly, we show that the expression of the CXCL10 receptor, CXCR3, is suppressed in cardiomyocytes and macrophages derived from ATF3-KO mice. CXCR3 is positively regulated by ATF3 through an ATF3 transcription response element found in its proximal promoter. Finally, mice lacking CXCR3 display a significant reduction of cardiac remodeling processes following PE infusion. Chronic PE infusion results in a unique cardiomyocytes-macrophages cross-talk that is mediated by IFNγ. Subsequently, macrophages that are recruited to the heart secrete CXCL10 resulting in maladaptive cardiac remodeling mediated by the CXCR3 receptor. ATF3-KO mice escape from PE-dependent maladaptive cardiac remodeling by suppressing the IFNγ-CXCL10-CXCR3 axis at multiple levels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Disruption of planar cell polarity signaling results in congenital heart defects and cardiomyopathy attributable to early cardiomyocyte disorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Helen M; Rhee, Hong Jun; Murdoch, Jennifer N; Hildreth, Victoria; Peat, Jonathan D; Anderson, Robert H; Copp, Andrew J; Chaudhry, Bill; Henderson, Deborah J

    2007-07-20

    The Drosophila scribble gene regulates apical-basal polarity and is implicated in control of cellular architecture and cell growth control. Mutations in mammalian Scrib (circletail; Crc mutant) also result in abnormalities suggestive of roles in planar cell polarity regulation. We show that Crc mutants develop heart malformations and cardiomyopathy attributable to abnormalities in cardiomyocyte organization within the early heart tube. N-Cadherin is lost from the cardiomyocyte cell membrane and cell-cell adhesion is disrupted. This results in abnormalities in heart looping and formation of both the trabeculae and compact myocardium, which ultimately results in cardiac misalignment defects and ventricular noncompaction. Thus, these late abnormalities arise from defects occurring at the earliest stages of heart development. Mislocalization of Vangl2 in Crc/Crc cardiomyocytes suggests Scrib is acting in the planar cell polarity pathway in this tissue. Moreover, double heterozygosity for mutations in both Scrib and Vangl2 can cause cardiac defects similar to those found in homozygous mutants for each gene but without other major defects. We propose that heterozygosity for mutations in different genes in the planar cell polarity pathway may be an important mechanism for congenital heart defects and cardiomyopathy in humans.

  20. Wnt/β-catenin signaling directs the regional expansion of first and second heart field-derived ventricular cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buikema, Jan Willem; Mady, Ahmed S; Mittal, Nikhil V; Atmanli, Ayhan; Caron, Leslie; Doevendans, Pieter A; Sluijter, Joost P G; Domian, Ibrahim J

    2013-10-01

    In mammals, cardiac development proceeds from the formation of the linear heart tube, through complex looping and septation, all the while increasing in mass to provide the oxygen delivery demands of embryonic growth. The developing heart must orchestrate regional differences in cardiomyocyte proliferation to control cardiac morphogenesis. During ventricular wall formation, the compact myocardium proliferates more vigorously than the trabecular myocardium, but the mechanisms controlling such regional differences among cardiomyocyte populations are not understood. Control of definitive cardiomyocyte proliferation is of great importance for application to regenerative cell-based therapies. We have used murine and human pluripotent stem cell systems to demonstrate that, during in vitro cellular differentiation, early ventricular cardiac myocytes display a robust proliferative response to β-catenin-mediated signaling and conversely accelerate differentiation in response to inhibition of this pathway. Using gain- and loss-of-function murine genetic models, we show that β-catenin controls ventricular myocyte proliferation during development and the perinatal period. We further demonstrate that the differential activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway accounts for the observed differences in the proliferation rates of the compact versus the trabecular myocardium during normal cardiac development. Collectively, these results provide a mechanistic explanation for the differences in localized proliferation rates of cardiac myocytes and point to a practical method for the generation of the large numbers of stem cell-derived cardiac myocytes necessary for clinical applications.

  1. ALDH2 Inhibition Potentiates High Glucose Stress-Induced Injury in Cultured Cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Pan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH gene superfamily consists of 19 isozymes. They are present in various organs and involved in metabolizing aldehydes that are biologically generated. For instance, ALDH2, a cardiac mitochondrial ALDH isozyme, is known to detoxify 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, a reactive aldehyde produced upon lipid peroxidation in diabetic conditions. We hypothesized that inhibition of ALDH leads to the accumulation of unmetabolized 4HNE and consequently exacerbates injury in cells subjected to high glucose stress. H9C2 cardiomyocyte cell lines were pretreated with 10 μM disulfiram (DSF, an inhibitor of ALDH2 or vehicle (DMSO for 2 hours, and then subjected to high glucose stress {33 mM D-glucose (HG or 33 mM D-mannitol as an osmotic control (Ctrl} for 24 hrs. The decrease in ALDH2 activity with DSF pretreatment was higher in HG group when compared to Ctrl group. Increased 4HNE adduct formation with DSF pretreatment was higher in HG group compared to Ctrl group. Pretreatment with DSF leads to potentiated HG-induced cell death in cultured H9C2 cardiomyocytes by lowering mitochondrial membrane potential. Our results indicate that ALDH2 activity is important in preventing high glucose induced cellular dysfunction.

  2. A comparative study between mixed-type tumours from human salivary and canine mammary glands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardoso Sérgio V

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In comparative pathology, canine mammary tumours have special interest because of their similarities with human breast cancer. Mixed tumours are uncommon lesions in the human breast, but they are found most frequently in the mammary gland of the female dogs and in the human salivary glands. The aim of the study was to compare clinical, morphological and immunohistochemical features of human salivary and canine mammary gland mixed tumours, in order to evaluate the latter as an experimental model for salivary gland tumours. Methods Ten examples of each mixed tumour type (human pleomorphic adenoma and carcinomas ex-pleomorphic adenomas and canine mixed tumour and metaplastic carcinoma were evaluated. First, clinical and morphologic aspects of benign and malignant variants were compared between the species. Then, streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase immunohistochemistry was performed to detect the expression of cytokeratins, vimentin, p63 protein, estrogen receptor, β-catenin, and E-cadherin. Results After standardization, similar age and site distributions were observed in human and canine tumours. Histological similarities were identified in the comparison of the benign lesions as well. Metaplastic carcinomas also resembled general aspects of carcinomas ex-pleomorphic adenomas in morphological evaluation. Additionally, immunohistochemical staining further presented similar antigenic expression between lesions. Conclusion There are many similar features between human salivary and canine mammary gland mixed tumours. This observation is of great relevance for those interested in the study and management of salivary gland tumours, since canine lesions may constitute useful comparative models for their investigations.

  3. The comparative psychology of same-different judgments by humans (Homo sapiens) and monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J David; Redford, Joshua S; Haas, Sarah M; Coutinho, Mariana V C; Couchman, Justin J

    2008-07-01

    The authors compared the performance of humans and monkeys in a Same-Different task. They evaluated the hypothesis that for humans the Same-Different concept is qualitative, categorical, and rule-based, so that humans distinguish 0-disparity pairs (i.e., same) from pairs with any discernible disparity (i.e., different); whereas for monkeys the Same-Different concept is quantitative, continuous, and similarity-based, so that monkeys distinguish small-disparity pairs (i.e., similar) from pairs with a large disparity (i.e., dissimilar). The results supported the hypothesis. Monkeys, more than humans, showed a gradual transition from same to different categories and an inclusive criterion for responding Same. The results have implications for comparing Same-Different performances across species--different species may not always construe or perform even identical tasks in the same way. In particular, humans may especially apply qualitative, rule-based frameworks to cognitive tasks like Same-Different.

  4. Comparative expression analysis of the phosphocreatine circuit in extant primates: Implications for human brain evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferle, Adam D; Warner, Lisa R; Wang, Catrina W; Nielsen, William J; Babbitt, Courtney C; Fedrigo, Olivier; Wray, Gregory A

    2011-02-01

    While the hominid fossil record clearly shows that brain size has rapidly expanded over the last ~2.5 M.yr. the forces driving this change remain unclear. One popular hypothesis proposes that metabolic adaptations in response to dietary shifts supported greater encephalization in humans. An increase in meat consumption distinguishes the human diet from that of other great apes. Creatine, an essential metabolite for energy homeostasis in muscle and brain tissue, is abundant in meat and was likely ingested in higher quantities during human origins. Five phosphocreatine circuit proteins help regulate creatine utilization within energy demanding cells. We compared the expression of all five phosphocreatine circuit genes in cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and skeletal muscle tissue for humans, chimpanzees, and rhesus macaques. Strikingly, SLC6A8 and CKB transcript levels are higher in the human brain, which should increase energy availability and turnover compared to non-human primates. Combined with other well-documented differences between humans and non-human primates, this allocation of energy to the cerebral cortex and cerebellum may be important in supporting the increased metabolic demands of the human brain. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A 1463 gene cattle-human comparative map with anchor points defined by human genome sequence coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everts-van der Wind, Annelie; Kata, Srinivas R; Band, Mark R; Rebeiz, Mark; Larkin, Denis M; Everts, Robin E; Green, Cheryl A; Liu, Lei; Natarajan, Shreedhar; Goldammer, Tom; Lee, Jun Heon; McKay, Stephanie; Womack, James E; Lewin, Harris A

    2004-07-01

    A second-generation 5000 rad radiation hybrid (RH) map of the cattle genome was constructed primarily using cattle ESTs that were targeted to gaps in the existing cattle-human comparative map, as well as to sparsely populated map intervals. A total of 870 targeted markers were added, bringing the number of markers mapped on the RH(5000) panel to 1913. Of these, 1463 have significant BLASTN hits (E genes) were identified between the cattle and human genomes, of which 31 are newly discovered and 34 were extended singletons on the first-generation map. The new map represents an improvement of 20% genome-wide comparative coverage compared with the first-generation map. Analysis of gene content within human genome regions where there are gaps in the comparative map revealed gaps with both significantly greater and significantly lower gene content. The new, more detailed cattle-human comparative map provides an improved resource for the analysis of mammalian chromosome evolution, the identification of candidate genes for economically important traits, and for proper alignment of sequence contigs on cattle chromosomes. Copyright 2004 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press ISSN

  6. Two inhibitory systems and CKIs regulate cell cycle exit of mammalian cardiomyocytes after birth

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    Tane, Shoji; Okayama, Hitomi; Ikenishi, Aiko; Amemiya, Yuki [School of Life Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, Yonago 683-8503 (Japan); Nakayama, Keiichi I. [Medical Institute of Bioregulation, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Takeuchi, Takashi, E-mail: takeuchi@med.tottori-u.ac.jp [School of Life Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, Yonago 683-8503 (Japan)

    2015-10-16

    Mammalian cardiomyocytes actively proliferate during embryonic stages, following which they exit their cell cycle after birth, and the exit is maintained. Previously, we showed that two inhibitory systems (the G1-phase inhibitory system: repression of cyclin D1 expression; the M-phase inhibitory system: inhibition of CDK1 activation) maintain the cell cycle exit of mouse adult cardiomyocytes. We also showed that two CDK inhibitors (CKIs), p21{sup Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1}, regulate the cell cycle exit in a portion of postnatal cardiomyocytes. It remains unknown whether the two inhibitory systems are involved in the cell cycle exit of postnatal cardiomyocytes and whether p21{sup Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1} also inhibit entry to M-phase. Here, we showed that more than 40% of cardiomyocytes entered an additional cell cycle by induction of cyclin D1 expression at postnatal stages, but M-phase entry was inhibited in the majority of cardiomyocytes. Marked cell cycle progression and endoreplication were observed in cardiomyocytes of p21{sup Cip1} knockout mice at 4 weeks of age. In addition, tri- and tetranucleated cardiomyocytes increased significantly in p21{sup Cip1} knockout mice. These data showed that the G1-phase inhibitory system and two CKIs (p21{sup Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1}) inhibit entry to an additional cell cycle in postnatal cardiomyocytes, and that the M-phase inhibitory system and p21{sup Cip1} inhibit M-phase entry of cardiomyocytes which have entered the additional cell cycle. - Highlights: • Many postnatal cardiomyocytes entered an additional cell cycle by cyclin D1 induction. • The majority of cardiomyocytes could not enter M-phase after cyclin D1 induction. • Cell cycle progressed markedly in p21{sup Cip1} knockout mice after postnatal day 14. • Tri- and tetranucleated cardiomyocytes increased in p21{sup Cip1} knockout mice.

  7. Anti-apoptosis effect of polysaccharide isolated from the seeds of Cuscuta chinensis Lam on cardiomyocytes in aging rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shou-Li; Guo, Li; Ren, Ya-Chao; Wang, Bing; Li, Rong-Hui; Qi, Yu-Shan; Yu, Hui; Chang, Nai-Dan; Li, Ming-Hui; Peng, Hai-Sheng

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the mechanism of apoptosis in myocardial cells of aging rats induced by D-galactose and to study the effect of the Polysaccharide isolated from the seeds of Cuscuta chinensis Lam (PCCL) on apoptosis of cardiomyocytes and its corresponding machinasim in aging rat model. Fifty male SD rats were randomly divided into 5 groups. Normal control group (NC). D-galactose (100 mg · kg(-1)d(-1) for 56 day) indued aging group (MC), D-galactose plus 100 mg kg(-1) d(-1) PCCL group (ML), D-galactose plus 200 mg kg(-1) d(-1) PCCL group (MM), and D-galactose plus 400 mg kg(-1) d(-1) PCCL group (MH). Same volume of solution (water, or PCCL aqueous solution) was given by gavage for 56 days. Then the hearts were collected and apoptosis parameters were evaluated. Caspase-3 and Cyt c were determined by fluorescence spectrometer, the apoptosis rate was assessed by AnnexinV-FITC method by Flow-Cytometry, [Ca(2+)]i and [Ca(2+)]i overloaded by KCL were observed by laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM); Bcl-2 and Bax were examined by immunohistochemistry. The content of Cyt C, [Ca(2+)]i of cardiomyocytes, the activity of Caspase-3, Bax expression level in D-galactose induced aging group were higher than NC (p aging group compared to NC. On the other hand, the content of Cyt C, [Ca(2+)]i of cardiomyocytes, the activity of Caspase-3 and apoptosis rate, as well as Bax expression level in all three PCCL groups were decreased compared to galactose induced group (p aging group. PCCL could decrease the apoptosis of cardiomyocytes by the mitochondria apoptosis pathway.

  8. Novel distribution of calreticulin to cardiomyocyte mitochondria and its increase in a rat model of dilated cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ming [Department of Cardiology, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi (China); Department of Respiratory Medicine, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi (China); Wei, Jin, E-mail: weijindr@163.com [Department of Cardiology, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi (China); Li, Yali [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi (China); Shan, Hu; Yan, Rui; Lin, Lin [Department of Cardiology, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi (China); Zhang, Qiuhong [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi (China); Xue, Jiahong [Department of Cardiology, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi (China)

    2014-06-20

    Highlights: • Calreticulin can also be found in cardiomyocyte mitochondria. • The mitochondrial content of calreticulin is increased in DCM hearts. • Increased expression of mitochondrial CRT may induce mitochondrial damage. • Mitochondrial CRT may inhibit the phosphorylation of mitochondrial STAT3. - Abstract: Background: Calreticulin (CRT), a Ca{sup 2+}-binding chaperone of the endoplasmic reticulum, can also be found in several other locations including the cytosol, nucleus, secretory granules, the outer side of the plasma membrane, and the extracellular matrix. Whether CRT is localized at mitochondria of cardiomyocytes and whether such localization is affected under DCM are still unclear. Methods and results: The DCM model was generated in rats by the daily oral administration of furazolidone for thirty weeks. Echocardiographic and hemodynamic studies demonstrated enlarged left ventricular dimensions and reduced systolic and diastolic function in DCM rats. Immuno-electron microscopy and Western blot showed that CRT was present in cardiomyocyte mitochondria and the mitochondrial content of CRT was increased in DCM hearts (P < 0.05). Morphometric analysis showed notable myocardial apoptosis and mitochondrial swelling with fractured or dissolved cristae in the DCM hearts. Compared with the control group, the mitochondrial membrane potential level of the freshly isolated cardiac mitochondria and the enzyme activities of cytochrome c oxidase and succinate dehydrogenase in the model group were significantly decreased (P < 0.05), and the myocardial apoptosis index and the caspase activities of caspase-9 and caspase-3 were significantly increased (P < 0.05). Pearson linear correlation analysis showed that the mitochondrial content of CRT had negative correlations with the mitochondrial function, and a positive correlation with myocardial apoptosis index (P < 0.001). The protein expression level of cytochrome c and the phosphorylation activity of STAT3 in the

  9. Comparative analysis of human milk and infant formula derived peptides following in vitro digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, M-Y; Broadhurst, M; Liu, C-P; Gathercole, J; Cheng, W-L; Qi, X-Y; Clerens, S; Dyer, J M; Day, L; Haigh, B

    2017-04-15

    It has long been recognised that there are differences between human milk and infant formulas which lead to differences in health and nutrition for the neonate. In this study we examine and compare the peptide profile of human milk and an exemplar infant formula. The study identifies both similarities and differences in the endogenous and postdigestion peptide profiles of human milk and infant formula. This includes differences in the protein source of these peptides but also with the region within the protein producing the dominant proteins. Clustering of similar peptides around regions of high sequence identity and known bioactivity was also observed. Together the data may explain some of the functional differences between human milk and infant formula, while identifying some aspects of conserved function between bovine and human milks which contribute to the effectiveness of modern infant formula as a substitute for human milk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. One Health and cancer: A comparative study of human and canine cancers in Nairobi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyariaro Kelvin Momanyi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Recent trends in comparative animal and human research inform us that collaborative research plays a key role in deciphering and solving cancer challenges. Globally, cancer is a devastating diagnosis with an increasing burden in both humans and dogs and ranks as the number three killer among humans in Kenya. This study aimed to provide comparative information on cancers affecting humans and dogs in Nairobi, Kenya. Materials and Methods: Dog data collection was by cancer case finding from five veterinary clinics and two diagnostic laboratories, whereas the human dataset was from the Nairobi Cancer Registry covering the period 2002-2012. The analysis was achieved using IBM SPSS Statistics® v.20 (Dog data and CanReg5 (human data. The human population was estimated from the Kenya National Census, whereas the dog population was estimated from the human using a human:dog ratio of 4.1:1. Results: A total of 15,558 human and 367 dog cancer cases were identified. In humans, females had higher cancer cases 8993 (an age-standardized rate of 179.3 per 100,000 compared to 6565 in males (122.1 per 100,000. This order was reversed in dogs where males had higher cases 198 (14.9 per 100,000 compared to 169 (17.5 per 100,000 in females. The incident cancer cases increased over the 11-year study period in both species. Common cancers affecting both humans and dogs were: Prostate (30.4, 0.8, the respiratory tract (8.3, 1.3, lymphoma (5.6, 1.4, and liver and biliary tract (6.3, 0.5, whereas, in females, they were: Breast (44.5, 3.6, lip, oral cavity, and pharynx (8.8, 0.6, liver and biliary tract (6.5, 1.2, and lymphoma (6.0, 0.6, respectively, per 100,000. Conclusion: The commonality of some of the cancers in both humans and dogs fortifies that it may be possible to use dogs as models and sentinels in studying human cancers in Kenya and Africa. We further infer that developing joint animalhuman cancer registries and integrated cancer surveillance systems may

  11. Comparative Proteomics of Human and Macaque Milk Reveals Species-Specific Nutrition during Postnatal Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Kristen L; Weber, Darren; Phinney, Brett S; Smilowitz, Jennifer T; Hinde, Katie; Lönnerdal, Bo; Korf, Ian; Lemay, Danielle G

    2015-05-01

    Milk has been well established as the optimal nutrition source for infants, yet there is still much to be understood about its molecular composition. Therefore, our objective was to develop and compare comprehensive milk proteomes for human and rhesus macaques to highlight differences in neonatal nutrition. We developed a milk proteomics technique that overcomes previous technical barriers including pervasive post-translational modifications and limited sample volume. We identified 1606 and 518 proteins in human and macaque milk, respectively. During analysis of detected protein orthologs, we identified 88 differentially abundant proteins. Of these, 93% exhibited increased abundance in human milk relative to macaque and include lactoferrin, polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, alpha-1 antichymotrypsin, vitamin D-binding protein, and haptocorrin. Furthermore, proteins more abundant in human milk compared with macaque are associated with development of the gastrointestinal tract, the immune system, and the brain. Overall, our novel proteomics method reveals the first comprehensive macaque milk proteome and 524 newly identified human milk proteins. The differentially abundant proteins observed are consistent with the perspective that human infants, compared with nonhuman primates, are born at a slightly earlier stage of somatic development and require additional support through higher quantities of specific proteins to nurture human infant maturation.

  12. Human Capital or Humane Talent? Rethinking the Nature of Education in China from a Comparative Historical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Limin

    2010-01-01

    In order to analyze the impact of human capital theory on contemporary Chinese education, this paper first draws a conceptual outline of how this theory was introduced and interpreted to suit the Chinese quest for modernization. The study then adopts a comparative historical approach to the points of similarity between Neo-Confucian educational…

  13. The ultrastructure of camel blood platelets: a comparative study with human, bovine, and equine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gader, Abdel Galil M Abdel; Ghumlas, Abeer K Al; Hussain, Mansour F; Haidari, Ahmed Al; White, James G

    2008-02-01

    Previous studies indicated that the camel has a very active haemostatic mechanism with a short bleeding time and thrombocytosis. However, platelet function, when tested by agonist-induced aggregation and PFA 100 closure time, showed marked inhibition compared to humans. Since camels are also far more resistant to long exposure to excessive heat and high body temperature than humans, it seemed worthwhile to explore fundamental morphological differences between human and camel platelets and those from other species. The present study has examined the ultrastructure of camel platelets and compared them with the fine structures of human, bovine and equine thrombocytes. Camel platelets, like bovine and equine cells, are discoid in shape and about two-thirds the size of human platelets. A circumferential coil of microtubular supports the disk-like form of camel platelets. Their cytoplasm, like bovine and equine platelets, is filled with alpha granule twice as large as those in human platelets, but lacking the organized matrix of equine alpha granules. Dense bodies are present in camel platelets with whip-like extensions not present on bovine or equine thrombocytes, but found on occasional human platelet dense bodies. Camel platelets, like bovine and equine thrombocytes, lack an open canalicular system (OCS) and must secrete granule products by fusion with the cell wall rather than an OCS. Future studies will determine if the differences in ultrastructural anatomy protect camel platelets from heat more than human thrombocytes.

  14. Generation of Cardiomyocytes in Pipe-Based Microbioreactor Under Segmented Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitry Spitkovsky

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Embryonic stem (ES cells have got a broad range differentiation potential. The differentiation is initiated via aggregation of non-differentiated ES cells into embryoid body (EB capable of multi-lineage development. However experimental variables present in standard differentiation techniques lead to high EB heterogeneity, affecting development into the cells of desired lineage, and do not support the process automatization and scalability. Methods: Here we present a novel pipe based microbioreactor (PBM setup based on segmented flow, designed for spatial maintenance of temperature, nutrition supply, gas supply and sterility. Results: We verified PBM feasibility for continuous process generating cardiac cells starting from single ES cell suspension followed by EB formation for up to 10 days. The ES cells used in the study were genetically modified for cardiac-specific EGFP expression allowing optical monitoring of cardiomyocytes while EBs remained within PBM for up to 10 days. Efficiency of cardiac cells formation within PBM was similar compared to a standard hanging drop based protocol. Conclusion: Our findings ensure further development of microfluidic bioreactor technology to enable robust cardiomyocytes production for needs of drug screening, tissue engineering and other applications.

  15. ERK5 knock down aggravates detrimental effects of hypothermal stimulation on cardiomyocytes via Bim upregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao-Sheng; Zhou, Jing; Liang, Chun; Hong, Kui; Cheng, Xiao-Shu; Wu, Zong-Gui

    2013-09-01

    Mechanism of cold induced myocardial injury remained unclear. Our study investigated the role of ERK5/Bim pathway in hypothermal stimulation-induced apoptosis or damage of cardiomyocytes (CMs). Results showed that in CMs which under hypothermal stimulation, ERK5 siRNA promoted expression of Bim protein. Bim siRNA did not influence ERK5 expression but attenuated production of p-ERK5. ERK5 siRNA induced higher apoptosis rate; intracellular Ca(2+) overload; ROS activity; ΔΨm damage in hypothermia stimulated CMs, when compared with hypothermal stimulation solely treated group, while Bim siRNA effected oppositely and canceled pro-apoptotic effect of ERK5 siRNA. In conclusion, ERK5 knock down releases inhibition to Bim expression, induces aggravated apoptosis in CMs under hypothermal stimulation, which related to higher intracellular Ca(2+) overload, ROS activity, and more severe ΔΨm damage. Results revealed regulative role of ERK5/Bim pathway in hypothermal stimulation-induced injure or apoptosis of cardiomyocytes.

  16. Proper Voltage-Dependent Ion Channel Function in Dysferlin-Deficient Cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubi, Lena; Gawali, Vaibhavkumar S; Kubista, Helmut; Todt, Hannes; Hilber, Karlheinz; Koenig, Xaver

    2015-01-01

    Dysferlin plays a decisive role in calcium-dependent membrane repair in myocytes. Mutations in the encoding DYSF gene cause a number of myopathies, e.g. limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B (LGMD2B). Besides skeletal muscle degenerative processes, dysferlin deficiency is also associated with cardiac complications. Thus, both LGMD2B patients and dysferlin-deficient mice develop a dilated cardiomyopathy. We and others have recently reported that dystrophin-deficient ventricular cardiomyocytes from mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy show significant abnormalities in voltage-dependent ion channels, which may contribute to the pathophysiology in dystrophic cardiomyopathy. The aim of the present study was to investigate if dysferlin, like dystrophin, is a regulator of cardiac ion channels. By using the whole cell patch-clamp technique, we compared the properties of voltage-dependent calcium and sodium channels, as well as action potentials in ventricular cardiomyocytes isolated from the hearts of normal and dysferlin-deficient (dysf) mice. In contrast to dystrophin deficiency, the lack of dysferlin did not impair the ion channel properties and left action potential parameters unaltered. In connection with normal ECGs in dysf mice these results suggest that dysferlin deficiency does not perturb cardiac electrophysiology. Our study demonstrates that dysferlin does not regulate cardiac voltage-dependent ion channels, and implies that abnormalities in cardiac ion channels are not a universal characteristic of all muscular dystrophy types. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Dynamic Alterations to α-Actinin Accompanying Sarcomere Disassembly and Reassembly during Cardiomyocyte Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaohu; Hughes, Bryan G; Ali, Mohammad A M; Cho, Woo Jung; Lopez, Waleska; Schulz, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Although mammals are thought to lose their capacity to regenerate heart muscle shortly after birth, embryonic and neonatal cardiomyocytes in mammals are hyperplastic. During proliferation these cells need to selectively disassemble their myofibrils for successful cytokinesis. The mechanism of sarcomere disassembly is, however, not understood. To study this, we performed a series of immunofluorescence studies of multiple sarcomeric proteins in proliferating neonatal rat ventricular myocytes and correlated these observations with biochemical changes at different cell cycle stages. During myocyte mitosis, α-actinin and titin were disassembled as early as prometaphase. α-actinin (representing the sarcomeric Z-disk) disassembly precedes that of titin (M-line), suggesting that titin disassembly occurs secondary to the collapse of the Z-disk. Sarcomere disassembly was concurrent with the dissolution of the nuclear envelope. Inhibitors of several intracellular proteases could not block the disassembly of α-actinin or titin. There was a dramatic increase in both cytosolic (soluble) and sarcomeric α-actinin during mitosis, and cytosolic α-actinin exhibited decreased phosphorylation compared to sarcomeric α-actinin. Inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) induced the quick reassembly of the sarcomere. Sarcomere dis- and re-assembly in cardiomyocyte mitosis is CDK1-dependent and features dynamic differential post-translational modifications of sarcomeric and cytosolic α-actinin.

  18. Proper Voltage-Dependent Ion Channel Function in Dysferlin-Deficient Cardiomyocytes

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    Lena Rubi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Dysferlin plays a decisive role in calcium-dependent membrane repair in myocytes. Mutations in the encoding DYSF gene cause a number of myopathies, e.g. limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B (LGMD2B. Besides skeletal muscle degenerative processes, dysferlin deficiency is also associated with cardiac complications. Thus, both LGMD2B patients and dysferlin-deficient mice develop a dilated cardiomyopathy. We and others have recently reported that dystrophin-deficient ventricular cardiomyocytes from mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy show significant abnormalities in voltage-dependent ion channels, which may contribute to the pathophysiology in dystrophic cardiomyopathy. The aim of the present study was to investigate if dysferlin, like dystrophin, is a regulator of cardiac ion channels. Methods and Results: By using the whole cell patch-clamp technique, we compared the properties of voltage-dependent calcium and sodium channels, as well as action potentials in ventricular cardiomyocytes isolated from the hearts of normal and dysferlin-deficient (dysf mice. In contrast to dystrophin deficiency, the lack of dysferlin did not impair the ion channel properties and left action potential parameters unaltered. In connection with normal ECGs in dysf mice these results suggest that dysferlin deficiency does not perturb cardiac electrophysiology. Conclusion: Our study demonstrates that dysferlin does not regulate cardiac voltage-dependent ion channels, and implies that abnormalities in cardiac ion channels are not a universal characteristic of all muscular dystrophy types.

  19. Impact of mitochondria on nitrite metabolism in HL-1 cardiomyocytes

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    Peter eDungel

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Apart from ATP synthesis mitochondria have many other functions, one being nitrite reductase activity. NO released from nitrite has been shown to protect the heart from ischemia/reperfusion injury in a cGMP-dependent manner. However, the exact impact of mitochondria on the release of NO from nitrite in cardiomyocytes is not completely understood. Besides mitochondria, a number of non-mitochondrial metalloproteins have been suggested to facilitate this process. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of mitochondria on the bioactivation of nitrite in HL-1 cardiomyocytes.The levels of nitrosyl complexes of hemoglobin (NO-Hb and cGMP levels were measured by electron spin resonance spectroscopy and enzyme immunoassay. In addition the formation of free NO was determined by confocal microscopy as well as intracellular nitrite and S-nitrosothiols by chemoluminescence analysis. NO was released from nitrite in cell culture in an oxygen dependent manner. Application of specific inhibitors of the respiratory chain, p450, NO synthases and xanthine oxidoreductase showed that all four enzymatic systems are involved in the release of NO, but more than 50% of NO is released via the mitochondrial pathway. Only NO released by mitochondria activated cGMP synthesis. Cardiomyocytes co-cultured with red blood cells (RBC competed with RBC for nitrite, but free NO was detected only in HL-1 cells suggesting that RBC are not a source of NO in this model. Apart from activation of cGMP synthesis, NO formed in HL-1 cells diffused out of the cells and formed NO-Hb complexes. In addition nitrite was converted by HL-1 cells to S-nitrosyl complexes. In HL-1 cardiomyocytes, several enzymatic systems are involved in nitrite reduction to NO but only the mitochondrial pathway of NO release activates cGMP synthesis. Our data suggest that this pathway may be a key regulator of myocardial contractility especially under hypoxic conditions.

  20. Modeling Fatty Acid Transfer from Artery to Cardiomyocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arts, Theo; Reneman, Robert S; Bassingthwaighte, James B; van der Vusse, Ger J

    2015-12-01

    Despite the importance of oxidation of blood-borne long-chain fatty acids (Fa) in the cardiomyocytes for contractile energy of the heart, the mechanisms underlying the transfer of Fa from the coronary plasma to the cardiomyocyte is still incompletely understood. To obtain detailed insight into this transfer process, we designed a novel model of Fa transfer dynamics from coronary plasma through the endothelial cells and interstitium to the cardiomyocyte, applying standard physicochemical principles on diffusion and on the chemical equilibrium of Fa binding to carrier proteins Cp, like albumin in plasma and interstitium and Fatty Acid-Binding Proteins within endothelium and cardiomyocytes. Applying these principles, the present model strongly suggests that in the heart, binding and release of Fa to and from Cp in the aqueous border zones on both sides of the cell membranes form the major hindrance to Fa transfer. Although often considered, the membrane itself appears not to be a significant hindrance to diffusion of Fa. Proteins, residing in the cellular membrane, may facilitate transfer of Fa between Cp and membrane. The model is suited to simulate multiple tracer dilution experiments performed on isolated rabbit hearts administrating albumin and Fa as tracer substances into the coronary arterial perfusion line. Using parameter values on myocardial ultrastructure and physicochemical properties of Fa and Cp as reported in literature, simulated washout curves appear to be similar to the experimentally determined ones. We conclude therefore that the model is realistic and, hence, can be considered as a useful tool to better understand Fa transfer by evaluation of experimentally determined tracer washout curves.

  1. Modeling Fatty Acid Transfer from Artery to Cardiomyocyte.

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    Theo Arts

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of oxidation of blood-borne long-chain fatty acids (Fa in the cardiomyocytes for contractile energy of the heart, the mechanisms underlying the transfer of Fa from the coronary plasma to the cardiomyocyte is still incompletely understood. To obtain detailed insight into this transfer process, we designed a novel model of Fa transfer dynamics from coronary plasma through the endothelial cells and interstitium to the cardiomyocyte, applying standard physicochemical principles on diffusion and on the chemical equilibrium of Fa binding to carrier proteins Cp, like albumin in plasma and interstitium and Fatty Acid-Binding Proteins within endothelium and cardiomyocytes. Applying these principles, the present model strongly suggests that in the heart, binding and release of Fa to and from Cp in the aqueous border zones on both sides of the cell membranes form the major hindrance to Fa transfer. Although often considered, the membrane itself appears not to be a significant hindrance to diffusion of Fa. Proteins, residing in the cellular membrane, may facilitate transfer of Fa between Cp and membrane. The model is suited to simulate multiple tracer dilution experiments performed on isolated rabbit hearts administrating albumin and Fa as tracer substances into the coronary arterial perfusion line. Using parameter values on myocardial ultrastructure and physicochemical properties of Fa and Cp as reported in literature, simulated washout curves appear to be similar to the experimentally determined ones. We conclude therefore that the model is realistic and, hence, can be considered as a useful tool to better understand Fa transfer by evaluation of experimentally determined tracer washout curves.

  2. Shock Wave Therapy Promotes Cardiomyocyte Autophagy and Survival during Hypoxia

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    Ling Du

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autophagy plays an important role in cardiovascular disease. Controversy still exists regarding the effect of autophagy on ischemic/hypoxic myocardium. Cardiac shock wave therapy (CSWT is an effective alternative treatment for refractory ischemic heart disease. Whether CSWT can regulate cardiomyocyte autophagy under hypoxic conditions is not clear. We established a myocardial hypoxia model using the H9c2 cell line and performed shock waves (SWs treatment to evaluate the effect of SW on autophagy. Methods: The H9c2 cells were incubated under hypoxic conditions, and SW treatment was then performed at energies of 0.02, 0.05, or 0.10 mJ/mm2. The cell viability and intracellular ATP level were examined. Western blot analysis was used to assess the expression of LC3B, AMPK, mTOR, Beclin-1, Sirt1, and HIF-1α. Autophagic vacuoles were visualized by monodansylcadaverine staining. Results: After the 24-hour hypoxic period, cardiomyocyte viability and ATP levels were decreased and autophagy was significantly increased in H9c2 cells. SW treatment with an energy of 0.05 mJ/mm2 significantly increased the cellular viability, ATP level, LC3B-II/I, and number of autophagic vacuoles. In addition, phosphorylated AMPK and Sirt1 were increased and phosphorylated mTOR and HIF-1α were decreased after SW treatment. Conclusion: SW treatment can potentially promote cardiomyocyte autophagy during hypoxia and protect cardiomyocyte function by regulating the AMPK/mTOR pathway.

  3. Caffeine exposure alters cardiac gene expression in embryonic cardiomyocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiefan; Mei, Wenbin; Barbazuk, William B.; Rivkees, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that in utero caffeine treatment at embryonic day (E) 8.5 alters DNA methylation patterns, gene expression, and cardiac function in adult mice. To provide insight into the mechanisms, we examined cardiac gene and microRNA (miRNA) expression in cardiomyocytes shortly after exposure to physiologically relevant doses of caffeine. In HL-1 and primary embryonic cardiomyocytes, caffeine treatment for 48 h significantly altered the expression of cardiac structural genes (Myh6, Myh7, Myh7b, Tnni3), hormonal genes (Anp and BnP), cardiac transcription factors (Gata4, Mef2c, Mef2d, Nfatc1), and microRNAs (miRNAs; miR208a, miR208b, miR499). In addition, expressions of these genes were significantly altered in embryonic hearts exposed to in utero caffeine. For in utero experiments, pregnant CD-1 dams were treated with 20–60 mg/kg of caffeine, which resulted in maternal circulation levels of 37.3–65.3 μM 2 h after treatment. RNA sequencing was performed on embryonic ventricles treated with vehicle or 20 mg/kg of caffeine daily from E6.5-9.5. Differential expression (DE) analysis revealed that 124 genes and 849 transcripts were significantly altered, and differential exon usage (DEU) analysis identified 597 exons that were changed in response to prenatal caffeine exposure. Among the DE genes identified by RNA sequencing were several cardiac structural genes and genes that control DNA methylation and histone modification. Pathway analysis revealed that pathways related to cardiovascular development and diseases were significantly affected by caffeine. In addition, global cardiac DNA methylation was reduced in caffeine-treated cardiomyocytes. Collectively, these data demonstrate that caffeine exposure alters gene expression and DNA methylation in embryonic cardiomyocytes. PMID:25354728

  4. Modeling Fatty Acid Transfer from Artery to Cardiomyocyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arts, Theo; Reneman, Robert S.; Bassingthwaighte, James B.; van der Vusse, Ger J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of oxidation of blood-borne long-chain fatty acids (Fa) in the cardiomyocytes for contractile energy of the heart, the mechanisms underlying the transfer of Fa from the coronary plasma to the cardiomyocyte is still incompletely understood. To obtain detailed insight into this transfer process, we designed a novel model of Fa transfer dynamics from coronary plasma through the endothelial cells and interstitium to the cardiomyocyte, applying standard physicochemical principles on diffusion and on the chemical equilibrium of Fa binding to carrier proteins Cp, like albumin in plasma and interstitium and Fatty Acid-Binding Proteins within endothelium and cardiomyocytes. Applying these principles, the present model strongly suggests that in the heart, binding and release of Fa to and from Cp in the aqueous border zones on both sides of the cell membranes form the major hindrance to Fa transfer. Although often considered, the membrane itself appears not to be a significant hindrance to diffusion of Fa. Proteins, residing in the cellular membrane, may facilitate transfer of Fa between Cp and membrane. The model is suited to simulate multiple tracer dilution experiments performed on isolated rabbit hearts administrating albumin and Fa as tracer substances into the coronary arterial perfusion line. Using parameter values on myocardial ultrastructure and physicochemical properties of Fa and Cp as reported in literature, simulated washout curves appear to be similar to the experimentally determined ones. We conclude therefore that the model is realistic and, hence, can be considered as a useful tool to better understand Fa transfer by evaluation of experimentally determined tracer washout curves. PMID:26675003

  5. Rac1 modulates cardiomyocyte adhesion during mouse embryonic development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Issa, Radwan, E-mail: rabuissa@umich.edu

    2015-01-24

    Highlights: • Conditional knockout of Rac1 using Nkx2.5 Cre line is lethal at E13.5. • The myocardium of the mutant is thin and disorganized. • The phenotype is not due to cardiomyocyte low proliferation or apoptosis. • The phenotype is due to specific defect in cardiomyocyte adhesion. - Abstract: Rac1, a member of the Rho subfamily of small GTPases, is involved in morphogenesis and differentiation of many cell types. Here we define a role of Rac1 in cardiac development by specifically deleting Rac1 in the pre-cardiac mesoderm using the Nkx2.5-Cre transgenic driver line. Rac1-conditional knockout embryos initiate heart development normally until embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5); their cardiac mesoderm is specified, and the heart tube is formed and looped. However, by E12.5-E13.5 the mutant hearts start failing and embryos develop edema and hemorrhage which is probably the cause for the lethality observed soon after. The hearts of Rac1-cKO embryos exhibit disorganized and thin myocardial walls and defects in outflow tract alignment. No significant differences of cardiomyocyte death or proliferation were found between developing control and mutant embryos. To uncover the role of Rac1 in the heart, E11.5 primary heart cells were cultured and analyzed in vitro. Rac1-deficient cardiomyocytes were less spread, round and loosely attached to the substrate and to each other implying that Rac1-mediated signaling is required for appropriate cell–cell and/or cellmatrix adhesion during cardiac development.

  6. Mapping of Redox State of Mitochondrial Cytochromes in Live Cardiomyocytes Using Raman Microspectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazhe, Nadezda A.; Treiman, Marek; Brazhe, Alexey R.; Find, Ninett L.; Maksimov, Georgy V.; Sosnovtseva, Olga V.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a nonivasive approach to study redox state of reduced cytochromes , and of complexes II and III in mitochondria of live cardiomyocytes by means of Raman microspectroscopy. For the first time with the proposed approach we perform studies of rod- and round-shaped cardiomyocytes, representing different morphological and functional states. Raman mapping and cluster analysis reveal that these cardiomyocytes differ in the amounts of reduced cytochromes , and . The rod-shaped cardiomyocytes possess uneven distribution of reduced cytochromes , and in cell center and periphery. Moreover, by means of Raman spectroscopy we demonstrated the decrease in the relative amounts of reduced cytochromes , and in the rod-shaped cardiomyocytes caused by H2O2-induced oxidative stress before any visible changes. Results of Raman mapping and time-dependent study of reduced cytochromes of complexes II and III and cytochrome in cardiomyocytes are in a good agreement with our fluorescence indicator studies and other published data. PMID:22957018

  7. Simple non-invasive analysis of embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes beating in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radaszkiewicz, Katarzyna Anna; Sýkorová, Dominika; Karas, Pavel; Kudová, Jana; Kohút, Lukáš; Binó, Lucia; Večeřa, Josef; Víteček, Jan; Kubala, Lukáš; Pacherník, Jiří

    2016-02-01

    The analysis of digital video output enables the non-invasive screening of various active biological processes. For the monitoring and computing of the beating parameters of cardiomyocytes in vitro, CB Analyser (cardiomyocyte beating analyser) software was developed. This software is based on image analysis of the video recording of beating cardiomyocytes. CB Analyser was tested using cardiomyocytes derived from mouse embryonic stem cells at different stages of cardiomyogenesis. We observed that during differentiation (from day 18), the beat peak width decreased, which corresponded to the increased speed of an individual pulse. However, the beating frequency did not change. Further, the effects of epinephrine modulating mature cardiomyocyte functions were tested to validate the CB Analyser analysis. In conclusion, data show that CB Analyser is a useful tool for evaluating the functions of both developing and mature cardiomyocytes under various conditions in vitro.

  8. Insulin improves cardiomyocyte contractile function through enhancement of SERCA2a activity in simulated ischemia/reperfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie YU; Hai-feng ZHANG; Feng WU; Qiu-xia LI; Heng MA; Wen-yi GUO; Hai-chang WANG; Feng GAO

    2006-01-01

    Aim: Insulin exerts anti-apoptotic effects in both cardiomyocytes and coronary endothelial cells following ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) via the Akt-endothelial nitric oxide synthase survival signal pathway. This important insulin signaling might further contribute to the improvement of cardiac function after reperfusion. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-AT-Pase (SERCA2a) is involved in the insulin-induced improvement of cardiac contractile function following I/R. Methods: Ventricular myocytes were enzymatically isolated from adult SD rats. Simulated I/R was induced by perfusing cells with chemical anoxic solution for 15 min followed by reperfusion with Tyrode's solution with or without insulin for 30 min. Myocyte shortening and intracellular calcium transients were assessed and underlying mechanisms were investigated. Results: Reperfusion with insulin (10-7 mol/L) significantly improved the recovery of contractile function (n=15-20 myocytes from 6-8 hearts, P<0.05), and increased calcium transients, as evidenced by the increased calcium (Ca2+) fluorescence ratio, shortened time to peak Ca2+ and time to 50% diastolic Ca2+, compared with those in cells reperfused with vehicle (P<0.05). In addition, Akt phosphorylation and SERCA2a activity were both increased in insulin-treated I/R cardiomyocytes, which were markedly inhibited by pretreatment of cells with a specific Akt inhibitor. Moreover, inhibition of Akt activity abolished insulin-induced positive contractile and calcium transients responses in I/R cardiomyocytes. Conclusion: These data demonstrated for the first time that insulin improves the recovery of contractile function in simulated I/R cardiomyocytes in an Akt-dependent and SERCA2a-mediated fashion.

  9. Interaction between Overtraining and the Interindividual Variability May (Not Trigger Muscle Oxidative Stress and Cardiomyocyte Apoptosis in Rats

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    Rodrigo Luiz Perroni Ferraresso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe endurance training (overtraining may cause underperformance related to muscle oxidative stress and cardiomyocyte alterations. Currently, such relationship has not been empirically established. In this study, Wistar rats (n=19 underwent eight weeks of daily exercise sessions followed by three overtraining weeks in which the daily frequency of exercise sessions increased. After the 11th training week, eight rats exhibited a reduction of 38% in performance (nonfunctional overreaching group (NFOR, whereas eleven rats exhibited an increase of 18% in performance (functional overreaching group (FOR. The red gastrocnemius of NFOR presented significantly lower citrate synthase activity compared to FOR, but similar to that of the control. The activity of mitochondrial complex IV in NFOR was lower than that of the control and FOR. This impaired mitochondrial adaptation in NFOR was associated with increased antioxidant enzyme activities and increased lipid peroxidation (in muscle and plasma relative to FOR and control. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis was higher in NFOR. Plasma creatine kinase levels were unchanged. We observed that some rats that presented evidence of muscle oxidative stress are also subject to cardiomyocyte apoptosis under endurance overtraining. Blood lipid peroxides may be a suitable biomarker for muscle oxidative stress that is unrelated to severe muscle damage.

  10. HEADING RECOVERY FROM OPTIC FLOW: COMPARING PERFORMANCE OF HUMANS AND COMPUTATIONAL MODELS

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    Andrew John Foulkes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Human observers can perceive their direction of heading with a precision of about a degree. Several computational models of the processes underpinning the perception of heading have been proposed. In the present study we set out to assess which of four candidate models best captured human performance; the four models we selected reflected key differences in terms of approach and methods to modelling optic flow processing to recover movement parameters. We first generated a performance profile for human observers by measuring how performance changed as we systematically manipulated both the quantity (number of dots in the stimulus per frame and quality (amount of 2D directional noise of the flow field information. We then generated comparable performance profiles for the four candidate models. Models varied markedly in terms of both their performance and similarity to human data. To formally assess the match between the models and human performance we regressed the output of each of the four models against human performance data. We were able to rule out two models that produced very different performance profiles to human observers. The remaining two shared some similarities with human performance profiles in terms of the magnitude and pattern of thresholds. However none of the models tested could capture all aspect of the human data.

  11. The top skin-associated genes: a comparative analysis of human and mouse skin transcriptomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Peter Arne; Buhren, Bettina Alexandra; Schrumpf, Holger; Homey, Bernhard; Zlotnik, Albert; Hevezi, Peter

    2014-06-01

    The mouse represents a key model system for the study of the physiology and biochemistry of skin. Comparison of skin between mouse and human is critical for interpretation and application of data from mouse experiments to human disease. Here, we review the current knowledge on structure and immunology of mouse and human skin. Moreover, we present a systematic comparison of human and mouse skin transcriptomes. To this end, we have recently used a genome-wide database of human gene expression to identify genes highly expressed in skin, with no, or limited expression elsewhere - human skin-associated genes (hSAGs). Analysis of our set of hSAGs allowed us to generate a comprehensive molecular characterization of healthy human skin. Here, we used a similar database to generate a list of mouse skin-associated genes (mSAGs). A comparative analysis between the top human (n=666) and mouse (n=873) skin-associated genes (SAGs) revealed a total of only 30.2% identity between the two lists. The majority of shared genes encode proteins that participate in structural and barrier functions. Analysis of the top functional annotation terms revealed an overlap for morphogenesis, cell adhesion, structure, and signal transduction. The results of this analysis, discussed in the context of published data, illustrate the diversity between the molecular make up of skin of both species and grants a probable explanation, why results generated in murine in vivo models often fail to translate into the human.

  12. Achieving Closed-Loop Control Simulation of Human-Artefact Interaction: A Comparative Review

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    Wilhelm Frederik van der Vegte

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To include user interactions in simulations of product use, the most common approach is to couple human subjects to simulation models, using hardware interfaces to close the simulation-control loop. Testing with virtual human models could offer a low-cost addition to evaluation with human subjects. This paper explores the possibilities for coupling human and artefact models to achieve fully software-based interaction simulations. We have critically reviewed existing partial solutions to simulate or execute control (both human control and product-embedded control and compared solutions from literature with a proof-of-concept we have recently developed. Our concept closes all loops, but it does not rely on validated algorithms to predict human decision making and low-level human motor control. For low-level control, validated solutions are available from other approaches. For human decision making, however, validated algorithms exist only to predict the timing but not the reasoning behind it. To identify decision-making schemes beyond what designers can conjecture, testing with human subjects remains indispensable.

  13. Induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes as models for cardiac arrhythmias

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    Maaike eHoekstra

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrhythmias are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. In younger patients, the majority of sudden cardiac deaths have an underlying Mendelian genetic cause. Over the last 15 years, enormous progress has been made in identifying the distinct clinical phenotypes and in studying the basic cellular and genetic mechanisms associated with the primary Mendelian (monogenic arrhythmia syndromes. Investigation of the electrophysiological consequences of an ion channel mutation is ideally done in the native cardiomyocyte environment. However, the majority of such studies so far have relied on heterologous expression systems in which single ion channel genes are expressed in non-cardiac cells. In some cases, transgenic mouse models haven been generated, but these also have significant shortcomings, primarily related to species differences.The discovery that somatic cells can be reprogrammed to pluripotency as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC has generated much interest since it presents an opportunity to generate patient- and disease-specific cell lines from which normal and diseased human cardiomyocytes can be obtained These genetically diverse human model systems can be studied in vitro and used to decipher mechanisms of disease and identify strategies and reagents for new therapies. Here we review the present state of the art with respect to cardiac disease models already generated using IPSC technology and which have been (partially characterized.Human iPSC (hiPSC models have been described for the cardiac arrhythmia syndromes, including LQT1, LQT2, LQT3-Brugada Syndrome, LQT8/Timothy syndrome and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia. In most cases, the hiPSC-derived cardiomyoctes recapitulate the disease phenotype and have already provided opportunities for novel insight into cardiac pathophysiology. It is expected that the lines will be useful in the development of pharmacological agents for the management of these

  14. Atrial Fibrillation and Fibrosis: Beyond the Cardiomyocyte Centric View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miragoli, Michele; Glukhov, Alexey V.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) associated with fibrosis is characterized by the appearance of interstitial myofibroblasts. These cells are responsible for the uncontrolled deposition of the extracellular matrix, which pathologically separate cardiomyocyte bundles. The enhanced fibrosis is thought to contribute to arrhythmias “indirectly” because a collagenous septum is a passive substrate for propagation, resulting in impulse conduction block and/or zigzag conduction. However, the emerging results demonstrate that myofibroblasts in vitro also promote arrhythmogenesis due to direct implications upon cardiomyocyte electrophysiology. This electrical interference may be considered beneficial as it resolves any conduction blocks; however, the passive properties of myofibroblasts might cause a delay in impulse propagation, thus promoting AF due to discontinuous slow conduction. Moreover, low-polarized myofibroblasts reduce, via cell-density dependence, the fast driving inward current for cardiac impulse conduction, therefore resulting in arrhythmogenic uniformly slow propagation. Critically, the subsequent reduction in cardiomyocytes resting membrane potential in vitro significantly increases the likelihood of ectopic activity. Myofibroblast densities and the degree of coupling at cellular border zones also impact upon this likelihood. By considering future in vivo studies, which identify myofibroblasts “per se” as a novel targets for cardiac arrhythmias, this review aims to describe the implications of noncardiomyocyte view in the context of AF. PMID:26229964

  15. Cation dyshomeostasis and cardiomyocyte necrosis: the Fleckenstein hypothesis revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Brian J.; Cheema, Yaser; Shahbaz, Atta U.; Bhattacharya, Syamal K.; Weber, Karl T.

    2011-01-01

    An ongoing loss of cardiomyocytes to apoptotic and necrotic cell death pathways contributes to the progressive nature of heart failure. The pathophysiological origins of necrotic cell loss relate to the neurohormonal activation that accompanies acute and chronic stressor states and which includes effector hormones of the adrenergic nervous system. Fifty years ago, Albrecht Fleckenstein and coworkers hypothesized the hyperadrenergic state, which accompanies such stressors, causes cardiomyocyte necrosis based on catecholamine-initiated excessive intracellular Ca2+ accumulation (EICA), and mitochondrial Ca2+ overloading in particular, in which the ensuing dysfunction and structural degeneration of these organelles leads to necrosis. In recent years, two downstream factors have been identified which, together with EICA, constitute a signal–transducer–effector pathway: (i) mitochondria-based induction of oxidative stress, in which the rate of reactive oxygen metabolite generation exceeds their rate of detoxification by endogenous antioxidant defences; and (ii) the opening of the mitochondrial inner membrane permeability transition pore (mPTP) followed by organellar swelling and degeneration. The pathogenesis of stress-related cardiomyopathy syndromes is likely related to this pathway. Other factors which can account for cytotoxicity in stressor states include: hypokalaemia; ionized hypocalcaemia and hypomagnesaemia with resultant elevations in parathyroid hormone serving as a potent mediator of EICA; and hypozincaemia with hyposelenaemia, which compromise antioxidant defences. Herein, we revisit the Fleckenstein hypothesis of EICA in leading to cardiomyocyte necrosis and the central role played by mitochondria. PMID:21398641

  16. Role of Histone Demethylases in Cardiomyocytes Induced to Hypertrophy

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    Wendy Rosales

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic changes induced by histone demethylases play an important role in differentiation and pathological changes in cardiac cells. However, the role of the jumonji family of demethylases in the development of cardiac hypertrophy remains elusive. In this study, the presence of different histone demethylases in cardiac cells was evaluated after hypertrophy was induced with neurohormones. A cell line from rat cardiomyocytes was used as a biological model. The phenotypic profiles of the cells, as well as the expression of histone demethylases, were studied through immunofluorescence, transient transfection, western blot, and qRT-PCR analysis after inducing hypertrophy by angiotensin II and endothelin-1. An increase in fetal gene expression (ANP, BNP, and β-MHC was observed in cardiomyocytes after treatment with angiotensin II and endothelin-1. A significant increase in JMJD2A expression, but not in UTX or JMJD2C expression, was observed. When JMJD2A was overexpressed in cardiomyocytes through transient transfection, the effect of neurohormones on fetal cardiac gene expression was increased. We conclude that JMJD2A plays a principal role in the regulation of fetal cardiac genes, which increase in expression during the pathological hypertrophic process.

  17. Effect of biophysical cues on reprogramming to cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sia, Junren; Yu, Pengzhi; Srivastava, Deepak; Li, Song

    2016-10-01

    Reprogramming of fibroblasts to cardiomyocytes offers exciting potential in cell therapy and regenerative medicine, but has low efficiency. We hypothesize that physical cues may positively affect the reprogramming process, and studied the effects of periodic mechanical stretch, substrate stiffness and microgrooved substrate on reprogramming yield. Subjecting reprogramming fibroblasts to periodic mechanical stretch and different substrate stiffness did not improve reprogramming yield. On the other hand, culturing the cells on microgrooved substrate enhanced the expression of cardiomyocyte genes by day 2 and improved the yield of partially reprogrammed cells at day 10. By combining microgrooved substrate with an existing optimized culture protocol, yield of reprogrammed cardiomyocytes with striated cardiac troponin T staining and spontaneous contractile activity was increased. We identified the regulation of Mkl1 activity as a new mechanism by which microgroove can affect reprogramming. Biochemical approach could only partially recapitulate the effect of microgroove. Microgroove demonstrated an additional effect of enhancing organization of sarcomeric structure, which could not be recapitulated by biochemical approach. This study provides insights into new mechanisms by which topographical cues can affect cellular reprogramming.

  18. A dual comparative approach: integrating lines of evidence from human evolutionary neuroanatomy and neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Kari L; Hrvoj-Mihic, Branka; Semendeferi, Katerina

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of the human brain has been marked by a nearly 3-fold increase in size since our divergence from the last common ancestor shared with chimpanzees and bonobos. Despite increased interest in comparative neuroanatomy and phylogenetic methods, relatively little is known regarding the effects that this enlargement has had on its internal organization, and how certain areas of the brain have differentially expanded over evolutionary time. Analyses of the microstructure of several regions of the human cortex and subcortical structures have demonstrated subtle changes at the cellular and molecular level, suggesting that the human brain is more than simply a 'scaled-up' primate brain. Ongoing research in comparative neuroanatomy has much to offer regarding our understanding of human brain evolution. Through analysis of the neuroanatomical phenotype at the level of reorganization in cytoarchitecture and cellular morphology, new data continue to highlight changes in cell density and organization associated with volumetric changes in discrete regions. An understanding of the functional significance of variation in neural circuitry can further be approached through studies of atypical human development. Many neurodevelopmental disorders cause disruption in systems associated with uniquely human features of cognition, including language and social cognition. Understanding the genetic and developmental mechanisms that underlie variation in the human cognitive phenotype can help to clarify the functional significance of interspecific variation. By uniting approaches from comparative neuroanatomy and neuropathology, insights can be gained that clarify trends in human evolution. Here, we explore these lines of evidence and their significance for understanding functional variation between species as well as within neuropathological variation in the human brain.

  19. Review of colorectal cancer and its metastases in rodent models: comparative aspects with those in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobaek-Larsen, M; Thorup, I; Diederichsen, Axel Cosmus Pyndt;

    2000-01-01

    that human trials become more directed, with greater chances of success. The orthotopic transplantation of colon cancer cells into the cecum of syngeneic animals or intraportal inoculation appears to resemble the human metastatic disease most closely, providing a model for study of the treatment......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains one of the most common cancer forms developing in industrialized countries, and its incidence appears to be rising. Studies of human population groups provide insufficient information about carcinogenesis, pathogenesis, and treatment of CRC...... models approximate many of the characteristics of human colonic carcinogenesis and metastasis. So far few comparative evaluations of the various animal models of CRC have been made. CONCLUSION: Animal studies cannot replace human clinical trials, but they can be used as a pre-screening tool, so...

  20. Body composition in Pan paniscus compared with Homo sapiens has implications for changes during human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zihlman, Adrienne L; Bolter, Debra R

    2015-06-16

    The human body has been shaped by natural selection during the past 4-5 million years. Fossils preserve bones and teeth but lack muscle, skin, fat, and organs. To understand the evolution of the human form, information about both soft and hard tissues of our ancestors is needed. Our closest living relatives of the genus Pan provide the best comparative model to those ancestors. Here, we present data on the body composition of 13 bonobos (Pan paniscus) measured during anatomical dissections and compare the data with Homo sapiens. These comparative data suggest that both females and males (i) increased body fat, (ii) decreased relative muscle mass, (iii) redistributed muscle mass to lower limbs, and (iv) decreased relative mass of skin during human evolution. Comparison of soft tissues between Pan and Homo provides new insights into the function and evolution of body composition.

  1. COMPARING PUMA ROBOT ARM WITH THE HUMAN ARM MOVEMENTS; AN ALTERNATIVE ROBOTIC ARM SHOULDER DESIGN

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa BOZDEMİR; ADIGÜZEL, Esat

    1999-01-01

    Using the robotic arms instead of human power becomes increasingly widespread nowadays. Widening of the robotic arms usage field is parallel to improvement of movement capability of it. In this study PUMA Robotic Arm System that is a developed system of the robotic arms was compared with a human arm due to movement. A new joint was added to PUMA Robotic Arm System to have the movements similar to the human shoulder joint. Thus, a shoulder was designed that can make movements through the sides...

  2. The human iliotibial band is specialized for elastic energy storage compared with the chimp fascia lata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Carolyn M; Arnold, Allison S; Biewener, Andrew A; Lieberman, Daniel E

    2015-08-01

    This study examines whether the human iliotibial band (ITB) is specialized for elastic energy storage relative to the chimpanzee fascia lata (FL). To quantify the energy storage potential of these structures, we created computer models of human and chimpanzee lower limbs based on detailed anatomical dissections. We characterized the geometry and force-length properties of the FL, tensor fascia lata (TFL) and gluteus maximus (GMax) in four chimpanzee cadavers based on measurements of muscle architecture and moment arms about the hip and knee. We used the chimp model to estimate the forces and corresponding strains in the chimp FL during bipedal walking, and compared these data with analogous estimates from a model of the human ITB, accounting for differences in body mass and lower extremity posture. We estimate that the human ITB stores 15- to 20-times more elastic energy per unit body mass and stride than the chimp FL during bipedal walking. Because chimps walk with persistent hip flexion, the TFL and portions of GMax that insert on the FL undergo smaller excursions (origin to insertion) than muscles that insert on the human ITB. Also, because a smaller fraction of GMax inserts on the chimp FL than on the human ITB, and thus its mass-normalized physiological cross-sectional area is about three times less in chimps, the chimp FL probably transmits smaller muscle forces. These data provide new evidence that the human ITB is anatomically derived compared with the chimp FL and potentially contributes to locomotor economy during bipedal locomotion.

  3. Comparative Methylome Analyses Identify Epigenetic Regulatory Loci of Human Brain Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendizabal, Isabel; Shi, Lei; Keller, Thomas E; Konopka, Genevieve; Preuss, Todd M; Hsieh, Tzung-Fu; Hu, Enzhi; Zhang, Zhe; Su, Bing; Yi, Soojin V

    2016-11-01

    How do epigenetic modifications change across species and how do these modifications affect evolution? These are fundamental questions at the forefront of our evolutionary epigenomic understanding. Our previous work investigated human and chimpanzee brain methylomes, but it was limited by the lack of outgroup data which is critical for comparative (epi)genomic studies. Here, we compared whole genome DNA methylation maps from brains of humans, chimpanzees and also rhesus macaques (outgroup) to elucidate DNA methylation changes during human brain evolution. Moreover, we validated that our approach is highly robust by further examining 38 human-specific DMRs using targeted deep genomic and bisulfite sequencing in an independent panel of 37 individuals from five primate species. Our unbiased genome-scan identified human brain differentially methylated regions (DMRs), irrespective of their associations with annotated genes. Remarkably, over half of the newly identified DMRs locate in intergenic regions or gene bodies. Nevertheless, their regulatory potential is on par with those of promoter DMRs. An intriguing observation is that DMRs are enriched in active chromatin loops, suggesting human-specific evolutionary remodeling at a higher-order chromatin structure. These findings indicate that there is substantial reprogramming of epigenomic landscapes during human brain evolution involving noncoding regions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  4. EGCG inhibits cardiomyocyte apoptosis in pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and protects cardiomyocytes from oxidative stress in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui SHENG; Zhen-lun GU; Mei-lin XIE; Wen-xuan ZHOU; Ci-yi GUO

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) on pressure overload and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced cardiac myocyte apoptosis. Methods: Cardiac hypertrophy was established in rats by abdominal aortic constriction. EGCG 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg were administered intragastrically (ig). Cultured newborn rat cardiomyocytes were preincubated with EGCG, and oxidative stress injury was induced by H2O2. Results: In cardiac hypertrophy induced by AC in rats, relative to the model group, EGCG 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg ig for 6weeks dose-dependently reduced systolic blood pressure (SBP) and heart weight indices, decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) content, and increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) activity, both in serum and in the myocardium. Also, treatment with EGCG 50 and 100 mg/kg markedly improved cardiac structure and inhibited fibrosis in HE and van Gieson (VG) stain, and reduced apoptotic myocytes in the hypertrophic myocardium detected by terminal transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay. Inthe Western blot analysis, EGCG significantly inhibited pressure overload-inducedp53 increase and bcl-2 decrease. In H2O2-induced cardiomyocyte injury, when preincubated with myocytes for 6-48 h, EGCG 12.5-200 mg/L increased cell viability determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide(MTT) assay. EGCG also attenuated H2O2-induced lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and MDA formation. Meanwhile, EGCG 50 and 100 mg/L significantly inhibited the cardiomyocyte apoptotic rate in flow cytometry. Conclusion: EGCG inhibits cardiac myocyte apoptosis and oxidative stress in pressure overload in-duced cardiac hypertrophy. Also, EGCG prevented cardiomyocyte apoptosis from oxidative stress in vitro. The mechanism might be related to the inhibitory effects of EGCG on p53 induction and bcl-2 decrease.

  5. Dedifferentiated fat cells convert to cardiomyocyte phenotype and repair infarcted cardiac tissue in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumabay, Medet; Matsumoto, Taro; Yokoyama, Shin-ichiro; Kano, Koichiro; Kusumi, Yoshiaki; Masuko, Takayuki; Mitsumata, Masako; Saito, Satoshi; Hirayama, Atsushi; Mugishima, Hideo; Fukuda, Noboru

    2009-11-01

    Adipose tissue-derived stem cells have been demonstrated to differentiate into cardiomyocytes and vascular endothelial cells. Here we investigate whether mature adipocyte-derived dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells can differentiate to cardiomyocytes in vitro and in vivo by establishing DFAT cell lines via ceiling culture of mature adipocytes. DFAT cells were obtained by dedifferentiation of mature adipocytes from GFP-transgenic rats. We evaluated the differentiating ability of DFAT cells into cardiomyocytes by detection of the cardiac phenotype markers in immunocytochemical and RT-PCR analyses in vitro. We also examined effects of the transplantation of DFAT cells into the infarcted heart of rats on cardiomyocytes regeneration and angiogenesis. DFAT cells expressed cardiac phenotype markers when cocultured with cardiomyocytes and also when grown in MethoCult medium in the absence of cardiomyocytes, indicating that DFAT cells have the potential to differentiate to cardiomyocyte lineage. In a rat acute myocardial infarction model, transplanted DFAT cells were efficiently accumulated in infarcted myocardium and expressed cardiac sarcomeric actin at 8 weeks after the cell transplantation. The transplantation of DFAT cells significantly (pDFAT cells have the ability to differentiate to cardiomyocyte-like cells in vitro and in vivo. In addition, transplantation of DFAT cells led to neovascuralization in rats with myocardial infarction. We propose that DFAT cells represent a promising candidate cell source for cardiomyocyte regeneration in severe ischemic heart disease.

  6. Comparative Analysis of Gene Regulation by the Transcription Factor PPARα between Mouse and Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Hooiveld, Guido; Müller, Michael; Kersten, Sander

    2009-01-01

    Background Studies in mice have shown that PPARα is an important regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism and the acute phase response. However, little information is available on the role of PPARα in human liver. Here we set out to compare the function of PPARα in mouse and human hepatocytes via analysis of target gene regulation. Methodology/Principal Findings Primary hepatocytes from 6 human and 6 mouse donors were treated with PPARα agonist Wy14643 and gene expression profiling was performed using Affymetrix GeneChips followed by a systems biology analysis. Baseline PPARα expression was similar in human and mouse hepatocytes. Depending on species and time of exposure, Wy14643 significantly induced the expression of 362–672 genes. Surprisingly minor overlap was observed between the Wy14643-regulated genes from mouse and human, although more substantial overlap was observed at the pathway level. Xenobiotics metabolism and apolipoprotein synthesis were specifically regulated by PPARα in human hepatocytes, whereas glycolysis-gluconeogenesis was regulated specifically in mouse hepatocytes. Most of the genes commonly regulated in mouse and human were involved in lipid metabolism and many represented known PPARα targets, including CPT1A, HMGCS2, FABP1, ACSL1, and ADFP. Several genes were identified that were specifically induced by PPARα in human (MBL2, ALAS1, CYP1A1, TSKU) or mouse (Fbp2, lgals4, Cd36, Ucp2, Pxmp4). Furthermore, several putative novel PPARα targets were identified that were commonly regulated in both species, including CREB3L3, KLF10, KLF11 and MAP3K8. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that PPARα activation has a major impact on gene regulation in human hepatocytes. Importantly, the role of PPARα as master regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism is generally well-conserved between mouse and human. Overall, however, PPARα regulates a mostly divergent set of genes in mouse and human hepatocytes. PMID:19710929

  7. Comparative analysis of gene regulation by the transcription factor PPARalpha between mouse and human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Rakhshandehroo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies in mice have shown that PPARalpha is an important regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism and the acute phase response. However, little information is available on the role of PPARalpha in human liver. Here we set out to compare the function of PPARalpha in mouse and human hepatocytes via analysis of target gene regulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Primary hepatocytes from 6 human and 6 mouse donors were treated with PPARalpha agonist Wy14643 and gene expression profiling was performed using Affymetrix GeneChips followed by a systems biology analysis. Baseline PPARalpha expression was similar in human and mouse hepatocytes. Depending on species and time of exposure, Wy14643 significantly induced the expression of 362-672 genes. Surprisingly minor overlap was observed between the Wy14643-regulated genes from mouse and human, although more substantial overlap was observed at the pathway level. Xenobiotics metabolism and apolipoprotein synthesis were specifically regulated by PPARalpha in human hepatocytes, whereas glycolysis-gluconeogenesis was regulated specifically in mouse hepatocytes. Most of the genes commonly regulated in mouse and human were involved in lipid metabolism and many represented known PPARalpha targets, including CPT1A, HMGCS2, FABP1, ACSL1, and ADFP. Several genes were identified that were specifically induced by PPARalpha in human (MBL2, ALAS1, CYP1A1, TSKU or mouse (Fbp2, lgals4, Cd36, Ucp2, Pxmp4. Furthermore, several putative novel PPARalpha targets were identified that were commonly regulated in both species, including CREB3L3, KLF10, KLF11 and MAP3K8. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that PPARalpha activation has a major impact on gene regulation in human hepatocytes. Importantly, the role of PPARalpha as master regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism is generally well-conserved between mouse and human. Overall, however, PPARalpha regulates a mostly divergent set of genes in mouse and

  8. Refractoriness in human atria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsbye, Lasse; Jespersen, Thomas; Christ, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    drugs. Cardiomyocyte excitability depends on availability of sodium channels, which involves both time- and voltage-dependent recovery from inactivation. This study therefore aims to characterise how sodium channel inactivation affects refractoriness in human atria. METHODS AND RESULTS: Steady......-state activation and inactivation parameters of sodium channels measured in vitro in isolated human atrial cardiomyocytes were used to parameterise a mathematical human atrial cell model. Action potential data were acquired from human atrial trabeculae of patients in either sinus rhythm or chronic atrial...... in pharmacological management of chronic atrial fibrillation....

  9. GFRA2 Identifies Cardiac Progenitors and Mediates Cardiomyocyte Differentiation in a RET-Independent Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidekazu Ishida

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A surface marker that distinctly identifies cardiac progenitors (CPs is essential for the robust isolation of these cells, circumventing the necessity of genetic modification. Here, we demonstrate that a Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor containing neurotrophic factor receptor, Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor receptor alpha 2 (Gfra2, specifically marks CPs. GFRA2 expression facilitates the isolation of CPs by fluorescence activated cell sorting from differentiating mouse and human pluripotent stem cells. Gfra2 mutants reveal an important role for GFRA2 in cardiomyocyte differentiation and development both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, the cardiac GFRA2 signaling pathway is distinct from the canonical pathway dependent on the RET tyrosine kinase and its established ligands. Collectively, our findings establish a platform for investigating the biology of CPs as a foundation for future development of CP transplantation for treating heart failure.

  10. Nerves Regulate Cardiomyocyte Proliferation and Heart Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud, Ahmed I.; O’Meara, Caitlin C.; Gemberling, Matthew; Zhao, Long; Bryant, Donald M.; Zheng, Ruimao; Gannon, Joseph B.; Cai, Lei; Choi, Wen-Yee; Egnaczyk, Gregory F.; Burns, Caroline E.; Burns, C. Geoffrey; MacRae, Calum A.; Poss, Kenneth D.; Lee, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    Some organisms, such as adult zebrafish and newborn mice, have the capacity to regenerate heart tissue following injury. Unraveling the mechanisms of heart regeneration is fundamental to understanding why regeneration fails in adult humans. Numerous studies have revealed that nerves are crucial for organ regeneration, thus we aimed to determine whether nerves guide heart regeneration. Here, we show using transgenic zebrafish that inhibition of cardiac innervation leads to reduction of myocyte...

  11. Comparative oncogenomic analysis of copy number alterations in human and zebrafish tumors enables cancer driver discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GuangJun Zhang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The identification of cancer drivers is a major goal of current cancer research. Finding driver genes within large chromosomal events is especially challenging because such alterations encompass many genes. Previously, we demonstrated that zebrafish malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs are highly aneuploid, much like human tumors. In this study, we examined 147 zebrafish MPNSTs by massively parallel sequencing and identified both large and focal copy number alterations (CNAs. Given the low degree of conserved synteny between fish and mammals, we reasoned that comparative analyses of CNAs from fish versus human MPNSTs would enable elimination of a large proportion of passenger mutations, especially on large CNAs. We established a list of orthologous genes between human and zebrafish, which includes approximately two-thirds of human protein-coding genes. For the subset of these genes found in human MPNST CNAs, only one quarter of their orthologues were co-gained or co-lost in zebrafish, dramatically narrowing the list of candidate cancer drivers for both focal and large CNAs. We conclude that zebrafish-human comparative analysis represents a powerful, and broadly applicable, tool to enrich for evolutionarily conserved cancer drivers.

  12. Comparative oncology: what dogs and other species can teach us about humans with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Joshua D; Breen, Matthew

    2015-07-19

    Over 1.66 million humans (approx. 500/100,000 population rate) and over 4.2 million dogs (approx. 5300/100,000 population rate) are diagnosed with cancer annually in the USA. The interdisciplinary field of comparative oncology offers a unique and strong opportunity to learn more about universal cancer risk and development through epidemiology, genetic and genomic investigations. Working across species, researchers from human and veterinary medicine can combine scientific findings to understand more quickly the origins of cancer and translate these findings to novel therapies to benefit both human and animals. This review begins with the genetic origins of canines and their advantage in cancer research. We next focus on recent findings in comparative oncology related to inherited, or genetic, risk for tumour development. We then detail the somatic, or genomic, changes within tumours and the similarities between species. The shared cancers between humans and dogs that we discuss include sarcoma (osteosarcoma, soft tissue sarcoma, histiocytic sarcoma, hemangiosarcoma), haematological malignancies (lymphoma, leukaemia), bladder cancer, intracranial neoplasms (meningioma, glioma) and melanoma. Tumour risk in other animal species is also briefly discussed. As the field of genomics advances, we predict that comparative oncology will continue to benefit both humans and the animals that live among us.

  13. COMPARATIVE MORPHOLOGICAL AND ANATOMICAL STUDY ON THYMUS GLAND OF HUMAN AND PRIMATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Devi Raja Rajeswari,

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Context: The comparative morphological and anatomical study on thymus was carried out in human and primate. The prenatal stage of Macaca radiata was selected for the present study. Study Design: Cross sectional analytical type of study. Place and Period of study: Department of Anatomy, Dr. A.L.M. PG Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chennai from July 1999 to June 2000. Materials: The comparative morphology and anatomy of thymus of human embryonic, 10 weeks, 15 weeks and prenatal foetuses, and monkey foetus was carried out. Methods: Comparative micro-anatomical study was done by paraffin processing method. The sections were stained as per the method published by Culling (1974. Results: In monkey foetus, the thymus gland is slightly elongated, whereas in human foetuses it is not elongated and oval in shape. The size of the thymus is larger in human foetuses than monkey foetus. In both cases cells are parenchymal in nature. Due to spatial organization in human foetuses, the lymphocytes aggregation is more in cortex than in medulla. In monkey foetus the lymphocyte aggregation is simpler in arrangement through spatial organization is much less.

  14. Comparative oncology: what dogs and other species can teach us about humans with cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Joshua D.; Breen, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Over 1.66 million humans (approx. 500/100 000 population rate) and over 4.2 million dogs (approx. 5300/100 000 population rate) are diagnosed with cancer annually in the USA. The interdisciplinary field of comparative oncology offers a unique and strong opportunity to learn more about universal cancer risk and development through epidemiology, genetic and genomic investigations. Working across species, researchers from human and veterinary medicine can combine scientific findings to understand more quickly the origins of cancer and translate these findings to novel therapies to benefit both human and animals. This review begins with the genetic origins of canines and their advantage in cancer research. We next focus on recent findings in comparative oncology related to inherited, or genetic, risk for tumour development. We then detail the somatic, or genomic, changes within tumours and the similarities between species. The shared cancers between humans and dogs that we discuss include sarcoma (osteosarcoma, soft tissue sarcoma, histiocytic sarcoma, hemangiosarcoma), haematological malignancies (lymphoma, leukaemia), bladder cancer, intracranial neoplasms (meningioma, glioma) and melanoma. Tumour risk in other animal species is also briefly discussed. As the field of genomics advances, we predict that comparative oncology will continue to benefit both humans and the animals that live among us. PMID:26056372

  15. Comparative metagenomic analysis of plasmid encoded functions in the human gut microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchesi Julian R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known regarding the pool of mobile genetic elements associated with the human gut microbiome. In this study we employed the culture independent TRACA system to isolate novel plasmids from the human gut microbiota, and a comparative metagenomic analysis to investigate the distribution and relative abundance of functions encoded by these plasmids in the human gut microbiome. Results Novel plasmids were acquired from the human gut microbiome, and homologous nucleotide sequences with high identity (>90% to two plasmids (pTRACA10 and pTRACA22 were identified in the multiple human gut microbiomes analysed here. However, no homologous nucleotide sequences to these plasmids were identified in the murine gut or environmental metagenomes. Functions encoded by the plasmids pTRACA10 and pTRACA22 were found to be more prevalent in the human gut microbiome when compared to microbial communities from other environments. Among the most prevalent functions identified was a putative RelBE toxin-antitoxin (TA addiction module, and subsequent analysis revealed that this was most closely related to putative TA modules from gut associated bacteria belonging to the Firmicutes. A broad phylogenetic distribution of RelE toxin genes was observed in gut associated bacterial species (Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria, but no RelE homologues were identified in gut associated archaeal species. We also provide indirect evidence for the horizontal transfer of these genes between bacterial species belonging to disparate phylogenetic divisions, namely Gram negative Proteobacteria and Gram positive species from the Firmicutes division. Conclusions The application of a culture independent system to capture novel plasmids from the human gut mobile metagenome, coupled with subsequent comparative metagenomic analysis, highlighted the unexpected prevalence of plasmid encoded functions in the gut microbial ecosystem. In

  16. Protection of cardiomyocytes from the hypoxia-mediated injury by a peptide targeting the activator of G-protein signaling 8.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motohiko Sato

    Full Text Available Signaling via heterotrimeric G-protein is involved in the development of human diseases including ischemia-reperfusion injury of the heart. We previously identified an ischemia-inducible G-protein activator, activator of G-protein signaling 8 (AGS8, which regulates Gβγ signaling and plays a key role in the hypoxia-induced apoptosis of cardiomyocytes. Here, we attempted to intervene in the AGS8-Gβγ signaling process and protect cardiomyocytes from hypoxia-induced apoptosis with a peptide that disrupted the AGS8-Gβγ interaction. Synthesized AGS8-peptides, with amino acid sequences based on those of the Gβγ-binding domain of AGS8, successfully inhibited the association of AGS8 with Gβγ. The AGS8-peptide effectively blocked hypoxia-induced apoptosis of cardiomyocytes, as determined by DNA end-labeling and an increase in cleaved caspase-3. AGS8-peptide also inhibited the change in localization/permeability of channel protein connexin 43, which was mediated by AGS8-Gβγ under hypoxia. Small compounds that inhibit a wide range of Gβγ signals caused deleterious effects in cardiomyocytes. In contrast, AGS8-peptide did not cause cell damage under normoxia, suggesting an advantage inherent in targeted disruption of the AGS8-Gβγ signaling pathway. These data indicate a pivotal role for the interaction of AGS8 with Gβγ in hypoxia-induced apoptosis of cardiomyocytes, and suggest that targeted disruption of the AGS8-Gβγ signal provides a novel approach for protecting the myocardium against ischemic injury.

  17. Protection of cardiomyocytes from the hypoxia-mediated injury by a peptide targeting the activator of G-protein signaling 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Motohiko; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Suzuki, Hiroko; Sakima, Miho; Mamun, Abdullah Al; Yamane, Yukiko; Fujita, Takayuki; Yokoyama, Utako; Okumura, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Signaling via heterotrimeric G-protein is involved in the development of human diseases including ischemia-reperfusion injury of the heart. We previously identified an ischemia-inducible G-protein activator, activator of G-protein signaling 8 (AGS8), which regulates Gβγ signaling and plays a key role in the hypoxia-induced apoptosis of cardiomyocytes. Here, we attempted to intervene in the AGS8-Gβγ signaling process and protect cardiomyocytes from hypoxia-induced apoptosis with a peptide that disrupted the AGS8-Gβγ interaction. Synthesized AGS8-peptides, with amino acid sequences based on those of the Gβγ-binding domain of AGS8, successfully inhibited the association of AGS8 with Gβγ. The AGS8-peptide effectively blocked hypoxia-induced apoptosis of cardiomyocytes, as determined by DNA end-labeling and an increase in cleaved caspase-3. AGS8-peptide also inhibited the change in localization/permeability of channel protein connexin 43, which was mediated by AGS8-Gβγ under hypoxia. Small compounds that inhibit a wide range of Gβγ signals caused deleterious effects in cardiomyocytes. In contrast, AGS8-peptide did not cause cell damage under normoxia, suggesting an advantage inherent in targeted disruption of the AGS8-Gβγ signaling pathway. These data indicate a pivotal role for the interaction of AGS8 with Gβγ in hypoxia-induced apoptosis of cardiomyocytes, and suggest that targeted disruption of the AGS8-Gβγ signal provides a novel approach for protecting the myocardium against ischemic injury.

  18. Comparative analysis of the macroscale structural connectivity in the macaque and human brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandros Goulas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The macaque brain serves as a model for the human brain, but its suitability is challenged by unique human features, including connectivity reconfigurations, which emerged during primate evolution. We perform a quantitative comparative analysis of the whole brain macroscale structural connectivity of the two species. Our findings suggest that the human and macaque brain as a whole are similarly wired. A region-wise analysis reveals many interspecies similarities of connectivity patterns, but also lack thereof, primarily involving cingulate regions. We unravel a common structural backbone in both species involving a highly overlapping set of regions. This structural backbone, important for mediating information across the brain, seems to constitute a feature of the primate brain persevering evolution. Our findings illustrate novel evolutionary aspects at the macroscale connectivity level and offer a quantitative translational bridge between macaque and human research.

  19. Comparative Study of Statistical Skin Detection Algorithms for Sub-Continental Human Images

    CERN Document Server

    Tabassum, Mirza Rehenuma; Kamal, Md Mostafa; Muctadir, Hossain Muhammad; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Shakir, Asif Khan; Imran, Asif; Islamm, Saiful; Rabbani, Md Golam; Khaled, Shah Mostafa; Islam, Md Saiful; Begum, Zerina; 10.3923/itj.2010.811.817

    2010-01-01

    Object detection has been a focus of research in human-computer interaction. Skin area detection has been a key to different recognitions like face recognition, human motion detection, pornographic and nude image prediction, etc. Most of the research done in the fields of skin detection has been trained and tested on human images of African, Mongolian and Anglo-Saxon ethnic origins. Although there are several intensity invariant approaches to skin detection, the skin color of Indian sub-continentals have not been focused separately. The approach of this research is to make a comparative study between three image segmentation approaches using Indian sub-continental human images, to optimize the detection criteria, and to find some efficient parameters to detect the skin area from these images. The experiments observed that HSV color model based approach to Indian sub-continental skin detection is more suitable with considerable success rate of 91.1% true positives and 88.1% true negatives.

  20. Bioavailability of selenium from fish, yeast and selenate: A comparative study in humans using stable isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fox, T.E.; Heuvel, E.G.H.M. van den; Atherton, C.A.; Dainty, J.R.; Lewis, D.J.; Langford, N.J.; Crews, H.M.; Luten, J.B.; Lorentzen, M.; Sieling, F.W.; Aken-Schneyder, P. van; Hoek, M.; Kotterman, M.J.J.; Dael, P. van; Firweather-Tail, S.J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To measure the bioavailability of selenium from cooked and raw fish in humans by estimating and comparing apparent absorption and retention of selenium in biosynthetically labelled fish with labelled selenate and biosynthetically labelled selenium in brewers yeast. Design: The interventio

  1. Eliciting Children's Recall of Events: How Do Computers Compare with Humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Martine B.; Wilson, J. Clare; Thomson, Donald M.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a study that investigated the usefulness of an interactive computer program in eliciting children's reports about an event. Compared results of interviews by computer with interviews with humans with children aged five through eight that showed little benefit in computers over face-to-face interviews. (Author/LRW)

  2. Human papillomavirus testing as a cytology gold standard : comparing Surinam with the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wachtel, MS; Boon, ME; Korporaal, H; Kok, LP

    2005-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction to detect high- risk human papillomavirus has been suggested as a gold standard for cytology. The Netherlands and Surinam were prospectively compared in regard to the proportions of Negative, Atypical Squamous Cells of Undetermined Significance, and Squamous Intraepithelial

  3. Bioavailibility of selenium from fish, yeast and selenate: a comparative study in humans using stable isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fox, T.E.; Heuvel, van den E.G.H.M.; Atherton, C.A.; Luten, J.B.; Hoek-van Nieuwenhuizen, van M.; Kotterman, M.J.J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To measure the bioavailability of selenium from cooked and raw fish in humans by estimating and comparing apparent absorption and retention of selenium in biosynthetically labelled fish with labelled selenate and biosynthetically labelled selenium in brewers yeast. Design: The interventio

  4. Human papillomavirus testing as a cytology gold standard : comparing Surinam with the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wachtel, MS; Boon, ME; Korporaal, H; Kok, LP

    2005-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction to detect high- risk human papillomavirus has been suggested as a gold standard for cytology. The Netherlands and Surinam were prospectively compared in regard to the proportions of Negative, Atypical Squamous Cells of Undetermined Significance, and Squamous Intraepithelial

  5. Comparative analysis of genome maintenance genes in naked mole rat, mouse, and human

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.L. Macrae (Sheila L.); Q. Zhang (Quanwei); C. Lemetre (Christophe); I. Seim (Inge); R.B. Calder (Robert B.); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); Y. Suh (Yousin); V.N. Gladyshev (Vadim N.); A. Seluanov (Andrei); V. Gorbunova (Vera); J. Vijg (Jan); Z.D. Zhang (Zhengdong D.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractGenome maintenance (GM) is an essential defense system against aging and cancer, as both are characterized by increased genome instability. Here, we compared the copy number variation and mutation rate of 518 GM-associated genes in the naked mole rat (NMR), mouse, and human genomes. GM g

  6. Comparative cortical bone thickness between the long bones of humans and five common non-human mammal taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croker, Sarah L; Reed, Warren; Donlon, Denise

    2016-03-01

    The task of identifying fragments of long bone shafts as human or non-human is difficult but necessary, for both forensic and archaeological cases, and a fast simple method is particularly useful. Previous literature suggests there may be differences in the thickness of the cortical bone between these two groups, but this has not been tested thoroughly. The aim of this study was not only to test this suggestion, but also to provide data that could be of practical assistance for future comparisons. The major limb bones (humerus, radius, femur and tibia) of 50 Caucasoid adult skeletons of known age and sex were radiographed, along with corresponding skeletal elements from sheep, pigs, cattle, large dogs and kangaroos. Measurements were taken from the radiographs at five points along the bone shaft, of shaft diameter, cortical bone thickness, and a cortical thickness index (sum of cortices divided by shaft diameter) in both anteroposterior and mediolateral orientations. Each variable for actual cortical bone thickness as well as cortical thickness indices were compared between the human group (split by sex) and each of the non-human groups in turn, using Student's t-tests. Results showed that while significant differences did exist between the human groups and many of the non-human groups, these were not all in the same direction. That is, some variables in the human groups were significantly greater than, and others were significantly less than, the corresponding variable in the non-human groups, depending on the particular non-human group, sex of the human group, or variable under comparison. This was the case for measurements of both actual cortical bone thickness and cortical thickness index. Therefore, for bone shaft fragments for which the skeletal element is unknown, the overlap in cortical bone thickness between different areas of different bones is too great to allow identification using this method alone. However, by providing extensive cortical bone

  7. Beat Keeping in a Sea Lion As Coupled Oscillation: Implications for Comparative Understanding of Human Rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Andrew A; Cook, Peter F; Large, Edward W; Reichmuth, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    Human capacity for entraining movement to external rhythms-i.e., beat keeping-is ubiquitous, but its evolutionary history and neural underpinnings remain a mystery. Recent findings of entrainment to simple and complex rhythms in non-human animals pave the way for a novel comparative approach to assess the origins and mechanisms of rhythmic behavior. The most reliable non-human beat keeper to date is a California sea lion, Ronan, who was trained to match head movements to isochronous repeating stimuli and showed spontaneous generalization of this ability to novel tempos and to the complex rhythms of music. Does Ronan's performance rely on the same neural mechanisms as human rhythmic behavior? In the current study, we presented Ronan with simple rhythmic stimuli at novel tempos. On some trials, we introduced "perturbations," altering either tempo or phase in the middle of a presentation. Ronan quickly adjusted her behavior following all perturbations, recovering her consistent phase and tempo relationships to the stimulus within a few beats. Ronan's performance was consistent with predictions of mathematical models describing coupled oscillation: a model relying solely on phase coupling strongly matched her behavior, and the model was further improved with the addition of period coupling. These findings are the clearest evidence yet for parity in human and non-human beat keeping and support the view that the human ability to perceive and move in time to rhythm may be rooted in broadly conserved neural mechanisms.

  8. Beat Keeping in a Sea Lion as Coupled Oscillation: Implications for Comparative Understanding of Human Rhythm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew A Rouse

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Human capacity for entraining movement to external rhythms—i.e., beat keeping—is ubiquitous, but its evolutionary history and neural underpinnings remain a mystery. Recent findings of entrainment to simple and complex rhythms in non-human animals pave the way for a novel comparative approach to assess the origins and mechanisms of rhythmic behavior. The most reliable non-human beat keeper to date is a California sea lion, Ronan, who was trained to match head movements to isochronous repeating stimuli and showed spontaneous generalization of this ability to novel tempos and to the complex rhythms of music. Does Ronan’s performance rely on the same neural mechanisms as human rhythmic behavior? In the current study, we presented Ronan with simple rhythmic stimuli at novel tempos. On some trials, we introduced perturbations, altering either tempo or phase in the middle of a presentation. Ronan quickly adjusted her behavior following all perturbations, recovering her consistent phase and tempo relationships to the stimulus within a few beats. Ronan’s performance was consistent with predictions of mathematical models describing coupled oscillation: a model relying solely on phase coupling strongly matched her behavior, and the model was further improved with the addition of period coupling. These findings are the clearest evidence yet for parity in human and non-human beat keeping and support the view that the human ability to perceive and move in time to rhythm may be rooted in broadly conserved neural mechanisms.

  9. Electrophysiological and morphological maturation of murine fetal cardiomyocytes during electrical stimulation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Sven; Halbach, Marcel; Krausgrill, Benjamin; Maass, Martina; Srinivasan, Sureshkumar Perumal; Sahito, Raja Ghazanfar Ali; Peinkofer, Gabriel; Nguemo, Filomain; Müller-Ehmsen, Jochen; Hescheler, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether continuous electrical stimulation affects electrophysiological properties and cell morphology of fetal cardiomyocytes (FCMs) in culture. Fetal cardiomyocytes at day 14.5 post coitum were harvested from murine hearts and electrically stimulated for 6 days in culture using a custom-made stimulation chamber. Subsequently, action potentials of FCM were recorded with glass microelectrodes. Immunostainings of α-Actinin, connexin 43, and vinculin were performed. Expression of ion channel subunits Kcnd2, Slc8a1, Cacna1, Kcnh2, and Kcnb1 was analyzed by quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Action potential duration to 50% and 90% repolarization (APD50 and APD90) of electrically stimulated FCMs were significantly decreased when compared to nonstimulated control FCM. Alignment of cells was significantly higher in stimulated FCM when compared to control FCM. The expression of connexin 43 was significantly increased in stimulated FCM when compared to control FCM. The ratio between cell length and cell width of the stimulated FCM was significantly higher than in control FCM. Kcnh2 and Kcnd2 were upregulated in stimulated FCM when compared to control FCM. Expression of Slc8a1, Cacna1c, and Kcnb1 was not different in stimulated and control FCMs. The decrease in APD50 observed after electrical stimulation of FCM in vitro corresponds to the electrophysiological maturation of FCM in vivo. Expression levels of ion channels suggest that some important but not all aspects of the complex process of electrophysiological maturation are promoted by electrical stimulation. Parallel alignment, increased connexin 43 expression, and elongation of FCM are signs of a morphological maturation induced by electrical stimulation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Lin28a protects against hypoxia/reoxygenation induced cardiomyocytes apoptosis by alleviating mitochondrial dysfunction under high glucose/high fat conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingming Zhang

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of Lin28a in protecting against hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R-induced cardiomyocytes apoptosis under high glucose/high fat (HG/HF conditions.Primary cardiomyocytes which were isolated from neonatal mouse were randomized to be treated with lentivirus carrying Lin28a siRNA, Lin28acDNA 72 h before H/R (9 h/2 h. Cardiomyocytes biomarkers release (LDH and CK, cardiomyocytes apoptosis, mitochondria biogenesis and morphology, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS production, ATP content and inflammatory cytokines levels after H/R injury in high glucose/high fat conditions were compared between groups. The target proteins of Lin28a were examined by western blot analysis.Our results revealed that Lin28a cDNA transfection (overexpression significantly inhibited cardiomyocyte apoptotic index, improved mitochondria biogenesis, increased ATP production and reduced ROS production as compared with the H/R group in HG/HF conditions. Lin28a siRNA transfection (knockdown rendered the cardiomyocytes more susceptible to H/R injury as evidenced by increased apoptotic index, impaired mitochondrial biogenesis, decreased ATP production and increased ROS level. Interestingly, these effects of Lin28a were blocked by pretreatment with the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin. Lin28a overexpression increased, while Lin28a knockdown inhibited IGF1R, Nrf-1, Tfam, p-IRS-1, p-Akt, p-mTOR, p-p70s6k, p-AMPK expression levels after H/R injury in HG/HF conditions. Moreover, pretreatment with wortmannin abolished the effects of Lin28a on the expression levels of p-AKT, p-mTOR, p-p70s6k, p-AMPK.The present results suggest that Lin28a inhibits cardiomyocytes apoptosis by enhancing mitochondrial biogenesis and function under high glucose/high fat conditions. The mechanism responsible for the effects of Lin28a is associated with the PI3K/Akt dependent pathway.

  11. Lin28a protects against hypoxia/reoxygenation induced cardiomyocytes apoptosis by alleviating mitochondrial dysfunction under high glucose/high fat conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingming; Niu, Xiaolin; Hu, Jianqiang; Yuan, Yuan; Sun, Shuhong; Wang, Jiaxing; Yu, Wenjun; Wang, Chen; Sun, Dongdong; Wang, Haichang

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of Lin28a in protecting against hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R)-induced cardiomyocytes apoptosis under high glucose/high fat (HG/HF) conditions. Primary cardiomyocytes which were isolated from neonatal mouse were randomized to be treated with lentivirus carrying Lin28a siRNA, Lin28acDNA 72 h before H/R (9 h/2 h). Cardiomyocytes biomarkers release (LDH and CK), cardiomyocytes apoptosis, mitochondria biogenesis and morphology, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, ATP content and inflammatory cytokines levels after H/R injury in high glucose/high fat conditions were compared between groups. The target proteins of Lin28a were examined by western blot analysis. Our results revealed that Lin28a cDNA transfection (overexpression) significantly inhibited cardiomyocyte apoptotic index, improved mitochondria biogenesis, increased ATP production and reduced ROS production as compared with the H/R group in HG/HF conditions. Lin28a siRNA transfection (knockdown) rendered the cardiomyocytes more susceptible to H/R injury as evidenced by increased apoptotic index, impaired mitochondrial biogenesis, decreased ATP production and increased ROS level. Interestingly, these effects of Lin28a were blocked by pretreatment with the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin. Lin28a overexpression increased, while Lin28a knockdown inhibited IGF1R, Nrf-1, Tfam, p-IRS-1, p-Akt, p-mTOR, p-p70s6k, p-AMPK expression levels after H/R injury in HG/HF conditions. Moreover, pretreatment with wortmannin abolished the effects of Lin28a on the expression levels of p-AKT, p-mTOR, p-p70s6k, p-AMPK. The present results suggest that Lin28a inhibits cardiomyocytes apoptosis by enhancing mitochondrial biogenesis and function under high glucose/high fat conditions. The mechanism responsible for the effects of Lin28a is associated with the PI3K/Akt dependent pathway.

  12. Comparative analysis of cardiovascular development related genes in stem cells isolated from deciduous pulp and adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Zhang Xin; Kunasekaran, Wijenthiran; Govindasamy, Vijayendran; Musa, Sabri; Abu Kasim, Noor Hayaty

    2014-01-01

    Human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) and adipose stem cells (ASC) were suggested as alternative cell choice for cardiac regeneration. However, the true functionability of these cells toward cardiac regeneration is yet to be discovered. Hence, this study was carried out to investigate the innate biological properties of these cell sources toward cardiac regeneration. Both cells exhibited indistinguishable MSCs characteristics. Human stem cell transcription factor arrays were used to screen expression levels in SHED and ASC. Upregulated expression of transcription factor (TF) genes was detected in both sources. An almost equal percentage of >2-fold changes were observed. These TF genes fall under several cardiovascular categories with higher expressions which were observed in growth and development of blood vessel, angiogenesis, and vasculogenesis categories. Further induction into cardiomyocyte revealed ASC to express more significantly cardiomyocyte specific markers compared to SHED during the differentiation course evidenced by morphology and gene expression profile. Despite this, spontaneous cellular beating was not detected in both cell lines. Taken together, our data suggest that despite being defined as MSCs, both ASC and SHED behave differently when they were cultured in a same cardiomyocytes culture condition. Hence, vigorous characterization is needed before introducing any cell for treating targeted diseases.

  13. Comparative Analysis of Cardiovascular Development Related Genes in Stem Cells Isolated from Deciduous Pulp and Adipose Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xin Loo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED and adipose stem cells (ASC were suggested as alternative cell choice for cardiac regeneration. However, the true functionability of these cells toward cardiac regeneration is yet to be discovered. Hence, this study was carried out to investigate the innate biological properties of these cell sources toward cardiac regeneration. Both cells exhibited indistinguishable MSCs characteristics. Human stem cell transcription factor arrays were used to screen expression levels in SHED and ASC. Upregulated expression of transcription factor (TF genes was detected in both sources. An almost equal percentage of > 2-fold changes were observed. These TF genes fall under several cardiovascular categories with higher expressions which were observed in growth and development of blood vessel, angiogenesis, and vasculogenesis categories. Further induction into cardiomyocyte revealed ASC to express more significantly cardiomyocyte specific markers compared to SHED during the differentiation course evidenced by morphology and gene expression profile. Despite this, spontaneous cellular beating was not detected in both cell lines. Taken together, our data suggest that despite being defined as MSCs, both ASC and SHED behave differently when they were cultured in a same cardiomyocytes culture condition. Hence, vigorous characterization is needed before introducing any cell for treating targeted diseases.

  14. Causal cognition in human and nonhuman animals: a comparative, critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Derek C; Povinelli, Daniel J

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we review some of the most provocative experimental results to have emerged from comparative labs in the past few years, starting with research focusing on contingency learning and finishing with experiments exploring nonhuman animals' understanding of causal-logical relations. Although the theoretical explanation for these results is often inchoate, a clear pattern nevertheless emerges. The comparative evidence does not fit comfortably into either the traditional associationist or inferential alternatives that have dominated comparative debate for many decades now. Indeed, the similarities and differences between human and nonhuman causal cognition seem to be much more multifarious than these dichotomous alternatives allow.

  15. Cartilage integrity and proteoglycan turnover are comparable in canine experimentally induced and human joint degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Femke Intema

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The value of experimental models of osteoarthritis (OA largely depends on the ability to translate observations to human OA. Surprisingly, direct comparison of characteristics of human and experimental OA is scarce. In the present study, cartilage integrity and matrix turnover in a canine model of joint degeneration were compared to human clinical OA. In 23 Beagle dogs, joint degeneration was induced in one knee, the contra-lateral knee served as a control. For comparison, human osteoarthritic and healthy knee cartilage were obtained at arthroplasty (n=14 and post-mortem (n=13. Cartilage was analyzed by histology and biochemistry. Values for cartilage integrity and proteoglycan (PG synthesis showed species specific differences; GAG content of healthy cartilage was 2-fold higher in canine cartilage and PG synthesis even 8-fold. However, the relative decrease in PG content between healthy and OA cartilage was similar for humans and canines (-17% vs. -15%, respectively, as was the histological damage (+7.0 vs. +6.1, respectively and the increase of PG synthesis (+100% vs. +70%, respectively. Remarkably, the percentage release of total and of newly formed PGs in human and canine controls was similar, as was the increase due to degeneration (+65% vs. +81% and +91% vs. +52%, respectively. Despite differences in control conditions, the observed changes in characteristics of cartilage integrity and matrix turnover are similar in a canine model of joint degeneration and human clinical OA. The canine Groove model shows that its characteristics reflect those of human OA which makes the model appropriate for studying human OA.

  16. Cloning and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 4-specific alpha satellite DNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aiuto, L; Antonacci, R; Marzella, R; Archidiacono, N; Rocchi, M

    1993-11-01

    We have isolated and characterized two human alphoid DNA clones: p4n1/4 and pZ4.1. Clone p4n1/4 identifies specifically the centromeric region of chromosome 4; pZ4.1 recognizes a subset of alphoid DNA shared by chromosomes 4 and 9. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments on metaphase spreads and Southern blotting analysis of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. The genomic organization of both subsets was also investigated. Comparative mapping on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes was performed. p4n1/4 hybridizes to chimpanzee chromosomes 11 and 13, homologs of human chromosomes 9 and 2q, respectively. On gorilla metaphase spreads, p4n1/4 hybridizes exclusively to the centromeric region of chromosome 19, partially homologous to human chromosome 17. No hybridization signal was detected on chromosome 3 of both chimpanzee and gorilla, in both species homolog of human chromosome 4. Identical comparative mapping results were obtained using pZ4.1 probe, although the latter recognizes an alphoid subset distinct from the one recognized by p4n1/4. The implications of these results in the evolution of centromeric regions of primate chromosomes are discussed.

  17. Cloning and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 4-specific alpha satellite DNA sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aiuto, L.; Marzella, R.; Archidiacono, N.; Rocchi, M. (Universita di Bari (Italy)); Antonacci, R. (Instituto Anatomia Umana Normale, Modena (Italy))

    1993-11-01

    The authors have isolated and characterized two human alphoid DNA clones: p4n1/4 and pZ4.1. Clone p4n1/4 identifies specifically the centromeric region of chromosome 4; pZ4.1 recognizes a subset of alphoid DNA shared by chromosomes 4 and 9. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments on metaphase spreads and Southern blotting analysis of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. The genomic organization of both subsets was also investigated. Comparative mapping on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes was performed. p4n1/4 hybridizes to chimpanzee chromosomes 11 and 13, homologs of human chromosomes 9 and 2q, respectively. On gorilla metaphase spreads, p4n1/4 hybridizes exclusively to the centromeric region of chromosome 19, partially homologous to human chromosome 17. No hybridization signal was detected on chromosome 3 of both chimpanzee and gorilla, in both species homolog of human chromosome 4. Identical comparative mapping results were obtained using pZ4.1 probe, although the latter recognizes an alphoid subset distinct from the one recognized by p4n1/4. The implications of these results in the evolution of centromeric regions of primate chromosomes are discussed. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Variants of the Morris water maze task to comparatively assess human and rodent place navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Robby; Schiffelholz, Thomas; Beyer, Christian; Leplow, Bernd; Foreman, Nigel

    2017-03-01

    Performance in the Morris water maze has been widely used in routine behavioural studies of rodents. Since the advent of computer-based virtual environments, adaptations of the water maze have become available for human research. Despite decades of comparative neuroscience, formal comparisons of human and animal place navigation performance are rare. We studied 36 subjects, 18 young male mice in a Morris water maze and 18 male students in a virtual version. Quantitative measures (escape latencies, distances and platform crossings) indicated no discernable differences between human and rodent performance, reinforcing the task's general validity and its implied cross-species comparability. However, we extracted, using an a priori free classification method, qualitatively different movement patterns for mice and humans, patterns that reflect the probable strategy that individuals might have been using to solve the task. Our results indicated young male students to have most likely solved the maze by means of spatial strategies whereas mice were observed more often to have adopted non-spatial strategies. These differences could be attributed to differences in our maze setups (spatial cues, task instruction, training protocol, motivation) and gave further hints that maze learning depends on many factors. In summary performance on both spatial tasks was equivalent in humans and mice but the kind of maze learning that was used to achieve maximum performance was different. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Human capital gains associated with robotic assisted laparoscopic pyeloplasty in children compared to open pyeloplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behan, James W; Kim, Steve S; Dorey, Frederick; De Filippo, Roger E; Chang, Andy Y; Hardy, Brian E; Koh, Chester J

    2011-10-01

    Robotic assisted laparoscopic pyeloplasty is an emerging, minimally invasive alternative to open pyeloplasty in children for ureteropelvic junction obstruction. The procedure is associated with smaller incisions and shorter hospital stays. To our knowledge previous outcome analyses have not included human capital calculations, especially regarding loss of parental workdays. We compared perioperative factors in patients who underwent robotic assisted laparoscopic and open pyeloplasty at a single institution, especially in regard to human capital changes, in an institutional cost analysis. A total of 44 patients 2 years old or older from a single institution underwent robotic assisted (37) or open (7) pyeloplasty from 2008 to 2010. We retrospectively reviewed the charts to collect demographic and perioperative data. The human capital approach was used to calculate parental productivity losses. Patients who underwent robotic assisted laparoscopic pyeloplasty had a significantly shorter average hospital length of stay (1.6 vs 2.8 days, p human capital gains, eg decreased lost parental wages, and lower hospitalization expenses. Future comparative outcome analyses in children should include financial factors such as human capital loss, which can be especially important for families with young children. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Aerially transmitted human fungal pathogens: what can we learn from metagenomics and comparative genomics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliouat-Denis, Cécile-Marie; Chabé, Magali; Delhaes, Laurence; Dei-Cas, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    In the last few decades, aerially transmitted human fungal pathogens have been increasingly recognized to impact the clinical course of chronic pulmonary diseases, such as asthma, cystic fibrosis or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thanks to recent development of culture-free high-throughput sequencing methods, the metagenomic approaches are now appropriate to detect, identify and even quantify prokaryotic or eukaryotic microorganism communities inhabiting human respiratory tract and to access the complexity of even low-burden microbe communities that are likely to play a role in chronic pulmonary diseases. In this review, we explore how metagenomics and comparative genomics studies can alleviate fungal culture bottlenecks, improve our knowledge about fungal biology, lift the veil on cross-talks between host lung and fungal microbiota, and gain insights into the pathogenic impact of these aerially transmitted fungi that affect human beings. We reviewed metagenomic studies and comparative genomic analyses of carefully chosen microorganisms, and confirmed the usefulness of such approaches to better delineate biology and pathogenesis of aerially transmitted human fungal pathogens. Efforts to generate and efficiently analyze the enormous amount of data produced by such novel approaches have to be pursued, and will potentially provide the patients suffering from chronic pulmonary diseases with a better management. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012).

  1. Comparative sensitivity of human and rat neural cultures to chemical-induced inhibition of neurite outgrowth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrill, Joshua A.; Freudenrich, Theresa M.; Robinette, Brian L.; Mundy, William R., E-mail: mundy.william@epa.gov

    2011-11-15

    There is a need for rapid, efficient and cost-effective alternatives to traditional in vivo developmental neurotoxicity testing. In vitro cell culture models can recapitulate many of the key cellular processes of nervous system development, including neurite outgrowth, and may be used as screening tools to identify potential developmental neurotoxicants. The present study compared primary rat cortical cultures and human embryonic stem cell-derived neural cultures in terms of: 1) reproducibility of high content image analysis based neurite outgrowth measurements, 2) dynamic range of neurite outgrowth measurements and 3) sensitivity to chemicals which have been shown to inhibit neurite outgrowth. There was a large increase in neurite outgrowth between 2 and 24 h in both rat and human cultures. Image analysis data collected across multiple cultures demonstrated that neurite outgrowth measurements in rat cortical cultures were more reproducible and had higher dynamic range as compared to human neural cultures. Human neural cultures were more sensitive than rat cortical cultures to chemicals previously shown to inhibit neurite outgrowth. Parallel analysis of morphological (neurite count, neurite length) and cytotoxicity (neurons per field) measurements were used to detect selective effects on neurite outgrowth. All chemicals which inhibited neurite outgrowth in rat cortical cultures did so at concentrations which did not concurrently affect the number of neurons per field, indicating selective effects on neurite outgrowth. In contrast, more than half the chemicals which inhibited neurite outgrowth in human neural cultures did so at concentrations which concurrently decreased the number of neurons per field, indicating that effects on neurite outgrowth were secondary to cytotoxicity. Overall, these data demonstrate that the culture models performed differently in terms of reproducibility, dynamic range and sensitivity to neurite outgrowth inhibitors. While human neural

  2. L30A Mutation of Phospholemman Mimics Effects of Cardiac Glycosides in Isolated Cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himes, Ryan D; Smolin, Nikolai; Kukol, Andreas; Bossuyt, Julie; Bers, Donald M; Robia, Seth L

    2016-11-08

    To determine if mutations introduced into phospholemman (PLM) could increase the level of PLM-Na,K-ATPase (NKA) binding, we performed scanning mutagenesis of the transmembrane domain of PLM and measured Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between each mutant and NKA. We observed an increased level of binding to NKA for several PLM mutants compared to that of the wild type (WT), including L27A, L30A, and I32A. In isolated cardiomyocytes, overexpression of WT PLM increased the amplitude of the Ca(2+) transient compared to the GFP control. The Ca(2+) transient amplitude was further increased by L30A PLM overexpression. The L30A mutation also delayed Ca(2+) extrusion and increased the duration of cardiomyocyte contraction. This mimics aspects of the effect of cardiac glycosides, which are known to increase contractility through inhibition of NKA. No significant differences between WT and L30A PLM-expressing myocytes were observed after treatment with isoproterenol, suggesting that the superinhibitory effects of L30A are reversible with β-adrenergic stimulation. We also observed a decrease in the extent of PLM tetramerization with L30A compared to WT using FRET, suggesting that L30 is an important residue for mediating PLM-PLM binding. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the potential energy of the L30A tetramer is greater than that of the WT, and that the transmembrane α helix is distorted by the mutation. The results identify PLM residue L30 as an important determinant of PLM tetramerization and of functional inhibition of NKA by PLM.

  3. Neural representations of faces and body parts in macaque and human cortex: a comparative FMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsk, Mark A; Arcaro, Michael; Weiner, Kevin S; Kalkus, Jan F; Inati, Souheil J; Gross, Charles G; Kastner, Sabine

    2009-05-01

    Single-cell studies in the macaque have reported selective neural responses evoked by visual presentations of faces and bodies. Consistent with these findings, functional magnetic resonance imaging studies in humans and monkeys indicate that regions in temporal cortex respond preferentially to faces and bodies. However, it is not clear how these areas correspond across the two species. Here, we directly compared category-selective areas in macaques and humans using virtually identical techniques. In the macaque, several face- and body part-selective areas were found located along the superior temporal sulcus (STS) and middle temporal gyrus (MTG). In the human, similar to previous studies, face-selective areas were found in ventral occipital and temporal cortex and an additional face-selective area was found in the anterior temporal cortex. Face-selective areas were also found in lateral temporal cortex, including the previously reported posterior STS area. Body part-selective areas were identified in the human fusiform gyrus and lateral occipitotemporal cortex. In a first experiment, both monkey and human subjects were presented with pictures of faces, body parts, foods, scenes, and man-made objects, to examine the response profiles of each category-selective area to the five stimulus types. In a second experiment, face processing was examined by presenting upright and inverted faces. By comparing the responses and spatial relationships of the areas, we propose potential correspondences across species. Adjacent and overlapping areas in the macaque anterior STS/MTG responded strongly to both faces and body parts, similar to areas in the human fusiform gyrus and posterior STS. Furthermore, face-selective areas on the ventral bank of the STS/MTG discriminated both upright and inverted faces from objects, similar to areas in the human ventral temporal cortex. Overall, our findings demonstrate commonalities and differences in the wide-scale brain organization between

  4. KCNQ channels are involved in the regulatory volume decrease response in primary neonatal rat cardiomyocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calloe, Kirstine; Nielsen, Morten Schak; Grunnet, Morten;

    2007-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes may experience significant cell swelling during ischemia and reperfusion. Such changes in cardiomyocyte volume have been shown to affect the electrical properties of the heart, possibly leading to cardiac arrhythmia. In the present study the regulatory volume decrease (RVD) response...

  5. Inhibition of Receptor Interacting Protein Kinases Attenuates Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy Induced by Palmitic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mingyue; Lu, Lihui; Lei, Song; Chai, Hua; Wu, Siyuan; Tang, Xiaoju; Bao, Qinxue; Chen, Li; Wu, Wenchao; Liu, Xiaojing

    2016-01-01

    Palmitic acid (PA) is known to cause cardiomyocyte dysfunction. Cardiac hypertrophy is one of the important pathological features of PA-induced lipotoxicity, but the mechanism by which PA induces cardiomyocyte hypertrophy is still unclear. Therefore, our study was to test whether necroptosis, a receptor interacting protein kinase 1 and 3 (RIPK1 and RIPK3-) dependent programmed necrosis, was involved in the PA-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. We used the PA-treated primary neonatal rat cardiac myocytes (NCMs) or H9c2 cells to study lipotoxicity. Our results demonstrated that cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was induced by PA treatment, determined by upregulation of hypertrophic marker genes and cell surface area enlargement. Upon PA treatment, the expression of RIPK1 and RIPK3 was increased. Pretreatment with the RIPK1 inhibitor necrostatin-1 (Nec-1), the PA-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, was attenuated. Knockdown of RIPK1 or RIPK3 by siRNA suppressed the PA-induced myocardial hypertrophy. Moreover, a crosstalk between necroptosis and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was observed in PA-treated cardiomyocytes. Inhibition of RIPK1 with Nec-1, phosphorylation level of AKT (Ser473), and mTOR (Ser2481) was significantly reduced in PA-treated cardiomyocytes. In conclusion, RIPKs-dependent necroptosis might be crucial in PA-induced myocardial hypertrophy. Activation of mTOR may mediate the effect of necroptosis in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by PA.

  6. Imaging alterations of cardiomyocyte cAMP microdomains in disease

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    Alexander eFroese

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available 3’,5’-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP is an important second messenger which regulates heart function by acting in distinct subcellular microdomains. Recent years have provided deeper mechanistic insights into compartmentalized cAMP signaling and its link to cardiac disease. In this mini review, we summarize newest developments in this field achieved by cutting-edge biochemical and biophysical techniques. We further compile the data from different studies into a bigger picture of so far uncovered alterations in cardiomyocyte cAMP microdomains which occur in compensated cardiac hypertrophy and chronic heart failure. Finally, future research directions and translational perspectives are briefly discussed.

  7. Effects of neutral sulfate berberine on LPS-induced cardiomyocyte TNF-αsecretion, abnormal calcium cycling, and cardiac dysfunction in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing YANG; Hua-dong WANG; Da-xiang LU; Yan-ping WANG; Ren-bin QI; Jing LI; Fei LI; Chu-jie LI

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of neutral sulfate berberine on cardiac function, tumornecrosis factor α (TNF-α) release, and intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i)in cardiomyocytes exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Methods: Primary cultured rat cardiomyocytes were prepared from ventricles of 3-4-day old SpragueDawley rats. TNF-α concentrations in cell-conditioned media were measured by using a Quantikine enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit, and cardiomyocyte [Ca2+]i was measured by using Fura-2/AM. The isolated rat hearts were perfused in the Langendorff mode. Results: LPS at doses of 1, 5, 10, and 20 μg/mL markedly stimulated TNF-α secretion from cardiomyocytes, and neutral sulfate berberine inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α production. Intracellular calcium concentration was significantly decreased after LPS stimulation for 1 h, and increased 2 h after LPS treatment. Pretreatment with neutral sulfate berberine reversed the LPS-induced [Ca2+]i alterations, although neutral sulfate berberine did not inhibit a rapid increase in cardiomyocyte [Ca2+]i induced by LPS. Perfusion of isolated hearts with LPS (100 μg/mL) for 20 min resulted in significantly impaired cardiac performance at 120 min after LPS challenge: the maximal rate of left ventricular pressure rise and fall (±dp/dtmax) decreased compared with the control. In contrast, ±dp/dtmax at 120min in hearts perfused with neutral sulfate berberine (1 μmol/L) for 10 min followed by 20 min LPS (100 μg/mL) was greater than the corresponding value in the LPS group. Conclusion: Neutral sulfate berberine inhibits LPS-stimulated myocardial TNF-α production, impairs calcium cycling, and improves LPS-induced contractile dysfunction in intact heart.

  8. Regulation of the cardiomyocyte transcriptome vs translatome by endothelin-1 and insulin: translational regulation of 5' terminal oligopyrimidine tract (TOP mRNAs by insulin

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    Sugden Peter H

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes in cellular phenotype result from underlying changes in mRNA transcription and translation. Endothelin-1 stimulates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy with associated changes in mRNA/protein expression and an increase in the rate of protein synthesis. Insulin also increases the rate of translation but does not promote overt cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. One mechanism of translational regulation is through 5' terminal oligopyrimidine tracts (TOPs that, in response to growth stimuli, promote mRNA recruitment to polysomes for increased translation. TOP mRNAs include those encoding ribosomal proteins, but the full panoply remains to be established. Here, we used microarrays to compare the effects of endothelin-1 and insulin on the global transcriptome of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, and on mRNA recruitment to polysomes (i.e. the translatome. Results Globally, endothelin-1 and insulin (1 h promoted >1.5-fold significant (false discovery rate 1.25-fold significant changes in expression in total and/or polysomal RNA induced by endothelin-1 or insulin, respectively, of which ~35% of endothelin-1-responsive and ~56% of insulin-responsive transcripts were translationally regulated. Of mRNAs for established proteins recruited to polysomes in response to insulin, 49 were known TOP mRNAs with a further 15 probable/possible TOP mRNAs, but 49 had no identifiable TOP sequences or other consistent features in the 5' untranslated region. Conclusions Endothelin-1, rather than insulin, substantially affects global transcript expression to promote cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Effects on RNA recruitment to polysomes are subtle, with differential effects of endothelin-1 and insulin on specific transcripts. Furthermore, although insulin promotes recruitment of TOP mRNAs to cardiomyocyte polysomes, not all recruited mRNAs are TOP mRNAs.

  9. Regulation of the cardiomyocyte transcriptome vs translatome by endothelin-1 and insulin: translational regulation of 5' terminal oligopyrimidine tract (TOP) mRNAs by insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Changes in cellular phenotype result from underlying changes in mRNA transcription and translation. Endothelin-1 stimulates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy with associated changes in mRNA/protein expression and an increase in the rate of protein synthesis. Insulin also increases the rate of translation but does not promote overt cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. One mechanism of translational regulation is through 5' terminal oligopyrimidine tracts (TOPs) that, in response to growth stimuli, promote mRNA recruitment to polysomes for increased translation. TOP mRNAs include those encoding ribosomal proteins, but the full panoply remains to be established. Here, we used microarrays to compare the effects of endothelin-1 and insulin on the global transcriptome of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, and on mRNA recruitment to polysomes (i.e. the translatome). Results Globally, endothelin-1 and insulin (1 h) promoted >1.5-fold significant (false discovery rate 1.25-fold significant changes in expression in total and/or polysomal RNA induced by endothelin-1 or insulin, respectively, of which ~35% of endothelin-1-responsive and ~56% of insulin-responsive transcripts were translationally regulated. Of mRNAs for established proteins recruited to polysomes in response to insulin, 49 were known TOP mRNAs with a further 15 probable/possible TOP mRNAs, but 49 had no identifiable TOP sequences or other consistent features in the 5' untranslated region. Conclusions Endothelin-1, rather than insulin, substantially affects global transcript expression to promote cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Effects on RNA recruitment to polysomes are subtle, with differential effects of endothelin-1 and insulin on specific transcripts. Furthermore, although insulin promotes recruitment of TOP mRNAs to cardiomyocyte polysomes, not all recruited mRNAs are TOP mRNAs. PMID:20509958

  10. Apoptosis-modulating interaction of the neuregulin/erbB pathway with anthracyclines in regulating Bcl-xS and Bcl-xL in cardiomyocytes.

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    Rohrbach, Susanne; Muller-Werdan, Ursula; Werdan, Karl; Koch, Susanne; Gellerich, Norbert F; Holtz, Juergen

    2005-03-01

    During chemotherapy with anthracyclines, attenuated neuregulin signaling by the erbB2 receptor inactivating antibody Trastuzumab enhances the heart failure risk. We compared the effects of attenuated neuregulin/erbB signaling and of daunorubicin on splicing of the Bcl-x gene and on mitochondrial activation of apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. Attenuating erbB signals in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes by the erbB2 antagonist tyrphostin AG825, by the erbB1/4 antagonist AG1478 or by antisense-induced lowering of erbB2 receptors resulted in an augmented Bcl-xS/Bcl-xL ratio, mitochondrial release of cytochrome c, activation of caspase 9 and caspase 3, and nucleosome-sized DNA fragmentation. A similar DNA fragmentation and caspase 3 activation was induced by TNF-alpha, but without Bcl-xS/Bcl-xL increase, cytochrome c release or caspase 9 activation. A BH4-domain containing HIV TAT fusion protein added to cardiomyocytes under attenuated erbB signaling lowered the enhanced Bcl-xS/Bcl-xL ratio, the cytochrome c release, the caspase 3 activation and the DNA fragmentation, while apoptosis was not modified by the fusion protein in TNF-alpha treated cardiomyocytes. Enhancement of Bcl-xS/Bcl-xL by reducing Bcl-xL via siRNA transfection mimicked the mitochondrial apoptotic activation due to erbB signal attenuation. Daunorubicin also caused Bcl-xS/Bcl-xL enhancement and mitochondrial apoptotic activation in cultured cardiomyocytes; this was attenuated by BH4-fusion protein or by neuregulin-1 and augmented by siRNA-mediated Bcl-xL lowering. We conclude that activation of mitochondrial apoptosis due to altered Bcl-x splicing contributes as a common mechanism of anthracyclines and erbB signal attenuation to the enhanced heart failure risk under this combination.

  11. Mechanical Unloading Activates FoxO3 to Trigger Bnip3‐Dependent Cardiomyocyte Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dian J.; Jiang, Nan; Blagg, Andrew; Johnstone, Janet L.; Gondalia, Raj; Oh, Misook; Luo, Xiang; Yang, Kai‐Chun; Shelton, John M.; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Gillette, Thomas G.; Dorn, Gerald W.; Hill, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Mechanical assist device therapy has emerged recently as an important and rapidly expanding therapy in advanced heart failure, triggering in some patients a beneficial reverse remodeling response. However, mechanisms underlying this benefit are unclear. Methods and Results In a model of mechanical unloading of the left ventricle, we observed progressive myocyte atrophy, autophagy, and robust activation of the transcription factor FoxO3, an established regulator of catabolic processes in other cell types. Evidence for FoxO3 activation was similarly detected in unloaded failing human myocardium. To determine the role of FoxO3 activation in cardiac muscle in vivo, we engineered transgenic mice harboring a cardiomyocyte‐specific constitutively active FoxO3 mutant (caFoxO3flox;αMHC‐Mer‐Cre‐Mer). Expression of caFoxO3 triggered dramatic and progressive loss of cardiac mass, robust increases in cardiomyocyte autophagy, declines in mitochondrial biomass and function, and early mortality. Whereas increases in cardiomyocyte apoptosis were not apparent, we detected robust increases in Bnip3 (Bcl2/adenovirus E1B 19‐kDa interacting protein 3), an established downstream target of FoxO3. To test the role of Bnip3, we crossed the caFoxO3flox;αMHC‐Mer‐Cre‐Mer mice with Bnip3‐null animals. Remarkably, the atrophy and autophagy phenotypes were significantly blunted, yet the early mortality triggered by FoxO3 activation persisted. Rather, declines in cardiac performance were attenuated by proteasome inhibitors. Consistent with involvement of FoxO3‐driven activation of the ubiquitin‐proteasome system, we detected time‐dependent activation of the atrogenes program and sarcomere protein breakdown. Conclusions In aggregate, these data point to FoxO3, a protein activated by mechanical unloading, as a master regulator that governs both the autophagy‐lysosomal and ubiquitin‐proteasomal pathways to orchestrate cardiac muscle atrophy. PMID:23568341

  12. Connexin 43 in cardiomyocyte mitochondria and its increase by ischemic preconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boengler, Kerstin; Dodoni, Giuliano; Rodriguez-Sinovas, Antonio; Cabestrero, Alberto; Ruiz-Meana, Marisol; Gres, Petra; Konietzka, Ina; Lopez-Iglesias, Carmen; Garcia-Dorado, David; Di Lisa, Fabio; Heusch, Gerd; Schulz, Rainer

    2005-08-01

    Connexin 43 (Cx43) is involved in infarct size reduction by ischemic preconditioning (IP); the underlying mechanism of protection, however, is unknown. Since mitochondria have been proposed to be involved in IP's protection, the present study analyzed whether Cx43 is localized at mitochondria of cardiomyocytes and whether such localization is affected by IP. Western blot analysis on mitochondrial preparations isolated from rat, mouse, pig, and human hearts showed the presence of Cx43. The preparations were not contaminated with markers for other cell compartments. The localization of Cx43 to mitochondria was also confirmed by FACS sorting (double staining with MitoTracker Red and Cx43) and immuno-electron and confocal microscopy. To study the role of Cx43 in IP, mitochondria were isolated from the ischemic anterior wall (AW) and the control posterior wall (PW) of pig myocardium at the end of 90 min low-flow ischemia without (n=13) or with (n=13) a preceding preconditioning cycle of 10 min ischemia and 15 min reperfusion. With IP, the mitochondrial Cx43/adenine nucleotide transporter ratio was 3.4+/-0.7 fold greater in AW than in PW, whereas the ratio remained unchanged in non-preconditioned myocardium (1.1+/-0.2, p<0.05). The enhancement of the mitochondrial Cx43 protein level occurred rapidly, since an increase of mitochondrial Cx43 was already detected with two cycles of 5 min ischemia/reperfusion in isolated rat hearts to 262+/-63% of baseline. These data demonstrate that Cx43 is localized at cardiomyocyte mitochondria and that IP enhances such mitochondrial localization.

  13. Doxycycline attenuates protein aggregation in cardiomyocytes and improves survival of a mouse model of cardiac proteinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hanqiao; Tang, Mingxin; Zheng, Qingwen; Kumarapeli, Asangi R K; Horak, Kathleen M; Tian, Zongwen; Wang, Xuejun

    2010-10-19

    The goal of this pre-clinical study was to assess the therapeutic efficacy of doxycycline (Doxy) for desmin-related cardiomyopathy (DRC) and to elucidate the potential mechanisms involved. DRC, exemplifying cardiac proteinopathy, is characterized by intrasarcoplasmic protein aggregation and cardiac insufficiency. No effective treatment for DRC is available presently. Doxy was shown to attenuate aberrant intranuclear aggregation and toxicity of misfolded proteins in noncardiac cells and animal models of other proteinopathies. Mice and cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes with transgenic (TG) expression of a human DRC-linked missense mutation R120G of αB-crystallin (CryAB(R120G)) were used for testing the effect of Doxy. Doxy was administered via drinking water (6 mg/ml) initiated at 8 or 16 weeks of age. Doxy treatment initiated at 16 weeks of age significantly delayed the premature death of CryAB(R120G) TG mice, with a median lifespan of 30.4 weeks (placebo group, 25 weeks; p Doxy treatment initiated at 8 weeks of age significantly attenuated cardiac hypertrophy in 1 month. Further investigation revealed that Doxy significantly reduced the abundance of CryAB-positive microscopic aggregates, detergent-resistant CryAB oligomers, and total ubiquitinated proteins in CryAB(R120G) TG hearts. In cell culture, Doxy treatment dose-dependently suppressed the formation of both microscopic protein aggregates and detergent-resistant soluble CryAB(R120G) oligomers and reversed the up-regulation of p62 protein induced by adenovirus-mediated CryAB(R120G) expression. Doxy suppresses CryAB(R120G)-induced aberrant protein aggregation in cardiomyocytes and prolongs CryAB(R120G)-based DRC mouse survival. Copyright © 2010 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Primitive cardiac cells from human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, James; Titmarsh, Drew; Hidalgo, Alejandro; Wolvetang, Ernst; Cooper-White, Justin

    2012-06-10

    Pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are currently being investigated for in vitro human heart models and as potential therapeutics for heart failure. In this study, we have developed a differentiation protocol that minimizes the need for specific human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line optimization. We first reduced the heterogeneity that exists within the starting population of bulk cultured hESCs by using cells adapted to single-cell passaging in a 2-dimensional (2D) culture format. Compared with bulk cultures, single-cell cultures comprised larger fractions of TG30(hi)/OCT4(hi) cells, corresponding to an increased expression of pluripotency markers OCT4 and NANOG, and reduced expression of early lineage-specific markers. A 2D temporal differentiation protocol was then developed, aimed at reducing the inherent heterogeneity and variability of embryoid body-based protocols, with induction of primitive streak cells using bone morphogenetic protein 4 and activin A, followed by cardiogenesis via inhibition of Wnt signaling using the small molecules IWP-4 or IWR-1. IWP-4 treatment resulted in a large percentage of cells expressing low amounts of cardiac myosin heavy chain and expression of early cardiac progenitor markers ISL1 and NKX2-5, thus indicating the production of large numbers of immature cardiomyocytes (~65,000/cm(2) or ~1.5 per input hESC). This protocol was shown to be effective in HES3, H9, and, to a lesser, extent, MEL1 hESC lines. In addition, we observed that IWR-1 induced predominantly atrial myosin light chain (MLC2a) expression, whereas IWP-4 induced expression of both atrial (MLC2a) and ventricular (MLC2v) forms. The intrinsic flexibility and scalability of this 2D protocol mean that the output population of primitive cardiomyocytes will be particularly accessible and useful for the investigation of molecular mechanisms driving terminal cardiomyocyte differentiation, and potentially for the future treatment of heart failure.

  15. Comparative analysis of genome maintenance genes in naked mole rat, mouse, and human

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacRae, Sheila L; Zhang, Quanwei; Lemetre, Christophe; Seim, Inge; Calder, Robert B; Hoeijmakers, Jan; Suh, Yousin; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera; Vijg, Jan; Zhang, Zhengdong D

    2015-01-01

    Genome maintenance (GM) is an essential defense system against aging and cancer, as both are characterized by increased genome instability. Here, we compared the copy number variation and mutation rate of 518 GM-associated genes in the naked mole rat (NMR), mouse, and human genomes. GM genes appeared to be strongly conserved, with copy number variation in only four genes. Interestingly, we found NMR to have a higher copy number of CEBPG, a regulator of DNA repair, and TINF2, a protector of telomere integrity. NMR, as well as human, was also found to have a lower rate of germline nucleotide substitution than the mouse. Together, the data suggest that the long-lived NMR, as well as human, has more robust GM than mouse and identifies new targets for the analysis of the exceptional longevity of the NMR. PMID:25645816

  16. Cell Competition Promotes Phenotypically Silent Cardiomyocyte Replacement in the Mammalian Heart

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    Cristina Villa del Campo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous anabolic capacity in cell populations can trigger a phenomenon known as cell competition, through which less active cells are eliminated. Cell competition has been induced experimentally in stem/precursor cell populations in insects and mammals and takes place endogenously in early mouse embryonic cells. Here, we show that cell competition can be efficiently induced in mouse cardiomyocytes by mosaic overexpression of Myc during both gestation and adult life. The expansion of the Myc-overexpressing cardiomyocyte population is driven by the elimination of wild-type cardiomyocytes. Importantly, this cardiomyocyte replacement is phenotypically silent and does not affect heart anatomy or function. These results show that the capacity for cell competition in mammals is not restricted to stem cell populations and suggest that stimulated cell competition has potential as a cardiomyocyte-replacement strategy.

  17. Feedforward Object-Vision Models Only Tolerate Small Image Variations Compared to Human

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    Masoud eGhodrati

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Invariant object recognition is a remarkable ability of primates' visual system that its underlying mechanism has constantly been under intense investigations. Computational modelling is a valuable tool toward understanding the processes involved in invariant object recognition. Although recent computational models have shown outstanding performances on challenging image databases, they fail to perform well when images with more complex variations of the same object are applied to them. Studies have shown that making sparse representation of objects by extracting more informative visual features through a feedforward sweep can lead to higher recognition performances. Here, however, we show that when the complexity of image variations is high, even this approach results in poor performance compared to humans. To assess the performance of models and humans in invariant object recognition tasks, we built a parametrically controlled image database consisting of several object categories varied in different dimensions and levels, rendered from 3D planes. Comparing the performance of several object recognition models with human observers shows that only in low-level image variations the models perform similar to humans in categorization tasks. Furthermore, the results of our behavioral experiments demonstrate that, even under difficult experimental conditions (i.e. briefly presented masked stimuli with complex image variations, human observers performed outstandingly well, suggesting that the models are still far from resembling humans in invariant object recognition. Taken together, we suggest that learning sparse informative visual features, although desirable, is not a complete solution for future progresses in object-vision modelling. We show that this approach is not of significant help in solving the computational crux of object recognition (that is invariant object recognition when the identity-preserving image variations become more complex.

  18. Comparative interactomics for virus-human protein-protein interactions: DNA viruses versus RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmuş, Saliha; Ülgen, Kutlu Ö

    2017-01-01

    Viruses are obligatory intracellular pathogens and completely depend on their hosts for survival and reproduction. The strategies adopted by viruses to exploit host cell processes and to evade host immune systems during infections may differ largely with the type of the viral genetic material. An improved understanding of these viral infection mechanisms is only possible through a better understanding of the pathogen-host interactions (PHIs) that enable viruses to enter into the host cells and manipulate the cellular mechanisms to their own advantage. Experimentally-verified protein-protein interaction (PPI) data of pathogen-host systems only became available at large scale within the last decade. In this study, we comparatively analyzed the current PHI networks belonging to DNA and RNA viruses and their human host, to get insights into the infection strategies used by these viral groups. We investigated the functional properties of human proteins in the PHI networks, to observe and compare the attack strategies of DNA and RNA viruses. We observed that DNA viruses are able to attack both human cellular and metabolic processes simultaneously during infections. On the other hand, RNA viruses preferentially interact with human proteins functioning in specific cellular processes as well as in intracellular transport and localization within the cell. Observing virus-targeted human proteins, we propose heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins and transporter proteins as potential antiviral therapeutic targets. The observed common and specific infection mechanisms in terms of viral strategies to attack human proteins may provide crucial information for further design of broad and specific next-generation antiviral therapeutics.

  19. Electrophysiological Characteristics of Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes are Cell Line-Dependent

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    Tobias Hannes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Modelling of cardiac development, physiology and pharmacology by differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs requires comparability of cardiac differentiation between different ESC lines. To investigate whether the outcome of cardiac differentiation is consistent between different ESC lines, we compared electrophysiological properties of ESC-derived cardiomyocytes (ESC-CMs of different murine ESC lines. Methods: Two wild-type (D3 and R1 and two transgenic ESC lines (D3/aPIG44 and CGR8/AMPIGX-7 were differentiated under identical culture conditions. The transgenic cell lines expressed enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP and puromycin-N-acetyltransferase under control of the cardiac specific α-myosin heavy chain (αMHC promoter. Action potentials (APs were recorded using sharp electrodes and multielectrode arrays in beating clusters of ESC-CMs. Results: Spontaneous AP frequency and AP duration (APD as well as maximal upstroke velocity differed markedly between unpurified CMs of the four ESC lines. APD heterogeneity was negligible in D3/aPIG44, moderate in D3 and R1 and extensive in CGR8/AMPIGX-7. Interspike intervals calculated from long-term recordings showed a high degree of variability within and between recordings in CGR8/AMPIGX-7, but not in D3/aPIG44. Purification of the αMHC+ population by puromycin treatment posed only minor changes to APD in D3/aPIG44, but significantly shortened APD in CGR8/AMPIGX-7. Conclusion: Electrophysiological properties of ESC-CMs are strongly cell line-dependent and can be influenced by purification of cardiomyocytes by antibiotic selection. Thus, conclusions on cardiac development, physiology and pharmacology derived from single stem cell lines have to be interpreted carefully.

  20. Rehmannia glutinosa oligosaccharide induces differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into cardiomyocyte-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X H; Du, H W; Guo, X H; Wang, S W; Zhou, R B; Li, Y; Li, Z B; Zhao, Y S; Zhu, Q L

    2016-10-17

    The aim of this study was to observe the effect of Rehmannia glutinosa oligosaccharide (RGO) on differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into cardiomyocyte-like cells . Rat MSCs were isolated, treated, and grouped as follows: RGO treatment group, 5-azacytidine (5-aza) treatment group, RGO + 5-aza treatment group, and control group. Following a four-week induction period, cardiac troponin I (cTnI) levels in MSCs were quantified by chemiluminescence, and the levels of myocardial enzymes creatine kinase (CK) and creatine kinase isoenzyme-MB (CK-MB) were measured using a dry chemistry analyzer. The cTnI- and connexin 43 (Cx43)-positive MSC population was identified by immunofluorescence, and expression levels of cTnI and Cx43 were analyzed by western blots. Following induction, cTnI, CK, and CK-MB levels were significantly higher in the RGO + 5-aza group as compared with the RGO and 5-aza groups (P < 0.05). In addition, fluorescence intensity of cTnI and Cx43 was higher in the RGO + 5-aza group as compared with the RGO and 5-aza groups. No cTnI- or Cx43-positive cells were detected in the control group. Western blot analysis further confirmed that cTnI and Cx43 were not expressed in the control group, while cTnI and Cx43 was higher in the RGO + 5-aza group than in the RGO and 5-aza groups. These results suggest that MSCs can be induced by RGO to differentiate into cardiomyocyte-like cells in vitro, and that RGO in combination with 5-aza enhance differentiation of MSCs.