WorldWideScience

Sample records for human carcinogen testing

  1. Carcinogen testing. Fact and fallacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J A

    1988-10-15

    In the absence of human information on the carcinogenicity of chemical substances, one must rely primarily on information from long-term animal testing. Although far from perfect, animal studies seem to be reasonable predictors of the human experience, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Short-term tests for genotoxicity may be helpful for establishing priorities for chemical testing, but they are not as strong indicators of potential carcinogenicity as had been previously thought. New directions in toxicologic research hold the promise for scientists being able to perform more reasoned assessments of carcinogenic risk.

  2. Acrylonitrile: a suspected human carcinogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerselman, W; van der Graaf, M

    1984-01-01

    The literature on carcinogenicity of acrylonitrile (an important intermediate in the chemical industry) is reviewed. The three main conclusions are: (1) Acrylonitrile has genotoxic effects in various tests in microorganisms and in mammal cells. (2) Chronic exposure to acrylonitrile causes tumours in rats. (3) Results of epidemiological studies indicate that acrylonitrile may be a human carcinogen. From this it is clear that acrylonitrile is very probably carcinogenic to humans. Therefore the authors plead for a reduction of acrylonitrile standards to the lowest practicable limit.

  3. The evolving definition of carcinogenic human papillomavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castle Philip E

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thirteen human papillomavirus (HPV genotypes have been judged to be carcinogenic or probably carcinogenic, and the cause of virtually all cervical cancer worldwide. Other HPV genotypes could possibly be involved. Although the inclusion of possibly carcinogenic HPV genotypes may hurt test specificity, it may indirectly increase the reassurance following a negative HPV test (i.e. the negative predictive value of an HPV test for cervical precancer and cancer. The future of cervical cancer screening in low-resource setting, however, may include once-in-a-lifetime, low-cost and rapid HPV testing. However, the tradeoff of more false positives for greater reassurance may not be acceptable if the local infrastructure cannot manage the screen positives. Now is the time for the community of scientists, doctors, and public health advocates to use the data presented at the 100th International Agency for Research on Cancer monograph meeting to rationally decide the target HPV genotypes for the next generation of HPV tests for use in high-resource and low-resource settings. The implications of including possibly HPV genotypes on HPV test performance, also for guidance on the use of these tests for cervical cancer prevention programs, are discussed.

  4. Prevalence of genotoxic chemicals among animal and human carcinogens evaluated in the IARC Monograph Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, H; Malaveille, C

    1989-06-01

    To determine whether genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens contribute similarly to the cancer burden in humans, an analysis was performed on agents that were evaluated in Supplements 6 and 7 to the IARC Monographs for their carcinogenic effects in humans and animals and for the activity in short-term genotoxicity tests. The prevalence of genotoxic carcinogens on four groups of agents, consisting of established human carcinogens (group 1, n = 30), probable human carcinogens (group 2A, n = 37), possible human carcinogens (group 2B, n = 113) and on agents with limited evidence of carcinogenicity in animals (a subset of group 3, n = 149) was determined. A high prevalence in the order of 80 to 90% of genotoxic carcinogens was found in each of the groups 1, 2A and 2B, which were also shown to be multi-species/multi-tissues carcinogens. The distribution of carcinogenic potency in rodents did not reveal any specific characteristic of the human carcinogens in group 1 that would differentiate them from agents in groups 2A, 2B and 3. The results of this analysis indicate that (a) an agent with unknown carcinogenic potential showing sufficient evidence of activity in in vitro/in vivo genotoxicity assays (involving as endpoints DNA damage and chromosomal/mutational damage) may represent a hazard to humans; and b) an agent showing lack of activity in this spectrum of genotoxicity assays should undergo evaluation for carcinogenicity by rodent bioassay, in view of the present lack of validated short-term tests for non-genotoxic carcinogens. Overall, this analysis implies that genotoxic carcinogens add more to the cancer burden in man than non-genotoxic carcinogens. Thus, identification of such genotoxic carcinogens and subsequent lowering of exposure will remain the main goal for primary cancer prevention in man.

  5. Known and Probable Human Carcinogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other does not necessarily mean there is a controversy, as one agency may not have evaluated it. ... to humans Acrylamide Adriamycin (doxorubicin) Androgenic (anabolic) steroids Art glass, glass containers, and press ware (manufacture of) ...

  6. [THE COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF RESULTS OF DETECTION OF CARCINOGENIC TYPES OF HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS BY QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE TESTS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, E T; Labigina, A V; Leshenko, O Ya; Rusanov, D N; Kuzmenko, V V; Fedko, L P; Pak, I P

    2015-05-01

    The analysis of results of screening (n = 3208; sexually active citizen aged from 18 to 59 years) was carried out to detect oncogene types of human papilloma virus in using qualitative (1150 females and 720 males) and quantitative (polymerase chain reaction in real-time (843 females and 115 males) techniques. The human papilloma virus of high oncogene type was detected in 65% and 68.4% of females and in 48.6% and 53% of males correspondingly. Among 12 types of human papilloma virus the most frequently diagnosed was human papilloma virus 16 independently of gender of examined and technique of analysis. In females, under application of qualitative tests rate of human papilloma virus 16 made up to 18.3% (n = 280) and under application of quantitative tests Rte of human papilloma virus made up to 14.9% (n = 126; p ≤ 0.05). Under examination of males using qualitative tests rate of human papilloma virus 16 made up to 8.3% (n = 60) and under application of qualitative tests made up to 12.2% (n = 14; p ≥ 0.05). Under application of qualitative tests rate of detection on the rest ofoncogene types of human papilloma virus varied in females from 3.4% to 8.4% and in males from 1.8% to 5.9%. Under application of qualitative tests to females rate of human papilloma virus with high viral load made up to 68.4%, with medium viral load - 2.85% (n = 24) and with low viral load -0.24% (n = 2). Under application of quantitative tests in males rate of detection of types of human papilloma virus made up to 53% and at that in all high viral load was established. In females, the most of oncogene types of human papilloma virus (except for 31, 39, 59) are detected significantly more often than in males.

  7. Breast cancer in intraductal carcinogen-treated non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillie, Madeline A; Ambrus, Clara M; Pickren, John W; Akhter, Selina; Islam, Abul; Ambrus, Julian L

    2004-01-01

    Eight female Macaca arctoides monkeys were given dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) directly into the milk ducts. During a 4-year observation period, ending with euthanasia and autopsy, no mammary cancers were noticed. However, one animal developed a superficial localized squamous cell carcinoma. DMBA is highly carcinogenic in rodents, e.g. producing a high incidence of breast cancer in C3H mice. It was concluded that carcinogenicity testing should be extended beyond testing in rodents to non-human primates in order to distinguish "primary rodent carcinogens" from those highly active in primates as well. Studies are in progress to study carcinogens in human cell lines transplanted into nu/nu mice.

  8. Best practices for clinical pathology testing in carcinogenicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jamie K; Hall, Robert L; O'Brien, Peter; Strauss, Volker; Vahle, John L

    2011-02-01

    The Society of Toxicologic Pathology (STP) and American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology (ASCVP) convened a Clinical Pathology in Carcinogenicity Studies Working Group to recommend best practices for inclusion of clinical pathology testing in carcinogenicity studies. Regulatory guidance documents and literature were reviewed, and veterinary pathologists from North America, Japan, and Europe were surveyed regarding current practices, perceived value, and recommendations for clinical pathology testing in carcinogenicity studies. For two-year rodent carcinogenicity studies, the Working Group recommends that clinical pathology testing be limited to collection of blood smears at scheduled and unscheduled sacrifices to be examined only if indicated to aid in the diagnosis of possible hematopoietic neoplasia following histopathologic evaluation. Additional clinical pathology testing is most appropriately used to address specific issues from prior toxicity studies or known test article-related class effects. Inadequate data were available to make a recommendation concerning clinical pathology testing for alternative six-month carcinogenicity assays using genetically modified mice, although the Working Group suggests that it may be appropriate to use the same approach as for two-year carcinogenicity studies since the study goal is the same.

  9. International Conference on Harmonisation: guidance on testing for carcinogenicity of pharmaceuticals. Notice. Food and Drug Administration, HHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-02-23

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is publishing a guidance entitled "S1B Testing for Carcinogenicity of Pharmaceuticals." The guidance was prepared under the auspices of the International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH). The guidance outlines experimental approaches to evaluating the carcinogenic potential of pharmaceuticals to humans that may obviate the necessity for the routine conduct of two long-term rodent carcinogenicity studies

  10. Classification of weakly carcinogenic human papillomavirus types: addressing the limits of epidemiology at the borderline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buonaguro Franco M

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Virtually all cases of cervical cancer are caused by persistent infections with a restricted set of human papillomaviruses (HPV. Some HPV types, like HPV16 and HPV18, are clear and powerful carcinogens. However, the categorization of the most weakly carcinogenic HPV types is extremely challenging. The decisions are important for screening test and vaccine development. This article describes for open discussion an approach recently taken by a World Health Organization International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC Monographs Working Group to re-assess the carcinogenicity of different HPV types.

  11. Binding of chemical carcinogens to macromolecules in cultured human colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1977-01-01

    Metabolic activation of different chemical classes of carcinogens was studied in cultured human colon epithelia. Human colon epithelia were maintained in explant culture up to 4 days. Binding of benzo(a)pyrene, dimethylnitrosamine, and 1,2- dimethylhydrazine was found in both cell DNA and protein....... 1,2-Dimethylhydrazine methylated DNA at both N·7 and 0-6 positions of guanin....

  12. Biomonitoring human exposure to environmental carcinogenic chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farmer, P.B.; Sepai, O.; Lawrence, R.

    1996-01-01

    aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges) and mutation frequency was estimated at a number of loci including the hprt gene and genes involving in cancer development. Blood and urine samples from individuals exposed to urban pollution were collected. Populations exposed through occupational or medical......A coordinated study was carried out on the development, evaluation and application of biomonitoring procedures for populations exposed to environmental genotoxic pollutants. The procedures used involved both direct measurement of DNA or protein damage (adducts) and assessment of second biological...... for detecting carcinogen-induced damage to DNA and proteins, and subsequent biological effects. These methods were validated with the occupational exposures, which showed evidence of DNA and/or protein and/or chromosome damage in workers in a coke oven plant, garage workers exposed to diesel exhaust and workers...

  13. IARC Monographs: 40 Years of Evaluating Carcinogenic Hazards to Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pearce, Neil E; Blair, Aaron; Vineis, Paolo; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Andersen, Aage; Anto, Josep M; Armstrong, Bruce K; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Beland, Frederick A; Berrington, Amy; Bertazzi, Pier A; Birnbaum, Linda S; Brownson, Ross C; Bucher, John R; Cantor, Kenneth P; Cardis, Elisabeth; Cherrie, John W; Christiani, David C; Cocco, Pierluigi; Coggon, David; Comba, Pietro; Demers, Paul A; Dement, John M; Douwes, Jeroen; Eisen, Ellen A; Engel, Lawrence S; Fenske, Richard A; Fleming, Lora E; Fletcher, Tony; Fontham, Elizabeth; Forastiere, Francesco; Frentzel-Beyme, Rainer; Fritschi, Lin; Gerin, Michel; Goldberg, Marcel; Grandjean, Philippe; Grimsrud, Tom K; Gustavsson, Per; Haines, Andy; Hartge, Patricia; Hansen, Johnni; Hauptmann, Michael; Heederik, Dick; Hemminki, Kari; Hemon, Denis; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Hoppin, Jane A; Huff, James; Jarvholm, Bengt; Kang, Daehee; Karagas, Margaret R; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Kjuus, Helge; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kriebel, David; Kristensen, Petter; Kromhout, Hans; Laden, Francine; Lebailly, Pierre; LeMasters, Grace; Lubin, Jay H; Lynch, Charles F; Lynge, Elsebeth; 't Mannetje, Andrea; McMichael, Anthony J; McLaughlin, John R; Marrett, Loraine; Martuzzi, Marco; Merchant, James A; Merler, Enzo; Merletti, Franco; Miller, Anthony; Mirer, Franklin E; Monson, Richard; Nordby, Karl-Kristian; Olshan, Andrew F; Parent, Marie-Elise; Perera, Frederica P; Perry, Melissa J; Pesatori, Angela C; Pirastu, Roberta; Porta, Miquel; Pukkala, Eero; Rice, Carol; Richardson, David B; Ritter, Leonard; Ritz, Beate; Ronckers, Cecile M; Rushton, Lesley; Rusiecki, Jennifer A; Rusyn, Ivan; Samet, Jonathan M; Sandler, Dale P; de Sanjose, Silvia; Schernhammer, Eva; Seniori Constantini, Adele; Seixas, Noah; Shy, Carl; Siemiatycki, Jack; Silvermann, Debra T; Simonato, Lorenzo; Smith, Allan H; Smith, Martyn T; Spinelli, John J; Spitz, Margaret R; Stallones, Lorann; Stayner, Leslie T; Steenland, Kyle; Stenzel, Mark; Stewart, Bernard W; Stewart, Patricia A; Symanski, Elaine; Terracini, Benedetto; Tolbert, Paige E; Vainio, Harri; Vena, John; Vermeulen, Roel; Victora, Cesar G; Ward, Elizabeth M; Weinberg, Clarice R; Weisenburger, Dennis; Wesseling, Catharina; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Zahm, Shelia H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recently the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Programme for the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans has been criticized for several of its evaluations, and also the approach used to perform these evaluations. Some critics have claimed that IARC Working Groups' fa

  14. IARC Monographs: 40 Years of Evaluating Carcinogenic Hazards to Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pearce, Neil E; Blair, Aaron; Vineis, Paolo; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Andersen, Aage; Anto, Josep M; Armstrong, Bruce K; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Beland, Frederick A; Berrington, Amy; Bertazzi, Pier A; Birnbaum, Linda S; Brownson, Ross C; Bucher, John R; Cantor, Kenneth P; Cardis, Elisabeth; Cherrie, John W; Christiani, David C; Cocco, Pierluigi; Coggon, David; Comba, Pietro; Demers, Paul A; Dement, John M; Douwes, Jeroen; Eisen, Ellen A; Engel, Lawrence S; Fenske, Richard A; Fleming, Lora E; Fletcher, Tony; Fontham, Elizabeth; Forastiere, Francesco; Frentzel-Beyme, Rainer; Fritschi, Lin; Gerin, Michel; Goldberg, Marcel; Grandjean, Philippe; Grimsrud, Tom K; Gustavsson, Per; Haines, Andy; Hartge, Patricia; Hansen, Johnni; Hauptmann, Michael; Heederik, Dick; Hemminki, Kari; Hemon, Denis; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Hoppin, Jane A; Huff, James; Jarvholm, Bengt; Kang, Daehee; Karagas, Margaret R; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Kjuus, Helge; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kriebel, David; Kristensen, Petter; Kromhout, Hans; Laden, Francine; Lebailly, Pierre; LeMasters, Grace; Lubin, Jay H; Lynch, Charles F; Lynge, Elsebeth; 't Mannetje, Andrea; McMichael, Anthony J; McLaughlin, John R; Marrett, Loraine; Martuzzi, Marco; Merchant, James A; Merler, Enzo; Merletti, Franco; Miller, Anthony; Mirer, Franklin E; Monson, Richard; Nordby, Karl-Kristian; Olshan, Andrew F; Parent, Marie-Elise; Perera, Frederica P; Perry, Melissa J; Pesatori, Angela C; Pirastu, Roberta; Porta, Miquel; Pukkala, Eero; Rice, Carol; Richardson, David B; Ritter, Leonard; Ritz, Beate; Ronckers, Cecile M; Rushton, Lesley; Rusiecki, Jennifer A; Rusyn, Ivan; Samet, Jonathan M; Sandler, Dale P; de Sanjose, Silvia; Schernhammer, Eva; Seniori Constantini, Adele; Seixas, Noah; Shy, Carl; Siemiatycki, Jack; Silvermann, Debra T; Simonato, Lorenzo; Smith, Allan H; Smith, Martyn T; Spinelli, John J; Spitz, Margaret R; Stallones, Lorann; Stayner, Leslie T; Steenland, Kyle; Stenzel, Mark; Stewart, Bernard W; Stewart, Patricia A; Symanski, Elaine; Terracini, Benedetto; Tolbert, Paige E; Vainio, Harri; Vena, John; Vermeulen, Roel; Victora, Cesar G; Ward, Elizabeth M; Weinberg, Clarice R; Weisenburger, Dennis; Wesseling, Catharina; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Zahm, Shelia H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recently the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Programme for the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans has been criticized for several of its evaluations, and also the approach used to perform these evaluations. Some critics have claimed that IARC Working Groups' fa

  15. IARC Monographs: 40 Years of Evaluating Carcinogenic Hazards to Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pearce, Neil E; Blair, Aaron; Vineis, Paolo; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Andersen, Aage; Anto, Josep M; Armstrong, Bruce K; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Beland, Frederick A; Berrington, Amy; Bertazzi, Pier A; Birnbaum, Linda S; Brownson, Ross C; Bucher, John R; Cantor, Kenneth P; Cardis, Elisabeth; Cherrie, John W; Christiani, David C; Cocco, Pierluigi; Coggon, David; Comba, Pietro; Demers, Paul A; Dement, John M; Douwes, Jeroen; Eisen, Ellen A; Engel, Lawrence S; Fenske, Richard A; Fleming, Lora E; Fletcher, Tony; Fontham, Elizabeth; Forastiere, Francesco; Frentzel-Beyme, Rainer; Fritschi, Lin; Gerin, Michel; Goldberg, Marcel; Grandjean, Philippe; Grimsrud, Tom K; Gustavsson, Per; Haines, Andy; Hartge, Patricia; Hansen, Johnni; Hauptmann, Michael; Heederik, Dick|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072910542; Hemminki, Kari; Hemon, Denis; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Hoppin, Jane A; Huff, James; Jarvholm, Bengt; Kang, Daehee; Karagas, Margaret R; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Kjuus, Helge; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kriebel, David; Kristensen, Petter; Kromhout, Hans|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074385224; Laden, Francine; Lebailly, Pierre; LeMasters, Grace; Lubin, Jay H; Lynch, Charles F; Lynge, Elsebeth; 't Mannetje, Andrea; McMichael, Anthony J; McLaughlin, John R; Marrett, Loraine; Martuzzi, Marco; Merchant, James A; Merler, Enzo; Merletti, Franco; Miller, Anthony; Mirer, Franklin E; Monson, Richard; Nordby, Karl-Kristian; Olshan, Andrew F; Parent, Marie-Elise; Perera, Frederica P; Perry, Melissa J; Pesatori, Angela C; Pirastu, Roberta; Porta, Miquel; Pukkala, Eero; Rice, Carol; Richardson, David B; Ritter, Leonard; Ritz, Beate; Ronckers, Cecile M; Rushton, Lesley; Rusiecki, Jennifer A; Rusyn, Ivan; Samet, Jonathan M; Sandler, Dale P; de Sanjose, Silvia; Schernhammer, Eva; Seniori Constantini, Adele; Seixas, Noah; Shy, Carl; Siemiatycki, Jack; Silvermann, Debra T; Simonato, Lorenzo; Smith, Allan H; Smith, Martyn T; Spinelli, John J; Spitz, Margaret R; Stallones, Lorann; Stayner, Leslie T; Steenland, Kyle; Stenzel, Mark; Stewart, Bernard W; Stewart, Patricia A; Symanski, Elaine; Terracini, Benedetto; Tolbert, Paige E; Vainio, Harri; Vena, John; Vermeulen, Roel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/216532620; Victora, Cesar G; Ward, Elizabeth M; Weinberg, Clarice R; Weisenburger, Dennis; Wesseling, Catharina; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Zahm, Shelia H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recently the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Programme for the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans has been criticized for several of its evaluations, and also the approach used to perform these evaluations. Some critics have claimed that IARC Working Groups'

  16. Can creatine supplementation form carcinogenic heterocyclic amines in humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Renato Tavares dos Santos; Dörr, Felipe Augusto; Pinto, Ernani; Solis, Marina Yazigi; Artioli, Guilherme Giannini; Fernandes, Alan Lins; Murai, Igor Hisashi; Dantas, Wagner Silva; Seguro, Antônio Carlos; Santinho, Mirela Aparecida Rodrigues; Roschel, Hamilton; Carpentier, Alain; Poortmans, Jacques Remi; Gualano, Bruno

    2015-09-01

    There is a long-standing concern that creatine supplementation could be associated with cancer, possibly by facilitating the formation of carcinogenic heterocyclic amines (HCAs). This study provides compelling evidence that both low and high doses of creatine supplementation, given either acutely or chronically, does not cause a significant increase in HCA formation. HCAs detection was unrelated to creatine supplementation. Diet was likely to be the main factor responsible for HCAs formation after either placebo (n = 6) or creatine supplementation (n = 3). These results directly challenge the recently suggested biological plausibility for the association between creatine use and risk of testicular germ cell cancer. Creatine supplementation has been associated with increased cancer risk. In fact, there is evidence indicating that creatine and/or creatinine are important precursors of carcinogenic heterocyclic amines (HCAs). The present study aimed to investigate the acute and chronic effects of low- and high-dose creatine supplementation on the production of HCAs in healthy humans (i.e. 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (8-MeIQx), 2-amino-(1,6-dimethylfuro[3,2-e]imidazo[4,5-b])pyridine (IFP) and 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (4,8-DiMeIQx)). This was a non-counterbalanced single-blind crossover study divided into two phases, in which low- and high-dose creatine protocols were tested. After acute (1 day) and chronic supplementation (30 days), the HCAs PhIP, 8-MeIQx, IFP and 4,8-DiMeIQx were assessed through a newly developed HPLC-MS/MS method. Dietary HCA intake and blood and urinary creatinine were also evaluated. Out of 576 assessments performed (from 149 urine samples), only nine (3 from creatine and 6 from placebo) showed quantifiable levels of HCAs (8-MeIQx: n = 3; 4,8-DiMeIQx: n = 2; PhIP: n = 4). Individual analyses revealed that diet rather than creatine supplementation was

  17. Linearity of dose-response relationships for human carcinogenic exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.H. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA))

    The shape of dose-response relationships is a critical factor in considering cancer risks for the work place and environmental exposure to carcinogens. Markedly different risk estimates result from assumptions of linearity versus sublinear and threshold assumptions. This paper presents evidence that the relationship between the relative risk of development of cancer and the dose rate to carcinogenic exposures is frequently linear with no evidence for thresholds. Dose-response relationships from four studies of asbestos and lung cancer were examined, all of which were consistent with a linear relationship. Analysis of the relationship between the relative risk of lung cancer and exposure to nickel in a smelter study, selected because of relatively good exposure data, demonstrated a close agreement with a linear relationship. The relationship between the level of arsenic in drinking wter and the prevalence of skin cancer also was linear for males in the highest prevalence age group in Taiwan, although there was some evidence of sublinearity for females and younger persons. Also, the relationships between the number of cigarettes smoked per day and the relative risk of lung cancer was very close to linear in many studies. The analysis of these and other studies involving human exposure to carcinogens provides empirical evidence for linearity when the response variable is a rate ratio measure, rather than a risk difference measure. Linearity in dose-response is biologically plausible, without invoking a one-hit model. Except in special circumstances. the epidemiological evidence supports linear extrapolation of cancer relative risks.

  18. International Conference on Harmonisation; proposed change to rodent carcinogenicity testing of pharmaceuticals; request for comments. Notice; request for comments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or the Agency) is considering a proposed change to the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) Sl guidance on rodent carcinogenicity testing. The goal of this potential change is to introduce a more comprehensive and integrated approach to address the risk of human carcinogenicity of small molecule pharmaceuticals, and to define conditions under which 2-year rodent carcinogenicity studies add value to that assessment. The basis of this proposed change is the retrospective analyses of several datasets that reflect three decades of experience with such studies. The datasets suggest that knowledge of certain pharmacologic and toxicologic data can sometimes provide sufficient information to anticipate the outcome of 2-year rodent studies and their potential value in predicting the risk of human carcinogenicity of a given pharmaceutical. FDA is requesting public comment regarding a proposed change in approach to carcinogenicity assessment, on the prospective evaluation period intended to test this new approach, and on the proposed weight-of-evidence factors for carcinogenicity assessment.

  19. DNA adducts in human tissues:biomarkers of exposure to carcinogens in tobacco smoke

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, D.H.

    1996-01-01

    Tobacco smoking causes millions of cancer deaths annually. Tobacco smoke is a complex mixture of thousands of chemicals including many known animal carcinogens. Because many carcinogens from DNA adducts in target animal or human tissues, the detection of the formation of adducts using such methods as postlabeling, immunoassay, fluorescence spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry is a means of monitoring human exposure to tobacco carcinogens. Smokers are at increased risk of cancer in many organs,...

  20. The in vivo rodent test systems for assessment of carcinogenic potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Laan, Jan-Willem; Spindler, Per

    2002-01-01

    A Drug Information Association (DIA) workshop was held in May 2001 to discuss the outcome of the International Life Sciences Institute-Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (ILSI-HESI) project on alternative models for carcinogenicity assessment such as the P53(+/-) and XPA(+/-) knockout...... mouse models, the RasH2 and Tg.AC transgenic mouse models, and the neonatal mouse model. The "ICH Guideline S1B on Testing for Carcinogenicity of Pharmaceuticals" advocates that carcinogenicity testing of pharmaceuticals, when needed, might be carried out choosing one 2-year rodent carcinogenicity study...... (rat) plus one other study that supplements the 2-year study and providing additional information that is not readily available from the 2-year study: either (1) a short- or medium-term in vivo rodent test system or (2) a 2-year carcinogenicity study in a second rodent species (mouse). Another topic...

  1. Human exposure to dioxins through the diet in Catalonia, Spain: carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llobet, Juan M; Domingo, Jose L; Bocio, Ana; Casas, Conrad; Teixidó, Angel; Müller, Lutz

    2003-03-01

    The main objectives of this study were to estimate the dietary intake of dioxins by the population of Catalonia, Spain, to determine which food groups showed the greatest contribution to this intake, and to assess the health risks potentially associated with the dietary dioxin intake. From June to August 2000, food samples were randomly acquired in seven cities of Catalonia. Dioxin concentrations were determined in 108 samples belonging to the following groups: vegetables, fruits, pulses, cereals, fish and shellfish, meats and meat products, eggs, milk and dairy products, and oils and fats. Estimates of average daily food consumption were obtained from recent studies. Total dietary intake of dioxins for the general population of Catalonia was estimated to be 95.4 pg WHO-TEQ/day (78.4 pg I-TEQ/day), with fish and shellfish (31%), diary products (25%), cereals (14%) and meat (13%) showing the greatest percentages of contribution to dioxin intake. The contribution of all the rest of food groups to the total dietary intake was under 20%. The non-carcinogenic risk index of dioxin intake through the diet was in the range 0.34-1.36, while the carcinogenic risk level was 1,360 excess cancer over a lifetime of 70 years. Our results corroborate the decreasing tendency in dietary intake of dioxins found in recent studies (2000-2001) from various countries.

  2. A cross-sectional study of a prototype carcinogenic human papillomavirus E6/E7 messenger RNA assay for detection of cervical precancer and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Philip E; Dockter, Janel; Giachetti, Cristina; Garcia, Francisco A R; McCormick, Mary Kay; Mitchell, Amy L; Holladay, E Blair; Kolk, Daniel P

    2007-05-01

    To evaluate carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) mRNA for E6 and E7 mRNA detection on clinical specimens to identify women with cervical precancer and cancer. We evaluated a prototype assay that collectively detects oncogenes E6/E7 mRNA for 14 carcinogenic HPV genotypes on a sample of liquid cytology specimens (n=531), masked to clinical data and to the presence of HPV genotypes detected by PGMY09/11 L1 consensus primer PCR assay. We found an increasing likelihood of testing positive for carcinogenic HPV E6/E7 mRNA with increasing severity of cytology (P(Trend) E6/E7 mRNA. Overall, fewer specimens tested positive for carcinogenic HPV E6/E7 mRNA than for carcinogenic HPV DNA (PE6/E7 mRNA improved the association of positive test results with cervical precancer and cancer by reducing the number of test positives in women without precancer without reducing clinical sensitivity for cervical precancer and cancer compared with detection of carcinogenic HPV E6/E7 mRNA using a lower positive cutpoint by the same assay and with detection of carcinogenic HPV DNA. We found that carcinogenic HPV E6/E7 mRNA is a potentially useful biomarker for detection of cervical precancer and cancer and warrants further evaluation.

  3. 18. Adduct detection in human monitoring for carcinogen exposure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Determination of the covalently bound products (adducts) of carcinogens with DNA or proteins may be used for the monitoring of exposure to these compounds. Protein adducts are generally stable and are not enzymatically repaired, and the use of these for cxposure monitoring is normally carried out with globin or albumin, because

  4. Use of the modified Ames test as an indicator of the carcinogenicity of residual aromatic extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boogaard, P.; Hedelin, A.; Riley, A.; Rushton, E.; Vaissiere, M.; Minsavage, G.; Rohde, A.; Dalbey, W.

    2013-01-15

    Existing data demonstrate that residual aromatic extracts (RAEs) can be either carcinogenic or non-carcinogenic. CONCAWE had previously concluded that 'Although limited data available indicate that some RAEs are weakly carcinogenic, it is not possible to provide a general recommendation. Classify on a case-by-case basis' (CONCAWE 2005). Therefore CONCAWE's Health/Toxicology Subgroup (H/TSG) has developed a proposal for the use of the modified Ames test as a short-term predictive screening tool for decisions on the classification of RAEs for carcinogenicity. The relationship between RAE chemistry and carcinogenic potential is not as well understood as it is for some other categories of substances, e.g. Other Lubricant Base Oils (OLBO). However, a correlation has been found between the results of the skin carcinogenicity bioassay and the mutagenicity index (MI) obtained from the modified Ames test. Data supporting this correlation are summarised in this report. The H/TSG confirmed that the modified Ames test can be used as a predictive screening tool and that a cut-off value can be established to make a distinction between carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic products. RAEs with a MI > 0.4 demonstrated carcinogenic potential upon dermal application to mouse skin with chronic exposure. RAEs with a MI > 0.4 did not demonstrate a carcinogenic potential. To justify the use of the modified Ames test with RAEs, additional analysis of the repeatability of the test with RAEs was required. With this objective, CONCAWE sponsored a round robin study with different samples of RAEs from member companies, at three different laboratories. The repeatability demonstrated in the round robin study with RAEs support the proposed use of the modified Ames test. As part of the tools available for use by member companies, the H/TSG proposed a standard operating procedure (SOP) (included as an Appendix to this report) on the conduct of the modified Ames test with RAEs. The H

  5. Changes in expression of imprinted genes following treatment of human cancer cell lines with non-mutagenic or mutagenic carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibui, Takeo; Higo, Yukari; Tsutsui, Takeo W; Uchida, Minoru; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Barrett, J Carl; Tsutsui, Takeki

    2008-08-01

    It remains possible that chemicals that act by mutagenic mechanisms as well as chemicals that do not induce gene mutations may affect epigenetic gene expression. To test the possibility, we investigated the ability of both types of chemicals to alter the expression of five imprinted genes, PEG3, SNRPN, NDN, ZAC and H19, using two human colon cancer cell lines and a human breast cancer cell line. The expression of imprinted genes was changed by some non-mutagenic and mutagenic carcinogens independent of their mutagenic activity. The genes most commonly exhibiting the changes in expression were SNRPN and PEG3. Alterations of the expression of NDN and ZAC were also observed in some conditions. Methylation-specific PCR and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays suggest the possibility that changes in the expression of SNRPN may be associated with DNA hypomethylation and histone acetylation of the promoters and euchromatinization of the heterochromatic domains of the promoters. Changes in expression of the imprinted genes, PEG3 and NDN, were also observed in cells immortalized by treatment of normal human fibroblasts with 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide or aflatoxin B1. We previously demonstrated that expression of the cancer-related gene, INK4a, in these immortal cells was lost via epigenetic mechanisms. The results prove that, in cancer cells, some mutagenic or non-mutagenic carcinogens can epigenetically influence the transcription levels of imprinted genes and also suggest the possibility that some chemical carcinogens may have epigenetic carcinogenic effects in human cells.

  6. Opportunities for an alternative integrating testing strategy for carcinogen hazard assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doktorova, Tatyana Y; Pauwels, Marleen; Vinken, Mathieu; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Rogiers, Vera

    2012-02-01

    The 2-year rodent carcinogenicity bioassay evolved more than 40 years ago, and although it is complex, long lasting, expensive, and animal consuming, it is still the only generally accepted test for assessing the carcinogenicity of chemicals. Over time, different alternative approaches have been developed with the final goal to replace the bioassay. Unfortunately, at present, none of these strategies alone provides sufficient assurance of accurate prediction. In this review paper, we discuss the major advantages and pitfalls of the existing alternative methodologies to the carcinogenicity bioassay. Finally, based on the available scientific data in the public domain, we propose what we would like to call a "feasible integrated testing strategy" which incorporates some promising alternatives, providing at the same time information on the mechanism of action and the toxic nature of the compounds tested. It is, however, clear that the adoption of whatever "new" testing scheme should be considered with caution and its effectiveness should be experimentally demonstrated in advance by addressing a reasonable number of chemical carcinogens and non-carcinogens from a variety of structural and functional classes.

  7. Epigenetic alterations induced by genotoxic occupational and environmental human chemical carcinogens: A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Grace; Pogribny, Igor P; Guyton, Kathryn Z; Rusyn, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that epigenetic alterations play an important role in chemically-induced carcinogenesis. Although the epigenome and genome may be equally important in carcinogenicity, the genotoxicity of chemical agents and exposure-related transcriptomic responses have been more thoroughly studied and characterized. To better understand the evidence for epigenetic alterations of human carcinogens, and the potential association with genotoxic endpoints, we conducted a systematic review of published studies of genotoxic carcinogens that reported epigenetic endpoints. Specifically, we searched for publications reporting epigenetic effects for the 28 agents and occupations included in Monograph Volume 100F of the International Agency for the Research on Cancer (IARC) that were classified as "carcinogenic to humans" (Group 1) with strong evidence of genotoxic mechanisms of carcinogenesis. We identified a total of 158 studies that evaluated epigenetic alterations for 12 of these 28 carcinogenic agents and occupations (1,3-butadiene, 4-aminobiphenyl, aflatoxins, benzene, benzidine, benzo[a]pyrene, coke production, formaldehyde, occupational exposure as a painter, sulfur mustard, and vinyl chloride). Aberrant DNA methylation was most commonly studied, followed by altered expression of non-coding RNAs and histone changes (totaling 85, 59 and 25 studies, respectively). For 3 carcinogens (aflatoxins, benzene and benzo[a]pyrene), 10 or more studies reported epigenetic effects. However, epigenetic studies were sparse for the remaining 9 carcinogens; for 4 agents, only 1 or 2 published reports were identified. While further research is needed to better identify carcinogenesis-associated epigenetic perturbations for many potential carcinogens, published reports on specific epigenetic endpoints can be systematically identified and increasingly incorporated in cancer hazard assessments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Predicting the carcinogenicity of chemicals in humans from rodent bioassay data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, G. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States) School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States)); Wilson, R. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States))

    1991-08-01

    Regulatory agencies currently rely on rodent carcinogenicity bioassay data to predict whether or not a given chemical poses a carcinogenic threat to humans. The authors argue that it is always more useful to know a chemical's carcinogenic potency (with confidence limits) than to be able to say only qualitatively that it has been found to be a carcinogen. In a typical bioassay, a chemical is administered to groups of 50 to 100 rodents at the highest feasible level (the maximum tolerated dose) and rarely at less than 1/10 this dose in order to maximize the statistical significance of any increase in tumors that might result. Recently, much experimental work has focused on the mechanisms by which site-specific toxicity arising from chronic administration at the maximum tolerated dose may lead to carcinogenicity. Extrapolation of high-dose results to low dose does not take into consideration the possibility of a threshold dose, below which the carcinogenic potency is much lower or even zero. Threshold dose-response phenomena may be much more relevant to the etiology of cancer in the rodent bioassays than was earlier realized; if so, there is an even greater need for establishing dose-dependent potency estimates. The emphasis of this review is in the interspecies comparison of high-dose potencies. The qualitative and quantitative comparison of carcinogenicities between mice and rats and between rodents and humans is reviewed and discussed. They conclude that there is a good qualitative (yes/no) correlation for both the rat/mouse and the rodent/human comparison.

  9. Human cytochrome P450 enzyme specificity for bioactivation of safrole to the proximate carcinogen 1'-hydroxysafrole

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurissen, S.M.F.; Bogaards, J.J.P.; Awad, H.M.; Boersma, M.G.; Brand, W.; Fiamegos, Y.C.; Beek, van T.A.; Alink, G.M.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Cnubben, N.H.P.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, the cytochrome P450 mediated bioactivation of safrole to its proximate carcinogenic metabolite, 1'-hydroxysafrole, has been investigated for the purpose of identifying the human P450 enzymes involved. The 1'-hydroxylation of safrole was characterized in a variety of in vitro te

  10. An Evaluation of the Human Carcinogenic Potential of Ethylene Glycol Butyl Ether (Egbe)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This position paper, An Evaluation of the Human Carcinogenic Potential of Ethylene Glycol Butyl Ether, was developed in support of the EPA's evaluation of a petition from the American Chemistry Council requesting to delist EGBE per the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA), Titl...

  11. Gene discovery for the carcinogenic human liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasser Robin B

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA – cancer of the bile ducts – is associated with chronic infection with the liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini. Despite being the only eukaryote that is designated as a 'class I carcinogen' by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, little is known about its genome. Results Approximately 5,000 randomly selected cDNAs from the adult stage of O. viverrini were characterized and accounted for 1,932 contigs, representing ~14% of the entire transcriptome, and, presently, the largest sequence dataset for any species of liver fluke. Twenty percent of contigs were assigned GO classifications. Abundantly represented protein families included those involved in physiological functions that are essential to parasitism, such as anaerobic respiration, reproduction, detoxification, surface maintenance and feeding. GO assignments were well conserved in relation to other parasitic flukes, however, some categories were over-represented in O. viverrini, such as structural and motor proteins. An assessment of evolutionary relationships showed that O. viverrini was more similar to other parasitic (Clonorchis sinensis and Schistosoma japonicum than to free-living (Schmidtea mediterranea flatworms, and 105 sequences had close homologues in both parasitic species but not in S. mediterranea. A total of 164 O. viverrini contigs contained ORFs with signal sequences, many of which were platyhelminth-specific. Examples of convergent evolution between host and parasite secreted/membrane proteins were identified as were homologues of vaccine antigens from other helminths. Finally, ORFs representing secreted proteins with known roles in tumorigenesis were identified, and these might play roles in the pathogenesis of O. viverrini-induced CCA. Conclusion This gene discovery effort for O. viverrini should expedite molecular studies of cholangiocarcinogenesis and accelerate research focused on developing new interventions

  12. Environmental exposure to human carcinogens in teenagers and the association with DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franken, Carmen; Koppen, Gudrun; Lambrechts, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    Background We investigated whether human environmental exposure to chemicals that are labeled as (potential) carcinogens leads to increased (oxidative) damage to DNA in adolescents. Material and methods Six hundred 14–15-year-old youngsters were recruited all over Flanders (Belgium) and in two...... areas with important industrial activities. DNA damage was assessed by alkaline and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg) modified comet assays in peripheral blood cells and analysis of urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels. Personal exposure to potentially carcinogenic compounds...... was measured in urine, namely: chromium, cadmium, nickel, 1-hydroxypyrene as a proxy for exposure to other carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), t,t-muconic acid as a metabolite of benzene, 2,5-dichlorophenol (2,5-DCP), organophosphate pesticide metabolites, and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP...

  13. 17. Exposure and Metabolism of Heterocyclic Amine Food Mutagens/Carcinogens in Humans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Carcinogens produced from overcooked foods are extremely mutagenic in numerous in vitro and in vivo test systems. One of these mutagens, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo [4,5-b] pyridine (PhIP) induces breast, colon and prostate tumors in rats and has been implicated in dietary epidemiology studies for raising the risk of

  14. 小鼠模型在药物致癌性评价中的应用及研发人源化模型的意义%Application of mouse models for drug carcinogenicity testing and the need for development of humanized models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏勤; 高翔; 徐平

    2013-01-01

    Carcinogenicity tests in preclinical drug safety studies have important impact on clinical trials and marketing authorization for medicines. In some developed countries, short/medium term models have been used as an additional component of the potential carcinogenicity assessment, replacing the 2-year mouse bioassay. Based on the data and information obtained from chemical carcinogenicity evaluation, in this article we overview the characteristics and recent application of these models. Then faced with the shortages of these models, the demand for developing new pharmaceuticals at home and the international circulation of pharmaceuticals, we suppose that the development of new humanized models with defects in functions of DNA damage repair; Cell cycle check-point appears to be very promising alternative models.%药物临床前安全性评价中的致癌实验对药物是否能进入临床实验和上市起着至关重要的作用.一些发达国家已经采用小鼠模型的短中期致癌实验作为附加实验,代替了传统的两年期实验.本文主要参考这些模型在致癌实验和药品致癌性评价中的已有数据及资料,对其特点和近年来的应用情况进行了概述.结合现有模型的缺陷,我国新药研发的需求和药物流通日益国际化的现状,得出研发DNA修复系统和细胞周期控制系统缺陷的人源化的转基因模型,是非常有前景的新替代模型.

  15. Use of short-term test systems for the prediction of the hazard represented by potential chemical carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, L.R.; Jones, T.D.; Easterly, C.E.; Walsh, P.J.

    1990-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that results from short-term bioassays will ultimately provide information that will be useful for human health hazard assessment. Historically, the validity of the short-term tests has been assessed using the framework of the epidemiologic/medical screens. In this context, the results of the carcinogen (long-term) bioassay is generally used as the standard. However, this approach is widely recognized as being biased and, because it employs qualitative data, cannot be used to assist in isolating those compounds which may represent a more significant toxicologic hazard than others. In contrast, the goal of this research is to address the problem of evaluating the utility of the short-term tests for hazard assessment using an alternative method of investigation. Chemicals were selected mostly from the list of carcinogens published by the International Agency for Research on Carcinogens (IARC); a few other chemicals commonly recognized as hazardous were included. Tumorigenicity and mutagenicity data on 52 chemicals were obtained from the Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (RTECS) and were analyzed using a relative potency approach. The data were evaluated in a format which allowed for a comparison of the ranking of the mutagenic relative potencies of the compounds (as estimated using short-term data) vs. the ranking of the tumorigenic relative potencies (as estimated from the chronic bioassays). Although this was a preliminary investigation, it offers evidence that the short-term tests systems may be of utility in ranking the hazards represented by chemicals which may contribute to increased carcinogenesis in humans as a result of occupational or environmental exposures. 177 refs., 8 tabs.

  16. A review of mammalian carcinogenicity study design and potential effects of alternate test procedures on the safety evaluation of food ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, A W; Dayan, A D; Hall, W C; Kodell, R L; Williams, G M; Waddell, W D; Slesinski, R S; Kruger, C L

    2011-06-01

    of test procedures, dose selection, histopathology procedures, application of historical control data, statistical evaluations and whether statistical extrapolations are supported by, or are beyond the limits of, the data generated. Without due consideration, there can be result conflicting data interpretations and uncertainty about the relevance of a study's results to human risk. This paper discusses the critical elements of rodent (rat) carcinogenicity studies, particularly with respect to the study of food ingredients. It also highlights study practices and procedures that can detract from the appropriate evaluation of human relevance of results, indicating the importance of adherence to international consensus protocols, such as those detailed by OECD.

  17. Comparison of the HeLa DNA-synthesis inhibition test and the Ames test for screening of mutagenic carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Painter, R.B.; Howard, R.

    1978-01-01

    The action of most mutagens is mediated by damage to DNA, which causes at least a temporary inhibition of DNA syntesis in mammalian cells. Assays for mammalian DNA-synthesis inhibition, both in vivo (mouse testes) and in vitro (HeLa cells), have been proposed as possible screening tests for mutagenic carcinogens. The mouse system has recently been chekced with 100 chemicals; of 88 known carcinogens and/or mutagens in this group, 76 were positive. The most generally used non-animal screening procedure is the Ames test, which uses auxotrophic strains of Salmonella typhimurium to measure mutagenesis. In this communication we summarize our results with 19 chemicals tested in HeLa cells and show that they correlate very well with the results obtained in the Ames test. Most of these chemicals act by alkylation, but an intercalator (adriamycin) is included among them as well as aflatoxin B/sub 1/, whose action is not established.

  18. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adducts in cervix of women infected with carcinogenic human papillomavirus types: An immunohistochemistry study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, M. Margaret [Carcinogen-DNA Interactions Section, LCBG, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD (United States)], E-mail: prattm@mail.nih.gov; Sirajuddin, Paul; Poirier, Miriam C. [Carcinogen-DNA Interactions Section, LCBG, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD (United States); Schiffman, Mark [Hormonal and Reproductive Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD (United States); Glass, Andrew G.; Scott, David R.; Rush, Brenda B. [Northwest Kaiser Permanente, Portland, OR (United States); Olivero, Ofelia A. [Carcinogen-DNA Interactions Section, LCBG, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD (United States); Castle, Philip E. [Hormonal and Reproductive Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2007-11-01

    Among women infected with carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV), there is a two- to five-fold increased risk of cervical precancer and cancer in women who smoke compared to those who do not smoke. Because tobacco smoke contains carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), it was of interest to examine human cervical tissue for PAH-DNA adduct formation. Here, we measured PAH-DNA adduct formation in cervical biopsies collected in follow-up among women who tested positive for carcinogenic HPV at baseline. A semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry (IHC) method using antiserum elicited against DNA modified with r7,t8-dihydroxy-t-9,10-oxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene (BPDE) was used to measure nuclear PAH-DNA adduct formation. Cultured human cervical keratinocytes exposed to 0, 0.153, or 0.331 {mu}M BPDE showed dose-dependent increases in r7,t8,t9-trihydroxy-c-10-(N{sup 2}deoxyguanosyl)-7,8,9, 10-tetrahydro-benzo[a]pyrene (BPdG) adducts. For BPdG adduct analysis, paraffin-embedded keratinocytes were stained by IHC with analysis of nuclear color intensity by Automated Cellular Imaging System (ACIS) and, in parallel cultures, extracted DNA was assayed by quantitative BPDE-DNA chemiluminescence immunoassay (CIA). For paraffin-embedded samples from carcinogenic HPV-infected women, normal-appearing cervical squamous epithelium suitable for scoring was found in samples from 75 of the 114 individuals, including 29 cases of cervical precancer or cancer and 46 controls. With a lower limit of detection of 20 adducts/10{sup 8} nucleotides, detectable PAH-DNA adduct values ranged from 25 to 191/10{sup 8} nucleotides, with a median of 75/10{sup 8} nucleotides. PAH-DNA adduct values above 150/10{sup 8} nucleotides were found in eight samples, and in three samples adducts were non-detectable. There was no correlation between PAH-DNA adduct formation and either smoking or case status. Therefore, PAH-DNA adduct formation as measured by this methodology did not appear

  19. Effect of chemical mutagens and carcinogens on gene expression profiles in human TK6 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lode Godderis

    Full Text Available Characterization of toxicogenomic signatures of carcinogen exposure holds significant promise for mechanistic and predictive toxicology. In vitro transcriptomic studies allow the comparison of the response to chemicals with diverse mode of actions under controlled experimental conditions. We conducted an in vitro study in TK6 cells to characterize gene expression signatures of exposure to 15 genotoxic carcinogens frequently used in European industries. We also examined the dose-responsive changes in gene expression, and perturbation of biochemical pathways in response to these carcinogens. TK6 cells were exposed at 3 dose levels for 24 h with and without S9 human metabolic mix. Since S9 had an impact on gene expression (885 genes, we analyzed the gene expression data from cells cultures incubated with S9 and without S9 independently. The ribosome pathway was affected by all chemical-dose combinations. However in general, no similar gene expression was observed among carcinogens. Further, pathways, i.e. cell cycle, DNA repair mechanisms, RNA degradation, that were common within sets of chemical-dose combination were suggested by clustergram. Linear trends in dose-response of gene expression were observed for Trichloroethylene, Benz[a]anthracene, Epichlorohydrin, Benzene, and Hydroquinone. The significantly altered genes were involved in the regulation of (anti- apoptosis, maintenance of cell survival, tumor necrosis factor-related pathways and immune response, in agreement with several other studies. Similarly in S9+ cultures, Benz[a]pyrene, Styrene and Trichloroethylene each modified over 1000 genes at high concentrations. Our findings expand our understanding of the transcriptomic response to genotoxic carcinogens, revealing the alteration of diverse sets of genes and pathways involved in cellular homeostasis and cell cycle control.

  20. The function and significance of SELENBP1 downregulation in human bronchial epithelial carcinogenic process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu-Qing Zeng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Our quantitative proteomic study showed that selenium-binding protein 1 (SELENBP1 was progressively decreased in human bronchial epithelial carcinogenic process. However, there is little information on expression and function of SELENBP1 during human lung squamous cell cancer (LSCC carcinogenesis. METHODS: iTRAQ-tagging combined with 2D LC-MS/MS analysis was used to identify differentially expressed proteins in the human bronchial epithelial carcinogenic process. SELENBP1, member of selenoproteins family and progressively downregulated in this process, was selected to further study. Both Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were performed to detect SELENBP1 expression in independent sets of tissues of bronchial epithelial carcinogenesis, and ability of SELENBP1 for discriminating NBE (normal bronchial epithelium from preneoplastic lesions from invasive LSCC was evaluated. The effects of SELENBP1 downregulation on the susceptibility of benzo(apyrene (B[a]P-induced human bronchial epithelial cell transformation were determined. RESULTS: 102 differentially expressed proteins were identified by quantitative proteomics, and SELENBP1 was found and confirmed being progressively decreased in the human bronchial epithelial carcinogenic process. The sensitivity and specificity of SELENBP1 were 80% and 79% in discriminating NBE from preneoplastic lesions, 79% and 82% in discriminating NBE from invasive LSCC, and 77% and 71% in discriminating preneoplastic lesions from invasive LSCC, respectively. Furthermore, knockdown of SELENBP1 in immortalized human bronchial epithelial cell line 16HBE cells significantly increased the efficiency of B[a]P-induced cell transformation. CONCLUSIONS: The present data shows for the first time that decreased SELENBP1 is an early event in LSCC, increases B[a]P-induced human bronchial epithelial cell transformation, and might serve as a novel potential biomarker for early detection of LSCC.

  1. Formation and Human Risk of Carcinogenic Heterocyclic Amines Formed from Natural Precursors in Meat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knize, M G; Felton, J S

    2004-11-22

    A group of heterocyclic amines that are mutagens and rodent carcinogens form when meat is cooked to medium and well-done states. The precursors of these compounds are natural meat components: creatinine, amino acids and sugars. Defined model systems of dry-heated precursors mimic the amounts and proportions of heterocyclic amines found in meat. Results from model systems and cooking experiments suggest ways to reduce their formation and, thus, to reduce human intake. Human cancer epidemiology studies related to consumption of well-done meat products are listed and compared.

  2. Effect of caffeic acid esters on carcinogen-induced mutagenicity and human colon adenocarcinoma cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, C V; Desai, D; Kaul, B; Amin, S; Reddy, B S

    1992-11-16

    Propolis, a honey bee hive product, is thought to exhibit a broad spectrum of activities including antibiotic, antiviral, anti-inflammatory and tumor growth inhibition; some of the observed biological activities may be due to caffeic acid (cinnamic acid) esters that are present in propolis. In the present study we synthesized three caffeic acid esters, namely methyl caffeate (MC), phenylethyl caffeate (PEC) and phenylethyl dimethylcaffeate (PEDMC) and tested them against the 3,2'-dimethyl-4-aminobiphenyl, (DMAB, a colon and mammary carcinogen)-induced mutagenicity in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA 98 and TA 100. Also, the effect of these agents on the growth of human colon adenocarcinoma, HT-29 cells and activities of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) was studied. Mutagenicity was induced in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA 98 and TA 100 plus S9 activation using 5 and 10 micrograms DMAB and antimutagenic activities of 0-150 microM MC, 0-60 microM PEC and 0-80 microM PEDMC were determined. The results indicate that MC, PEC and PEDMC were not mutagenic in the Salmonella tester system. DMAB-induced mutagenicity was significantly inhibited with 150 microM MC, 40-60 microM PEC and 40-80 microM PEDMC in both tester systems. Treatment of HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells with > 150 microM MC, 30 microM PEC and 20 microM PEDMC significantly inhibited the cell growth and syntheses of RNA, DNA and protein. ODC and PTK activities were also inhibited in HT-29 cells treated with different concentrations of MC, PEC and PEDMC. These results demonstrate that caffeic acid esters which are present in Propolis possess chemopreventive properties when tested in short-term assay systems.

  3. Results of screening NCI/NTP nongenotoxic carcinogens and genotoxic noncarcinogens with the k sub e test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendelsohn, M.L. (ed.); Bakale, G.; McCreary, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    The interdependence of the electrophilic and carcinogenic properties of chemicals that was demonstrated two decades ago rekindled interest in the somatic mutation theory of carcinogenesis. Interest in this theory grew with the development of a reverse-mutation bacterial assay in the laboratory of B.N. Ames that permitted the mutagenic properties of the chemicals to be determined quickly and yielded results which indicated that carcinogens are mutagens.'' Subsequent validation studies of this bioassay, the Salmonella typhimurium/microsome or Ames test,'' by Ames' group and others provided additional support for the correlation between mutagenicity and carcinogenicity which led to the worldwide deployment of the Ames test in thousands of laboratories and to the development of more than 100 other short-term tests that continue to be used to identify potential carcinogens via various end-points of genotoxicity. This document discusses electrophilicity, mutagenicity, and carcinogenicity relationships as well as carcinogen-screening of chemicals. 28 refs., 4 tabs.

  4. Food derived carcinogenic amnoimidazoazaarenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik

    Carcinogenic aminoimidazoazaarenes are formed during cooking of meat and fish. Important factors for the formation of these compounds are meat type, cooking temperature and time. The compounds are genotoxic in bacterial and mammalian cells. In animal feeding studies the compounds tested so far we...... of the exocyclic amino group. Estimations of human cancer risk have indicated that ingestion of food containing aminoimidazoazaarenes are of importance....

  5. The Food and Beverage Occurrence of Furfuryl Alcohol and Myrcene—Two Emerging Potential Human Carcinogens?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex O. Okaru

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available For decades, compounds present in foods and beverages have been implicated in the etiology of human cancers. The World Health Organization (WHO International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC continues to classify such agents regarding their potential carcinogenicity in humans based on new evidence from animal and human studies. Furfuryl alcohol and β-myrcene are potential human carcinogens due to be evaluated. The major source of furfuryl alcohol in foods is thermal processing and ageing of alcoholic beverages, while β-myrcene occurs naturally as a constituent of the essential oils of plants such as hops, lemongrass, and derived products. This study aimed to summarize the occurrence of furfuryl alcohol and β-myrcene in foods and beverages using literature review data. Additionally, results of furfuryl alcohol occurrence from our own nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR analysis are included. The highest content of furfuryl alcohol was found in coffee beans (>100 mg/kg and in some fish products (about 10 mg/kg, while among beverages, wines contained between 1 and 10 mg/L, with 8 mg/L in pineapple juice. The content of β-myrcene was highest in hops. In conclusion, the data about the occurrence of the two agents is currently judged as insufficient for exposure and risk assessment. The results of this study point out the food and beverage groups that may be considered for future monitoring of furfuryl alcohol and β-myrcene.

  6. Human gastric cancer, Helicobacter pylori and bracken carcinogens: A connecting hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveros-Bastidas, Alberto; Calcagno-Pissarelli, María Pía; Naya, Marlene; Ávila-Núñez, Jorge Luis; Alonso-Amelot, Miguel E

    2016-03-01

    Long term infection of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) virulent strains is a key factor in the genesis of human gastric cancer, and so are certain dietary proinflammatory and genotoxic compounds. Carcinogenic bracken fern (Pteridium spp.) is one of these. Toxins from this plant are consumed as bracken culinary preparations, through milk and meat of bracken-exposed livestock, and drain waters from bracken swards. Bracken toxin ptaquiloside (PtQ), a suspected human carcinogen, elicits complex responses in animals leading to death. PtQ and Hp might cooperate in gastric pathologies. This paper presents an hypothesis on PtQ-Hp association leading to the enhancement of carcinogenesis in the human gastric environment that might explain the high gastric cancer incidence and death rates among Hp-infected people living in bracken zones at two levels: (1) The macroscopic scale comprising the flow of PtQ in the human diet. (2) the microscopic scale encompassing (A) gastric luminal medium; (B) gastric mucus structure and mucin degradation elicited by Hp; (C) bacterial pH gradient modification of the gastric mucosa that favors PtQ survival and its penetration into epithelial tissue; (D) combined PtQ/Hp effects on gastric immune and inflammatory responses; (E) PtQ-Hp complementary activity at selected cell signaling cascades and genome disturbance.

  7. Incidence and persistence of carcinogenic genital human papillomavirus infections in young women with or without Chlamydia trachomatis co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriend, Henrike J; Bogaards, Johannes A; van Bergen, Jan E A M; Brink, Antoinette A T P; van den Broek, Ingrid V F; Hoebe, Christian J P A; King, Audrey J; van der Sande, Marianne A B; Wolffs, Petra F G; de Melker, Hester E

    2015-10-01

    We assessed whether infection with chlamydia increases the incidence of carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) infections and if HPV persistence is affected by chlamydia co-infection. For 1982 women (16-29 years-old) participating in two consecutive rounds of a chlamydia screening implementation trial, swabs were polymerase chain reaction tested to detect chlamydia and 14 carcinogenic HPV genotypes. HPV type-specific incidence and persistence rates were stratified for chlamydia positivity at follow-up. Associations were assessed by multilevel logistic regression analyses with correction for sexual risk factors. HPV type-specific incidence ranged from 1.4% to 8.9% and persistence from 22.7% to 59.4% after a median follow-up of 11 months (interquartile range: 11-12). Differences in 1-year HPV persistence rates between chlamydia -infected and noninfected women were less distinct than differences in HPV incidence rates (pooled adjusted odds ratios of 1.17 [95% CI: 0.69-1.96] and 1.84 [95% CI: 1.36-2.47], respectively). The effect of chlamydia co-infection on HPV-infection risk did not significantly differ by HPV genotype. In conclusion, infection with chlamydia increases the risk of infection by carcinogenic HPV types and may enhance persistence of some HPV types. Although these findings could reflect residual confounding through unobserved risk factors, our results do give reason to explore more fully the association between chlamydia and HPV type-specific acquisition and persistence. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Carcinogen derived biomarkers: applications in studies of human exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke

    OpenAIRE

    Hecht, S

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To review the literature on carcinogen derived biomarkers of exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke (SHS). These biomarkers are specifically related to known carcinogens in tobacco smoke and include urinary metabolites, DNA adducts, and blood protein adducts.

  9. Aflatoxin is not a probably human carcinogen: the published evidence is sufficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoloff, L

    1989-12-01

    Since the early 1960s, when aflatoxin, the mold-produced contaminant of a number of important food commodities, was found to be a potent hepatocarcinogen for laboratory rats, there has been a sustained search for evidence to support the regulatory presumption that aflatoxin is a probable human carcinogen. The developing laboratory evidence of differences between species in metabolism of aflatoxin and susceptibility to its oncogenic effects indicated that humans were probably refractory to aflatoxin carcinogenesis, but the early epidemiological evidence indicated otherwise. That epidemiological evidence, however, contained flaws so that Working Groups of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) meeting in 1970, 1976, and 1982, although ignoring the biochemical evidence, did consider the available epidemiological evidence insufficient for a conclusion of human carcinogenicity. During the 1970s and 1980s, studies on the connection between chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and primary liver cell cancer (PLC), the expected lesion from aflatoxin exposure, had established a very strong etiological relationship between HBV and PLC. Since all the epidemiological studies of aflatoxin and PLC conducted prior to 1982 had been of populations with endemic HBV infection, and, in addition to other flaws, had not been controlled for this confounding factor, there was a solid basis for their rejection. Most epidemiological studies in the 1980s of aflatoxin and PLC were either in the United States, where HBV-infected groups could be excluded from the study, or, when in areas of chronic HBV infection, attempts were made to include that factor. The study of U.S. populations showed no difference in mortality rates from PLC that could be attributed to aflatoxin exposure. The studies of populations with endemic HBV infection produced no convincing evidence to support a primary role for aflatoxin in the induction of human PLC, although an accessory role to HBV

  10. Treatment of mice with the Ah receptor agonist and human carcinogen dioxin results in altered numbers and function of hematopoietic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Kameshwar P.; Wyman, Amber; Casado, Fanny L.; Garrett, Russell W.; Gasiewicz, Thomas A.

    2008-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates the carcinogenicity of a family of environmental contaminants, the most potent being 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Increased incidence of lymphoma and leukemia in humans is associated with TCDD exposure. Although AhR activation by TCDD has profound effects on the immune system, precise cellular and molecular mechanisms have yet to be determined. These studies tested the hypothesis that alteration of marrow populations following treatm...

  11. Review of short-term screening tests for mutagens, toxigens, and carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carney, H.J.; Hass, B.S.

    1979-07-01

    In order to test the thousands of man-made chemicals in the environment for carcinogenic and genetic hazards, a multitude of short-term screening tests has been developed to complement long-term mammalian bioassays and epidemiological studies. These tests cover a broad spectrum of organisms, and include the use of naked and viral nucleic acids, bacteria, fungi, higher plants, insects in vitro mammalian cell cultures (cell transformation, cell-mediated mutagenesis, DNA repair, and chromosome aberration tests) and live mammals. Assay end points include effects on nucleic acids, DNA repair synthesis, point or gene mutation, structural and numerical chromosome aberrations, cytological alterations, and in vitro cell transformation. The present review describes and compares these assays. In addition, it discusses their historical development, the problems and limitations associated with their use, and their implementation in comprehensive testing programs. It is intended to provide overview and specific information to the laboratory that is in the process of establishing genetic toxicological systems. (The literature is reviewed to January 1978.)

  12. Human exposure to carcinogenic heterocyclic amines and their mutational fingerprints in experimental animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, M; Wakabayashi, K; Ushijima, T; Toyota, M; Totsuka, Y; Sugimura, T

    1996-01-01

    Heterocyclic amines (HCAs) are mutagens/carcinogens to which humans are exposed on almost a daily basis. 2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhlP) is the most abundant of the various carcinogenic HCAs (present at a level of 0.56 to 69.2 ng/g of cooked meat or fish), with 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MelQx) following it at 0.64 to 6.44 ng/g. HCAs have been found in the urine of healthy people who consume ordinary diets, while patients receiving parenteral alimentation lack, for example, PhlP and MelQx in their urine. Based on the concentrations of PhlP and MelQx in urine samples from 10 healthy volunteers, daily intake of MelQx in Japanese was calculated to be 0.3 to 3.9 micrograms/person, while that of PhlP was 0.005 to 0 micrograms. The Japanese consume more MelQx than Americans, whereas Japanese intake of PhlP was about one-third that of Americans. MelQx-DNA adducts have also detected in Japanese Kidney, colon, and rectum samples using the 32P-postlabeling method followed by identification using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis; the levels were 0.18, 1.8, and 1.4 per 10(9) nucleotides, respectively. In addition, we elucidated the mutational fingerprints of Phlp by analyzing Apc mutations in rat colon cancers induced by this carcinogen. Four of eight tumors had a total of five mutations in the Apc gene, four of which featured a guanine deletion from 5'-GTGGGAT-3' sequences. This specific mutation spectrum may be used as a fingerprint of PhlP in evaluating its risk potential for human colon carcinogenesis. Mutations were not found in similar 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline-induced colon lesions. Microsatellite instability was detected in both colon and mammary tumors induced by PhlP. The mechanisms involved in this development of microsatellite instability in PhlP. The mechanisms involved in this development of microsatellite instability in PhlP-induced cancers remain to be elucidated. Images Figure 1

  13. Use of in silico models for prioritization of heat-induced food contaminants in mutagenicity and carcinogenicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, Falko; Buhrke, Thorsten; Wenzel, Irina; Andrack, Jennifer; Hielscher, Jan; Lampen, Alfonso

    2017-01-16

    Numerous Maillard reaction and lipid oxidation products are present in processed foods such as heated cereals, roasted meat, refined oils, coffee, and juices. Due to the lack of experimental toxicological data, risk assessment is hardly possible for most of these compounds. In the present study, an in silico approach was employed for the prediction of the toxicological endpoints mutagenicity and carcinogenicity on the basis of the structure of the respective compound, to examine (quantitative) structure-activity relationships for more than 800 compounds. Five software tools for mutagenicity prediction (T.E.S.T., SARpy, CAESAR, Benigni-Bossa, and LAZAR) and three carcinogenicity prediction tools (CAESAR, Benigni-Bossa, and LAZAR) were combined to yield so-called mutagenic or carcinogenic scores for every single substance. Alcohols, ketones, acids, lactones, and esters were predicted to be mutagenic and carcinogenic with low probability, whereas the software tools tended to predict a considerable mutagenic and carcinogenic potential for thiazoles. To verify the in silico predictions for the endpoint mutagenicity experimentally, twelve selected compounds were examined for their mutagenic potential using two different validated in vitro test systems, the bacterial reverse mutation assay (Ames test) and the in vitro micronucleus assay. There was a good correlation between the results of the Ames test and the in silico predictions. However, in the case of the micronucleus assay, at least three substances, 2-amino-6-methylpyridine, 6-heptenoic acid, and 2-methylphenol, were clearly positive although they were predicted to be non-mutagenic. Thus, software tools for mutagenicity prediction are suitable for prioritization among large numbers of substances, but these predictions still need experimental verification.

  14. Human cytochrome P450 enzyme specificity for bioactivation of safrole to the proximate carcinogen 1′-hydroxysafrole

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurissen, S.M.F.; Bogaards, J.J.P.; Awad, H.M.; Boersma, M.G.; Brand, W.; Fiamegos, Y.C.; Beek, T.A. van; Alink, G.M.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Cnubben, N.H.P.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, the cytochrome P450 mediated bioactivation of safrole to its proximate carcinogenic metabolite, 1′-hydroxysafrole, has been investigated for the purpose of identifying the human P450 enzymes involved. The 1′-hydroxylation of safrole was characterized in a variety of in vitro te

  15. Human Cytochrome P450 Enzymes of Importance for the Bioactivation of Methyleugenol to the Proximate Carcinogen 1'-Hydroxymethyleugenol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurissen, S.M.F.; Bogaards, J.J.P.; Boersma, M.G.; Horst, ter J.P.F.; Awad, H.M.; Fiamegos, Y.C.; Beek, van T.A.; Alink, G.M.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Cnubben, N.H.P.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2006-01-01

    In vitro studies were performed to elucidate the human cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in the bioactivation of methyleugenol to its proximate carcinogen 1'-hydroxymethyleugenol. Incubations with Supersomes, expressing individual P450 enzymes to a high level, revealed that P450 1A2, 2A6, 2C9, 2C19,

  16. Evaluating the mechanistic evidence and key data gaps in assessing the potential carcinogenicity of carbon nanotubes and nanofibers in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuempel, Eileen D; Jaurand, Marie-Claude; Møller, Peter; Morimoto, Yasuo; Kobayashi, Norihiro; Pinkerton, Kent E; Sargent, Linda M; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Fubini, Bice; Kane, Agnes B

    2017-01-01

    In an evaluation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for the IARC Monograph 111, the Mechanisms Subgroup was tasked with assessing the strength of evidence on the potential carcinogenicity of CNTs in humans. The mechanistic evidence was considered to be not strong enough to alter the evaluations based on the

  17. Human cytochrome P450 enzymes of importance for the bioactivation of methyleugenol to the proximate carcinogen 1′-hydroxymethyleugenol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurissen, S.M.F.; Bogaards, J.J.P.; Boersma, M.G.; Horst, J.P.F. ter; Awad, H.M.; Fiamegos, Y.C.; Beek, T.A. van; Alink, G.M.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Cnubben, N.H.P.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2006-01-01

    In vitro studies were performed to elucidate the human cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in the bioactivation of methyleugenol to its proximate carcinogen 1′-hydroxymethyleugenol. Incubations with Supersomes, expressing individual P450 enzymes to a high level, revealed that P450 1A2, 2A6, 2C9, 2C19,

  18. Screening assays for carcinogenic agents and mixtures: an appraisal based on data in the IARC Monograph series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, H; Malaveille, C

    1990-01-01

    To determine whether genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens contribute similarly to the cancer burden in humans and which types of short-term test are more relevant for predicting human hazards, an analysis was performed on agents that were evaluated in IARC Monographs Supplements 6 and 7 for their carcinogenic effects in humans and animals and for activity in short-term genotoxicity tests. The prevalence of genotoxicity among four groups of agents, consisting of established human carcinogens (group 1, n = 30), probable human carcinogens (group 2A, n = 37), possible human carcinogens (group 2B, n = 113) and agents with limited evidence of carcinogenicity in animals (a subset of group 3, n = 66) was determined. Each of the groups 1, 2A and 2B contained a high proportion (80-90%) of genotoxic carcinogens, which were also multi-species or multi-tissue carcinogens. The distribution of carcinogenic potency in rodents did not reveal any specific characteristic of the human carcinogens in group 1 that would differentiate them from agents in groups 2A, 2B and many in group 3. Although limited by the data-base available through the Monographs series, this analysis implies that genotoxic carcinogens add more to the human cancer burden than non-genotoxic carcinogens. Thus, the continued use of in vitro/in vivo short-term tests, involving as endpoints DNA chromosomal or mutational damage, to identify genotoxic carcinogens or in the isolation of carcinogenic components in complex mixtures is fully justified. It is concluded that (a) an agent or complex mixture with unknown carcinogenic potential showing sufficient evidence of activity in genotoxicity assays in vitro or in vivo is likely to represent a hazard to humans and (b) an agent or complex mixture showing lack of activity in this spectrum of genotoxicity assays should undergo evaluation for carcinogenicity for rodent bioassay, in view of the present lack of validated short-term tests for non-genotoxic carcinogens.

  19. Evaluation of the sensitivity and specificity of in vivo erythrocyte micronucleus and transgenic rodent gene mutation tests to detect rodent carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Takeshi; Hamada, Shuichi; Masumura, Kenichi; Wakata, Akihiro; Maniwa, Jiro; Takasawa, Hironao; Yasunaga, Katsuaki; Hashizume, Tsuneo; Honma, Masamitsu

    2016-05-01

    Sensitivity and/or specificity of the in vivo erythrocyte micronucleus (MN) and transgenic rodent mutation (TGR) tests to detect rodent carcinogens and non-carcinogens were investigated. The Carcinogenicity and Genotoxicity eXperience (CGX) dataset created by Kirkland et al. was used for the carcinogenicity and in vitro genotoxicity data, i.e., Ames and chromosome aberration (CA) tests. Broad literature surveys were conducted to gather in vivo MN or TGR test data to add to the CGX dataset. Genotoxicity data in vitro were also updated slightly. Data on 379 chemicals (293 carcinogens and 86 non-carcinogens) were available for the in vivo MN test; sensitivity, specificity or concordances were calculated as 41.0%, 60.5% or 45.4%, respectively. For the TGR test, data on 80 chemicals (76 carcinogens and 4 non-carcinogens) were available; sensitivity was calculated as 72.4%. Based on the recent guidance on genotoxicity testing strategies, performance (sensitivity/specificity) of the following combinations was calculated; Ames+in vivo MN (68.7%/45.3%), Ames+TGR (83.8%/not calculated (nc)), Ames+in vitro CA+in vivo MN (80.8%/21.3%), Ames+in vitro CA+TGR (89.1%/nc), Ames+in vivo MN+TGR (87.5%/nc), Ames+in vitro CA+in vivo MN+TGR (89.3%/nc). Relatively good balance in performance was shown by the Ames+in vivo MN in comparison with Ames+in vitro CA (74.3%/37.5%). Ames+TGR and Ames+in vivo MN+TGR gave even higher sensitivity, but the specificity could not be calculated (too few TGR data on non-carcinogens). This indicates that in vivo MN and TGR tests are both useful as in vivo tests to detect rodent carcinogens.

  20. Human health risk due to consumption of vegetables contaminated with carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Sardar [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China). Inst. of Urban Environment; Peshawar Univ. (Pakistan). Dept. of Environmental Science; Cao, Qing [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Research Center for Eco-Environemntal Sciences

    2012-02-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are persistent, toxic, and carcinogenic contaminants present in soil ecosystem globally. These pollutants are gradually accumulating in wastewater-irrigated soils and lead to the contamination of vegetables. Food chain contamination with PAH is considered as one of the major pathways for human exposure. This study was aimed to investigate the concentrations of PAH in soils and vegetables collected from wastewater-irrigated fields from metropolitan areas of Beijing, China. Origin of PAH, daily intake, and health risks of PAH through consumption of contaminated vegetables were studied. Soil samples were collected from the upper horizon (0-20 cm) of both wastewater-irrigated and reference sites and sieved (<2 mm mesh) and then followed by freeze-drying at -50 C and 123 {+-} 2 Pa. Standing vegetables were also collected from the same sites used for soil sampling and divided into roots and shoots, thoroughly washed with deionized water, and freeze-dried. PAH were extracted using the Soxhlet method with 200 mL DCM for 24 h, and the extracts were cleaned with silica adsorption chromatography prepared with silica gel, alumina, and capped with anhydrous sodium. The final concentrated extracts (soil and vegetable) were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Agilent 6890). Bioaccumulation factors, daily intake of PAH, and carcinogenicity of PAH were calculated by different statistical equations. Results indicate that the soils and grown vegetables were contaminated with all possible carcinogenic PAH (declared by USEPA 2002) except indeno[1,2,3-c,d]pyrene. The highest concentration (242.9 {mu}g kg{sup -1}) was found for benzo(k)fluoranthene (BkF), while lowest (79.12 {mu}g kg{sup -1}) for benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). The emission sources of PAH were both pyrogenic and petrogenic in nature. However, the total concentrations of PAH were lower than the permissible limits set by different countries like Canada, Denmark and Germany

  1. Carcinogenicity studies on natural and man-made fibres with the intraperitoneal test in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pott, F; Roller, M; Ziem, U; Reiffer, F J; Bellmann, B; Rosenbruch, M; Huth, F

    1989-01-01

    Female Wistar rats were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with a suspension of 11 fibrous and 3 granular dusts. A dose of 0.25 mg actinolite or UICC chrysotile induced tumours of the peritoneum in more than 50% of the animals. Even 0.05 and 0.01 mg proved to be carcinogenic, although no adhesions of the abdominal organs could be observed. The findings are in conflict with the hypothesis that a scar is always the morphological precondition for the development of an asbestos-induced tumour. Actinolite injected i.p. in a solution of polyvinylpyridine-N-oxide gave a lower tumour incidence than when suspended only in saline, possibly due to inactivation of the fibre surface. Persistent glass fibres were less effective than actinolite having a similar fibre size distribution. On the other hand, relatively thick basalt fibres and ceramic fibres gave higher tumour incidences than expected. Wollastonite fibres were not carcinogenic, probably because of their low durability. Large amounts of polyvinylchloride, alpha-ferric oxide hydrate and wood dust also led only to adhesions of the abdominal organs and fibrosis; a definite carcinogenic effect was not detected.

  2. Human exposure to carcinogens in ambient air in Denmark, Finland and Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauser, P.; Ketzel, M.; Becker, T.; Plejdrup, M. S.; Brandt, J.; Gidhagen, L.; Omstedt, G.; Skårman, T.; Bartonova, A.; Schwarze, P.; Karvosenoja, N.; Paunu, V.-V.; Kukkonen, J.; Karppinen, A.

    2017-10-01

    The concentrations of seventeen pollutants (particulate mass fractions PM2.5 and PM10, a range of metals, inorganic gases and organic compounds) are for the first time analyzed in a screening of the carcinogenic risk at a resolution of 1 × 1 km2 in ambient air in three Nordic countries. Modelled annual mean air concentrations in 2010 show no exceedances of the EU air quality limit, guideline or target values. The only modelled exceedance of US-EPA 1:100,000 cancer risk concentrations (0.12 ng/m3, US-EPA IRIS, 2015) occurs for B(a)P in Denmark, for approximately 80% of the Danish population. However, the EU target value threshold of 1 ng/m3 for B(a)P is not exceeded in the modelled values in any parts of Denmark. No emission data for B(a)P were available for the whole domain of the other two considered Nordic countries and important uncertainties are still related to the emissions. Long-range transport is significant for the concentrations of all of the considered pollutants, except for B(a)P that commonly originates mostly from local residential wood combustion. The ambient air concentrations of NOx, SO2, Cd, Cr and Pb also have significant contributions from national sources; 45-65% for NOx and SO2, and for the metals from 15 to 60% in urban areas and from 1 to 20% in rural areas, within the considered Nordic area. High national contributions occur especially in urban air, due to primarily road traffic, residential wood combustion, energy production and industrial point sources. It is recommended to monitor the influence from residential wood combustion more extensively, and to analyze longer time trends for long-term human exposure.

  3. The human immune system's response to carcinogenic and other infectious agents transmitted by mosquito vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Olle; Ward, Martin

    2017-01-01

    It has been hypothesised that mosquitoes [Diptera: Culicidae] may play more of a role in certain cancers than is currently appreciated. Research links 33 infectious agents to cancer, 27 of which have a presence in mosquitoes, and that, in addition, mosquito saliva downregulates the immune system. The objective of this paper is to review the literature on the immune system and cancer-causing infectious agents, particularly those present in mosquitoes, with a view to establishing whether such infectious agents can, in the long run, defeat the immune system or be defeated by it. Many of the viruses, bacteria and parasites recognised by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as carcinogenic and suspected by others as being involved in cancer have evolved numerous complex ways of avoiding, suppressing or altering the immune system's responses. These features, coupled with the multiplicity and variety of serious infectious agents carried by some species of mosquitoes and the adverse effects on the immune system of mosquito saliva, suggest that post-mosquito bite the immune system is likely to be overwhelmed. In such a situation, immunisation strategies offer little chance of cancer prevention, unless a single or limited number of critical infectious agents can be isolated from the 'mosquito' cocktail. If that proves to be impossible cancer prevention will, therefore, if the hypothesis proves to be correct, rest on the twin strategies of environmentally controlling the mosquito population and humans avoiding being bitten. The latter strategy will involve determining the factors that demark those being bitten from those that are not.

  4. Evaluating the mechanistic evidence and key data gaps in assessing the potential carcinogenicity of carbon nanotubes and nanofibers in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuempel, Eileen D.; Jaurand, Marie-Claude; Møller, Peter

    2017-01-01

    In an evaluation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for the IARC Monograph 111, the Mechanisms Subgroup was tasked with assessing the strength of evidence on the potential carcinogenicity of CNTs in humans. The mechanistic evidence was considered to be not strong enough to alter the evaluations based...... on the animal data. In this paper, we provide an extended, in-depth examination of the in vivo and in vitro experimental studies according to current hypotheses on the carcinogenicity of inhaled particles and fibers. We cite additional studies of CNTs that were not available at the time of the IARC meeting...... in October 2014, and extend our evaluation to include carbon nanofibers (CNFs). Finally, we identify key data gaps and suggest research needs to reduce uncertainty. The focus of this review is on the cancer risk to workers exposed to airborne CNT or CNF during the production and use of these materials...

  5. A review of human carcinogens - Part E: tobacco, areca nut, alcohol, coal smoke, and salted fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Secretan, B.; Straif, K.; Baan, R.; Grosse, Y.; El Ghissassi, F.; Bouvard, V.; Benbrahim-Tallaa, L.; Guha, N.; Freeman, C.; Galichet, L.; Cogliano, V. [International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon (France)

    2009-11-15

    In October, 2009, 30 scientists from 10 countries met at the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) to reassess the carcinogenicity of tobacco, areca nut, alcohol, coal smoke, and salt-preserved fish, and to identify additional tumor sites and mechanisms of carcinogenesis. These assessments will be published as Part E of Volume 100 of the IARC Monographs.

  6. [The implementation of polymerase chain reaction technique: the real time to reveal and differentiate the viruses of human papilloma of high carcinogenic risk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andosova, L D; Kontorshchikova, K N; Blatova, O L; Kudel'kina, S Iu; Kuznetsova, I A; Belov, A V; Baĭkova, R A

    2011-07-01

    The polymerase chain reaction technique was applied in "real time" format to evaluate the occurrence rate and infection ratio of various genotypes of human papilloma of high carcinogenic risk in virus-positive women and contact persons. The examination sampling consisted of 738 women aged of 17-50 years. The examination results permitted to establish high percentage of infection of 546 patients (74%) by carcinogenic papilloma viruses. The analysis of detection rate of various genotypes of human papilloma of high carcinogenic risk established that the 56th and 16th types of high carcinogenic risk are revealed more often than others--in 33% and 15.4% correspondingly. In males, first place in occurrence rate is for those types of virus of human papilloma: the 56th n = 10 (33.3%), 16th n = 3 (10%), 45th n = 3 (10%), 51th n = 3 (10%). The rest of genotypes are detected in 3-7% cases.

  7. Prospective comparison of hybrid capture 2 and SPF₁₀-LiPA for carcinogenic human papillomavirus detection and risk prediction of cervical cancer: a population-based cohort study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Li; Feng, Rui Mei; Zhang, Li; Xu, Xiao Qian; Zhao, Xue Lian; Wang, Margaret Zhuoer; Qiao, You Lin; Zhao, Fang Hui

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the extent of the cross-reactivity of hybrid capture 2 (HC2) assay and evaluate the potential effect of cross-reactivity on the long-term risk for cervical cancer and precancers. Based on the Shanxi Province Cervical Cancer Screening Study-I (SPOCCS-I) cohort from 2005 to 2014 in Shanxi, China, SPF₁₀-line probe assay (LiPA) was performed in all 598 HC2 positive and 300 random-selected HC2 negative cervical specimens. Ten-year cumulative incidence rate (CIR) of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse (CIN2+) of these two tests was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier methods. Possible human papillomavirus (HPV) types to be cross-reacted by HC2 were also analyzed. The overall agreement between HC2 and SPF₁₀-LiPA for detecting carcinogenic HPV was 73.27%. The highest 10-year cumulative risk of CIN2+ was observed in both HC2 positive and LiPA-carcinogenic HPV positive women (25.70%; 95% confidence interval [CI]=23.55%-27.91%), followed by HC2 positive but LiPA-non-carcinogenic HPV positive women (9.97%; 95% CI=8.57%-11.50%), HC2 negative but LiPA-carcinogenic HPV positive (2.56%; 95% CI=2.44%-2.70%) and HC2 positive but LiPA-HPV negative (1.85%; 95% CI=1.78%-1.92%) women. The proportion of cross-reactivity of HC2 with untargeted carcinogenic types was 8.9%, most of which were attributable to HPV26, 73, 82, 69, 71, 53, 11, 43, and 54. The noticeable high risk of CIN2+ in women infected with cross-reacted non-carcinogenic HPV and low risk in those with miss-to-detective carcinogenic HPV supported an overall good clinical performance of HC2 for a general cervical cancer screening.

  8. An industry perspective on the utility of short-term carcinogenicity testing in transgenic mice in pharmaceutical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storer, Richard D; Sistare, Frank D; Reddy, M Vijayaraj; DeGeorge, Joseph J

    2010-01-01

    International guidelines allow for use of a short-term cancer bioassay (twenty-six weeks) in transgenic mice as a substitute for one of the two required long-term rodent bioassays in the preclinical safety evaluation of pharmaceuticals. The two models that have gained the widest acceptance by sponsors and regulatory authorities are the CB6F1-RasH2 mouse hemizygous for a human H-ras transgene and the B6.129N5-Trp53 mouse heterozygous for a p53 null allele. The p53(+/-) model is of particular value for compounds with residual concern that genotoxic activity may contribute to tumorigenesis. The rasH2 model is an appropriate alternative without regard to evidence of genotoxic potential. Since results from a short-term bioassay can be obtained relatively early in drug development, there is the potential for more timely assessment of cancer risk for individuals in long-term clinical trials. Use of these models in preclinical safety evaluation also significantly reduces animal use, time, and manpower. Preliminary findings indicate that prediction of two-year rat bioassay outcomes based on data from chronic rat toxicity studies, together with early assessment of carcinogenic potential in short-term transgenic models, may have the potential to increase the timeliness and efficiency of strategies for the identification of human carcinogenic hazards.

  9. Disulfiram promotes the conversion of carcinogenic cadmium to a proteasome inhibitor with pro-apoptotic activity in human cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lihua; Yang, Huanjie; Chen, Di; Cui, Cindy; Dou, Q. Ping

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitinproteasome system is involved in various cellular processes, including transcription, apoptosis, and cell cycle. In vitro, in vivo, and clinical studies suggest the potential use of proteasome inhibitors as anticancer drugs. Cadmium (Cd) is a widespread environmental pollutant that has been classified as a human carcinogen. Recent study in our laboratory suggested that the clinically used anti-alcoholism drug disulfiram (DSF) could form a complex with tumor cellular copper, resulting in inhibition of the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity and induction of cancer cell apoptosis. In the current study, we report, for the first time, that DSF is able to convert the carcinogen Cd to a proteasome-inhibitor and cancer cell apoptosis inducer. Although the DSF–Cd complex inhibited the chymotrypsin-like activity of a purified 20S proteasome with an IC50 value of 32 μmol/L, this complex was much more potent in inhibiting the chymotrypsin-like activity of prostate cancer cellular 26S proteasome. Inhibition of cellular proteasome activity by the DSF–Cd complex resulted in the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and the natural proteasome substrate p27, which was followed by activation of calpain and induction of apoptosis. Importantly, human breast cancer MCF10DCIS cells were much more sensitive to the DSF–Cd treatment than immortalized but non-tumorigenic human breast MCF-10A cells, demonstrating that the DSF–Cd complex could selectively induce proteasome inhibition and apoptosis in human tumor cells. Our work suggests the potential use of DSF for treatment of cells with accumulated levels of carcinogen Cd. PMID:18304598

  10. Disulfiram promotes the conversion of carcinogenic cadmium to a proteasome inhibitor with pro-apoptotic activity in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lihua; Yang, Huanjie; Chen, Di; Cui, Cindy; Dou, Q Ping

    2008-06-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system is involved in various cellular processes, including transcription, apoptosis, and cell cycle. In vitro, in vivo, and clinical studies suggest the potential use of proteasome inhibitors as anticancer drugs. Cadmium (Cd) is a widespread environmental pollutant that has been classified as a human carcinogen. Recent study in our laboratory suggested that the clinically used anti-alcoholism drug disulfiram (DSF) could form a complex with tumor cellular copper, resulting in inhibition of the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity and induction of cancer cell apoptosis. In the current study, we report, for the first time, that DSF is able to convert the carcinogen Cd to a proteasome-inhibitor and cancer cell apoptosis inducer. Although the DSF-Cd complex inhibited the chymotrypsin-like activity of a purified 20S proteasome with an IC(50) value of 32 micromol/L, this complex was much more potent in inhibiting the chymotrypsin-like activity of prostate cancer cellular 26S proteasome. Inhibition of cellular proteasome activity by the DSF-Cd complex resulted in the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and the natural proteasome substrate p27, which was followed by activation of calpain and induction of apoptosis. Importantly, human breast cancer MCF10DCIS cells were much more sensitive to the DSF-Cd treatment than immortalized but non-tumorigenic human breast MCF-10A cells, demonstrating that the DSF-Cd complex could selectively induce proteasome inhibition and apoptosis in human tumor cells. Our work suggests the potential use of DSF for treatment of cells with accumulated levels of carcinogen Cd.

  11. Chemical Carcinogen (Hydrazine et al.) Induced Carcinogenesis of Human Diploid Cells in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-07

    Chsaactariaane a/lthe Transformed C4110. essential amino acids. IX euenstial amino acida.,USAq 2.0 mM giutamine, IX vitamina , 0.2% sodium Taumor omnk in...subcutaneous injection of *&mino acids. 2.0 mM glusamine. IX vitamina , SX 10’ carcinogen-treazed or control cells ssa. 0.2% sodium bicarbonate. S iAg/ml

  12. Human bronchus-mediated mutagenesis of mammalian cells by carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1978-01-01

    was found in Chinese hamster V-79 cells when they were cocultivated with bronchial explants in the presence of BzaP. The proximate carcinogenic form of BzaP, the 7,8-diol [(+/-)-r7,t8-dihyroxy-7,8-dihydrobenzo[a]pyrene], was 5-fold more potent as a promutagen than the parent compound. Neither BzaP nor the 7...

  13. Cytotoxicity and chromosome aberrations in normal human oral keratinocytes induced by chemical carcinogens: Comparison of inter-individual variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, T; Kawamoto, Y; Suzuki, N; Gladen, B C; Barrett, J C

    1991-01-01

    Normal human keratinocytes from the oral cavity were cultured in vitro in serum-free medium. Cultures from different individuals were established, and the responses of the cells to different chemicals were compared. The cells, grown at clonal densities, were treated separately with an alkylating agent (N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine; MNNG), two arsenical salts (sodium arsenate or sodium arsenite), sodium fluoride or two polyaromatic hydrocarbons (benzo[a]pyrene or 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]-anthracene). There were no significant differences in the colony-forming efficiencies (22.8 +/- 4.2%) of control (untreated) cells from five different individuals. At selected doses, each of the chemicals reduced the colony-forming efficiencies of the treated cells. The cytotoxicity of most of the chemicals did not differ significantly among cells derived from different individuals, with the exception of sodium arsenate at two doses and sodium fluoride at the highest dose tested. Induction of chromosome aberrations by MNNG, sodium arsenite, sodium arsenate and sodium flouride was analysed with cells derived from up to nine individuals. There was little difference in the inducibilities of chromosome aberrations among cultured keratinocytes from different donors. Treatment of cells from nine donors with one dose of sodium fluoride revealed a statistically significant inter-individual variation. These findings provide a model system to study the effects of carcinogens on the target cells for oral cancers. The results can be compared with findings for cells from other epithelial tissues, since the culture conditions support the growth of keratinocytes regardless of origin. Little inter-individual variation was observed in the response of oral keratinocytes to the chemicals examined.

  14. Long-term in vivo carcinogenicity tests of potassium bromate, sodium hypochlorite, and sodium chlorite conducted in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Y; Takayama, S; Konishi, Y; Hiasa, Y; Asahina, S; Takahashi, M; Maekawa, A; Hayashi, Y

    1986-01-01

    Long-term in vivo carcinogenicity tests of potassium bromate (KBrO3), sodium hypochlorite (NaClO), and sodium chlorite (NaClO2) have been conducted in Japan from 1977 to 1985. In these investigations, groups of approximately 50 male and 50 female F344 rats or B6C3F1 mice were given solutions of the compounds as their drinking water ad libitum at two dose levels determined on the basis of preliminary 13-week tests. Control animals were given distilled water. The carcinogenic potential of KBrO3 was tested by administering doses of 500 or 250 ppm to rats for 110 weeks. Significantly elevated incidences of renal cell tumors in males and females and mesotheliomas of the peritoneum in males as compared to controls were observed. When female mice were given KBrO3 at doses of 1000 or 500 ppm for 78 weeks, no significant differences in tumor incidences between experimental and control groups were apparent. NaClO was administered to male and female rats, respectively, at doses of 1000 or 500 ppm and 2000 or 1000 ppm for 104 weeks. In mice, NaClO was given at doses of 1000 or 500 ppm to either sex for 103 weeks. The incidences of tumors in NaClO-treated and control animals of both sexes were not significantly different in both rat and mouse studies. NaClO2 was given to rats of both sexes at a dose of 600 or 300 ppm for 85 weeks. No statistically significant differences were observed in the incidences of tumor formation between NaClO2-treated and control groups of both sexes. NaClO2 was administered to mice at a concentration of 500 or 250 ppm for 85 weeks. In males, the combined incidences of hyperplastic nodules and hepatocellular carcinomas of the liver in a low-dose group, and adenomas and adenocarcinomas of the lung in a high-dose group, were marginally increased compared to controls (p less than 0.05). However, these incidences in treated males were within the range of values of historical control data in our program. We concluded that KBrO3 was carcinogenic in rats of

  15. [Leather azo dyes: mutagenic and carcinogenic risks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clonfero, E; Venier, P; Granella, M; Levis, A G

    1990-01-01

    The paper reviews the carcinogenicity and mutagenicity data on azo dyes used in the leather industry. Two water soluble benzidine-based dyes were classified as "probably carcinogenic to humans" by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). No other dyes have been evaluated by the IARC. Of the 48 azo dyes assayed in the Salmonella/microsome test, 20 gave positive results. Attention is drawn to the important role of the in vivo metabolism of azo compounds, which includes a preliminary reduction of the azo bonds and subsequent release of the aromatic amines of the dye. A useful assay (Prival test) for evaluating the mutagenic properties of azo dyes involves a reductive step that permits the release of any genotoxic agents present in the compounds. A list of leather azo dyes is furnished that are considered as potentially harmful due to the presence of a carcinogenic aromatic amine (benzidine, p-aminobenzene and derivatives) in their formulae.

  16. In Silico Methods for Carcinogenicity Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golbamaki, Azadi; Benfenati, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Screening compounds for potential carcinogenicity is of major importance for prevention of environmentally induced cancers. A large sequence of alternative predictive models, ranging from short-term biological assays (e.g. mutagenicity tests) to theoretical models, have been attempted in this field. Theoretical approaches such as (Q)SAR are highly desirable for identifying carcinogens, since they actively promote the replacement, reduction, and refinement of animal tests. This chapter reports and describes some of the most noted (Q)SAR models based on the human expert knowledge and statistically approach, aiming at predicting the carcinogenicity of chemicals. Additionally, the performance of the selected models has been evaluated and the results are interpreted in details by applying these prediction models to some pharmaceutical molecules.

  17. Induction of a stable, heritable epigenetic change by mutagenic carcinogens: a new test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toman, Z; Dambly, C; Radman, M

    1980-01-01

    The expression of the E. coli gal operon was set under the direct negative control of phage lambda repressor by a fusion between the gal operon an the active cI cro segment of phage lambda genoma. This system can exist in two stable but reversible epigenetic states: (A) the immune cI+ cro- gal- state (white colonies on McConkey gal plates) and (B) the nonimmune cI- cro+ gal+ state (red colonies). Transcription of this gal operon depends upon activation of the PR promoter; hence requiring the removal of lambda immunity repressor (cI) from the oR operator. Short exposure of this E. coli strain to radiation or chemical mutagens/carcinogens leads to a stable, inherited loss of the cI repressor (due to the take-over by the cro repressor, repressing the cI gene) and subsequent constitutive expression of the gal operon. This switch, from the (A) state to the (B) state, depends upon E. coli recA+ and lambda cro+ genes and is reversible upon supply of lambda cI repressor; this is consistent with the fact that cI and cro proteins are mutual repressors, i.e., only one of them can be expressed at a given time. This E. coli strain provides the easiest, most accurate and sensitive assay for all mutagenic and SOS-inducing agents.

  18. An improved classification of foci for carcinogenicity testing by statistical descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callegaro, Giulia; Stefanini, Federico Mattia; Colacci, Annamaria; Vaccari, Monica; Urani, Chiara

    2015-10-01

    Carcinogenesis is a multi-step process involving genetic alterations and non-genotoxic mechanisms. The in vitro cell transformation assay (CTA) is a promising tool for both genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogenesis. CTA relies on the ability of cells (e.g. BALB/c 3T3 mouse embryo fibroblasts) to develop a transformed phenotype after the treatment with suspected carcinogens. The classification of the transformed phenotype is based on coded morphological features, which are scored under a light microscope by trained experts. This procedure is time-consuming and somewhat prone to subjectivity. Herewith we provide a promising approach based on image analysis to support the scoring of malignant foci in BALB/c 3T3 CTA. The image analysis system is a quantitative approach, based on measuring features of malignant foci: dimension, multilayered growth, and invasivity into the surrounding monolayer of non-transformed cells. A logistic regression model was developed to estimate the probability for each focus to be transformed as a function of three statistical image descriptors. The estimated sensitivity of the derived classifier (untransformed against Type III) was 0.9, with an Area Under the Curve (AUC) value equal to 0.90 under the Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curve.

  19. Carcinogenic effects of benzene: Cesare Maltoni's contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlman, Myron A

    2002-12-01

    Cesare Maltoni's contributions to understanding, identifying, and characterizing widely used commercial chemicals in experimental animals are among the most important methods developed in the history of toxicology and serve to protect working men and women, the general population, and our environment from hazardous substances. Maltoni developed experimental methods that have reached the "platinum standard" for protection of public health. Benzene was among the 400 or more chemicals that Maltoni and his associates tested for carcinogenicity. In 1976, Maltoni reported that benzene is a potent experimental carcinogen. Maltoni's experiments clearly demonstrated that benzene is carcinogenic in Sprague-Dawley rats, Wistar rats, Swiss mice, and RF/J mice when administered by inhalation or ingestion. Benzene caused carcinomas of the Zymbal gland, oral cavity, nasal cavities; cancers of the skin, forestomach, mammary glands, and lungs; angiosarcomas and hepatomas of the liver; and hemolymphoreticular cancers. Thus, benzene was shown to be a multipotential carcinogen that produced cancers in several species of animals by various routes of administration. On November 2, 1977, Chemical Week reported that Maltoni provided a "bombshell" when he demonstrated the "first direct link" between benzene and cancer. In this paper, I shall summarize early experiments and human studies and reports; Maltoni's experimental contribution to understanding the carcinogenicity of benzene in humans and animals; earlier knowledge concerning benzene toxicity; and benzene standards and permissible exposure levels.

  20. The Weight of Evidence Does Not Support the Listing of Styrene as “Reasonably Anticipated to be a Human Carcinogen” in NTP's Twelfth Report on Carcinogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhomberg, Lorenz R.; Goodman, Julie E.; Prueitt, Robyn L.

    2013-01-01

    Styrene was listed as “reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen” in the twelfth edition of the National Toxicology Program's Report on Carcinogens based on what we contend are erroneous findings of limited evidence of carcinogenicity in humans, sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals, and supporting mechanistic data. The epidemiology studies show no consistent increased incidence of, or mortality from, any type of cancer. In animal studies, increased incidence rates of mostly benign tumors have been observed only in certain strains of one species (mice) and at one tissue site (lung). The lack of concordance of tumor incidence and tumor type among animals (even within the same species) and humans indicates that there has been no particular cancer consistently observed among all available studies. The only plausible mechanism for styrene-induced carcinogenesis—a non-genotoxic mode of action that is specific to the mouse lung—is not relevant to humans. As a whole, the evidence does not support the characterization of styrene as “reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen,” and styrene should not be listed in the Report on Carcinogens. PMID:23335843

  1. Removal of probable human carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from contaminated water using molecularly imprinted polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupadam, Reddithota J; Khan, Muntazir S; Wate, Satish R

    2010-02-01

    A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) adsorbent for carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was prepared using a non-covalent templating technique. MIP particles sized from 2 to 5 microm were synthesized in acetonitrile by using six PAHs mix as a template, methacrylic acid as the functional monomer, and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the cross-linker. When compared with the non-imprinted polymer (NIP), the MIP showed an excellent affinity towards PAHs in aqueous solution with binding capacity (B(max)) of 687 microg g(-1)MIP, imprinting effect of 6, and a dissociation constant of 24 microM. The MIP exhibited significant binding affinity towards PAHs even in the presence of environmental parameters such as dissolved organic matter (COD) and total dissolved inorganic solids (TDS), suggesting that this material may be appropriate for removal of carcinogenic PAHs. The feasibility of removing PAHs from water by the MIP demonstrated using groundwater spiked with PAHs. In addition, the MIP reusability without any deterioration in performance was demonstrated at least ten repeated cycles.

  2. The carcinogenic air pollutant 3-nitrobenzanthrone induces GC to TA transversion mutations in human p53 sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    vom Brocke, Jochen; Krais, Annette; Whibley, Catherine; Hollstein, Monica C; Schmeiser, Heinz H

    2009-01-01

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) is a potent mutagen and a suspected human carcinogen present in particulate matter of diesel exhaust and ambient air pollution. Employing an assay with human p53 knock-in (Hupki) murine embryonic fibroblasts (HUFs), we examined p53 mutations induced by 3-NBA and its active metabolite, N-hydroxy-3-aminobenzanthrone (N-OH-3-ABA). Twenty-nine immortalized cultures (cell lines) from 89 HUF primary cultures exposed at passage 1 for 5 days to 2 microM 3-NBA harboured 22 different mutations in the human DNA-binding domain sequence of the Hupki p53 tumour suppressor gene. The most frequently observed mutation was GC to TA transversion (46%), corroborating previous mutation studies with 3-NBA, and consistent with the presence of persistent 3-NBA-guanosine adducts found in DNA of exposed rodents. Six of the transversions found solely in 3-NBA-treated HUFs have not been detected thus far in untreated HUFs, but have been found repeatedly in human lung tumours. (32)P-post-labelling adduct analysis of DNA from HUF cells treated with 2 microM 3-NBA for 5 days showed a pattern similar to that found in vivo, indicating the metabolic competence of HUF cells to metabolize 3-NBA to electrophilic intermediates. Total DNA binding was 160 +/- 56 per 10(7) normal nucleotides with N(2)-guanosine being the major adduct. In contrast, identical treatment with N-OH-3-ABA resulted in a 100-fold lower level of specific DNA adducts and no carcinogen-specific mutation pattern in the Hupki assay. This indicates that the level of DNA adduct formation by the mutagen is critical to obtain specific mutation spectra in the assay. Our results are consistent with previous experiments in Muta Mouse and are compatible with the possibility that diesel exhaust exposure contributes to mutation load in humans and to lung cancer risk.

  3. Study of the mechanism of carcinogenesis by carcinogens which are negative in the Ames test. Progress report, April 1-September 1, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-01-01

    Carcinogens ethionine, thioacetamide, and actinomycin D, all of which are negative in the Ames test and all of which raise the progesterone level in the chicken, were tested to determine their physiological role in carcinogenesis. The optimization of the carcinogenesis model also included evaluation of the chicken as the biological indicator of physiological changes relative to the above compounds. (PCS)

  4. A paradox of cadmium: a carcinogen that impairs the capability of human breast cancer cells to induce angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacini, Stefania; Punzi, Tiziana; Morucci, Gabriele; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Cadmium, a highly persistent heavy metal, has been categorized as a human carcinogen. Even though it is known that cadmium acts as estrogens in breast cancer cells, several studies failed to demonstrate whether cadmium is a causal factor for breast cancer. The lack of a strong association between cadmium and breast cancer could be found in the antiangiogenic properties of this heavy metal, which might counteract its carcinogenic properties in the progression of breast cancer. In this study, we exposed estrogen-responsive breast cancer cells to subtoxic levels of cadmium, and we evaluated their angiogenic potential using the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane assay. Exposure of breast cancer cells to subtoxic levels of cadmium significantly inhibited the angiogenic potential of the breast cancer cell line, suggesting the possibility that cadmium might negatively regulate the production of proangiogenic factors in breast cancer cells. Our results suggest that cadmium might exert a paradoxical effect in breast cancer: on the one hand, it could promote carcinogenesis, and, on the other hand, it could delay the onset of tumors by inhibiting breast cancer cell-induced angiogenesis.

  5. Looking at the carcinogenicity of human insulin analogues via the intrinsic disorder prism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redwan, Elrashdy M; Linjawi, Moustafa H; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-03-17

    Therapeutic insulin, in its native and biosynthetic forms as well as several currently available insulin analogues, continues to be the protein of most interest to researchers. From the time of its discovery to the development of modern insulin analogues, this important therapeutic protein has passed through several stages and product generations. Beside the well-known link between diabetes and cancer risk, the currently used therapeutic insulin analogues raised serious concerns due to their potential roles in cancer initiation and/or progression. It is possible that structural variations in some of the insulin analogues are responsible for the appearance of new oncogenic species with high binding affinity to the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) receptor. The question we are trying to answer in this work is: are there any specific features of the distribution of intrinsic disorder propensity within the amino acid sequences of insulin analogues that may provide an explanation for the carcinogenicity of the altered insulin protein?

  6. /sup 32/P-Postlabeling test for covalent DNA binding of chemicals in vivo: Application to a variety of aromatic carcinogens and methylating agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, M.V.; Gupta, R.C.; Randerath, E.; Randerath, K.

    1984-02-01

    Carcinogen--DNA adducts were detected and determined by /sup 32/P-postlabeling assay after exposure of mouse or rat tissues in vivo to a total of 28 compounds comprising 7 arylamines and derivatives, 3 azo compounds, 2 nitroaromatics, 12 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and 4 methylating agents. DNA was isolated from mouse skin, mouse liver, and rat liver after treatment with the individual carcinogens, then digested enzymatically to deoxyribonucleoside 3'-monophosphates, which were converted to 5'-/sup 32/P-labeled deoxyribonucleoside 3',5'-bisphosphates by T4 polynucleotide kinase-catalyzed (/sup 32/P)phosphate transfer from (gamma-/sup 32/P)ATP. The nucleotides were resolved by anion-exchange t.l.c. on polyethyleneimine-cellulose and detected by autoradiography. The determination of low levels of DNA binding of the aromatic carcinogens entailed the removal of normal nucleotides prior to the resolution of adduct nucleotides. For this purpose, an alternative procedure employing reversed-phase t.l.c. was devised which offered advantages for the detection of quantitatively minor adducts. The procedures described enabled the detection of 1 aromatic DNA adduct in approximately 10(/sup 8/) normal nucleotides, while the limit of detection of methylated adducts was 1 adduct in approximately 6 X 10(/sup 5/) nucleotides. The results show that a great number of carcinogen-DNA adducts of diverse structure are substrates for /sup 32/P-labeling by polynucleotide kinase-catalyzed phosphorylation. Because covalent DNA adduct formation in vivo appears to be an essential property of the majority of chemical carcinogens, /sup 32/P-postlabeling analysis of carcinogen--DNA adducts in mammalian tissues may serve as a test for the screening of chemicals for potential carcinogenicity.

  7. Towards incorporating epigenetic mechanisms into carcinogen identification and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herceg, Zdenko; Lambert, Marie-Pierre; van Veldhoven, Karin; Demetriou, Christiana; Vineis, Paolo; Smith, Martyn T; Straif, Kurt; Wild, Christopher P

    2013-09-01

    Remarkable progress in the field of epigenetics has turned academic, medical and public attention to the potential applications of these new advances in medicine and various fields of biomedical research. The result is a broader appreciation of epigenetic phenomena in the a etiology of common human diseases, most notably cancer. These advances also represent an exciting opportunity to incorporate epigenetics and epigenomics into carcinogen identification and safety assessment. Current epigenetic studies, including major international sequencing projects, are expected to generate information for establishing the 'normal' epigenome of tissues and cell types as well as the physiological variability of the epigenome against which carcinogen exposure can be assessed. Recently, epigenetic events have emerged as key mechanisms in cancer development, and while our search of the Monograph Volume 100 revealed that epigenetics have played a modest role in evaluating human carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Monographs so far, epigenetic data might play a pivotal role in the future. Here, we review (i) the current status of incorporation of epigenetics in carcinogen evaluation in the IARC Monographs Programme, (ii) potential modes of action for epigenetic carcinogens, (iii) current in vivo and in vitro technologies to detect epigenetic carcinogens, (iv) genomic regions and epigenetic modifications and their biological consequences and (v) critical technological and biological issues in assessment of epigenetic carcinogens. We also discuss the issues related to opportunities and challenges in the application of epigenetic testing in carcinogen identification and evaluation. Although the application of epigenetic assays in carcinogen evaluation is still in its infancy, important data are being generated and valuable scientific resources are being established that should catalyse future applications of epigenetic testing.

  8. 1,3-Propane sultone as an extremely potent human carcinogen: description of an exposed cohort in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolt, Hermann M; Golka, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    1,3-Propane sultone (1,3-PS) is a directly alkylating, genotoxic and carcinogenic substance. In rats, 1,3-PS induces local and systemic tumors at multiple sites, including the mammary gland, intestine, hematopoietic system, kidneys, and the central nervous system (CNS), especially in the form of gliomas. In one particular company, 1,3-PS had been manufactured in limited amounts in the 1950s and 1960s, and for a few purposes until the 1970s. The number of individuals having been in contact with the compound occupationally comprised 55 in total. Data were obtained from this group with an open question of legal compensation regarding an occupational disease. Particular emphasis was placed on malignancies occurring among the occupationally exposed persons. As cerebral gliomas are a major type of tumor induced by 1,3-PS experimentally, the occurrence of two glioblastomas among the previously exposed persons was significant. Three intestinal malignancies were recorded within the cases observed. It is also noteworthy that there was one case of a duodenal carcinoma, which is normally a rare human malignancy. Two hematopoietic/lymphatic malignancies were observed, and there was one case of a renal cell carcinoma. The types of malignancies within a group of only 55 exposed persons are surprisingly consistent with the results from rodent studies. Data clearly indicate that 1,3-PS is carcinogenic in humans. Evidence indicates that 12 cases with various neoplasms were legally compensated within the period of 1985-2010 as an occupational disease, based on the "opening clause" of § 9 (2) SGB VII of legislation in Germany.

  9. Carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in umbilical cord blood of human neonates from Guiyu, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Yongyong; Huo, Xia [Analytic Cytology Laboratory and the Key Immunopathology Laboratory of Guangdong Province, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou (China); Wu, Kusheng [Analytic Cytology Laboratory and the Key Immunopathology Laboratory of Guangdong Province, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou (China); Department of Preventive Medicine, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou (China); Liu, Junxiao; Zhang, Yuling [Analytic Cytology Laboratory and the Key Immunopathology Laboratory of Guangdong Province, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou (China); Xu, Xijin, E-mail: xuxj@stu.edu.cn [Analytic Cytology Laboratory and the Key Immunopathology Laboratory of Guangdong Province, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou (China); Department of Cell Biology and Genetics, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou (China)

    2012-06-15

    Unregulated electronic-waste recycling results in serious environmental pollution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Guiyu, China. We evaluated the body burden of seven carcinogenic PAHs and potential health risks for neonates. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) samples were collected from Guiyu (n = 103), and the control area of Chaonan (n = 80), China. PAHs in UCB were determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The median N-Ary-Summation 7c-PAH concentration was 108.05 ppb in UCB samples from Guiyu, vs. 79.36 ppb in samples from Chaonan. Residence in Guiyu and longer cooking time of food during the gestation period were significant factors contributing to the N-Ary-Summation 7c-PAH level. Benzo[a]anthracene (BaA), chrysene (Chr), and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) were found to correlate with reduced neonatal height and gestational age. Infants experiencing adverse birth outcomes, on the whole, displayed higher BaA, Chr, and BaP levels compared to those with normal outcomes. We conclude that maternal PAH exposure results in fetal accumulation of toxic PAHs, and that such prenatal exposure correlates with adverse effects on neonatal health.

  10. Beryllium: genotoxicity and carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Terry; Bowser, Darlene

    2003-12-10

    Beryllium (Be) has physical-chemical properties, including low density and high tensile strength, which make it useful in the manufacture of products ranging from space shuttles to golf clubs. Despite its utility, a number of standard setting agencies have determined that beryllium is a carcinogen. Only a limited number of studies, however, have addressed the underlying mechanisms of the carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of beryllium. Importantly, mutation and chromosomal aberration assays have yielded somewhat contradictory results for beryllium compounds and whereas bacterial tests were largely negative, mammalian test systems showed evidence of beryllium-induced mutations, chromosomal aberrations, and cell transformation. Although inter-laboratory differences may play a role in the variability observed in genotoxicity assays, it is more likely that the different chemical forms of beryllium have a significant effect on mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. Because workers are predominantly exposed to airborne particles which are generated during the machining of beryllium metal, ceramics, or alloys, testing of the mechanisms of the mutagenic and carcinogenic activity of beryllium should be performed with relevant chemical forms of beryllium.

  11. Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... education Fact Sheet PFS005: Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus AUGUST 2015 • Reasons for Getting Tested • Who Should ... For More Information • Glossary Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that ...

  12. Carcinogens formed when Meat is Cooked

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felton, J S; Salmon, C P; Knize, M G

    2003-05-30

    Diet has been associated with varying cancer rates in human populations for many years, yet the causes of the observed variation in cancer patterns have not been adequately explained (Wynder et al. 1977). Along with the effect of diet on human cancer incidence is the strong evidence that mutations are the initiating events in the cancer process (Vogelstein et al. 1992). Foods, when heated, are a good source of genotoxic carcinogens that very likely are a cause for some of these events(Doll et al. 1981). These carcinogens fall into two chemical classes: heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAA) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). There is ample evidence that many of these compounds are complete carcinogens in rodents(El-Bayoumy et al. 1995; Ohgaki et al. 1991). Heterocyclic aromatic amines are among the most potent mutagenic substances ever tested in the Ames/Salmonella mutagenicity test (Wakabayashi et al. 1992). Both classes of carcinogen cause tumors in rodents at multiple sites, (El-Bayoumy et al. 1995; Ohgaki et al. 1991) many of which are common tumor sites in people on a Western diet. An HAA, PhIP (2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine), and a PAH, B[a]P (benzo[a]pyrene), of comparable carcinogenic potency caused mammary gland tumors in a feeding study in female rats (El-Bayoumy et al. 1995). In addition, PhIP has recently been shown to cause carcinomas in the prostate of the male rat (Shirai et al. 1997). Complementing the rodent cancer studies are numerous human case-control and prospective studies suggesting a relationship between overheated beef, chicken, and lamb, and cancer of the colon, breast, prostate, and stomach (Sinha et al. 1999; Ward et al. 1997; Zheng et al. 1998).

  13. Development of a screening tool to prioritize testing for the carcinogenic hazard of residual aromatic extracts and related petroleum streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyak, Katy O; Kung, Ming H; Chen, Min; Aldous, Keith K; Freeman, James J

    2016-12-15

    Residual aromatic extracts (RAE) are petroleum substances with variable composition predominantly containing aromatic hydrocarbons with carbon numbers greater than C25. Because of the high boiling nature of RAEs, the aromatics present are high molecular weight, with most above the range of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). However, refinery distillations are imperfect; some PAHs and their heteroatom-containing analogs (collectively referred to as polycyclic aromatic content or PAC) may remain in the parent stream and be extracted into the RAE, and overall PAC content is related to the carcinogenic potential of an RAE. We describe here a real-time analytical chemistry-based tool to assess the carcinogenic hazard of RAE via the development of a functional relationship between carcinogenicity and boiling point. Samples representative of steps along the RAE manufacturing process were obtained from five refineries to evaluate relationships between mutagenicity index (MI), PAC ring content and gas chromatographic distillation (GCD) curves. As expected, a positive linear relationship between MI and PAC ring content occurred, most specifically for 3-6 ring PAC (R(2)=0.68). A negative correlation was found between MI and temperature at 5% vaporization by GCD (R(2)=0.72), indicating that samples with greater amounts of lower boiling constituents were more likely to be carcinogenic. The inverse relationship between boiling range and carcinogenicity was further demonstrated by fractionation of select RAE samples (MI=0.50+0.07; PAC=1.70+0.51wt%; n=5) into low and high boiling fractions, where lower boiling fractions were both more carcinogenic than the higher boiling fractions (MI=2.36±0.55 and 0.17±0.11, respectively) and enriched in 3-6 ring PACs (5.20+0.70wt% and 0.97+0.35wt%, respectively). The criteria defining carcinogenicity was established as 479°C for the 5% vaporization points by GCD, with an approximate 95% probability of a future sample having

  14. Techniques for carcinogenicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisburger, E K

    1981-09-01

    Short-term tests to detect genetic, chromosomal, or DNA damage are now required by regulatory agencies for any new compound proposed for commercial production. Furthermore, full-scale carcinogenicity tests may be required for certain compounds. In this circumstance, the compound-related factors including stability, purity, physical properties, and chemical structure and reactivity must be considered. Animal factors include species and strain of test animal, route of administration, age, sex, diet, and spontaneous tumor incidence. A team of qualified investigators with experience in various disciplines is required to conduct the studies properly. Quality control measures and adherence to the code of good laboratory practice are also necessary during all phases of the study. The investment in a carcinogenicity study therefore becomes fairly substantial in terms of both time and money.

  15. Swedish review strengthens grounds for concluding that radiation from cellular and cordless phones is a probable human carcinogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Devra Lee; Kesari, Santosh; Soskolne, Colin L; Miller, Anthony B; Stein, Yael

    2013-04-01

    With 5.9 billion reported users, mobile phones constitute a new, ubiquitous and rapidly growing exposure worldwide. Mobile phones are two-way microwave radios that also emit low levels of electromagnetic radiation. Inconsistent results have been published on potential risks of brain tumors tied with mobile phone use as a result of important methodological differences in study design and statistical power. Some studies have examined mobile phone users for periods of time that are too short to detect an increased risk of brain cancer, while others have misclassified exposures by placing those with exposures to microwave radiation from cordless phones in the control group, or failing to attribute such exposures in the cases. In 2011, the World Health Organization, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) advised that electromagnetic radiation from mobile phone and other wireless devices constitutes a "possible human carcinogen," 2B. Recent analyses not considered in the IARC review that take into account these methodological shortcomings from a number of authors find that brain tumor risk is significantly elevated for those who have used mobile phones for at least a decade. Studies carried out in Sweden indicate that those who begin using either cordless or mobile phones regularly before age 20 have greater than a fourfold increased risk of ipsilateral glioma. Given that treatment for a single case of brain cancer can cost between $100,000 for radiation therapy alone and up to $1 million depending on drug costs, resources to address this illness are already in short supply and not universally available in either developing or developed countries. Significant additional shortages in oncology services are expected at the current growth of cancer. No other environmental carcinogen has produced evidence of an increased risk in just one decade. Empirical data have shown a difference in the dielectric properties of tissues as a function of age, mostly due to the

  16. Formation of a carcinogenic aromatic amine from an azo dye by human skin bacteria in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platzek, T; Lang, C; Grohmann, G; Gi, U S; Baltes, W

    1999-09-01

    Azo dyes represent the major class of dyestuffs. They are metabolised to the corresponding amines by liver enzymes and the intestinal microflora following incorporation by both experimental animals and humans. For safety evaluation of the dermal exposure of consumers to azo dyes from wearing coloured textiles, a possible cleavage of azo dyes by the skin microflora should be considered since, in contrast to many dyes, aromatic amines are easily absorbed by the skin. A method for measuring the ability of human skin flora to reduce azo dyes was established. In a standard experiment, 3x10(11) cells of a culture of Staphylococcus aureus were incubated in synthetic sweat (pH 6.8, final volume 20 mL) at 28 degrees C for 24 h with Direct Blue 14 (C.I. 23850, DB 14). The reaction products were extracted and analysed using HPLC. The reduction product o-tolidine (3,3'-dimethylbenzidine, OT) could indeed be detected showing that the strain used was able to metabolise DB 14 to the corresponding aromatic amine. In addition to OT, two further metabolites of DB 14 were detected. Using mass spectrometry they were identified as 3,3'-dimethyl-4-amino-4'-hydroxybiphenyl and 3, 3'-dimethyl-4-aminobiphenyl. The ability to cleave azo dyes seems to be widely distributed among human skin bacteria, as, under these in vitro conditions, bacteria isolated from healthy human skin and human skin bacteria from strain collections also exhibited azo reductase activity. Further studies are in progress in order to include additional azo dyes and coloured textiles. At the moment, the meaning of the results with regard to consumer health cannot be finally assessed.

  17. Two azole fungicides (carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil) exhibit different hepatic cytochrome P450 activities in medaka fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Hung; Chou, Pei-Hsin; Chen, Pei-Jen

    2014-07-30

    Conazoles are a class of imidazole- or triazole-containing drugs commonly used as fungicides in agriculture and medicine. The broad application of azole drugs has led to the contamination of surface aquifers receiving the effluent of municipal or hospital wastewater or agricultural runoff. Several triazoles are rodent carcinogens; azole pollution is a concern to environmental safety and human health. However, the carcinogenic mechanisms associated with cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) of conazoles remain unclear. We exposed adult medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) to continuous aqueous solutions of carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil for 7 to 20 days at sub-lethal or environmentally relevant concentrations and assessed hepatic CYP activity and gene expression associated with CYP-mediated toxicity. Both triadimefon and myclobutanil induced hepatic CYP3A activity, but only triadimefon enhanced CYP1A activity. The gene expression of cyp3a38, cyp3a40, pregnane x receptor (pxr), cyp26b, retinoid acid receptor γ1 (rarγ1) and p53 was higher with triadimefon than myclobutanil. As well, yeast-based reporter gene assay revealed that 4 tested conazoles were weak agonists of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We reveal differential CYP gene expression with carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic conazoles in a lower vertebrate, medaka fish. Liver CYP-enzyme induction may be a key event in conazole-induced tumorigenesis. This information is essential to evaluate the potential threat of conazoles to human health and fish populations in the aquatic environment.

  18. Amelioratory effect of coenzyme Q10 on potential human carcinogen Microcystin-LR induced toxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lone, Yaqoob; Bhide, Mangla; Koiri, Raj Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Microcystins are a group of cyclic heptapeptide toxins produced by cyanobacteria. More than 100 microcystin analogues have been detected, among which microcystin-LR is the most abundant and toxic variant. Present study was designed to reveal whether potential human carcinogen microcystin-LR could imbalance the glycolytic-oxidative-nitrosative status of heart, kidney and spleen of mice and also to explore the amelioratory effect of coenzyme Q10 on microcystin-LR induced toxicity. Microcystin-LR was administered at a dose of 10 μg/kg bw/day, ip for 14 days in male mice. In microcystin-LR treated mice as compared to control, significant increase in the level of lipid peroxidation, hydrogen peroxide, lactate dehydrogenase, nitric oxide with a concomitant decrease in the level of glutathione was observed, suggesting microcystin-LR induced toxicity via induction of oxidative-nitrosative-glycolytic pathway. Although several studies have evaluated numerous antioxidants but still there is no effective chemoprotectant against microcystin-LR induced toxicity. When microcystin-LR treated mice were co-administered coenzyme Q10 (10 mg/kg bw/day, im) for 14 days, it was observed that coenzyme Q10 ameliorates microcystin-LR induced toxicity via modulation of glycolytic-oxidative-nitrosative stress pathway. Thus, the results suggest that coenzyme Q10 has a potential to be developed as preventive agent against microcystin-LR induced toxicity.

  19. Chemical Carcinogen-Induced Changes in tRNA Metabolism in Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-01

    the resolution and quantitation of modified ucleosides in the urine of cancer patients would not be particularly useful for the cell culture studies...Comparison of nucleic acid catabolism by normal human fibroblasts and fibroblasts transformed with methylazoxymethyl alcohol ( MAMA ),an activated...catabolite in long-term, pulse-chase experiments. However, the kinetics of catabolism differed, in that only the MAMA -transformed cells had generated

  20. [Levels of carcinogenic, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in human and animal tissues. IIIrd communication (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräf, W; Eff, H; Schormair, S

    1975-10-01

    (1) The mean content in benzypyrene (bp) of human pulmonary tissue amounts to 0.2 mug./100 g. of dry substance. As in all other organ tissues, however, the content differs with the age of the individual: in infants, we find maximum concentrations, in the medium age groups the levels decline and rise once more with increasing age. (2) No increase in the 3,4-benzpyrene levels (average: 0.2 mug./100 g. of dry substance) will be found in tissues with high cellular proliferative activity, such as exocrine and endocrine glands (pancreas, testicles, thyroid gland, adrenals, mammary glands, as well as bone marrow). (3) In human adipose tissue, as well as in that of pork and beef, the 3,4-benzpyrene levels are found to be exceedingly low. With values of 0.1 mug./100 g, the average concentrations lie markedly below the organ tissue levels. Hence, this class of noxious substances in not stored in the adipose tissue. (4) Both in man and in animals (pig, fowl), the 3,4-benzyprene concentrations consistently exceed the average values during early postnatal life. (5) This relatively high concentration of bp in early infancy is due to exogenous factors and is not the expression of biogenous synthesis, as has been demonstrated in examinations of the environmentally influenced embryonic development of the chick. Throughout the entire development of the embryo within the hen's egg, the benzpyrene levels remain constant. Only when the chickens have been hatched out do the benzyprene levels rise significantly. Thus, the low 3,4-benzpyrene levels detected in all human and animal organ tissues prove to be the result of the interplay of exogenous environmental loading and individual capability of eliminating this substance.

  1. Two azole fungicides (carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil) exhibit different hepatic cytochrome P450 activities in medaka fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Hung [Department of Agricultural Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chou, Pei-Hsin [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Chen, Pei-Jen, E-mail: chenpj@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Agricultural Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2014-07-30

    Highlights: • We assess ecotoxicological impact of azole fungicides in the aquatic environment. • Carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic azoles show different CYP activities in medaka. • We compare azole-induced CYP expression and carcinogenesis between fish and rodents. • Liver CYP-enzyme induction is a key event in conazole-induced tumorigenesis. • We suggest toxicity evaluation methods for azole fungicides using medaka fish. - Abstract: Conazoles are a class of imidazole- or triazole-containing drugs commonly used as fungicides in agriculture and medicine. The broad application of azole drugs has led to the contamination of surface aquifers receiving the effluent of municipal or hospital wastewater or agricultural runoff. Several triazoles are rodent carcinogens; azole pollution is a concern to environmental safety and human health. However, the carcinogenic mechanisms associated with cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) of conazoles remain unclear. We exposed adult medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) to continuous aqueous solutions of carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil for 7 to 20 days at sub-lethal or environmentally relevant concentrations and assessed hepatic CYP activity and gene expression associated with CYP-mediated toxicity. Both triadimefon and myclobutanil induced hepatic CYP3A activity, but only triadimefon enhanced CYP1A activity. The gene expression of cyp3a38, cyp3a40, pregnane x receptor (pxr), cyp26b, retinoid acid receptor γ1 (rarγ1) and p53 was higher with triadimefon than myclobutanil. As well, yeast-based reporter gene assay revealed that 4 tested conazoles were weak agonists of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We reveal differential CYP gene expression with carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic conazoles in a lower vertebrate, medaka fish. Liver CYP-enzyme induction may be a key event in conazole-induced tumorigenesis. This information is essential to evaluate the potential threat of conazoles to human health and fish

  2. Independent [Ca2+]i increases and cell proliferation induced by the carcinogen safrole in human oral cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jong-Khing; Huang, Chun-Jen; Chen, Wei-Chuan; Liu, Shiuh-Inn; Hsu, Shu-Shong; Chang, Hong-Tai; Tseng, Li-Ling; Chou, Chiang-Ting; Chang, Chih-Hung; Jan, Chung-Ren

    2005-07-01

    The effect of the carcinogen safrole on intracellular Ca2+ movement and cell proliferation has not been explored previously. The present study examined whether safrole could alter Ca2+ handling and growth in human oral cancer OC2 cells. Cytosolic free Ca2+ levels ([Ca2+]i) in populations of cells were measured using fura-2 as a fluorescent Ca2+ probe. Safrole at a concentration of 325 microM started to increase [Ca2+]i in a concentration-dependent manner. The Ca2+ signal was reduced by 40% by removing extracellular Ca2+, and was decreased by 39% by nifedipine but not by verapamil or diltiazem. In Ca2+-free medium, after pretreatment with 650 microM safrole, 1 microM thapsigargin (an endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pump inhibitor) barely induced a [Ca2+]i rise; in contrast, addition of safrole after thapsigargin treatment induced a small [Ca2+]i rise. Neither inhibition of phospholipase C with 2 microM U73122 nor modulation of protein kinase C activity affected safrole-induced Ca2+ release. Overnight incubation with 1 microM safrole did not alter cell proliferation, but incubation with 10-1000 microM safrole increased cell proliferation by 60+/-10%. This increase was not reversed by pre-chelating Ca2+ with 10 microM of the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA. Collectively, the data suggest that in human oral cancer cells, safrole induced a [Ca2+]i rise by causing release of stored Ca2+ from the endoplasmic reticulum in a phospholipase C- and protein kinase C-independent fashion and by inducing Ca2+ influx via nifedipine-sensitive Ca2+ entry. Furthermore, safrole can enhance cell growth in a Ca2+-independent manner.

  3. Carcinogenic effects of oil dispersants: A KEGG pathway-based RNA-seq study of human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao-Zhong; Zhang, Lei; Roy-Engel, Astrid M; Saito, Shigeki; Lasky, Joseph A; Wang, Guangdi; Wang, He

    2017-02-20

    The health impacts of the BP oil spill are yet to be further revealed as the toxicological effects of oil products and dispersants on human respiratory system may be latent and complex, and hence difficult to study and follow up. Here we performed RNA-seq analyses of a system of human airway epithelial cells treated with the BP crude oil and/or dispersants Corexit 9500 and Corexit 9527 that were used to help break up the oil spill. Based on the RNA-seq data, we then systemically analyzed the transcriptomic perturbations of the cells at the KEGG pathway level using two pathway-based analysis tools, GAGE (generally applicable gene set enrichment) and GSNCA (Gene Sets Net Correlations Analysis). Our results suggested a pattern of change towards carcinogenesis for the treated cells marked by upregulation of ribosomal biosynthesis (hsa03008) (p=1.97E-13), protein processing (hsa04141) (p=4.09E-7), Wnt signaling (hsa04310) (p=6.76E-3), neurotrophin signaling (hsa04722) (p=7.73E-3) and insulin signaling (hsa04910) (p=1.16E-2) pathways under the dispersant Corexit 9527 treatment, as identified by GAGE analysis. Furthermore, through GSNCA analysis, we identified gene co-expression changes for several KEGG cancer pathways, including small cell lung cancer pathway (hsa05222, p=9.99E-5), under various treatments of oil/dispersant, especially the mixture of oil and Corexit 9527. Overall, our results suggested carcinogenic effects of dispersants (in particular Corexit 9527) and their mixtures with the BP crude oil, and provided further support for more stringent safety precautions and regulations for operations involving long-term respiratory exposure to oil and dispersants.

  4. Laser diagnostics of native cervix dabs with human papilloma virus in high carcinogenic risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peresunko, O. P.; Karpenko, Ju. G.; Burkovets, D. N.; Ivashko, P. V.; Nikorych, A. V.; Yermolenko, S. B.; Gruia, Ion; Gruia, M. J.

    2015-11-01

    The results of experimental studies of coordinate distributions of Mueller matrix elements of the following types of cervical scraping tissue are presented: rate- low-grade - highly differentiated dysplasia (CIN1-CIN3) - adenocarcinoma of high, medium and low levels of differentiation (G1-G3). The rationale for the choice of statistical points 1-4 orders polarized coherent radiation field, transformed as a result of interaction with the oncologic modified biological layers "epithelium-stroma" as a quantitative criterion of polarimetric optical differentiation state of human biological tissues are shown here. The analysis of the obtained Mueller matrix elements and statistical correlation methods, the systematized by types studied tissues is accomplished. The results of research images of Mueller matrix elements m34 for this type of pathology as low-grade dysplasia (CIN2), the results of its statistical and correlation analysis are presented.

  5. Nitrites and nitrates in the human diet: Carcinogens or beneficial hypotensive agents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Anthony

    2015-06-05

    The presence of nitrite in the human diet was thought to constitute a hazard as secondary nitrosamines are known to cause gastric cancers. Recent publications on the physiology of serum nitrite have been consulted. Nitrite is added to some foodstuffs as an antibotulinum agent. The epidemiological evidence that nitrite causes gastric ulcers is weak. On the other hand, evidence that the presence of nitrite in serum lowers blood pressure is strong. This allows us to explain why a Tang dynasty treatment for angina, given in a Dunhuang medical manuscript, can be successful. The presence of nitrite in food is free of danger and a diet high in nitrate is beneficial to the health. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. 39-week carcinogenicity study with cyclosporin A in XPA-/- mice, wild type mice and XPA-/-.P53+/- double transgenic mice. Part of the ILSI/HESI Program on Alternative Methods for Carcinogenicity Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beems RB; Kreijl CF van; Steeg H van; LPI; LEO

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the carcinogenic response of cyclosporin A in XPA-/- mice having a C57BL/6 background. XPA-/- mice are deficient in nucleotide excision repair and have shown increased susceptibility to genotoxic carcinogens and uv-light. The study was part of a world-wide

  7. Molecular expression and enzymatic characterization of thioredoxin from the carcinogenic human liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttiprapa, Sutas; Matchimakul, Pitchaya; Loukas, Alex; Laha, Thewarach; Wongkham, Sopit; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Brindley, Paul J; Sripa, Banchob

    2012-03-01

    The human liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, induces inflammation of the hepatobiliary system. Despite being constantly exposed to inimical oxygen radicals released from inflammatory cells, the parasite survives for years. Defense against oxidative damage can be mediated through glutathione and/or thioredoxin utilizing systems. Here, we report the molecular expression and biochemical characterization of a thioredoxin (Trx) from O. viverrini. O. viverrini Trx cDNA encoded a polypeptide of 105 amino acid residues, of molecular mass 11.63 kDa. The predicted protein has similarity to previously characterized thioredoxins with 26-51% identity. Recombinant O. viverrini Trx (Ov-Trx-1) was expressed as soluble protein in E. coli. The recombinant protein showed insulin reduction activity and supported the enzymatic function of O. viverrini thioredoxin peroxidase. Expression of Ov-Trx-1 at mRNA and protein levels was observed in all obtainable developmental stages of the liver fluke. Ov-Trx-1 was also detected in excretory-secretory products released by adult O. viverrini. Immunohistochemistry, Ov-Trx-1 was expressed in nearly all parasite tissue excepted ovary and mature sperms. Interestingly, Ov-Trx-1 was observed in the infected biliary epithelium but not in normal bile ducts. These results suggest that Ov-Trx-1 is essential for the parasite throughout the life cycle. In the host-parasite interaction aspect, Ov-Trx-1 may support thioredoxin peroxidase in protecting the parasite against damage induced by reactive oxygen species from inflammation.

  8. Interpretation of the margin of exposure for genotoxic carcinogens - elicitation of expert knowledge about the form of the dose response curve at human relevant exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boobis, Alan; Flari, Villie; Gosling, John Paul; Hart, Andy; Craig, Peter; Rushton, Lesley; Idahosa-Taylor, Ehi

    2013-07-01

    The general approach to risk assessment of genotoxic carcinogens has been to advise reduction of exposure to "as low as reasonably achievable/practicable" (ALARA/P). However, whilst this remains the preferred risk management option, it does not provide guidance on the urgency or extent of risk management actions necessary. To address this, the "Margin of Exposure" (MOE) approach has been proposed. The MOE is the ratio between the point of departure for carcinogenesis and estimated human exposure. However, interpretation of the MOE requires implicit or explicit consideration of the shape of the dose-response curve at human relevant exposures. In a structured elicitation exercise, we captured expert opinion on available scientific evidence for low dose-response relationships for genotoxic carcinogens. This allowed assessment of: available evidence for the nature of dose-response relationships at human relevant exposures; the generality of judgments about such dose-response relationships; uncertainties affecting judgments on the nature of such dose-response relationships; and whether this last should differ for different classes of genotoxic carcinogens. Elicitation results reflected the variability in experts' views on the form of the dose-response curve for low dose exposure and major sources of uncertainty affecting the assumption of a linear relationship.

  9. Strong spontaneous tumor neoantigen responses induced by a natural human carcinogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creaney, Jenette; Ma, Shaokang; Sneddon, Sophie A; Tourigny, Michelle R; Dick, Ian M; Leon, Justine S; Khong, Andrea; Fisher, Scott A; Lake, Richard A; Lesterhuis, W Joost; Nowak, Anna K; Leary, Shay; Watson, Mark W; Robinson, Bruce W

    2015-01-01

    A key to improving cancer immunotherapy will be the identification of tumor-specific “neoantigens” that arise from mutations and augment the resultant host immune response. In this study we identified single nucleotide variants (SNVs) by RNA sequencing of asbestos-induced murine mesothelioma cell lines AB1 and AB1-HA. Using the NetMHCpan 2.8 algorithm, the theoretical binding affinity of predicted peptides arising from high-confidence, exonic, non-synonymous SNVs was determined for the BALB/c strain. The immunoreactivity to 20 candidate mutation-carrying peptides of increased affinity and the corresponding wild-type peptides was determined using interferon-γ ELISPOT assays and lymphoid organs of non-manipulated tumor-bearing mice. A strong endogenous immune response was demonstrated to one of the candidate neoantigens, Uqcrc2; this response was detected in the draining lymph node and spleen. Antigen reactive cells were not detected in non-tumor bearing mice. The magnitude of the response to the Uqcrc2 neoantigen was similar to that of the strong influenza hemagglutinin antigen, a model tumor neoantigen. This work confirms that the approach of RNAseq plus peptide prediction and ELISPOT testing is sufficient to identify natural tumor neoantigens. PMID:26140232

  10. Fermented wheat aleurone induces enzymes involved in detoxification of carcinogens and in antioxidative defence in human colon cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Katrin; Borowicki, Anke; Scharlau, Daniel; Glei, Michael

    2010-10-01

    Dietary fibre is fermented by the human gut flora resulting mainly in the formation of SCFA, for example, acetate, propionate and butyrate. SCFA, in particular butyrate, may be important for secondary cancer prevention by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting cell growth of cancer cells, thereby inhibiting the promotion and/or progression of cancer. Furthermore, SCFA could also act on primary cancer prevention by activation of detoxifying and antioxidative enzymes. We investigated the effects of fermented wheat aleurone on the expression of genes involved in stress response and toxicity, activity of drug-metabolising enzymes and anti-genotoxic potential. Aleurone was digested and fermented in vitro to obtain samples that reflect the content of the colon. HT29 cells and colon epithelial stripes were incubated with the resulting fermentation supernatant fractions (fs) and effects on mRNA expression of CAT, GSTP1 and SULT2B1 and enzyme activity of glutathione S-transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT) were measured. Fermented aleurone was also used to study the protection against H2O2-induced DNA damage in HT29 cells. The fs of aleurone significantly induced the mRNA expression of CAT, GSTP1 and SULT2B1 (HT29) and GSTP1 (epithelial stripes), respectively. The enzyme activities of GST (HT29) and CAT (HT29, epithelial stripes) were also unambiguously increased (1.4- to 3.7-fold) by the fs of aleurone. DNA damage induced by H2O2 was significantly reduced by the fs of aleurone after 48 h, whereupon no difference was observed compared with the faeces control. In conclusion, fermented aleurone is able to act on primary prevention by inducing mRNA expression and the activity of enzymes involved in detoxification of carcinogens and antioxidative defence.

  11. Carcinogenicity of hair dye components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Duuren, B L

    1980-03-01

    The available animal carcinogenicity data on hair dye components was reviewed. From this review it became clear that certain hair dye components, some of which are still in hair dye formulations now on the market, are animal carcinogens. The compounds of concern that are still in use are: 3-amino-4-methoxyaniline, 2-nitro-4-aminoaniline and 3-nitro-4-hydroxyaniline. Certain azo dyes formerly used, and related compounds still in use, contain the benzidine moiety. Two of these compounds, Direct Blue 6 and Direct Black 38, have been shown to be metabolized in animals to the human carcinogen benzidine. Furthermore, skin absorption studies carried out with radiolabeled hair dye components applied to animal or human skin have conclusively shown that these compounds are systemically absorbed and excreted. Known cocarcinogens such as catechol and pyrogallol, which enhance benzo(a)pyrene carcinogenicity on mouse skin, are used as hair dye components. It is not known whether such compounds will enhance the carcinogenicity of substituted aniline hair dye chemicals. The available epidemiologic data are not sufficient to link hair dye use with an increased incidence in human cancer.

  12. Prediction of the carcinogenic potential of human pharmaceuticals using repeated dose toxicity data and their pharmacological properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Willem Van Der Laan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In an exercise designed to reduce animal use, we analysed the results of rat sub-chronic toxicity studies from 289 pharmaceutical compounds with the aim to predict the tumour outcome of carcinogenicity studies in this species. The results were obtained from the assessment reports available at the Medicines Evaluation Board of the Netherlands for 289 pharmaceutical compounds that had been shown to be non-genotoxic. One hundred and forty-three of the 239 compounds not inducing putative preneoplastic lesions in the sub-chronic study did not induce tumours in the carcinogenicity study (True Negatives - TN, whereas 96 compounds were categorised as False Negatives (FN, because tumours were observed in the carcinogenicity study. For the remaining 50 compounds, 31 showed preneoplastic lesions in the subchronic study and tumours in the carcinogenicity study (True positives - TP, and 19 only showed preneoplastic lesions in subchronic studies but no tumours in the carcinogenicity study (False positives - FP. In addition, we then re-assessed the prediction of the tumour outcome by integrating the pharmacological properties of these compounds. These pharmacological properties were evaluated with respect to the presence or absence of a direct or indirect proliferative action. We found support for the absence of cellular proliferation for 204 compounds (TN. For 67 compounds the presence of cellular hyperplasia as evidence for proliferative action could be found (TP. Therefore, this approach resulted in an ability to predict non-carcinogens at a success rate of 92 % and the ability to detect carcinogens at 98 %. The combined evaluation of pharmacological and histopathological endpoints eventually led to only 18 unknown outcomes (17 categorised as FN. 1 as FP, thereby enhancing both the negative and positive predictivity of an evaluation based upon histopathological evaluation only. The data show the added value of a consideration of the pharmacological

  13. Vaccinia virus, herpes simplex virus, and carcinogens induce DNA amplification in a human cell line and support replication of a helpervirus dependent parvovirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlehofer, J.R.; Ehrbar, M.; zur Hausen, H.

    1986-07-15

    The SV40-transformed human kidney cell line, NB-E, amplifies integrated as well as episomal SV40 DNA upon treatment with chemical (DMBA) or physical (uv irradiation) carcinogens (initiators) as well as after infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 or with vaccinia virus. In addition it is shown that vaccinia virus induces SV40 DNA amplification also in the SV40-transformed Chinese hamster embryo cell line, CO631. These findings demonstrate that human cells similar to Chinese hamster cells amplify integrated DNA sequences after treatment with carcinogens or infection with specific viruses. Furthermore, a poxvirus--vaccinia virus--similar to herpes group viruses induces DNA amplification. As reported for other systems, the vaccinia virus-induced DNA amplification in NB-E cells is inhibited by coinfection with adeno-associated virus (AAV) type 5. This is in line with previous studies on inhibition of carcinogen- or HSV-induced DNA amplification in CO631 cells. The experiments also demonstrate that vaccinia virus, in addition to herpes and adenoviruses acts as a helper virus for replication and structural antigen synthesis of AAV-5 in NB-E cells.

  14. Chronic occupational exposure to arsenic induces carcinogenic gene signaling networks and neoplastic transformation in human lung epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stueckle, Todd A., E-mail: tstueckle@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Lu, Yongju, E-mail: yongju6@hotmail.com [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Davis, Mary E., E-mail: mdavis@wvu.edu [Department of Physiology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Wang, Liying, E-mail: lmw6@cdc.gov [Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Jiang, Bing-Hua, E-mail: bhjiang@jefferson.edu [Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Holaskova, Ida, E-mail: iholaskova@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Schafer, Rosana, E-mail: rschafer@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Barnett, John B., E-mail: jbarnett@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Rojanasakul, Yon, E-mail: yrojan@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure remains a human health risk; however a clear mode of action to understand gene signaling-driven arsenic carcinogenesis is currently lacking. This study chronically exposed human lung epithelial BEAS-2B cells to low-dose arsenic trioxide to elucidate cancer promoting gene signaling networks associated with arsenic-transformed (B-As) cells. Following a 6 month exposure, exposed cells were assessed for enhanced cell proliferation, colony formation, invasion ability and in vivo tumor formation compared to control cell lines. Collected mRNA was subjected to whole genome expression microarray profiling followed by in silico Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) to identify lung carcinogenesis modes of action. B-As cells displayed significant increases in proliferation, colony formation and invasion ability compared to BEAS-2B cells. B-As injections into nude mice resulted in development of primary and secondary metastatic tumors. Arsenic exposure resulted in widespread up-regulation of genes associated with mitochondrial metabolism and increased reactive oxygen species protection suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction. Carcinogenic initiation via reactive oxygen species and epigenetic mechanisms was further supported by altered DNA repair, histone, and ROS-sensitive signaling. NF-κB, MAPK and NCOR1 signaling disrupted PPARα/δ-mediated lipid homeostasis. A ‘pro-cancer’ gene signaling network identified increased survival, proliferation, inflammation, metabolism, anti-apoptosis and mobility signaling. IPA-ranked signaling networks identified altered p21, EF1α, Akt, MAPK, and NF-κB signaling networks promoting genetic disorder, altered cell cycle, cancer and changes in nucleic acid and energy metabolism. In conclusion, transformed B-As cells with their whole genome expression profile provide an in vitro arsenic model for future lung cancer signaling research and data for chronic arsenic exposure risk assessment. Highlights: ► Chronic As{sub 2}O

  15. Overview of bioassays for mutagens, carcinogens, and teratogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumont, J.N.

    1982-01-01

    Bioassays to determine the risk of health hazards of man-made chemical substances are reviewed. The standard approach to testing a substance is the tier system, consisting of three levels of testing that are increasingly complex, lengthy, and costly. The paper describes the biological basis of bioassays, identifies various assays for mutagens, carcinogens and teratogens, and explains the problems involved in extrapolating test data to human risk estimates. Future improvements in assay techniques are discussed. (CR)

  16. [DNA synthesis inhibition test of INAH by cultured human fibroblasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, K; Yanagisawa, K

    1986-03-20

    The most commonly used screening test of carcinogens is the Ames test. But this system occasionally shows false positive and false negative. Painter's method is one which has been developed to minimize false results. Now we test by Painter's method isonicotinic acid hydrazide, which shows negative in the Ames test but positive in an animal test. INAH showed positive by Painter's method. More chemicals are now under study for their carcinogenicity by Painter's method.

  17. Cobalt and antimony: genotoxicity and carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boeck, Marlies; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Lison, Dominique

    2003-12-10

    The purpose of this review is to summarise the data concerning genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of Co and Sb. Both metals have multiple industrial and/or therapeutical applications, depending on the considered species. Cobalt is used for the production of alloys and hard metal (cemented carbide), diamond polishing, drying agents, pigments and catalysts. Occupational exposure to cobalt may result in adverse health effects in different organs or tissues. Antimony trioxide is primarily used as a flame retardant in rubber, plastics, pigments, adhesives, textiles, and paper. Antimony potassium tartrate has been used worldwide as an anti-shistosomal drug. Pentavalent antimony compounds have been used for the treatment of leishmaniasis. Co(II) ions are genotoxic in vitro and in vivo, and carcinogenic in rodents. Co metal is genotoxic in vitro. Hard metal dust, of which occupational exposure is linked to an increased lung cancer risk, is proven to be genotoxic in vitro and in vivo. Possibly, production of active oxygen species and/or DNA repair inhibition are mechanisms involved. Given the recently provided proof for in vitro and in vivo genotoxic potential of hard metal dust, the mechanistic evidence of elevated production of active oxygen species and the epidemiological data on increased cancer risk, it may be advisable to consider the possibility of a new evaluation by IARC. Both trivalent and pentavalent antimony compounds are generally negative in non-mammalian genotoxicity tests, while mammalian test systems usually give positive results for Sb(III) and negative results for Sb(V) compounds. Assessment of the in vivo potential of Sb2O3 to induce chromosome aberrations (CA) gave conflicting results. Animal carcinogenicity data were concluded sufficient for Sb2O3 by IARC. Human carcinogenicity data is difficult to evaluate given the frequent co-exposure to arsenic. Possible mechanisms of action, including potential to produce active oxygen species and to interfere with

  18. Flavonoids targeting of IκB phosphorylation abrogates carcinogen-induced MMP-9 and COX-2 expression in human brain endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahanian E

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth Tahanian¹, Luis Arguello Sanchez¹, Tze Chieh Shiao², René Roy², Borhane Annabi¹¹Centre de Recherche BioMED, ²Centre de Recherche PharmaQAM, Département de chimie, Université du Québec à Montréal, QC, CanadaAbstract: Brain endothelial cells play an essential role as structural and functional components of the blood–brain barrier (BBB. Increased BBB breakdown and brain injury are associated with neuroinflammation and are thought to trigger mechanisms involving matrix metalloproteinase upregulation. Emerging evidence also indicates that cyclooxygenase (COX inhibition limits BBB disruption, but the mechanisms linking metalloproteinase to COX remain unknown. In this study, we sought to investigate the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB signaling pathway, a common pathway in both the regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 and COX-2 expression, and the inhibitory properties of several chemopreventive flavonoids. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells were treated with a combination of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, a carcinogen documented to increase MMP-9 and COX-2 through NF-κB, and several naturally occurring flavonoids. Among the molecules tested, we found that fisetin, apigenin, and luteolin specifically and dose-dependently antagonized PMA-induced COX-2 and MMP-9 gene and protein expressions as assessed by qRT-PCR, immunoblotting, and zymography respectively. We further demonstrate that flavonoids impact on IκK-mediated phosphorylation activity as demonstrated by the inhibition of PMA-induced IκB phosphorylation levels. Our results suggest that BBB disruption during neuroinflammation could be pharmacologically reduced by a specific class of flavonoids acting as NF-κB signal transduction inhibitors.Keywords: blood–brain barrier, flavonoids, neuroinflammation, NF-κB signal transduction inhibitors

  19. DNA Adduct Formation from Metabolic 5'-Hydroxylation of the Tobacco-Specific Carcinogen N'-Nitrosonornicotine in Human Enzyme Systems and in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarth, Adam T; Upadhyaya, Pramod; Yang, Jing; Hecht, Stephen S

    2016-03-21

    N'-Nitrosonornicotine (NNN) is carcinogenic in multiple animal models and has been evaluated as a human carcinogen. NNN can be metabolized by cytochrome P450s through two activation pathways: 2'-hydroxylation and 5'-hydroxylation. While most previous studies have focused on 2'-hydroxylation in target tissues of rats, available evidence suggests that 5'-hydroxylation is a major activation pathway in human enzyme systems, in nonhuman primates, and in target tissues of some other rodent carcinogenicity models. In the study reported here, we investigated DNA damage resulting from NNN 5'-hydroxylation by quantifying the adduct 2-(2-(3-pyridyl)-N-pyrrolidinyl)-2'-deoxyinosine (py-py-dI). In rats treated with NNN in the drinking water (7-500 ppm), py-py-dI was the major DNA adduct resulting from 5'-hydroxylation of NNN in vivo. Levels of py-py-dI in the lung and nasal cavity were the highest, consistent with the tissue distribution of CYP2A3. In rats treated with (S)-NNN or (R)-NNN, the ratios of formation of (R)-py-py-dI to (S)-py-py-dI were not the expected mirror image, suggesting that there may be a carrier for one of the unstable intermediates formed upon 5'-hydroxylation of NNN. Rat hepatocytes treated with (S)- or (R)-NNN or (2'S)- or (2'R)-5'-acetoxyNNN exhibited a pattern of adduct formation similar to that of live rats. In vitro studies with human liver S9 fraction or human hepatocytes incubated with NNN (2-500 μM) demonstrated that py-py-dI formation was greater than the formation of pyridyloxobutyl-DNA adducts resulting from 2'-hydroxylation of NNN. (S)-NNN formed more total py-py-dI adducts than (R)-NNN in human liver enzyme systems, which is consistent with the critical role of CYP2A6 in the 5'-hydroxylation of NNN in human liver. The results of this study demonstrate that the major DNA adduct resulting from NNN metabolism by human enzymes is py-py-dI and provide potentially important new insights into the metabolic activation of NNN in rodents and humans.

  20. Assessment of the carcinogenic potential of high intense-sweeteners through the test for detection of epithelial tumor clones (warts) in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Mirley Alves; Orsolin, Priscila Capelari; Silva-Oliveira, Rosiane Gomes; Nepomuceno, Júlio César; Spanó, Mário Antônio

    2017-03-01

    High intensity-sweeteners (HIS) are natural or synthetic substances, sweeter than sugar, providing sweetness without calories. Sweeteners are mainly used as an aid in losing weight, preventing obesity and controlling blood sugar levels for diabetics. The objective of this study was to evaluate the carcinogenic potential of the sweeteners aspartame, sucralose, sodium saccharin and steviol glycoside, using the test for detection of epithelial tumor clones in Drosophila melanogaster. Larvae of 72 ± 4h, obtained from wts/TM3 female mated with mwh/mwh males, were treated for approximately 48h with different concentrations of aspartame (0.85, 1.7, 3.4, 6.8 or 13.6 mM ); sucralose (0.5, 1.25, 2.5, 5.0 or 10 mM); sodium saccharin (25; 50; 100; 200 or 400 mM) and steviol glycoside (2.5; 5.0; 10; 20 or 40 mM). Water (Reverse Osmosis) and doxorubicin (DXR 0.4 mM) were used as negative and positive controls, respectively. No statistically significant differences were observed (p > 0.05) in tumor frequencies in individuals treated with all concentrations of these sweeteners when compared to negative control. It was therefore concluded that, in these experimental conditions, aspartame, sucralose, sodium saccharin and steviol glycoside have no carcinogenic effect in D. melanogaster. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. trans-11 18:1 Vaccenic Acid (TVA Has a Direct Anti-Carcinogenic Effect on MCF-7 Human Mammary Adenocarcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Na Lim

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Trans vaccenic acid (TVA; trans-11 18:1 is a positional and geometric isomer of oleic acid and it is the predominant trans isomer found in ruminant fats. TVA can be converted into cis-9, trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid (c9, t11-CLA, a CLA isomer that has many beneficial effects, by stearoyl CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1 in the mammary gland. The health benefits associated with CLA are well documented, but it is unclear whether trans fatty acids (TFAs from ruminant products have healthy effects. Therefore, the effects of TVA on the proliferation of MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma cells and MCF-10A human breast epithelial cells were investigated in the present study. Results showed that TVA inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 cells but not MCF-10A cells by down-regulating the expression of Bcl-2 as well as procaspase-9. In addition, the suppressive effect of TVA was confirmed in SCD1-depleted MCF-7 cells. Our results suggested that TVA exerts a direct anti-carcinogenic effect on MCF-7 cells. These findings provided a better understanding of the research on the anti-carcinogenic effects of TVA and this may facilitate the manufacture of TVA/c9, t11-CLA fortified ruminant products.

  2. Non—Genotoxic Carcinogens.Approaches to Their Rish Assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.A.CASTRO; M.I.DiazGomez; 等

    1993-01-01

    Epidemiological studies support the idea that most human cancers are related to chemicals present in the human environment.In turn,chemicals are believed to cause cancer via either genotoxic or non-genotoxic mechanisms.There were described in literature several simple rapid and inexpensive short term ests to reasonably predict the genotoxic nature of chemicals but in contrast,there is no reliable test or battery of tests available to predict the carcinogenicity of non-genotoxic compounds and this poses a major problem to their rish assessment.In addition,there are conflictive opinions about rish assessment needs for both classes of carcinogens.Some workers elieve that for non-genotoxic carcinogens,thresholds for exposure can be drawn while others do not.In this review,the reasons behind both of these opinions and the present hypotheses about the mechanism of action of non-genotoxic carcinogens are described and analyzed in relation to future needs.

  3. Human Microdosing with Carcinogenic Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: In Vivo Pharmacokinetics of Dibenzo[def,p]chrysene and Metabolites by UPLC Accelerator Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeen, Erin P; Ognibene, Ted J; Corley, Richard A; McQuistan, Tammie J; Henderson, Marilyn C; Baird, William M; Bench, Graham; Turteltaub, Ken W; Williams, David E

    2016-10-17

    Metabolism is a key health risk factor following exposures to pro-carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) such as dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC), an IARC classified 2A probable human carcinogen. Human exposure to PAHs occurs primarily from the diet in nonsmokers. However, little data is available on the metabolism and pharmacokinetics in humans of high molecular weight PAHs (≥4 aromatic rings), including DBC. We previously determined the pharmacokinetics of DBC in human volunteers orally administered a microdose (29 ng; 5 nCi) of [(14)C]-DBC by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) analysis of total [(14)C] in plasma and urine. In the current study, we utilized a novel "moving wire" interface between ultraperformance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and AMS to detect and quantify parent DBC and its major metabolites. The major [(14)C] product identified in plasma was unmetabolized [(14)C]-DBC itself (Cmax = 18.5 ±15.9 fg/mL, Tmax= 2.1 ± 1.0 h), whereas the major metabolite was identified as [(14)C]-(+/-)-DBC-11,12-diol (Cmax= 2.5 ±1.3 fg/mL, Tmax= 1.8 h). Several minor species of [(14)C]-DBC metabolites were also detected for which no reference standards were available. Free and conjugated metabolites were detected in urine with [(14)C]-(+/-)-DBC-11,12,13,14-tetraol isomers identified as the major metabolites, 56.3% of which were conjugated (Cmax= 35.8 ± 23.0 pg/pool, Tmax = 6-12 h pool). [(14)C]-DBC-11,12-diol, of which 97.5% was conjugated, was also identified in urine (Cmax = 29.4 ± 11.6 pg/pool, Tmax = 6-12 h pool). Parent [(14)C]-DBC was not detected in urine. This is the first data set to assess metabolite profiles and associated pharmacokinetics of a carcinogenic PAH in human volunteers at an environmentally relevant dose, providing the data necessary for translation of high dose animal models to humans for translation of environmental health risk assessment.

  4. Mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, and teratogenicity of acrylonitrile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léonard, A; Gerber, G B; Stecca, C; Rueff, J; Borba, H; Farmer, P B; Sram, R J; Czeizel, A E; Kalina, I

    1999-05-01

    Acrylonitrile (AN) is an important intermediary for the synthesis of a variety of organic products, such as artificial fibres, household articles and resins. Although acute effects are the primary concern for an exposure to AN, potential genotoxic, carcinogenic and teratogenic risks of AN have to be taken seriously in view of the large number of workers employed in such industries and the world-wide population using products containing and possibly liberating AN. An understanding of the effect of acrylonitrile must be based on a characterization of its metabolism as well as of the resulting products and their genotoxic properties. Tests for mutagenicity in bacteria have in general been positive, those in plants and on unscheduled DNA synthesis doubtful, and those on chromosome aberrations in vivo negative. Wherever positive results had been obtained, metabolic activation of AN appeared to be a prerequisite. The extent to which such mutagenic effects are significant in man depends, however, also on the conditions of exposure. It appears from the limited data that the ultimate mutagenic factor(s), such as 2-cyanoethylene oxide, may have little opportunity to act under conditions where people are exposed because it is formed only in small amounts and is rapidly degraded. The carcinogenic action of AN has been evaluated by various agencies and ranged from 'reasonably be anticipated to be a human carcinogen' to 'cannot be excluded', the most recent evaluation being 'possibly carcinogenic to humans'. Animal data that confirm the carcinogenic potential of AN have certain limitations with respect to the choice of species, type of tumors and length of follow up. Epidemiological studies which sometimes, but not always, yielded positive results, encounter the usual difficulties of confounding factors in chemical industries. Exposure of workers to AN should continue to be carefully monitored, but AN would not have to be considered a cancer risk to the population provided

  5. Non-regulatory and cost-effectiveness control of carcinogenic hazard. The beginnings: a methodology for using animal data to decrease uncertainty in human risk of carcinogens released by energy technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crouch, E.A.C.; Feller, J.; Fiering, M.B.; Hakanoglu, E.; Wilson, R.; Zeise, L.

    1982-09-01

    A logical cost effective procedure for assessing carcinogenic risk associated with emerging energy technologies is outlined. All chemicals are assumed to be carcinogenic with a potency that has to be measured. In this scheme a non-carcinogen is a chemical with zero potency. If the carcinogenic potency in animals has not been measured, it may be assumed from an a priori measure. Using estimates of potency, exposure, and an interspecies factor (which also accounts for uncertainties in extrapolating the animal data to man), an estimate of risk and the uncertainty associated with that estimate is made, together with upper bounds on the risk. If the upper bound is small the risk is negligible and can be ignored. If it is large, the exposure at the level proposed should not be permitted. However further information may be obtained which changes the risk estimate or lowers the uncertainty so that the upper bound on the risk is reduced. Notice that estimation of the uncertainty is as important as estimation of a best value of risk.

  6. Human Papillomavirus Testing in the Prevention of Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wacholder, Sholom; Kinney, Walter; Gage, Julia C.; Castle, Philip E.

    2011-01-01

    Strong evidence now supports the adoption of cervical cancer prevention strategies that explicitly focus on persistent infection with the causal agent, human papillomavirus (HPV). To inform an evidence-based transition to a new public health approach for cervical cancer screening, we summarize the natural history and cervical carcinogenicity of HPV and discuss the promise and uncertainties of currently available screening methods. New HPV infections acquired at any age are virtually always benign, but persistent infections with one of approximately 12 carcinogenic HPV types explain virtually all cases of cervical cancer. In the absence of an overtly persistent HPV infection, the risk of cervical cancer is extremely low. Thus, HPV test results predict the risk of cervical cancer and its precursors (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3) better and longer than cytological or colposcopic abnormalities, which are signs of HPV infection. The logical and inevitable move to HPV-based cervical cancer prevention strategies will require longer screening intervals that will disrupt current gynecologic and cytology laboratory practices built on frequent screening. A major challenge will be implementing programs that do not overtreat HPV-positive women who do not have obvious long-term persistence of HPV or treatable lesions at the time of initial evaluation. The greatest potential for reduction in cervical cancer rates from HPV screening is in low-resource regions that can implement infrequent rounds of low-cost HPV testing and treatment. PMID:21282563

  7. A comparative study of biodegradability of a carcinogenic aromatic amine (4,4'-diaminodiphenylmethane) with OECD 301 test methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Cheng-Fang; Liu, Yan-Zhen; Long, Wei-Nian; Sun, Guo-Ping; Zeng, Guo-Qu; Xu, Mei-Ying; Luan, Tian-Gang

    2015-01-01

    4,4'-Diaminodiphenylmethane (MDA) is a widely used compound in industries. Studies on the biodegradability of MDA are necessary for environmental hazard identification and risk assessment. Previous studies have suggested that MDA was not readily biodegradable. In the present study, three batches of biodegradation tests (OECD 301A, B, D and F tests) were performed on MDA in June, August and December of 2012. MDA was found to be readily biodegradable and produced colored intermediates in the 301A, B and F test systems. MDA biodegradation measurements were consistent among the three batches of tests. Differences in the extent of biodegradation determined in different methods originated from different test conditions and assessment endpoints. The 301D test has stringent test conditions and is usually performed on chemicals that are toxic to microorganisms, so the test results obtained from 301D tests are less meaningful for evaluating the biodegradability of MDA. The low MDA biodegradation measurements in the 301B tests compared to the 301A and F tests were due to the assessment method, which did not account for MDA incorporation into biomass in its calculation of CO2 formation rate. The differences in the biodegradation rates, as measured by the different OECD 301 test systems, could also be related to the structure and properties of the chemical. For test substances that can be assessed by all OECD 301 test methods, the highest biodegradation values may be obtained from the 301A and F test methods. This study provides new information to assess the environmental fate in the risk assessment of MDA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Short-term carcinogenicity testing of a potent murine intestinal mutagen, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo(4,5-b)pyridine (PhIP), in Apc1638N transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ilona Kryspin; Kristiansen, E.; Mortensen, Alicja;

    1997-01-01

    others, mammary tumors, We have studied these mice in a short-term carcinogenicity test with 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo(4,5-b)pyridine (PhIP), a potent murine small intestinal mutagen and lymphomagen. Upon dietary administration of 0.03% PhIP in a short-term (6 months) study, a significantly...

  9. Reevaluating the carcinogenicity of ortho-toluidine: a new conclusion and its implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, C; Markowitz, S

    1992-12-01

    The aromatic amine ortho-toluidine has been recognized by IARC as an animal carcinogen for the past decade. Three recent epidemiological studies of worker populations have now implicated this chemical as a human bladder carcinogen. In a study by E. Ward, A. Carpenter, S. Markowitz, D. Roberts, and W. Halperin ((1991), J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 83, 501-506), workers definitely exposed to ortho-toluidine for at least 10 years experienced a Standardized Incidence Ratio (SIR) of 27.2 (90% CI = 11.8-53.7). The other major exposure was to aniline, which significant epidemiological studies have failed to confirm as a human carcinogen. In retrospect, studies by G. F. Rubino, G. Scansetti, G. Piolatto ((1982) Environ. Res. 27, 241-254) and M. J. Stasik ((1988) Int. Arch. Occup. Environ. Health 60, 21-24) also support the hypothesis that ortho-toluidine is a human bladder carcinogen. Animal studies of both ortho-toluidine and its possible confounders in these epidemiological investigations further confirm this hypothesis. When evaluated in a suitably comprehensive way, according to the traditional standards for assessing causality outlined by A. B. Hill ((1977) A Short Textbook of Medical Statistics, pp. 288-294, Lippincott, Philadelphia) the evidence that ortho-toluidine causes human bladder cancer has become much more conclusive. In this case, animal tests have proven a good predictor of human carcinogenicity.

  10. Evaluation of the potential carcinogenicity of chlorambucil. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-06-01

    Chlorambucil is a probable human carcinogen, classified as weight-of-evidence Group B1 under the EPA Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment. Evidence on potential carcinogenicity from animal studies is Sufficient, and the evidence from human studies is Limited. Data available are inadequate for calculating a potency factor (F) and no quantitative inferences can be made according to the CAG's methodology for evaluating potential carcinogens. Chlorambucil is, therefore, assigned to the median potency factor range and placed in potency group 2. Combining the weight-of-evidence group and the potency group, chlorambucil is assigned a MEDIUM hazard ranking.

  11. [The identification of viruses of human papilloma of high carcinogenic risk and evaluation of physical status of viral DNA using technique of polymerase-chain reaction under affection of cervical epithelium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viazovaia, A A; Kuevda, D A; Trofimova, O B; Shipulina, O Iu; Ershov, V A; Lialina, L V; Narvskaia, O V

    2013-08-01

    The DNA of virus of human papilloma of high carcinogenic risk was detected in 116 cervical samples. At that, the morphological symptoms of background processes are detected in 19 samples, CIN 1 in 9, CIN 2 in 23, CIN 3 in 54 (and out of them carcinoma in situ in 13), epidermoid cancer (squamous cell carcinoma) in 11 cases. The viral load of human papilloma of high carcinogenic risk in all samples of DNA exceeded threshold of clinical value (3 lg copies of DNA of human papilloma/105 cells). The genetic typing of human papilloma of high carcinogenic risk revealed the dominance of human papilloma of type 16 in 49.7%, type 33 in 15.3%, type 31 in 12.3% and type 45 in 5.5%. In women with background processes in cervix of the uterus DNA of human papilloma type 16 was detected more often in episome form. In case of dysplastic alterations of epithelium and cervical cancer DNA of human papilloma type 16 is detected in mixt form with different degree of integration into cell genome.

  12. Critical factors in assessing risk from exposure to nasal carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanffy, M S; Mathison, B H; Kuykendall, J R; Harman, A E

    1997-10-31

    Anatomical, physiological, biochemical and molecular factors that contribute to chemical-induced nasal carcinogenesis are either largely divergent between test species and humans, or we know very little of them. These factors, let alone the uncertainty associated with our knowledge gap, present a risk assessor with the formidable task of making judgments about risks to human health from exposure to chemicals that have been identified in rodent studies to be nasal carcinogens. This paper summarizes some of the critical attributes of the hazard identification and dose-response aspects of risk assessments for nasal carcinogens that must be accounted for by risk assessors in order to make informed decisions. Data on two example compounds, dimethyl sulfate and hexamethylphosphoramide, are discussed to illustrate the diversity of information that can be used to develop informed hypotheses about mode of action and decisions on appropriate dosimeters for interspecies extrapolation. Default approaches to interspecies dosimetry extrapolation are described briefly and are followed by a discussion of a generalized physiologically based pharmacokinetic model that, unlike default approaches, is flexible and capable of incorporating many of the critical species-specific factors. Recent advancements in interspecies nasal dosimetry modeling are remarkable. However, it is concluded that without the development of research programs aimed at understanding carcinogenic susceptibility factors in human and rodent nasal tissues, development of plausible modes of action will lag behind the advancements made in dosimetry modeling.

  13. Diagnostic Tests in Human Brucellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Nouri

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Context: Brucellosis represents a zoonotic bacterial disease, caused by a gram negative bacterium called Brucella. Between the diverses pecies of this bacteria, B. melitensis, B. abortus, B. suis and B. canis consist the main causes of the disease in humans.More than half a million new cases of Brucellosis are reported annually. Consequently, brucellosis is a remarkable threat for the health of society. Because of the multiple nonspecific clinical signs of this infection, such as fever (60% of cases, night sweating, insomnia and anorexia, which are similar to other diseases, the detection of brucellosis is time-consuming and needs more scrutiny. Evidence Acquisition: Blood culture is considered the gold standard for the detection of brucellosis and the sensitivity of this test in the acute form is high. However, for the chronic type of disease, it is remarkably low, in addition, in some cases, it needs long reaction times. Nevertheless, today, some kinds of tests like automatic culturing system and serological methods, such as Rose Bengal (RB test, serum agglutination test (SAT, 2-mercaptoethanol (2ME and coombs, which are operated based on agglutination, are useful for the problems mentioned earlier. Conclusion: Although serological methods are common for the diagnosis of brucellosis, false results are observable for several methods, such as the SAT method. Tests like the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, for the screening of specific traits, although confirmed, have their advantages and defects. The lateral flow assay (LFA shows promising evidence to be effective in the diagnosis of brucellosis. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR is more prevalent than other common tests, according to sensitivity and fast answering potency in case of molecular diagnosis. Also, PCR is proper for patients' follow-up during the period of treatment and crimination of relapse by this method is easier compared to others.

  14. Carcinogen-Induced Hepatic Tumors in KLF6+/- Mice Recapitulate Aggressive Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Associated with p53 Pathway Deregulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tarocchi, Mirko; Hannivoort, Rebekka; Hoshida, Yujin; Lee, Ursula E.; Vetter, Diana; Narla, Goutham; Villanueva, Augusto; Oren, Moshe; Llovet, Josep M.; Friedman, Scott L.

    2011-01-01

    Inactivation of KLF6 is common in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, thereby abrogating its normal antiproliferative activity in liver cells. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of KLF6 depletion on human HCC and experimental hepatocarcinoge

  15. Potent inhibition of human 5-lipoxygenase and microsomal prostaglandin E₂ synthase-1 by the anti-carcinogenic and anti-inflammatory agent embelin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaible, Anja M; Traber, Heidi; Temml, Veronika; Noha, Stefan M; Filosa, Rosanna; Peduto, Antonella; Weinigel, Christina; Barz, Dagmar; Schuster, Daniela; Werz, Oliver

    2013-08-15

    Embelin (2,5-dihydroxy-3-undecyl-1,4-benzoquinone) possesses anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic properties in vivo, and these features have been related to interference with multiple targets including XIAPs, NFκB, STAT-3, Akt and mTOR. However, interference with these proteins requires relatively high concentrations of embelin (IC₅₀>4 μM) and cannot fully explain its bioactivity observed in several functional studies. Here we reveal human 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) and microsomal prostaglandin E₂ synthase (mPGES)-1 as direct molecular targets of embelin. Thus, embelin potently suppressed the biosynthesis of eicosanoids by selective inhibition of 5-LO and mPGES-1 with IC₅₀=0.06 and 0.2 μM, respectively. In intact human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes, embelin consistently blocked the biosynthesis of various 5-LO products regardless of the stimulus (fMLP or A23187) with IC₅₀=0.8-2 μM. Neither the related human 12- and 15-LO nor the cyclooxygenases-1 and -2 or cytosolic phospholipase A₂ were significantly affected by 10 μM embelin. Inhibition of 5-LO and mPGES-1 by embelin was (I) essentially reversible after wash-out, (II) not impaired at higher substrate concentrations, (III) unaffected by inclusion of Triton X-100, and (IV) did not correlate to its proposed antioxidant properties. Docking simulations suggest concrete binding poses in the active sites of both 5-LO and mPGES-1. Because 5-LO- and mPGES-1-derived eicosanoids play roles in inflammation and cancer, the interference of embelin with these enzymes may contribute to its biological effects and suggests embelin as novel chemotype for development of dual 5-LO/mPGES-1 inhibitors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Short-term exposure of nontumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells to carcinogenic chromium(VI) compromises their respiratory capacity and alters their bioenergetic signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerveira, Joana F; Sánchez-Aragó, María; Urbano, Ana M; Cuezva, José M

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies on the impact of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] on mammalian cell energetics revealed alterations suggestive of a shift to a more fermentative metabolism. Aiming at a more defined understanding of the metabolic effects of Cr(VI) and of their molecular basis, we assessed the impact of a mild Cr(VI) exposure on critical bioenergetic parameters (lactate production, oxygen consumption and intracellular ATP levels). Cells derived from normal human bronchial epithelium (BEAS-2B cell line), the main in vivo target of Cr(VI) carcinogenicity, were subjected for 48 h to 1 μM Cr(VI). We could confirm a shift to a more fermentative metabolism, resulting from the simultaneous inhibition of respiration and stimulation of glycolysis. This shift was accompanied by a decrease in the protein levels of the catalytic subunit (subunit β) of the mitochondrial H(+)-ATP synthase (β-F1-ATPase) and a concomitant marked increase in those of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). The corresponding alteration in the β-F1-ATPase/GAPDH protein ratio (viewed as a bioenergetic signature) upon Cr(VI) exposure was in agreement with the observed attenuation of cellular respiration and enhancement of glycolytic flux. Altogether, these results constitute a novel finding in terms of the molecular mechanisms of Cr(VI) effects.

  17. Short-term exposure of nontumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells to carcinogenic chromium(VI compromises their respiratory capacity and alters their bioenergetic signature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana F. Cerveira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies on the impact of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI] on mammalian cell energetics revealed alterations suggestive of a shift to a more fermentative metabolism. Aiming at a more defined understanding of the metabolic effects of Cr(VI and of their molecular basis, we assessed the impact of a mild Cr(VI exposure on critical bioenergetic parameters (lactate production, oxygen consumption and intracellular ATP levels. Cells derived from normal human bronchial epithelium (BEAS-2B cell line, the main in vivo target of Cr(VI carcinogenicity, were subjected for 48 h to 1 μM Cr(VI. We could confirm a shift to a more fermentative metabolism, resulting from the simultaneous inhibition of respiration and stimulation of glycolysis. This shift was accompanied by a decrease in the protein levels of the catalytic subunit (subunit β of the mitochondrial H+-ATP synthase (β-F1-ATPase and a concomitant marked increase in those of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH. The corresponding alteration in the β-F1-ATPase/GAPDH protein ratio (viewed as a bioenergetic signature upon Cr(VI exposure was in agreement with the observed attenuation of cellular respiration and enhancement of glycolytic flux. Altogether, these results constitute a novel finding in terms of the molecular mechanisms of Cr(VI effects.

  18. Assessment of the DNA Damage in Human Sperm and Lymphocytes Exposed to the Carcinogen Food Contaminant Furan with Comet Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Pandir

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe aim of this work was to assess the damage of DNA in human blood cell and spermin vitro under the influence of furan. These cells were administered 0-600 μM of furan at 37 and 32oC for 30 and 60 min, respectively. A significant increase in tail DNA%, tail length and moment indicating DNA damage was observed at increasing doses when compared to the controls. The treatment with 300 and 600 μM of furan showed a maximum increase of 86.74 ± 2.43 and 93.29 ± 8.68 compared to the control tail DNA% in lymphocytes. However, only 600 μM of furan showed a maximum increase of 94.71 ± 6.24 compared to the control tail DNA% in sperm. The results suggested that furan caused DNA damage in lymphocytes at increasing doses, but appeared to have not the same effect on human sperm at the low doses. Genotoxic activity had an impact on the risk assessment of furan formed on the food for human cells. Therefore, it would be important to further investigate these properties of furan as the food mutagen.

  19. Chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes predict human cancer independently of exposure to carcinogens. European Study Group on Cytogenetic Biomarkers and Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonassi, S; Hagmar, L; Strömberg, U

    2000-01-01

    An increased risk of cancer in healthy individuals with high levels of chromosomal aberrations (CAs) in peripheral blood lymphocytes has been described in recent epidemiological studies. This association did not appear to be modified by sex, age, country, or time since CA test, whereas the role p...

  20. Tobacco carcinogens, their biomarkers and tobacco-induced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Stephen S

    2003-10-01

    The devastating link between tobacco products and human cancers results from a powerful alliance of two factors - nicotine and carcinogens. Without either one of these, tobacco would be just another commodity, instead of being the single greatest cause of death due to preventable cancer. Nicotine is addictive and toxic, but it is not carcinogenic. This addiction, however, causes people to use tobacco products continually, and these products contain many carcinogens. What are the mechanisms by which this deadly combination leads to 30% of cancer-related deaths in developed countries, and how can carcinogen biomarkers help to reveal these mechanisms?

  1. Evaluation of the Xpa-Deficient Transgenic Mouse Model for Short-Term Carcinogenicity Testing: 9-Month Studies with Haloperidol, Reserpine, Phenacetin, and D-Mannitol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lina, B.A.R.; Woutersen, R.A.; Bruijntjes, J.P.; Benthem, J. van; Berg, J.A.H. van den; Monbaliu, J.; Thoolen, B.J.J.M.; Beems, R.B.; Kreijl, C.F. van

    2004-01-01

    As part of the international evaluation program coordinated by ILSI/HESI, the potential of DNA repair deficient Xpa-/- mice and the double knockout Xpa-/-.p53+/- mice for short term carcinogenicity assays was evaluated. For comparison also wild-type C57BL/6 mice (WT) were included in these studies.

  2. Mapping of HPV transcripts in four human cervical lesions using RNAseq suggests quantitative rearrangements during carcinogenic progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinmiao; Xue, Yuezhen; Poidinger, Michael; Lim, Thimothy; Chew, Sung Hock; Pang, Chai Ling; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Thierry, Françoise

    2014-08-01

    Two classes of Human papillomaviruses (HPV) infect the anogenital track: high risk viruses that are associated with risk of cervical cancer and low risk types that drive development of benign lesions, such as condylomas. In the present study, we established quantitative transcriptional maps of the viral genome in clinical lesions associated with high risk HPV16 or low risk HPV6b. Marked qualitative and quantitative changes in the HPV16 transcriptome were associated with progression from low to high grade lesions. Specific transcripts encoding essential regulatory proteins such as E7, E2, E1^E4 and E5 were identified. We also identified intrinsic differences between the HPV6b-associated condyloma transcript map and that of the HPV16-associated low grade CIN specifically regarding promoter usage. Characterization and quantification of HPV transcripts in patient samples thus establish the impact of viral transcriptional regulation on the status of HPV-associated lesions and may therefore help in defining new biologically-relevant prognosis markers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Epigenetic factors in cancer risk: effect of chemical carcinogens on global DNA methylation pattern in human TK6 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali M Tabish

    Full Text Available In the current study, we assessed the global DNA methylation changes in human lymphoblastoid (TK6 cells in vitro in response to 5 direct and 10 indirect-acting genotoxic agents. TK6 cells were exposed to the selected agents for 24 h in the presence and/or absence of S9 metabolic mix. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used for quantitative profiling of 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine. The effect of exposure on 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine between control and exposed cultures was assessed by applying the marginal model with correlated residuals on % global DNA methylation data. We reported the induction of global DNA hypomethylation in TK6 cells in response to S9 metabolic mix, under the current experimental settings. Benzene, hydroquinone, styrene, carbon tetrachloride and trichloroethylene induced global DNA hypomethylation in TK6 cells. Furthermore, we showed that dose did not have an effect on global DNA methylation in TK6 cells. In conclusion we report changes in global DNA methylation as an early event in response to agents traditionally considered as genotoxic.

  4. Evaluation of the carcinogenic potential of pharmaceuticals. Opportunities arising from the International Conference on Harmonisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monro, A M; MacDonald, J S

    1998-05-01

    The evaluation of the carcinogenic potential of pharmaceuticals is currently undergoing dramatic changes. For the past 25 years the regulatory expectation for agents intended for long term use has been that lifespan studies (usually lasting 2 years) in 2 rodent species be conducted. These studies take at least 3 years to plan, execute and interpret, and use over 1200 animals. It is now recognised that the quality of the information obtained from these studies is unreliable for prediction of carcinogenic risk to humans. Over the past 4 years, the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) has recommended changes in approaches to assessing the carcinogenic potential of pharmaceuticals. In future, only one long term rodent study will be routinely required (usually in rats), provided this is complemented with a short or medium term test in one of the emerging new models for carcinogenicity, such as transgenic mice or newborn mice. However, the relevance of these new models to human cancer and their use in risk assessment is still largely unknown and this situation must be kept under review as knowledge accumulates. A long term study in a second rodent species is still an option. Dose selection has also been improved inasmuch as there are now several alternatives to the use of the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). In the past, the use of the MTD, when the normal homeostasis of the test animals is disturbed, has been considered one of the major problems with the rodent carcinogenicity bioassay. However, one of the alternative end-points to the use of the MTD, i.e. the comparison of plasma concentrations in rodents and humans, must be viewed with caution. While this may contribute to limiting the high dose level for agents of very low toxicity, the concept should not be interpreted as signifying that plasma concentrations provide a sound basis for comparing the carcinogenic activity of agents in different species. Recognition of the 4 properties (genotoxicity

  5. Carcinogenic compounds in alcoholic beverages: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflaum, Tabea; Hausler, Thomas; Baumung, Claudia; Ackermann, Svenja; Kuballa, Thomas; Rehm, Jürgen; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2016-10-01

    The consumption of alcoholic beverages has been classified as carcinogenic to humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) since 1988. More recently, in 2010, ethanol as the major constituent of alcoholic beverages and its metabolite acetaldehyde were also classified as carcinogenic to humans. Alcoholic beverages as multi-component mixtures may additionally contain further known or suspected human carcinogens as constituent or contaminant. This review will discuss the occurrence and toxicology of eighteen carcinogenic compounds (acetaldehyde, acrylamide, aflatoxins, arsenic, benzene, cadmium, ethanol, ethyl carbamate, formaldehyde, furan, glyphosate, lead, 3-MCPD, 4-methylimidazole, N-nitrosodimethylamine, pulegone, ochratoxin A, safrole) occurring in alcoholic beverages as identified based on monograph reviews by the IARC. For most of the compounds of alcoholic beverages, quantitative risk assessment provided evidence for only a very low risk (such as margins of exposure above 10,000). The highest risk was found for ethanol, which may reach exposures in ranges known to increase the cancer risk even at moderate drinking (margin of exposure around 1). Other constituents that could pose a risk to the drinker were inorganic lead, arsenic, acetaldehyde, cadmium and ethyl carbamate, for most of which mitigation by good manufacturing practices is possible. Nevertheless, due to the major effect of ethanol, the cancer burden due to alcohol consumption can only be reduced by reducing alcohol consumption in general or by lowering the alcoholic strength of beverages.

  6. Capsaicin in hot chili pepper: carcinogen, co-carcinogen or anticarcinogen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surh, Y J; Lee, S S

    1996-03-01

    Capsaicin (trans-8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide) is a major pungent ingredient of the Capsicum fruits such as hot green and red peppers. Besides its use as a food additive in various spicy cuisines, capsaicin is currently utilized for therapeutic purposes to treat various peripheral painful conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and diabetic neuropathy. Considering consumption of capsaicin as a food additive and its current medicinal application in humans, correct evaluation and precise assessment of any harmful effects of this compound are essential from the public health standpoint. Numerous investigations have been conducted to determine the potential mutagenic and carcinogenic activity of capsaicin and chili pepper, but results are discordant. This review briefly examines findings in the literature of studies testing mutagenicity and tumorigenicity of capsaicin and presents a possible mechanistic basis for the dual effects exerted by the compound.

  7. Mutagenicity, carcinogenicity and teratogenicity of beryllium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léonard, A; Lauwerys, R

    1987-07-01

    The carcinogenicity of a number of beryllium compounds has been confirmed in experiments on laboratory animals and this metal has to be treated as a possible carcinogenic threat to man. These carcinogenic properties are associated with mutagenic activity as shown by the results of short-term tests performed in vitro with beryllium chloride and beryllium sulfate. These soluble beryllium compounds can produce some infidelity of in vitro synthesis, forward gene mutations in microorganisms and in mammalian cells. They are also able to induce cell transformation. In addition to the positive results obtained in several short-term assays beryllium compounds have been found to bind to nucleoproteins, to inhibit certain enzymes needed for DNA synthesis, to bind nucleic acids to cell membranes and to inhibit microtubule polymerization. The teratogenicity of beryllium salts is relatively unknown and needs additional investigation.

  8. Cruciferous vegetable consumption alters the metabolism of the dietary carcinogen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, David G; Young, Philip J; Agus, Cynthia; Knize, Mark G; Boobis, Alan R; Gooderham, Nigel J; Lake, Brian G

    2004-09-01

    Consumption of red meat is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer, whereas cruciferous vegetable consumption reduces cancer risk. While the mechanisms remain to be determined, cruciferous vegetables may act by altering the metabolism of carcinogens present in cooked food, such as the heterocyclic amine 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cruciferous vegetable consumption on the metabolism of PhIP in 20 non-smoking Caucasian male subjects. The study consisted of three 12-day phases, namely two periods of avoidance of cruciferous vegetables (phases 1 and 3) and a high cruciferous vegetable diet period (phase 2), when subjects ingested 250 g each of Brussels sprouts and broccoli per day. At the end of each study phase, the subjects consumed a cooked meat meal containing 4.90 microg PhIP and urine samples were collected for up to 48 h. Cruciferous vegetable consumption significantly increased hepatic CYP1A2, as demonstrated by changes in saliva caffeine kinetics. Samples of N(2)-hydroxy-PhIP-N(2)-glucuronide (the major urinary metabolite of PhIP in humans), N(2)-hydroxy-PhIP-N(3)-glucuronide and their trideuterated derivatives (to serve as internal standards) were synthesized and a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry method developed for their analysis. In phases 1 and 3, the excretion of N(2)-hydroxy-N(2)-PhIP-glucuronide in 0-48 h urine samples was six times that of N(2)-hydroxy-PhIP-N(3)-glucuronide. Cruciferous vegetable consumption significantly increased the urinary excretion of N(2)-hydroxy-PhIP-N(2)-glucuronide in 0-48 h urine samples to 127 and 136% of levels observed in phases 1 and 3, respectively. In contrast, the urinary excretion of N(2)-hydroxy-PhIP-N(3)-glucuronide was unchanged. While the urinary excretion of both PhIP metabolites accounted for approximately 39% of the PhIP dose in phases 1 and 3, they accounted for approximately 49% of the

  9. 40 CFR 799.9420 - TSCA carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true TSCA carcinogenicity. 799.9420 Section 799.9420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES... their selection. (ii) Age/weight. (A) Testing shall be started with young healthy animals as soon...

  10. DNA adducts of the tobacco carcinogens 2-amino-9H-pyrido[2,3-b]indole and 4-aminobiphenyl are formed at environmental exposure levels and persist in human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauwelaërs, Gwendoline; Bellamri, Medjda; Fessard, Valérie; Turesky, Robert J; Langouët, Sophie

    2013-09-16

    Aromatic amines and structurally related heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs) are produced during the combustion of tobacco or during the high-temperature cooking of meat. Exposure to some of these chemicals may contribute to the etiology of several common types of human cancers. 2-Amino-9H-pyrido[2,3-b]indole (AαC) is the most abundant HAA formed in mainstream tobacco smoke: it arises in amounts that are 25-100 times greater than the levels of the arylamine, 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP), a human carcinogen. 2-Amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) is a prevalent HAA formed in cooked meats. AαC and MeIQx are rodent carcinogens; however, their carcinogenic potency in humans is unknown. A preliminary assessment of the carcinogenic potential of these HAAs in humans was conducted by examining the capacity of primary human hepatocytes to form DNA adducts of AαC and MeIQx, in comparison to 4-ABP, followed by the kinetics of DNA adduct removal by cellular enzyme repair systems. The principal DNA adducts formed were N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl) (dG-C8) adducts. Comparable levels of DNA adducts were formed with AαC and 4-ABP, whereas adduct formation was ∼5-fold lower for MeIQx. dG-C8-AαC and dG-C8-4-ABP were formed at comparable levels in a concentration-dependent manner in human hepatocytes treated with procarcinogens over a 10,000-fold concentration range (1 nM-10 μM). Pretreatment of hepatocytes with furafylline, a selective inhibitor of cytochrome P450 1A2, resulted in a strong diminution of DNA adducts signifying that P450 1A2 is a major P450 isoform involved in bioactivation of these procarcinogens. The kinetics of adduct removal varied for each hepatocyte donor. Approximately half of the DNA adducts were removed within 24 h of treatment; however, the remaining lesions persisted over 5 days. The high levels of AαC present in tobacco smoke and its propensity to form persistent DNA adducts in human hepatocytes suggest that AαC can contribute to DNA damage

  11. [Quality assurance in human genetic testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhrmann-Spangenberg, Manfred

    2015-02-01

    Advances in technical developments of genetic diagnostics for more than 50 years, as well as the fact that human genetic testing is usually performed only once in a lifetime, with additional impact for blood relatives, are determining the extraordinary importance of quality assurance in human genetic testing. Abidance of laws, directives, and guidelines plays a major role. This article aims to present the major laws, directives, and guidelines with respect to quality assurance of human genetic testing, paying careful attention to internal and external quality assurance. The information on quality assurance of human genetic testing was obtained through a web-based search of the web pages that are referred to in this article. Further information was retrieved from publications in the German Society of Human Genetics and through a PubMed-search using term quality + assurance + genetic + diagnostics. The most important laws, directives, and guidelines for quality assurance of human genetic testing are the gene diagnostics law (GenDG), the directive of the Federal Medical Council for quality control of clinical laboratory analysis (RiliBÄK), and the S2K guideline for human genetic diagnostics and counselling. In addition, voluntary accreditation under DIN EN ISO 15189:2013 offers a most recommended contribution towards quality assurance of human genetic testing. Legal restraints on quality assurance of human genetic testing as mentioned in § 5 GenDG are fulfilled once RiliBÄK requirements are followed.

  12. Consumption of organic meat does not diminish the carcinogenic potential associated with the intake of persistent organic pollutants (POPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Ángel Rodríguez; Boada, Luis D; Mendoza, Zenaida; Ruiz-Suárez, Norberto; Valerón, Pilar F; Camacho, María; Zumbado, Manuel; Almeida-González, Maira; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis A; Luzardo, Octavio P

    2017-02-01

    Numerous studies have shown an epidemiological link between meat consumption and the incidence of cancer, and it has been suggested that this relationship may be motivated by the presence of carcinogenic contaminants on it. Among the most frequently detected contaminants in meat are several types of persistent organic pollutants (POPs), and it is well known that many of them are carcinogenic. On the other hand, an increasing number of consumers choose to feed on what are perceived as healthier foods. Thus, the number of consumers of organic food is growing. However, environmental contamination by POPs is ubiquitous, and it is therefore unlikely that the practices of organic food production are able to prevent this contamination. To test this hypothesis, we acquired 76 samples of meat (beef, chicken, and lamb) of two modes of production (organic and conventional) and quantified their levels of 33 carcinogenic POPs. On this basis, we determined the human meat-related daily dietary exposure to these carcinogens using as a model a population with a high consumption of meat, such as the Spanish population. The maximum allowable meat consumption for this population and the carcinogenic risk quotients associated with the current pattern of consumption were calculated. As expected, no sample was completely free of carcinogenic contaminants, and the differences between organically and conventionally produced meats were minimal. According to these results, the current pattern of meat consumption exceeded the maximum limits, which are set according to the levels of contaminations, and this is associated with a relevant carcinogenic risk. Strikingly, the consumption of organically produced meat does not diminish this carcinogenic risk, but on the contrary, it seems to be even higher, especially that associated with lamb consumption.

  13. Report on carcinogens monograph on 1-bromopropane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The National Toxicology Program conducted a cancer evaluation on 1 bromopropane for possible listing in the Report on Carcinogens (RoC). The cancer evaluation is captured in the RoC monograph, which was peer reviewed in a public forum. The monograph consists of two components: (Part 1) the cancer evaluation, which reviews the relevant scientific information, assesses its quality, applies the RoC listing criteria to the scientific information, and provides the NTP recommendation for listing status for 1 bromopropane in the RoC, and (Part 2) the substance profile proposed for the RoC, containing the NTP's listing status recommendation, a summary of the scientific evidence considered key to reaching that decision, and data on properties, use, production, exposure, and Federal regulations and guidelines to reduce exposure to 1-bromopropane. This monograph provides an assessment of the available scientific information on 1 bromopropane, including human exposure and properties, disposition and toxicokinetics, cancer studies in experimental animals, and studies of mechanisms and other related effects, including relevant toxicological effects, genetic toxicology, and mechanisms of carcinogenicity. From this assessment, the NTP recommended that 1 bromopropane be listed as reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen in the RoC based on sufficient evidence from studies in experimental animals, which found inhalation exposure to 1-bromopropane caused skin tumors in male rats, large intestine tumors in female and male rats, and lung tumors in female mice. Also noted was that 1 bromopropane, either directly or via reactive metabolites, caused molecular alterations that typically are associated with carcinogenesis, including genotoxicity, oxidative stress, and glutathione depletion. These alterations, observed in mainly in vitro and toxicity studies in rodents, are relevant to possible mechanisms of human carcinogenicity and support the relevance of the cancer studies in

  14. The carcinogenicity of the biocide ortho-phenylphenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, K E

    2000-04-01

    The biocides ortho-phenylphenol and its sodium salt (OPP and SOPP) are widely used as fungicides and antibacterial agents for commercial and consumer purposes. The carcinogenicity of OPP/SOPP toward the urinary bladder was demonstrated when rats were chronically fed concentrations of 0.5%-4% in their diet. Other species tested so far did not develop tumours. Understanding the mechanisms underlying OPP/SOPP-induced bladder carcinogenesis is critical to determine whether risks observed at high doses in rats are of relevance to humans exposed at much lower levels. This overview details experimental studies of carcinogenicity, genotoxicity as well as metabolism/toxicokinetics and other mechanistic studies which bear on cancer hazard and risk evaluation of exposure to humans. Based on the presently available knowledge, it is concluded that reactive quinoid metabolites exhibiting redox cycling activities are the crucial factors. At certain concentration levels, these metabolites are able to produce cytotoxic events with concomitant enhanced cell proliferation of the target tissue. Further important risk factors are probably promutagenic lesions induced by oxidative stress and a higher urinary pH. Supposed that these mechanisms are the basis for the tumourigenicity observed, then suitable low doses of OPP/SOPP will practically pose no cancer risk.

  15. Prenatal exposure of mice to the human liver carcinogen Aflatoxin B1 reveals a critical window of susceptibility to genetic change

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    It has become axiomatic that critical windows of susceptibility to genotoxins exist and that genetic damage in utero may be a trigger for later life cancers. Data supporting this critical window hypothesis are remarkably few. This study provides a quantitative bridge between DNA damage by the liver carcinogen aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) during prenatal development and the risk of later life genetic disease. AFB1 was given to pregnant C57BL/6J mice, carrying F1 gestation day 14 (GD14) embryos of the B...

  16. Genetic analysis of colon tumors induced by a dietary carcinogen PhIP in CYP1A humanized mice: Identification of mutation of β-catenin/Ctnnb1 as the driver gene for the carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Zhou, Hong; Liu, Anna; Guo, Xiangyi; Yang, Chung S

    2015-11-01

    Replacing mouse Cyp1a with human CYP1A enables the humanized CYP1A mice to mimic human metabolism of the dietary carcinogen, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), by N(2) -hydroxylation to a proximate carcinogen. Our previous study demonstrated that PhIP, combined with the dextrin sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, induces colon carcinogenesis in hCYP1A mice. Here, we employed whole exome sequencing and found multiple gene mutations in PhIP/DSS-induced colon tumors. Mutations in the exon 3 of Ctnnb1/β-catenin, however, were the predominant events. We further sequenced the key fragments of Apc, Ctnnb1, and Kras, because mutations of these genes in the humans are commonly found as the drivers of colorectal cancer. Mutations on either codon 32 or 34 in the exon 3 of Ctnnb1 were found in 39 out of 42 tumors, but no mutation was found in either Apc or Kras. The sequence context of codons 32 and 34 suggests that PhIP targets +3G in a TGGA motif of Ctnnb1. Since mutations that activate Wnt signal is a major driving force for human colorectal cancers, we conclude that the mutated β-catenin is the driver in PhIP/DSS-induced colon carcinogenesis. This result suggests that the colon tumors in hCYP1A mice mimic human colorectal carcinogenesis not only in the dietary etiology involving PhIP, but also in the aberrant activation of the Wnt signaling pathway as the driving force.

  17. Human Microdosing with Carcinogenic Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: In Vivo Pharmacokinetics of Dibenzo[ def,p ]chrysene and Metabolites by UPLC Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madeen, Erin P.; Ognibene, Ted J.; Corley, Richard A.; McQuistan, Tammie J.; Henderson, Marilyn C.; Baird, William M.; Bench, Graham; Turteltaub, Ken W.; Williams, David E.

    2016-10-17

    Metabolism is a key health risk factor following exposures to pro-carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) such as dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC), an IARC classified 2A probable human carcinogen. Human exposure to PAHs occurs primarily from the diet in non-smokers. However, little data is available on the metabolism and pharmacokinetics in humans of high molecular weight PAHs (≥4 aromatic rings), including DBC. We previously determined the pharmacokinetics of DBC in human volunteers orally administered a micro-dose (29 ng; 5 nCi) of [14C]-DBC by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) analysis of total [14C] in plasma and urine. In the current study, we utilized a novel “moving wire” interface between ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and AMS to detect and quantify parent DBC and its major metabolites. The major [14C] product identified in plasma was unmetabolized [14C]-DBC itself, (Cmax= 18.5 ± 15.9 fg/mL, Tmax= 2.1 ± 1.0 h), whereas the major metabolite was identified as [14C]-(+/-)-DBC-11,12-diol (Cmax= 2.5 ± 1.3 fg/mL, Tmax= 1.8 h). Several minor species of [14C]-DBC metabolites were also detected for which no reference standards were available. Free and conjugated metabolites were detected in urine with [14C]-(+/-)-DBC-11,12,13,14-tetraol isomers identified as the major metabolites, 56.3% of which were conjugated (Cmax= 35.8 ± 23.0 pg/pool, Tmax= 6-12 h pool). [14C]-DBC-11,12-diol, of which 97.5% was conjugated, was also identified in urine (Cmax= 29.4 ± 11.6 pg/pool, Tmax= 6-12 h pool). Parent [14C]-DBC was not detected in urine. This is the first dataset to assess metabolite profiles and associated pharmacokinetics of a carcinogenic PAH in human volunteers at an environmentally relevant dose, providing the data necessary for translation of high dose animal models to humans for translation of environmental health risk assessment.

  18. Trichloroethylene: Mechanistic, Epidemiologic and Other Supporting Evidence of Carcinogenic Hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusyn, Ivan; Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Lash, Lawrence H.; Kromhout, Hans; Hansen, Johnni; Guyton, Kathryn Z.

    2013-01-01

    The chlorinated solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant. The carcinogenic hazard of TCE was the subject of a 2012 evaluation by a Working Group of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Information on exposures, relevant data from epidemiologic studies, bioassays in experimental animals, and toxicity and mechanism of action studies was used to conclude that TCE is carcinogenic to humans (Group 1). This article summarizes the key evidence forming the scientific bases for the IARC classification. Exposure to TCE from environmental sources (including from hazardous waste sites and contaminated water) is common throughout the world. While workplace use of TCE has been declining, occupational exposures remain of concern, especially in developing countries. Strongest human evidence is from studies of occupational TCE exposure and kidney cancer. Positive, although less consistent, associations were reported for liver cancer and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. TCE is carcinogenic at multiple sites in multiple species and strains of experimental animals. The mechanistic evidence includes extensive data on the toxicokinetics and genotoxicity of TCE and its metabolites. Together, available evidence provided a cohesive database supporting the human cancer hazard of TCE, particularly in the kidney. For other target sites of carcinogenicity, mechanistic and other data were found to be more limited. Important sources of susceptibility to TCE toxicity and carcinogenicity were also reviewed by the Working Group. In all, consideration of the multiple evidence streams presented herein informed the IARC conclusions regarding the carcinogenicity of TCE. PMID:23973663

  19. Trichloroethylene: Mechanistic, epidemiologic and other supporting evidence of carcinogenic hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusyn, Ivan; Chiu, Weihsueh A; Lash, Lawrence H; Kromhout, Hans; Hansen, Johnni; Guyton, Kathryn Z

    2014-01-01

    The chlorinated solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant. The carcinogenic hazard of TCE was the subject of a 2012 evaluation by a Working Group of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Information on exposures, relevant data from epidemiologic studies, bioassays in experimental animals, and toxicity and mechanism of action studies was used to conclude that TCE is carcinogenic to humans (Group 1). This article summarizes the key evidence forming the scientific bases for the IARC classification. Exposure to TCE from environmental sources (including hazardous waste sites and contaminated water) is common throughout the world. While workplace use of TCE has been declining, occupational exposures remain of concern, especially in developing countries. The strongest human evidence is from studies of occupational TCE exposure and kidney cancer. Positive, although less consistent, associations were reported for liver cancer and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. TCE is carcinogenic at multiple sites in multiple species and strains of experimental animals. The mechanistic evidence includes extensive data on the toxicokinetics and genotoxicity of TCE and its metabolites. Together, available evidence provided a cohesive database supporting the human cancer hazard of TCE, particularly in the kidney. For other target sites of carcinogenicity, mechanistic and other data were found to be more limited. Important sources of susceptibility to TCE toxicity and carcinogenicity were also reviewed by the Working Group. In all, consideration of the multiple evidence streams presented herein informed the IARC conclusions regarding the carcinogenicity of TCE.

  20. Oxidative Stress in the Carcinogenicity of Chemical Carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakehashi, Anna; Wei, Min [Department of Pathology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3 Asahi-machi, Abeno-Ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan); Fukushima, Shoji [Japan Bioassay Research Center, Japan Industrial Safety and Health Association, 2445 Hirasawa, Hadano, Kanagawa 257-0015 (Japan); Wanibuchi, Hideki, E-mail: wani@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Pathology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3 Asahi-machi, Abeno-Ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan)

    2013-10-28

    This review highlights several in vivo studies utilizing non-genotoxic and genotoxic chemical carcinogens, and the mechanisms of their high and low dose carcinogenicities with respect to formation of oxidative stress. Here, we survey the examples and discuss possible mechanisms of hormetic effects with cytochrome P{sub 450} inducers, such as phenobarbital, α-benzene hexachloride and 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroethane. Epigenetic processes differentially can be affected by agents that impinge on oxidative DNA damage, repair, apoptosis, cell proliferation, intracellular communication and cell signaling. Non-genotoxic carcinogens may target nuclear receptors and induce post-translational modifications at the protein level, thereby impacting on the stability or activity of key regulatory proteins, including oncoproteins and tumor suppressor proteins. We further discuss role of oxidative stress focusing on the low dose carcinogenicities of several genotoxic carcinogens such as a hepatocarcinogen contained in seared fish and meat, 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, arsenic and its metabolites, and the kidney carcinogen potassium bromate.

  1. Oxidative Stress in the Carcinogenicity of Chemical Carcinogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Wanibuchi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights several in vivo studies utilizing non-genotoxic and genotoxic chemical carcinogens, and the mechanisms of their high and low dose carcinogenicities with respect to formation of oxidative stress. Here, we survey the examples and discuss possible mechanisms of hormetic effects with cytochrome P450 inducers, such as phenobarbital, a-benzene hexachloride and 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl-2,2,2-trichloroethane. Epigenetic processes differentially can be affected by agents that impinge on oxidative DNA damage, repair, apoptosis, cell proliferation, intracellular communication and cell signaling. Non-genotoxic carcinogens may target nuclear receptors and induce post-translational modifications at the protein level, thereby impacting on the stability or activity of key regulatory proteins, including oncoproteins and tumor suppressor proteins. We further discuss role of oxidative stress focusing on the low dose carcinogenicities of several genotoxic carcinogens such as a hepatocarcinogen contained in seared fish and meat, 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, arsenic and its metabolites, and the kidney carcinogen potassium bromate.

  2. Noncoding RNA response to xenobiotic exposure: an indicator of toxicity and carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrone, April K; Beland, Frederick A; Pogribny, Igor P

    2014-10-01

    Human exposure to certain environmental and occupational chemicals is one of the major risk factors for noncommunicable diseases, including cancer. Therefore, it is desirable to take advantage of subtle exposure-related adverse cellular events for early disease detection and to identify potential dangers caused by new and currently under-evaluated drugs and chemicals. Nongenotoxic events due to carcinogen/toxicant exposure are a general hallmark of sustained cellular stress leading to tumorigenesis. These processes are globally regulated via noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). Tumorigenesis-associated genotoxic and nongenotoxic events lead to the altered expression of ncRNAs and may provide a mechanistic link between chemical exposure and tumorigenesis. Current advances in toxicogenomics are beginning to provide valuable insight into gene-chemical interactions at the transcriptome level. In this review, we summarize recent information about the impact of xenobiotics on ncRNAs. Evidence highlighted in this review suggests a critical role of ncRNAs in response to carcinogen/toxicant exposure. Benefits for the use of ncRNAs in carcinogenicity assessment include remarkable tissue specificity, early appearance, low baseline variability, and their presence and stability in biological fluids, which suggests that the incorporation of ncRNAs in the evaluation of cancer risk assessment may enhance substantially the efficiency of toxicity and carcinogenicity testing.

  3. [Fiber as a carcinogenic agent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pott, F

    1987-04-01

    According to the findings that long, thin, and durable fibres have a high carcinogenic potency after intrapleural and intraperitoneal administration, the elongated shape of a particle represents a carcinogenic agent; this physical phenomenon is a special cause of cancer. It induces a biological process which can lead to cancer by several as yet unknown steps. However, the properties of the material the fibres are made of determine the carcinogenic potency of a fibre in a secondary way although they do not seem to be responsible for the true carcinogenic agent. For example, these properties determine the degree of solubility and flexibility. The persistence of fibres in the tissue is a very important property with regard to their carcinogenic effect because the formation of a tumour takes many years or some decades. It can be assumed that a fibre has to remain by the bronchial or serosa tissue until the induction of tumour cells occurs. If this hypothesis is correct, there could be a "durability threshold value" for fibres whose length and diameter would otherwise indicate a high carcinogenic potency. There are indications that other fibre properties apart from length, diameter and durability are important for tumour induction, however, at present, they cannot be included in a definition of carcinogenic fibres. It is proposed to classify all natural and man-made mineral fibres with an aspect ratio of greater than 5:1 as carcinogenic when they are longer than 3 microns, thinner than 1 micron (or can split into such fine fibres) and when they can persist in the tissue for more than 3 years.

  4. Detection of genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens in Xpc{sup −/−}p53{sup +/−} mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melis, Joost P.M. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden (Netherlands); Speksnijder, Ewoud N. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden (Netherlands); Kuiper, Raoul V. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Dutch Molecular Pathology Center, Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Salvatori, Daniela C.F. [Leiden University Medical Center, Central Animal Facility, Leiden (Netherlands); Schaap, Mirjam M. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden (Netherlands); Maas, Saskia [Leiden University Medical Center, Central Animal Facility, Leiden (Netherlands); Robinson, Joke; Verhoef, Aart; Benthem, Jan van; Luijten, Mirjam [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Steeg, Harry van, E-mail: Harry.van.Steeg@rivm.nl [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2013-01-15

    An accurate assessment of the carcinogenic potential of chemicals and pharmaceutical drugs is essential to protect humans and the environment. Therefore, substances are extensively tested before they are marketed to the public. Currently, the rodent two-year bioassay is still routinely used to assess the carcinogenic potential of substances. However, over time it has become clear that this assay yields false positive results and also has several economic and ethical drawbacks including the use of large numbers of animals, the long duration, and the high cost. The need for a suitable alternative assay is therefore high. Previously, we have proposed the Xpa*p53 mouse model as a very suitable alternative to the two-year bioassay. We now show that the Xpc*p53 mouse model preserves all the beneficial traits of the Xpa*p53 model for sub-chronic carcinogen identification and can identify both genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. Moreover, Xpc*p53 mice appear to be more responsive than Xpa*p53 mice towards several genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. Furthermore, Xpc*p53 mice are far less sensitive than Xpa*p53 mice for the toxic activity of DNA damaging agents and as such clearly respond in a similar way as wild type mice do. These advantageous traits of the Xpc*p53 model make it a better alternative for in vivo carcinogen testing than Xpa*p53. This pilot study suggests that Xpc*p53 mice are suited for routine sub-chronic testing of both genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens and as such represent a suitable alternative to possibly replace the murine life time cancer bioassay. Highlights: ► The Xpc*p53 mouse model is able to identify genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. ► Time, animals and cost can be significantly reduced compared to the 2-year bioassay. ► Xpc*p53 mice are more advantageous for carcinogen identification than Xpa*p53 mice. ► Xpc*p53 mice exhibit a wild type response upon exposure to genotoxicants.

  5. Report on carcinogens monograph on cumene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The National Toxicology Program conducted a cancer evaluation on cumene for possible listing in the Report on Carcinogens (RoC). The cancer evaluation is captured in the RoC monograph, which was peer reviewed in a public forum. The monograph consists of two components: (Part 1) the cancer evaluation, which reviews the relevant scientific information, assesses its quality, applies the RoC listing criteria to the scientific information, and provides the NTP recommendation for listing status for cumene in the RoC, and (Part 2) the substance profile proposed for the RoC, containing the NTP's listing status recommendation, a summary of the scientific evidence considered key to reaching that decision, and data on properties, use, production, exposure, and Federal regulations and guidelines to reduce exposure to cumene. This monograph provides an assessment of the available scientific information on cumene, including human exposure and properties, disposition and toxicokinetics, cancer studies in experimental animals, and studies of mechanisms and other related effects, including relevant toxicological effects, genetic toxicology, and mechanisms of carcinogenicity. From this assessment, the NTP recommended that cumene be listed as reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen in the RoC based on sufficient evidence from studies in experimental animals, which found that cumene exposure caused lung tumors in male and female mice and liver tumors in female mice. Several proposed mechanisms of carcinogenesis support the relevance to humans of the lung and liver tumors observed in experimental animals. Specifically, there is evidence that humans and experimental animals metabolize cumene through similar metabolic pathways. In addition, mutations of the K-ras oncogene and p53 tumor-suppressor gene observed in cumene-induced lung tumors in mice, along with altered expression of many other genes, resemble molecular alterations found in human lung and other cancers.

  6. Quantification of carcinogenic 4- to 6-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in human urine by solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-isotope dilution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Laura; Fustinoni, Silvia; Bertazzi, Pieralberto

    2011-08-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are pollutants found in living and working environments. The aim of this study was to develop a solid-phase microextraction (SPME) gas chromatography (GC)-isotope dilution mass spectrometry method for the quantification of 10 four- to six-ring PAHs in urine samples. Seven of the selected PAHs have been classified as carcinogenic. Under the final conditions, analytes were sampled with a 100-μm polydimethylsiloxane SPME fibre for 60 min at 80 °C and desorbed in the injection port of the GC at 270 °C. Fluoranthene, pyrene, benz[a]anthracene, chrysene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, benzo[a]pyrene, dibenzo[a,h]anthracene, indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene and benzo[ghi]perylene were separated using a highly arylene-modified phase capillary column and quantified by MS using eight deuterated PAHs as surrogate internal standards. Limits of quantification (LOQ) were in the 0.5- to 2.2-ng/L range. Validation showed linear dynamic ranges up to 340 ng/L, inter- and intra-run precisions <20%, and accuracies within 20% of spiked concentrations. Matrix effect evaluation and the use of control charts to monitor process performances showed that the isotope dilution approach allowed for the control of bias sources. Urinary PAHs were above or equal to LOQ, depending on different compounds, in 58-100% (min-max), 40-100% and 5-39% of samples from coke oven workers (n = 12), asphalt workers (n = 10) and individuals not occupationally exposed to PAHs (n = 18), respectively. Chrysene was the most abundant PAH determined with median levels of 62.6, 6.9 and <0.6 ng/L, respectively. These results show that the method is suitable for quantifying carcinogenic PAHs in specimens from individuals with different levels of PAH exposure.

  7. Genotoxicity and carcinogenicity risk of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyokuni, Shinya

    2013-12-01

    Novel materials are often commercialized without a complete assessment of the risks they pose to human health because such assessments are costly and time-consuming; additionally, sometimes the methodology needed for such an assessment does not exist. Carbon nanotubes have the potential for widespread application in engineering, materials science and medicine. However, due to the needle-like shape and high durability of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), concerns have been raised that they may induce asbestos-like pathogenicity when inhaled. Indeed, experiments in rodents supported this hypothesis. Notably, the genetic alterations in MWCNT-induced rat malignant mesothelioma were similar to those induced by asbestos. Single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) cause mitotic disturbances in cultured cells, but thus far, there has been no report that SWCNTs are carcinogenic. This review summarizes the recent noteworthy publications on the genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of CNTs and explains the possible molecular mechanisms responsible for this carcinogenicity. The nanoscale size and needle-like rigid structure of CNTs appear to be associated with their pathogenicity in mammalian cells, where carbon atoms are major components in the backbone of many biomolecules. Publishing adverse events associated with novel materials is critically important for alerting people exposed to such materials. CNTs still have a bright future with superb economic and medical merits. However, appropriate regulation of the production, distribution and secondary manufacturing processes is required, at least to protect the workers.

  8. Testing to Enhance Retention in Human Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Jessica M.; Thompson, Andrew J.; Marshak, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Recent work in cognitive psychology has shown that repeatedly testing one's knowledge is a powerful learning aid and provides substantial benefits for retention of the material. To apply this in a human anatomy course for medical students, 39 fill-in-the-blank quizzes of about 50 questions each, one for each region of the body, and four about the…

  9. Comment on the significance of positive carcinogenicity studies using gavage as the route of exposure.

    OpenAIRE

    Perera, F.; Brennan, T. (Thomas); Fouts, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    There is continuing controversy, extending into regulatory matters, over the significance to human health of positive results in carcinogenicity studies in animals using the gavage technique as the route of exposure. Our review of a nonrandom sample of 117 chemicals or chemical processes listed as known or reasonably anticipated to be carcinogenic in the National Toxicology Program's Third Annual Report on Carcinogens provides support for the validity of the gavage route in such studies. Twen...

  10. Human Papillomavirus Laboratory Testing: the Changing Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause essentially all cervical cancers, most anal and oropharyngeal cancers, and some vaginal, vulvar, and penile cancers. Improved understanding of the pathogenesis of infection and the availability of newer tests are changing the approach to screening and diagnosis. Molecular tests to detect DNA from the most common high-risk HPVs are FDA approved for use in conjunction with cytology in cervical cancer screening programs. More-specific tests that detect RNA from high-risk HPV types are now also available. The use of molecular tests as the primary screening tests is being adopted in some areas. Genotyping to identify HPV16 and -18 has a recommended role in triaging patients for colposcopy who are high-risk HPV positive but have normal cytology. There are currently no recommended screening methods for anal, vulvar, vaginal, penile, or oropharyngeal HPV infections. HPV testing has limited utility in patients at high risk for anal cancer, but p16 immunohistochemistry is recommended to clarify lesions in tissue biopsy specimens that show moderate dysplasia or precancer mimics. HPV testing is recommended for oropharyngeal squamous cell tumors as a prognostic indicator. Ongoing research will help to improve the content of future guidelines for screening and diagnostic testing. PMID:26912568

  11. Carcinogenicity and other health effects of acrylonitrile with reference to occupational exposure limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, H

    2000-04-01

    The occupational exposure limit for acrylonitrile (AN) has been set by many organizations on the basis of its carcinogenicity. However, recent epidemiological studies do not afford evidence supporting the hypothesis that AN is carcinogenic to humans. Review of the 18 published cohort studies revealed that, although there is not adequate evidence in humans for carcinogenicity of AN, the possibility of a causal association between high exposure to AN and lung cancer in humans cannot be excluded. It was pointed out that carcinogenic potential of AN may be weak, if any, to humans, and the current occupational exposure limit (OEL) for AN of 2 ppm was evaluated as appropriate in view of AN exposure levels reported by epidemiological studies. Based also on review of the literature on health effects other than carcinogenicity, it was concluded that the current OEL for AN is a reasonable value and there is no need for a revision at present.

  12. Micropropagation effect on the anti-carcinogenic activitiy of polyphenolics from Mexican oregano (Poliomintha glabrescens Gray) in human colon cancer cells HT-29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pérez, Enrique; Noratto, Giuliana D; García-Lara, Silverio; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet A; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U

    2013-06-01

    Phenolic extracts obtained from spices are known to have anti-carcinogenic activities but little is known about the effect of micropropagation on these beneficial effects. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic activity of flavonoid-enriched extracts (FEE) from the leaves of wild (WT), in vitro (IN), and ex vitro (EX) grown oregano plants in colon cancer cells HT-29 and the non-cancer cells CCD-18Co. Cell proliferation of HT-29 cells was reduced to 50 % by WT, IN, and EX at concentrations of 4.01, 1.32, and 4.84 mg of gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/L, respectively. In contrast, in CCD-18Co cells, higher concentrations were required for the same cytotoxic effect. At 6 mg GAE/L, WT and IN reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-stimulated control cells to 59.89 and 59.43 %, respectively, and EX to 73.89 %. The mRNA of Caspase-3 was increased 1.53-fold when cells were treated with 4 mg GAE/L of IN extract, and tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 6 (FAS), and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) mRNA increased 2.55 and 1.53 fold, respectively. Results on protein expression corroborated the apoptotic effects with a significant decrease of B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) expression for all treatments but more remarkable for EX that also showed the most intense signal of BAX. Overall, FEE extracts derived from micropropagation had increased pro-apoptotic effects, however extracts from the in vitro plants produced more efficacy at the transcriptional level while extracts from the ex vitro plant were superior at the traductional level.

  13. Longitudinal Analysis of Carcinogenic Human Papillomavirus Infection and Associated Cytologic Abnormalities in the Guanacaste Natural History Study: Looking Ahead to Cotesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Ana C.; Burk, Robert D.; Hildesheim, Allan; Herrero, Rolando; Wacholder, Sholom; Hutchinson, Martha; Schiffman, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Background. Few studies have addressed the timing of cervical cytologic abnormalities and human papillomavirus (HPV) positivity during the course of an infection. It remains largely unknown how infections detected by HPV and cytology wax and wane relative to each other. The aim of this analysis was to assess the longitudinal relationship of abnormal cytology and HPV positivity in a 7-year prospective study of 2500 women in Guanacaste, Costa Rica. Methods. At each semiannual or annual visit, cervical specimens were screened using liquid-based cytology and tested for >40 HPV types with use of MY09/MY11 L1 degenerate primer polymerase chain reaction–based methods. On the basis of previous work, we separated prevalent and newly detected infections in younger and older women. Results. Among newly detected HPV- and/or cytology-positive events, HPV and cytology appeared together ∼60% of the time; when discordant, HPV tended to appear before cytology in younger and older women. Combining newly and prevalently detected events, HPV and cytology disappeared at the same time >70% of the time. When discordant, HPV tended to disappear after cytology in younger and older women. Conclusions. Detection of HPV DNA and associated cytological abnormalities tend to come and leave together; however, when discordant, detection of HPV DNA tends to precede and/or last longer than associated cytologic abnormalities. PMID:22147792

  14. 78 FR 15020 - Report on Carcinogens Webinar on Pentachlorophenol; Notice of Public Webinar and Registration...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Report on Carcinogens Webinar on Pentachlorophenol; Notice of Public Webinar and Registration Information SUMMARY: The National Toxicology Program (NTP) announces a public webinar, ``Human cancer studies on exposure to pentachlorophenol (PCP):...

  15. Occurrence, uses, and carcinogenicity of arylamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, King-Thom

    2015-01-01

    Arylamines are chemically synthesized and contained in oxidants, epoxy polymers, explosives, fungicides, pesticides, colorants, polyurethanes, and used in rubber, pharmacology, cosmetics, and other chemical industries. Many arylamines are ubiquitously present in cigarette smoke, cooking fume hoods, foods, automobile exhaust, industrial sites, etc. Some arylamines can be generated through azo reduction by intestinal, skin, and environmental microorganisms from azo dyes that are widely used. Arylamines can also be generated by reduction of the nitro-group containing polyhydrated hydrocarbons including muntions. Some arylamines are released by burning nitrogen containing organic materials at high temperatures. Some medical drugs are also arylamines. Furthermore, many arylamines are essential constituents of normal metabolism or the result of abnormal metabolism or dietary sources. Some arylamines are mutagenic, carcinogenic or the cause of other kinds of maladies. Some arylamine are considered the major etiological agents of bladder tumors in humans and animals but may also induce other types of cancers in various organs. The organ, tissue, and species specificity of the arylamine-inducing carcinogenesis may be determined by their availability, distribution, and the presence of metabolic activation/detoxicification enzymes of each organ or tissue of different species. The ubiquitous arylamines, therefore, pose serious hazards to human health and environment. This article will address the occurrence, uses, carcinogenicity, and other arylamines-induced diseases.

  16. The carcinogenicity of dietary acrylamide intake: A comparative discussion of epidemiological and experimental animal research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogervorst, J.G.F.; Baars, B.-J.; Schouten, L.J.; Konings, E.J.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2010-01-01

    Since 2002, it is known that the probable human carcinogen acrylamide is present in commonly consumed carbohydrate-rich foods, such as French fries and potato chips. In this review, the authors discuss the body of evidence on acrylamide carcinogenicity from both epidemiological and rodent studies, i

  17. 78 FR 4419 - Draft Report on Carcinogens Monographs for 1-Bromopropane and Cumene; Availability of Documents...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Draft Report on Carcinogens Monographs for 1-Bromopropane... meeting of the Draft Report on Carcinogens (RoC) Monographs for 1-Bromopropane and Cumene. These documents....m. until adjournment, approximately 2:00 p.m. EDT. Document Availability: Draft monographs will...

  18. Review of testing for human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bylund, D J; Ziegner, U H; Hooper, D G

    1992-06-01

    The performance of HIV testing requires meticulous attention to preanalytic, analytic, and postanalytic variables, especially matters of patient confidentiality. Laboratory directors must pay strict attention to quality control and quality assurance practices. Careful attention to these considerations can produce a screening program in low-prevalence populations that has an extremely low false-positive rate, with a positive predictive value of greater than 99%. Issuing a clear and concise laboratory report to the clinician is important. The Fifth Consensus Conference on Testing for Human Retroviruses of the Association of State and Territorial Public Health Laboratory Directors, March 1990, has recommended that ELISA be reported as reactive or nonreactive; IFA as reactive, nonreactive, or nonspecific, and WB as reactive, nonreactive, or indeterminate. It is recommended that the terms positive and negative be reserved for the summary interpretation given at the conclusion of the HIV-1 antibody testing algorithm. The testing algorithm used for HIV antibody screening at Scripps Clinic is shown in Figure 3. Other algorithms for complete testing on a single sample only or on two separate samples are reported. We agree with others that the patient should not be counseled for infection with HIV until a reactive confirmatory test(s) establishes a positive diagnosis. Certain special situations in diagnostic testing deserve comment. Establishing the diagnosis of HIV infection can be difficult in seronegative persons with acute infection. Polymerase chain reaction, viral culture or antigen detection may be useful tests in this situation. However, careful interpretation of test results and close correlation with patient risk factors are important to establish the proper diagnosis. Reports of seronegative persons, some remaining seronegative over a protracted time, have raised concerns over the transfusional risk of HIV infection. Blood donor screening programs are using

  19. Human Machine Interface Programming and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Thomas Garrison

    2013-01-01

    Human Machine Interface (HMI) Programming and Testing is about creating graphical displays to mimic mission critical ground control systems in order to provide NASA engineers with the ability to monitor the health management of these systems in real time. The Health Management System (HMS) is an online interactive human machine interface system that monitors all Kennedy Ground Control Subsystem (KGCS) hardware in the field. The Health Management System is essential to NASA engineers because it allows remote control and monitoring of the health management systems of all the Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC) and associated field devices. KGCS will have equipment installed at the launch pad, Vehicle Assembly Building, Mobile Launcher, as well as the Multi-Purpose Processing Facility. I am designing graphical displays to monitor and control new modules that will be integrated into the HMS. The design of the display screen will closely mimic the appearance and functionality of the actual modules. There are many different field devices used to monitor health management and each device has its own unique set of health management related data, therefore each display must also have its own unique way to display this data. Once the displays are created, the RSLogix5000 application is used to write software that maps all the required data read from the hardware to the graphical display. Once this data is mapped to its corresponding display item, the graphical display and hardware device will be connected through the same network in order to test all possible scenarios and types of data the graphical display was designed to receive. Test Procedures will be written to thoroughly test out the displays and ensure that they are working correctly before being deployed to the field. Additionally, the Kennedy Ground Controls Subsystem's user manual will be updated to explain to the NASA engineers how to use the new module displays.

  20. Use of a high-throughput umu-microplate test system for rapid detection of genotoxicity produced by mutagenic carcinogens and airborne particulate matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Yoshimitsu; Funasaka, Kunihiro; Kitano, Masaaki; Nakama, Akihiko; Yoshikura, Taro

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, we developed a rapid umu-microplate test system that uses the nitroreductase- and O-acetyltransferase-overproducing Salmonella typhimurium strain NM3009 and the O-acetyltransferase-overproducing S. typhimurium strain NM2009 to detect genotoxic activity in small volume samples. The assay was used to test the genotoxicity of several standard mutagens and environmental samples. Exponentially growing cultures of NM3009, NM2009, and the parental strain TA1535/pSK1002 were incubated in 96-well microplates with test chemicals both in the presence and in the absence of rat liver S9. The relative beta-galactosidase activities were then determined colorimetrically using either chlorophenol red-beta-D-galactopyranoside (CPRG) or O-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside (ONPG) as a measure of umuC gene induction activity. The sensitivities of NM3009 without S9 mix and NM2009 with S9 mix to nitroarenes and aromatic amines were up to 24- to 75-fold higher than those of the parent strain. Induction of umuC gene expression was detected more readily with CPRG than ONPG. The umu-microplate assay also detected genotoxicity in organic extracts of particulate matter from air samples collected in Osaka City, Japan. The pattern of the responses suggested that the genotoxic activity of the particulate extract was due primarily to nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Our results indicate that the umu-microplate assay may be a useful way of carrying out rapid screens for genotoxicity in small-volume environmental samples. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Development of a Medium-term Animal Model Using gpt Delta Rats to Evaluate Chemical Carcinogenicity and Genotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Kohei; Kijima, Aki; Ishii, Yuji; Takasu, Shinji; Jin, Meilan; Kuroda, Ken; Kawaguchi, Hiroaki; Miyoshi, Noriaki; Nohmi, Takehiko; Ogawa, Kumiko; Umemura, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the potential for development of an animal model (GPG46) capable of rapidly detecting chemical carcinogenicity and the underlying mechanisms of action were examined in gpt delta rats using a reporter gene assay to detect mutations and a medium-term rat liver bioassay to detect tumor promotion. The tentative protocol for the GPG46 model was developed based on the results of dose-response exposure to diethylnitrosamine (DEN) and treatment with phenobarbital over time following DEN administration. Briefly, gpt delta rats were exposed to various chemicals for 4 weeks, followed by a partial hepatectomy (PH) to collect samples for an in vivo mutation assay. The mutant frequencies (MFs) of the reporter genes were examined as an indication of tumor initiation. A single intraperitoneal (ip) injection of 10 mg/kg DEN was administered to rats 18 h after the PH to initiate hepatocytes. Tumor-promoting activity was evaluated based on the development of glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P)-positive foci at week 10. The genotoxic carcinogens 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF), 2-amino-3-methylimidazo [4,5-f] quinolone (IQ) and safrole (SF), the non-genotoxic carcinogens piperonyl butoxide (PBO) and phenytoin (PHE), the non-carcinogen acetaminophen (APAP) and the genotoxic non-hepatocarcinogen aristolochic acid (AA) were tested to validate the GPG46 model. The validation results indicate that the GPG46 model could be a powerful tool in understanding chemical carcinogenesis and provide valuable information regarding human risk hazards. PMID:23723564

  2. In vivo rat glandular stomach and colon micronucleus tests: Kinetics of micronucleated cells, apoptosis, and cell proliferation in the target tissues after a single oral administration of stomach- or colon-carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, Wakako; Okada, Emiko; Fujiishi, Yohei; Narumi, Kazunori; Yasutake, Nobuyoshi

    2013-08-15

    We have developed in vivo micronucleus (MN) tests by using an epithelial cell suspension isolated from the glandular stomach and colon of rodents. In the present study, our aim was to demonstrate the characteristics of the glandular stomach and colon MN tests by analyzing time-related changes in MN frequencies, apoptosis and cell proliferation in the target tissues of male CD (SD) rats that were orally administered a single dose of a stomach- or colon-targeted carcinogen, i.e., N-nitroso-N-methylurea (MNU) or N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) for the stomach and 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH) for the colon. After treatment, the MN frequencies significantly increased in the respective target tissues, peaking at 48-96h and decreasing afterwards. The time-response pattern could be explained by the epithelial cell turnover confirmed with a labeling experiment using the thymidine analog, 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU). In the study with MNU and DMH, we also prepared paraffin sections of the respective target tissues for the immunohistochemical evaluation of apoptosis and cell proliferation. The incidence of apoptosis increased in the early phase (6 and/or 24h) after treatment, and then decreased. Cell proliferation was depressed when a high incidence of apoptosis was observed, and then it recovered until 72h. MN frequencies increased with the recovery of cell proliferation occurring later than the peak apoptosis response. These results indicated that micronuclei were induced in the glandular stomach and colon epithelial cells by administration of the model chemicals. On the other hand, MNU induced significant increases of MNed cells in both the glandular stomach and bone marrow in the same rats, while MNNG did only in the glandular stomach when administered orally up to 1/4 of the LD50. These results suggest that the glandular stomach- and colon-MN tests would be useful for evaluating the genotoxicity of agents in the gastrointestinal tract.

  3. Psychometric testing and Human Resource Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. van der Merwe

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available This is a cumulative report on the findings of various exploratory research that were done with regard to the practice of psychometric testing in the Eastern Cape. Recent and ongoing developments in the South African labour legislation, and especially the implications of the Employment Equity Act, highlight once again the importance of the validation of all instruments to be used for human assessment and selection purposes. Information was gathered to establish which psychometric tests are used, and for what purposes, in industry today. Biographical information on each organisation is supplied, including the number of employees. The role of psychometric testing in the selection procedure is discussed. The different tests used, as well as the test users, are also indicated. The findings of other, related research, as well as comments, recommendations and shortcomings, are discussed. Opsomming Hierdie is ‘n kumulatiewe verslag wat die resultate verstrek van verskeie verkennende ondersoeke wat gedoen is na die aanwending van psigometriese toetsing in die Oos-Kaap. Onlangse en voortdurende ontwikkelinge in die Suid-Afrikaanse arbeidswetgewing, en veral die implikasies van die Wet op Gelyke Indiensneming, beklemtoon weer eens die belangrikheid van die validering van enige instrumente wat gebruik word vir evaluerings- en keuringsdoeleindes van individue. Inligting is ingewin om te bepaal watter psigometriese toetse, sowel as vir watter doel, vandag in die bedryf gebruik word. Biografiese inligting oor die onderskeie organisasies, insluitende hul aantal werknemers, word verstrek. Die rol van psigometriese toetsing in die keuringsproses word bespreek. Die verskillende toetse wat deur die organisasies gebruik word, sowel as die toetsge-bruikers, word ook aangedui. Die bevindinge van ander, relevante navorsing, sowel as opmerkings, aanbevelings en tekortkominge word bespreek.

  4. Carcinogenic risk of copper gluconate evaluated by a rat medium-term liver carcinogenicity bioassay protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Masayoshi; Usuda, Koji; Hayashi, Seigo; Ogawa, Izumi; Furukawa, Satoshi [Nissan Chemical Industries Limited, Toxicology and Environmental Science Department, Biological Research Laboratories, Saitama (Japan); Igarashi, Maki [Tokyo University of Agriculture, Laboratory of Protection of Body Function, Department of Food and Nutritional Science, Graduate School of Agriculture, Tokyo (Japan); Nakae, Dai [Tokyo University of Agriculture, Laboratory of Protection of Body Function, Department of Food and Nutritional Science, Graduate School of Agriculture, Tokyo (Japan); Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Public Health, Tokyo (Japan)

    2008-08-15

    Carcinogenic risk and molecular mechanisms underlying the liver tumor-promoting activity of copper gluconate, an additive of functional foods, were investigated using a rat medium-term liver carcinogenicity bioassay protocol (Ito test) and a 2-week short-term administration experiment. In the medium-term liver bioassay, Fischer 344 male rats were given a single i.p. injection of N-nitrosodiethylamine at a dose of 200 mg/kg b.w. as a carcinogenic initiator. Starting 2 weeks thereafter, rats received 0, 10, 300 or 6,000 ppm of copper gluconate in diet for 6 weeks. All rats underwent 2/3 partial hepatectomy at the end of week 3, and all surviving rats were killed at the end of week 8. In the short-term experiment, rats were given 0, 10, 300 or 6,000 ppm of copper gluconate for 2 weeks. Numbers of glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P) positive lesions, single GST-P-positive hepatocytes and 8-oxoguanine-positive hepatocytes, and levels of cell proliferation and apoptosis in the liver were significantly increased by 6,000 ppm of copper gluconate in the medium-term liver bioassay. Furthermore, hepatic mRNA expression of genes relating to the metal metabolism, inflammation and apoptosis were elevated by 6,000 ppm of copper gluconate both in the medium-term liver bioassay and the short-term experiments. These results indicate that copper gluconate possesses carcinogenic risk toward the liver at the high dose level, and that oxidative stress and inflammatory and pro-apoptotic signaling statuses may participate in its underlying mechanisms. (orig.)

  5. Comparative toxicity and carcinogenicity of soluble and insoluble cobalt compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behl, Mamta; Stout, Matthew D; Herbert, Ronald A; Dill, Jeffrey A; Baker, Gregory L; Hayden, Barry K; Roycroft, Joseph H; Bucher, John R; Hooth, Michelle J

    2015-07-03

    Occupational exposure to cobalt is of widespread concern due to its use in a variety of industrial processes and the occurrence of occupational disease. Due to the lack of toxicity and carcinogenicity data following exposure to cobalt, and questions regarding bioavailability following exposure to different forms of cobalt, the NTP conducted two chronic inhalation exposure studies in rats and mice, one on soluble cobalt sulfate heptahydrate, and a more recent study on insoluble cobalt metal. Herein, we compare and contrast the toxicity profiles following whole-body inhalation exposures to these two forms of cobalt. In general, both forms were genotoxic in the Salmonella T98 strain in the absence of effects on micronuclei. The major sites of toxicity and carcinogenicity in both chronic inhalation studies were the respiratory tract in rats and mice, and the adrenal gland in rats. In addition, there were distinct sites of toxicity and carcinogenicity noted following exposure to cobalt metal. In rats, carcinogenicity was observed in the blood, and pancreas, and toxicity was observed in the testes of rats and mice. Taken together, these findings suggest that both forms of cobalt, soluble and insoluble, appear to be multi-site rodent carcinogens following inhalation exposure. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  6. Diphtheria toxin resistance in human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts in the in vivo somatic cell mutation test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomkins, D.J.; Wei, L.; Laurie, K.E.

    1985-01-01

    It has been shown that circulating peripheral blood lymphocytes can be used for the enumeration of 6-thioguanine-resistant cells that presumably arise by mutation in vivo. This somatic cell mutation test has been studied in lymphocytes from human populations exposed to known mutagens and/or carcinogens. The sensitivity of the test could be further enhanced by including other gene markers, since there is evidence for locus-specific differences in response to mutagens. Resistance to diphtheria toxin (Dip/sup r/) seemed like a potential marker to incorporate into the test because the mutation acts codominantly, can readily be selected in human diploid fibroblasts and Chinese hamster cells with no evidence for cell density or cross-feeding effects, and can be assayed for in nondividing cells by measuring protein synthesis inhibition. Blood samples were collected from seven individuals, and fresh, cryopreserved, or Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphocytes were tested for continued DNA synthesis (TH-thymidine, autoradiography) or protein synthesis (TVS-methionine, scintillation counting). Both fresh and cryopreserved lymphocytes, stimulated to divide with phytohemagglutinin (PHA), continued to synthesize DNA in the presence of high doses of diphtheria toxin (DT). Similarly, both dividing (PHA-stimulated) and nondividing fresh lymphocytes carried on significant levels of protein synthesis even 68 hr after exposure to 100 flocculating units (LF)/ml DT. The results suggest that human T and B lymphocytes may not be as sensitive to DT protein synthesis inhibition as human fibroblast and Chinese hamster cells. For this reason, Dip/sup r/ may not be a suitable marker for the somatic cell mutation test.

  7. OVERVIEW OF DRINKING WATER MUTAGENICITY AND CARCINOGENICITY AND RISK FOR BLADDER CANCER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Among the 11 disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water that are regulated by the U.S. EPA, (a) 2 DBPs (chloroacetic acid and chlorite) are not carcinogenic-in either of 2 species; (b) chlorite is not carcinogenic in 3 rodent assays and has never been tested for genotoxici...

  8. GENETIC POLYMORPHISMS IN HUMAN LIVER PHENOL SULFOTRANSFERASES INVOLVED IN THE BIOACTIVATION OF N-HYDROXY DERIVATIVES OF CARCINOGENIC ARYLAMINES AND HETEROCYCLIC AMINES. (R825280)

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractThree related forms of phenol sulfotransferase (PSULT), thermostable ST1A2 (SULT1A2hum) and ST1A3 (SULT1A1hum) and a thermolabile TL-PST (SULT1A3hum), are known to exist in human livers. Thermostable forms, whose activities are polymorphically distributed, hav...

  9. Conversion of Suspected Food Carcinogen 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural by Sulfotransferases and Aldehyde Dehydrogenases in Postmitochondrial Tissue Preparations of Humans, Mice, and Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachse, Benjamin; Meinl, Walter; Glatt, Hansruedi; Monien, Bernhard H

    2016-01-01

    The food contaminant 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) is formed by heat- and acid-catalyzed reactions from carbohydrates. More than 80% of HMF is metabolized by oxidation of the aldehyde group in mice and rats. Sulfo conjugation yields mutagenic 5-sulfoxymethylfurfural, the probable cause for the neoplastic effects observed in HMF-treated rodents. Considerable metabolic differences between species hinder assessing the tumorigenic risk associated with human dietary HMF uptake. Here, we assayed HMF turnover catalyzed by sulfotransferases or by aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) in postmitochondrial preparations from liver, kidney, colon, and lung of humans, mice, and rats. The tissues-specific clearance capacities of HMF sulfo conjugation (CL(SC)) and ALDH-catalyzed oxidation (CL(OX)) were concentrated to the liver. The hepatic clearance CL(SC) in mice (males: 487 µl/min/kg bw, females: 2520 µl/min/kg bw) and rats (males: 430 µl/min/kg bw, females: 198 µl/min/kg bw) were considerably higher than those in humans (males: 21.2 µl/min/kg bw, females: 32.2 µl/min/kg bw). The ALDH-related clearance rates CLOX in mice (males: 3400 ml/min/kg bw, females: 1410 ml/min/kg bw) were higher than those of humans (males: 436 ml/min/kg bw, females: 646 ml/min/kg bw) and rats (males: 627 ml/min/kg bw, females: 679 ml/min/kg bw). The ratio of CL(OX) to CL(SC) was lowest in female mice. This finding indicated that HMF sulfo conjugation was most substantial in the liver of female mice, a target tissue for HMF-induced neoplastic effects, and that humans may be less sensitive regarding HMF sulfo conjugation compared with the rodent models.

  10. NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase expression in Cyp1a-knockout and CYP1A-humanized mouse lines and its effect on bioactivation of the carcinogen aristolochic acid I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levova, Katerina; Moserova, Michaela [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Nebert, Daniel W. [Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati (United States); Phillips, David H. [Analytical and Environmental Sciences Division, MRC-HPA Centre for Environment and Health, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); Frei, Eva [Division of Preventive Oncology, National Center for Tumor Diseases, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Schmeiser, Heinz H. [Research Group Genetic Alterations in Carcinogenesis, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Arlt, Volker M. [Analytical and Environmental Sciences Division, MRC-HPA Centre for Environment and Health, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); Stiborova, Marie, E-mail: stiborov@natur.cuni.cz [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2012-12-15

    Aristolochic acid causes a specific nephropathy (AAN), Balkan endemic nephropathy, and urothelial malignancies. Using Western blotting suitable to determine protein expression, we investigated in several transgenic mouse lines expression of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1)—the most efficient cytosolic enzyme that reductively activates aristolochic acid I (AAI). The mouse tissues used were from previous studies [Arlt et al., Chem. Res. Toxicol. 24 (2011) 1710; Stiborova et al., Toxicol. Sci. 125 (2012) 345], in which the role of microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in AAI metabolism in vivo had been determined. We found that NQO1 levels in liver, kidney and lung of Cyp1a1(−/−), Cyp1a2(−/−) and Cyp1a1/1a2(−/−) knockout mouse lines, as well as in two CYP1A-humanized mouse lines harboring functional human CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 and lacking the mouse Cyp1a1/1a2 orthologs, differed from NQO1 levels in wild-type mice. NQO1 protein and enzymic activity were induced in hepatic and renal cytosolic fractions isolated from AAI-pretreated mice, compared with those in untreated mice. Furthermore, this increase in hepatic NQO1 enzyme activity was associated with bioactivation of AAI and elevated AAI-DNA adduct levels in ex vivo incubations of cytosolic fractions with DNA and AAI. In conclusion, AAI appears to increase its own metabolic activation by inducing NQO1, thereby enhancing its own genotoxic potential. Highlights: ► NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase expression in Cyp1a knockout and humanized CYP1A mice ► Reductive activation of the nephrotoxic and carcinogenic aristolochic acid I (AAI) ► NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase is induced in mice treated with AAI. ► Induced hepatic enzyme activity resulted in elevated AAI-DNA adduct levels.

  11. Transformation of human fibroblasts by ionizing radiation, a chemical carcinogen, or simian virus 40 correlates with an increase in susceptibility to the autonomous parvoviruses H-1 virus and minute virus of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornelis, J.J.; Becquart, P.; Duponchel, N.; Salome, N.; Avalosse, B.L.; Namba, M.; Rommelaere, J.

    1988-05-01

    Morphologically altered and established human fibroblasts, obtained either by /sup 60/Co gamma irradiation, treatment with the carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide, or simian virus 40 (SV40) infection, were compared with their normal finite-life parental strains for susceptibility to the autonomous parvoviruses H-1 virus and the prototype strain of minute virus of mice (MVMp). All transformed cells suffered greater virus-induced killing than their untransformed progenitors. The cytotoxic effect of H-1 virus was more severe than that of MVMp. Moreover, the level of viral DNA replication was much (10- to 85-fold) enhanced in the transformants compared with their untransformed parent cells. Thus, in this system, cell transformation appears to correlate with an increase in both DNA amplification and cytotoxicity of the parvoviruses. However, the accumulation of parvovirus DNA in the transformants was not always accompanied by the production of infectious virus. Like in vitro-transformed fibroblasts, a fibrosarcoma-derived cell line was sensitive to the killing effect of both H-1 virus and MVMp and amplified viral DNA to high extents. The results indicate that oncogenic transformation can be included among cellular states which modulate permissiveness to parvoviruses under defined growth conditions.

  12. Transformation of human fibroblasts by ionizing radiation, a chemical carcinogen, or simian virus 40 correlates with an increase in susceptibility to the autonomous parvoviruses H-1 virus and minute virus of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornelis, J.J.; Becquart, P.; Duponchel, N.; Salome, N.; Avalosse, B.L.; Namba, M.; Rommelaere, J.

    1988-05-01

    Morphologically altered and established human fibroblasts, obtained either by /sup 60/Co gamma irradiation, treatment with the carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide, or simian virus 40 (SV40) infection, were compared with their normal finite-life parental strains for susceptibility to the autonomous parvoviruses H-1 virus and the prototype strain of minute virus of mice (MVMp). All transformed cells suffered greater virus-induced killing than their untransformed progenitors. The cytotoxic effect of H-1 virus was more severe than that of MVMp. Moreover, the level of viral DNA replication was much (10- to 85-fold) enhanced in the transformants compared with their untransformed parent cells. Thus, in this system, cell transformation appears to correlate with an increase in both DNA amplification and cytotoxicity of the parvoviruses. However, the accumulation of parvovirus DNA in the transformants was not always accompanied by the production of infectious virus. Like in vitro-transformed fibroblasts, a fibrosarcoma-derived cell line was sensitive to the killing effect of both H-1 virus and MVMp and amplified viral DNA to high extents. The results indicate that oncogenic transformation can be included among cellular states which modulate permissiveness to parvoviruses under defined growth conditions.

  13. Evaluation of carcinogenic potential of the herbicide glyphosate, drawing on tumor incidence data from fourteen chronic/carcinogenicity rodent studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greim, Helmut; Saltmiras, David; Mostert, Volker; Strupp, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Abstract Glyphosate, an herbicidal derivative of the amino acid glycine, was introduced to agriculture in the 1970s. Glyphosate targets and blocks a plant metabolic pathway not found in animals, the shikimate pathway, required for the synthesis of aromatic amino acids in plants. After almost forty years of commercial use, and multiple regulatory approvals including toxicology evaluations, literature reviews, and numerous human health risk assessments, the clear and consistent conclusions are that glyphosate is of low toxicological concern, and no concerns exist with respect to glyphosate use and cancer in humans. This manuscript discusses the basis for these conclusions. Most toxicological studies informing regulatory evaluations are of commercial interest and are proprietary in nature. Given the widespread attention to this molecule, the authors gained access to carcinogenicity data submitted to regulatory agencies and present overviews of each study, followed by a weight of evidence evaluation of tumor incidence data. Fourteen carcinogenicity studies (nine rat and five mouse) are evaluated for their individual reliability, and select neoplasms are identified for further evaluation across the data base. The original tumor incidence data from study reports are presented in the online data supplement. There was no evidence of a carcinogenic effect related to glyphosate treatment. The lack of a plausible mechanism, along with published epidemiology studies, which fail to demonstrate clear, statistically significant, unbiased and non-confounded associations between glyphosate and cancer of any single etiology, and a compelling weight of evidence, support the conclusion that glyphosate does not present concern with respect to carcinogenic potential in humans.

  14. A call to expand regulation to all carcinogenic fibrous minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, F.; Steele, I.; Ambrosi, J.; Carbone, M.

    2013-05-01

    vitro and in vivo studies have shown its toxic and carcinogenic properties; 2) the carcinogenic properties of erionite have been demonstrated, and erionite has been associated with a mesothelioma epidemic in Anatolia, Turkey. Erionite is also widespread in areas of north central USA, where it is contained in gravel paving stone, and is cause for concern due to increased commercial traffic. Numerous studies have shown that non-regulated fibrous materials pose similar health hazards to regulated "asbestos". An increase in human activities in areas where these fibrous minerals are present, such as in surficial rock and soil, will result in the generation of airborne dust, exposing people to carcinogenic fibers. The current limited regulation leads people to believe that only the six mineral fibers referred to as "asbestos" are dangerous. We propose that fibrous minerals should be regulated as a single group, as they have similar deleterious effects on the human body. Regulations would be simplified and more effective if they embrace all carcinogenic fibrous minerals.

  15. Predicting carcinogenicity of diverse chemicals using probabilistic neural network modeling approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Kunwar P., E-mail: kpsingh_52@yahoo.com [Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, New Delhi (India); Environmental Chemistry Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India); Gupta, Shikha; Rai, Premanjali [Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, New Delhi (India); Environmental Chemistry Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India)

    2013-10-15

    abilities of the interspecies GRNN model to predict the carcinogenic potency of diverse chemicals. - Highlights: • Global robust models constructed for carcinogenicity prediction of diverse chemicals. • Tanimoto/BDS test revealed structural diversity of chemicals and nonlinearity in data. • PNN/GRNN successfully predicted carcinogenicity/carcinogenic potency of chemicals. • Developed interspecies PNN/GRNN models for carcinogenicity prediction. • Proposed models can be used as tool to predict carcinogenicity of new chemicals.

  16. Excretory/secretory products of the carcinogenic liver fluke are endocytosed by human cholangiocytes and drive cell proliferation and IL6 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiyadet, Sujittra; Smout, Michael; Johnson, Michael; Whitchurch, Cynthia; Turnbull, Lynne; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Sotillo, Javier; Loukas, Alex; Sripa, Banchob

    2015-10-01

    Liver fluke infection caused by Opisthorchis viverrini remains a major public health problem in many parts of Asia including Thailand, Lao PDR, Vietnam and Cambodia, where there is a strikingly high incidence of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA - hepatic cancer of the bile duct epithelium). Among other factors, uptake of O. viverrini excretory/secretory products (OvES) by biliary epithelial cells has been postulated to be responsible for chronic inflammation and proliferation of cholangiocytes, but the mechanisms by which cells internalise O. viverrini excretory/secretory products are still unknown. Herein we incubated normal human cholangiocytes (H69), human cholangiocarcinoma cells (KKU-100, KKU-M156) and human colon cancer (Caco-2) cells with O. viverrini excretory/secretory products and analysed the effects of different endocytic inhibitors to address the mechanism of cellular uptake of ES proteins. Opisthorchis viverrini excretory/secretory products was internalised preferentially by liver cell lines, and most efficiently/rapidly by H69 cells. There was no evidence for trafficking of ES proteins to cholangiocyte organelles, and most of the fluorescence was detected in the cytoplasm. Pretreatment with clathrin inhibitors significantly reduced the uptake of O. viverrini excretory/secretory products, particularly by H69 cells. Opisthorchis viverrini excretory/secretory products induced proliferation of liver cells (H69 and CCA lines) but not intestinal (Caco-2) cells, and proliferation was blocked using inhibitors of the classical endocytic pathways (clathrin and caveolae). Opisthorchis viverrini excretory/secretory products drove IL6 secretion by H69 cells but not Caco-2 cells, and cytokine secretion was significantly reduced by endocytosis inhibitors. This the first known study to address the endocytosis of helminth ES proteins by host epithelial cells and sheds light on the pathways by which this parasite causes one of the most devastating forms of cancer in south

  17. Switch from cytology-based to human papillomavirus test-based cervical screening: implications for colposcopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras, Carolina; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Rodríguez, Ana C; Morales, Jorge; Burk, Robert D; Alfaro, Mario; Hutchinson, Martha; Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan; Sherman, Mark E; Wacholder, Sholom; Solomon, Diane; Schiffman, Mark

    2012-04-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing is more sensitive than cytology; some cervical cancer prevention programs will switch from cytology to carcinogenic HPV test-based screening. The objective of our study is to evaluate the clinical implications of a switch to HPV test-based screening on performance and workload of colposcopy. Women in the population-based, 7-year Guanacaste cohort study were screened at enrollment using cytology. We also took another specimen for HPV DNA testing and collected magnified cervical photographic images (cervigrams). A final case diagnosis (≥cervical intraepithelial neoplasia [CIN] grade 3, CIN2, lesions at referral to colposcopy and the sensitivity versus specificity trade-off of the colposcopic impressions would be similar to programs using cytology (≥ atypical squamous cells of unknown significance [ASCUS]) for referral. The major concern with switching from cytology to more sensitive HPV screening is management of the many HPV-positive women, including those with still nonvisible ≥CIN2 lesions. Our data support the need for a nonvisual diagnostic method to guide management and treatment of HPV-positive women. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  18. Carcinogenic metal compounds: recent insight into molecular and cellular mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyersmann, Detmar [University of Bremen (Germany). Biochemistry, Department of Biology and Chemistry; Hartwig, Andrea [Technical University of Berlin (Germany). Institute of Food Technology and Food Chemistry

    2008-08-15

    Mechanisms of carcinogenicity are discussed for metals and their compounds, classified as carcinogenic to humans or considered to be carcinogenic to humans: arsenic, antimony, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, nickel and vanadium. Physicochemical properties govern uptake, intracellular distribution and binding of metal compounds. Interactions with proteins (e.g., with zinc finger structures) appear to be more relevant for metal carcinogenicity than binding to DNA. In general, metal genotoxicity is caused by indirect mechanisms. In spite of diverse physicochemical properties of metal compounds, three predominant mechanisms emerge: (1) interference with cellular redox regulation and induction of oxidative stress, which may cause oxidative DNA damage or trigger signaling cascades leading to stimulation of cell growth; (2) inhibition of major DNA repair systems resulting in genomic instability and accumulation of critical mutations; (3) deregulation of cell proliferation by induction of signaling pathways or inactivation of growth controls such as tumor suppressor genes. In addition, specific metal compounds exhibit unique mechanisms such as interruption of cell-cell adhesion by cadmium, direct DNA binding of trivalent chromium, and interaction of vanadate with phosphate binding sites of protein phosphatases. (orig.)

  19. Metabolism of benzo(a)pyrene, N-nitrosomethylamine, and N-nitrosopyrrolidine and identification of the major carcinogen-DNA adducts formed in cultured human esophagus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1979-01-01

    The wide variation in the world-wide incidence of esophageal carcinoma suggests that environmental agents including chemicals cause this cancer. Since the interaction between chemical procarcinogens and human esophagus has not been studied previously, we examined the metabolic fate of benzo......(a)pyrene (BP), N-nitrosodimethylamine (DMN), and A/-nitrosopyrrolidine in cultured nontumorous esophagus from two patients with and six patients without esophageal carcinoma. Esophageal explants were cultured in a chemically defined medium for 7 days prior to adding [3H]BP (1.5 JUM),[14C]DMN (100 /IM), or [14C...

  20. Exploring the Molecular Mechanisms of Nickel-Induced Genotoxicity and Carcinogenicity: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Keyuna S.; Buchner, Virginia; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2011-01-01

    Nickel, a naturally occurring element that exists in various mineral forms, is mainly found in soil and sediment, and its mobilization is influenced by the physicochemical properties of the soil. Industrial sources of nickel include metallurgical processes such as electroplating, alloy production, stainless steel, and nickel-cadmium batteries. Nickel industries, oil- and coal-burning power plants, and trash incinerators have been implicated in its release into the environment. In humans, nickel toxicity is influenced by the route of exposure, dose, and solubility of the nickel compound. Lung inhalation is the major route of exposure for nickel-induced toxicity. Nickel may also be ingested or absorbed through the skin. The primary target organs are the kidneys and lungs. Other organs such as the liver, spleen, heart and testes may also be affected to a lesser extent. Although the most common health effect is an allergic reaction, research has also demonstrated that nickel is carcinogenic to humans. The focus of the present review is on recent research concerning the molecular mechanisms of nickel-induced genotoxicity and carcinogenicity. We first present a background on the occurrence of nickel in the environment, human exposure, and human health effects. PMID:21905451

  1. Anti-carcinogenic properties of omeprazole against human colon cancer cells and azoxymethane-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci formation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patlolla, Jagan M R; Zhang, Yuting; Li, Qian; Steele, Vernon E; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2012-01-01

    Omeprazole is a proton pump inhibitor, a widely used drug to treat ulcers and gastroesophageal refluxdisease. We have evaluated colon cancer chemopreventive properties of omeprazole using azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in male F344 rats and analyzed cell growth inhibition and apoptosis induction in human colon cancer cells. Five-week-old male F344 rats were fed a control or experimental diet containing two doses of omeprazole (200 and 400 ppm). After one week, all animals were s.c. injected with AOM (15 mg/kg body weight, once weekly for two weeks). Rats continued on experimental diets for seven more weeks before being sacrificed. Colons were histopathologically evaluated for ACF. Human colon cancer HCT-116 and HCA-7 cells treated with omeprazole were evaluated for different markers associated with proliferation and apoptotic markers using Western blot technique. Rats fed with 200 and 400 ppm of omeprazole significantly suppressed total colonic ACF formation (~30%, Pcancer cell lines HCT-116 and HCA-7 cells resulted in induction of p21waf1/cip1 and decreased the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Bcl-XL and survivin in a dose-dependent manner. Anticancer properties observed in colon cancer cell lines suggest that omeprazole may induce key signaling molecules of antiproliferation and inhibition of anti-apoptotic proteins.

  2. Lactoperoxidase-catalyzed activation of carcinogenic aromatic and heterocyclic amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlewska-Roberts, Katarzyna M; Teitel, Candee H; Lay, Jackson O; Roberts, Dean W; Kadlubar, Fred F

    2004-12-01

    Lactoperoxidase, an enzyme secreted from the human mammary gland, plays a host defensive role through antimicrobial activity. It has been implicated in mutagenic and carcinogenic activation in the human mammary gland. The potential role of heterocyclic and aromatic amines in the etiology of breast cancer led us to examination of the lactoperoxidase-catalyzed activation of the most commonly studied arylamine carcinogens: 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]-pyridine (PhIP), benzidine, 4-aminobiphenyl (ABP), 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ), and 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx). In vitro activation was performed with lactoperoxidase (partially purified from bovine milk or human milk) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and calf thymus DNA. Products formed during enzymatic activation were monitored by HPLC with ultraviolet and radiometric detection. Two of these products were characterized as hydrazo and azo derivatives by means of mass spectrometry. The DNA binding level of 3H- and 14C-radiolabeled amines after peroxidase-catalyzed activation was dependent on the hydrogen peroxide concentration, and the highest levels of carcinogen binding to DNA were observed at 100 microM H2O2. Carcinogen activation and the level of binding to DNA were in the order of benzidine > ABP > IQ > MeIQx > PhIP. One of the ABP adducts was identified, and the level at which it is formed was estimated to be six adducts/10(5) nucleotides. The susceptibility of aromatic and heterocyclic amines for lactoperoxidase-catalyzed activation and the binding levels of activated products to DNA suggest a potential role of lactoperoxidase-catalyzed activation of carcinogens in the etiology of breast cancer.

  3. 76 FR 71037 - Proposed National Toxicology Program (NTP) Review Process for the Report on Carcinogens: Request...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Proposed National Toxicology Program (NTP) Review Process for the Report on Carcinogens... Toxicology Program (DNTP), National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS); National Institutes... (see ADDRESSES). Dated: November 8, 2011. John R. Bucher, Associate Director, National...

  4. Urinary Metabolites of the Dietary Carcinogen PhIP are Predictive of Colon DNA Adducts After a Low Dose Exposure in Humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malfatti, M; Dingley, K; Nowell, S; Ubick, E; Mulakken, N; Nelson, D; Lang, N; Felton, J; Turteltaub, K

    2006-04-28

    Epidemiologic evidence indicates that exposure to heterocyclic amines (HAs) in the diet is an important risk factor for the development of colon cancer. Well-done cooked meats contain significant levels of HAs which have been shown to cause cancer in laboratory animals. To better understand the mechanisms of HA bioactivation in humans, the most mass abundant HA, 2-amino-l-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), was used to assess the relationship between PhIP metabolism and DNA adduct formation. Ten human volunteers were administered a dietary relevant dose of [{sup 14}C]PhIP 48-72 h prior to surgery to remove colon tumors. Urine was collected for 24 h after dosing for metabolite analysis, and DNA was extracted from colon tissue and analyzed by accelerator mass spectrometry for DNA adducts. All ten subjects were phenotyped for CYP1A2, NAT2, and SULT1A1 enzyme activity. Twelve PhIP metabolites were detected in the urine samples. The most abundant metabolite in all volunteers was N-hydroxy-PhIP-N{sup 2}-glucuronide. Metabolite levels varied significantly between the volunteers. Interindividual differences in colon DNA adducts levels were observed between each individual. The data showed that individuals with a rapid CYP1A2 phenotype and high levels of urinary N-hydroxy-PhIP-N{sup 2}-glucuronide, had the lowest level of colon PhIP-DNA adducts. This suggests that glucuronidation plays a significant role in detoxifying N-hydroxy-PhIP. The levels of urinary N-hydroxy-PhIP-N{sup 2}-glucuronide were negatively correlated to colon DNA adduct levels. Although it is difficult to make definite conclusions from a small data set, the results from this pilot study have encouraged further investigations using a much larger study group.

  5. Short-term carcinogenicity testing of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) and 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f] quinoline (IQ) in E mu-pim-1 transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ilona Kryspin; Mortensen, Alicja; Kristiansen, E.

    1996-01-01

    ]pyridine (PhIP) for 7 months or with 0.03% 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) for 6 months, PhIP and IQ are heterocyclic amines formed during cooking of meat and fish and are mutagenic to bacteria and cultured mammalian cells, PhIP is a potent mouse lymphomagen, while IQ is a liver carcinogen...... and also causes lung tumors and tumors of the forestomach in mice. We found that transgenic E mu-pim-1 mice are highly susceptible to PhIP induced lymphomagenesis but do not respond to the IQ treatment, PhIP feeding of E mu-pim-1 mice not only increased the total number of T-cell lymphomas but also...... to non-transgenic mice. Our results suggest that the transgenic E mu-pim-1 mouse may be a useful model for short-term carcinogenicity screening of potential genotoxic carcinogens having the lymphoid system as target tissue, The carcinogen IQ which does not have the lymphoid system as a target...

  6. Mechanism of Error-Free Bypass of the Environmental Carcinogen N-(2'-Deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-3-aminobenzanthrone Adduct by Human DNA Polymerase η.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Amritraj; Politica, Dustin A; Chatterjee, Arindom; Tokarsky, E John; Suo, Zucai; Basu, Ashis K; Stone, Michael P; Egli, Martin

    2016-11-03

    The environmental pollutant 3-nitrobenzanthrone produces bulky aminobenzanthrone (ABA) DNA adducts with both guanine and adenine nucleobases. A major product occurs at the C8 position of guanine (C8-dG-ABA). These adducts present a strong block to replicative polymerases but, remarkably, can be bypassed in a largely error-free manner by the human Y-family polymerase η (hPol η). Here, we report the crystal structure of a ternary Pol⋅DNA⋅dCTP complex between a C8-dG-ABA-containing template:primer duplex and hPol η. The complex was captured at the insertion stage and provides crucial insight into the mechanism of error-free bypass of this bulky lesion. Specifically, bypass involves accommodation of the ABA moiety inside a hydrophobic cleft to the side of the enzyme active site and formation of an intra-nucleotide hydrogen bond between the phosphate and ABA amino moiety, allowing the adducted guanine to form a standard Watson-Crick pair with the incoming dCTP. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Dehydropyrrolizidine Alkaloid Toxicity, Cytotoxicity, and Carcinogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan L. Stegelmeier

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloid (DHPA-producing plants have a worldwide distribution amongst flowering plants and commonly cause poisoning of livestock, wildlife, and humans. Previous work has produced considerable understanding of DHPA metabolism, toxicity, species susceptibility, conditions, and routes of exposure, and pathogenesis of acute poisoning. Intoxication is generally caused by contaminated grains, feed, flour, and breads that result in acute, high-dose, short-duration poisoning. Acute poisoning produces hepatic necrosis that is usually confirmed histologically, epidemiologically, and chemically. Less is known about chronic poisoning that may result when plant populations are sporadic, used as tisanes or herbal preparations, or when DHPAs contaminate milk, honey, pollen, or other animal-derived products. Such subclinical exposures may contribute to the development of chronic disease in humans or may be cumulative and probably slowly progress until liver failure. Recent work using rodent models suggest increased neoplastic incidence even with very low DHPA doses of short durations. These concerns have moved some governments to prohibit or limit human exposure to DHPAs. The purpose of this review is to summarize some recent DHPA research, including in vitro and in vivo DHPA toxicity and carcinogenicity reports, and the implications of these findings with respect to diagnosis and prognosis for human and animal health.

  8. Dehydropyrrolizidine Alkaloid Toxicity, Cytotoxicity, and Carcinogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegelmeier, Bryan L.; Colegate, Steven M.; Brown, Ammon W.

    2016-01-01

    Dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloid (DHPA)-producing plants have a worldwide distribution amongst flowering plants and commonly cause poisoning of livestock, wildlife, and humans. Previous work has produced considerable understanding of DHPA metabolism, toxicity, species susceptibility, conditions, and routes of exposure, and pathogenesis of acute poisoning. Intoxication is generally caused by contaminated grains, feed, flour, and breads that result in acute, high-dose, short-duration poisoning. Acute poisoning produces hepatic necrosis that is usually confirmed histologically, epidemiologically, and chemically. Less is known about chronic poisoning that may result when plant populations are sporadic, used as tisanes or herbal preparations, or when DHPAs contaminate milk, honey, pollen, or other animal-derived products. Such subclinical exposures may contribute to the development of chronic disease in humans or may be cumulative and probably slowly progress until liver failure. Recent work using rodent models suggest increased neoplastic incidence even with very low DHPA doses of short durations. These concerns have moved some governments to prohibit or limit human exposure to DHPAs. The purpose of this review is to summarize some recent DHPA research, including in vitro and in vivo DHPA toxicity and carcinogenicity reports, and the implications of these findings with respect to diagnosis and prognosis for human and animal health. PMID:27916846

  9. Low intracellular ATP levels exacerbate carcinogen-induced inflammatory stress response and inhibit in vitro tubulogenesis in human brain endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Tahanian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth Tahanian, Sabrina Peiro, Borhane AnnabiLaboratoire d'Oncologie Moléculaire, Centre de Recherche BioMED, Département de Chimie, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montréal, Québec, CanadaAbstract: Solid tumor development requires angiogenesis and is correlated to the expression of inflammatory markers through cellular metabolic and energetic adaptation. While high glycolysis rates enable the cancer cell compartment to generate adenosine triphosphate (ATP, very little is known about the impact of low intracellular ATP concentrations within the vascular endothelial cell compartment, which is responsible for tumor angiogenesis. Here, we investigated the effect of 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG, a glucose analog that inhibits glycolysis through intracellular ATP depletion, on human brain microvascular endothelial cell (HBMEC angiogenic properties. While preformed capillaries remained unaffected, we found that in vitro tubulogenesis was dose-dependently decreased by 2-DG and that this correlated with reduced intracellular ATP levels. Procarcinogenic signaling was induced with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA and found to trigger the proinflammatory marker cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress marker GRP78 expression, whose inductions were potentiated when PMA was combined with 2-DG treatment. Inversely, PMA-induced matrix-metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 gene expression and protein secretion were abrogated in the presence of 2-DG, and this can be partially explained by reduced nuclear factor-κB signaling. Collectively, we provide evidence for an intracellular ATP requirement in order for tubulogenesis to occur, and we link increases in ER stress to inflammation. A better understanding of the metabolic adaptations of the vascular endothelial cells that mediate tumor vascularization will help the development of new drugs and therapies.Keywords: endoplasmic reticulum stress, MMP-9, COX-2, 2-deoxy-D-glucose, endothelial

  10. Cell-mediated mutagenesis and cell transformation by chemical carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberman, E.; Langenbach, R.

    1977-01-01

    Results are reported from studies that showed that mutagenesis of mammalian cells can be achieved by carcinogenic polycyclic hydrocarbons, nitrosamines, and aflatoxins when tested in the presence of fibroblasts and hepatocytes which are able to metabolize these carcinogens. Further, we have found that there is a relationship between the degree of mutant induction and the degree of carcinogenicity of the different chemicals tested. By simultaneously measuring the frequency of cell transformation and the frequency of mutation at one locus (ouabain resistance) in the same cell system, it was possible to estimate the genetic target site for cell transformation. The results indicated that the target site for transformation is approximately 20 times larger than that determined for ouabain resistance. The results suggest that cell transformation may be due to a mutational event and the mutation can occur in one out of a small number of the same or different genes, and that the cell-mediated mutagenesis approach may be a valuable means of detecting tissue-specific carcinogens.

  11. Sensory testing of the human gastrointestinal tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christina Brock; Lars Arendt-Nielsen; Oliver Wilder-Smith; Asbjφrn Mohr Drewes

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this appraisal is to shed light on the various approaches to screen sensory information in the human gut. Understanding and characterization of sensory symptoms in gastrointestinal disorders is poor. Experimental methods allowing the investigator to control stimulus intensity and modality, as well as using validated methods for assessing sensory response have contributed to the understanding of pain mechanisms. Mechanical stimulation based on impedance planimetry allows direct recordings of luminal cross-sectional areas, and combined with ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, the contribution of different gut layers can be estimated. Electrical stimulation depolarizes free nerve endings non-selectively. Consequently, the stimulation paradigm (single, train, tetanic) influences the involved sensory nerves. Visual controlled electrical stimulation combines the probes with an endoscopic approach, which allows the investigator to inspect and obtain small biopsies from the stimulation site. Thermal stimulation (cold or warm) activates selectively mucosal receptors, and chemical substances such as acid and capsaicin (either alone or in combination) are used to evoke pain and sensitization. The possibility of multimodal (e.g. mechanical, electrical, thermal and chemical) stimulation in different gut segments has developed visceral pain research. The major advantage is involvement of distinctive receptors, various sensory nerves and different pain pathways mimicking clinical pain that favors investigation of central pain mechanisms involved in allodynia, hyperalgesia and referred pain. As impairment of descending control mechanisms partly underlies the pathogenesis in chronic pain, a cold pressor test that indirectly stimulates such control mechanisms can be added. Hence, the methods undoubtedly represent a major step forward in the future characterization and treatment of patients with various diseases of the gut, which provides knowledge to

  12. On the issue of higher human sensitivity to carcinogenic substances in early childhood; Zur Frage einer hoeheren Empfindlichkeit von Kindern gegenueber krebserzeugenden Stoffen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, K. [comp.

    1998-09-01

    Age-dependent carcinogenesis in humans has been proven with high probability for a number of substances investigated within one or several model systems. Sometimes, very high tumor incidence after short exposure time was observed. Extreme differences were found in some models. (A) Vinyl chloride, Maltoni et al.,1981: 6000 ppm, hepatic angiosarcoma incidence: - Exposure for 4 weeks, from day 1: 40.5 %, - exposure for 4 weeks, from week 13: 0%, - exposure for 52 weeks, from week 13: 22%. Hepatoma incidence: - Exposure for 4 weeks, from day 1: 47.6%, exposure for 4 weeks, from week 13: 0%, exposure for 52 weeks, from week 13: 1.7%. (B) Diethyl nitrosamine, Dyroff et al., 1986: (DEN + phenobarbital), hepatic carcinoma after exposure of rats for 6 weeks: - as from 4 weeks of age: 100% incidence, - as from 8 weeks of age: 0% incidence. (C) Benzopyrene, Vesselinovitch et al., 1975: Hepatic tumor incidence after single, parenteral administration to rats: - at day 1: males: 81%, females: 18%, - at day 42: males: 9%, females: 0%. As is shown by the study on vinyl chloride by Maltoni et al., the same exposure concentration may lead to higher tumor incidence in young animals after short exposure times than it does in long-term experiments with adult animals. Genetic toxicity was detected for all substances, except for saccharin. So it can be assumed that the mechanism of carcinogenesis has an essential influence on the age-dependence. This conclusion agrees well with mechanistic approaches. (orig./CB) [German] Fuer eine Reihe von Schadstoffen ist eine Altersabhaengigkeit der Kanzerogenese mit hoher Wahrscheinlichkeit in einem oder mehreren Modellsystemen gezeigt worden. Dabei wurden zum Teil bereits nach kurzer Expositionszeit sehr hohe Tumorausbeuten erzielt. Extreme Unterschiede wurden in folgenden Modellen beobachtet. (A) Vinylchlorid, Maltoni et al., 1981: 6000 ppm, Inzidenz Leberangiosarkome: - Exposition ueber 4 Wochen ab Tag 1: 40,5%, - Exposition ueber 4 Wochen ab 13

  13. Impact of Environmental Exposures on the Mutagenicity/Carcinogenicity of Heterocyclic Amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felton, J S; Knize, M G; Bennett, L M; Malfatti, M A; Colvin, M E; Kulp, K S

    2003-12-19

    Carcinogenic heterocyclic amines are produced from overcooked foods and are highly mutagenic in most short-term test systems. One of the most abundant of these amines, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), induces breast, colon and prostate tumors in rats. Human dietary epidemiology studies suggest a strong correlation between either meat consumption or well-done muscle meat consumption and cancers of the colon, breast, stomach, lung and esophagus. For over 20 years our laboratory has helped define the human exposure to these dietary carcinogens. In this report we describe how various environmental exposures may modulate the risk from exposure to heterocyclic amines, especially PhIP. To assess the impact of foods on PhIP metabolism in humans, we developed an LC/MS/MS method to analyze the four major PhIP urinary metabolites following the consumption of a single portion of grilled chicken. Adding broccoli to the volunteers' diet altered the kinetics of PhIP metabolism. At the cellular level we have found that PhIP itself stimulates a significant estrogenic response in MCF-7 cells, but even more interestingly, co-incubation of the cells with herbal teas appear to enhance the response. Numerous environmental chemicals found in food or the atmosphere can impact the exposure, metabolism, and cell proliferation response of heterocyclic amines.

  14. Circulating mitochondrial DNA as biomarker linking environmental chemical exposure to early preclinical lesions elevation of mtDNA in human serum after exposure to carcinogenic halo-alkane-based pesticides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lygia T Budnik

    Full Text Available There is a need for a panel of suitable biomarkers for detection of environmental chemical exposure leading to the initiation or progression of degenerative diseases or potentially, to cancer. As the peripheral blood may contain increased levels of circulating cell-free DNA in diseased individuals, we aimed to evaluate this DNA as effect biomarker recognizing vulnerability after exposure to environmental chemicals. We recruited 164 individuals presumably exposed to halo-alkane-based pesticides. Exposure evaluation was based on human biomonitoring analysis; as biomarker of exposure parent halo-methanes, -ethanes and their metabolites, as well as the hemoglobin-adducts methyl valine and hydroxyl ethyl valine in blood were used, complemented by expert evaluation of exposure and clinical intoxication symptoms as well as a questionnaire. Assessment showed exposures to halo alkanes in the concentration range being higher than non-cancer reference doses (RfD but (mostly lower than the occupational exposure limits. We quantified circulating DNA in serum from 86 individuals with confirmed exposure to off-gassing halo-alkane pesticides (in storage facilities or in home environment and 30 non-exposed controls, and found that exposure was significantly associated with elevated serum levels of circulating mitochondrial DNA (in size of 79 bp, mtDNA-79, p = 0.0001. The decreased integrity of mtDNA (mtDNA-230/mtDNA-79 in exposed individuals implicates apoptotic processes (p = 0.015. The relative amounts of mtDNA-79 in serum were positively associated with the lag-time after intoxication to these chemicals (r = 0.99, p<0.0001. Several months of post-exposure the specificity of this biomarker increased from 30% to 97% in patients with intoxication symptoms. Our findings indicate that mitochondrial DNA has a potential to serve as a biomarker recognizing vulnerable risk groups after exposure to toxic/carcinogenic chemicals.

  15. Circulating mitochondrial DNA as biomarker linking environmental chemical exposure to early preclinical lesions elevation of mtDNA in human serum after exposure to carcinogenic halo-alkane-based pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budnik, Lygia T; Kloth, Stefan; Baur, Xaver; Preisser, Alexandra M; Schwarzenbach, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    There is a need for a panel of suitable biomarkers for detection of environmental chemical exposure leading to the initiation or progression of degenerative diseases or potentially, to cancer. As the peripheral blood may contain increased levels of circulating cell-free DNA in diseased individuals, we aimed to evaluate this DNA as effect biomarker recognizing vulnerability after exposure to environmental chemicals. We recruited 164 individuals presumably exposed to halo-alkane-based pesticides. Exposure evaluation was based on human biomonitoring analysis; as biomarker of exposure parent halo-methanes, -ethanes and their metabolites, as well as the hemoglobin-adducts methyl valine and hydroxyl ethyl valine in blood were used, complemented by expert evaluation of exposure and clinical intoxication symptoms as well as a questionnaire. Assessment showed exposures to halo alkanes in the concentration range being higher than non-cancer reference doses (RfD) but (mostly) lower than the occupational exposure limits. We quantified circulating DNA in serum from 86 individuals with confirmed exposure to off-gassing halo-alkane pesticides (in storage facilities or in home environment) and 30 non-exposed controls, and found that exposure was significantly associated with elevated serum levels of circulating mitochondrial DNA (in size of 79 bp, mtDNA-79, p = 0.0001). The decreased integrity of mtDNA (mtDNA-230/mtDNA-79) in exposed individuals implicates apoptotic processes (p = 0.015). The relative amounts of mtDNA-79 in serum were positively associated with the lag-time after intoxication to these chemicals (r = 0.99, p<0.0001). Several months of post-exposure the specificity of this biomarker increased from 30% to 97% in patients with intoxication symptoms. Our findings indicate that mitochondrial DNA has a potential to serve as a biomarker recognizing vulnerable risk groups after exposure to toxic/carcinogenic chemicals.

  16. Vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) genotoxicity profile: relevance for carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertini, Richard J

    2013-09-01

    Vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) is a site-of-contact carcinogen in rodents. It is also DNA reactive and mutagenic, but only after its carboxylesterase mediated conversion to acetaldehyde (AA), a metabolic reaction that also produces acetic acid and protons. As VAM's mutagenic metabolite, AA is normally produced endogenously; detoxification by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) is required to maintain intra-cellular AA homeostasis. This review examines VAM's overall genotoxicity, which is due to and limited by AA, and the processes leading to mutation induction. VAM and AA have both been universally negative in mutation studies in bacteria but both have tested positive in several in vitro studies in higher organisms that usually employed high concentrations of test agents. Recently however, in vitro studies evaluating submillimolar concentrations of VAM or AA have shown threshold dose-responses for mutagenicity in human cultured cells. Neither VAM nor AA induced systemic mutagenicity in in vivo studies in metabolically competent mice when tested at non-lethal doses while treatments of animals deficient in aldehyde dehydrogenase (Aldh in animals) did induce both gene and chromosome level mutations. The results of several studies have reinforced the critical role for aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2 in humans) in limiting AA's (and therefore VAM's) mutagenicity. The overall aim of this review of VAM's mutagenic potential through its AA metabolite is to propose a mode of action (MOA) for VAM's site-of-contact carcinogenesis that incorporates the overall process of mutation induction that includes both background mutations due to endogenous AA and those resulting from exogenous exposures.

  17. Dose-response relationships for carcinogens: a review.

    OpenAIRE

    Zeise, L; Wilson, R.; Crouch, E A

    1987-01-01

    We review the experimental evidence for various shapes of dose-response relationships for carcinogens and summarize those experiments that give the most information on relatively low doses. A brief review of some models is given to illustrate the shapes of dose-response curve expected from them. Our major interest is in the use of dose-response relationships to estimate risks to humans at low doses, and so we pay special attention to experimentally observed and theoretically expected nonlinea...

  18. Biomonitoring human exposure to environmental carcinogenic chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farmer, P.B.; Sepai, O.; Lawrence, R.;

    1996-01-01

    A coordinated study was carried out on the development, evaluation and application of biomonitoring procedures for populations exposed to environmental genotoxic pollutants. The procedures used involved both direct measurement of DNA or protein damage (adducts) and assessment of second biological...

  19. Biomonitoring human exposure to environmental carcinogenic chemicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farmer, P.B.; Sepai, O.; Lawrence, R.; Autrup, H.; Nielsen, P.S.; Baan, R.A.; Delft, J.H.M. van; Steenwinkel, M.J.S.T.; et al.

    1996-01-01

    A coordinated study was carried out on the development, evaluation and application of biomonitoring procedures for populations exposed to environmental genotoxic pollutants. The procedures used involved both direct measurement of DNA or protein damage (adducts) and assessment of secondary biological

  20. Monitoring human exposure to 2-hydroxyethylating carcinogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farmer, P.B.; Cordero, Rosa; Autrup, Herman

    1996-01-01

    agents was also studied by the analysis of umbilical cord hemoglobin. The adduct levels in smokers were significantly higher than those in nonsmokers. The adduct levels in umbilical cord blood globin were quantitatively related to those in maternal blood (maternal:fetal ratio 2.7 in smokers and 2...

  1. The adsorption of a range of dietary carcinogens by alpha-cellulose, a model insoluble dietary fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, L R; Roberton, A M; Watson, M E; Kestell, P; Harris, P J

    1993-12-01

    One of the ways dietary fibers may protect against colorectal cancer is by adsorbing carcinogens and carrying them out of the digestive tract, thus lessening interaction of the carcinogens with the colonic tissue. We investigated this mechanism of action by testing in vitro the abilities of a range of carcinogens, including known animal colon carcinogens, to adsorb to alpha-cellulose, which we have used as a model insoluble dietary fiber. The carcinogens were N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU), benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and a number of heterocyclic aromatic amines which have been found in heated foods. It was found that the ability of a carcinogen to adsorb to alpha-cellulose is strongly related to the hydrophobicity of the carcinogen measured as the calculated logarithm of the partition coefficient between 1-octanol and water (C log P). The hydrophilic carcinogen, NMU, (C log P = -0.204), adsorbed only poorly, whereas the very hydrophobic carcinogen, B[a]P, (C log P = 6.124), adsorbed strongly. Carcinogens with intermediate hydrophobicities showed intermediate abilities to adsorb.

  2. Perceptions and Experiences of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection and Testing among Low-Income Mexican Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Maldonado, Leith; Wentzell, Emily; Brown, Brandon; Allen-Leigh, Betania; Torres-Ibarra, Leticia; Salmerón, Jorge; Billings, Deborah L; Thrasher, James F; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    HPV infection causes cervical cancer, a major contributor to morbidity and mortality among low-income Mexican women. Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing is now a primary screening strategy in Mexico's early cervical cancer detection program (ECDP). Research on Mexican women's perceptions of HPV and testing is necessary for establishing culturally appropriate protocols and educational materials. Here, we explore perceptions about HPV and HPV-related risk factors among low-income Mexican ECDP participants. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 24 ECDP participants from two primary care health clinics in Michoacán state, Mexico. Interviews addressed women's understandings of and experiences with HPV and HPV testing. Analysis was inductive and guided by the Health Belief Model with a focus on gender. Women's confusion about HPV and HPV screening caused emotional distress. They understood HPV to be a serious disease that would always cause severe symptoms, often characterizing it as analogous to HIV or inevitably carcinogenic. Women also attributed it to men's sexual behaviors, specifically infidelity and poor hygiene. Women described both sexes' desire for sex as natural but understood men's negative practices of masculinity, like infidelity, as the causes of women's HPV infection. Some women believed dirty public bathrooms or heredity could also cause HPV transmission. These results are consistent with prior findings that geographically and economically diverse populations lack clear understandings of the nature, causes, or symptoms of HPV, even among those receiving HPV testing. Our findings also reveal that local cultural discourse relating to masculinity, along with failure to provide sufficient education to low-income and indigenous-language speaking patients, exacerbate women's negative emotions surrounding HPV testing. While negative emotions did not deter women from seeking testing, they could be ameliorated with better health education and

  3. Perceptions and Experiences of Human Papillomavirus (HPV Infection and Testing among Low-Income Mexican Women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leith León-Maldonado

    Full Text Available HPV infection causes cervical cancer, a major contributor to morbidity and mortality among low-income Mexican women. Human papillomavirus (HPV DNA testing is now a primary screening strategy in Mexico's early cervical cancer detection program (ECDP. Research on Mexican women's perceptions of HPV and testing is necessary for establishing culturally appropriate protocols and educational materials. Here, we explore perceptions about HPV and HPV-related risk factors among low-income Mexican ECDP participants.We conducted semi-structured interviews with 24 ECDP participants from two primary care health clinics in Michoacán state, Mexico. Interviews addressed women's understandings of and experiences with HPV and HPV testing. Analysis was inductive and guided by the Health Belief Model with a focus on gender.Women's confusion about HPV and HPV screening caused emotional distress. They understood HPV to be a serious disease that would always cause severe symptoms, often characterizing it as analogous to HIV or inevitably carcinogenic. Women also attributed it to men's sexual behaviors, specifically infidelity and poor hygiene. Women described both sexes' desire for sex as natural but understood men's negative practices of masculinity, like infidelity, as the causes of women's HPV infection. Some women believed dirty public bathrooms or heredity could also cause HPV transmission.These results are consistent with prior findings that geographically and economically diverse populations lack clear understandings of the nature, causes, or symptoms of HPV, even among those receiving HPV testing. Our findings also reveal that local cultural discourse relating to masculinity, along with failure to provide sufficient education to low-income and indigenous-language speaking patients, exacerbate women's negative emotions surrounding HPV testing. While negative emotions did not deter women from seeking testing, they could be ameliorated with better health

  4. How well can in vitro data predict in vivo effects of chemicals? Rodent carcinogenicity as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony Tony Cox, Louis; Popken, Douglas A; Kaplan, A Michael; Plunkett, Laura M; Becker, Richard A

    2016-06-01

    A recent research article by the National Center for Computational Toxicology (NCCT) (Kleinstreuer et al., 2013), indicated that high throughput screening (HTS) data from assays linked to hallmarks and presumed pathways of carcinogenesis could be used to predict classification of pesticides as either (a) possible, probable or likely rodent carcinogens; or (b) not likely carcinogens or evidence of non-carcinogenicity. Using independently developed software to validate the computational results, we replicated the majority of the results reported. We also found that the prediction model correlating cancer pathway bioactivity scores with in vivo carcinogenic effects in rodents was not robust. A change of classification of a single chemical in the test set was capable of changing the overall study conclusion about the statistical significance of the correlation. Furthermore, in the subset of pesticide compounds used in model validation, the accuracy of prediction was no better than chance for about three quarters of the chemicals (those with fewer than 7 positive outcomes in HTS assays representing the 11 histopathological endpoints used in model development), suggesting that the prediction model was not adequate to predict cancer hazard for most of these chemicals. Although the utility of the model for humans is also unclear because a number of the rodent responses modeled (e.g., mouse liver tumors, rat thyroid tumors, rat testicular tumors, etc.) are not considered biologically relevant to human responses, the data examined imply the need for further research with HTS assays and improved models, which might help to predict classifications of in vivo carcinogenic responses in rodents for the pesticide considered, and thus reduce the need for testing in laboratory animals.

  5. Toxicity and Carcinogenicity of Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Takanori; Takeda, Makio; Kojima, Sayuri; Tomiyama, Naruto

    2016-01-01

    Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) is still used in certain areas of tropics and subtropics to control malaria and other insect-transmitted diseases. DDT and its metabolites have been extensively studied for their toxicity and carcinogenicity in animals and humans and shown to have an endocrine disrupting potential affecting reproductive system although the effects may vary among animal species in correlation with exposure levels. Epidemiologic studies revealed either positive or negative associations between exposure to DDT and tumor development, but there has been no clear evidence that DDT causes cancer in humans. In experimental animals, tumor induction by DDT has been shown in the liver, lung, and adrenals. The mechanisms of hepatic tumor development by DDT have been studied in rats and mice. DDT is known as a non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogen and has been shown to induce microsomal enzymes through activation of constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and to inhibit gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in the rodent liver. The results from our previously conducted 4-week and 2-year feeding studies of p,p′-DDT in F344 rats indicate that DDT may induce hepatocellular eosinophilic foci as a result of oxidative DNA damage and leads them to hepatic neoplasia in combination with its mitogenic activity and inhibitory effect on GJIC. Oxidative stress could be a key factor in hepatocarcinogenesis by DDT. PMID:26977256

  6. 78 FR 67371 - Draft Report on Carcinogens Monographs for ortho-Toluidine and Pentachlorophenol and By-products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Draft Report on Carcinogens Monographs for ortho-Toluidine... Report on Carcinogens (RoC) Monographs for ortho-Toluidine and Pentachlorophenol and By-products of its... a.m. until adjournment, approximately 11:30 a.m. Document Availability: Draft monographs...

  7. 78 FR 51733 - Draft Report on Carcinogens Monographs for ortho-Toluidine and Pentachlorophenol and By-Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Draft Report on Carcinogens Monographs for ortho-Toluidine... Carcinogens (RoC) Monographs for ortho-Toluidine and Pentachlorophenol and By-products of its Synthesis.... Document Availability: Draft monographs will be available by August 28, 2013, at...

  8. Asphalt fume dermal carcinogenicity potential: I. dermal carcinogenicity evaluation of asphalt (bitumen) fume condensates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Charles R; Burnett, Donald M; Parker, Craig M; Arp, Earl W; Swanson, Mark S; Minsavage, Gary D; Kriech, Anthony J; Osborn, Linda V; Freeman, James J; Barter, Robert A; Newton, Paul E; Beazley, Shelley L; Stewart, Christopher W

    2011-10-01

    Asphalt (bitumen) fume condensates collected from the headspace above paving and Type III built up roofing asphalt (BURA) tanks were evaluated in two-year dermal carcinogenicity assays in male C3H/HeNCrl mice. A third sample was generated from the BURA using a NIOSH laboratory generation method. Similar to earlier NIOSH studies, the BURA fume condensates were applied dermally in mineral oil twice per week; the paving sample was applied 7 days/week for a total weekly dose of 50 mg/wk in both studies. A single benign papilloma was observed in a group of 80 mice exposed to paving fume condensate at the end of the two-year study and only mild skin irritation was observed. The lab generated BURA fume condensate resulted in statistically significant (P<0.0001) increases in squamous cell carcinomas (35 animals or 55% of animals at risk). The field-matched BURA condensate showed a weaker but significant (P=0.0063) increase (8 carcinomas or 13% of animals) and a longer average latency (90 weeks vs. 76 for the lab fume). Significant irritation was observed in both BURA condensates. It is concluded that the paving fume condensate was not carcinogenic under the test conditions and that the field-matched BURA fume condensate produced a weak tumor response compared to the lab generated sample.

  9. Carcinogenicity and co-carcinogenicity studies on propoxur in mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Y; Baqar, S M; Mehrotra, N K

    1998-12-01

    Propoxur (2-isopropoxyphenyl methylcarbamate) is a widely used broad spectrum carbamate insecticide mainly used to control household pests. Propoxur exposure is reported to inhibit cholinesterase activity in rodents. Apart from other toxic effects, propoxur was found to possess tumorigenic activity in rats after oral administration. Propoxur does not produce tumours in mice or hamsters, or bladder hyperplasia in dogs and monkeys following oral feeding. In this set of investigations the complete carcinogenic, tumour initiating and promoting potential of propoxur was evaluated in male and female Swiss albino mice, since no information was available following dermal exposure of propoxur. The animals were exposed to propoxur through topical painting on the interscapular region at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight. The results revealed that propoxur has tumour promoting potential on mouse skin following a two-stage initiation-promotion protocol, but it failed to induce the tumour(s) at a significant level, when tested for tumour initiating and complete carcinogenic property.

  10. Sensory testing of the human gastrointestinal tract.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brock, C.; Arendt-Nielsen, L.; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Drewes, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this appraisal is to shed light on the various approaches to screen sensory information in the human gut. Understanding and characterization of sensory symptoms in gastrointestinal disorders is poor. Experimental methods allowing the investigator to control stimulus intensity and mo

  11. 21 CFR 862.1370 - Human growth hormone test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Human growth hormone test system. 862.1370 Section 862.1370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test...

  12. Mineral fibre persistence and carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, J C

    1998-10-01

    Epidemiological research during the past 40 years has demonstrated with increasing clarity that amphibole asbestos fibres--crocidolite, amosite and tremolite--are more carcinogenic than chrysotile. A smaller number of well-controlled studies using lung burden analyses, while adding to the specificity of this conclusion, have shown that amphibole fibres also differ from chrysotile in being far more durable and biopersistent in lung tissue. Analyses of mesothelioma and lung cancer in a large cohort of Canadian chrysotile miners and millers have recently shown that the low-level presence of fibrous tremolite in these mines, rather than the chrysotile, may well be responsible. The high risk of lung cancer, but not of mesothelioma, in the chrysotile textile industry remains anomalous and cannot be explained in this way. These various findings are directly relevant to the choice of the experimental methods which should be used for screening man-made fibres for industrial use. Although it is clear that biopersistence is a major determinant of cancer risk in animals, and perhaps also in man, other factors affecting the biological activity of mineral fibres may also be important.

  13. Research on Normal Human Plantar Pressure Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xi Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available FSR400 pressure sensor, nRF905 wireless transceiver and MSP40 SCM are used to design the insole pressure collection system, LabVIEW is used to make HMI of data acquisition, collecting a certain amount of normal human foot pressure data, statistical analysis of pressure distribution relations about five stages of swing phase during walking, using the grid closeness degree to identify plantar pressure distribution pattern recognition, and the algorithm simulation, experimental results demonstrated this method feasible.

  14. Diagnostic tests based on human basophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Erdmann, Stephan; Knol, Edward F;

    2006-01-01

    -maximal responses, termed 'intrinsic sensitivity'. These variables give rise to shifts in the dose-response curves which, in a diagnostic setting where only a single antigen concentration is employed, may produce false-negative data. Thus, in order to meaningfully utilize the current basophil activation tests...

  15. Abnormal regulation of DNA replication and increased lethality in ataxia telangiectasia cells exposed to carcinogenic agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaspers, N.G.; de Wit, J.; Regulski, M.R.; Bootsma, D.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of different carcinogenic agents on the rate of semiconservative DNA replication in normal and ataxia telangiectasis (AT) cells was investigated. The rate of DNA synthesis in all AT cell strains tested was depressed to a significantly lesser extent than in normal cells after exposure to X-rays under oxia or hypoxia or to bleomycin, agents to which AT cells are hypersensitive. In contrast, inhibition of DNA replication in normal human and AT cells was similar after treatment with some DNA-methylating agents or mitomycin C. Colony-forming ability of AT cells treated with these agents was not different from normal cells. Treatment with 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide elicited a variable response in both AT and normal cell strains. In some strains, including those shown to be hypersensitive to the drug by other workers, the inhibition of DNA synthesis was more pronounced than in other cell strains, but no significant difference between AT and normal cells could be detected. The rejoining of DNA strand breaks induced by X-rays, measured by DNA elution techniques, occurred within l2 hr after treatment and could not be correlated with the difference in DNA synthesis inhibition in AT and normal cells. After low doses of X-rays, AT cells rejoined single-strand breaks slightly more slowly than did normal cells. The rate of DNA replication in X-irradiation AT and normal cells was not affected by nicotinamide, an inhibitor of poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) synthesis. These data indicate that the diminished inhibition of DNA replication in carcinogen-treated AT cells (a) is a general characteristic of all AT cell strains, (b) correlates with AT cellular hypersensitivity, (c) is not directly caused by the bulk of the DNA strand breaks produced by carcinogenic agents, and (d) is not based on differences in the induction of poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) synthesis between X-irradiated AT and normal cells.

  16. A review of biosensing techniques for detection of trace carcinogen contamination in food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhanming; Yu, Yue; Li, Zhiliang; Wu, Tao

    2015-04-01

    Carcinogen contaminations in the food chain, for example heavy metal ions, pesticides, acrylamide, and mycotoxins, have caused serious health problems. A major objective of food-safety research is the identification and prevention of exposure to these carcinogens, because of their impossible-to-reverse tumorigenic effects. However, carcinogen detection is difficult because of their trace-level presence in food. Thus, reliable and accurate separation and determination methods are essential to protect food safety and human health. This paper summarizes the state of the art in separation and determination methods for analyzing carcinogen contamination, especially the advances in biosensing methods. Furthermore, the application of promising technology including nanomaterials, imprinted polymers, and microdevices is detailed. Challenges and perspectives are also discussed.

  17. OSIRIS, a quest for proof of principle for integrated testing strategies of chemicals for four human health endpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeire, Theo; Aldenberg, Tom; Buist, Harrie; Escher, Sylvia; Mangelsdorf, Inge; Pauné, Eduard; Rorije, Emiel; Kroese, Dinant

    2013-11-01

    Chemical substances policies in Europe are aiming towards chemical safety and at the same time a reduction in animal testing. These goals are alleged to be reachable by mining as many relevant data as possible, evaluate these data with regard to validity, reliability and relevance, and use of these data in so-called Integrated Testing Strategies (ITS). This paper offers an overview of four human health endpoints that were part of the EU-funded OSIRIS project, aiming to develop ITS fit for the EU chemicals legislation REACH. The endpoints considered cover their categorical as well as continuous characteristics: skin sensitisation, repeated dose toxicity, mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. Detailed papers are published elsewhere in this volume. The stepwise ITS approach developed takes advantage of existing information, groups information about similar substances and integrates exposure considerations. The different and possibly contradictory information is weighted and the respective uncertainties taken into account in a weight of evidence (WoE) approach. In case of data gaps, the ITS proposes the most appropriate method to acquire the missing information. Each building block for the ITS, i.e. each in vivo test, in vitro test, (Q)SAR model or human evidence, is evaluated with regard to quality.

  18. Chemical and molecular regulation of enzymes that detoxify carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prestera, T.; Holtzclaw, W.D.; Zhang, Y., Talalay, P. (John Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States))

    1993-04-01

    Inductions of detoxication (phase 2) enzymes, such as glutathione transferases and NAD(P)H:(quinone-acceptor) oxidoreductase, are a major mechanism for protecting animals and their cells against the toxic and neoplastic effects of carcinogens. These inductions result from enhances transcription, and they are evoked by diverse chemical agents: oxidizable diphenols and phenylenediamines; Michael reaction acceptors; organic isothiocyanates; other electrophiles-e.g., alkyl and aryl halides; metal ions-e.g., HgCl[sub 2] and CdCl[sub 2]; trivalent arsenic derivatives; vicinal dimercaptans; organic hydroperoxides and hydrogen peroxide; and 1,2-dithiole-3-thiones. The molecular mechanisms of these inductions were analyzed with the help of a construct containing a 41-bp enhancer element derived from the 5[prime] upstream region of the mouse liver glutathione transferase Ya subunit gene ligated to the 5[prime] end of the isolated promoter region of this gene, and inserted into a plasmid containing a human growth hormone reporter gene. When this construct was transfected into Hep G2 human hepatoma cells, the concentrations of 28 compounds (from the above classes) required to double growth hormone production, and the concentrations required to double quinone reductase specific activities in Hepa 1c1c7 cells, spanned a range of four orders of magnitude but were closely linearly correlated. Six compounds tested were inactive in both systems. A 26-bp subregion of the above enhancer oligonucleotide (containing the two tandem [open quotes]AP-1 like[close quotes] sites but lacking the preceding ETS protein binding sequence) was considerably less responsive to the same inducers. We conclude that the 41-bp enhancer element mediates most, if not all, of the phase 2 enzyme inducer activity of all of these widely different classes of compounds. 33 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Human sports drug testing by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Since the installation of anti-doping rules and regulations and their international enforcement in the mid-1960s, mass spectrometry has been an integral part of doping control procedures. Although its utility was limited in the first decade, instrumental improvements and method optimizations have made mass spectrometry, in all its facets, an indispensable tool in modern sports drug testing. In this review, milestones in doping control analysis accomplished in Germany and reaching from the early developments to the current use of hyphenated mass spectrometric techniques concerning low- and high molecular mass analytes are presented. The considered drug classes include anabolic agents, peptidic drugs, nucleotide-derived therapeutics, approved and non-approved organic as well as inorganic analytes, and particular focus is put on drug class- and instrument-driven strategies. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 36:16-46, 2017.

  20. Is dermatologic usage of coal tar carcinogenic? A review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pion, I.A.; Koenig, K.L.; Lim, H.W. [New York VA Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Coal tar ointments have been used for decades in the treatment of various dermatoses, most notably eczema and psoriasis. Occupational exposure to coal tar poses an increased risk of developing cutaneous malignancies. The evidence of an increased risk of skin cancer in humans, as a result of dermatologic usage of tar, however, is conflicting. A consensus on the carcinogenicity of tar was sought. The existing literature (in vitro, animal and human studies) on this subject was reviewed. The carcinogenicity of coal tar was clearly demonstrated by in vitro and animal studies, and appears to be potentiated by concomitant use of ultraviolet radiation. Systemic absorption of mutagens from topically applied tar has been demonstrated in humans. Epidemiologic studies in humans, however, have not definitively shown an increase in skin cancer with therapeutic use of tar. Conclusive evidence for the carcinogenicity of tar used in dermatologic practice is lacking. Further controlled studies are necessary. 49 refs., 1 tab.

  1. QSAR Study for Carcinogenic Potency of Aromatic Amines Based on GEP and MLPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fucheng Song

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A new analysis strategy was used to classify the carcinogenicity of aromatic amines. The physical-chemical parameters are closely related to the carcinogenicity of compounds. Quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR is a method of predicting the carcinogenicity of aromatic amine, which can reveal the relationship between carcinogenicity and physical-chemical parameters. This study accessed gene expression programming by APS software, the multilayer perceptrons by Weka software to predict the carcinogenicity of aromatic amines, respectively. All these methods relied on molecular descriptors calculated by CODESSA software and eight molecular descriptors were selected to build function equations. As a remarkable result, the accuracy of gene expression programming in training and test sets are 0.92 and 0.82, the accuracy of multilayer perceptrons in training and test sets are 0.84 and 0.74 respectively. The precision of the gene expression programming is obviously superior to multilayer perceptrons both in training set and test set. The QSAR application in the identification of carcinogenic compounds is a high efficiency method.

  2. QSAR Study for Carcinogenic Potency of Aromatic Amines Based on GEP and MLPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Fucheng; Zhang, Anling; Liang, Hui; Cui, Lianhua; Li, Wenlian; Si, Hongzong; Duan, Yunbo; Zhai, Honglin

    2016-01-01

    A new analysis strategy was used to classify the carcinogenicity of aromatic amines. The physical-chemical parameters are closely related to the carcinogenicity of compounds. Quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) is a method of predicting the carcinogenicity of aromatic amine, which can reveal the relationship between carcinogenicity and physical-chemical parameters. This study accessed gene expression programming by APS software, the multilayer perceptrons by Weka software to predict the carcinogenicity of aromatic amines, respectively. All these methods relied on molecular descriptors calculated by CODESSA software and eight molecular descriptors were selected to build function equations. As a remarkable result, the accuracy of gene expression programming in training and test sets are 0.92 and 0.82, the accuracy of multilayer perceptrons in training and test sets are 0.84 and 0.74 respectively. The precision of the gene expression programming is obviously superior to multilayer perceptrons both in training set and test set. The QSAR application in the identification of carcinogenic compounds is a high efficiency method. PMID:27854309

  3. Artificial sweeteners--do they bear a carcinogenic risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weihrauch, M R; Diehl, V

    2004-10-01

    Artificial sweeteners are added to a wide variety of food, drinks, drugs and hygiene products. Since their introduction, the mass media have reported about potential cancer risks, which has contributed to undermine the public's sense of security. It can be assumed that every citizen of Western countries uses artificial sweeteners, knowingly or not. A cancer-inducing activity of one of these substances would mean a health risk to an entire population. We performed several PubMed searches of the National Library of Medicine for articles in English about artificial sweeteners. These articles included 'first generation' sweeteners such as saccharin, cyclamate and aspartame, as well as 'new generation' sweeteners such as acesulfame-K, sucralose, alitame and neotame. Epidemiological studies in humans did not find the bladder cancer-inducing effects of saccharin and cyclamate that had been reported from animal studies in rats. Despite some rather unscientific assumptions, there is no evidence that aspartame is carcinogenic. Case-control studies showed an elevated relative risk of 1.3 for heavy artificial sweetener use (no specific substances specified) of >1.7 g/day. For new generation sweeteners, it is too early to establish any epidemiological evidence about possible carcinogenic risks. As many artificial sweeteners are combined in today's products, the carcinogenic risk of a single substance is difficult to assess. However, according to the current literature, the possible risk of artificial sweeteners to induce cancer seems to be negligible.

  4. Prevention of Carcinogen-Induced Oral Cancer by Sulforaphane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Julie E; Zang, Yan; Sen, Malabika; Li, Changyou; Wang, Lin; Egner, Patricia A; Fahey, Jed W; Normolle, Daniel P; Grandis, Jennifer R; Kensler, Thomas W; Johnson, Daniel E

    2016-07-01

    Chronic exposure to carcinogens represents the major risk factor for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Beverages derived from broccoli sprout extracts (BSE) that are rich in glucoraphanin and its bioactive metabolite sulforaphane promote detoxication of airborne pollutants in humans. Herein, we investigated the potential chemopreventive activity of sulforaphane using in vitro models of normal and malignant mucosal epithelial cells and an in vivo model of murine oral cancer resulting from the carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO). Sulforaphane treatment of Het-1A, a normal mucosal epithelial cell line, and 4 HNSCC cell lines led to dose- and time-dependent induction of NRF2 and the NRF2 target genes NQO1 and GCLC, known mediators of carcinogen detoxication. Sulforaphane also promoted NRF2-independent dephosphorylation/inactivation of pSTAT3, a key oncogenic factor in HNSCC. Compared with vehicle, sulforaphane significantly reduced the incidence and size of 4NQO-induced tongue tumors in mice. A pilot clinical trial in 10 healthy volunteers evaluated the bioavailability and pharmacodynamic activity of three different BSE regimens, based upon urinary sulforaphane metabolites and NQO1 transcripts in buccal scrapings, respectively. Ingestion of sulforaphane-rich BSE demonstrated the greatest, most consistent bioavailability. Mucosal bioactivity, defined as 2-fold or greater upregulation of NQO1 mRNA, was observed in 6 of 9 evaluable participants ingesting glucoraphanin-rich BSE; 3 of 6 ingesting sulforaphane-rich BSE; and 3 of 9 after topical-only exposure to sulforaphane-rich BSE. Together, our findings demonstrate preclinical chemopreventive activity of sulforaphane against carcinogen-induced oral cancer, and support further mechanistic and clinical investigation of sulforaphane as a chemopreventive agent against tobacco-related HNSCC. Cancer Prev Res; 9(7); 547-57. ©2016 AACR.

  5. Deciphering CAPTCHAs: What a Turing Test Reveals about Human Cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Hannagan; Maria Ktori; Myriam Chanceaux; Jonathan Grainger

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Turning Turing's logic on its head, we used widespread letter-based Turing Tests found on the internet CAPTCHAs) to shed light on human cognition. We examined the basis of the human ability to solve CAPTCHAs, where machines fail. We asked whether this is due to our use of slow-acting inferential processes that would not be available to machines, or whether fastacting automatic orthographic processing in humans has superior robustness to shape variations. A masked primi...

  6. 1. HUMAN POPULATION MONITORING FOR CANCER PREVENTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Most of the chemicals classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as human carcinogens are mutagenic across test systems, cf. [www.epa.gov/gapdb ] and induce tumors at multiple sites in rodent species. They are therefore readity detected in short term tests for gene-tic and related effects (GRE), in animal carcinogenesis bioassays and in human monitoring studies. Carcinogens that are not genotoxic may be studied using new toxicogenomic approaches as will be discussed. A Chemical Effects in Biological Systems (CEBS) database is planned by the National Center for Toxicogenomics to contain information on such compounds. The 1992 Preamble to the IARC Monographs

  7. Human-Robot Interaction Reconfigurable Test Environment: Optimizing the Human Interface Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Human-Robot Interaction Reconfigurable Test Environment (HRI-RTE) integrates a grid-based, reconfigurable test arena and an operator workstation with...

  8. Carcinogenicity evaluation for the application of carbon nanotubes as biomaterials in rasH2 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takanashi, Seiji; Hara, Kazuo; Aoki, Kaoru; Usui, Yuki; Shimizu, Masayuki; Haniu, Hisao; Ogihara, Nobuhide; Ishigaki, Norio; Nakamura, Koichi; Okamoto, Masanori; Kobayashi, Shinsuke; Kato, Hiroyuki; Sano, Kenji; Nishimura, Naoyuki; Tsutsumi, Hideki; Machida, Kazuhiko; Saito, Naoto

    2012-01-01

    The application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as biomaterials is of wide interest, and studies examining their application in medicine have had considerable significance. Biological safety is the most important factor when considering the clinical application of CNTs as biomaterials, and various toxicity evaluations are required. Among these evaluations, carcinogenicity should be examined with the highest priority; however, no report using transgenic mice to evaluate the carcinogenicity of CNTs has been published to date. Here, we performed a carcinogenicity test by implanting multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs) into the subcutaneous tissue of rasH2 mice, using the carbon black present in black tattoo ink as a reference material for safety. The rasH2 mice did not develop neoplasms after being injected with MWCNTs; instead, MWCNTs showed lower carcinogenicity than carbon black. Such evaluations should facilitate the clinical application and development of CNTs for use in important medical fields.

  9. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons In Edible Mushrooms from Niger Delta, Nigeria: Carcinogenic and Non-Carcinogenic Health Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igbiri, Sorbari; Udowelle, Nnaemeka Arinze; Ekhator, Osazuwa Clinton; Asomugha, Rose Ngozi; Igweze, Zelinjo Nkeiruka; Orisakwe, Orish Ebere

    2017-02-01

    In the oil-rich Niger Delta, hydrocarbon pollution and oil spillages, gas flaring and sundry anthropogenic activities constitute sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), with food contamination playing a major role in human exposure. In this study we assessed PAH levels in wild and cultivated edible mushroom species consumed by the general population from the oil producing Niger Delta, Nigeria. The concentrations of USEPA-16 PAHs were determined by gas chromatography and carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic health risks were calculated. The concentrations of USEPA-16 PAHs ranged from 0.02 mg/kg – 3.37 mg/kg. The dietary intake of carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic USEPA-16 PAHs (Naphthalene, Acenaphthylene, Acenaphthene, Anthracene, Phenanthrene, Flourene, Flouranthene, Pyrene, Benzo[a]Anthracene, Chrysene, Benzo[a]Pyrene, Benzo[b]Flouranthene, Benzo[K]Flouranthene, Benzo[g,h,i] Perylene, Dibenz[a,h]Anthracene and Ideno[1,2,3-cd]Pyrene) for adults, adolescents and seniors ranged from 0.00 – 0.05 mg/kg/day, 0.00 – 0.06 mg/kg/day and 0.00 – 0.07 mg/kg/day. The BaPeq ranged from 0.02 – 2.76 with margin of exposure MOE values of BaP ranging from 3,500,000 to 700,000, 3,500,000 and 3,500,000 to 7,000,000 for adults, adolescents and seniors indicating very insignificant health risk. The incremental lifetime cancer risk was within the safe range of 1.56x10-8 – 1.73x10-6 with the highest calculated risk found for wild Pleurotus ostreatus mushroom species from the study area. Creative Commons Attribution License

  10. The dermal carcinogenic potential of unrefined and hydrotreated lubricating oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, R H; Daughtrey, W C; Freeman, J J; Federici, T M; Phillips, R D; Plutnick, R T

    1989-08-01

    Unrefined lubricating oils contain relatively high levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and have been shown to induce tumors in mouse skin. Exxon has developed a new method of refining these materials, a severe hydrotreatment process that is optimized for PAH removal. The specific objectives of the current study were to assess PAH reduction and then to evaluate directly the dermal carcinogenic potential of the materials that spanned the range of products produced by this method. The test samples included unrefined light and heavy vacuum distillates from a naphthenic crude oil, as well as the corresponding severely hydrotreated products. Two sets of samples were prepared to assess the effects of various operating parameters in the reactor. Additionally, positive (benzo[a]pyrene), negative (white mineral oil) and vehicle (toluene) control groups were included to assess the sensitivity and specificity of the bioassay. Each sample was applied in twice-weekly aliquots to the backs of 40 male C3H mice. In the analytical studies, significant reductions in the levels of several specific PAH were demonstrated. In the dermal carcinogenesis studies, the unrefined oils and the positive control induced tumors and also significantly reduced survival. None of the mice treated with severely hydrotreated oils or with the negative or vehicle controls developed skin tumors, and survival of these mice was not significantly different from the control. Thus, the data demonstrated that this new, severe hydrotreatment process was an effective means of converting carcinogenic feedstocks to non-carcinogenic products.

  11. Cell-mediated mutagenesis by chemical carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberman, E.; Langenbach, R.

    1978-01-01

    The cell-mediated mutation system, with the proper choice of metabolizing cells, can be used to detect the mutagenic activities of different classes of chemical carcinogens. When fibroblastic cells were used as the metabolizing cells, a correlation between the in vivo carcinogenic activity and the in vitro mutagenic activity of 11 aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons was observed. When primary liver cells were used as the metabolizing cells, three known liver carcinogens were demonstrated to be mutagenic by the cell-mediated assay, while two non-carcinogenic analogues were not mutagenic. These results from the cell-mediated system suggest that the reactive intermediates of the carcinogens are stable enough to be transferred from the metabolizing cells to the V79 cells. The cell-mediated mutagenesis system is a simple in vitro assay which may simulate the in vivo situation. It was concluded that this approach could be extended to the co-cultivation of cells from other organs or tissues with mutable mammalian cells.

  12. Chicken Fetal Liver DNA Damage and Adduct Formation by Activation-Dependent DNA-Reactive Carcinogens and Related Compounds of Several Structural Classes

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The chicken egg genotoxicity assay (CEGA), which utilizes the liver of an intact and aseptic embryo-fetal test organism, was evaluated using four activation-dependent DNA-reactive carcinogens and four structurally related less potent carcinogens or non-carcinogens. In the assay, three daily doses of test substances were administered to eggs containing 9–11-day-old fetuses and the fetal livers were assessed for two endpoints, DNA breaks using the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet...

  13. Cadmium chloride, benzo[a]pyrene and cyclophosphamide tested in the in vitro mammalian cell micronucleus test (MNvit) in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6 at Covance laboratories, Harrogate UK in support of OECD draft Test Guideline 487.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Paul; Whitwell, James; Jeffrey, Laura; Young, Jamie; Smith, Katie; Kirkland, David

    2010-10-29

    The following genotoxic chemicals were tested in the in vitro micronucleus assay, at Covance Laboratories, Harrogate, UK in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6. Cadmium chloride (an inorganic carcinogen), benzo[a]pyrene (a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon requiring metabolic activation) and cyclophosphamide (an alkylating agent requiring metabolic activation) were treated with and without cytokinesis block (by addition of cytochalasin B). This work formed part of a collaborative evaluation of the toxicity measures recommended in the draft OECD Test Guideline 487 for the in vitro micronucleus test. The toxicity measures used, capable of detecting both cytostasis and cell death, were relative population doubling, relative increase in cell counts and relative cell counts for treatments in the absence of cytokinesis block, and replication index or cytokinesis blocked proliferation index in the presence of cytokinesis block. All of the chemicals tested gave significant increases in the percentage of micronucleated cells with and without cytokinesis block at concentrations giving approximately 60% toxicity (cytostasis and cell death) or less by all of the toxicity measures used. The outcomes from this series of tests support the use of relative increase in cell counts and relative population doubling, as well as relative cell counts, as appropriate measures of cytotoxicity for the non-cytokinesis blocked in the in vitro micronucleus assay.

  14. Environmental carcinogens and mutational pathways in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulliero, A; Godschalk, R; Andreassi, M G; Curfs, D; Van Schooten, F J; Izzotti, A

    2015-05-01

    Atherosclerosis is associated with DNA damage in both circulating and vessel-wall cells and DNA adducts derived from exposure to environmental mutagens are abundant in atherosclerotic vessels. Environmental chemical carcinogens identified as risk factor for atherosclerosis include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (benzo(a)pyrene, dimethylbenz(a)anthracene, beta-naphthoflavone, pyrene, 3-methylcolanthrene), arsenic, cadmium, 1,3-butadiene, cigarette smoke. Accordingly, polymorphisms of genes encoding for phase I/II metabolic reaction and DNA repair are risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, although their role is negligible as compared to other risk factors. The pathogenic relevance of mutation-related molecular damage in atherosclerosis has been demonstrated in experimental animal models involving the exposure to chemical mutagens. The relevance of mutation-related events in worsening atherosclerosis prognosis has been demonstrated in human clinical studies mainly as referred to mitochondrial DNA damage. Atherosclerosis is characterized by the occurrence of high level of oxidative damage in blood vessel resulting from both endogenous and exogenous sources. Mitochondrial damage is a main endogenous source of oxidative stress whose accumulation causes activation of intrinsic apoptosis through BIRC2 inhibition and cell loss contributing to plaque development and instability. Environmental physical mutagens, including ionizing radiation, are a risk factor for atherosclerosis even at the low exposure dose occurring in case of occupational exposure or the high exposure doses occurring during radiotherapy. Conversely, the role of exciting UV radiation in atherosclerosis is still uncertain. This review summarizes the experimental and clinical evidence supporting the pathogenic role of mutation-related pathway in atherosclerosis examining the underlying molecular mechanisms.

  15. The ISS Carcinogens Data Bank (BDC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binetti, Roberto; Ceccarelli, Federica; Costamagna, Francesca Marina; D'Angiolini, Antonella; Fabri, Alessandra; Ferri, Maurizio; Riva, Giovanni; Roazzi, Paolo; Trucchi, Daniela; Marcello, Ida

    2008-01-01

    The Data Bank on Carcinogens (Banca Dati Cancerogeni, BDC) is a factual data bank, available on the Istituto Superiore di Sanità website, aimed at supporting the risk management decision making of central and local administrators. It can also represent a valuable tool for industry. The available information on carcinogenicity evaluations/classifications produced by European Union and by other institutions (IARC, USEPA, NTP, CCTN) is presented in a concise form accompanied by bibliographic references enabling the users to consult the original sources and, in some cases, to be directly connected to the relevant website. The classifications carried out by each organization in accordance with its own criteria assign the examined agents to specific qualitative categories and do not include quantitative assessment. BDC intends to provide an easy tool for experts, researchers and risk managers dealing with carcinogenic agents.

  16. Carcinogenicity of azo colorants: influence of solubility and bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golka, Klaus; Kopps, Silke; Myslak, Zdislaw W

    2004-06-15

    In the past, azo colorants based on benzidine, 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine, 3,3'-dimethylbenzidine (o-tolidine), and 3,3'-dimethoxybenzidine (o-dianisidine) have been synthesized in large amounts and numbers. Studies in exposed workers have demonstrated that the azoreduction of benzidine-based dyes occurs in man. The metabolic conversion of benzidine-, 3,3'-dimethylbenzidine- and 3,3'-dimethoxybenzidine-based dyes to their (carcinogenic) amine precursors in vivo is a general phenomenon that must be considered for each member of this class of chemicals. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated that the use of the benzidine-based dyes has caused bladder cancer in humans. However, in contrast to water-soluble dyes, the question of biological azoreduction of (practically insoluble) pigments has been a matter of discussion. As a majority of azo pigments are based on 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine, much of the available experimental data are focused on this group. Long-term animal carcinogenicity studies performed with pigments based on 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine did not show a carcinogenic effect. The absence of a genotoxic effect has been supported by mutagenicity studies with the 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine-based Pigment Yellow 12. Studies in which azo pigments based on 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine had been orally administered to rats, hamsters, rabbits and monkeys could generally not detect significant amounts of 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine in the urine. It, therefore, appears well established that the aromatic amine components from azo pigments based on 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine are practically not bioavailable. Hence, it is very unlikely that occupational exposure to insoluble azo pigments would be associated with a substantial risk of (bladder) cancer in man. According to current EU regulations, azo dyes based on benzidine, 3,3'-dimethoxybenzidine and 3,3'-dimethylbenzidine have been classified as carcinogens of category 2 as "substances which should be regarded as if they are carcinogenic

  17. Tungsten-induced carcinogenesis in human bronchial epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulicht, Freda; Brocato, Jason; Cartularo, Laura; Vaughan, Joshua; Wu, Feng; Kluz, Thomas; Sun, Hong; Oksuz, Betul Akgol; Shen, Steven; Paena, Massimilano; Medici, Serenella; Zoroddu, Maria Antonietta; Costa, Max

    2015-01-01

    Metals such as arsenic, cadmium, beryllium, and nickel are known human carcinogens; however, other transition metals, such as tungsten (W), remain relatively uninvestigated with regard to their potential carcinogenic activity. Tungsten production for industrial and military applications has almost doubled over the past decade and continues to increase. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate tungsten’s ability to induce carcinogenic related endpoints including cell transformation, increased migration, xenograft growth in nude mice, and the activation of multiple cancer related pathways in transformed clones as determined by RNA seq. Human bronchial epithelial cell line (Beas-2B) exposed to tungsten developed carcinogenic properties. In a soft agar assay, tungsten-treated cells formed more colonies than controls and the tungsten-transformed clones formed tumors in nude mice. RNA-sequencing data revealed that the tungsten-transformed clones altered the expression of many cancer-associated genes when compared to control clones. Genes involved in lung cancer, leukemia, and general cancer genes were deregulated by tungsten. Taken together, our data shows the carcinogenic potential of tungsten. Further tests are needed, including in vivo and human studies, in order to validate tungsten as a carcinogen to humans. PMID:26164860

  18. Effect of DNA type on response of DNA biosensor for carcinogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, Nor Diyana bt. Md.; Heng, Lee Yook; Surif, Salmijah; Lazim, Azwani Mat

    2013-11-01

    Carcinogens are cancer causing chemicals that can bind to DNA and cause damage to the DNA. These chemicals are available everywhere including in water, air, soil and food. Therefore, a sensor that can detect the presence of these chemicals will be a very useful tool. Since carcinogens bind to DNA, DNA can be used as the biological element in a biosensor. This study has utilized different types of DNA in a biosensor for carcinogen detection. The DNAs include double stranded calf thymus DNA, single stranded calf thymus DNA and guanine rich single stranded DNA. The modified SPE was exposed to a carcinogen followed by interaction with methylene blue which acts as the electroactive indicator. The SPE was then analysed using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Optimization studies were conducted for MB concentration and accumulation time, DNA concentration, as well as effect of buffer concentration, buffer pH and ionic strength. The performance of the biosensor was tested on a group 1 carcinogen, formaldehyde. The results indicated that the usage of guanine rich single stranded DNA also gives higher response as carcinogens prefer to bind with guanine compared to other bases.

  19. Humane Society International's global campaign to end animal testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidle, Troy

    2013-12-01

    The Research & Toxicology Department of Humane Society International (HSI) operates a multifaceted and science-driven global programme aimed at ending the use of animals in toxicity testing and research. The key strategic objectives include: a) ending cosmetics animal testing worldwide, via the multinational Be Cruelty-Free campaign; b) achieving near-term reductions in animal testing requirements through revision of product sector regulations; and c) advancing humane science by exposing failing animal models of human disease and shifting science funding toward human biology-based research and testing tools fit for the 21st century. HSI was instrumental in ensuring the implementation of the March 2013 European sales ban for newly animal-tested cosmetics, in achieving the June 2013 cosmetics animal testing ban in India as well as major cosmetics regulatory policy shifts in China and South Korea, and in securing precedent-setting reductions in in vivo data requirements for pesticides in the EU through the revision of biocides and plant protection product regulations, among others. HSI is currently working to export these life-saving measures to more than a dozen industrial and emerging economies. 2013 FRAME.

  20. SHORT COMMUNICATION CARCINOGENIC POTENCY OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (oral, intraperitoneal, subcutaneous, epicutaneous, intratracheal and intrapulmonary) and ... injection of 10 mg benzo(a)pyrene per animal caused an immediate, ... Benzo(a)pyrene has been tested in a range of species, including frogs, toads ...

  1. Evaluation of the utility of the lifetime mouse bioassay in the identification of cancer hazards for humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osimitz, Thomas G; Droege, Wiebke; Boobis, Alan R; Lake, Brian G

    2013-10-01

    Limited testing resources, the need to limit animal use, and the demand for better knowledge about carcinogenic hazards require that the carcinogenicity testing paradigm based on lifetime cancer bioassays in rats and mice should be as efficient and reliable as possible. We have therefore reevaluated the rodent bioassay, particularly for nongenotoxic chemicals and conducted a rigorous examination of the 710 substances listed in the Carcinogenic Potency Database (CPDB) that were tested in both mice and rats. The CPDB is a web-based database that provides access to the literature and the results of 6540 bioassays on 1547 chemicals that have been published in the general literature through 2001 and by the National Cancer Institute/National Toxicology Program through 2004. Only three chemicals (o-benzyl-p-chlorophenol, Elmiron®, p-tolylurea) were identified as unequivocally non-genotoxic, mouse non-liver carcinogens. A careful analysis showed that their carcinogenicity in mice is irrelevant for assessment of human cancer hazards. This is consistent with data showing, with a few well-known exceptions, that non-genotoxic carcinogens in rodents are considered to be non-carcinogenic to humans. As a result, we propose that the inclusion of the mouse bioassay in the standard assessment scheme for non-genotoxic chemicals is no longer necessary.

  2. In vitro determination of carcinogenicity of sixty-four compounds using a bovine papillomavirus DNA-carrying C3H/10T(1/2) cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, L A; Laitinen, A M; Mortazavi-Asl, B; Wee, R K; Erb, H E; Assi, K P; Madden, Z

    2000-01-01

    A new in vitro test for predicting rodent carcinogenicity is evaluated against a testing database of 64 chemicals including both genotoxic and nongenotoxic carcinogens and carcinogens that normally require addition of an S-9 microsomal fraction for detection in the bacterial mutagenicity assay. The assay uses focus formation in a stable, bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV-1) DNA carrying C3H/10T(1/2) mouse embryo fibroblast cell line (T1) that does not require transfection, infection with virus, isolation of primary cells from animals, or addition of a microsomal fraction. Of a total database of 64 compounds, 92% of the carcinogens, promoters, or noncarcinogens were correctly predicted. Based on previously reported results, the test of bacterial mutagenicity would have correctly predicted 58% of carcinogens, promoters or noncarcinogens and the Syrian hamster embryo test would have correctly predicted 87% of carcinogens, promoters, or noncarcinogens of this database. Of carcinogens that normally require addition of an S-9 fraction, T1 cells correctly predicted rodent carcinogenicity of polyaromatic hydrocarbons, aflatoxins, azo-compounds, nitrosamines, and hydrazine without the addition of an S-9 fraction. Of nongenotoxic carcinogens, T1 cells correctly predicted diethylstilbestroel, diethylhexylphthalate, acetamides, alkyl halides, ethyl carbamate, and phorbol ester tumour promoters.

  3. Carcinogenicity, allergenicity, and lupus-inducibility of arylamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, King-Thom

    2016-01-01

    Arylamines are widely used in food, drugs, and cosmetics as well as other industries. These chemicals are present ubiquitously in cigarette smoke, smoke emitted from cooking fume hoods as well as are generated by diverse industries. Arylamines can be generated by cleavage of azo dyes by intestinal and skin microbiota. Some arylamines are used as drugs while others are constituents of human metabolism. Many of the arylamines are mutagenic and carcinogenic. They are generally recognized as the major cause of human bladder cancer, but arylamines can induce cancers of other organs in humans and animals. Some arylamines are allergenic, causing lupus like syndrome, or other maladies. In view of their unbiquitious nature and the diseases they cause, arylamines are probably the most important chemicals causing health problems.

  4. Reshaping the carcinogenic risk assessment of medicines: international harmonisation for drug safety, industry/regulator efficiency or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, John; Reed, Tim

    2003-07-01

    The most significant institutional entity involved in the harmonisation of drug testing standards worldwide is the International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH), which comprises the three pharmaceutical industry associations and regulatory agencies of the EU, US and Japan. It is often claimed that such harmonisation will both accelerate the development and approval of new drugs and preserve safety standards, if not strengthen safety regimes. Drawing on extensive documentary research and interviews, this paper systematically examines whether the efforts by the ICH to improve industrial and regulatory efficiency by harmonising drug testing requirements is likely to raise, maintain or compromise safety standards in carcinogenic risk assessment of pharmaceuticals. The evidence suggests that, in the field of carcinogenicity testing, the ICH management of international harmonisation of medicines regulation is not achieving simultaneous improvements in safety standards and acceleration of drug development. Rather, the latter is being achieved at the expense of the former. Indeed, the ICH may be converting permissive regulatory practices of the past into new scientific standards for the future. These findings are significant as many expert scientific advisers to drug regulatory agencies seem to have accepted uncritically the conclusions reached by the ICH, which may affect a potential patient population of half a billion and tens of thousands of clinical trials.

  5. Testing the Neutral Theory of Biodiversity with Human Microbiome Datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lianwei; Ma, Zhanshan Sam

    2016-08-16

    The human microbiome project (HMP) has made it possible to test important ecological theories for arguably the most important ecosystem to human health-the human microbiome. Existing limited number of studies have reported conflicting evidence in the case of the neutral theory; the present study aims to comprehensively test the neutral theory with extensive HMP datasets covering all five major body sites inhabited by the human microbiome. Utilizing 7437 datasets of bacterial community samples, we discovered that only 49 communities (less than 1%) satisfied the neutral theory, and concluded that human microbial communities are not neutral in general. The 49 positive cases, although only a tiny minority, do demonstrate the existence of neutral processes. We realize that the traditional doctrine of microbial biogeography "Everything is everywhere, but the environment selects" first proposed by Baas-Becking resolves the apparent contradiction. The first part of Baas-Becking doctrine states that microbes are not dispersal-limited and therefore are neutral prone, and the second part reiterates that the freely dispersed microbes must endure selection by the environment. Therefore, in most cases, it is the host environment that ultimately shapes the community assembly and tip the human microbiome to niche regime.

  6. False-positive Human Papillomavirus DNA tests in cervical screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Pribac, Igor; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2011-01-01

    Based on data from randomised controlled trials (RCT) on primary cervical screening, it has been reported that the problem of more frequent false-positive tests in Human Papillomavirus (HPV) DNA screening compared to cytology could be overcome. However, these reports predominantly operated...

  7. Limitation of using synthetic human odours to test mosquito repellents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mbeyela Edgar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gold-standard tests of mosquito repellents involve exposing human volunteers to host-seeking mosquitoes, to assess the protective efficacy of the repellents. These techniques are not exposure-free and cannot be performed prior to toxicological evaluation. It is postulated that synthetic lures could provide a useful assay that mimics in-vivo conditions for use in high-throughput screening for mosquito repellents. Methods This paper reports on a semi-field evaluation of repellents using a synthetic blend of human derived attractants for the malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto Different concentrations of known repellents, N, N diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (deet and Para-methane-3, 8, diol (PMD were added into traps baited with the synthetic blend, and resulting changes in mosquito catches were measured. Results All test concentrations of deet (0.001% to 100% reduced the attractiveness of the synthetic blend. However, PMD was repellent only at 0.25%. Above this concentration, it significantly increased the attractiveness of the blend. There was no relationship between the repellent concentrations and the change in mosquito catches when either deet (r2 = 0.033, P = 0.302 or PMD (r2 = 0.020, P = 0.578 was used. Conclusion It is concluded that while some repellents may reduce the attractiveness of synthetic human odours, others may instead increase their attractiveness. Such inconsistencies indicate that even though the synthetic attractants may provide exposure-free and consistent test media for repellents, careful selection and multiple-repellent tests are necessary to ascertain their suitability for use in repellent screening. The synthetic odour blend tested here is not yet sufficiently refined to serve as replacement for humans in repellent testing, but may be developed further and evaluated in different formats for exposure free repellent testing purposes.

  8. Deciphering CAPTCHAs: what a Turing test reveals about human cognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Hannagan

    Full Text Available Turning Turing's logic on its head, we used widespread letter-based Turing Tests found on the internet (CAPTCHAs to shed light on human cognition. We examined the basis of the human ability to solve CAPTCHAs, where machines fail. We asked whether this is due to our use of slow-acting inferential processes that would not be available to machines, or whether fast-acting automatic orthographic processing in humans has superior robustness to shape variations. A masked priming lexical decision experiment revealed efficient processing of CAPTCHA words in conditions that rule out the use of slow inferential processing. This shows that the human superiority in solving CAPTCHAs builds on a high degree of invariance to location and continuous transforms, which is achieved during the very early stages of visual word recognition in skilled readers.

  9. Deciphering CAPTCHAs: what a Turing test reveals about human cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannagan, Thomas; Ktori, Maria; Chanceaux, Myriam; Grainger, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Turning Turing's logic on its head, we used widespread letter-based Turing Tests found on the internet (CAPTCHAs) to shed light on human cognition. We examined the basis of the human ability to solve CAPTCHAs, where machines fail. We asked whether this is due to our use of slow-acting inferential processes that would not be available to machines, or whether fast-acting automatic orthographic processing in humans has superior robustness to shape variations. A masked priming lexical decision experiment revealed efficient processing of CAPTCHA words in conditions that rule out the use of slow inferential processing. This shows that the human superiority in solving CAPTCHAs builds on a high degree of invariance to location and continuous transforms, which is achieved during the very early stages of visual word recognition in skilled readers.

  10. Evaluation of the Inhalation Carcinogenicity of Ethylene Oxide (Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has finalized its Evaluation of the Inhalation Carcinogenicity of Ethylene Oxide. This assessment addresses the potential carcinogenicity from long-term inhalation exposure to ethylene oxide. Now final, this assessment updates the carcinogenicity information in EPA’s 1985 Hea...

  11. Human immunodeficiency virus antibody test and seroprevalence in psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naber, D; Pajonk, F G; Perro, C; Löhmer, B

    1994-05-01

    Psychiatric inpatients are at risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Investigations in the United States revealed seroprevalence rates of 5.5-8.9%. Therefore, inclusion of HIV antibody testing in routine laboratory screening is sometimes suggested. To investigate this issue for inpatients in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Munich, the incidence, reason for HIV testing and results were analyzed. Of 12,603 patients, hospitalized from 1985 to 1993, 4.9% (623 patients, 265 in risk groups) underwent the HIV test after informed consent. Thirty patients (4.8% of those tested) were found to be positive, but only in 5 cases (all of risk groups) was infection newly detected. Data indicate that, in psychiatry, HIV testing is reasonable only in patients in risk groups or if clinical variables suggest HIV infection.

  12. Comparison of the expression profiles induced by genotoxic and nongenotoxic carcinogens in rat liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun [Bayer Healthcare AG, Department of Molecular and Genetic Toxicology, Aprather Weg 18a, 42096 Wuppertal (Germany)]. E-mail: heidrun.ellinger-ziegelbauer@bayerhealthcare.com; Stuart, Barry [Bayer Crop Science, Department of Toxicology, Stilwell, KS (United States); Wahle, Brad [Bayer Crop Science, Department of Toxicology, Stilwell, KS (United States); Bomann, Werner [Bayer Crop Science, Department of Toxicology, Stilwell, KS (United States); Ahr, Hans Juergen [Bayer Healthcare AG, Department of Molecular and Genetic Toxicology, Aprather Weg 18a, 42096 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2005-08-04

    Application of recently developed gene expression techniques using microarrays in toxicological studies (toxicogenomics) facilitate the interpretation of a toxic compound's mode of action and may also allow the prediction of selected toxic effects based on gene expression changes. In order to test this hypothesis, we investigated whether carcinogens at doses known to induce liver tumors in the 2-year rat bioassay deregulate characteristic sets of genes in a short term in vivo study and whether these deregulated genes represent defined biological pathways. Male Wistar rats were dosed with the four nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogens methapyrilene (MPy, 60 mg/kg/day), diethylstilbestrol (DES, 10 mg/kg/day), Wy-14643 (Wy, 60 mg/kg/day), and piperonylbutoxide (PBO, 1200 mg/kg/day). After 1, 3, 7, and 14 days, the livers were taken for histopathological evaluation and for analysis of the gene expression profiles on Affymetrix RG{sub U}34A arrays. The expression profile of the four nongenotoxic carcinogens were compared to the profiles of the four genotoxic carcinogens 2-nitrofluorene (2-NF), dimethylnitrosamine (DMN), 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), and aflatoxin B1 (AB1) from a similar study reported previously. By using statistical and clustering tools characteristically deregulated genes were extracted and functionally classified. Distinct cellular pathways were affected by the nongenotoxic carcinogens compared to the genotoxic carcinogens which at least partly correlated with the two-stage model of carcinogenesis. Characteristic to genotoxic carcinogens were a DNA damage response and the activation of proliferative and survival signaling. Nongenotoxic carcinogens showed responses to oxidative DNA or protein damage, as well as cell cycle progression and signs of regeneration. Many of the gene alterations found with the nongenotoxic carcinogens imply compound-specific mechanisms. Although neither a single gene nor a single pathway will be

  13. Electrochemical sensing carcinogens in beverages

    CERN Document Server

    Zia, Asif Iqbal

    2016-01-01

    This book describes a robust, low-cost electrochemical sensing system that is able to detect hormones and phthalates – the most ubiquitous endocrine disruptor compounds – in beverages and is sufficiently flexible to be readily coupled with any existing chemical or biochemical sensing system. A novel type of silicon substrate-based smart interdigital transducer, developed using MEMS semiconductor fabrication technology, is employed in conjunction with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to allow real-time detection and analysis. Furthermore, the presented interdigital capacitive sensor design offers a sufficient penetration depth of the fringing electric field to permit bulk sample testing. The authors address all aspects of the development of the system and fully explain its benefits. The book will be of wide interest to engineers, scientists, and researchers working in the fields of physical electrochemistry and biochemistry at the undergraduate, postgraduate, and research levels. It will also be high...

  14. Commercially available molecular tests for human papillomaviruses (HPV): 2015 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poljak, Mario; Kocjan, Boštjan J; Oštrbenk, Anja; Seme, Katja

    2016-03-01

    Commercial molecular tests for human papillomaviruses (HPV) are invaluable diagnostic tools in cervical carcinoma screening and management of women with cervical precancerous lesions as well as important research tools for epidemiological studies, vaccine development, and implementation and monitoring of vaccination programs. In this third inventory of commercial HPV tests, we identified 193 distinct commercial HPV tests and at least 127 test variants available on the market in 2015, which represents a 54% and 79% increase in the number of distinct HPV tests and variants, respectively, in comparison to our last inventory performed in 2012. Identified HPV tests were provisionally divided into eight main groups and several subgroups. Among the 193 commercial HPV tests, all but two target alpha-HPV types only. Although the number of commercial HPV tests with at least one published study in peer-reviewed literature has increased significantly in the last three years, several published performance evaluations are still not in line with agreed-upon standards in the HPV community. Manufacturers should invest greater effort into evaluating their products and publishing validation/evaluation results in peer-reviewed journals. To achieve this, more clinically oriented external quality-control panels and initiatives are required. For evaluating the analytical performance of the entire range of HPV tests currently on the market, more diverse and reliable external quality-control programs based on international standards for all important HPV types are indispensable. The performance of a wider range of HPV tests must be promptly evaluated on a variety of alternative clinical specimens. In addition, more complete HPV assays containing validated sample-extraction protocols and appropriate internal controls are urgently needed. Provision of a broader range of automated systems allowing large-scale HPV testing as well as the development of reliable, rapid, and affordable molecular

  15. Levels of Genotoxic and Carcinogenic Compounds in Plant food Supplements and Associated Risk Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den S.J.P.L.; Restani, P.; Boersma, M.G.; Delmulle, L.; Rietjens, I.

    2011-01-01

    The present study describes the selection, analysis and risk assessment of genotoxic and carcinogenic compounds of botanicals and botanical preparations which can be found in plant food supplements (PFS). First an inventory was made of botanical compounds that are of possible concern for human healt

  16. Biological effect markers for exposure to carcinogenic compound and their relevance for risk assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delft, J.H.M. van; Baan, R.A.; Roza, L.

    1998-01-01

    In this review data are summarized on biomarkers that are used for biological effect monitoring of human populations exposed to genotoxic carcinogens. The biomarkers are DNA and protein adducts and cytogenetic effects. Most of these biomarkers are relevant for the process of carcinogenesis. Emphasis

  17. Optimizing human semen cryopreservation by reducing test vial volume and repetitive test vial sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian F S; Ohl, Dana A; Parker, Walter R

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate optimal test vial (TV) volume, utility and reliability of TVs, intermediate temperature exposure (-88°C to -93°C) before cryostorage, cryostorage in nitrogen vapor (VN2) and liquid nitrogen (LN2), and long-term stability of VN2 cryostorage of human semen. DESIGN: Prospec......OBJECTIVE: To investigate optimal test vial (TV) volume, utility and reliability of TVs, intermediate temperature exposure (-88°C to -93°C) before cryostorage, cryostorage in nitrogen vapor (VN2) and liquid nitrogen (LN2), and long-term stability of VN2 cryostorage of human semen. DESIGN...

  18. Human skin equivalent as an alternative to animal testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertsching, Heike; Weimer, Michaela; Kersen, Silke; Brunner, Herwig

    2008-03-11

    The 3-D skin equivalent can be viewed as physiologically comparable to the natural skin and therefore is a suitable alternative for animal testing. This highly differentiated in vitro human skin equivalent is used to assess the efficacy and mode of action of novel agents. This model is generated from primary human keratinocytes on a collagen substrate containing human dermal fibroblasts. It is grown at the air-liquid interface which allows full epidermal stratification and epidermal-dermal interactions to occur. Future emphasis is the establishment of different test systems to investigate wound healing, melanoma research and infection biology. Key features of this skin model are that it can be used as an alternative for in vivo studies, donor tissue can be tailored to the needs of the study and multiple analyses can be carried out at mRNA and protein level. Driven by both ethical and economical incentives, this has already resulted in a shift of the test strategies used by the Pharmaceutical Industry in the early drug development process as reflected by the increased demand for application of cell based assays. It is also a suitable model for testing a wide variety of endpoints including cell viability, the release of proinflammatory mediators, permeation rate, proliferation and biochemical changes.

  19. Meeting Human Reliability Requirements through Human Factors Design, Testing, and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. L. Boring

    2007-06-01

    In the design of novel systems, it is important for the human factors engineer to work in parallel with the human reliability analyst to arrive at the safest achievable design that meets design team safety goals and certification or regulatory requirements. This paper introduces the System Development Safety Triptych, a checklist of considerations for the interplay of human factors and human reliability through design, testing, and modeling in product development. This paper also explores three phases of safe system development, corresponding to the conception, design, and implementation of a system.

  20. It is time to regulate carcinogenic tobacco-specific nitrosamines in cigarette tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Stephen S

    2014-07-01

    The Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act gives the U.S. Food and Drug Administration power to regulate tobacco products. This commentary calls for immediate regulation of the carcinogenic tobacco-specific nitrosamines 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and N'-nitrosonornicotine (NNN) in cigarette tobacco as a logical path to cancer prevention. NNK and NNN, powerful carcinogens in laboratory animals, have been evaluated as "carcinogenic to humans" by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. NNK and NNN are present in the tobacco of virtually all marketed cigarettes; levels in cigarette smoke are directly proportional to the amounts in tobacco. The NNK metabolite NNAL, itself a strong carcinogen, is present in the urine of smokers and nonsmokers exposed to secondhand smoke. Some of the highest levels of NNK and NNN are found in U.S. products. It is well established that factors such as choice of tobacco blend, agricultural conditions, and processing methods influence levels of NNK and NNN in cigarette tobacco and cigarette smoke. Therefore, it is time to control these factors and produce cigarettes with 100 ppb or less each of NNK and NNN in tobacco, which would result in an approximate 15- to 20-fold reduction of these carcinogens in the mainstream smoke of popular cigarettes sold in the United States.

  1. The comet assay with multiple mouse organs: comparison of comet assay results and carcinogenicity with 208 chemicals selected from the IARC monographs and U.S. NTP Carcinogenicity Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Y F; Sekihashi, K; Izumiyama, F; Nishidate, E; Saga, A; Ishida, K; Tsuda, S

    2000-11-01

    as genotoxic (Ames test-positive) and putative nongenotoxic (Ames test-negative) carcinogens. The Ames test is generally used as a first screening method to assess chemical genotoxicity and has provided extensive information on DNA reactivity. Out of 208 chemicals studied, 117 are Ames test-positive rodent carcinogens, 43 are Ames test-negative rodent carcinogens, and 30 are rodent noncarcinogens (which include both Ames test-positive and negative noncarcinogens). High positive response ratio (110/117) for rodent genotoxic carcinogens and a high negative response ratio (6/30) for rodent noncarcinogens were shown in the comet assay. For Ames test-negative rodent carcinogens, less than 50% were positive in the comet assay, suggesting that the assay, which detects DNA lesions, is not suitable for identifying nongenotoxic carcinogens. In the safety evaluation of chemicals, it is important to demonstrate that Ames test-positive agents are not genotoxic in vivo. This assay had a high positive response ratio for rodent genotoxic carcinogens and a high negative response ratio for rodent genotoxic noncarcinogens, suggesting that the comet assay can be used to evaluate the in vivo genotoxicity of in vitro genotoxic chemicals. For chemicals whose in vivo genotoxicity has been tested in multiple organs by the comet assay, published data are summarized with unpublished data and compared with relevant genotoxicity and carcinogenicity data. Because it is clear that no single test is capable of detecting all relevant genotoxic agents, the usual approach should be to carry out a battery of in vitro and in vivo tests for genotoxicity. The conventional micronucleus test in the hematopoietic system is a simple method to assess in vivo clastogenicity of chemicals. Its performance is related to whether a chemical reaches the hematopoietic system. Among 208 chemicals studied (including 165 rodent carcinogens), 54 rodents carcinogens do not induce micronuclei in mouse hematopoietic system

  2. An Overview of Carcinogenic Heavy Metal: Molecular Toxicity Mechanism and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Kim, Yeo Jin; Seo, Young Rok

    2015-01-01

    Almost all heavy metals are serious toxicants as carcinogens. However, due to their chemical and physiological properties, heavy metals are useful in industrial areas including alloy, smelting and production of commercial products. Such applications increase the opportunity for heavy metal exposure. Waste from industrial processes is also a major source of environmental contamination and accumulation in the human body. Arsenic, cadmium, chromium, and nickel are classified as group 1 carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, and are utilized commercially. In this review, we used molecular pathway analysis to understand the toxicity and carcinogenic mechanisms of these metals. Our analyzed data showed that above-mentioned metallic substances induce oxidative stress, DNA damage, and cell death processes, resulting in increase the risk of cancer and cancer-related diseases. Thus, we might think phytochelatin molecules and antioxidative phytochemical substances are helpful for prevention of heavy metal-induced cancer. PMID:26734585

  3. Carcinogenicity studies on fibres, metal compounds, and some other dusts in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pott, F; Ziem, U; Reiffer, F J; Huth, F; Ernst, H; Mohr, U

    1987-01-01

    About 50 dusts were examined on their carcinogenicity in rats mainly after intraperitoneal injection and some after intratracheal instillation. In the i.p. test, very low doses between 0.05 and 0.5 mg asbestos led to tumour incidences of about 20 to 80%. Polyvinyl-pyridine-N-oxide prolonged the tumour latency after injection of actinolite. 60 mg attapulgite from three sources with short fibre lengths were not shown to be carcinogenic but an attapulgite sample with longer fibres had a moderate effect. Relatively thick rock and ceramic fibres (median greater than 1 micron) induced tumours, but slag and wollastonite fibres did not, probably because of their better solubility. Intratracheal instillations of glass microfibres (20 X 0.5 mg) led to lung tumours in 5 of 34 rats (0 in control). The carcinogenic potency of an inorganic fibre depends on its size and persistency, and possibly also on other properties, especially on the surface. Nickel powder, nickel oxide, nickel subsulfide and cadmium sulfide were all found to be carcinogenic in the two tests. Cadmium chloride and cadmium oxide could only be administered in very low doses because of their high acute toxicity. A high amount of magnetite (15 X 15 mg i.tr.) led to an unexpected lung tumour incidence of 69%. The i.p. test in rats proved to be very sensitive for detecting the carcinogenic potency of non-acute toxic natural and man-made mineral dusts as well as metal compounds. This means that, if a high dose of one of these dusts does not induce tumours in this test, no suspicion of carcinogenic potency can be substantiated.

  4. 78 FR 66366 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Use of Donor Screening Tests To Test Donors of Human Cells, Tissues...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ... Test Donors of Human Cells, Tissues, and Cellular and Tissue-Based Products for Infection With... entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Use of Donor Screening Tests to Test Donors of Human Cells, Tissues, and... ``Guidance for Industry: Eligibility Determination for Donors of Human Cells, Tissues, and Cellular and...

  5. RADON AND CARCINOGENIC RISK IN MOSCOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Golovanev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: comparative evaluation of carcinogenic risk inMoscowfrom radon in indoor and atmospheric pollutants.Materials and methods: the lung cancer incidence in Moscow; radiation-hygienic passport of the territory; .U.S. EPA estimated average age at all and radon induced deaths, years of life lost; Report of UNSCEAR 2006 and WHO handbook on indoor radon, 2009. Trend analysis of incidence; evaluation of the excess relative risk; assessment of ratio radon-induced population risk and published values оf total population carcinogenic risk from chemical carcinogens.Results: it is shown that the 304 cases of lung cancer per year (1. 85 10-3 on average from 2006 to 2011 (21280diseases for 70 years in addition to background level induced by radon; the differences in average trends of all lungcancer incidence in the districts can exceed 25%.Conclusion. The potential of risk reduction by measures of mitigation radon concentration exceeds 5 times the cost efficiency to reduce emissions from vehicles and can reduce cancer incidence, on average 236 cases per year; population risk 16520 cases over 70 years or save not less than 2832 person-years of life per year. The annual effect of reducing losses from not-survival of 12 years as a result of radon-induced lung cancer deaths exceeds 14160000 dollars. The evaluating of the carcinogenic risk from radon in accordance with the definition of population risk increases the predictive evaluation of the effectiveness of preventive measures more than twice.

  6. [Carcinogenic activity of the pesticide propoxur].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylev, L N; Vasil'eva, L A; Smirnova, O V; Khrustalev, S A; Trukhina, G M

    2010-01-01

    Wistar rats were fed propoxur in their diet at 0, 500, 3000, and 8000 ppm during throughout their life. The number of tumors was equal in the control and experimental groups. These were hemoblastoses and breast and uterine tumors. All tumors occurred spontaneously in the rats. A few experimental animals were found to have bladder epithelial hyperplasia that might be pretumorous; however, no bladder tumors were detected. It is concluded that the investigations revealed no carcinogenic activity of propoxur.

  7. Molecular basis of carcinogenicity of tungsten alloy particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Robert M.; Williams, Tim D.; Waring, Rosemary H.; Hodges, Nikolas J., E-mail: n.hodges@bham.ac.uk

    2015-03-15

    The tungsten alloy of 91% tungsten, 6% nickel and 3% cobalt (WNC 91–6–3) induces rhabdomyosarcoma when implanted into a rat thigh muscle. To investigate whether this effect is species-specific human HSkMc primary muscle cells were exposed to WNC 91–6–3 particles and responses were compared with those from a rat skeletal muscle cell line (L6-C11). Toxicity was assessed by the adenylate kinase assay and microscopy, DNA damage by the Comet assay. Caspase 3 enzyme activity was measured and oligonucleotide microarrays were used for transcriptional profiling. WNC 91–6–3 particles caused toxicity in cells adjacent to the particles and also increased DNA strand breaks. Inhibition of caspase 3 by WNC 91–6–3 occurred in rat but not in human cells. In both rat and human cells, the transcriptional response to WNC 91–6–3 showed repression of transcripts encoding muscle-specific proteins with induction of glycolysis, hypoxia, stress responses and transcripts associated with DNA damage and cell death. In human cells, genes encoding metallothioneins were also induced, together with genes related to angiogenesis, dysregulation of apoptosis and proliferation consistent with pre-neoplastic changes. An alloy containing iron, WNF 97–2–1, which is non-carcinogenic in vivo in rats, did not show these transcriptional changes in vitro in either species while the corresponding cobalt-containing alloy, WNC 97–2–1 elicited similar responses to WNC 91–6–3. Tungsten alloys containing both nickel and cobalt therefore have the potential to be carcinogenic in man and in vitro assays coupled with transcriptomics can be used to identify alloys, which may lead to tumour formation, by dysregulation of biochemical processes. - Highlights: • Use of transcriptomics to identify likely carcinogenic tungsten alloys in vitro • Cobalt containing alloys cause oxidative stress, DNA-damage and perturb apoptosis. • Presence of cobalt causes changes in gene expression

  8. Formaldehyde in dentistry: a review of mutagenic and carcinogenic potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, B.B.; Chestner, S.B.

    1981-09-01

    For many years there has been controversy over the value of antimicrobial drugs for intracanal dressings in endodontics. Formocresol, a formaldehyde compound, has evolved as the preferred drug for routine endodontic procedures, as well as pediatric endodontics. The increase in the use of formaldehyde has been complicated by the introduction of paraformaldehyde pastes for filling root canals. Neither of these formulas has ever been standardized. The doses are arbitrary, and the common dose of formocresol has been shown to be many times greater than the minimum dose needed for effect. The efficacy of paraformaldehyde pastes is questionable and remains clouded by inconclusive evidence, conflicting research, inadequate terminology, and a lack of convincing statistical evidence. The clinical use and delivery of formocresol and paraformaldehyde pastes remain arbitrary and unscientific. Formaldehyde has a known toxic mutagenic and carcinogenic potential. Many investigations have been conducted to measure the risk of exposure to formaldehyde; it is clear that formaldehyde poses a carcinogenic risk in humans. There is a need to reevaluate the rationale underlying the use of formaldehyde in dentistry particularly in light of its deleterious effects.

  9. Carcinogenic effects ofcircadian disruption:an epigenetic viewpoint

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abbas Salavaty

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms refer to the endogenous rhythms that are generated to synchronize physiology and behavior with 24-h environmental cues. These rhythms are regulated by both external cues and molecular clock mechanisms in almost all cells. Disruption of circadian rhythms, which is called circadian disruption, affects many biological processes within the body and results in different long-term diseases, including cancer. Circadian regulatory pathways result in rhythmic epigenetic modiifcations and the formation of circadian epigenomes. Aberrant epigenetic modiifcations, such as hypermethylation, due to circadian disruption may be involved in the transformation of normal cells into cancer cells. Several studies have indicated an epigenetic basis for the carcinogenic effects of circadian disruption. In this review, I ifrst discuss some of the circadian genes and regulatory proteins. Then, I summarize the current evidence related to the epigenetic modiifcations that result in circadian disruption. In addition, I explain the carcinogenic effects of circadian disruption and highlight its potential role in different human cancers using an epigenetic view-point. Finally, the importance of chronotherapy in cancer treatment is highlighted.

  10. Carcinogenic effects of circadian disruption: an epigenetic viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salavaty, Abbas

    2015-08-08

    Circadian rhythms refer to the endogenous rhythms that are generated to synchronize physiology and behavior with 24-h environmental cues. These rhythms are regulated by both external cues and molecular clock mechanisms in almost all cells. Disruption of circadian rhythms, which is called circadian disruption, affects many biological processes within the body and results in different long-term diseases, including cancer. Circadian regulatory pathways result in rhythmic epigenetic modifications and the formation of circadian epigenomes. Aberrant epigenetic modifications, such as hypermethylation, due to circadian disruption may be involved in the transformation of normal cells into cancer cells. Several studies have indicated an epigenetic basis for the carcinogenic effects of circadian disruption. In this review, I first discuss some of the circadian genes and regulatory proteins. Then, I summarize the current evidence related to the epigenetic modifications that result in circadian disruption. In addition, I explain the carcinogenic effects of circadian disruption and highlight its potential role in different human cancers using an epigenetic viewpoint. Finally, the importance of chronotherapy in cancer treatment is highlighted.

  11. Assessment of Rose Bengal test in diagnosing Egyptian human brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Fekhfakh, Effat Abdel-Monaem; Hassanain, Nawal Abdel-Hafiz; El-Folly, Runia Fouad; El-Hariri, Hazem

    2011-08-01

    A total of 30 patients suffering from brucellosis were suspected based on history taking, clinical manifestations and positive serum tube agglutination test (at titer > or = 1/160). The followings were done for all cases; complete blood picture (differential leucocytic count) and liver function tests, serodiagnosis of Brucella (serum tube agglutination test (STAT) as well as Rose Bengal test (RBT) and PCR. The study aimed to analyze the diagnostic value of RBT as compared to STAT and PCR for human brucellosis, and to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, the cost and the time consuming of RBT as compared to STAT and PCR. There was a significant difference between diagnosis by RBT and both STAT > or = 1/640, & STAT > or = 1/1280. Also, there was a significant difference between PCR and both STAT > or = 1/640, and STAT > or = 1/1280. No significant difference was detected between RBT in diagnosing acute and chronic infection. STAT > or = 1/320 proved to be better than STAT at other titers and RBT in diagnosis of brucellosis. RBT proved to be suitable as screening test regarding time (faster) and cost. But, STAT > or = 1/320 from a practical and economic point of views proved to be the best one in diagnosing human brucellosis.

  12. Human papillomavirus testing and genotyping in cervical screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Lynge, Elsebeth; Bonde, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    the incidence of cervical cancer, but has a low sensitivity for high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and requires frequent testing. Several HPV tests have become available commercially. They appear to be more sensitive for high-grade CIN, and may further reduce the incidence of cervical cancer......Mass vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes 16 and 18 will, in the long term, reduce the incidence of cervical cancer, but screening will remain an important cancer control measure in both vaccinated and unvaccinated women. Since the 1960s, cytology screening has helped to reduce...

  13. Carcinogenicity of consumption of red and processed meat: What about environmental contaminants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, José L; Nadal, Martí

    2016-02-01

    In October 26, 2015, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) issued a press release informing of the recent evaluation of the carcinogenicity of red and processed meat consumption. The consumption of red meat and processed meat was classified as "probably carcinogenic to humans", and as "carcinogenic to humans", respectively. The substances responsible of this potential carcinogenicity would be generated during meat processing, such as curing and smoking, or when meat is heated at high temperatures (N-nitroso-compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic aromatic amines). However, in its assessments, the IARC did not make any reference to the role that may pose some carcinogenic environmental pollutants, which are already present in raw or unprocessed meat. The potential role of a number of environmental chemical contaminants (toxic trace elements, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans, polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, polychlorinated diphenyl ethers, polychlorinated naphthalenes and perfluoroalkyl substances) on the carcinogenicity of consumption of meat and meat products is discussed in this paper. A case-study, Catalonia (Spain), is specifically assessed, while the influence of cooking on the concentrations of environmental pollutants is also reviewed. It is concluded that although certain cooking processes could modify the levels of chemical contaminants in food, the influence of cooking on the pollutant concentrations depends not only on the particular cooking process, but even more on their original contents in each specific food item. As most of these environmental pollutants are organic, cooking procedures that release or remove fat from the meat should tend to reduce the total concentrations of these contaminants in the cooked meat. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 21 CFR 862.1155 - Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) test system... Test Systems § 862.1155 Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) test system. (a) Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) test system intended for the early detection of pregnancy—(1) Identification. A human...

  15. An international literature survey of "IARC Group I carcinogens" reported in mainstream cigarette smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C J; Livingston, S D; Doolittle, D J

    1997-01-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) currently lists 44 individual chemical agents, 12 groups or mixtures of chemicals and 13 exposure circumstances as "Group 1 human carcinogens". A comprehensive search of the published literature revealed that nine of the 44 chemical agents classified as "Group I carcinogens" by IARC have been reported to occur in mainstream cigarette smoke. The other 35 have never been reported to occur in cigarette smoke. The nine agents reported are benzene, cadmium, arsenic, nickel, chromium, 2-naphthyl-amine, vinyl chloride, 4-aminobiphenyl and beryllium. The reported yields of each of these nine agents in mainstream smoke varies widely. The range of yields reported for a given compound is influenced by the type of cigarette tested and when the analysis was conducted. In micrograms/cigarette, the ranges that have been reported for each of the nine compounds are: benzene (0.05-104), cadmium (0-6.67), arsenic (0-1.4), nickel (0-0.51), chromium (0.0002-0.5), 2-naphthylamine (0.0002-0.022), vinyl chloride (0.0013-0.0158), 4-aminobiphenyl (0.00019-0.005) and beryllium (0-0.0005). Although some of the variation in reported yields may be due to differences in analytical methodology, several correlations between the yield of a particular chemical in mainstream smoke and certain cigarette characteristics were observed. For example, charcoal filtration was associated with reduced vinyl chloride, and the concentration of sodium nitrate in the tobacco was positively correlated with the mainstream yield of both 2-naphthylamine and 4-aminobiphenyl. Benzene yield in mainstream cigarette smoke was correlated with the amount of tobacco burned and with the 'tar' level. Agronomic factors such as production practices and soil characteristics, and environmental conditions such as rainfall, reportedly influence the accumulation of metals, for example, cadmium, beryllium, chromium, nickel and arsenic, in the leaf. The use of fertilizers low in

  16. A pseudoisochromatic test of color vision for human infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Michele E; Drodge, Suzanne C; Courage, Mary L; Adams, Russell J

    2014-07-01

    Despite the development of experimental methods capable of measuring early human color vision, we still lack a procedure comparable to those used to diagnose the well-identified congenital and acquired color vision anomalies in older children, adults, and clinical patients. In this study, we modified a pseudoisochromatic test to make it more suitable for young infants. Using a forced choice preferential looking procedure, 216 3-to-23-mo-old babies were tested with pseudoisochromatic targets that fell on either a red/green or a blue/yellow dichromatic confusion axis. For comparison, 220 color-normal adults and 22 color-deficient adults were also tested. Results showed that all babies and adults passed the blue/yellow target but many of the younger infants failed the red/green target, likely due to the interaction of the lingering immaturities within the visual system and the small CIE vector distance within the red/green plate. However, older (17-23 mo) infants, color- normal adults and color-defective adults all performed according to expectation. Interestingly, performance on the red/green plate was better among female infants, well exceeding the expected rate of genetic dimorphism between genders. Overall, with some further modification, the test serves as a promising tool for the detection of early color vision anomalies in early human life.

  17. Tuberculin test in nursing and human-sciences students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Golchin

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tuberculosis (TB is a leading cause of death worldwide due to any single infectious agent. It seems that health care workers including nursing students can be affected easier than the other people, because of probable contacts in hospital. The risk of TB infection in nursing students has not estimated in Iran, so we conducted this study to compare the results of tuberculin test in the beginning and the end of educational course for nursing and human-sciences student. Methods: In a Cohort study, 320 students (160 nursing and 160 human-sciences underwent PPD skin test (5 units RT 23 at the beginning and the end of educational course by expert technician. The data of remaining students (123 nursing and 111 human-sciences were analyzed by SPSS software using Wilcoxson and Mann-Whitney tests. Results: The frequency distribution of skin reaction in nursing students was negative (0-4 mm: 93.7%, suspected (5-9 mm: 4.4% and significant (≥15mm: 1.9% at the beginning of study, while it was negative( 75.5 %, suspected (9.8%, positive (10-14 mm 3.3% and significant (11.4% at the end of study. The frequency of skin reaction in human-sciences student was negative (93.7%, suspected (0.6%, positive (1.3% and significant (4.4% at the beginning of study, while it was negative (79.3%, significant (10.8%, suspected (8.1% and positive (1.8% at the end of study. The difference in that proportion of nursing students and control group with positive and significant PPD test at the end of study was statistically significant. The difference for the above proportions between two groups was not statistically significant. Conclusion: All subjects had no significant difference regarding to age, indigenous area and PPD test. Both groups have the same chance for exposure to M. Tuberculosis. The rate of new TB infection in Iranian community has diminished in comparison with the last few decades. Although risk of new infection may be a little bit more after age

  18. Detection of mutagenic/carcinogenic compounds in unused and used motor oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquini, R; Monarca, S

    1983-12-15

    The discharge of used motor oils in the environment poses public health problems because of the mutagenic/carcinogenic compounds in them. Among these hazardous chemicals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are of particular interest since the carcinogenic properties of some of them are known. The authors have applied the Salmonella/microsome test, coupled with two preparation methods of samples, to motor oils of different brands, both before and after use in car petrol engines. A PAH determination method was also studied. The results showed the unused motor oils to be nonmutagenic and to contain traces of PAH, while the used motor oils of the samples taken according to both preparation methods were highly mutagenic and contained a much higher quantity of mutagenic/carcinogenic PAH.

  19. Testing modern human out-of-Africa dispersal models and implications for modern human origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Centeno, Hugo; Hubbe, Mark; Hanihara, Tsunehiko; Stringer, Chris; Harvati, Katerina

    2015-10-01

    The modern human expansion process out of Africa has important implications for understanding the genetic and phenotypic structure of extant populations. While intensely debated, the primary hypotheses focus on either a single dispersal or multiple dispersals out of the continent. Here, we use the human fossil record from Africa and the Levant, as well as an exceptionally large dataset of Holocene human crania sampled from Asia, to model ancestor-descendant relationships along hypothetical dispersal routes. We test the spatial and temporal predictions of competing out-of-Africa models by assessing the correlation of geographical distances between populations and measures of population differentiation derived from quantitative cranial phenotype data. Our results support a model in which extant Australo-Melanesians are descendants of an initial dispersal out of Africa by early anatomically modern humans, while all other populations are descendants of a later migration wave. Our results have implications for understanding the complexity of modern human origins and diversity.

  20. An in vitro cell irradiation protocol for testing photopharmaceuticals and the effect of blue, green, and red light on human cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, S L; Siewert, B; Askes, S H C; Veldhuizen, P; Zwier, R; Heger, Michal; Bonnet, Sylvestre

    2016-05-11

    Traditionally, ultraviolet light (100-400 nm) is considered an exogenous carcinogen while visible light (400-780 nm) is deemed harmless. In this work, a LED irradiation system for in vitro photocytotoxicity testing is described. The LED irradiation system was developed for testing photopharmaceutical drugs, but was used here to determine the basal level response of human cancer cell lines to visible light of different wavelengths, without any photo(chemo)therapeutic. The effects of blue (455 nm, 10.5 mW cm(-2)), green (520 nm, 20.9 mW cm(-2)), and red light (630 nm, 34.4 mW cm(-2)) irradiation was measured for A375 (human malignant melanoma), A431 (human epidermoid carcinoma), A549 (human lung carcinoma), MCF7 (human mammary gland adenocarcinoma), MDA-MB-231 (human mammary gland adenocarcinoma), and U-87 MG (human glioblastoma-grade IV) cell lines. In response to a blue light dose of 19 J cm(-2), three cell lines exhibited a minimal (20%, MDA-MB-231) to moderate (30%, A549 and 60%, A375) reduction in cell viability, compared to dark controls. The other cell lines were not affected. Effective blue light doses that produce a therapeutic response in 50% of the cell population (ED50) compared to dark conditions were found to be 10.9 and 30.5 J cm(-2) for A375 and A549 cells, respectively. No adverse effects were observed in any of the six cell lines irradiated with a 19 J cm(-2) dose of 520 nm (green) or 630 nm (red) light. The results demonstrate that blue light irradiation can have an effect on the viability of certain human cancer cell types and controls should be used in photopharmaceutical testing, which uses high-energy (blue or violet) visible light activation.

  1. Development of a two-dimensional high-performance liquid chromatography system coupled with on-line reduction as a new efficient analytical method of 3-nitrobenzanthrone, a potential human carcinogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasei, Tomohiro; Nakanishi, Haruka; Toda, Yumiko; Watanabe, Tetsushi

    2012-08-31

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) is an extremely strong mutagen and carcinogen in rats inducing squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. We developed a new sensitive analytical method, a two-dimensional HPLC system coupled with on-line reduction, to quantify non-fluorescent 3-NBA as fluorescent 3-aminobenzanthrone (3-ABA). The two-dimensional HPLC system consisted of reversed-phase HPLC and normal-phase HPLC, which were connected with a switch valve. 3-NBA was purified by reversed-phase HPLC and reduced to 3-ABA with a catalyst column, packed with alumina coated with platinum, in ethanol. An alcoholic solvent is necessary for reduction of 3-NBA, but 3-ABA is not fluorescent in the alcoholic solvent. Therefore, 3-ABA was separated from alcohol and impurities by normal-phase HPLC and detected with a fluorescence detector. Extracts from surface soil, airborne particles, classified airborne particles, and incinerator dust were applied to the two-dimensional HPLC system after clean-up with a silica gel column. 3-NBA, detected as 3-ABA, in the extracts was found as a single peak on the chromatograms without any interfering peaks. 3-NBA was detected in 4 incinerator dust samples (n=5). When classified airborne particles, that is, those 7.0 μm in size, were applied to the two-dimensional HPLC system after purified using a silica gel column, 3-NBA was detected in those particles with particle sizes NBA in airborne particles and the detection of 3-NBA in incinerator dust. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Thermal human phantom for testing of millimeter wave cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palka, Norbert; Ryniec, Radoslaw; Piszczek, Marek; Szustakowski, Mieczyslaw; Zyczkowski, Marek; Kowalski, Marcin

    2012-06-01

    Screening cameras working in millimetre band gain more and more interest among security society mainly due to their capability of finding items hidden under clothes. Performance of commercially available passive cameras is still limited due to not sufficient resolution and contrast in comparison to other wavelengths (visible or infrared range). Testing of such cameras usually requires some persons carrying guns, bombs or knives. Such persons can have different clothes or body temperature, what makes the measurements even more ambiguous. To avoid such situations we built a moving phantom of human body. The phantom consists of a polystyrene manikin which is covered with a number of small pipes with water. Pipes were next coated with a silicone "skin". The veins (pipes) are filled with water heated up to 37 C degrees to obtain the same temperature as human body. The phantom is made of non-metallic materials and is placed on a moving wirelessly-controlled platform with four wheels. The phantom can be dressed with a set of ordinary clothes and can be equipped with some dangerous (guns, bombs) and non-dangerous items. For tests we used a passive commercially available camera TS4 from ThruVision Systems Ltd. operating at 250 GHz. We compared the images taken from phantom and a man and we obtained good similarity both for naked as well as dressed man/phantom case. We also tested the phantom with different sets of clothes and hidden items and we got good conformity with persons.

  3. Comparison of rat olfactory mucosal responses to carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic chloracetanilides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genter, M.B.; Warner, B.M.; Medvedovic, M.; Sartor, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Alachlor and butachlor are chloracetanilide herbicides that induce olfactory tumors in rats, whereas propachlor does not. The mechanism by which alachlor induces tumors is distinct from many other nasal carcinogens, in that alachlor induces a gradual de-differentiation of the olfactory mucosa (OM) to a more respiratory-like epithelium, in contrast to other agents that induce cytotoxicity, followed by an aberrant regenerative response. We studied biochemical and genomic effects of these compounds to identify processes that occur in common between alachlor- and butachlor-treated rats. Because we have previously shown that matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) is activated in OM by alachlor, in the present studies we evaluated both MMP2 activation and changes in OM gene expression in response to carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic chloracetanilide treatments. All three chloracetanilides activated MMP2, and > 300 genes were significantly up- or downregulated between control and alachlor-treated rats. The most significantly regulated gene was vomeromodulin, which was dramatically upregulated by alachlor and butachlor treatment (>60-fold), but not by propachlor treatment. Except for similar gene responses in alachlor- and butachlor-treated rats, we did not identify clear-cut differences that would predict OM carcinogenicity in this study. PMID:19425180

  4. Combining QSAR modeling and text-mining techniques to link chemical structures and carcinogenic modes of action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Papamokos

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing need for new reliable non-animal based methods to predict and test toxicity of chemicals. QSAR, a computer-based method linking chemical structures with biological activities, is used in predictive toxicology. In this study we tested the approach to combine QSAR data with literature profiles of carcinogenic modes of action automatically generated by a text-mining tool. The aim was to generate data patterns to identify associations between chemical structures and biological mechanisms related to carcinogenesis. Using these two methods, individually and combined, we evaluated 96 rat carcinogens of the hematopoietic system, liver, lung and skin. We found that skin and lung rat carcinogens were mainly mutagenic, while the group of carcinogens affecting the hematopoietic system and the liver also included a large proportion of non-mutagens. The automatic literature analysis showed that mutagenicity was a frequently reported endpoint in the literature of these carcinogens, however less common endpoints such as immunosuppression and hormonal receptor-mediated effects were also found in connection with some of the carcinogens, results of potential importance for certain target organs. The combined approach, using QSAR and text-mining techniques, could be useful for identifying more detailed information on biological mechanisms and the relation with chemical structures. The method can be particularly useful in increasing the understanding of structure and activity relationships for non-mutagens.

  5. Combining QSAR Modeling and Text-Mining Techniques to Link Chemical Structures and Carcinogenic Modes of Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papamokos, George; Silins, Ilona

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing need for new reliable non-animal based methods to predict and test toxicity of chemicals. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR), a computer-based method linking chemical structures with biological activities, is used in predictive toxicology. In this study, we tested the approach to combine QSAR data with literature profiles of carcinogenic modes of action automatically generated by a text-mining tool. The aim was to generate data patterns to identify associations between chemical structures and biological mechanisms related to carcinogenesis. Using these two methods, individually and combined, we evaluated 96 rat carcinogens of the hematopoietic system, liver, lung, and skin. We found that skin and lung rat carcinogens were mainly mutagenic, while the group of carcinogens affecting the hematopoietic system and the liver also included a large proportion of non-mutagens. The automatic literature analysis showed that mutagenicity was a frequently reported endpoint in the literature of these carcinogens, however, less common endpoints such as immunosuppression and hormonal receptor-mediated effects were also found in connection with some of the carcinogens, results of potential importance for certain target organs. The combined approach, using QSAR and text-mining techniques, could be useful for identifying more detailed information on biological mechanisms and the relation with chemical structures. The method can be particularly useful in increasing the understanding of structure and activity relationships for non-mutagens.

  6. Can clinical tests help monitor human papillomavirus vaccine impact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meites, Elissa; Lin, Carol; Unger, Elizabeth R; Steinau, Martin; Patel, Sonya; Markowitz, Lauri E; Hariri, Susan

    2013-09-01

    As immunization programs for human papillomavirus (HPV) are implemented more widely around the world, interest is increasing in measuring their impact. One early measurable impact of HPV vaccine is on the prevalence of specific HPV types in a population. In low-resource settings, a potentially attractive strategy would be to monitor HPV prevalence using clinical cervical cancer screening test results to triage specimens for HPV typing. We assessed this approach in a nationally representative population of U.S. females aged 14-59 years. Using self-collected cervico-vaginal swab specimens from 4,150 women participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey during 2003-2006, we evaluated type-specific HPV prevalence detected by the Roche linear array (LA) research test on all specimens, compared with type-specific HPV prevalence detected by LA conducted only on specimens positive by the digene hybrid capture 2 (HC-2) clinical test. We calculated weighted prevalence estimates and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs), and examined relative type-specific HPV prevalence according to the two testing approaches. The population prevalence of oncogenic HPV vaccine types 16/18 was 6.2% (CI:5.4-7.1) by LA if all specimens were tested, and 2.4% (CI:1.9-3.0) if restricted to positive HC-2. Relative prevalence of individual HPV types was similar for both approaches. Compared with typing all specimens, a triage approach would require testing fewer specimens, but a greater reduction in HPV prevalence or a larger group of specimens would be needed to detect vaccine impact. Further investigation is warranted to inform type-specific HPV monitoring approaches around the world.

  7. Inflammatory aetiology of human myometrial activation tested using directed graphs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available THERE ARE THREE MAIN HYPOTHESES FOR THE ACTIVATION OF THE HUMAN UTERUS AT LABOUR: functional progesterone withdrawal, inflammatory stimulation, and oxytocin receptor activation. To test these alternatives we have taken information and data from the literature to develop causal pathway models for the activation of human myometrium. The data provided quantitative RT-PCR results on key genes from samples taken before and during labour. Principal component analysis showed that pre-labour samples form a homogenous group compared to those during labour. We therefore modelled the alternative causal pathways in non-labouring samples using directed graphs and statistically compared the likelihood of the different models using structural equations and D-separation approaches. Using the computer program LISREL, inflammatory activation as a primary event was highly consistent with the data (p = 0.925, progesterone withdrawal, as a primary event, is plausible (p = 0.499, yet comparatively unlikely, oxytocin receptor mediated initiation is less compatible with the data (p = 0.091. DGraph, a software program that creates directed graphs, produced similar results (p= 0.684, p= 0.280, and p = 0.04, respectively. This outcome supports an inflammatory aetiology for human labour. Our results demonstrate the value of directed graphs in determining the likelihood of causal relationships in biology in situations where experiments are not possible.

  8. Carcinogenicity/tumour promotion by NDL PCB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrenk, D. [Kaiserslautern Univ. (Germany). Food Chemistry and Environmental Toxicology

    2004-09-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) belong to the group of persistent environmental pollutants exhibiting neurotoxic, teratogenic and tumour-promoting effects in experimental animal models. PCB congeners can be divided into 'dioxinlike' and 'non-dioxinlike' congeners on the basis of their ability to act as aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists. Like the most toxic dioxin congener 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) 'dioxinlike' PCBs bind to the AhR and show characteristic effects on the expression of AhR-regulated genes including the induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1. On the other hand, 'non-dioxinlike' PCB congeners have a lower or no binding affinity to the AhR, but exhibit a 'phenobarbital-type' induction of CYP 2B1/2 activity. A carcinogenic potential of PCBs has been demonstrated with technical mixtures such as Aroclors or Clophens. In these studies the liver and the thyroid gland were found to be the principal target organs of PCB-mediated carcinogenesis in rodents. No studies have been published, however, on the carcinogenicity of individual congeners. In two-stage initiation-promotion protocols in rats, both technical mixtures and individual 'dioxinlike' and 'non-dioxinlike' congeners were reported to act as liver tumour promoters.

  9. Pumpless microfluidic platform for drug testing on human skin equivalents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaci, Hasan Erbil; Gledhill, Karl; Guo, Zongyou; Christiano, Angela M; Shuler, Michael L

    2015-02-07

    Advances in bio-mimetic in vitro human skin models increase the efficiency of drug screening studies. In this study, we designed and developed a microfluidic platform that allows for long-term maintenance of full thickness human skin equivalents (HSE) which are comprised of both the epidermal and dermal compartments. The design is based on the physiologically relevant blood residence times in human skin tissue and allows for the establishment of an air-epidermal interface which is crucial for maturation and terminal differentiation of HSEs. The small scale of the design reduces the amount of culture medium and the number of cells required by 36 fold compared to conventional transwell cultures. Our HSE-on-a-chip platform has the capability to recirculate the medium at desired flow rates without the need for pump or external tube connections. We demonstrate that the platform can be used to maintain HSEs for three weeks with proliferating keratinocytes similar to conventional HSE cultures. Immunohistochemistry analyses show that the differentiation and localization of keratinocytes was successfully achieved, establishing all sub-layers of the epidermis after one week. Basal keratinocytes located at the epidermal-dermal interface remain in a proliferative state for three weeks. We use a transdermal transport model to show that the skin barrier function is maintained for three weeks. We also validate the capability of the HSE-on-a-chip platform to be used for drug testing purposes by examining the toxic effects of doxorubucin on skin cells and structure. Overall, the HSE-on-a-chip is a user-friendly and cost-effective in vitro platform for drug testing of candidate molecules for skin disorders.

  10. Studies on the Mutagenicity and Teratogenicity of Kuianchun and Its Potential Carcinogenicity Prediction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Jian-ping; ZHANG Li; CAO Sui-zhong; ZHOU Li-xia; ZHOU Xue-hui; LIU Zong-ping; WEI Chun-mei; MIAO Xiao-lin; WEI Zeng-quan

    2002-01-01

    Kuianchun is a newly synthesized antibacterial and growth-promoting drug. This paper selected a battery of three short-term tests, including Ames test, micronucleus test and sperm abnormality test, to detect the mutagenicity of Kuianchun. The carcinogenicity prediction and battery selection method (CPBS method) was used to determine the probability of carcinogenicity of Kuianchun based upon the results of shortterm tests mentioned above. In addition, traditional teratogenic test was selected to study teratogenicity of Kuianchun. In Ames test, Kuianchun showed mutagenic for Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100 in the absence and presence of microsomal metabolic activation system (S9-mix). However, the mutagenicity was reduced by the addition of S9-mix. In micronucleus test, Kuianchun was administered intra-peritoneally to male mouse 30 hours and 6 hours before they were killed respectively. The result indicated that there was no significant difference on the number of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) in the mouse bone marrow induced by Kuianchun compared with the negative contrast (50% DMSO) (P > 0.05). In sperm abnormality test, Kuianchun was administered through a gastric incubation to male mouse as a suspension in 2% Tween-80. The dosage levels were 450, 750, 1000 and 1500mg/kg per day for 5 days. The result indicated that the percentage of abnormal sperms induced by Kuianchun was not significant compared with the negative contrast (P>0.05). In traditional teratogenic test, Kuianchun was given orally to pregnant mouse at 1/30,1/20 and 1/15 LDs0 during 6 - 15days of pregnancy period (the LD50 = 9000mg/kg). No toxicity was found either on mother and embryo in mouse, and teratogenic effects were also not observed at all tested dosages. The probability of carcinogenicity of Kuianchun is 23.8 % (θ = 0.238). The result demonstrated that Kuianchun is a non-carcinogen.

  11. Induction of H2AX phosphorylation in pulmonary cells by tobacco smoke: a new assay for carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albino, A P; Huang, X; Jorgensen, E; Yang, J; Gietl, D; Traganos, F; Darzynkiewicz, Z

    2004-08-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are potentially carcinogenic lesions. The induction of DSBs triggers phosphorylation of histone H2AX. Phosphorylated H2AX, denoted p-H2AX, may be detected immunocytochemically and the intensity of p-H2AX immunofluorescence (IF) reveals the frequency of DSBs. Using this assay we tested whether the exposure of A549 human pulmonary adenocarcinoma cells to tobacco smoke, and normal human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBE) to tobacco smoke condensate, induces DSBs. Cellular p-H2AX IF and DAPI fluorescence of individual cells were measured by laser scanning cytometry (LSC). Exposure of A549 cells to tobacco smoke and NHBE cells to smoke condensate led to H2AX phosphorylation in both a time and dose dependent manner. The maximal rate of H2AX phosphorylation was seen during the initial 4h of cell treatment. At high doses (50 microg/ml of smoke condensate), H2AX phosphorylation continued to increase for up to 24h. No differences in the level of H2AX phosphorylation were apparent between cells in G(1) vs S vs G(2)/M phase of the cell cycle in response to treatment with smoke condensate. The data provide strong evidence that exposure of A549 cells to tobacco smoke or NHBE cells to smoke condensate rapidly induces DSBs in these cells. The present assay to detect and measure DSBs induced by tobacco products complements other mutagenicity assays and may be applied to test potential carcinogens in other products.

  12. Assessment of carcinogenic heavy metal levels in Brazilian cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Gustavo Freitas de Sousa; Garcia, Karina S; Menezes-Filho, Jose Antonio

    2011-10-01

    Several studies have associated high cancer incidence with smoking habits. According to IARC, lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), arsenic (As), nickel (Ni), and chromium (Cr) are carcinogenic to humans. These metals are present in cigarettes and their levels vary according to geographical region of tobacco cultivation, fertilizer treatment, plant variety etc. This study aims to assess these metal levels in cigarettes commercialized in Brazil. Three cigarettes of each 20 different brands were individually weighed, the tobacco filling removed, and homogenized. After desiccation, samples were subjected to microwave-assisted digestion. Analyses were performed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Mean levels for Pb, Cd, As, Ni, and Cr were, respectively, 0.27 ± 0.054, 0.65 ± 0.091, 0.09 ± 0.024, 1.26 ± 0.449, and 1.43 ± 0.630, in micrograms per gram of tobacco. No correlation was observed between Cd and any other metal analyzed. A mild correlation (r = 0.483, p < 0.05) was observed between Pb and Cr levels. Strong significant (p < 0.01) correlations were observed between Ni and Cr (r = 0.829), Ni and As (r = 0.799), Ni and Pb (r = 0.637), and between Cr and As (r = 0.621). Chromium and Ni levels were significantly higher in cigarettes from a multinational manufacturer. Our results show a high variability in heavy metal levels in cigarettes, representing an important exposure source of smokers and passive smokers to carcinogenic substances.

  13. Morpho-chemical characterization and surface properties of carcinogenic zeolite fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, Michele; Giordani, Matteo; Dogan, Meral; Cangiotti, Michela; Avella, Giuseppe; Giorgi, Rodorico; Dogan, A Umran; Ottaviani, Maria Francesca

    2016-04-05

    Erionite belonging to the zeolite family is a human health-hazard, since it was demonstrated to be carcinogenic. Conversely, offretite family zeolites were suspected carcinogenic. Mineralogical, morphological, chemical, and surface characterizations were performed on two erionites (GF1, MD8) and one offretite (BV12) fibrous samples and, for comparison, one scolecite (SC1) sample. The specific surface area analysis indicated a larger availability of surface sites for the adsorption onto GF1, while SC1 shows the lowest one and the presence of large pores in the poorly fibrous zeolite aggregates. Selected spin probes revealed a high adsorption capacity of GF1 compared to the other zeolites, but the polar/charged interacting sites were well distributed, intercalated by less polar sites (Si-O-Si). MD8 surface is less homogeneous and the polar/charged sites are more interacting and closer to each other compared to GF1. The interacting ability of BV12 surface is much lower than that found for GF1 and MD8 and the probes are trapped in small pores into the fibrous aggregates. In comparison with the other zeolites, the non-carcinogenic SC1 shows a poor interacting ability and a lower surface polarity. These results helped to clarify the chemical properties and the surface interacting ability of these zeolite fibers which may be related to their carcinogenicity.

  14. Temporal aspects of tumorigenic response to individual and mixed carcinogens. Progress report, October 1, 1978-September 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, R.E.; Burns, F.J.; Altshuler, B.

    1979-06-01

    The research proposed here is designed to obtain a better understanding of the temporal kinetics of tumor induction when one or more carcinogens are present simultaneously or sequentially for prolonged periods of time. Studies done to date under this contract have shown that carcinogenesis in mouse skin by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon carcinogens is consistent with the induction of dependent and autonomous cell transformations by the carcinogen followed by the conversion of autonomous tumor cells into malignancies at a rate which is determined by the level of carcinogen exposure. Dependent cell transformations remain latent in the skin unless expressed by a promoting agent. Dependent neoplasia appears to follow one-hit kinetics while malignancy is a multihit endpoint. Dose-related and time-related aspects of tumor induction are separable in the initiation-promotion system of mouse skin which along with rat skin and hamster lung is being used as a model for testing hypotheses. Results to date provide the basis for a new interpretation of the linear non-threshold extrapolation model. The broad aim of the study is to provide a basis or rationale for estimating risks associated with prolonged exposures to carcinogens found in the environment and to predict how different tissues and species respond to the carcinogens, promoters, and cocarcinogens.

  15. 75 FR 51273 - Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately Affected Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately Affected Populations AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). ACTION: Notice. Notice of Intent to...

  16. [Human basophil degranulation test. Results of a modified technic (I)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román Pérez, F; Berlanga Cortés, J A; Urquiă, M; Guerra Pasadas, F; Peña Martínez, J

    1986-01-01

    The degranulation of human basophils towards antigenic substances, to which they must be previously sensitized as a result of the antigen-antibody union at the membrane level, is a phenomenon that has an important application complementing diagnosis of diseases mediated by the Gell and Coombs classification of Type I Hypersensitivity, on which the principle of Human Basophils Degranulation Test (HBDT) was based. An essential requirement is to be able to collect an adequate quantity of basophils, as well as the visualization by means of a technique of convenient stain. In this work, we show a modified HBDT technique for basophil granulocytes staining. A total of 33 HBDT was carried out on patients sensitive to grass pollen and/or Olea europea pollen and/or D. pteronyssinus, and as controls, HBDT was done on healthy individuals with negative clinical history. Basophil enrichemnt from the circulating blood sample was done by means of centrifugation in Percoll density gradients of 1072, 1076, 1080 and 1082, and we obtained a higher number of basophils with a density of 1080 at 400 Xg for 30 minutes. The cellular bottom was resuspended in 600 microliters of PBS. We employed lyophilized antigenic extracts from grass pollen, Olea europea and D. pteronyssinus, employing weight/volume concentration of 10(-4), 10(-5), 10(-6) and 10(-7). The optimum dilutions were 10(-5) for grass pollen and D. pteronyssinus.

  17. Carcinogenicity of residual fuel oils by nonbiological laboratory methods: annotated bibliography. Part I. Laboratory methods of analysis. Part II. Analysis results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cichorz, R. S.

    1976-04-09

    Recent emphases have been directed by Federal government regulatory agencies and other research groups on the carcinogenic effects of certain aromatic hydrocarbon components in naturally occurring petroleum products. These are used in plant operations, and underline the importance of evaluating environments. Since Rocky Flats Plant uses large quantities of fuel oil, the author was prompted to undertake a search of the chemical literature. Articles and accounts of studies were reviewed on nonbiological laboratory methods for determining the carcinogenicity of residual fuel oils and related high-boiling petroleum fractions. The physical and chemical methods involve the separation or measurement (or both) of polynuclear aromatic constituents which generally are responsible for the carcinogenic effects. Thus, the author suggests that the total carcinogenic activity of any petroleum product may not be due to a specific potent carcinogen, but rather to the cumulative effect of several individually weak carcinogens. The literature search is presented as an annotated bibliography, current as of January 1, 1975, and includes significant parts of the studies along with the total number of other references found when the citation was examined in its entirety. Part I deals with laboratory chemical and physical methods of determining carcinogenicity or polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (or both) in residual fuel oils and contains ten entries. Part II includes the results of testing specific fuel oils for carcinogenic constituents and contains eleven entries. An author index and subject categories are included.

  18. Method for converting asbestos to non-carcinogenic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, Thomas W.

    1996-01-01

    Hazardous and carcinogenic asbestos waste characterized by a crystalline fibrous structure is transformed into non-carcinogenic, relatively nonhazardous, and non-crystalline solid compounds and gaseous compounds which have commercial utilization. The asbestos waste is so transformed by the complete fluorination of the crystalline fibrous silicate mineral defining the asbestos.

  19. Workshop on problem areas associated with developing carcinogen guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-06-01

    A workshop was conducted to discuss problem areas associated with developing carcinogen guidelines. Session topics included (1) definition of a carcinogen for regulatory purposes; (2) potency; (3) risk assessment; (4) uncertainties; (5) de minimis quantity; and (6) legal and regulatory issues. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual papers. (ACR)

  20. Emissions and air exposure of carcinogens and co-carcinogens in four Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fauser, Patrik; Plejdrup, Marlene Schmidt; Ketzel, Matthias;

    . A list of carcinogenic andco-carcinogenic pollutants (particles, heavy metals and organic compounds) emittedfrom energy production, industrial activities, road transport, navigation, agriculture, residential heating and product use was compiled. Pollutant emissions levels for 2010and trends for 1990......This project (KoL 12-08) was performed for the Climate and Air Quality Group (KlimaogLuftgruppen, KoL), Nordic Council of Ministers by atmospheric emission, exposureand epidemiology experts from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. Emission inventory methods and exposure models were presented...... to 2010 were compiled and discussed, and modelled andmeasured atmospheric concentrations for 2010 were compiled on regional, urbanand local scales. Nordic maps of emissions and air concentrations of PM2.5, PM10, NOx,NMVOC, benzene, BaP, dioxin, cadmium and nickel were compiled for allaggregated main...

  1. Electromagnetic respiratory effort harvester: human testing and metabolic cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahhaidar, E; Padasdao, B; Romine, R; Stickley, C; Lubecke, O Boric

    2015-03-01

    Remote health monitoring is increasingly recognized as a valuable tool in chronic disease management. Continuous respiratory monitoring could be a powerful tool in managing chronic diseases, however it is infrequently performed because of obtrusiveness and inconvenience of the existing methods. The movements of the chest wall and abdominal area during normal breathing can be monitored and harvested to enable self-powered wearable biosensors for continuous remote monitoring. This paper presents human testing results of a light-weight (30 g), wearable respiratory effort energy harvesting sensor. The harvester output voltage, power, and its metabolic burden, are measured on twenty subjects in two resting and exercise conditions each lasting 5 min. The system includes two off-the-shelf miniature electromagnetic generators harvesting and sensing thoracic and abdominal movements. Modules can be placed in series to increase the output voltage for rectification purposes. Electromagnetic respiratory effort harvester/sensor system can produce up to 1.4 V, 6.44 mW, and harvests 30.4 mJ during a 5-min exercise stage. A statistical paired t-test analysis of the calculated EE confirmed there is no significant change ( P > 0.05 ) in the metabolic rate of subjects wearing the electromagnetic harvester and biosensor.

  2. The molecular anatomy of spontaneous germline mutations in human testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jian; Calabrese, Peter; Tiemann-Boege, Irene; Shinde, Deepali Narendra; Yoon, Song-Ro; Gelfand, David; Bauer, Keith; Arnheim, Norman

    2007-09-01

    The frequency of the most common sporadic Apert syndrome mutation (C755G) in the human fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 gene (FGFR2) is 100-1,000 times higher than expected from average nucleotide substitution rates based on evolutionary studies and the incidence of human genetic diseases. To determine if this increased frequency was due to the nucleotide site having the properties of a mutation hot spot, or some other explanation, we developed a new experimental approach. We examined the spatial distribution of the frequency of the C755G mutation in the germline by dividing four testes from two normal individuals each into several hundred pieces, and, using a highly sensitive PCR assay, we measured the mutation frequency of each piece. We discovered that each testis was characterized by rare foci with mutation frequencies 10(3) to >10(4) times higher than the rest of the testis regions. Using a model based on what is known about human germline development forced us to reject (p < 10(-6)) the idea that the C755G mutation arises more frequently because this nucleotide simply has a higher than average mutation rate (hot spot model). This is true regardless of whether mutation is dependent or independent of cell division. An alternate model was examined where positive selection acts on adult self-renewing Ap spermatogonial cells (SrAp) carrying this mutation such that, instead of only replacing themselves, they occasionally produce two SrAp cells. This model could not be rejected given our observed data. Unlike the disease site, similar analysis of C-to-G mutations at a control nucleotide site in one testis pair failed to find any foci with high mutation frequencies. The rejection of the hot spot model and lack of rejection of a selection model for the C755G mutation, along with other data, provides strong support for the proposal that positive selection in the testis can act to increase the frequency of premeiotic germ cells carrying a mutation deleterious to an

  3. The molecular anatomy of spontaneous germline mutations in human testes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Qin

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of the most common sporadic Apert syndrome mutation (C755G in the human fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 gene (FGFR2 is 100-1,000 times higher than expected from average nucleotide substitution rates based on evolutionary studies and the incidence of human genetic diseases. To determine if this increased frequency was due to the nucleotide site having the properties of a mutation hot spot, or some other explanation, we developed a new experimental approach. We examined the spatial distribution of the frequency of the C755G mutation in the germline by dividing four testes from two normal individuals each into several hundred pieces, and, using a highly sensitive PCR assay, we measured the mutation frequency of each piece. We discovered that each testis was characterized by rare foci with mutation frequencies 10(3 to >10(4 times higher than the rest of the testis regions. Using a model based on what is known about human germline development forced us to reject (p < 10(-6 the idea that the C755G mutation arises more frequently because this nucleotide simply has a higher than average mutation rate (hot spot model. This is true regardless of whether mutation is dependent or independent of cell division. An alternate model was examined where positive selection acts on adult self-renewing Ap spermatogonial cells (SrAp carrying this mutation such that, instead of only replacing themselves, they occasionally produce two SrAp cells. This model could not be rejected given our observed data. Unlike the disease site, similar analysis of C-to-G mutations at a control nucleotide site in one testis pair failed to find any foci with high mutation frequencies. The rejection of the hot spot model and lack of rejection of a selection model for the C755G mutation, along with other data, provides strong support for the proposal that positive selection in the testis can act to increase the frequency of premeiotic germ cells carrying a mutation

  4. The carcinogenicity of certain derivatives of p-dimethylaminozobenz in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MILLER, J A; MILLER, E C

    1948-02-01

    1. Eighteen known or possible metabolites of the hepatic carcinogen 4- (or p-) dimethylaminoazobenzene were tested for carcinogenic activity in the rat. Of these compounds only 4-monomethylaminoazobenzene, a known metabolite, proved to be active. Eight compounds, which appear to be metabolites of the dye, were inactive; these included 4-aminoazobenzene, 4'-hydroxy-4-monomethylaminoazobenzene, 4'-hydroxy-4-aminoazobenzene, N-methyl-p-phenylenediamine, p-phenylenediamine, aniline, p-aminophenol, and o-aminophenol. Nine compounds which may possibly be metabolites also were inactive; these compounds were 4'-hydroxy-, 3'-hydroxy-, and 2'-hydroxy-4-dimethylaminoazobenzene, 4-formylaminoazobenzene, 4-hydroxyazobenzene, 2, 4'-diamino-5-dimethylaminodiphenyl, 3-dimethylaminocarbazole, N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine, and p-hydroquinone. A mixture of 9 known and possible metabolites was also found to be inactive. These data indicate that the primary carcinogen operative in tumor formation by 4-dimethylaminoazobenzene is probably an azo dye closely related to the parent carcinogen. This conclusion is supported by recent work from this laboratory which indicates that the primary carcinogen consists of either or both of the protein-bound dyes found in the liver, i.e. 4-monomethylaminoazobenzene and an unidentified polar aminoazo dye, and that the formation of bound dye constitutes one of the first steps in this carcinogenic process. 2. The carcinogenic activities of 19 other compounds related to 4-dimethyl-aminoazobenzene were tested to obtain more information on the structural features needed for a 4-aminoazo dye to possess strong activity in the rat. 3'-Methyl-4-monomethylaminoazobenzene and the corresponding dimethylamino derivative were nearly twice as active and 4-ethylmethylaminoazobenzene had the same activity as 4-dimethylaminoazobenzene. As tested 3'-nitro- and 3'-chloro-4-dimethylaminoazobenzene both had about the same activity as 4-dimethylaminoazobenzene; however

  5. Human breast cancer resistance protein : Interactions with steroid drugs, hormones, the dietary carcinogen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo(4,5-b)pyridine, and transport of cimetidine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavek, P; Merino, G; Wagenaar, E; Bolscher, E; Novotna, M; Jonker, JW; Schinkel, AH

    2005-01-01

    The breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) is an ATP-binding cassette drug efflux transporter that extrudes xenotoxins from cells, mediating drug resistance and affecting the pharmacological behavior of many compounds. To study the interaction of human wild-type BCRP with steroid drugs, hormo

  6. An Overview of Carcinogenic Heavy Metal: Molecular Toxicity Mechanism and Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Kim,Hyun Soo; Kim, Yeo Jin; Seo, Young Rok

    2015-01-01

    Almost all heavy metals are serious toxicants as carcinogens. However, due to their chemical and physiological properties, heavy metals are useful in industrial areas including alloy, smelting and production of commercial products. Such applications increase the opportunity for heavy metal exposure. Waste from industrial processes is also a major source of environmental contamination and accumulation in the human body. Arsenic, cadmium, chromium, and nickel are classified as group 1 carcinoge...

  7. Ranking the potential carcinogenic hazards to workers from exposures to chemicals that are tumorigenic in rodents.

    OpenAIRE

    Gold, L S; Backman, G M; Hooper, N K; Peto, R.

    1987-01-01

    For 41 chemicals there exist both reasonable data on carcinogenic potency in experimental animals and also a defined Permissible Exposure Level (PEL), which is the upper limit of legally permissible chronic occupational exposure for U.S. workers. These 41 agents are ranked by an index that compares the permitted chronic human exposure to the chronic dose rate that induces tumors in 50% of laboratory animals. This index, the Permitted Exposure/Rodent Potency index, or PERP, does not estimate a...

  8. Molecular basis for effects of carcinogenic heavy metals on inducible gene expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, J W; Kaltreider, R C; Bajenova, O V; Ihnat, M A; McCaffrey, J; Turpie, B W; Rowell, E E; J. Oh; Nemeth, M. J.; Pesce, C A; Lariviere, J P

    1998-01-01

    Certain forms of the heavy metals arsenic and chromium are considered human carcinogens, although they are believed to act through very different mechanisms. Chromium(VI) is believed to act as a classic and mutagenic agent, and DNA/chromatin appears to be the principal target for its effects. In contrast, arsenic(III) is considered nongenotoxic, but is able to target specific cellular proteins, principally through sulfhydryl interactions. We had previously shown that various genotoxic chemica...

  9. The breast cancer resistance protein BCRP (ABCG2) concentrates drugs and carcinogenic xenotoxins into milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonker, Johan W; Merino, Gracia; Musters, Sandra; van Herwaarden, Antonius E; Bolscher, Ellen; Wagenaar, Els; Mesman, Elly; Dale, Trevor C; Schinkel, Alfred H

    2005-02-01

    Contamination of milk with drugs, pesticides and other xenotoxins can pose a major health risk to breast-fed infants and dairy consumers. Here we show that the multidrug transporter BCRP (encoded by ABCG2) is strongly induced in the mammary gland of mice, cows and humans during lactation and that it is responsible for the active secretion of clinically and toxicologically important substrates such as the dietary carcinogen PhIP, the anticancer drug topotecan and the antiulcerative cimetidine into mouse milk.

  10. A compilation of genotoxicity and carcinogenicity data on aromatic aminosulphonic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, R; Steinle, D; Anliker, R

    1992-07-01

    A review is presented to evaluate existing information on genotoxicity and carcinogenicity testing of various aromatic aminosulphonic acids (AASAs). A great variety of water-soluble azo dyes can form aromatic phenyl- or naphthyl-aminosulphonic acids by chemical and enzymatic reduction. AASAs are also used as intermediates in the synthesis of azo dyes and azo pigments and can arise as contaminants in the final products. Comparisons have been made with the data available on the corresponding unsulphonated analogues, some of which are known to be genotoxic and/or carcinogenic. The vast majority of the AASAs were conclusively non-mutagenic in the Ames test. In most cases the absence of genotoxicity was also demonstrated with a variety of other test systems in vitro and in vivo. It is concluded that AASAs, in contrast with some of their unsulphonated analogues, generally have no or very low genotoxic and tumorigenic potential.

  11. Carcinogenicity of individual and a mixture of dioxin-like compounds in female Harlan Sprague Dawley rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, N.; Nyska, A. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Crockett, P. [Constella Group, Research Triangle Park, NC (US)] (and others)

    2004-09-15

    The human health risk posed by exposure to persistent organochlorine pollutants (POPs), including polychlorinated-dioxins (PCDDs), -furans (PCDFs) and - biphenyls (PCBs), present in the food and the environment is one of widespread concern throughout the industrialized world. The dioxin Toxic Equivalency Factor (TEF) approach is currently the most feasible interim approach for assessing and managing the risk posed by exposure to mixtures of these compounds and has been formally adopted by regulatory bodies in many countries, the International Programme on Chemical Safety and the World Health Organization. The TEF methodology is a relative potency scheme that estimates the total exposure and biological effects of a mixture of chemicals based on a common mechanism of action involving an initial binding of the compound to the Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). An implicit assumption of the TEF methodology is that the combined risk of effects of the different congeners is dose additive. Therefore, the total dioxin toxic equivalents (TEQs) of a mixture of PCDDs, PCDFs, and PCBs may be estimated by the summation of the mass of each compound in the mixture after adjustment for its potency relative to that of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). While dose additivity is supported for certain mixtures for some biological endpoints in some experimental models, this has never been evaluated for cancer risk. Here we present a summary of four chronic rodent bioassay conducted by the National Toxicology Program (US Department of Health and Human Services) that evaluated the carcinogenicity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), 3.3',4,4',5- pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126) and 2,3,4,7,8 pentachlorodibenzofuran (PeCDF) and a mixture of these three dioxin-like compounds in female Harlan Sprague Dawley rats. Data from these studies will be used to test the hypothesis of dose-additivity of carcinogenicity by a defined mixture of dioxin-like compounds.

  12. Two-year carcinogenicity study of acrylamide in Wistar Han rats with in utero exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maronpot, R R; Thoolen, R J M M; Hansen, B

    2015-02-01

    Acrylamide is an important chemical with widespread industrial and other uses in addition to generalized population exposure from certain cooked foods. Previous rat studies to assess the carcinogenic potential of acrylamide have been carried out exclusively in the Fischer 344 rat with identification of a number of tumors amongst which mesotheliomas of the tunica vaginalis is an important tumor endpoint in the classification of acrylamide as a 'probably human carcinogen. In a rat carcinogenicity study to determine the human relevance of mesotheliomas Wistar Han rats were exposed to 0, 0.5, 1.5, or 3.0mg acrylamide/kg body weight/day in drinking water starting at gestation day 6. At the end of two years, mammary gland fibroadenomas in females and thyroid follicular cell tumors in both sexes were the only tumors increased in acrylamide treated rats. These tumor endpoints have rat-specific modes of action suggesting less likelihood of human cancer risk than previously estimated. This study demonstrates that tunica vaginalis mesotheliomas are strain specific and not likely of genotoxic origin.

  13. A test chamber for experimental hydrogen fluoride exposure in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søstrand, P; Kongerud, J; Eduard, W; Nilsen, T; Skogland, M; Boe, J

    1997-07-01

    An inhalation chamber was built to perform experimental studies with hydrogen fluoride (HF), other gases, and particulate matter. The present study sought to describe a new gas delivery system and the distribution and concentration of HF gas in the chamber. The aluminum chamber has a volume of 19.2 m3 and a variable ventilation rate of about 1 to 10 air changes per hour. The negative pressure difference between the chamber and outside air can be regulated from 0 to 300 Pa. HF was fed at concentrations of up to 4000 mg/m3 directly into the ventilation duct feeding the chamber through openings with diameters as small as 50 microns, oriented opposite to the airflow. Gas flow was varied from about 0.1 dm3/min at a pressure of 4 atm. The dilution factor of HF concentration from cylinder to chamber was on the order of 10(3) to 10(4). The standard deviation (SD) of the HF concentrations at a fixed measurement point during a 1-hour test was typically 0.05 mg/m3 at a time-weighted average (TWA) concentration of 2.66 mg/m3. The SD of the TWA HF concentrations at six locations in the chamber was typically 0.05 mg/m3 and 0.29 mg/m3 at 0.61 and 3.46 mg/m3, respectively. Human exposure could be predicted from calculations based on ventilation data, gas flow, and observed ratio between calculated and measured concentrations. When the target exposure concentration was 1.5 mg/m3, the measured mean exposure concentration was typically 1.54 mg/m3 (range: 1.4-1.7 mg/m3, SD 0.09 mg/m3, n = 8). The chamber is well-suited for inhalation studies in humans. Chamber atmosphere was controlled and has proved to be stable and homogeneous, even in tests with HF, a highly reactive gas in the class of superacids.

  14. SMILES-based optimal descriptors: QSAR modeling of carcinogenicity by balance of correlations with ideal slopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropov, A A; Toropova, A P; Benfenati, E

    2010-09-01

    Optimal descriptors which are calculated using the simplified molecular input line entry system (SMILES) were utilized to build quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) of carcinogenicity (log TD50). Three schemes of the modeling have been examined: 1. The most traditional "classic" training-test system, i.e., models are built with training set and validated with external test set; 2. The correlation balance, i.e., models are built with preliminary estimation of the predictability of the model with the calibration set (this set plays a role of preliminary test set); and 3. The extended correlation balance that takes into account the slopes of regression lines in plots experimental versus predicted values of carcinogenicity (in ideal, these slopes should be similar). It has been shown that the extended correlation balance with the ideal slopes gives most robust prediction of carcinogenicity for external test set. These models have been built by Monte Carlo method for three splits into subtraining set, calibration set, and test set. The number of the N-nitroso groups (i.e., R1-N(R2)-N=O) in a molecular system has been examined as an additional descriptor. 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Human factors issues in the design of stereo-rendered photorealistic objects: a stereoscopic Turing test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brack, Collin D.; Clewlow, John C.; Kessel, Ivan

    2010-02-01

    We present visual acuity metrics, human factors issues, and technical considerations in the construction of a stereorendered reality test in the spirit of the Turing test, Alan Turing's famous artificial intelligence test designed to explore the boundaries between human and machine interaction. The overall aim of this work is to provide guiding principles in the design of a stereoscopic reality test.

  16. Moving Forward in Human Cancer Risk Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Paules, Richard S.; Aubrecht, Jiri; Corvi, Raffaella; Garthoff, Bernward; Kleinjans, Jos C.

    2010-01-01

    Background The current safety paradigm for assessing carcinogenic properties of drugs, cosmetics, industrial chemicals, and environmental exposures relies mainly on in vitro genotoxicity testing followed by 2-year rodent bioassays. This testing battery is extremely sensitive but has low specificity. Furthermore, rodent bioassays are associated with high costs, high animal burden, and limited predictive value for human risks. Objectives We provide a response to a growing appeal for a paradigm ...

  17. An estimation of the carcinogenic risk associated with the intake of multiple relevant carcinogens found in meat and charcuterie products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Ángel Rodríguez; Boada, Luis D; Almeida-González, Maira; Mendoza, Zenaida; Ruiz-Suárez, Norberto; Valeron, Pilar F; Camacho, María; Zumbado, Manuel; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis A; Luzardo, Octavio P

    2015-05-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have demonstrated a link between excessive meat consumption and the incidence of various cancers, especially colorectal cancer, and it has been suggested that environmental carcinogens present in meat might be related to the increased risk of cancer associated with this food. However, there are no studies evaluating the carcinogenic potential of meat in relation to its content of carcinogens. Our purpose was to emphasize the relevance of environmental carcinogens existing in meat as a determinant of the association between cancer and meat consumption. Because within Europe, Spain shows high consumption of meat and charcuterie, we performed this study focusing on Spanish population. Based on the preferences of consumers we acquired 100 samples of meat and charcuterie that reflect the variety available in the European market. We quantified in these samples the concentration of 33 chemicals with calculated carcinogenic potential (PAHs, organochlorine pesticides, and dioxin-like PCBs). The carcinogenic risk of these contaminants was assessed for each food using a risk ratio based on the current consumption of meat and charcuterie and the maximum tolerable intake of these foods depending on the level of contamination by the carcinogens they contain. Our results indicate that the current consumption of beef, pork, lamb, chicken, and "chorizo", represents a relevant carcinogenic risk for consumers (carcinogenic risk quotient between 1.33 and 13.98). In order to reduce carcinogenic risk, the study population should halve the monthly consumption of these foods, and also not to surpass the number of 5 servings of beef/pork/chicken (considered together). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. COMPARATIVE GENOTOXIC RESPONSES TO ARSENITE IN GUINEA PIG, MOUSE, RAT AND HUMAN LYMPHOCYTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparative genotoxic responses to arsenite in guinea pig, mouse, rat and human lymphocytes.Inorganic arsenic is a known human carcinogen causing skin, lung, and bladder cancer following chronic exposures. Yet, long-term laboratory animal carcinogenicity studies have ...

  19. The Use of Isolated Human Lymphocytes in Mycotoxin Cytotoxicity Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike F. Dutton

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The cytotoxicity of selected mycotoxins against isolated human lymphocytes was investigated, as a means of detecting mycotoxins in extracts derived from cereal samples. The methodology was based on the ability of viable cells to reduce methyl tetrazolium bromide to a purple formazan dye that could be quantitated by spectrophometric means and hence give a measure of the cytotoxicity of added substances. The results showed that there was good correlation with the occurrence of identified mycotoxins with only a minimum of false positives. For example, of the 13 samples of barley or barley derivatives that were positive for the mycotoxins, fumonisin B1 (FB1 deoxynivalenol (DON and ochratoxin A (OTA, all gave positive cytotoxicity responses. Two samples negative for mycotoxins gave no cytotoxicity responses. There was little variation between the results for lymphocytes drawn from the same healthy volunteer on three different occasions. Furthermore, for two of the mycotoxins tested (FB1 and DON it was possible to correlate general levels of mycotoxins present to the cytotoxic response of the lymphocytes but not for OTA, where it was concluded that interfering substances prevented direct correlation. It was concluded that this method was suited for general application as it could handle relatively high number of samples in a short period of time.

  20. Key Characteristics of Carcinogens as a Basis for Organizing Data on Mechanisms of Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Martyn T; Guyton, Kathryn Z; Gibbons, Catherine F; Fritz, Jason M; Portier, Christopher J; Rusyn, Ivan; DeMarini, David M; Caldwell, Jane C; Kavlock, Robert J; Lambert, Paul F; Hecht, Stephen S; Bucher, John R; Stewart, Bernard W; Baan, Robert A; Cogliano, Vincent J; Straif, Kurt

    2016-06-01

    A recent review by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) updated the assessments of the > 100 agents classified as Group 1, carcinogenic to humans (IARC Monographs Volume 100, parts A-F). This exercise was complicated by the absence of a broadly accepted, systematic method for evaluating mechanistic data to support conclusions regarding human hazard from exposure to carcinogens. IARC therefore convened two workshops in which an international Working Group of experts identified 10 key characteristics, one or more of which are commonly exhibited by established human carcinogens. These characteristics provide the basis for an objective approach to identifying and organizing results from pertinent mechanistic studies. The 10 characteristics are the abilities of an agent to 1) act as an electrophile either directly or after metabolic activation; 2) be genotoxic; 3) alter DNA repair or cause genomic instability; 4) induce epigenetic alterations; 5) induce oxidative stress; 6) induce chronic inflammation; 7) be immunosuppressive; 8) modulate receptor-mediated effects; 9) cause immortalization; and 10) alter cell proliferation, cell death, or nutrient supply. We describe the use of the 10 key characteristics to conduct a systematic literature search focused on relevant end points and construct a graphical representation of the identified mechanistic information. Next, we use benzene and polychlorinated biphenyls as examples to illustrate how this approach may work in practice. The approach described is similar in many respects to those currently being implemented by the U.S. EPA's Integrated Risk Information System Program and the U.S. National Toxicology Program. Smith MT, Guyton KZ, Gibbons CF, Fritz JM, Portier CJ, Rusyn I, DeMarini DM, Caldwell JC, Kavlock RJ, Lambert P, Hecht SS, Bucher JR, Stewart BW, Baan R, Cogliano VJ, Straif K. 2016. Key characteristics of carcinogens as a basis for organizing data on mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Environ Health

  1. Key Characteristics of Carcinogens as a Basis for Organizing Data on Mechanisms of Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Martyn T.; Guyton, Kathryn Z.; Gibbons, Catherine F.; Fritz, Jason M.; Portier, Christopher J.; Rusyn, Ivan; DeMarini, David M.; Caldwell, Jane C.; Kavlock, Robert J.; Lambert, Paul F.; Hecht, Stephen S.; Bucher, John R.; Stewart, Bernard W.; Baan, Robert A.; Cogliano, Vincent J.; Straif, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Background: A recent review by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) updated the assessments of the > 100 agents classified as Group 1, carcinogenic to humans (IARC Monographs Volume 100, parts A–F). This exercise was complicated by the absence of a broadly accepted, systematic method for evaluating mechanistic data to support conclusions regarding human hazard from exposure to carcinogens. Objectives and Methods: IARC therefore convened two workshops in which an international Working Group of experts identified 10 key characteristics, one or more of which are commonly exhibited by established human carcinogens. Discussion: These characteristics provide the basis for an objective approach to identifying and organizing results from pertinent mechanistic studies. The 10 characteristics are the abilities of an agent to 1) act as an electrophile either directly or after metabolic activation; 2) be genotoxic; 3) alter DNA repair or cause genomic instability; 4) induce epigenetic alterations; 5) induce oxidative stress; 6) induce chronic inflammation; 7) be immunosuppressive; 8) modulate receptor-mediated effects; 9) cause immortalization; and 10) alter cell proliferation, cell death, or nutrient supply. Conclusion: We describe the use of the 10 key characteristics to conduct a systematic literature search focused on relevant end points and construct a graphical representation of the identified mechanistic information. Next, we use benzene and polychlorinated biphenyls as examples to illustrate how this approach may work in practice. The approach described is similar in many respects to those currently being implemented by the U.S. EPA’s Integrated Risk Information System Program and the U.S. National Toxicology Program. Citation: Smith MT, Guyton KZ, Gibbons CF, Fritz JM, Portier CJ, Rusyn I, DeMarini DM, Caldwell JC, Kavlock RJ, Lambert P, Hecht SS, Bucher JR, Stewart BW, Baan R, Cogliano VJ, Straif K. 2016. Key characteristics of carcinogens as a

  2. Carcinogenic effects in a phenylketonuria mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Sidell

    Full Text Available Phenylketonuria (PKU is a metabolic disorder caused by impaired phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH. This condition results in hyperphenylalaninemia and elevated levels of abnormal phenylalanine metabolites, among which is phenylacetic acid/phenylacetate (PA. In recent years, PA and its analogs were found to have anticancer activity against a variety of malignancies suggesting the possibility that PKU may offer protection against cancer through chronically elevated levels of PA. We tested this hypothesis in a genetic mouse model of PKU (PAH(enu2 which has a biochemical profile that closely resembles that of human PKU. Plasma levels of phenylalanine in homozygous (HMZ PAH(enu2 mice were >12-fold those of heterozygous (HTZ littermates while tyrosine levels were reduced. Phenylketones, including PA, were also markedly elevated to the range seen in the human disease. Mice were subjected to 7,12 dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA carcinogenesis, a model which is sensitive to the anticancer effects of the PA derivative 4-chlorophenylacetate (4-CPA. Tumor induction by DMBA was not significantly different between the HTZ and HMZ mice, either in total tumor development or in the type of cancers that arose. HMZ mice were then treated with 4-CPA as positive controls for the anticancer effects of PA and to evaluate its possible effects on phenylalanine metabolism in PKU mice. 4-CPA had no effect on the plasma concentrations of phenylalanine, phenylketones, or tyrosine. Surprisingly, the HMZ mice treated with 4-CPA developed an unexplained neuromuscular syndrome which precluded its use in these animals as an anticancer agent. Together, these studies support the use of PAH(enu2 mice as a model for studying human PKU. Chronically elevated levels of PA in the PAH(enu2 mice were not protective against cancer.

  3. 77 FR 14022 - Guidance for Industry: Testing for Salmonella Species in Human Foods and Direct-Human-Contact...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-08

    ..., Storage, and Transportation.'' The guidance addresses testing procedures for Salmonella species (spp.) in... results, when the presence of Salmonella spp. in the food may render the food injurious to human health... Salmonella spp. in human foods (except shell eggs) and direct-human-contact animal foods, and...

  4. Relationship between Structures and Carcinogenicities of Heterocyclic Amines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JU Xue-hai; DAI Qian-huan; CHEN Sha; WANG Wen-jun

    2004-01-01

    Semi-empirical molecular orbital calculations were performed on heterocyclic aromatic amines(HCAs). The relationship between the structures and the carcinogenicities can be rationally elucidated by the models based on the metabolism of HCAs and the Di-region theory. The degree of easiness for the formation of Di-region electrophilic centers determines the carcinogenic activity. There is a good linear relationship between the observed carcinogenicities and the PM3 calculated parameters, with r=0.973 and F=29.8>(F*0.*01).

  5. 77 FR 1707 - National Toxicology Program (NTP) Final Process for Preparation of the Report on Carcinogens (RoC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Toxicology Program (NTP) Final Process for Preparation of the Report on Carcinogens (RoC) AGENCY: Division of the National Toxicology Program (DNTP...: December 21, 2011. John R. Bucher, Associate Director, National Toxicology Program. BILLING CODE 4140-01-P...

  6. Molecular Analysis of Medaka Tumors: New Models for Carcinogenicity Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-07-06

    Medaka can be induced to breed year round, provide large numbers of eggs and are easy to culture . Induction of tumors has been reported in nearly every... culture of pSV neo in pBR322 was obtained and plasmid DNA was isolated on a CsCl gradient. This DNA will be used to continue the screening of the genomic...methylazoxymethanol acetate in the guppy Poecilia reticulata. JNCI 78:715-725. Graham, F.L. and van der Eb, A.J. 1973. A new technique for the assay of

  7. Bioindication of mutagenic and carcinogenic pollutants in waters of the Oława River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlaczyk-Szpilowa, M; Sztajer, H; Traczewska, T

    1985-01-01

    Samples of raw waters from the Oława River, chlorinated raw water, raw water filtered through activated charcoal and treated and chlorinated water before and after ozonization were examined with the use of the Ames test for potential carcinogenic activity. Positive results were obtained for raw water with Salmonella typhimurium strains TA 98 and TA 1535 and for chlorinated raw water with strain TA 1537.

  8. Biotin-mediated epigenetic modifications: Potential defense against the carcinogenicity of benzo[a]pyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bo; Pang, Li; Zhuang, Zhi-xiong; Liu, Jian-jun

    2016-01-22

    Environmental pollution and an unhealthy lifestyle result in direct exposure to dangerous chemicals that can modify endogenous pathways and induce malignant transformation of human cells. Although the molecular mechanisms of tumorigenesis are still not well understood, epigenetic alteration may be associated with exogenous chemical-induced carcinogenicity. Given the association between nutrition and cancer, nutrient supplementation may reduce aberrant epigenetic modifications induced by chemicals, thus decreasing carcinogenesis. This paper provides an overview of the epigenetic events caused by benzo[a]pyrene, a procarcinogenic and environmental pollutant, and biotin, an essential water-soluble vitamin, and investigates potential connections between them. This paper also discusses the potential inhibitory effect of biotin-related epigenetic modifications on the carcinogenicity of benzo[a]pyrene. The effect of nutritional supplementation on tumorigenesis involving epigenetic modifications is also discussed.

  9. Tobacco carcinogen NNK-induced lung cancer animal models and associated carcinogenic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Guang-Zhe; Xu, Tian-Rui; Chen, Ceshi

    2015-07-01

    Tobacco usage is a major risk factor in the development, progression, and outcomes for lung cancer. Of the carcinogens associated with lung cancer, tobacco-specific nitrosamines 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) is among the most potent ones. The oncogenic mechanisms of NNK are not entirely understood, hindering the development of effective strategies for preventing and treating smoking-associated lung cancers. Here, we introduce the NNK-induced lung cancer animal models in different species and its potential mechanisms. Finally, we summarize several chemopreventive agents developed from these animal models.

  10. Increase of carcinogenic risk via enhancement of cyclooxygenase-2 expression and hydroxyestradiol accumulation in human lung cells as a result of interaction between BaP and 17-beta estradiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Louis W; Chang, Yun-Ching; Ho, Chia-Chi; Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Lin, Pinpin

    2007-07-01

    Animal studies demonstrated that females are more susceptible than males to benzo[a]pyrene (BaP)-induced toxicities, including lung carcinogenesis. Elevation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression has been shown to increase the risk of cancer development. BaP induces COX-2 expression, and an interaction between BaP and estrogen in relation to COX-2 expression is suspected. In the present study, 10 muM BaP alone only slightly increased COX-2 mRNA expression and 10 nM 17-beta estradiol (E(2)) alone slightly increased prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) secretion in human bronchial epithelial cells. However, co-treatment with BaP and E(2) potentiated COX-2 mRNA expression and significantly elevated PGE2 secretion. Utilizing specific inhibitors and reporter assays, we further investigated the potentiation mechanisms of E(2) on BaP-induced COX-2 expression. First, E(2) activated estrogen receptor to increase PGE2 secretion, which directly increased COX-2 expression. Second, E(2) potentiated BaP-induced nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation, which regulates COX-2 expression. Third, although the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) did not play a role in BaP-induced COX-2 expression, the potentiation effect of E(2) itself was AhR dependent. We further demonstrated that BaP induced the production of genotoxic E(2) metabolites (2- and 4-hydroxyestradiols) via AhR-up-regulated cytochromes P450 1A1 and 1B1. These metabolites could directly activate NF-kappaB to further promote COX-2 mRNA expression in human lung epithelial cells. These findings were further supported by increased PGE2 secretion in rat lung slice cultures. Our findings that the BaP-E(2) interaction enhanced COX-2 expression and hydroxyestradiol accumulation in the media of cultivated lung cells and tissues provide the needed scientific basis for higher risk of BaP-associated lung cancer in females.

  11. Pumpless microfluidic platform for drug testing on human skin equivalents

    OpenAIRE

    Abaci, Hasan Erbil; Gledhill, Karl; Guo, Zongyou; Christiano, Angela M.; Shuler, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in bio-mimetic in vitro human skin models increase the efficiency of drug screening studies. In this study, we designed and developed a microfluidic platform that allows for long-term maintenance of full thickness human skin equivalents (HSE) which are comprised of both the epidermal and dermal compartments. The design is based on the physiologically relevant blood residence times in human skin tissue and allows for the establishment of an air-epidermal interface which is crucial for...

  12. 76 FR 50221 - International Workshop on Alternative Methods for Human and Veterinary Rabies Vaccine Testing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES International Workshop on Alternative Methods for Human and Veterinary Rabies Vaccine... ``International Workshop on Alternative Methods for Human and Veterinary Rabies Vaccine Testing: State of the... approaches that may reduce, refine, or replace animal use in human and veterinary rabies vaccine...

  13. [Design and trial of computer test system for experiment courses of human parasitology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hua; Ling, Jin; Su, Shui-Lian; Zeng, Jie; Xie, Qiong-Jun

    2011-06-01

    Based on the traditional experimental test of human parasitology, a reform was conducted to avoid the shortage of specimens and a disclosure of test questions. An experimental test system of human parasitology based on client/server (C/S) structure was therefore developed. This practicable system can increase the efficiency and fairness of examination and reduce cost.

  14. Carcinogenic Aspects of Protein Phosphatase 1 and 2A Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiki, Hirota; Suganuma, Masami

    Okadaic acid is functionally a potent tumor promoter working through inhibition of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A (PP1 and PP2A), resulting in sustained phosphorylation of proteins in cells. The mechanism of tumor promotion with oka-daic acid is thus completely different from that of the classic tumor promoter phorbol ester. Other potent inhibitors of PP1 and PP2A - such as dinophysistoxin-1, calyculins A-H, microcystin-LR and its derivatives, and nodularin - were isolated from marine organisms, and their structural features including the crystal structure of the PP1-inhibitor complex, tumor promoting activities, and biochemical and biological effects, are here reviewed. The compounds induced tumor promoting activity in three different organs, including mouse skin, rat glandular stomach and rat liver, initiated with three different carcinogens. The results indicate that inhibition of PP1 and PP2A is a general mechanism of tumor promotion applicable to various organs. This study supports the concept of endogenous tumor promoters in human cancer development.

  15. Cell transformation and mutability of different genetic loci in mammalian cells by metabolically activated carcinogenic polycylic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberman, E.

    1977-01-01

    Treatment of experimental animals with chemical carcinogens, including some polycyclic hydrocarbons, can result in the formation of malignant tumors. The process whereby some chemicals induce malignancy is as yet unknown. However, in a model system using mammalian cells in culture, it was possible to show that the chemical carcinogens induce malignant transformation rather than select for pre-existing tumor cells. In the process of the in vitro cell transformation, the normal cells, which have an oriented pattern of cell growth, a limited life-span in vitro, and are not tumorigenic, are converted into cells that have a hereditary random pattern of cell growth, the ability to grow continuously in culture, and the ability to form tumors in vivo. This stable heritable phenotype of the transformed cells is similar to that of cells derived from spontaneous or experimentally induced tumors. Such stable heritable phenotype changes may arise from alteration in gene expression due to a somatic mutation after interaction of the carcinogen with cellular DNA. In the present experiments we have shown that metabolically activated carcinogenic polycyclic hydrocarbons which have been shown to bind to cellular DNA induce somatic mutations at different genetic loci in mammalian cells and that there is a relationship between the degree of mutant induction and the degree of carcinogenicity of the different hydrocarbons tested.

  16. 29 CFR 1990.143 - General provisions for the use of human and animal data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to workers. (b) Positive animal studies. Positive results obtained in one or more experimental...) Use of high doses in animal testing. Positive results for carcinogenicity obtained in mammals exposed..., whether or not there is direct evidence that it induces tumors in humans or experimental animals. Evidence...

  17. Scientific analysis of the proposed uses of the T25 dose descriptor in chemical carcinogen regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, R A; Crump, K S; Lutz, W K; Wiegand, H J; Williams, G M; Harrison, P T; Purchase, I F

    2001-11-01

    harmonisation of approaches to risk assessment for all genotoxic and nongenotoxic carcinogens. In summary, the T25 method has utility for ranking potency to focus efforts in risk reduction. However, uncertainties such as the false assumption of precision and non-linearity in the dose-response curve for tumour induction raise serious concerns that caution against the use of T25/linear method for predicting human cancer risk.

  18. Does the term carcinogen send the wrong message?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamm, W G; Hughes, D

    1997-08-19

    The term carcinogen has been used by scientists and health regulatory officials for decades. During the last 20 years there have been attempts to redefine the term to make it more rigorous. But, as predicted two decades ago by a benchmark-setting subcommittee of the National Cancer Advisory Board, advances in scientific understanding have brought about dramatic changes in the way we are able to view the term carcinogen. These changes, their scientific bases and their effect on defining the term carcinogen are described. An alternative to the use of the term carcinogen is suggested by the recently proposed US Environmental Agency's guidelines for cancer risk assessment which appear to be in accord with current scientific understanding and the importance of considering the factors affecting the term carcinogen. The guidelines set forth four questions, the answers to which could, in our judgment, replace the need to define or use the term carcinogen which, in light of new scientific knowledge, has become more misleading than useful.

  19. Mechanisms of the different DNA adduct forming potentials of the urban air pollutants 2-nitrobenzanthrone and carcinogenic 3-nitrobenzanthrone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiborová, Marie; Martínek, Václav; Svobodová, Martina; Sístková, Jana; Dvorák, Zdenek; Ulrichová, Jitka; Simánek, Vilím; Frei, Eva; Schmeiser, Heinz H; Phillips, David H; Arlt, Volker M

    2010-07-19

    2-Nitrobenzanthrone (2-NBA) has recently been detected in ambient air particulate matter. Its isomer 3-nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) is a potent mutagen and suspected human carcinogen identified in diesel exhaust. We compared the efficiencies of human enzymatic systems [hepatic microsomes and cytosols, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), xanthine oxidase, NADPH:cytochrome P450 reductase, N,O-acetyltransferases, and sulfotransferases] and human primary hepatocytes to activate 2-NBA and its isomer 3-NBA to species forming DNA adducts. In contrast to 3-NBA, 2-NBA was not metabolized at detectable levels by the tested human enzymatic systems and enzymes expressed in human hepatocytes, and no DNA adducts detectable by (32)P-postlabeling were generated by 2-NBA. Even NQO1, the most efficient human enzyme to bioactive 3-NBA, did not activate 2-NBA. Molecular docking of 2-NBA and 3-NBA to the active site of NQO1 showed similar binding affinities; however, the binding orientation of 2-NBA does not favor the reduction of the nitro group. This was in line with the inhibition of 3-NBA-DNA adduct formation by 2-NBA, indicating that 2-NBA can compete with 3-NBA for binding to NQO1, thereby decreasing the metabolic activation of 3-NBA. In addition, the predicted equilibrium conditions favor a 3 orders of magnitude higher dissociation of N-OH-3-ABA in comparison to N-OH-2-ABA. These findings explain the very different genotoxicity, mutagenicity, and DNA adduct forming potential of the two compounds. Collectively, our results suggest that 2-NBA possesses a relatively lower risk to humans than 3-NBA.

  20. A review of the carcinogenic potential of glyphosate by four independent expert panels and comparison to the IARC assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gary M; Aardema, Marilyn; Acquavella, John; Berry, Sir Colin; Brusick, David; Burns, Michele M; de Camargo, Joao Lauro Viana; Garabrant, David; Greim, Helmut A; Kier, Larry D; Kirkland, David J; Marsh, Gary; Solomon, Keith R; Sorahan, Tom; Roberts, Ashley; Weed, Douglas L

    2016-09-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) published a monograph in 2015 concluding that glyphosate is "probably carcinogenic to humans" (Group 2A) based on limited evidence in humans and sufficient evidence in experimental animals. It was also concluded that there was strong evidence of genotoxicity and oxidative stress. Four Expert Panels have been convened for the purpose of conducting a detailed critique of the evidence in light of IARC's assessment and to review all relevant information pertaining to glyphosate exposure, animal carcinogenicity, genotoxicity, and epidemiologic studies. Two of the Panels (animal bioassay and genetic toxicology) also provided a critique of the IARC position with respect to conclusions made in these areas. The incidences of neoplasms in the animal bioassays were found not to be associated with glyphosate exposure on the basis that they lacked statistical strength, were inconsistent across studies, lacked dose-response relationships, were not associated with preneoplasia, and/or were not plausible from a mechanistic perspective. The overall weight of evidence from the genetic toxicology data supports a conclusion that glyphosate (including GBFs and AMPA) does not pose a genotoxic hazard and therefore, should not be considered support for the classification of glyphosate as a genotoxic carcinogen. The assessment of the epidemiological data found that the data do not support a causal relationship between glyphosate exposure and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma while the data were judged to be too sparse to assess a potential relationship between glyphosate exposure and multiple myeloma. As a result, following the review of the totality of the evidence, the Panels concluded that the data do not support IARC's conclusion that glyphosate is a "probable human carcinogen" and, consistent with previous regulatory assessments, further concluded that glyphosate is unlikely to pose a carcinogenic risk to humans.

  1. Urban air carcinogens and their effects on health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechner, J.F.

    1994-11-01

    Airborne carcinogens may be relevant especially in metropolitan regions with extreme smog as a primary cause of lung cancer. Lung cancer is most common in urban environs and the incidence directly correlates with the size of the city. In addition, several, but not all formal epidemiological studies also suggest a positive correlation between lung cancer incidence and the intensity of air pollution exposure. There is further support for a role of air pollution; as of 1993, 4.4% of all of the bronchogenic adenocarcinoma cancer cases among Mexicans living in industrialized cities are under 40 years of age. It is plausible that chronic inhalation of automobile combustion products, factory emissions, and/or radon is at least partially responsible for the higher incidence of lung cancer exemplified by the never-smoking urban residents. The exceptionally high incidence of lung cancer cases among never-smokers living in highly industrialized Mexican cities offers a unique opportunity to use molecular epidemiology to test whether chronic inhalation of atmospheric pollutants increases the risk for this disease. Overall, the analysis of the genetic alterations in two cancer genes, and possibly the hprt locus should give new insight as to whether the urban never-smokers developed their cancers because of exposure to environmental pollutants.

  2. Detection of genotoxic carcinogens in the in vivo-in vitro hepatocyte DNA repair assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsalis, J C; Tyson, C K; Butterworth, B E

    1982-01-01

    The in vivo-in vitro hepatocyte DNA repair assay has been shown to be useful in the evaluation of the carcinogenic potential of chemicals. The purpose of this study was to apply this assay to determining the genotoxicity of the compounds from a wide variety of structural classes. Male Fischer-334 rats were treated by gavage or ip injection with compounds dissolved in either corn oil, water, or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). At selected times after treatment, hepatocytes were isolated by liver perfusion and cultured with 3H-thymidine, Unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) was measured by quantitative autoradiography as net grains/nucleus (NG); greater than or equal to 5 NG was considered positive. Water, corn oil, or DMSO controls produced -3 to -6 NG with less than or equal to 6% of the cells in repair. All genotoxic hepatocarcinogens tested produced strong positive responses of greater than 15 NG including dimethylnitrosamine, 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF), azoxymethane, 1,2-dimethylhydrazine, benzidine, aflatoxin B1, 2,6-dinitrotoluene, and 2,4-diaminotoluene. The noncarcinogen, 2,6-diaminotoluene, was negative. The mutagen and rat brain carcinogen methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and the rat pancreatic carcinogen azaserine were also positive. The carcinogens benzo(a)pyrene and 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene yielded from -2 to -4 NG. This negative response is consistent with their lack of carcinogenic activity in rat liver. MMS produced the greatest amount of UDS 2 hr after treatment whereas 2-AAF did not induce its maximum response until 12 hr post-treatment. The potent hepatotoxin carbon tetrachloride induced a 40-fold elevation in DNA replication 48 hr after a 400 mg/kg dose, but no UDS was observed at 2, 12, 24, or 48 hr post-treatment. The weak hepatocarcinogen safrole induced no UDS suggesting that it is either nongenotoxic or is metabolized to an active form at an extremely slow rate following a single administration. These results demonstrate that this assay is

  3. Analysis of genotoxicity and the carcinogenic mode of action for ortho-phenylphenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusick, David

    2005-06-01

    Ortho-phenylphenol (OPP) and its sodium salt (SOPP) are commercial products that have wide human exposure and have been shown in several studies to be rodent carcinogens. Genetic toxicology data were assessed in an attempt to understand the carcinogenic mode of action of OPP and SOPP. More than 130 studies were evaluated to determine if OPP, SOPP, or any of their enzymatic or nonenzymatic breakdown products react directly with DNA to induce mutation, changes in chromosome structure or number, DNA repair, or nonspecific DNA damage including strand breakage or covalent binding. The genotoxicity databases for OPP and SOPP are not only large but heterogeneous, requiring weight-of-evidence methods to arrive at a conclusion regarding their genotoxic properties and potential. Evidence derived from the available studies leads to the conclusion that study results showing OPP/SOPP directly interacting with DNA are equivocal. Clastogenicity was the most consistent type of genetic toxicity produced by OPP/SOPP (and their break-down products) and was consistently associated with other intracellular preneoplastic toxicity produced at super-threshold concentrations. The weight of evidence from the combined database supports the hypothesis that OPP/SOPP-induced DNA damage is a threshold-dependent response associated with target tissue toxicity, most likely induced by their breakdown products phenylhydroquinone and phenylbenzoquinone. It is possible that this threshold-dependent clastogenicity could contribute to the carcinogenic mode of action for OPP or SOPP.

  4. Occurrence of Pineal Gland Tumors in Combined Chronic Toxicity/Carcinogenicity Studies in Wistar Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treumann, Silke; Buesen, Roland; Gröters, Sibylle; Eichler, Jens-Olaf; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard

    2015-08-01

    Pineal gland tumors are very rare brain lesions in rats as well as in other species including humans. A total of 8 (out of 1,360 examined) Wistar rats from 3 different combined chronic toxicity/carcinogenicity or mere carcinogenicity studies revealed pineal gland tumors. The tumors were regarded to be spontaneous and unrelated to treatment. The morphology and immunohistochemical evaluation led to the diagnosis malignant pinealoma. The main characteristics that were variably developed within the tumors were the following: cellular atypia, high mitotic index, giant cells, necrosis, Homer Wright rosettes, Flexner-Wintersteiner rosettes and pseudorosettes, positive immunohistochemical reaction for synaptophysin, and neuron-specific enolase. The pineal gland is not a protocol organ for histopathological examination in carcinogenicity studies. Nevertheless, the pineal gland can occasionally be encountered on the routine brain section or if it is the origin of a tumor protruding into the brain, the finding will be recorded. Therefore, although known to be a rare tumor in rats, pineal neoplasms should be included in the list of possible differential diagnoses for brain tumors, especially when the tumor is located in the region of the pineal body.

  5. Oxidative Stress Mechanisms Do Not Discriminate between Genotoxic and Nongenotoxic Liver Carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deferme, Lize; Wolters, Jarno; Claessen, Sandra; Briedé, Jacco; Kleinjans, Jos

    2015-08-17

    It is widely accepted that in chemical carcinogenesis different modes-of-action exist, e.g., genotoxic (GTX) versus nongenotoxic (NGTX) carcinogenesis. In this context, it has been suggested that oxidative stress response pathways are typical for NGTX carcinogenesis. To evaluate this, we examined oxidative stress-related changes in gene expression, cell cycle distribution, and (oxidative) DNA damage in human hepatoma cells (HepG2) exposed to GTX-, NGTX-, and noncarcinogens, at multiple time points (4-8-24-48-72 h). Two GTX (azathriopine (AZA) and furan) and two NGTX (tetradecanoyl-phorbol-acetate, (TPA) and tetrachloroethylene (TCE)) carcinogens as well as two noncarcinogens (diazinon (DZN, d-mannitol (Dman)) were selected, while per class one compound was deemed to induce oxidative stress and the other not. Oxidative stressors AZA, TPA, and DZN induced a 10-fold higher number of gene expression changes over time compared to those of furan, TCE, or Dman treatment. Genes commonly expressed among AZA, TPA, and DZN were specifically involved in oxidative stress, DNA damage, and immune responses. However, differences in gene expression between GTX and NGTX carcinogens did not correlate to oxidative stress or DNA damage but could instead be assigned to compound-specific characteristics. This conclusion was underlined by results from functional readouts on ROS formation and (oxidative) DNA damage. Therefore, oxidative stress may represent the underlying cause for increased risk of liver toxicity and even carcinogenesis; however, it does not discriminate between GTX and NGTX carcinogens.

  6. Absence of mutagenic and citotoxic potentiality of senna (Cassia angustifolia Vahl. evaluated by microbiological tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.R Silva

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Senna (Cassia angustifolia Vahl. is widely used as laxative, but data from Ames test and animal and/or human studies with this agent have shown a mutagenic and carcinogenic potentiality. Using thee experimental models (bacterial inactivation test; bacterail mutagenisis assay-Mutoxitest; and growth Inhibition test, we investigated the toxicity of senna. Our data suggest an absence of mutagenic and citotoxic potentiality of senna.

  7. The Rose Bengal Test in human brucellosis: a neglected test for the diagnosis of a neglected disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Ramón; Casanova, Aurora; Ariza, Javier; Moriyón, Ignacio

    2011-04-19

    Brucellosis is a highly contagious zoonosis affecting livestock and human beings. The human disease lacks pathognomonic symptoms and laboratory tests are essential for its diagnosis. However, most tests are difficult to implement in the areas and countries were brucellosis is endemic. Here, we compared the simple and cheap Rose Bengal Test (RBT) with serum agglutination, Coombs, competitive ELISA, Brucellacapt, lateral flow immunochromatography for IgM and IgG detection and immunoprecipitation with Brucella proteins. We tested 208 sera from patients with brucellosis proved by bacteriological isolation, 20 contacts with no brucellosis, and 1559 sera of persons with no recent contact or brucellosis symptoms. RBT was highly sensitive in acute and long evolution brucellosis cases and this related to its ability to detect IgM, IgG and IgA, to the absence of prozones, and to the agglutinating activity of blocking IgA at the pH of the test. RBT was also highly specific in the sera of persons with no contact with Brucella. No test in this study outperformed RBT, and none was fully satisfactory in distinguishing contacts from infected patients. When modified to test serum dilutions, a diagnostic titer >4 in RBT resulted in 87.4% sensitivity (infected patients) and 100% specificity (contacts). We discuss the limitations of serological tests in the diagnosis of human brucellosis, particularly in the more chronic forms, and conclude that simplicity and affordability of RBT make it close to the ideal test for small and understaffed hospitals and laboratories.

  8. [Experimental study on the potential carcinogenicity of cooking oil fume condensate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jinming; Su, Fei; Zhou, Shaoqin

    2002-02-01

    The potential carcinogenicity of cooking oil fume condensate (COFC) to human was studied. Human embryo lung diploid fibroblast cell strain KMB-17 cell was applied to establish a human diploid cell transformation system in vitro. Different concentrations of COFC were added into the media and co-incubated with cells. The malignant degree of transformation was assessed by the biological characteristics of the cells. The concentrations of COFC within the dose range of the experiment could induce the malignant transformation of KMB-17 cell, and with a obvious dose-response relationship (r = 0.9811). Transformed cells have exhibited many characteristics associating with malignant transformation, such as loss of density and contact-dependent inhibition, growth at low serum concentration, agglutination by low concentration of Con A, alteration of karyotype from diploid to aneuploid, and lose of anchorage dependence. It suggested that the malignant transformation of human embryo lung diploid fibroblast cell strain KMB-17 cell could be induced by COFC, which might have potential carcinogenicity to human.

  9. Towards a pragmatic human migraine model for drug testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Emma Katrine; Olesen, Jes

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A model for the testing of novel anti-migraine drugs should preferably use healthy volunteers for ease of recruiting. Isosorbide-5-mononitrate (5-ISMN) provokes headache in healthy volunteers with some migraine features such as pulsating pain quality and aggravation by physical activity...... drug testing....

  10. A Human Capital Model of Educational Test Scores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIntosh, James; D. Munk, Martin

    Latent class Poisson count models are used to analyze a sample of Danish test score results from a cohort of individuals born in 1954-55 and tested in 1968. The procedure takes account of unobservable effects as well as excessive zeros in the data. The bulk of unobservable effects are uncorrelate...

  11. A Human Capital Model of Educational Test Scores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIntosh, James; D. Munk, Martin

    measure of pure cognitive ability. We find that variables which are not closely associated with traditional notions of intelligence explain a significant proportion of the variation in test scores. This adds to the complexity of interpreting test scores and suggests that school culture, attitudes...

  12. Evaluation of behaviour testing for human directed aggression in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borg, van der J.A.M.; Beerda, B.; Ooms, M.; Silveira de Souza, A.; Hagen, M.; Kemp, B.

    2010-01-01

    Behaviour test batteries are used to identify aggressive dogs. The Dutch Socially Acceptable Behaviour (SAB)-test has been used since 2001 to select against unwanted aggression and fear in specific dog breeds, though much is unknown yet regarding its reliability, validity and feasibility. In this pa

  13. Standards guidelines for human comfort tested on timber footbridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Gutemberg de Alcântara Segundinho

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Activities such as walking, running and jumping can produce undesirable dynamic excitations, which are a phenomenon that occurs due to pedestrian-induced dynamic forces whenever a footbridge features a natural frequency within stepping frequency ranges. Dynamic evaluations of timber footbridges are necessary to verify the level of human comfort and the suitability of the bridges when subjected to human traffic. The objective of this paper is to present a bibliography review on the standards guidelines contained in international codes BS 5400, SIA 160, OHBDC, CEB, EUROCODE 5, AASHTO, BRO and ISO 10137 as well as in studies by various researchers, in order to verify the serviceability limit state for vibrations. In Brazil, codes ABNT NBR 7190 and ABNT NBR 7188 set the sizing criteria for timber footbridges considering the ultimate and serviceability limit states, with the latter ignoring human comfort with regard to vibrations. Thus, the information contained in this study can contribute to the refinement of Brazilian code ABNT NBR 7190, as it takes into account human comfort in pedestrian-induced vibrations on footbridges.

  14. Opisthorchis viverrini:The carcinogenic human liver fluke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Natthawut Kaewpitoon; Soraya J Kaewpitoon; Prasit Pengsaa; Banchob Sripa

    2008-01-01

    Opisthorchiasis caused by Opisthorchis viverrini remains a major public health problem in many parts of Southeast Asia,including Thailand,Lao PDR,Vietnam and Cambodia.The infection is associated with a number of hepatobiliary diseases,including cholangitis,obstructive jaundice,hepatomegaly,cholecystitis and cholelithiasis.Multi-factorial etiology of cholangiocarcinoma,mechanical damage,parasite secretions,and immunopathology may enhance cholangiocarcinogenesis.Moreover,both experimental and epidemiological evidences strongly implicate liver fluke infection as the major risk factor in cholangiocarcinoma,cancer of the bile ducts.The liver fluke infection is induced by eating raw or uncooked fish products that is the tradition and popular in the northeastern and northern region,particularly in rural areas,of Thailand.The health education programs to prevent and control opisthorchiasis are still required in the high-risk areas.

  15. DNA-damaging activity in vivo and bacterial mutagenicity of sixteen aromatic amines and azo-derivatives, as related quantitatively to their carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodi, S; Taningher, M; Russo, P; Pala, M; Tamaro, M; Monti-Bragadin, C

    1981-01-01

    Sixteen aromatic amines and azo-derivatives were studied. They were: benzidine; 2-acetylaminofluorene; 3'-methyl-p-dimethylaminobenzene; o-aminoazo-toluene; p-dimethylaminoazobenzene; 2,4-diamino-toluene; 4,4'-oxydianiline; 2,4-diaminoanisole; 4,4'-methylenedianiline; 2-naphthylamine; Auramine O; Rhodamine B; Ponceau MX; 1-naphthylamine; p-aminoazobenzene and aniline. The compounds were examined for their capability to induce alkaline DNA fragmentation in rat liver after treatment in vivo, for their mutagenicity in the Salmonella strains TA 98 and TA 100, for their acute toxicity and for their carcinogenicity in mice and rats. For each parameter a quantitative potency index was established, and the correlation existing amongst the different parameters investigated. Only mutagenicity in the strain TA 98 was slightly correlated with carcinogenic potency (r = 0.408). DNA fragmentation and toxicity were not correlated with carcinogenicity. A significant correlation was found between DNA fragmentation and toxicity (r = 0.539). No correlation was found between DNA fragmentation and mutagenicity. The lack of correlation between DNA fragmentation and carcinogenicity is in contrast with previous results obtained with a family of hydrazine derivatives (12) and a group of nitrosocompounds (22). For these two groups of chemicals correlation between DNA fragmentation and carcinogenicity existed, but not between carcinogenicity and mutagenicity in the Ames' test. It is suggested that short term tests can perform very differently for different classes of chemicals.

  16. Chronic Dermal Toxicity of Epoxy Resins I. Skin Carcinogenic Potency and General Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, J.M.

    2001-01-16

    Epoxy resins are a diverse class of chemicals that differ in structure, physical properties, and, presumably, biological activity. The purpose of these experiments was to compare the chronic dermal toxicity and carcinogenicity of selected commercial epoxy resins and to determine the potential for positive synergistic carcinogenic interactions between different resins. This work is an extension and continuation of a Department of Energy sponsored program to evaluate epoxy resins for potential occupational health risks. The materials examined were chosen on the basis of their interest to the U.S. government. They are representative of the manufacturer's production at the time, and therefore the data are completely valid only for the specific production period. Results of the experimental exposures will be reported in two parts. This report describes the test materials, their chemical and physical characteristics and the experimental design. General (systemic) toxicity will be evaluated and the skin carcinogenicity of the materials compared. A subsequent report will provide morphological descriptions of skin and significant internal pathology induced by the various treatments.

  17. Pleural carcinogenic potency of mineral fibers (asbestos, attapulgite) and their cytotoxicity on cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaurand, M C; Fleury, J; Monchaux, G; Nebut, M; Bignon, J

    1987-10-01

    The carcinogenicity of several samples of mineral fibers was tested following injection of 20 mg in the pleural cavity of noninbred Sprague-Dawley rats. Three samples of chrysotile asbestos (mean length: 3.2, 2.1, and 1.2 micron) induced mesotheliomas at a rate of 48, 52, and 19%, respectively. The first sample was acid leached prior to intrapleural injection; in that group, the percentage of mesotheliomas was reduced to 25%. Treatment with amosite and crocidolite resulted in the occurrence of 57 and 56% of mesotheliomas. Acid-treatment of amphiboles did not significantly modify the percentage of mesotheliomas. When the Stanton's fiber dimensions were taken into consideration to correlate with mesothelioma incidence, the observed number of mesotheliomas in the chrysotile-treated animals was much lower than that expected, suggesting that other fiber parameters (chemistry, physicochemistry) play a role in the carcinogenicity. Attapulgite fibers (mean length: 0.77 micron) did not induce tumor, and the mean survival time was of the same order as that observed in the control groups. The injection of quartz resulted in no mesothelioma but did result in 6 malignant histiocytic lymphomas (17%) and 2 malignant schwannomas (6%). In vitro experiments did not show strong correlation between cytotoxicity and the carcinogenic potency of these minerals, but the qualitative cellular responses might give some indications on the fiber's potency. In addition, the in vitro effects of the fibers seem to be modulated by their size.

  18. A Comparison of the Roche Cobas HPV Test With the Hybrid Capture 2 Test for the Detection of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Genotypes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Levi, Angelique W; Bernstein, Jane I; Hui, Pei; Duch, Kara; Schofield, Kevin; Chhieng, David C

    2016-01-01

    All Food and Drug Administration-approved methods in the United States for human papillomavirus testing including the Hybrid Capture 2 human papillomavirus assay and the Roche cobas human papilloma...

  19. In vitro chemosensitivity tests on xenografted human melanomas.

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    An in vitro chemosensitivity test has been applied to malignant melanoma cells from 5 patients. The tumour cells were first grown as xenografts in immune-suppressed mice, so that the results of the in vitro test could be compared with precise measurements of the sensitivity of the melanoma cells when exposed to chemotherapeutic drugs in vivo in the mouse. The in vitro assay involved exposing the tumour cells to each of 8 drugs, after which cell survival was determined by colony assay in soft ...

  20. Carcinogenicity of Embedded Tungsten Alloys in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    been shown to accumulate depleted uranium after chronic ingestion (Dublineau et al. 2006). Inhalation results in the exposure of epithelial cells and...phagocytizing small metal particulates and can concentrate these metals in the phagolysosomal vesicles before exiting through the lymphatic system...method of Kalinich and McClain (2001), Molt-4, a human T-cell leukemia line, and REH, a human B-cell lymphoma line, did not appear to internalize DU

  1. [Studies on the genotoxic effects of crude liver oils from 3 species of Mediterranean sharks by means of in vitro micronucleus test using human lymphocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartfai, E; Orsière, T; Duffaud, F; Villani, P; Pompili, J; Botta, A

    2000-01-01

    Lymphoid system tumours have been identified in two subjects who used to handle for several years mediterranean shark liver oil and squalen extracted from this oil. Moreover, scientific data, reported in 1959 by Kröning, show the induction of lymphoid tumours in C57 B1 mice after exposure of their skin to squalen. These observations rose the question of a possible mutagenic power of shark liver oil. In order to determine the genotoxicity of these oils, in vitro assays have been performed on crude hepatic oil of three species of mediterranean sharks: two benthic sharks, Centrophorus granulosus and Galeus melastomus, and one pelagic specie, Prionace glauca. Genotoxicity of oils have been assayed using a micronucleus test which can detected simultaneously clastogen and aneugen effects. The incubation of human cells with the hepatic crude oils of Centrophorus granulosus increases the rate of the binucleated micronucleated cell in a dose dependent manner. The mean micronucleated cell rate was 9.0%. +/- 1.1 in controls and increased up to 27,1%. +/- 4,0 for the highest concentrations of oil extracts. Similar results have been obtained with crude hepatic oils of Galeus melastomus and Prionace glauca. The results of this experimental study show that the crude liver oils of three species of sharks are genotoxic and confirm a high carcinogenic risk.

  2. DNA replication, repair, and repair tests. [Rat; human leukocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, B.

    1980-09-01

    The rate of inhibition and recovery of DNA synthesis can be used in a rapid assay system to detect genotoxic potentials of chemicals. Also, the observation that an agent stimulates DNA repair in a test system indicates its ability to cause damage in DNA. Different experimental approaches to the study of repair synthesis are discussed.

  3. Intelligent self-tuning of PID control for the robotic testing system for human musculoskeletal joints test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lianfang

    2004-06-01

    In this paper, an intelligent proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control method is introduced to the robotic testing system for the biomechanical study of human musculoskeletal joints. For the testing system, the robot is a highly nonlinear and heavily coupled complicated system, and the human spinal specimen also demonstrates nonlinear property when undergoing testing. Although the conventional PID control approach is extensively used in most industrial control systems, it will break down for nonlinear systems, particularly for complicated systems that have no precise mathematical models. To overcome those difficulties, an intelligent fuzzy PID controller is proposed replacing the widely used conventional PID controllers. The fuzzy PID algorithm is outlined using the fuzzy set theory. The design techniques are developed based on the linguistic phase plane approach. The heuristic rules of syntheses are summarized into a rule-based expert system. Experiments are carried out and the results demonstrate the good performance of the robotic testing system using the proposed control method.

  4. Studies in vitro to discern the structural requirements for carcinogenicity in analogues of the carcinogen 4-dimethylaminoazobenzene (butter yellow).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, J; Styles, J A; Paton, D

    1980-01-01

    4-Dimethylaminoazobenzene (butter yellow, DAB), is the parent member of a large family of 'azo-carcinogens'. Experiments have been conducted in vitro to determine the key structural requirements for carcinogenic activity in this chemical class, and it is suggested, based on the activity observed for 4-cyano-N,N-dimethylaniline, that the 4-phenylazo group of DAB is not an essential structural feature per se. The N-oxide derivative of DAB has been evaluated in vitro and the positive response observed related to its metabolic activation. It is concluded that cyclic amines, such as pyrrolidine, can replace the N-dimethyl group of DAB with a retention of biological activity. The confusion that exists in the literature concerning the chemical identity and carcinogenic status of 2-dimethylaminobenzo[c]cinnoline has been investigated, and it is concluded that it is a potential animal carcinogen. This observation also indicates that the phenylazo group of DAB can be incorporated within an aromatic ring system with a retention of biological activity. As observed earlier with a mixture of azobenzene and DAB, azobenzene also potentiates the cell transforming properties of the above cinnoline derivative in vitro. Two charts are presented. The first attempts to integrate DAB within a much larger family of carcinogens, and the second illustrates the usefulness of structure-activity studies in general.

  5. An Alternative to the Human Hemoglobin Test in the Investigation of Bloodstains Treated with Active Oxygen: The Human Glycophorin A Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Castelló

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In criminal investigations, there are three stages involved when studying bloodstains: search and orientation, confirmation, and individualization. Confirmatory tests have two aims: to show that the stain contains a human biological fluid and to confirm the type of biological fluid. The need to determine the nature of the evidence is reflected in the latest bibliography, where the possibility of employing mRNA and miRNA markers for this purpose is proposed. While these new proposals are being investigated, the kits for determining human hemoglobin currently provide a simple solution for resolving this issue. With these kits, the possibility of obtaining false positives and false negatives is well known. However, recently, a new problem has been detected. This involves the interference caused by new cleaning products that contain sodium percarbonate (or active oxygen when determining human hemoglobin. With the aim to resolve this problem, this work studied the ability of the human glycophorin A test to determine human blood in samples that have been treated with active oxygen. Our results show that the human glycophorin A test has a greater resistance to the destructive effect of the new detergents containing active oxygen; consequently, it provides an alternative to be taken into consideration in the confirmatory diagnoses of bloodstains.

  6. Improvement and validation of a medium-term gpt delta rat model for predicting chemical carcinogenicity and underlying mode of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Kohei; Kuroda, Ken; Ishii, Yuji; Takasu, Shinji; Kijima, Aki; Kawaguchi, Hiroaki; Miyoshi, Noriaki; Nohmi, Takehiko; Ogawa, Kumiko; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Umemura, Takashi

    2014-09-01

    We have developed a new medium-term animal model, "GPG", in which an in vivo mutation assay in partially hepatectomized tissue and a tumor-promoting assay were performed. The tumor-promoting assay measures glutathione S-transferase placental form positive foci induced by diethylnitrosamine (DEN) in the residual tissue. Given that a limitation of the original protocol is the potential interaction between the test chemical and DEN, the present study establishes a modified protocol that includes a test chemical washout period. Using CYP2E1 inhibitor and CYP1A or CYP2B inducers, a period of 2 weeks after cessation of exposure to the chemicals was confirmed to be sufficient to return their enzymatic activities to normal levels. Additionally, to avoid the effects of DEN on the pharmacokinetics of the test chemical, re-exposure to the test chemical started 1 week after DEN injection, in which tumor-promoting activities were clearly detected. Consequently, a modified protocol has been established with 2- and 1-week washout periods before and after DEN injection, respectively. The applicability of the modified protocol was demonstrated using the genotoxic hepatocarcinogen, estragole (ES), the genotoxic renal carcinogen, aristolochic acid (AA), and the non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogens, β-naphthoflavone and barbital. Furthermore, the increase of cell cycle-related parameters in ES-treated livers, but not in AA-treated livers, may indicate that the liver is not the carcinogenic target site of AA despite its genotoxic role. Thus, since various parameters related to carcinogenesis can be evaluated concurrently, the GPG model could be a rapid and reliable assay for the assessment of human cancer hazards.

  7. Mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of a textile azo dye processing plant effluent that impacts a drinking water source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves de Lima, Rodrigo Otávio; Bazo, Ana Paula; Salvadori, Daisy Maria Fávero; Rech, Célia Maria; de Palma Oliveira, Danielle; de Aragão Umbuzeiro, Gisela

    2007-01-10

    river, Chemosphere 60 (2005) 55-64]. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the possible risks involved in the human consumption of this contaminated water. With that objective, one sample of the cited industrial effluent was tested for carcinogenicity in the aberrant crypt foci medium-term assay in colon of Wistar rats. The rats received the effluent in natura through drinking water at concentrations of 0.1%, 1%, and 10%. The effluent mutagenicity was also confirmed in the Salmonella/microsome assay with the strains TA98 and YG1041. There was an increased number of preneoplastic lesions in the colon of rats exposed to concentrations of 1% and 10% of the effluent, and a positive response for both Salmonella strains tested. These results indicate that the discharge of the effluent should be avoided in waters used for human consumption and show the sensitivity of the ACF crypt foci assay as an important tool to evaluate the carcinogenic potential of environmental complex mixtures.

  8. A theoretical concept of low level/low LET radiation carcinogenic risk (LLCR) projection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filyushkin, I.V. [Laboratory of Theoretical Radiobiology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1992-06-01

    Carcinogenic risk to humans resulting from low level/low LET radiation exposure (LLLCR) has not been observed directly because epidemiological observations have not yet provided statistically significant data on risk values. However, these values are of great interest for radiation health science and radiation protection practice under both normal conditions and emergency situations. This report presents a theoretical contribution to the validation of dose and dose rate efficiency factors (DDREF) transforming cocinogenic risk coefficients from those revealed in A-bomb survivors to factors appropriate for the projection of the risk resulting from very low levels of low LET radiation.

  9. Potential health effects of exposure to carcinogenic compounds in incense smoke in temple workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navasumrit, Panida; Arayasiri, Manasawee; Hiang, Ohmar May Tin; Leechawengwongs, Manoon; Promvijit, Jeerawan; Choonvisase, Suppachai; Chantchaemsai, Samroeng; Nakngam, Netnapa; Mahidol, Chulabhorn; Ruchirawat, Mathuros

    2008-05-09

    Incense smoke is a potential hazard to human health due to various airborne carcinogens emitted from incense burning. This study aimed to evaluate the potential health effects of exposure to benzene, 1,3-butadiene, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emitted from incense smoke in temple workers. Exposure and health risks were assessed through the measurement of ambient exposure as well as through the use of biomarkers of exposure and early biological effects. Ambient air measurement showed that incense burning generates significantly higher levels of airborne benzene (Pincense burning may increase health risk for the development of cancer in temple workers.

  10. Cannabis and tobacco smoke are not equally carcinogenic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melamede Robert

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract More people are using the cannabis plant as modern basic and clinical science reaffirms and extends its medicinal uses. Concomitantly, concern and opposition to smoked medicine has occurred, in part due to the known carcinogenic consequences of smoking tobacco. Are these reactions justified? While chemically very similar, there are fundamental differences in the pharmacological properties between cannabis and tobacco smoke. Cannabis smoke contains cannabinoids whereas tobacco smoke contains nicotine. Available scientific data, that examines the carcinogenic properties of inhaling smoke and its biological consequences, suggests reasons why tobacco smoke, but not cannabis smoke, may result in lung cancer.

  11. Human Health Risk Assessment Based on Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure and Simple Bioaccessibility Extraction Test of Toxic Metals in Urban Street Dust of Tianjin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Binbin; Wang, Yu; Zhou, Qixing

    2014-01-01

    The potential ecological and human health risk related with urban street dust from urban areas of Tianjin, China was quantitatively analyzed using the method of toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and simple bioaccessibility extraction test (SBET). In the study, Hakason index, Nemerow index (P), the hazard index (HI) and the cancer risk index (RI) were calculated to assess the potential risk. The sequence of potential ecological risk based on Hakason index was arsenic (As) > cadmium (Cd) > lead (Pb) > copper (Cu) > chromium (Cr), in particular, As and Cd were regarded as high polluted metals. While the results of extraction of TCLP were assessed using P, the sequence was As > Pb > Cd > Cr > Cu, which mean that As and Pb should be low polluted, and Cd, Cr and Cu would barely not polluted. For human health, total carcinogenic risk for children and adults was 2.01×10−3 and 1.05×10−3, respectively. This could be considered to be intolerable in urban street dust exposure. The sequence in the hazard quotient (HQ) of each element was As > Cr > Pb > Cu > Cd. The HI value of these toxic metals in urban street dust for children and adults was 5.88×10−1 and 2.80×10−1, respectively. According to the characters of chemistry, mobility, and bioavailability of metals in urban street dust, we estimated the hazards on the environment and human health, which will help us to get more reasonable information for risk management of metals in urban environment. PMID:24651129

  12. Human health risk assessment based on toxicity characteristic leaching procedure and simple bioaccessibility extraction test of toxic metals in urban street dust of Tianjin, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binbin Yu

    Full Text Available The potential ecological and human health risk related with urban street dust from urban areas of Tianjin, China was quantitatively analyzed using the method of toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP and simple bioaccessibility extraction test (SBET. In the study, Hakason index, Nemerow index (P, the hazard index (HI and the cancer risk index (RI were calculated to assess the potential risk. The sequence of potential ecological risk based on Hakason index was arsenic (As > cadmium (Cd > lead (Pb > copper (Cu > chromium (Cr, in particular, As and Cd were regarded as high polluted metals. While the results of extraction of TCLP were assessed using P, the sequence was As > Pb > Cd > Cr > Cu, which mean that As and Pb should be low polluted, and Cd, Cr and Cu would barely not polluted. For human health, total carcinogenic risk for children and adults was 2.01 × 10(-3 and 1.05 × 10(-3, respectively. This could be considered to be intolerable in urban street dust exposure. The sequence in the hazard quotient (HQ of each element was As > Cr > Pb > Cu > Cd. The HI value of these toxic metals in urban street dust for children and adults was 5.88 × 10(-1 and 2.80 × 10(-1, respectively. According to the characters of chemistry, mobility, and bioavailability of metals in urban street dust, we estimated the hazards on the environment and human health, which will help us to get more reasonable information for risk management of metals in urban environment.

  13. Preleptotene chromosome condensation stage in human foetal and neonatal testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciani, J M; Devictor, M; Stahl, A

    1977-04-01

    A preleptotene stage of chromosome condensation analogous to that already described in various plants and in the oocytes of several animal species has been observed in the human foetal testis. Contrary to what has been previously described, this stage in the testis is not followed by decondensation leading to leptotene filaments. This observation underlines the problem of the precise significance of this stage and its relation to initiation of meiosis. It is suggested that meiosis may be initiated during this condensation phase and that the male germ cell, despite its XY chromosome constitution, tends to evolve towards meiosis. This proposal pleads in favour of both the role of somatic cells in the inhibition of meiosis in the male foetus and the role of environmental factors rather than genetic constitution of the germ cell in meiotic induction.

  14. Mu suppression and human movement responses to the Rorschach test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Jaime A; Giromini, Luciano; Porcelli, Piero; Parolin, Laura; Viglione, Donald J

    2011-03-30

    Electroencephalographic μ wave suppression was investigated using all 10 static, ambiguous Rorschach stimuli. In an earlier study using four Rorschach stimuli, the two stimuli that elicited feelings of movement were associated with μ suppression. In this study, we replicated this relationship using all 10 Rorschach stimuli while overcoming a number of other earlier limitations. The results strongly support the hypothesis that internal representation of the feeling of movement is sufficient to suppress the μ rhythm even when minimal external cues are present. This outcome increases the generalizability and ecological validity of this approach and gives support to the traditional interpretation of the Rorschach human movement responses as being associated with cognitive functioning, empathy, and social cognition.

  15. Temporal aspects of tumorigenic response to individual and mixed carcinogens. Comprehensive progress report, June 1, 1975--May 31, 1978. [Mouse skin, rats, hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, R.E.; Burns, F.J.; Altshuler, B.

    1978-02-01

    The research proposed here is designed to obtain a better understanding of the temporal kinetics of tumor induction when one or more carcinogens are present simultaneously or sequentially for prolonged periods of time. Studies done to date under this contract have shown that carcinogenesis in mouse skin by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon carcinogens is consistent with the induction of dependent and autonomous cell transformations by the carcinogen followed by the conversion of autonomous tumor cells into malignancies at a rate which is determined by the level of carcinogen exposure. Dependent cell transformations remain latent in the skin unless expressed by a promoting agent. Dependent neoplasia appears to follow one-hit kinetics while malignancy is a multihit endpoint. Dose-related and time-related aspects of tumor induction are separable in the initiation-promotion system of mouse skin which along with rat skin and hamster lung is being used as a model for testing hypotheses. Results to date provide the basis for a new interpretation of the linear non-threshold extrapolation model. The broad aim of the study is to provide a basis or rationale for estimating risks associated with prolonged exposures to carcinogens found in the environment and to predict how different tissues and species respond to the same carcinogens.

  16. Assuring safety without animal testing concept (ASAT). Integration of human disease data with in vitro data to improve toxicology testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stierum, Rob; Aarts, Jac; Boorsma, Andre; Bosgra, Sieto; Caiment, Florian; Ezendam, Janine; Greupink, Rick; Hendriksen, Peter; Soeteman-Hernandez, Lya G.; Jennen, Danyel; Kleinjans, Jos; Kroese, Dinant; Kuper, Frieke; van Loveren, Henk; Monshouwer, Mario; Russel, Frans; van Someren, Eugene; Tsamou, Maria; Groothuis, Geny

    2014-01-01

    According to the Assuring Safety Without Animal Testing (ASAT) principle, risk assessment may ultimately become possible without the use of animals (Fentem et al., (2004). Altern. Lab. Anim. 32, 617-623). The ASAT concept takes human disease mechanisms as starting point and tries to define if activa

  17. Assuring safety without animal testing concept (ASAT). Integration of human disease data with in vitro data to improve toxicology testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stierum, R.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Boorsma, J.; Bosgra, S.; Caiment, F.; Ezendam, J.; Greuping, R.; Hendriksen, P.; Soeteman-Hernandez, L.G.; Jennen, D.; Kleinjans, J.; Kroese, D.; Kuper, F.; Loveren, van H.; Monshouwer, M.; Russel, F.; Someren, van E.; Tsamou, M.; Groothuis, G.

    2014-01-01

    According to the Assuring Safety Without Animal Testing (ASAT) principle, risk assessment may ultimately become possible without the use of animals (Fentem et al., (2004). Altern. Lab. Anim. 32, 617–623). The ASAT concept takes human disease mechanisms as starting point and tries to define if activa

  18. Biodegradation of the metallic carcinogen hexavalent chromium Cr(VI by an indigenously isolated bacterial strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Alok

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI], a potential mutagen and carcinogen, is regularly introduced into the environment through diverse anthropogenic activities, including electroplating, leather tanning, and pigment manufacturing. Human exposure to this toxic metal ion not only causes potential human health hazards but also affects other life forms. The World Health Organization, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, and the Environmental Protection Agency have determined that Cr(VI compounds are known human carcinogens. The Sukinda valley in Jajpur District, Orissa, is known for its deposit of chromite ore, producing nearly 98% of the chromite ore in India and one of the prime open cast chromite ore mines in the world (CES, Orissa Newsletter. Materials and Methods: Our investigation involved microbial remediation of Cr(VI without producing any byproduct. Bacterial cultures tolerating high concentrations of Cr were isolated from the soil sample collected from the chromite-contaminated sites of Sukinda, and their bioaccumulation properties were investigated. Strains capable of growing at 250 mg/L Cr(VI were considered as Cr resistant. Results: The experimental investigation showed the maximum specific Cr uptake at pH 7 and temperature 30oC. At about 50 mg/L initial Cr(VI concentrations, uptake of the selected potential strain exceeded 98% within 12 h of incubation. The bacterial isolate was identified by 16S rRNA sequencing as Brevebacterium casei. Conclusion: Results indicated promising approach for microbial remediation of effluents containing elevated levels of Cr(VI.

  19. Protein adducts of the prostate carcinogen PhIP in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    2004-02-20

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in men in the United States. few epidemiology studies have indicated that exposure to PhIP, a rodent prostate carcinogen formed in meat during cooking, may be an important risk factor for prostate cancer in humans. Therefore, a highly sensitive biomarker assay is urgently needed to clarify the role of PhIP in prostate cancer. The goal of this project is to develop an assay that can be used to more accurately quantify human exposure to PhIP and potential prostate cancer risk. Our hypothesis is that an Accelerator Mass Spectrometry-based method can be developed to measure protein adducts of PhIP in the blood of humans. This will provide a measure of the internal dose, as well as the capacity for carcinogen bioactivation to a form that can initiate the cancer process. Towards this goal, we have characterized an adduct formed by PhIP in vitro with the amino acid cysteine. This adduct should provide a biomarker of dietary PhIP exposure and potential prostate cancer risk that could be used to identify individuals for prevention and for monitoring the effect chemoprevention strategies.

  20. The carcinogenic risks of low-LET and high-LET ionizing radiations. Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J.I. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)]|[California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1991-08-01

    This report presents a discussion on risk from ionizing radiations to human populations. Important new information on human beings has come mainly from further follow-up of existing epidemiological studies, notably the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and the ankylosing spondylitis patients; from new epidemiological surveys, such as the patients treated for cancer of the uterine cervix; and from combined surveys, including workers exposed in underground mines. Since the numerous and complex differences among the different study populations introduce factors that influence the risk estimates derived in ways that are not completely understood, it is not clear how to combine the different risk estimates obtained. These factors involve complex biological and physical variables distributed over time. Because such carcinogenic effects occur too infrequently to be demonstrated at low doses, the risks of low-dose radiation can be estimated only by interpolation from observations at high doses on the basis of theoretical concepts, mathematical models and available empirical evidence, primarily the epidemiological surveys of large populations exposed to ionizing radiation. In spite of a considerable amount of research, only recently has there has been efforts to apply the extensive laboratory data in animals to define the dose-incidence relationship in the low dose region. There simply are insufficient data in the epidemiological studies of large human populations to estimate risk coefficients directly from exposure to low doses. The risk estimates for the carcinogenic effects of radiation have been, in the past, somewhat low and reassessment of the numerical values is now necessary.

  1. The carcinogenic risks of low-LET and high-LET ionizing radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J.I. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States))

    1991-08-01

    This report presents a discussion on risk from ionizing radiations to human populations. Important new information on human beings has come mainly from further follow-up of existing epidemiological studies, notably the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and the ankylosing spondylitis patients; from new epidemiological surveys, such as the patients treated for cancer of the uterine cervix; and from combined surveys, including workers exposed in underground mines. Since the numerous and complex differences among the different study populations introduce factors that influence the risk estimates derived in ways that are not completely understood, it is not clear how to combine the different risk estimates obtained. These factors involve complex biological and physical variables distributed over time. Because such carcinogenic effects occur too infrequently to be demonstrated at low doses, the risks of low-dose radiation can be estimated only by interpolation from observations at high doses on the basis of theoretical concepts, mathematical models and available empirical evidence, primarily the epidemiological surveys of large populations exposed to ionizing radiation. In spite of a considerable amount of research, only recently has there has been efforts to apply the extensive laboratory data in animals to define the dose-incidence relationship in the low dose region. There simply are insufficient data in the epidemiological studies of large human populations to estimate risk coefficients directly from exposure to low doses. The risk estimates for the carcinogenic effects of radiation have been, in the past, somewhat low and reassessment of the numerical values is now necessary.

  2. Improving prediction of carcinogenicity to reduce, refine, and replace the use of experimental animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourcier, Todd; McGovern, Tim; Stavitskaya, Lidiya; Kruhlak, Naomi; Jacobson-Kram, David

    2015-03-01

    Cancer risk assessment of new pharmaceuticals is crucial to protect public health. However, clinical trials lack the duration needed to clearly detect drug-related tumor emergence, and biomarkers suggestive of increased cancer risk from a drug typically are not measured in clinical trials. Therefore, the carcinogenic potential of a new pharmaceutical is extrapolated predominately based on 2-y bioassays in rats and mice. A key drawback to this practice is that the results are frequently positive for tumors and can be irrelevant to human cancer risk for reasons such as dose, mode of action, and species specificity. Alternative approaches typically strive to reduce, refine, and replace rodents in carcinogenicity assessments by leveraging findings in short-term studies, both in silico and in vivo, to predict the likely tumor outcome in rodents or, more broadly, to identify a cancer risk to patients. Given the complexities of carcinogenesis and the perceived impracticality of assessing risk in the course of clinical trials, studies conducted in animals will likely remain the standard by which potential cancer risks are characterized for new pharmaceuticals in the immediate foreseeable future. However, a weight-of-evidence evaluation based on short-term toxicologic, in silico, and pharmacologic data is a promising approach to identify with reasonable certainty those pharmaceuticals that present a likely cancer risk in humans and, conversely, those that do not present a human cancer risk.

  3. Validating an artificial intelligence human proximity operations system with test cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Justin; Straub, Jeremy

    2013-05-01

    An artificial intelligence-controlled robot (AICR) operating in close proximity to humans poses risk to these humans. Validating the performance of an AICR is an ill posed problem, due to the complexity introduced by the erratic (noncomputer) actors. In order to prove the AICR's usefulness, test cases must be generated to simulate the actions of these actors. This paper discusses AICR's performance validation in the context of a common human activity, moving through a crowded corridor, using test cases created by an AI use case producer. This test is a two-dimensional simplification relevant to autonomous UAV navigation in the national airspace.

  4. Dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloid toxicity, cytotoxicity, and carcinogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehyro-pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PA)-containing plants compose about 5% of the world’s flowering plants and they commonly poison livestock, wildlife and humans. Previous work has produced considerable understanding of PA toxicity, species susceptibility, conditions and routes of exposure, toxin metab...

  5. Suitport Feasibility: Development and Test of a Suitport and Space Suit for Human Pressurized Space Suit Donning Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert M.; Mitchell, Kathryn; Allton, Charles; Ju, Hsing

    2012-01-01

    The suitport concept has been recently implemented as part of the small pressurized lunar rover (Currently the Space Exploration vehicle, or SEV) and the Multi-Mission Space Exploration Vehicle (MMSEV) concept demonstrator vehicle. Suitport replaces or augments the traditional airlock function of a spacecraft by providing a bulkhead opening, capture mechanism, and sealing system to allow ingress and egress of a space suit while the space suit remains outside of the pressurized volume of the spacecraft. This presents significant new opportunities to EVA exploration in both microgravity and surface environments. The suitport concept will enable three main improvements in EVA by providing reductions in: pre-EVA time from hours to less than thirty minutes; airlock consumables; contamination returned to the cabin with the EVA crewmember. To date, the first generation suitport has been tested with mockup suits on the rover cabins and pressurized on a bench top engineering unit. The work on the rover cabin has helped define the operational concepts and timelines, and has demonstrated the potential of suitport to save significant amounts of crew time before and after EVAs. The work with the engineering unit has successfully demonstrated the pressurizable seal concept including the ability to seal after the introduction and removal of contamination to the sealing surfaces. Using this experience, a second generation suitport was designed. This second generation suitport has been tested with a space suit prototype on the second generation MMSEV cabin, and testing is planned using the pressure differentials of the spacecraft. Pressurized testing will be performed using the JSC B32 Chamber B, a human rated vacuum chamber. This test will include human rated suitports, a suitport compatible prototype suit, and chamber modifications. This test will bring these three elements together in the first ever pressurized donning of a rear entry suit through a suitport. This paper presents

  6. Are 20 human papillomavirus types causing cervical cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbyn, Marc; Tommasino, Massimo; Depuydt, Christophe; Dillner, Joakim

    2014-12-01

    In 2012, the International Agency for Research on Cancer concluded that there was consistent and sufficient epidemiological, experimental and mechanistic evidence of carcinogenicity to humans for 12 HPV types (HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV39, HPV45, HPV51, HPV52, HPV56, HPV58 and HPV59) for cervical cancer. Therefore, these types were considered as 1A carcinogens. They all belong to the family of the α-Papillomaviridae, in particular to the species α5 (HPV51), α6 (HPV56), α7 (HPV18, HPV39, HPV45, HPV59) and α9 (HPV16, HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV52, HPV58). Less evidence is available for a thirteenth type (HPV68, α7), which is classified as a 2A carcinogen (probably carcinogenic). Moreover, seven other phylogenetically related types (HPV26, HPV53, HPV66, HPV67, HPV68, HPV70 and HPV73) were identified as single HPV infections in certain rare cases of cervical cancer and were considered possibly carcinogenic (2B carcinogens). Recently, Halec et al [7] demonstrated that the molecular signature of HPV-induced carcinogenesis (presence of type-specific spliced E6*| mRNA; increased expression of p16; and decreased expression of cyclin D1, p53 and Rb) was similar in cervical cancers containing single infections with one of the eight afore-mentioned 2A or 2B carcinogens to those in cancers with single infections with group 1 carcinogens. Ninety six percent of cervical cancers are attributable to one of the 13 most common HPV types (groups 1 and 2A). Including the additional seven HPV types (group 2B) added 2.6%, to reach a total of 98.7% of all HPV-positive cervical cancers. From recently updated meta-analyses, it was shown that HPV68, HPV26, HPV66, HPV67, HPV73 and HPV82 were significantly more common in cancer cases than in women with normal cervical cytology, suggesting that for these HPV types, an upgrading of the carcinogen classification could be considered. However, there is no need to include them in HPV screening tests or vaccines, given their rarity in

  7. Prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus by cobas 4800 HPV test in urban Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Iwasaki

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Molecular tests allow the detection of high-risk human papillomavirus in cervical samples, playing an important role in the prevention of cervical cancer. Objectives: We performed a study to determine the prevalence of HPV 16, HPV 18 and other high-risk human papillomavirus (pool 12 genotypes in Peruvian females from diverse urban areas using the cobas 4800 HPV test. Methods: Routine cervical samples collected in our laboratory were analyzed by cobas 4800 HPV test. Results: A total of 2247 samples from female patients aged 17–79 years were tested. high-risk human papillomavirus was positive in 775 (34.49% samples. Of these, 641 (82.71% were single infections and 134 (17.29% were multiple infections. The positivity rates for HPV 16, HPV 18, and other high-risk human papillomavirus were 10.77%, 2.0%, and 28.08%, respectively. In multiple high-risk human papillomavirus infections, the concomitance of HPV 16 and other high-risk human papillomavirus was more prevalent (13.42%. Conclusion: Our study showed high prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus in urban Peru, mainly among young women. In both single and multiple infections other high-risk human papillomavirus were more prevalent than HPV 16 and HPV 18, which might influence vaccine impact in our country. Furthermore, the cobas 4800 HPV test may be considered a useful tool for HPV molecular diagnosis.

  8. Comparative pathophysiology, toxicology, and human cancer risk assessment of pharmaceutical-induced hibernoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radi, Zaher, E-mail: zaher.radi@pfizer.com [Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, Drug Safety R and D, 1 Burtt Rd., Andover, MA 01810 (United States); Bartholomew, Phillip, E-mail: phillip.m.bartholomew@pfizer.com [Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, Drug Safety R and D, Eastern Point Road, Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Elwell, Michael, E-mail: michael.elwell@covance.com [Covance Laboratories, Chantilly, VA 20151 (United States); Vogel, W. Mark, E-mail: w.mark.vogel@pfizer.com [Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, Drug Safety R and D, 1 Burtt Rd., Andover, MA 01810 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    In humans, hibernoma is a very rare, benign neoplasm of brown adipose tissue (BAT) that typically occurs at subcutaneous locations and is successfully treated by surgical excision. No single cause has been accepted to explain these very rare human tumors. In contrast, spontaneous hibernoma in rats is rare, often malignant, usually occurs in the thoracic or abdominal cavity, and metastases are common. In recent years, there has been an increased incidence of spontaneous hibernomas in rat carcinogenicity studies, but overall the occurrence remains relatively low and highly variable across studies. There have only been four reported examples of pharmaceutical-induced hibernoma in rat carcinogenicity studies. These include phentolamine, an alpha-adrenergic antagonist; varenicline, a nicotine partial agonist; tofacitinib, a Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor; and hydromorphone, an opiod analgesic. Potential non-genotoxic mechanisms that may contribute to the pathogenesis of BAT activation/proliferation and/or subsequent hibernoma development in rats include: (1) physiological stimuli, (2) sympathetic stimulation, (3) peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonism, and/or (4) interference or inhibition of JAK/Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (JAK/STAT) signaling. The evaluation of an apparent increase of hibernoma in rats from 2-year carcinogenicity studies of novel pharmaceutical therapeutics and its relevance to human safety risk assessment is complex. One should consider: the genotoxicity of the test article, dose/exposure and safety margins, and pathophysiologic and morphologic differences and similarities of hibernoma between rats and humans. Hibernomas observed to date in carcinogenicity studies of pharmaceutical agents do not appear to be relevant for human risk at therapeutic dosages. - Highlights: • Highly variable incidence of spontaneous hibernoma in carcinogenicity studies • Recent increase in the spontaneous incidence of hibernomas

  9. Science, politics, and health in the brave new world of pharmaceutical carcinogenic risk assessment: technical progress or cycle of regulatory capture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, John; Ballinger, Rachel

    2012-10-01

    The carcinogenicity (cancer-inducing potential) of pharmaceuticals is an important risk factor for health when considering whether thousands of patients on drug trials or millions/billions of consumers in the marketplace should be exposed to a new drug. Drawing on fieldwork involving over 50 interviews and documentary research spanning 2002-2010 in Europe and the US, and on regulatory capture theory, this article investigates how the techno-regulatory standards for carcinogenicity testing of pharmaceuticals have altered since 1998. It focuses on the replacement of long-term carcinogenicity tests in rodents (especially mice) with shorter-term tests involving genetically-engineered mice (GEM). Based on evidence regarding financial/organizational control, methodological design, and interpretation of the validation and application of these new GEM tests, it is argued that regulatory agencies permitted the drug industry to shape such validation and application in ways that prioritized commercial interests over the need to protect public health. Boundary-work enabling industry scientists to define some standards of public-health policy facilitated such capture. However, as the scientific credibility of GEM tests as tools to protect public health by screening out carcinogens became inescapably problematic, a regulatory resurgence, impelled by reputational concerns, exercised more control over industry's construction and use of the tests, The extensive problems with GEM tests as public-health protective regulatory science raises the spectre that alterations to pharmaceutical carcinogenicity-testing standards since the 1990s may have been boundary-work in which the political project of decreasing the chance that companies' products are defined as carcinogenic has masqueraded as techno-science.

  10. Testing biomechanical models of human lumbar lordosis variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Eric R; Hsu, Connie; Mair, Ross W; Lieberman, Daniel E

    2017-05-01

    Lumbar lordosis (LL) is a key adaptation for bipedalism, but factors underlying curvature variations remain unclear. This study tests three biomechanical models to explain LL variability. Thirty adults (15 male, 15 female) were scanned using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a standing posture analysis was conducted, and lumbar range of motion (ROM) was assessed. Three measures of LL were compared. The trunk's center of mass was estimated from external markers to calculate hip moments (Mhip ) and lumbar flexion moments. Cross-sectional areas of lumbar vertebral bodies and trunk muscles were measured from scans. Regression models tested associations between LL and the Mhip moment arm, a beam bending model, and an interaction between relative trunk strength (RTS) and ROM. Hip moments were not associated with LL. Beam bending was moderately predictive of standing but not supine LL (R(2)  = 0.25). Stronger backs and increased ROM were associated with greater LL, especially when standing (R(2)  = 0.65). The strength-flexibility model demonstrates the differential influence of RTS depending on ROM: individuals with high ROM exhibited the most LL variation with RTS, while those with low ROM showed reduced LL regardless of RTS. Hip moments appear constrained suggesting the possibility of selection, and the beam model explains some LL variability due to variations in trunk geometry. The strength-flexibility interaction best predicted LL, suggesting a tradeoff in which ROM limits the effects of back strength on LL. The strength-flexibility model may have clinical relevance for spinal alignment and pathology. This model may also suggest that straight-backed Neanderthals had reduced lumbar mobility. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Cellular evidence for selfish spermatogonial selection in aged human testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, G J; Goriely, A; Wilkie, A O M

    2014-05-01

    Owing to a recent trend for delayed paternity, the genomic integrity of spermatozoa of older men has become a focus of increased interest. Older fathers are at higher risk for their children to be born with several monogenic conditions collectively termed paternal age effect (PAE) disorders, which include achondroplasia, Apert syndrome and Costello syndrome. These disorders are caused by specific mutations originating almost exclusively from the male germline, in genes encoding components of the tyrosine kinase receptor/RAS/MAPK signalling pathway. These particular mutations, occurring randomly during mitotic divisions of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), are predicted to confer a selective/growth advantage on the mutant SSC. This selective advantage leads to a clonal expansion of the mutant cells over time, which generates mutant spermatozoa at levels significantly above the background mutation rate. This phenomenon, termed selfish spermatogonial selection, is likely to occur in all men. In rare cases, probably because of additional mutational events, selfish spermatogonial selection may lead to spermatocytic seminoma. The studies that initially predicted the clonal nature of selfish spermatogonial selection were based on DNA analysis, rather than the visualization of mutant clones in intact testes. In a recent study that aimed to identify these clones directly, we stained serial sections of fixed testes for expression of melanoma antigen family A4 (MAGEA4), a marker of spermatogonia. A subset of seminiferous tubules with an appearance and distribution compatible with the predicted mutant clones were identified. In these tubules, termed 'immunopositive tubules', there is an increased density of spermatogonia positive for markers related to selfish selection (FGFR3) and SSC self-renewal (phosphorylated AKT). Here we detail the properties of the immunopositive tubules and how they relate to the predicted mutant clones, as well as discussing the utility of

  12. Trichloroethylene: Mechanistic, epidemiologic and other supporting evidence of carcinogenic hazard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusyn, Ivan; Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Lash, Lawrence H.; Kromhout, Hans; Hansen, Johnni; Guyton, Kathryn Z.

    2014-01-01

    The chlorinated solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant. The carcinogenic hazard of TCE was the subject of a 2012 evaluation by a Working Group of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Information on exposures, relevant data from epidemiologic

  13. Flavonoids and alkenylbenzenes: mechanisms of mutagenic action and carcinogenic risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Boersma, M.G.; Woude, van der H.; Jeurissen, S.M.F.; Schutte, M.E.; Alink, G.M.

    2005-01-01

    The present review focuses on the mechanisms of mutagenic action and the carcinogenic risk of two categories of botanical ingredients, namely the flavonoids with quercetin as an important bioactive representative, and the alkenylbenzenes, namely safrole, methyleugenol and estragole. For quercetin a

  14. An Interdisciplinary and Alternative Approach to Assess Carcinogenicity of Chlorobenzenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    carcinogenic activity of 1,4-di-, 1,2,4,5-tetra-, penta-, and hexa - chlorobenzenes in the Ito’s "Medium-Term Bioassay System" using partially...GST-P positive foci and related morphometric analyses, gene expressions of CYP1 A2, c-fos, c-jun, GSH/GSSG ratio, tissue porphyrin levels, DNA damage

  15. Chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity study of erythritol in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lina, B.A.R.; Bos-Kuijpers, M.H.M.; Til, H.P.; Bär, A.

    1996-01-01

    The potential toxicity and carcinogenicity of erythritol, a low-calorie sugar substitute, were examined in Wistar Crl:(WI) WU BR rats. Groups of 50 rats of each sex consumed diets with 0, 2, 5, or 10% erythritol, or 10% mannitol, for a period of 104-107 weeks. To each of these main groups, two

  16. Trichloroethylene: Mechanistic, epidemiologic and other supporting evidence of carcinogenic hazard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusyn, Ivan; Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Lash, Lawrence H.; Kromhout, Hans|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074385224; Hansen, Johnni; Guyton, Kathryn Z.

    2014-01-01

    The chlorinated solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant. The carcinogenic hazard of TCE was the subject of a 2012 evaluation by a Working Group of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Information on exposures, relevant data from epidemiologic studie

  17. Trichloroethylene: Mechanistic, epidemiologic and other supporting evidence of carcinogenic hazard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusyn, Ivan; Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Lash, Lawrence H.; Kromhout, Hans; Hansen, Johnni; Guyton, Kathryn Z.

    2014-01-01

    The chlorinated solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant. The carcinogenic hazard of TCE was the subject of a 2012 evaluation by a Working Group of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Information on exposures, relevant data from epidemiologic studie

  18. CARCINOGENIC EFFECTS OF LOW DOSES OF IONIZING RADIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcinogenic Effects of Low Doses of Ionizing RadiationR Julian Preston, Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711The form of the dose-response curve for radiation-induced cancers, particu...

  19. Mutagenic activation reduces carcinogenic activity of ortho-aminoazotoluene for mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikova, L P; Bogdanova, L A; Kaledin, V I

    2013-03-01

    Pentachlorophenol (aromatic amine and azo stain metabolic stimulation inhibitor) reduced the hepatocarcinogenic activity of 4-aminoazobenzene and reduced that of ortho-aminoazotoluene in suckling mice. Both 4-aminoazobenzene and ortho-aminoazotoluene exhibited mutagenic activity in Ames' test in vitro on S. typhimurium TA 98 strain with activation with liver enzymes; this mutagenic activity was similarly suppressed by adding pentachlorophenol into activation medium. Induction of xenobiotic metabolism enzymes, stimulating the mutagenic activity of ortho-aminoazotoluene, suppressed its carcinogenic effect on mouse liver. Hence, ortho-aminotoluene (the initial compound), but not its mutagenic metabolites, was the direct active hepatocarcinogen for mice.

  20. Analysis of rear-end impact response using mathematical human modeling and volunteer tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, R.; Hoof, J.F.A.M. van; Ono, K.; Kaneoka, K.

    2001-01-01

    At TNO multi-directional mathematical human body models have been developed. The objective of this study was to simulate the rigid seat and standard seat JARI rear-impact sled tests using the MADYMO 50th percentile male model. The head and neck response of this human model and the volunteers were co

  1. An international network (PlaNet) to evaluate a human placental testing platform for chemicals safety testing in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brownbill, Paul; Chernyavsky, Igor; Bottalico, Barbara;

    2016-01-01

    in pregnancy and how ex vivo and in vitro human placental models might be advanced to reproducible human placental test systems (HPTSs), refining a weight of evidence to the guidance given around compound risk assessment during pregnancy. The placental pharmacokinetics of xenobiotic transfer, dysregulated...... placental function in pregnancy-related pathologies and influx/efflux transporter polymorphisms are a few caveats that could be addressed by HPTSs, not the specific focus of current mammalian reproductive toxicology systems. An international consortium, “PlaNet”, will bridge academia, industry...... and regulators to consider screen ability and standardisation issues surrounding these models, with proven reproducibility for introduction into industrial and clinical practice....

  2. Evaluation of Human and Anthropomorphic Test Device Finite Element Models under Spaceflight Loading Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Jacob P.; Untaroiu, Costin; Somers. Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to develop occupant protection standards for future multipurpose crew vehicles, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has looked to evaluate the test device for human occupant restraint with the modification kit (THOR-K) anthropomorphic test device (ATD) in relevant impact test scenarios. With the allowance and support of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, NASA has performed a series of sled impact tests on the latest developed THOR-K ATD. These tests were performed to match test conditions from human volunteer data previously collected by the U.S. Air Force. The objective of this study was to evaluate the THOR-K finite element (FE) model and the Total HUman Model for Safety (THUMS) FE model with respect to the tests performed. These models were evaluated in spinal and frontal impacts against kinematic and kinetic data recorded in ATD and human testing. Methods: The FE simulations were developed based on recorded pretest ATD/human position and sled acceleration pulses measured during testing. Predicted responses by both human and ATD models were compared to test data recorded under the same impact conditions. The kinematic responses of the models were quantitatively evaluated using the ISO-metric curve rating system. In addition, ATD injury criteria and human stress/strain data were calculated to evaluate the risk of injury predicted by the ATD and human model, respectively. Results: Preliminary results show well-correlated response between both FE models and their physical counterparts. In addition, predicted ATD injury criteria and human model stress/strain values are shown to positively relate. Kinematic comparison between human and ATD models indicates promising biofidelic response, although a slightly stiffer response is observed within the ATD. Conclusion: As a compliment to ATD testing, numerical simulation provides efficient means to assess vehicle safety throughout the design process and further improve the

  3. Suitport Feasibility - Development and Test of a Suitport and Space Suit for Human Pressurized Space Suit Donning Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert M.; Mitchell, Kathryn; Allton, Charles; Ju, Hsing

    2011-01-01

    The suitport concept has been recently implemented as part of the small pressurized lunar rover (Currently the Space Exploration vehicle, or SEV) and the Multi-Mission Space Exploration Vehicle (MMSEV) concept demonstrator vehicle. Suitport replaces or augments the traditional airlock function of a spacecraft by providing a bulkhead opening, capture mechanism, and sealing system to allow ingress and egress of a spacesuit while the spacesuit remains outside of the pressurized volume of the spacecraft. This presents significant new opportunities to EVA exploration in both microgravity and surface environments. The suitport concept will enable three main improvements in EVA by providing reductions in: pre-EVA time from hours to less than thirty minutes; airlock consumables; contamination returned to the cabin with the EVA crewmember. To date, the first generation suitport has been tested with mockup suits on the rover cabins and pressurized on a bench top engineering unit. The work on the rover cabin has helped define the operational concepts and timelines, and has demonstrated the potential of suitport to save significant amounts of crew time before and after EVAs. The work with the engineering unit has successfully demonstrated the pressurizable seal concept including the ability to seal after the introduction and removal of contamination to the sealing surfaces. Using this experience, a second generation suitport was designed. This second generation suitport has been tested with a spacesuit prototype using the pressure differentials of the spacecraft. This test will be performed using the JSC B32 Chamber B, a human rated vacuum chamber. This test will include human rated suitports, the suitport compatible prototype suit, and chamber modifications. This test will bring these three elements together in the first ever pressurized donning of a rear entry suit through a suitport. This paper presents design of a human rated second generation suitport, modifications to

  4. Head excursion of restrained human volunteers and hybrid III dummies in steady state rollover tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffatt, Edward; Hare, Barry; Hughes, Raymond; Lewis, Lance; Iiyama, Hiroshi; Curzon, Anne; Cooper, Eddie

    2003-01-01

    Seatbelts provide substantial benefits in rollover crashes, yet occupants still receive head and neck injuries from contacting the vehicle roof interior when the roof exterior strikes the ground. Prior research has evaluated rollover restraint performance utilizing anthropomorphic test devices (dummies), but little dynamic testing has been done with human volunteers to learn how they move during rollovers. In this study, the vertical excursion of the head of restrained dummies and human subjects was measured in a vehicle being rotated about its longitudinal roll axis at roll rates from 180-to-360 deg/sec and under static inversion conditions. The vehicle's restraint design was the commonly used 3-point seatbelt with continuous loop webbing and a sliding latch plate. This paper presents an analysis of the observed occupant motion and provides a comparison of dummy and human motion under similar test conditions. Thirty-five tests (eighteen static and seventeen dynamic) were completed using two different sizes of dummies and human subjects in both near and far-side roll directions. The research indicates that far-side rollovers cause the restrained test subjects to have greater head excursion than near-side rollovers, and that static inversion testing underestimates head excursion for far-side occupants. Human vertical head excursion of up to 200 mm was found at a roll rate of 220 deg/sec. Humans exhibit greater variability in head excursion in comparison to dummies. Transfer of seatbelt webbing through the latch plate did not correlate directly with differences in head excursion.

  5. Complementation of Yeast Genes with Human Genes as an Experimental Platform for Functional Testing of Human Genetic Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Akil; Tammpere, Erik; Kofoed, Megan; Keong, Christelle; Chiang, Jennifer; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Hieter, Philip

    2015-11-01

    While the pace of discovery of human genetic variants in tumors, patients, and diverse populations has rapidly accelerated, deciphering their functional consequence has become rate-limiting. Using cross-species complementation, model organisms like the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, can be utilized to fill this gap and serve as a platform for testing human genetic variants. To this end, we performed two parallel screens, a one-to-one complementation screen for essential yeast genes implicated in chromosome instability and a pool-to-pool screen that queried all possible essential yeast genes for rescue of lethality by all possible human homologs. Our work identified 65 human cDNAs that can replace the null allele of essential yeast genes, including the nonorthologous pair yRFT1/hSEC61A1. We chose four human cDNAs (hLIG1, hSSRP1, hPPP1CA, and hPPP1CC) for which their yeast gene counterparts function in chromosome stability and assayed in yeast 35 tumor-specific missense mutations for growth defects and sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. This resulted in a set of human-yeast gene complementation pairs that allow human genetic variants to be readily characterized in yeast, and a prioritized list of somatic mutations that could contribute to chromosome instability in human tumors. These data establish the utility of this cross-species experimental approach. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  6. Innovative Test Operations to Support Orion and Future Human Rated Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, William J.; Garcia, Rafael; Harris, Richard F.; See, Michael J.; Van Lear, Benjamin S.; Dobson, Jill M.; Norris, Scott Douglas

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes how the Orion program is implementing new and innovative test approaches and strategies in an evolving development environment. The early flight test spacecraft are evolving in design maturity and complexity requiring significant changes in the ground test operations for each mission. The testing approach for EM-2 is planned to validate innovative Orion production acceptance testing methods to support human exploration missions in the future. Manufacturing and testing at Kennedy Space Center in the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout facility will provide a seamless transition directly to the launch site avoiding transportation and checkout of the spacecraft from other locations.

  7. Aflatoxins in Iran: Nature, Hazards and Carcinogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DD Farhud

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have shown that mycotoxin contamination of agricultural products is a challenge for individual's health espe­cially in developing countries. Improper production and storage of foods, prepare conditions for aflatoxin production in crops, especially rice, wheat, pistachio, walnut, almond, etc which are the main sources of foods for people. Feeding live­stock by contaminated bread is another way of human exposure to mycotoxins, especially aflatoxin and because of expen­sive methods for detecting and analyzing aflatoxin in laboratory; it is not measured in foods. This manuscript is a review of some Iranian and nonIranian reports about aflatoxin, its exposure ways, its adverse effect on human health and nutrition, as well as methods for reducing its exposure. Based on studies on foods, aflatoxin exposure is high in Iran. Since livestock feeding by contaminated bread is one of the potential ways for milk contamination, we should control and reduce aflatoxin contamination by improving production process, storage condition and livestock feeding as soon as possible. Pistachio is one of the most important exporting products of Iran and to maintain Iran's position in exporting of this product, specific regulations on lowering its contamination with aflatoxin should be considered seriously. Finally, effective controlling of all food and feedstuffs which are vulnerable to aflatoxin contamination is necessary to prevent its effects.

  8. Carcinogenicity and mechanistic insights on the behavior of epoxides and epoxide-forming chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnick, Ronald L

    2002-12-01

    Many epoxides and their precursors are high production volume chemicals that have major uses in the polymer industry and as intermediates in the manufacture of other chemicals. Several of these chemicals were demonstrated to be carcinogenic in laboratory animal studies conducted by the Ramazzini Foundation (e.g., vinyl chloride, acrylonitrile, styrene, styrene oxide, and benzene) and by the National Toxicology Program (e.g., ethylene oxide, 1,3-butadiene, isoprene, chloroprene, acrylonitrile, glycidol, and benzene). The most common sites of tumor induction were lung, liver, harderian gland, and circulatory system in mice; Zymbal's gland and brain in rats; and mammary gland and forestomach in both species. Differences in cancer outcome among studies of epoxide chemicals may be related to differences in study design (e.g., dose, duration, and route of exposure; observation period; animal strains), as well as biological factors affecting target organ dosimetry of the DNA-reactive epoxide (toxicokinetics) and tissue response (toxicodynamics). N7-Alkylguanine, N1-alkyladenine, and cyclic etheno adducts, as well as K-ras and p53 mutations, have been detected in animals and/or workers exposed to several of these chemicals. The classifications of these chemical carcinogens by IARC and NTP are based on animal and human data and results of mechanistic studies. Reducing occupational and environmental exposures to these chemicals will certainly reduce human cancer risks.

  9. Evaluation of carcinogenic hazard of diesel engine exhaust needs to consider revolutionary changes in diesel technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, Roger O; Hesterberg, Thomas W; Wall, John C

    2012-07-01

    Diesel engines, a special type of internal combustion engine, use heat of compression, rather than electric spark, to ignite hydrocarbon fuels injected into the combustion chamber. Diesel engines have high thermal efficiency and thus, high fuel efficiency. They are widely used in commerce prompting continuous improvement in diesel engines and fuels. Concern for health effects from exposure to diesel exhaust arose in the mid-1900s and stimulated development of emissions regulations and research to improve the technology and characterize potential health hazards. This included epidemiological, controlled human exposure, laboratory animal and mechanistic studies to evaluate potential hazards of whole diesel exhaust. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (1989) classified whole diesel exhaust as - "probably carcinogenic to humans". This classification stimulated even more stringent regulations for particulate matter that required further technological developments. These included improved engine control, improved fuel injection system, enhanced exhaust cooling, use of ultra low sulfur fuel, wall-flow high-efficiency exhaust particulate filters, exhaust catalysts, and crankcase ventilation filtration. The composition of New Technology Diesel Exhaust (NTDE) is qualitatively different and the concentrations of particulate constituents are more than 90% lower than for Traditional Diesel Exhaust (TDE). We recommend that future reviews of carcinogenic hazards of diesel exhaust evaluate NTDE separately from TDE.

  10. Application of complementary DNA microarray technology to carcinogen identification, toxicology, and drug safety evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshari, C A; Nuwaysir, E F; Barrett, J C

    1999-10-01

    One major challenge facing today's cancer researchers and toxicologists is the development of new approaches for the identification of carcinogens and other environmental hazards. Here, we describe the potential impact of emerging technologies for measuring gene expression profiles on carcinogen identification and on the general field of toxicology. An example of one of these technologies is the use of cDNA microarray chips. We provide an overview to the key questions that are confronting investigators charged with determining the relative safety of natural or synthetic chemicals to which humans are exposed, followed by a discussion of how cDNA microarray technology may be applied to these questions. Gene chip technology is still a relatively new technology, and only a handful of studies have demonstrated its utility. However, as the technical hurdles to development are passed, the use of this methodology in addressing the questions raised here will be critical to increase the sensitivity of detection of the potential toxic effects of environmental chemicals and to understand their risks to humans.

  11. Enhancement of DNA repair capacity of mammalian cells by carcinogen treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Protic, M.; Roilides, E.; Levine, A.S.; Dixon, K.

    1988-07-01

    To determine whether DNA excision repair is enhanced in mammalian cells in response to DNA damage, as it is in bacteria as part of the SOS response, we used an expression vector-host cell reactivation assay to measure cellular DNA repair capacity. When UV-damaged chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) vector DNA was introduced into monkey cells (CV-1), the level of CAT activity was inversely related to the UV fluence due to inhibition of CAT gene expression by UV photoproducts. When CV-1 cells were treated with either UV radiation or mitomycin C, 24-48 h before transfection, CAT expression from the UV-irradiated plasmid was increased. This increase also occurred in a line of normal human cells, but not in repair-deficient human xeroderma pigmentosum cells. We confirmed that this increase in CAT expression was due to repair, and not to production of damage-free templates by recombination; the frequency of generation of supF+ recombinants after transfection with UV-irradiated pZ189 vectors carrying different point mutations in the supF gene did not significantly increase in carcinogen-treated CV-1 cells. From these results we conclude that carcinogen treatment enhances the excision-repair capacity of normal mammalian cells.

  12. Gaps in scientific knowledge about the carcinogenic potential of asphalt/bitumen fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Paul A

    2007-01-01

    Despite a relatively large body of published research, the potential carcinogenicity of asphalt/bitumen fumes is still a vexing question. Various uncertainties and gaps in scientific knowledge need to be addressed. These include uncertainties in chemistry, animal studies, and human studies. The chemistry of asphalt/bitumen fumes is complex and varies according to the source of the crude oil and the application parameters. The epidemiological studies, while showing weak evidence of lung cancer, are inconsistent and many confounding factors have not been addressed. Studies of animal exposure are also inconsistent regarding laboratory and field-generated fumes. There is a need for further human studies that address potential confounding factors such as smoking, diet, coal tar, and diesel exposures. Animal inhalation studies need to be conducted with asphalt/bitumen fumes that are chemically representative of roofing and paving fumes. Underlying all of this is the need for continued characterization of fumes so their use in animal and field studies can be properly assessed. Nonetheless, uncertainties such as these should not preclude appropriate public health actions to protect workers in the even that asphalt fumes are found to be a carcinogenic hazard.

  13. Molecular basis for effects of carcinogenic heavy metals on inducible gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, J W; Kaltreider, R C; Bajenova, O V; Ihnat, M A; McCaffrey, J; Turpie, B W; Rowell, E E; Oh, J; Nemeth, M J; Pesce, C A; Lariviere, J P

    1998-08-01

    Certain forms of the heavy metals arsenic and chromium are considered human carcinogens, although they are believed to act through very different mechanisms. Chromium(VI) is believed to act as a classic and mutagenic agent, and DNA/chromatin appears to be the principal target for its effects. In contrast, arsenic(III) is considered nongenotoxic, but is able to target specific cellular proteins, principally through sulfhydryl interactions. We had previously shown that various genotoxic chemical carcinogens, including chromium (VI), preferentially altered expression of several inducible genes but had little or no effect on constitutive gene expression. We were therefore interested in whether these carcinogenic heavy metals might target specific but distinct sites within cells, leading to alterations in gene expression that might contribute to the carcinogenic process. Arsenic(III) and chromium(VI) each significantly altered both basal and hormone-inducible expression of a model inducible gene, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), at nonovertly toxic doses in the chick embryo in vivo and rat hepatoma H411E cells in culture. We have recently developed two parallel cell culture approaches for examining the molecular basis for these effects. First, we are examining the effects of heavy metals on expression and activation of specific transcription factors known to be involved in regulation of susceptible inducible genes, and have recently observed significant but different effects of arsenic(III) and chromium(VI) on nuclear transcription factor binding. Second, we have developed cell lines with stably integrated PEPCK promoter-luciferase reporter gene constructs to examine effects of heavy metals on promoter function, and have also recently seen profound effects induced by both chromium(VI) and arsenic(III) in this system. These model systems should enable us to be able to identify the critical cis (DNA) and trans (protein) cellular targets of heavy metal exposure

  14. JaCVAM-organized international validation study of the in vivo rodent alkaline comet assay for detection of genotoxic carcinogens: II. Summary of definitive validation study results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Yoshifumi; Kojima, Hajime; Omori, Takashi; Corvi, Raffaella; Honma, Masamistu; Schechtman, Leonard M; Tice, Raymond R; Beevers, Carol; De Boeck, Marlies; Burlinson, Brian; Hobbs, Cheryl A; Kitamoto, Sachiko; Kraynak, Andrew R; McNamee, James; Nakagawa, Yuzuki; Pant, Kamala; Plappert-Helbig, Ulla; Priestley, Catherine; Takasawa, Hironao; Wada, Kunio; Wirnitzer, Uta; Asano, Norihide; Escobar, Patricia A; Lovell, David; Morita, Takeshi; Nakajima, Madoka; Ohno, Yasuo; Hayashi, Makoto

    2015-07-01

    The in vivo rodent alkaline comet assay (comet assay) is used internationally to investigate the in vivo genotoxic potential of test chemicals. This assay, however, has not previously been formally validated. The Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM), with the cooperation of the U.S. NTP Interagency Center for the Evaluation of Alternative Toxicological Methods (NICEATM)/the Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM), the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM), and the Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society/Mammalian Mutagenesis Study Group (JEMS/MMS), organized an international validation study to evaluate the reliability and relevance of the assay for identifying genotoxic carcinogens, using liver and stomach as target organs. The ultimate goal of this exercise was to establish an Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) test guideline. The study protocol was optimized in the pre-validation studies, and then the definitive (4th phase) validation study was conducted in two steps. In the 1st step, assay reproducibility was confirmed among laboratories using four coded reference chemicals and the positive control ethyl methanesulfonate. In the 2nd step, the predictive capability was investigated using 40 coded chemicals with known genotoxic and carcinogenic activity (i.e., genotoxic carcinogens, genotoxic non-carcinogens, non-genotoxic carcinogens, and non-genotoxic non-carcinogens). Based on the results obtained, the in vivo comet assay is concluded to be highly capable of identifying genotoxic chemicals and therefore can serve as a reliable predictor of rodent carcinogenicity.

  15. An international network (PlaNet) to evaluate a human placental testing platform for chemicals safety testing in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownbill, Paul; Chernyavsky, Igor; Bottalico, Barbara; Desoye, Gernot; Hansson, Stefan; Kenna, Gerry; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Markert, Udo R; Powles-Glover, Nicola; Schneider, Henning; Leach, Lopa

    2016-09-01

    The human placenta is a critical life-support system that nourishes and protects a rapidly growing fetus; a unique organ, species specific in structure and function. We consider the pressing challenge of providing additional advice on the safety of prescription medicines and environmental exposures in pregnancy and how ex vivo and in vitro human placental models might be advanced to reproducible human placental test systems (HPTSs), refining a weight of evidence to the guidance given around compound risk assessment during pregnancy. The placental pharmacokinetics of xenobiotic transfer, dysregulated placental function in pregnancy-related pathologies and influx/efflux transporter polymorphisms are a few caveats that could be addressed by HPTSs, not the specific focus of current mammalian reproductive toxicology systems. An international consortium, "PlaNet", will bridge academia, industry and regulators to consider screen ability and standardisation issues surrounding these models, with proven reproducibility for introduction into industrial and clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Assessment of the mutagenic, recombinagenic and carcinogenic potential of orlistat in somatic cells of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsolin, P C; Silva-Oliveira, R G; Nepomuceno, J C

    2012-08-01

    In this study the mutagenic, recombinagenic, carcinogenic and anticarcinogenic potential of orlistat was assessed using the somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) and the epithelial tumor detection test (wts). The experiments were conducted on Drosophila melanogaster. In the assessment using SMART, larvae, descendants from the standard (ST) cross and the high bioactivation (HB) cross, were treated chronically with three orlistat concentrations. The results revealed a recombinagenic effect, associated with orlistat, in the descendants of the HB cross, at all three levels of concentration. Homologous recombination can function as a determinant at different stages of carcinogenesis. For verification, larvae from the wts test, descendants of the wts/TM3 virgin female and mwh/mwh male cross, were treated with the same three orlistat concentrations separately and in association with mitomicin C (0.1mM). The results did not, however, provide evidence that orlistat has carcinogenic potential nor was it associated with the reduction of tumors induced by mitomicin C in D. melanogaster.

  17. Additive SMILES-Based Carcinogenicity Models: Probabilistic Principles in the Search for Robust Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropov, Andrey A.; Toropova, Alla P.; Benfenati, Emilio

    2009-01-01

    Optimal descriptors calculated with the simplified molecular input line entry system (SMILES) have been utilized in modeling of carcinogenicity as continuous values (logTD50). These descriptors can be calculated using correlation weights of SMILES attributes calculated by the Monte Carlo method. A considerable subset of these attributes includes rare attributes. The use of these rare attributes can lead to overtraining. One can avoid the influence of the rare attributes if their correlation weights are fixed to zero. A function, limS, has been defined to identify rare attributes. The limS defines the minimum number of occurrences in the set of structures of the training (subtraining) set, to accept attributes as usable. If an attribute is present less than limS, it is considered “rare”, and thus not used. Two systems of building up models were examined: 1. classic training-test system; 2. balance of correlations for the subtraining and calibration sets (together, they are the original training set: the function of the calibration set is imitation of a preliminary test set). Three random splits into subtraining, calibration, and test sets were analysed. Comparison of abovementioned systems has shown that balance of correlations gives more robust prediction of the carcinogenicity for all three splits (split 1: rtest2=0.7514, stest=0.684; split 2: rtest2=0.7998, stest=0.600; split 3: rtest2=0.7192, stest=0.728). PMID:19742127

  18. Additive SMILES-Based Carcinogenicity Models: Probabilistic Principles in the Search for Robust Predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Benfenati

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Optimal descriptors calculated with the simplified molecular input line entry system (SMILES have been utilized in modeling of carcinogenicity as continuous values (logTD50. These descriptors can be calculated using correlation weights of SMILES attributes calculated by the Monte Carlo method. A considerable subset of these attributes includes rare attributes. The use of these rare attributes can lead to overtraining. One can avoid the influence of the rare attributes if their correlation weights are fixed to zero. A function, limS, has been defined to identify rare attributes. The limS defines the minimum number of occurrences in the set of structures of the training (subtraining set, to accept attributes as usable. If an attribute is present less than limS, it is considered “rare”, and thus not used. Two systems of building up models were examined: 1. classic training-test system; 2. balance of correlations for the subtraining and calibration sets (together, they are the original training set: the function of the calibration set is imitation of a preliminary test set. Three random splits into subtraining, calibration, and test sets were analysed. Comparison of abovementioned systems has shown that balance of correlations gives more robust prediction of the carcinogenicity for all three splits (split 1: rtest2=0.7514, stest=0.684; split 2: rtest2=0.7998, stest=0.600; split 3: rtest2=0.7192, stest=0.728.

  19. The OSIRIS Weight of Evidence approach: ITS mutagenicity and ITS carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buist, Harrie; Aldenberg, Tom; Batke, Monika; Escher, Sylvia; Klein Entink, Rinke; Kühne, Ralph; Marquart, Hans; Pauné, Eduard; Rorije, Emiel; Schüürmann, Gerrit; Kroese, Dinant

    2013-11-01

    Risk assessment of chemicals usually implies data evaluation of in vivo tests in rodents to conclude on their hazards. The FP7 European project OSIRIS has developed integrated testing strategies (ITS) for relevant toxicological endpoints to avoid unnecessary animal testing and thus to reduce time and costs. This paper describes the implementation of ITS mutagenicity and carcinogenicity in the public OSIRIS webtool. The data requirements of REACH formed the basis for these ITS. The main goal was to implement procedures to reach a conclusion on the adequacy and validity of available data. For the mutagenicity ITS a quantitative Weight of Evidence approach based on Bayesian statistics was developed and implemented. The approach allows an overall quality assessment of all available data for the five types of mutagenicity data requirements: in vitro bacterial mutagenicity, in vitro and in vivo chromosome aberration, in vitro and in vivo mammalian mutagenicity. For the carcinogenicity ITS a tool was developed to evaluate the quality of studies not conforming (entirely) to guidelines. In a tiered approach three quality aspects are assessed: documentation (reliability), study design (adequacy) and scope of examination (validity). The quality assessment is based on expert and data driven quantitative Weight of Evidence.

  20. Aroclor 1254 increases the genotoxicity of several carcinogens to liver primary cell cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza-Figueroa, T.; Lopez-Revilla, R.; Villa-Trevino, S.

    1985-01-01

    The genotoxicity of both direct-acting and precarcinogenic chemicals was evaluated in liver primary cell cultures (LPCC) from untreated and Aroclor 1254 (Ar) pretreated rats. Hepatocytes were isolated from partially hepatectomized rats and their DNA was labeled in vitro with (/sup 3/H) dThd; the molecular weight of single-stranded DNA was determined by alkaline sucrose sedimentation. Two parameters of DNA damage were defined: 1) the mean effective dose (ED50), i.e., the carcinogen concentration that decreased the DNA molecular weight to half the original, and 2) the DNA breaking potency (DBP), i.e., the number of breaks per DNA molecule produced by 2 h exposure to 1mM concentration of the chemical. Two hours exposure of LPCC from untreated rats to the direct-acting alkylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) (6.8-340..mu..M) and to the precarcinogens benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) (0.05-0.33 mM) and dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) (0.45-16 mM) produced a concentration-dependent decrease in the molecular weight of DNA. Pretreatment of rats with Ar decreased significantly the sedimentation velocity of DNA and increased five, three, and two times the DBP of MNNG, BaP, and DMN, respectively. These results show that Ar-pretreatment of rats increases the genotoxicity of both direct-acting and precarcinogenic chemicals and suggest that Ar might increase the genotoxicity of chemical carcinogens perhaps by enhancing their metabolic activation, by producing direct genotoxic effects, or both. Our results also emphasize the carcinogenic risk that the environmental pollution by polychlorinated biphenyls might represent to humans.

  1. Aroclor 1254 increases the genotoxicity of several carcinogens to liver primary cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Figueroa, T; López-Revilla, R; Villa-Treviño, S

    1985-01-01

    The genotoxicity of both direct-acting and precarcinogenic chemicals was evaluated in liver primary cell cultures (LPCC) from untreated and Aroclor 1254 (Ar) pretreated rats. Hepatocytes were isolated from partially hepatectomized rats and their DNA was labeled in vitro with [3H] dThd; the molecular weight of single-stranded DNA was determined by alkaline sucrose sedimentation. Two parameters of DNA damage were defined: the mean effective dose (ED50), i.e., the carcinogen concentration that decreased the DNA molecular weight to half the original, and the DNA breaking potency (DBP), i.e., the number of breaks per DNA molecule produced by 2 h exposure to 1 mM concentration of the chemical. Two hours exposure of LPCC from untreated rats to the direct-acting alkylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) (6.8-340 microM) and to the precarcinogens benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) (0.05-0.33 mM) and dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) (0.45-16 mM) produced a concentration-dependent decrease in the molecular weight of DNA. Pretreatment of rats with Ar decreased significantly the sedimentation velocity of DNA and increased five, three, and two times the DBP of MNNG, BaP, and DMN, respectively. These results show that Ar-pretreatment of rats increases the genotoxicity of both direct-acting and precarcinogenic chemicals and suggest that Ar might increase the genotoxicity of chemical carcinogens perhaps by enhancing their metabolic activation, by producing direct genotoxic effects, or both. Our results also emphasize the carcinogenic risk that the environmental pollution by polychlorinated biphenyls might represent to humans.

  2. Hamster exhibits major differences in organ-specific metabolism of the esophageal carcinogen N-nitrosodiethylamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visoni, Sílvia; Lang, Matti; Ribeiro Pinto, Luis Felipe

    2008-12-15

    Nitrosamines are carcinogens that require metabolic activation by CYP enzymes in order to exert their carcinogenic effect. Species differences exist in their esophageal carcinogenic potency, with the rat being the most sensitive and the Syrian hamster a resistant species. In the latter, the liver is the main target organ. This difference does not apply to directly acting N-nitroso compounds, suggesting that tissue-specific metabolic activation is involved in hamster esophageal resistance to nitrosamines. We have previously shown that Cytochrome P450 2A3 (CYP2A3) is responsible for N-nitrosodiethylamine activation in the rat esophagus. In order to find a mechanistic explanation for the resistance of hamster esophagus for nitrosamines, we have compared the metabolism of NDEA between esophagus and liver of the hamster. Hamster esophagus is capable of activating NDEA (K(m)=1.02+/-0.44microM and V(max)=1.96+/-0.26nmol acetaldehyde/min/mg microsomal protein). However, the hamster liver showed a 40-fold higher catalytic efficiency (V(max)/K(m)) towards NDEA metabolism compared with its esophagus. Hamster esophagus expresses CYP2A8, CYP2A9 and CYP2A16, but not CYP2E1. An antibody against human CYP2A6 was able to inhibit NDEA metabolism in hamster esophageal, but not liver microsomes. Our results suggest that in the hamster esophagus, but not in the liver, most of the NDEA is metabolized by CYP2A enzymes, but with a rather poor efficiency when compared to the liver. This is in accordance with previous results showing that for the hamster, the main target organ of NDEA is the liver.

  3. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing and False Disclosures in Heterosexual College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marelich, William D.; Clark, Tonya

    2004-01-01

    The authors assessed factors that motivate individuals to report negative human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody test results, although they had never been tested. In particular, they investigated sexual intimacy motives associated with the needs for affiliation, sex, and dominance as contributing factors for faulty disclosures. Participants…

  4. Restriction of human papillomavirus DNA testing in primary cervical screening to women above age 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Njor, Sisse H; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2012-01-01

    Cervical screening with human papillomavirus (HPV) testing is less specific for high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (=CIN3) than cytology. The aim of this systematic review was to determine whether a restriction of HPV testing to women aged at least 30 years would eliminate the problem....

  5. Problem-Solving Test: Analysis of DNA Damage Recognizing Proteins in Yeast and Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2013-01-01

    The experiment described in this test was aimed at identifying DNA repair proteins in human and yeast cells. Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: DNA repair, germline mutation, somatic mutation, inherited disease, cancer, restriction endonuclease, radioactive labeling, [alpha-[superscript 32]P]ATP, [gamma-[superscript…

  6. Genetic Testing and Its Implications: Human Genetics Researchers Grapple with Ethical Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabino, Isaac

    2003-01-01

    Contributes systematic data on the attitudes of scientific experts who engage in human genetics research about the pros, cons, and ethical implications of genetic testing. Finds that they are highly supportive of voluntary testing and the right to know one's genetic heritage. Calls for greater genetic literacy. (Contains 87 references.) (Author/NB)

  7. Problem-Solving Test: Analysis of DNA Damage Recognizing Proteins in Yeast and Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2013-01-01

    The experiment described in this test was aimed at identifying DNA repair proteins in human and yeast cells. Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: DNA repair, germline mutation, somatic mutation, inherited disease, cancer, restriction endonuclease, radioactive labeling, [alpha-[superscript 32]P]ATP, [gamma-[superscript…

  8. Attitudes of medical students towards human genome research and genetic counselling and testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schäfer, Mike Steffen

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The study aimed to describe students' attitudes towards human genome research and towards genetic counselling and testing at cancer patients. The background of this investigation provided the increasing relevance ob human genetics research for clinical practice.Methods: A total of 167 medical students (54% female, aged 24 +/- 2 years from the second phase of their studies were surveyed in obligatory courses at the University of Leipzig, using a standardized questionnaire. Topics of the survey were attitudes towards human genome research and genetic counselling and testing at cancer patients as well as general values and socio-demographic data of the students.Results: The students consider human genome research as relevant and evaluate it positively, mainly based on expectations of medical uses. Genetic counselling and testing at cancer patients as an application of human genetics is also evaluated as important. The students attribute high relevance to clinical procedures for identification of genetic backgrounds for cancer (family history, information about genetic diagnostic. Nevertheless, deficits in their medical education are highlighted und reflected upon: the increased integration of human genetic content into medical curricula is demanded.Discussion: In accordance with the newly formulated „Approbationsordnung für Ärzte", the results suggest that current human genetic development should be more emphasized in medical education. This could be realized by an enlarged ratio of human genetic courses within curricula and by the transformation of these courses from facultative into obligatory.

  9. Inhalation toxicity and carcinogenicity studies of cobalt sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, J R; Hailey, J R; Roycroft, J R; Haseman, J K; Sills, R C; Grumbein, S L; Mellick, P W; Chou, B J

    1999-05-01

    Cobalt sulfate is a water-soluble cobalt salt with a variety of industrial and agricultural uses. Several cobalt compounds have induced sarcomas at injection sites in animals, and reports have suggested that exposure to cobalt-containing materials may cause lung cancer in humans. The present studies were done because no adequate rodent carcinogenicity studies had been performed with a soluble cobalt salt using a route relevant to occupational exposures. Groups of 50 male and 50 female F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice were exposed to aerosols containing 0, 0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 mg/m3 cobalt sulfate hexahydrate, 6 h/day, 5 days/week, for 104 weeks. Survival and body weights of exposed rats and mice were generally unaffected by the exposures. In rats, proteinosis, alveolar epithelial metaplasia, granulomatous alveolar inflammation, and interstitial fibrosis were observed in the lung in all exposed groups. Nonneoplastic lesions of the nose and larynx were also attributed to exposure to all concentrations of cobalt sulfate. In 3.0 mg/m3 male rats and in female rats exposed to 1.0 or 3.0 mg/m3, the incidences of alveolar/bronchiolar neoplasms were increased over those in the control groups. Lung tumors occurred with significant positive trends in both sexes. The incidences of adrenal pheochromocytoma in 1.0 mg/m3 male rats and in 3.0 mg/m3 female rats were increased. Nonneoplastic lesions of the respiratory tract were less severe in mice than in rats. In mice, alveolar/bronchiolar neoplasms in 3.0 mg/m3 males and females were greater than those in the controls, and lung tumors occurred with significantly positive trends. Male mice had liver lesions consistent with a Helicobacter hepaticus infection. Incidences of liver hemangiosarcomas were increased in exposed groups of male mice; however, because of the infection, no conclusion could be reached concerning an association between liver hemangiosarcomas and cobalt sulfate. In summary, exposure to cobalt sulfate by inhalation

  10. Testing and Results of Human Metabolic Simulation Utilizing Ultrasonic Nebulizer Technology for Water Vapor Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbe, Matthew; Curley, Su

    2010-01-01

    Life support technology must be evaluated thoroughly before ever being implemented into a functioning design. A major concern during that evaluation is safety. The ability to mimic human metabolic loads allows test engineers to evaluate the effectiveness of new technologies without risking injury to any actual humans. The main function of most life support technologies is the removal of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) vapor. As such any good human metabolic simulator (HMS) will mimic the human body s ability to produce these items. Introducing CO2 into a test chamber is a very straightforward process with few unknowns so the focus of this particular new HMS design was on the much more complicated process of introducing known quantities of H2O vapor on command. Past iterations of the HMS have utilized steam which is very hard to keep in vapor phase while transporting and injecting into a test chamber. Also steam adds large quantities of heat to any test chamber, well beyond what an actual human does. For the new HMS an alternative approach to water vapor generation was designed utilizing ultrasonic nebulizers as a method for creating water vapor. Ultrasonic technology allows water to be vibrated into extremely tiny pieces (2-5 microns) and evaporate without requiring additional heating. Doing this process inside the test chamber itself allows H2O vapor generation without the unwanted heat and the challenging process of transporting water vapor. This paper presents the design details as well as results of all initial and final acceptance system testing. Testing of the system was performed at a range of known human metabolic rates in both sea-level and reduced pressure environments. This multitude of test points fully defines the systems capabilities as they relate to actual environmental systems testing.

  11. Freeze-drying as a preserving preparation technique for in vitro testing of human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, Lutz; Vidlářová, Lucie; Kostka, Karl-Heinz; Schaefer, Ulrich F; Windbergs, Maike

    2013-01-01

    In vitro testing of drugs with excised human skin is a valuable prerequisite for clinical studies. However, the analysis of excised human skin presents several obstacles. Ongoing drug diffusion, microbial growth and changes in hydration state influence the results of drug penetration studies. In this work, we evaluate freeze-drying as a preserving preparation method for skin samples to overcome these obstacles. We analyse excised human skin before and after freeze-drying and compare these results with human skin in vivo. Based on comprehensive thermal and spectroscopic analysis, we demonstrate comparability to in vivo conditions and exclude significant changes within the skin samples due to freeze-drying. Furthermore, we show that freeze-drying after skin incubation with drugs prevents growth of drug crystals on the skin surface due to drying effects. In conclusion, we introduce freeze-drying as a preserving preparation technique for in vitro testing of human skin.

  12. Characterization of the toxicity, mutagenicity, and carcinogenicity of methacrylonitrile in F344 Rats and B6C3F1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyska, Abraham; Ghanayem, Burhan I

    2003-04-01

    Methacrylonitrile is an unsaturated aliphatic nitrile. It is widely used in the preparation of homopolymers and copolymers, elastomers, and plastics, and as a chemical intermediate in the preparation of acids, amides, amines, esters, and other nitriles. Methacrylonitrile was nominated for study by the National Cancer Institute (USA) because of the potential for human exposure, structural similarity to the known carcinogen acrylonitrile, and a lack of toxicity and carcinogenicity data. Doses selected for the 2-year study were based on the results of the 13-week gavage studies. Groups of 50 male and 50 female animals were exposed by gavage to 0, 3, 10, or 30 mg/kg in F344 rats, and 0, 1.5, 3 or 6 mg/kg in B6C3F1 mice, 5 days per week for 2 years. Urinary excretion of N-acetyl- S-(2-cyanopropyl)- l-cysteine (NACPC) and N-acetyl- S-(2-hydroxypropyl)- l-cysteine (NAHPC) were measured as markers of exposure at various time points after methacrylonitrile administration, and demonstrated that exposure of animals to methacrylonitrile occurred as intended. Urinary excretion of NACPC and NAHPC increased in rats and mice in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast to observations in rats, the ratios of NACPC/creatinine were generally higher in female than in male mice. Further, the ratios of NAHPC/creatinine in rats were significantly greater at all time points and all doses than the corresponding ratios of NACPC/creatinine in male and female mice. In both rats and mice, survival was not affected by treatment. In rats, mean body weights of the 30 mg/kg groups were less than those of the vehicle controls after weeks 21 and 37 for males and females, respectively. No treatment-related effect on body weight was seen in mice. There were no neoplasms (in either species) or non-neoplastic lesions (mice only) that were attributed to methacrylonitrile administration. In rats, the incidences of olfactory epithelial atrophy and metaplasia of the nose were significantly greater in 30 mg

  13. Investigations on the carcinogenic burden by air pollution in man. XIII. Assessment of the contribution of passenger cars to air pollution by carcinogenic polycylic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimmer, G; Hildebrandt, A

    1975-10-01

    A total of 100 passenger cars were tested with regard to the amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) emitted during the EUROPA-Test (E.-Test, simulate city driving; 4 times 195 s). As determined by frequency of registration, the 20 most common car models were chosen. Each model was represented by 5 cars. The total amount of selected 14 PAH emitted by all test vehicles during an E.-test is in the range of 1-16 mg. As can be seen from the average of fuel consumption (409.4 g/E.-test) and benzo(a)pyrene emission (41.6 mug/E.-test), 1000 kg of burned fuel yield 101 mg of benzo(a)pyrene. Based on the consumption of gasoline in 1973 in West Germany (18508200 tons), an annual amount of 1.85 tons of benzo(a)pyrene is produced by gas engine vehicles. However, the biological effect of the automobile exhaust is still larger because it contains additional carcinogenic PAH. - A statistical evaluation of the results shows that different car models can not be distinguish by their PAH emission. When evaluating individual vehicles after 5 repeated E.-tests, the margin of error for any single PAH is between 6.3-10.9% (variation coefficient) for this car. A larger margin of error is obtained by pooling 5 different vehicles of the same model.

  14. An analysis of the Gene-Tox Carcinogen Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesnow, S; Bergman, H

    1988-01-01

    The Gene-Tox Carcinogen Data Base is an evaluated source of cancer data on 506 chemicals selected in part for their previous assessment in genetic toxicology bioassays. This data base has been analyzed for the distribution of these chemicals into chemical classes. The major chemical classes (6% or greater of the total data base) are: acyl-, alkyl-, and aryl-halides; alcohols and phenols; aliphatic and aromatic amines, amides, and sulfonamides; benzene-ring-containing chemicals; organo-lead, -mercury, -phosphorous compounds, metals and derivatives, phosphoric acid esters, and phosphoramides; and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Cancer studies representing a subset of the Gene-Tox Carcinogen Data Base, 199 chemicals which were rated as Sufficient Positive/Negative or Limited Positive/Negative, were examined for distribution of those studies by animal species, gender, route of chemical administration, duration of study, major tumor sites, and major tumor types. These analyses revealed that the Gene-Tox Carcinogen Data Base contains a large number of lifetime studies involving the rat and mouse treated by oral routes of administration. The major organs that were targets were: liver, lung, skin, forestomach, bladder, and mammary gland, while the major tumor types were: carcinoma, sarcoma, papilloma, and adenoma. Chemicals in the data base have been assessed for species-specific carcinogenic effects, and these results indicate that for mice and rats there is a high correspondence (85%). This number is higher than that (71%) reported by Tennant et al. (1986) based on the recent results of 72 chronic cancer bioassays performed by the National Toxicology Program. This difference is probably based on the nature of the chemicals selected for inclusion in both data bases. Although the absolute value of this correspondence is unknown, it would seem to be within this range. When chemicals in the Gene-Tox Carcinogen Data Base were examined for their previous evaluation in 73

  15. Diagnostic Efficacy of Modified Coagglutination Test in the Diagnosis of Human Brucellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohite S.T

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laboratory help is must for thediagnosis of human brucellosis due to proteanclinical manifestations. As culture is hazardous,time consuming and less sensitive, serologicaltests are preferred for the diagnosis. Aggluti-nation tests like Rose Bengal PlateTest (RBPT, Serum Agglutination tests (SAT,2-Mercaptoethanol test (2-ME that are com-monly employed for the diagnosis either lacksensitivity or specificity. Coombs test andBrucellacapt though are sensitive and specific,workout costly. Therefore, modifiedcoagglutination test was developed and its di-agnostic efficacy was evaluated. Aims and Ob-jectives: To develop modified coagglutinationtest for the diagnosis of human brucellosis andcompare it with Coombs test. Materials andMethods: Serum samples collected from 191brucellosis patients and 100 controls were sub-jected to 2-ME, Coombs test and modifiedcoagglutination test (MCOAG. Blood culturewas performed by Castaneda’s method in all thepatients. Results: Significant difference in thepositivity rate was seen between MCOAG and2-ME. The results of MCOAG were compa-rable with Coombs test. Conclusions: Modi-fied coagglutination test is a better option toCoombs test for the serodiagnosis of brucel-losis in resource constrained countries as it issensitive, specific and cost effective.

  16. PROPOSED PROCEDURE FOR DERIVATION OF REGULATORY VALUES FOR CARCINOGENIC AIRBORNE POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS (PAHS) BASED ON COAL TAR PITCH (CTP) VOLATILES

    Science.gov (United States)

    A procedure for estimating upper bound lifetime human cancer risk from air levels of 6 common carcinogenic PAHs, termed "PAHs of concern", is proposed. These PAHs are benzo(a)pyrene, benz(a)anathracene, benzo(k)flouranthene, indeno(1,2,3-c,d)pyrene and chrysene. In application,...

  17. PROPOSED PROCEDURE FOR DERIVATION OF REGULATORY VALUES FOR CARCINOGENIC AIRBORNE POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS (PAHS) BASED ON COAL TAR PITCH (CTP) VOLATILES

    Science.gov (United States)

    A procedure for estimating upper bound lifetime human cancer risk from air levels of 6 common carcinogenic PAHs, termed "PAHs of concern", is proposed. These PAHs are benzo(a)pyrene, benz(a)anathracene, benzo(k)flouranthene, indeno(1,2,3-c,d)pyrene and chrysene. In application,...

  18. Biomarkers for Exposure to Ambient Air Pollution - Comparison of Carcinogen-DNA Adduct Levels with Other Exposure Markers and Markers for Oxidative Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autrup, Herman; Daneshvar, Bahram; Dragsted, Lars Ove;

    1999-01-01

    Human exposure to genotoxic compounds present in ambient air has been studied using selected biomarkers in nonsmoking Danish bus drivers and postal workers. A large interindividual variation in biomarker levels was observed. Significantly higher levels of bulky carcinogen-DNA adducts (75.42 adduc...

  19. Toward Perceiving Robots as Humans: Three Handshake Models Face the Turing-Like Handshake Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avraham, G; Nisky, I; Fernandes, H L; Acuna, D E; Kording, K P; Loeb, G E; Karniel, A

    2012-01-01

    In the Turing test a computer model is deemed to "think intelligently" if it can generate answers that are indistinguishable from those of a human. We developed an analogous Turing-like handshake test to determine if a machine can produce similarly indistinguishable movements. The test is administered through a telerobotic system in which an interrogator holds a robotic stylus and interacts with another party - artificial or human with varying levels of noise. The interrogator is asked which party seems to be more human. Here, we compare the human-likeness levels of three different models for handshake: (1) Tit-for-Tat model, (2) λ model, and (3) Machine Learning model. The Tit-for-Tat and the Machine Learning models generated handshakes that were perceived as the most human-like among the three models that were tested. Combining the best aspects of each of the three models into a single robotic handshake algorithm might allow us to advance our understanding of the way the nervous system controls sensorimotor interactions and further improve the human-likeness of robotic handshakes.

  20. A new alternative method for testing skin irritation using a human skin model: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, A; Berthet, A; Hopf, N B; Gilliet, M; Raffoul, W; Vernez, D; Spring, P

    2014-03-01

    Studies assessing skin irritation to chemicals have traditionally used laboratory animals; however, such methods are questionable regarding their relevance for humans. New in vitro methods have been validated, such as the reconstructed human epidermis (RHE) model (Episkin®, Epiderm®). The comparison (accuracy) with in vivo results such as the 4-h human patch test (HPT) is 76% at best (Epiderm®). There is a need to develop an in vitro method that better simulates the anatomo-pathological changes encountered in vivo. To develop an in vitro method to determine skin irritation using human viable skin through histopathology, and compare the results of 4 tested substances to the main in vitro methods and in vivo animal method (Draize test). Human skin removed during surgery was dermatomed and mounted on an in vitro flow-through diffusion cell system. Ten chemicals with known non-irritant (heptylbutyrate, hexylsalicylate, butylmethacrylate, isoproturon, bentazon, DEHP and methylisothiazolinone (MI)) and irritant properties (folpet, 1-bromohexane and methylchloroisothiazolinone (MCI/MI)), a negative control (sodiumchloride) and a positive control (sodiumlaurylsulphate) were applied. The skin was exposed at least for 4h. Histopathology was performed to investigate irritation signs (spongiosis, necrosis, vacuolization). We obtained 100% accuracy with the HPT model; 75% with the RHE models and 50% with the Draize test for 4 tested substances. The coefficients of variation (CV) between our three test batches were test method presented effective results for the tested chemicals. It should be further validated using a greater number of substances; and tested in different laboratories in order to suitably evaluate reproducibility. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The use of mechanistic data and the handling of scientific uncertainty in carcinogen risk assessments. The trichloroethylene example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudén, Christina

    2002-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore how risk assessors actually use mechanistic data in carcinogen risk assessment and to discuss how the handling of scientific uncertainty may affect the outcome of the risk assessment. The analysis is performed by comparing 29 trichloroethylene risk assessment documents in general and 2 of these, namely the ECETOC (1994, Trichloroethylene: Assessment of Human Carcinogenic Hazard, Technical Report No. 60) and the OECD/EU (1996, Initial Assessment Report for the 4th SIAM (Screening Information Data Set Initial Assessment Meeting), May 1996: Trichloroethylene, sponsor country, United Kingdom [Draft]), in more detail. It is concluded that in this example the ECETOC required less evidence for considering a carcinogenic mechanism irrelevant to humans than did the OECD/EU risk assessors. There are examples of when two risk assessors have selected different primary data for their argumentation and also examples of how one and the same primary publication was interpreted differently. Biased data selection and evaluation of primary data that correlate to the risk assessor's overall conclusions have also been identified. The general comparison of all 29 TCE risk assessment documents indicates that the assessment of scientific uncertainty in the mechanistic data affects the overall conclusions.

  2. Toxicity and carcinogenicity studies of Ginkgo biloba extract in rat and mouse: liver, thyroid, and nose are targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Cynthia V; Nyska, Abraham; Cora, Michelle C; Kissling, Grace E; Smith, Cynthia; Travlos, Gregory S; Hejtmancik, Milton R; Fomby, Laurene M; Colleton, Curtis A; Ryan, Michael J; Kooistra, Linda; Morrison, James P; Chan, Po C

    2014-07-01

    Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE) is a popular herbal supplement that is used to improve circulation and brain function. In spite of widespread human exposure to relatively high doses over potentially long periods of time, there is a paucity of data from animal studies regarding the toxicity and carcinogenicity associated with GBE. In order to fill this knowledge gap, 3-month and 2-year toxicity and carcinogenicity studies with GBE administered by oral gavage to B6C3F1/N mice and F344/N rats were performed as part of the National Toxicology Program's Dietary Supplements and Herbal Medicines Initiative. The targets of GBE treatment were the liver, thyroid, and nose. These targets were consistent across exposure period, sex, and species, albeit with varying degrees of effect observed among studies. Key findings included a notably high incidence of hepatoblastomas in male and female mice and evidence of carcinogenic potential in the thyroid gland of both mice and rats. Various nonneoplastic lesions were observed beyond control levels in the liver, thyroid gland, and nose of rats and mice administered GBE. Although these results cannot be directly extrapolated to humans, the findings fill an important data gap in assessing risk associated with GBE use.

  3. A study of the carcinogenicity of glycidol in Syrian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lijinsky, W; Kovatch, R M

    1992-01-01

    The industrial chemical glycidol is a directly acting mutagen and a broadly acting carcinogen in rats. It was administered to Syrian golden hamsters (20 male and 20 female) by gavage of 12 mg twice a week for 60 weeks. The total dose per animal was 1.45 g or 20 mmol. Survival was not different from control hamsters treated with corn oil/ethyl acetate. Of the treated males, 9 had tumors and 13 of the treated females had tumors, some of which were adrenal cortex tumors seen in controls. More tumors were seen in the glycidol-treated hamsters than in controls, but the spleen was the only notable target organ and the number of animals with spleen hemangiosarcomas was small. Glycidol appeared to be less carcinogenic in hamsters than in rats or mice.

  4. 4-Dimethylaminoazobenzenes: carcinogenicities and reductive cleavage by microsomal azo reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambooy, J P; Koffman, B M

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-four 4-dimethylaminoazobenzenes (DABs) in which systematic structural modifications have been made in the prime ring have been studied for substrate specificity for microsomal azo reductase. The DABs were also evaluated for carcinogenicity and it was found that there was no correlation between carcinogenicity and extent of azo bond cleavage by azo reductase. While any substituent in the prime ring reduces the rate of cleavage of the azo bond relative to the unsubstituted dye, there is a correlation between substituent size and susceptibility to the enzyme. Substituent size was also found to be a significant factor in the induction of hepatomas by the dyes. Preliminary studies have shown that there appears to be a positive correlation between microsomal riboflavin content and the activity of the azo reductase.

  5. Prediction of Non-Genotoxic Carcinogenicity Based on Genetic Profiles of Short Term Exposure Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Luis Orlando; González-José, Rolando; García, Pilar Peral

    2016-01-01

    Non-genotoxic carcinogens are substances that induce tumorigenesis by non-mutagenic mechanisms and long term rodent bioassays are required to identify them. Recent studies have shown that transcription profiling can be applied to develop early identifiers for long term phenotypes. In this study, we used rat liver expression profiles from the NTP (National Toxicology Program, Research Triangle Park, USA) DrugMatrix Database to construct a gene classifier that can distinguish between non-genotoxic carcinogens and other chemicals. The model was based on short term exposure assays (3 days) and the training was limited to oxidative stressors, peroxisome proliferators and hormone modulators. Validation of the predictor was performed on independent toxicogenomic data (TG-GATEs, Toxicogenomics Project-Genomics Assisted Toxicity Evaluation System, Osaka, Japan). To build our model we performed Random Forests together with a recursive elimination algorithm (VarSelRF). Gene set enrichment analysis was employed for functional interpretation. A total of 770 microarrays comprising 96 different compounds were analyzed and a predictor of 54 genes was built. Prediction accuracy was 0.85 in the training set, 0.87 in the test set and increased with increasing concentration in the validation set: 0.6 at low dose, 0.7 at medium doses and 0.81 at high doses. Pathway analysis revealed gene prominence of cellular respiration, energy production and lipoprotein metabolism. The biggest target of toxicogenomics is accurately predict the toxicity of unknown drugs. In this analysis, we presented a classifier that can predict non-genotoxic carcinogenicity by using short term exposure assays. In this approach, dose level is critical when evaluating chemicals at early time points. PMID:27818731

  6. Functional test of PCDHB11, the most human-specific neuronal surface protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Guilherme Braga; Gonçalves, Rafaella Araújo; Gralle, Matthias

    2016-04-12

    Brain-expressed proteins that have undergone functional change during human evolution may contribute to human cognitive capacities, and may also leave us vulnerable to specifically human diseases, such as schizophrenia, autism or Alzheimer's disease. In order to search systematically for those proteins that have changed the most during human evolution and that might contribute to brain function and pathology, all proteins with orthologs in chimpanzee, orangutan and rhesus macaque and annotated as being expressed on the surface of cells in the human central nervous system were ordered by the number of human-specific amino acid differences that are fixed in modern populations. PCDHB11, a beta-protocadherin homologous to murine cell adhesion proteins, stood out with 12 substitutions and maintained its lead after normalizing for protein size and applying weights for amino acid exchange probabilities. Human PCDHB11 was found to cause homophilic cell adhesion, but at lower levels than shown for other clustered protocadherins. Homophilic adhesion caused by a PCDHB11 with reversion of human-specific changes was as low as for modern human PCDHB11; while neither human nor reverted PCDHB11 adhered to controls, they did adhere to each other. A loss of function in PCDHB11 is unlikely because intra-human variability did not increase relative to the other human beta-protocadherins. The brain-expressed protein with the highest number of human-specific substitutions is PCDHB11. In spite of its fast evolution and low intra-human variability, cell-based tests on the only proposed function for PCDHB11 did not indicate a functional change.

  7. The Role of Tobacco-Derived Carcinogens in Pancreas Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lochan, Rajiv; Reeves, Helen L.; Daly, Anne K.; Charnley, Richard M

    2011-01-01

    The extremely poor outcome from pancreas cancer is well known. However, its aetiology less well appreciated, and the molecular mechanisms underlying this are poorly understood. Tobacco usage is one of the strongest risk factors for this disease, and this is a completely avoidable hazard. In addition, there are well described hereditary diseases which predispose, and familial pancreas cancer. We have sought here to summarise the role of tobacco-derived carcinogens and the mode of their tumorig...

  8. Surfactant-induced dermatitis: comparison of corneosurfametry with predictive testing on human and reconstructed skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piérard, G E; Goffin, V; Hermanns-Lê, T; Arrese, J E; Piérard-Franchimont, C

    1995-09-01

    Surfactants elicit alterations in the stratum corneum. Predictive tests that avoid animal experimentation are needed. This study compares three methods of rating and predicting shampoo-induced irritation. Corneosurfametry entails collection of stratum corneum followed by brief contact with diluted surfactants and measurement of variations in staining of samples. Corneosurfametry appears to correlate well with in vivo testing in volunteers with sensitive skin. However, corneosurfametry presents less interindividual variability than in vivo testing and allows better discrimination among mild products. Morphologic information about surfactant-induced loosening of corneocytes may be increased by testing surfactants on human skin equivalent. Results are similar to those provided by specimens used for corneosurfametry. The corneosurfametric prediction of surfactant irritancy correlates with in vivo testing and with in vitro evaluation on human skin equivalent.

  9. Exposure and Metabolic Activation Biomarkers of Carcinogenic Tobacco-Specific Nitrosamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Stephen S; Stepanov, Irina; Carmella, Steven G

    2016-01-19

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the world, and cigarette smoking is its main cause. Oral cavity cancer is another debilitating and often fatal cancer closely linked to tobacco product use. While great strides have been made in decreasing tobacco use in the United States and some other countries, there are still an estimated 1 billion men and 250 million women in the world who are cigarette smokers and there are hundreds of millions of smokeless tobacco users, all at risk for cancer. Worldwide, lung cancer kills about three people per minute. This Account focuses on metabolites and biomarkers of two powerful tobacco-specific nitrosamine carcinogens, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and N'-nitrosonornicotine (NNN), considered to be among the main causes of lung cancer and oral cavity cancer in people who use tobacco products. Three properties of NNK and NNN are critical for successful biomarker studies: they are present in all tobacco products, they are tobacco-specific and are not found in any other product, and they are strong carcinogens. NNK and NNN are converted in humans to urinary metabolites that can be quantified by mass spectrometry as biomarkers of exposure to these carcinogens. They are also metabolized to diazonium ions and related electrophiles that react with DNA to form addition products that can be detected and quantified by mass spectrometry. These urinary metabolites and DNA addition products can serve as biomarkers of exposure and metabolic activation, respectively. The biomarkers of exposure, in particular the urinary NNK metabolites 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) and its glucuronides, have been extensively applied to document tobacco-specific lung carcinogen uptake in smokers and nonsmokers exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke. Highly sensitive mass spectrometric methods have been developed for quantitative analysis of these NNK metabolites as well as metabolites of NNN in human urine

  10. Workplace carcinogen and pesticide exposures in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partanen, Timo; Chaves, Jorge; Wesseling, Catharina; Chaverri, Fabio; Monge, Patricia; Ruepert, Clemens; Aragón, Aurora; Kogevinas, Manolis; Hogstedt, Christer; Kauppinen, Timo

    2003-01-01

    The CAREX data system converts national workforce volumes and proportions of workers exposed to workplace carcinogens into numbers of exposed in 55 industrial categories. CAREX was adapted for Costa Rica for 27 carcinogens and seven groups of pesticides. Widespread workplace carcinogens in the 1.3 million workforce of Costa Rica are solar radiation (333,000 workers), diesel engine exhaust (278,000), environmental tobacco smoke (71,000), hexavalent chromium compounds (55,000), benzene (52,000), wood dust (32,000), silica dust (27,000), lead and inorganic lead compounds (19,000), and polycyclic aromatic compounds (17,000). The most ubiquitous pesticides were paraquat and diquat (175,000), mancozeb, maneb, and zineb (49,000), chlorothalonil (38,000), benomyl (19,000), and chlorophenoxy herbicides (11,000). Among women, formaldehyde, radon, and methylene chloride overrode pesticides, chromium, wood dust, and silica dust in numbers of exposed. High-risk sectors included agriculture, construction, personal and household services, land and water transport and allied services, pottery and similar industries, woodworks, mining, forestry and logging, fishing, manufacturing of electrical machinery, and bar and restaurant personnel.

  11. Potential health risks related to carcinogens in the atmospheric environment in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurjar, B R; Mohan, M; Sidhu, K S

    1996-10-01

    In India, rapid urbanization and industrialization have contributed positively toward meeting the materialistic needs of the citizens, but have also resulted in contamination of the atmospheric environment. This paper deals with the assessment of potential health risks posed by carcinogenic substances, namely cadmium, chromium, and nickel, present in certain atmospheric environments in India. Average air concentrations of these carcinogenic metals have been assessed for different states and regions of India (C. R. Krishnamurti and P. Vishwanathan, Toxic Metals in the Indian Environment, Tata/McGraw-Hill, New Delhi, 1991). Based on these assessments, both individual and societal risks have been estimated in different states of the country, and comparisons were made. Reported concentration, release sources, potential health risks including cancer risk estimates, and ambient air interim guidelines are discussed. The reported environmental releases and cancer risk from cadmium are minimal. There is a potential for increased respiratory cancer risk from exposure to chromium and nickel in some northern Indian states. These metals are irritants to nasal passages and the respiratory tract. Chromium is also corrosive to mucus membranes. They have the potential to cause chronic respiratory problems. Since it appears that these metals may cause some adverse health effects in humans, exposure to these ambient air pollutants should be minimized by managing the release of these contaminants to the environment. There is a need for the development and strict enforcement of national and state regulatory standards.

  12. Ferns and lycopods--a potential treasury of anticancer agents but also a carcinogenic hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomšík, Pavel

    2014-06-01

    Many species of seedless vascular plants-ferns and lycopods-have been used as food and folk medicine since ancient times. Some of them have become the focus of intensive research concerning their anticancer properties. Studies on the anticancer effect of crude extracts are being increasingly replaced by bioactivity-guided fractionation, as well as detailed assessment of the mechanism of action. Numerous compounds-especially flavonoids such as amentoflavone and protoapigenone, and also simpler phenolic compounds, steroids, alkaloids and terpenoids-were isolated and found to be cytotoxic, particularly pro-apoptotic, or to induce cell cycle arrest in cancer cell lines in vitro. In in vivo experiments, some fern-derived compounds inhibited tumour growth with little toxicity. On the other hand, many ferns-not only the well-known Bracken (Pteridium)-may pose a significant hazard to human health due to the fact that they contain carcinogenic sesquiterpenoids and their analogues. The objective of this review is to summarise the recent state of research on the anticancer properties of ferns and lycopods, with a focus on their characteristic bioactive constituents. The carcinogenic hazard posed by ferns is also mentioned.

  13. Regulatory Forum Opinion Piece: Carcinogen Risk Assessment: The Move from Screens to Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downes, Noel; Foster, John

    2015-12-01

    Throughout the last 50 years, the paradigm for carcinogenicity assessment has depended on lifetime bioassays in rodents. Since 1997, the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) S1B has permitted the use of a 2-year rodent bioassay (usually in the rat) and an alternative, genetically modified mouse model to support cancer risk assessment of pharmaceuticals. Since its introduction, it has become apparent that many of the stated advantages of the 6-month Tg mouse bioassay have, in actual fact, not been realized, and the concern exists that an albeit imperfect, 2-year mouse bioassay has been replaced by a similarly imperfect 6-month equivalent. This essay argues strongly that model systems, using cancer as the end point, should be discontinued, and that the recent initiatives, from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and Institute of Peace and Conflict Studies, on "mode of action," "adverse outcome pathways," and "human relevance framework" should be embraced as being risk assessments based upon the available science. The recent suggested revisions to the ICH S1 guidelines, utilizing carcinogenicity assessment documents, go some way to developing a science-based risk assessment that does not depend almost entirely on a single, imperfect, cancer-based end point in nonrelevant animal species.

  14. Anti-proliferative activities of sinigrin on carcinogen-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Meng; Cheung, Wan Man; Yu, Vivian; Zhou, Yanling; Tong, Pak Ho; Ho, John W S

    2014-01-01

    Liver cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide. A very high incidence of new liver cancer cases is diagnosed every year, and metastasis has been found to correlate to poor prognoses in humans. Better treatments for liver cancer are thus clearly needed. Sinigrin is one of the major ingredients present in Brassica nigra, which has been used in combination with other herbs for treatment of various diseases. The anti-proliferative activities of sinigrin were studied in a model of carcinogen-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Rats were orally administered with sinigrin on a daily basis for three months before sacrifice. Sinigrin was found to significantly inhibit the proliferation of liver tumor cells; the number of surface tumors in the rat liver was dramatically reduced. Sinigrin induced apoptosis of liver cancer cells through up-regulation of p53 and down-regulation of Bcl-2 family members and caspases. Our findings indicated that the liver functions were gradually restored after treatment with sinigrin and that the agent did not cause liver toxicity. Cell cycle analysis indicated that sinigrin caused cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase. The results suggest that sinigrin exerts important anti-proliferative activities in carcinogen-induced hepatocarcinogenesis in rats, and highlight the potential of sinigrin as an anti-cancer agent for liver cancer.

  15. Studies on Mechanisms and Blockade of Carcinogenic Action of Female Sex Hormones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高凤鸣; 蒋涵英; 余璐; 李新兰; 王文惠; 段云波; 周红宁

    1994-01-01

    Tumours of mice are induced by administration of Inj. Hydroxyprogesteroni Caproatis Co. (EP) in a practical subthreshold dose of carcinogenesis or 2. 5-5 times the human contraceptive dose (simply referred to as 2. 5- to 5-fold dose) combined with whole-body 0. 5 Gy gamma-ray irradiation. Malignant transformation of Syrian golden hamster embryo (SHE) cells is also induced by 5-fold dose of EP combined with 0. 3 Gy gamma-ray irradiation in vitro, thereby indicating that synergistic carcinogenesis can be obtained by combined use of physical and chemical carcinogens.The mechanisms of synergistic carcinogenesis have been further explained by cytogenetics, damage extent of the target cell DNA and production of free radicals. The Chinese traditional medicine with antioxidat-ing effect (Sulekang Capsule, SC), food additive--butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and green tea can effectively inhibit the carcinogenic effect of EP or EP combined with gamma rays in mice. They all have marked ability to scavenge or remove

  16. Artificial Human Phantoms: Human proxy in testing microwave apparatus that have electromagnetic interaction with the human body

    CERN Document Server

    Mobashsher, A T

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript, an effort is made in this review to address different state-of-the-art artificial tissue emulating (ATE) materials and phantom types for various operating frequencies, and fabrication procedures in order to have a better understanding of the pros and cons of various ATE phantoms which leads us to develop superior version of artificial human body substitute for various applications.

  17. Personality and support for universal human rights: a review and test of a structural model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Sam

    2010-12-01

    All individual differences that predict support for international human rights are first reviewed: support for human rights is linked most positively to "globalism" (other international and environmental concerns), "identification with all humanity," principled moral reasoning, benevolence, and dispositional empathy. It is related most negatively to ethnocentrism and its root dispositions, the social dominance orientation, and authoritarianism. Other correlates are also noted. Secondly, a structural model of the effects of authoritarianism, social dominance, ethnocentrism and identification with all humanity upon commitment to human rights is presented and tested. Across 2 studies (Study 1, N=218 nonstudent adults; Study 2, N=102 university students), ethnocentrism and identification with all humanity directly predicted human rights commitment. The effects of authoritarianism upon this commitment were fully mediated through enhanced ethnocentrism and reduced identification with all humanity. The effects of social dominance were similar, but its direct effect upon human rights commitment remained significant and was not, in the second study, mediated by reduced dispositional empathy. © 2010 The Author. Journal of Personality © 2010, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Human figure drawing test: validity in assessing intelligence in children aged 3-10 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plubrukarn, Ratanotai; Theeramanoparp, Somchit

    2003-08-01

    Human-figure-drawing abilities are related with cognitive development in children. As cognitive skills progress, drawing abilities also improve in details and sex differentiation. The Goodenough-Harris (G-H) drawing test was developed to score human figure drawing with separate norms for males and females. To evaluate whether the Goodenough-Harris human drawing test is valid to classify intelligence in children aged 3-10 years. Record files of 528 children aged between 3-10 years who had attended the Child and Adolescent Unit at Queen Sirikit National Institute of Child Health (Children's Hospital), Bangkok, Thailand from January 1999 to December 2001 were retrospectively reviewed. Inclusion criteria included: 1) performing the human figure drawing test and standard intelligence tests on the same day and 2) diagnoses were addressed. The ages of the children ranged from 3 10/12 years to 10 11/12 years with a mean age of 7 9/12 years, 49.5 per cent were males and 50.5 per cent were female. The study group was diagnosed as pervasive development disorder 17 per cent, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder 13 per cent, and mental retardation 11.3 per cent. Overall correlation of full scale intellectual quotient (FSIQ) from the standard intelligence test and standard scores on the Goodenough-Harris system was 0.813 (p test in classified correct intellectual level was 60.8 per cent but in children with an intellectual quotient (IQ) less than 70, the correct classification was 69.2 per cent. After stratification by age, it was found that the human figure drawing test had validity in predicting IQ below 70 in 88.7 per cent and 68.8 per cent of children aged 6 years respectively. The human figure drawing test can be used as an additional measure of assessing intelligence in young children but it should not be substituted for standard tests. The test is not complicated, therefore, trained personnel can use it in combination with other screening tests for cognitive

  19. Biomonitoring the Cooked Meat Carcinogen 2-Amino-1-methy-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine in Canine Fur

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Dan; Neuman, Zachary L.; Modiano, Jaime F.; Turesky, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4, 5-b]pyridine (PhIP) is a heterocyclic aromatic amine (HAA) that is formed during the cooking of meat, poultry, and fish. PhIP is a rodent carcinogen and thought to contribute to several diet-related cancers in humans. PhIP is present in the hair of human omnivores but not in the hair of vegetarians. We have now identified PhIP in the fur of fourteen out of sixteen healthy dogs consuming different brands of commercial pet food. The levels of PhIP in canine f...

  20. Validation studies of an immunochromatographic 1-step test for the forensic identification of human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochmeister, M N; Budowle, B; Sparkes, R; Rudin, O; Gehrig, C; Thali, M; Schmidt, L; Cordier, A; Dirnhofer, R

    1999-05-01

    An immunochromatographic 1-step test for the detection of fecal occult blood was evaluated for applicability for the forensic identification of human blood in stained material. The following experiments were conducted: 1) determination of the sensitivity and specificity of the assay; 2) evaluation of different extraction media for bloodstains (sterile water, Tris buffer pH 7.5 provided in the test kit, 5% ammonia); 3) analysis of biological samples subjected to a variety of environmental insults; and 4) evaluation of casework samples. This immunochromatographic 1-step occult blood test is specific for human (primate) hemoglobin and is at least an order of magnitude more sensitive than previous methods for detecting human hemoglobin in bloodstains. The antigen is insensitive to a variety of environmental insults, except for exposure to certain detergents and household bleaches and prolonged exposure to certain preparations of luminol. The entire assay can be conducted in field testing conditions within minutes. When in the laboratory the supernatant from a DNA extraction is used for the assay, there is essentially no consumption of DNA for determining the presence of human hemoglobin in a forensic sample. The data demonstrate that this test is robust and suitable for forensic analyses.

  1. Personal exposure to carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svecova, Vlasta; Topinka, Jan; Solansky, Ivo; Rossner, Pavel; Sram, Radim J

    2013-07-01

    Personal exposures to carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (c-PAHs) bound to airborne particulate matter 2.5 μm (PM2.5) were measured in the context of a large-scale molecular epidemiological study in order to iden