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  1. Molecular Mechanisms of Metastasis Suppression in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-01

    and breast carcinoma metastasis, Wake Forest University Cancer Center, July 28 Molecular mechanisms controlling melanoma and breast carcinoma...Bowman Show, August 17 Molecular regulation of melanoma and breast carcinoma metastasis, Wake Forest University Cancer Center, July 28 Molecular...Institute, April 20, Pathology ofNeoplasia Cumberland Unit, American Cancer Society, April 19; Breast Cancer Research Ministerio de Sanidad y

  2. Molecular profiling of ADAM12 in human bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frolich, Camilla; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: We have previously found ADAM12, a disintegrin and metalloprotease, to be an interesting biomarker for breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine the gene and protein expression profiles of ADAM12 in different grades and stages of bladder cancer. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: ADAM12...... gene expression was evaluated in tumors from 96 patients with bladder cancer using a customized Affymetrix GeneChip. Gene expression in bladder cancer was validated using reverse transcription-PCR, quantitative PCR, and in situ hybridization. Protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemical...

  3. Molecular profiling of ADAM12 in human bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Reidar; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Rudkjaer, Lise;

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: We have previously found ADAM12, a disintegrin and metalloprotease, to be an interesting biomarker for breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine the gene and protein expression profiles of ADAM12 in different grades and stages of bladder cancer. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: ADAM12...... staining on tissue arrays of bladder cancers. The presence and relative amount of ADAM12 in the urine of cancer patients were determined by Western blotting and densitometric measurements, respectively. RESULTS: ADAM12 mRNA expression was significantly up-regulated in bladder cancer, as determined...... by microarray analysis, and the level of ADAM12 mRNA correlated with disease stage. Reverse transcription-PCR, quantitative PCR, and in situ hybridization validated the gene expression results. Using immunohistochemistry, we found ADAM12 protein expression correlated with tumor stage and grade. Finally, ADAM12...

  4. Molecular profiling of ADAM12 in human bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frolich, Camilla; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt

    2006-01-01

    by microarray analysis, and the level of ADAM12 mRNA correlated with disease stage. Reverse transcription-PCR, quantitative PCR, and in situ hybridization validated the gene expression results. Using immunohistochemistry, we found ADAM12 protein expression correlated with tumor stage and grade. Finally, ADAM12...... could be detected in the urine by Western blotting; ADAM12 was present in higher levels in the urine from patients with bladder cancer compared with urine from healthy individuals. Significantly, following removal of tumor by surgery, in most bladder cancer cases examined, the level of ADAM12...

  5. Cross-cancer profiling of molecular alterations within the human autophagy interaction network.

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    Lebovitz, Chandra B; Robertson, A Gordon; Goya, Rodrigo; Jones, Steven J; Morin, Ryan D; Marra, Marco A; Gorski, Sharon M

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant activation or disruption of autophagy promotes tumorigenesis in various preclinical models of cancer, but whether the autophagy pathway is a target for recurrent molecular alteration in human cancer patient samples is unknown. To address this outstanding question, we surveyed 211 human autophagy-associated genes for tumor-related alterations to DNA sequence and RNA expression levels and examined their association with patient survival outcomes in multiple cancer types with sequence data from The Cancer Genome Atlas consortium. We found 3 (RB1CC1/FIP200, ULK4, WDR45/WIPI4) and one (ATG7) core autophagy genes to be under positive selection for somatic mutations in endometrial carcinoma and clear cell renal carcinoma, respectively, while 29 autophagy regulators and pathway interactors, including previously identified KEAP1, NFE2L2, and MTOR, were significantly mutated in 6 of the 11 cancer types examined. Gene expression analyses revealed that GABARAPL1 and MAP1LC3C/LC3C transcripts were less abundant in breast cancer and non-small cell lung cancers than in matched normal tissue controls; ATG4D transcripts were increased in lung squamous cell carcinoma, as were ATG16L2 transcripts in kidney cancer. Unsupervised clustering of autophagy-associated mRNA levels in tumors stratified patient overall survival in 3 of 9 cancer types (acute myeloid leukemia, clear cell renal carcinoma, and head and neck cancer). These analyses provide the first comprehensive resource of recurrently altered autophagy-associated genes in human tumors, and highlight cancer types and subtypes where perturbed autophagy may be relevant to patient overall survival.

  6. Specific survivin dual fluorescence resonance energy transfer molecular beacons for detection of human bladder cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-qiang WANG; Jun ZHAO; Jin ZENG; Kai-jie WU; Yu-le CHEN; Xin-ya ng WANG; Luke S CHANG; Da-lin HE

    2011-01-01

    Survivin molecular beacons can be used to detectbladder cancer cells in urine samples non-invasively.The aim of this study is to improve the specificity of detection of bladder cancer cells using survivin dual fluorescence resonance energy transfer molecular beacons (FRET MBs) that have fluorophores forming one donor-acceptor pair.Methods:Survivin-targeting dual fluorescence resonance energy transfer molecular beacons with unique target sequences were designed,which had no overlap with the other genes in the apoptosis inhibitor protein family.Human bladder cancer cell lines 5637,253J and T24,as well as the exfoliated cells in the urine of healthy adults and patients with bladder cancer were examined.Images of cells were taken using a laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscope.For assays using dual FRET MBs,the excitation wavelength was 488 nm,and the emission detection wavelengths were 520+20 nm and 560+20 nm,respectively.Results:The human bladder cancer cell lines and exfoliated cells in the urine of patients with bladder cancer incubated with the survivin dual FRET MBs exhibited strong fluorescence signals.In contrast,no fluorescence was detected in the survivin-negative human dermal fibroblasts-adult (HDF-a) cells or exfoliated cells in the urine of healthy adults incubated with the survivin dual FRET MBs.Conclusion:The results suggest that the survivin dual FRET MBs may be used as a specific and non-invasive method for early detection and follow-up of patients with bladder cancer.

  7. DETECTION OF OXIDATIVE STRESS, APOPTOSIS AND MOLECULAR LESIONS IN HUMAN OVARIAN CANCER CELLS

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    H. I. Falfushynska

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ovarian cancer has the highest mortality rate of gynaecological cancers. This is partly due to the lack of effective screening markers. Indices of oxidative stress are well-recognized prognostic criteria for tumorous transformation of tissue, but their value depends on the type of tumor and the stage of its development. Objective. The aim of this study is to clarify the relationship between antioxidant/pro-oxidant ratio and the signs of molecular lesions and apoptosis rate in blood of ovarian cancer patients and non-cancer ones. Results. The ovarian cancer group is marked by antioxidant/prooxidant balance shifting to oxidative damage in blood as the consequence of overexpression of oxyradicals (by 300%. Higher level of glutathione (by 366%, lower level of metallothioneins (by 65% as well as higher level of lipid peroxidation (by 174% and protein carbonyls (by 186% in blood of ovarian cancer patients compared to the normal ovarian group have been observed. The signs of cytotoxicity are determined in blood of ovarian cancer patients: an increased (compared to control level of DNA fragmentation (by 160%, choline esterase (up to twice, higher rate of both caspase dependent and caspase independent lysosomal mediated apoptosis. Conclusions. Cathepsin D activity both total and free, choline esterase activity, TBA-reactive substance and protein carbonyls level in blood could be used as the predictive markers of worse prognosis and the signs of human ovarian cancer.

  8. Molecular Recognition of Human Liver Cancer Cells Using DNA Aptamers Generated via Cell-SELEX.

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    Jiehua Xu

    Full Text Available Most clinical cases of liver cancer cannot be diagnosed until they have evolved to an advanced stage, thus resulting in high mortality. It is well recognized that the implementation of early detection methods and the development of targeted therapies for liver cancer are essential to reducing the high mortality rates associated with this disease. To achieve these goals, molecular probes capable of recognizing liver cancer cell-specific targets are needed. Here we describe a panel of aptamers able to distinguish hepatocarcinoma from normal liver cells. The aptamers, which were selected by cell-based SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment, have Kd values in the range of 64-349 nM toward the target human hepatoma cell HepG2, and also recognize ovarian cancer cells and lung adenocarcinoma. The proteinase treatment experiment indicated that all aptamers could recognize target HepG2 cells through surface proteins. This outcome suggested that these aptamers could be used as potential probes for further research in cancer studies, such as developing early detection assays, targeted therapies, and imaging agents, as well as for the investigation of common membrane proteins in these distinguishable cancers.

  9. Molecular Recognition of Human Liver Cancer Cells Using DNA Aptamers Generated via Cell-SELEX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiehua; Teng, I-Ting; Zhang, Liqin; Delgado, Stefanie; Champanhac, Carole; Cansiz, Sena; Wu, Cuichen; Shan, Hong; Tan, Weihong

    2015-01-01

    Most clinical cases of liver cancer cannot be diagnosed until they have evolved to an advanced stage, thus resulting in high mortality. It is well recognized that the implementation of early detection methods and the development of targeted therapies for liver cancer are essential to reducing the high mortality rates associated with this disease. To achieve these goals, molecular probes capable of recognizing liver cancer cell-specific targets are needed. Here we describe a panel of aptamers able to distinguish hepatocarcinoma from normal liver cells. The aptamers, which were selected by cell-based SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment), have Kd values in the range of 64-349 nM toward the target human hepatoma cell HepG2, and also recognize ovarian cancer cells and lung adenocarcinoma. The proteinase treatment experiment indicated that all aptamers could recognize target HepG2 cells through surface proteins. This outcome suggested that these aptamers could be used as potential probes for further research in cancer studies, such as developing early detection assays, targeted therapies, and imaging agents, as well as for the investigation of common membrane proteins in these distinguishable cancers.

  10. Molecular Insights into Division of Single Human Cancer Cells in On-Chip Transparent Microtubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In vivo, mammalian cells proliferate within 3D environments consisting of numerous microcavities and channels, which contain a variety of chemical and physical cues. External environments often differ between normal and pathological states, such as the unique spatial constraints that metastasizing cancer cells experience as they circulate the vasculature through arterioles and narrow capillaries, where they can divide and acquire elongated cylindrical shapes. While metastatic tumors cause most cancer deaths, factors impacting early cancer cell proliferation inside the vasculature and those that can promote the formation of secondary tumors remain largely unknown. Prior studies investigating confined mitosis have mainly used 2D cell culture systems. Here, we mimic aspects of metastasizing tumor cells dividing inside blood capillaries by investigating single-cell divisions of living human cancer cells, trapped inside 3D rolled-up, transparent nanomembranes. We assess the molecular effects of tubular confinement on key mitotic features, using optical high- and super-resolution microscopy. Our experiments show that tubular confinement affects the morphology and dynamics of the mitotic spindle, chromosome arrangements, and the organization of the cell cortex. Moreover, we reveal that membrane blebbing and/or associated processes act as a potential genome-safety mechanism, limiting the extent of genomic instability caused by mitosis in confined circumstances, especially in tubular 3D microenvironments. Collectively, our study demonstrates the potential of rolled-up nanomembranes for gaining molecular insights into key cellular events occurring in tubular 3D microenvironments in vivo. PMID:27267364

  11. Molecular network analysis of human microRNA targetome: from cancers to Alzheimer’s disease

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    Satoh Jun-ichi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract MicroRNAs (miRNAs, a class of endogenous small noncoding RNAs, mediate posttranscriptional regulation of protein-coding genes by binding chiefly to the 3’ untranslated region of target mRNAs, leading to translational inhibition, mRNA destabilization or degradation. A single miRNA concurrently downregulates hundreds of target mRNAs designated “targetome”, and thereby fine-tunes gene expression involved in diverse cellular functions, such as development, differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis and metabolism. Recently, we characterized the molecular network of the whole human miRNA targetome by using bioinformatics tools for analyzing molecular interactions on the comprehensive knowledgebase. We found that the miRNA targetome regulated by an individual miRNA generally constitutes the biological network of functionally-associated molecules in human cells, closely linked to pathological events involved in cancers and neurodegenerative diseases. We also identified a collaborative regulation of gene expression by transcription factors and miRNAs in cancer-associated miRNA targetome networks. This review focuses on the workflow of molecular network analysis of miRNA targetome in silico. We applied the workflow to two representative datasets, composed of miRNA expression profiling of adult T cell leukemia (ATL and Alzheimer’s disease (AD, retrieved from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO repository. The results supported the view that miRNAs act as a central regulator of both oncogenesis and neurodegeneration.

  12. The Transferrin Receptor: A Potential Molecular Imaging Marker for Human Cancer

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    Dagmar Högemann-Savellano

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Noninvasive imaging of differences between the molecular properties of cancer and normal tissue has the potential to enhance the detection of tumors. Because overexpression of endogenous transferrin receptor (TfR has been qualitatively described for various cancers and is presumably due to malignant transformation of cells, TfR may represent a suitable target for application of molecular imaging technologies to increase detection of smaller tumors. In the work reported here, investigation into the biology of this receptor using electron microscopy has demonstrated that iron oxide particles targeted to TfR are internalized and accumulate in lysosomal vesicles within cells. Biochemical analysis of the interaction of imaging probes with cells overexpressing the TfR demonstrated that the extent of accumulation, and therefore probe efficacy, is dependent on the nature of the chemical cross-link between transferrin and the iron oxide particle. These data were utilized to design and synthesize an improved imaging probe. Experiments demonstrate that the novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI probe is sensitive enough to detect small differences in endogenous TfR expression in human cancer cell lines. Quantitative measurement of TfR overexpression in a panel of 27 human breast cancer patients demonstrated that 74% of patient cancer tissues overexpressed the TfR and that the sensitivity of the new imaging agent was suitable to detect TfR overexpression in greater than 40% of these cases. Based on a biochemical and cell biological approach, these studies have resulted in the synthesis and development of an improved MRI probe with the best in vitro and in vivo imaging properties reported to date.

  13. Molecular Mechanisms and Translational Therapies for Human Epidermal Receptor 2 Positive Breast Cancer

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    Quanxia Lv

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among women. Human epidermal receptor 2 (HER2 positive breast cancer (HER2+ BC is the most aggressive subtype of breast cancer, with poor prognosis and a high rate of recurrence. About one third of breast cancer is HER2+ BC with significantly high expression level of HER2 protein compared to other subtypes. Therefore, HER2 is an important biomarker and an ideal target for developing therapeutic strategies for the treatment HER2+ BC. In this review, HER2 structure and physiological and pathological roles in HER2+ BC are discussed. Two diagnostic tests, immunohistochemistry (IHC and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH, for evaluating HER2 expression levels are briefly introduced. The current mainstay targeted therapies for HER2+ BC include monoclonal antibodies, small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, antibody–drug conjugates (ADC and other emerging anti-HER2 agents. In clinical practice, combination therapies are commonly adopted in order to achieve synergistic drug response. This review will help to better understand the molecular mechanism of HER2+ BC and further facilitate the development of more effective therapeutic strategies against HER2+ BC.

  14. A novel gene signature for molecular diagnosis of human prostate cancer by RT-qPCR.

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    Federica Rizzi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer (CaP is one of the most relevant causes of cancer death in Western Countries. Although detection of CaP at early curable stage is highly desirable, actual screening methods present limitations and new molecular approaches are needed. Gene expression analysis increases our knowledge about the biology of CaP and may render novel molecular tools, but the identification of accurate biomarkers for reliable molecular diagnosis is a real challenge. We describe here the diagnostic power of a novel 8-genes signature: ornithine decarboxylase (ODC, ornithine decarboxylase antizyme (OAZ, adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC, spermidine/spermine N(1-acetyltransferase (SSAT, histone H3 (H3, growth arrest specific gene (GAS1, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH and Clusterin (CLU in tumour detection/classification of human CaP. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The 8-gene signature was detected by retrotranscription real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR in frozen prostate surgical specimens obtained from 41 patients diagnosed with CaP and recommended to undergo radical prostatectomy (RP. No therapy was given to patients at any time before RP. The bio-bank used for the study consisted of 66 specimens: 44 were benign-CaP paired from the same patient. Thirty-five were classified as benign and 31 as CaP after final pathological examination. Only molecular data were used for classification of specimens. The Nearest Neighbour (NN classifier was used in order to discriminate CaP from benign tissue. Validation of final results was obtained with 10-fold cross-validation procedure. CaP versus benign specimens were discriminated with (80+/-5% accuracy, (81+/-6% sensitivity and (78+/-7% specificity. The method also correctly classified 71% of patients with Gleason score or =7, an important predictor of final outcome. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The method showed high sensitivity in a collection of specimens in which a significant

  15. Common molecular pathways involved in human CD133+/CD34+ progenitor cell expansion and cancer

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    Vêncio Ricardo Z

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uncovering the molecular mechanism underlying expansion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is critical to extend current therapeutic applications and to understand how its deregulation relates to leukemia. The characterization of genes commonly relevant to stem/progenitor cell expansion and tumor development should facilitate the identification of novel therapeutic targets in cancer. Methods CD34+/CD133+ progenitor cells were purified from human umbilical cord blood and expanded in vitro. Correlated molecular changes were analyzed by gene expression profiling using microarrays covering up to 55,000 transcripts. Genes regulated during progenitor cell expansion were identified and functionally classified. Aberrant expression of such genes in cancer was indicated by in silico SAGE. Differential expression of selected genes was assessed by real-time PCR in hematopoietic cells from chronic myeloid leukemia patients and healthy individuals. Results Several genes and signaling pathways not previously associated with ex vivo expansion of CD133+/CD34+ cells were identified, most of which associated with cancer. Regulation of MEK/ERK and Hedgehog signaling genes in addition to numerous proto-oncogenes was detected during conditions of enhanced progenitor cell expansion. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis confirmed down-regulation of several newly described cancer-associated genes in CD133+/CD34+ cells, including DOCK4 and SPARCL1 tumor suppressors, and parallel results were verified when comparing their expression in cells from chronic myeloid leukemia patients Conclusion Our findings reveal potential molecular targets for oncogenic transformation in CD133+/CD34+ cells and strengthen the link between deregulation of stem/progenitor cell expansion and the malignant process.

  16. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging in a Human CD276 Expression-Modulated Murine Ovarian Cancer Model

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    Lutz, Amelie M.; Bachawal, Sunitha V.; Drescher, Charles W.; Pysz, Marybeth A.; Willmann, Jürgen K.; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop a mouse ovarian cancer model that allows modulating the expression levels of human vascular targets in mouse xenograft tumors and to test whether expression of CD276 during tumor angiogenesis can be visualized by molecularly targeted ultrasound in vivo. Materials and Methods CD276-expressing MS-1 mouse endothelial cells were engineered and used for co-injection with 2008 human ovarian cancer cells for subcutaneous xenograft tumor induction in 15 nude mice. Fourteen control mice were injected with 2008 cells only. After confirming their binding specificity in flow chamber cell attachment studies, anti CD276 antibody-functionalized contrast microbubbles were used for in vivo CD276-targeted contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging. Results CD276-targeted ultrasound imaging signal was significantly higher (P=0.006) in mixed MS1/2008 tumors compared to control tumors. Compared to control microbubbles the ultrasound signal using CD276-targeted microbubbles was significantly higher (P=0.002) and blocking with purified anti-CD276 antibody significantly decreased (P=0.0096) the signal in mixed MS-1/2008 tumors. Immunofluorescence analysis of the tumor tissue confirmed higher quantitative immunofluorescence signal in mixed MS-1/2008 tumors than in control 2008 only tumors, but showed not significantly different (P=0.54) microvessel density. Conclusion Our novel small animal model allows for modulating the expression of human tumor-associated vascular endothelial imaging targets in a mouse host and these expression differences can be visualized non-invasively by ultrasound molecular imaging. The animal model can be applied to other human vascular targets and may facilitate the preclinical development of new imaging probes such as microbubbles targeted at human vascular markers not expressed in mice. PMID:24389327

  17. Identification of prognostic molecular features in the reactive stroma of human breast and prostate cancer.

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    Anne Planche

    Full Text Available Primary tumor growth induces host tissue responses that are believed to support and promote tumor progression. Identification of the molecular characteristics of the tumor microenvironment and elucidation of its crosstalk with tumor cells may therefore be crucial for improving our understanding of the processes implicated in cancer progression, identifying potential therapeutic targets, and uncovering stromal gene expression signatures that may predict clinical outcome. A key issue to resolve, therefore, is whether the stromal response to tumor growth is largely a generic phenomenon, irrespective of the tumor type or whether the response reflects tumor-specific properties. To address similarity or distinction of stromal gene expression changes during cancer progression, oligonucleotide-based Affymetrix microarray technology was used to compare the transcriptomes of laser-microdissected stromal cells derived from invasive human breast and prostate carcinoma. Invasive breast and prostate cancer-associated stroma was observed to display distinct transcriptomes, with a limited number of shared genes. Interestingly, both breast and prostate tumor-specific dysregulated stromal genes were observed to cluster breast and prostate cancer patients, respectively, into two distinct groups with statistically different clinical outcomes. By contrast, a gene signature that was common to the reactive stroma of both tumor types did not have survival predictive value. Univariate Cox analysis identified genes whose expression level was most strongly associated with patient survival. Taken together, these observations suggest that the tumor microenvironment displays distinct features according to the tumor type that provides survival-predictive value.

  18. The secretion of high molecular weight cathepsin B from cultured human liver cancers.

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    Ohsawa,Toshiya

    1989-02-01

    Full Text Available The biochemical characteristics of cathepsin B secreted from cultured human liver cancer cells were examined. The enzyme activity of culture medium against a synthetic substrate, N-carbobenzoxy-L-arginyl-L-arginine-4-methyl-coumaryl-7-amide, was dependent on the addition of cysteine, and the optimal pH was found to be 6.0. No activity was observed when the enzyme source was fresh medium not used for culture. These results suggest that the enzyme released from liver cancer cells is the thiol-protease cathepsin B. The molecular weight of the enzyme with 90% of the total activity was 40,000. Two cathepsin B molecules were found in liver tissue from patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC; one was equivalent in size to the secreted enzyme, and a smaller one was the same as normal liver cathepsin B (27,000, which was also obtained from HCC-bearing cirrhotic liver. These results demonstrate that two molecules of cathepsin B are synthesized in liver cancer, and that the larger one is released into the surrounding tissue.

  19. Molecular profiling of multiple human cancers defines an inflammatory cancer-associated molecular pattern and uncovers KPNA2 as a uniform poor prognostic cancer marker.

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    Saleh M Rachidi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Immune evasion is one of the recognized hallmarks of cancer. Inflammatory responses to cancer can also contribute directly to oncogenesis. Since the immune system is hardwired to protect the host, there is a possibility that cancers, regardless of their histological origins, endow themselves with a common and shared inflammatory cancer-associated molecular pattern (iCAMP to promote oncoinflammation. However, the definition of iCAMP has not been conceptually and experimentally investigated. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Genome-wide cDNA expression data was analyzed for 221 normal and 324 cancer specimens from 7 cancer types: breast, prostate, lung, colon, gastric, oral and pancreatic. A total of 96 inflammatory genes with consistent dysregulation were identified, including 44 up-regulated and 52 down-regulated genes. Protein expression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry for some of these genes. The iCAMP contains proteins whose roles in cancer have been implicated and others which are yet to be appreciated. The clinical significance of many iCAMP genes was confirmed in multiple independent cohorts of colon and ovarian cancer patients. In both cases, better prognosis correlated strongly with high CXCL13 and low level of GREM1, LOX, TNFAIP6, CD36, and EDNRA. An "Inflammatory Gene Integrated Score" was further developed from the combination of 18 iCAMP genes in ovarian cancer, which predicted overall survival. Noticeably, as a selective nuclear import protein whose immuno-regulatory function just begins to emerge, karyopherin alpha 2 (KPNA2 is uniformly up-regulated across cancer types. For the first time, the cancer-specific up-regulation of KPNA2 and its clinical significance were verified by tissue microarray analysis in colon and head-neck cancers. CONCLUSION: This work defines an inflammatory signature shared by seven epithelial cancer types and KPNA2 as a consistently up-regulated protein in cancer. Identification of iCAMP may not only

  20. Gene expression correlations in human cancer cell lines define molecular interaction networks for epithelial phenotype.

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    Kurt W Kohn

    Full Text Available Using gene expression data to enhance our knowledge of control networks relevant to cancer biology and therapy is a challenging but urgent task. Based on the premise that genes that are expressed together in a variety of cell types are likely to functions together, we derived mutually correlated genes that function together in various processes in epithelial-like tumor cells. Expression-correlated genes were derived from data for the NCI-60 human tumor cell lines, as well as data from the Broad Institute's CCLE cell lines. NCI-60 cell lines that selectively expressed a mutually correlated subset of tight junction genes served as a signature for epithelial-like cancer cells. Those signature cell lines served as a seed to derive other correlated genes, many of which had various other epithelial-related functions. Literature survey yielded molecular interaction and function information about those genes, from which molecular interaction maps were assembled. Many of the genes had epithelial functions unrelated to tight junctions, demonstrating that new function categories were elicited. The most highly correlated genes were implicated in the following epithelial functions: interactions at tight junctions (CLDN7, CLDN4, CLDN3, MARVELD3, MARVELD2, TJP3, CGN, CRB3, LLGL2, EPCAM, LNX1; interactions at adherens junctions (CDH1, ADAP1, CAMSAP3; interactions at desmosomes (PPL, PKP3, JUP; transcription regulation of cell-cell junction complexes (GRHL1 and 2; epithelial RNA splicing regulators (ESRP1 and 2; epithelial vesicle traffic (RAB25, EPN3, GRHL2, EHF, ADAP1, MYO5B; epithelial Ca(+2 signaling (ATP2C2, S100A14, BSPRY; terminal differentiation of epithelial cells (OVOL1 and 2, ST14, PRSS8, SPINT1 and 2; maintenance of apico-basal polarity (RAB25, LLGL2, EPN3. The findings provide a foundation for future studies to elucidate the functions of regulatory networks specific to epithelial-like cancer cells and to probe for anti-cancer drug targets.

  1. MOLECULAR DOCKING OF COMPOUNDS FROM Chaetomium Sp. AGAINST HUMAN ESTROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA IN SEARCHING ANTI BREAST CANCER

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    Maywan Hariono

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A study on molecular docking-based virtual screening has been conducted to select virtual hit of compounds, reported its existence in fungal endophytes of Chaetomium sp. as cytotoxic agent of breast cancer. The ligands were docked into Human Estrogen Receptor alpha (HERa as the protein which regulates the breast cancer growth via estradiol-estrogen receptor binding intervention. The results showed that two compounds bearing xanthone and two compounds bearing benzonaphtyridinedione scaffolds were selected as virtual hit ligands for HERa leading to the conclusion that these compounds were good to be developed as anti breast cancer.

  2. Xmrk, kras and myc transgenic zebrafish liver cancer models share molecular signatures with subsets of human hepatocellular carcinoma.

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    Weiling Zheng

    Full Text Available Previously three oncogene transgenic zebrafish lines with inducible expression of xmrk, kras or Myc in the liver have been generated and these transgenic lines develop oncogene-addicted liver tumors upon chemical induction. In the current study, comparative transcriptomic approaches were used to examine the correlation of the three induced transgenic liver cancers with human liver cancers. RNA profiles from the three zebrafish tumors indicated relatively small overlaps of significantly deregulated genes and biological pathways. Nevertheless, the three transgenic tumor signatures all showed significant correlation with advanced or very advanced human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Interestingly, molecular signature from each oncogene-induced zebrafish liver tumor correlated with only a small subset of human HCC samples (24-29% and there were conserved up-regulated pathways between the zebrafish and correlated human HCC subgroup. The three zebrafish liver cancer models together represented nearly half (47.2% of human HCCs while some human HCCs showed significant correlation with more than one signature defined from the three oncogene-addicted zebrafish tumors. In contrast, commonly deregulated genes (21 up and 16 down in the three zebrafish tumor models generally showed accordant deregulation in the majority of human HCCs, suggesting that these genes might be more consistently deregulated in a broad range of human HCCs with different molecular mechanisms and thus serve as common diagnosis markers and therapeutic targets. Thus, these transgenic zebrafish models with well-defined oncogene-induced tumors are valuable tools for molecular classification of human HCCs and for understanding of molecular drivers in hepatocarcinogenesis in each human HCC subgroup.

  3. Molecular profiling of indolent human prostate cancer:tackling technical challenges to achieve high-fidelity genome-wide data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thomas A. Dunn; Helen L. Fedor; Angelo M. De Marzo; Jun Luo

    2012-01-01

    The contemporary problem of prostate cancer overtreatment can be partially attributed to the diagnosis of potentially indolent prostate cancers that pose low risk to aged men,and lack of sufficiently accurate risk stratification methods to reliably seek out men with indolent diseases.Since progressive acquisition and accumulation of genomic alterations,both genetic and epigenetic,is a defining feature of all human cancers at different stages of disease progression,it is hypothesized that RNA and DNA alterations characteristic of indolent prostate tumors may be different from those previously characterized in the setting of clinically significant prostate cancer.Approaches capable of detecting such alterations on a genome-wide level are the most promising.Such analysis may uncover molecular events defining early initiating stages along the natural history of prostate cancer progression,and ultimately lead to rational development of risk stratification methods for identification of men who can safely forego treatment.However,defining and characterizing indolent prostate cancer in a clinically relevant context remains a challenge,particularly when genome-wide approaches are employed to profile formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens.Here,we provide the conceptual basis underlying the importance of understanding indolent prostate cancer from molecular profiling studies,identify the key hurdles in sample acquisition and variables that affect molecular data derived from FFPE tissues,and highlight recent progresses in efforts to address these technical challenges.

  4. Lung Cancer and Human Papilloma Viruses (HPVs: Examining the Molecular Evidence

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    Priya R. Prabhu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human papilloma virus (HPV, known to be an etiological agent for genital cancers, has been suggested also to be a possible contributory agent for lung cancer. Alternatively, lung cancer, formerly considered to be solely a smoker's disease, may now be more appropriately categorised into never smoker's and smoker's lung cancer. Through this paper we attempt to bring forth the current knowledge regarding mechanisms of HPV gaining access into the lung tissue, various strategies involved in HPV-associated tumorigenesis in lung tissue.

  5. Molecular Modulation of Inhibitors of Apoptosis as a Novel Approach for Radiosensitization of Human Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    providing a proof-of- concept that IAPs may be a novel and promising target for chemo/ radiosensitization of human cancers. Loss of XIAP by RNAi also...33] Hawkins CJ, Ekert PG, Uren AG, Holmgreen SP, Vaux DL. Anti-apoptotic potential of insect cellular and viral IAPs in mammalian cells. Cell Death...expression by RNAi and antisense approaches sensitizes cancer cells to functionally diverse chemotherapeutics. Oncogene 2004; 23: 8105-17. [68

  6. A novel human ex vivo model for the analysis of molecular events during lung cancer chemotherapy

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    Lang Dagmar S

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC causes most of cancer related deaths in humans and is characterized by poor prognosis regarding efficiency of chemotherapeutical treatment and long-term survival of the patients. The purpose of the present study was the development of a human ex vivo tissue culture model and the analysis of the effects of conventional chemotherapy, which then can serve as a tool to test new chemotherapeutical regimens in NSCLC. Methods In a short-term tissue culture model designated STST (Short-Term Stimulation of Tissues in combination with the novel *HOPE-fixation and paraffin embedding method we examined the responsiveness of 41 human NSCLC tissue specimens to the individual cytotoxic drugs carboplatin, vinorelbine or gemcitabine. Viability was analyzed by LIFE/DEAD assay, TUNEL-staining and colorimetric MTT assay. Expression of Ki-67 protein and of BrdU (bromodeoxyuridine uptake as markers for proliferation and of cleaved (activated effector caspase-3 as indicator of late phase apoptosis were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Transcription of caspase-3 was analyzed by RT-PCR. Flow cytometry was utilized to determine caspase-3 in human cancer cell lines. Results Viability, proliferation and apoptosis of the tissues were moderately affected by cultivation. In human breast cancer, small-cell lung cancer (SCLC and human cell lines (CPC-N, HEK proliferative capacity was clearly reduced by all 3 chemotherapeutic agents in a very similar manner. Cleavage of caspase-3 was induced in the chemo-sensitive types of cancer (breast cancer, SCLC. Drug-induced effects in human NSCLC tissues were less evident than in the chemo-sensitive tumors with more pronounced effects in adenocarcinomas as compared to squamous cell carcinomas. Conclusion Although there was high heterogeneity among the individual tumor tissue responses as expected, we clearly demonstrate specific multiple drug-induced effects simultaneously. Thus, STST

  7. Molecular and Cellular Effects of Hydrogen Peroxide on Human Lung Cancer Cells: Potential Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Vilema-Enríquez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer has a very high mortality-to-incidence ratio, representing one of the main causes of cancer mortality worldwide. Therefore, new treatment strategies are urgently needed. Several diseases including lung cancer have been associated with the action of reactive oxygen species (ROS from which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 is one of the most studied. Despite the fact that H2O2 may have opposite effects on cell proliferation depending on the concentration and cell type, it triggers several antiproliferative responses. H2O2 produces both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA lesions, increases the expression of cell adhesion molecules, and increases p53 activity and other transcription factors orchestrating cancer cell death. In addition, H2O2 facilitates the endocytosis of oligonucleotides, affects membrane proteins, induces calcium release, and decreases cancer cell migration and invasion. Furthermore, the MAPK pathway and the expression of genes related to inflammation including interleukins, TNF-α, and NF-κB are also affected by H2O2. Herein, we will summarize the main effects of hydrogen peroxide on human lung cancer leading to suggesting it as a potential therapeutic tool to fight this disease. Because of the multimechanistic nature of this molecule, novel therapeutic approaches for lung cancer based on the use of H2O2 may help to decrease the mortality from this malignancy.

  8. Molecular diagnosis of human papillomavirus in the development of cervical cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lourdes Gutiérrez-Xicoténcatl; Tanya Plett-Torres; Claudia L Madrid-González; Vicente Madrid-Marina

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is a major public health problem in developing countries and its most significant etiological risk factor is infection by the human papillomavirus (HPV). The main approach to date for the prevention of CC has been through screening programs, using the cervical smear (PAP test) to detect precursory lesions. The sensitivity and specificity of the PAP smear depend on the skills of the observer to recognize and classify a variety of cellular abnormalities. The development of ...

  9. Molecular characterization of irinotecan (SN-38) resistant human breast cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jandu, Haatisha; Aluzaite, Kristina; Fogh, Louise

    2016-01-01

    resistance protein (ABCG2/BCRP) drug efflux pump.Results: We found that the resistant cell lines showed 7-100 fold increased resistance to SN-38 but remained sensitive to docetaxel and the non-camptothecin Top1 inhibitor LMP400. The resistant cell lines were characterized by Top1 down-regulation, changed...... of this study was to lay the groundwork for development of predictive biomarkers for irinotecan treatment in BC.Methods: We established BC cell lines with acquired or de novo resistance to SN-38, by exposing the human BC cell lines MCF 7 and MDA MB 231 to either stepwise increasing concentrations over 6 months...... or an initial high dose of SN-38 (the active metabolite of irinotecan), respectively. The resistant cell lines were analyzed for cross-resistance to other anti-cancer drugs, global gene expression, growth rates, TOP1 and TOP2A gene copy numbers and protein expression, and inhibition of the breast cancer...

  10. Molecular conservation of estrogen-response associated with cell cycle regulation, hormonal carcinogenesis and cancer in zebrafish and human cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govindarajan Kunde R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The zebrafish is recognized as a versatile cancer and drug screening model. However, it is not known whether the estrogen-responsive genes and signaling pathways that are involved in estrogen-dependent carcinogenesis and human cancer are operating in zebrafish. In order to determine the potential of zebrafish model for estrogen-related cancer research, we investigated the molecular conservation of estrogen responses operating in both zebrafish and human cancer cell lines. Methods Microarray experiment was performed on zebrafish exposed to estrogen (17β-estradiol; a classified carcinogen and an anti-estrogen (ICI 182,780. Zebrafish estrogen-responsive genes sensitive to both estrogen and anti-estrogen were identified and validated using real-time PCR. Human homolog mapping and knowledge-based data mining were performed on zebrafish estrogen responsive genes followed by estrogen receptor binding site analysis and comparative transcriptome analysis with estrogen-responsive human cancer cell lines (MCF7, T47D and Ishikawa. Results Our transcriptome analysis captured multiple estrogen-responsive genes and signaling pathways that increased cell proliferation, promoted DNA damage and genome instability, and decreased tumor suppressing effects, suggesting a common mechanism for estrogen-induced carcinogenesis. Comparative analysis revealed a core set of conserved estrogen-responsive genes that demonstrate enrichment of estrogen receptor binding sites and cell cycle signaling pathways. Knowledge-based and network analysis led us to propose that the mechanism involving estrogen-activated estrogen receptor mediated down-regulation of human homolog HES1 followed by up-regulation cell cycle-related genes (human homologs E2F4, CDK2, CCNA, CCNB, CCNE, is highly conserved, and this mechanism may involve novel crosstalk with basal AHR. We also identified mitotic roles of polo-like kinase as a conserved signaling pathway with multiple entry

  11. Interleukin 4 receptor on human lung cancer: a molecular target for cytotoxin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Mariko; Kawakami, Koji; Stepensky, Vitaly A; Maki, Richard A; Robin, Howard; Muller, Wayne; Husain, Syed R; Puri, Raj K

    2002-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that human lung tumor cell lines express interleukin 4 (IL-4) receptors, and IL-4 can mediate modest to moderate antiproliferative activity in vitro and in vivo in animal models of human lung tumors. On the basis of these studies, IL-4 was tested in clinical trials; however, it showed little antitumor activity in lung cancer patients. In the present study, we examined the expression of IL-4 receptors (IL-4Rs) in lung tumor samples and normal lung tissues and tested whether an IL-4R targeted agent will have better antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo compared with IL-4. IL-4R expression was tested by immunohistochemistry in 54 lung tumor samples and normal lung tissues in a tissue array, by reverse-transcription PCR and Northern blot analyses in lung tumor cell lines. Cytotoxic activity of IL-4 cytotoxin [IL-4(38-37)-PE38KDEL], composed of a circular permuted IL-4 and a mutated form of Pseudomonas exotoxin (PE38KDEL) was tested by protein synthesis inhibition and clonogenic assays in seven lung tumor cell lines. Antitumor activity of IL-4 cytotoxin was tested in vitro and in immunodeficient animal models of human lung tumors. We observed that IL-4Rs are expressed at higher levels in situ in lung tumor samples compared with normal lung tissues and IL-4 cytotoxin is highly and specifically cytotoxic to lung tumor cell lines in vitro. Intratumoral and i.p. administration of IL-4 cytotoxin to immunodeficient mice with s.c. established human lung H358 non-small cell lung cancer tumors mediated considerable antitumor activity in a dose-dependent manner with the higher dose producing durable complete responses. On the other hand, H460 non-small cell lung cancer tumors expressing low levels of IL-4R did not respond to IL-4 cytotoxin therapy. Because IL-4 cytotoxin mediates its antitumor activity through IL-4R, and a variety of lung tumors expressed high levels of IL-4R, we propose testing the safety of this agent in patients with lung

  12. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Josef J; Schöder, Heiko; Larson, Steven M

    2012-07-01

    Prostate cancer is a complex and biologically heterogeneous disease that is not adequately assessed with conventional imaging alone. Molecular imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) is poised to fill this unmet need through noninvasive probing of the multiple molecular and cellular processes that are active in prostate cancer patients. Several PET tracers are active in early-stage and late-stage prostate cancer in humans. F18-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), C11/F18-choline and sodium F18-fluoride have been studied most extensively. There is a growing body of literature supporting the utility of choline in early-stage prostate cancer. FDG and sodium F18-fluoride are more valuable in advanced disease, especially for assessing bone metastases, the prevalent form of metastases in this patient population. F18-fluorodihydrotestosterone is active in castrate disease and is emerging as a valuable pharmacodynamic marker in the development of novel androgen receptor-targeted therapies. Prostate-specific membrane antigen PET tracers are in the early stages of clinical development. Multiple PET tracers are currently available to aid in the detection and management of prostate cancer across the clinical spectrum of the disease. Prospective, rigorously controlled, clinical imaging trials are needed to establish the optimal role of PET in prostate cancer.

  13. First-in-Human Ultrasound Molecular Imaging With a VEGFR2-Specific Ultrasound Molecular Contrast Agent (BR55) in Prostate Cancer: A Safety and Feasibility Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeenge, Martijn; Tranquart, François; Mannaerts, Christophe K; de Reijke, Theo M; van de Vijver, Marc J; Laguna, M Pilar; Pochon, Sibylle; de la Rosette, Jean J M C H; Wijkstra, Hessel

    2017-07-01

    BR55, a vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2)-specific ultrasound molecular contrast agent (MCA), has shown promising results in multiple preclinical models regarding cancer imaging. In this first-in-human, phase 0, exploratory study, we investigated the feasibility and safety of the MCA for the detection of prostate cancer (PCa) in men using clinical standard technology. Imaging with the MCA was performed in 24 patients with biopsy-proven PCa scheduled for radical prostatectomy using a clinical ultrasound scanner at low acoustic power. Safety monitoring was done by physical examination, blood pressure and heart rate measurements, electrocardiogram, and blood sampling. As first-in-human study, MCA dosing and imaging protocol were necessarily fine-tuned along the enrollment to improve visualization. Imaging data were correlated with radical prostatectomy histopathology to analyze the detection rate of ultrasound molecular imaging with the MCA. Imaging with MCA doses of 0.03 and 0.05 mL/kg was adequate to obtain contrast enhancement images up to 30 minutes after administration. No serious adverse events or clinically meaningful changes in safety monitoring data were identified during or after administration. BR55 dosing and imaging were fine-tuned in the first 12 patients leading to 12 subsequent patients with an improved MCA dosing and imaging protocol. Twenty-three patients underwent radical prostatectomy. A total of 52 lesions were determined to be malignant by histopathology with 26 (50%) of them seen during BR55 imaging. In the 11 patients that were scanned with the improved protocol and underwent radical prostatectomy, a total of 28 malignant lesions were determined: 19 (68%) were seen during BR55 ultrasound molecular imaging, whereas 9 (32%) were not identified. Ultrasound molecular imaging with BR55 is feasible with clinical standard technology and demonstrated a good safety profile. Detectable levels of the MCA can be reached in patients

  14. Dynamic network of transcription and pathway crosstalk to reveal molecular mechanism of MGd-treated human lung cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyan Shao

    Full Text Available Recent research has revealed various molecular markers in lung cancer. However, the organizational principles underlying their genetic regulatory networks still await investigation. Here we performed Network Component Analysis (NCA and Pathway Crosstalk Analysis (PCA to construct a regulatory network in human lung cancer (A549 cells which were treated with 50 uM motexafin gadolinium (MGd, a metal cation-containing chemotherapeutic drug for 4, 12, and 24 hours. We identified a set of key TFs, known target genes for these TFs, and signaling pathways involved in regulatory networks. Our work showed that putative interactions between these TFs (such as ESR1/Sp1, E2F1/Sp1, c-MYC-ESR, Smad3/c-Myc, and NFKB1/RELA, between TFs and their target genes (such as BMP41/Est1, TSC2/Myc, APE1/Sp1/p53, RARA/HOXA1, and SP1/USF2, and between signaling pathways (such as PPAR signaling pathway and Adipocytokines signaling pathway. These results will provide insights into the regulatory mechanism of MGd-treated human lung cancer cells.

  15. From Breast to Bone: Tracking Gene Expression Changes Responsible for Breast Cancer Metastasis in a Humanized Mouse Model with Molecular Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    to the date of euthanasia (Fig. 4, right panel). Normalization to the photon flux of the mammary tumors was not possible because they were resected... Humanized Mouse Model with Molecular Imaging PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Emily Powell CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: The University of Texas MD Anderson...Breast to Bone: Tracking Gene Expression Changes Responsible for Breast Cancer Metastasis in a Humanized Mouse Model with Molecular Imaging 5b. GRANT

  16. Inhibitory effects and molecular mechanisms of tetrahydrocurcumin against human breast cancer MCF-7 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Han

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tetrahydrocurcumin (THC, an active metabolite of curcumin, has been reported to have similar biological effects to curcumin, but the mechanism of the antitumor activity of THC is still unclear. Methods: The present study was to investigate the antitumor effects and mechanism of THC in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells using the methods of MTT assay, LDH assay, flow cytometry analysis, and western blot assay. Results: THC was found to have markedly cytotoxic effect and antiproliferative activity against MCF-7 cells in a dose-dependent manner with the IC50 for 24 h of 107.8 μM. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that THC mediated the cell-cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase, and 32.8% of MCF-7 cells entered the early phase of apoptosis at 100 μM for 24 h. THC also dose-dependently led to apoptosis in MCF-7 cells via the mitochondrial pathway, as evidenced by the activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9, the elevation of intracellular ROS, a decrease in Bcl-2 and PARP expression, and an increase in Bax expression. Meanwhile, cytochrome C was released to cytosol and the loss of mitochondria membrane potential (Δψm was observed after THC treatment. Conclusion: THC is an excellent source of chemopreventive agents in the treatment of breast cancer and has excellent potential to be explored as antitumor precursor compound.

  17. Molecular Testing for Gastrointestinal Cancer

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    Hye Seung Lee

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available With recent advances in molecular diagnostic methods and targeted cancer therapies, several molecular tests have been recommended for gastric cancer (GC and colorectal cancer (CRC. Microsatellite instability analysis of gastrointestinal cancers is performed to screen for Lynch syndrome, predict favorable prognosis, and screen patients for immunotherapy. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor has been approved in metastatic CRCs with wildtype RAS (KRAS and NRAS exon 2–4. A BRAF mutation is required for predicting poor prognosis. Additionally, amplification of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 and MET is also associated with resistance to EGFR inhibitor in metastatic CRC patients. The BRAF V600E mutation is found in sporadic microsatellite unstable CRCs, and thus is helpful for ruling out Lynch syndrome. In addition, the KRAS mutation is a prognostic biomarker and the PIK3CA mutation is a molecular biomarker predicting response to phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors and response to aspirin therapy in CRC patients. Additionally, HER2 testing should be performed in all recurrent or metastatic GCs. If the results of HER2 immunohistochemistry are equivocal, HER2 silver or fluorescence in situ hybridization testing are essential for confirmative determination of HER2 status. Epstein-Barr virus–positive GCs have distinct characteristics, including heavy lymphoid stroma, hypermethylation phenotype, and high expression of immune modulators. Recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies enable us to examine various genetic alterations using a single test. Pathologists play a crucial role in ensuring reliable molecular testing and they should also take an integral role between molecular laboratories and clinicians.

  18. Molecular Testing for Gastrointestinal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Seung; Kim, Woo Ho; Kwak, Yoonjin; Koh, Jiwon; Bae, Jeong Mo; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Chang, Mee Soo; Han, Hye Seung; Kim, Joon Mee; Kim, Hwal Woong; Chang, Hee Kyung; Choi, Young Hee; Park, Ji Y.; Gu, Mi Jin; Lhee, Min Jin; Kim, Jung Yeon; Kim, Hee Sung; Cho, Mee-Yon

    2017-01-01

    With recent advances in molecular diagnostic methods and targeted cancer therapies, several molecular tests have been recommended for gastric cancer (GC) and colorectal cancer (CRC). Microsatellite instability analysis of gastrointestinal cancers is performed to screen for Lynch syndrome, predict favorable prognosis, and screen patients for immunotherapy. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor has been approved in metastatic CRCs with wildtype RAS (KRAS and NRAS exon 2–4). A BRAF mutation is required for predicting poor prognosis. Additionally, amplification of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and MET is also associated with resistance to EGFR inhibitor in metastatic CRC patients. The BRAF V600E mutation is found in sporadic microsatellite unstable CRCs, and thus is helpful for ruling out Lynch syndrome. In addition, the KRAS mutation is a prognostic biomarker and the PIK3CA mutation is a molecular biomarker predicting response to phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors and response to aspirin therapy in CRC patients. Additionally, HER2 testing should be performed in all recurrent or metastatic GCs. If the results of HER2 immunohistochemistry are equivocal, HER2 silver or fluorescence in situ hybridization testing are essential for confirmative determination of HER2 status. Epstein-Barr virus–positive GCs have distinct characteristics, including heavy lymphoid stroma, hypermethylation phenotype, and high expression of immune modulators. Recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies enable us to examine various genetic alterations using a single test. Pathologists play a crucial role in ensuring reliable molecular testing and they should also take an integral role between molecular laboratories and clinicians. PMID:28219002

  19. Human Viruses and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail Morales-Sánchez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The first human tumor virus was discovered in the middle of the last century by Anthony Epstein, Bert Achong and Yvonne Barr in African pediatric patients with Burkitt’s lymphoma. To date, seven viruses -EBV, KSHV, high-risk HPV, MCPV, HBV, HCV and HTLV1- have been consistently linked to different types of human cancer, and infections are estimated to account for up to 20% of all cancer cases worldwide. Viral oncogenic mechanisms generally include: generation of genomic instability, increase in the rate of cell proliferation, resistance to apoptosis, alterations in DNA repair mechanisms and cell polarity changes, which often coexist with evasion mechanisms of the antiviral immune response. Viral agents also indirectly contribute to the development of cancer mainly through immunosuppression or chronic inflammation, but also through chronic antigenic stimulation. There is also evidence that viruses can modulate the malignant properties of an established tumor. In the present work, causation criteria for viruses and cancer will be described, as well as the viral agents that comply with these criteria in human tumors, their epidemiological and biological characteristics, the molecular mechanisms by which they induce cellular transformation and their associated cancers.

  20. The kinetic mechanism of Human Thymidine Phosphorylase - a molecular target for cancer drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deves, Candida; Rostirolla, Diana Carolina; Martinelli, Leonardo Kras Borges; Bizarro, Cristiano Valim; Santos, Diogenes Santiago; Basso, Luiz Augusto

    2014-03-04

    Human Thymidine Phosphorylase (HTP), also known as the platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor (PD-ECGF) or gliostatin, catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of thymidine (dThd) to thymine and 2-deoxy-α-d-ribose-1-phosphate (2dR1P). HTP is a key enzyme in the pyrimidine salvage pathway involved in dThd homeostasis in cells. HTP is a target for anticancer drug development as its enzymatic activity promotes angiogenesis. Here, we describe cloning, expression, and purification to homogeneity of recombinant TYMP-encoded HTP. Peptide fingerprinting and the molecular mass value of the homogenous protein confirmed its identity as HTP assessed by mass spectrometry. Size exclusion chromatography showed that HTP is a dimer in solution. Kinetic studies revealed that HTP displayed substrate inhibition for dThd. Initial velocity and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) studies suggest that HTP catalysis follows a rapid-equilibrium random bi-bi kinetic mechanism. ITC measurements also showed that dThd and Pi binding are favorable processes. The pH-rate profiles indicated that maximal enzyme activity was achieved at low pH values. Functional groups with apparent pK values of 5.2 and 9.0 are involved in dThd binding and groups with pK values of 6.1 and 7.8 are involved in phosphate binding.

  1. Conserved Molecular and Epigenetic Determinants of Aromatase Gene Induction by the Herbicide Atrazine in Human and Rat Cellular Models Relevant to Breast Cancer Risk

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    AbstractConserved Molecular and Epigenetic Determinants of Aromatase Gene Induction by the Herbicide Atrazine in Human and Rat Cellular Models Relevant to Breast Cancer Risk ByTheresa Ryan StueveDoctor of Philosophy in Molecular ToxicologyUniversity of California, BerkeleyProfessor Gary Firestone, Co-ChairProfessor Dale Leitman, Co-ChairFall 2011The widely-applied herbicide atrazine (ATR) is a potent endocrine disruptor that elicits anti-androgenic and estrogenic effects, often at concentrat...

  2. Molecular phenotyping of human ovarian cancer stem cells unravels the mechanisms for repair and chemoresistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvero, Ayesha B; Chen, Rui; Fu, Han-Hsuan

    2009-01-01

    A major burden in the treatment of ovarian cancer is the high percentage of recurrence and chemoresistance. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) provide a reservoir of cells that can self-renew, can maintain the tumor by generating differentiated cells [non-stem cells (non-CSCs)] which make up the bulk of th...

  3. Cochinchina momordica seed suppresses proliferation and metastasis in human lung cancer cells by regulating multiple molecular targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yang; Meng, Linyi; Sun, Huajun; Zhu, Yizhun; Liu, Hongrui

    2015-01-01

    Cochinchina Momordica Seed, which is the dried ripe seed of Momordica cochinchinensis (Lour.) Spreng, has been used as a mainly anticancer ingredient for many years in China. This study aims at investigating the roles of an ethanol-soluble extract of Cochinchina Momordica Seed (ECMS) in suppressing the proliferation and metastasis of human lung cancer cells, and further elucidating underlying molecular mechanisms. Our researches suggest that ECMS dose-dependently decreased the survival rates of A549 and H1299 cells, and inhibited the migration and invasion in A549 cells. ECMS-induced apoptosis was accompanied by up-regulation of p53, Bax and the down-regulation of Bcl-2, PI-3K/Akt signal pathway, and resulted in the dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and sequentially activated caspase-3 cascade. Pre-treated with specific inhibitors, LY294002 (PI-3K inhibitor) and BAY11-7082 (NF-κB inhibitor) could enhance the anti-proliferation effects of ECMS on A549 cells. Furthermore, ECMS could increase the level of E-cadherin and decrease of the level of STAT-3 and MMP-2, and scarcely affected the expression of VEGF, and resulted in the inhibition of migration and invasion. Pre-treated with specific inhibitors, WP1066 (STAT-3 inhibitor) and TIMP-2 (MMP-2 inhibitor) could enhance the inhibitory effects of ECMS on migration. In conclusion, the current data demonstrated ECMS inhibited the proliferation of A549 cells by inducing apoptosis, at least partly through the activation of p53 and inactivation of PI-3K/Akt signaling. STAT-3 and MMP-2 pathways may be partly involved in anti-metastasis activities of ECMS. Hence, ECMS might be a promising candidate for the therapy of the non-small cell lung cancer by regulating multiple molecular targets.

  4. Combined therapeutic effect and molecular mechanisms of metformin and cisplatin in human lung cancer xenografts in nude mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Qin Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This work was aimed at studying the inhibitory activity of metformin combined with the commonly used chemotherapy drug cisplatin in human lung cancer xenografts in nude mice. We also examined the combined effects of these drugs on the molecular expression of survivin, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2, vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C, and vascular endothelial growth factorreceptor-3 (VEGFR-3 to determine the mechanism of action and to explore the potential applications of the new effective drug therapy in lung cancer. Materials and Methods: The nude mice model of lung cancer xenografts was established, and mice were randomly divided into the metformin group, the cisplatin group, the metformin + cisplatin group, and the control group. The animals were killed 42 days after drug administration, and the tumor tissues were then sampled to detect the messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA and protein expression levels of survivin, MMP-2, VEGF-C, and VEGFR-3 by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Results: The protein and mRNA expression levels of survivin, MMP-2, VEGF-C, and VEGFR-3 in the cisplatin group and the combined treatment group were lower than that in the control group (P < 0.05. In the metformin group, the expression of MMP-2 protein and mRNA was lower than that in the control group (P < 0.05. The protein and mRNA expression levels of survivin, MMP-2, VEGF-C, and VEGFR-3 in the combined treatment group were lower than that in the cisplatin group and the metformin group (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Metformin inhibited the expression of MMP-2, cisplatin and the combined treatment inhibited the expression of survivin, MMP-2, VEGF-C, and VEGFR-3, and the combined treatment of metformin with cisplatin resulted in enhanced anti-tumor efficacy.

  5. Molecular Imaging of Ovarian Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Sai Kiran; Nemieboka, Brandon; Sala, Evis; Lewis, Jason S.; Zeglis, Brian M

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy and the fifth leading cause of cancer-related death in women. Over the past decade, medical imaging has played an increasingly valuable role in the diagnosis, staging, and treatment planning of the disease. In this “Focus on Molecular Imaging” review, we seek to provide a brief yet informative survey of the current state of the molecular imaging of ovarian cancer. The article is divided into sections according to modality, covering rece...

  6. The molecular biology of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, J S

    2000-12-01

    The process by which normal cells become progressively transformed to malignancy is now known to require the sequential acquisition of mutations which arise as a consequence of damage to the genome. This damage can be the result of endogenous processes such as errors in replication of DNA, the intrinsic chemical instability of certain DNA bases or from attack by free radicals generated during metabolism. DNA damage can also result from interactions with exogenous agents such as ionizing radiation, UV radiation and chemical carcinogens. Cells have evolved means to repair such damage, but for various reasons errors occur and permanent changes in the genome, mutations, are introduced. Some inactivating mutations occur in genes responsible for maintaining genomic integrity facilitating the acquisition of additional mutations. This review seeks first to identify sources of mutational damage so as to identify the basic causes of human cancer. Through an understanding of cause, prevention may be possible. The evolution of the normal cell to a malignant one involves processes by which genes involved in normal homeostatic mechanisms that control proliferation and cell death suffer mutational damage which results in the activation of genes stimulating proliferation or protection against cell death, the oncogenes, and the inactivation of genes which would normally inhibit proliferation, the tumor suppressor genes. Finally, having overcome normal controls on cell birth and cell death, an aspiring cancer cell faces two new challenges: it must overcome replicative senescence and become immortal and it must obtain adequate supplies of nutrients and oxygen to maintain this high rate of proliferation. This review examines the process of the sequential acquisition of mutations from the prospective of Darwinian evolution. Here, the fittest cell is one that survives to form a new population of genetically distinct cells, the tumor. This review does not attempt to be comprehensive but

  7. Molecular Characterization of Human MUC16 (CA125) in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    THIS PAGE Unclassified Unclassified 35 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std...imparts tumorigenic and metastatic funcions through nuclear translocation of JAK2 to pancreatic cancer cells. Oncotarget 2015; 6(8):5772-87 4...s) PLTGNSDLPFWA ub ub ub ub ub ub n n Site # 2 Site # 1 Novel cleavage area Tandem repeat (TR) 60+ repeats of 156 aa SEA A N K1 T R SEA SEA A N K2SEA

  8. Molecular tests to detect human papillomavirus infection in patients with cervical dysplasia and invasive cervical cancer in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sait KH

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Khalid H Sait1, Faten S Gazzaz21Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, 2Medical Virology Department, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi ArabiaPurpose: The aim of this study was to determine the actual human papillomavirus (HPV subtype that presents in cervical dysplasia and invasive carcinoma in the Saudi population, and the feasibility of using Hybrid Capture 2 technique (HC2 on biopsy specimens to detect certain HPV subtypes.Patients and methods: A prospective study was conducted from March 2007 to December 2008. The subjects studied were women with a mean age of 48.18 years, who attended the hospital for cervical biopsy due to the suspected diagnosis of cervical dysplasia or an invasive disease, based on previous suspicious Pap smear. HPV DNA hybridization by HC2 was performed on the cervical biopsies of these patients, to detect HPV infection.Results: During the period of this study, 45 patients had cervical biopsies taken for HPV testing. Seven patients had a negative HC2 result and were found to have no cervical dysplasia on the final pathology review. Seventeen cases with cervical dysplasia and 21 patients with invasive disease were presented; the mean age was 48 years. HC2 testing for HPV were found to be positive in patients with cervical dysplasia, invasive carcinoma, and all in 5 (29.4%, 13 (61.9% and 18 (47.4%, respectively. The sensitivity of the test is 47% and specificity is 100%.Conclusion: The use of molecular detection of HPV DNA by HC2 in biopsy is feasible and effective. These results confirm the finding that HPV contributes to the etiology of cervical cancer in Muslim society.Keywords: HPV, subtyping, cervical neoplasia

  9. Testing the variability of PSA expression by different human prostate cancer cell lines by means of a new potentiometric device employing molecularly antibody assembled on graphene surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebelo, Tânia S.C.R. [BioMark-CINTESIS/ISEP, Instituto Superior de Engenharia do Instituto Politécnico do Porto (Portugal); LAQV, REQUIMTE, Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica (Portugal); Laboratory for Bone Metabolism and Regeneration, Faculdade de Medicina Dentária, Universidade do Porto, Porto (Portugal); Noronha, João P.; Galésio, Marco; Santos, Hugo; Diniz, Mário [LAQV, REQUIMTE, Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica (Portugal); Sales, M. Goreti F. [BioMark-CINTESIS/ISEP, Instituto Superior de Engenharia do Instituto Politécnico do Porto (Portugal); Fernandes, Maria H. [Laboratory for Bone Metabolism and Regeneration, Faculdade de Medicina Dentária, Universidade do Porto, Porto (Portugal); Costa-Rodrigues, João, E-mail: jrodrigues@fmd.up.pt [Laboratory for Bone Metabolism and Regeneration, Faculdade de Medicina Dentária, Universidade do Porto, Porto (Portugal); ESTSP — Escola Superior de Tecnologia da Saúde do Porto, Instituto Politécnico do Porto (Portugal)

    2016-02-01

    Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) is widely used as a biomarker for prostate cancer. Recently, an electrochemical biosensor for PSA detection by means of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) was developed. This work evaluated the performance and the effectiveness of that PSA biosensor in screening the biomarker PSA in biological media with complex composition, collected from different human prostate cell line cultures. For that, the prostate cancer LNCaP and PC3 cells, and the non-cancerous prostate cell line PNT2 were cultured for 2, 7 and 14 days in either α-MEM or RPMI in the presence of 10% or 30% fetal bovine serum. Human gingival fibroblasts were used as a non-cancerous non-prostatic control. The different culture conditions modulated cellular proliferation and the expression of several prostate markers, including PSA. The electrochemical biosensor was able to specifically detect PSA in the culture media and values obtained were similar to those achieved by a commercial Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) kit, the most commonly used method for PSA quantification in prostate cancer diagnosis. Thus, the tested biosensor may represent a useful alternative as a diagnostic tool for PSA determination in biological samples. - Highlights: • PSA quantification was performed in prostate cancer cell culture media. • Culture media composition and culture period significantly affect PSA production. • The PSA biosensor detected a wide range of PSA levels in complex media. • A high data correlation was observed between the biosensor and the ELISA analysis.

  10. Molecular pathways leading to loss of skeletal muscle mass in cancer cachexia--can findings from animal models be translated to humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Tara C; Bachmann, Jeannine; Prokopchuk, Olga; Friess, Helmut; Martignoni, Marc E

    2016-02-08

    Cachexia is a multi-factorial, systemic syndrome that especially affects patients with cancer of the gastrointestinal tract, and leads to reduced treatment response, survival and quality of life. The most important clinical feature of cachexia is the excessive wasting of skeletal muscle mass. Currently, an effective treatment is still lacking and the search for therapeutic targets continues. Even though a substantial number of animal studies have contributed to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of the loss of skeletal muscle mass, subsequent clinical trials of potential new drugs have not yet yielded any effective treatment for cancer cachexia. Therefore, we questioned to which degree findings from animal studies can be translated to humans in clinical practice and research. A substantial amount of animal studies on the molecular mechanisms of muscle wasting in cancer cachexia has been conducted in recent years. This extensive review of the literature showed that most of their observations could not be consistently reproduced in studies on human skeletal muscle samples. However, studies on human material are scarce and limited in patient numbers and homogeneity. Therefore, their results have to be interpreted critically. More research is needed on human tissue samples to clarify the signaling pathways that lead to skeletal muscle loss, and to confirm pre-selected drug targets from animal models in clinical trials. In addition, improved diagnostic tools and standardized clinical criteria for cancer cachexia are needed to conduct standardized, randomized controlled trials of potential drug candidates in the future.

  11. Molecular mechanisms of paclitaxel and NM-3 on human gastric cancer in a severe combined immune deficiency mice orthotopic implantation model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Shui Zhu; Ming-Quan Song; Guo-Qiang Chen; Qin Li; Qun Sun; Qiang Zhang

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To explore the molecular mechanisms of action of paclitaxel and NM-3 on human gastric cancer in severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) mice.METHODS: Human gastric cancer cells SGC-7901 were implanted into SCID mice and mice were treated with paclitaxel and NM-3. The effects of paclitaxel and NM-3 on apoptosis of human gastric cancer cells were analyzed using flow cytometry, TUNEL assays, and DNA fragment analyses.RESULTS: Apoptosis of SGC-7901 cells was successfully induced by paclitaxel, NM-3, and the combination of paclitaxel and NM-3 24 h after injection as shown by the presence of apoptotic hypodiploid peaks on the flow cytometer before G1-S and a characteristic apoptotic band pattern in the DNA electrophoresis. The apoptotic rate detected by TUNEL assay was found to be significantly higher in the paclitaxel/NM-3 compared to the control group (38.5% ± 5.14% vs 13.2% ± 1.75%,P < 0.01).CONCLUSION: Paclitaxel in combination with NM-3 is able to induce apoptosis of the human gastric cancer cells in SCID mice effectively and synergistically.

  12. Molecular imaging in cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalski, Mark H. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Chen, Xiaoyuan [National Institutes of Health (NIH), Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine (LOMIN), National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2011-02-15

    The success of cancer therapy can be difficult to predict, as its efficacy is often predicated upon characteristics of the cancer, treatment, and individual that are not fully understood or are difficult to ascertain. Monitoring the response of disease to treatment is therefore essential and has traditionally been characterized by changes in tumor volume. However, in many instances, this singular measure is insufficient for predicting treatment effects on patient survival. Molecular imaging allows repeated in vivo measurement of many critical molecular features of neoplasm, such as metabolism, proliferation, angiogenesis, hypoxia, and apoptosis, which can be employed for monitoring therapeutic response. In this review, we examine the current methods for evaluating response to treatment and provide an overview of emerging PET molecular imaging methods that will help guide future cancer therapies. (orig.)

  13. Human mammary microenvironment better regulates the biology of human breast cancer in humanized mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ming-Jie; Wang, Jue; Xu, Lu; Zha, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Yi; Ling, Li-Jun; Wang, Shui

    2015-02-01

    During the past decades, many efforts have been made in mimicking the clinical progress of human cancer in mouse models. Previously, we developed a human breast tissue-derived (HB) mouse model. Theoretically, it may mimic the interactions between "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin and human breast cancer cells. However, detailed evidences are absent. The present study (in vivo, cellular, and molecular experiments) was designed to explore the regulatory role of human mammary microenvironment in the progress of human breast cancer cells. Subcutaneous (SUB), mammary fat pad (MFP), and HB mouse models were developed for in vivo comparisons. Then, the orthotopic tumor masses from three different mouse models were collected for primary culture. Finally, the biology of primary cultured human breast cancer cells was compared by cellular and molecular experiments. Results of in vivo mouse models indicated that human breast cancer cells grew better in human mammary microenvironment. Cellular and molecular experiments confirmed that primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model showed a better proliferative and anti-apoptotic biology than those from SUB to MFP mouse models. Meanwhile, primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model also obtained the migratory and invasive biology for "species-specific" tissue metastasis to human tissues. Comprehensive analyses suggest that "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin better regulates the biology of human breast cancer cells in our humanized mouse model of breast cancer, which is more consistent with the clinical progress of human breast cancer.

  14. Apoptosis-related molecular differences for response to tyrosin kinase inhibitors in drug-sensitive and drug-resistant human bladder cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jixia Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR family is reportedly overexpressed in bladder cancer, and tyrosine kinaseinhibitors (TKIs have been suggested as treatment. Gefitinib is a selective inhibitor of the EGFR and lapatinib is a dual inhibitor of both the EGFR and HER2 (human EGFR type 2 receptor. Both compounds compete with the binding of adenosine triphosphate (ATP to the tyrosine kinase domain of the respective receptors to inhibit receptor autophosphorylation causing suppression of signal transduction. Unfortunately, resistance to these inhibitors is a major clinical problem. Aims: To compare the apoptosis signaling pathway(s induced by gefitinib and lapatinib, in UM-UC-5 (drug-sensitive and UM-UC-14 (drug-resistant bladder cancer cells and to identify molecular differences that might be useful predictors of their efficacy. Materials and Methods: Cell proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis assay were used to detect the effect of TKIs on UM-UC-5 and UM-UC-14 cells. Molecular differences for response to TKIs were examined by protein array. Results: TKIs strongly inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell cycle G1 arrest and apoptosis in UM-UC-5 cells. Most notable apoptosis molecular differences included decreased claspin, trail, and survivin by TKIs in the sensitive cells. In contrast, TKIs had no effect on resistant cells. Conclusions: Claspin, trail, and survivin might be used to determine the sensitivity of bladder cancers to TKIs.

  15. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Psychological Stress and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kyeong Jin; Lee, Yu Jin; Yang, Yong Ryoul; Park, Seorim; Suh, Pann-Ghill; Follo, Matilde Yung; Cocco, Lucio; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2016-01-01

    Psychological stress is an emotion experienced when people are under mental pressure or encounter unexpected problems. Extreme or repetitive stress increases the risk of developing human disease, including cardiovascular disease (CVD), immune diseases, mental disorders, and cancer. Several studies have shown an association between psychological stress and cancer growth and metastasis in animal models and case studies of cancer patients. Stress induces the secretion of stress-related mediators, such as catecholamine, cortisol, and oxytocin, via the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis or the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). These stress-related hormones and neurotransmitters adversely affect stress-induced tumor progression and cancer therapy. Catecholamine is the primary factor that influences tumor progression. It can regulate diverse cellular signaling pathways through adrenergic receptors (ADRs), which are expressed by several types of cancer cells. Activated ADRs enhance the proliferation and invasion abilities of cancer cells, alter cell activity in the tumor microenvironment, and regulate the interaction between cancer and its microenvironment to promote tumor progression. Additionally, other stress mediators, such as glucocorticoids and oxytocin, and their cognate receptors are involved in stress-induced cancer growth and metastasis. Here, we will review how each receptor-mediated signal cascade contributes to tumor initiation and progression and discuss how we can use these molecular mechanisms for cancer therapy.

  16. CDK2 and mTOR are direct molecular targets of isoangustone A in the suppression of human prostate cancer cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eunjung; Son, Joe Eun; Byun, Sanguine; Lee, Seung Joon; Kim, Yeong A [WCU Biomodulation Major, Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Center for Food and Bioconvergence, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Liu, Kangdong [The Hormel Institute, University of Minnesota, 801 16th Avenue NE, Austin, MN 55912 (United States); Kim, Jiyoung [WCU Biomodulation Major, Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Center for Food and Bioconvergence, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Soon Sung; Park, Jung Han Yoon [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, College of Natural Science, Hallym University, Chuncheon, 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Dong, Zigang [The Hormel Institute, University of Minnesota, 801 16th Avenue NE, Austin, MN 55912 (United States); Lee, Ki Won, E-mail: kiwon@snu.ac.kr [WCU Biomodulation Major, Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Center for Food and Bioconvergence, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyong Joo, E-mail: leehyjo@snu.ac.kr [WCU Biomodulation Major, Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Center for Food and Bioconvergence, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-01

    Licorice extract which is used as a natural sweetener has been shown to possess inhibitory effects against prostate cancer, but the mechanisms responsible are poorly understood. Here, we report a compound, isoangustone A (IAA) in licorice that potently suppresses the growth of aggressive prostate cancer and sought to clarify its mechanism of action. We analyzed its inhibitory effects on the growth of PTEN-deleted human prostate cancer cells, in vitro and in vivo. Administration of IAA significantly attenuated the growth of prostate cancer cell cultures and xenograft tumors. These effects were found to be attributable to inhibition of the G1/S phase cell cycle transition and the accumulation of p27{sup kip1}. The elevated p27{sup kip1} expression levels were concurrent with the decrease of its phosphorylation at threonine 187 through suppression of CDK2 kinase activity and the reduced phosphorylation of Akt at Serine 473 by diminishing the kinase activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Further analysis using recombinant proteins and immunoprecipitated cell lysates determined that IAA exerts suppressive effects against CDK2 and mTOR kinase activity by direct binding with both proteins. These findings suggested that the licorice compound IAA is a potent molecular inhibitor of CDK2 and mTOR, with strong implications for the treatment of prostate cancer. Thus, licorice-derived extracts with high IAA content warrant further clinical investigation for nutritional sources for prostate cancer patients. - Highlights: • Isoangustone A suppresses growth of PC3 and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. • Administration of isoangustone A inhibits tumor growth in mice. • Treatment of isoangustone A induces cell cycle arrest and accumulation of p27{sup kip1}. • Isoangustone A inhibits CDK2 and mTOR activity. • Isoangustone A directly binds with CDK2 and mTOR complex in prostate cancer cells.

  17. Molecular markers in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Syed A; James, Nicholas D

    2005-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the malignancies for which extensive information regarding molecular pathogenesis and genetic predictors of natural history as well as response to various modalities of treatment based on molecular profile is available. As more prognostic markers are being investigated in clinical trial settings, in the not very distant future we will be able to use these predictive markers in clinical decision-making. Bladder cancer is the second most common genitourinary tumor and is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. A need for tumor markers that can be incorporated into clinical practice to add prognostic information and to refine the conventional TNM and grading systems in terms of treatment response and prognosis is crucial. Intravesical and systemic chemotherapy in bladder cancer are limited in their efficacy in the treatment of bladder cancer patients primarily when they are unable to induce apoptosis in bladder tumor cells. Understanding the apoptotic signals and the cascade of reactions that give pro-survival signals will go a long way in refining the treatments and will help in the future to individualize cancer therapies. It is imperative to study the role of these mechanisms in prospective clinical trials in a quest to find predictive markers that can help to tailor treatments, keeping in view the molecular heterogeneity.

  18. Effect of low molecular weight heparins and fondaparinux upon thrombin generation triggered by human pancreatic cancer cells BXPC3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerotziafas, Grigoris T; Galea, Vassiliki; Mbemba, Elisabeth; Sassi, Mouna; Roman, Marie-Paule; Khaterchi, Amir; van Dreden, Patrick; Japcowitz, Max; Lotz, Jean Pierre; Bernaudin, Jean Francois; Fareed, Jawed; Hatmi, Mohamed; Elalamy, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs) and fondaparinux are widely used for prophylaxis and treatment of venous thromboembolic disease in cancer patients. However, the optimization of the antithrombotic treatment especially in patients with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is a challenging issue. The understanding of the mechanism of action of the LMWHs and fondaparinux in cancer-induced hypercoagulability might help to optimize antithrombotic treatment. To this aim, we investigated the influence of BXPC3 pancreas adenocarcinoma cells on the antithrombotic activity of LMWHs and fondaparinux. Thrombin generation (TG) in normal platelet poor (PPP) and platelet rich plasma (PRP) spiked with clinically relevant concentrations of dalteparin, enoxaparin, nadroparin tinzaparin and fondaparinux was assessed with the Calibrated Automated Thrombogram assay. BXPC3 (5 cells/μl) were added to plasma. The mean rate index (MRI) of the propagation phase of TG and the endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) were analyzed. The IC50 of the studied compounds were determined and compared on the basis of anti-Xa and anti-IIa equivalent units. We demonstrate that the specific antithrombin (AT)-dependent anti-Xa activity of LMWHs and fondaparinux almost selectively inhibits the propagation phase of TG. The synergy between the anti-Xa and anti-IIa activities of LMWHs rather than the selective inhibition of FXa warrants abrogation of TG. The mean molecular weight and anti-Xa/anti-IIa ratio of the AT-dependent agents cannot predict the alteration of their capacity to inhibit TG. Tinzaparin was the most potent inhibitor of TG than the other LMWHs. Enoxaparin was more potent than nadroparin and dalteparin.

  19. New molecular targets against cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duenas-Gonzalez A

    2014-12-01

    knocking down the key alterations in cervical cancer – E6 and E7 human papillomavirus oncoproteins – must not be overlooked. Keywords: cervical cancer, molecular-targeted therapy, bevacizumab, HPV

  20. Integrated Molecular Profiling of Human Gastric Cancer Identifies DDR2 as a Potential Regulator of Peritoneal Dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurashige, Junji; Hasegawa, Takanori; Niida, Atsushi; Sugimachi, Keishi; Deng, Niantao; Mima, Kosuke; Uchi, Ryutaro; Sawada, Genta; Takahashi, Yusuke; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Inomata, Masashi; Kitano, Seigo; Fukagawa, Takeo; Sasako, Mitsuru; Sasaki, Hiroki; Sasaki, Shin; Mori, Masaki; Yanagihara, Kazuyoshi; Baba, Hideo; Miyano, Satoru; Tan, Patrick; Mimori, Koshi

    2016-03-03

    Peritoneal dissemination is the most frequent, incurable metastasis occurring in patients with advanced gastric cancer (GC). However, molecular mechanisms driving peritoneal dissemination still remain poorly understood. Here, we aimed to provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms that drive the peritoneal dissemination of GC. We performed combined expression analysis with in vivo-selected metastatic cell lines and samples from 200 GC patients to identify driver genes of peritoneal dissemination. The driver-gene functions associated with GC dissemination were examined using a mouse xenograft model. We identified a peritoneal dissemination-associated expression signature, whose profile correlated with those of genes related to development, focal adhesion, and the extracellular matrix. Among the genes comprising the expression signature, we identified that discoidin-domain receptor 2 (DDR2) as a potential regulator of peritoneal dissemination. The DDR2 was upregulated by the loss of DNA methylation and that DDR2 knockdown reduced peritoneal metastasis in a xenograft model. Dasatinib, an inhibitor of the DDR2 signaling pathway, effectively suppressed peritoneal dissemination. DDR2 was identified as a driver gene for GC dissemination from the combined expression signature and can potentially serve as a novel therapeutic target for inhibiting GC peritoneal dissemination.

  1. Molecular switch role of Akt in Polygonatum odoratum lectin-induced apoptosis and autophagy in human non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunyang; Chen, Jie; Lu, Bangmin; Shi, Zheng; Wang, Hailian; Zhang, Bin; Zhao, Kailiang; Qi, Wei; Bao, Jinku; Wang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Polygonatum odoratum lectin (POL), isolated from traditional Chinese medicine herb (Mill.) Druce, has drawn rising attention due to its wide biological activities. In the present study, anti-tumor effects, including apoptosis- and autophagy-inducing properties of POL, were determined by a series of cell biology methods such as MTT, cellular morphology observation, flow cytometry, immunoblotting. Herein, we found that POL could simultaneously induce apoptosis and autophagy in human non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells. POL initiated apoptosis through inhibiting Akt-NF-κB pathway, while POL triggered autophagy via suppressing Akt-mTOR pathway, suggesting the molecular switch role of Akt in regulating between POL-induced apoptosis and autophagy. Moreover, ROS was involved in POL-induced inhibition of Akt expression, and might therefore mediate both apoptosis and autophagy in A549 cells. In addition, POL displayed no significant cytotoxicity toward normal human embryonic lung fibroblast HELF cells. Due to the anti-tumor activities, POL might become a potent anti-cancer drug in future therapy, which might pave the way for exploring GNA-related lectins into effective drugs in cancer treatment.

  2. Affinity of estrogens for human progesterone receptor A and B monomers and risk of breast cancer: a comparative molecular modeling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarique N Hasan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Tarique N Hasan1,4, Leena Grace B2, Tariq A Masoodi3,5, Gowhar Shafi4 , Ali A. Alshatwi4, P Sivashanmugham31Department of Biotechnology, Bharathiar University, Coimbator, TN, India; 2Department of Biotechnology, V. M. K. V. College of Engineering, Salem, TN, India; 3Department of Bioinformatics, Jamal Mohammed College, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli, India; 4Molecular Cancer Biology Laboratory, Department of Food Science and Nutrition, College of Food and Agricultural Sciences; 5Department of Community Health Sciences, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Saudi ArabiaBackground: The human progesterone receptor (hPR belongs to the steroid receptor family. It may be found as monomers (A and B and or as a dimer (AB. hPR is regarded as the prognostic biomarker for breast cancer. In a cellular dimer system, AB is the dominant species in most cases. However, when a cell coexpresses all three isoforms of hPR, the complexity of the action of this receptor increases. For example, hPR A suppresses the activity of hPR B, and the ratio of hPR A to hPR B may determine the physiology of a breast tumor. Also, persistent exposure of hPRs to nonendogenous ligands is a common risk factor for breast cancer. Hence we aimed to study progesterone and some nonendogenous ligand interactions with hPRs and their molecular docking.Methods and results: A pool of steroid derivatives, namely, progesterone, cholesterol, testosterone, testolectone, estradiol, estrone, norethindrone, exemestane, and norgestrel, was used for this in silico study. Dockings were performed on AutoDock 4.2. We found that estrogens, including estradiol and estrone, had a higher affinity for hPR A and B monomers in comparison with the dimer, hPR AB, and that of the endogenous progesterone ligand. hPR A had a higher affinity to all the docked ligands than hPR B.Conclusion: This study suggests that the exposure of estrogens to hPR A as well as hPR B, and more

  3. Molecular Targeted Intervention for Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altaf Mohammed

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer (PC remains one of the worst cancers, with almost uniform lethality. PC risk is associated with westernized diet, tobacco, alcohol, obesity, chronic pancreatitis, and family history of pancreatic cancer. New targeted agents and the use of various therapeutic combinations have yet to provide adequate treatments for patients with advanced cancer. To design better preventive and/or treatment strategies against PC, knowledge of PC pathogenesis at the molecular level is vital. With the advent of genetically modified animals, significant advances have been made in understanding the molecular biology and pathogenesis of PC. Currently, several clinical trials and preclinical evaluations are underway to investigate novel agents that target signaling defects in PC. An important consideration in evaluating novel drugs is determining whether an agent can reach the target in concentrations effective to treat the disease. Recently, we have reported evidence for chemoprevention of PC. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of current updates on molecularly targeted interventions, as well as dietary, phytochemical, immunoregulatory, and microenvironment-based approaches for the development of novel therapeutic and preventive regimens. Special attention is given to prevention and treatment in preclinical genetically engineered mouse studies and human clinical studies.

  4. Molecular Targeted Intervention for Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Altaf; Janakiram, Naveena B.; Pant, Shubham; Rao, Chinthalapally V.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) remains one of the worst cancers, with almost uniform lethality. PC risk is associated with westernized diet, tobacco, alcohol, obesity, chronic pancreatitis, and family history of pancreatic cancer. New targeted agents and the use of various therapeutic combinations have yet to provide adequate treatments for patients with advanced cancer. To design better preventive and/or treatment strategies against PC, knowledge of PC pathogenesis at the molecular level is vital. With the advent of genetically modified animals, significant advances have been made in understanding the molecular biology and pathogenesis of PC. Currently, several clinical trials and preclinical evaluations are underway to investigate novel agents that target signaling defects in PC. An important consideration in evaluating novel drugs is determining whether an agent can reach the target in concentrations effective to treat the disease. Recently, we have reported evidence for chemoprevention of PC. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of current updates on molecularly targeted interventions, as well as dietary, phytochemical, immunoregulatory, and microenvironment-based approaches for the development of novel therapeutic and preventive regimens. Special attention is given to prevention and treatment in preclinical genetically engineered mouse studies and human clinical studies. PMID:26266422

  5. Molecular biology of pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miroslav Zavoral; Petra Minarikova; Filip Zavada; Cyril Salek; Marek Minarik

    2011-01-01

    In spite of continuous research efforts directed at early detection and treatment of pancreatic cancer, the outlook for patients affected by the disease remains dismal. With most cases still being diagnosed at advanced stages, no improvement in survival prognosis is achieved with current diagnostic imaging approaches. In the absence of a dominant precancerous condition, several risk factors have been identified including family history, chronic pancreatitis, smoking, diabetes mellitus, as well as certain genetic disorders such as hereditary pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, familial atypical multiple Most pancreatic carcinomas, however, remain sporadic. Current progress in experimental molecular techniques has enabled detailed understanding of the molecular processes of pancreatic cancer development. According to the latest information, malignant pancreatic transformation involves multiple oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes that are involved in a variety of signaling pathways. The most characteristic aberrations (somatic point mutations and allelic losses) affect oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes within RAS, AKT and Wnt signaling, and have a key role in transcription and proliferation, as well as systems that regulate the cell cycle (SMAD/DPC, CDKN2A/p16) and apoptosis (TP53). Understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms should promote development of new methodology for early diagnosis and facilitate improvement in current approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment.

  6. Cellular and molecular aspects of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Malcolm G Smith; Georgina L Hold; Eiichi Tahara; Emad M El-Omar

    2006-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains a global killer with a shifting burden from the developed to the developing world.The cancer develops along a multistage process that is defined by distinct histological and pathophysiological phases. Several genetic and epigenetic alterations mediate the transition from one stage to another and these include mutations in oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes and cell cycle and mismatch repair genes. The most significant advance in the fight against gastric caner came with the recognition of the role of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) as the most important acquired aetiological agent for this cancer. Recent work has focussed on elucidating the complex host/microbial interactions that underlie the neoplastic process. There is now considerable insight into the pathogenesis of this cancer and the prospect of preventing and eradicating the disease has become a reality. Perhaps more importantly, the study of H pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis offers a paradigm for understanding more complex human cancers. In this review, we examine the molecular and cellular events that underlie H pyloriinduced gastric cancer.

  7. [Study of the association between polymorphism of persistent obesity, human leptin gene/leptin receptor gene and molecular subtypes of breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, X L; Xu, Z P; Liu, C R; Yan, L P; Tao, P; Xiong, P; Li, Q; Zhou, M; Li, H; Zhao, M; Li, J Y

    2017-06-06

    Objectives: To explore the association between the polymorphism of persistent obesity and genetic variations in the LEP (human leptin gene, LEP) and LEPR (leptin receptor gene, LEPR) genes and different molecular subtypes of breast cancer. Methods: All 703 female patients of breast cancer diagnosed by histopathology in the Sichuan Cancer Hospital or the West China Hospital, excluding patients with metastatic breast cancer or mental disease, were selected as cases from April 2014 to May 2015. At the same time, 805 healthy women received physical examination in medical examination center of Sichuan People Hospital or Shuangliu maternal and child health care hospital, excluding those with therioma, breast disease, and mental disease, were enrolled in control group. A uniform questionnaire was used to collect general information including demographic characteristic, reproductive history height, weight, and so on. And the obesity status in recent 10 years was judged. Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer was used to determine the genotypes of LEP rs7799039, LEPR rs1137100 and LEPR rs1137101, while the multinomial logistic regression analysis was conducted to estimate the effect of risk factors related to breast cancer in different molecular subtypes; and then, the association between polymorphism of persistent obesity, the LEP, LEPR genes and breast cancer of different molecular subtypes was analyzed by binary logistic regression models. Results: The average age of controls was (48.98±8.83) years old, while the age of cases of TNBC, Luminal A, Luminal B, and HER-2+ were (51.43±11.33), (49.94±10.10), (49.73±9.38), (50.50±9.04) years old, respectively. The frequency of genotype LEP rs7799039, LEPR rs1137100 and LEPR rs1137101 in control group was separately 74.8%(1 157/1 546), 83.6%(1 339/1 602) and 88.4%(1 416/1 602); while 77.6% (1 074/1 384), 82.4% (1 155/1 402) and 87.9% (1 232/1 402) respectively in case group. Compared with non-persistent obesity subjects, the

  8. Tissue-specific gene expression templates for accurate molecular characterization of the normal physiological states of multiple human tissues with implication in development and cancer studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Pei-Ing; Wu, Huan-Bin; Wang, Chin-Di; Lin, Bai-Ling; Chen, Cheng-Tao; Yuan, Shinsheng; Wu, Guani; Li, Ker-Chau

    2011-09-01

    To elucidate the molecular complications in many complex diseases, we argue for the priority to construct a model representing the normal physiological state of a cell/tissue. By analyzing three independent microarray datasets on normal human tissues, we established a quantitative molecular model GET, which consists of 24 tissue-specific Gene Expression Templates constructed from a set of 56 genes, for predicting 24 distinct tissue types under disease-free condition. 99.2% correctness was reached when a large-scale validation was performed on 61 new datasets to test the tissue-prediction power of GET. Network analysis based on molecular interactions suggests a potential role of these 56 genes in tissue differentiation and carcinogenesis.Applying GET to transcriptomic datasets produced from tissue development studies the results correlated well with developmental stages. Cancerous tissues and cell lines yielded significantly lower correlation with GET than the normal tissues. GET distinguished melanoma from normal skin tissue or benign skin tumor with 96% sensitivity and 89% specificity. These results strongly suggest that a normal tissue or cell may uphold its normal functioning and morphology by maintaining specific chemical stoichiometry among genes. The state of stoichiometry can be depicted by a compact set of representative genes such as the 56 genes obtained here. A significant deviation from normal stoichiometry may result in malfunction or abnormal growth of the cells.

  9. Tissue-specific gene expression templates for accurate molecular characterization of the normal physiological states of multiple human tissues with implication in development and cancer studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Shinsheng

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To elucidate the molecular complications in many complex diseases, we argue for the priority to construct a model representing the normal physiological state of a cell/tissue. Results By analyzing three independent microarray datasets on normal human tissues, we established a quantitative molecular model GET, which consists of 24 tissue-specific Gene Expression Templates constructed from a set of 56 genes, for predicting 24 distinct tissue types under disease-free condition. 99.2% correctness was reached when a large-scale validation was performed on 61 new datasets to test the tissue-prediction power of GET. Network analysis based on molecular interactions suggests a potential role of these 56 genes in tissue differentiation and carcinogenesis. Applying GET to transcriptomic datasets produced from tissue development studies the results correlated well with developmental stages. Cancerous tissues and cell lines yielded significantly lower correlation with GET than the normal tissues. GET distinguished melanoma from normal skin tissue or benign skin tumor with 96% sensitivity and 89% specificity. Conclusions These results strongly suggest that a normal tissue or cell may uphold its normal functioning and morphology by maintaining specific chemical stoichiometry among genes. The state of stoichiometry can be depicted by a compact set of representative genes such as the 56 genes obtained here. A significant deviation from normal stoichiometry may result in malfunction or abnormal growth of the cells.

  10. Human papillomaviruses and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haedicke, Juliane; Iftner, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are small oncogenic DNA viruses of which more than 200 types have been identified to date. A small subset of these is etiologically linked to the development of anogenital malignancies such as cervical cancer. In addition, recent studies established a causative relationship between these high-risk HPV types and tonsillar and oropharyngeal cancer. Clinical management of cervical cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) is largely standardized and involves surgical removal of the tumor tissue as well as adjuvant chemoradiation therapy. Notably, the response to therapeutic intervention of HPV-positive HNSCCs has been found to be better as compared to HPV-negative tumors. Although the existing HPV vaccine is solely licensed for the prevention of cervical cancer, it might also have prophylactic potential for the development of high-risk HPV-associated HNSCCs. Another group of viruses, which belongs to the beta-HPV subgroup, has been implicated in nonmelanoma skin cancer, however, the etiology remains to be established. Treatment of HPV-induced nonmelanoma skin cancer is based on local excision. However, topically applied immune-modulating substances represent non-surgical alternatives for the management of smaller cutaneous tumors. In this review we present the current knowledge of the role of HPV in cancer development and discuss clinical management options as well as targets for the development of future intervention therapies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, M.C. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Lippman, M. [Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)] [comps.

    1992-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

  12. Study of association and molecular analysis of human papillomavirus in breast cancer of Indian patients: Clinical and prognostic implication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Saimul; Dasgupta, Hemantika; Roychowdhury, Anirban; Bhattacharya, Rittwika; Mukherjee, Nupur; Roy, Anup; Mandal, Gautam Kumar; Alam, Neyaz; Biswas, Jaydip; Mandal, Shyamsundar; Roychoudhury, Susanta

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes tumors primarily Cervical cancer. Recently, inconsistent reports came up in Breast cancer (BC) too. In India, despite treatment 70,218 BC patients die each year. So, we explored the association of HPV, if any, with BC prognosis in Indian pre-therapeutic (PT) and Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) patients with subsequent analysis of HPV profile. Methods HPV prevalence was checked and analysis of physical status, copy number, genome variation, promoter methylation and expression (mRNA and protein) of the prevalent subtype was done. Results High prevalence of HPV was observed in both PT (64.0%) and NACT (71.0%) cases with significant association with younger (20–45 yrs) PT patients. Interestingly, HPV infection was significantly increased from adjacent normal breast (9.5%, 2/21), fibro adenomas (30%, 3/10) to tumors (64.8%, 203/313) samples. In both PT and NACT cases, HPV16 was the most prevalent subtype (69.0%) followed by HPV18 and HPV33. Survival analysis illustrated hrHPV infected PT patients had worst prognosis. So, detailed analysis of HPV16 profile was done which showed Europian-G350 as the most frequent HPV16 variant along with high rate of integration. Moreover, low copy number and hyper-methylation of P97 early promoter were concordant with low HPV16 E6 and E7 mRNA and protein expression. Notably, four novel variations (KT020838, KT020840, KT020841 and KT020839) in the LCR region and two (KT020836 and KT020837) in the E6 region were identified for the first time along with two novel E6^E7*I (KU199314) and E6^E7*II (KU199315) fusion transcript variants. Conclusion Thus, significant association of hrHPV with prognosis of Indian BC patients led to additional investigation of HPV16 profile. Outcomes indicated a plausible role of HPV in Indian BC patients. PMID:28245287

  13. Serglycin in human cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Jian Li; Chao-Nan Qian

    2011-01-01

    Serglycin belongs to a family of small proteoglycans with Ser-Gly dipeptide repeats,and it is modified with different types of glycosaminoglycan side chains.Intracellular serglycin affects the retention and secretion of proteases,chemokines,or other cytokines by physically binding to these factors in secretory granules.Extracellular serglycin has been found to be released by several types of human cancer cells,and it is able to promote the metastasis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.Serglycin can bind to CD44,which is another glycoprotein located in cellular membrane.Serglycin's function of promoting cancer cell metastasis depends on glycosylation of its core protein,which can be achieved by autocrine as well as paracrine secretion mechanisms.Further investigations are warranted to elucidate serglycin signaling mechanisms with the goal of targeting them to prevent cancer cell metastasis.

  14. Cancer and molecular biomarkers of phase 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalhoff, Kim; Enghusen Poulsen, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    as molecular genetic biomarkers of risk. GSTM(my)1 has been associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer, lung cancer, and bladder cancer and GSTP(pi)1 with prostate cancer. UGT1A1*28 and *37 are both associated with an increased risk of breast cancer as is SULT1A1*2. The presence of UGT1A1...

  15. Molecular mechanisms and clinical applications of miR-22 in regulating malignant progression in human cancer (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingyu; Li, Yuan; Ding, Meiman; Zhang, Honghe; Xu, Xiaoming; Tang, Jinlong

    2017-01-01

    miRNAs (microRNAs) have been validated to play fateful roles in the occurrence and development of cancers by post-transcriptionally targeting 3′-untranslated regions of the downstream gene mRNAs to repress mRNA expression. Mounting investigations forcefully document that not only does miR-22 biologically impinge on the processes of senescence, energy supply, angiogenesis, EMT (epithelial-mesenchymal transition), proliferation, migration, invasion, metastasis and apoptosis, but also it genetically or epigenetically exerts dual (inhibitory/promoting cancer) effects in various cancers via CNAs (copy number alterations), SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms), methylation, acetylation and even more momentously hydroxymethylation. Additionally, miR-22 expression may fluctuate with cancer progression in the body fluids of cancer patients and miR-22 could amplify its inhibitory or promoting effects through partaking in positive or negative feedback loops and interplaying with many other related miRNAs in the cascade of events, making it possible for miR-22 to be a promising and complementary or even independent cancer biomarker in some cancers and engendering profound influences on the early diagnosis, therapeutics, supervising curative effects and prognosis. PMID:28000852

  16. Molecular beacon-decorated polymethylmethacrylate core-shell fluorescent nanoparticles for the detection of survivin mRNA in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adinolfi, Barbara; Pellegrino, Mario; Giannetti, Ambra; Tombelli, Sara; Trono, Cosimo; Sotgiu, Giovanna; Varchi, Greta; Ballestri, Marco; Posati, Tamara; Carpi, Sara; Nieri, Paola; Baldini, Francesco

    2017-02-15

    One of the main goals of nanomedicine in cancer is the development of effective drug delivery systems, primarily nanoparticles. Survivin, an overexpressed anti-apoptotic protein in cancer, represents a pharmacological target for therapy and a Molecular Beacon (MB) specific for survivin mRNA is available. In this study, the ability of polymethylmethacrylate nanoparticles (PMMA-NPs) to promote survivin MB uptake in human A549 cells was investigated. Fluorescent and positively charged core PMMA-NPs of nearly 60nm, obtained through an emulsion co-polymerization reaction, and the MB alone were evaluated in solution, for their analytical characterization; then, the MB specificity and functionality were verified after adsorption onto the PMMA-NPs. The carrier ability of PMMA-NPs in A549 was examined by confocal microscopy. With the optimized protocol, a hardly detectable fluorescent signal was obtained after incubation of the cells with the MB alone (fluorescent spots per cell of 1.90±0.40 with a mean area of 1.04±0.20µm(2)), while bright fluorescent spots inside the cells were evident by using the MB loaded onto the PMMA-NPs. (27.50±2.30 fluorescent spots per cell with a mean area of 2.35±0.16µm(2)). These results demonstrate the ability of the PMMA-NPs to promote the survivin-MB internalization, suggesting that this complex might represent a promising strategy for intracellular sensing and for the reduction of cancer cell proliferation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular Characterization of Indolent Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0480 TITLE: Molecular Characterization of Indolent Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jun...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Molecular Characterization of Indolent Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0480 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Indolent prostate cancers that pose very low risk to aged men occur frequently and may be detected

  18. Molecular therapeutics in pancreas cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vignesh Narayanan; Colin D Weekes

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of the "precision-medicine" paradigm in oncology has ushered in tremendous improvements in patient outcomes in a wide variety of malignancies. However, pancreas ductal adenocarcinoma(PDAC) has remained an obstinate challenge to the oncology community and continues to be associated with a dismal prognosis with 5-year survival rates consistently less than 5%. Cytotoxic chemotherapy with gemcitabine-based regimens has been the cornerstone of treatment in PDAC especially because most patients present with inoperable disease. But in recent years remarkable basic science research has improved our understanding of the molecular and genetic basis of PDAC. Whole genomic analysis has exemplified the genetic heterogeneity of pancreas cancer and has led to ingenious efforts to target oncogenes and their downstream signaling cascades. Novel stromal depletion strategies have been devised based on our enhanced recognition of the complex architecture of the tumor stroma and the various mechanisms in the tumor microenvironment that sustain tumorigenesis. Immunotherapy using vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors has also risen to the forefront of therapeutic strategies against PDAC. Furthermore, adoptive T cell transfer and strategies to target epigenetic regulators are being explored with enthusiasm. This review will focus on the recent advances in molecularly targeted therapies in PDAC and offer future perspectives to tackle this lethal disease.

  19. 2. Molecular Biology as a Tool in Cancer Epidemiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@There can be little doubt that we are entering a new era in our understanding of the origins of human cancer. Unfortunately from the point of view of the cancer epidemiology community, some of the more recent advances in the molecular biology of cancer (once fully assimilated) will tend to make the talk of the up-to-date cancer epidemiologist a great deal less straightforward than many of us had previously envisaged it to be, There may still be a few cancers that will prove to result from only a few distinctive types of mutation in a relatively small number of genes, but I strongly suspect that the great majority of human cancers that we wish to study will prove to have their origins in a complex set of DNA changes whose precise

  20. Molecular profiling of human mammary gland links breast cancer risk to a p27(+) cell population with progenitor characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Sibgat; Almendro, Vanessa; Merino, Vanessa F; Wu, Zhenhua; Maruyama, Reo; Su, Ying; Martins, Filipe C; Fackler, Mary Jo; Bessarabova, Marina; Kowalczyk, Adam; Conway, Thomas; Beresford-Smith, Bryan; Macintyre, Geoff; Cheng, Yu-Kang; Lopez-Bujanda, Zoila; Kaspi, Antony; Hu, Rong; Robens, Judith; Nikolskaya, Tatiana; Haakensen, Vilde D; Schnitt, Stuart J; Argani, Pedram; Ethington, Gabrielle; Panos, Laura; Grant, Michael; Clark, Jason; Herlihy, William; Lin, S Joyce; Chew, Grace; Thompson, Erik W; Greene-Colozzi, April; Richardson, Andrea L; Rosson, Gedge D; Pike, Malcolm; Garber, Judy E; Nikolsky, Yuri; Blum, Joanne L; Au, Alfred; Hwang, E Shelley; Tamimi, Rulla M; Michor, Franziska; Haviv, Izhak; Liu, X Shirley; Sukumar, Saraswati; Polyak, Kornelia

    2013-07-03

    Early full-term pregnancy is one of the most effective natural protections against breast cancer. To investigate this effect, we have characterized the global gene expression and epigenetic profiles of multiple cell types from normal breast tissue of nulliparous and parous women and carriers of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. We found significant differences in CD44(+) progenitor cells, where the levels of many stem cell-related genes and pathways, including the cell-cycle regulator p27, are lower in parous women without BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations. We also noted a significant reduction in the frequency of CD44(+)p27(+) cells in parous women and showed, using explant cultures, that parity-related signaling pathways play a role in regulating the number of p27(+) cells and their proliferation. Our results suggest that pathways controlling p27(+) mammary epithelial cells and the numbers of these cells relate to breast cancer risk and can be explored for cancer risk assessment and prevention.

  1. Targeted therapies in epithelial ovarian cancer: Molecular mechanisms of action

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroaki; Itamochi

    2010-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death in women with gynecological cancer. Most patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage and have a poor prognosis.Currently, surgical tumor debulking, followed by platinum- and taxane-based chemotherapy is the standard treatment for advanced ovarian cancer. However, these patients are at great risk of recurrence and emerging drug resistance. Therefore, novel treatment strategies are required to improve outcomes for women with advanced ovarian cancer. A variety of molecular targeted agents, the majority of which are monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule protein-kinase inhibitors, have been explored in the management of ovarian cancer. The targets of these agents include angiogenesis, the human epidermal growth factor receptor family, ubiquitinproteasome pathway, epigenetic modulators, poly(ADPribose) polymerase (PARP), and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, which are aberrant in tumor tissue. The antiangiogenic agent, bevacizumab, has been reported as the most effective targeted agent and should be included in the standard chemotherapeutic regimen for advanced ovarian cancer. PARP inhibitors, which are mainly used in breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene-mutated patients, and mTOR inhibitors are also attractive treatment strategies, either alone or combination with chemotherapy, for ovarian cancer. Understanding the tumor molecular biology and identification of predictive biomarkers are essential steps for selection of the best treatment strategies. This article reviews the molecular mechanisms of the most promising targeted agents that are under early phase clinical evaluation for ovarian cancer.

  2. Biological and Molecular Effects of Small Molecule Kinase Inhibitors on Low-Passage Human Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falko Lange

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-passage cancer cell lines are versatile tools to study tumor cell biology. Here, we have employed four such cell lines, established from primary tumors of colorectal cancer (CRC patients, to evaluate effects of the small molecule kinase inhibitors (SMI vemurafenib, trametinib, perifosine, and regorafenib in an in vitro setting. The mutant BRAF (V600E/V600K inhibitor vemurafenib, but also the MEK1/2 inhibitor trametinib efficiently inhibited DNA synthesis, signaling through ERK1/2 and expression of genes downstream of ERK1/2 in BRAF mutant cells only. In case of the AKT inhibitor perifosine, three cell lines showed a high or intermediate responsiveness to the drug while one cell line was resistant. The multikinase inhibitor regorafenib inhibited proliferation of all CRC lines with similar efficiency and independent of the presence or absence of KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, and TP53 mutations. Regorafenib action was associated with broad-range inhibitory effects at the level of gene expression but not with a general inhibition of AKT or MEK/ERK signaling. In vemurafenib-sensitive cells, the antiproliferative effect of vemurafenib was enhanced by the other SMI. Together, our results provide insights into the determinants of SMI efficiencies in CRC cells and encourage the further use of low-passage CRC cell lines as preclinical models.

  3. Molecular Biology of Esophageal Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuanXi; JanBrabender; RalfMetzger; PaulM.Schneider

    2004-01-01

    There have been many new developments in our understanding of esophageal carcinoma biology over the past several years. Information regarding both of the major forms of this disease, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, has accumulated in conjunction with data on precursor conditions such as Barrett's esophagus. Interesting and promising findings have included overexpression of proto-oncogenes,loss of heterozygosity at multiple chromosomal loci, tumor suppressor gene inactivation, epigenetic silencing by DNA methylation, and mutations and deletions involving the tumor suppressor gene p53. Important cancer pathways, the cyclin kinase inhibitor cascade and the DNA mismatch repair process, implicated in the genesis of multiple tumor types have also been inculpated in esophageal carcinogenesis. Alterations in the p16 and p15 cyclin kinase inhibitors including point mutations and homozygous deletions have been reported in primary esophageal tumors. Further developments in the field of molecular carcinogenesis of esophageal malignancies promise to yield improvements in prevention, early detection, prognostic categorization, and perhaps gene-based therapy of this deadly disease.

  4. Genetic and molecular changes in ovarian cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert L Hollis; Charlie Gourley

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer represents the most lethal gynecological malignancy in the developed world, and can be divided into five main histological subtypes: high grade serous, endometrioid, clear cell, mucinous and low grade serous. These subtypes represent distinct disease entities, both clinically and at the molecular level. Molecular analysis has revealed significant genetic heterogeneity in ovarian cancer, particularly within the high grade serous subtype. As such, this subtype has been the focus of much research effort to date, revealing molecular subgroups at both the genomic and transcriptomic level that have clinical implications. However, stratification of ovarian cancer patients based on the underlying biology of their disease remains in its infancy. Here, we summarize the molecular changes that characterize the five main ovarian cancer subtypes, highlight potential opportunities for targeted therapeutic intervention and outline priorities for future research.

  5. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer with PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadvar, Hossein

    2013-10-01

    Molecular imaging is paving the way for precision and personalized medicine. In view of the significant biologic and clinical heterogeneity of prostate cancer, molecular imaging is expected to play an important role in the evaluation of this prevalent disease. The natural history of prostate cancer spans from an indolent localized process to biochemical relapse after radical treatment with curative intent to a lethal castrate-resistant metastatic disease. The ongoing unraveling of the complex tumor biology of prostate cancer uniquely positions molecular imaging with PET to contribute significantly to every clinical phase of prostate cancer evaluation. The purpose of this article was to provide a concise review of the current state of affairs and potential future developments in the diagnostic utility of PET in prostate cancer.

  6. Molecular Epidemiology of Female Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seon-Hee Yim

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is still a leading cause of cancer mortality in the world. The incidence of lung cancer in developed countries started to decrease mainly due to global anti-smoking campaigns. However, the incidence of lung cancer in women has been increasing in recent decades for various reasons. Furthermore, since the screening of lung cancer is not as yet very effective, clinically applicable molecular markers for early diagnosis are much required. Lung cancer in women appears to have differences compared with that in men, in terms of histologic types and susceptibility to environmental risk factors. This suggests that female lung cancer can be derived by carcinogenic mechanisms different from those involved in male lung cancer. Among female lung cancer patients, many are non-smokers, which could be studied to identify alternative carcinogenic mechanisms independent from smoking-related ones. In this paper, we reviewed molecular susceptibility markers and genetic changes in lung cancer tissues observed in female lung cancer patients, which have been validated by various studies and will be helpful to understand the tumorigenesis of lung cancer.

  7. Colon cancer associated transcripts in human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yincong; Xie, Haibiao; Gao, Qunjun; Zhan, Hengji; Xiao, Huizhong; Zou, Yifan; Zhang, Fuyou; Liu, Yuchen; Li, Jianfa

    2017-08-02

    Long non-coding RNAs serve as important regulators in complicated cellular activities, including cell differentiation, proliferation and death. Dysregulation of long non-coding RNAs occurs in the formation and progression of cancers. The family of colon cancer associated transcripts, long non-coding RNAs colon cancer associated transcript-1 and colon cancer associated transcript-2 are known as oncogenes involved in various cancers. Colon cancer associated transcript-1 is a novel lncRNA located in 8q24.2, and colon cancer associated transcript-2 maps to the 8q24.21 region encompassing rs6983267. Colon cancer associated transcripts have close associations with clinical characteristics, such as lymph node metastasis, high TNM stage and short overall survival. Knockdown of them can reverse the malignant phenotypes of cancer cells, including proliferation, migration, invasion and apoptosis. Moreover, they can increase the expression level of c-MYC and oncogenic microRNAs via activating a series of complex mechanisms. In brief, the family of colon cancer associated transcripts may serve as potential biomarkers or therapeutic targets for human cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular imaging in the framework of personalized cancer medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkić, Dzevad; Belkić, Karen

    2013-11-01

    With our increased understanding of cancer cell biology, molecular imaging offers a strategic bridge to oncology. This complements anatomic imaging, particularly magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, which is sensitive but not specific. Among the potential harms of false positive findings is lowered adherence to recommended surveillance post-therapy and by persons at increased cancer risk. Positron emission tomography (PET) plus computerized tomography (CT) is the molecular imaging modality most widely used in oncology. In up to 40% of cases, PET-CT leads to changes in therapeutic management. Newer PET tracers can detect tumor hypoxia, bone metastases in androgen-sensitive prostate cancer, and human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2)-expressive tumors. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy provides insight into several metabolites at the same time. Combined with MRI, this yields magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), which does not entail ionizing radiation and is thus suitable for repeated monitoring. Using advanced signal processing, quantitative information can be gleaned about molecular markers of brain, breast, prostate and other cancers. Radiation oncology has benefited from molecular imaging via PET-CT and MRSI. Advanced mathematical approaches can improve dose planning in stereotactic radiosurgery, stereotactic body radiotherapy and high dose-rate brachytherapy. Molecular imaging will likely impact profoundly on clinical decision making in oncology. Molecular imaging via MR could facilitate early detection especially in persons at high risk for specific cancers.

  9. Molecular imaging of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, A.L.L.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women. Imaging techniques play a pivotal role in breast cancer management, especially in lesion detection, treatment planning and evaluation, and prognostication. These imaging techniques have however limitations such as the use of ionizing radiatio

  10. Molecular Diagnosis in Bladder Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.C.M. Zuiverloon (Tahlita)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractEpidemiologyBladder cancer (BC) is the most prevalent type of urothelial cancer and is associated with thehighest costs of all cancer types due to intensive patient surveillance. Because bladder tumorsfrequently recur, patients need to be monitored extensively [1-4]. Incidence increases

  11. Molecular imaging of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, A.L.L.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women. Imaging techniques play a pivotal role in breast cancer management, especially in lesion detection, treatment planning and evaluation, and prognostication. These imaging techniques have however limitations such as the use of ionizing

  12. Report: Human cancer genetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Marilyn; ALBERTSON Donna

    2006-01-01

    The short report will be focused on the genetic basis and possible mechanisms of tumorigenesis, common types of cancer, the importance of genetic diagnosis of cancer, and the methodology of cancer genetic diagnosis. They will also review presymptomatic testing of hereditary cancers, and the application of expression profiling to identify patients likely to benefit from particular therapeutic approaches.

  13. Human cancer genetics*

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The short report will be focused on the genetic basis and possible mechanisms of tumorigenesis, common types of cancer, the importance of genetic diagnosis of cancer, and the methodology of cancer genetic diagnosis. They will also review presymptomatic testing of hereditary cancers, and the application of expression profiling to identify patients likely to benefit from particular therapeutic approaches.

  14. Genitourinary cancers: molecular determinants for personalized therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzucchelli, Roberta; Gasparrini, Silvia; Galosi, Andrea B; Massari, Francesco; Raspollini, Maria Rosaria; Scarpelli, Marina; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo

    2016-09-26

    Recent insights and emerging strategies for individualized therapeutic approaches in patients with genitourinary (GU) cancers are based on patient's genomic and cancer's molecular profiles. This depends on the significant advances made in molecular biology technologies, such as next-generation sequencing and whole-exome sequencing. The rise of such novel techniques has grayly increased our knowledge on cancer cell biology and development, thus allowing to identify complex abnormalities at the genomic level. These findings have paved the way toward what is called precision medicine, thus providing healthcare from an individual perspective in patients with GU tumors.

  15. Molecular and genetic bases of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, Vanja; Gelibter, Alain; Bria, Emilio; Iapicca, Pierluigi; Cappello, Paola; Di Modugno, Francesca; Pino, Maria Simona; Nuzzo, Carmen; Cognetti, Francesco; Novelli, Francesco; Nistico, Paola; Milella, Michele

    2012-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains a formidable challenge for oncologists and patients alike. Despite intensive efforts, attempts at improving survival in the past 15 years, particularly in advanced disease, have failed. This is true even with the introduction of molecularly targeted agents, chosen on the basis of their action on pathways that were supposedly important in pancreatic cancer development and progression: indeed, with the notable exception of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor erlotinib, that has provided a minimal survival improvement when added to gemcitabine, other agents targeting EGFR, matrix metallo-proteases, farnesyl transferase, or vascular endothelial growth factor have not succeeded in improving outcomes over standard gemcitabine monotherapy for a variety of different reasons. However, recent developments in the molecular epidemiology of pancreatic cancer and an ever evolving understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying pancreatic cancer initiation and progression raise renewed hope to find novel, relevant therapeutic targets that could be pursued in the clinical setting. In this review we focus on molecular epidemiology of pancreatic cancer, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and its influence on sensitivity to EGFR-targeted approaches, apoptotic pathways, hypoxia-related pathways, developmental pathways (such as the hedgehog and Notch pathways), and proteomic analysis as keys to a better understanding of pancreatic cancer biology and, most importantly, as a source of novel molecular targets to be exploited therapeutically.

  16. Exploiting novel molecular targets in gastrointestinal cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Novel molecular targets are being discovered as we learn more about the aberrant processes underlying various cancers. Efforts to translate this knowledge are starting to impact on the care of patients with gastrointestinal cancers. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway and angiogenesis have been targeted successfully in colorectal cancer with cetuximab, panitunumab and bevacizumab. Similarly, EGFR-targeting with erlotinib yielded significant survival benefit in pancreatic cancer when combined with gemcitabine. The multi-targeting approach with sorafenib has made it the first agent to achieve significant survival benefit in hepatocellular carcinoma. Efforts to exploit the dysregulated Akt/mTOR pathway in GI cancer therapy are ongoing. These molecular targets can be disrupted by various approaches, including the use of monoclonal antibody to intercept extracellular ligands and disrupt receptor-ligand binding, and small molecule inhibitors that interrupt the activation of intracellular kinases.

  17. Human papilloma virus (HPV) molecular diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroupis, Christos; Vourlidis, Nikolaos

    2011-11-01

    Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is becoming a menace worldwide, especially to the developing world, due to its involvement in a variety of malignancies, with cervical cancer being the most important and prevalent. There are many HPV types; HPV 16/18 are the most carcinogenic but few others are also characterized as high-risk (HR). They can cause a variety of low- or high-grade cellular abnormalities, most frequently detected in a routine Pap test. Most infections clear within 2 years, however, a minority persists and potentially could progress to cervical cancer. Molecular tests detecting HPV DNA, RNA or proteins are now being available either commercially or in-house developed. DNA detection is nowadays an established tool for diagnosis and monitoring of HPV-related disease, however, there is lack of a reference method and standardization with reference materials. The various available test formats create confusion on which molecular test to choose and what are its limitations. Therefore, the need for lab accreditation and participation in proficiency testing has to be stressed. Novel HPV biomarkers (RNA, protein etc.) are now intensively examined for their inclusion as adjunct tools. Recently, developed prophylactic vaccines for HPV 16/18 have already proven safe and efficient and raise high expectations for the complete eradication of these types in the future.

  18. Terahertz molecular resonance of cancer DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Hwayeong; Yang, Hee-Jin; Lee, Sang-Hun; Kim, Young A.; Son, Joo-Hiuk

    2016-11-01

    Carcinogenesis involves the chemical and structural alteration of biomolecules in cells. Aberrant methylation of DNA is a well-known carcinogenic mechanism and a common chemical modification of DNA. Terahertz waves can directly observe changes in DNA because the characteristic energies lie in the same frequency region. In addition, terahertz energy levels are not high enough to damage DNA by ionization. Here, we present terahertz molecular resonance fingerprints of DNA methylation in cancer DNA. Methylated cytidine, a nucleoside, has terahertz characteristic energies that give rise to the molecular resonance of methylation in DNA. Molecular resonance is monitored in aqueous solutions of genomic DNA from cancer cell lines using a terahertz time-domain spectroscopic technique. Resonance signals can be quantified to identify the types of cancer cells with a certain degree of DNA methylation. These measurements reveal the existence of molecular resonance fingerprints of cancer DNAs in the terahertz region, which can be utilized for the early diagnosis of cancer cells at the molecular level.

  19. Water pipe smoking and human oral cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastam, Samer; Li, Fu-Min; Fouad, Fouad M; Al Kamal, Haysam M; Akil, Nizar; Al Moustafa, Ala-Eddin

    2010-03-01

    While cigarette smoking is recognized as an important risk factor in human oral cancers, the effect of water pipe smoking (WPS) on these cancers is not known. WPS is very common in the young adult population, especially in the Middle East, and has been associated with several respiratory problems. However, to date, there have been no studies examining the association between WPS and the progression of human oral cancers. Currently, the role of WPS in human oral cancers remains uncertain because of the limited number of investigations. This raises the question of whether WPS plays a significant role in the development of human oral carcinomas. In this paper, we propose the hypothesis that human oral normal epithelial cells are vulnerable to persistent WPS; moreover, WPS could play an important role in the initiation of a neoplastic transformation of human normal oral epithelial cells. Therefore, we believe that an international collaboration of epidemiological and clinical studies as well as cellular and molecular biology investigations is necessary to answer this important question.

  20. Acoustic and Photoacoustic Molecular Imaging of Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Katheryne E.; Wang, Tzu Yin; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound and combined optical and ultrasonic (photoacoustic) molecular imaging have shown great promise in the visualization and monitoring of cancer through imaging of vascular and extravascular molecular targets. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound with molecularly targeted microbubbles can detect early-stage cancer through the visualization of targets expressed on the angiogenic vasculature of tumors. Ultrasonic molecular imaging can be extended to the imaging of extravascular targets through use of nanoscale, phase-change droplets and photoacoustic imaging, which provides further molecular information on cancer given by the chemical composition of tissues and by targeted nanoparticles that can interact with extravascular tissues at the receptor level. A new generation of targeted contrast agents goes beyond merely increasing imaging signal at the site of target expression but shows activatable and differential contrast depending on their interactions with the tumor microenvironment. These innovations may further improve our ability to detect and characterize tumors. In this review, recent developments in acoustic and photoacoustic molecular imaging of cancer are discussed. PMID:24187042

  1. Acoustic and photoacoustic molecular imaging of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Katheryne E; Wang, Tzu Yin; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2013-11-01

    Ultrasound and combined optical and ultrasonic (photoacoustic) molecular imaging have shown great promise in the visualization and monitoring of cancer through imaging of vascular and extravascular molecular targets. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound with molecularly targeted microbubbles can detect early-stage cancer through the visualization of targets expressed on the angiogenic vasculature of tumors. Ultrasonic molecular imaging can be extended to the imaging of extravascular targets through use of nanoscale, phase-change droplets and photoacoustic imaging, which provides further molecular information on cancer given by the chemical composition of tissues and by targeted nanoparticles that can interact with extravascular tissues at the receptor level. A new generation of targeted contrast agents goes beyond merely increasing imaging signal at the site of target expression but shows activatable and differential contrast depending on their interactions with the tumor microenvironment. These innovations may further improve our ability to detect and characterize tumors. In this review, recent developments in acoustic and photoacoustic molecular imaging of cancer are discussed.

  2. Molecular aspects of carcinogenesis in pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexandros Koliopanos; Constantinos Avgerinos; Constantina Paraskeva; Zisis Touloumis; Dionisisa Kelgiorgi; Christos Dervenis

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer (PCa) is one of the most aggressive human solid tumors, with rapid growth and metastatic spread as well as resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, leading rapidly to virtually incurable disease. Over the last 20 years, however, signiifcant advances have been made in our understanding of the molecular biology of PCa, with a focus on the cytogenetic abnormalities in PCa cell growth and differentiation. DATA SOURCES: A MEDLINE search and manual cross-referencing were utilized to identify published data for PCa molecular biology studies between 1986 and 2008, with emphasis on genetic alterations and developmental oncology. RESULTS: Activation of oncogenes, deregulation of tumor suppressor and genome maintenance genes, upregulation of growth factors/growth factor receptor signaling cascade systems, and alterations in cytokine expression, have been reported to play important roles in the process of pancreatic carcinogenesis. Alterations in the K-ras proto-oncogene and the p16INK4a, p53, FHIT, and DPC4 tumor suppressor genes occur in a high percentage of tumors. Furthermore, a variety of growth factors are expressed at increased levels. In addition, PCa often exhibits alterations in growth inhibitory pathways and evades apoptosis through p53 mutations and aberrant expression of apoptosis-regulating genes, such as members of the Bcl family. Additional pathways in the development of an aggressive phenotype, local inifltration and metastasis are still under ongoing genetic research. The present paper reviews recent studies on the pathogenesis of PCa, and includes a brief reference to alterations reported for other types of pancreatic tumor. CONCLUSIONS: Advances in molecular genetics and biology have improved our perception of the pathogenesis of PCa. However, further studies are needed to better understand the fundamental changes that occur in PCa, thus leading to better diagnostic and therapeutic management.

  3. Regulatory T Cells in Human Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Jun Peng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple layers of suppressive components including regulatory T (TReg cells, suppressive antigen-presenting cells, and inhibitory cytokines form suppressive networks in the ovarian cancer microenvironment. It has been demonstrated that as a major suppressive element, TReg cells infiltrate tumor, interact with several types of immune cells, and mediate immune suppression through different molecular and cellular mechanisms. In this paper, we focus on human ovarian cancer and will discuss the nature of TReg cells including their subsets, trafficking, expansion, and function. We will briefly review the development of manipulation of TReg cells in preclinical and clinical settings.

  4. Gene profile identifies zinc transporters differentially expressed in normal human organs and human pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J; Zhang, Y; Cui, X; Yao, W; Yu, X; Cen, P; Hodges, S E; Fisher, W E; Brunicardi, F C; Chen, C; Yao, Q; Li, M

    2013-03-01

    Deregulated expression of zinc transporters was linked to several cancers. However, the detailed expression profile of all human zinc transporters in normal human organs and in human cancer, especially in pancreatic cancer is not available. The objectives of this study are to investigate the complete expression patterns of 14 ZIP and 10 ZnT transporters in a large number of normal human organs and in human pancreatic cancer tissues and cell lines. We examined the expression patterns of ZIP and ZnT transporters in 22 different human organs and tissues, 11 pairs of clinical human pancreatic cancer specimens and surrounding normal/benign tissues, as well as 10 established human pancreatic cancer cell lines plus normal human pancreatic ductal epithelium (HPDE) cells, using real time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The results indicate that human zinc transporters have tissue specific expression patterns, and may play different roles in different organs or tissues. Almost all the ZIPs except for ZIP4, and most ZnTs were down-regulated in human pancreatic cancer tissues compared to the surrounding benign tissues. The expression patterns of individual ZIPs and ZnTs are similar among different pancreatic cancer lines. Those results and our previous studies suggest that ZIP4 is the only zinc transporter that is significantly up-regulated in human pancreatic cancer and might be the major zinc transporter that plays an important role in pancreatic cancer growth. ZIP4 might serve as a novel molecular target for pancreatic cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  5. HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER RISK FACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prostate cancer has the highest prevalence of any non-skin cancer in the human body, with similar likelihood of neoplastic foci found within the prostates of men around the world regardless of diet, occupation, lifestyle, or other factors. Essentially all men with circulating an...

  6. The cancer nuclear microenvironment: interface between light microscopic cytology and molecular phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    True, Lawrence D; Jordan, C Diana

    2008-08-15

    A definitive diagnosis of cancer may be rendered by microscopic assessment of only a few cells in an appropriate clinical setting due to the distinctive nuclear structure of most cancer cells in comparison to nuclei of normal human cells. The molecular architecture of non-neoplastic human nuclei--of the nuclear matrix and of matrix-associated proteins and nucleic acids--is being characterized in exquisite molecular detail. What is missing is the application of the findings and tools of molecular biology to understanding the cytological structure of cancer nuclei. This article delves into the basis of nuclear structure at different levels of resolution--light microscopic, electron microscopic, and molecular.

  7. Molecular alterations and biomarkers in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, William M.; Pritchard, Colin C.

    2013-01-01

    The promise of precision medicine is now a clinical reality. Advances in our understanding of the molecular genetics of colorectal cancer genetics is leading to the development of a variety of biomarkers that are being used as early detection markers, prognostic markers, and markers for predicting treatment responses. This is no more evident than in the recent advances in testing colorectal cancers for specific molecular alterations in order to guide treatment with the monoclonal antibody therapies cetuximab and panitumumab, which target the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In this review, we update a prior review published in 2010 and describe our current understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of colorectal cancer and how these alterations relate to emerging biomarkers for early detection and risk stratification (diagnostic markers), prognosis (prognostic markers), and the prediction of treatment responses (predictive markers). PMID:24178577

  8. MOLECULAR PROGNOSTIC MARKERS OF URINE BLADDER CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Pavlov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer (BC remains a current problem in oncourology. Despite that bladder cancer risk factors have been studied and described in the literature, new molecular and genetic mechanisms have been identified that predisposes to the disease development. There are numerous cellular processes involve in BC pathogenesis. The less-aggressive, non-invasive slow progressing bladder cancer types are defined by Ras-MAPK system activation. Tumors that are more aggressive and have low cancer-specific survival rate are characterized by changes in retinoblastoma genes and p53. Attempts are made to develop prognostic tests to predict tumor behavior, targeted treatment. perspectively, BC patients will be treated using molecular genetic markers allowing the accurate prediction of the patient’s tumor behavior and fitting the treatment tactics on the individual basis.

  9. Molecular and Clinical Markers of Pancreas Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    James L Buxbaum; Eloubeidi, Mohamad A

    2010-01-01

    Pancreas cancer has the worst prognosis of any solid tumor but is potentially treatable if it is diagnosed at an early stage. Thus there is critical interest in delineating clinical and molecular markers of incipient disease. The currently available biomarker, CA 19-9, has an inadequate sensitivity and specificity to achieve this objective. Diabetes mellitus, tobacco use, and chronic pancreatitis are associated with pancreas cancer. However, screening is currently only recommended in those wi...

  10. Transcriptional networks inferred from molecular signatures of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongbai, Ron; Idelman, Gila; Nordgard, Silje H; Cui, Wenwu; Jacobs, Jonathan L; Haggerty, Cynthia M; Chanock, Stephen J; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Livingston, Gary; Shaunessy, Patrick; Chiang, Chih-Hung; Kristensen, Vessela N; Bilke, Sven; Gardner, Kevin

    2008-02-01

    Global genomic approaches in cancer research have provided new and innovative strategies for the identification of signatures that differentiate various types of human cancers. Computational analysis of the promoter composition of the genes within these signatures may provide a powerful method for deducing the regulatory transcriptional networks that mediate their collective function. In this study we have systematically analyzed the promoter composition of gene classes derived from previously established genetic signatures that recently have been shown to reliably and reproducibly distinguish five molecular subtypes of breast cancer associated with distinct clinical outcomes. Inferences made from the trends of transcription factor binding site enrichment in the promoters of these gene groups led to the identification of regulatory pathways that implicate discrete transcriptional networks associated with specific molecular subtypes of breast cancer. One of these inferred pathways predicted a role for nuclear factor-kappaB in a novel feed-forward, self-amplifying, autoregulatory module regulated by the ERBB family of growth factor receptors. The existence of this pathway was verified in vivo by chromatin immunoprecipitation and shown to be deregulated in breast cancer cells overexpressing ERBB2. This analysis indicates that approaches of this type can provide unique insights into the differential regulatory molecular programs associated with breast cancer and will aid in identifying specific transcriptional networks and pathways as potential targets for tumor subtype-specific therapeutic intervention.

  11. Bladder cancer: molecular determinants of personalized therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Santoni, Matteo; Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Tortora, Giampaolo; Cheng, Liang; Moch, Holger; Scarpelli, Marina; Reymundo, Carlos; Montironi, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Several molecular and genetic studies have provided new perspectives on the histologic classification of bladder tumors. Recent developments in the field of molecular mutational pathway analyses based on next generation sequencing technology together with classic data derived from the description of mutations in the FGFR3 (fibroblast growth factor receptor 3) gene, mutations on TP53 gene, and cDNA technology profiling data gives support to a differentiated taxonomy of bladder cancer. All these changes are behind the use of non-traditional approach to therapy of bladder cancer patients and are ready to change our daily practice of uro-oncology. The observed correlation of some molecular alterations with tumor behavior and the identification of their targets at cellular level might support the use of molecular changes together with morphological data to develop new clinical and biological strategies to manage patients with urothelial cancer. The current review provides comprehensive data to support personalized therapy for bladder cancer based on an integrated approach including pathologic and clinical features and molecular biology.

  12. [Colorectal cancer (CCR): genetic and molecular alterations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Vázquez, Clara Ibet; Rosales-Reynoso, Mónica Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present a genetic and molecular overview of colorectal carcinogenesis (sporadic and hereditary origin) as a multistage process, where there are a number of molecular mechanisms associated with the development of colorectal cancer and genomic instability that allows the accumulation of mutations in proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, chromosomal instability, and methylation and microsatellite instability, and the involvement of altered expression of microRNAs' prognosis factors.

  13. Molecular markers for prostate cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reynolds, M.A.; Kastury, K.; Groskopf, J.; Schalken, J.A.; Rittenhouse, H.G.

    2007-01-01

    Serum PSA testing has been used for over 20 years as an aid in the diagnosis and management of prostate cancer. Although highly sensitive, it suffers from a lack of specificity, showing elevated serum levels in a variety of other conditions including prostatitis, benign prostate hyperplasia, and non

  14. Molecular and Clinical Markers of Pancreas Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James L Buxbaum

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Pancreas cancer has the worst prognosis of any solid tumor but is potentially treatable if it is diagnosed at an early stage. Thus there is critical interest in delineating clinical and molecular markers of incipient disease. The currently available biomarker, CA 19-9, has an inadequate sensitivity and specificity to achieve this objective. Diabetes mellitus, tobacco use, and chronic pancreatitis are associated with pancreas cancer. However, screening is currently only recommended in those with hereditary pancreatitis and genetic syndromes which predispose to cancer. Ongoing work to identify early markers of pancreas cancer consists of high throughput discovery methods including gene arrays and proteomics as well as hypothesis driven methods. While several promising candidates have been identified none has yet been convincingly proven to be better than CA 19-9. New methods including endoscopic ultrasound are improving detection of pancreas cancer and are being used to acquire tissue for biomarker discovery.

  15. LOW MOLECULAR MASS POLYPEPTIDE AND TRANSPORTER ANTIGEN PEPTIDE GENES POLYMORPHISM AS THE RISK FACTORS OF CERVICAL CANCER WHICH CAUSED BY HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS TYPE-16 INFECTION IN BALI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I N. B. Mahendra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Until recently, cervical cancer is one of the major problem in women’s health issue related to its high incidence and mortality rate. The etiology of cervical cancer is the high risk oncogenic group of Human Papillomavirus (HPV, especially HPV-16 and 18 and its phylogenies. Meanwhile in Bali, more than 50% of infection are caused by HPV-16 infection. The main objective of this study was to investigate the role of LMP-2, LMP-7, TAP-1 and TAP-2 gene polymorphism as the risk factor in the cervical cancer carcinogenesis that is caused by HPV-16 infection. Method: A nested non-paired case-control study was conducted at Obstetric and Gynecologic Department Sanglah General Hospital, Bali-Indonesia from March 1 until August 31, 2013. Laboratory testing was carried out at Laboratory of Histopathology Leiden University Medical Centre, Netherlands,. Results: A total of 40 samples were collected, consist of 20epithelial cervical cancer patients with positive HPV-16 infection as the case group and 20 non-cervical cancer patients with positive HPV-16 infection as the control group. Women infected by HPV-16 with LMP-7 gene polymorphism had a higher risk (OR=7.36, CI 95%=1.38-40.55, p=0.013 to be diagnosed with cervical cancer. Balinese women who were infected by HPV-16 with TAP-2 gene polymorphism had a higher risk (OR= 9.33, CI 95%=2.18-39.96, p=0.001 to be diagnosed with cervical cancer. Meanwhile, Balinese women who were infected by HPV-16 with LMP-7 and TAP-2 genes polymorphism had a higher risk (OR=12.67, CI 95%=1.40-114.42, p=0.020 to be diagnosed with cervical cancer. As the result, it was shown that both of this gene polymorphism was working synergistically. Conclusion: TAP-2 and LMP-7 genes polymorphism play a role in the carcinogenesis mechanism of cervical cancer that is caused by HPV-16 infection in Bali. Meanwhile, LMP-2 and TAP-1 genes polymorphism were not found to play a role in the immunology pathway of cervical cancer that is

  16. Molecular and neuroendocrine mechanisms of cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Maria Carolina S; Pimentel, Gustavo D; Costa, Felipe O; Carvalheira, José B C

    2015-09-01

    Cancer and its morbidities, such as cancer cachexia, constitute a major public health problem. Although cancer cachexia has afflicted humanity for centuries, its underlying multifactorial and complex physiopathology has hindered the understanding of its mechanism. During the last few decades we have witnessed a dramatic increase in the understanding of cancer cachexia pathophysiology. Anorexia and muscle and adipose tissue wasting are the main features of cancer cachexia. These apparently independent symptoms have humoral factors secreted by the tumor as a common cause. Importantly, the hypothalamus has emerged as an organ that senses the peripheral signals emanating from the tumoral environment, and not only elicits anorexia but also contributes to the development of muscle and adipose tissue loss. Herein, we review the roles of factors secreted by the tumor and its effects on the hypothalamus, muscle and adipose tissue, as well as highlighting the key targets that are being exploited for cancer cachexia treatment.

  17. Ovarian cancer: a molecularly insidious disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzanzanica, Delia

    2015-01-01

    In this issue of the Chinese Journal of Cancer, European, American, and Chinese experts review the current management and future perspectives of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), the leading cause of gynecological cancer deaths. Although major advances have been made in understanding the cellular and molecular biology of this highly heterogeneous malignancy, the survival rate of women with EOC has changed little since the introduction of platinum-based treatment as a front-line therapy. The papers describe the progress in deciphering the molecular complexity of this disease and the newly available molecular-driven therapies, which have been applied by shifting trial designs toward restricting eligibility to specific subgroups of patients rather than testing agents in unselected populations. These new trial designs provide potential opportunities for improved efficacy in targeted populations. Given the molecular complexity of this disease, patient survival may be increased by searching for new molecular prognostic/predictive signatures as well as by translating the recent insight of microRNA involvement in EOC progression into new, targeted therapies. Particular attention has been given to the issue of fertility sparing for women affected by curable diseases.

  18. Isolation of Cancer Stem Cells From Human Prostate Cancer Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Samuel J.; Quinn, S. Aidan; de la Iglesia-Vicente, Janis; Bonal, Dennis M.; Rodriguez-Bravo, Veronica; Firpo-Betancourt, Adolfo; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Domingo-Domenech, Josep

    2014-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model has been considerably revisited over the last two decades. During this time CSCs have been identified and directly isolated from human tissues and serially propagated in immunodeficient mice, typically through antibody labeling of subpopulations of cells and fractionation by flow cytometry. However, the unique clinical features of prostate cancer have considerably limited the study of prostate CSCs from fresh human tumor samples. We recently reported the isolation of prostate CSCs directly from human tissues by virtue of their HLA class I (HLAI)-negative phenotype. Prostate cancer cells are harvested from surgical specimens and mechanically dissociated. A cell suspension is generated and labeled with fluorescently conjugated HLAI and stromal antibodies. Subpopulations of HLAI-negative cells are finally isolated using a flow cytometer. The principal limitation of this protocol is the frequently microscopic and multifocal nature of primary cancer in prostatectomy specimens. Nonetheless, isolated live prostate CSCs are suitable for molecular characterization and functional validation by transplantation in immunodeficient mice. PMID:24686446

  19. Modern criteria to establish human cancer etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Michele; Klein, George; Gruber, Jack; Wong, May

    2004-08-01

    The Cancer Etiology Branch of the National Cancer Institute hosted a workshop, "Validation of a causal relationship: criteria to establish etiology," to determine whether recent technological advances now make it possible to delineate improved or novel criteria for the rapid establishment for cancer causation. The workshop was held in Washington, D.C., December 11-12, 2003, and participants were among the international leaders in the fields of epidemiology, chemistry, biochemistry, microbiology, virology, environmental and chemical carcinogenesis, immunology, pathology, molecular pathology, genetics, oncology, and surgical oncology. There was a general consensus that the rapid identification of human carcinogens and their removal (when possible) or the establishment of specific preventive and therapeutic measures was the most desirable and effective way to have a rapid and positive impact in the fight against cancer. From a clinical perspective, it may be as important to target initiators, cocarcinogens and promoters, if by removing any one of them tumor growth can be prevented. Future studies should focus on interactions among and between different biological, chemical, and physical agents. Analyses of single agents can at times miss their carcinogenic potential when such agents are carcinogenic only in subgroups of individuals because of their genetic background, diet, exposure to other carcinogens, or microbial infection. Epidemiology, molecular pathology (including chemistry, biochemistry, molecular biology, molecular virology, molecular genetics, epigenetics, genomics, proteomics, and other molecular-based approaches), and animal and tissue culture experiments should all be seen as important integrating evidence in the determination of human carcinogenicity. Concerning the respective roles of epidemiology and molecular pathology, it was noted that epidemiology allows the determination of the overall effect of a given carcinogen in the human population (e

  20. Molecular pathogenesis ofsporadic colorectal cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HidetsuguYamagishi; HajimeKuroda; YasuoImai; HideyukiHiraishi

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) results from the progressive accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations that lead to the transformation of normal colonic mucosa to adenocarcinoma. Approximately 75% of CRCs are sporadic and occur in people without genetic predisposition or family history of CRC. During the past two decades, sporadic CRCs were classiifed into three major groups according to frequently altered/mutated genes. These genes have been identiifed by linkage analyses of cancer-prone families and by individual mutation analyses of candidate genes selected on the basis of functional data. In the ifrst half of this review, we describe the genetic pathways of sporadic CRCs and their clinicopathologic features. Recently, large-scale genome analyses have detected many infrequently mutated genes as well as a small number of frequently mutated genes. These infrequently mutated genes are likely described in a lim-ited number of pathways. Gene-oriented models of CRC progression are being replaced by pathway-oriented models. In the second half of this review, we summarize the present knowledge of this research ifeld and discuss its prospects.

  1. [Molecular bases of cancer immunology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Rodríguez, R; Peralta-Zaragoza, O; Madrid-Marina, V

    1995-01-01

    The immune system is a tight network of different types of cells and molecules. The coordinated action of these elements mounts a precise immune response against tumor cells. However, these cells present several escape mechanisms, leading to tumor progression. This paper shows several cellular and molecular events involved in the regulation of the immune response against tumor cells. The interaction of several molecules such as MHC, TcR, adhesins, tumor antigens and cytokines are discussed, as well as the most recent knowledge about escape mechanisms and immunotherapy.

  2. Immunological and Functional Characterization of RhoGDI3 and Its Molecular Targets RhoG and RhoB in Human Pancreatic Cancerous and Normal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    de León-Bautista, Mercedes Piedad; Cardenas-Aguayo, Maria del Carmen; Casique-Aguirre, Diana; Almaraz-Salinas, Manuel; Parraguirre-Martinez, Sara; Olivo-Diaz, Angelica; Thompson-Bonilla, María del Rocío

    2016-01-01

    RhoGDI proteins have been implicated in several human cancers; changes in their expression levels have shown pro- or anti-tumorigenic effects. Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a complex pathology, with poor prognosis, and most patients die shortly after diagnosis. Efforts have been focused on understanding the role of RhoGDI's in PDAC, specially, RhoGDI1 and RhoGDI2. However, the role of RhoGDI3 has not been studied in relation to cancer or to PDAC. Here, we characterized the expression and functionality of RhoGDI3 and its target GTPases, RhoG and RhoB in pancreatic cell lines from both normal pancreatic tissue and tissue in late stages of PDAC, and compared them to human biopsies. Through immunofluorescences, pulldown assays and subcellular fractionation, we found a reduction in RhoGDI3 expression in the late stages of PDAC, and this reduction correlates with tumor progression and aggressiveness. Despite the reduction in the expression of RhoGDI3 in PDAC, we found that RhoB was underexpressed while RhoG was overexpressed, suggesting that cancerous cells preserve their capacity to activate this pathway, thus these cells may be more eager to response to the stimuli needed to proliferate and become invasive unlike normal cells. Surprisingly, we found nuclear localization of RhoGDI3 in non-cancerous pancreatic cell line and normal pancreatic tissue biopsies, which could open the possibility of novel nuclear functions for this protein, impacting gene expression regulation and cellular homeostasis. PMID:27832197

  3. Targets for molecular therapy of skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Cheryl L; Khavari, Paul A

    2004-02-01

    Cancers of the skin encompass the first and second most common neoplasms in the United States, epidermal basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), respectively, as well as the melanocytic malignancy, malignant melanoma (MM). Recently identified alterations in the function of specific genes in these cancers provide new potential therapeutic targets. These alterations affect conserved regulators of cellular proliferation and viability, including the Sonic Hedgehog, Ras/Raf, ARF/p53, p16(INK4A)/CDK4/Rb and NF-kappaB pathways. New modalities designed to target these specific proteins may represent promising approaches to therapy of human skin cancers.

  4. Oncogenes and human cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C.P. Heisterkamp (Nora); J.H.C. Groffen (John)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractThe first demonstrations that cancer could have an infectious nature was by Ellerman and Bang (1) ~ who showed that leukemia in chickens was transmissible with cell-free extracts and by Rous (2), who found in a similar fashion that naturally occurring chicken sarcomas were transmissible.

  5. Molecular diagnosis of prostate cancer: Topical issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Knyazev

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is the second most common cancer and the fifth highest malignancy mortality rate in men worldwide. Although PC is detectable in 15-20% of men during life, its death risk is only about 3%. This means that not all PC cases require the same management tactics. The given review analyzes the current investigations searching for molecular biological markers to predict the course of PC and to choose its treatment policy, including that in the development of resistance to androgen-deprivation therapy.

  6. Cellular and molecular effects of yeast probiotics on cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saber, Amir; Alipour, Beitollah; Faghfoori, Zeinab; Yari Khosroushahi, Ahmad

    2017-02-01

    The cancer is one of the main causes of human deaths worldwide. The exact mechanisms of initiation and progression of malignancies are not clear yet, but there is a common agreement about the role of colonic microbiota in the etiology of different cancers. Probiotics have been examined for their anti-cancer effects, and different mechanisms have been suggested about their antitumor functions. Nonpathogenic yeasts, as members of probiotics family, can be effective on gut microbiota dysbiosis. Generally safe yeasts have shown so many beneficial effects on human health. Probiotic yeasts influence physiology, metabolism, and immune homeostasis in the colon and contribute to cancer treatment due to possessing anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative and anti-cancer properties. This study reviews some of the health-beneficial effects of probiotic yeasts and their biological substances like folic acid and β-glucan on cancer and focuses on the possible cellular and molecular mechanisms of probiotic yeasts such as influencing pathogenic bacteria, inactivation of carcinogenic compounds, especially those derived from food, improvement of intestinal barrier function, modulation of immune responses, antitoxic function, apoptosis, and anti-proliferative effects.

  7. Breast Cancer: Current Molecular Therapeutic Targets and New Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagini, Siddavaram

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer and the most frequent cause of cancer death among women worldwide. Breast cancer is a complex, heterogeneous disease classified into hormone-receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 overexpressing (HER2+) and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) based on histological features. Endocrine therapy, the mainstay of treatment for hormone-responsive breast cancer involves use of selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), selective estrogen receptor downregulators (SERDs) and aromatase inhibitors (AIs). Agents that target estrogen receptor (ER) and HER2 such as tamoxifen and trastuzumab have been the most extensively used therapeutics for breast cancer. Crosstalk between ER and other signalling networks as well as epigenetic mechanisms have been envisaged to contribute to endocrine therapy resistance. TNBC, a complex, heterogeneous, aggressive form of breast cancer in which the cells do not express ER, progesterone receptor or HER2 is refractory to therapy. Several molecular targets are being explored to target TNBC including androgen receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Receptors, protein tyrosine kinases, phosphatases, proteases, PI3K/Akt signalling pathway, microRNAs (miRs) and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are potential therapeutic targets. miR-based therapeutic approaches include inhibition of oncomiRs by antisense oligonucleotides, restoration of tumour suppressors using miR mimics, and chemical modification of miRs. The lnRNAs HOTAIR, SPRY4-IT1, GAS5, and PANDAR, new players in tumour development and prognosis may have theranostic applications in breast cancer. Several novel classes of mechanism-based drugs have been designed and synthesised for treatment of breast cancer. Integration of nucleic acid sequencing studies with mass spectrometry-based peptide sequencing and posttranslational modifications as

  8. Relative expression analysis for molecular cancer diagnosis and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, James A; Sung, Jaeyun; Geman, Donald; Price, Nathan D

    2010-04-01

    The enormous amount of biomolecule measurement data generated from high-throughput technologies has brought an increased need for computational tools in biological analyses. Such tools can enhance our understanding of human health and genetic diseases, such as cancer, by accurately classifying phenotypes, detecting the presence of disease, discriminating among cancer sub-types, predicting clinical outcomes, and characterizing disease progression. In the case of gene expression microarray data, standard statistical learning methods have been used to identify classifiers that can accurately distinguish disease phenotypes. However, these mathematical prediction rules are often highly complex, and they lack the convenience and simplicity desired for extracting underlying biological meaning or transitioning into the clinic. In this review, we survey a powerful collection of computational methods for analyzing transcriptomic microarray data that address these limitations. Relative Expression Analysis (RXA) is based only on the relative orderings among the expressions of a small number of genes. Specifically, we provide a description of the first and simplest example of RXA, the K-TSP classifier, which is based on _ pairs of genes; the case K = 1 is the TSP classifier. Given their simplicity and ease of biological interpretation, as well as their invariance to data normalization and parameter-fitting, these classifiers have been widely applied in aiding molecular diagnostics in a broad range of human cancers. We review several studies which demonstrate accurate classification of disease phenotypes (e.g., cancer vs. normal), cancer subclasses (e.g., AML vs. ALL, GIST vs. LMS), disease outcomes (e.g., metastasis, survival), and diverse human pathologies assayed through blood-borne leukocytes. The studies presented demonstrate that RXA-specifically the TSP and K-TSP classifiers-is a promising new class of computational methods for analyzing high-throughput data, and has the

  9. Pre-clinical Orthotopic Murine Model of Human Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahryari, Varahram; Nip, Hannah; Saini, Sharanjot; Dar, Altaf A; Yamamura, Soichiro; Mitsui, Yozo; Colden, Melissa; Bucay, Nathan; Tabatabai, Laura Z; Greene, Kirsten; Deng, Guoren; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Dahiya, Rajvir; Majid, Shahana

    2016-08-29

    To study the multifaceted biology of prostate cancer, pre-clinical in vivo models offer a range of options to uncover critical biological information about this disease. The human orthotopic prostate cancer xenograft mouse model provides a useful alternative approach for understanding the specific interactions between genetically and molecularly altered tumor cells, their organ microenvironment, and for evaluation of efficacy of therapeutic regimens. This is a well characterized model designed to study the molecular events of primary tumor development and it recapitulates the early events in the metastatic cascade prior to embolism and entry of tumor cells into the circulation. Thus it allows elucidation of molecular mechanisms underlying the initial phase of metastatic disease. In addition, this model can annotate drug targets of clinical relevance and is a valuable tool to study prostate cancer progression. In this manuscript we describe a detailed procedure to establish a human orthotopic prostate cancer xenograft mouse model.

  10. Thiazole-based nitrogen mustards: Design, synthesis, spectroscopic studies, DFT calculation, molecular docking, and antiproliferative activity against selected human cancer cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łączkowski, Krzysztof Z.; Świtalska, Marta; Baranowska-Łączkowska, Angelika; Plech, Tomasz; Paneth, Agata; Misiura, Konrad; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Czaplińska, Barbara; Mrozek-Wilczkiewicz, Anna; Malarz, Katarzyna; Musioł, Robert; Grela, Izabela

    2016-09-01

    Synthesis, characterization and investigation of antiproliferative activity of ten thiazole-based nitrogen mustard against human cancer cells lines (MV4-11, A549, MCF-7 and HCT116) and normal mouse fibroblast (BALB/3T3) is presented. The structures of novel compounds were determined using 1H and 13C NMR, FAB(+)-MS, and elemental analyses. Among the derivatives, 5b, 5c, 5e, 5f and 5i were found to exhibit high activity against human leukaemia MV4-11 cells with IC50 values of 2.17-4.26 μg/ml. The cytotoxic activity of compound 5c and 5f against BALB/3T3 cells is up to 20 times lower than against cancer cell lines. Our results also show that compounds 5e and 5i have very strong activity against MCF-7 and HCT116 with IC50 values of 3.02-4.13 μg/ml. Moreover, spectroscopic characterization and cellular localization for selected compound were performed. In order to identify potential drug targets we perform computer simulations with DNA-binding site of hTopoI and hTopoII and quantum chemical calculation of interaction and binding energies in complexes of the five most active compounds with guanine.

  11. O-Linked glycome and proteome of high-molecular-mass proteins in human ovarian cancer ascites: Identification of sulfation, disialic acid and O-linked fucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Niclas G; McGuckin, Michael A

    2012-07-01

    The O-linked glycosylation of the main acidic high-molecular-weight glycoprotein from ascites fluid from patients with ovarian cancer were analyzed. The O-linked oligosaccharides were shown to consist of mainly highly sialylated core 1 and 2 structures with a smaller amount of sulfated core 2 structures. These structures were shown to be able to be further extended into small keratan sulfate (KS)-type oligosaccharides with up to four N-acetyllactosamine units. Proteomic studies of the acidic fraction of ascites fluid from patients with ovarian cancer showed that this fraction was enriched in proteoglycans. Among them, lumican, agrin, versican and dystroglycans were potential candidates, with threonine- and serine-rich domains that could carry a significant amount of O-linked glycosylation, including also the O-linked KS. Glycomic analysis using liquid chromatography (LC)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) also showed that the disialic acid NeuAc-NeuAc- was frequently found as the terminating structure on the O-linked core 1 and 2 oligosaccharides from one ascites sample. Also, a small amount of the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-associated O-linked fucose structure Gal-GlcNAc-Fucitol was detected with and without sialic acid in the LC-MS/MS analysis. Candidate proteins containing O-linked fucose were suggested to be proteoglycan-type molecules containing the O-linked fucose EGF consensus domain.

  12. Viruses and human cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallo, R.C.; Haseltine, W.; Klein, G.; Zur Hausen, H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers on the following topics: Immunology and Epidemiology, Biology and Pathogenesis, Models of Pathogenesis and Treatment, Simian and Bovine Retroviruses, Human Papilloma Viruses, EBV and Herpesvirus, and Hepatitis B Virus.

  13. Molecular cloning of the 31 kDa cytosolic phospholipase A2, as an antigen recognized by the lung cancer-specific human monoclonal antibody, AE6F4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, S; Shoji, M; Setoguchi, Y; Kato, M; Hashizume, S; Ichikawa, A; Osada, K; Katakura, Y; Tachibana, H; Murakami, H

    1995-01-01

    The human monoclonal antibody AE6F4 specifically reacts with human lung cancer tissues but does not with normal tissues. This monoclonal antibody recognizes a cytosolic 31 kDa antigen in the cancer cells. In a previous study, we elucidated that the 31 kDa antigen belonged to a family of proteins collectively designated as 14-3-3 proteins, which were known as protein kinase-dependent activators of tyrosine/trytophan hydroxylases, or protein kinase C inhibitor proteins. Here we report molecular cloning of the 31 kDa antigen from the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line, A549. Sequencing analysis indicates that the cloned cDNA is identical to that of previously reported human placental cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), which is also a member of the 14-3-3 protein family. Western analysis demonstrated that a 31 kDa recombinant cPLA2 expressed in monkey COS cells was recognized by the AE6F4 monoclonal antibody. Binding of the monoclonal antibody to the recombinant cPLA2 was abolished when treated with sodium periodate, suggesting that not only are carbohydrate chains associated with the cPLA2, but they also play a crucial role in antigen recognition by the monoclonal antibody.

  14. Molecular mechanisms of metastasis in prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Noel W.Clarke; Claire A.Hart; Mick D.Brown

    2009-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) preferentially metastasizes to the bone marrow stroma of the axial skeleton.This activity is the principal cause of PCa morbidity and mortality.The exact mechanism of PCa metastasis is currently unknown,although considerable progress has been made in determining the key players in this process.In this review,we present the current understanding of the molecular processes driving PCa metastasis to the bone.

  15. Animal models and therapeutic molecular targets of cancer: utility and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekanova, Maria; Rathore, Kusum

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is the term used to describe over 100 diseases that share several common hallmarks. Despite prevention, early detection, and novel therapies, cancer is still the second leading cause of death in the USA. Successful bench-to-bedside translation of basic scientific findings about cancer into therapeutic interventions for patients depends on the selection of appropriate animal experimental models. Cancer research uses animal and human cancer cell lines in vitro to study biochemical pathways in these cancer cells. In this review, we summarize the important animal models of cancer with focus on their advantages and limitations. Mouse cancer models are well known, and are frequently used for cancer research. Rodent models have revolutionized our ability to study gene and protein functions in vivo and to better understand their molecular pathways and mechanisms. Xenograft and chemically or genetically induced mouse cancers are the most commonly used rodent cancer models. Companion animals with spontaneous neoplasms are still an underexploited tool for making rapid advances in human and veterinary cancer therapies by testing new drugs and delivery systems that have shown promise in vitro and in vivo in mouse models. Companion animals have a relatively high incidence of cancers, with biological behavior, response to therapy, and response to cytotoxic agents similar to those in humans. Shorter overall lifespan and more rapid disease progression are factors contributing to the advantages of a companion animal model. In addition, the current focus is on discovering molecular targets for new therapeutic drugs to improve survival and quality of life in cancer patients.

  16. A pilot study exploring the molecular architecture of the tumor microenvironment in human prostate cancer using laser capture microdissection and reverse phase protein microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pin, Elisa; Stratton, Steven; Belluco, Claudio; Liotta, Lance; Nagle, Ray; Hodge, K Alex; Deng, Jianghong; Dong, Ting; Baldelli, Elisa; Petricoin, Emanuel; Pierobon, Mariaelena

    2016-12-01

    The cross-talk between tumor epithelium and surrounding stromal/immune microenvironment is essential to sustain tumor growth and progression and provides new opportunities for the development of targeted treatments focused on disrupting the tumor ecology. Identification of novel approaches to study these interactions is of primary importance. Using laser capture microdissection (LCM) coupled with reverse phase protein microarray (RPPA) based protein signaling activation mapping we explored the molecular interconnection between tumor epithelium and surrounding stromal microenvironment in 18 prostate cancer (PCa) specimens. Four specimen-matched cellular compartments (normal-appearing epithelium and its adjacent stroma, and malignant epithelium and its adjacent stroma) were isolated for each case. The signaling network analysis of the four compartments unraveled a number of molecular mechanisms underlying the communication between tumor cells and stroma in the context of the tumor microenvironment. In particular, differential expression of inflammatory mediators like IL-8 and IL-10 by the stroma cells appeared to modulate specific cross-talks between the tumor cells and surrounding microenvironment. Copyright © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosbie, Emma J; Einstein, Mark H; Franceschi, Silvia; Kitchener, Henry C

    2013-09-07

    Cervical cancer is caused by human papillomavirus infection. Most human papillomavirus infection is harmless and clears spontaneously but persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (especially type 16) can cause cancer of the cervix, vulva, vagina, anus, penis, and oropharynx. The virus exclusively infects epithelium and produces new viral particles only in fully mature epithelial cells. Human papillomavirus disrupts normal cell-cycle control, promoting uncontrolled cell division and the accumulation of genetic damage. Two effective prophylactic vaccines composed of human papillomavirus type 16 and 18, and human papillomavirus type 16, 18, 6, and 11 virus-like particles have been introduced in many developed countries as a primary prevention strategy. Human papillomavirus testing is clinically valuable for secondary prevention in triaging low-grade cytology and as a test of cure after treatment. More sensitive than cytology, primary screening by human papillomavirus testing could enable screening intervals to be extended. If these prevention strategies can be implemented in developing countries, many thousands of lives could be saved.

  18. Molecular basis of telomere dysfunction in human genetic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarek, Grzegorz; Marzec, Paulina; Margalef, Pol; Boulton, Simon J

    2015-11-01

    Mutations in genes encoding proteins required for telomere structure, replication, repair and length maintenance are associated with several debilitating human genetic disorders. These complex telomere biology disorders (TBDs) give rise to critically short telomeres that affect the homeostasis of multiple organs. Furthermore, genome instability is often a hallmark of telomere syndromes, which are associated with increased cancer risk. Here, we summarize the molecular causes and cellular consequences of disease-causing mutations associated with telomere dysfunction.

  19. Alterations of 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine in Human Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Yesilkanal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Prior to 2009, 5-methylcytosine (5-mC was thought to be the only biologically significant cytosine modification in mammalian DNA. With the discovery of the TET enzymes, which convert 5-methylcytosine (5-mC to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC, however, intense interest has emerged in determining the biological function of 5-hmC. Here, we review the techniques used to study 5-hmC and evidence that alterations to 5-hmC physiology play a functional role in the molecular pathogenesis of human cancers.

  20. Molecular Mechanism Underlying Lymphatic Metastasis in Pancreatic Cancer

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    Zhiwen Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As the most challenging human malignancies, pancreatic cancer is characterized by its insidious symptoms, low rate of surgical resection, high risk of local invasion, metastasis and recurrence, and overall dismal prognosis. Lymphatic metastasis, above all, is recognized as an early adverse event in progression of pancreatic cancer and has been described to be an independent poor prognostic factor. It should be noted that the occurrence of lymphatic metastasis is not a casual or stochastic but an ineluctable and designed event. Increasing evidences suggest that metastasis-initiating cells (MICs and the microenvironments may act as a double-reed style in this crime. However, the exact mechanisms on how they function synergistically for this dismal clinical course remain largely elusive. Therefore, a better understanding of its molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in pancreatic lymphatic metastasis is urgently required. In this review, we will summarize the latest advances on lymphatic metastasis in pancreatic cancer.

  1. Molecular diagnosis of human papillomavirus in the development of cervical cancer Diagnóstico molecular del virus del papiloma humano en el desarrollo del cáncer cervical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Gutiérrez-Xicoténcatl

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer (CC is a major public health problem in developing countries and its most significant etiological risk factor is infection by the human papillomavirus (HPV. The main approach to date for the prevention of CC has been through screening programs, using the cervical smear (PAP test to detect precursory lesions. The sensitivity and specificity of the PAP smear depend on the skills of the observer to recognize and classify a variety of cellular abnormalities. The development of early diagnoses to detect HPV infection has been a problem as cytology and colposcopy identify the lesion at an advanced stage. Therefore, molecular approaches have become more successful for early CC diagnosis. These molecular techniques recognize HPV DNA sequences by DNA hybridization, PCR-RFLP, hybrid capture and reverse line blot systems. Unfortunately, these systems cannot determine whether the HPV infection is active, latent or persistent. Thus, immunological techniques such as Western blot and ELISA have been designed to follow the immune response against the virus, and they can also be used to identify the stage of the infection. Several companies have developed, manufactured and merchandised gene-based testing systems for the screening, monitoring and diagnosis of HPV. Our review and comments focus on the critical analysis of existing products and their use in clinical practice as well as on immunological systems used mainly in research, but that may be applied in large population screening programs.El cáncer cervical (CC es el mayor problema de salud pública en países en vías de desarrollo, al ser la infección por el virus del papiloma humano (HPV el factor etiológico más importante de esta enfermedad. Actualmente, el principal acercamiento para la prevención del CC ha sido a través de programas de detección oportuna del cáncer, lo cual se ha realizado a través del estudio citológico del Papanicolaou (Pap para la detección de lesiones

  2. Comprehensive molecular portraits of human breast tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    We analysed primary breast cancers by genomic DNA copy number arrays, DNA methylation, exome sequencing, messenger RNA arrays, microRNA sequencing and reverse-phase protein arrays. Our ability to integrate information across platforms provided key insights into previously defined gene expression subtypes and demonstrated the existence of four main breast cancer classes when combining data from five platforms, each of which shows significant molecular heterogeneity. Somatic mutations in only three genes (TP53, PIK3CA and GATA3) occurred at >10% incidence across all breast cancers; however, there were numerous subtype-associated and novel gene mutations including the enrichment of specific mutations in GATA3, PIK3CA and MAP3K1 with the luminal A subtype. We identified two novel protein-expression-defined subgroups, possibly produced by stromal/microenvironmental elements, and integrated analyses identified specific signalling pathways dominant in each molecular subtype including a HER2/phosphorylated HER2/EGFR/phosphorylated EGFR signature within the HER2-enriched expression subtype. Comparison of basal-like breast tumours with high-grade serous ovarian tumours showed many molecular commonalities, indicating a related aetiology and similar therapeutic opportunities. The biological finding of the four main breast cancer subtypes caused by different subsets of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities raises the hypothesis that much of the clinically observable plasticity and heterogeneity occurs within, and not across, these major biological subtypes of breast cancer.

  3. Molecular functions of human endogenous retroviruses in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suntsova, Maria; Garazha, Andrew; Ivanova, Alena; Kaminsky, Dmitry; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Buzdin, Anton

    2015-10-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) and related genetic elements form 504 distinct families and occupy ~8% of human genome. Recent success of high-throughput experimental technologies facilitated understanding functional impact of HERVs for molecular machinery of human cells. HERVs encode active retroviral proteins, which may exert important physiological functions in the body, but also may be involved in the progression of cancer and numerous human autoimmune, neurological and infectious diseases. The spectrum of related malignancies includes, but not limits to, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, lupus, schizophrenia, multiple cancer types and HIV. In addition, HERVs regulate expression of the neighboring host genes and modify genomic regulatory landscape, e.g., by providing regulatory modules like transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). Indeed, recent bioinformatic profiling identified ~110,000 regulatory active HERV elements, which formed at least ~320,000 human TFBS. These and other peculiarities of HERVs might have played an important role in human evolution and speciation. In this paper, we focus on the current progress in understanding of normal and pathological molecular niches of HERVs, on their implications in human evolution, normal physiology and disease. We also review the available databases dealing with various aspects of HERV genetics.

  4. Septin mutations in human cancers

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    Elias T Spiliotis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Septins are GTP-binding proteins that are evolutionarily and structurally related to the RAS oncogenes. Septin expression levels are altered in many cancers and new advances point to how abnormal septin expression may contribute to the progression of cancer. In contrast to the RAS GTPases, which are frequently mutated and actively promote tumorigenesis, little is known about the occurrence and role of septin mutations in human cancers. Here, we review septin missense mutations that are currently in the Catalog of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC database. The majority of septin mutations occur in tumors of the large intestine, skin, endometrium and stomach. Over 25% of the annotated mutations in SEPT2, SEPT4 and SEPT9 belong to large intestine tumors. From all septins, SEPT9 and SEPT14 exhibit the highest mutation frequencies in skin, stomach and large intestine cancers. While septin mutations occur with frequencies lower than 3%, recurring mutations in several invariant and highly conserved amino acids are found across different septin paralogs and tumor types. Interestingly, a significant number of these mutations occur in the GTP-binding pocket and septin dimerization interfaces. Future studies may determine how these somatic mutations affect septin structure and function, whether they contribute to the progression of specific cancers and if they could serve as tumor-specific biomarkers.

  5. DBGC: A Database of Human Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Jun; Cai, Mingdeng; Zhu, Zhenggang; Gu, Wenjie; Yu, Yingyan; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    The Database of Human Gastric Cancer (DBGC) is a comprehensive database that integrates various human gastric cancer-related data resources. Human gastric cancer-related transcriptomics projects, proteomics projects, mutations, biomarkers and drug-sensitive genes from different sources were collected and unified in this database. Moreover, epidemiological statistics of gastric cancer patients in China and clinicopathological information annotated with gastric cancer cases were also integrated into the DBGC. We believe that this database will greatly facilitate research regarding human gastric cancer in many fields. DBGC is freely available at http://bminfor.tongji.edu.cn/dbgc/index.do.

  6. Inhibitory effects of polyphenol-enriched extract from Ziyang tea against human breast cancer MCF-7 cells through reactive oxygen species-dependent mitochondria molecular mechanism

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    Wenfeng Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A polyphenol-enriched extract from selenium-enriched Ziyang green tea (ZTP was selected to evaluate its antitumor effects against human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. In ZTP, (−-epigallocatechin gallate (28.2% was identified as the major catechin, followed by (−-epigallocatechin (5.7% and (−-epicatechin gallate (12.6%. ZTP was shown to inhibit MCF-7 cell proliferation (half maximal inhibitory concentration, IC50 = 172.2 μg/mL by blocking cell-cycle progression at the G0/G1 phase and inducing apoptotic death. Western blotting assay indicated that ZTP induced cell-cycle arrest by upregulation of p53 and reduced the expression of CDK2 in MCF-7 cells. ZTP-caused cell apoptosis was associated with an increase in Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, and activation of caspase-3 and -9. MCF-7 cells treated with ZTP also showed an overproduction of reactive oxygen species, suggesting that reactive oxygen species played an important role in the induction of apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. This is the first report showing that ZTP is a potential novel dietary agent for cancer chemoprevention or chemotherapy.

  7. Methodologies in cancer cytogenetics and molecular cytogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nancy

    2002-10-30

    Various types of cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic approaches, including conventional banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), fiber-FISH, comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), matrix array CGH, chromosome microdissection, and microcell-mediated chromosome transfer are summarized. The rationale, advantage, and limitations of each approach are discussed with respect to research and clinical applications in human neoplasia.

  8. Molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Nariya [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    During the last 15 years, traditional breast cancer classifications based on histopathology have been reorganized into the luminal A, luminal B, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and basal-like subtypes based on gene expression profiling. Each molecular subtype has shown varying risk for progression, response to treatment, and survival outcomes. Research linking the imaging phenotype with the molecular subtype has revealed that non-calcified, relatively circumscribed masses with posterior acoustic enhancement are common in the basal-like subtype, spiculated masses with a poorly circumscribed margin and posterior acoustic shadowing in the luminal subtype, and pleomorphic calcifications in the HER2-enriched subtype. Understanding the clinical implications of the molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes could help radiologists guide precision medicine, tailoring medical treatment to patients and their tumor characteristics.

  9. Molecular epidemiology, cancer-related symptoms, and cytokines pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Gibby, Cielito C; Wu, Xifeng; Spitz, Margaret; Kurzrock, Razelle; Fisch, Michael; Bruera, Eduardo; Shete, Sanjay

    2008-08-01

    The Human Genome Project and HapMap have led to a better appreciation of the importance of common genetic variation in determining cancer risk, created potential for predicting response to therapy, and made possible the development of targeted prevention and therapeutic interventions. Advances in molecular epidemiology can be used to explore the role of genetic variation in modulating the risk for severe and persistent symptoms, such as pain, depression, and fatigue, in patients with cancer. The same genes that are implicated in cancer risk might also be involved in the modulation of therapeutic outcomes. For example, polymorphisms in several cytokine genes are potential markers for genetic susceptibility both for cancer risk and for cancer-related symptoms. These genetic polymorphisms are stable markers and easily and reliably assayed to explore the extent to which genetic variation might prove useful in identifying patients with cancer at high-risk of symptom development. Likewise, they could identify subgroups who might benefit most from symptom intervention, and contribute to developing personalized and more effective therapies for persistent symptoms.

  10. Immunophenotyping invasive breast cancer: paving the road for molecular imaging

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    Vermeulen Jeroen F

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammographic population screening in The Netherlands has increased the number of breast cancer patients with small and non-palpable breast tumors. Nevertheless, mammography is not ultimately sensitive and specific for distinct subtypes. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers might increase specificity and sensitivity of detection. Because development of new tracers is labor-intensive and costly, we searched for the smallest panel of tumor membrane markers that would allow detection of the wide spectrum of invasive breast cancers. Methods Tissue microarrays containing 483 invasive breast cancers were stained by immunohistochemistry for a selected set of membrane proteins known to be expressed in breast cancer. Results The combination of highly tumor-specific markers glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1-R, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, hepatocyte growth factor receptor (MET, and carbonic anhydrase 9 (CAIX 'detected' 45.5% of tumors, especially basal/triple negative and HER2-driven ductal cancers. Addition of markers with a 2-fold tumor-to-normal ratio increased the detection rate to 98%. Including only markers with >3 fold tumor-to-normal ratio (CD44v6 resulted in an 80% detection rate. The detection rate of the panel containing both tumor-specific and less tumor-specific markers was not dependent on age, tumor grade, tumor size, or lymph node status. Conclusions In search of the minimal panel of targeted probes needed for the highest possible detection rate, we showed that 80% of all breast cancers express at least one of a panel of membrane markers (CD44v6, GLUT1, EGFR, HER2, and IGF1-R that may therefore be suitable for molecular imaging strategies. This study thereby serves as a starting point for further development of a set of antibody-based optical tracers with a high breast cancer detection rate.

  11. Low molecular weight procyanidins from grape seeds enhance the impact of 5-Fluorouracil chemotherapy on Caco-2 human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Ker Y; Howarth, Gordon S; Bindon, Keren A; Kennedy, James A; Bastian, Susan E P

    2014-01-01

    Grape seed procyanidins (PC) are flavan-3-ol oligomers and polymers known for their biological activity in the gut. Grape seed extract (GSE) have been reported to reduce intestinal injury in a rat model of mucositis. We sought to investigate effects of purified PC fractions differing in mean degree of polymerization (mDP) combined with 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) chemotherapy on the viability of colon cancer cells (Caco-2). SixPC fractions (F1-F6) were isolated from Cabernet Sauvignon seeds at two ripeness stages: pre-veraison unripe (immature) and ripe (mature), utilizing step gradient, low-pressure chromatography on a Sephadex LH-20 resin. Fractions were tested on Caco-2 cells, alone and in combination with 5-FU. Eluted fractions were characterized by phloroglucinolysis and gel permeation chromatography. Cell viability was determined by the 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide) (MTT) assay. All isolated fractions significantly reduced Caco-2 cell viability compared to the control (Pseed PC fractions (F1-F4) significantly enhanced the toxicity of 5-FU by 60-83% against Caco-2 cells (Pcancer agent.The bioactivity of PC is therefore attributed primarily to lower molecular weight PCs.

  12. Expression of the matrix metalloproteases 2, 14, 24, and 25 and tissue inhibitor 3 as potential molecular markers in advanced human gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Peña, Sol; Sampieri, Clara Luz; Ochoa-Lara, Mariana; León-Córdoba, Kenneth; Remes-Troche, José María

    2014-01-01

    During progression of gastric cancer (GC), degradation of the extracellular matrix is mediated by the matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs): changes in the expression of these have been related to unfavorable prognosis in GC. To analyze the expression of certain MMPs and TIMPs in chronic superficial gastritis (SG) and GC. The expression of MMPs and TIMPs was determined using qRT-PCR; the expression was classified, using threshold cycle (C(T)) values, as very high (C(T) ≤ 25), high (C(T) = 26-30), moderate (C(T) = 31-35), low (C(T) = 36-39), or not detected (C(T) = 40). Strength of association was estimated between the proteins, which were detected by Western blot, and the risk of developing GC. We found a high expression of MMP1, MMP2, MMP14, TIMP1, and TIMP3; moderate one of MMP9 and MMP25, and low one of MMP13 and MMP24 in both tissues. In absolute mRNA levels, significant differences were found in expression of MMP2, MMP24, and MMP25, which are overexpressed in GC compared with SG. The presence of the proteins MMP-14 and TIMP-3 was associated with the risk of developing GC. We consider that MMP2, MMP24, and MMP25 and the proteins MMP-14 and TIMP-3 could be candidates for prognostic molecular markers in GC.

  13. Expression of the Matrix Metalloproteases 2, 14, 24, and 25 and Tissue Inhibitor 3 as Potential Molecular Markers in Advanced Human Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sol de la Peña

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. During progression of gastric cancer (GC, degradation of the extracellular matrix is mediated by the matrix metalloproteases (MMPs and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs: changes in the expression of these have been related to unfavorable prognosis in GC. Objective. To analyze the expression of certain MMPs and TIMPs in chronic superficial gastritis (SG and GC. Methods. The expression of MMPs and TIMPs was determined using qRT-PCR; the expression was classified, using threshold cycle (CT values, as very high (CT≤25, high (CT=26–30, moderate (CT=31–35, low (CT=36–39, or not detected (CT=40. Strength of association was estimated between the proteins, which were detected by Western blot, and the risk of developing GC. Results. We found a high expression of MMP1, MMP2, MMP14, TIMP1, and TIMP3; moderate one of MMP9 and MMP25, and low one of MMP13 and MMP24 in both tissues. In absolute mRNA levels, significant differences were found in expression of MMP2, MMP24, and MMP25, which are overexpressed in GC compared with SG. The presence of the proteins MMP-14 and TIMP-3 was associated with the risk of developing GC. Conclusions. We consider that MMP2, MMP24, and MMP25 and the proteins MMP-14 and TIMP-3 could be candidates for prognostic molecular markers in GC.

  14. Expression of the Matrix Metalloproteases 2, 14, 24, and 25 and Tissue Inhibitor 3 as Potential Molecular Markers in Advanced Human Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Peña, Sol; Sampieri, Clara Luz; Ochoa-Lara, Mariana; León-Córdoba, Kenneth; Remes-Troche, José María

    2014-01-01

    Background. During progression of gastric cancer (GC), degradation of the extracellular matrix is mediated by the matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs): changes in the expression of these have been related to unfavorable prognosis in GC. Objective. To analyze the expression of certain MMPs and TIMPs in chronic superficial gastritis (SG) and GC. Methods. The expression of MMPs and TIMPs was determined using qRT-PCR; the expression was classified, using threshold cycle (CT) values, as very high (CT ≤ 25), high (CT = 26–30), moderate (CT = 31–35), low (CT = 36–39), or not detected (CT = 40). Strength of association was estimated between the proteins, which were detected by Western blot, and the risk of developing GC. Results. We found a high expression of MMP1, MMP2, MMP14, TIMP1, and TIMP3; moderate one of MMP9 and MMP25, and low one of MMP13 and MMP24 in both tissues. In absolute mRNA levels, significant differences were found in expression of MMP2, MMP24, and MMP25, which are overexpressed in GC compared with SG. The presence of the proteins MMP-14 and TIMP-3 was associated with the risk of developing GC. Conclusions. We consider that MMP2, MMP24, and MMP25 and the proteins MMP-14 and TIMP-3 could be candidates for prognostic molecular markers in GC. PMID:24669030

  15. Molecular alterations associated with breast cancer mortality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M Voeghtly

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease and patients with similar pathologies and treatments may have different clinical outcomes. Identification of molecular alterations associated with disease outcome may improve risk assessment and treatments for aggressive breast cancer. METHODS: Allelic imbalance (AI data was generated for 122 invasive breast tumors with known clinical outcome. Levels and patterns of AI were compared between patients who died of disease (DOD and those with ≥5 years disease-free survival (DFS using Student t-test and chi-square analysis with a significance value of P5-years post-diagnosis mortality but not with death from disease within five years, suggesting that patients with short- and long-term mortality may have distinct genetic diseases.

  16. Animal models and therapeutic molecular targets of cancer: utility and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cekanova M

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Maria Cekanova, Kusum Rathore Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA Abstract: Cancer is the term used to describe over 100 diseases that share several common hallmarks. Despite prevention, early detection, and novel therapies, cancer is still the second leading cause of death in the USA. Successful bench-to-bedside translation of basic scientific findings about cancer into therapeutic interventions for patients depends on the selection of appropriate animal experimental models. Cancer research uses animal and human cancer cell lines in vitro to study biochemical pathways in these cancer cells. In this review, we summarize the important animal models of cancer with focus on their advantages and limitations. Mouse cancer models are well known, and are frequently used for cancer research. Rodent models have revolutionized our ability to study gene and protein functions in vivo and to better understand their molecular pathways and mechanisms. Xenograft and chemically or genetically induced mouse cancers are the most commonly used rodent cancer models. Companion animals with spontaneous neoplasms are still an underexploited tool for making rapid advances in human and veterinary cancer therapies by testing new drugs and delivery systems that have shown promise in vitro and in vivo in mouse models. Companion animals have a relatively high incidence of cancers, with biological behavior, response to therapy, and response to cytotoxic agents similar to those in humans. Shorter overall lifespan and more rapid disease progression are factors contributing to the advantages of a companion animal model. In addition, the current focus is on discovering molecular targets for new therapeutic drugs to improve survival and quality of life in cancer patients. Keywords: mouse cancer model, companion animal cancer model, dogs, cats, molecular targets

  17. Molecular Taxonomy and Tumourigenesis of Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, S; Holyoake, D; Maughan, T S

    2016-02-01

    Over the last 5 years there has been a surge in interest in the molecular classification of colorectal cancer. The effect of molecular subtyping on current treatment decisions is limited to avoidance of adjuvant 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy in stage II microsatellite unstable-high disease and avoidance of epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted antibodies in extended RAS mutant tumours. The emergence of specific novel combination therapy for the BRAF-mutant cohort and of the microsatellite unstable-high cohort as a responsive group to immune checkpoint inhibition shows the growing importance of a clinically relevant molecular taxonomy. Clinical trials such as the Medical Research Council FOCUS4 trial using biomarkers to select patients for specific therapies are currently open and testing such approaches. The integration of mutation, gene expression and pathological analyses is refining our understanding of the biological subtypes within colorectal cancer. Sharing of data sets of parallel sequencing and gene expression of thousands of cancers among independent groups has allowed the description of disease subsets and the need for a validated consensus classification has become apparent. This biological understanding of the disease is a key step forward in developing a stratified approach to patient management. The discovery of stratifiers that predict a response to existing and emerging therapies will enable better use of these treatments. Improved scientific understanding of the biological characteristics of poorly responsive subgroups will facilitate the design of novel biologically rational combinations. Novel treatment regimens, including the combination of new drugs with radiation, and the discovery and validation of their associated predictive biomarkers will gradually lead to improved outcomes from therapy.

  18. Oral cancer: molecular technologies for risk assessment and diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan Tao Chen

    2008-01-01

    @@ Purpose: The effective biomarkers related to diagnosis, metastasis, drug resistance and irradiation sensitivity of oral cancers will help the pathologist and oncologist to determine the molecular taxonomy diagnosis and design the individualization treatment for the patients with oral cancers.

  19. Clinical Advances in Molecular Biomarkers for Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkar, Fazlul H.; Philip, Philip A.; Seema Sethi; Shadan Ali

    2013-01-01

    Cancer diagnosis is currently undergoing a paradigm shift with the incorporation of molecular biomarkers as part of routine diagnostic panel. The molecular alteration ranges from those involving the DNA, RNA, microRNAs (miRNAs) and proteins. The miRNAs are recently discovered small non-coding endogenous single-stranded RNAs that critically regulates the development, invasion and metastasis of cancers. They are altered in cancers and have the potential to serve as diagnostic markers for cancer...

  20. Low molecular weight procyanidins from grape seeds enhance the impact of 5-Fluorouracil chemotherapy on Caco-2 human colon cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ker Y Cheah

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Grape seed procyanidins (PC are flavan-3-ol oligomers and polymers known for their biological activity in the gut. Grape seed extract (GSE have been reported to reduce intestinal injury in a rat model of mucositis. We sought to investigate effects of purified PC fractions differing in mean degree of polymerization (mDP combined with 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU chemotherapy on the viability of colon cancer cells (Caco-2. DESIGN: SixPC fractions (F1-F6 were isolated from Cabernet Sauvignon seeds at two ripeness stages: pre-veraison unripe (immature and ripe (mature, utilizing step gradient, low-pressure chromatography on a Sephadex LH-20 resin. Fractions were tested on Caco-2 cells, alone and in combination with 5-FU. Eluted fractions were characterized by phloroglucinolysis and gel permeation chromatography. Cell viability was determined by the 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2yl-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. RESULTS: All isolated fractions significantly reduced Caco-2 cell viability compared to the control (P<0.05, but F2 and F3 (mDP 2-6 were the most active fractions (immature F2 = 32% mDP 2.4, F3 = 35% mDP 5.8 and mature F2 = 13% mDP 3.6 and F3 = 17% mDP 5.9; percentage of viable cells remaining on Caco-2 cells. When combined with 5-FU, immature fractions F1-F3 enhanced the cell toxicity effects of 5-FU by 27-73% (P<0.05. Mature seed PC fractions (F1-F4 significantly enhanced the toxicity of 5-FU by 60-83% against Caco-2 cells (P<0.05. Moreover, some fractions alone were more potent at decreasing viability in Caco-2 cells (P<0.05; immature fractions = 65-68% and mature fractions = 83-87% compared to 5-FU alone (37%. CONCLUSIONS: PCs of mDP 2-6 (immature F1-F3 and mature F1 and F4not only enhanced the impact of 5-FU in killing Caco-2 cells, but also surpassed standard 5-FU chemotherapy as an anti-cancer agent.The bioactivity of PC is therefore attributed primarily to lower molecular weight PCs.

  1. Molecular markers for thyroid cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Linwah

    2015-01-01

    Molecular markers including gene expression profiles, somatic gene alterations, and circulating peripheral markers have augmented diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic options for thyroid cancer patients.

  2. The Molecular Basis of Human Brain Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enard, Wolfgang

    2016-10-24

    Humans are a remarkable species, especially because of the remarkable properties of their brain. Since the split from the chimpanzee lineage, the human brain has increased three-fold in size and has acquired abilities for vocal learning, language and intense cooperation. To better understand the molecular basis of these changes is of great biological and biomedical interest. However, all the about 16 million fixed genetic changes that occurred during human evolution are fully correlated with all molecular, cellular, anatomical and behavioral changes that occurred during this time. Hence, as humans and chimpanzees cannot be crossed or genetically manipulated, no direct evidence for linking particular genetic and molecular changes to human brain evolution can be obtained. Here, I sketch a framework how indirect evidence can be obtained and review findings related to the molecular basis of human cognition, vocal learning and brain size. In particular, I discuss how a comprehensive comparative approach, leveraging cellular systems and genomic technologies, could inform the evolution of our brain in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular profiling of childhood cancer: Biomarkers and novel therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Saletta

    2014-06-01

    General significance: The increasing recognition of the heterogeneity of molecular causes of cancer favors the continued development of molecularly targeted agents, and their transfer to pediatric and adolescent populations.

  4. A review of molecular biomarkers for bladder cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    McRoy

    reached to integrate molecular staging in to the current TNM staging system. Key words: Molecular markers, ..... Clinical and laboratory science had shown that there are two .... statistics registration: registration of cancers diagnosed in 2008. 2.

  5. Exploring the molecular targets of dietary flavonoid fisetin in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Deeba N; Adhami, Vaqar Mustafa; Khan, Naghma; Khan, Mohammad Imran; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2016-10-01

    The last few decades have seen a resurgence of interest among the scientific community in exploring the efficacy of natural compounds against various human cancers. Compounds of plant origin belonging to different groups such as alkaloids, flavonoids and polyphenols evaluated for their cancer preventive effects have yielded promising data, thereby offering a potential therapeutic alternative against this deadly disease. The flavonol fisetin (3,3',4',7-tetrahydroxyflavone), present in fruits and vegetables such as strawberries, apple, cucumber, persimmon, grape and onion, was shown to possess anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and more significantly anti-carcinogenic activity when assessed in diverse cell culture and animal model systems. The purpose of this review is to update and discuss key findings obtained till date from in vitro and in vivo studies on fisetin, with special focus on its anti-cancer role. The molecular mechanism(s) described in the observed growth inhibitory effects of fisetin in different cancer cell types is also summarized. Moreover, an attempt is made to delineate the direction of future studies that could lead to the development of fisetin as a potent chemopreventive/chemotherapeutic agent against cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Xenogeneic homologous genes, molecular evolution and cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田聆; 魏于全

    2001-01-01

    Cancer is one of the main causes for death of human beings to date, and cancer biotherapy (mainlyimmunotherapy and gene therapy) has become the most promising approach after surgical therapy, radiotherapy andchemotherapy. However, there are still many limitations on cancer immunotherapy and gene therapy; therefore great ef-fort is being made to develop new strategies. It has been known that, in the process of evolution, a number of genes, theso-called xenogeneic homologous genes, are well-conserved and show the structural and/or functional similarity betweenvarious species to some degree. The nucleotide changes between various xenogeneic homologous genes are derived frommutation, and most of them are neutral mutations. Considering that the subtle differences in xenogeneic homologousgenes can break immune tolerance, enhance the immunogenicity and induce autologous immune response so as to elimi-nate tumor cells, we expect that a strategy of inducing autoimmune response using the property of xenogeneic homologousgenes will become a new therapy for cancer. Moreover, this therapy can also be used in the treatment of other diseases,such as autoimmune diseases and AIDS. This article will discuss the xenogeneic homologous genes, molecular evolutionand cancer therapy.

  7. The iron chelator, deferasirox, as a novel strategy for cancer treatment: oral activity against human lung tumor xenografts and molecular mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Goldie Y L; Obeidy, Peyman; Ford, Samuel J; Tselepis, Chris; Sharp, Danae M; Jansson, Patric J; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Lovejoy, David B; Richardson, Des R

    2013-01-01

    Deferasirox is an orally effective iron (Fe) chelator currently used for the treatment of iron-overload disease and has been implemented as an alternative to the gold standard chelator, desferrioxamine (DFO). Earlier studies demonstrated that DFO exhibits anticancer activity due to its ability to deplete cancer cells of iron. In this investigation, we examined the in vitro and in vivo activity of deferasirox against cells from human solid tumors. To date, there have been no studies to investigate the effect of deferasirox on these types of tumors in vivo. Deferasirox demonstrated similar activity at inhibiting proliferation of DMS-53 lung carcinoma and SK-N-MC neuroepithelioma cell lines compared with DFO. Furthermore, deferasirox was generally similar or slightly more effective than DFO at mobilizing cellular (59)Fe and inhibiting iron uptake from human transferrin depending on the cell type. However, deferasirox potently inhibited DMS-53 xenograft growth in nude mice when given by oral gavage, with no marked alterations in normal tissue histology. To understand the antitumor activity of deferasirox, we investigated its effect on the expression of molecules that play key roles in metastasis, cell cycle control, and apoptosis. We demonstrated that deferasirox increased expression of the metastasis suppressor protein N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 and upregulated the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(CIP1/WAF1) while decreasing cyclin D1 levels. Moreover, this agent increased the expression of apoptosis markers, including cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1. Collectively, we demonstrate that deferasirox is an orally effective antitumor agent against solid tumors.

  8. Fecal Molecular Markers for Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani Kanthan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite multiple screening techniques, including colonoscopy, flexible sigmoidoscopy, radiological imaging, and fecal occult blood testing, colorectal cancer remains a leading cause of death. As these techniques improve, their sensitivity to detect malignant lesions is increasing; however, detection of precursor lesions remains problematic and has generated a lack of general acceptance for their widespread usage. Early detection by an accurate, noninvasive, cost-effective, simple-to-use screening technique is central to decreasing the incidence and mortality of this disease. Recent advances in the development of molecular markers in faecal specimens are encouraging for its use as a screening tool. Genetic mutations and epigenetic alterations that result from the carcinogenetic process can be detected by coprocytobiology in the colonocytes exfoliated from the lesion into the fecal matter. These markers have shown promising sensitivity and specificity in the detection of both malignant and premalignant lesions and are gaining popularity as a noninvasive technique that is representative of the entire colon. In this paper, we summarize the genetic and epigenetic fecal molecular markers that have been identified as potential targets in the screening of colorectal cancer.

  9. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of canine histiocytic sarcoma: A spontaneous model for human histiocytic cancer identifies deletion of tumor suppressor genes and highlights influence of genetic background on tumor behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abadie Jerome

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histiocytic malignancies in both humans and dogs are rare and poorly understood. While canine histiocytic sarcoma (HS is uncommon in the general domestic dog population, there is a strikingly high incidence in a subset of breeds, suggesting heritable predisposition. Molecular cytogenetic profiling of canine HS in these breeds would serve to reveal recurrent DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs that are breed and/or tumor associated, as well as defining those shared with human HS. This process would identify evolutionarily conserved cytogenetic changes to highlight regions of particular importance to HS biology. Methods Using genome wide array comparative genomic hybridization we assessed CNAs in 104 spontaneously occurring HS from two breeds of dog exhibiting a particularly elevated incidence of this tumor, the Bernese Mountain Dog and Flat-Coated Retriever. Recurrent CNAs were evaluated further by multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization and loss of heterozygosity analyses. Statistical analyses were performed to identify CNAs associated with tumor location and breed. Results Almost all recurrent CNAs identified in this study were shared between the two breeds, suggesting that they are associated more with the cancer phenotype than with breed. A subset of recurrent genomic imbalances suggested involvement of known cancer associated genes in HS pathogenesis, including deletions of the tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A/B, RB1 and PTEN. A small number of aberrations were unique to each breed, implying that they may contribute to the major differences in tumor location evident in these two breeds. The most highly recurrent canine CNAs revealed in this study are evolutionarily conserved with those reported in human histiocytic proliferations, suggesting that human and dog HS share a conserved pathogenesis. Conclusions The breed associated clinical features and DNA copy number aberrations exhibited by canine HS offer a valuable model

  10. Apoptosis and Molecular Targeting Therapy in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is the programmed cell death which maintains the healthy survival/death balance in metazoan cells. Defect in apoptosis can cause cancer or autoimmunity, while enhanced apoptosis may cause degenerative diseases. The apoptotic signals contribute into safeguarding the genomic integrity while defective apoptosis may promote carcinogenesis. The apoptotic signals are complicated and they are regulated at several levels. The signals of carcinogenesis modulate the central control points of the apoptotic pathways, including inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP proteins and FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP. The tumor cells may use some of several molecular mechanisms to suppress apoptosis and acquire resistance to apoptotic agents, for example, by the expression of antiapoptotic proteins such as Bcl-2 or by the downregulation or mutation of proapoptotic proteins such as BAX. In this review, we provide the main regulatory molecules that govern the main basic mechanisms, extrinsic and intrinsic, of apoptosis in normal cells. We discuss how carcinogenesis could be developed via defective apoptotic pathways or their convergence. We listed some molecules which could be targeted to stimulate apoptosis in different cancers. Together, we briefly discuss the development of some promising cancer treatment strategies which target apoptotic inhibitors including Bcl-2 family proteins, IAPs, and c-FLIP for apoptosis induction.

  11. Apoptosis and Molecular Targeting Therapy in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mohamed; Watari, Hidemichi; AbuAlmaaty, Ali; Ohba, Yusuke; Sakuragi, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis is the programmed cell death which maintains the healthy survival/death balance in metazoan cells. Defect in apoptosis can cause cancer or autoimmunity, while enhanced apoptosis may cause degenerative diseases. The apoptotic signals contribute into safeguarding the genomic integrity while defective apoptosis may promote carcinogenesis. The apoptotic signals are complicated and they are regulated at several levels. The signals of carcinogenesis modulate the central control points of the apoptotic pathways, including inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins and FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP). The tumor cells may use some of several molecular mechanisms to suppress apoptosis and acquire resistance to apoptotic agents, for example, by the expression of antiapoptotic proteins such as Bcl-2 or by the downregulation or mutation of proapoptotic proteins such as BAX. In this review, we provide the main regulatory molecules that govern the main basic mechanisms, extrinsic and intrinsic, of apoptosis in normal cells. We discuss how carcinogenesis could be developed via defective apoptotic pathways or their convergence. We listed some molecules which could be targeted to stimulate apoptosis in different cancers. Together, we briefly discuss the development of some promising cancer treatment strategies which target apoptotic inhibitors including Bcl-2 family proteins, IAPs, and c-FLIP for apoptosis induction. PMID:25013758

  12. Tea and cancer prevention: studies in animals and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Fung-Lung; Schwartz, Joel; Herzog, Christopher R; Yang, Yang-Ming

    2003-10-01

    The role of tea in protection against cancer has been supported by ample evidence from studies in cell culture and animal models. However, epidemiological studies have generated inconsistent results, some of which associated tea with reduced risk of cancer, whereas others found that tea lacks protective activity against certain human cancers. These results raise questions about the actual role of tea in human cancer that needs to be addressed. This article is intended to provide a better perspective on this controversy by summarizing the laboratory studies in animals and humans with emphasis on animal tumor bioassays on skin, lung, mammary glands and colon, and the molecular and cellular mechanisms affected by tea. Finally, a recent small pilot intervention study with green tea in smokers is presented.

  13. Role of ARPC2 in Human Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer continues to be the second most frequent cause of cancer deaths worldwide. However, the exact molecular mechanisms are still unclear. Further research to find potential targets for therapy is critical and urgent. In this study, we found that ARPC2 promoted cell proliferation and invasion in the human cancer cell line MKN-28 using a cell total number assay, MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide assay, cell colony formation assay, migration assay, invasion assay, and wound healing assay. For downstream pathways, CTNND1, EZH2, BCL2L2, CDH2, VIM, and EGFR were upregulated by ARPC2, whereas PTEN, BAK, and CDH1 were downregulated by ARPC2. In a clinical study, we examined the expression of ARPC2 in 110 cases of normal human gastric tissues and 110 cases of human gastric cancer tissues. ARPC2 showed higher expression in gastric cancer tissues than in normal gastric tissues. In the association analysis of 110 gastric cancer tissues, ARPC2 showed significant associations with large tumor size, lymph node invasion, and high tumor stage. In addition, ARPC2-positive patients exhibited lower RFS and OS rates compared with ARPC2-negative patients. We thus identify that ARPC2 plays an aneretic role in human gastric cancer and provided a new target for gastric cancer therapy.

  14. Matrix metalloproteinases in cancer metastasis: molecular targets for prostate cancer prevention by green tea polyphenols and grape seed proanthocyanidins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katiyar, Santosh K

    2006-03-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) play a crucial role in the development and metastatic spread of cancer. One of the earliest events in the metastatic spread of cancer is the invasion through the basement membrane and proteolytic degradation of the extracellular matrix proteins, such as, collagens, laminin, elastin and fibronectin etc, and non-matrix proteins. MMPs are the important regulators of tumor growth, both at the primary site and in distant metastases. Given the clear implications of MMPs in many human cancers, MMPs remain important targets of cancer therapy. Metastatic spread of cancer continues to be the greatest barrier in prevention or cure of cancer. The recognition that MMPs facilitate tumor cell growth, invasion and metastasis of cancer has led to the development of MMP inhibitors as cancer therapeutic agents. Understanding the molecular mechanism of metastasis is also crucial for the design and effective use of novel therapeutic strategies to combat metastases. In this short review article, we discuss the evidences that MMPs are associated with cancer metastasis and that they make a functional contribution to the process. Further, since considerable interest among human population is increasing with regard to the use of dietary botanical supplements for the prevention of age-associated diseases like some forms of cancer, we also discuss the beneficial effects of dietary botanicals, such as green tea polyphenols and grape seed proanthocyanidins, in chemoprevention of cancer with particular emphasis on the involvement of MMPs in prostate cancer.

  15. Molecular biology of human muscle disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunne, P.W.; Epstein, H.F. (Baylor Coll. of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The molecular revolution that is transforming the entire biomedical field has had far-reaching impact in its application to inherited human muscle disease. The gene for Duchenne muscular dystrophy was one of the first cloned without knowledge of the defective protein product. This success was based upon the availability of key chromosomal aberrations that provided molecular landmarks for the disease locus. Subsequent discoveries regarding the mode of expression for this gene, the structure and localization of its protein product dystrophin, and molecular diagnosis of affected and carrier individuals constitute a paradigm for investigation of human genetics. Finding the gene for myotonic muscular dystrophy is requiring the brute force approach of cloning several million bases of DNA, identifying expressed sequences, and characterizing candidate genes. The gene that causes hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has been found serendipitously to be one of the genetic markers on chromosome 14, the {beta} myosin heavy chain.

  16. Lung cancer-associated brain metastasis: Molecular mechanisms and therapeutic options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Meysam; Bahrami, Tayyeb; Salmaninejad, Arash; Nosrati, Rahim; Ghaffari, Parisa; Ghaffari, Seyed H

    2017-09-18

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related mortality in humans. There are several reasons for this high rate of mortality, including metastasis to several organs, especially the brain. In fact, lung cancer is responsible for approximately 50% of all brain metastases, which are very difficult to manage. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying lung cancer-associated brain metastasis brings up novel therapeutic promises with the hope to ameliorate the severity of the disease. Here, we provide an overview of the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of lung cancer dissemination and metastasis to the brain, as well as promising horizons for impeding lung cancer brain metastasis, including the role of cancer stem cells, the blood-brain barrier, interactions of lung cancer cells with the brain microenvironment and lung cancer-driven systemic processes, as well as the role of growth factor/receptor tyrosine kinases, cell adhesion molecules and non-coding RNAs. In addition, we provide an overview of current and novel therapeutic approaches, including radiotherapy, surgery and stereotactic radiosurgery, chemotherapy, as also targeted cancer stem cell and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-based therapies, micro-RNA-based therapies and other small molecule or antibody-based therapies. We will also discuss the daunting potential of some combined therapies. The identification of molecular mechanisms underlying lung cancer metastasis has opened up new avenues towards their eradication and provides interesting opportunities for future research aimed at the development of novel targeted therapies.

  17. Molecular genetics of human lactase deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvelä, Irma; Torniainen, Suvi; Kolho, Kaija-Leena

    2009-01-01

    Lactase non-persistence (adult-type hypolactasia) is present in more than half of the human population and is caused by the down-regulation of lactase enzyme activity during childhood. Congenital lactase deficiency (CLD) is a rare severe gastrointestinal disorder of new-borns enriched in the Finnish population. Both lactase deficiencies are autosomal recessive traits and characterized by diminished expression of lactase activity in the intestine. Genetic variants underlying both forms have been identified. Here we review the current understanding of the molecular defects of human lactase deficiencies and their phenotype-genotype correlation, the implications on clinical practice, and the understanding of their function and role in human evolution.

  18. Molecular Imaging of Prostate Cancer: A Concise Synopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Jadvar

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men and continues to be a major public health problem. Imaging of prostate cancer remains particularly challenging owing to disease heterogeneity. Molecular imaging can provide unprecedented opportunities for deciphering the molecular mechanisms that are involved in the development and natural progression of prostate cancer from a localized process to the hormone-refractory metastatic disease. Such understanding will be the key for targeted imaging and therapy and for predicting and evaluating treatment response and prognosis. In this article, we review briefly the contribution of multimodality molecular imaging methods for the in vivo characterization of the pathophysiology of prostate cancer.

  19. HCSD: the human cancer secretome database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feizi, Amir; Banaei-Esfahani, Amir; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The human cancer secretome database (HCSD) is a comprehensive database for human cancer secretome data. The cancer secretome describes proteins secreted by cancer cells and structuring information about the cancer secretome will enable further analysis of how this is related with tumor biology. The secreted proteins from cancer cells are believed to play a deterministic role in cancer progression and therefore may be the key to find novel therapeutic targets and biomarkers for many cancers. Consequently, huge data on cancer secretome have been generated in recent years and the lack of a coherent database is limiting the ability to query the increasing community knowledge. We therefore developed the Human Cancer Secretome Database (HCSD) to fulfil this gap. HCSD contains >80 000 measurements for about 7000 nonredundant human proteins collected from up to 35 high-throughput studies on 17 cancer types. It has a simple and user friendly query system for basic and advanced search based on gene name, cancer type and data type as the three main query options. The results are visualized in an explicit and interactive manner. An example of a result page includes annotations, cross references, cancer secretome data and secretory features for each identified protein. Database URL: www.cancersecretome.org. PMID:26078477

  20. Molecular Link between Vitamin D and Cancer Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William B. Grant

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The metabolite of vitamin D, 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (also known as calcitriol, is a biologically active molecule required to maintain the physiological functions of several target tissues in the human body from conception to adulthood. Its molecular mode of action ranges from immediate nongenomic responses to longer term mechanisms that exert persistent genomic effects. The genomic mechanisms of vitamin D action rely on cross talk between 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 signaling pathways and that of other growth factors or hormones that collectively regulate cell proliferation, differentiation and cell survival. In vitro and in vivo studies demonstrate a role for vitamin D (calcitriol in modulating cellular growth and development. Vitamin D (calcitriol acts as an antiproliferative agent in many tissues and significantly slows malignant cellular growth. Moreover, epidemiological studies have suggested that ultraviolet-B exposure can help reduce cancer risk and prevalence, indicating a potential role for vitamin D as a feasible agent to prevent cancer incidence and recurrence. With the preventive potential of this biologically active agent, we suggest that countries where cancer is on the rise—yet where sunlight and, hence, vitamin D may be easily acquired—adopt awareness, education and implementation strategies to increase supplementation with vitamin D in all age groups as a preventive measure to reduce cancer risk and prevalence.

  1. Breast cancer molecular subtypes: from TNBC to QNBC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hon, Jane Date C; Singh, Baljit; Sahin, Aysegul; Du, Gang; Wang, Jinhua; Wang, Vincent Y; Deng, Fang-Ming; Zhang, David Y; Monaco, Marie E; Lee, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Treatment protocols for breast cancer depend predominantly on receptor status with respect to estrogen (estrogen receptor alpha), progesterone (progesterone receptor) and human epidermal growth factor [human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)]. The presence of one or more of these receptors suggests that a treatment targeting these pathways might be effective, while the absence of, or in the case of HER2, lack of overexpression of, all of these receptors, termed triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), indicates a need for the more toxic chemotherapy. In an effort to develop targeted therapies for TNBC, it will be necessary to differentiate among specific TNBC subtypes. The subset of TNBC that expresses androgen receptor (AR) has been determined to express genes consistent with a luminal subtype and therefore may be amenable to therapies targeting either AR, itself, or other pathways typical of a luminal subtype. Recent investigations of the AR signal pathway within breast cancer lead to AR as a significant target for breast cancer therapy with several clinical trials currently in progress. The subclass of TNBC that lacks AR, which we have termed quadruple negative breast cancer (QNBC) currently lacks a defined targetable pathway. Unlike AR-positive TNBC, QNBC predominantly exhibits a basal-like molecular subtype. Several subtypes and related pathway proteins are preferentially expressed in QNBC that may serve as effective targets for treatment, such as ACSL4, SKP2 and EGFR. ACSL4 expression has been demonstrated to be inversely correlated with expression of hormone/growth factor receptors and may thus serve as a biomarker for QNBC as well as a target for therapy. In the following review we summarize some of the current efforts to develop alternatives to chemotherapy for TNBC and QNBC.

  2. Molecular Pathways: Isocitrate Dehydrogenase Mutations in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Owen; Yen, Katharine; Mellinghoff, Ingo K

    2016-04-15

    IDH1 and IDH2 are homodimeric enzymes that catalyze the conversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) and concomitantly produce reduced NADPH from NADP(+) Mutations in the genes encoding IDH1 and IDH2 have recently been found in a variety of human cancers, most commonly glioma, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), chondrosarcoma, and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. The mutant protein loses its normal enzymatic activity and gains a new ability to produce the "oncometabolite" R(-)-2-hydroxyglutarate (R-2-HG). R-2-HG competitively inhibits α-KG-dependent enzymes which play crucial roles in gene regulation and tissue homeostasis. Expression of mutant IDH impairs cellular differentiation in various cell lineages and promotes tumor development in cooperation with other cancer genes. First-generation inhibitors of mutant IDH have entered clinical trials, and have shown encouraging results in patients with IDH-mutant AML. This article summarizes recent progress in our understanding of the role of mutant IDH in tumorigenesis.Clin Cancer Res; 22(8); 1837-42. ©2016 AACR.

  3. Noninvasive and real-time monitoring of molecular targeting therapy for lymph node and peritoneal metastasis in nude mice bearing xenografts of human colorectal cancer cells tagged with GFP and DsRed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Hayao; Hara, Masayasu; Ikehara, Yuzuru; Tatematsu, Masae

    2007-02-01

    We have developed an in vivo imaging system consisting of GFP- and DsRed-tagged human colonic cancer cell line, which has peritoneal and lymph node metastatic potential and show high sensitivity to EGFR targeting drugs, and convenient detection devices for GFP and DsRed. The latter includes a small handy fluorescence detection device for external monitoring of the therapeutic effect of the drug and a convenient stereo fluorescent microscope for internal visualization of micrometastases. We applied this imaging system to investigate anti-metastatic effects of EGFR targeting drugs such as gefitinib (Iressa). This system allowed sensitive detection of the development of peritoneal and lymph node metastases from the micrometastasis stage at the cellular level and also permited noninvasive, non-anesthetic monitoring of anti-metastatic effect of the drug in an animal facility without any pretreatment. Significant decreases in the intraabdominal metastatic tumor growth and prevention of inguinal lymph node metastasis by gefitinib treatment could be clearly monitored. These results suggest that convenient, low-cost, true real-time monitoring of therapeutic effect using such a fluorescence-mediated whole body imaging system seems to enhance the speed of preclinical study for novel anti-cancer agents and will allow us to understand the action mechanism of molecular targeting drugs.

  4. Molecular and cellular heterogeneity in breast cancer: challenges for personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivenbark, Ashley G; O'Connor, Siobhan M; Coleman, William B

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer is noted for disparate clinical behaviors and patient outcomes, despite common histopathological features at diagnosis. Molecular pathogenesis studies suggest that breast cancer is a collection of diseases with variable molecular underpinnings that modulate therapeutic responses, disease-free intervals, and long-term survival. Traditional therapeutic strategies for individual patients are guided by the expression status of the estrogen and progesterone receptors (ER and PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). Although such methods for clinical classification have utility in selection of targeted therapies, short-term patient responses and long-term survival remain difficult to predict. Molecular signatures of breast cancer based on complex gene expression patterns have utility in prediction of long-term patient outcomes, but are not yet used for guiding therapy. Examination of the correspondence between these methods for breast cancer classification reveals a lack of agreement affecting a significant percentage of cases. To realize true personalized breast cancer therapy, a more complete analysis and evaluation of the molecular characteristics of the disease in the individual patient is required, together with an understanding of the contributions of specific genetic and epigenetic alterations (and their combinations) to management of the patient. Here, we discuss the molecular and cellular heterogeneity of breast cancer, the impact of this heterogeneity on practical breast cancer classification, and the challenges for personalized breast cancer treatment. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Role of ARPC2 in Human Gastric Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Zhang; Yi Liu; Chang-Jun Yu; Fu Dai; Jie Xiong; Hong-Jun Li; Zheng-Sheng Wu; Rui Ding; Hong Wang

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer continues to be the second most frequent cause of cancer deaths worldwide. However, the exact molecular mechanisms are still unclear. Further research to find potential targets for therapy is critical and urgent. In this study, we found that ARPC2 promoted cell proliferation and invasion in the human cancer cell line MKN-28 using a cell total number assay, MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide) assay, cell colony formation assay, migration assay...

  6. Hormonal and molecular aspects of endometrioid endometrial cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, Vincentius Hubertus Willibrordus Maria

    2008-01-01

    This thesis concerns the expression and prognostic value of various hormones and molecular markers playing a role n endometrioid endometrial cancer. Especially we were interested in the enzyme aromatase, its expression and (prognostic) role in endometrioid endometrial cancer. Endometrial cancer is t

  7. Hormonal and molecular aspects of endometrioid endometrial cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, Vincentius Hubertus Willibrordus Maria

    2008-01-01

    This thesis concerns the expression and prognostic value of various hormones and molecular markers playing a role n endometrioid endometrial cancer. Especially we were interested in the enzyme aromatase, its expression and (prognostic) role in endometrioid endometrial cancer. Endometrial cancer is t

  8. Research advances in molecular targeted therapy for pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Ying

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer remains one of the malignant tumors with the worst prognosis, and its incidence is associated with Western diet, smoking, drinking, obesity, chronic pancreatitis, and a family history of pancreatic cancer. Currently, the treatment of pancreatic cancer focuses on surgery and chemotherapy, but no ideal therapeutic effect has been achieved. An understanding of the specific molecular mechanism of the development of pancreatic cancer helps to better prevent and treat pancreatic cancer. This article introduces the latest advances in the specific molecular mechanism of the development of pancreatic cancer and its targeted therapy and points out that molecular-targeted therapy in addition to traditional treatment helps to improve the prognosis of patients with pancreatic cancer.

  9. Human Cancer Models Initiative | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Human Cancer Models Initiative (HCMI) is an international consortium that is generating novel human tumor-derived culture models, which are annotated with genomic and clinical data. In an effort to advance cancer research and more fully understand how in vitro findings are related to clinical biology, HCMI-developed models and related data will be available as a community resource for cancer research.

  10. Appraisal of progenitor markers in the context of molecular classification of breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haviv, Izhak

    2011-01-25

    Clinical management of breast cancer relies on case stratification, which increasingly employs molecular markers. The motivation behind delineating breast epithelial differentiation is to better target cancer cases through innate sensitivities bequeathed to the cancer from its normal progenitor state. A combination of histopathological and molecular classification of breast cancer cases suggests a role for progenitors in particular breast cancer cases. Although a remarkable fraction of the real tissue repertoire is maintained within a population of independent cell line cultures, some steps that are closer to the terminal differentiation state and that form a majority of primary human breast tissues are missing in the cell line cultures. This raises concerns about current breast cancer models.

  11. Molecular biology of cantharidin in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauh, Rolf; Kahl, Stefan; Boechzelt, Herbert; Bauer, Rudolf; Kaina, Bernd; Efferth, Thomas

    2007-07-04

    Herbal medicine is one of the forms of traditional medical practice. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and traditional Vietnamese medicine (TVM) are well-known for their long-standing tradition of herbal medicine. Secreted by many species of blister beetle, most notably by the 'Spanish fly' (Lytta vesicatoria), cantharidin inhibits protein phosphatases 1 and 2A (PP1, PP2A). Blister beetle has been used in Asian traditional medicine to treat Molluscum contagiosum virus (MCV) infections and associated warts, and is now also used for cancer treatment. A combination of both genomic and postgenomic techniques was used in our studies to identify candidate genes affecting sensitivity or resistance to cantharidin. Cantharidin was not found to be related to multidrug resistance phenotype, suggesting its potential usefulness for the treatment of refractory tumors. Oxidative stress response genes diminish the activity of cantharidin by inducing DNA strand breaks which may be subject to base excision repair and induce apoptosis in a p53- and Bcl2-dependent manner. Cantharidin is one of many natural products used in traditional Chinese medicine and traditional Vietnamese medicine for cancer treatment. Combined methods of pharmaceutical biology and molecular biology can help elucidate modes of action of these natural products.

  12. Molecular biology of cantharidin in cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauer Rudolf

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Herbal medicine is one of the forms of traditional medical practice. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM and traditional Vietnamese medicine (TVM are well-known for their long-standing tradition of herbal medicine. Secreted by many species of blister beetle, most notably by the 'Spanish fly' (Lytta vesicatoria, cantharidin inhibits protein phosphatases 1 and 2A (PP1, PP2A. Blister beetle has been used in Asian traditional medicine to treat Molluscum contagiosum virus (MCV infections and associated warts, and is now also used for cancer treatment. A combination of both genomic and postgenomic techniques was used in our studies to identify candidate genes affecting sensitivity or resistance to cantharidin. Cantharidin was not found to be related to multidrug resistance phenotype, suggesting its potential usefulness for the treatment of refractory tumors. Oxidative stress response genes diminish the activity of cantharidin by inducing DNA strand breaks which may be subject to base excision repair and induce apoptosis in a p53- and Bcl2-dependent manner. Cantharidin is one of many natural products used in traditional Chinese medicine and traditional Vietnamese medicine for cancer treatment. Combined methods of pharmaceutical biology and molecular biology can help elucidate modes of action of these natural products.

  13. Early-onset gastric cancers have a different molecular expression profile than conventional gastric cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.N.A. Milne; R. Carvalho; F.M. Morsink; A.R. Musler; W.W.J. de Leng; A. Ristimaki; G.J.A. Offerhaus

    2006-01-01

    Many studies examine the molecular genetics of gastric cancer, but few look at young patients in particular and there is no comparison of molecular expression between early-onset gastric cancer (<= 45 years old) and conventional gastric cancers. Expression of cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2) is elevated in g

  14. Special conference of the American Association for Cancer Research on molecular imaging in cancer: linking biology, function, and clinical applications in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luker, Gary D

    2002-04-01

    The AACR Special Conference on Molecular Imaging in Cancer: Linking Biology, Function, and Clinical Applications In Vivo, was held January 23-27, 2002, at the Contemporary Hotel, Walt Disney World, Orlando, FL. Co-Chairs David Piwnica-Worms, Patricia Price and Thomas Meade brought together researchers with diverse expertise in molecular biology, gene therapy, chemistry, engineering, pharmacology, and imaging to accelerate progress in developing and applying technologies for imaging specific cellular and molecular signals in living animals and humans. The format of the conference was the presentation of research that focused on basic and translational biology of cancer and current state-of-the-art techniques for molecular imaging in animal models and humans. This report summarizes the special conference on molecular imaging, highlighting the interfaces of molecular biology with animal models, instrumentation, chemistry, and pharmacology that are essential to convert the dreams and promise of molecular imaging into improved understanding, diagnosis, and management of cancer.

  15. Arsenic Exposure and the Induction of Human Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor D. Martinez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic is a metalloid, that is, considered to be a human carcinogen. Millions of individuals worldwide are chronically exposed through drinking water, with consequences ranging from acute toxicities to development of malignancies, such as skin and lung cancer. Despite well-known arsenic-related health effects, the molecular mechanisms involved are not fully understood; however, the arsenic biotransformation process, which includes methylation changes, is thought to play a key role. This paper explores the relationship of arsenic exposure with cancer development and summarizes current knowledge of the potential mechanisms that may contribute to the neoplastic processes observed in arsenic exposed human populations.

  16. Telomerase activity in human cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, J.

    2000-10-01

    The overall goal of this collaborative project was to investigate the role in malignant cells of both chromosome telomeres, and telomerase, the enzyme that replicates telomeres. Telomeres are highly conserved nucleoprotein complexes located at the ends of eucaryotic chromosomes. Telomere length in somatic cells is reduced by 40--50 nucleotide pairs with every cell division due to incomplete replication of terminal DNA sequences and the absence of telomerase, the ribonucleoprotein that adds telomere DNA to chromosome ends. Although telomerase is active in cells with extended proliferative capacities, including more than 85% of tumors, work performed under this contract demonstrated that the telomeres of human cancer cells are shorter than those of paired normal cells, and that the length of the telomeres is characteristic of particular types of cancers. The extent of telomere shortening ostensibly is related to the number of cell divisions the tumor has undergone. It is believed that ongoing cell proliferation leads to the accumulation and fixation of new mutations in tumor cell lineages.Therefore, it is not unreasonable to assume that the degree of phenotypic variability is related to the proliferative history of the tumor, and therefore to telomere length, implying a correlation with prognosis. In some human tumors, short telomeres are also correlated with genomic instabilities, including interstitial chromosome translocation, loss of heterozygosity, and aneuoploidy. Moreover, unprotected chromosome ends are highly recombinogenic and telomere shortening in cultured human cells correlates with the formation of dicentric chromosomes, suggesting that critically short telomeres not only identify, but also predispose, cells to genomic instability, again implying a correlation with prognosis. Therefore, telomere length or content could be an important predictor of metastatic potential or responsiveness to various therapeutic modalities.

  17. Molecular karyotyping in human constitutional cytogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanlaville, Damien; Lapierre, Jean-Michel; Turleau, Catherine; Coquin, Aurélie; Borck, Guntram; Colleaux, Laurence; Vekemans, Michel; Romana, Serge Pierrick

    2005-01-01

    Using array CGH it is possible to detect very small genetic imbalances anywhere in the genome. Its usefulness has been well documented in cancer and more recently in constitutional disorders. In particular it has been used to detect interstitial and subtelomeric submicroscopic imbalances, to characterize their size at the molecular level and to define the breakpoints of chromosomal translocation. Here, we review the various applications of array CGH in constitutional cytogenetics. This technology remains expensive and the existence of numerous sequence polymorphisms makes its interpretation difficult. The challenge today is to transfer this technology in the clinical setting.

  18. Clinical characteristics and molecular pathology of skull ectopic thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Longxing; Wang, Zhongyong; Ma, Jiawei; Chen, Jinsheng; Zhu, Haojiang; Zhou, Xiaohua; Zhu, Qing; Dong, Jun; Lan, Qing; Huang, Qiang

    2016-12-01

    Thyroid cancer is very common, but skull ectopic thyroid cancer has not been reported in 50 years of literatures in foreign countries. There are only four cases of the skull ectopic thyroid cancer reported in more than 30 years of domestic literature including the cases in this report. This paper aims to investigate the clinical characteristics and possible molecular mechanisms of this rare disease. Five keywords of "thyroid gland", "ectopic thyroid", "thyroid cancer", "ectopic thyroid cancer" and "metastatic thyroid cancer" were included and 50 years of literatures in the PubMed-MEDLINE and Wanfang database were reviewed. By combining the test data of 2 cases of surgical patient tissue microarray specimens-molecular immunology pathology, the possible molecular mechanisms were analyzed and molecular regulation network diagram was drawn. The skull ectopic thyroid cancer has not been reported in 50 years of literatures in foreign countries and there are only four cases of the skull ectopic thyroid cancer reported in more than 30 years of domestic literature including the cases in this report. The molecular expressions of skull ectopic thyroid cancer, orthotopic thyroid cancer, and metastatic thyroid cancer were not the same: (I) AKT (P=0.012, 0.002) and mTOR (P=0.002, 0.004) were highly expressed in the skull ectopic thyroid cancer; (II) BRAF (P=0.029, 0.014) and ERK (P=0.002, 0.001) were highly expressed in orthotopic thyroid cancer; (III) MMP-9 (P=0.023, 0.016) was highly expressed in metastatic thyroid cancer. According to the molecular information base, the PI3K is predicted to be a key crossing gene of the above three signaling pathways, which showed no significant differences in these three thyroid cancers (P=0.692, 0.388, 0.227), but PI3K has regulation roles in the three signaling pathways of Akt/mTOR, MAPK, and NF-κB. PI3K gene is an important starting gene of thyroid cancers. After the canceration starts, due to the fact that the local microenvironments of

  19. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of 3,3′-Diindolylmethane in Gastrointestinal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Mi Kim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies in humans have shown that 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM, which is found in cruciferous vegetables, such as cabbage and broccoli, is effective in the attenuation of gastrointestinal cancers. This review presents the latest findings on the use, targets, and modes of action of DIM for the treatment of human gastrointestinal cancers. DIM acts upon several cellular and molecular processes in gastrointestinal cancer cells, including apoptosis, autophagy, invasion, cell cycle regulation, metastasis, angiogenesis, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. In addition, DIM increases the efficacy of other drugs or therapeutic chemicals when used in combinatorial treatment for gastrointestinal cancer. The studies to date offer strong evidence to support the use of DIM as an anticancer and therapeutic agent for gastrointestinal cancer. Therefore, this review provides a comprehensive understanding of the preventive and therapeutic properties of DIM in addition to its different perspective on the safety of DIM in clinical applications for the treatment of gastrointestinal cancers.

  20. Molecular Structure of Human-Liver Glycogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Deng

    Full Text Available Glycogen is a highly branched glucose polymer which is involved in maintaining blood-sugar homeostasis. Liver glycogen contains large composite α particles made up of linked β particles. Previous studies have shown that the binding which links β particles into α particles is impaired in diabetic mice. The present study reports the first molecular structural characterization of human-liver glycogen from non-diabetic patients, using transmission electron microscopy for morphology and size-exclusion chromatography for the molecular size distribution; the latter is also studied as a function of time during acid hydrolysis in vitro, which is sensitive to certain structural features, particularly glycosidic vs. proteinaceous linkages. The results are compared with those seen in mice and pigs. The molecular structural change during acid hydrolysis is similar in each case, and indicates that the linkage of β into α particles is not glycosidic. This result, and the similar morphology in each case, together imply that human liver glycogen has similar molecular structure to those of mice and pigs. This knowledge will be useful for future diabetes drug targets.

  1. Molecular Structure of Human-Liver Glycogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Bin; Sullivan, Mitchell A.; Chen, Cheng; Li, Jialun; Powell, Prudence O.; Hu, Zhenxia; Gilbert, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen is a highly branched glucose polymer which is involved in maintaining blood-sugar homeostasis. Liver glycogen contains large composite α particles made up of linked β particles. Previous studies have shown that the binding which links β particles into α particles is impaired in diabetic mice. The present study reports the first molecular structural characterization of human-liver glycogen from non-diabetic patients, using transmission electron microscopy for morphology and size-exclusion chromatography for the molecular size distribution; the latter is also studied as a function of time during acid hydrolysis in vitro, which is sensitive to certain structural features, particularly glycosidic vs. proteinaceous linkages. The results are compared with those seen in mice and pigs. The molecular structural change during acid hydrolysis is similar in each case, and indicates that the linkage of β into α particles is not glycosidic. This result, and the similar morphology in each case, together imply that human liver glycogen has similar molecular structure to those of mice and pigs. This knowledge will be useful for future diabetes drug targets. PMID:26934359

  2. Molecular Dimensions of Gastric Cancer: Translational and Clinical Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Young Choi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is a global health burden and has the highest incidence in East Asia. This disease is complex in nature because it arises from multiple interactions of genetic, local environmental, and host factors, resulting in biological heterogeneity. This genetic intricacy converges on molecular characteristics reflecting the pathophysiology, tumor biology, and clinical outcome. Therefore, understanding the molecular characteristics at a genomic level is pivotal to improving the clinical care of patients with gastric cancer. A recent landmark study, The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA project, showed the molecular landscape of gastric cancer through a comprehensive molecular evaluation of 295 primary gastric cancers. The proposed molecular classification divided gastric cancer into four subtypes: Epstein-Barr virus–positive, microsatellite unstable, genomic stable, and chromosomal instability. This information will be taken into account in future clinical trials and will be translated into clinical therapeutic decisions. To fully realize the clinical benefit, many challenges must be overcome. Rapid growth of high-throughput biology and functional validation of molecular targets will further deepen our knowledge of molecular dimensions of this cancer, allowing for personalized precision medicine.

  3. Rationale and design of the Japan molecular epidemiology for lung cancer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Tomoya; Ando, Masahiko; Ito, Norimasa; Isa, Shun-Ichi; Tamiya, Akihiro; Shimizu, Shigeki; Saka, Hideo; Kubo, Akihito; Koh, Yasuhiro; Matsumura, Akihide

    2013-09-01

    We present the rationale for the Japan Molecular Epidemiology for Lung Cancer study designed to elucidate molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis in smokers and never-smokers with non-small-cell lung cancer. This prospective, ongoing, multicenter study is being conducted nationwide in Japan. Although there is no doubt that active smoking is the major cause of lung cancer, the contribution of other possible factors, including environmental tobacco or wood smoke, human papilloma virus, radon, occupational exposures, and genetic susceptibility, is highly likely, based on studies of never-smokers with non-small-cell lung cancer. Because of the predominance of women in the never-smoker subgroup, the role of female hormones in lung cancer development has also been considered. We hypothesize that driver mutations, which are critical for the development of lung cancer, are triggered by the environmental factors with or without the influence of the hormone. The SWOG-led intergroup molecular epidemiology study S0424 was conducted to focus on these issues by using a detailed questionnaire and specimen collection in statistically significant cohorts of smokers and never-smokers from both sexes. The Japan Molecular Epidemiology for Lung Cancer study follows and extends the S0424 molecular epidemiology concept in principle by using a similar approach that will facilitate future comparisons between the studies but with a greater focus on more recently defined driver mutations and broad genomic sequencing.

  4. Cancer stem cells in human gastrointestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Moriya, Chiharu; Igarashi, Hisayoshi; Saitoh, Anri; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Adachi, Yasushi; Imai, Kohzoh

    2016-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to be responsible for tumor initiation, drug and radiation resistance, invasive growth, metastasis, and tumor relapse, which are the main causes of cancer-related deaths. Gastrointestinal cancers are the most common malignancies and still the most frequent cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Because gastrointestinal CSCs are also thought to be resistant to conventional therapies, an effective and novel cancer treatment is imperative. The first reported CSCs in a gastrointestinal tumor were found in colorectal cancer in 2007. Subsequently, CSCs were reported in other gastrointestinal cancers, such as esophagus, stomach, liver, and pancreas. Specific phenotypes could be used to distinguish CSCs from non-CSCs. For example, gastrointestinal CSCs express unique surface markers, exist in a side-population fraction, show high aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 activity, form tumorspheres when cultured in non-adherent conditions, and demonstrate high tumorigenic potential in immunocompromised mice. The signal transduction pathways in gastrointestinal CSCs are similar to those involved in normal embryonic development. Moreover, CSCs are modified by the aberrant expression of several microRNAs. Thus, it is very difficult to target gastrointestinal CSCs. This review focuses on the current research on gastrointestinal CSCs and future strategies to abolish the gastrointestinal CSC phenotype.

  5. Human papillomaviruses and skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smola, Sigrun

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) infect squamous epithelia and can induce hyperproliferative lesions. More than 120 different HPV types have been characterized and classified into five different genera. While mucosal high-risk HPVs have a well-established causal role in anogenital carcinogenesis, the biology of cutaneous HPVs is less well understood. The clinical relevance of genus beta-PV infection has clearly been demonstrated in patients suffering from epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV), a rare inherited disease associated with ahigh rate of skin cancer. In the normal population genus beta-PV are suspected to have an etiologic role in skin carcinogenesis as well but this is still controversially discussed. Their oncogenic potency has been investigated in mouse models and in vitro. In 2009, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified the genus beta HPV types 5 and 8 as "possible carcinogenic" biological agents (group 2B) in EV disease. This chapter will give an overview on the knowns and unknowns of infections with genus beta-PV and discuss their potential impact on skin carcinogenesis in the general population.

  6. Identifying Molecular Culprits of Cervical Cancer Progression | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA is found in 99.7% of invasive cervical carcinomas, providing strong evidence that the virus is a causative agent in the development of this disease. However, most women who become infected with HPV do not develop invasive cervical lesions, indicating that additional exogenous or genetic factors may determine whether HPV preclinical lesions will progress to cancer. Identification of these factors would be facilitated by a deeper understanding of the cellular and molecular changes that accompany progression to malignancy. In addition, knowledge of which women are at greatest risk for disease progression would be a significant clinical advancement in the management of patients with premalignant cervical lesions.

  7. Molecular medicine and the development of cancer chemopreventive agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzotti, Alberto

    2012-07-01

    Chemoprevention is effective in inhibiting the onset of cancer in experimental animal models, but the transferability of similar results to humans is questionable. Therefore, reliable intermediate molecular biomarkers are needed to evaluate the efficacy of chemopreventive agents before the onset of cancer. The use of genomic biomarkers is limited by their poor predictive value. Although post-genomic biomarkers (i.e., gene-expression analyses) are useful for evaluating the safety, efficacy, and mechanistic basis of chemopreventive agents, the biomarkers are often poorly related to the phenotype, due to posttranscriptional regulation. Proteome analyses can evaluate preclinical phenotype alterations, but only at low protein counts. MicroRNA alterations, which are essential for the development of cancer, may be modulated by chemopreventive agents. Furthermore, microRNA delivery may be used to counteract carcinogenesis. Exposure to cigarette smoke induces microRNA let-7 downregulation and cell proliferation that can be converted to cell growth arrest and apoptosis upon let-7a transfection. Therefore, microRNAs are reliable biomarkers for evaluating chemoprevention efficacy and may be used to counteract carcinogenesis. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  8. Molecular insight into conformational transmission of human P-glycoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Shan-Yan [Department of Biochemical Engineering and Key Laboratory of Systems Bioengineering of the Ministry of Education, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Liu, Fu-Feng, E-mail: fufengliu@tju.edu.cn, E-mail: ysun@tju.edu.cn; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan, E-mail: fufengliu@tju.edu.cn, E-mail: ysun@tju.edu.cn [Department of Biochemical Engineering and Key Laboratory of Systems Bioengineering of the Ministry of Education, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2013-12-14

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a kind of ATP-binding cassette transporter, can export candidates through a channel at the two transmembrane domains (TMDs) across the cell membranes using the energy released from ATP hydrolysis at the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). Considerable evidence has indicated that human P-gp undergoes large-scale conformational changes to export a wide variety of anti-cancer drugs out of the cancer cells. However, molecular mechanism of the conformational transmission of human P-gp from the NBDs to the TMDs is still unclear. Herein, targeted molecular dynamics simulations were performed to explore the atomic detail of the conformational transmission of human P-gp. It is confirmed that the conformational transition from the inward- to outward-facing is initiated by the movement of the NBDs. It is found that the two NBDs move both on the two directions (x and y). The movement on the x direction leads to the closure of the NBDs, while the movement on the y direction adjusts the conformations of the NBDs to form the correct ATP binding pockets. Six key segments (KSs) protruding from the TMDs to interact with the NBDs are identified. The relative movement of the KSs along the y axis driven by the NBDs can be transmitted through α-helices to the rest of the TMDs, rendering the TMDs to open towards periplasm in the outward-facing conformation. Twenty eight key residue pairs are identified to participate in the interaction network that contributes to the conformational transmission from the NBDs to the TMDs of human P-gp. In addition, 9 key residues in each NBD are also identified. The studies have thus provided clear insight into the conformational transmission from the NBDs to the TMDs in human P-gp.

  9. Molecular insight into conformational transmission of human P-glycoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shan-Yan; Liu, Fu-Feng; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2013-12-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a kind of ATP-binding cassette transporter, can export candidates through a channel at the two transmembrane domains (TMDs) across the cell membranes using the energy released from ATP hydrolysis at the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). Considerable evidence has indicated that human P-gp undergoes large-scale conformational changes to export a wide variety of anti-cancer drugs out of the cancer cells. However, molecular mechanism of the conformational transmission of human P-gp from the NBDs to the TMDs is still unclear. Herein, targeted molecular dynamics simulations were performed to explore the atomic detail of the conformational transmission of human P-gp. It is confirmed that the conformational transition from the inward- to outward-facing is initiated by the movement of the NBDs. It is found that the two NBDs move both on the two directions (x and y). The movement on the x direction leads to the closure of the NBDs, while the movement on the y direction adjusts the conformations of the NBDs to form the correct ATP binding pockets. Six key segments (KSs) protruding from the TMDs to interact with the NBDs are identified. The relative movement of the KSs along the y axis driven by the NBDs can be transmitted through α-helices to the rest of the TMDs, rendering the TMDs to open towards periplasm in the outward-facing conformation. Twenty eight key residue pairs are identified to participate in the interaction network that contributes to the conformational transmission from the NBDs to the TMDs of human P-gp. In addition, 9 key residues in each NBD are also identified. The studies have thus provided clear insight into the conformational transmission from the NBDs to the TMDs in human P-gp.

  10. Optimization of human cancer radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Swan, George W

    1981-01-01

    The mathematical models in this book are concerned with a variety of approaches to the manner in which the clinical radiologic treatment of human neoplasms can be improved. These improvements comprise ways of delivering radiation to the malignan­ cies so as to create considerable damage to tumor cells while sparing neighboring normal tissues. There is no unique way of dealing with these improvements. Accord­ ingly, in this book a number of different presentations are given. Each presentation has as its goal some aspect of the improvement, or optimization, of radiotherapy. This book is a collection of current ideas concerned with the optimization of human cancer radiotherapy. It is hoped that readers will build on this collection and develop superior approaches for the understanding of the ways to improve therapy. The author owes a special debt of thanks to Kathy Prindle who breezed through the typing of this book with considerable dexterity. TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter GENERAL INTRODUCTION 1. 1 Introduction 1...

  11. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Genotype as a Contributor to Racial/Ethnic Differences in Breast Cancer: A Population-Based Molecular Epidemiologic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    stratified by racial/ethnic group (white, black, Hispanic) and in 5e below. d. Examine whether relationships are confounded by other epidemiologic or...absence of associations in the face of interracial variation in prevalences indicates a complex role of class II genotype to breast cancer incidence...women, suggests a protective association for this allele that could contribute to the lower incidence rates in this group. However, a relationship of

  12. The current state of molecular cytogenetics in cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liehr, Thomas; Othman, Moneeb A K; Rittscher, Katharina; Alhourani, Eyad

    2015-04-01

    Cytogenetics and molecular cytogenetics are and will continue to be indispensable tools in cancer diagnostics. Leukemia and lymphoma diagnostics are still emphases of routine (molecular) cytogenetics and corresponding studies of solid tumors gain more and more prominence. Here, first a historical perspective of molecular tumor cytogenetics is provided, which is followed by the basic principles of the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) approach. Finally the current state of molecular cytogenetics in cancer diagnostics is discussed. Nowadays routine diagnostics includes basic FISH approaches rather than multicolor-FISH. The latter together with modern high-throughput methods have their impact on research to identify new tumor-associated genomic regions.

  13. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in endometrial cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Tina Bech; Svahn, Malene Frøsig; Faber, Mette Tuxen

    2014-01-01

    HPV is a common sexually transmitted infection and is considered to be a necessary cause of cervical cancer. The anatomical proximity to the cervix has led researchers to investigate whether Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has a role in the etiology of endometrial cancer.......HPV is a common sexually transmitted infection and is considered to be a necessary cause of cervical cancer. The anatomical proximity to the cervix has led researchers to investigate whether Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has a role in the etiology of endometrial cancer....

  14. HCSD: the human cancer secretome database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feizi, Amir; Banaei-Esfahani, Amir; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    database is limiting the ability to query the increasing community knowledge. We therefore developed the Human Cancer Secretome Database (HCSD) to fulfil this gap. HCSD contains >80 000 measurements for about 7000 nonredundant human proteins collected from up to 35 high-throughput studies on 17 cancer...... types. It has a simple and user friendly query system for basic and advanced search based on gene name, cancer type and data type as the three main query options. The results are visualized in an explicit and interactive manner. An example of a result page includes annotations, cross references, cancer...

  15. Molecular cytogenetics: recent developments and applications in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, K; Tan, P

    2013-10-01

    Aneuploidy or alteration in chromosome numbers is a characteristic feature in cancer that is generally a consequence of defective chromosome segregation during cell division. Molecular cytogenetic analyses have conferred substantial evidence with regards to the chromosomal architectures in cancer. Most importantly, the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique that plays a leading role in diagnostic pathology for its single-cell analysis has provided crucial information regarding genomic variations in malignant cells. Further development of molecular cytogenetic methodologies such as chromosome specific FISH karyotyping and comparative genomic hybridization have also helped in the detection of cryptic genetic changes in cancer. But, the recent advancement of high throughput sequencing technologies have provided a more comprehensive genomic analyses resulting in novel chromosome rearrangements, somatic mutations as well as identification of fusion genes leading to new therapeutic targets. This review highlights the application of early molecular cytogenetics and the recent high throughput genomic approaches in characterizing various cancers and their invaluable support in cancer therapeutics.

  16. Molecular Pathology of Human Prion Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative conditions in humans and animals. In this review, we summarize the molecular background of phenotypic variability, relation of prion protein (PrP to other proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases, and pathogenesis of neuronal vulnerability. PrP exists in different forms that may be present in both diseased and non-diseased brain, however, abundant disease-associated PrP together with tissue pathology characterizes prion diseases and associates with transmissibility. Prion diseases have different etiological background with distinct pathogenesis and phenotype. Mutations of the prion protein gene are associated with genetic forms. The codon 129 polymorphism in combination with the Western blot pattern of PrP after proteinase K digestion serves as a basis for molecular subtyping of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Tissue damage may result from several parallel, interacting or subsequent pathways that involve cellular systems associated with synapses, protein processing, oxidative stress, autophagy, and apoptosis.

  17. Molecular Imaging and Precision Medicine in Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Esther; Thippsandra, Shwetha; Yanamadala, Anusha; Redy, Siddaling; Pattanayak, Puskar; Subramaniam, Rathan M

    2017-01-01

    The concept of using tumor genomic profiling information has revolutionized personalized cancer treatment. Head and neck (HN) cancer management is being influenced by recent discoveries of activating mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor and related targeted therapies with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, targeted therapies for Kristen Rat Sarcoma, and MET proto-oncogenes. Molecular imaging using PET plays an important role in assessing the biologic behavior of HN cancer with the goal of delivering individualized cancer treatment. This review summarizes recent genomic discoveries in HN cancer and their implications for functional PET imaging in assessing response to targeted therapies, and drug resistance mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Single and Multiple Gene Manipulations in Mouse Models of Human Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Heather L; Stairs, Douglas B

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models of human cancer play a critical role in understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms of tumorigenesis. Advances continue to be made in modeling human disease in a mouse, though the relevance of a mouse model often relies on how closely it is able to mimic the histologic, molecular, and physiologic characteristics of the respective human cancer. A classic use of a genetically engineered mouse in studying cancer is through the overexpression or deletion of a gene. However, the manipulation of a single gene often falls short of mimicking all the characteristics of the carcinoma in humans; thus a multiple gene approach is needed. Here we review genetic mouse models of cancers and their abilities to recapitulate human carcinoma with single versus combinatorial approaches with genes commonly involved in cancer. PMID:26380553

  19. [The detection of human papillomavirus 16, 18, 35 and 58 in cervical-uterine cancer and advanced degree of squamous intraepithelial lesions in Western Mexico: clinical-molecular correlation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya-Fuentes, H; Suárez Rincón, A E; Ramírez-Muñoz, M P; Arévalo-Lagunas, I; Morán Moguel, M C; Gallegos Arreola, M P; Flores-Martínez, S E; Rosales Quintana, S; Sánchez Corona, J

    2001-04-01

    The purposes of this study were to estimate the infection frequency of Human Papilomavirus (HPV) and to identify the viral types in patients with diagnosis of uterine cervical cancer (UCC) and High Grade Squamous Intraepitelial lesions (HGSILs), and to correlate the molecular findings versus HPV infection suggestive clinical findings. Biopsies from 50 patients (37 HGSILs and 13 UCC) histopathologically diagnosed were studied. The presence of HPV were detected by means of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using consensus primers for types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, and 58 among others, as well as specific primers for some of them. The frequencies for HPV 16, 18, 33, 35, and 58 in HGSIL samples were 24.3, 2.7, 0, 5.4 and 16.2% respectively. In UCC samples were 61.5, 7.7, 0, 0 and 15.4% with significative differences only for HPV 16. Clinical findings (histologic, colposcopic and histopathologic), showed deficient diagnostic accuracy in the identification of HPV 16 in HGSIL, wich resulted less frequent and there is a high frequency of HPV. These results are similar to those previously described in our country and the other populations, with the exception of HPV16 in HGSIL, wich resulted less frequent and there is a high frequency of HPV 58 in our region. When analyzing clinical features with the presence of HPV DNA, we conclude that these are insufficient to discard or establish the possibility of HPV infection in patients with HGSIL's and UUC.

  20. Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer: Role of RGD Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Rubel; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Dash, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths among women of all ages worldwide. With advances in molecular imaging procedures, it has been possible to detect breast cancer in its early stage, determine the extent of the disease to administer appropriate therapeutic protocol and also monitor the effects of treatment. By accurately characterizing the tumor properties and biological processes involved, molecular imaging can play a crucial role in minimizing the morbidity and mortality associated with breast cancer. The integrin αvβ3 plays an important role in breast cancer angiogenesis and is expressed on tumor endothelial cells as well as on some tumor cells. It is a receptor for the extracellular matrix proteins with the exposed arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) tripeptide sequence and therefore RGD peptides can preferentially bind to integrin αvβ3. In this context, targeting tumor vasculature or tumor cells by RGD-based probes is a promising strategy for molecular imaging of breast cancer. Using RGD-based probes, several preclinical studies have employed different imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound and optical imaging for visualization of integrin αvβ3 expression in breast cancer models. Limited clinical trials using (18)F-labeled RGD peptides have also been initiated for non-invasive detection and staging of breast cancer. Herein, we provide a comprehensive overview of the latest advances in molecular imaging of breast cancer using RGD peptide-based probes and discuss the challenges and opportunities for advancement of the field. The reported strategies for molecular imaging of breast cancer using RGD peptide-based probes holds promise for making clinically translatable advances that can positively impact the overall diagnostic and therapeutic processes and result in improved quality of life for breast cancer patients.

  1. [When history meets molecular medicine: molecular history of human tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottini, Laura; Falchetti, Mario

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis represents one of the humankind's most socially devastating diseases. Despite a long history of medical research and the development of effective therapies, this disease remains a global health danger even in the 21st century. Tuberculosis may cause death but infected people with effective immunity may remain healthy for years, suggesting long-term host-pathogen co-existence. Because of its antiquity, a supposed association with human settlements and the tendency to leave typical lesions on skeletal and mummified remains, tuberculosis has been the object of intensive multidisciplinary studies, including paleo-pathological research. During the past 10 years molecular paleo-pathology developed as a new scientific discipline allowing the study of ancient pathogens by direct detection of their DNA. In this work, we reviewed evidences for tuberculosis in ancient human remains, current methods for identifying ancient mycobacterial DNA and explored current theories of Mycobacterium tuberculosis evolution and their implications in the global development of tuberculosis looking into the past and present at the same time.

  2. Expression of polarity genes in human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wan-Hsin; Asmann, Yan W; Anastasiadis, Panos Z

    2015-01-01

    Polarity protein complexes are crucial for epithelial apical-basal polarity and directed cell migration. Since alterations of these processes are common in cancer, polarity proteins have been proposed to function as tumor suppressors or oncogenic promoters. Here, we review the current understanding of polarity protein functions in epithelial homeostasis, as well as tumor formation and progression. As most previous studies focused on the function of single polarity proteins in simplified model systems, we used a genomics approach to systematically examine and identify the expression profiles of polarity genes in human cancer. The expression profiles of polarity genes were distinct in different human tissues and classified cancer types. Additionally, polarity expression profiles correlated with disease progression and aggressiveness, as well as with identified cancer types, where specific polarity genes were commonly altered. In the case of Scribble, gene expression analysis indicated its common amplification and upregulation in human cancer, suggesting a tumor promoting function.

  3. Basic evidence of molecular targeted therapy for oral cancer and salivary gland cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamakawa, H.; Nakashiro, K.; Sumida, T.; Shintani, S.; Myers, J.N.; Takes, R.P.; Rinaldo, A.; Ferlito, A.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recently, attention has been focused on molecular targeted cancer therapy in various tumors. Although there is no single consistent molecular target specific for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and salivary gland cancer (SGC), there are a number of promising candidate proteins. The a

  4. A Molecular Epidemiologic Case-Case Study of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-03-01

    Receptor Polymorphism and Prostate Cancer Risk 1 Sara S. Strom 2, Qiang Zhang, Yun Gu, Margaret R. Spitz, Peter T. Scardino 3, Christopher J. Logothetis...Taylor, J. A. Vitamin D receptor polymorphisms and prostate cancer. Molecular Carcinogenesis, 27: 18-23, 2000. 6. Ma, J., Stampfer , M. J., Gann, P. H...Margaret R. Spitz, Richard J. Babaian, Christopher Logothetis, Sara S. Strom, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX; The University

  5. Antiangiogenic Steroids in Human Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Despite advances in the early detection of tumors and in the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery for disease management, the worldwide mortality from human cancer remains unacceptably high. The treatment of cancer may benefit from the introduction of novel therapies derived from natural products. Natural products have served to provide a basis for many of the pharmaceutical agents in current use in cancer therapy. Emerging research indicates that progressive growth and spread of ...

  6. An adult tissue-specific stem cell molecular phenotype is activated in epithelial cancer stem cells and correlated to patient outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussenet, Thomas; Dembélé, Doulaye; Martinet, Nadine; Vignaud, Jean-Michel; du Manoir, Stanislas

    2010-01-15

    Recent studies have shown that embryonic stem cell-like molecular phenotypes are commonly activated in human epithelial primary tumors and are linked to adverse patient prognosis.(1,2) However it remains unclear whether these correlations to outcome are linked to the differentiation status of the human primary tumors(1) or represent molecular reminiscences of epithelial cancer stem cells.(2) In addition, while it has been demonstrated that leukemic cancer stem cells re-acquire an embryonic stem cell-like phenotype,(3,4) the molecular basis of stem cell function in epithelial cancer stem cells has not been investigated. Here we show that a normal adult tissue-specific stem cell molecular phenotype is commonly activated in epithelial cancer stem cells and for the first time provide evidence that enrichment in cancer stem cells-specific molecular signatures are correlated to highly aggressive tumor phenotypes in human epithelial cancers.

  7. HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTIONS IN LARYNGEAL CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torrente, Mariela C.; Rodrigo, Juan P.; Haigentz, Missak; Dikkers, Frederik G.; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Takes, Robert P.; Olofsson, Jan; Ferlito, Alfio

    2011-01-01

    Although the association and clinical significance of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections with a subset of head and neck cancers, particularly for oropharyngeal carcinoma, has recently been well documented, the involvement of HPV in laryngeal cancer has been inadequately evaluated. Herein we revie

  8. HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTIONS IN LARYNGEAL CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torrente, Mariela C.; Rodrigo, Juan P.; Haigentz, Missak; Dikkers, Frederik G.; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Takes, Robert P.; Olofsson, Jan; Ferlito, Alfio

    2011-01-01

    Although the association and clinical significance of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections with a subset of head and neck cancers, particularly for oropharyngeal carcinoma, has recently been well documented, the involvement of HPV in laryngeal cancer has been inadequately evaluated. Herein we revie

  9. Human papillomavirus infections in laryngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torrente, M.C.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Haigentz Jr., M.; Dikkers, F.G.; Rinaldo, A.; Takes, R.P.; Olofsson, J.; Ferlito, A.

    2011-01-01

    Although the association and clinical significance of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections with a subset of head and neck cancers, particularly for oropharyngeal carcinoma, has recently been well documented, the involvement of HPV in laryngeal cancer has been inadequately evaluated. Herein we revie

  10. Human papillomavirus infections in laryngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torrente, M.C.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Haigentz Jr., M.; Dikkers, F.G.; Rinaldo, A.; Takes, R.P.; Olofsson, J.; Ferlito, A.

    2011-01-01

    Although the association and clinical significance of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections with a subset of head and neck cancers, particularly for oropharyngeal carcinoma, has recently been well documented, the involvement of HPV in laryngeal cancer has been inadequately evaluated. Herein we

  11. HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTIONS IN LARYNGEAL CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torrente, Mariela C.; Rodrigo, Juan P.; Haigentz, Missak; Dikkers, Frederik G.; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Takes, Robert P.; Olofsson, Jan; Ferlito, Alfio

    Although the association and clinical significance of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections with a subset of head and neck cancers, particularly for oropharyngeal carcinoma, has recently been well documented, the involvement of HPV in laryngeal cancer has been inadequately evaluated. Herein we

  12. Molecular markers for detection, surveillance and prognostication of bladder cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrooman, O.P.; Witjes, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Many markers for the detection of bladder cancers have been tested and almost all urinary markers reported are better than cytology with regard to sensitivity, but they score lower in specificity. Currently molecular and genetic changes play an important role in the discovery of new molecular

  13. New generation of breast cancer clinical trials implementing molecular profiling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dimitrios Zardavas; Martine Piccart-Gebhart

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of molecular profiling technologies in oncology deepens our knowledge for the molecular landscapes of cancer diagnoses, identifying aberrations that could be linked with specific therapeutic vulnerabilities. In particular, there is an increasing list of molecularly targeted anticancer agents undergoing clinical development that aim to block specific molecular aberrations. This leads to a paradigm shift, with an increasing list of specific aberrations dictating the treatment of patients with cancer. This paradigm shift impacts the field of clinical trials, since the classical approach of having clinico-pathological disease characteristics dictating the patients' enrolment in oncology trials shifts towards the implementation of molecular profiling as pre-screening step. In order to facilitate the successful clinical development of these new anticancer drugs within specific molecular niches of cancer diagnoses, there have been developed new, innovative trial designs that could be classified as follows: i) longitudinal cohort studies that implement (or not) "nested" downstream trials, 2) studies that assess the clinical utility of molecular profiling, 3) "master" protocol trials, iv) "basket" trials, v) trials following an adaptive design. In the present article, we review these innovative study designs, providing representative examples from each category and we discuss the challenges that still need to be addressed in this era of new generation oncology trials implementing molecular profiling. Emphasis is put on the field of breast cancer clinical trials.

  14. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Human Glucose Transporter GLUT1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Sun Park

    Full Text Available Glucose transporters (GLUTs provide a pathway for glucose transport across membranes. Human GLUTs are implicated in devastating diseases such as heart disease, hyper- and hypo-glycemia, type 2 diabetes and cancer. The human GLUT1 has been recently crystalized in the inward-facing open conformation. However, there is no other structural information for other conformations. The X-ray structures of E. coli Xylose permease (XylE, a glucose transporter homolog, are available in multiple conformations with and without the substrates D-xylose and D-glucose. XylE has high sequence homology to human GLUT1 and key residues in the sugar-binding pocket are conserved. Here we construct a homology model for human GLUT1 based on the available XylE crystal structure in the partially occluded outward-facing conformation. A long unbiased all atom molecular dynamics simulation starting from the model can capture a new fully opened outward-facing conformation. Our investigation of molecular interactions at the interface between the transmembrane (TM domains and the intracellular helices (ICH domain in the outward- and inward-facing conformation supports that the ICH domain likely stabilizes the outward-facing conformation in GLUT1. Furthermore, inducing a conformational transition, our simulations manifest a global asymmetric rocker switch motion and detailed molecular interactions between the substrate and residues through the water-filled selective pore along a pathway from the extracellular to the intracellular side. The results presented here are consistent with previously published biochemical, mutagenesis and functional studies. Together, this study shed light on the structure and functional relationships of GLUT1 in multiple conformational states.

  15. Molecular profiling of male breast cancer - lost in translation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Ida; Killander, Fredrika; Linderholm, Barbro; Hedenfalk, Ingrid

    2014-08-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer form in women and it has been extensively studied on the molecular level. Male breast cancer (MBC), on the other hand, is rare and has not been thoroughly investigated in terms of transcriptional profiles or genomic aberrations. Most of our understanding of MBC has therefore been extrapolated from knowledge of female breast cancer. Although differences in addition to similarities with female breast cancer have been reported, the same prognostic and predictive markers are used to determine optimal management strategies for both men and women diagnosed with breast cancer. This review is focused on prognosis for MBC patients, prognostic and predictive factors and molecular subgrouping; comparisons are made with female breast cancer. Information was collected from relevant literature on both male and female breast cancer from the MEDLINE database between 1992 and 2014. MBC is a heterogeneous disease, and on the molecular level many differences compared to female breast cancer have recently been revealed. Two distinct subgroups of MBC, luminal M1 and luminal M2, have been identified which differ from the well-established intrinsic subtypes of breast cancer in women. These novel subgroups of breast cancer therefore appear unique to MBC. Furthermore, several studies report inferior survival for men diagnosed with breast cancer compared to women. New promising prognostic biomarkers for MBC (e.g. NAT1) deserving further attention are reviewed. Further prospective studies aimed at validating the novel subgroups and recently proposed biomarkers for MBC are warranted to provide the basis for optimal patient management in this era of personalized medicine. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Rare Cancers. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Deciphering the Molecular Mechanisms of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2, by a Signalosome-like Subunit and its Role in DNA Repair. Molecular Cell 12; 1087-1099 (2003). Presentations/Abstracts...BRCA1 and BRCA2, by a Signalosome-like Subunit and its Role in DNA Repair. Molecular Cell 12; 1087-1099. APPENDICIES: CURRICULUM VITAE...Oncogenesis Program Member, Faculty Recruitment Committee Periodic Manuscript Reviews: Cell, Science, Molecular Cell , Molecular and Cellular

  17. Potential Prognostic Markers for Human Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-03-01

    Prostate 35: 185-192, 1998 osteoblasts on prostate carcinoma proliferation and chemo- 32. Trikha M, Cai Y, Grignon D, Honn KV: Identification taxis ...Markers for Human Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Bruce R. Zetter, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Children’s Hospital Boston, Massachusetts...March 2001 Final (1 Sep 98 - 28 Feb 01) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Potential Prognostic Markers for Human Prostate Cancer DAMD17-98-1

  18. Ultrasound for molecular imaging and therapy in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kaneko, Osamu F; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, molecularly-targeted contrast enhanced ultrasound (ultrasound molecular imaging) has attracted significant attention in preclinical research of cancer diagnostic and therapy. Potential applications for ultrasound molecular imaging run the gamut from early detection and characterization of malignancies to monitoring treatment responses and guiding therapies. There may also be a role for ultrasound contrast agents for improved delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs and gene th...

  19. Molecular Concordance Between Primary Breast Cancer and Matched Metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøigård, Anne Bruun; Larsen, Martin Jakob; Thomassen, Mads;

    2016-01-01

    . The purpose of this review is to illuminate the extent of cancer genome evolution through disease progression and the degree of molecular concordance between primary breast cancers and matched metastases. We present an overview of the most prominent studies investigating the expression of endocrine receptors......Clinical management of breast cancer is increasingly personalized and based on molecular profiling. Often, primary tumors are used as proxies for systemic disease at the time of recurrence. However, recent studies have revealed substantial discordances between primary tumors and metastases, both......, transcriptomics, and genome aberrations in primary tumors and metastases. In conclusion, biopsy of metastatic lesions at recurrence of breast cancer is encouraged to provide optimal treatment of the disease. Furthermore, molecular profiling of metastatic tissue provides invaluable mechanistic insight...

  20. Anatomical and molecular imaging of skin cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Weibo

    2008-01-01

    Hao Hong1, Jiangtao Sun1, Weibo Cai1,21Departments of Radiology and Medical Physics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin – Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA; 2University of Wisconsin Paul P. Carbone Comprehensive Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin, USAAbstract: Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer types. It is generally divided into two categories: melanoma (∼5%) and nonmelanoma (∼95%), which can be further categorized into basal cell...

  1. Upstream molecular signaling pathways of p27(Kip1 expression in human breast cancer cells in vitro: differential effects of 4-hydroxytamoxifen and deficiency of either D-(+-glucose or L-leucine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eto Isao

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to investigate whether the levels of glucose or certain amino acids could regulate the expression of a cell cycle repressor protein p27(Kip1, thereby dictating the risk of cancer in either obesity or caloric/dietary restriction. Previously, we identified and reported four different upstream molecular signaling pathways of p27 expression in human breast cancer cells. We called these four pathways as pathway #1, #2, #3 and #4. We found that 4-hydroxytamoxifen - but not tamoxifen - up-regulated the expression of p27 using pathway #1 which consisted mainly of receptor tyrosine kinases and mTORC1. We now investigate, using 4-hydroxytamoxifen as a reference anti-cancer agents, whether (a the moderate increase in the concentration of D-(+-glucose could down-regulate and, conversely, (b the deficiency of D-(+-glucose or certain L-amino acids could up-regulate the expression of p27 in these cells using pathway #2 which consists mainly of AMPK and mTORC1. Results Using human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells in vitro, these hypotheses were tested experimentally by performing p27-luciferase reporter transfection assays and western immunoblot analyses. The results obtained are consistent with these hypotheses. Furthermore, the results indicated that, although 4-hydroxytamoxifen used primarily pathway #1 to down-regulate the phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 and up-regulate the expression of p27, it also secondarily down-regulated the phosphorylation of S6K1. In contrast, the deficiency of D-(+-glucose or L-leucine used primarily pathway #2 to down-regulate the phosphorylation of S6K1, but they also secondarily down-regulated the phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 and up-regulated the expression of p27. Finally, deficiency of D-(+-glucose or L-leucine - but not 4-hydroxytamoxifen - up-regulated the expression of mitochondrial ATP5A and SIRT3. Conclusions (a 4-Hydroxitamoxifen used primarily pathway #1 to up-regulate the

  2. Novel approaches for the molecular classification of prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert H. Getzenberg

    2010-01-01

    @@ Among the urologic cancers, prostate cancer is by far the most common, and it appears to have the potential to affect almost all men throughout the world as they age. A number of studies have shown that many men with prostate cancer will not die from their disease, but rather with the disease but from other causes. These men have a form of prostate cancer that is de-scribed as "very low risk" and has often been called indolent. There are however a group of men that have a form of prostate cancer that is much more aggressive and life threatening. Unlike other cancer types, we have few tools to provide for the molecular classification of prostate cancer.

  3. Biological stoichiometry in human cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Elser

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A growing tumor in the body can be considered a complex ecological and evolutionary system. A new eco-evolutionary hypothesis (the "Growth Rate Hypothesis", GRH proposes that tumors have elevated phosphorus (P demands due to increased allocation to P-rich nucleic acids, especially ribosomal RNA, to meet the protein synthesis demands of accelerated proliferation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We determined the elemental (C, N, P and nucleic acid contents of paired malignant and normal tissues from colon, lung, liver, or kidney for 121 patients. Consistent with the GRH, lung and colon tumors were significantly higher (by approximately two-fold in P content (fraction of dry weight and RNA content and lower in nitrogen (N:P ratio than paired normal tissue, and P in RNA contributed a significantly larger fraction of total biomass P in malignant relative to normal tissues. Furthermore, patient-specific differences for %P between malignant and normal tissues were positively correlated with such differences for %RNA, both for the overall data and within three of the four organ sites. However, significant differences in %P and %RNA between malignant and normal tissues were not seen in liver and kidney and, overall, RNA contributed only approximately 11% of total tissue P content. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Data for lung and colon tumors provide support for the GRH in human cancer. The two-fold amplification of P content in colon and lung tumors may set the stage for potential P-limitation of their proliferation, as such differences often do for rapidly growing biota in ecosystems. However, data for kidney and liver do not support the GRH. To account for these conflicting observations, we suggest that local environments in some organs select for neoplastic cells bearing mutations increasing cell division rate ("r-selected," as in colon and lung while conditions elsewhere may select for reduced mortality rate ("K-selected," as in liver and

  4. Deoxyribonucleic-binding homeobox proteins are augmented in human cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Mercurio, A M; Chung, S Y;

    1990-01-01

    the highly conserved 60 amino acid homeodomain. This peptide antiserum recognized a protein species of molecular weight 63,000 in immunoblots of nuclear extracts obtained from several tumor cell lines. The predominant molecular weight 63,000 nuclear protein recognized by the peptide antiserum...... the same patients exhibited little immunoreactivity. Both the peptide antiserum and the polyclonal antiserum against the native protein immunoblotted a molecular weight 63,000 protein in nuclear extracts of tumor tissue, but not significantly in extracts of normal tissue. At the molecular level......Homeobox genes encode sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins that are involved in the regulation of gene expression during embryonic development. In this study, we examined the expression of homeobox proteins in human cancer. Antiserum was obtained against a synthetic peptide derived from...

  5. Catalog of genetic progression of human cancers: breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmedt, Christine; Yates, Lucy; Kulka, Janina

    2016-03-01

    With the rapid development of next-generation sequencing, deeper insights are being gained into the molecular evolution that underlies the development and clinical progression of breast cancer. It is apparent that during evolution, breast cancers acquire thousands of mutations including single base pair substitutions, insertions, deletions, copy number aberrations, and structural rearrangements. As a consequence, at the whole genome level, no two cancers are identical and few cancers even share the same complement of "driver" mutations. Indeed, two samples from the same cancer may also exhibit extensive differences due to constant remodeling of the genome over time. In this review, we summarize recent studies that extend our understanding of the genomic basis of cancer progression. Key biological insights include the following: subclonal diversification begins early in cancer evolution, being detectable even in in situ lesions; geographical stratification of subclonal structure is frequent in primary tumors and can include therapeutically targetable alterations; multiple distant metastases typically arise from a common metastatic ancestor following a "metastatic cascade" model; systemic therapy can unmask preexisting resistant subclones or influence further treatment sensitivity and disease progression. We conclude the review by describing novel approaches such as the analysis of circulating DNA and patient-derived xenografts that promise to further our understanding of the genomic changes occurring during cancer evolution and guide treatment decision making.

  6. Molecular mechanism of size control in development and human diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaolong Yang; Tian Xu

    2011-01-01

    How multicellular organisms control their size is a fundamental question that fascinated generations of biologists.In the past 10 years, tremendous progress has been made toward our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying size control. Original studies from Drosophila showed that in addition to extrinsic nutritional and hormonal cues, intrinsic mechanisms also play important roles in the control of organ size during development. Several novel signaling pathways such as insulin and Hippo-LATS signaling pathways have been identified that control organ size by regulating cell size and/or cell number through modulation of cell growth, cell division, and cell death. Later studies using mammalian cell and mouse models also demonstrated that the signaling pathways identified in flies are also conserved in mammals. Significantly, recent studies showed that dysregulation of size control plays important roles in the development of many human diseases sucha as cancer,diabetes,and hypertrophy.

  7. Gallic acid: molecular rival of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sharad; Singh, Amit; Mishra, Abha

    2013-05-01

    Gallic acid, a predominant polyphenol, has been shown to inhibit carcinogenesis in animal models and in vitro cancerous cell lines. The inhibitory effect of gallic acid on cancer cell growth is mediated via the modulation of genes which encodes for cell cycle, metastasis, angiogenesis and apoptosis. Gallic acid inhibits activation of NF-κB and Akt signaling pathways along with the activity of COX, ribonucleotide reductase and GSH. Moreover, gallic acid activates ATM kinase signaling pathways to prevent the processes of carcinogenesis. The data so far available, both from in vivo and in vitro studies, indicate that this dietary polyphenol could be promising agent in the field of cancer chemoprevention.

  8. [Molecular pathology of lung cancer. State of the art 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warth, A; Endris, V; Penzel, R; Weichert, W

    2014-11-01

    Lung cancer is the most frequent cause of cancer-related death in Germany in men and women alike. While in the last decades a classification of epithelial lung tumors into non-small cell and small cell lung cancer was clearly sufficient from the therapeutic viewpoint, the dawn of the era of personalized medicine together with tremendous developments in the field of high throughput technologies have led to a molecular individualization of these tumors and, even more important, to a molecularly defined individualization of tumor therapy. This development resulted in the definition of a wide array of molecularly divergent tumor families. In this article we will give an overview on relevant molecular alterations in non-small cell lung cancers, comprising adenocarcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas and large cell carcinomas and also small cell carcinomas and carcinoids. Besides some similarities data gathered in the last few years specifically highlighted the immense diversity of molecular alterations that might underlie tumorigenesis of lung neoplasms. The knowledge on how to detect these alterations is of utmost importance in pathology, as treatment decisions are increasingly based on their presence or absence, putting molecular pathology in the central focus of the novel era of personalized medicine in oncology.

  9. Epidemiological bases and molecular mechanisms linking obesity, diabetes, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Salmerón, María; Chocarro-Calvo, Ana; García-Martínez, José Manuel; de la Vieja, Antonio; García-Jiménez, Custodia

    2017-02-01

    The association between diabetes and cancer was hypothesized almost one century ago. Today, a vast number of epidemiological studies support that obese and diabetic populations are more likely to experience tissue-specific cancers, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Obesity, diabetes, and cancer share many hormonal, immune, and metabolic changes that may account for the relationship between diabetes and cancer. In addition, antidiabetic treatments may have an impact on the occurrence and course of some cancers. Moreover, some anticancer treatments may induce diabetes. These observations aroused a great controversy because of the ethical implications and the associated commercial interests. We report an epidemiological update from a mechanistic perspective that suggests the existence of many common and differential individual mechanisms linking obesity and type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus to certain cancers. The challenge today is to identify the molecular links responsible for this association. Classification of cancers by their molecular signatures may facilitate future mechanistic and epidemiological studies. Copyright © 2016 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Precursor lesions in pancreatic cancer: morphological and molecular pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlett, Christopher J; Salisbury, Elizabeth L; Biankin, Andrew V; Kench, James

    2011-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a dismal prognosis and is the fourth most common cause of cancer related death in Western societies. In large part this is due to its typically late presentation, usually as locally advanced or metastatic disease. Identification of the non-invasive precursor lesions to pancreatic cancer raises the possibility of surgical treatment or chemoprevention at an early stage in the evolution of this disease, when more amenable to therapeutic interventions. Precursor lesions to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, in particular pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN), have been recognised under a variety of synonyms for over 50 years. Over the past decade our understanding of the morphology, biological significance and molecular aberrations of these lesions has grown rapidly and there is now a widely accepted progression model integrating the accumulated morphological and molecular observations. Further progress is likely to be accelerated by improved mouse models of pancreatic cancer and by insight into the cancer genome gained by the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC), in which an Australian consortium is leading the pancreatic cancer initiative. This review also outlines the morphological and molecular features of the other two precursors of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, i.e., intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms and mucinous cystic neoplasms.

  11. [Molecular therapeutics in patients with cancer unresponsive to conventional treatments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdespino-Gómez, Víctor Manuel; Valdespino-Castillo, Víctor Edmundo

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances and insights into the molecular pathogenesis of cancer provide unprecedented opportunities for discovery and development of molecularly target-therapeutic (MTT) strategies. Cancer is a complex process due to accumulation of multiple mutations and alterations in the genoma. Tumor cells seem to rely heavily on the continued deregulation of one or more signaling pathways. Complete identification on cell signaling deregulations have provided greater understanding on the biology that underlies most cancers. High-throughput technologies in genomics and proteomics can help to detect the response in vitro and in vivo of targeted MTT effects. Cancer MTT are drugs blocking specific oncogenes or oncogenic signaling pathways and can secondary block off the growth and spreading involved in carcinogenesis and tumor progression. In this paper we revised concepts of oncogene addiction, oncogenic pathways signature and commented the high-tech technologies related to their study. Also we revised the favorable clinical results using new MTT strategies for hard-to-treat cancers in the last year, and the limitations and perspectives to achieve more effective targeted cancer therapy results. Identification of a progressive number of molecularly targeted oncogenes and their corresponding blocking agents will give cancer MTT strategies great potential for development in the next years. Novel biologic endpoints and innovative clinical designs are also required to the successful application of the therapies.

  12. Differentially Expressed Genes and Signature Pathways of Human Prostate Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S Myers

    Full Text Available Genomic technologies including microarrays and next-generation sequencing have enabled the generation of molecular signatures of prostate cancer. Lists of differentially expressed genes between malignant and non-malignant states are thought to be fertile sources of putative prostate cancer biomarkers. However such lists of differentially expressed genes can be highly variable for multiple reasons. As such, looking at differential expression in the context of gene sets and pathways has been more robust. Using next-generation genome sequencing data from The Cancer Genome Atlas, differential gene expression between age- and stage- matched human prostate tumors and non-malignant samples was assessed and used to craft a pathway signature of prostate cancer. Up- and down-regulated genes were assigned to pathways composed of curated groups of related genes from multiple databases. The significance of these pathways was then evaluated according to the number of differentially expressed genes found in the pathway and their position within the pathway using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis and Signaling Pathway Impact Analysis. The "transforming growth factor-beta signaling" and "Ran regulation of mitotic spindle formation" pathways were strongly associated with prostate cancer. Several other significant pathways confirm reported findings from microarray data that suggest actin cytoskeleton regulation, cell cycle, mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, and calcium signaling are also altered in prostate cancer. Thus we have demonstrated feasibility of pathway analysis and identified an underexplored area (Ran for investigation in prostate cancer pathogenesis.

  13. Molecular Imaging and Precision Medicine in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceci, Francesco; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Castellucci, Paolo; Fanti, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to discuss about the role of new probes for molecular imaging in the evaluation of prostate cancer (PCa). This review focuses particularly on the role of new promising radiotracers for the molecular imaging with PET/computed tomography in the detection of PCa recurrence. The role of these new imaging techniques to guide lesion-target therapies and the potential application of these molecular probes as theranostics agents is discussed. Finally, the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance to castration in PCa and the maintenance of active androgen receptor are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Novel innate cancer killing activity in humans

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    Lovato James

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study, we pilot tested an in vitro assay of cancer killing activity (CKA in circulating leukocytes of 22 cancer cases and 25 healthy controls. Methods Using a human cervical cancer cell line, HeLa, as target cells, we compared the CKA in circulating leukocytes, as effector cells, of cancer cases and controls. The CKA was normalized as percentages of total target cells during selected periods of incubation time and at selected effector/target cell ratios in comparison to no-effector-cell controls. Results Our results showed that CKA similar to that of our previous study of SR/CR mice was present in human circulating leukocytes but at profoundly different levels in individuals. Overall, males have a significantly higher CKA than females. The CKA levels in cancer cases were lower than that in healthy controls (mean ± SD: 36.97 ± 21.39 vs. 46.28 ± 27.22. Below-median CKA was significantly associated with case status (odds ratio = 4.36; 95% Confidence Interval = 1.06, 17.88 after adjustment of gender and race. Conclusions In freshly isolated human leukocytes, we were able to detect an apparent CKA in a similar manner to that of cancer-resistant SR/CR mice. The finding of CKA at lower levels in cancer patients suggests the possibility that it may be of a consequence of genetic, physiological, or pathological conditions, pending future studies with larger sample size.

  15. Anticancer Properties of Capsaicin Against Human Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Ruth; Lee, Seong-Ho

    2016-03-01

    There is persuasive epidemiological and experimental evidence that dietary phytochemicals have anticancer activity. Capsaicin is a bioactive phytochemical abundant in red and chili peppers. While the preponderance of the data strongly indicates significant anticancer benefits of capsaicin, more information to highlight molecular mechanisms of its action is required to improve our knowledge to be able to propose a potential therapeutic strategy for use of capsaicin against cancer. Capsaicin has been shown to alter the expression of several genes involved in cancer cell survival, growth arrest, angiogenesis and metastasis. Recently, many research groups, including ours, found that capsaicin targets multiple signaling pathways, oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes in various types of cancer models. In this review article, we highlight multiple molecular targets responsible for the anticancer mechanism of capsaicin. In addition, we deal with the benefits of combinational use of capsaicin with other dietary or chemotherapeutic compounds, focusing on synergistic anticancer activities.

  16. [Matrix metalloproteases as molecular markers in gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Peña, Sol; Sampieri, Clara L; León-Córdoba, Kenneth

    2010-02-06

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-associated mortality in the world. Prognosis in patients with gastric cancer is difficult to establish because it is commonly diagnosed when gastric wall invasion and metastasis have occurred. Currently, some members of the extracellular matrix metalloproteinases have been identified, whose expression in gastric tumor tissue is significantly elevated compared to healthy gastric tissue. Matrix metalloproteinases are 24 zinc-dependent endopeptidases that catalyze the proteolysis of the extracellular matrix. This degradation allows the cancer cells invade the surrounding stroma and trigger metastasis. Upregulation of certain matrix metalloproteinases in gastric cancer has been associated with a poor prognosis and elevated invasive capacity. This review compiles evidence about the genetic expression of matrix metalloproteinases in gastric cancer and their role in tumour invasion and metastasis, emphasizing their potential as molecular markers of prognosis. Copyright 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  17. Breast cancer Molecular subtypes and their clinicopathological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-01-20

    Jan 20, 2010 ... The ANNALS of AFRICAN SURGERY • Volume 5 • January 2010 19. The ANNALS of AFRICAN ... ture the varied clinical heterogeneity of breast cancer as histologically similar ..... with clinical implications. Proc Natl Acad Sci ...

  18. Molecular Determinants of Radio Resistance in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    lymph node metastasis in an orthotopic murine model of human abnormal DNA-dsb repair in prostate tumors as an adjunct to cervical carcinoma. Cancer Res... Cancer . 1997;79:81-89. to monitor recurrence and assess response. Semin Oncol. 50. Chakravarti A, Heydon K, Wu CL, et al. Loss of p16 expres- 2002;29...radiation hypersensitivity cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 and p16 in the mechan- arising from disabled atm function. Cancer Res 1999; 59: isms

  19. EMT is the dominant program in human colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tollenaar Rob AEM

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colon cancer has been classically described by clinicopathologic features that permit the prediction of outcome only after surgical resection and staging. Methods We performed an unsupervised analysis of microarray data from 326 colon cancers to identify the first principal component (PC1 of the most variable set of genes. PC1 deciphered two primary, intrinsic molecular subtypes of colon cancer that predicted disease progression and recurrence. Results Here we report that the most dominant pattern of intrinsic gene expression in colon cancer (PC1 was tightly correlated (Pearson R = 0.92, P -135 with the EMT signature-- both in gene identity and directionality. In a global micro-RNA screen, we further identified the most anti-correlated microRNA with PC1 as MiR200, known to regulate EMT. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the biology underpinning the native, molecular classification of human colon cancer--previously thought to be highly heterogeneous-- was clarified through the lens of comprehensive transcriptome analysis.

  20. Transcriptional Network Architecture of Breast Cancer Molecular Subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo de Anda-Jáuregui

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer heterogeneity is evident at the clinical, histological and molecular level. High throughput technologies allowed the identification of intrinsic subtypes that capture transcriptional differences among tumors. A remaining question is whether said differences are associated to a particular transcriptional program which involves different connections between the same molecules. In other words, whether particular transcriptional network architectures can be linked to specific phenotypes.In this work we infer, construct and analyze transcriptional networks from whole-genome gene expression microarrays, by using an information theory approach. We use 493 samples of primary breast cancer tissue classified in four molecular subtypes: Luminal A, Luminal B, Basal and HER2-enriched. For comparison, a network for non-tumoral mammary tissue (61 samples is also inferred and analyzed.Transcriptional networks present particular architectures in each breast cancer subtype as well as in the non-tumor breast tissue. We find substantial differences between the non-tumor network and those networks inferred from cancer samples, in both structure and gene composition. More importantly, we find specific network architectural features associated to each breast cancer subtype. Based on breast cancer networks' centrality, we identify genes previously associated to the disease, either, generally (i.e. CNR2 or to a particular subtype (such as LCK. Similarly, we identify LUZP4, a gene barely explored in breast cancer, playing a role in transcriptional networks with subtype-specific relevance.With this approach we observe architectural differences between cancer and non-cancer at network level, as well as differences between cancer subtype networks which might be associated with breast cancer heterogeneity. The centrality measures of these networks allow us to identify genes with potential biomedical implications to breast cancer.

  1. Transcriptional Network Architecture of Breast Cancer Molecular Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Anda-Jáuregui, Guillermo; Velázquez-Caldelas, Tadeo E; Espinal-Enríquez, Jesús; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer heterogeneity is evident at the clinical, histological and molecular level. High throughput technologies allowed the identification of intrinsic subtypes that capture transcriptional differences among tumors. A remaining question is whether said differences are associated to a particular transcriptional program which involves different connections between the same molecules. In other words, whether particular transcriptional network architectures can be linked to specific phenotypes. In this work we infer, construct and analyze transcriptional networks from whole-genome gene expression microarrays, by using an information theory approach. We use 493 samples of primary breast cancer tissue classified in four molecular subtypes: Luminal A, Luminal B, Basal and HER2-enriched. For comparison, a network for non-tumoral mammary tissue (61 samples) is also inferred and analyzed. Transcriptional networks present particular architectures in each breast cancer subtype as well as in the non-tumor breast tissue. We find substantial differences between the non-tumor network and those networks inferred from cancer samples, in both structure and gene composition. More importantly, we find specific network architectural features associated to each breast cancer subtype. Based on breast cancer networks' centrality, we identify genes previously associated to the disease, either, generally (i.e., CNR2) or to a particular subtype (such as LCK). Similarly, we identify LUZP4, a gene barely explored in breast cancer, playing a role in transcriptional networks with subtype-specific relevance. With this approach we observe architectural differences between cancer and non-cancer at network level, as well as differences between cancer subtype networks which might be associated with breast cancer heterogeneity. The centrality measures of these networks allow us to identify genes with potential biomedical implications to breast cancer.

  2. Transcriptional Network Architecture of Breast Cancer Molecular Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Anda-Jáuregui, Guillermo; Velázquez-Caldelas, Tadeo E.; Espinal-Enríquez, Jesús; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer heterogeneity is evident at the clinical, histological and molecular level. High throughput technologies allowed the identification of intrinsic subtypes that capture transcriptional differences among tumors. A remaining question is whether said differences are associated to a particular transcriptional program which involves different connections between the same molecules. In other words, whether particular transcriptional network architectures can be linked to specific phenotypes. In this work we infer, construct and analyze transcriptional networks from whole-genome gene expression microarrays, by using an information theory approach. We use 493 samples of primary breast cancer tissue classified in four molecular subtypes: Luminal A, Luminal B, Basal and HER2-enriched. For comparison, a network for non-tumoral mammary tissue (61 samples) is also inferred and analyzed. Transcriptional networks present particular architectures in each breast cancer subtype as well as in the non-tumor breast tissue. We find substantial differences between the non-tumor network and those networks inferred from cancer samples, in both structure and gene composition. More importantly, we find specific network architectural features associated to each breast cancer subtype. Based on breast cancer networks' centrality, we identify genes previously associated to the disease, either, generally (i.e., CNR2) or to a particular subtype (such as LCK). Similarly, we identify LUZP4, a gene barely explored in breast cancer, playing a role in transcriptional networks with subtype-specific relevance. With this approach we observe architectural differences between cancer and non-cancer at network level, as well as differences between cancer subtype networks which might be associated with breast cancer heterogeneity. The centrality measures of these networks allow us to identify genes with potential biomedical implications to breast cancer. PMID:27920729

  3. Molecular biology of cancer-associated fibroblasts: can these cells be targeted in anti-cancer therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Tamas A; Varro, Andrea; Wang, Timothy C; Tycko, Benjamin

    2010-02-01

    It is increasingly recognized that the non-neoplastic stromal compartment in most solid cancers plays an active role in tumor proliferation, invasion and metastasis. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are one of the most abundant cell types in the tumor stroma, and these cells are pro-tumorigenic. Evidence that CAFs are epigenetically and possibly also genetically distinct from normal fibroblasts is beginning to define these cells as potential targets of anti-cancer therapy. Here, we review the cell-of-origin and molecular biology of CAFs, arguing that such knowledge provides a rational basis for designing therapeutic strategies to coordinately and synergistically target both the stromal and malignant epithelial component of human cancers.

  4. Breast Cancer Detection by B7-H3-Targeted Ultrasound Molecular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachawal, Sunitha V; Jensen, Kristin C; Wilson, Katheryne E; Tian, Lu; Lutz, Amelie M; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2015-06-15

    Ultrasound complements mammography as an imaging modality for breast cancer detection, especially in patients with dense breast tissue, but its utility is limited by low diagnostic accuracy. One emerging molecular tool to address this limitation involves contrast-enhanced ultrasound using microbubbles targeted to molecular signatures on tumor neovasculature. In this study, we illustrate how tumor vascular expression of B7-H3 (CD276), a member of the B7 family of ligands for T-cell coregulatory receptors, can be incorporated into an ultrasound method that can distinguish normal, benign, precursor, and malignant breast pathologies for diagnostic purposes. Through an IHC analysis of 248 human breast specimens, we found that vascular expression of B7-H3 was selectively and significantly higher in breast cancer tissues. B7-H3 immunostaining on blood vessels distinguished benign/precursors from malignant lesions with high diagnostic accuracy in human specimens. In a transgenic mouse model of cancer, the B7-H3-targeted ultrasound imaging signal was increased significantly in breast cancer tissues and highly correlated with ex vivo expression levels of B7-H3 on quantitative immunofluorescence. Our findings offer a preclinical proof of concept for the use of B7-H3-targeted ultrasound molecular imaging as a tool to improve the diagnostic accuracy of breast cancer detection in patients.

  5. Breast Cancer Detection by B7-H3 Targeted Ultrasound Molecular Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachawal, Sunitha V.; Jensen, Kristin C.; Wilson, Katheryne E.; Tian, Lu; Lutz, Amelie M.; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound complements mammography as an imaging modality for breast cancer detection, especially in patients with dense breast tissue, but its utility is limited by low diagnostic accuracy. One emerging molecular tool to address this limitation involves contrast-enhanced ultrasound using microbubbles targeted to molecular signatures on tumor neovasculature. In this study, we illustrate how tumor vascular expression of B7-H3 (CD276), a member of the B7 family of ligands for T cell co-regulatory receptors, can be incorporated into an ultrasound method that can distinguish normal, benign, precursor and malignant breast pathologies for diagnostic purposes. Through an immunohistochemical analysis of 248 human breast specimens, we found that vascular expression of B7-H3 was selectively and significantly higher in breast cancer tissues. B7-H3 immunostaining on blood vessels distinguished benign/precursors from malignant lesions with high diagnostic accuracy in human specimens. In a transgenic mouse model of cancer, the B7-H3-targeted ultrasound imaging signal was increased significantly in breast cancer tissues and highly correlated with ex vivo expression levels of B7-H3 on quantitative immunofluorescence. Our findings offer a preclinical proof of concept for the use of B7-H3-targeted ultrasound molecular imaging as a tool to improve the diagnostic accuracy of breast cancer detection in patients. PMID:25899053

  6. Molecular genetics and genomics progress in urothelial bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netto, George J

    2013-11-01

    The clinical management of solid tumor patients has recently undergone a paradigm shift as the result of the accelerated advances in cancer genetics and genomics. Molecular diagnostics is now an integral part of routine clinical management in lung, colon, and breast cancer patients. In a disappointing contrast, molecular biomarkers remain largely excluded from current management algorithms of urologic malignancies. The need for new treatment alternatives and validated prognostic molecular biomarkers that can help clinicians identify patients in need of early aggressive management is pressing. Identifying robust predictive biomarkers that can stratify response to newly introduced targeted therapeutics is another crucially needed development. The following is a brief discussion of some promising candidate biomarkers that may soon become a part of clinical management of bladder cancers.

  7. Molecular therapy of colorectal cancer: progress and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Wenhao; Feng, Junlan; Qin, Huanlong; Ma, Yanlei

    2015-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains one of the most common types of cancer and leading causes of cancer death worldwide. Although the introduction of cytotoxic drugs such as oxaliplatin, irinotecan and fluorouracil has improved the treatment of advanced CRC, the individual response to chemoradiotherapy varies tremendously from one patient to another. However, recent progress in CRC molecular therapies may provide new insight into the treatment of this disease. Currently, components of the EGFR, VEGF, Wnt and NF-kB pathways are the most important targets for CRC therapy. This review chronicles the development of molecular CRC therapies over the past few decades. We also provide an update on the current progress of research concerning the molecular pathways leading to CRC and discuss the possible implications for CRC therapy.

  8. Human papilloma viruses (HPV and breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Sutherland Lawson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Human papillomaviruses (HPV may have a role in some breast cancers. The purpose of this study is to fill important gaps in the evidence. These gaps are: (i confirmation of the presence of high risk for cancer HPVs in breast cancers, (ii evidence of HPV infections in benign breast tissues prior to the development of HPV positive breast cancer in the same patients, (iii evidence that HPVs are biologically active and not harmless passengers in breast cancer.Methods: RNA-seq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA was used to identify HPV RNA sequences in breast cancers. We also conducted a retrospective cohort study based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR analyses to identify HPVs in archival specimens from Australian women with benign breast biopsies who later developed breast cancer. To assess whether HPVs in breast cancer were biologically active, the expression of the oncogenic protein HPV E7 was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC.Results: Thirty (3.5% low risk and 20 (2.3% high risk HPV types were identified in 855 breast cancers from the TCGA data base. The high risk types were HPV 18 (48%, HPV 113 (24%, HPV 16 (10%, HPV 52 (10%. Data from the PCR cohort study, indicated that HPV type 18 was the most common type identified in breast cancer specimens (55% of 40 breast cancer specimens followed by HPV 16 (13%. The same HPV type was identified in both the benign and subsequent breast cancer in 15 patients. HPV E7 proteins were identified in 72% of benign breast specimens and 59% of invasive breast cancer specimens.Conclusions: There were 4 observations of particular interest: (i confirmation by both NGS and PCR of the presence of high risk HPV gene sequences in breast cancers, (ii a correlation between high risk HPV in benign breast specimens and subsequent HPV positive breast cancer in the same patient, (iii HPVs in breast cancer are likely to be biologically active (as shown by transcription of HPV DNA to RNA plus the expression of

  9. Molecular mechanisms of cisplatin resistance in cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu H

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Haiyan Zhu, Hui Luo, Wenwen Zhang, Zhaojun Shen, Xiaoli Hu, Xueqiong Zhu Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Patients with advanced or recurrent cervical cancer have poor prognosis, and their 1-year survival is only 10%–20%. Chemotherapy is considered as the standard treatment for patients with advanced or recurrent cervical cancer, and cisplatin appears to treat the disease effectively. However, resistance to cisplatin may develop, thus substantially compromising the efficacy of cisplatin to treat advanced or recurrent cervical cancer. In this article, we systematically review the recent literature and summarize the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cisplatin resistance in cervical cancer. Keywords: cisplatin, epithelial–mesenchymal transition, microRNA, molecular mechanism, resistance

  10. Molecular targeted agents for gastric and gastroesophageal junction cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Takashi; Masuda, Munetaka

    2012-04-01

    Despite recent improvements in surgical techniques and chemotherapy, advanced cancers of the stomach and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) continue to have poor clinical outcomes. However, molecules intimately related to cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and metastasis have been studied as candidates for molecular targeted agents. Target molecules, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, and P13k/Akt/mTor pathway, as well as the insulin-like growth factor receptor, c-Met pathways, fibroblast growth factor receptor, and other pathways are considered to be promising candidates for molecular targeted therapy for gastric and GEJ cancer. In this review we focus on the recent developments in targeting relevant pathways in these types of cancer.

  11. Prevalence of Telomerase Activity in Human Cancer

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    Chi-Hau Chen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase activity has been measured in a wide variety of cancerous and non-cancerous tissue types, and the vast majority of clinical studies have shown a direct correlation between it and the presence of cancerous cells. Telomerase plays a key role in cellular immortality and tumorigenesis. Telomerase is activated in 80–90% of human carcinomas, but not in normal somatic cells, therefore, its detection holds promise as a diagnostic marker for cancer. Measurable levels of telomerase have been detected in malignant cells from various samples: tissue from gestational trophoblastic neoplasms; squamous carcinoma cells from oral rinses; lung carcinoma cells from bronchial washings; colorectal carcinoma cells from colonic luminal washings; bladder carcinoma cells from urine or bladder washings; and breast carcinoma or thyroid cancer cells from fine needle aspirations. Such clinical tests for telomerase can be useful as non-invasive and cost-effective methods for early detection and monitoring of cancer. In addition, telomerase activity has been shown to correlate with poor clinical outcome in late-stage diseases such as non-small cell lung cancer, colorectal cancer, and soft tissue sarcomas. In such cases, testing for telomerase activity can be used to identify patients with a poor prognosis and to select those who might benefit from adjuvant treatment. Our review of the latest medical advances in this field reveals that telomerase holds great promise as a biomarker for early cancer detection and monitoring, and has considerable potential as the basis for developing new anticancer therapies.

  12. Cancer Metabolomics and the Human Metabolome Database

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    David S. Wishart

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The application of metabolomics towards cancer research has led to a renewed appreciation of metabolism in cancer development and progression. It has also led to the discovery of metabolite cancer biomarkers and the identification of a number of novel cancer causing metabolites. The rapid growth of metabolomics in cancer research is also leading to challenges. In particular, with so many cancer-associate metabolites being identified, it is often difficult to keep track of which compounds are associated with which cancers. It is also challenging to track down information on the specific pathways that particular metabolites, drugs or drug metabolites may be affecting. Even more frustrating are the difficulties associated with identifying metabolites from NMR or MS spectra. Fortunately, a number of metabolomics databases are emerging that are designed to address these challenges. One such database is the Human Metabolome Database (HMDB. The HMDB is currently the world’s largest and most comprehensive, organism-specific metabolomics database. It contains more than 40,000 metabolite entries, thousands of metabolite concentrations, >700 metabolic and disease-associated pathways, as well as information on dozens of cancer biomarkers. This review is intended to provide a brief summary of the HMDB and to offer some guidance on how it can be used in metabolomic studies of cancer.

  13. Molecular mechanisms of TRAIL-induced apoptosis of cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Tumor Necrosis Factor-related Apoptosis-inducing Ligand (TRAIL) is a recently identified member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family[1]. Numerous studies indicate that TRAIL can induce apoptosis of cancer cells but not of normal cells, pointing to the possibility of de-veloping TRAIL into a cancer drug[2-4]. This review will summary the molecular mechanisms of TRAIL-induced apoptosis and discuss the questions to be resolved in this field.

  14. Quantum dot-based molecular imaging of cancer cell growth using a clone formation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xia-Fei; Fang, Min; Liu, Shao-Ping; Li, Yan

    2016-10-01

    This aim of the present study was to investigate clonal growth behavior and analyze the proliferation characteristics of cancer cells. The MCF‑7 human breast cancer cell line, SW480 human colon cancer cell line and SGC7901 human gastric cancer cell line were selected to investigate the morphology of cell clones. Quantum dot‑based molecular targeted imaging techniques (which stained pan‑cytokeratin in the cytoplasm green and Ki67 in the cell nucleus yellow or red) were used to investigate the clone formation rate, cell morphology, discrete tendency, and Ki67 expression and distribution in clones. From the cell clone formation assay, the MCF‑7, SW480 and SGC7901 cells were observed to form clones on days 6, 8 and 12 of cell culture, respectively. These three types of cells had heterogeneous morphology, large nuclear:cytoplasmic ratios, and conspicuous pathological mitotic features. The cells at the clone periphery formed multiple pseudopodium. In certain clones, cancer cells at the borderline were separated from the central cell clusters or presented a discrete tendency. With quantum dot‑based molecular targeted imaging techniques, cells with strong Ki67 expression were predominantly shown to be distributed at the clone periphery, or concentrated on one side of the clones. In conclusion, cancer cell clones showed asymmetric growth behavior, and Ki67 was widely expressed in clones of these three cell lines, with strong expression around the clones, or aggregated at one side. Cell clone formation assay based on quantum dots molecular imaging offered a novel method to study the proliferative features of cancer cells, thus providing a further insight into tumor biology.

  15. Human Papillomavirus in Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rosa Garbuglia

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV is currently considered to be a major etiologic factor, in addition to tobacco and alcohol, for oropharyngeal cancer (OPC development. HPV positive OPCs are epidemiologically distinct from HPV negative ones, and are characterized by younger age at onset, male predominance, and strong association with sexual behaviors. HPV16 is the most prevalent types in oral cavity cancer (OCC, moreover the prevalence of beta, and gamma HPV types is higher than that of alpha HPV in oral cavity.

  16. DNA aptamers as molecular probes for colorectal cancer study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwame Sefah

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding the molecular features of specific tumors can increase our knowledge about the mechanism(s underlying disease development and progression. This is particularly significant for colorectal cancer, which is a heterogeneous complex of diseases developed in a sequential manner through a multistep carcinogenic process. As such, it is likely that tumors with similar characteristics might originate in the same manner and have a similar molecular behavior. Therefore, specific mapping of the molecular features can be potentially useful for both tumor classification and the development of appropriate therapeutic regimens. However, this can only be accomplished by developing high-affinity molecular probes with the ability to recognize specific markers associated with different tumors. Aptamers can most easily meet this challenge based on their target diversity, flexible manipulation and ease of development. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: Using a method known as cell-based Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment (cell-SELEX and colorectal cancer cultured cell lines DLD-1 and HCT 116, we selected a panel of target-specific aptamers. Binding studies by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy showed that these aptamers have high affinity and selectivity. Our data further show that these aptamers neither recognize normal colon cells (cultured and fresh, nor do they recognize most other cancer cell lines tested. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The selected aptamers can identify specific biomarkers associated with colorectal cancers. We believe that these probes could be further developed for early disease detection, as well as prognostic markers, of colorectal cancers.

  17. Oral contraceptives, human papillomavirus and cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Vecchia, Carlo; Boccia, Stefania

    2014-03-01

    Oncogenic human papillomavirus is the key determinant of cervical cancer, but other risk factors interact with it to define individual risk. Among these, there is oral contraceptive (OC) use. A quantitative review of the link between OCs and cervical cancer was performed. Long-term (>5 year) current or recent OC use has been related to an about two-fold excess risk of cervical cancer. Such an excess risk, however, levels off after stopping use, and approaches unity 10 or more years after stopping. The public health implications of OC use for cervical cancer are limited. In any case, such implications are greater in middle-income and low-income countries, as well as in central and eastern Europe and Latin America, where cervical cancer screening and control remain inadequate.

  18. Radiobiology of human cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    The author has systematically collected and collated the scientific literature correlating the basic and clinical sciences in this field in order to produce a definitive treatise. The book thoroughly reviews the biology and biochemistry relevant to radiobiology and describes the critical locus for the extinction of cell reproductive capacity. Extensive coverage is given to oxygen effect, hyperthermia, high linear energy transfer, cell populations, and similar topics. Separate sections cover time, dose, and fractionation; radiation hematology; cancer chemotherapy; and cancer immunology. The book also contains invaluable discussions of techniques for optimizing radiotherapy alone and in combination with other therapies.

  19. Colorectal Cancer & Molecular Mutations and Polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aga Syed Sameer

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity, and is the third most common cancer in men and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. The incidence of CRC shows considerable variation among racially or ethnically defined populations in multiracial/ethnic countries. The tumorigenesis of CRC is either because of the chromosomal instability (CIN or microsatellite instability (MIN or involving various proto-oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and also epigenetic changes in the DNA. In this review I have focused on the mutations and polymorphisms of various important genes of the CIN and MIN pathways which have been implicated in the development of CRC.

  20. Correlation of morphological and molecular parameters for colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shuai; Roney, Celeste A.; Li, Qian; Jiang, James; Cable, Alex; Summers, Ronald M.; Chen, Yu

    2010-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. There is great interest in studying the relationship among microstructures and molecular processes of colorectal cancer during its progression at early stages. In this study, we use our multi-modality optical system that could obtain co-registered optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fluorescence molecular imaging (FMI) images simultaneously to study CRC. The overexpressed carbohydrate α-L-fucose on the surfaces of polyps facilitates the bond of adenomatous polyps with UEA-1 and is used as biomarker. Tissue scattering coefficient derived from OCT axial scan is used as quantitative value of structural information. Both structural images from OCT and molecular images show spatial heterogeneity of tumors. Correlations between those values are analyzed and demonstrate that scattering coefficients are positively correlated with FMI signals in conjugated. In UEA-1 conjugated samples (8 polyps and 8 control regions), the correlation coefficient is ranged from 0.45 to 0.99. These findings indicate that the microstructure of polyps is changed gradually during cancer progression and the change is well correlated with certain molecular process. Our study demonstrated that multi-parametric imaging is able to simultaneously detect morphology and molecular information and it can enable spatially and temporally correlated studies of structure-function relationships during tumor progression.

  1. Gallbladder cancer epidemiology, pathogenesis and molecular genetics: Recent update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Aarti; Sharma, Kiran Lata; Gupta, Annapurna; Yadav, Alka; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-06-14

    Gallbladder cancer is a malignancy of biliary tract which is infrequent in developed countries but common in some specific geographical regions of developing countries. Late diagnosis and deprived prognosis are major problems for treatment of gallbladder carcinoma. The dramatic associations of this orphan cancer with various genetic and environmental factors are responsible for its poorly defined pathogenesis. An understanding to the relationship between epidemiology, molecular genetics and pathogenesis of gallbladder cancer can add new insights to its undetermined pathophysiology. Present review article provides a recent update regarding epidemiology, pathogenesis, and molecular genetics of gallbladder cancer. We systematically reviewed published literature on gallbladder cancer from online search engine PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed). Various keywords used for retrieval of articles were Gallbladder, cancer Epidemiology, molecular genetics and bullion operators like AND, OR, NOT. Cross references were manually searched from various online search engines (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed,https://scholar.google.co.in/, http://www.medline.com/home.jsp). Most of the articles published from 1982 to 2015 in peer reviewed journals have been included in this review.

  2. Cellular heterogeneity and molecular evolution in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almendro, Vanessa; Marusyk, Andriy; Polyak, Kornelia

    2013-01-24

    Intratumor heterogeneity represents a major obstacle to effective cancer treatment and personalized medicine. However, investigators are now elucidating intratumor heterogeneity at the single-cell level due to improvements in technologies. Better understanding of the composition of tumors, and monitoring changes in cell populations during disease progression and treatment, will improve cancer diagnosis and therapeutic design. Measurements of intratumor heterogeneity may also be used as biomarkers to predict the risk of progression and therapeutic resistance. We summarize important considerations related to intratumor heterogeneity during tumor evolution. We also discuss experimental approaches that are commonly used to infer intratumor heterogeneity and describe how these methodologies can be translated into clinical practice.

  3. Salinomycin as a Drug for Targeting Human Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cord Naujokat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs represent a subpopulation of tumor cells that possess self-renewal and tumor initiation capacity and the ability to give rise to the heterogenous lineages of malignant cells that comprise a tumor. CSCs possess multiple intrinsic mechanisms of resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, novel tumor-targeted drugs, and radiation therapy, allowing them to survive standard cancer therapies and to initiate tumor recurrence and metastasis. Various molecular complexes and pathways that confer resistance and survival of CSCs, including expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC drug transporters, activation of the Wnt/β-catenin, Hedgehog, Notch and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways, and acquisition of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, have been identified recently. Salinomycin, a polyether ionophore antibiotic isolated from Streptomyces albus, has been shown to kill CSCs in different types of human cancers, most likely by interfering with ABC drug transporters, the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and other CSC pathways. Promising results from preclinical trials in human xenograft mice and a few clinical pilote studies reveal that salinomycin is able to effectively eliminate CSCs and to induce partial clinical regression of heavily pretreated and therapy-resistant cancers. The ability of salinomycin to kill both CSCs and therapy-resistant cancer cells may define the compound as a novel and an effective anticancer drug.

  4. Advanced imaging of colorectal cancer: From anatomy to molecular imaging

    OpenAIRE

    García-Figueiras, Roberto; Baleato-González, Sandra; Padhani, Anwar R.; Marhuenda, Ana; Luna, Antonio; Alcalá, Lidia; Carballo-Castro, Ana; Álvarez-Castro, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Imaging techniques play a key role in the management of patients with colorectal cancer. The introduction of new advanced anatomical, functional, and molecular imaging techniques may improve the assessment of diagnosis, prognosis, planning therapy, and assessment of response to treatment of these patients. Functional and molecular imaging techniques in clinical practice may allow the assessment of tumour-specific characteristics and tumour heterogeneity. This paper will review recent...

  5. Colorectal Cancer Molecular Biology Moves Into Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Colin C.; Grady, William M.

    2010-01-01

    The promise of personalized medicine is now a clinical reality, with colorectal cancer genetics at the forefront of this next major advance in clinical medicine. This is no more evident than in the recent advances in testing of colorectal cancers for specific molecular alterations in order to guide treatment with the monoclonal antibody therapies cetuximab and panitumumab, which target the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In this review, we examine genetic mechanisms of colorectal cancer and how these alterations relate to emerging biomarkers for early detection and risk stratification (diagnostic markers), prognosis (prognostic markers), and the prediction of treatment responses (predictive markers). PMID:20921207

  6. Molecular Imaging and Precision Medicine in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudgar, Amy V; Mankoff, David A

    2017-01-01

    Precision medicine, basing treatment approaches on patient traits and specific molecular features of disease processes, has an important role in the management of patients with breast cancer as targeted therapies continue to improve. PET imaging offers noninvasive information that is complementary to traditional tissue biomarkers, including information about tumor burden, tumor metabolism, receptor status, and proliferation. Several PET agents that image breast cancer receptors can visually demonstrate the extent and heterogeneity of receptor-positive disease and help predict which tumors are likely to respond to targeted treatments. This review presents applications of PET imaging in the targeted treatment of breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular-Genetic Aspects of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasteva M.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy among women. Advances in breast cancer knowledge have deciphered the involvement of a number of tumor suppressor genes and proto-oncogenes in disease pathogenesis. These genes are part of the complex biochemical pathways, which enable cell cycle control and maintenance of genome integrity. Their function may be disrupted as a result of alterations in gene sequence or misregulation of gene expression including alterations in DNA methylation pattern. The present review summarizes the main findings on major breast cancer related genes BRCA1/2, p53, ATM, CHEK2, HER2, PIK3CA and their tumorigenic inactivation/activation. The potential clinical importance of these genes with respect to patients’ prognosis and therapy are also discussed. The possible implication of other putative breast cancer related genes is also outlined. The first elaborate data on the genetic and epigenetic status of the above mentioned genes concerning Bulgarian patients with the sporadic form of the disease are presented. The studies indicate for a characteristic mutational spectrum in some of the genes for the Bulgarian patients and specific correlation between the status of different genes and clinicopathological characteristics.

  8. Molecular testing in colorectal cancer: diagnosis of Lynch syndrome and personalized cancer medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chanjuan; Washington, Kay

    2012-06-01

    Currently, molecular testing in colorectal cancer (CRC) is aimed at detecting Lynch syndrome and predicting response to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapies. However, CRC is a complex disease, with at least 3 molecular pathways of carcinogenesis. The importance of the EGFR signaling pathway in colorectal carcinogenesis is underscored by the availability of anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of some metastatic CRCs. Potentially, mutations in any of the genes in the EGFR signaling pathway may be associated with prognosis and may predict response to anti-EGFR or other targeted therapies. Although not currently the standard of care, molecular testing of CRCs is expanding to include mutational analysis of the genes in the EGFR pathway, in addition to more widely performed tests for identifying cancers with high microsatellite instability. Multiplex molecular prognostic panels for therapeutic decision making in stage II CRCs also represent expanding use of molecular testing for this common cancer.

  9. Clinical variability and molecular heterogeneity in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Shoag

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is a clinically heterogeneous disease, with some men having indolent disease that can safely be observed, while others have aggressive, lethal disease. Over the past decade, researchers have begun to unravel some of the genomic heterogeneity that contributes to these varying clinical phenotypes. Distinct molecular sub-classes of prostate cancer have been identified, and the uniqueness of these sub-classes has been leveraged to predict clinical outcomes, design novel biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis, and develop novel therapeutics. Recent work has also elucidated the temporal and spatial heterogeneity of prostate cancer, helping us understand disease pathogenesis, response to therapy, and progression. New genomic techniques have provided us with a window into the remarkable clinical and genomic heterogeneity of prostate cancer, and this new perspective will increasingly impact patient care.

  10. Molecular markers as therapeutic targets in lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hsin-Hui Tseng; Biao He

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is responsible for 29% of cancer deaths in the United States and has very low 5-year survival rates of approximately 11% in men and 15% in women.Although the early diagnosis of lung cancer may increase the survival rate with adequate treatment,advanced lung cancers are often metastasized and receive limited benefit from therapeutic regimens.As conventional treatments for lung cancer reach their limitations,researchers have attempted to discover novel drug therapies aimed at specific targets contributing to the progression of tumorigenesis.Recent advances in systems biology have enabled the molecular biology of lung carcinogenesis to be elucidated.Our understanding of the physiologic processes of tumor development provide a means to design more effective and specific drugs with less toxicity,thereby accelerating the delivery of new drug therapies to the patient's bedside.

  11. Emerging of fractal geometry on surface of human cervical epithelial cells during progression towards cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokukin, M. E.; Guz, N. V.; Woodworth, C.D.; Sokolov, I.

    2015-01-01

    Despite considerable advances in understanding the molecular nature of cancer, many biophysical aspects of malignant development are still unclear. Here we study physical alterations of the surface of human cervical epithelial cells during stepwise in vitro development of cancer (from normal to immortal (premalignant), to malignant). We use atomic force microscopy to demonstrate that development of cancer is associated with emergence of simple fractal geometry on the cell surface. Contrary to the previously expected correlation between cancer and fractals, we find that fractal geometry occurs only at a limited period of development when immortal cells become cancerous; further cancer progression demonstrates deviation from fractal. Because of the connection between fractal behaviour and chaos (or far from equilibrium behaviour), these results suggest that chaotic behaviour coincides with the cancer transformation of the immortalization stage of cancer development, whereas further cancer progression recovers determinism of processes responsible for cell surface formation. PMID:25844044

  12. Molecular Markers for Breast Cancer: Prediction on Tumor Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Karina Banin Hirata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers with greater than 1,300,000 cases and 450,000 deaths each year worldwide. The development of breast cancer involves a progression through intermediate stages until the invasive carcinoma and finally into metastatic disease. Given the variability in clinical progression, the identification of markers that could predict the tumor behavior is particularly important in breast cancer. The determination of tumor markers is a useful tool for clinical management in cancer patients, assisting in diagnostic, staging, evaluation of therapeutic response, detection of recurrence and metastasis, and development of new treatment modalities. In this context, this review aims to discuss the main tumor markers in breast carcinogenesis. The most well-established breast molecular markers with prognostic and/or therapeutic value like hormone receptors, HER-2 oncogene, Ki-67, and p53 proteins, and the genes for hereditary breast cancer will be presented. Furthermore, this review shows the new molecular targets in breast cancer: CXCR4, caveolin, miRNA, and FOXP3, as promising candidates for future development of effective and targeted therapies, also with lower toxicity.

  13. [Advances of molecular targeted therapy in squamous cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Zhang, Shucai

    2013-12-01

    Squamous cell lung cancer (SQCLC) is one of the most prevalent subtypes of lung cancer worldwide, about 400,000 persons die from squamous-cell lung cancer around the world, and its pathogenesis is closely linked with tobacco exposure. Unfortunately, squamous-cell lung cancer patients do not benefit from major advances in the development of targeted therapeutics such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitors that show exquisite activity in lung adenocarcinomas with EGFR mutations or echinoderm microtubule associated protein like-4 (EML4)-ALK fusions, respectively. Major efforts have been launched to characterize the genomes of squamous-cell lung cancers. Among the new results emanating from these efforts are amplifications of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene, the discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) gene mutation as potential novel targets for the treatment of SQCLCs. Researchers find that there are many specific molecular targeted genes in the genome of squamous-cell lung cancer patients. These changes play a vital role in cell cycle regulation, oxidative stress, cell apoptosis, squamous epithelium differentiation, may be the candidate targeted moleculars in SQCLCs. Here, we provide a review on these discoveries and their implications for clinical trials in squamous-cell lung cancer assessing the value of novel therapeutics addressing these targets.

  14. [New molecular classification of colorectal cancer, pancreatic cancer and stomach cancer: Towards "à la carte" treatment?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Chantal; Afchain, Pauline; Trouilloud, Isabelle; André, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    This review reports 3 of recently published molecular classifications of the 3 main gastro-intestinal cancers: gastric, pancreatic and colorectal adenocarcinoma. In colorectal adenocarcinoma, 6 independent classifications were combined to finally hold 4 molecular sub-groups, Consensus Molecular Subtypes (CMS 1-4), linked to various clinical, molecular and survival data. CMS1 (14% MSI with immune activation); CMS2 (37%: canonical with epithelial differentiation and activation of the WNT/MYC pathway); CMS3 (13% metabolic with epithelial differentiation and RAS mutation); CMS4 (23%: mesenchymal with activation of TGFβ pathway and angiogenesis with stromal invasion). In gastric adenocarcinoma, 4 groups were established: subtype "EBV" (9%, high frequency of PIK3CA mutations, hypermetylation and amplification of JAK2, PD-L1 and PD-L2), subtype "MSI" (22%, high rate of mutation), subtype "genomically stable tumor" (20%, diffuse histology type and mutations of RAS and genes encoding integrins and adhesion proteins including CDH1) and subtype "tumors with chromosomal instability" (50%, intestinal type, aneuploidy and receptor tyrosine kinase amplification). In pancreatic adenocarcinomas, a classification in four sub-groups has been proposed, stable subtype (20%, aneuploidy), locally rearranged subtype (30%, focal event on one or two chromosoms), scattered subtype (36%,200 structural variation events, defects in DNA maintenance). Although currently away from the care of patients, these classifications open the way to "à la carte" treatment depending on molecular biology.

  15. IMPACT: Imaging and Molecular Markers for Patients with Lung Cancer: Approaches with Molecular Targets, Complementary/Innovative Treatments, and Therapeutic Modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Research Findings Feb 2009 Report : Phage display screening on human cancer cells from the NCI-60 panel of cell lines suggested that the tripeptide...biocompatible networks of phage -gold as nanotechnology-based molecular sensors and reporters . Project 4: Inhibition of bFGF Signaling for Lung Cancer Therapy ... reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions

  16. Marker evaluation of human breast and bladder cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayall, B.H.; Carroll, P.R.; Chen, Ling-Chun; Cohen, M.B.; Goodson, W.H. III; Smith, H.S.; Waldman, F.M. (California Univ., San Francisco, CA (USA))

    1990-11-02

    We are investigating multiple markers in human breast and bladder cancers. Our aim is to identify markers that are clinically relevant and that contribute to our understanding of the disease process in individual patients. Good markers accurately assess the malignant potential of a cancer in an individual patient. Thus, they help identify those cancers that will recur, and they may be used to predict more accurately time to recurrence, response to treatment, and overall prognosis. Therapy and patient management may then be optimized to the individual patient. Relevant markers reflect the underlying pathobiology of individual tumors. As a tissue undergoes transformation from benign to malignant, the cells lose their differentiated phenotype. As a generalization, the more the cellular phenotype, cellular proliferation and cellular genotype depart from normal, the more advanced is the tumor in its biological evolution and the more likely it is that the patient has a poor prognosis. We use three studies to illustrate our investigation of potential tumor markers. Breast cancers are labeled in vivo with 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) to give a direct measure of the tumor labeling index. Bladder cancers are analyzed immunocytochemically using an antibody against proliferation. Finally, the techniques of molecular genetics are used to detect allelic loss in breast cancers. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  17. ANALYSES ON DIFFERENTIALLY EXPRESSED GENES ASSOCIATED WITH HUMAN BREAST CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Xu-li; DING Xiao-wen; XU Xiao-hong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the molecular etiology of breast cancer by way of studying the differential expression and initial function of the related genes in the occurrence and development of breast cancer. Methods: Two hundred and eighty-eight human tumor related genes were chosen for preparation of the oligochips probe. mRNA was extracted from 16 breast cancer tissues and the corresponding normal breast tissues, and cDNA probe was prepared through reverse-transcription and hybridized with the gene chip. A laser focused fluorescent scanner was used to scan the chip. The different gene expressions were thereafter automatically compared and analyzed between the two sample groups. Cy3/Cy5>3.5 meant significant up-regulation. Cy3/Cy5<0.25 meant significant down-regulation. Results: The comparison between the breast cancer tissues and their corresponding normal tissues showed that 84 genes had differential expression in the Chip. Among the differently expressed genes, there were 4 genes with significant down-regulation and 6 with significant up-regulation. Compared with normal breast tissues, differentially expressed genes did partially exist in the breast cancer tissues. Conclusion: Changes in multi-gene expression regulations take place during the occurrence and development of breast cancer; and the research on related genes can help understanding the mechanism of tumor occurrence.

  18. Methodological aspects of the molecular and histological study of prostate cancer: focus on PTEN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugalde-Olano, Aitziber; Egia, Ainara; Fernández-Ruiz, Sonia; Loizaga-Iriarte, Ana; Zuñiga-García, Patricia; Garcia, Stephane; Royo, Félix; Lacasa-Viscasillas, Isabel; Castro, Erika; Cortazar, Ana R; Zabala-Letona, Amaia; Martín-Martín, Natalia; Arruabarrena-Aristorena, Amaia; Torrano-Moya, Verónica; Valcárcel-Jiménez, Lorea; Sánchez-Mosquera, Pilar; Caro-Maldonado, Alfredo; González-Tampan, Jorge; Cachi-Fuentes, Guido; Bilbao, Elena; Montero, Rocío; Fernández, Sara; Arrieta, Edurne; Zorroza, Kerman; Castillo-Martín, Mireia; Serra, Violeta; Salazar, Eider; Macías-Cámara, Nuria; Tabernero, Jose; Baselga, Jose; Cordón-Cardo, Carlos; Aransay, Ana M; Villar, Amaia Del; Iovanna, Juan L; Falcón-Pérez, Juan M; Unda, Miguel; Bilbao, Roberto; Carracedo, Arkaitz

    2015-05-01

    Prostate cancer is among the most frequent cancers in men, and despite its high rate of cure, the high number of cases results in an elevated mortality worldwide. Importantly, prostate cancer incidence is dramatically increasing in western societies in the past decades, suggesting that this type of tumor is exquisitely sensitive to lifestyle changes. Prostate cancer frequently exhibits alterations in the PTEN gene (inactivating mutations or gene deletions) or at the protein level (reduced protein expression or altered sub-cellular compartmentalization). The relevance of PTEN in this type of cancer is further supported by the fact that the sole deletion of PTEN in the murine prostate epithelium recapitulates many of the features of the human disease. In order to study the molecular alterations in prostate cancer, we need to overcome the methodological challenges that this tissue imposes. In this review we present protocols and methods, using PTEN as proof of concept, to study different molecular characteristics of prostate cancer. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Immunohistochemical Studies of the Expression of Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 and Metalloproteinase-9 in Human Prostate Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾汉青; 肖亚军; 鲁功成; 陈勇

    2003-01-01

    To study the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 in human prostate cancer,matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 were immunohistochemically detected in tissues of prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Our results showed that matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 levels in prostate cancer were much higher than those in tissues of BPH, with the cancer invasion being positively correlated with the expression of the metalloproteinases. It is concluded that matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 are better molecular markers, which are of help in the diagnosis and prediction of prognosis of prostate cancer.

  20. Molecular Pathways: Reactive Oxygen Species Homeostasis in Cancer Cells and Implications for Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Nogueira, Veronique; Hay, Nissim

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important in regulating normal cellular processes, but deregulated ROS contribute to the development of various human diseases including cancers. Cancer cells have increased ROS levels compared to normal cells, because of their accelerated metabolism. The high ROS levels in cancer cells, which distinguish them from normal cells, could be pro-tumorigenic, but are also their Achilles’ heel. The high ROS content in cancer cells renders them more susceptible to o...

  1. Molecular imaging of cancer using PET and SPECT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    for molecular imaging of cancer. Especially the possibility of a quick transfer of methods developed in animals to patients (translational research) is an important strength. This article will briefly discuss the newest applications and their importance and perspective in relation to the shift in paradigm......Molecular imaging allows for the study of molecular and cellular events in the living intact organism. The nuclear medicine methodologies of positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) posses several advantages, which make them particularly suited...

  2. Multi-modality molecular imaging for gastric cancer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jimin; Chen, Xueli; Liu, Junting; Hu, Hao; Qu, Xiaochao; Wang, Fu; Nie, Yongzhan

    2011-12-01

    Because of the ability of integrating the strengths of different modalities and providing fully integrated information, multi-modality molecular imaging techniques provide an excellent solution to detecting and diagnosing earlier cancer, which remains difficult to achieve by using the existing techniques. In this paper, we present an overview of our research efforts on the development of the optical imaging-centric multi-modality molecular imaging platform, including the development of the imaging system, reconstruction algorithms and preclinical biomedical applications. Primary biomedical results show that the developed optical imaging-centric multi-modality molecular imaging platform may provide great potential in the preclinical biomedical applications and future clinical translation.

  3. Molecular Biology and Prevention of Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    of the oral contraceptive pill (OCP). Project 1: Objectives completed and data previously submitted with 2004 report. Data published this past year...molecular aberrations associated with endometrial carcinogenesis and the biologic mechanisms underlying the protective effect of oral contraceptive (OC...not been altered appreciably. Despite the known protective effect of oral contraceptives , little has been learned regarding the underlying mechanism

  4. Pathological Bases for a Robust Application of Cancer Molecular Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador J. Diaz-Cano

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Any robust classification system depends on its purpose and must refer to accepted standards, its strength relying on predictive values and a careful consideration of known factors that can affect its reliability. In this context, a molecular classification of human cancer must refer to the current gold standard (histological classification and try to improve it with key prognosticators for metastatic potential, staging and grading. Although organ-specific examples have been published based on proteomics, transcriptomics and genomics evaluations, the most popular approach uses gene expression analysis as a direct correlate of cellular differentiation, which represents the key feature of the histological classification. RNA is a labile molecule that varies significantly according with the preservation protocol, its transcription reflect the adaptation of the tumor cells to the microenvironment, it can be passed through mechanisms of intercellular transference of genetic information (exosomes, and it is exposed to epigenetic modifications. More robust classifications should be based on stable molecules, at the genetic level represented by DNA to improve reliability, and its analysis must deal with the concept of intratumoral heterogeneity, which is at the origin of tumor progression and is the byproduct of the selection process during the clonal expansion and progression of neoplasms. The simultaneous analysis of multiple DNA targets and next generation sequencing offer the best practical approach for an analytical genomic classification of tumors.

  5. Molecular Characterization of Indolent Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Luo, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Johns Hopkins University Baltimore, MD 21218-2680 REPORT DATE: October 2015 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual...DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE October 2015 2. REPORT TYPE Annual Report 3. DATES COVERED 15 Sep 2014- 14 Sep 2015...detected at biopsy , leading to the contemporary problem of prostate cancer over-diagnosis and over-treatment. The objective of the project is to

  6. Immunophenotyping invasive breast cancer: paving the road for molecular imaging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, J.F.; Brussel, A.S. van; Groep, P. van der; Morsink, F.H.; Bult, P.; Wall, E. van der; Diest, P.J. van

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Mammographic population screening in The Netherlands has increased the number of breast cancer patients with small and non-palpable breast tumors. Nevertheless, mammography is not ultimately sensitive and specific for distinct subtypes. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers m

  7. Molecular prostate cancer pathology: current issues and achievements.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalken, J.A.; Bergh, A. von; Bono, A.V.; Foster, C.; Gospadarowicz, M.; Isaacs, W.B.; Rubin, M.; Schroder, F.H.; Tribukait, B.; Tsukamotot, T.; Wiklund, P.

    2005-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of molecular techniques have provided new tools that have led to the discovery of many new promising biomarkers for prostate cancer. These biomarkers may be instrumental in the development of new tests that will have a high specificity for the diagnosis and prognosis

  8. Guidance for laboratories performing molecular pathology for cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cree, Ian A.; Deans, Zandra; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Normanno, Nicola; Edsjo, Anders; Rouleau, Etienne; Sole, Francesc; Thunnissen, Erik; Timens, Wim; Schuuring, Ed; Dequeker, Elisabeth; Murray, Samuel; Dietel, Manfred; Groenen, Patricia; Van Krieken, J. Han

    2014-01-01

    Molecular testing is becoming an important part of the diagnosis of any patient with cancer. The challenge to laboratories is to meet this need, using reliable methods and processes to ensure that patients receive a timely and accurate report on which their treatment will be based. The aim of this

  9. Miniature and Molecularly Specific Optical Screening Technologies for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    and molecular contrast in breast cancer V. Millon SR, Provenzano PP, Elicieri, KW, Brown, JQ, Keely, PJ, Ramanujam, N. "Imaging of ALA-induced PpIX...calculating tissue optical properties. Part I: Theory and validation on synthetic phantoms. Appl Opt, 2006. 45(5): p. 1062-71. 4. Baumann, M., C

  10. Immunophenotyping invasive breast cancer: paving the road for molecular imaging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, J.F.; Brussel, A.S. van; Groep, P. van der; Morsink, F.H.; Bult, P.; Wall, E. van der; Diest, P.J. van

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Mammographic population screening in The Netherlands has increased the number of breast cancer patients with small and non-palpable breast tumors. Nevertheless, mammography is not ultimately sensitive and specific for distinct subtypes. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers m

  11. Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer: Present and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eAlcantara

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Medical imaging technologies have undergone explosive growth over the past few decades and now play a central role in clinical oncology. But the truly transformative power of imaging in the clinical management of cancer patients lies ahead. Today, imaging is at a crossroads, with molecularly targeted imaging agents expected to broadly expand the capabilities of conventional anatomical imaging methods. Molecular imaging will allow clinicians to not only see where a tumour is located in the body, but also to visualize the expression and activity of specific molecules (e.g. proteases and protein kinases and biological processes (e.g. apoptosis, angiogenesis, and metastasis that influence tumour behavior and/or response to therapy. Breast cancer, the most common cancer among women and a research area where our group is actively involved, is a very heterogeneous disease with diverse patterns of development and response to treatment. Hence, molecular imaging is expected to have a major impact on this type of cancer, leading to important improvements in diagnosis, individualized treatment, and drug development, as well as our understanding of how breast cancer arises.

  12. TCGA divides gastric cancer into four molecular subtypes:implications for individualized therapeutics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths in the world. The treatment of gastric cancer is chalenging because of its highly heterogeneous etiology and clinical characteristics. Recent genomic and molecular characterization of gastric cancer, especialy the findings reported by the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), have shed light on the heterogeneity and potential targeted therapeutics for four different subtypes of gastric cancer.

  13. Molecular imaging of cell-mediated cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucignani, Giovanni; Ottobrini, Luisa; Martelli, Cristina; Rescigno, Maria; Clerici, Mario

    2006-09-01

    New strategies based on the activation of a patient's immune response are being sought to complement present conventional exogenous cancer therapies. Elucidating the trafficking pathways of immune cells in vivo, together with their migratory properties in relation to their differentiation and activation status, is useful for understanding how the immune system interacts with cancer. Methods based on tissue sampling to monitor immune responses are inadequate for repeatedly characterizing the responses of the immune system in different organs. A solution to this problem might come from molecular and cellular imaging - a branch of biomedical sciences that combines biotechnology and imaging methods to characterize, in vivo, the molecular and cellular processes involved in normal and pathologic states. The general concepts of noninvasive imaging of targeted cells as well as the technology and probes applied to cell-mediated cancer immunotherapy imaging are outlined in this review.

  14. Molecular mechanisms linking adipokines to obesity-related colon cancer: focus on leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Janice E

    2012-02-01

    Obesity is linked to increased risk of colon cancer, currently the third most common cancer. Consequently rising levels of obesity worldwide are likely to significantly impact on obesity-related colon cancers in the decades to come. Understanding the molecular mechanisms whereby obesity increases colon cancer risk is thus a focus for research to inform strategies to prevent the increasing trend in obesity-related cancers. This review will consider research on deregulation of adipokine signalling, a consequence of altered adipokine hormone secretion from excess adipose tissue, with a focus on leptin, which has been studied extensively as a potential mediator of obesity-related colon cancer. Numerous investigations using colon cell lines in vitro, in vivo studies in rodents and investigations of colon cancer patients illuminate the complexity of the interactions of leptin with colon tissues via leptin receptors expressed by the colon epithelium. Although evidence indicates a role for leptin in proliferation of colon epithelial cells in vitro, this has been contradicted by studies in rodent models. However, recent studies have indicated that leptin may influence inflammatory mediators linked with colon cancer and also promote cell growth dependent on genotype and is implicated in growth promotion of colon cancer cells. Studies in human cancer patients indicate that there may be different tumour sub-types with varying levels of leptin receptor expression, indicating the potential for leptin to induce variable responses in the different tumour types. These studies have provided insights into the complex interplay of adipokines with responsive tissues prone to obesity-related colon cancer. Deregulation of adipokine signalling via adipokine receptors located in the colon appears to be a significant factor in obesity-related colon cancer. Molecular profiling of colon tumours will be a useful tool in future strategies to characterise the influence that adipokines may have

  15. Identification of EpCAM as a Molecular Target of Prostate Cancer Stroma

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, Sumana; Richardson, Annely M.; Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Ylaya, Kris; Erickson, Heidi S; Player, Audrey; Kawasaki, Ernest S; Peter A. Pinto; Choyke, Peter L.; Merino, Maria J.; Albert, Paul S.; Chuaqui, Rodrigo F.; Emmert-Buck, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    To delineate the molecular changes that occur in the tumor microenvironment, we previously performed global transcript analysis of human prostate cancer specimens using tissue microdissection and expression microarrays. Epithelial and stromal compartments were individually studied in both tumor and normal fields. Tumor-associated stroma showed a distinctly different expression pattern compared with normal stroma, having 44 differentially expressed transcripts, the majority of which were up-re...

  16. Epigenetic Markers for Molecular Detection of Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera L. Costa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is a highly prevalent malignancy, which is clinically silent but curable while organ-confined. Because available screening methods show poor sensitivity and specificity, the development of new molecular markers is warranted. Epigenetic alterations, mainly promoter hypermethylation of cancer-related genes, are common events in prostate cancer and might be used as cancer biomarkers. Moreover, the development of quantitative, high-throughput techniques to assess promoter methylation enabled the simultaneous screening of multiple clinical samples. From the numerous cancer-related genes hypermethylated in prostate cancer only a few proved to be strong candidates to become routine biomarkers. This small set of genes includes GSTP1, APC, RARβ2, Cyclin D2, MDR1, and PTGS2. Single and/or multigene analyses demonstrated the feasibility of detecting early prostate cancer, with high sensitivity and specificity, in body fluids (serum, plasma, urine, and ejaculates and tissue samples. In addition, quantitative hypermethylation of several genes has been associated with clinicopathologic features of tumor aggressiveness, and also reported as independent prognostic factor for relapse. The identification of age-related methylation at specific loci and the differential frequency of methylation among ethnical groups, also provided interesting data linking methylation and prostate cancer risk. Although large trials are needed to validate these findings, the clinical use of these markers might be envisaged for the near future.

  17. Pattern of distant recurrence according to the molecular subtypes in Korean women with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Hyung Seok

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Distant recurrence is one of the most important risk factors in overall survival, and distant recurrence is related to a complex biologic interaction of seed and soil factors. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between the molecular subtypes and patterns of distant recurrence in patients with breast cancer. Methods In an investigation of 313 women with breast cancer who underwent surgery from 1994 and 2000, the expressions of estrogen and progestrone receptor (ER/PR, and human epithelial receptor-2 (HER2 were evaluated. The subtypes were defined as luminal-A, luminal-HER2, HER2-enriched, and triple negative breast cancer (TNBC according to ER, PR, and HER2 status. Results Bone was the most common site of distant recurrence. The incidence of first distant recurrence site was significantly different among the subtypes. Brain metastasis was more frequent in the luminal-HER2 and TNBC subtypes. In subgroup analysis, overall survival in patients with distant recurrence after 24 months after surgery was significantly different among the subtypes. Conclusions Organ-specific metastasis may depend on the molecular subtype of breast cancer. Tailored strategies against distant metastasis concerning the molecular subtypes in breast cancer may be considered.

  18. Application of Proteomics to Cancer Molecular Diagnostics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sam HANASH

    2009-01-01

    @@ Strategies to achieve personalized medicine and improve public health encompass assessment of an individual's risk for disease, early detection and molecular classification of disease resulting in an informed choice of the most appropriate treatment instituted at an early stage of disease develop- ment. A major contribution of proteomics in this field is the development of blood based tests to achieve the goals of personalized medicine.

  19. Evolving molecularly targeted therapies for advanced-stage thyroid cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Keith C; Ryder, Mabel

    2016-07-01

    Increased understanding of disease-specific molecular targets of therapy has led to the regulatory approval of two drugs (vandetanib and cabozantinib) for the treatment of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), and two agents (sorafenib and lenvatinib) for the treatment of radioactive- iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in both the USA and in the EU. The effects of these and other therapies on overall survival and quality of life among patients with thyroid cancer, however, remain to be more-clearly defined. When applied early in the disease course, intensive multimodality therapy seems to improve the survival outcomes of patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), but salvage therapies for ATC are of uncertain benefit. Additional innovative, rationally designed therapeutic strategies are under active development both for patients with DTC and for patients with ATC, with multiple phase II and phase III randomized clinical trials currently ongoing. Continued effort is being made to identify further signalling pathways with potential therapeutic relevance in thyroid cancers, as well as to elaborate on the complex interactions between signalling pathways, with the intention of translating these discoveries into effective and personalized therapies. Herein, we summarize the progress made in molecular medicine for advanced-stage thyroid cancers of different histotypes, analyse how these developments have altered - and might further refine - patient care, and identify open questions for future research.

  20. Advances of Molecular Targeted Therapy in Squamous Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li MA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell lung cancer (SQCLC is one of the most prevalent subtypes of lung cancer worldwide, about 400,000 persons die from squamous-cell lung cancer around the world, and its pathogenesis is closely linked with tobacco exposure. Unfortunately, squamous-cell lung cancer patients do not benefit from major advances in the development of targeted therapeutics such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR inhibitors or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK inhibitors that show exquisite activity in lungadenocarcinomas with EGFR mutations or echinoderm microtubule associated protein like-4 (EML4-ALK fusions, respectively. Major efforts have been launched to characterize the genomes of squamous-cell lung cancers. Among the new results emanating from these efforts are amplifications of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1 gene, the discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2 gene mutation as potential novel targets for the treatment of SQCLCs. Researchers find that there are many specific molecular targeted genes in the genome of squamous-cell lung cancer patients. These changes play a vital role in cell cycle regulation, oxidative stress, cell apoptosis, squamous epithelium differentiation, may be the candidate targeted moleculars in SQCLCs. Here, we provide a review on these discoveries and their implications for clinical trials in squamous-cell lungcancer assessing the value of novel therapeutics addressing these targets.

  1. Using large-scale genome variation cohorts to decipher the molecular mechanism of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habermann, Nina; Mardin, Balca R; Yakneen, Sergei; Korbel, Jan O

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing genomic structural variations (SVs) in the human genome remains challenging, and there is a growing interest to understand somatic SVs occurring in cancer, a disease of the genome. A havoc-causing SV process known as chromothripsis scars the genome when localized chromosome shattering and repair occur in a one-off catastrophe. Recent efforts led to the development of a set of conceptual criteria for the inference of chromothripsis events in cancer genomes and to the development of experimental model systems for studying this striking DNA alteration process in vitro. We discuss these approaches, and additionally touch upon current "Big Data" efforts that employ hybrid cloud computing to enable studies of numerous cancer genomes in an effort to search for commonalities and differences in molecular DNA alteration processes in cancer.

  2. Molecular Determinants of Hormone Refractory Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    to known prostate cancer oncogenes, Never In Mitosis A (NIMA) related kinase 6 (NEK6) reproducibly yielded androgen-independent tumors in female...constitutively active MEK, RAF1, ERBB2, AKT1, PIM1 and PIM2), overexpression of the Never In Mitosis A (NIMA) related kinase 6 (NEK6) reproducibly yielded...Never In Mitosis A (NIMA) related kinase 6 (NEK6), and nemo-like kinase (NLK). Aim 1. Elucidating the role of NIMA-related kinase 6 (NEK6) and nemo

  3. Chemotherapy and molecular targeting therapy for recurrent cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Naotake; Watari, Hidemichi; Ushijima, Kimio

    2016-01-01

    For patients with primary stage ⅣB, persistent, or recurrent cervical cancer, chemotherapy remains the standard treatment, although it is neither curative nor associated with long-term disease control. In this review, we summarized the history of treatment of recurrent cervical cancer, and the current recommendation for chemotherapy and molecular targeted therapy. Eligible articles were identified by a search of the MEDLINE bibliographical database for the period up to November 30, 2014. The search strategy included the following any or all of the keywords: “uterine cervical cancer”, “chemotherapy”, and “targeted therapies”. Since cisplatin every 21 days was considered as the historical standard treatment for recurrent cervical cancer, subsequent trials have evaluated and demonstrated activity for other agents including paclitaxel, gemcitabine, topotecan and vinorelbine among others. Accordingly, promising agents were incorporated into phase Ⅲ trials. To examine the best agent to combine with cisplatin, several landmark phase Ⅲ clinical trials were conducted by Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) and Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG). Through, GOG204 and JCOG0505, paclitaxel/cisplatin (TP) and paclitaxel/carboplatin (TC) are now considered to be the recommended therapies for recurrent cervical cancer patients. However, the prognosis of patients who are already resistant to chemotherapy, are very poor. Therefore new therapeutic strategies are urgently required. Molecular targeted therapy will be the most hopeful candidate of these strategies. From the results of GOG240, bevacizumab combined with TP reached its primary endpoint of improving overall survival (OS). Although, the prognosis for recurrent cervical cancer patients is still poor, the results of GOG240 shed light on the usefulness of molecular target agents to chemotherapy in cancer patients. Recurrent cervical cancer is generally considered incurable and current chemotherapy regiments

  4. Raf kinase inhibitory protein role in the molecular subtyping of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mulla, Fahd; Marafie, Makia; Zea Tan, Tuan; Paul Thiery, Jean

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we examined the association between the RKIP expression and the molecular subtypes of breast cancer. Microarray gene expression data of 2,333 human breast cancer from 26 different cohorts performed on Affymetrix U133A or U133Plus2 platforms were downloaded from Array Express and Gene Expression Omnibus and the molecular subtype of breast cancer for the samples was determined by single sample Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. Differences in recurrence-free survival (RFS) were tested using the Log-rank test in univariate analysis and displayed using Kaplan-Meier curves. Cox proportional-hazards model was used to calculate the hazard ratio using univariate and multivariate analysis. Loss or reduced RKIP expression was associated with reduced RFS in breast cancer using univariate and multivariate analyses, which was independent of lymph node (LN) metastasis status. Basal-like, Claudin-low, and Her-2-enriched tumors had significantly lower RKIP levels compared to other subclasses (P < 0.0001). Conversely, the Luminal subclass exhibited the highest expression levels of RKIP (P < 0.0001 for Luminal A and P = 0.0005 for Luminal B subtype), while in normal-like breast cancer subtype, RKIP expression was not informative. RKIP expression was prognostic in ER+ and ER- subgroups. RKIP expression had no significant prognostic power within Basal-like, Claudine-low, Luminal B, or Her-2-enriched breast cancer subtypes. However, its expression pinpointed excellent from intermediate-poor Luminal A survivors, in both ER+ (P = 0.035) and ER- (P = 0.012) subgroups, especially in LN negative breast cancers. In conclusion, RKIP expression adds significant value to the molecular subclassification of breast cancer especially for the Luminal A subtype.

  5. Prostate cancer molecular profiling: the Achilles heel for the implementation of precision medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Barros, Eliane Gouvêa; Nicolau-Neto, Pedro; Da Costa, Nathalia Meireles; Pinto, Luís Felipe Ribeiro; Palumbo, Antonio; Nasciutti, Luiz Eurico

    2017-05-06

    Cancer has been mainly treated by traditional therapeutic approaches which do not consider the human genetic diversity and present limitations, probably as a consequence of a poor knowledge of both patient's genetic background and tumor biology. Due to genome project conclusion and large-scale gene analyses emergence, the therapeutic management of several prevalent and aggressive tumors has dramatically improved and represents the closest examples of a precision medicine intervention in this field. Nonetheless, prostate cancer (PCa) remains as a challenge to personalized medicine implementation, probably due to its notorious heterogeneous molecular profile. Cancer treatment personalized approaches rely on the premise that a well-defined panorama of tumor molecular alterations can help selecting new and specific therapeutic targets for its treatment and potentially discriminate tumors which behave differentially. Lately, molecular and genetic studies have been investigating PCa basis, revealing multiple recurrent genomic alterations that include mutations, DNA copy-number variations, rearrangements, and gene fusions, among others. In addition to the increment on PCa molecular biology knowledge, mapping the molecular alterations pattern of this neoplasia, especially the differences existent between tumors displaying distinct behaviors, could represent a great improvement concerning the identification of new targets, personalized medicine, and patients' management and prognosis. © 2017 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  6. Role of TRPM7 in Cancer: Potential as Molecular Biomarker and Therapeutic Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson S. Yee

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The transient receptor potential melastatin-subfamily member 7 (TRPM7 is a ubiquitously expressed ion channel with intrinsic kinase activity. Molecular and electrophysiological analyses of the structure and activity of TRPM7 have revealed functional coupling of its channel and kinase activity. Studies have indicated the important roles of TRPM7 channel-kinase in fundamental cellular processes, physiological responses, and embryonic development. Accumulating evidence has shown that TRPM7 is aberrantly expressed and/or activated in human diseases including cancer. TRPM7 plays a variety of functional roles in cancer cells including survival, cell cycle progression, proliferation, growth, migration, invasion, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Data from a study using mouse xenograft of human cancer show that TRPM7 is required for tumor growth and metastasis. The aberrant expression of TRPM7 and its genetic mutations/polymorphisms have been identified in various types of carcinoma. Chemical modulators of TRPM7 channel produced inhibition of proliferation, growth, migration, invasion, invadosome formation, and markers of EMT in cancer cells. Taken together, these studies suggest the potential value of exploiting TRPM7 channel-kinase as a molecular biomarker and therapeutic target in human malignancies.

  7. Association of Fusobacterium nucleatum with immunity and molecular alterations in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosho, Katsuhiko; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Adachi, Yasushi; Ito, Miki; Mitsuhashi, Kei; Kurihara, Hiroyoshi; Kanno, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Itaru; Ishigami, Keisuke; Igarashi, Hisayoshi; Maruyama, Reo; Imai, Kohzoh; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2016-01-14

    The human intestinal microbiome plays a major role in human health and diseases, including colorectal cancer. Colorectal carcinogenesis represents a heterogeneous process with a differing set of somatic molecular alterations, influenced by diet, environmental and microbial exposures, and host immunity. Fusobacterium species are part of the human oral and intestinal microbiota. Metagenomic analyses have shown an enrichment of Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum) in colorectal carcinoma tissue. Using 511 colorectal carcinomas from Japanese patients, we assessed the presence of F. nucleatum. Our results showed that the frequency of F. nucleatum positivity in the Japanese colorectal cancer was 8.6% (44/511), which was lower than that in United States cohort studies (13%). Similar to the United States studies, F. nucleatum positivity in Japanese colorectal cancers was significantly associated with microsatellite instability (MSI)-high status. Regarding the immune response in colorectal cancer, high levels of infiltrating T-cell subsets (i.e., CD3+, CD8+, CD45RO+, and FOXP3+ cells) have been associated with better patient prognosis. There is also evidence to indicate that molecular features of colorectal cancer, especially MSI, influence T-cell-mediated adaptive immunity. Concerning the association between the gut microbiome and immunity, F. nucleatum has been shown to expand myeloid-derived immune cells, which inhibit T-cell proliferation and induce T-cell apoptosis in colorectal cancer. This finding indicates that F. nucleatum possesses immunosuppressive activities by inhibiting human T-cell responses. Certain microRNAs are induced during the macrophage inflammatory response and have the ability to regulate host-cell responses to pathogens. MicroRNA-21 increases the levels of IL-10 and prostaglandin E2, which suppress antitumor T-cell-mediated adaptive immunity through the inhibition of the antigen-presenting capacities of dendritic cells and T-cell proliferation in

  8. Definition of molecular determinants of prostate cancer cell bone extravasation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthel, Steven R; Hays, Danielle L; Yazawa, Erika M; Opperman, Matthew; Walley, Kempland C; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Burdick, Monica M; Gillard, Bryan M; Moser, Michael T; Pantel, Klaus; Foster, Barbara A; Pienta, Kenneth J; Dimitroff, Charles J

    2013-01-15

    Advanced prostate cancer commonly metastasizes to bone, but transit of malignant cells across the bone marrow endothelium (BMEC) remains a poorly understood step in metastasis. Prostate cancer cells roll on E-selectin(+) BMEC through E-selectin ligand-binding interactions under shear flow, and prostate cancer cells exhibit firm adhesion to BMEC via β1, β4, and αVβ3 integrins in static assays. However, whether these discrete prostate cancer cell-BMEC adhesive contacts culminate in cooperative, step-wise transendothelial migration into bone is not known. Here, we describe how metastatic prostate cancer cells breach BMEC monolayers in a step-wise fashion under physiologic hemodynamic flow. Prostate cancer cells tethered and rolled on BMEC and then firmly adhered to and traversed BMEC via sequential dependence on E-selectin ligands and β1 and αVβ3 integrins. Expression analysis in human metastatic prostate cancer tissue revealed that β1 was markedly upregulated compared with expression of other β subunits. Prostate cancer cell breaching was regulated by Rac1 and Rap1 GTPases and, notably, did not require exogenous chemokines as β1, αVβ3, Rac1, and Rap1 were constitutively active. In homing studies, prostate cancer cell trafficking to murine femurs was dependent on E-selectin ligand, β1 integrin, and Rac1. Moreover, eliminating E-selectin ligand-synthesizing α1,3 fucosyltransferases in transgenic adenoma of mouse prostate mice dramatically reduced prostate cancer incidence. These results unify the requirement for E-selectin ligands, α1,3 fucosyltransferases, β1 and αVβ3 integrins, and Rac/Rap1 GTPases in mediating prostate cancer cell homing and entry into bone and offer new insight into the role of α1,3 fucosylation in prostate cancer development.

  9. The molecular mechanisms between metabolic syndrome and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Wen, Ya-yuan; Li, Zhi-rong; Luo, Dong-lin; Zhang, Xiao-hua

    2016-03-18

    Metabolic syndrome, which is extremely common in developed and some developing countries, is a clustering of at least three of five of the following medical conditions: abdominal obesity, elevated blood pressure, elevated fasting plasma glucose, high serum triglycerides, and low high-density lipoprotein levels. It has been proved that there is a strong association between metabolic syndrome and breast cancer. Metabolic syndrome could increase the risk of breast cancer and influence the prognosis of the breast cancer patients. Some characteristic of metabolic syndrome such as obesity and lack of physical exercise are all risk factors for developing breast cancer. The metabolic syndrome mainly include obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypercholesterolemia and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and each of them impacts the risk of breast cancer and the prognosis of the breast cancer patients in different ways. In this Review, we focus on recently uncovered aspects of the immunological and molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the development of this highly prevalent and serious disease. These studies bring new insight into the complex associations between metabolic syndrome and breast cancer and have led to the development of novel therapeutic strategies that might enable a personalized approach in the management of this disease.

  10. Molecular biology of breast cancer stem cells: potential clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nam P; Almeida, Fabio S; Chi, Alex; Nguyen, Ly M; Cohen, Deirdre; Karlsson, Ulf; Vinh-Hung, Vincent

    2010-10-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (CSC) have been postulated recently as responsible for failure of breast cancer treatment. The purpose of this study is to review breast CSCs molecular biology with respect to their mechanism of resistance to conventional therapy, and to develop treatment strategies that may improve survival of breast cancer patients. A literature search has identified in vitro and in vivo studies of breast CSCs. Breast CSCs overexpress breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) which allows cancer cells to transport actively chemotherapy agents out of the cells. Radioresistance is modulated through activation of Wnt signaling pathway and overexpression of genes coding for glutathione. Lapatinib can selectively target HER-2 positive breast CSCs and improves disease-free survival in these patients. Metformin may target basal type breast CSCs. Parthenolide and oncolytic viruses are promising targeting agents for breast CSCs. Future clinical trials for breast cancer should include anti-cancer stem cells targeting agents in addition to conventional chemotherapy. Hypofractionation radiotherapy may be indicated for residual disease post chemotherapy.

  11. Molecular Subgroup of Primary Prostate Cancer Presenting with Metastatic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Steven M; Knight, Laura A; McCavigan, Andrena M; Logan, Gemma E; Berge, Viktor; Sherif, Amir; Pandha, Hardev; Warren, Anne Y; Davidson, Catherine; Uprichard, Adam; Blayney, Jaine K; Price, Bethanie; Jellema, Gera L; Steele, Christopher J; Svindland, Aud; McDade, Simon S; Eden, Christopher G; Foster, Chris; Mills, Ian G; Neal, David E; Mason, Malcolm D; Kay, Elaine W; Waugh, David J; Harkin, D Paul; Watson, R William; Clarke, Noel W; Kennedy, Richard D

    2017-10-01

    Approximately 4-25% of patients with early prostate cancer develop disease recurrence following radical prostatectomy. To identify a molecular subgroup of prostate cancers with metastatic potential at presentation resulting in a high risk of recurrence following radical prostatectomy. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering was performed using gene expression data from 70 primary resections, 31 metastatic lymph nodes, and 25 normal prostate samples. Independent assay validation was performed using 322 radical prostatectomy samples from four sites with a mean follow-up of 50.3 months. Molecular subgroups were identified using unsupervised hierarchical clustering. A partial least squares approach was used to generate a gene expression assay. Relationships with outcome (time to biochemical and metastatic recurrence) were analysed using multivariable Cox regression and log-rank analysis. A molecular subgroup of primary prostate cancer with biology similar to metastatic disease was identified. A 70-transcript signature (metastatic assay) was developed and independently validated in the radical prostatectomy samples. Metastatic assay positive patients had increased risk of biochemical recurrence (multivariable hazard ratio [HR] 1.62 [1.13-2.33]; p=0.0092) and metastatic recurrence (multivariable HR=3.20 [1.76-5.80]; p=0.0001). A combined model with Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment post surgical (CAPRA-S) identified patients at an increased risk of biochemical and metastatic recurrence superior to either model alone (HR=2.67 [1.90-3.75]; p<0.0001 and HR=7.53 [4.13-13.73]; p<0.0001, respectively). The retrospective nature of the study is acknowledged as a potential limitation. The metastatic assay may identify a molecular subgroup of primary prostate cancers with metastatic potential. The metastatic assay may improve the ability to detect patients at risk of metastatic recurrence following radical prostatectomy. The impact of adjuvant therapies should be assessed in

  12. Molecular markers and targets for colorectal cancer prevention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naveena B JANAKIRAM; Chinthalapally V RAO

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most prevalent cancer in the world. If detected at an early stage, treatment often might lead to cure. As prevention is better than cure, epidemiological studies reveal that having a healthy diet often protects from pro-moting/developing cancer. An important consideration in evaluating new drugs and devices is determining whether a product can effectively treat a targeted disease. There are quite a number of biomarkers making their way into clinical trials and few are awaiting the preclinical efficacy and safety results to enter into clinical trials. Researchers are facing challenges in modifying trial design and defining the right control population, validating biomarker assays from the bio-logical and analytical perspective and using biomarker data as a guideline for decision making. In spite of following all guidelines, the results are disappointing from many of the large clinical trials. To avoid these disappointments, selection of biomarkers and its target drug needs to be evaluated in appropriate animal models for its toxicities and efficacies. The focus of this review is on the few of the potential molecular targets and their biomarkers in colorectal cancers. Strengths and limitations of biomarkers/surrogate endpoints are also discussed. Various pathways involved in tumor cells and the specific agents to target the altered molecular biomarkerin biomolecular pathwayare elucidated. Importance of emerging new platforms siRNAs and miRNAs technology for colorectal cancer therapeutics is reviewed.

  13. [Molecular genetic mechanism of the kidney cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaigawa, N; Yao, M; Kishida, T; Kubota, Y

    2001-01-01

    The oncogenic mechanisms of renal cell carcinoma(RCC) are becoming elucidated with recent advances in molecular biology. von Hipple-Lindau disease(VHL) tumor suppressor gene is mutated and inactivated frequently in clear cell type RCCs. The VHL protein forms a complex which shows a ubiquitin ligase activity. The lost of the ubiquitin ligase activity of VHL protein may be a key step for clear cell tumorigenesis. Papillary renal cell carcinomas are caused by activating mutation in the tyrosine kinase domain of the MET gene. This tumorigenic pathway is regulated by c-Src. Immunogene therapies have been started for the patients with advanced RCC. The information based on microarray and Serial Analysis of Gene Expression(SAGE) will provide novel diagnosis and therapy which focus on the tumorigenic mechanism of RCC in the near future.

  14. Prostate Cancer Detection by Molecular Urinalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    molecule 1 (ICAM-1), and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3). A Quantikine human immunoassay kit (R&D Systems, Minneapolis, MN) was used to detect interleukin 17 (IL17...Total PSA levels in each prostatic fluid sample were measured by Hybritech PSA assay on the Beckman Coulter Access Immunoassay System (BeckmanCoulter...chronic pelvic pain syndrome? J Urol 2006;176:119–24. 14. Schroder FH, Carter HB , Wolters T, van den Bergh RC, Gosselaar C, Bangma CH, Roobol MJ. Early

  15. A taxonomy of epithelial human cancer and their metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Moor Bart

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray technology has allowed to molecularly characterize many different cancer sites. This technology has the potential to individualize therapy and to discover new drug targets. However, due to technological differences and issues in standardized sample collection no study has evaluated the molecular profile of epithelial human cancer in a large number of samples and tissues. Additionally, it has not yet been extensively investigated whether metastases resemble their tissue of origin or tissue of destination. Methods We studied the expression profiles of a series of 1566 primary and 178 metastases by unsupervised hierarchical clustering. The clustering profile was subsequently investigated and correlated with clinico-pathological data. Statistical enrichment of clinico-pathological annotations of groups of samples was investigated using Fisher exact test. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA and DAVID functional enrichment analysis were used to investigate the molecular pathways. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and log-rank tests were used to investigate prognostic significance of gene signatures. Results Large clusters corresponding to breast, gastrointestinal, ovarian and kidney primary tissues emerged from the data. Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma clustered together with follicular differentiated thyroid carcinoma, which supports recent morphological descriptions of thyroid follicular carcinoma-like tumors in the kidney and suggests that they represent a subtype of chromophobe carcinoma. We also found an expression signature identifying primary tumors of squamous cell histology in multiple tissues. Next, a subset of ovarian tumors enriched with endometrioid histology clustered together with endometrium tumors, confirming that they share their etiopathogenesis, which strongly differs from serous ovarian tumors. In addition, the clustering of colon and breast tumors correlated with clinico-pathological characteristics

  16. Molecular targeting of acid ceramidase: implications to cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidan, Youssef H; Jenkins, Russell W; Korman, John B; Liu, Xiang; Obeid, Lina M; Norris, James S; Hannun, Yusuf A

    2008-08-01

    Increasingly recognized as bioactive molecules, sphingolipids have been studied in a variety of disease models. The impact of sphingolipids on cancer research facilitated the entry of sphingolipid analogues and enzyme modulators into clinical trials. Owing to its ability to regulate two bioactive sphingolipids, ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate, acid ceramidase (AC) emerges as an attractive target for drug development within the sphingolipid metabolic pathway. Indeed, there is extensive evidence supporting a pivotal role for AC in lipid metabolism and cancer biology. In this article, we review the current knowledge of the biochemical properties of AC, its relevance to tumor promotion, and its molecular targeting approaches.

  17. Molecular Sex Differences in Human Serum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Ramsey (Jordan); E. Schwarz (Emanuel); P.C. Guest (Paul); N.J.M. van Beveren (Nico); F.M. Leweke (Marcus); M. Rothermundt (Matthias); B. Bogerts (Bernhard); J. Steiner (Johann); L. Ruta (Liliana); S. Baron-Cohen (Simon); S. Bahn (Sabine)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Sex is an important factor in the prevalence, incidence, progression, and response to treatment of many medical conditions, including autoimmune and cardiovascular diseases and psychiatric conditions. Identification of molecular differences between typical males and females c

  18. Molecular damage in cancer: an argument for mTOR-driven aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2011-12-01

    Despite common belief, accumulation of molecular damage does not play a key role in aging. Still, cancer (an age-related disease) is initiated by molecular damage. Cancer and aging share a lot in common including the activation of the TOR pathway. But the role of molecular damage distinguishes cancer and aging. Furthermore, an analysis of the role of both damage and aging in cancer argues against "a decline, caused by accumulation of molecular damage" as a cause of aging. I also discuss how random molecular damage, via rounds of multiplication and selection, brings about non-random hallmarks of cancer.

  19. Molecular subtypes of metastatic colorectal cancer are associated with patient response to irinotecan-based therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rio, M; Mollevi, C; Bibeau, F; Vie, N; Selves, J; Emile, J-F; Roger, P; Gongora, C; Robert, J; Tubiana-Mathieu, N; Ychou, M; Martineau, P

    2017-05-01

    Currently, metastatic colorectal cancer is treated as a homogeneous disease and only RAS mutational status has been approved as a negative predictive factor in patients treated with cetuximab. The aim of this study was to evaluate if recently identified molecular subtypes of colon cancer are associated with response of metastatic patients to first-line therapy. We collected and analysed 143 samples of human colorectal tumours with complete clinical annotations, including the response to treatment. Gene expression profiling was used to classify patients in three to six classes using four different molecular classifications. Correlations between molecular subtypes, response to treatment, progression-free and overall survival were analysed. We first demonstrated that the four previously described molecular classifications of colorectal cancer defined in non-metastatic patients also correctly classify stage IV patients. One of the classifications is strongly associated with response to FOLFIRI (P=0.003), but not to FOLFOX (P=0.911) and FOLFIRI + Bevacizumab (P=0.190). In particular, we identify a molecular subtype representing 28% of the patients that shows an exceptionally high response rate to FOLFIRI (87.5%). These patients have a two-fold longer overall survival (40.1 months) when treated with FOLFIRI, as first-line regimen, instead of FOLFOX (18.6 months). Our results demonstrate the interest of molecular classifications to develop tailored therapies for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and a strong impact of the first-line regimen on the overall survival of some patients. This however remains to be confirmed in a large prospective clinical trial. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. MicroRNAs as molecular markers in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Silva

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in the western world for both men and women. Lung cancer appears to be a perfect candidate for a screening program, since it is the number one cancer killer, it has a long preclinical phase, curative treatment for the minority of patients who are diagnosed early and a target population at risk (smokers and it is also a major economic burden. The earliest approaches to identifying cancer markers were based on preliminary clinical or pathological observations, although molecular biology is a strong candidate for occupying a place among the set of methods. In search of markers, several alterations, such as mutations, loss of heterozygosity, microsatellite instability, DNA methylation, mitochondrial DNA mutations, viral DNA, modified expression of mRNA, miRNA and proteins, and structurally altered proteins have all been analysed. MicroRNAs (miRNA are small RNA molecules, about 19-25 nucleotides long and encoded in genomes of plants, animals, fungi and viruses. It has been reported that miRNAs may have multiple functions in lung development and that aberrant expression of miRNAs could induce lung tumorigenesis. We review here the role of miRNAs in lung tumorigenesis and also as a novel type of biomarker.-----------------------------------Cite this article as:Silva J, Garcia V, Lopez-Gonzalez A, Provencio M. MicroRNAs as molecular markers in lung cancer. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2013;1(1:010111. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14319/ijcto.0101.11

  1. Molecular aspects of prostate cancer: implications for future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etel R. P. Gimba

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have been developed trying to understand the complex molecular mechanisms involved in oncogenesis and progression of prostate cancer (PCa. Current biotechnological methodologies, especially genomic studies, are adding important aspects to this area. The construction of extensive DNA sequence data and gene expression profiles have been intensively explored to search for candidate biomarkers to evaluate PCa. The use of DNA micro-array robotic systems constitutes a powerful approach to simultaneously monitor the expression of a great number of genes. The resulting gene expressing profiles can be used to specifically describe tumor staging and response to cancer therapies. Also, it is possible to follow PCa pathological properties and to identify genes that anticipate the behavior of clinical disease. The molecular pathogenesis of PCa involves many contributing factors, such as alterations in signal transduction pathways, angiogenesis, adhesion molecules expression and cell cycle control. Also, molecular studies are making clear that many genes, scattered through several different chromosomal regions probably cause predisposition to PCa. The discovery of new molecular markers for PCa is another relevant advance resulting from molecular biology studies of prostate tumors. Interesting tissue and serum markers have been reported, resulting in many cases in useful novelties to diagnostic and prognostic approaches to follow-up PCa. Finally, gene therapy comes as an important approach for therapeutic intervention in PCa. Clinical trials for PCa have been demonstrating that gene therapy is relatively safe and well tolerated, although some improvements are yet to be developed.

  2. Human molecular cytogenetics: From cells to nucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegel, Mariluce

    2014-03-01

    The field of cytogenetics has focused on studying the number, structure, function and origin of chromosomal abnormalities and the evolution of chromosomes. The development of fluorescent molecules that either directly or via an intermediate molecule bind to DNA has led to the development of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), a technology linking cytogenetics to molecular genetics. This technique has a wide range of applications that increased the dimension of chromosome analysis. The field of cytogenetics is particularly important for medical diagnostics and research as well as for gene ordering and mapping. Furthermore, the increased application of molecular biology techniques, such as array-based technologies, has led to improved resolution, extending the recognized range of microdeletion/microduplication syndromes and genomic disorders. In adopting these newly expanded methods, cytogeneticists have used a range of technologies to study the association between visible chromosome rearrangements and defects at the single nucleotide level. Overall, molecular cytogenetic techniques offer a remarkable number of potential applications, ranging from physical mapping to clinical and evolutionary studies, making a powerful and informative complement to other molecular and genomic approaches. This manuscript does not present a detailed history of the development of molecular cytogenetics; however, references to historical reviews and experiments have been provided whenever possible. Herein, the basic principles of molecular cytogenetics, the technologies used to identify chromosomal rearrangements and copy number changes, and the applications for cytogenetics in biomedical diagnosis and research are presented and discussed.

  3. Human molecular cytogenetics: from cells to nucleotides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariluce Riegel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of cytogenetics has focused on studying the number, structure, function and origin of chromosomal abnormalities and the evolution of chromosomes. The development of fluorescent molecules that either directly or via an intermediate molecule bind to DNA has led to the development of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH, a technology linking cytogenetics to molecular genetics. This technique has a wide range of applications that increased the dimension of chromosome analysis. The field of cytogenetics is particularly important for medical diagnostics and research as well as for gene ordering and mapping. Furthermore, the increased application of molecular biology techniques, such as array-based technologies, has led to improved resolution, extending the recognized range of microdeletion/microduplication syndromes and genomic disorders. In adopting these newly expanded methods, cytogeneticists have used a range of technologies to study the association between visible chromosome rearrangements and defects at the single nucleotide level. Overall, molecular cytogenetic techniques offer a remarkable number of potential applications, ranging from physical mapping to clinical and evolutionary studies, making a powerful and informative complement to other molecular and genomic approaches. This manuscript does not present a detailed history of the development of molecular cytogenetics; however, references to historical reviews and experiments have been provided whenever possible. Herein, the basic principles of molecular cytogenetics, the technologies used to identify chromosomal rearrangements and copy number changes, and the applications for cytogenetics in biomedical diagnosis and research are presented and discussed.

  4. Molecular dynamics insights into human aquaporin 2 water channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binesh, A R; Kamali, R

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the first molecular dynamics simulation of the human aquaporin 2 is performed and for a better understanding of the aquaporin 2 permeability performance, the characteristics of water transport in this protein channel and key biophysical parameters of AQP2 tetramer including osmotic and diffusive permeability constants and the pore radius are investigated. For this purpose, recently recovered high resolution X-ray crystal structure of` the human aquaporin 2 is used to perform twenty nanosecond molecular dynamics simulation of fully hydrated tetramer of this protein embedded in a lipid bilayer. The resulting water permeability characteristics of this protein channel showed that the water permeability of the human AQP2 is in a mean range in comparison with other human aquaporins family. Finally, the results reported in this research demonstrate that molecular dynamics simulation of human AQP2 provided useful insights into the mechanisms of water permeation and urine concentration in the human kidney.

  5. Human papillomavirus and gastrointestinal cancer: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucchi, Dania; Stracci, Fabrizio; Buonora, Nicola; Masanotti, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide. Exposure to HPV is very common, and an estimated 65%-100% of sexually active adults are exposed to HPV in their lifetime. The majority of HPV infections are asymptomatic, but there is a 10% chance that individuals will develop a persistent infection and have an increased risk of developing a carcinoma. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has found that the following cancer sites have a strong causal relationship with HPV: cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx, including the base of the tongue and the tonsils. However, studies of the aetiological role of HPV in colorectal and esophageal malignancies have conflicting results. The aim of this review was to organize recent evidence and issues about the association between HPV infection and gastrointestinal tumours with a focus on esophageal, colorectal and anal cancers. The ultimate goal was to highlight possible implications for prognosis and prevention. PMID:27672265

  6. Current Molecular Targeted Therapy in Advanced Gastric Cancer: A Comprehensive Review of Therapeutic Mechanism, Clinical Trials, and Practical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaichun Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the great progress in the treatment of gastric cancer, it is still the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Patients often miss the opportunity for a surgical cure, because the cancer has already developed into advanced cancer when identified. Compared to best supportive care, chemotherapy can improve quality of life and prolong survival time, but the overall survival is often short. Due to the molecular study of gastric cancer, new molecular targeted drugs have entered the clinical use. Trastuzumab, an antibody targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, can significantly improve survival in advanced gastric cancer patients with HER2 overexpression. Second-line treatment of advanced gastric cancer with ramucirumab, an antibody targeting VEGFR-2, alone or in combination with paclitaxel, has been proved to provide a beneficial effect. The VEGFR-2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor, apatinib, can improve the survival of advanced gastric cancer patients after second-line chemotherapy failure. Unfortunately, none of the EGFR targeting antibodies (cetuximab or panitumumab, VEGF targeting monoclonal antibodies (bevacizumab, mTOR inhibitor (everolimus, or HGF/MET pathway targeting drugs has a significant survival benefit. Many other clinical trials based on molecular markers are underway. This review will summarize targeted therapies for advanced gastric cancer.

  7. Intraoperative Assessment of Breast Cancer Margins ex vivo using Aqueous Quantum Dot-Functionalized Molecular Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Giang Hoang Thuy

    Breast cancer is increasingly diagnosed at an early stage, allowing the diseased breast to be removed only partially or breast conserving surgery (BCS). Current BCS procedures have no rapid methods during surgery to assess if the surgical margin is clear of cancer, often resulting in re-excision. The current breast cancer re-excision rate is estimated to be 15% to as high as 60%. It would be desirable if there is a rapid and reliable breast cancer margin assessment tool in the operating room to help assess if the surgical margin is clean to minimize unnecessary re-excisions. In this research, we seek to develop an intraoperative, molecular probe-based breast cancer surgical margin assessment tool using aqueous quantum dots (AQDs) coupled with cancer specific biomarkers. Quantum dots (QDs) are photoluminescent semiconductor nanoparticles that do not photobleach and are brighter than organic fluorescent dyes. Aqueous quantum dots (AQDs) such as CdSe and near infrared (NIR) CdPbS developed in Shih's lab emit light longer than 600 nm. We have examined conjugating AQDs with antibodies to cancer specific biomarkers such as Tn antigen, a cancer-associated glycan antigen for epithelial cancers. We showed that AQDs could achieve ~80% antibody conjugation efficiency, i.e., 100 times less antibodies than required by commercial, making such AQD molecular probe surgical margin evaluation economically feasible. By conjugating AQDs with anti-Tn-antigen antibody, the AQDs molecular probe exhibited 94% sensitivity and 92% specificity in identifying breast cancer against normal breast tissues as well as benign breast tumors in 480 tissue blocks from 126 patients. Furthermore, mice model and clinical human studies indicated that AQDs imaging did not interfere with the following pathological staining. More interestingly, we showed that it it possible to directly conjugate one antibody to multiple AQDs, further reduces the required amount of antibodies needed, a feat that could not be

  8. Biologia molecular do câncer cervical Molecular biology of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Augusto Rivoire

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A carcinogênese é um processo de múltiplas etapas. Alterações no equilíbrio citogenético ocorrem na transformação do epitélio normal a câncer cervical. Numerosos estudos apoiam a hipótese de que a infecção por HPV está associada com o desenvolvimento de alterações malignas e pré-malignas do trato genital inferior. Neste trabalho são apresentadas as bases para a compreensão da oncogênese cervical. O ciclo celular é controlado por proto-oncogenes e genes supressores. Quando ocorrem mutações, proto-oncogenes tornam-se oncogenes, que são carcinogênicos e causam multiplicação celular excessiva. A perda da ação de genes supressores funcionais pode levar a célula ao crescimento inadequado. O ciclo celular também pode ser alterado pela ação de vírus, entre eles o HPV (Human Papiloma Virus, de especial interesse na oncogênese cervical. Os tipos de HPV 16 e 18 são os de maior interesse, freqüentemente associados a câncer cervical e anal. O conhecimento das bases moleculares que estão envolvidas na oncogênese cervical tem sido possível devido a utilização de técnicas avançadas de biologia molecular. A associação destas técnicas aos métodos diagnósticos clássicos, poderão levar a uma melhor avaliação das neoplasias cervicais e auxiliar no desenvolvimento de novas terapias, talvez menos invasivas e mais efetivas.Carcinogenesis involves several steps. Disorders of the cytogenetic balance occur during the evolution from normal epithelium to cervical cancer. Several studies support the hypothesis that the Human Papiloma Virus (HPV infection is associated to development of premalignant and malignant lesions of cervical cancer. In this review we show the basis to understand cervical oncogenesis. The cell cycle is controlled by protooncogenes and supressive genes. This orchestrated cell cycle can be affected by virus such as HPV. Of special interest in the cervical carcinogenesis are the HPV subtypes 16 and 18

  9. Viral Etiology Relationship between Human Papillomavirus and Human Breast Cancer and Target of Gene Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Chen; TENG Zhi Ping; CHEN Yun Xin; SHEN Dan Hua; LI Jin Tao; ZENG Yi

    2016-01-01

    ObjectiveTo explore the viral etiology of human breast cancer to determine whether there are novel molecular targets for gene therapy of breast cancer and provide evidence for the research of gene therapy and vaccine development for breast cancer. MethodsPCR was used to screen HPV16 and HPV18 oncogenesE6 andE7 in the SKBR3 cell line andin 76 paraffin embedded breast cancer tissue samples. RNA interference was used to knock down the expression of HPV18E6 andE7 in SKBR3 cells, then the changes in the expression of cell-cycle related proteins, cell viability, colony formation, metastasis, and cell cycle progression were determined. ResultsHPV18 oncogenesE6 andE7 were amplified and sequenced from the SKBR3 cells. Ofthe patient samples, 6.58% and 23.68% were tested to bepositivefor HPV18E6 and HPV18E7. In the cell culture models, the knockdown of HPV18E6 andE7 inhibited the proliferation, metastasis, and cell cycle progression of SKBR3 cell. The knockdown also clearly affected the expression levels of cell cycle related proteins. ConclusionHPV was a contributor to virus causedhuman breast cancer, suggesting that the oncogenes in HPV were potential targets for gene therapy of breast cancer.

  10. Deciphering the Molecular Nature of Ovarian Cancer Biomarker CA125

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Hoffmann

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The ovarian cancer biomarker CA125 has been extensively investigated over the last 30 years. The knowledge about the exact molecular nature of this protein, however, remains fragmented. This review provides an overview of the structural research regarding CA125, and presents an orthogonal verification method to confirm the identity of this molecule. The need for independent identification of CA125 is exemplified by several reports where mutually exclusive data concerning the existence of isoforms and the glycan moieties is presented. Mass spectrometry can overcome the pitfalls of a single detection/identification method such as antibody probing. Independent verification of CA125 identity in characterization studies will help establish a refined model of its molecular structure that will promote the development of new approaches for diagnosis, prognosis and therapy of ovarian cancer.

  11. Clinical Challenges to Current Molecularly Targeted Therapies in Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Gagan; Eggert, Ashley; Puri, Neelu

    Lung cancer is difficult to treat with a poor prognosis and a five year survival of 15%. Current molecularly targeted therapies are initially effective in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients; however, they are plagued with difficulties including induced resistance and small therapeutically responsive populations. This mini review describes the mechanism of resistance to several molecularly targeted therapies which are currently being used to treat NSCLC. The major targets discussed are c-Met, EGFR, HER2, ALK, VEGFR, and BRAF. The first generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) resulted in resistance; however, second and third generation TKIs are being developed, which are generally more efficacious and have potential to treat NSCLC patients with resistance to first generation TKIs. Combination therapies could also be effective in preventing TKI resistance in NSCLC patients.

  12. AN EPIDEMIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR GENETIC STUDY ON BREAST CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾卫华; 王继先; 李本孝; 李征

    2000-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the genetic susceptibility for breast cancer of Chinese, a hospital-based case-control study, pedigree survey and molecular genetic study were conducted. Methods. Logistic regression model and stratification methods were used in the risk factors analysis. Li-Mantel art and Falconer methods were used to analyze the segregation ratio and heritability. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were used to detect AI, G-banding technique was used to detect the chromosome aberration of peripheral blood lymphocyte. Results. Family history of breast cancer is related to enhanced breast cancer risk significartly, OR is 3.905 ( 95 % CI = 1.079 ~ 14.13), and it widely interacts with other risk factors. Accumulative incidence of breast cancer in first degree relatives is 9.99%, which is larger than that in second, third degree and non-blood relatives. Segregation ratio is 0.021, heritability among first degree relatives is 35.6 ± 5.8%. Frequencies of LOH at BRCA1 and BRCA2 loci in sporadic breast cancer are 6.12% and 5.77% respectively. In the sibs, both of them show LOH at D13S173 locus, and high frequencies of chromosome aberrations were observed. Conclusions. Genetic susceptibility contributes to breast cancer occurrence of Chinese, and its racial variation may be one of the important reasons for the large difference of incidence between western and eastern countries.

  13. AN EPIDEMIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR GENETIC STUDY ON BREAST CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾卫华; 王继先; 李本孝; 李征

    2000-01-01

    Obieaites. To investigate the genetic susceptibility for breast cancer of Chinese, a hospital-besed case-control study, pedigree survey and molecular genetic study were conducted. Methods. Logistic regression model and stratification methods were used in the risk factors analysis. Li-Mantel-Gart and Falconer methods were used to analyze the segregation ratio and heritability. Polymemse chain reaction (PCR) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were used to detect AI, G-banding technique was used to detect the chromosome aberration of peripheral blood lymphocyte. Results. Family history of breast cancer is related to enhanced breast cancer risk significantly, OR is 3.905(95% CI = 1.079—14.13), and it widely interacts with other risk factors. Accumulative incidence of breast cancer in first degree relatives is 9.99%, which is larger than that in second, third degree and non-blnod relatives. Segregation ratio is 0.021, heritability among first degree relatives is 35.6 ± 5.8%. Frequencies of LDH at BRCA1 and BRCA2 loci in sporadic breast cancer are 6.12% and 5.77% respectively. In the sibs, both of them show LOH at D13S173 locus, and high frequencies of chromosome abermtions were observed.Condusions. Genetic susceptibility contributes to breast cancer occurrence of Chinese, and its racial variation may be one of the important reasons for the large difference of incidence between western and eastern countries.

  14. MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF HUMAN SPERMATOZOA: POTENTIAL FOR INFERTILITY RESEARCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon Research Conference: Mammalian Gametogenesis and Embryogenesis New London, CT, July 1-6, 2000Molecular Analysis of Human Spermatozoa: Potential for Infertility ResearchDavid Miller 1, David Dix2, Robert Reid 3, Stephen A Krawetz 3 1Reproductive ...

  15. MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF HUMAN SPERMATOZOA: POTENTIAL FOR INFERTILITY RESEARCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon Research Conference: Mammalian Gametogenesis and Embryogenesis New London, CT, July 1-6, 2000Molecular Analysis of Human Spermatozoa: Potential for Infertility ResearchDavid Miller 1, David Dix2, Robert Reid 3, Stephen A Krawetz 3 1Reproductive ...

  16. REAL-TIME DETECTION OF SURVIVIN mRNA EXPRESSION IN CERVICAL CANCER CELL LINES USING MOLECULAR BEACON IMAGING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    An Ruifang; He Dalin; Xue Yan; Wang Shu; Xie Li; Zhao Jun; Wang Xinyang; Yang Lili

    2006-01-01

    Objective To detect the expression of survivin mRNA in cervical cancer cell lines using molecular beacon imaging technology. Methods Human cervical cancer cells (HeLa and SiHa) and human fetal lung fibroblast HFL-I were cultured in vitro. After adding 100 nmol/L survivin mRNA molecular beacon, the fluorescent signals were observed under fluorescent microscope. The expressions of survivin in cervical cancer cells and HFL-I cell were examined by immunocytochemical streptravidin-biothin peroxidase (SP) assay at the same time. Results Two kinds of survivin mRNA molecular beacon, with different color fluorescence, had strong fluorescent signal in cervical cancer cell lines, and the signal in SiHa cell line was stronger, but these signals were not found in HFL-I ; Immunocytochemical staining of positive survivin was located in the cytoplasm of cervical cancer cell lines HeLa and SiHa, whereas, no expression of survivin was detected in HFL-I cell line. Conclusion The technology of molecular beacon imaging can be used to detect the expression of survivin mRNA in viable cells successfully, and may provide a new approach to the diagnosis of early stage cervical cancer and the following-up in the clinic.

  17. Molecular Targeted Approaches to Cancer Therapy and Prevention Using Chalcones

    OpenAIRE

    Jandial, Danielle D.; Blair, Christopher A.; Zhang, Saiyang; Krill, Lauren S; Zhang, Yan-Bing; Zi, Xiaolin

    2014-01-01

    There is an emerging paradigm shift in oncology that seeks to emphasize molecularly targeted approaches for cancer prevention and therapy. Chalcones (1,3-diphenyl-2-propen-1-ones), naturally-occurring compounds with widespread distribution in spices, tea, beer, fruits and vegetables, consist of open-chain flavonoids in which the two aromatic rings are joined by a three-carbon α, β-unsaturated carbonyl system. Due to their structural diversity, relative ease of chemical manipulation and reacti...

  18. Clinical implications of the intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat, Aleix; Pineda, Estela; Adamo, Barbara; Galván, Patricia; Fernández, Aranzazu; Gaba, Lydia; Díez, Marc; Viladot, Margarita; Arance, Ana; Muñoz, Montserrat

    2015-11-01

    Gene-expression profiling has had a considerable impact on our understanding of breast cancer biology. During the last 15 years, 5 intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer (Luminal A, Luminal B, HER2-enriched, Basal-like and Claudin-low) have been identified and intensively studied. In this review, we will focus on the current and future clinical implications of the intrinsic molecular subtypes beyond the current pathological-based classification endorsed by the 2013 St. Gallen Consensus Recommendations. Within hormone receptor-positive and HER2-negative early breast cancer, the Luminal A and B subtypes predict 10-year outcome regardless of systemic treatment administered as well as residual risk of distant recurrence after 5 years of endocrine therapy. Within clinically HER2-positive disease, the 4 main intrinsic subtypes can be identified and dominate the biological and clinical phenotype. From a clinical perspective, patients with HER2+/HER2-enriched disease seem to benefit the most from neoadjuvant trastuzumab, or dual HER2 blockade with trastuzumab/lapatinib, in combination with chemotherapy, and patients with HER2+/Luminal A disease seem to have a relative better outcome compared to the other subtypes. Finally, within triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), the Basal-like disease predominates (70-80%) and, from a biological perspective, should be considered a cancer-type by itself. Importantly, the distinction between Basal-like versus non-Basal-like within TNBC might predict survival following (neo)adjvuvant multi-agent chemotherapy, bevacizumab benefit in the neoadjuvant setting (CALGB40603), and docetaxel vs. carboplatin benefit in first-line metastatic disease (TNT study). Overall, this data suggests that intrinsic molecular profiling provides clinically relevant information beyond current pathology-based classifications.

  19. Comparative proteomics analysis of human gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Li; Jian-Fang Li; Ying Qu; Xue-Hua Chen; Jian-Min Qin; Qin-Long Gu; Min Yan; Zheng-Gang Zhu; Bing-Ya Liu

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To isolate and identify differentially expressed proteins between cancer and normal tissues of gastric cancer by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS).METHODS: Soluble fraction proteins of gastric cancer tissues and paired normal tissues were separated by 2-DE.The differentially expressed proteins were selected and identified by MALDI-TOF-MS and database search.RESULTS: 2-DE profiles with high resolution and reproducibility were obtained.Twenty-three protein spots were excised from sliver staining gel and digested in gel by trypsin,in which fifteen protein spots were identified successfully.Among the identified proteins,there were ten over-expressed and five under-expressed proteins in stomach cancer tissues compared with normal tissues.CONCLUSION: In this study,the well-resolved,reproducible 2-DE patterns of human gastric cancer tissue and paired normal tissue were established and optimized and certain differentially-expressed proteins were identified.The combined use of 2-DE and MS provides an effective approach to screen for potential tumor markers.

  20. Comprehensive molecular portraits of human breast tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koboldt, Daniel C.; Fulton, Robert S.; McLellan, Michael D.; Schmidt, Heather; Kalicki-Veizer, Joelle; McMichael, Joshua F.; Fulton, Lucinda L.; Dooling, David J.; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Ally, Adrian; Balasundaram, Miruna; Butterfield, Yaron S. N.; Carlsen, Rebecca; Carter, Candace; Chu, Andy; Chuah, Eric; Chun, Hye-Jung E.; Coope, Robin J. N.; Dhalla, Noreen; Guin, Ranabir; Hirst, Carrie; Hirst, Martin; Holt, Robert A.; Lee, Darlene; Li, Haiyan I.; Mayo, Michael; Moore, Richard A.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Pleasance, Erin; Robertson, A. Gordon; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Shafiei, Arash; Sipahimalani, Payal; Slobodan, Jared R.; Stoll, Dominik; Tam, Angela; Thiessen, Nina; Varhol, Richard J.; Wye, Natasja; Zeng, Thomas; Zhao, Yongjun; Birol, Inanc; Jones, Steven J. M.; Marra, Marco A.; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Saksena, Gordon; Onofrio, Robert C.; Pho, Nam H.; Carter, Scott L.; Schumacher, Steven E.; Tabak, Barbara; Hernandez, Bryan; Gentry, Jeff; Nguyen, Huy; Crenshaw, Andrew; Ardlie, Kristin; Beroukhim, Rameen; Winckler, Wendy; Getz, Gad; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Meyerson, Matthew; Chin, Lynda; Park, Peter J.; Kucherlapati, Raju; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Auman, J. Todd; Fan, Cheng; Turman, Yidi J.; Shi, Yan; Li, Ling; Topal, Michael D.; He, Xiaping; Chao, Hann-Hsiang; Prat, Aleix; Silva, Grace O.; Iglesia, Michael D.; Zhao, Wei; Usary, Jerry; Berg, Jonathan S.; Adams, Michael; Booker, Jessica; Wu, Junyuan; Gulabani, Anisha; Bodenheimer, Tom; Hoyle, Alan P.; Simons, Janae V.; Soloway, Matthew G.; Mose, Lisle E.; Jefferys, Stuart R.; Balu, Saianand; Parker, Joel S.; Hayes, D. Neil; Perou, Charles M.; Malik, Simeen; Mahurkar, Swapna; Shen, Hui; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Triche, Timothy; Lai, Phillip H.; Bootwalla, Moiz S.; Maglinte, Dennis T.; Berman, Benjamin P.; Van den Berg, David J.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Laird, Peter W.; Creighton, Chad J.; Donehower, Lawrence A.; Getz, Gad; Noble, Michael; Voet, Doug; Saksena, Gordon; Gehlenborg, Nils; DiCara, Daniel; Zhang, Juinhua; Zhang, Hailei; Wu, Chang-Jiun; Liu, Spring Yingchun; Lawrence, Michael S.; Zou, Lihua; Sivachenko, Andrey; Lin, Pei; Stojanov, Petar; Jing, Rui; Cho, Juok; Sinha, Raktim; Park, Richard W.; Nazaire, Marc-Danie; Robinson, Jim; Thorvaldsdottir, Helga; Mesirov, Jill; Park, Peter J.; Chin, Lynda; Reynolds, Sheila; Kreisberg, Richard B.; Bernard, Brady; Bressler, Ryan; Erkkila, Timo; Lin, Jake; Thorsson, Vesteinn; Zhang, Wei; Shmulevich, Ilya; Ciriello, Giovanni; Weinhold, Nils; Schultz, Nikolaus; Gao, Jianjiong; Cerami, Ethan; Gross, Benjamin; Jacobsen, Anders; Sinha, Rileen; Aksoy, B. Arman; Antipin, Yevgeniy; Reva, Boris; Shen, Ronglai; Taylor, Barry S.; Ladanyi, Marc; Sander, Chris; Anur, Pavana; Spellman, Paul T.; Lu, Yiling; Liu, Wenbin; Verhaak, Roel R. G.; Mills, Gordon B.; Akbani, Rehan; Zhang, Nianxiang; Broom, Bradley M.; Casasent, Tod D.; Wakefield, Chris; Unruh, Anna K.; Baggerly, Keith; Coombes, Kevin; Weinstein, John N.; Haussler, David; Benz, Christopher C.; Stuart, Joshua M.; Benz, Stephen C.; Zhu, Jingchun; Szeto, Christopher C.; Scott, Gary K.; Yau, Christina; Paul, Evan O.; Carlin, Daniel; Wong, Christopher; Sokolov, Artem; Thusberg, Janita; Mooney, Sean; Ng, Sam; Goldstein, Theodore C.; Ellrott, Kyle; Grifford, Mia; Wilks, Christopher; Ma, Singer; Craft, Brian; Yan, Chunhua; Hu, Ying; Meerzaman, Daoud; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Bowen, Jay; Ramirez, Nilsa C.; Black, Aaron D.; Pyatt, Robert E.; White, Peter; Zmuda, Erik J.; Frick, Jessica; Lichtenberg, Taram.; Brookens, Robin; George, Myra M.; Gerken, Mark A.; Harper, Hollie A.; Leraas, Kristen M.; Wise, Lisa J.; Tabler, Teresa R.; McAllister, Cynthia; Barr, Thomas; Hart-Kothari, Melissa; Tarvin, Katie; Saller, Charles; Sandusky, George; Mitchell, Colleen; Iacocca, Mary V.; Brown, Jennifer; Rabeno, Brenda; Czerwinski, Christine; Petrelli, Nicholas; Dolzhansky, Oleg; Abramov, Mikhail; Voronina, Olga; Potapova, Olga; Marks, Jeffrey R.; Suchorska, Wiktoria M.; Murawa, Dawid; Kycler, Witold; Ibbs, Matthew; Korski, Konstanty; Spychala, Arkadiusz; Murawa, Pawel; Brzezinski, Jacek J.; Perz, Hanna; Lazniak, Radoslaw; Teresiak, Marek; Tatka, Honorata; Leporowska, Ewa; Bogusz-Czerniewicz, Marta; Malicki, Julian; Mackiewicz, Andrzej; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Van Le, Xuan; Kohl, Bernard; Viet Tien, Nguyen; Thorp, Richard; Van Bang, Nguyen; Sussman, Howard; Duc Phu, Bui; Hajek, Richard; Phi Hung, Nguyen; Viet The Phuong, Tran; Quyet Thang, Huynh; Khan, Khurram Zaki; Penny, Robert; Mallery, David; Curley, Erin; Shelton, Candace; Yena, Peggy; Ingle, James N.; Couch, Fergus J.; Lingle, Wilma L.; King, Tari A.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria; Mills, Gordon B.; Dyer, Mary D.; Liu, Shuying; Meng, Xiaolong; Patangan, Modesto; Waldman, Frederic; Stoeppler, Hubert; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Thorne, Leigh; Huang, Mei; Boice, Lori; Hill, Ashley; Morrison, Carl; Gaudioso, Carmelo; Bshara, Wiam; Daily, Kelly; Egea, Sophie C.; Pegram, Mark D.; Gomez-Fernandez, Carmen; Dhir, Rajiv; Bhargava, Rohit; Brufsky, Adam; Shriver, Craig D.; Hooke, Jeffrey A.; Campbell, Jamie Leigh; Mural, Richard J.; Hu, Hai; Somiari, Stella; Larson, Caroline; Deyarmin, Brenda; Kvecher, Leonid; Kovatich, Albert J.; Ellis, Matthew J.; King, Tari A.; Hu, Hai; Couch, Fergus J.; Mural, Richard J.; Stricker, Thomas; White, Kevin; Olopade, Olufunmilayo; Ingle, James N.; Luo, Chunqing; Chen, Yaqin; Marks, Jeffrey R.; Waldman, Frederic; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Bose, Ron; Chang, Li-Wei; Beck, Andrew H.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria; Pihl, Todd; Jensen, Mark; Sfeir, Robert; Kahn, Ari; Chu, Anna; Kothiyal, Prachi; Wang, Zhining; Snyder, Eric; Pontius, Joan; Ayala, Brenda; Backus, Mark; Walton, Jessica; Baboud, Julien; Berton, Dominique; Nicholls, Matthew; Srinivasan, Deepak; Raman, Rohini; Girshik, Stanley; Kigonya, Peter; Alonso, Shelley; Sanbhadti, Rashmi; Barletta, Sean; Pot, David; Sheth, Margi; Demchok, John A.; Shaw, Kenna R. Mills; Yang, Liming; Eley, Greg; Ferguson, Martin L.; Tarnuzzer, Roy W.; Zhang, Jiashan; Dillon, Laura A. L.; Buetow, Kenneth; Fielding, Peter; Ozenberger, Bradley A.; Guyer, Mark S.; Sofia, Heidi J.; Palchik, Jacqueline D.

    2012-01-01

    We analysed primary breast cancers by genomic DNA copy number arrays, DNA methylation, exome sequencing, messenger RNA arrays, microRNA sequencing and reverse-phase protein arrays. Our ability to integrate information across platforms provided key insights into previously defined gene expression sub

  1. Comprehensive molecular portraits of human breast tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koboldt, Daniel C.; Fulton, Robert S.; McLellan, Michael D.; Schmidt, Heather; Kalicki-Veizer, Joelle; McMichael, Joshua F.; Fulton, Lucinda L.; Dooling, David J.; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Ally, Adrian; Balasundaram, Miruna; Butterfield, Yaron S. N.; Carlsen, Rebecca; Carter, Candace; Chu, Andy; Chuah, Eric; Chun, Hye-Jung E.; Coope, Robin J. N.; Dhalla, Noreen; Guin, Ranabir; Hirst, Carrie; Hirst, Martin; Holt, Robert A.; Lee, Darlene; Li, Haiyan I.; Mayo, Michael; Moore, Richard A.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Pleasance, Erin; Robertson, A. Gordon; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Shafiei, Arash; Sipahimalani, Payal; Slobodan, Jared R.; Stoll, Dominik; Tam, Angela; Thiessen, Nina; Varhol, Richard J.; Wye, Natasja; Zeng, Thomas; Zhao, Yongjun; Birol, Inanc; Jones, Steven J. M.; Marra, Marco A.; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Saksena, Gordon; Onofrio, Robert C.; Pho, Nam H.; Carter, Scott L.; Schumacher, Steven E.; Tabak, Barbara; Hernandez, Bryan; Gentry, Jeff; Nguyen, Huy; Crenshaw, Andrew; Ardlie, Kristin; Beroukhim, Rameen; Winckler, Wendy; Getz, Gad; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Meyerson, Matthew; Chin, Lynda; Park, Peter J.; Kucherlapati, Raju; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Auman, J. Todd; Fan, Cheng; Turman, Yidi J.; Shi, Yan; Li, Ling; Topal, Michael D.; He, Xiaping; Chao, Hann-Hsiang; Prat, Aleix; Silva, Grace O.; Iglesia, Michael D.; Zhao, Wei; Usary, Jerry; Berg, Jonathan S.; Adams, Michael; Booker, Jessica; Wu, Junyuan; Gulabani, Anisha; Bodenheimer, Tom; Hoyle, Alan P.; Simons, Janae V.; Soloway, Matthew G.; Mose, Lisle E.; Jefferys, Stuart R.; Balu, Saianand; Parker, Joel S.; Hayes, D. Neil; Perou, Charles M.; Malik, Simeen; Mahurkar, Swapna; Shen, Hui; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Triche, Timothy; Lai, Phillip H.; Bootwalla, Moiz S.; Maglinte, Dennis T.; Berman, Benjamin P.; Van den Berg, David J.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Laird, Peter W.; Creighton, Chad J.; Donehower, Lawrence A.; Getz, Gad; Noble, Michael; Voet, Doug; Saksena, Gordon; Gehlenborg, Nils; DiCara, Daniel; Zhang, Juinhua; Zhang, Hailei; Wu, Chang-Jiun; Liu, Spring Yingchun; Lawrence, Michael S.; Zou, Lihua; Sivachenko, Andrey; Lin, Pei; Stojanov, Petar; Jing, Rui; Cho, Juok; Sinha, Raktim; Park, Richard W.; Nazaire, Marc-Danie; Robinson, Jim; Thorvaldsdottir, Helga; Mesirov, Jill; Park, Peter J.; Chin, Lynda; Reynolds, Sheila; Kreisberg, Richard B.; Bernard, Brady; Bressler, Ryan; Erkkila, Timo; Lin, Jake; Thorsson, Vesteinn; Zhang, Wei; Shmulevich, Ilya; Ciriello, Giovanni; Weinhold, Nils; Schultz, Nikolaus; Gao, Jianjiong; Cerami, Ethan; Gross, Benjamin; Jacobsen, Anders; Sinha, Rileen; Aksoy, B. Arman; Antipin, Yevgeniy; Reva, Boris; Shen, Ronglai; Taylor, Barry S.; Ladanyi, Marc; Sander, Chris; Anur, Pavana; Spellman, Paul T.; Lu, Yiling; Liu, Wenbin; Verhaak, Roel R. G.; Mills, Gordon B.; Akbani, Rehan; Zhang, Nianxiang; Broom, Bradley M.; Casasent, Tod D.; Wakefield, Chris; Unruh, Anna K.; Baggerly, Keith; Coombes, Kevin; Weinstein, John N.; Haussler, David; Benz, Christopher C.; Stuart, Joshua M.; Benz, Stephen C.; Zhu, Jingchun; Szeto, Christopher C.; Scott, Gary K.; Yau, Christina; Paul, Evan O.; Carlin, Daniel; Wong, Christopher; Sokolov, Artem; Thusberg, Janita; Mooney, Sean; Ng, Sam; Goldstein, Theodore C.; Ellrott, Kyle; Grifford, Mia; Wilks, Christopher; Ma, Singer; Craft, Brian; Yan, Chunhua; Hu, Ying; Meerzaman, Daoud; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Bowen, Jay; Ramirez, Nilsa C.; Black, Aaron D.; Pyatt, Robert E.; White, Peter; Zmuda, Erik J.; Frick, Jessica; Lichtenberg, Taram.; Brookens, Robin; George, Myra M.; Gerken, Mark A.; Harper, Hollie A.; Leraas, Kristen M.; Wise, Lisa J.; Tabler, Teresa R.; McAllister, Cynthia; Barr, Thomas; Hart-Kothari, Melissa; Tarvin, Katie; Saller, Charles; Sandusky, George; Mitchell, Colleen; Iacocca, Mary V.; Brown, Jennifer; Rabeno, Brenda; Czerwinski, Christine; Petrelli, Nicholas; Dolzhansky, Oleg; Abramov, Mikhail; Voronina, Olga; Potapova, Olga; Marks, Jeffrey R.; Suchorska, Wiktoria M.; Murawa, Dawid; Kycler, Witold; Ibbs, Matthew; Korski, Konstanty; Spychala, Arkadiusz; Murawa, Pawel; Brzezinski, Jacek J.; Perz, Hanna; Lazniak, Radoslaw; Teresiak, Marek; Tatka, Honorata; Leporowska, Ewa; Bogusz-Czerniewicz, Marta; Malicki, Julian; Mackiewicz, Andrzej; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Van Le, Xuan; Kohl, Bernard; Viet Tien, Nguyen; Thorp, Richard; Van Bang, Nguyen; Sussman, Howard; Duc Phu, Bui; Hajek, Richard; Phi Hung, Nguyen; Viet The Phuong, Tran; Quyet Thang, Huynh; Khan, Khurram Zaki; Penny, Robert; Mallery, David; Curley, Erin; Shelton, Candace; Yena, Peggy; Ingle, James N.; Couch, Fergus J.; Lingle, Wilma L.; King, Tari A.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria; Mills, Gordon B.; Dyer, Mary D.; Liu, Shuying; Meng, Xiaolong; Patangan, Modesto; Waldman, Frederic; Stoeppler, Hubert; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Thorne, Leigh; Huang, Mei; Boice, Lori; Hill, Ashley; Morrison, Carl; Gaudioso, Carmelo; Bshara, Wiam; Daily, Kelly; Egea, Sophie C.; Pegram, Mark D.; Gomez-Fernandez, Carmen; Dhir, Rajiv; Bhargava, Rohit; Brufsky, Adam; Shriver, Craig D.; Hooke, Jeffrey A.; Campbell, Jamie Leigh; Mural, Richard J.; Hu, Hai; Somiari, Stella; Larson, Caroline; Deyarmin, Brenda; Kvecher, Leonid; Kovatich, Albert J.; Ellis, Matthew J.; King, Tari A.; Hu, Hai; Couch, Fergus J.; Mural, Richard J.; Stricker, Thomas; White, Kevin; Olopade, Olufunmilayo; Ingle, James N.; Luo, Chunqing; Chen, Yaqin; Marks, Jeffrey R.; Waldman, Frederic; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Bose, Ron; Chang, Li-Wei; Beck, Andrew H.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria; Pihl, Todd; Jensen, Mark; Sfeir, Robert; Kahn, Ari; Chu, Anna; Kothiyal, Prachi; Wang, Zhining; Snyder, Eric; Pontius, Joan; Ayala, Brenda; Backus, Mark; Walton, Jessica; Baboud, Julien; Berton, Dominique; Nicholls, Matthew; Srinivasan, Deepak; Raman, Rohini; Girshik, Stanley; Kigonya, Peter; Alonso, Shelley; Sanbhadti, Rashmi; Barletta, Sean; Pot, David; Sheth, Margi; Demchok, John A.; Shaw, Kenna R. Mills; Yang, Liming; Eley, Greg; Ferguson, Martin L.; Tarnuzzer, Roy W.; Zhang, Jiashan; Dillon, Laura A. L.; Buetow, Kenneth; Fielding, Peter; Ozenberger, Bradley A.; Guyer, Mark S.; Sofia, Heidi J.; Palchik, Jacqueline D.

    2012-01-01

    We analysed primary breast cancers by genomic DNA copy number arrays, DNA methylation, exome sequencing, messenger RNA arrays, microRNA sequencing and reverse-phase protein arrays. Our ability to integrate information across platforms provided key insights into previously defined gene expression sub

  2. Detection of early primary colorectal cancer with upconversion luminescent NP-based molecular probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunyan; Qi, Yifei; Qiao, Ruirui; Hou, Yi; Chan, Kaying; Li, Ziqian; Huang, Jiayi; Jing, Lihong; Du, Jun; Gao, Mingyuan

    2016-06-01

    Early detection and diagnosis of cancers is extremely beneficial for improving the survival rate of cancer patients and molecular imaging techniques are believed to be relevant for offering clinical solutions. Towards early cancer detection, we developed a primary animal colorectal cancer model and constructed a tumor-specific imaging probe by using biocompatible NaGdF4:Yb,Er@NaGdF4 upconversion luminescent NPs for establishing a sensitive early tumor imaging method. The primary animal tumor model, which can better mimic the human colorectal cancer, was built upon continual administration of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine in Kunming mice and the tumor development was carefully monitored through histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses to reveal the pathophysiological processes and molecular features of the cancer microenvironment. The upconversion imaging probe was constructed through covalent coupling of PEGylated core-shell NPs with folic acid whose receptor is highly expressed in the primary tumors. Upon 980 nm laser excitation, the primary colorectal tumors in the complex abdominal environment were sensitively imaged owing to the ultralow background of the upconversion luminescence and the high tumor-targeting specificity of the nanoprobe. We believe that the current studies provide a highly effective and potential approach for early colorectal cancer diagnosis and tumor surgical navigation.Early detection and diagnosis of cancers is extremely beneficial for improving the survival rate of cancer patients and molecular imaging techniques are believed to be relevant for offering clinical solutions. Towards early cancer detection, we developed a primary animal colorectal cancer model and constructed a tumor-specific imaging probe by using biocompatible NaGdF4:Yb,Er@NaGdF4 upconversion luminescent NPs for establishing a sensitive early tumor imaging method. The primary animal tumor model, which can better mimic the human colorectal cancer, was built upon continual

  3. Human Colon Cancer Cells Cultivated in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Within five days, bioreactor cultivated human colon cancer cells (shown) grown in Microgravity on the STS-70 mission in 1995, had grown 30 times the volume of the control specimens on Earth. The samples grown in space had a higher level of cellular organization and specialization. Because they more closely resemble tumors found in the body, microgravity grown cell cultures are ideal for research purposes.

  4. Molecular mechanism of bitter melon juice efficacy against pancreatic cancer. | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Pancreatic cancer (PanC) is an aggressive disease;median life of PanC patients post-diagnosis is been tested in several clinical trials for its anti-diabetic effects and has plenty of human safety data. We, therefore, anticipate that the positive outcomes from the proposed studies will provide compelling rationale for initiating clinical trials to establish BMJ activity against human pancreatic cancer. |

  5. Aspartame bioassay findings portend human cancer hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, James; LaDou, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) should reevaluate its position on aspartame as being safe under all conditions. Animal bioassay results predict human cancer risks, and a recent animal study confirms that there is a potential aspartame risk to humans. Aspartame is produced and packaged in China for domestic use and global distribution. Japan, France, and the United States are also major producers. No study of long-term adverse occupational health effects on aspartame workers have been conducted. The FDA should consider sponsoring a prospective epidemiologic study of aspartame workers.

  6. 1. HUMAN POPULATION MONITORING FOR CANCER PREVENTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Most of the chemicals classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as human carcinogens are mutagenic across test systems, cf. [www.epa.gov/gapdb ] and induce tumors at multiple sites in rodent species. They are therefore readity detected in short term tests for gene-tic and related effects (GRE), in animal carcinogenesis bioassays and in human monitoring studies. Carcinogens that are not genotoxic may be studied using new toxicogenomic approaches as will be discussed. A Chemical Effects in Biological Systems (CEBS) database is planned by the National Center for Toxicogenomics to contain information on such compounds. The 1992 Preamble to the IARC Monographs

  7. Status and Advances of RGD Molecular Imaging in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning YUE

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer has been one of the most common and the highest mortality rates malignant tumors at home and abroad. Sustained angiogenesis was not only the characteristic of malignant tumors, but also the foundation of tumor proliferation, invasion, recurrence and metastasis, it was also one of the hot spots of treatments in lung cancer biology currently. Integrins played an important part in tumor angiogenesis. Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD peptides could combine with integrins specifically, and the application of radionuclide-labeled RGD molecular probes enabled imaging of tumor blood vessels to reflect its changes. The lung cancer imaging of RGD peptides at home and abroad in recent years was reviewed in this article.

  8. Molecular Imaging and Precision Medicine in Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukotynski, Katherine A; Gerbaudo, Victor H

    2017-01-01

    Precision medicine allows tailoring of preventive or therapeutic interventions to avoid the expense and toxicity of futile treatment given to those who will not respond. Lung cancer is a heterogeneous disease functionally and morphologically. PET is a sensitive molecular imaging technique with a major role in the precision medicine algorithm of patients with lung cancer. It contributes to the precision medicine of lung neoplasia by interrogating tumor heterogeneity throughout the body. It provides anatomofunctional insight during diagnosis, staging, and restaging of the disease. It is a biomarker of tumoral heterogeneity that helps direct selection of the most appropriate treatment, the prediction of early response to cytotoxic and cytostatic therapies, and is a prognostic biomarker in patients with lung cancer. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Multifunctional Gold Nanostars for Molecular Imaging and Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Yuan, Hsiangkuo; Fales, Andrew; Register, Janna; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2015-08-01

    Plasmonics-active gold nanoparticles offer excellent potential in molecular imaging and cancer therapy. Among them, gold nanostars (AuNS) exhibit cross-platform flexibility as multimodal contrast agents for macroscopic X-ray computer tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), as well as nanoprobes for photoacoustic tomography (PAT), two-photon photoluminescence (TPL) and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Their surfactant-free surface enables versatile functionalization to enhance cancer targeting, and allow triggered drug release. AuNS can also be used as an efficient platform for drug carrying, photothermal therapy, and photodynamic therapy. This review paper presents the latest progress regarding AuNS as a promising nanoplatform for cancer nanotheranostics. Future research directions with AuNS for biomedical applications will also be discussed.

  10. Multifunctional Gold Nanostars for Molecular Imaging and Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang eLiu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonics-active gold nanoparticles offer excellent potential in molecular imaging and cancer therapy. Among them, gold nanostars (AuNS exhibit cross-platform flexibility as multimodal contrast agents for macroscopic X-ray computer tomography (CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, positron emission tomography (PET, as well as nanoprobes for photoacoustic tomography (PAT, two-photon photoluminescence (TPL and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS. Their surfactant-free surface enables versatile functionalization to enhance cancer targeting, and allow triggered drug release. AuNS can also be used as an efficient platform for drug carrying, photothermal therapy, and photodynamic therapy. This review paper presents the latest progress regarding AuNS as a promising nanoplatform for cancer nanotheranostics. Future research directions with AuNS for biomedical applications will also be discussed.

  11. Molecular target based combinational therapeutic approaches in thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajoria Shilpi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thyroid cancer, as with other types of cancer, is dependent on angiogenesis for its continued growth and development. Interestingly, estrogen has been shown to contribute to thyroid cancer aggressiveness in vitro, which is in full support of the observed increased incidence of thyroid cancer in women over men. Provided that estrogen has been observed to contribute to increased angiogenesis of estrogen responsive breast cancer, it is conceivable to speculate that estrogen also contributes to angiogenesis of estrogen responsive thyroid cancer. Methods In this study, three human thyroid cancer cells (B-CPAP, CGTH-W-1, ML-1 were treated with estrogen alone or estrogen and anti-estrogens (fulvestrant and 3,3′-diindolylmethane, a natural dietary compound for 24 hours. The cell culture media was then added to human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVECs and assayed for angiogenesis associated events. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF levels were also quantified in the conditioned media so as to evaluate if it is a key player involved in these observations. Results Conditioned medium from estrogen treated thyroid cancer cells enhanced phenotypical changes (proliferation, migration and tubulogenesis of endothelial cells typically observed during angiogenesis. These phenotypic changes observed in HUVECs were determined to be modulated by estrogen induced secretion of VEGF by the cancer cells. Lastly, we show that VEGF secretion was inhibited by the anti-estrogens, fulvestrant and 3,3′-diindolylmethane, which resulted in diminished angiogenesis associated events in HUVECs. Conclusion Our data establishes estrogen as being a key regulator of VEGF secretion/expression in thyroid cells which enhances the process of angiogenesis in thyroid cancer. These findings also suggest the clinical utility of anti-estrogens as anti-angiogenic compounds to be used as a therapeutic means to treat thyroid cancer. We also observed that 3,3

  12. Molecular target based combinational therapeutic approaches in thyroid cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Thyroid cancer, as with other types of cancer, is dependent on angiogenesis for its continued growth and development. Interestingly, estrogen has been shown to contribute to thyroid cancer aggressiveness in vitro, which is in full support of the observed increased incidence of thyroid cancer in women over men. Provided that estrogen has been observed to contribute to increased angiogenesis of estrogen responsive breast cancer, it is conceivable to speculate that estrogen also contributes to angiogenesis of estrogen responsive thyroid cancer. Methods In this study, three human thyroid cancer cells (B-CPAP, CGTH-W-1, ML-1) were treated with estrogen alone or estrogen and anti-estrogens (fulvestrant and 3,3′-diindolylmethane, a natural dietary compound) for 24 hours. The cell culture media was then added to human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVECs) and assayed for angiogenesis associated events. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels were also quantified in the conditioned media so as to evaluate if it is a key player involved in these observations. Results Conditioned medium from estrogen treated thyroid cancer cells enhanced phenotypical changes (proliferation, migration and tubulogenesis) of endothelial cells typically observed during angiogenesis. These phenotypic changes observed in HUVECs were determined to be modulated by estrogen induced secretion of VEGF by the cancer cells. Lastly, we show that VEGF secretion was inhibited by the anti-estrogens, fulvestrant and 3,3′-diindolylmethane, which resulted in diminished angiogenesis associated events in HUVECs. Conclusion Our data establishes estrogen as being a key regulator of VEGF secretion/expression in thyroid cells which enhances the process of angiogenesis in thyroid cancer. These findings also suggest the clinical utility of anti-estrogens as anti-angiogenic compounds to be used as a therapeutic means to treat thyroid cancer. We also observed that 3,3′-diindolylmethane is a

  13. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer: translating molecular biology approaches into the clinical realm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Sala, Evis; Hricak, Hedvig [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Grimm, Jan [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Program in Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States); Donati, Olivio F. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-05-01

    The epidemiology of prostate cancer has dramatically changed since the introduction of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening in the 1980's. Most prostate cancers today are detected at early stages of the disease and are considered 'indolent'; however, some patients' prostate cancers demonstrate a more aggressive behaviour which leads to rapid progression and death. Increasing understanding of the biology underlying the heterogeneity that characterises this disease has led to a continuously evolving role of imaging in the management of prostate cancer. Functional and metabolic imaging techniques are gaining importance as the impact on the therapeutic paradigm has shifted from structural tumour detection alone to distinguishing patients with indolent tumours that can be managed conservatively (e.g., by active surveillance) from patients with more aggressive tumours that may require definitive treatment with surgery or radiation. In this review, we discuss advanced imaging techniques that allow direct visualisation of molecular interactions relevant to prostate cancer and their potential for translation to the clinical setting in the near future. The potential use of imaging to follow molecular events during drug therapy as well as the use of imaging agents for therapeutic purposes will also be discussed. (orig.)

  14. Molecular Classification of Gastric Cancer: A new paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Manish A.; Khanin, Raya; Tang, Laura; Janjigian, Yelena Y.; Klimstra, David S.; Gerdes, Hans; Kelsen, David P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Gastric cancer may be subdivided into three distinct subtypes –proximal, diffuse, and distal gastric cancer– based on histopathologic and anatomic criteria. Each subtype is associated with unique epidemiology. Our aim is to test the hypothesis that these distinct gastric cancer subtypes may also be distinguished by gene expression analysis. Experimental Design Patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma being screened for a phase II preoperative clinical trial (NCI 5917) underwent endoscopic biopsy for fresh tumor procurement. 4–6 targeted biopsies of the primary tumor were obtained. Macrodissection was performed to ensure >80% carcinoma in the sample. HG-U133A GeneChip (Affymetrix) was used for cDNA expression analysis, and all arrays were processed and analyzed using the Bioconductor R-package. Results Between November 2003 and January 2006, 57 patients were screened to identify 36 patients with localized gastric cancer who had adequate RNA for expression analysis. Using supervised analysis, we built a classifier to distinguish the three gastric cancer subtypes, successfully classifying each into tightly grouped clusters. Leave-one-out cross validation error was 0.14, suggesting that >85% of samples were classified correctly. Gene set analysis with the False Discovery Rate set at 0.25 identified several pathways that were differentially regulated when comparing each gastric cancer subtype to adjacent normal stomach. Conclusions Subtypes of gastric cancer that have epidemiologic and histologic distinction are also distinguished by gene expression data. These preliminary data suggest a new classification of gastric cancer with implications for improving our understanding of disease biology and identification of unique molecular drivers for each gastric cancer subtype. PMID:21430069

  15. Molecular targets of naturopathy in cancer research: bridge to modern medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Aamir; Ginnebaugh, Kevin R; Li, Yiwei; Padhye, Subhash B; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2015-01-06

    The relevance of naturopathy (defined as the practice of medicine for the treatment of human diseases with natural agents) in human cancer is beginning to be appreciated, as documented by renewed interest in nutraceutical research, the natural anticancer agents of dietary origin. Because of their pleiotropic effects and the ability to modulate multiple signaling pathways, which is a good attribute of natural agents, nutraceuticals have frequently been demonstrated to re-sensitize drug-resistant cancers. The effectiveness of nutraceuticals can be further enhanced if the tools for the relative assessment of their molecular targets are readily available. Such information can be critical for determining their most effective uses. Here, we discuss the anticancer potential of nutraceuticals and the associated challenges that have interfered with their translational potential as a naturopathic approach for the management of cancers. In the years to come, an efficient screening and assessment of molecular targets will be the key to make rapid progress in the area of drug design and discovery, especially focusing on evidence-based development of naturopathy for the treatment of human malignancies.

  16. Molecular Targets of Naturopathy in Cancer Research: Bridge to Modern Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aamir Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of naturopathy (defined as the practice of medicine for the treatment of human diseases with natural agents in human cancer is beginning to be appreciated, as documented by renewed interest in nutraceutical research, the natural anticancer agents of dietary origin. Because of their pleiotropic effects and the ability to modulate multiple signaling pathways, which is a good attribute of natural agents, nutraceuticals have frequently been demonstrated to re-sensitize drug-resistant cancers. The effectiveness of nutraceuticals can be further enhanced if the tools for the relative assessment of their molecular targets are readily available. Such information can be critical for determining their most effective uses. Here, we discuss the anticancer potential of nutraceuticals and the associated challenges that have interfered with their translational potential as a naturopathic approach for the management of cancers. In the years to come, an efficient screening and assessment of molecular targets will be the key to make rapid progress in the area of drug design and discovery, especially focusing on evidence-based development of naturopathy for the treatment of human malignancies.

  17. Harnessing Integrative Omics to Facilitate Molecular Imaging of the Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Family for Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, Martin; de Boer, H Rudolf; Hooge, Marjolijn N Lub-de; van Vugt, Marcel A T M; de Vries, Elisabeth G E

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is a growing problem worldwide. The cause of death in cancer patients is often due to treatment-resistant metastatic disease. Many molecularly targeted anticancer drugs have been developed against 'oncogenic driver' pathways. However, these treatments are usually only effective in properly selected patients. Resistance to molecularly targeted drugs through selective pressure on acquired mutations or molecular rewiring can hinder their effectiveness. This review summarizes how molecular imaging techniques can potentially facilitate the optimal implementation of targeted agents. Using the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) family as a model in (pre)clinical studies, we illustrate how molecular imaging may be employed to characterize whole body target expression as well as monitor drug effectiveness and the emergence of tumor resistance. We further discuss how an integrative omics discovery platform could guide the selection of 'effect sensors' - new molecular imaging targets - which are dynamic markers that indicate treatment effectiveness or resistance.

  18. Mortalin sensitizes human cancer cells to MKT-077-induced senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deocaris, Custer C; Widodo, Nashi; Shrestha, Bhupal G; Kaur, Kamaljit; Ohtaka, Manami; Yamasaki, Kazuhiko; Kaul, Sunil C; Wadhwa, Renu

    2007-07-18

    Mortalin is a chaperone protein that functions in many cellular processes such as mitochondrial biogenesis, intracellular trafficking, cell proliferation and signaling. Its upregulation in many human cancers makes it a candidate target for therapeutic intervention by small molecule drugs. In continuation to our earlier studies showing mortalin as a cellular target of MKT-077, a mitochondrion-seeking delocalized cationic dye that causes selective death of cancer cells, in this work, we report that MKT-077 binds to the nucleotide-binding domain of mortalin, causes tertiary structural changes in the protein, inactivates its chaperone function, and induces senescence in human tumor cell lines. Interestingly, in tumor cells with elevated level of mortalin expression, fairly low drug doses were sufficient to induce senescence. Guided by molecular screening for mortalin in tumor cells, our results led to the idea that working at low doses of the drug could be an alternative senescence-inducing cancer therapeutic strategy that could, in theory, avoid renal toxicities responsible for the abortion of MKT-077 clinical trials. Our work may likely translate to a re-appraisal of the therapeutic benefits of low doses of several classes of anti-tumor drugs, even of those that had been discontinued due to adverse effects.

  19. Princess takamatsu symposium on DNA repair and human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Lawrence A; Nishimura, Susumu

    2010-06-01

    The 40th International Symposium of the Princess Takamatsu Cancer Research Fund, entitled "DNA Repair and Human Cancers," was held on November 10-12, 2009 at Hotel Grand Palace, Tokyo, Japan. The meeting focused on the role of DNA repair in preventing mutations by endogenous and exogenous DNA damage and increasing the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents by interfering with DNA repair. The 14 presentations by the speakers from the United States, four from the United Kingdom, one each from Italy, The Netherlands, and France, and 13 from Japan, covered most aspects of DNA repair, spanning DNA damage, molecular structures of repair enzymes, and clinical studies on inhibition of DNA repair processes. Extensive time was reserved for discussions with the active participation of the 150 invited Japanese scientists. The choice of a symposium on DNA repair in human cancers resulted in part from the excellent basic and clinical studies that have been carried out for many years in Japan, and the general lack of recognition versus the importance of DNA repair in understanding carcinogenesis. Copyright 2010 AACR.

  20. A molecular monopoly? HPV testing, the Pap smear and the molecularisation of cervical cancer screening in the USA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogarth, Stuart; Hopkins, Michael M.; Rodriguez, Victor

    2012-01-01

    DNA-based molecular testing for human papillomavirus has emerged as a novel approach to cervical cancer screening in the context of well-entrenched existing technology, the Pap smear. This article seeks to elucidate the process of molecularisation in the context of screening programmes. We illustrat

  1. Predictive and prognostic molecular markers for cancer medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sunali; Shelling, Andrew; Muthukaruppan, Anita; Lasham, Annette; Blenkiron, Cherie; Laking, George; Print, Cristin

    2010-03-01

    Over the last 10 years there has been an explosion of information about the molecular biology of cancer. A challenge in oncology is to translate this information into advances in patient care. While there are well-formed routes for translating new molecular information into drug therapy, the routes for translating new information into sensitive and specific diagnostic, prognostic and predictive tests are still being developed. Similarly, the science of using tumor molecular profiles to select clinical trial participants or to optimize therapy for individual patients is still in its infancy. This review will summarize the current technologies for predicting treatment response and prognosis in cancer medicine, and outline what the future may hold. It will also highlight the potential importance of methods that can integrate molecular, histopathological and clinical information into a synergistic understanding of tumor progression. While these possibilities are without doubt exciting, significant challenges remain if we are to implement them with a strong evidence base in a widely available and cost-effective manner.

  2. Preanalytical considerations in detection of colorectal cancer in blood serum using Raman molecular imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treado, Patrick J.; Stewart, Shona D.; Smith, Aaron; Kirschner, Heather; Post, Christopher; Overholt, Bergein F.

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and women in the United States. Raman Molecular Imaging (RMI) is an effective technique to evaluate human tissue, cells and bodily fluids, including blood serum for disease diagnosis. ChemImage Corporation, in collaboration with clinicians, has been engaged in development of an in vitro diagnostic Raman assay focused on CRC detection. The Raman Assay for Colorectal Cancer (RACC) exploits the high specificity of Raman imaging to distinguish diseased from normal dried blood serum droplets without additional reagents. Pilot Study results from testing of hundreds of biobank patient samples have demonstrated that RACC detects CRC with high sensitivity and specificity. However, expanded clinical trials, which are ongoing, are revealing a host of important preanalytical considerations associated with sample collection, sample storage and stability, sample shipping, sample preparation and sample interferents, which impact detection performance. Results from recent clinical studies will be presented.

  3. Single-band upconversion nanoprobes for multiplexed simultaneous in situ molecular mapping of cancer biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lei; Wang, Rui; Yao, Chi; Li, Xiaomin; Wang, Chengli; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Congjian; Zeng, Aijun; Zhao, Dongyuan; Zhang, Fan

    2015-04-01

    The identification of potential diagnostic markers and target molecules among the plethora of tumour oncoproteins for cancer diagnosis requires facile technology that is capable of quantitatively analysing multiple biomarkers in tumour cells and tissues. Diagnostic and prognostic classifications of human tumours are currently based on the western blotting and single-colour immunohistochemical methods that are not suitable for multiplexed detection. Herein, we report a general and novel method to prepare single-band upconversion nanoparticles with different colours. The expression levels of three biomarkers in breast cancer cells were determined using single-band upconversion nanoparticles, western blotting and immunohistochemical technologies with excellent correlation. Significantly, the application of antibody-conjugated single-band upconversion nanoparticle molecular profiling technology can achieve the multiplexed simultaneous in situ biodetection of biomarkers in breast cancer cells and tissue specimens and produce more accurate results for the simultaneous quantification of proteins present at low levels compared with classical immunohistochemical technology.

  4. Investigation of the molecular relationship between breast cancer and obesity by candidate gene prioritization methods

    OpenAIRE

    Saba Garshasbi; Dariush Salimi; Abbas Doosti

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cancer and obesity are two major public health concerns. More than 12 million cases of cancer are reported annually. Many reports confirmed obesity as a risk factor for cancer. The molecular relationship between obesity and breast cancer has not been clear yet. The purpose of this study was to investigate priorities of effective genes in the molecular relationship between obesity and breast cancer. Methods: In this study, computer simulation method was used for prioritizing the ge...

  5. Recapitulating Human Gastric Cancer Pathogenesis: Experimental Models of Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Lin; El Zaatari, Mohamad

    2017-01-01

    Overview Gastric cancer has been traditionally defined by the Correa paradigm as a progression of sequential pathological events that begins with chronic inflammation [1]. Infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the typical explanation for why the stomach becomes chronically inflamed. Acute gastric inflammation then leads to chronic gastritis, atrophy particularly of acid-secreting parietal cells, metaplasia due to mucous neck cell expansion from trans-differentiation of zymogenic cells to dysplasia and eventually carcinoma [2]. The chapter contains an overview of gastric anatomy and physiology to set the stage for signaling pathways that play a role in gastric tumorigenesis. Finally, the major known mouse models of gastric transformation are critiqued in terms of the rationale behind their generation and contribution to our understanding of human cancer subtypes. PMID:27573785

  6. [Molecular-targeted therapy for hormone-refractory prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Kazuo; Takayama, Hitoshi; Nakayama, Masashi; Nonomura, Norio; Okuyama, Akihiko

    2006-06-01

    Molecular-targeted therapy is to treat pathologic pathways specifically in tumor cell or tumor microenvironment. Specific molecular-targeted therapeutic agents for hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) include endothelin-A receptor antagonist, EGF receptor (EGFR) inhibitor, platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) inhibitor, nuclear factor of kappaB (NF-kappaB) inhibitor, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) inhibitor, and active form of Vitamin D. These agents have been investigated in clinical trials. So far, none of the above-mentioned agent has shown a sufficient clinical efficacy alone. However, docetaxel-based combinations with thalidomide or calcitriol have promising clinical activities. Further investigations are needed to optimize the molecular-targeted agents in the combinations with chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of HRPC.

  7. HUMAN CANCER IS A PARASITE SPREAD VIA INTRUSION IN GENOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey N. Rumyantsev

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The present article is devoted to further development of new paradigm about the biology of human cancer: the hypothesis of parasitic nature, origin and evolution of the phenomenon. The study included integrative reconsidering, and reinterpretation of the make-ups, traits and processes existing both in human and animal cancers. It was demonstrated that human cancer possesses nearly analogous set of traits characteristic of transmissible animal cancer. Undoubted analogies are seen in the prevalence, clinical exposure, progression of disease, origin of causative agents, immune response against invasion and especially in the intrinsic deviations of the leading traits of cancerous cells. Both human and animal cancers are highly exceptional pathogens. But in contrast to contagious animal cancers the cells of of human cancer can not pass between individuals as usual infectious agents. Exhaustive evidence of the parasitic nature and evolutionary origin of human cancer was revealed and interpreted. In contrast to animal cancer formed of solitary cell lineage, human cancer consists of a couple of lineages constructed under different genetic regulations and performed different structural and physiological functions. The complex make-up of cancer composition remains stable over sequential propagation. The subsistence of human cancer regularly includes obligatory interchange of its successive forms. Human cancer possesses its own biological watch and the ability to gobble its victim, transmit via the intrusion of the genome, perform intercommunications within the tumor components and between the dispersed subunits of cancer. Such intrinsic traits characterize human cancer as a primitively structured parasite that can be classified in Class Mammalians, Species Genomeintruder malevolent (G.malevolent.

  8. STAT3 as an emerging molecular target in pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma NK

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Narinder Kumar Sharma,1 Sharmila Shankar,2 Rakesh K Srivastava1 1Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, and Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA; 2Kansas City VA Medical Center, Kansas City, MO, USA Abstract: Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths. Although, surgical resection of pancreatic cancer may provide the best chance for cure and long-term survival, due to the late onset of symptoms only 15% to 20% of patients have resectable tumors. Most of the pancreatic tumors have mutations in the K-ras gene, followed by mutations in tumor suppressor genes such as p53 and SMAD4. In addition, there is growing evidence for the potential involvement of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 in malignant transformation of pancreatic cancer. STAT3 plays critical roles in regulating many physiological functions in normal and malignant tissues, such as inflammation, survival, proliferation, differentiation, and angiogenesis. STAT3 is activated by a wide variety of cytokines, growth factors, and other stimuli. Unlike other members of the STAT family, ablation of STAT3 leads to embryonic lethality and conditional loss of STAT3 protein in adult tissues, leading to a variety of abnormalities, confirming that STAT3 participates in a wide variety of physiological processes. Constitutive activation of STAT3 is implicated in a wide range of human cancers; therefore, STAT3 has been identified as a novel target to treat and prevent cancers. Several STAT3 inhibitors display antitumor effectiveness, and data supporting the use of STAT3 inhibitors are emerging. Different approaches used for the inhibition of activated STAT3 include modulating upstream positive or negative regulators or directly targeting its different domains. These approaches have been used in the inhibition of STAT3 in different cancers, but in this review, we will focus specifically on the inhibition

  9. Multiplex bioimaging of piRNA molecular pathway-regulated theragnostic effects in a single breast cancer cell using a piRNA molecular beacon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youn Jung; Moon, Sung Ung; Park, Min Geun; Jung, Woon Yong; Park, Yong Keun; Song, Sung Kyu; Ryu, Je Gyu; Lee, Yong Seung; Heo, Hye Jung; Gu, Ha Na; Cho, Su Jeong; Ali, Bahy A; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Lee, Ilkyun; Kim, Soonhag

    2016-09-01

    Recently, PIWI-interacting small non-coding RNAs (piRNAs) have emerged as novel cancer biomarkers candidate because of their high expression level in various cancer types and role in the control of tumor suppressor genes. In this study, a novel breast cancer theragnostics probe based on a single system targeting the piRNA-36026 (piR-36026) molecular pathway was developed using a piR-36026 molecular beacon (MB). The piR-36026 MB successfully visualized endogenous piR-36026 biogenesis, which is highly expressed in MCF7 cells (a human breast cancer cell line), and simultaneously inhibited piR-36026-mediated cancer progression in vitro and in vivo. We discovered two tumor suppressor proteins, SERPINA1 and LRAT, that were directly regulated as endogenous piR-36026 target genes in MCF7 cells. Furthermore, multiplex bioimaging of a single MCF7 cell following treatment with piR-36026 MB clearly visualized the direct molecular interaction of piRNA-36026 with SERPINA1 or LRAT and subsequent molecular therapeutic responses including caspase-3 and PI in the nucleus.

  10. Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Xiaolan, E-mail: huxiaolan1998@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Zhang, Xianqi [The 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Qiu, Shuifeng [Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Yu, Daihua; Lin, Shuxin [Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China)

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Salidroside inhibits the growth of human breast cancer cells. {yields} Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest of human breast cancer cells. {yields} Salidroside induces apoptosis of human breast cancer cell lines. -- Abstract: Recently, salidroside (p-hydroxyphenethyl-{beta}-D-glucoside) has been identified as one of the most potent compounds isolated from plants of the Rhodiola genus used widely in traditional Chinese medicine, but pharmacokinetic data on the compound are unavailable. We were the first to report the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on cancer cell lines derived from different tissues, and we found that human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells (estrogen receptor negative) were sensitive to the inhibitory action of low-concentration salidroside. To further investigate the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on breast cancer cells and reveal possible ER-related differences in response to salidroside, we used MDA-MB-231 cells and MCF-7 cells (estrogen receptor-positive) as models to study possible molecular mechanisms; we evaluated the effects of salidroside on cell growth characteristics, such as proliferation, cell cycle duration, and apoptosis, and on the expression of apoptosis-related molecules. Our results demonstrated for the first time that salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells and may be a promising candidate for breast cancer treatment.

  11. Knowledge environments representing molecular entities for the virtual physiological human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann-Apitius, Martin; Fluck, Juliane; Furlong, Laura; Fornes, Oriol; Kolárik, Corinna; Hanser, Susanne; Boeker, Martin; Schulz, Stefan; Sanz, Ferran; Klinger, Roman; Mevissen, Theo; Gattermayer, Tobias; Oliva, Baldo; Friedrich, Christoph M

    2008-09-13

    In essence, the virtual physiological human (VPH) is a multiscale representation of human physiology spanning from the molecular level via cellular processes and multicellular organization of tissues to complex organ function. The different scales of the VPH deal with different entities, relationships and processes, and in consequence the models used to describe and simulate biological functions vary significantly. Here, we describe methods and strategies to generate knowledge environments representing molecular entities that can be used for modelling the molecular scale of the VPH. Our strategy to generate knowledge environments representing molecular entities is based on the combination of information extraction from scientific text and the integration of information from biomolecular databases. We introduce @neuLink, a first prototype of an automatically generated, disease-specific knowledge environment combining biomolecular, chemical, genetic and medical information. Finally, we provide a perspective for the future implementation and use of knowledge environments representing molecular entities for the VPH.

  12. Epigenetic: a molecular link between testicular cancer and environmental exposures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelie eVega

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, studies in rodents have highlighted links between in utero and/or neonatal exposures to molecules that alter endocrine functions and the development of genital tract abnormalities, such as cryptorchidism, hypospadias, and impaired spermatogenesis. Most of these molecules, called endocrine disrupters (EDs exert estrogenic and/or antiandrogenic activities. These data led to the hypothesis of the Testicular Dysgenesis Syndrome which postulates that these disorders are one clinical entity and are linked by epidemiological and pathophysiological relations. Futhermore, infertility has been stated as a risk factor for testicular cancer. The incidence of testicular cancer has been increasing over the past decades. Most of testicular germ cell cancers develop through a pre-invasive carcinoma in situ (CIS from fetal germ cells (primordial germ cell or gonocyte. During their development, fetal germ cells undergo epigenetic modifications. Interestingly, several lines of evidence have shown that gene regulation through epigenetic mechanisms (DNA and histone modifications plays an important role in normal development as well as in various diseases, including testicular cancer.Here we will review chromatin modifications which can affect testicular physiology leading to the development of testicular cancer; and highlight potential molecular pathways involved in these alterations in the context of environmental exposures.

  13. Molecular cytogenetic applications in analysis of the cancer genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Pulivarthi H; Nandula, Subhadra V; Murty, Vundavalli V

    2007-01-01

    Cancer cells exhibit nonrandom and complex chromosome abnormalities. The role of genomic changes in cancer is well established. However, the identification of complex and cryptic chromosomal changes is beyond the resolution of conventional banding methods. The fluorescence microscopy afforded by imaging technologies, developed recently, facilitates a precise identification of these chromosome alterations in cancer. The three most commonly utilized molecular cytogenetics methods comparative genomic hybridization, spectral karyotype, and fluorescence in situ hybridization, that have already become benchmark tools in cancer cytogenetics, are described in this chapter. Comparative genomic hybridization is a powerful tool for screening copy-number changes in tumor genomes without the need for preparation of metaphases from tumor cells. Multicolor spectral karyotype permits visualization of all chromosomes in one experiment permitting identification of precise chromosomal changes on metaphases derived from tumor cells. The uses of fluorescence in situ hybridization are diverse, including mapping of alteration in single copy genes, chromosomal regions, or entire chromosomes. The opportunities to detect genetic alterations in cancer cells continue to evolve with the use of these methodologies both in diagnosis and research.

  14. Molecular targets of cancer chemoprevention by garlic-derived organosulfides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anna HERMAN-ANTOSIEWICZ; Anna A POWOLNY; Shivendra V SINGH

    2007-01-01

    The medicinal benefits of Allium vegetables, especially garlic, have been noted throughout recorded history. The known health benefits of Allium vegetables and their constituents include cardiovascular protective effects, stimulation of immune function, reduction of blood glucose level, radioprotection, improvement of memory loss, protection against microbial, viral and fungal infections, as well as anticancer effects. Population-based case control studies have suggested an inverse correlation between dietary intake of Allium vegetables and the risk of different types of cancers. The anticarcinogenic effect of Allium vegetables in-eluding garlic is attributed to organosulfur compounds (OSC), which are highly effective in affording protection against cancer in animal models induced by a variety of chemical carcinogens. More recent studies have shown that certain naturally occurring OSC analogues can suppress proliferation of cancer cells in culture and in vivo. The OSC-induced changes in the proliferation of cancer Cellsare frequently associated with perturbations in cell cycle progression and induc-tion of G2/M phase arrest. The OSC have also been demonstrated to induce apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway by altering the ratio of the Bc1-2 family of proteins both in cell culture and in in vivo models. Anti-angiogenic activity for garlic-derived OSC has also been documented. This article summarizes current knowledge on molecular targets of cancer chemoprevention by OSC.

  15. 59. Cold Spring Harbor symposium on quantitative biology: Molecular genetics of cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    Investigation of the mechanistic aspects of cancer has its roots in the studies on tumor viruses and their effects on cell proliferation, function, and growth. This outstanding progress was well documented in previous Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology. In the early to mid 1980s, progress on the development of chromosome mapping strategies and the accumulation of DNA probes that identified polymorphisms, encouraged by the international Human Genome Project, enabled the identification of other genes that contributed to familial inheritance of high susceptibility to specific cancers. This approach was very successful and led to a degree of optimism that one aspect of cancer, the multistep genetic process from early neoplasia to metastatic tumors, was beginning to be understood. It therefore seemed appropriate that the 59th Symposium on Quantitative Biology focus attention on the Molecular Genetics of Cancer. The concept was to combine the exciting progress on the identification of new genetic alterations in human tumor cells with studies on the function of the cancer gene products and how they go awry in tumor cells.

  16. Molecular pharmacology of human NMDA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Maiken; Hansen, Kasper Bø; Andersen, Karen Toftegaard

    2012-01-01

    current knowledge of the relationship between NMDA receptor structure and function. We summarize studies on the biophysical properties of human NMDA receptors and compare these properties to those of rat orthologs. Finally, we provide a comprehensive pharmacological characterization that allows side......-by-side comparison of agonists, un-competitive antagonists, GluN2B-selective non-competitive antagonists, and GluN2C/D-selective modulators at recombinant human and rat NMDA receptors. The evaluation of biophysical properties and pharmacological probes acting at different sites on the receptor suggest...... that the binding sites and conformational changes leading to channel gating in response to agonist binding are highly conserved between human and rat NMDA receptors. In summary, the results of this study suggest that no major detectable differences exist in the pharmacological and functional properties of human...

  17. Molecular analysis of precursor lesions in familial pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Crnogorac-Jurcevic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With less than a 5% survival rate pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC is almost uniformly lethal. In order to make a significant impact on survival of patients with this malignancy, it is necessary to diagnose the disease early, when curative surgery is still possible. Detailed knowledge of the natural history of the disease and molecular events leading to its progression is therefore critical. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We have analysed the precursor lesions, PanINs, from prophylactic pancreatectomy specimens of patients from four different kindreds with high risk of familial pancreatic cancer who were treated for histologically proven PanIN-2/3. Thus, the material was procured before pancreatic cancer has developed, rather than from PanINs in a tissue field that already contains cancer. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling using such unique specimens was performed. Bulk frozen sections displaying the most extensive but not microdissected PanIN-2/3 lesions were used in order to obtain the holistic view of both the precursor lesions and their microenvironment. A panel of 76 commonly dysregulated genes that underlie neoplastic progression from normal pancreas to PanINs and PDAC were identified. In addition to shared genes some differences between the PanINs of individual families as well as between the PanINs and PDACs were also seen. This was particularly pronounced in the stromal and immune responses. CONCLUSIONS: Our comprehensive analysis of precursor lesions without the invasive component provides the definitive molecular proof that PanIN lesions beget cancer from a molecular standpoint. We demonstrate the need for accumulation of transcriptomic changes during the progression of PanIN to PDAC, both in the epithelium and in the surrounding stroma. An identified 76-gene signature of PDAC progression presents a rich candidate pool for the development of early diagnostic and/or surveillance markers as well as potential novel preventive

  18. Molecular adaptations in human atrial fibrillation : mechanisms of protein remodeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brundel, Bianca Johanna Josephina Maria

    2000-01-01

    The main goal was to study the molecular remodeling in human atrial fibrillation. We focussed on gene expression of proteins wich influence the calcium homeostasis and action potential duration in human AF. The impact of modulation sysems like the natriuretic peptide system and the endothelin system

  19. Human molecular cytogenetics: from cells to nucleotides

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The field of cytogenetics has focused on studying the number, structure, function and origin of chromosomal abnormalities and the evolution of chromosomes. The development of fluorescent molecules that either directly or via an intermediate molecule bind to DNA has led to the development of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), a technology linking cytogenetics to molecular genetics. This technique has a wide range of applications that increased the dimension of chromosome analysis. The f...

  20. Molecular Identification of Human Fungal Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    military environment are urgently needed. The objective of this proposal is to develop a rapid molecular diagnostic assay using a new PCR technology...called LATE- PCR (Linear-After-The-Exponential Polymerase Chain Reaction). This study has three aims: 1) selection of targets suitable for a multiplex PCR ...reaction, 2) design of primers and probes for each class of fungus, all of which will be compatible in a single reaction, and 3) pilot testing on

  1. Antiangiogenic Steroids in Human Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Pietras

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in the early detection of tumors and in the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery for disease management, the worldwide mortality from human cancer remains unacceptably high. The treatment of cancer may benefit from the introduction of novel therapies derived from natural products. Natural products have served to provide a basis for many of the pharmaceutical agents in current use in cancer therapy. Emerging research indicates that progressive growth and spread of many solid tumors depends, in part, on the formation of an adequate blood supply, and this process of tumor-associated angiogenesis is reported to have prognostic significance in several human cancers. This review focuses on the potential application in antitumor therapy of naturally-occurring steroids that target tumor-associated angiogenesis. Squalamine, a 7,24 dihydroxylated 24-sulfated cholestane steroid conjugated to a spermidine at position C-3, is known to have strong antiangiogenic activity in vitro, and it significantly disrupts tumor proliferation and progression in laboratory studies. Work on the interactions of squalamine with vascular endothelial cells indicate that it binds with cell membranes, inhibits the membrane Na+/H+ exchanger and may further function as a calmodulin chaperone. These primary actions appear to promote inhibition of several vital steps in angiogenesis, such as blockade of mitogen-induced actin polymerization, cell–cell adhesion and cell migration, leading to suppression of endothelial cell proliferation. Preclinical studies with squalamine have shown additive benefits in tumor growth delay when squalamine is combined with cisplatin, paclitaxel, cyclophosphamide, genistein or radiation therapy. This compound has also been assessed in early phase clinical trials in cancer; squalamine was found to exhibit little systemic toxicity and was generally well tolerated by treated patients with various solid tumor malignancies

  2. Antiangiogenic Steroids in Human Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietras, Richard J; Weinberg, Olga K

    2005-03-01

    Despite advances in the early detection of tumors and in the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery for disease management, the worldwide mortality from human cancer remains unacceptably high. The treatment of cancer may benefit from the introduction of novel therapies derived from natural products. Natural products have served to provide a basis for many of the pharmaceutical agents in current use in cancer therapy. Emerging research indicates that progressive growth and spread of many solid tumors depends, in part, on the formation of an adequate blood supply, and this process of tumor-associated angiogenesis is reported to have prognostic significance in several human cancers. This review focuses on the potential application in antitumor therapy of naturally-occurring steroids that target tumor-associated angiogenesis. Squalamine, a 7,24 dihydroxylated 24-sulfated cholestane steroid conjugated to a spermidine at position C-3, is known to have strong antiangiogenic activity in vitro, and it significantly disrupts tumor proliferation and progression in laboratory studies. Work on the interactions of squalamine with vascular endothelial cells indicate that it binds with cell membranes, inhibits the membrane Na(+)/H(+) exchanger and may further function as a calmodulin chaperone. These primary actions appear to promote inhibition of several vital steps in angiogenesis, such as blockade of mitogen-induced actin polymerization, cell-cell adhesion and cell migration, leading to suppression of endothelial cell proliferation. Preclinical studies with squalamine have shown additive benefits in tumor growth delay when squalamine is combined with cisplatin, paclitaxel, cyclophosphamide, genistein or radiation therapy. This compound has also been assessed in early phase clinical trials in cancer; squalamine was found to exhibit little systemic toxicity and was generally well tolerated by treated patients with various solid tumor malignancies, including ovarian, non

  3. Identifying molecular targets of lifestyle modifications in colon cancer prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly Marie Derry

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available One in four deaths in the United States is cancer-related, and colorectal cancer (CRC is the second leading cause of cancer-associated deaths. Screening strategies are utilized but have not reduced disease incidence or mortality. In this regard, there is an interest in cancer preventive strategies focusing on lifestyle intervention, where specific etiologic factors involved in cancer initiation, promotion, and progression could be targeted. For example, exposure to dietary carcinogens, such as nitrosamines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons influences colon carcinogenesis. Furthermore, dietary deficiencies could alter sensitivity to genetic damage and influence carcinogen metabolism contributing to CRC. High alcohol consumption increases the risk of mutations including the fact that acetaldehyde, an ethanol metabolite, is classified as a group 1 carcinogen. Tobacco smoke exposure is also a risk factor for cancer development; ~20% of CRCs are associated with smoking. Additionally, obese patients have a higher risk of cancer development, which is further supported by the fact that physical activity decreases CRC risk by 55%. Similarly, chronic inflammatory conditions also increase the risk of CRC development. Moreover, the circadian clock alters digestion and regulates other biochemical, physiological and behavioral processes that could positively influence CRC. Taken together, colon carcinogenesis involves a number of etiological factors, and therefore, to create effective preventive strategies, molecular targets need to be identified and beleaguered prior to disease progression. With this in mind, the following is a comprehensive review identifying downstream target proteins of the above lifestyle risk factors, which are modulated during colon carcinogenesis and could be targeted for CRC prevention by novel agents including phytochemicals.

  4. Epidemiologic studies of the human microbiome and cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vogtmann, Emily; Goedert, James J

    2016-01-01

    .... Previously detected associations of individual bacteria (e.g., Helicobacter pylori), periodontal disease, and inflammation with specific cancers have motivated studies considering the association between the human microbiome and cancer risk...

  5. A Gene Regulatory Program in Human Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Renhua; Campos, John; Iida, Joji

    2015-12-01

    Molecular heterogeneity in human breast cancer has challenged diagnosis, prognosis, and clinical treatment. It is well known that molecular subtypes of breast tumors are associated with significant differences in prognosis and survival. Assuming that the differences are attributed to subtype-specific pathways, we then suspect that there might be gene regulatory mechanisms that modulate the behavior of the pathways and their interactions. In this study, we proposed an integrated methodology, including machine learning and information theory, to explore the mechanisms. Using existing data from three large cohorts of human breast cancer populations, we have identified an ensemble of 16 master regulator genes (or MR16) that can discriminate breast tumor samples into four major subtypes. Evidence from gene expression across the three cohorts has consistently indicated that the MR16 can be divided into two groups that demonstrate subtype-specific gene expression patterns. For example, group 1 MRs, including ESR1, FOXA1, and GATA3, are overexpressed in luminal A and luminal B subtypes, but lowly expressed in HER2-enriched and basal-like subtypes. In contrast, group 2 MRs, including FOXM1, EZH2, MYBL2, and ZNF695, display an opposite pattern. Furthermore, evidence from mutual information modeling has congruently indicated that the two groups of MRs either up- or down-regulate cancer driver-related genes in opposite directions. Furthermore, integration of somatic mutations with pathway changes leads to identification of canonical genomic alternations in a subtype-specific fashion. Taken together, these studies have implicated a gene regulatory program for breast tumor progression.

  6. Molecular mechanisms of anti-cancer action of garlic compounds in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Surajit; Choudhury, Subhasree Roy; Banik, Naren L; Ray, Swapan K

    2011-05-01

    The medicinal properties of garlic (Allium sativum) have been well known and widely used since historical times. Garlic compounds have received increasing attention during the last few years due to their cancer chemopreventive properties. The anti-cancer activity of garlic-derived organosulfur compounds (OSCs) are extensively reported in many cancers but only a few in the pediatric tumor neuroblastoma, which warrants exploration of new therapy for its management. There are some recent reports suggesting that garlic-derived OSCs cause cell cycle arrest, generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), activate stress kinases, and also stimulate the mitochondrial pathway for apoptosis in malignant neuroblastoma. The comprehensive mechanisms of anti-cancer action of OSCs still remain unclear and require more studies in neuroblastoma. This review is designed to highlight the molecular mechanisms of anti-cancer actions of garlic-derived OSCs in neuroblastoma and as well as in several other cancers. Further studies should be conducted to establish the clinical expediency of garlic-derived OSCs for treatment of malignant neuroblastoma in humans.

  7. Potent Human Telomerase Inhibitors: Molecular Dynamic Simulations, Multiple Pharmacophore-Based Virtual Screening, and Biochemical Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirgahi Talari, Faezeh; Bagherzadeh, Kowsar; Golestanian, Sahand; Jarstfer, Michael; Amanlou, Massoud

    2015-12-28

    Telomere maintenance is a universal cancer hallmark, and small molecules that disrupt telomere maintenance generally have anticancer properties. Since the vast majority of cancer cells utilize telomerase activity for telomere maintenance, the enzyme has been considered as an anticancer drug target. Recently, rational design of telomerase inhibitors was made possible by the determination of high resolution structures of the catalytic telomerase subunit from a beetle and subsequent molecular modeling of the human telomerase complex. A hybrid strategy including docking, pharmacophore-based virtual screening, and molecular dynamics simulations (MDS) were used to identify new human telomerase inhibitors. Docking methodology was applied to investigate the ssDNA telomeric sequence and two well-known human telomerase inhibitors' (BIBR1532 and MST-312) modes of interactions with hTERT TEN domain. Subsequently molecular dynamic simulations were performed to monitor and compare hTERT TEN domain, TEN-ssDNA, TEN-BIBR1532, TEN-MST-312, and TEN-ssDNA-BIBR1532 behavior in a dynamic environment. Pharmacophore models were generated considering the inhibitors manner in the TEN domain anchor site. These exploratory studies identified several new potent inhibitors whose IC50 values were generated experimentally in a low micromolar range with the aid of biochemical assays, including both the direct telomerase and the telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assays. The results suggest that the current models of human telomerase are useful templates for rational inhibitor design.

  8. Are 20 human papillomavirus types causing cervical cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbyn, Marc; Tommasino, Massimo; Depuydt, Christophe; Dillner, Joakim

    2014-12-01

    In 2012, the International Agency for Research on Cancer concluded that there was consistent and sufficient epidemiological, experimental and mechanistic evidence of carcinogenicity to humans for 12 HPV types (HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV39, HPV45, HPV51, HPV52, HPV56, HPV58 and HPV59) for cervical cancer. Therefore, these types were considered as 1A carcinogens. They all belong to the family of the α-Papillomaviridae, in particular to the species α5 (HPV51), α6 (HPV56), α7 (HPV18, HPV39, HPV45, HPV59) and α9 (HPV16, HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV52, HPV58). Less evidence is available for a thirteenth type (HPV68, α7), which is classified as a 2A carcinogen (probably carcinogenic). Moreover, seven other phylogenetically related types (HPV26, HPV53, HPV66, HPV67, HPV68, HPV70 and HPV73) were identified as single HPV infections in certain rare cases of cervical cancer and were considered possibly carcinogenic (2B carcinogens). Recently, Halec et al [7] demonstrated that the molecular signature of HPV-induced carcinogenesis (presence of type-specific spliced E6*| mRNA; increased expression of p16; and decreased expression of cyclin D1, p53 and Rb) was similar in cervical cancers containing single infections with one of the eight afore-mentioned 2A or 2B carcinogens to those in cancers with single infections with group 1 carcinogens. Ninety six percent of cervical cancers are attributable to one of the 13 most common HPV types (groups 1 and 2A). Including the additional seven HPV types (group 2B) added 2.6%, to reach a total of 98.7% of all HPV-positive cervical cancers. From recently updated meta-analyses, it was shown that HPV68, HPV26, HPV66, HPV67, HPV73 and HPV82 were significantly more common in cancer cases than in women with normal cervical cytology, suggesting that for these HPV types, an upgrading of the carcinogen classification could be considered. However, there is no need to include them in HPV screening tests or vaccines, given their rarity in

  9. Optical contrast agents to visualize molecular expression in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langsner, Robert James

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of death of women in the United States. Improvements in screening technology have increased the breast cancer incidence rate, as smaller lesions are being detected. Due to the small size of lesions, patients can choose to receive breast conservation therapy (BCT) rather than a modified radical mastectomy. Even though the breast retains cosmesis after BCT, there is an increased risk of the patient having residual microscopic disease, known as positive margins. Patients with positive margins receive increased radiation and have an increased chance of second surgery. Pathology with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) remains the gold standard for diagnosing margin status in patients. Intraoperative pathology has been shown to reduce the rate of positive margins in BCT. However, a minority of surgery centers have intraoperative pathology centers, limiting the number of patients that receive this standard of care. The expression profiles of surface receptors such as ErbB2 (HER2-positive) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) provide information about the aggressiveness of a particular tumor. Recent research has shown that there was elevated EGFR expression in patients with a local recurrence even though the biopsies were assessed to be disease free using standard H&E. If the physicians had known the molecular expression of these biopsies, a different treatment regimen or excision of more tissue might have prevented the recurrence. This thesis investigates targeted molecular contrast agents that enhance the visualization of molecular markers such as glucose transporters (GLUTs) and growth factor receptors in tissue specimens. First, application of 2-NBDG, a fluorescent deoxyglucose, enhances signal in cancerous tissue with a 20-minute incubation. Then, antibody functionalized silica-gold nanoshells enhance the visualization of ErbB2 overexpression in specimens with a 5-minute incubation. To image these contrast agents in cancerous

  10. Guidance for laboratories performing molecular pathology for cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cree, Ian A; Deans, Zandra; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; Normanno, Nicola; Edsjö, Anders; Rouleau, Etienne; Solé, Francesc; Thunnissen, Erik; Timens, Wim; Schuuring, Ed; Dequeker, Elisabeth; Murray, Samuel; Dietel, Manfred; Groenen, Patricia; Van Krieken, J Han

    2014-11-01

    Molecular testing is becoming an important part of the diagnosis of any patient with cancer. The challenge to laboratories is to meet this need, using reliable methods and processes to ensure that patients receive a timely and accurate report on which their treatment will be based. The aim of this paper is to provide minimum requirements for the management of molecular pathology laboratories. This general guidance should be augmented by the specific guidance available for different tumour types and tests. Preanalytical considerations are important, and careful consideration of the way in which specimens are obtained and reach the laboratory is necessary. Sample receipt and handling follow standard operating procedures, but some alterations may be necessary if molecular testing is to be performed, for instance to control tissue fixation. DNA and RNA extraction can be standardised and should be checked for quality and quantity of output on a regular basis. The choice of analytical method(s) depends on clinical requirements, desired turnaround time, and expertise available. Internal quality control, regular internal audit of the whole testing process, laboratory accreditation, and continual participation in external quality assessment schemes are prerequisites for delivery of a reliable service. A molecular pathology report should accurately convey the information the clinician needs to treat the patient with sufficient information to allow for correct interpretation of the result. Molecular pathology is developing rapidly, and further detailed evidence-based recommendations are required for many of the topics covered here.

  11. Targeting Cell Surface Proteins in Molecular Photoacoustic Imaging to Detect Ovarian Cancer Early

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    10-1-0422 TITLE: Targeting Cell Surface Proteins in Molecular Photoacoustic Imaging to Detect Ovarian Cancer Early PRINCIPAL...DATES COVERED 1 July 2010 - 30 June 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeting Cell Surface Proteins in Molecular 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Photoacoustic ...upon request). Aim 2) Prioritize ovarian cancer-associated surface proteins for their utility as molecular photoacoustic imaging targets and

  12. Prevention of the Angiogenic Switch in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    chronic myeloid leukaemia | colorectal cancer | Down syndrome | infantile haemangiomas | multiple myeloma | non-small-cell lung cancer | rheumatoid...Human Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Donald Ingber, M.D., Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Children’s Hospital...From - To) 15 FEB 2004 - 14 FEB 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Prevention of the Angiogenic Switch in Human Breast Cancer 5b

  13. Molecular diagnosis of lung cancer: an overview of recent developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutti, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Health surveillance of workers occupationally exposed to lung carcinogens calls for screening procedures which may not be fully justified, owing to current uncertainties about the outcome of early detection. Indeed, bias-free designs are difficult to set up, and the effects of lead time, length and screening biases can all result in an overestimation of the benefits of screenings, which certainly increase survival, but without any actual reduction of mortality. A major issue with modern imaging techniques is the very high incidence of discovery of lung nodules, usually false positive, but still calling for additional and sometimes painful examinations. Currently, the differential diagnosis is mainly based on additional imaging approaches, particularly positron emission tomography, which is very expensive and also shows limitations in terms of sensitivity and specificity. Therefore, purely morphological criteria seem to be insufficient to distinguish lung cancer at early stages from benign nodules with sufficient confidence. A molecular approach to the diagnosis of lung cancer through biomarkers measured by non-invasive means could greatly improve the specificity of imaging procedures. Extremely sensitive mass spectrometric techniques and polymerase chain reaction-based methods are available to detect, in accessible media, molecular alterations which characterise lung cancer at an early stage, thereby reducing the rate of false positives. The lessons learnt from decades of screening programmes based on imaging and the future prospects possibly enhanced by using biomarkers are briefly discussed in this overview. (www.actabiomedica.it)

  14. Emerging Molecularly Targeted Therapies in Castration Refractory Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesal C. Patel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT with medical or surgical castration is the mainstay of therapy in men with metastatic prostate cancer. However, despite initial responses, almost all men eventually develop castration refractory metastatic prostate cancer (CRPC and die of their disease. Over the last decade, it has been recognized that despite the failure of ADT, most prostate cancers maintain some dependence on androgen and/or androgen receptor (AR signaling for proliferation. Furthermore, androgen independent molecular pathways have been identified as drivers of continued progression of CRPC. Subsequently, drugs have been developed targeting these pathways, many of which have received regulatory approval. Agents such as abiraterone, enzalutamide, orteronel (TAK-700, and ARN-509 target androgen signaling. Sipuleucel-T, ipilimumab, and tasquinimod augment immune-mediated tumor killing. Agents targeting classic tumorogenesis pathways including vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor, insulin like growth factor-1, tumor suppressor, and those which regulate apoptosis and cell cycles are currently being developed. This paper aims to focus on emerging molecular pathways underlying progression of CRPC, and the drugs targeting these pathways, which have recently been approved or have reached advanced stages of development in either phase II or phase III clinical trials.

  15. Molecular insights into human brain evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Robert Sean; Walsh, Christopher A

    2005-09-01

    Rapidly advancing knowledge of genome structure and sequence enables new means for the analysis of specific DNA changes associated with the differences between the human brain and that of other mammals. Recent studies implicate evolutionary changes in messenger RNA and protein expression levels, as well as DNA changes that alter amino acid sequences. We can anticipate having a systematic catalogue of DNA changes in the lineage leading to humans, but an ongoing challenge will be relating these changes to the anatomical and functional differences between our brain and that of our ancient and more recent ancestors.

  16. REAL-TIME DETECTION OF SURVIVIN mRNA EXPRESSION IN CERVICAL CANCER CELL LINES USING MOLECULAR BEACON IMAGING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The initiated growth of human cancer cells of-ten mostly come fromthe abnor mal expression ofgenes.Survivinis anapotosis inhibitor of IAPfami-ly,cloned by Ambrosini in1997usingthe cDNAofeffector cell protease receptor-1(EPR-1),and is thekey gene for the development and advancement oftumor.Inthe present study,the feasibility of detec-ting the expression of survivin mRNA was exam-inedincervical cancer cell lines using molecular bea-coni maging technology.MATERIALS AND METHODS1Cervical cancer cell lines and ce...

  17. Precision Medicine for Advanced Pancreas Cancer: The Individualized Molecular Pancreatic Cancer Therapy (IMPaCT) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantrill, Lorraine A; Nagrial, Adnan M; Watson, Clare; Johns, Amber L; Martyn-Smith, Mona; Simpson, Skye; Mead, Scott; Jones, Marc D; Samra, Jaswinder S; Gill, Anthony J; Watson, Nicole; Chin, Venessa T; Humphris, Jeremy L; Chou, Angela; Brown, Belinda; Morey, Adrienne; Pajic, Marina; Grimmond, Sean M; Chang, David K; Thomas, David; Sebastian, Lucille; Sjoquist, Katrin; Yip, Sonia; Pavlakis, Nick; Asghari, Ray; Harvey, Sandra; Grimison, Peter; Simes, John; Biankin, Andrew V

    2015-05-01

    Personalized medicine strategies using genomic profiling are particularly pertinent for pancreas cancer. The Individualized Molecular Pancreatic Cancer Therapy (IMPaCT) trial was initially designed to exploit results from genome sequencing of pancreatic cancer under the auspices of the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) in Australia. Sequencing revealed small subsets of patients with aberrations in their tumor genome that could be targeted with currently available therapies. The pilot stage of the IMPaCT trial assessed the feasibility of acquiring suitable tumor specimens for molecular analysis and returning high-quality actionable genomic data within a clinically acceptable timeframe. We screened for three molecular targets: HER2 amplification; KRAS wild-type; and mutations in DNA damage repair pathways (BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2, ATM). Tumor biopsy and archived tumor samples were collected from 93 patients and 76 were screened. To date 22 candidate cases have been identified: 14 KRAS wild-type, 5 cases of HER2 amplification, 2 mutations in BRCA2, and 1 ATM mutation. Median time from consent to the return of validated results was 21.5 days. An inability to obtain a biopsy or insufficient tumor content in the available specimen were common reasons for patient exclusion from molecular analysis while deteriorating performance status prohibited a number of patients from proceeding in the study. Documenting the feasibility of acquiring and screening biospecimens for actionable molecular targets in real time will aid other groups embarking on similar trials. Key elements include the need to better prescreen patients, screen more patients, and offer more attractive clinical trial options. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. A profile of prognostic and molecular factors in European and Māori breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheale Michelle

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New Zealand Māori have a poorer outcome from breast cancer than non-Māori, yet prognostic data are sparse. The objective of this study was to quantify levels of prognostic factors in a cohort of self-declared Māori and European breast cancer patients from Christchurch, New Zealand. Methods and Results Clinicopathological and survival data from 337 consecutive breast cancer patients (27 Māori, 310 European were evaluated. Fewer tumours were high grade in Māori women than European women (p = 0.027. No significant ethnic differences were detected for node status, tumour type, tumour size, human epidermal growth factor receptor, oestrogen and progesterone receptor (ER/PR status, or survival. In addition, tumour and serum samples from a sub-cohort of 14 Māori matched to 14 NZ European patients were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay for molecular prognostic factors. Significant correlations were detected between increased grade and increased levels of hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1α, glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1, microvessel density (MVD and cytokeratins CK5/6 (p Conclusions In this Christchurch cohort of breast cancer patients, Māori women were no more likely than European women to have pathological or molecular factors predictive of poor prognosis. These data contrast with data from the North Island NZ, and suggest potential regional differences.

  19. Treatment outcome in patients with triple negative early stage breast cancers compared with other molecular subtypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ja Young; Chang, Sei Kyung; Lee, Bo Mi; Shin, Hyun Soo [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Park, Heily [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Presbyterian Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    To determine whether triple negative (TN) early stage breast cancers have poorer survival rates compared with other molecular types. Between August 2000 and July 2006, patients diagnosed with stage I, II early stage breast cancers, in whom all three markers (estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor [HER]-2) were available and treated with modified radical mastectomy or breast conserving surgery followed by radiotherapy, were retrospectively reviewed. Of 446 patients, 94 (21.1%) were classified as TN, 57 (12.8%) as HER-2 type, and 295 (66.1%) as luminal. TN was more frequently associated with young patients younger than 35 years old (p = 0.002), higher histologic grade (p < 0.0001), and nuclear (p < 0.0001). The median follow-up period was 78 months (range, 4 to 130 months). There were 9 local relapses (2.0%), 15 nodal (3.4%), 40 distant metastases (9.0%), and 33 deaths (7.4%) for all patients. The rates of 5-year OS, DFS, LFS, and DMFS for all patients were 95.5%, 89.9%, 95.4%, and 91.7%, respectively. There were no significant differences in OS, DFS, LFS, and DMFS between triple negative and other subtypes (p > 0.05). We found that patients with TN early stage breast cancers had no difference in survival rates compared with other molecular subtypes. Prospective study in homogeneous treatment group will need for a prognosis of TN early stage breast cancer.

  20. Occult Breast Cancer Presenting as Metastatic Adenocarcinoma of Unknown Primary: Clinical Presentation, Immunohistochemistry, and Molecular Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jue Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare presentation of a 66-year-old female with diffuse metastatic adenocarcinoma of unknown primary involving liver, lymphatic system and bone metastases. The neoplastic cells were positive for CK7 and OC125, while negative for CK20, thyroid transcription factor 1, CDX2, BRST-2, chromogranin, synaptophysin, estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PR, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed no amplification of the HER2/neu gene. Molecular profiling reported a breast cancer origin with a very high confidence score of 98%. The absence of immunohistochemistry staining for ER, PR, and HER2/neu further classified her cancer as triple-negative breast cancer. Additional studies revealed high expression levels of topoisomerase (Topo I, androgen receptor, and ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase large subunit; the results were negative for thymidylate synthase, Topo II-α and O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase. The patient was initially treated with a combination regimen of cisplatin and etoposide, and she experienced a rapid resolution of cancer-related symptoms. Unfortunately, her therapy was complicated by a cerebrovascular accident (CVA, which was thought to be related to cisplatin and high serum mucin. After recovery from the CVA, the patient was successfully treated with second-line chemotherapy based on her tumor expression profile. We highlight the role of molecular profiling in the diagnosis and management of this patient and the implication of personalized chemotherapy in this challenging disease.

  1. Potentiometric Sensors Based on Surface Molecular Imprinting: Detection of Cancer Biomarkers and Viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.; Zhang, Z; Jain, V; Yi, J; Mueller, S; Sokolov, J; Liu, Z; Levon, K; Rigas, B; Rafailovich, M

    2010-01-01

    The continuing discovery of cancer biomarkers necessitates improved methods for their detection. Molecular imprinting using artificial materials provides an alternative to the detection of a wide range of substances. We applied surface molecular imprinting using self-assembled monolayers to design sensing elements for the detection of cancer biomarkers and other proteins. These elements consist of a gold-coated silicon chip onto which hydroxyl-terminated alkanethiol molecules and template biomolecule are co-adsorbed, where the thiol molecules are chemically bound to the metal substrate and self-assembled into highly ordered monolayers, the biomolecules can be removed, creating the foot-print cavities in the monolayer matrix for this kind of template molecules. Re-adsorption of the biomolecules to the sensing chip changes its potential, which can be measured potentiometrically. We applied this method to the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in both solutions of purified CEA and in the culture medium of a CEA-producing human colon cancer cell line. The CEA assay, validated also against a standard immunoassay, was both sensitive (detection range 2.5-250 ng/mL) and specific (no cross-reactivity with hemoglobin; no response by a non-imprinted sensor). Similar results were obtained for human amylase. In addition, we detected virions of poliovirus in a specific manner (no cross-reactivity to adenovirus, no response by a non-imprinted sensor). Our findings demonstrate the application of the principles of molecular imprinting to the development of a new method for the detection of protein cancer biomarkers and to protein-based macromolecular structures such as the capsid of a virion. This approach has the potential of generating a general assay methodology that could be highly sensitive, specific, simple and likely inexpensive.

  2. High-molecular-mass hyaluronan mediates the cancer resistance of the naked mole rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiao; Azpurua, Jorge; Hine, Christopher; Vaidya, Amita; Myakishev-Rempel, Max; Ablaeva, Julia; Mao, Zhiyong; Nevo, Eviatar; Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei

    2013-07-18

    The naked mole rat (Heterocephalus glaber) displays exceptional longevity, with a maximum lifespan exceeding 30 years. This is the longest reported lifespan for a rodent species and is especially striking considering the small body mass of the naked mole rat. In comparison, a similarly sized house mouse has a maximum lifespan of 4 years. In addition to their longevity, naked mole rats show an unusual resistance to cancer. Multi-year observations of large naked mole-rat colonies did not detect a single incidence of cancer. Here we identify a mechanism responsible for the naked mole rat's cancer resistance. We found that naked mole-rat fibroblasts secrete extremely high-molecular-mass hyaluronan (HA), which is over five times larger than human or mouse HA. This high-molecular-mass HA accumulates abundantly in naked mole-rat tissues owing to the decreased activity of HA-degrading enzymes and a unique sequence of hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2). Furthermore, the naked mole-rat cells are more sensitive to HA signalling, as they have a higher affinity to HA compared with mouse or human cells. Perturbation of the signalling pathways sufficient for malignant transformation of mouse fibroblasts fails to transform naked mole-rat cells. However, once high-molecular-mass HA is removed by either knocking down HAS2 or overexpressing the HA-degrading enzyme, HYAL2, naked mole-rat cells become susceptible to malignant transformation and readily form tumours in mice. We speculate that naked mole rats have evolved a higher concentration of HA in the skin to provide skin elasticity needed for life in underground tunnels. This trait may have then been co-opted to provide cancer resistance and longevity to this species.

  3. High molecular weight hyaluronan mediates the cancer resistance of the naked mole-rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiao; Azpurua, Jorge; Hine, Christopher; Vaidya, Amita; Myakishev-Rempel, Max; Ablaeva, Julia; Mao, Zhiyong; Nevo, Eviatar; Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    The naked mole-rat displays exceptional longevity, with a maximum lifespan exceeding 30 years1–3. This is the longest reported lifespan for a rodent species and is especially striking considering the small body mass of the naked mole-rat. In comparison, a similarly sized house mouse has a maximum lifespan of 4 years4,5. In addition to their longevity, naked mole-rats show an unusual resistance to cancer. Multi-year observations of large naked mole-rat colonies did not detect a single incidence of cancer2,6. Here we identify a mechanism responsible for the naked mole-rat’s cancer resistance. We found that naked mole-rat fibroblasts secrete extremely high molecular weight hyaluronan (HA), which is over five times larger than human or mouse HA. This high molecular weight HA accumulates abundantly in naked mole rat tissues due to the decreased activity of HA-degrading enzymes and a unique sequence of hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2). Furthermore, the naked mole-rat cells are more sensitive to HA signaling, as the naked mole rat cells have a higher affinity to HA than the mouse or human cells. Perturbation of the signaling pathways sufficient for malignant transformation of mouse fibroblasts fails to transform naked mole-rat cells. However, once high molecular weight HA is removed by either knocking down HAS2 or overexpressing the HA-degrading enzyme, Hyal2, naked mole-rat cells become susceptible to malignant transformation and readily form tumors in mice. We speculate that naked mole-rats have evolved a higher concentration of HA in the skin to provide skin elasticity needed for life in underground tunnels. This trait may have then been co-opted to provide cancer resistance and longevity to this species. PMID:23783513

  4. Human papillomavirus-associated diseases and cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan Yang; Jianbo Zhu Co-first author; Xiaoyue Song; Yan Qi; Xiaobin Cui; Feng Li 

    2015-01-01

    Human papilomaviruses (HPVs) have been detected in cervical cancer cels and skin papiloma cels, which have a variety of types, including low-risk and high-risk types. HPV genome replication requires the host cel’s DNA synthesis machinery, and HPVs encode proteins that maintain diferentiated epithelial cels in a replication-competent state. HPV types are tissue-specific and generaly produce diferent types of le-sions, either benign or malignant. This review examines diferent HPV types and their associated diseases and presents therapeutic options for the treatment of HPV-positive diseases.

  5. Molecular Endoscopic Ultrasound for Diagnosis of Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bournet, Barbara [Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Center Rangueil, 1 avenue Jean Poulhès, TSA 50032, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); INSERM U1037, University Hospital Center Rangueil, Toulouse (France); Pointreau, Adeline; Delpu, Yannick; Selves, Janick; Torrisani, Jerome [INSERM U1037, University Hospital Center Rangueil, Toulouse (France); Buscail, Louis, E-mail: buscail.l@chu-toulouse.fr [Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Center Rangueil, 1 avenue Jean Poulhès, TSA 50032, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); INSERM U1037, University Hospital Center Rangueil, Toulouse (France); Cordelier, Pierre [INSERM U1037, University Hospital Center Rangueil, Toulouse (France)

    2011-02-24

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy is a safe and effective technique in diagnosing and staging of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. However its predictive negative value does not exceed 50% to 60%. Unfortunately, the majority of pancreatic cancer patients have a metastatic and/or a locally advanced disease (i.e., not eligible for curative resection) which explains the limited access to pancreatic tissue specimens. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy is the most widely used approach for cytological and histological material sampling in these situations used in up to two thirds of patients with pancreatic cancer. Based on this unique material, we and others developed strategies to improve the differential diagnosis between carcinoma and inflammatory pancreatic lesions by analysis of KRAS oncogene mutation, microRNA expression and methylation, as well as mRNA expression using both qRT-PCR and Low Density Array Taqman analysis. Indeed, differentiating pancreatic cancer from pseudotumoral chronic pancreatitis remains very difficult in current clinical practice, and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy analysis proved to be very helpful. In this review, we will compile the clinical and molecular advantages of using endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy in managing pancreatic cancer.

  6. Molecular imaging for assessment of mesenchymal stem cells mediated breast cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Liang; Wang, Yuebing; He, Ningning; Wang, Di; Zhao, Qianjie; Feng, Guowei; Su, Weijun; Xu, Yang; Han, Zhongchao; Kong, Deling; Cheng, Zhen; Xiang, Rong; Li, Zongjin

    2014-06-01

    The tumor tropism of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) makes them an excellent delivery vehicle used in anticancer therapy. However, the exact mechanisms of MSCs involved in tumor microenvironment are still not well defined. Molecular imaging technologies with the versatility in monitoring the therapeutic effects, as well as basic molecular and cellular processes in real time, offer tangible options to better guide MSCs mediated cancer therapy. In this study, an in situ breast cancer model was developed with MDA-MB-231 cells carrying a reporter system encoding a double fusion (DF) reporter gene consisting of firefly luciferase (Fluc) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP). In mice breast cancer model, we injected human umbilical cord-derived MSCs (hUC-MSCs) armed with a triple fusion (TF) gene containing the herpes simplex virus truncated thymidine kinase (HSV-ttk), renilla luciferase (Rluc) and red fluorescent protein (RFP) into tumor on day 13, 18, 23 after MDA-MB-231 cells injection. Bioluminescence imaging of Fluc and Rluc provided the real time monitor of tumor cells and hUC-MSCs simultaneously. We found that tumors were significantly inhibited by hUC-MSCs administration, and this effect was enhanced by ganciclovir (GCV) application. To further demonstrate the effect of hUC-MSCs on tumor cells in vivo, we employed the near infrared (NIR) imaging and the results showed that hUC-MSCs could inhibit tumor angiogenesis and increased apoptosis to a certain degree. In conclusion, hUC-MSCs can inhibit breast cancer progression by inducing tumor cell death and suppressing angiogenesis. Moreover, molecular imaging is an invaluable tool in tracking cell delivery and tumor response to hUC-MSCs therapies as well as cellular and molecular processes in tumor.

  7. Challenges and opportunities in international molecular cancer prevention research: An ASPO Molecular Epidemiology and the Environment and International Cancer Prevention Interest Groups Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epplein, Meira; Bostick, Roberd M; Mu, Lina; Ogino, Shuji; Braithwaite, Dejana; Kanetsky, Peter A

    2014-11-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer estimates that over half of the new cancer cases and almost two-thirds of the cancer deaths in 2012 occurred in low and middle income countries. To discuss the challenges and opportunities to reducing the burden of cancer worldwide, the Molecular Epidemiology and the Environment and the International Issues in Cancer Special Interest Groups joined forces to hold a session during the 38th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Preventive Oncology (March 2014, Arlington, Virginia). The session highlighted three topics of particular interest to molecular cancer prevention researchers working internationally, specifically: 1) biomarkers in cancer research; 2) environmental exposures and cancer; and 3) molecular pathological epidemiology. A major factor for successful collaboration illuminated during the discussion was the need for strong, committed, and reliable international partners. A key element of establishing such relationships is to thoroughly involve individual international collaborators in the development of the research question; engaged international collaborators are particularly motivated to champion and shepherd the project through all necessary steps, including issues relating to institutional review boards, political sensitivity, laboratory-based assays, and tumor subtyping. Also essential is allotting time for the building, maintaining, and investing in such relationships so that successful international collaborations may take root and bloom. While there are many challenges inherent to international molecular cancer research, the opportunities for furthering the science and prevention of cancer worldwide are great, particularly at this time of increasing cancer incidence and prevalence in low and middle income countries.

  8. Mangiferin in cancer chemoprevention and treatment: pharmacokinetics and molecular targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Peramaiyan; Rengarajan, Thamaraiselvan; Nandakumar, Natarajan; Divya, H; Nishigaki, Ikuo

    2015-02-01

    A variety of bioactive food components have been shown to modulate inflammatory responses and to attenuate carcinogenesis. Polyphenols isolated several years ago from various medicinal plants now seem to have a prominent role in the prevention and therapy of a variety of ailments. Mangiferin, a unique, important, and highly investigated polyphenol, has attracted much attention of late for its potential as a chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent against various types of cancer. Mangiferin has been shown to target multiple proinflammatory transcription factors, cell- cycle proteins, growth factors, kinases, cytokines, chemokines, adhesion molecules, and inflammatory enzymes. These targets can potentially mediate the chemopreventive and therapeutic effects of mangiferin by inhibiting the initiation, promotion, and metastasis of cancer. This review not only summarizes the diverse molecular targets of mangiferin, but also gives the results of various preclinical studies that have been performed in the last decade with this promising polyphenol.

  9. Review of Histopathological and Molecular Prognostic Features in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Schofield

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Prediction of prognosis in colorectal cancer is vital for the choice of therapeutic options. Histopathological factors remain paramount in this respect. Factors such as tumor size, histological type and subtype, presence of signet ring morphology and the degree of differentiation as well as the presence of lymphovascular invasion and lymph node involvement are well known factors that influence outcome. Our understanding of these factors has improved in the past few years with factors such as tumor budding, lymphocytic infiltration being recognized as important. Likewise the prognostic significance of resection margins, particularly circumferential margins has been appreciated in the last two decades. A number of molecular and genetic markers such as KRAS, BRAF and microsatellite instability are also important and correlate with histological features in some patients. This review summarizes our current understanding of the main histopathological factors that affect prognosis of colorectal cancer.

  10. Pancreatic Cancer Gene Therapy: From Molecular Targets to Delivery Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillat, Cristina, E-mail: cristina.fillat@crg.es; Jose, Anabel; Ros, Xavier Bofill-De; Mato-Berciano, Ana; Maliandi, Maria Victoria; Sobrevals, Luciano [Programa Gens i Malaltia, Centre de Regulació Genòmica-CRG, UPF, Parc de Recerca Biomedica de Barcelona-PRBB and Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Raras (CIBERER), Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-01-18

    The continuous identification of molecular changes deregulating critical pathways in pancreatic tumor cells provides us with a large number of novel candidates to engineer gene-targeted approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment. Targets—both protein coding and non-coding—are being exploited in gene therapy to influence the deregulated pathways to facilitate cytotoxicity, enhance the immune response or sensitize to current treatments. Delivery vehicles based on viral or non-viral systems as well as cellular vectors with tumor homing characteristics are a critical part of the design of gene therapy strategies. The different behavior of tumoral versus non-tumoral cells inspires vector engineering with the generation of tumor selective products that can prevent potential toxic-associated effects. In the current review, a detailed analysis of the different targets, the delivery vectors, the preclinical approaches and a descriptive update on the conducted clinical trials are presented. Moreover, future possibilities in pancreatic cancer treatment by gene therapy strategies are discussed.

  11. Review of Histopathological and Molecular Prognostic Features in Colorectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzouk, Ola; Schofield, John, E-mail: john.schofield@nhs.net [Department of Cellular Pathology, Maidstone Hospital, Hermitage Lane, Maidstone, Kent ME16 9QQ (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-23

    Prediction of prognosis in colorectal cancer is vital for the choice of therapeutic options. Histopathological factors remain paramount in this respect. Factors such as tumor size, histological type and subtype, presence of signet ring morphology and the degree of differentiation as well as the presence of lymphovascular invasion and lymph node involvement are well known factors that influence outcome. Our understanding of these factors has improved in the past few years with factors such as tumor budding, lymphocytic infiltration being recognized as important. Likewise the prognostic significance of resection margins, particularly circumferential margins has been appreciated in the last two decades. A number of molecular and genetic markers such as KRAS, BRAF and microsatellite instability are also important and correlate with histological features in some patients. This review summarizes our current understanding of the main histopathological factors that affect prognosis of colorectal cancer.

  12. Overcoming tumor heterogeneity in the molecular diagnosis of urological cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Michael J; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos

    2014-11-01

    Our understanding of tumor heterogeneity and impact on treatment response is still in its infancy, presenting significant challenges to the molecular pathologist, treating physician and ultimately for the patient. Given that tumor recurrence due to treatment resistance is the most common cause of cancer death, there remains a critical unmet need to change the current paradigm. The mechanisms which underlie tumor heterogeneity can be broadly divided into genomic instability and non-mutational processes, including stochastic variations in cellular responses, modulation by tumor microenvironment and or phenotypic/ functional plasticity relating to cancer stem cells. We believe that these biological mechanisms are not mutually exclusive and emphasize the need for more suitable methodologies to exploit the spatiotemporal patterns of intratumoral heterogeneity using novel approaches such as quantitative tissue-based biomarker assessment and systemic fluid analytics. Generating a comprehensive patient-centric phenotypic disease profile should generate a 'codex' which can be employed to change the current treatment decision process.

  13. KRAS and BRAF Mutation Detection: Is Immunohistochemistry a Possible Alternative to Molecular Biology in Colorectal Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Piton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available KRAS genotyping is mandatory in metastatic colorectal cancer treatment prior to undertaking antiepidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR monoclonal antibody therapy. BRAF V600E mutation is often present in colorectal carcinoma with CpG island methylator phenotype and microsatellite instability. Currently, KRAS and BRAF evaluation is based on molecular biology techniques such as SNaPshot or Sanger sequencing. As molecular testing is performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE samples, immunodetection would appear to be an attractive alternative for detecting mutations. Thus, our objective was to assess the validity of KRAS and BRAF immunodetection of mutations compared with the genotyping reference method in colorectal adenocarcinoma. KRAS and BRAF genotyping was assessed by SNaPshot. A rabbit anti-human KRAS polyclonal antibody was tested on 33 FFPE colorectal tumor samples with known KRAS status. Additionally, a mouse anti-human BRAF monoclonal antibody was tested on 30 FFPE tumor samples with known BRAF status. KRAS immunostaining demonstrated both poor sensitivity (27% and specificity (64% in detecting KRAS mutation. Conversely, BRAF immunohistochemistry showed perfect sensitivity (100% and specificity (100% in detecting V600E mutation. Although molecular biology remains the reference method for detecting KRAS mutation, immunohistochemistry could be an attractive method for detecting BRAF V600E mutation in colorectal cancer.

  14. KRAS and BRAF Mutation Detection: Is Immunohistochemistry a Possible Alternative to Molecular Biology in Colorectal Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piton, Nicolas; Borrini, Francesco; Bolognese, Antonio; Lamy, Aude; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    KRAS genotyping is mandatory in metastatic colorectal cancer treatment prior to undertaking antiepidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody therapy. BRAF V600E mutation is often present in colorectal carcinoma with CpG island methylator phenotype and microsatellite instability. Currently, KRAS and BRAF evaluation is based on molecular biology techniques such as SNaPshot or Sanger sequencing. As molecular testing is performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples, immunodetection would appear to be an attractive alternative for detecting mutations. Thus, our objective was to assess the validity of KRAS and BRAF immunodetection of mutations compared with the genotyping reference method in colorectal adenocarcinoma. KRAS and BRAF genotyping was assessed by SNaPshot. A rabbit anti-human KRAS polyclonal antibody was tested on 33 FFPE colorectal tumor samples with known KRAS status. Additionally, a mouse anti-human BRAF monoclonal antibody was tested on 30 FFPE tumor samples with known BRAF status. KRAS immunostaining demonstrated both poor sensitivity (27%) and specificity (64%) in detecting KRAS mutation. Conversely, BRAF immunohistochemistry showed perfect sensitivity (100%) and specificity (100%) in detecting V600E mutation. Although molecular biology remains the reference method for detecting KRAS mutation, immunohistochemistry could be an attractive method for detecting BRAF V600E mutation in colorectal cancer.

  15. Early detection of breast cancer: a molecular optical imaging approach using novel estrogen conjugate fluorescent dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Shubhadeep; Jose, Iven

    2011-02-01

    Estrogen induced proliferation of mutant cells is widely understood to be the one of major risk determining factor in the development of breast cancer. Hence determination of the Estrogen Receptor[ER] status is of paramount importance if cancer pathogenesis is to be detected and rectified at an early stage. Near Infrared Fluorescence [NIRf] Molecular Optical Imaging is emerging as a powerful tool to monitor bio-molecular changes in living subjects. We discuss pre-clinical results in our efforts to develop an optical imaging diagnostic modality for the early detection of breast cancer. We have successfully carried out the synthesis and characterization of a novel target-specific NIRf dye conjugate aimed at measuring Estrogen Receptor[ER] status. The conjugate was synthesized by ester formation between 17-β estradiol and a hydrophilic derivative of Indocyanine Green (ICG) cyanine dye, bis-1,1-(4-sulfobutyl) indotricarbocyanine-5-carboxylic acid, sodium salt. In-vitro studies regarding specific binding and endocytocis of the dye performed on ER+ve [MCF-7] and control [MDA-MB-231] adenocarcinoma breast cancer cell lines clearly indicated nuclear localization of the dye for MCF-7 as compared to plasma level staining for MDA-MB-231. Furthermore, MCF-7 cells showed ~4.5-fold increase in fluorescence signal intensity compared to MDA-MB-231. A 3-D mesh model mimicking the human breast placed in a parallel-plate DOT Scanner is created to examine the in-vivo efficacy of the dye before proceeding with clinical trials. Photon migration and florescence flux intensity is modeled using the finite-element method with the coefficients (quantum yield, molar extinction co-efficient etc.) pertaining to the dye as obtained from photo-physical and in-vitro studies. We conclude by stating that this lipophilic dye can be potentially used as a target specific exogenous contrast agent in molecular optical imaging for early detection of breast cancer.

  16. Cytogenetics and genetics of human cancer: methods and accomplishments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Avery A; Meloni-Ehrig, Aurelia M

    2010-12-01

    Cytogenetic and related changes in human cancer constitute part of a constantly developing and enlarging continuum of known genetic alterations associated with cancer development and biology. The cytogenetic component of this continuum has fulfilled much of its pioneering role and now constitutes a small but dynamic segment of the vast literature on cancer genetics, in which it has played an important if not initiating role. The goals of this article are (a) to address historical and methodological aspects of cancer cytogenetics; (b) to present information on diagnostic translocations in leukemias, lymphomas, bone and soft tissue tumors, and carcinomas; (c) to connect some of these chromosomal aberrations with their molecular equivalents; and (d) to describe anomalies in some solid tumors indicative of the complexity of the genomic alterations in cancer. We also look at a few of the more recent genomic developments in cancer and offer an opinion as to what all these findings add up to.

  17. Upregulated HSP27 in human breast cancer cells reduces Herceptin susceptibility by increasing Her2 protein stability

    OpenAIRE

    Kong Sun-Young; Lee Ho-Young; Kim Seok-Ki; Kwon Bumi; Kim Kyung-Hee; Kang Keon; Kang Se; Lee Eun; Jang Sang-Geun; Yoo Byong

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Elucidating the molecular mechanisms by which tumors become resistant to Herceptin is critical for the treatment of Her2-overexpressed metastatic breast cancer. Methods To further understand Herceptin resistance mechanisms at the molecular level, we used comparative proteome approaches to analyze two human breast cancer cell lines; Her2-positive SK-BR-3 cells and its Herceptin-resistant SK-BR-3 (SK-BR-3 HR) cells. Results Heat-shock protein 27 (HSP27) expression was shown ...

  18. MOLECULAR CLONING OF HUMAN NEUROTROPHIN-4 GENE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective Cloning and sequencing of the human neurotrophin-4(hNT-4) gene.Methods With the chromosomal DNA of human blood lymphocytes as template,hNT-4 coding genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction(PCR) and recombinated into phage vector pGEM-T Easy,which were sequenced by using Sanger's single stranded DNA terminal termination method.Results The sequence of the cloned gene is completely the same as that reported in the literature(GenBank data base,M86528).Conclusion This study successfully cloning and sequenced the gene of mhNT-4,and it would be convenient for us to study the expression of mhNT-4 in eukaryote,and to continue the research on the gene therapy of Alzheimer's disease intensively.This study indicate that the hNT-4 is conservative in different races and individuals.

  19. Human Papillomavirus and Tonsillar and Base of Tongue Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torbjörn Ramqvist

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In 2007, human papillomavirus (HPV type 16 was recognized as a risk factor by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, where tonsillar and base of tongue cancer (TSCC and BOTSCC dominate. Furthermore, patients with HPV-positive TSCC and BOTSCC, had a much better clinical outcome than those with corresponding HPV-negative cancer and other head and neck cancer. More specifically, survival was around 80% for HPV-positive TSCC and BOTSCC vs. 40% five-year disease free survival, for the corresponding HPV-negative tumors with conventional radiotherapy and surgery, while this could not be observed for HPV-positive OSCC at other sites. In addition, the past 20–40 years in many Western Countries, the incidence of HPV-positive TSCC and BOTSCC has risen, and >70% are men. This has resulted in a relative increase of patients with HPV-positive TSCC and BOTSCC that may not need the intensified chemo-radiotherapy (with many more severe debilitating side effects often given today to patients with head and neck cancer. However, before tapering therapy, one needs to enable selection of patients for such treatment, by identifying clinical and molecular markers that together with HPV-positive status will better predict patient prognosis and response to therapy. To conclude, there is a new increasing group of patients with HPV-positive TSCC and BOTSCC with good clinical outcome, where options for better-tailored therapy are needed. For prevention, it would be of benefit to vaccinate both girls and boys against HPV16 infection. For potential future screening the ways to do so need optimizing.

  20. Molecular sex differences in human serum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan M Ramsey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sex is an important factor in the prevalence, incidence, progression, and response to treatment of many medical conditions, including autoimmune and cardiovascular diseases and psychiatric conditions. Identification of molecular differences between typical males and females can provide a valuable basis for exploring conditions differentially affected by sex. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using multiplexed immunoassays, we analyzed 174 serum molecules in 9 independent cohorts of typical individuals, comprising 196 males and 196 females. Sex differences in analyte levels were quantified using a meta-analysis approach and put into biological context using k-means to generate clusters of analytes with distinct biological functions. Natural sex differences were established in these analyte groups and these were applied to illustrate sexually dimorphic analyte expression in a cohort of 22 males and 22 females with Asperger syndrome. Reproducible sex differences were found in the levels of 77 analytes in serum of typical controls, and these comprised clusters of molecules enriched with distinct biological functions. Analytes involved in fatty acid oxidation/hormone regulation, immune cell growth and activation, and cell death were found at higher levels in females, and analytes involved in immune cell chemotaxis and other indistinct functions were higher in males. Comparison of these naturally occurring sex differences against a cohort of people with Asperger syndrome indicated that a cluster of analytes that had functions related to fatty acid oxidation/hormone regulation was associated with sex and the occurrence of this condition. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Sex-specific molecular differences were detected in serum of typical controls and these were reproducible across independent cohorts. This study extends current knowledge of sex differences in biological functions involved in metabolism and immune function. Deviations from typical

  1. Molecular Markers of Lung Cancer in MAYAK Workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven A. Belinsky, PhD

    2007-02-15

    The molecular mechanisms that result in the elevated risk for lung cancer associated with exposure to radiation have not been well characterized. Workers from the MAYAK nuclear enterprise are an ideal cohort in which to study the molecular epidemiology of cancer associated with radiation exposure and to identify the genes targeted for inactivation that in turn affect individual risk for radiation-induced lung cancer. Epidemiology studies of the MAYAK cohort indicate a significantly higher frequency for adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in workers than in a control population and a strong correlation between these tumor types and plutonium exposure. Two hypotheses will be evaluated through the proposed studies. First, radiation exposure targets specific genes for inactivation by promoter methylation. This hypothesis is supported by our recent studies with the MAYAK population that demonstrated the targeting of the p16 gene for inactivation by promoter methylation in adenocarcinomas from workers (1). Second, genes inactivated in tumors can serve as biomarkers for lung cancer risk in a cancer-free population of workers exposed to plutonium. Support for this hypothesis is based on exciting preliminary results of our nested, case-control study of persons from the Colorado cohort. In that study, a panel of methylation markers for predicting lung cancer risk is being evaluated in sputum samples from incident lung cancer cases and controls. The first hypothesis will be tested by determining the prevalence for promoter hypermethylation of a panel of genes shown to play a critical role in the development of either adenocarcinoma and/or SCC associated with tobacco. Our initial studies on adenocarcinoma in MAYAK workers will be extended to evaluate methylation of the PAX5 {alpha}, PAX5 {beta}, H-cadherin, GATA5, and bone morphogenesis 3B (BMP3B) genes in the original sample set described under Preliminary studies. In addition, studies will be initiated in SCC

  2. Molecular Characterization of ERα-positive and Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severson, T.M.

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer, one of the most common of all cancers, is diagnosed in over 1.5 million people world-wide each year. Overall, treatments for breast cancer are considered relatively successful, however recurrence is a clinical problem of paramount importance. Molecular subtypes of breast cancer, defin

  3. Molecular Characterization of ERα-positive and Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severson, T.M.

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer, one of the most common of all cancers, is diagnosed in over 1.5 million people world-wide each year. Overall, treatments for breast cancer are considered relatively successful, however recurrence is a clinical problem of paramount importance. Molecular subtypes of breast cancer,

  4. Lobular breast cancer: Clinical, molecular and morphological characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christgen, Matthias; Steinemann, Doris; Kühnle, Elna; Länger, Florian; Gluz, Oleg; Harbeck, Nadia; Kreipe, Hans

    2016-07-01

    Infiltrating lobular breast cancer (ILBC) is the most common special breast cancer subtype. This review provides a comprehensive description of ILBC characteristics, including epidemiology, clinical features, molecular genetics and histomorphology. Twenty detailed supplemental data tables guide through primary data of more than 200 original studies. Meta-analyses indicate that ILBC is at least twice as common in the Western world as it is in other geographic regions. ILBC is over-represented in so-called interval carcinomas and in primary metastatic breast cancer. ILBC is also associated higher age, higher pT stage and hormone receptor (ER/PR) positivity. Pathological complete response rates after neoadjuvant chemotherapy are low, ranging between 0% and 11%. Positive resection margins after breast-conserving surgery are comparatively frequent and 17% to 65% of patients undergo a second surgical intervention. Depending on the morphological stringency in the diagnosis of ILBC, lack of E-cadherin expression is observed in 55% to 100% of cases. CDH1/E-cadherin mutation detection rates vary between 12% and 83%. Various additional molecular factors, including PIK3CA, TP53, FOXA1, FGFR1, ZNF703 and BCAR4, have been implicated in ILBC or progression of lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) to invasive cancer and are discussed in detail. Eight instructive figure plates recapitulate the histomorphology of ILBC and its variants. Furthermore, we draw attention to rarely addressed histological details, such as two-sided nuclear compression and fat-avoiding growth at the invasion front. Last but not least, we discuss future translational research directions and emphasize the concept of synthetic lethality, which promises new options for targeted ILBC therapy.

  5. Clinical and Molecular Characteristics of Post-Colonoscopy Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoffel, Elena M; Erichsen, Rune; Frøslev, Trine;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Colonoscopy provides incomplete protection from colorectal cancer (CRC), but determinants of post-colonoscopy CRC are not well understood. We compared clinical features and molecular characteristics of CRCs diagnosed at different time intervals after a previous colonoscopy....... METHODS: We performed a population-based, cross-sectional study of incident CRC cases in Denmark (2007-2011), categorized as post-colonoscopy or detected during diagnostic colonoscopy (in patients with no prior colonoscopy). We compared prevalence of proximal location and DNA mismatch repair deficiency (d...

  6. Assessing global transitions in human development and colorectal cancer incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Miranda M; Bray, Freddie; Vaccarella, Salvatore; Soerjomataram, Isabelle

    2017-06-15

    Colorectal cancer incidence has paralleled increases in human development across most countries. Yet, marked decreases in incidence are now observed in countries that have attained very high human development. Thus, in this study, we explored the relationship between human development and colorectal cancer incidence, and in particular assessed whether national transitions to very high human development are linked to temporal patterns in colorectal cancer incidence. For these analyses, we utilized the Human Development Index (HDI) and annual incidence data from regional and national cancer registries. Truncated (30-74 years) age-standardized incidence rates were calculated. Yearly incidence rate ratios and HDI ratios, before and after transitioning to very high human development, were also estimated. Among the 29 countries investigated, colorectal cancer incidence was observed to decrease after reaching the very high human development threshold for 12 countries; decreases were also observed in a further five countries, but the age-standardized incidence rates remained higher than that observed at the threshold. Such declines or stabilizations are likely due to colorectal cancer screening in some populations, as well as varying levels of exposure to protective factors. In summary, it appears that there is a threshold at which human development predicts a stabilization or decline in colorectal cancer incidence, though this pattern was not observed for all countries assessed. Future cancer planning must consider the increasing colorectal cancer burden expected in countries transitioning towards higher levels of human development, as well as possible declines in incidence among countries reaching the highest development level. © 2017 UICC.

  7. Obesity and Breast Cancer: Molecular Interconnections and Potential Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simone, Valeria; D'Avenia, Morena; Argentiero, Antonella; Felici, Claudia; Rizzo, Francesca Maria; De Pergola, Giovanni; Silvestris, Franco

    2016-04-01

    Obesity is an important risk factor for breast cancer (BC) in postmenopausal women; interlinked molecular mechanisms might be involved in the pathogenesis. Increased levels of estrogens due to aromatization of the adipose tissue, inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and prostaglandin E2, insulin resistance and hyperactivation of insulin-like growth factors pathways, adipokines, and oxidative stress are all abnormally regulated in obese women and contribute to cancerogenesis. These molecular factors interfere with intracellular signaling in the mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphatydilinositol-3-phosphate/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways, which regulate the progression of the cell cycle, apoptosis, and protein synthesis. In this context, structural defects of typical genes related to both BC and obesity, such as leptin, leptin receptor, serum paraoxonase/arylesterase 1, the fat mass and obesity-associated gene and melanocortin receptor 4, have been associated with a high or low risk of BC development. The early detection of these gene alterations might be useful as risk predictors in obese women, and targeting these pathways involved in the BC pathogenesis in obese women is a potential therapeutic tool. In particular, mTOR pathway deregulation concurs in both obesity and BC, and inhibition of this might disrupt the molecular interlinks in a similar manner to that of metformin, which exerts definite anticancer activity and is currently used as an antidiabetic drug with a weight-reducing property. The identification of both genetic and pharmacological implications on the prevention and management of BC is the ultimate aim of these studies. Obese women are at risk of breast cancer, but clinicians lack concrete tools for the prevention or early diagnosis of this risk. The present study, starting from the biology and the molecular defects characterizing both obesity and breast cancer, analyzed the potential

  8. Molecular markers for human placental investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppertz, Berthold

    2006-01-01

    The human placenta is a source for a variety of growth factors, hormones, and other proteins. The cellular source of the proteins can be best determined by immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry can also be used to identify a specific cell type and to differentiate it from other types of cells. Thus, there is the need for specific markers of those cell types that are present in the placenta. In this chapter, the basic protocols for the identification of proteins in a tissue section are described. This chapter focuses on methods that are available in the majority of laboratories, and therefore concentrates on methods that are used together with light microscopy.

  9. Molecular-targeted therapy for elderly patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Antonelli,Giovanna; Libra, Massimo; PANEBIANCO, VINCENZO; Russo,Alessia Erika; Vitale, Felice Vito; COLINA, PAOLO; D'Angelo,Alessandro; ROSSELLO, ROSALBA; Ferraù, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related mortality in men and women. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents close to 90% of all lung cancers. When diagnosed, >50% of patients are >65 years old. Through an improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in lung oncogenesis, molecular-targeted approaches have become an essential element for the treatment of patients with NSCLC. As the toxicity profiles of the techniques are definitely more favorable compared wit...

  10. Endogenous retroviral promoter exaptation in human cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artem Babaian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer arises from a series of genetic and epigenetic changes, which result in abnormal expression or mutational activation of oncogenes, as well as suppression/inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Aberrant expression of coding genes or long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs with oncogenic properties can be caused by translocations, gene amplifications, point mutations or other less characterized mechanisms. One such mechanism is the inappropriate usage of normally dormant, tissue-restricted or cryptic enhancers or promoters that serve to drive oncogenic gene expression. Dispersed across the human genome, endogenous retroviruses (ERVs provide an enormous reservoir of autonomous gene regulatory modules, some of which have been co-opted by the host during evolution to play important roles in normal regulation of genes and gene networks. This review focuses on the “dark side” of such ERV regulatory capacity. Specifically, we discuss a growing number of examples of normally dormant or epigenetically repressed ERVs that have been harnessed to drive oncogenes in human cancer, a process we term onco-exaptation, and we propose potential mechanisms that may underlie this phenomenon.

  11. Molecular Effects of Doxorubicin on Choline Metabolism in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menglin Cheng

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal choline phospholipid metabolism is a hallmark of cancer. The magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS detected total choline (tCho signal can serve as an early noninvasive imaging biomarker of chemotherapy response in breast cancer. We have quantified the individual components of the tCho signal, glycerophosphocholine (GPC, phosphocholine (PC and free choline (Cho, before and after treatment with the commonly used chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin in weakly metastatic human MCF7 and triple-negative human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. While the tCho concentration did not change following doxorubicin treatment, GPC significantly increased and PC decreased. Of the two phosphatidylcholine-specific PLD enzymes, only PLD1, but not PLD2, mRNA was down-regulated by doxorubicin treatment. For the two reported genes encoding GPC phosphodiesterase, the mRNA of GDPD6, but not GDPD5, decreased following doxorubicin treatment. mRNA levels of choline kinase α (ChKα, which converts Cho to PC, were reduced following doxorubicin treatment. PLD1 and ChKα protein levels decreased following doxorubicin treatment in a concentration dependent manner. Treatment with the PLD1 specific inhibitor VU0155069 sensitized MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells to doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity. Low concentrations of 100 nM of doxorubicin increased MDA-MB-231 cell migration. GDPD6, but not PLD1 or ChKα, silencing by siRNA abolished doxorubicin-induced breast cancer cell migration. Doxorubicin induced GPC increase and PC decrease are caused by reductions in PLD1, GDPD6, and ChKα mRNA and protein expression. We have shown that silencing or inhibiting these genes/proteins can promote drug effectiveness and reduce adverse drug effects. Our findings emphasize the importance of detecting PC and GPC individually.

  12. Matrix metalloproteinases and their tissue inhibitors in gastric cancer as molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampieri, Clara L; León-Córdoba, Kenneth; Remes-Troche, Jos Maria

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a complex disease that involves a range of biological individuals and tumors with histopathological features. The pathogenesis of this disease is multi-factorial and includes the interaction of genetic predisposition with environmental factors. Gastric cancer is normally diagnosed in advanced stages where there are few alternatives to offer and the prognosis is difficult to establish. Metastasis is the leading cause of cancer deaths. Identification of key genes and signaling pathways involved in metastasis and recurrence could predict these events and thereby identify therapeutic targets. In this context, the extracellular matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their inhibitors (TIMPs) represent a potential prognostic tool, because both genetic families regulate growth, angiogenesis, invasion, immune response, epithelial mesenchymal transition and cellular survival. Proteolytic parameters based on MMP/TIMP expression could be useful in the identification of patients with a high probability of developing distant metastases or peritoneal dissemination for each degree of histological malignancy. It is also probable that these parameters can allow improvement in the extent of surgery and dictate the most suitable therapy. We reviewed papers focused on human gastric epithelial cancer as a model and focus on the potential use of MMPs and TIMPs as molecular markers; also we include literature regarding gastric cancer risk factors, classification systems and MMP/TIMP regulation.

  13. Matrix metalloproteinases and their tissue inhibitors in gastric cancer as molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara L Sampieri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is a complex disease that involves a range of biological individuals and tumors with histopathological features. The pathogenesis of this disease is multi-factorial and includes the interaction of genetic predisposition with environmental factors. Gastric cancer is normally diagnosed in advanced stages where there are few alternatives to offer and the prognosis is difficult to establish. Metastasis is the leading cause of cancer deaths. Identification of key genes and signaling pathways involved in metastasis and recurrence could predict these events and thereby identify therapeutic targets. In this context, the extracellular matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and their inhibitors (TIMPs represent a potential prognostic tool, because both genetic families regulate growth, angiogenesis, invasion, immune response, epithelial mesenchymal transition and cellular survival. Proteolytic parameters based on MMP/TIMP expression could be useful in the identification of patients with a high probability of developing distant metastases or peritoneal dissemination for each degree of histological malignancy. It is also probable that these parameters can allow improvement in the extent of surgery and dictate the most suitable therapy. We reviewed papers focused on human gastric epithelial cancer as a model and focus on the potential use of MMPs and TIMPs as molecular markers; also we include literature regarding gastric cancer risk factors, classification systems and MMP/TIMP regulation.

  14. Molecular Modeling of Prion Transmission to Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Levavasseur

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Using different prion strains, such as the variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease agent and the atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathy agents, and using transgenic mice expressing human or bovine prion protein, we assessed the reliability of protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA to model interspecies and genetic barriers to prion transmission. We compared our PMCA results with in vivo transmission data characterized by attack rates, i.e., the percentage of inoculated mice that developed the disease. Using 19 seed/substrate combinations, we observed that a significant PMCA amplification was only obtained when the mouse line used as substrate is susceptible to the corresponding strain. Our results suggest that PMCA provides a useful tool to study genetic barriers to transmission and to study the zoonotic potential of emerging prion strains.

  15. Emerging roles of deubiquitinating enzymes in human cancer1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-ming YANG

    2007-01-01

    Protein modifications by the covalent linkage of ubiquitin have significant in-volvement in many cellular processes, including stress response, oncogenesis,viral infection, transcription, protein turnover, organelle biogenesis, DNA repair,cellular differentiation, and cell cycle control. Protein ubiquitination and subse-quent degradation by the proteasome require the participation of both ubiquitinating enzymes and deubiquitinating enzymes. Although deubiquitinatingenzymes constitute a large family in the ubiquitin system, the study of this class of proteins is still in its infant stage. Recent studies have revealed a variety of molecular and biological functions of deubiquitinating enzymes and their associa-tion with human diseases. In this review we will discuss the possible roles that deubiquitinating enzymes may play in cancers.

  16. Molecular cytogenetics: an indispensable tool for cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Thomas Sk; Ma, Edmond Sk

    2012-01-01

    Cytogenetic aberrations may escape detection or recognition in traditional karyotyping. The past decade has seen an explosion of methodological advances in molecular cytogenetics technology. These cytogenetics techniques add color to the black and white world of conventional banding. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) study has emerged as an indispensable tool for both basic and clinical research, as well as diagnostics, in leukemia and cancers. FISH can be used to identify chromosomal abnormalities through fluorescent labeled DNA probes that target specific DNA sequences. Subsequently, FISH-based tests such as multicolor karyotyping, comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and array CGH have been used in emerging clinical applications as they enable resolution of complex karyotypic aberrations and whole global scanning of genomic imbalances. More recently, crossspecies array CGH analysis has also been employed in cancer gene identification. The clinical impact of FISH is pivotal, especially in the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment decisions for hematological diseases, all of which facilitate the practice of personalized medicine. This review summarizes the methodology and current utilization of these FISH techniques in unraveling chromosomal changes and highlights how the field is moving away from conventional methods towards molecular cytogenetics approaches. In addition, the potential of the more recently developed FISH tests in contributing information to genetic abnormalities is illustrated.

  17. Comprehensive Molecular Portraits of Invasive Lobular Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciriello, Giovanni; Gatza, Michael L; Beck, Andrew H; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Rhie, Suhn K; Pastore, Alessandro; Zhang, Hailei; McLellan, Michael; Yau, Christina; Kandoth, Cyriac; Bowlby, Reanne; Shen, Hui; Hayat, Sikander; Fieldhouse, Robert; Lester, Susan C; Tse, Gary M K; Factor, Rachel E; Collins, Laura C; Allison, Kimberly H; Chen, Yunn-Yi; Jensen, Kristin; Johnson, Nicole B; Oesterreich, Steffi; Mills, Gordon B; Cherniack, Andrew D; Robertson, Gordon; Benz, Christopher; Sander, Chris; Laird, Peter W; Hoadley, Katherine A; King, Tari A; Perou, Charles M

    2015-10-08

    Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) is the second most prevalent histologic subtype of invasive breast cancer. Here, we comprehensively profiled 817 breast tumors, including 127 ILC, 490 ductal (IDC), and 88 mixed IDC/ILC. Besides E-cadherin loss, the best known ILC genetic hallmark, we identified mutations targeting PTEN, TBX3, and FOXA1 as ILC enriched features. PTEN loss associated with increased AKT phosphorylation, which was highest in ILC among all breast cancer subtypes. Spatially clustered FOXA1 mutations correlated with increased FOXA1 expression and activity. Conversely, GATA3 mutations and high expression characterized luminal A IDC, suggesting differential modulation of ER activity in ILC and IDC. Proliferation and immune-related signatures determined three ILC transcriptional subtypes associated with survival differences. Mixed IDC/ILC cases were molecularly classified as ILC-like and IDC-like revealing no true hybrid features. This multidimensional molecular atlas sheds new light on the genetic bases of ILC and provides potential clinical options.

  18. Anti-cancer chalcones: Structural and molecular target perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Debarshi Kar; Bharti, Sanjay Kumar; Asati, Vivek

    2015-06-15

    Chalcone or (E)-1,3-diphenyl-2-propene-1-one scaffold remained a fascination among researchers in the 21st century due to its simple chemistry, ease of synthesis and a wide variety of promising biological activities. Several natural and (semi) synthetic chalcones have shown anti-cancer activity due to their inhibitory potential against various targets namely ABCG2/P-gp/BCRP, 5α-reductase, aromatase, 17-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, HDAC/Situin-1, proteasome, VEGF, VEGFR-2 kinase, MMP-2/9, JAK/STAT signaling pathways, CDC25B, tubulin, cathepsin-K, topoisomerase-II, Wnt, NF-κB, B-Raf and mTOR etc. In this review, a comprehensive study on molecular targets/pathways involved in carcinogenesis, mechanism of actions (MOAs), structure activity relationships (SARs) and patents granted have been highlighted. With the knowledge of molecular targets, structural insights and SARs, this review may be helpful for (medicinal) chemists to design more potent, safe, selective and cost effective anti-cancer chalcones.

  19. Molecular and functional definition of the developing human striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onorati, Marco; Castiglioni, Valentina; Biasci, Daniele; Cesana, Elisabetta; Menon, Ramesh; Vuono, Romina; Talpo, Francesca; Laguna Goya, Rocio; Lyons, Paul A; Bulfamante, Gaetano P; Muzio, Luca; Martino, Gianvito; Toselli, Mauro; Farina, Cinthia; Barker, Roger A; Biella, Gerardo; Cattaneo, Elena

    2014-12-01

    The complexity of the human brain derives from the intricate interplay of molecular instructions during development. Here we systematically investigated gene expression changes in the prenatal human striatum and cerebral cortex during development from post-conception weeks 2 to 20. We identified tissue-specific gene coexpression networks, differentially expressed genes and a minimal set of bimodal genes, including those encoding transcription factors, that distinguished striatal from neocortical identities. Unexpected differences from mouse striatal development were discovered. We monitored 36 determinants at the protein level, revealing regional domains of expression and their refinement, during striatal development. We electrophysiologically profiled human striatal neurons differentiated in vitro and determined their refined molecular and functional properties. These results provide a resource and opportunity to gain global understanding of how transcriptional and functional processes converge to specify human striatal and neocortical neurons during development.

  20. Modelling mutational landscapes of human cancers in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Magali; Weninger, Annette; Ardin, Maude; Huskova, Hana; Castells, Xavier; Vallée, Maxime P.; McKay, James; Nedelko, Tatiana; Muehlbauer, Karl-Rudolf; Marusawa, Hiroyuki; Alexander, John; Hazelwood, Lee; Byrnes, Graham; Hollstein, Monica; Zavadil, Jiri

    2014-03-01

    Experimental models that recapitulate mutational landscapes of human cancers are needed to decipher the rapidly expanding data on human somatic mutations. We demonstrate that mutation patterns in immortalised cell lines derived from primary murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) exposed in vitro to carcinogens recapitulate key features of mutational signatures observed in human cancers. In experiments with several cancer-causing agents we obtained high genome-wide concordance between human tumour mutation data and in vitro data with respect to predominant substitution types, strand bias and sequence context. Moreover, we found signature mutations in well-studied human cancer driver genes. To explore endogenous mutagenesis, we used MEFs ectopically expressing activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and observed an excess of AID signature mutations in immortalised cell lines compared to their non-transgenic counterparts. MEF immortalisation is thus a simple and powerful strategy for modelling cancer mutation landscapes that facilitates the interpretation of human tumour genome-wide sequencing data.

  1. HABP2 is a novel regulator of hyaluronan-mediated human lung cancer progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara eMirzapoiazova

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lung cancer is a devastating disease with limited treatment options. Many lung cancers have changes in their microenvironment including upregulation of the extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycan, hyaluronan (HA, which we have previously demonstrated can regulate the activity of the extracellular serine protease, Hyaluronan Binding Protein 2 (HABP2. This study examined the functional role of HABP2 on HA-mediated human lung cancer dynamics.Methods: Immunohistochemical analysis was performed on lung cancer patient samples using anti-HABP2 antibody. Stable control, shRNA and HABP2 overexpressing human lung adenocarcinoma cells were evaluated using immunoblot analysis, migration, extravasation and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA activation assays with or without high molecular weight HA (HMW-HA or low molecular weight HA (LMW-HA. In human lung cancer xenograft models, primary tumor growth rates and lung metastasis were analyzed using consecutive tumor volume measurements and nestin immunoreactivity in nude mouse lungs.Results: We provide evidence that HABP2 is an important regulator of lung cancer progression. HABP2 expression was increased in several subtypes of patient non-small cell lung cancer samples. Further, HABP2 overexpression increased LMW-HA-induced uPA activation, migration and extravasation in human lung adenocarcinoma cells. In vivo, overexpression of HABP2 in human lung adenocarcinoma cells increased primary tumor growth rates in nude mice by ~2 fold and lung metastasis by ~10 fold compared to vector control cells (n=5 per condition.Conclusions: Our data suggests a possible direct effect of HABP2 on uPA activation and lung cancer progression. Our observations suggest that exploration of HABP2 in non-small cell lung carcinoma merits further study both as a diagnostic and therapeutic option.

  2. Arsenic trioxide inhibits cell proliferation and human papillomavirus oncogene expression in cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongtao; Gao, Peng; Zheng, Jie

    2014-09-05

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has shown therapeutic effects in some leukemias and solid cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms of its anticancer efficacy have not been clearly elucidated, particularly in solid cancers. Our previous data showed that As2O3 induced apoptosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA-immortalized human cervical epithelial cells and cervical cancer cells and inhibited the expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. In the present study, we systemically examined the effects of As2O3 on five human cervical cancer cell lines and explored the possible molecular mechanisms. MTT assay showed that HPV-negative C33A cells were more sensitive to growth inhibition induced by As2O3 than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells, and HPV 18-positive HeLa and C4-I cells were more sensitive to As2O3 than HPV 16-positive CaSki and SiHa cells. After As2O3 treatment, both mRNA and protein levels of HPV E6 and E7 obviously decreased in all HPV positive cell lines. In contrast, p53 and Rb protein levels increased in all tested cell lines. Transcription factor AP-1 protein expression decreased significantly in HeLa, CaSki and C33A cells with ELISA method. These results suggest that As2O3 is a potential anticancer drug for cervical cancer.

  3. Interplay between Cellular and Molecular Inflammatory Mediators in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Orozco-Morales

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a component of the tumor microenvironment and represents the 7th hallmark of cancer. Chronic inflammation plays a critical role in tumorigenesis. Tumor infiltrating inflammatory cells mediate processes associated with progression, immune suppression, promotion of neoangiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis, remodeling of extracellular matrix, invasion and metastasis, and, lastly, the inhibition of vaccine-induced antitumor T cell response. Accumulating evidence indicates a critical role of myeloid cells in the pathophysiology of human cancers. In contrast to the well-characterized tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs, the significance of granulocytes in cancer has only recently begun to emerge with the characterization of tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs. Recent studies show the importance of CD47 in the interaction with macrophages inhibiting phagocytosis and promoting the migration of neutrophils, increasing inflammation which can lead to recurrence and progression in lung cancer. Currently, therapies are targeted towards blocking CD47 and enhancing macrophage-mediated phagocytosis. However, antibody-based therapies may have adverse effects that limit its use.

  4. Molecular targeted treatment and radiation therapy for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquardt, Friederike; Roedel, Franz; Capalbo, Gianni; Weiss, Christian; Roedel, Claus [Dept. of Radiation Therapy, Univ. of Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    Background: EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) inhibitors confer clinical benefit in metastatic colorectal cancer when combined with chemotherapy. An emerging strategy to improve outcomes in rectal cancer is to integrate biologically active, targeted agents as triple therapy into chemoradiation protocols. Material and methods: cetuximab and bevacizumab have now been incorporated into phase I-II studies of preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for rectal cancer. The rationale of these combinations, early efficacy and toxicity data, and possible molecular predictors for tumor response are reviewed. Computerized bibliographic searches of Pubmed were supplemented with hand searches of reference lists and abstracts of ASCO and ASTRO meetings. Results: the combination of cetuximab and CRT can be safely applied without dose compromises of the respective treatment components. Disappointingly low rates of pathologic complete remission have been noted in several phase II studies. The K-ras mutation status and the gene copy number of EGFR may predict tumor response. The toxicity pattern (radiation-induced enteritis, perforations) and surgical complications (wound healing, fistula, bleeding) observed in at least some of the clinical studies with bevacizumab and CRT warrant further investigations. Conclusion: longer follow-up (and, finally, randomized trials) is needed to draw any firm conclusions with respect to local and distant failure rates, and toxicity associated with these novel treatment approaches. (orig.)

  5. Metabolic syndrome and Cancer: Do they share common molecular pathways?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veniou E.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome, a clustering of risk factors including obesity, has emerged as a global health plague. A lot of epidemiological and clinical evidence suggests that the metabolic syndrome is linked not only to cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus type 2 but also to cancer development and progression. In this review the potential mechanisms tying the metabolic syndrome with cancer are presented. The role of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia, the activation of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 pathway, and the induction of cytotoxic products are highlighted. Subsequent effects leading to oxidative stress, release of lipokines with signaling properties by adipocytes, development of a sustained systemic inflammation, production of inflammatory cytokines, and establishment of a tumorigenic environment are also discussed. The importance of the metabolic syndrome and obesity coupled with the deeper understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms has trigger intensive clinical research with an aim to prevent the risk of cancer and improve outcomes. Moreover, the need for lifestyle changes with increased physical activity and improved dietary quality has been emerged as urgent health priority.

  6. Influence of low molecular weight heparin on cancer patients’ survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Ptushkin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an evidence of interaction between the hemostasis system and tumor progression factors. It is known that in addition to the fibrin formation and platelets activation, thrombin can influence many cells function interacting with protease-activating receptors including tumor cells. These receptors are involved in the malignant cell phenotype formation (adhesion, proliferation, proteolysis. Thrombin can also affect angiogenesis by stimulating endothelial cells penetration through basal membrane and its migration with new vessels formation. Furthermore, it can cause the release of main neoangiogenesis promoter – vascular endothelial growth factor. All of the above and many other linkages of coagulation and tumor create a theoretical background of possible affecting tumor by regulation of the coagulation activity. Thepromise of this approach is controversial, but there is some clinical and experimental evidence of their effectiveness. The most used group ofdrugs for this purpose was heparins. Several retrospective studies have shown a benefit of low molecular weight heparins (LMWH over unfractionated heparin in cancer patient survival. The appearance of a new heparins group – ultra LMWH are of interest from this point ofview and their possible use in cancer patients. To date bemiparin and semuloparin are used in clinic. Both (bemiparin about 3600 kDa,semuloparin 3000 kDa have substancially reduced molecular weight as compared with the smallest of LMWH – enoxaparin (4600 kDa.Use of bemiparin in patients with small cell lung cancer receiving chemotherapy resulted in increased of 2-year survival rate compared to the control group (68.6 % vs. 29.4 %, p = 0.0042.

  7. Influence of low molecular weight heparin on cancer patients’ survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Ptushkin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available There is an evidence of interaction between the hemostasis system and tumor progression factors. It is known that in addition to the fibrin formation and platelets activation, thrombin can influence many cells function interacting with protease-activating receptors including tumor cells. These receptors are involved in the malignant cell phenotype formation (adhesion, proliferation, proteolysis. Thrombin can also affect angiogenesis by stimulating endothelial cells penetration through basal membrane and its migration with new vessels formation. Furthermore, it can cause the release of main neoangiogenesis promoter – vascular endothelial growth factor. All of the above and many other linkages of coagulation and tumor create a theoretical background of possible affecting tumor by regulation of the coagulation activity. Thepromise of this approach is controversial, but there is some clinical and experimental evidence of their effectiveness. The most used group ofdrugs for this purpose was heparins. Several retrospective studies have shown a benefit of low molecular weight heparins (LMWH over unfractionated heparin in cancer patient survival. The appearance of a new heparins group – ultra LMWH are of interest from this point ofview and their possible use in cancer patients. To date bemiparin and semuloparin are used in clinic. Both (bemiparin about 3600 kDa,semuloparin 3000 kDa have substancially reduced molecular weight as compared with the smallest of LMWH – enoxaparin (4600 kDa.Use of bemiparin in patients with small cell lung cancer receiving chemotherapy resulted in increased of 2-year survival rate compared to the control group (68.6 % vs. 29.4 %, p = 0.0042.

  8. Extracellular Matrix Molecular Remodeling in Human Liver Fibrosis Evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Baiocchini

    Full Text Available Chronic liver damage leads to pathological accumulation of ECM proteins (liver fibrosis. Comprehensive characterization of the human ECM molecular composition is essential for gaining insights into the mechanisms of liver disease. To date, studies of ECM remodeling in human liver diseases have been hampered by the unavailability of purified ECM. Here, we developed a decellularization method to purify ECM scaffolds from human liver tissues. Histological and electron microscopy analyses demonstrated that the ECM scaffolds, devoid of plasma and cellular components, preserved the three-dimensional ECM structure and zonal distribution of ECM components. This method has been then applied on 57 liver biopsies of HCV-infected patients at different stages of liver fibrosis according to METAVIR classification. Label-free nLC-MS/MS proteomics and computation biology were performed to analyze the ECM molecular composition in liver fibrosis progression, thus unveiling protein expression signatures specific for the HCV-related liver fibrotic stages. In particular, the ECM molecular composition of liver fibrosis was found to involve dynamic changes in matrix stiffness, flexibility and density related to the dysregulation of predominant collagen, elastic fibers and minor components with both structural and signaling properties. This study contributes to the understanding of the molecular bases underlying ECM remodeling in liver fibrosis and suggests new molecular targets for fibrolytic strategies.

  9. Different response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy for different molecular subtypes in patients with locally advanced breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huafeng Kang; Zhijun Dai; Xiaobin Ma; Xing Bao; Shuai Lin; Hongbing Ma; Xiaoxu Liu; Xijing Wang

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of different molecular subtypes defined by immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining on the response rate for patients with locally advanced breast cancer received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods: One hundred and seven breast cancer patients admitted from 2007 to 2011 who received 4 cycles of docetaxel/epirubicin-combined (TE) neoadjuvant chemotherapy were retrospectively reviewed, the patients were classified into 4 subtypes: luminal A, luminal B, HER-2 and triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) according to different combination patterns of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor-2 (HER-2) expression defined by IHC method. The correlation between response rate and the molecular subtypes were analyzed. Results: The pathological complete response (PCR), clinical complete response (CCR), clinical partial response (CPR), and clinical stable disease (CSD) rate of whole group was 15.89% (17/107), 22.43% (24/107), 63.55% (68/107), 14.02% (15/107), respectively, and the overall response rate (ORR) was 85.98% (92/107). The PCR rate and ORR of luminal A, luminal B, HER-2 and TNBC subtypes was 4.76% and 73.81%; 16.67% and 83.33%;17.65% and 100.00%; 30.00% and 96.67%, respectively. The PCR and ORR rate of HER-2/TNBC subtypes was higher than that of luminal A/B subtypes (P = 0.019, P = 0.002, respectively). Conclusion: Different molecular subtypes display different response rate for patients with locally advanced breast cancer received neoadjuvant TE chemotherapy, HER-2/TNBC subtypes have a higher PCR and ORR rate than that of luminal A/B subtypes.

  10. Molecular aging and rejuvenation of human muscle stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Morgan E; Suetta, Charlotte; Conboy, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    Very little remains known about the regulation of human organ stem cells (in general, and during the aging process), and most previous data were collected in short-lived rodents. We examined whether stem cell aging in rodents could be extrapolated to genetically and environmentally variable humans....... Our findings establish key evolutionarily conserved mechanisms of human stem cell aging. We find that satellite cells are maintained in aged human skeletal muscle, but fail to activate in response to muscle attrition, due to diminished activation of Notch compounded by elevated transforming growth...... factor beta (TGF-beta)/phospho Smad3 (pSmad3). Furthermore, this work reveals that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/phosphate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) signalling declines in human muscle with age, and is important for activating Notch in human muscle stem cells. This molecular...

  11. Molecular Criteria for Defining the Naive Human Pluripotent State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theunissen, Thorold W; Friedli, Marc; He, Yupeng; Planet, Evarist; O'Neil, Ryan C; Markoulaki, Styliani; Pontis, Julien; Wang, Haoyi; Iouranova, Alexandra; Imbeault, Michaël; Duc, Julien; Cohen, Malkiel A; Wert, Katherine J; Castanon, Rosa; Zhang, Zhuzhu; Huang, Yanmei; Nery, Joseph R; Drotar, Jesse; Lungjangwa, Tenzin; Trono, Didier; Ecker, Joseph R; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2016-10-06

    Recent studies have aimed to convert cultured human pluripotent cells to a naive state, but it remains unclear to what extent the resulting cells recapitulate in vivo naive pluripotency. Here we propose a set of molecular criteria for evaluating the naive human pluripotent state by comparing it to the human embryo. We show that transcription of transposable elements provides a sensitive measure of the concordance between pluripotent stem cells and early human development. We also show that induction of the naive state is accompanied by genome-wide DNA hypomethylation, which is reversible except at imprinted genes, and that the X chromosome status resembles that of the human preimplantation embryo. However, we did not see efficient incorporation of naive human cells into mouse embryos. Overall, the different naive conditions we tested showed varied relationships to human embryonic states based on molecular criteria, providing a backdrop for future analysis of naive human pluripotency. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Apoptosis of human pancreatic cancer cells induced by Triptolide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Xiong Zhou; Xiao-Ling Ding; Jie-Fei Huang; Hong Zhang; Sheng-Bao Wu; Jian-Ping Cheng; Qun Wei

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To investigate apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer ceils induced by Triptolide (TL),and the relationship between this apoptosis and expression of caspase-3' bcl-2 and bax.METHODS:Human pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990 was cultured in DIEM media for this study.MTT assay was used to determine the cell growth inhibitory rate in vitro.Flow cytometry and TUNEL assay were used to detect the apoptosis of human pancreatic cancer cells before and after TL treatment.RT-PCR was used to detect the expression of apoptosis-associated gene caspase-3' bcl-2 and bax.RESULTS:TL inhibited the growth of human pancreatic cancer cells in a dose-and time-dependent manner.TL induced human pancreatic cancer cells to undergo apoptosis with typically apoptotic characteristics.TUNEL assay showed that after the treatment of human pancreatic cancer cells with 40 ng/mL TL for 12 h and 24 h,the apoptotic rates of human pancreatic cancer cells increased significantly.RT-PCR demonstrated that caspase-3 and bax were significantly up-regulated in SW1990 cells treated with TL while bcl-2 mRNA was not.CONCLUSION:TL is able to induce the apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells.This apoptosis may be mediated by up-regulating the expression of apoptosisassociated caspase-3 and bax gene.

  13. ACK1/TNK2 tyrosine kinase: molecular signaling and evolving role in cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, K; Mahajan, N P

    2015-08-01

    Deregulated tyrosine kinase signaling alters cellular homeostasis to drive cancer progression. The emergence of a non-receptor tyrosine kinase (non-RTK), ACK1 (also known as activated Cdc42-associated kinase 1 or TNK2) as an oncogenic kinase, has uncovered novel mechanisms by which tyrosine kinase signaling promotes cancer progression. Although early studies focused on ACK1 as a cytosolic effector of activated transmembrane RTKs, wherein it shuttles between the cytosol and the nucleus to rapidly transduce extracellular signals from the RTKs to the intracellular effectors, recent data unfold a new aspect of its functionality as an epigenetic regulator. ACK1 interacts with the estrogen receptor (ER)/histone demethylase KDM3A (JHDM2a) complex, which modifies KDM3A by tyrosine phosphorylation to regulate the transcriptional outcome at HOXA1 locus to promote the growth of tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer. It is also well established that ACK1 regulates the activity of androgen receptor (AR) by tyrosine phosphorylation to fuel the growth of hormone-refractory prostate cancers. Further, recent explosion in genomic sequencing has revealed recurrent ACK1 gene amplification and somatic mutations in a variety of human malignancies, providing a molecular basis for its role in neoplastic transformation. In this review, we will discuss the various facets of ACK1 signaling, including its newly uncovered epigenetic regulator function, which enables cells to bypass the blockade to major survival pathways to promote resistance to standard cancer treatments. Not surprisingly, cancer cells appear to acquire an 'addiction' to ACK1-mediated survival, particularly under stress conditions, such as growth factor deprivation or genotoxic insults or hormone deprivation. With the accelerated development of potent and selective ACK1 inhibitors, targeted treatment for cancers harboring aberrant ACK1 activity may soon become a clinical reality.

  14. Molecular Pathology: A Requirement for Precision Medicine in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietel, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The increasing importance of targeting drugs and check-point inhibitors in the treatment of several tumor entities (breast, colon, lung, malignant melanoma, lymphoma, etc.) and the necessity of a companion diagnostic (HER2, (pan)RAS, EGFR, ALK, BRAF, ROS1, MET, PD-L1, etc.) is leading to new challenges for surgical pathology. Since almost all the biomarkers to be specifically detected are tissue based, a precise and reliable diagnostic is absolutely crucial. To meet this challenge surgical pathology has adapted a number of molecular methods (semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry, fluorescence in situ hybridization, PCR and its multiple variants, (pyro/Sanger) sequencing, next generation sequencing (amplicon, whole exome, whole genome), DNA arrays, methylation analyses, etc.) to be applicable for formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. Reading a patient's tissue as 'deeply' as possible and obtaining information on the morphological, genetic, proteomic and epigenetic background are the tasks of pathologists and molecular biologists and provide the clinicians with information relevant for precision medicine. Intensified cooperation between clinicians and pathologists will provide the basis of improved clinical drug selection and guide development of new cancer gene therapies and molecularly targeted drugs by research units and the pharmaceutical industry. © 2016 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  15. Naturally Occurring Canine Invasive Urinary Bladder Cancer: A Complementary Animal Model to Improve the Success Rate in Human Clinical Trials of New Cancer Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M. Fulkerson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Genomic analyses are defining numerous new targets for cancer therapy. Therapies aimed at specific genetic and epigenetic targets in cancer cells as well as expanded development of immunotherapies are placing increased demands on animal models. Traditional experimental models do not possess the collective features (cancer heterogeneity, molecular complexity, invasion, metastasis, and immune cell response critical to predict success or failure of emerging therapies in humans. There is growing evidence, however, that dogs with specific forms of naturally occurring cancer can serve as highly relevant animal models to complement traditional models. Invasive urinary bladder cancer (invasive urothelial carcinoma (InvUC in dogs, for example, closely mimics the cancer in humans in pathology, molecular features, biological behavior including sites and frequency of distant metastasis, and response to chemotherapy. Genomic analyses are defining further intriguing similarities between InvUC in dogs and that in humans. Multiple canine clinical trials have been completed, and others are in progress with the aim of translating important findings into humans to increase the success rate of human trials, as well as helping pet dogs. Examples of successful targeted therapy studies and the challenges to be met to fully utilize naturally occurring dog models of cancer will be reviewed.

  16. Report of the Integrative Molecular Cancer Epidemiology International Symposium, Lyon, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, S

    2008-01-01

    An International Symposium on Integrative Molecular Cancer Epidemiology took place in Lyon, France, on 3-5 July 2008. The Symposium focused on aetiological and mechanistic aspects of molecular and genetic cancer epidemiology research and was divided into the following three sections: Molecular epidemiology-application of novel molecular markers to cancer epidemiology.Genomic epidemiology in the era of whole genome scan.INTEGRATIVE MOLECULAR EPIDEMIOLOGY: visions for the future.Participants included epidemiologists, geneticists, biochemical and molecular biologists, pharmacologists, pathologists and all researchers interested in this field. The Symposium provided a complete and clear overview of the present and future programmes in molecular cancer epidemiology. It also served to encourage international scientific collaboration between investigators working in this specific research field, and to stimulate transdisciplinary research with experts of other research areas. Highlights of each of the scientific presentations are summarized below.

  17. The Isolation and Characterization of Human Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    IGF1, SOX15, BMPR1B, TGFBR1, etc), which fall into distinct GO categories including SC, development, stress response, and wound healing (unpublished...prostate cancer through the elucidation of the role of cancer stem cells in the pathogenesis of the disease. During the past year, we have made the...studies, ii) in vitro co-culture of human prostate cancer cells (established cell lines and primary patient samples) with human prostate fibroblasts

  18. Molecular targeting of drug delivery systems to ovarian cancer by BH3 and LHRH peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharap, S S; Qiu, B; Williams, G C; Sinko, P; Stein, S; Minko, T

    2003-08-28

    Novel targeted proapoptotic anticancer drug delivery systems were developed and evaluated. Poly(ethyleneglycol) (PEG) conjugates were used as carriers. Camptothecin (CPT) was used as an anticancer agent-apoptosis inductor. Two types of molecular targets were investigated: (1) an extracellular membrane receptor specific to ovarian cancer and (2) intracellular controlling mechanisms of apoptosis. Synthetic peptides similar to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) and BCL-2 homology 3 (BH3) peptide were used as a targeting moiety and a suppressor of cellular antiapoptotic defense, respectively. Three different conjugates (CPT-PEG, CPT-PEG-BH3 and CPT-PEG-LHRH) were synthesized and examined in A2780 human ovarian cancer cells. Cytotoxicity, expression of genes encoding BCL-2, BCL-XL, SMAC, APAF-1 proteins and caspases 3 and 9, the activity of caspases 3 and 9 and apoptosis induction were studied. Taken together the results indicate much higher cytotoxicity and apoptosis-inducing activity of PEG-CPT conjugates when compared to free CPT. Moreover, the effects of targeted CPT-PEG-BH3 and CPT-PEG-LHRH conjugates were more pronounced than the non-targeted PEG-CPT conjugate. The results confirmed the feasibility of this new two-tier molecular targeting strategy for enhancing the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy.

  19. Mouse Low-Grade Gliomas Contain Cancer Stem Cells with Unique Molecular and Functional Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsien Chen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The availability of adult malignant glioma stem cells (GSCs has provided unprecedented opportunities to identify the mechanisms underlying treatment resistance. Unfortunately, there is a lack of comparable reagents for the study of pediatric low-grade glioma (LGG. Leveraging a neurofibromatosis 1 (Nf1 genetically engineered mouse LGG model, we report the isolation of CD133+ multi-potent low-grade glioma stem cells (LG-GSCs, which generate glioma-like lesions histologically similar to the parent tumor following injection into immunocompetent hosts. In addition, we demonstrate that these LG-GSCs harbor selective resistance to currently employed conventional and biologically targeted anti-cancer agents, which reflect the acquisition of new targetable signaling pathway abnormalities. Using transcriptomic analysis to identify additional molecular properties, we discovered that mouse and human LG-GSCs harbor high levels of