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Sample records for human cancer protein

  1. Bacterial protein toxins in human cancers.

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    Rosadi, Francesca; Fiorentini, Carla; Fabbri, Alessia

    2016-02-01

    Many bacteria causing persistent infections produce toxins whose mechanisms of action indicate that they could have a role in carcinogenesis. Some toxins, like CDT and colibactin, directly attack the genome by damaging DNA whereas others, as for example CNF1, CagA and BFT, impinge on key eukaryotic processes, such as cellular signalling and cell death. These bacterial toxins, together with other less known toxins, mimic carcinogens and tumour promoters. The aim of this review is to fulfil an up-to-date analysis of toxins with carcinogenic potential that have been already correlated to human cancers. Bacterial toxins-induced carcinogenesis represents an emerging aspect in bacteriology, and its significance is increasingly recognized.

  2. Deoxyribonucleic-binding homeobox proteins are augmented in human cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Mercurio, A M; Chung, S Y;

    1990-01-01

    the highly conserved 60 amino acid homeodomain. This peptide antiserum recognized a protein species of molecular weight 63,000 in immunoblots of nuclear extracts obtained from several tumor cell lines. The predominant molecular weight 63,000 nuclear protein recognized by the peptide antiserum...... the same patients exhibited little immunoreactivity. Both the peptide antiserum and the polyclonal antiserum against the native protein immunoblotted a molecular weight 63,000 protein in nuclear extracts of tumor tissue, but not significantly in extracts of normal tissue. At the molecular level......Homeobox genes encode sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins that are involved in the regulation of gene expression during embryonic development. In this study, we examined the expression of homeobox proteins in human cancer. Antiserum was obtained against a synthetic peptide derived from...

  3. Candidate serological biomarkers for cancer identified from the secretomes of 23 cancer cell lines and the human protein atlas.

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    Wu, Chih-Ching; Hsu, Chia-Wei; Chen, Chi-De; Yu, Chia-Jung; Chang, Kai-Ping; Tai, Dar-In; Liu, Hao-Ping; Su, Wen-Hui; Chang, Yu-Sun; Yu, Jau-Song

    2010-06-01

    Although cancer cell secretome profiling is a promising strategy used to identify potential body fluid-accessible cancer biomarkers, questions remain regarding the depth to which the cancer cell secretome can be mined and the efficiency with which researchers can select useful candidates from the growing list of identified proteins. Therefore, we analyzed the secretomes of 23 human cancer cell lines derived from 11 cancer types using one-dimensional SDS-PAGE and nano-LC-MS/MS performed on an LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer to generate a more comprehensive cancer cell secretome. A total of 31,180 proteins was detected, accounting for 4,584 non-redundant proteins, with an average of 1,300 proteins identified per cell line. Using protein secretion-predictive algorithms, 55.8% of the proteins appeared to be released or shed from cells. The identified proteins were selected as potential marker candidates according to three strategies: (i) proteins apparently secreted by one cancer type but not by others (cancer type-specific marker candidates), (ii) proteins released by most cancer cell lines (pan-cancer marker candidates), and (iii) proteins putatively linked to cancer-relevant pathways. We then examined protein expression profiles in the Human Protein Atlas to identify biomarker candidates that were simultaneously detected in the secretomes and highly expressed in cancer tissues. This analysis yielded 6-137 marker candidates selective for each tumor type and 94 potential pan-cancer markers. Among these, we selectively validated monocyte differentiation antigen CD14 (for liver cancer), stromal cell-derived factor 1 (for lung cancer), and cathepsin L1 and interferon-induced 17-kDa protein (for nasopharyngeal carcinoma) as potential serological cancer markers. In summary, the proteins identified from the secretomes of 23 cancer cell lines and the Human Protein Atlas represent a focused reservoir of potential cancer biomarkers.

  4. Siah1 proteins enhance radiosensitivity of human breast cancer cells

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    Engenhart-Cabillic Rita

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Siah proteins play an important role in cancer progression. We evaluated the effect of Siah1, its splice variants Siah1L and the Siah1 mutant with the RING finger deleted (Siah1ΔR on radiosensitization of human breast cancer cells. Methods The status of Siah1 and Siah1L was analysed in five breast cancer cell lines. To establish stable cells, SKBR3 cells were transfected with Siah1, Siah-1L and Siah1ΔR. Siah1 function was suppressed by siRNA in MCF-7 cells. The impact of Siah1 overexpression and silencing on apoptosis, proliferation, survival, invasion ability and DNA repair was assessed in SKBR3 and MCF-7 cells, also in regards to radiation. Results Siah1 and Siah1L mRNA expression was absent in four of five breast cancer cells lines analysed. Overexpression of Siah1 and Siah1L enhanced radiation-induced apoptosis in stable transfected SKBR3 cells, while Siah1ΔR failed to show this effect. In addition, Siah1 and Siah1L significantly reduced cell clonogenic survival and proliferation. Siah1L sensitization enhancement ratio values were over 1.5 and 4.0 for clonogenic survival and proliferation, respectively, pointing to a highly cooperative and potentially synergistic fashion with radiation. Siah1 or Siah1L significantly reduced invasion ability of SKBR3 and suppressed Tcf/Lef factor activity. Importantly, Siah1 siRNA demonstrated opposite effects in MCF-7 cells. Siah1 and Siah1L overexpression resulted in inhibition of DNA repair as inferred by increased levels of DNA double-strand breaks in irradiated SKBR3 cells. Conclusion Our results reveal for the first time how overexpression of Siah1L and Siah1 can determine radiosensitivity of breast cancer cells. These findings suggest that development of drugs augmenting Siah1 and Siah1L activity could be a novel approach in improving tumor cell kill.

  5. Targeting Human Cancer by a Glycosaminoglycan Binding Malaria Protein.

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    Salanti, Ali; Clausen, Thomas M; Agerbæk, Mette Ø; Al Nakouzi, Nader; Dahlbäck, Madeleine; Oo, Htoo Z; Lee, Sherry; Gustavsson, Tobias; Rich, Jamie R; Hedberg, Bradley J; Mao, Yang; Barington, Line; Pereira, Marina A; LoBello, Janine; Endo, Makoto; Fazli, Ladan; Soden, Jo; Wang, Chris K; Sander, Adam F; Dagil, Robert; Thrane, Susan; Holst, Peter J; Meng, Le; Favero, Francesco; Weiss, Glen J; Nielsen, Morten A; Freeth, Jim; Nielsen, Torsten O; Zaia, Joseph; Tran, Nhan L; Trent, Jeff; Babcook, John S; Theander, Thor G; Sorensen, Poul H; Daugaard, Mads

    2015-10-12

    Plasmodium falciparum engineer infected erythrocytes to present the malarial protein, VAR2CSA, which binds a distinct type chondroitin sulfate (CS) exclusively expressed in the placenta. Here, we show that the same CS modification is present on a high proportion of malignant cells and that it can be specifically targeted by recombinant VAR2CSA (rVAR2). In tumors, placental-like CS chains are linked to a limited repertoire of cancer-associated proteoglycans including CD44 and CSPG4. The rVAR2 protein localizes to tumors in vivo and rVAR2 fused to diphtheria toxin or conjugated to hemiasterlin compounds strongly inhibits in vivo tumor cell growth and metastasis. Our data demonstrate how an evolutionarily refined parasite-derived protein can be exploited to target a common, but complex, malignancy-associated glycosaminoglycan modification.

  6. p53 Family: Role of Protein Isoforms in Human Cancer

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    Jinxiong Wei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available TP53, TP63, and TP73 genes comprise the p53 family. Each gene produces protein isoforms through multiple mechanisms including extensive alternative mRNA splicing. Accumulating evidence shows that these isoforms play a critical role in the regulation of many biological processes in normal cells. Their abnormal expression contributes to tumorigenesis and has a profound effect on tumor response to curative therapy. This paper is an overview of isoform diversity in the p53 family and its role in cancer.

  7. Long interspersed element-1 protein expression is a hallmark of many human cancers.

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    Rodić, Nemanja; Sharma, Reema; Sharma, Rajni; Zampella, John; Dai, Lixin; Taylor, Martin S; Hruban, Ralph H; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Maitra, Anirban; Torbenson, Michael S; Goggins, Michael; Shih, Ie-Ming; Duffield, Amy S; Montgomery, Elizabeth A; Gabrielson, Edward; Netto, George J; Lotan, Tamara L; De Marzo, Angelo M; Westra, William; Binder, Zev A; Orr, Brent A; Gallia, Gary L; Eberhart, Charles G; Boeke, Jef D; Harris, Chris R; Burns, Kathleen H

    2014-05-01

    Cancers comprise a heterogeneous group of human diseases. Unifying characteristics include unchecked abilities of tumor cells to proliferate and spread anatomically, and the presence of clonal advantageous genetic changes. However, universal and highly specific tumor markers are unknown. Herein, we report widespread long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1) repeat expression in human cancers. We show that nearly half of all human cancers are immunoreactive for a LINE-1-encoded protein. LINE-1 protein expression is a common feature of many types of high-grade malignant cancers, is rarely detected in early stages of tumorigenesis, and is absent from normal somatic tissues. Studies have shown that LINE-1 contributes to genetic changes in cancers, with somatic LINE-1 insertions seen in selected types of human cancers, particularly colon cancer. We sought to correlate this observation with expression of the LINE-1-encoded protein, open reading frame 1 protein, and found that LINE-1 open reading frame 1 protein is a surprisingly broad, yet highly tumor-specific, antigen.

  8. The bone morphogenetic protein antagonist gremlin 1 is overexpressed in human cancers and interacts with YWHAH protein

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    Hur Soo

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Basic studies of oncogenesis have demonstrated that either the elevated production of particular oncogene proteins or the occurrence of qualitative abnormalities in oncogenes can contribute to neoplastic cellular transformation. The purpose of our study was to identify an unique gene that shows cancer-associated expression, and characterizes its function related to human carcinogenesis. Methods We used the differential display (DD RT-PCR method using normal cervical, cervical cancer, metastatic cervical tissues, and cervical cancer cell lines to identify genes overexpressed in cervical cancers and identified gremlin 1 which was overexpressed in cervical cancers. We determined expression levels of gremlin 1 using Northern blot analysis and immunohistochemical study in various types of human normal and cancer tissues. To understand the tumorigenesis pathway of identified gremlin 1 protein, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen, GST pull down assay, and immunoprecipitation to identify gremlin 1 interacting proteins. Results DDRT-PCR analysis revealed that gremlin 1 was overexpressed in uterine cervical cancer. We also identified a human gremlin 1 that was overexpressed in various human tumors including carcinomas of the lung, ovary, kidney, breast, colon, pancreas, and sarcoma. PIG-2-transfected HEK 293 cells exhibited growth stimulation and increased telomerase activity. Gremlin 1 interacted with homo sapiens tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxygenase activation protein, eta polypeptide (14-3-3 eta; YWHAH. YWHAH protein binding site for gremlin 1 was located between residues 61–80 and gremlin 1 binding site for YWHAH was found to be located between residues 1 to 67. Conclusion Gremlin 1 may play an oncogenic role especially in carcinomas of the uterine cervix, lung, ovary, kidney, breast, colon, pancreas, and sarcoma. Over-expressed gremlin 1 functions by interaction with YWHAH. Therefore, Gremlin 1 and its binding

  9. Derailing the UPS of Protein Turnover in Cancer and other Human Diseases

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    Jit Kong Cheong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein modifications by the covalent linkage of ubiquitin have significant involvement in many cellular processes, including stress response, oncogenesis, viral infection, transcription, protein turnover, organelle biogenesis, DNA repair, cellular differentiation, and cell cycle control. We provide a brief overview of the fundamentals of the regulation of protein turnover by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and discuss new therapeutic strategies that aim to mitigate the deleterious effects of its dysregulation in cancer and other human disease pathophysiology.

  10. Clinicopathological significance of p53 and mdm2 protein expression in human pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Dong; Gang Ma; Wei Tu; Ke-Jian Guo; Yu-Lin Tian; Yu-Ting Dong

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the clinicopathological significance of p53 and mdm2 protein expression in human pancreatic cancer. METHODS: To investigate the expression of p53 and mdm2 in pancreatic cancer by immunohistochemistry, and the relationships between the p53 and mdm2 protein expression and clinicopathological parameters in pancreatic cancer.RESULTS: The positive expression of p53 protein was found in 40 of 59 patients (67.8%) and that of mdm2 protein in 17 of 59 patients (28.8%). No obvious relationships were found between p53 as well as mdm2 expression and sex, tumor site, TNM staging and histological differentiation. p53 expression was increased in patients younger than 65 years old, while mdm2 had no relationship with age. The survival time of the patients with the positive expression of p53 and mdm2 proteins was obviously shorter than the other groups. CONCLUSION: Both p53 and mdm2 presented relatively high expression in human pancreatic cancer. The overexpression of p53 and mdm2 might reflect the malignant proliferation of pancreatic cancer and their co-expression might be helpful to evaluate the prognosis of the patients with pancreatic cancer.

  11. Zinc finger protein 278, a potential oncogene in human colorectal cancer

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    Xiaoqing Tian; Danfeng Sun; Yanjie Zhang; Shuliang Zhao; Hua Xiong; Jingyuan Fang

    2008-01-01

    Zinc finger protein 278 (ZNF278) is a novel Krueppel Cys2-His2-type zinc finger protein that is ubiquitously distributed in human tissues. Whether ZNF278 is related to the development of colorectal cancer is still unclear. The transcriptional level of ZNF278 was studied in colorectal cancer by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that ZNF278 expression was increased in 53% of colorectal cancer tissues compared to corresponding non-cancerous tissues. The transcriptional down-regulation of ZNF278 was detected in only three (6%) human colorectal cancer tissues compared to corresponding non-cancer tissues. No significant difference was detected in 19 (41%) pairs of samples.However, we failed to find a significant association between the up-regulation of ZNF278 transcription and age, sex, the degree of infiltration, or the tumor size of colorectal cancer.To study the function of ZNF278 in colorectal carcinogenesis,the colon cancer cell line SW1116 was stably transfected with a wild-type ZNF278 plasmid to construct an overexpression system, and was transiently transfected with the small interfering RNA of ZNF278 to construct a ZNF278 knockdown system. Cell proliferation was assessed with 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide dye and a cell counter. The results show that ZNF278 promotes cell growth, and its knockdown suppresses cell proliferation. ZNF278 could be a potential proto-oncogene in colorectal cancer.

  12. Analysis of human papillomavirus E7 protein status in C-33A cervical cancer cells.

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    Kaiser, Andreas; Jenewein, Brigitte; Pircher, Haymo; Rostek, Ursula; Jansen-Dürr, Pidder; Zwerschke, Werner

    2015-02-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) are the main etiologic factor for the development of cervical cancer. Infections by these viruses have been detected in virtually all cervical cancers. C-33A is one of the rare cervical cancer derived cell lines considered as HPV-negative. Employing monoclonal antibodies raised against a conformational epitope of the HPV-16 E7 oncoprotein, we present evidence suggesting that E7-positive cells can be sporadically and transiently detected in C-33A cell cultures. Immunoblotting with affinity-purified rabbit polyclonal anti-HPV 16 E7 antisera and q-RT-PCR analysis suggest that these cells do probably not express HPV-16 E7. Moreover, we show that the HPV E7 protein level differs considerably between individual cells in cultures of several established cervical cancer cell lines. Our data suggest that expression of the E7 protein is variable in established cervical cancer cell lines including C-33A cells.

  13. Down-expression of tumor protein p53-induced nuclear protein 1 in human gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei-Hong Jiang; Yoshiharu Motoo; Stéphane Garcia; Juan Lucio Iovanna; Marie-Josèphe Pébusque; Norio Sawabu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: Overexpression of tumor protein p53-induced nuclear protein 1 (TP53INP1) induces G1 cell cycle arrest and increases p53-mediated apoptosis. To clarify the clinical importance of TP53INP1, we analyzed TP53INP1and p53 expression in gastric cancer.METHODS: TP53INP1 and p53 expression were examined using immunohistochemistry in 142 cases of gastric cancer. The apoptosis of gastric cancer cells was analyzed using the TUNEL method. The relationship between the expression of TP53INP1 and clinicopathological factors was statistically analyzed.RESULTS: TP53INP1 was expressed in 98% (139/142cases) of non-cancerous gastric tissues and was downexpressed in 64% (91/142 cases) of gastric cancer lesions from the same patients. TP53INP1 expression was significantly decreased (43.9%) in poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma compared with well or moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma (81.6%).Cancers invading the submucosa or deeper showed lower positively (59.1%) compared with mucosal cancers (85.2%). Decrease or loss of TP53INP1 expression was significantly correlated with lymphatic invasion (54.3%vs 82.0% without lymphatic invasion) and node-positive patients (31.3% vs 68.3% in node-negative patients).P53 was expressed in 68 (47.9%) patients of gastric cancer, whereas it was absent in normal gastric tissues.A significant association was also observed between TP53INP1 status and the level of apoptosis in tumor cells: the apoptotic index in TP53INP1-positive tissues was significantly higher than that in TP53INP1-negative portions. Finally, when survival data were analyzed,loss of TP53INP1 expression had a significant effect in predicting a poor prognosis (P= 0.0006).CONCLUSION: TP53INP1-positive rate decreases with the progression of gastric cancer. TP53INP1 protein negativity is significantly associated with aggressive pathological phenotypes of gastric cancer. TP53INP1is related to the apoptosis of gastric cancer cells. The decreased expression of the TP53INP1 protein may

  14. Sulforaphane, a cruciferous vegetable-derived isothiocyanate, inhibits protein synthesis in human prostate cancer cells.

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    Wiczk, Aleksandra; Hofman, Dagmara; Konopa, Grażyna; Herman-Antosiewicz, Anna

    2012-08-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is a compound derived from cruciferous plants. Its anticancer properties have been demonstrated both, in cancer cell lines as well as tumors in animal models. It has been shown that SFN inhibits cell proliferation, induces apoptosis, autophagy, and sensitizes cancer cells to therapies. As induction of catabolic processes is often related to perturbation in protein synthesis we aimed to investigate the impact of SFN on this process in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells. In the present study we show that SFN inhibits protein synthesis in PC-3 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner which is accompanied by a decreased phosphorylation of mTOR substrates. Translation inhibition is independent of mitochondria-derived ROS as it is observed in PC-3 derivatives devoid of functional mitochondrial respiratory chain (Rho0 cells). Although SFN affects mitochondria and slightly decreases glycolysis, the ATP level is maintained on the level characteristic for control cells. Inhibition of protein synthesis might be a protective response of prostate cancer cells to save energy. However, translation inhibition contributes to the death of PC-3 cells due to decreased level of a short-lived protein, survivin. Overexpression of this anti-apoptotic factor protects PC-3 cells against SFN cytotoxicity. Protein synthesis inhibition by SFN is not restricted to prostate cancer cells as we observed similar effect in SKBR-3 breast cancer cell line. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Targeting Human Cancer by a Glycosaminoglycan Binding Malaria Protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salanti, Ali; Clausen, Thomas M.; Agerbæk, Mette Ø.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum engineer infected erythrocytes to present the malarial protein, VAR2CSA, which binds a distinct type chondroitin sulfate (CS) exclusively expressed in the placenta. Here, we show that the same CS modification is present on a high proportion of malignant cells and that it can...

  16. Effects of ELF magnetic fields on protein expression profile of human breast cancer cell MCF7

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Han; ZENG Qunli; WENG Yu; LU Deqiang; JIANG Huai; XU Zhengping

    2005-01-01

    Extremely Low Frequency Magnetic Fields (ELF MF) has been considered as a "possible human carcinogen" by International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) while credible mechanisms of its carcinogenicity remain unknown. In this study, a proteomics approach was employed to investigate the changes of protein expression profile induced by ELF MF in human breast cancer cell line MCF7, in order to determine ELF MF-responsive proteins. MCF7 cells were exposed to 50 Hz, 0.4 mT ELF MF for 24 h and the changes of protein profile were examined using two dimensional electrophoresis. Up to 6 spots have been statistically significantly altered (their expression levels were changed at least 5 fold up or down) compared with sham-exposed group. 19 ones were only detected in exposure group while 19 ones were missing. Three proteins were identified by LC-IT Tandem MS as RNA binding protein regulatory subunit、Proteasome subunit beta type 7 precursor and Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein. Our finding showed that 50 Hz, 0.4 mT ELF MF alternates the protein profile of MCF7 cell and may affect many physiological functions of normal cell and 2-DE coupled with MS is a promising approach to elucidating cellular effects of electromagnetic fields.

  17. Two-dimensional liquid separations-mass mapping of proteins from human cancer cell lysates.

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    Lubman, David M; Kachman, Maureen T; Wang, Haixing; Gong, Siyuan; Yan, Fang; Hamler, Rick L; O'Neil, Kimberly A; Zhu, Kan; Buchanan, Nathan S; Barder, Timothy J

    2002-12-25

    A review of two-dimensional (2D) liquid separation methods used in our laboratory to map the protein content of human cancer cells is presented herein. The methods discussed include various means of fractionating proteins according to isoelectric point (pI) in the first dimension. The proteins in each pI fraction are subsequently separated using nonporous (NPS) reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). The liquid eluent of the RP-HPLC separation is directed on-line into an electrospray ionization time-of-flight (ESI-TOF) mass spectrometer where an accurate value of the protein intact M(r) can be obtained. The result is a 2D map of pI versus M(r) analogous to 2D gel electrophoresis; however the highly accurate and reproducible M(r) serves as the basis for interlysate comparisons. In addition, the use of liquid separations allows for the collection of hundreds of purified proteins in the liquid phase for further analysis via peptide mass mapping using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization TOF MS. A description of the methodology used and its applications to analysis of several types of human cancer cell lines is described. The potential of the method for differential proteomic analysis for the identification of biomarkers of disease is discussed.

  18. Variation of Protein's Expression Correlated to the Drug Resistance after Sequential Anti-cancer Treatment in Human Lung Cancer Cell Line

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    Zhi-hong Chi; Ji-ren Zhang; Peng Li; Duan-qi Liu

    2005-01-01

    @@ Multi-drug resistance is one of the leading causes for fai lure to treat patients with cancer. This study is to explore the expression of the proteins correlated with chemoresistance in a human lung cancer cell line (LPET-a-1) repeatedly treated by anti-cancer drugs.

  19. Human epididymis protein 4 immunostaining of malignant ascites differentiates cancer of Müllerian origin from gastrointestinal cancer.

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    Stiekema, Anna; Van de Vijver, Koen K; Boot, Henk; Broeks, Annegien; Korse, Catharina M; van Driel, Willemien J; Kenter, Gemma G; Lok, Christianne A R

    2017-03-01

    An accurate diagnosis of cancer of Müllerian origin is required before the initiation of treatment. An overlap in clinical presentation and cytological, histological, or imaging studies with other nongynecological tumors does occur. Therefore, immunocytochemistry markers are used to determine tumor origin. Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) is overexpressed in tissue of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). It has shown to be a sensitive and specific serum marker for EOC and to be of value for the differentiation between EOC and ovarian metastases of gastrointestinal origin. The objective of the current study was to evaluate HE4 immunocytochemistry in malignant ascites for differentiation between cancer of Müllerian origin, including EOC, and adenocarcinomas of the gastrointestinal tract. Cytological specimens of 115 different adenocarcinomas (45 EOCs, 46 cases of gastric cancer, and 24 cases of colorectal cancer) were stained for HE4, paired box 8 (PAX8), and other specific markers. 91% of the ascites samples from patients with EOC stained for both HE4 and PAX8. The 4 samples without HE4 staining were a clear cell carcinoma, a low-grade serous adenocarcinoma, an undifferentiated adenocarcinoma, and a neuroendocrine carcinoma. All high-grade serous adenocarcinomas (n = 37, 100%) stained with HE4, compared with 94% that stained positively for PAX8. In cases of gastric or colorectal cancer, 25% and 21% of cases, respectively, stained positive for HE4. No PAX8 staining was observed in colorectal or gastric adenocarcinomas. HE4 staining in ascites is feasible and appears to have a high sensitivity for high-grade serous ovarian cancer. HE4 is a useful addition to the current panel of immunocytochemistry markers for the diagnosis of EOC and for differentiation with gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas. Cancer Cytopathol 2017;125:197-204. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  20. Novel snail1 target proteins in human colon cancer identified by proteomic analysis.

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    María Jesús Larriba

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The transcription factor Snail1 induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT, a process responsible for the acquisition of invasiveness during tumorigenesis. Several transcriptomic studies have reported Snail1-regulated genes in different cell types, many of them involved in cell adhesion. However, only a few studies have used proteomics as a tool for the characterization of proteins mediating EMT. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified by proteomic analysis using 2D-DIGE electrophoresis combined with MALDI-TOF-TOF and ESI-linear ion trap mass spectrometry a number of proteins with variable functions whose expression is modulated by Snail1 in SW480-ADH human colon cancer cells. Validation was performed by Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses. Snail1 repressed several members of the 14-3-3 family of phosphoserine/phosphothreonine binding proteins and also the expression of the Proliferation-associated protein 2G4 (PA2G4 that was mainly localized at the nuclear Cajal bodies. In contrast, the expression of two proteins involved in RNA processing, the Cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor subunit 6 (CPSF6 and the Splicing factor proline/glutamine-rich (SFPQ, was higher in Snail1-expressing cells than in controls. The regulation of 14-3-3epsilon, 14-3-3tau, 14-3-3zeta and PA2G4 by Snail1 was reproduced in HT29 colon cancer cells. In addition, we found an inverse correlation between 14-3-3sigma and Snail1 expression in human colorectal tumors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have identified a set of novel Snail1 target proteins in colon cancer that expand the cellular processes affected by Snail1 and thus its relevance for cell function and phenotype.

  1. Overexpression of human sperm protein 17 increases migration and decreases the chemosensitivity of human epithelial ovarian cancer cells

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    Huang Wen-bin

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most deaths from ovarian cancer are due to metastases that are resistant to conventional therapies. But the factors that regulate the metastatic process and chemoresistance of ovarian cancer are poorly understood. In the current study, we investigated the aberrant expression of human sperm protein 17 (HSp17 in human epithelial ovarian cancer cells and tried to analyze its influences on the cell behaviors like migration and chemoresistance. Methods Immunohistochemistry and immunocytochemistry were used to identify HSp17 in paraffin embedded ovarian malignant tumor specimens and peritoneal metastatic malignant cells. Then we examined the effect of HSp17 overexpression on the proliferation, migration, and chemoresistance of ovarian cancer cells to carboplatin and cisplatin in a human ovarian carcinoma cell line, HO8910. Results We found that HSp17 was aberrantly expressed in 43% (30/70 of the patients with primary epithelial ovarian carcinomas, and in all of the metastatic cancer cells of ascites from 8 patients. The Sp17 expression was also detected in the metastatic lesions the same as in ovarian lesions. None of the 7 non-epithelial tumors primarily developed in the ovaries was immunopositive for HSp17. Overexpression of HSp17 increased the migration but decreased the chemosensitivity of ovarian carcinoma cells to carboplatin and cisplatin. Conclusion HSp17 is aberrantly expressed in a significant proportion of epithelial ovarian carcinomas. Our results strongly suggest that HSp17 plays a role in metastatic disease and resistance of epithelial ovarian carcinoma to chemotherapy.

  2. Parasporal Proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis and Their Cytotoxicity on Human Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lei; LV Yuan; YI Yin-sha; YI Shang-hui; LI Lin

    2015-01-01

    Parasporins(PSs) represent a novel functional category of crystal proteins (Cry) produced by non-insecticidal Bacillus thuringiensisA distinct feature for PSs is their specific cytotoxicity against human cancer cells from diverse origins, other than hemolytic or insecticidal activityAs structurally/functionally Cry proteins, parasporins are expressed as protoxins that require protease cleavage for activationCurrently, identified PSs is classified into 6 groups:PS1, PS2, PS3, PS4, PS5 and PS6, which are heterogeneous in cytotoxic spectrum and activity levelSome PSs have been explored for their mode of anticancer activities, reports mainly include pore formation induced by binding to putative receptors on cell membrane and apoptosis by intracellular Ca 2+concentrationFurther work should focus on the identification of new PS or PS homologs and better understanding of their anticancer mechanism before possible application in cancer therapy.

  3. Effect of human epididymis protein 4 gene silencing on the malignant phenotype in ovarian cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Shu-li; CUI Heng; CHANG Xiao-hong; YE Xue; CHENG Hong-yan; CHENG Ye-xia; TANG Zhi-jian; ZHANG Zu-juan; GAO Li; CHEN Xin-hua

    2011-01-01

    Background Human epididymis secretory protein 4 (HE4) has been proved to be a promising novel biomarker for the detection of epithelial ovarian carcinomas. Compared with CA125, HE4 assay demonstrated an improved ability to discriminate between pelvic mass with malignant and benign disease. Though it is well known that HE4 is overexpressed in ovarian cancer, however, the role of HE4 in the carcinogenesis and progression of ovarian cancer remains unkown.Methods In this study, we explored the role of HE4 in the carcinogenesis and progression of ovarian cancer. We screened nine ovarian cancer cell lines for HE4 expression, and using RNA interference (RNAi), we silenced HE4 gene expression in CaoV3 and SKOV3.ip1 ovarian cancer cell lines. We assessed the effect of HE4 gene silencing on the transformed phenotype by examining the cell cycle, apoptosis, proliferation and transwell migration/invasion in vitro.Results HE4 gene silencing induces G0/G1 arrest and blocks the progression from the G1 to S phase in CaoV3 and SKOV3.ip1 cells. HE4 knockdown also inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion in SKOV3.ip1 cells in vitro.Conclusion HE4 may be involved in the regulation of the cell cycle and promote ovarian cancer migration and invasion.

  4. Endothelial protein C receptor function in murine and human breast cancer development.

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    Florence Schaffner

    Full Text Available Several markers identify cancer stem cell-like populations, but little is known about the functional roles of stem cell surface receptors in tumor progression. Here, we show that the endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR, a stem cell marker in hematopoietic, neuronal and epithelial cells, is crucial for breast cancer growth in the orthotopic microenvironment of the mammary gland. Mice with a hypomorphic allele of EPCR show reduced tumor growth in the PyMT-model of spontaneous breast cancer development and deletion of EPCR in established PyMT tumor cells significantly attenuates transplanted tumor take and growth. We find expansion of EPCR(+ cancer stem cell-like populations in aggressive, mammary fat pad-enhanced human triple negative breast cancer cells. In this model, EPCR-expressing cells have markedly increased mammosphere- and tumor-cell initiating activity compared to another stable progenitor-like subpopulation present at comparable frequency. We show that receptor blocking antibodies to EPCR specifically attenuate in vivo tumor growth initiated by either EPCR(+ cells or the heterogenous mixture of EPCR(+ and EPCR(- cells. Furthermore, we have identified tumor associated macrophages as a major source for recognized ligands of EPCR, suggesting a novel mechanism by which cancer stem cell-like populations are regulated by innate immune cells in the tumor microenvironment.

  5. S100A10 protein expression is associated with oxaliplatin sensitivity in human colorectal cancer cells

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    Suzuki Sayo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individual responses to oxaliplatin (L-OHP-based chemotherapy remain unpredictable. The objective of our study was to find candidate protein markers for tumor sensitivity to L-OHP from intracellular proteins of human colorectal cancer (CRC cell lines. We performed expression difference mapping (EDM analysis of whole cell lysates from 11 human CRC cell lines with different sensitivities to L-OHP by using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS, and identified a candidate protein by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry ion trap time-of-flight (LCMS-IT-TOF. Results Of the qualified mass peaks obtained by EDM analysis, 41 proteins were differentially expressed in 11 human colorectal cancer cell lines. Among these proteins, the peak intensity of 11.1 kDa protein was strongly correlated with the L-OHP sensitivity (50% inhibitory concentrations (P R2 = 0.80. We identified this protein as Protein S100-A10 (S100A10 by MS/MS ion search using LCMS-IT-TOF. We verified its differential expression and the correlation between S100A10 protein expression levels in drug-untreated CRC cells and their L-OHP sensitivities by Western blot analyses. In addition, S100A10 protein expression levels were not correlated with sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil, suggesting that S100A10 is more specific to L-OHP than to 5-fluorouracil in CRC cells. S100A10 was detected in cell culture supernatant, suggesting secretion out of cells. Conclusions By proteomic approaches including SELDI technology, we have demonstrated that intracellular S100A10 protein expression levels in drug-untreated CRC cells differ according to cell lines and are significantly correlated with sensitivity of CRC cells to L-OHP exposure. Our findings provide a new clue to searching predictive markers of the response to L-OHP, suggesting that S100A10 is expected to be one of the candidate protein markers.

  6. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MAP2K4 promotes human prostate cancer metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet M Pavese

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is the second leading cause of cancer death in the US. Death from PCa primarily results from metastasis. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MAP2K4 is overexpressed in invasive PCa lesions in humans, and can be inhibited by small molecule therapeutics that demonstrate favorable activity in phase II studies. However, MAP2K4's role in regulating metastatic behavior is controversial and unknown. To investigate, we engineered human PCa cell lines which overexpress either wild type or constitutive active MAP2K4. Orthotopic implantation into mice demonstrated MAP2K4 increases formation of distant metastasis. Constitutive active MAP2K4, though not wild type, increases tumor size and circulating tumor cells in the blood and bone marrow. Complementary in vitro studies establish stable MAP2K4 overexpression promotes cell invasion, but does not affect cell growth or migration. MAP2K4 overexpression increases the expression of heat shock protein 27 (HSP27 protein and protease production, with the largest effect upon matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2, both in vitro and in mouse tumor samples. Further, MAP2K4-mediated increases in cell invasion are dependent upon heat shock protein 27 (HSP27 and MMP-2, but not upon MAP2K4's immediate downstream targets, p38 MAPK or JNK. We demonstrate that MAP2K4 increases human PCa metastasis, and prolonged over expression induces long term changes in cell signaling pathways leading to independence from p38 MAPK and JNK. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation for human studies linking increases in HSP27 and MMP-2 to progression to metastatic disease. MAP2K4 is validated as an important therapeutic target for inhibiting human PCa metastasis.

  7. hTERT protein expression is independent of clinicopathological parameters and c-Myc protein expression in human breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meligonis G

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that synthesises telomeres after cell division and maintains chromosomal length and stability thus leading to cellular immortalisation. The hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase subunit seems to be the rate-limiting determinant of telomerase and knowledge of factors controlling hTERT transcription may be useful in therapeutic strategies. The hTERT promoter contains binding sites for c-Myc and there is some experimental and in vitro evidence that c-Myc may increase hTERT expression. We previously reported no correlation between c-Myc mRNA expression and hTERT mRNA or telomerase activity in human breast cancer. This study aims to examine the correlation between hTERT expression as determined by immunohistochemistry and c-Myc expression, lymph node status, and tumour size and grade in human breast cancer. Materials and methods The immunohistochemical expression of hTERT and c-Myc was investigated in 38 malignant breast tumours. The expression of hTERT was then correlated with the lymph node status, c-Myc expression and other clinicopathological parameters of the tumours. Results hTERT expression was positive in 27 (71% of the 38 tumours. 15 (79% of 19 node positive tumours were hTERT positive compared with 11 (63% of 19 node negative tumours. The expression was higher in node positive tumours but this failed to reach statistical significance (p = 0.388. There was no significant association with tumour size, tumour grade or c-Myc expression. However, hTERT expression correlated positively with patients' age (correlation coefficient = 0.415, p = 0.0097. Conclusion hTERT protein expression is independent of lymph node status, tumour size and grade and c-Myc protein expression in human breast cancer

  8. Effects of ovarian cancer G protein coupled receptor 1 on the proliferation, migration, and adhesion of human ovarian cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Juan; ZHANG Long

    2011-01-01

    Background OGR1 was found as a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and proton sensor. Our previous studies have found that OGR1 has inhibitory effect on the metastasis of prostate cancer. In order to investigate the roles of OGR1 gene in the biological activities of ovarian cancer, we studied the OGR1 effects on ovarian cancer cells, HEY cells.Methods OGR1 gene was transfected into HEY cell, in which endogenous expression is low. OGR1-overxepressed cells and vector-transfected cells were compared in different assays. Western blotting was employed to confirm the high expression level of OGR1. Cell proliferation was determined by MTT assay and cell doubling time assay. Cell migration assay (transwell assay) and cell adhesion assay were performed to determine the migration and adhesion potential of cells. Student's t test was employed for statistical analysis.Results Proliferation of OGR1-overexpressed cells was significantly reduced (P <0.01); cell migration was significantly inhibited in the OGR1-transfected cells (P <0.01); cell adhesion to extracellular matrix including fibronectin, vitronectin,collagen Ⅰ/Ⅳ was significantly increased (P <0.01).Conclusions OGR1 expression in human ovarian cancer cells significantly inhibited the cell proliferation and migration,but significantly enhanced cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix. It indicated that OGR1 may be a tumor suppressor gene for ovarian cancer.

  9. The histone demethylase PHF8 is an oncogenic protein in human non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yuzhou; Pan, Xufeng; Zhao, Heng, E-mail: hengzhao1966@sina.com

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • PHF8 overexpresses in human NSCLC and predicts poor survival. • PHF8 regulates lung cancer cell growth and transformation. • PHF8 regulates apoptosis in human lung cancer cells. • PHF8 promotes miR-21 expression in human lung cancer. • MiR-21 is critically essential for PHF8 function in human lung cancer cells. - Abstract: PHF8 is a JmjC domain-containing protein and erases repressive histone marks including H4K20me1 and H3K9me1/2. It binds to H3K4me3, an active histone mark usually located at transcription start sites (TSSs), through its plant homeo-domain, and is thus recruited and enriched in gene promoters. PHF8 is involved in the development of several types of cancer, including leukemia, prostate cancer, and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Herein we report that PHF8 is an oncogenic protein in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). PHF8 is up-regulated in human NSCLC tissues, and high PHF8 expression predicts poor survival. Our in vitro and in vivo evidence demonstrate that PHF8 regulates lung cancer cell proliferation and cellular transformation. We found that PHF8 knockdown induces DNA damage and apoptosis in lung cancer cells. PHF8 promotes miR-21 expression in human lung cancer, and miR-21 knockdown blocks the effects of PHF8 on proliferation and apoptosis of lung cancer cells. In summary, PHF8 promotes lung cancer cell growth and survival by regulating miR-21.

  10. Interaction between fragile histamine triad and protein kinase C alpha in human non-small cell lung cancer tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng-hui Zhuang; Zhao-hui Liu; Xiao-gang Jiang; Cheng-en Pan

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the interaction between fragile histamine triad (FHIT) and protein kinase C alpha (PKCα) in human non-small cell lung cancer tissues. Methods FHIT and PKC伪 double positive samples were screened by immunohistochemical staining from 13 human non-small cell lung cancer tissues. Co-immunoprecipitation was performed by using anti-FHIT and anti-PKCα. The immune precipitate was analyzed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Results Immune precipitate staining detection showed that 3 samples out of the 13 cases were double positive for FHIT and PKCα. FHIT protein was present in the immune precipitate of anti-PKCα while there was PKCα in the immune precipitate of anti-FHITmAb. Conclusion FHIT and PKCα exist as a complex in human non-small cell lung cancer tissues, which will provide a new route for studying the pathogenesis and immunotherapy of human non-small cell lung cancer.

  11. Identification of cytoskeleton-associated proteins essential for lysosomal stability and survival of human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth-Pedersen, Line; Aits, Sonja; Corcelle-Termeau, Elisabeth; Petersen, Nikolaj H T; Nylandsted, Jesper; Jäättelä, Marja

    2012-01-01

    Microtubule-disturbing drugs inhibit lysosomal trafficking and induce lysosomal membrane permeabilization followed by cathepsin-dependent cell death. To identify specific trafficking-related proteins that control cell survival and lysosomal stability, we screened a molecular motor siRNA library in human MCF7 breast cancer cells. SiRNAs targeting four kinesins (KIF11/Eg5, KIF20A, KIF21A, KIF25), myosin 1G (MYO1G), myosin heavy chain 1 (MYH1) and tropomyosin 2 (TPM2) were identified as effective inducers of non-apoptotic cell death. The cell death induced by KIF11, KIF21A, KIF25, MYH1 or TPM2 siRNAs was preceded by lysosomal membrane permeabilization, and all identified siRNAs induced several changes in the endo-lysosomal compartment, i.e. increased lysosomal volume (KIF11, KIF20A, KIF25, MYO1G, MYH1), increased cysteine cathepsin activity (KIF20A, KIF25), altered lysosomal localization (KIF25, MYH1, TPM2), increased dextran accumulation (KIF20A), or reduced autophagic flux (MYO1G, MYH1). Importantly, all seven siRNAs also killed human cervix cancer (HeLa) and osteosarcoma (U-2-OS) cells and sensitized cancer cells to other lysosome-destabilizing treatments, i.e. photo-oxidation, siramesine, etoposide or cisplatin. Similarly to KIF11 siRNA, the KIF11 inhibitor monastrol induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization and sensitized several cancer cell lines to siramesine. While KIF11 inhibitors are under clinical development as mitotic blockers, our data reveal a new function for KIF11 in controlling lysosomal stability and introduce six other molecular motors as putative cancer drug targets.

  12. Putrescine, DNA, RNA and protein contents in human uterine, breast and rectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandopadhyay M

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: To find out the status of DNA, RNA and protein in human uterine, ovarian, breast and rectal carcinoma. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this prospective study, patients of age group between late thirties and late fifties suffering from uterine, ovarian, breast and rectal cancer were taken as subjects of the present study. The total number of cases studied for each cases was ten. Pieces of human carcinomatous tissues of above mentioned cases were taken along with surrounding normal tissues. From the tissue samples, putrescine is separated by the method of Herbst et al, DNA analysed by Diphenylamine method, RNA by Orcinol method and protein by Biuret method. RESULTS: Tissue content of putrescine rises simultaneously with that of DNA, RNA and protein in carcinomatous growths as above in comparison to their respective adjacent normal tissue, the differences being statistically highly significant. CONCLUSIONS: Increase in DNA, RNA and protein concentration may be a pre-requisite for increased synthesis of putrescine in carcinomatous tissue and thereby the concentration of other di- and poly-amines.

  13. Identification of cytoskeleton-associated proteins essential for lysosomal stability and survival of human cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth-Pedersen, Line; Aits, Sonja; Corcelle-Termeau, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Microtubule-disturbing drugs inhibit lysosomal trafficking and induce lysosomal membrane permeabilization followed by cathepsin-dependent cell death. To identify specific trafficking-related proteins that control cell survival and lysosomal stability, we screened a molecular motor siRNA library...... in human MCF7 breast cancer cells. SiRNAs targeting four kinesins (KIF11/Eg5, KIF20A, KIF21A, KIF25), myosin 1G (MYO1G), myosin heavy chain 1 (MYH1) and tropomyosin 2 (TPM2) were identified as effective inducers of non-apoptotic cell death. The cell death induced by KIF11, KIF21A, KIF25, MYH1 or TPM2 si......), increased dextran accumulation (KIF20A), or reduced autophagic flux (MYO1G, MYH1). Importantly, all seven siRNAs also killed human cervix cancer (HeLa) and osteosarcoma (U-2-OS) cells and sensitized cancer cells to other lysosome-destabilizing treatments, i.e. photo-oxidation, siramesine, etoposide...

  14. Calprotectin induces cell death in human prostate cancer cell (LNCaP) through survivin protein alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattari, Mina; Pazhang, Yaghub; Imani, Mehdi

    2014-11-01

    Calprotectin (CP), an abundant heterodimeric cytosolic protein of neutrophils, conveys a variety of functions such as tumor cell growth arrest and antimicrobial activity. We investigated CP activity and its possible apoptosis-inducing mechanism of action against an antiandrogen therapy-resistance prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. Cell viability and Annexin V FITC assays were performed in order to investigate its cell death activity and apoptosis, respectively. In order to address cell death inducing mechanism(s), immunocytochemistry and immunobloting analysis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) measurements were performed. The effective concentration of CP against LNCaP promoting LNCaP cell death was 200 µg/mL. ROS and NO levels of cells remarkably were enhanced following treatment with 50 and 100 µg/mL of CP, respectively. Protein expression of anti-apoptotic protein survivin was significantly decreased after administration of tumor cells with CP. Our data indicate that CP regulates the LNCaP cells viability via survivin-mediated pathway and ROS and NO enhancement. Thus, inhibition of survivin expression, enhancement of ROS and NO level by CP or other similar pharmaceutical agents might be effective in lowering the malignant proliferation of human prostate cancer cells.

  15. Identification of differentially expressed proteins during human urinary bladder cancer progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Memon, Ashfaque Ahmed; chang, Jong. w; Oh, Bong R.

    2005-01-01

    Comparative proteome analysis was performed between RT4 (grade-1) and T24 (grade-3) bladder cancer cell lines, in an attempt to identify differentially expressed proteins during bladder cancer progression. Among those relatively abundant proteins, seven spots changed more than two-fold reproducibly...

  16. The PDZ protein TIP-1 facilitates cell migration and pulmonary metastasis of human invasive breast cancer cells in athymic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Miaojun [Key Laboratory of Animal Models and Human Disease Mechanisms of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Yunnan Province, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Yunnan (China); Graduate School, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Wang, Hailun [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Zhang, Hua-Tang [Key Laboratory of Animal Models and Human Disease Mechanisms of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Yunnan Province, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Yunnan (China); Han, Zhaozhong, E-mail: zhaozhong.han@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study has revealed novel oncogenic functions of TIP-1 in human invasive breast cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elevated TIP-1 expression levels in human breast cancers correlate to the disease prognosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the cell migration and pulmonary metastasis of human breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the expression and functionality of motility-related genes. -- Abstract: Tax-interacting protein 1 (TIP-1, also known as Tax1bp3) inhibited proliferation of colon cancer cells through antagonizing the transcriptional activity of beta-catenin. However, in this study, elevated TIP-1 expression levels were detected in human invasive breast cancers. Studies with two human invasive breast cancer cell lines indicated that RNAi-mediated TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the cell adhesion, proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro, and inhibited tumor growth in mammary fat pads and pulmonary metastasis in athymic mice. Biochemical studies showed that TIP-1 knockdown had moderate and differential effects on the beta-catenin-regulated gene expression, but remarkably down regulated the genes for cell adhesion and motility in breast cancer cells. The decreased expression of integrins and paxillin was accompanied with reduced cell adhesion and focal adhesion formation on fibronectin-coated surface. In conclusion, this study revealed a novel oncogenic function of TIP-1 suggesting that TIP-1 holds potential as a prognostic biomarker and a therapeutic target in the treatment of human invasive breast cancers.

  17. Antibodies against high-risk human papillomavirus proteins as markers for invasive cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, Jean-Damien; Pawlita, Michael; Waterboer, Tim; Hammouda, Doudja; Rajkumar, Thangarajan; Vanhems, Philippe; Snijders, Peter; Herrero, Rolando; Franceschi, Silvia; Clifford, Gary

    2014-11-15

    Different human papillomavirus (HPV) genes are expressed during the various phases of the HPV life cycle and may elicit immune responses in the process towards malignancy. To evaluate their association with cervical cancer, antibodies against proteins from HPV16 (L1, E1, E2, E4, E6 and E7) and HPV18/31/33/35/45/52/58 (L1, E6 and E7) were measured in serum of 307 invasive cervical cancer cases and 327 controls from Algeria and India. Antibody response was evaluated using a glutathione S-transferase-based multiplex serology assay and HPV DNA detected from exfoliated cervical cells using a GP5+/6+-mediated PCR assay. Among HPV16 DNA-positive cases, seroprevalence of HPV16 antibodies ranged from 16% for HPV16 E1 to 50% for HPV16 E6 and all were significantly higher than controls. Seroprevalence of E6, E7 and L1 antibodies for HPV18 and for at least one of HPV31/33/35/45/52/58 were also higher in cases positive for DNA of the corresponding type (50% and 30% for E6 of HPV18 and HPV31/33/35/45/52/58 combined, respectively). E6 and E7 antibodies were rarely found in controls, but cross-reactivity was evident among cancer cases positive for DNA of closely phylogenetically-related HPV types. E6 or E7 antibodies against any of the eight HPV types were detected in 66.1% of all cervical cancer cases, as compared to 10.1% of controls. E6, and to a lesser extent E7, antibodies appear to be specific markers of HPV-related malignancy. However, even among cases positive for the same type of HPV DNA, approximately one-third of cervical cancer cases show no detectable immune response to either E6 or E7.

  18. The role of human epididymis protein 4 in the diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, L-T; Zhang, Y-C; Li, J; Tian, Y; Li, J-F

    2016-03-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is one of the most lethal female genital tract cancers. Early diagnosis of EOC would benefit the patients a lot. Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) has been regarded as a new powerful biomarker in diagnosis of EOC; we hope to obtain system knowledge of HE4 and understand the role of HE4 in diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). We searched Pubmed, Embase, Medline, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) for articles that included HE4's origin, characteristics, detection methods, clinical efficacy alone or combined with CA125, the risk of malignancy index, and the risk of ovarian malignancy algorithm. The diagnostic performance for the EOC and the role in the recurrence and procession in EOC were also discussed. We got 83 most related articles and found that there were significantly difference existing among the studies, such as the clinical characteristics of patients, the methodology for measuring HE4, the different cut-offs for HE4 and so on. HE4 is a promising biomarker for the early diagnosis of EOC. However, each lab should establish its own reference internal of HE4.

  19. Multi-target QPDR classification model for human breast and colon cancer-related proteins using star graph topological indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munteanu, Cristian Robert; Magalhães, Alexandre L; Uriarte, Eugenio; González-Díaz, Humberto

    2009-03-21

    The cancer diagnostic is a complex process and, sometimes, the specific markers can interfere or produce negative results. Thus, new simple and fast theoretical models are required. One option is the complex network graphs theory that permits us to describe any real system, from the small molecules to the complex genetic, neural or social networks by transforming real properties in topological indices. This work converts the protein primary structure data in specific Randic's star networks topological indices using the new sequence to star networks (S2SNet) application. A set of 1054 proteins were selected from previous works and contains proteins related or not with two types of cancer, human breast cancer (HBC) and human colon cancer (HCC). The general discriminant analysis method generates an input-coded multi-target classification model with the training/predicting set accuracies of 90.0% for the forward stepwise model type. In addition, a protein subset was modified by single amino acid mutations with higher log-odds PAM250 values and tested with the new classification if can be related with HBC or HCC. In conclusion, we shown that, using simple input data such is the primary protein sequence and the simples linear analysis, it is possible to obtain accurate classification models that can predict if a new protein related with two types of cancer. These results promote the use of the S2SNet in clinical proteomics.

  20. Upregulated HSP27 in human breast cancer cells reduces Herceptin susceptibility by increasing Her2 protein stability

    OpenAIRE

    Kong Sun-Young; Lee Ho-Young; Kim Seok-Ki; Kwon Bumi; Kim Kyung-Hee; Kang Keon; Kang Se; Lee Eun; Jang Sang-Geun; Yoo Byong

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Elucidating the molecular mechanisms by which tumors become resistant to Herceptin is critical for the treatment of Her2-overexpressed metastatic breast cancer. Methods To further understand Herceptin resistance mechanisms at the molecular level, we used comparative proteome approaches to analyze two human breast cancer cell lines; Her2-positive SK-BR-3 cells and its Herceptin-resistant SK-BR-3 (SK-BR-3 HR) cells. Results Heat-shock protein 27 (HSP27) expression was shown ...

  1. Applying of hierarchical clustering to analysis of protein patterns in the human cancer-associated liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia A Petushkova

    Full Text Available There are two ways that statistical methods can learn from biomedical data. One way is to learn classifiers to identify diseases and to predict outcomes using the training dataset with established diagnosis for each sample. When the training dataset is not available the task can be to mine for presence of meaningful groups (clusters of samples and to explore underlying data structure (unsupervised learning.We investigated the proteomic profiles of the cytosolic fraction of human liver samples using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE. Samples were resected upon surgical treatment of hepatic metastases in colorectal cancer. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of 2DE gel images (n = 18 revealed a pair of clusters, containing 11 and 7 samples. Previously we used the same specimens to measure biochemical profiles based on cytochrome P450-dependent enzymatic activities and also found that samples were clearly divided into two well-separated groups by cluster analysis. It turned out that groups by enzyme activity almost perfectly match to the groups identified from proteomic data. Of the 271 reproducible spots on our 2DE gels, we selected 15 to distinguish the human liver cytosolic clusters. Using MALDI-TOF peptide mass fingerprinting, we identified 12 proteins for the selected spots, including known cancer-associated species.Our results highlight the importance of hierarchical cluster analysis of proteomic data, and showed concordance between results of biochemical and proteomic approaches. Grouping of the human liver samples and/or patients into differing clusters may provide insights into possible molecular mechanism of drug metabolism and creates a rationale for personalized treatment.

  2. Identification of differentially expressed proteins during human urinary bladder cancer progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Memon, Ashfaque Ahmed; chang, Jong. w; Oh, Bong R.

    2005-01-01

    cancer cell line. Subsequent Western blotting analysis of human biopsy samples from bladder cancer patient revealed significant loss of IDPc and Prx-II in more advance tumor samples, in agreement with data on cell lines. These results suggest that loss of IDPc and Prx-II during tumor development may...

  3. Expression status of cyclase‑associated protein 2 as a prognostic marker for human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lihua; Peng, Sida; Huang, Qunai; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Hua; Li, Xi; Wang, Jiani

    2016-10-01

    Cyclase-associated protein 2 (CAP2) protein is reported to be upregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, data regarding its expression pattern and clinical relevance in breast cancer are unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate CAP2 expression and its prognostic significance in breast cancer. CAP2 expression at the mRNA and protein levels was examined by real‑time quantitative-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting in 10 paired breast cancer tissues and adjacent normal tissues. The expression level of CAP2 protein in normal breast epithelial cells and breast cancer cell lines was quantified by western blotting. CAP2 protein expression was analyzed in paraffin‑embedded breast cancer samples, paired adjacent non‑tumor and normal breast tissues by immunohistochemical analysis. Statistical analyses were also performed to evaluate the clinicopathological significance of CAP2 expression. The results showed that the expression of CAP2 mRNA and protein was higher in breast cancer than that noted in the adjacent normal tissues in 10 paired samples. The expression level of CAP2 protein in breast cancer cell lines was higher than that in normal breast epithelial cells. In paraffin‑embedded tissue samples, the expression of CAP2 was higher in breast cancer than that found in the adjacent non‑cancerous tissues and normal breast tissues. Compared with the adjacent non‑cancerous tissues, overexpression of CAP2 was detected in 29.4% (37/126) of the patients. Overexpression of CAP2 was significantly associated with progesterone receptor (PR) expression (p<0.05), and decreased overall survival (OS) (p<0.05). In multivariate analysis, expression of CAP2 was an independent prognostic factor for OS [hazard ratio (HR), 4.821; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.442‑9.518; p<0.001]. CAP2 is upregulated in breast cancer and is associated with the expression of PR and patient survival. CAP2 may serve as a prognostic indicator for patients

  4. Human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 protein expression in Chinese metastatic prostate cancer patients correlates with cancer specific survival and increases after exposure to hormonal therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Dai; Yun-Yi Kong; Ding-Wei Ye; Chun-Guang Ma; Xiao-Yan Zhou; Xu-Dong Yao

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To investigate human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) protein expression and gene amplification in Chinese metastatic prostate cancer patients and their potential value as prognostic factors. Methods: Immuno-histochemistry (IHC) was performed to investigate HER2 protein expression in prostate biopsy specimens from 104 Chinese metastatic prostate cancer patients. After 3-11 months of hormonal therapy, 12 patients underwent transure- thral resection of the prostate (TURP). HER2 protein expression of TURP specimens was compared with that of the original biopsy specimens. Of these, 10 biopsy and 4 TURP specimens with HER2 IHC staining scores ≥ 2+ were investigated for HER2 gene amplification status by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Results: Of the 104 prostate biopsy specimens, HER2 protein expression was 0, 1+, 2+ and 3+ in 49 (47.1%), 45 (43.3%), 8 (7.7%) and 2 (1.9%) cases, respectively. There was a significant association between HER2 expression and Gleason score (P = 0.026). HER2 protein expression of prostate cancer tissues increased in 33.3% of patients after hormonal therapy. None of the 14 specimens with HER2 IHC scores > 2+ showed HER2 gene amplification. Patients with HER2 scores ≥ 2+ had a significantly higher chance of dying from prostate cancer than those with HER2 scores of 0 (P = 0.004) and 1+ (P = 0.034). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that HER2 protein expression intensity was an independent predictor of cancer-related death (P = 0.039). Conclusion: An HER2 IHC score ≥ 2+ should be defined as HER2 protein overexpression in prostate cancer. Overexpression of HER2 protein in cancer tissue might suggest an increased risk of dying from prostate cancer. HER2 protein expression increases in some individual patients after hormonal therapy.

  5. Metastasis-related plasma membrane proteins of human breast cancer cells identified by comparative quantitative mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Lund, Rikke; Hansen, Helle V

    2009-01-01

    The spread of cancer cells from a primary tumor to form metastasis at distant sites is a complex multi-step process. The cancer cell proteins, and plasma membrane proteins in particular, involved in this process are poorly defined and a study of the very early events of the metastatic process using...... clinical samples or in vitro assays is not feasible. We have used a unique model system consisting of two isogenic human breast cancer cell lines that are equally tumorigenic in mice, but while one gives rise to metastasis, the other disseminates single cells that remain dormant at distant organs. Membrane...... by the two cell lines. The study demonstrates a quantitative and comparative proteomic strategy to identify clinically-relevant key molecules in the early events of metastasis, some of which may prove to be potential targets for cancer therapy....

  6. Interaction between fragile histamine triad and protein kinase C alpha in human non-small cell lung cancer tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the interaction between fragile histamine triad (FHIT) and protein kinase C alpha (PKCα) in human non-small cell lung cancer tissues. Methods FHIT and PKCα double positive samples were screened by immunohistochemical staining from 13 human non-small cell lung cancer tissues. Co-immunoprecipitation was performed by using anti-FHIT and anti-PKCα. The immune precipitate was analyzed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Results Immune precipitate staining detection showed that 3 samples out of...

  7. Proteins that interact with calgranulin B in the human colon cancer cell line HCT-116

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Hee; Baek, Kwang-Soo; Shin, Daye; Kim, Jong Heon; Cho, Jae Youl; Yoo, Byong Chul

    2017-01-01

    Calgranulin B is released from immune cells and can be internalized into colon cancer cells to prevent proliferation. The present study aimed to identify proteins that interact with calgranulin B to suppress the proliferation of colon cancer cells, and to obtain information on the underlying anti-tumor mechanism(s) of calgranulin B. Calgranulin B expression was induced in colon cancer cell line HCT-116 by infection with calgranulin B-FLAG expressing lentivirus, and it led to a significant suppression of cell proliferation. Proteins that interacted with calgranulin B were obtained by immunoprecipitation using whole homogenate of lentivirus-infected HCT-116 cells which expressing calgranulin B-FLAG, and identified using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry analysis. A total of 454 proteins were identified that potentially interact with calgranulin B, and most identified proteins were associated with RNA processing, post-transcriptional modifications and the EIF2 signaling pathway. Direct interaction of calgranulin B with flotillin-1, dynein intermediate chain 1, and CD59 glycoprotein has been confirmed, and the molecules N-myc proto-oncogene protein, rapamycin-insensitive companion of mTOR, and myc proto-oncogene protein were shown to regulate calgranulin B-interacting proteins. Our results provide new insight and useful information to explain the possible mechanism(s) underlying the role of calgranulin B as an anti-tumor effector in colon cancer cells. PMID:28036279

  8. Expression, purification and anticancer analysis of GST-tagged human perforin and granzyme B proteins in human laryngeal cancer Hep-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiuying; Zhang, Guang; An, Guijie; Liu, Sha; Lai, Yandong

    2014-03-01

    Granzyme B and perforin, two major effector molecules in the granule-mediated cytolytic pathway, are thought to be involved in suppression of tumor progression. In this study, the pGEX-4T-1 expression vector was used to express full-length human perforin or granzyme B as a GST-tagged fusion protein in Escherichia coli (E. coli). GST-tagged proteins were induced with IPTG and purified by GSTrap 4B columns. Purified fusion proteins migrated at the predicted molecular mass on SDS-PAGE and were recognized by specific antibodies. Moreover, the fusion proteins can induce apoptosis and directly inhibit the growth of human laryngeal cancer Hep-2 cells in vitro. These results suggest that active perforin and granzyme B fusion proteins can be produced in E. coli and exhibit anticancer potential in laryngeal cancer cells.

  9. Suppression of Poly(rC)-Binding Protein 4 (PCBP4) reduced cisplatin resistance in human maxillary cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yumi; Narita, Norihiko; Nomi, Nozomi; Sugimoto, Chizuru; Takabayashi, Tetsuji; Yamada, Takechiyo; Karaya, Kazuhiro; Matsumoto, Hideki; Fujieda, Shigeharu

    2015-07-21

    Cisplatin plays an important role in the therapy for human head and neck cancers. However, cancer cells develop cisplatin resistance, leading to difficulty in treatment and poor prognosis. To analyze cisplatin-resistant mechanisms, a cisplatin-resistant cell line, IMC-3CR, was established from the IMC-3 human maxillary cancer cell line. Flow cytometry revealed that, compared with IMC-3 cells, cisplatin more dominantly induced cell cycle G2/M arrest rather than apoptosis in IMC-3CR cells. That fact suggests that IMC-3CR cells avoid cisplatin-induced apoptosis through induction of G2/M arrest, which allows cancer cells to repair damaged DNA and survive. In the present study, we specifically examined Poly(rC)-Binding Protein 4 (PCBP4), which reportedly induces G2/M arrest. Results showed that suppression of PCBP4 by RNAi reduced cisplatin-induced G2/M arrest and enhanced apoptosis in IMC-3CR cells, resulting in the reduction of cisplatin resistance. In contrast, overexpression of PCBP4 in IMC-3 cells induced G2/M arrest after cisplatin treatment and enhanced cisplatin resistance. We revealed that PCBP4 combined with Cdc25A and suppressed the expression of Cdc25A, resulting in G2/M arrest. PCBP4 plays important roles in the induction of cisplatin resistance in human maxillary cancers. PCBP4 is a novel molecular target for the therapy of head and neck cancers, especially cisplatin-resistant cancers.

  10. The CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta-2 isoform (CEBPβ-2 upregulates galectin-7 expression in human breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carole G Campion

    Full Text Available Galectin-7 is considered a gene under the control of p53. However, elevated expression of galectin-7 has been reported in several forms of cancer harboring an inactive p53 pathway. This is especially true for breast cancer where galectin-7 expression is readily expressed in a high proportion in basal-like breast cancer tissues, conferring cancer cells with increased resistance to cell death and metastatic properties. These observations suggest that other transcription factors are capable of inducing galectin-7 expression. In the present work, we have examined the role of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (C/EBPβ in inducing expression of galectin-7. C/EBP proteins have been shown to contribute to breast cancer by upregulating pro-metastatic genes. We paid particular attention to C/EBPβ-2 (also known as LAP2, the most transcriptionally active of the C/EBPβ isoforms. Our results showed that ectopic expression of C/EBPβ-2 in human breast cancer cells was sufficient to induce expression of galectin-7 at both the mRNA and protein levels. In silico analysis further revealed the presence of an established CEBP element in the galectin-7 promoter. Mutation of this binding site abolished the transcriptional activity of the galectin-7 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed that C/EBPβ-2 binds to the endogenous galectin-7 promoter. Analysis of galectin-7 protein expression in normal epithelia and in breast carcinoma by immunohistochemistry further showed the expression pattern of C/EBPβ closely micmicked that of galectin-7, most notably in mammary myoepithelial cells and basal-like breast cancer where galectin-7 is preferentially expressed. Taken together, our findings suggest that C/EBPβ is an important mediator of galectin-7 gene activation in breast cancer cells and highlight the different transcriptional mechanisms controlling galectin-7 in cancer cells.

  11. Comparison of Nuclear Accumulation of p53 Protein with Mutations in the p53 Gene of Human Breast Cancer Tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王萱仪; 查小明; 武正炎; 范萍

    2001-01-01

    Objective The objective was to compare nuclear accumulation of p53 protein with mutations in the p53 gene on the tissues of human breast cancer. Methods Fifty-four invasive ductal carcinomas of breast were analyzed by the method of polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) silver stain and strep-avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex (SABC) immunohistochemistry. Results A statistically significant association between the presence of p53 gene mutation and nuclear accumulation of p53 protein was found (P<0.01). 22 tumors that demonstrated p53 gene mutations showed nuclear accumulation of p53 protein, while only 9 (28%) showed nuclear accumulation of p53 protein in 32 tumors without p53 gene mutations. Both p53 mutation protein and p53 gene mutations were prevalent in steroid and progesterone receptors negative tumors (P<0.05). A statistically significant association was found between the nuclear accumulation of p53 protein and lymph node invasion (P<0.05), and between p53 gene mutations and lymph node invasion (P<0.05). p53 abnormalities might be associated with an aggressive phenotype in breast cancer. Conclusion The immunohistochemical detection of nuclear p53 protein accumulation is highly associated with p53 gene mutations in breast cancer tissues, and that this method is useful for rapid screening of p53 abnormalities. However, in order to avoid false positive reaction, the p53 gene mutations should be determined in cases slightly positive for p53 nuclear protein.

  12. BIRC6 protein, an inhibitor of apoptosis: role in survival of human prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher G Low

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: BIRC6 is a member of the Inhibitors of Apoptosis Protein (IAP family which is thought to protect a variety of cancer cells from apoptosis. The main objective of the present study was to investigate whether BIRC6 plays a role in prostate cancer and could be useful as a novel therapeutic target. METHODS: BIRC6 expression in cell lines was assessed using Western blot analysis and in clinical samples using immunohistochemistry of tissue microarrays. The biological significance of BIRC6 was determined by siRNA-induced reduction of BIRC6 expression in LNCaP cells followed by functional assays. RESULTS: Elevated BIRC6 protein expression was found in prostate cancer cell lines and clinical specimens as distinct from their benign counterparts. Increased BIRC6 expression was associated with Gleason 6-8 cancers and castration resistance. Reduction of BIRC6 expression in LNCaP cells led to a marked reduction in cell proliferation which was associated with an increase in apoptosis and a decrease in autophagosome formation. Doxorubicin-induced apoptosis was found to be coupled to a reduction in BIRC6 protein expression. CONCLUSION: The data suggest a role for BIRC6 in prostate cancer progression and treatment resistance, and indicate for the first time that the BIRC6 gene and its product are potentially valuable targets for treatment of prostate cancers.

  13. Differentially expressed proteins in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells sensitive and resistant to paclitaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlíková, Nela; Bartoňová, Irena; Balušíková, Kamila; Kopperova, Dana; Halada, Petr; Kovář, Jan

    2015-04-10

    Resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents is one of the main causes of treatment failure. In order to detect proteins potentially involved in the mechanism of resistance to taxanes, we assessed differences in protein expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells that are sensitive to paclitaxel and in the same cells with acquired resistance to paclitaxel (established in our lab). Proteins were separated using two-dimensional electrophoresis. Changes in their expression were determined and proteins with altered expression were identified using mass spectrometry. Changes in their expression were confirmed using western blot analysis. With these techniques, we found three proteins expressed differently in resistant MCF-7 cells, i.e., thyroid hormone-interacting protein 6 (TRIP6; upregulated to 650%), heat shock protein 27 (HSP27; downregulated to 50%) and cathepsin D (downregulated to 28%). Silencing of TRIP6 expression by specific siRNA leads to decreased number of grown resistant MCF-7 cells. In the present study we have pointed at some new directions in the studies of the mechanism of resistance to paclitaxel in breast cancer cells.

  14. Multiple implications of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 in human cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Keum-Jin; Yang; Jongsun; Park

    2010-01-01

    3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1(PDK1) is a central mediator of cellular signaling between phosphoinositide-3 kinase and various intracellular serine/threonine kinases,including protein kinase B,p70 ribosomal S6 kinase,serum and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase,and protein kinase C.PDK1 activates members of the AGC family of protein kinases by phosphorylating serine/threonine residues in the activation loop.Here,we review the regulatory mechanisms of PDK1 and its roles in cancer.PDK1 is activated by autophosphorylation in the activation loop and other serine residues,as well as by phosphorylation of Tyr-9 and Tyr-373/376.Src appears to recognize PDK1 following tyrosine phosphorylation.The role of heat shock protein 90 in regulating PDK1 stability and PDK1-Src complex formation are also discussed.Furthermore,we summarize the subcellular distribution of PDK1.Finally,an important role for PDK1 in cancer chemotherapy is proposed.In conclusion,a better understanding of its molecular regulatory mechanisms in various signaling pathways will help to explain how PDK1 acts as an oncogenic kinase in various cancers,and will contribute to the development of novel cancer chemotherapies.

  15. Differentially expressed proteins in human breast cancer cells sensitive and resistant to paclitaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlikova, Nela; Bartonova, Irena; Dincakova, Lucia; Halada, Petr; Kovar, Jan

    2014-08-01

    The resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs represents a major problem in cancer treatment. Despite all efforts, mechanisms of resistance have not yet been elucidated. To reveal proteins that could be involved in resistance to taxanes, we compared protein expression in whole cell lysates of SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells sensitive to paclitaxel and in lysates of the same line with acquired resistance to paclitaxel. The resistant SK-BR-3 cell line was established in our lab. Protein separation was achieved using high-resolution 2D-electrophoresis, computer analysis and mass spectro-metry. With these techniques we identified four proteins with different expression in resistant SK-BR-3 cells, i.e., serpin B3, serpin B4, heat shock protein 27 (all three upregulated) and cytokeratin 18 (downregulated). Observed changes were confirmed using western blot analysis. This study suggests new directions worthy of further study in the effort to reveal the mechanism of resistance to paclitaxel in breast cancer cells.

  16. Ski protein levels increase during in vitro progression of HPV16-immortalized human keratinocytes and in cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yi; Pirisi, Lucia [Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Creek, Kim E., E-mail: creekk@sccp.sc.edu [Department of Drug Discovery and Biomedical Sciences, South Carolina College of Pharmacy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2013-09-15

    We compared the levels of the Ski oncoprotein, an inhibitor of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling, in normal human keratinocytes (HKc), HPV16 immortalized HKc (HKc/HPV16), and differentiation resistant HKc/HPV16 (HKc/DR) in the absence and presence of TGF-β. Steady-state Ski protein levels increased in HKc/HPV16 and even further in HKc/DR, compared to HKc. TGF-β treatment of HKc, HKc/HPV16, and HKc/DR dramatically decreased Ski. TGF-β-induced Ski degradation was delayed in HKc/DR. Ski and phospho-Ski protein levels are cell cycle dependent with maximal Ski expression and localization to centrosomes and mitotic spindles during G2/M. ShRNA knock down of Ski in HKc/DR inhibited cell proliferation. More intense nuclear and cytoplasmic Ski staining and altered Ski localization were found in cervical cancer samples compared to adjacent normal tissue in a cervical cancer tissue array. Overall, these studies demonstrate altered Ski protein levels, degradation and localization in HPV16-transformed human keratinocytes and in cervical cancer. - Highlights: • Ski oncoprotein levels increase during progression of HPV16-transformed cells. • Ski and phospho-Ski protein levels are cell cycle dependent. • Ski knock-down in HPV16-transformed keratinocytes inhibited cell proliferation. • Cervical cancer samples overexpress Ski.

  17. Ran GTPase protein promotes human pancreatic cancer proliferation by deregulating the expression of Survivin and cell cycle proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Lin [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710032 (China); Department of Oncology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710038 (China); Lu, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Xiaodi; Sun, Yi; Shi, Yongquan; Fan, Hongwei; Liu, Changhao; Zhou, Jinfeng; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710032 (China); Fan, Daiming, E-mail: daimingfan@fmmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710032 (China); Guo, Xuegang, E-mail: xuegangguo@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710032 (China)

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •Overexpression of Ran in pancreatic cancer was correlated with histological grade. •Downregulation of Ran could induce cell apoptosis and inhibit cell proliferation. •The effects were mediated by cell cycle proteins, Survivin and cleaved Caspase-3. -- Abstract: Ran, a member of the Ras GTPase family, has important roles in nucleocytoplasmic transport. Herein, we detected Ran expression in pancreatic cancer and explored its potential role on tumour progression. Overexpressed Ran in pancreatic cancer tissues was found highly correlated with the histological grade. Downregulation of Ran led to significant suppression of cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest at the G1/S phase and induction of apoptosis. In vivo studies also validated that result. Further studies revealed that those effects were at least partly mediated by the downregulation of Cyclin A, Cyclin D1, Cyclin E, CDK2, CDK4, phospho-Rb and Survivin proteins and up regulation of cleaved Caspase-3.

  18. High prevalence of human cytomegalovirus proteins and nucleic acids in primary breast cancer and metastatic sentinel lymph nodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chato Taher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is a leading cause of death among women worldwide. Increasing evidence implies that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection is associated with several malignancies. We aimed to examine whether HCMV is present in breast cancer and sentinel lymph node (SLN metastases. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue specimens from breast cancer and paired sentinel lymph node (SLN samples were obtained from patients with (n = 35 and without SLN metastasis (n = 38. HCMV immediate early (IE and late (LA proteins were detected using a sensitive immunohistochemistry (IHC technique and HCMV DNA by real-time PCR. RESULTS: HCMV IE and LA proteins were abundantly expressed in 100% of breast cancer specimens. In SLN specimens, 94% of samples with metastases (n = 34 were positive for HCMV IE and LA proteins, mostly confined to neoplastic cells while some inflammatory cells were HCMV positive in 60% of lymph nodes without metastases (n = 35. The presence of HCMV DNA was confirmed in 12/12 (100% of breast cancer and 10/11 (91% SLN specimens from the metastatic group, but was not detected in 5/5 HCMV-negative, SLN-negative specimens. There was no statistically significant association between HCMV infection grades and progesterone receptor, estrogen receptor alpha and Elston grade status. CONCLUSIONS: The role of HCMV in the pathogenesis of breast cancer is unclear. As HCMV proteins were mainly confined to neoplastic cells in primary breast cancer and SLN samples, our observations raise the question whether HCMV contributes to the tumorigenesis of breast cancer and its metastases.

  19. Buffer optimization for high resolution of human lung cancer tissue proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kibeom; Pi, Kyungbae; Lee, Keeman

    2009-01-01

    A problem in proteomic analysis of lung cancer tissue is the presence of complex components of different histological backgrounds (squamous cell carcinoma, small cell lung carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma). The efficient solubilization of protein components before two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) is a very critical. Poor solubilization has been associated with a failure to detect proteins and diffuse, streaked and/or trailing protein spots. Here, we have optimized the solubilization of human lung cancer tissue to increase protein resolution. Isoelectric focusing (IEF) rehydration buffer containing a thiourea-urea mixture provided superior resolution, whereas a buffer without thiourea yielded consistently poor results. In addition, IEF rehydration buffers containing CHAPS and DTT gave superior resolution, whereas buffers containing Nonidet P-40 (NP-40) and/or Triton X-100 did not. A tributylphosphine-containing buffer gave consistently poor results. Using optimized conditions, we used 2-D gel analysis of human lung cancer tissue to identify 11 differentially-expressed protein spots by MALDI-mass spectrometry. This study provides a methodological tool to study the complex mammalian proteomes.

  20. The bone morphogenetic protein pathway is active in human colon adenomas and inactivated in colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kodach, Liudmila L.; Bleurning, Sylvia A.; Musler, Alex R.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel R.; Hommes, Daniel W.; van den Brink, Gijs R.; van Noesel, Carel J. M.; Offerhaus, G. Johan A.; Hardwick, James C. H.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) is important in colorectal cancer (CRQ progression. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), a subgroup within the TGF beta superfamily, recently also have been implicated in CRC, but their precise role in CRC has yet to be investigated. METHODS. The

  1. Human FK506 binding protein 65 is associated with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Sanne Harder; Christensen, Lise Lotte; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt;

    2005-01-01

    this gene hFKBP10 together with its encoded protein hFKBP65 as a novel marker associated with colorectal cancer. Analysis of 31 colorectal adenocarcinomas and 14 normal colorectal mucosa by RealTime PCR for hFKBP10 showed a significant up-regulation in tumors, when compared with normal mucosa...

  2. Protein degradation rate is the dominant mechanism accounting for the differences in protein abundance of basal p53 in a human breast and colorectal cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Eszter; Salehi-Reyhani, Ali; Barclay, Michael; Stumpf, Michael P H; Klug, David R

    2017-01-01

    We determine p53 protein abundances and cell to cell variation in two human cancer cell lines with single cell resolution, and show that the fractional width of the distributions is the same in both cases despite a large difference in average protein copy number. We developed a computational framework to identify dominant mechanisms controlling the variation of protein abundance in a simple model of gene expression from the summary statistics of single cell steady state protein expression distributions. Our results, based on single cell data analysed in a Bayesian framework, lends strong support to a model in which variation in the basal p53 protein abundance may be best explained by variations in the rate of p53 protein degradation. This is supported by measurements of the relative average levels of mRNA which are very similar despite large variation in the level of protein.

  3. Significance of expression of heat shock protein90α in human gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Sheng Zuo; Jie Dai; Ai-Hua Bo; Jie Fan; Xiu-Ying Xiao

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the significance of hsp90α expression in human gastric cancer tissues.METHODS: Immunohistochemical staining was used in clinical specimens from 33 cases of gastric cancer and 33 cases of gastritis with rabbit anti-human hsp90α multi-clonal antibody in order to explore the relationship between the expression of hsp90α in gastric carcinoma tissue and gastritis tissue as well as in mucous membrane adjacent to cancer and lymph node metastasis.RESULTS: Hsp90α was detected in 88 % of gastric carcinoma cases and 55 % of gastritis cases. The hsp90α positive rate in gastric cancer group was significantly higher than that in gastritis group (P<0.01, P=0.005). The hsp90α positive rate in gastric cancer and in mucous membrane adjacent to cancer was 88 % and 55 % respectively (P<0.01,P=0.005). The hsp90α positive rate in lymph node metastasis group and non-lymph node metastasis group was 100 % and 60 %respectively, and a significant correlation between hsp90α expression and lymph node metastasis was shown (P<0.01,P=0.005).CONCLUSION: The hsp90α expression rate in gastric cancer group was significantly higher than that in gastritis group as well as that in the group of mucous membrane adjacent to cancer. The hsp90α expression in lymphatic node metastasis group was higher than that in non-lymphatic node metastasis group. The results indicate that increased hsp90α expression has a close relationship with occurrence and lymph node metastasis of gastric cancer.

  4. Protein kinase CK2 inhibition is associated with the destabilization of HIF-1α in human cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, Barbara; Rasmussen, Tine D. L.; Schnitzler, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Screening for protein kinase CK2 inhibitors of the structural diversity compound library (DTP NCI/NIH) led to the discovery of 4-[(E)-(fluoren-9-ylidenehydrazinylidene)-methyl]benzoic acid (E9). E9 induces apoptotic cell death in various cancer cell lines and upon hypoxia, the compound suppresses...... CK2-catalyzed HSP90/Cdc37 phosphorylation and induces HIF-1alpha degradation. Furthermore, E9 exerts a strong anti-tumour activity by inducing necrosis in murine xenograft models underlining its potential to be used for cancer treatment in future clinical studies. Crystal structure analysis of human...

  5. The PDZ protein TIP-1 facilitates cell migration and pulmonary metastasis of human invasive breast cancer cells in athymic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Miaojun; Wang, Hailun; Zhang, Hua-Tang; Han, Zhaozhong

    2012-05-25

    Tax-interacting protein 1 (TIP-1, also known as Tax1bp3) inhibited proliferation of colon cancer cells through antagonizing the transcriptional activity of beta-catenin. However, in this study, elevated TIP-1 expression levels were detected in human invasive breast cancers. Studies with two human invasive breast cancer cell lines indicated that RNAi-mediated TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the cell adhesion, proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro, and inhibited tumor growth in mammary fat pads and pulmonary metastasis in athymic mice. Biochemical studies showed that TIP-1 knockdown had moderate and differential effects on the beta-catenin-regulated gene expression, but remarkably down regulated the genes for cell adhesion and motility in breast cancer cells. The decreased expression of integrins and paxillin was accompanied with reduced cell adhesion and focal adhesion formation on fibronectin-coated surface. In conclusion, this study revealed a novel oncogenic function of TIP-1 suggesting that TIP-1 holds potential as a prognostic biomarker and a therapeutic target in the treatment of human invasive breast cancers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Deletion of ribosomal protein genes is a common vulnerability in human cancer, especially in concert with TP53 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajore, Ram; Raiser, David; McConkey, Marie; Jöud, Magnus; Boidol, Bernd; Mar, Brenton; Saksena, Gordon; Weinstock, David M; Armstrong, Scott; Ellis, Steven R; Ebert, Benjamin L; Nilsson, Björn

    2017-04-01

    Heterozygous inactivating mutations in ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) are associated with hematopoietic and developmental abnormalities, activation of p53, and altered risk of cancer in humans and model organisms. Here we performed a large-scale analysis of cancer genome data to examine the frequency and selective pressure of RPG lesions across human cancers. We found that hemizygous RPG deletions are common, occurring in about 43% of 10,744 cancer specimens and cell lines. Consistent with p53-dependent negative selection, such lesions are underrepresented in TP53-intact tumors (P ≪ 10(-10)), and shRNA-mediated knockdown of RPGs activated p53 in TP53-wild-type cells. In contrast, we did not see negative selection of RPG deletions in TP53-mutant tumors. RPGs are conserved with respect to homozygous deletions, and shRNA screening data from 174 cell lines demonstrate that further suppression of hemizygously deleted RPGs inhibits cell growth. Our results establish RPG haploinsufficiency as a strikingly common vulnerability of human cancers that associates with TP53 mutations and could be targetable therapeutically. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  7. Human heterochromatin protein 1 isoforms regulate androgen receptor signaling in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itsumi, Momoe; Shiota, Masaki; Yokomizo, Akira; Kashiwagi, Eiji; Takeuchi, Ario; Tatsugami, Katsunori; Inokuchi, Junichi; Song, Yoohyun; Uchiumi, Takeshi; Naito, Seiji

    2013-06-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling is critical for the tumorigenesis and development of prostate cancer, as well as the progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer. We previously showed that the heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) β isoform plays a critical role in transactivation of AR signaling as an AR coactivator that promotes prostate cancer cell proliferation. However, the roles of other HP1 isoforms, HP1α and HP1γ, in AR expression and prostate cancer remain unclear. Here, we found that knockdown of HP1γ, but not HP1α, reduced AR expression and cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest at G1 phase in LNCaP cells. Conversely, overexpression of full-length HP1α and its C-terminal deletion mutant increased AR expression and cell growth, whereas overexpression of HP1γ had no effect. Similarly, HP1α overexpression promoted 22Rv1 cell growth, whereas HP1γ knockdown reduced the proliferation of CxR cells, a castration-resistant LNCaP derivative. Taken together, HP1 isoforms distinctly augment AR signaling and cell growth in prostate cancer. Therefore, silencing of HP1β and HP1γ may be a promising therapeutic strategy for treatment of prostate cancer.

  8. Correlation between Protein Expression of PTEN in Human Pancreatic Cancer and the Proliferation, Infiltration, Metastasis and Prognosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Jing; XIONG Jiongxin; LI Tao; YANG Zhiyong; LI Xiaohui; LI Kai; WU Heshui; WANG Chunyou

    2006-01-01

    In order to investigate the correlation between protein expression of PTEN and the proliferation, infiltration, metastasis and prognosis in pancreatic cancer, immunohistochemical SP method was used to examine the protein expression of PTEN, PCNA, MVD, MMP-2, MMP-9 and TUNEL method to detect the levels of apoptosis of pancreatic cells in 41 pancreatic head cancers from regional pancreatectomy (RP) and 10 normal pancreatic tissues. The results showed that among 41 cases of pancreatic cancers, the positive staining of PTNE (39.02 %) was significantly weaker than that in normal pancreatic tissues (P<0.05). The levels of PCNA labeling index (LI), apoptotic index(AI), microvessel density (MVD), MMP-2 LI and MMP-9 LI were decreased gradually with the increase of the expression intensity of PTEN, and there was a significant difference in the above parameters among the patients having different expression levels of PTEN (P<0.01 or P<0.05). There was a negative correlation between the expression of PTEN and PCNA LI, MVD, MMP-2 LI,MMP-9 LI, and a positive correlation between AI and the expression of PTEN. The expression intensity of PTEN was correlated with the postoperative survival of the patients with pancreatic cancer(x2=22.3400, P<0.0001, RR=2.030). It was suggested that the expression levels of PTEN protein were closely related with proliferation, infiltration and metastasis in human pancreatic cancer, and the expression of PTEN protein was one of the prognostic factors for pancreatic cancer following RP.

  9. Integrated epigenetics of human breast cancer: synoptic investigation of targeted genes, microRNAs and proteins upon demethylation treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Radpour

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The contribution of aberrant DNA methylation in silencing of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs and microRNAs has been investigated. Since these epigenetic alterations are reversible, it became of interest to determine the effects of the 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC demethylation therapy in breast cancer at different molecular levels. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here we investigate a synoptic model to predict complete DAC treatment effects at the level of genes, microRNAs and proteins for several human breast cancer lines. The present study assessed an effective treatment dosage based on the cell viability, cytotoxicity, apoptosis and methylation assays for the investigated cell lines. A highly aggressive and a non-aggressive cell line were investigated using omics approaches such as MALDI-TOF MS, mRNA- and microRNA expression arrays, 2-D gel electrophoresis and LC-MS-MS. Complete molecular profiles including the biological interaction and possible early and late systematic stable or transient effects of the methylation inhibition were determined. Beside the activation of several epigenetically suppressed TSGs, we also showed significant dysregulation of some important oncogenes, oncomiRs and oncosuppressors miRNAs as well as drug tolerance genes/miRNAs/proteins. CONCLUSIONS: In the present study, the results denote some new molecular DAC targets and pathways based on the chemical modification of DNA methylation in breast cancer. The outlined approach might prove to be useful as an epigenetic treatment model also for other human solid tumors in the management of cancer patients.

  10. Ski protein levels increase during in vitro progression of HPV16-immortalized human keratinocytes and in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Pirisi, Lucia; Creek, Kim E

    2013-09-01

    We compared the levels of the Ski oncoprotein, an inhibitor of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling, in normal human keratinocytes (HKc), HPV16 immortalized HKc (HKc/HPV16), and differentiation resistant HKc/HPV16 (HKc/DR) in the absence and presence of TGF-β. Steady-state Ski protein levels increased in HKc/HPV16 and even further in HKc/DR, compared to HKc. TGF-β treatment of HKc, HKc/HPV16, and HKc/DR dramatically decreased Ski. TGF-β-induced Ski degradation was delayed in HKc/DR. Ski and phospho-Ski protein levels are cell cycle dependent with maximal Ski expression and localization to centrosomes and mitotic spindles during G2/M. ShRNA knock down of Ski in HKc/DR inhibited cell proliferation. More intense nuclear and cytoplasmic Ski staining and altered Ski localization were found in cervical cancer samples compared to adjacent normal tissue in a cervical cancer tissue array. Overall, these studies demonstrate altered Ski protein levels, degradation and localization in HPV16-transformed human keratinocytes and in cervical cancer.

  11. ETS1 mediates MEK1/2-dependent overexpression of cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A in human cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anchit Khanna

    Full Text Available EGFR-MEK-ERK signaling pathway has an established role in promoting malignant growth and disease progression in human cancers. Therefore identification of transcriptional targets mediating the oncogenic effects of the EGFR-MEK-ERK pathway would be highly relevant. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A is a recently characterized human oncoprotein. CIP2A promotes malignant cell growth and is over expressed at high frequency (40-80% in most of the human cancer types. However, the mechanisms inducing its expression in cancer still remain largely unexplored. Here we present systematic analysis of contribution of potential gene regulatory mechanisms for high CIP2A expression in cancer. Our data shows that evolutionary conserved CpG islands at the proximal CIP2A promoter are not methylated both in normal and cancer cells. Furthermore, sequencing of the active CIP2A promoter region from altogether seven normal and malignant cell types did not reveal any sequence alterations that would increase CIP2A expression specifically in cancer cells. However, treatment of cancer cells with various signaling pathway inhibitors revealed that CIP2A mRNA expression was sensitive to inhibition of EGFR activity as well as inhibition or activation of MEK-ERK pathway. Moreover, MEK1/2-specific siRNAs decreased CIP2A protein expression. Series of CIP2A promoter-luciferase constructs were created to identify proximal -27 to -107 promoter region responsible for MEK-dependent stimulation of CIP2A expression. Additional mutagenesis and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed ETS1 as the transcription factor mediating stimulation of CIP2A expression through EGFR-MEK pathway. Thus, ETS1 is probably mediating high CIP2A expression in human cancers with increased EGFR-MEK1/2-ERK pathway activity. These results also suggest that in addition to its established role in invasion and angiogenesis, ETS1 may support malignant cellular growth via regulation of

  12. Moonlighting proteins in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyung-Won; Lee, Seong-Ho; Baek, Seung Joon

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1980s, growing evidence suggested that the cellular localization of proteins determined their activity and biological functions. In a classical view, a protein is characterized by the single cellular compartment where it primarily resides and functions. It is now believed that when proteins appear in different subcellular locations, the cells surpass the expected activity of proteins given the same genomic information to fulfill complex biological behavior. Many proteins are recognized for having the potential to exist in multiple locations in cells. Dysregulation of translocation may cause cancer or contribute to poorer cancer prognosis. Thus, quantitative and comprehensive assessment of dynamic proteins and associated protein movements could be a promising indicator in determining cancer prognosis and efficiency of cancer treatment and therapy. This review will summarize these so-called moonlighting proteins, in terms of a coupled intracellular cancer signaling pathway. Determination of the detailed biological intracellular and extracellular transit and regulatory activity of moonlighting proteins permits a better understanding of cancer and identification of potential means of molecular intervention.

  13. Genistein affects HER2 protein concentration, activation, and promoter regulation in BT-474 human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakla, Mary S; Shenouda, Nader S; Ansell, Pete J; Macdonald, Ruth S; Lubahn, Dennis B

    2007-08-01

    The HER2 proto-oncogene, a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor family, is overexpressed in 20-30% of breast cancers. Genistein, the main soy isoflavone, interacts with estrogen receptors (ER) and it is also a potent tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Previously, our laboratory found that genistein delayed mammary tumor onset in transgenic mice that overexpress HER2 gene. Our goal was to define the mechanism through which genistein affects mammary tumorigenesis in HER2 overexpressing mice. We hypothesized that genistein inhibits HER2 activation and expression through ER-dependent and ER-independent mechanisms. Genistein inhibited total HER2 protein expression and tyrosine phosphorylation in BT-474, an ERalpha (-) and ERbeta (+) human breast cancer cell line, however, E2 had no effect. Taken together, these data suggest that genistein has an ER-independent inhibitory effect, presumably, through tyrosine kinase inhibition activity. Genistein at 1.0 microM mimicked E2 and down-regulated HER2 protein phosphorylation when BT-474 was co-transfected with ERalpha, but not ERbeta. Although E2 and overexpression of HER2 can promote mammary tumorigenesis, an inverse relationship between ER expression and HER2 overexpression has been found in human breast cancer. We cloned a 500-bp promoter region upstream of the HER2 transcription initiation site. Co-transfection with ERalpha, but not with ERbeta, down-regulated HER2 promoter reporter in BT-474. At concentrations > or =1 microM, genistein inhibited HER2 promoter reporter in the absence of ERalpha. In conclusion, genistein at > or =1 microM inhibited HER2 protein expression, phosphorylation, and promoter activity through an ER-independent mechanism. In the presence of ERalpha, genistein mimicked E2 and inhibited HER2 protein phosphorylation. These data support genistein's chemo-prevention and potential chemo-therapeutic roles in breast cancer.

  14. Protein Profiling of Isolated Leukocytes, Myofibroblasts, Epithelial, Basal, and Endothelial Cells from Normal, Hyperplastic, Cancerous, and Inflammatory Human Prostate Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahraa I. Khamis, Kenneth A. Iczkowski, Ziad J. Sahab, Qing-Xiang Amy Sang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In situ neoplastic prostate cells are not lethal unless they become invasive and metastatic. For cells to become invasive, the prostate gland must undergo degradation of the basement membrane and disruption of the basal cell layer underneath the luminal epithelia. Although the roles of proteinases in breaking down the basement membrane have been well-studied, little is known about the factors that induce basal cell layer disruption, degeneration, and its eventual disappearance in invasive cancer. It is hypothesized that microenvironmental factors may affect the degradation of the basal cell layer, which if protected may prevent tumor progression and invasion. In this study, we have revealed differential protein expression patterns between epithelial and stromal cells isolated from different prostate pathologies and identified several important epithelial and stromal proteins that may contribute to inflammation and malignant transformation of human benign prostate tissues to cancerous tissues using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and proteomics methods. Cellular retinoic acid-binding protein 2 was downregulated in basal cells of benign prsotate. Caspase-1 and interleukin-18 receptor 1 were highly expressed in leukocytes of prostate cancer. Proto-oncogene Wnt-3 was downregulated in endothelial cells of prostatitis tissue and tyrosine phosphatase non receptor type 1 was only found in normal and benign endothelial cells. Poly ADP-ribose polymerase 14 was downregulated in myofibroblasts of prostatitis tissue. Interestingly, integrin alpha-6 was upregulated in epithelial cells but not detected in myofibroblasts of prostate cancer. Further validation of these proteins may generate new strategies for the prevention of basal cell layer disruption and subsequent cancer invasion.

  15. Gene promoter methylation and protein expression of BRMS1 in uterine cervix in relation to high-risk human papilloma virus infection and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagopoulou, Maria; Lambropoulou, Maria; Balgkouranidou, Ioanna; Nena, Evangelia; Karaglani, Makrina; Nicolaidou, Christina; Asimaki, Anthi; Konstantinidis, Theocharis; Constantinidis, Theodoros C; Kolios, George; Kakolyris, Stylianos; Agorastos, Theodoros; Chatzaki, Ekaterini

    2017-04-01

    Cervical cancer is strongly related to certain high-risk types of human papilloma virus infection. Breast cancer metastasis suppressor 1 (BRMS1) is a tumor suppressor gene, its expression being regulated by DNA promoter methylation in several types of cancers. This study aims to evaluate the methylation status of BRMS1 promoter in relation to high-risk types of human papilloma virus infection and the development of pre-cancerous lesions and describe the pattern of BRMS1 protein expression in normal, high-risk types of human papilloma virus-infected pre-cancerous and malignant cervical epithelium. We compared the methylation status of BRMS1 in cervical smears of 64 women with no infection by high-risk types of human papilloma virus to 70 women with proven high-risk types of human papilloma virus infection, using real-time methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. The expression of BRMS1 protein was described by immunohistochemistry in biopsies from cervical cancer, pre-cancerous lesions, and normal cervices. Methylation of BRMS1 promoter was detected in 37.5% of women with no high-risk types of human papilloma virus infection and was less frequent in smears with high-risk types of human papilloma virus (11.4%) and in women with pathological histology (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia) (11.9%). Methylation was detected also in HeLa cervical cancer cells. Immunohistochemistry revealed nuclear BRMS1 protein staining in normal high-risk types of human papilloma virus-free cervix, in cervical intraepithelial neoplasias, and in malignant tissues, where staining was occasionally also cytoplasmic. In cancer, expression was stronger in the more differentiated cancer blasts. In conclusion, BRMS1 promoter methylation and aberrant protein expression seem to be related to high-risk types of human papilloma virus-induced carcinogenesis in uterine cervix and is worthy of further investigation.

  16. Identification of protein biomarkers for cervical cancer using human cervicovaginal fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geert A A Van Raemdonck

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Cervicovaginal fluid (CVF can be considered as a potential source of biomarkers for diseases of the lower female reproductive tract. The fluid can easily be collected, thereby offering new opportunities such as the development of self tests. Our objective was to identify a CVF protein biomarker for cervical cancer or its precancerous state. METHODS: A differential proteomics study was set up using CVF samples from healthy and precancerous women. Label-free spectral counting was applied to quantify protein abundances. RESULTS: The proteome analysis revealed 16 candidate biomarkers of which alpha-actinin-4 (p = 0.001 and pyruvate kinase isozyme M1/M2 (p = 0.014 were most promising. Verification of alpha-actinin-4 by ELISA (n = 28 showed that this candidate biomarker discriminated between samples from healthy and both low-risk and high-risk HPV-infected women (p = 0.009. Additional analysis of longitudinal samples (n = 29 showed that alpha-actinin-4 levels correlated with virus persistence and clearing, with a discrimination of approximately 18 pg/ml. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that CVF is an excellent source of protein biomarkers for detection of lower female genital tract pathologies and that alpha-actinin-4 derived from CVF is a promising candidate biomarker for the precancerous state of cervical cancer. Further studies regarding sensitivity and specificity of this biomarker will demonstrate its utility for improving current screening programs and/or its use for a cervical cancer self-diagnosis test.

  17. Upregulated HSP27 in human breast cancer cells reduces Herceptin susceptibility by increasing Her2 protein stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kong Sun-Young

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elucidating the molecular mechanisms by which tumors become resistant to Herceptin is critical for the treatment of Her2-overexpressed metastatic breast cancer. Methods To further understand Herceptin resistance mechanisms at the molecular level, we used comparative proteome approaches to analyze two human breast cancer cell lines; Her2-positive SK-BR-3 cells and its Herceptin-resistant SK-BR-3 (SK-BR-3 HR cells. Results Heat-shock protein 27 (HSP27 expression was shown to be upregulated in SK-BR-3 HR cells. Suppression of HSP27 by specific siRNA transfection increased the susceptibility of SK-BR-3 HR cells to Herceptin. In the presence of Herceptin, Her2 was downregulated in both cell lines. However, Her2 expression was reduced by a greater amount in SK-BR-3 parent cells than in SK-BR-3 HR cells. Interestingly, co-immunoprecipitation analysis showed that HSP27 can bind to Her2. In the absence of Herceptin, HSP27 expression is suppressed and Her2 expression is reduced, indicating that downregulation of Her2 by Herceptin can be obstructed by the formation of a Her2-HSP27 complex. Conclusion Our present study demonstrates that upregulated HSP27 in human breast cancer cells can reduce Herceptin susceptibility by increasing Her2 protein stability.

  18. Telomere-binding protein TPP1 modulates telomere homeostasis and confers radioresistance to human colorectal cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Radiotherapy is one of the major therapeutic strategies in cancer treatment. The telomere-binding protein TPP1 is an important component of the shelterin complex at mammalian telomeres. Our previous reports showed that TPP1 expression was elevated in radioresistant cells, but the exact effects and mechanisms of TPP1 on radiosensitivity is unclear. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we found that elevated TPP1 expression significantly correlated with radioresistance and longer telomere length in human colorectal cancer cell lines. Moreover, TPP1 overexpression showed lengthened telomere length and a significant decrease of radiosensitivity to X-rays. TPP1 mediated radioresistance was correlated with a decreased apoptosis rate after IR exposure. Furthermore, TPP1 overexpression showed prolonged G2/M arrest mediated by ATM/ATR-Chk1 signal pathway after IR exposure. Moreover, TPP1 overexpression accelerated the repair kinetics of total DNA damage and telomere dysfunction induced by ionizing radiation. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrated that elevated expressions of TPP1 in human colorectal cancer cells could protect telomere from DNA damage and confer radioresistance. These results suggested that TPP1 may be a potential target in the radiotherapy of colorectal cancer.

  19. Serglycin in human cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Jian Li; Chao-Nan Qian

    2011-01-01

    Serglycin belongs to a family of small proteoglycans with Ser-Gly dipeptide repeats,and it is modified with different types of glycosaminoglycan side chains.Intracellular serglycin affects the retention and secretion of proteases,chemokines,or other cytokines by physically binding to these factors in secretory granules.Extracellular serglycin has been found to be released by several types of human cancer cells,and it is able to promote the metastasis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.Serglycin can bind to CD44,which is another glycoprotein located in cellular membrane.Serglycin's function of promoting cancer cell metastasis depends on glycosylation of its core protein,which can be achieved by autocrine as well as paracrine secretion mechanisms.Further investigations are warranted to elucidate serglycin signaling mechanisms with the goal of targeting them to prevent cancer cell metastasis.

  20. Protein-associated intercalator-induced DNA scission is enhanced by estrogen stimulation in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwelling, L A; Kerrigan, D; Lippman, M E

    1983-01-01

    Estrogen-responsive human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) displayed a higher frequency of intercalator-induced protein-associated DNA scission after treatment with 17 beta-estradiol (E2) than did cells that had not received estrogen treatment. This effect was dependent on estrogen concentration (maximum enhancement at approximately equal to 1 nM E2) and time (maximum effect seen approximately equal to 24 hr after E2 addition). Human breast cancer cells lacking estrogen receptors did not display the enhanced response. Antiestrogens produced a slight decrease in intercalator-induced DNA scission, whereas insulin produced an enhanced effect. The DNA breaks produced by the intercalators 5-iminodaunorubicin and 4'-(9-acridinylamino)methanesulfon-m-anisidide (m-AMSA) in these cells were undetectable without enzymatic deproteinization of cell lysates prior to quantification by alkaline elution. Intercalator-induced DNA-protein crosslinking also was enhanced in E2-treated MCF-7 cells. Studies with m-[14C]AMSA revealed no estrogen-associated increases in drug uptake. The data suggest that E2 treatment, either by specifically and directly increasing active transcription in chromatin or through secondary effects on DNA that accompany alterations in cell growth or cell cycle distribution, alters the susceptibility of DNA to intercalator-induced protein-associated DNA scission. If this enhanced protein-associated scission is selectively localized to transcriptionally active chromatin, the adsorption of the DNA-bound proteins to membrane filters (DNA-protein crosslinking) may allow identification and isolation of estrogen-regulated gene sequences. PMID:6353411

  1. Tetranectin, a plasminogen kringle 4-binding protein. Cloning and gene expression pattern in human colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Albrechtsen, R

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tetranectin is a recently discovered protein that binds to kringle 4 region of plasminogen (Clemmensen I, Petersen LC, Kluft C. Eur J Biochem 1986; 156:327. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The mRNA encoding human tetranectin was cloned by using degenerate primers in a reverse transcriptase...... reaction followed by polymerase chain reaction amplification. The resulting polymerase chain reaction product was examined by DNA sequencing and subsequently used as probe for screening a human placental cDNA library. A full length cDNA clone (TET-1) was isolated, characterized, and used for Northern blot...

  2. Heat shock protein 70 antisense oligonucleotide inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in human gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Gang Zhao; Wen-Lu Shen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Heat shock protein (HSP)70 is over-expressed in human gastric cancer and plays an important role in the progression of this cancer. We investigated the effects of antisense HSP70 oligomer on human gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901, and its potential role in gene therapy for this cancer.METHODS: Human gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901 was treated in vitro with various concentrations of antisense HSP70 oligonucleotides at different intervals. Growth inhibition was determined as percentage by trypan blue dye exclusion test. Extracted DNA was electrophoresed on agarose gel, and distribution of cell cycle and kinetics of apoptosis induction were analyzed by propidium iodide DNA incorporation using flow cytometry, which was also used to detect the effects of antisense oligomer pretreatment on the subsequent apoptosis induced by heat shock in SGC-7901 cells. Proteins were extracted for simultaneous measurement of HSP70 expression level by SDS-PAGE Western blotting.RESULTS: The number of viable cells decreased in a doseand time-dependent manner, and ladder-like patterns of DNA fragments were observed in SGC-7901 cells treated with antisense HSP70 oligomers at a concentration of 10 μmol/L for 48 h or 8 μmol/L for 72 h, which were consistent with inter-nucleosomal DNA fragmentation. Flow cytometric analysis showed a dose- and time-dependent increase in apoptotic rate by HSP70 antisense oligomers. This response was accompanied with a decrease in the percentage of cells in the G1 and S phases of the cell cycle, suggesting inhibition of cell proliferation. In addition, flow cytometry also showed that pretreatment of SGC-7901 cells with HSP70 antisense oligomers enhanced the subsequent apoptosis induced by heat shock treatment. Western blotting demonstrated that HSP70 antisense oligomers inhibited HSP70 expression, which preceded apoptosis, and HSP70 was undetectable at the concentration of 10 μmol/L for 48 h or 8 μmol/L for 72 h.CONCLUSION: Antisense HSP70 oligomers

  3. Screening for proteins interacting with MCM7 in human lung cancer library using yeast two hybrid system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuchen HAN

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective MCM7 is a subunit of the MCM complex that plays a key role in DNA replication initiation. But little is known about its interaction proteins. In this study yeast two hybrid screening was used to identify the MCM7 interacting proteins. Methods Yeast expression vector containing human full length MCM7-pGBKT7 plasmid was constructed, and with a library of cDNAs from human lung cancer-pACT2 plasmid was transformed into yeast strain AH109, and was electively grew in X-a-gal auxotrophy medium SD/-Trp-Leu-His-Ade, and the blue colonies were picked up, the plasmid of the yeast colonies was extracted , and transformed into E. Coli to extract DNA and performed sequence analysis. Results Eleven proteins were identified which could specifically interact with MCM7 proteins, among these five were cytoskeleton proteins, six were enzymes, kinases and related receptors. Conclusion The investigation provides functional clues for further exploration of MCM7 gene.

  4. Human pancreatic cancer tumors are nutrient poor and tumor cells actively scavenge extracellular protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphorst, Jurre J; Nofal, Michel; Commisso, Cosimo; Hackett, Sean R; Lu, Wenyun; Grabocka, Elda; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Miller, George; Drebin, Jeffrey A; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Thompson, Craig B; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2015-02-01

    Glucose and amino acids are key nutrients supporting cell growth. Amino acids are imported as monomers, but an alternative route induced by oncogenic KRAS involves uptake of extracellular proteins via macropinocytosis and subsequent lysosomal degradation of these proteins as a source of amino acids. In this study, we examined the metabolism of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), a poorly vascularized lethal KRAS-driven malignancy. Metabolomic comparisons of human PDAC and benign adjacent tissue revealed that tumor tissue was low in glucose, upper glycolytic intermediates, creatine phosphate, and the amino acids glutamine and serine, two major metabolic substrates. Surprisingly, PDAC accumulated essential amino acids. Such accumulation could arise from extracellular proteins being degraded through macropinocytosis in quantities necessary to meet glutamine requirements, which in turn produces excess of most other amino acids. Consistent with this hypothesis, active macropinocytosis is observed in primary human PDAC specimens. Moreover, in the presence of physiologic albumin, we found that cultured murine PDAC cells grow indefinitely in media lacking single essential amino acids and replicate once in the absence of free amino acids. Growth under these conditions was characterized by simultaneous glutamine depletion and essential amino acid accumulation. Overall, our findings argue that the scavenging of extracellular proteins is an important mode of nutrient uptake in PDAC.

  5. A novel uPAg-KPI fusion protein inhibits the growth and invasion of human ovarian cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li-Ping; Xu, Tian-Min; Kan, Mu-Jie; Xiao, Ye-Chen; Cui, Man-Hua

    2016-05-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) acts by breaking down the basement membrane and is involved in cell proliferation, migration and invasion. These actions are mediated by binding to the uPA receptor (uPAR) via its growth factor domain (GFD). The present study evaluated the effects of uPAg-KPI, a fusion protein of uPA-GFD and a kunitz protease inhibitor (KPI) domain that is present in the amyloid β-protein precursor. Using SKOV-3 cells, an ovarian cancer cell line, we examined cell viability, migration, invasion and also protein expression. Furthermore, we examined wound healing, and migration and invasion using a Transwell assay. Our data showed that uPAg-KPI treatment reduced the viability of ovarian cancer SKOV-3 cells in both a concentration and time-dependent manner by arresting tumor cells at G1/G0 phase of the cell cycle. The IC50 of uPAg-KPI was 0.5 µg/µl after 48 h treatment. At this concentration, uPAg-KPI also inhibited tumor cell colony formation, wound closure, as well as cell migration and invasion capacity. At the protein level, western blot analysis demonstrated that uPAg-KPI exerted no significant effect on the expression of total extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/ERK2 and AKT, whereas it suppressed levels of phosphorylated ERK1/ERK2 and AKT. Thus, we suggest that this novel uPAg-KPI fusion protein reduced cell viability, colony formation, wound healing and the invasive ability of human ovarian cancer SKOV-3 cells in vitro by regulating ERK and AKT signaling. Further studies using other cell lines will confirm these findings.

  6. Implication of a protein-tyrosine-phosphatase in human lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaits, F; Li, R Y; Ragab, A; Selves, J; Ragab-Thomas, J M; Chap, H

    1994-07-01

    Protein tyrosyl phosphorylation plays an essential role in regulating cellular events such as proliferation, differentiation and oncogenesis. The recent characterization of the family of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases) suggests that dephosphorylation might be a crucial event in these phenomena. One of the functions of PTPases is to reverse the effect of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKases), many of which are oncogenes, suggesting that they may act as tumor suppressors as described for HPTP gamma. In order to investigate the implication in lung cancer of HPTP beta, a receptor PTPase, we have developed a semi-quantitative method derived from primer-directed reverse transcription (RT) and subsequent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with 32P-labelled nucleotide. We have demonstrated that the expression of HPTP beta mRNA was dramatically decreased in lung adenocarcinomas and lung malpighian carcinomas as compared to normal lung tissue. In addition, HPTP beta was not expressed in the pulmonar adenocarcinoma cell line A427, which proliferates in a deregulated way. These results suggest that the loss of expression of HPTP beta might play a role in neoplasic transformation and thus this molecule could act as a tumor suppressor factor.

  7. The synthesis and characterization of cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns for the study of human multidrug resistant proteins MRP1, MRP2 and human breast cancer resistant protein BCRP using membranes obtained from Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) insect cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatia, Prateek A.; Moaddel, Ruin; Wainer, Irving W.

    2010-01-01

    CMAC (cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns) have been developed for the study of the human multidrug transporters MRP1, MRP2 and the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). The columns were constructed using the immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) stationary phase and cellular membrane fragments obtained from Spodopetra frugiperda (Sf9) cells that had been stably transfected with human Mrp1, Mrp2 or Bcrp c-DNA, using a baculovirus expression system. The resulting CMAC(Sf9MRP1)...

  8. Identification of Max binding protein as a novel binding protein of Nck1 and characterization of its role in inhibiting human liver cancer SK-HEP-1 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Qi; HUANG Tao; WANG Ya-feng; ZHANG Kun-sun; CHEN Dong; PENG Bao-gang

    2012-01-01

    Background The tendency of tumor cells to disperse throughout the liver is a distinct feature of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).Nck family adaptor proteins function to regulate actin cytoskeletal reorganization that leads to cell motility.We previously found that Max binding protein (MNT) was differentially expressed in HCC,and interacted with Nck1 by 2-DE.MNT is a protein member of the Myc/Max/Mad network which plays roles in cell proliferation,differentiation,and death.We investigated the effects of MNT on migration of human liver cancer SK-HEP-1 cells to study the migration regulatory role of MNT in HCC cells.Methods Interaction between MNT and Nck1 was further validated in hepatoma cells by GST-pull down assay and immunoprecipitation,siRNAs specific to MNT (MNT siRNA) were used to knockdown MNT expression.Western blotting,transwell assay were used to determine the migration potential of cells.Results Interaction between MNT and Nck1 was validated in hepatoma cells.MNT knockdown promoted the migration of human liver cancer SK-HEP-1 cells (P <0.01 ).Conclusion The results suggest that MNT,via interaction with Nck1,inhibits hepatoma cell migration.

  9. Diverse activation states of RhoA in human lung cancer cells: contribution of G protein coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touge, Hirokazu; Chikumi, Hiroki; Igishi, Tadashi; Kurai, Jun; Makino, Haruhiko; Tamura, Yoshisato; Takata, Miyako; Yoneda, Kazuhiko; Nakamoto, Masaki; Suyama, Hisashi; Gutkind, J Silvio; Shimizu, Eiji

    2007-03-01

    Rho GTPases play an essential role in the control of various cellular functions. Accumulating evidence suggests that RhoA overexpression contributes to human cancer development. However, the activation states of RhoA are poorly defined in cancer cells. In this study, we examined both the expression levels and the activation states of RhoA in various lung cancer cells by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and in vivo Rho guanine nucleotide exchange assay, respectively. Moreover, we dissected the signaling pathway from the cell surface receptors to RhoA using a broad-spectrum G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) antagonist, [D-Arg1,D-Trp5,7,9,Leu11]Substance P (SP), and a recently reported Galphaq/11-selective inhibitor, YM-254890. We found that RhoA was expressed highly in large cell carcinoma cells but only weakly in adenocarcinoma cells. The activation states of RhoA are considerably different from its expression profiles. We found that four of six small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) cell lines exhibited a moderate to high activation rate of RhoA. The addition of [D-Arg1,D-Trp5,7,9,Leu11]SP reduced RhoA activity by almost 60% in H69 SCLC cells. The addition of YM-254890 had no effect on RhoA activity in H69 cells. Our results suggest that RhoA is activated in various lung cancer cells independent of its expression levels, and the high activation state of RhoA in SCLC cells mainly depends on a neuroendocrine peptide autocrine system which signals through Galpha12 coupled GPCR to RhoA. This study provides new insights into RhoA signaling in lung cancer cells and may help in developing novel therapeutic strategies against lung cancer.

  10. Down-regulation in multiple human cancers of a novel gene, DMHC, from 17q25.1 that encodes an integral membrane protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, I; Harada, H; Nagai, H; Tsuneizumi, M; Nobe, Y; Koizumi, K; Sugano, S; Tanaka, S; Emi, M

    2001-04-01

    Frequent observations of allelic loss in chromosomal band 17q25.1 in a variety of human cancers have suggested that one or more tumor suppressor genes are present in that region. Moreover, a genetic locus for hereditary focal non-epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma, a condition associated with cancer of the esophagus (TOC; Tylosis with Oesophageal Cancer), lies in the same region. We screened cell lines derived from a variety of human cancers by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to detect alterations in expression of genes within the region in question, by examining expressed sequence tags located there. These experiments identified an 1834-bp full-length cDNA encoding a novel, 441-amino acid integral membrane protein with seven putative transmembrane domains. This gene showed loss or extreme decrease of expression in 6 of 10 uterine cancer-cell lines, 2 of 11 hepatic cell carcinoma-cell lines, 2 of 7 lung cancer-cell lines, 1 of 6 gastric cancer-cell lines, and 1 of 10 breast cancer-cell lines. (We named it DMHC ("down-regulated in multiple human cancers").) Our results suggest that loss of expression of DMHC at 17q25.1 may play an important role in development of variety of human cancers.

  11. The expression of translocator protein in human thyroid cancer and its role in the response of thyroid cancer cells to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klubo-Gwiezdzinska, Joanna; Jensen, Kirk; Bauer, Andrew; Patel, Aneeta; Costello, John; Burman, Kenneth D; Wartofsky, Leonard; Hardwick, Matthew J; Vasko, Vasyl V

    2012-08-01

    The translocator protein (TSPO), formerly known as a peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, exerts pro-apoptotic function via regulation of mitochondrial membrane potential. We examined TSPO expression in human thyroid tumors (25 follicular adenomas (FA), 15 follicular cancers (FC), and 70 papillary cancers (PC)). The role of TSPO in the regulation of cell growth, migration, and apoptosis was examined in thyroid cancer cell lines after TSPO knockdown with siRNA and after treatment with TSPO antagonist (PK11195). Compared with normal thyroid, the level of TSPO expression was increased in FA, FC, and PC in 24, 26.6, and 55.7% of cases respectively. Thyroid cancer cell lines demonstrated variable levels of TSPO expression, without specific association with thyroid oncogene mutations. Treatment with inhibitors of PI3K/AKT or MEK/ERK signaling was not associated with changes in TSPO expression. Treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitor (valproic acid) increased TSPO expression in TSPO-deficient cell lines (FTC236 cells). TSPO gene silencing or treatment with PK11195 did not affect thyroid cancer cell growth and migration but prevented depolarization of mitochondrial membranes induced by oxidative stress. Induction of TSPO expression by valproic acid was associated with increased sensitivity of FTC236 to oxidative stress-inducible apoptosis. Overall, we showed that TSPO expression is frequently increased in PC. In vitro data suggested the role of epigenetic mechanism(s) in the regulation of TSPO in thyroid cells. Implication of TSPO in the thyroid cancer cell response to oxidative stress suggested its potential role in the regulation of thyroid cancer cell response to treatment with radioiodine and warrants further investigation.

  12. Cancer immunoediting by GITR (glucocorticoid-induced TNF-related protein) ligand in humans: NK cell/tumor cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltz, Katrin M; Krusch, Matthias; Bringmann, Anita; Brossart, Peter; Mayer, Frank; Kloss, Mercedes; Baessler, Tina; Kumbier, Ingrid; Peterfi, Andrea; Kupka, Susan; Kroeber, Stefan; Menzel, Dagmar; Radsak, Markus P; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Salih, Helmut R

    2007-08-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced TNF-related protein (GITR) has been shown to stimulate T cell-mediated antitumor immunity in mice. However, the functional relevance of GITR and its ligand (GITRL) for non-T cells has yet to be fully explored. In addition, recent evidence suggests that GITR plays different roles in mice and humans. We studied the role of GITR-GITRL interaction in human tumor immunology and report for the first time that primary gastrointestinal cancers and tumor cell lines of different histological origin express substantial levels of GITRL. Signaling through GITRL down-regulated the expression of the immunostimulatory molecules CD40 and CD54 and the adhesion molecule EpCAM, and induced production of the immunosuppressive cytokine TGF-beta by tumor cells. On NK cells, GITR is constitutively expressed and up-regulated following activation. Blocking GITR-GITRL interaction in cocultures of tumor cells and NK cells substantially increased cytotoxicity and IFN-gamma production of NK cells demonstrating that constitutive expression of GITRL by tumor cells diminishes NK cell antitumor immunity. GITRL-Ig fusion protein or cell surface-expressed GITRL did not induce apoptosis in NK cells, but diminished nuclear localized c-Rel and RelB, indicating that GITR might negatively modulate NK cell NF-kappaB activity. Taken together, our data indicate that tumor-expressed GITRL mediates immunosubversion in humans.

  13. Yes-associated protein regulates the growth of human non-small cell lung cancer in response to matrix stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yonggang; Zhong, Weiliang; Ma, Ge; Zhang, Baoxiang; Tian, Hui

    2015-06-01

    The Yes‑associated protein (YAP) transcriptional coactivator is recognized as a crucial regulator of human cancer. However, its involvement in human non‑small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in response to physical cues remains unclear. In this study, substrates with different rigidity were generated in order to evaluate the role of YAP, and its upstream regulators in the Hippo pathway, in the regulation of growth of an NSCLC cell line within particular environments. It was shown that the expression of the YAP protein in SPCA-1 NSCLC cells was significantly increased when cultured on a stiff substrate compared to a soft substrate. However, the expression of phospho‑YAP protein and large tumor suppressor kinase 1 (LATS1) were markedly decreased after culturing on the stiff substrate. Phosphorylation of YAP by LATS1 leads to cytoplasmic retention of YAP, which inhibits its function as a nuclear transcription coactivator. The study also found that the stiff substrate promoted the growth of NSCLC cells in vitro, and an increase in the transcription levels of Survivin, connective tissue growth factor, amphiregulin and Ki67, as well as a decrease in the expression level of YAP in the cytoplasm, and adecrease in p-YAP. In conclusion, the findings showed that the stiffness of the subcellular matrix altered the behavior of NSCLC cells, and that YAP regulated the growth of NSCLC cells in response to matrix stiffness, thereby suggesting a role for the Hippo‑YAP pathway in the response of NSCLC cell growth to specific microenvironments.

  14. Tissue microarray analysis of eIF4E and its downstream effector proteins in human breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clifford John

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E is elevated in many cancers and is a prognostic indicator in breast cancer. Many pro-tumorigenic proteins are selectively translated via eIF4E, including c-Myc, cyclin D1, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and Tousled-like kinase 1B (TLK1B. However, western blot analysis of these factors in human breast cancer has been limited by the availability of fresh frozen tissue and the labor-intensive nature of the multiple assays required. Our goal was to validate whether formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues arranged in a tissue microarray (TMA format would be more efficient than the use of fresh-frozen tissue and western blot to test multiple downstream gene products. Results Breast tumor TMAs were stained immunohistochemically and quantitated using the ARIOL imaging system. In the TMAs, eIF4E levels correlated strongly with c-Myc, cyclin D1, TLK1B, VEGF, and ODC. Western blot comparisons of eIF4E vs. TLK1B were consistent with the immunohistochemical results. Consistent with our previous western blot results, eIF4E did not correlate with node status, ER, PR, or HER-2/neu. Conclusion We conclude that the TMA technique yields similar results as the western blot technique and can be more efficient and thorough in the evaluation of several products downstream of eIF4E.

  15. Quantum dots-based multiplexed immunohistochemistry of protein expression in human prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Shi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs are bright fluorescent nanoparticles that have been successfully used for the detection of biomarker expression in cells. The objective of the present study is to use this technology in a multiplexing manner to determine at a single cell level the expression of a cell-specific bio-marker, prostate-specific antigen (PSA expressed by human prostate cancer LNCaP and ARCaP cell lines. Here we compared the sensitivity of immunohistochemistry (IHC and QD-based detection of AR and PSA expression in these cell lines. Further, we conducted multiplexing QD-based detection of PSA and androgen receptor (AR expression in LNCaP cells subjecting to androgen (R1881 stimulation. The involvement of AR in PSA regulation in LNCaP cells, at a single cell level, was confirmed by the co-incubation of LNCaP cells in the presence of both R1881 and its receptor antagonist, bicalutamide (Casodex. We showed here the superior quality of QDs, in comparison to IHC, for the detection of AR and PSA in cultured LNCaP and ARCaP cells. Multiplexing QDs technique can be used to detect simultaneously AR and PSA expression induced by R1881 which promoted AR translocation from its cytosolic to the nuclear compartment.We observed AR antagonist, bicalutamide, inhibited AR nuclear translocation and PSA, but not AR expression in LNCaP cells.

  16. Magnolol Affects Cellular Proliferation, Polyamine Biosynthesis and Catabolism-Linked Protein Expression and Associated Cellular Signaling Pathways in Human Prostate Cancer Cells in vitro

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    Brendan T. McKeown

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed form of cancer in men in Canada and the United States. Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to the development and progression of many cancers, including prostate cancer. Context and purpose of this study: This study investigated the effects of magnolol, a compound found in the roots and bark of the magnolia tree Magnolia officinalis, on cellular proliferation and proliferation-linked activities of PC3 human prostate cancer cells in vitro. Results: PC3 cells exposed to magnolol at a concentration of 80 μM for 6 hours exhibited decreased protein expression of ornithine decarboxylase, a key regulator in polyamine biosynthesis, as well as affecting the expression of other proteins involved in polyamine biosynthesis and catabolism. Furthermore, protein expression of the R2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, a key regulatory protein associated with DNA synthesis, was significantly decreased. Finally, the MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase, PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, NFκB (nuclear factor of kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells and AP-1 (activator protein 1 cellular signaling pathways were assayed to determine which, if any, of these pathways magnolol exposure would alter. Protein expressions of p-JNK-1 and c-jun were significantly increased while p-p38, JNK-1/2, PI3Kp85, p-PI3Kp85, p-Akt, NFκBp65, p-IκBα and IκBα protein expressions were significantly decreased. Conclusions: These alterations further support the anti-proliferative effects of magnolol on PC3 human prostate cancer cells in vitro and suggest that magnolol may have potential as a novel anti-prostate cancer agent.

  17. JAB1 regulates unphosphorylated STAT3 DNA-binding activity through protein–protein interaction in human colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimoto, Arata, E-mail: anishimo@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp [Department of Surgery and Clinical Science, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Minami-Kogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Kugimiya, Naruji; Hosoyama, Toru; Enoki, Tadahiko [Department of Surgery and Clinical Science, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Minami-Kogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Li, Tao-Sheng [Department of Stem Cell Biology, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Hamano, Kimikazu [Department of Surgery and Clinical Science, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Minami-Kogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan)

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: •JAB1 interacted with unphosphorylated STAT3 in the nucleus. •JAB1 knockdown tended to increase nuclear STAT3 expression. •JAB1 knockdown significantly decreased unphosphorylated STAT3 DNA-binding activity. •JAB1 knockdown significantly decreased MDR1, NANOG, and VEGF expressions. •Nuclear JAB1, but not nuclear STAT3, correlated with STAT3 DNA-binding activity. -- Abstract: Recent studies have revealed that unphosphorylated STAT3 forms a dimer, translocates to the nucleus, binds to the STAT3 binding site, and activates the transcription of STAT3 target genes, thereby playing an important role in oncogenesis in addition to phosphorylated STAT3. Among signaling steps of unphosphorylated STAT3, nuclear translocation and target DNA-binding are the critical steps for its activation. Therefore, elucidating the regulatory mechanism of these signaling steps of unphosphorylated STAT3 is a potential step in the discovery of a novel cancer drug. However, the mechanism of unphosphorylated STAT3 binding to the promoter of target genes remains unclear. In this study, we focused on Jun activation domain-binding protein 1 (JAB1) as a candidate protein that regulates unphosphorylated STAT3 DNA-binding activity. Initially, we observed that both unphosphorylated STAT3 and JAB1 existed in the nucleus of human colon cancer cell line COLO205 at the basal state (no cytokine stimulation). On the other hand, phosphorylated STAT3 did not exist in the nucleus of COLO205 cells at the basal state. Immunoprecipitation using nuclear extract of COLO205 cells revealed that JAB1 interacted with unphosphorylated STAT3. To investigate the effect of JAB1 on unphosphorylated STAT3 activity, RNAi studies were performed. Although JAB1 knockdown tended to increase nuclear STAT3 expression, it significantly decreased unphosphorylated STAT3 DNA-binding activity. Subsequently, JAB1 knockdown significantly decreased the expression levels of MDR1, NANOG, and VEGF, which are STAT3 target

  18. Estrogens increase the expression of fibulin-1, an extracellular matrix protein secreted by human ovarian cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clinton, GM; Rougeot, C; Derancourt, J; Roger, P; Defrenne, A; Godyna, S; Argraves, WS; Rochefort, H

    1996-01-01

    Ovarian cancers have a high ability to invade the peritoneal cavity and some are stimulated by estrogens, In an attempt to understand the mode of action of estrogens on these cancer cells and to develop new markers, we have characterized estrogen-regulated proteins, This study,vas aimed at identifyi

  19. Magnolol causes alterations in the cell cycle in androgen insensitive human prostate cancer cells in vitro by affecting expression of key cell cycle regulatory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown, Brendan T; McDougall, Luke; Catalli, Adriana; Hurta, Robert A R

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer, one of the most common cancers in the Western world, affects many men worldwide. This study investigated the effects of magnolol, a compound found in the roots and bark of the magnolia tree Magnolia officinalis, on the behavior of 2 androgen insensitive human prostate cancer cell lines, DU145 and PC3, in vitro. Magnolol, in a 24-h exposure at 40 and 80 μM, was found to be cytotoxic to cells. Magnolol also affected cell cycle progression of DU145 and PC3 cells, resulting in alterations to the cell cycle and subsequently decreasing the proportion of cells entering the G2/M-phase of the cell cycle. Magnolol inhibited the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins including cyclins A, B1, D1, and E, as well as CDK2 and CDK4. Protein expression levels of pRBp107 decreased and pRBp130 protein expression levels increased in response to magnolol exposure, whereas p16(INK4a), p21, and p27 protein expression levels were apparently unchanged post 24-h exposure. Magnolol exposure at 6 h did increase p27 protein expression levels. This study has demonstrated that magnolol can alter the behavior of androgen insensitive human prostate cancer cells in vitro and suggests that magnolol may have potential as a novel anti-prostate cancer agent.

  20. Clinicopathological significance of Bcl-2 and Bax protein expression in human pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Dong; Jian-Ping Zhou; Hao Zhang; Ke-Jian Guo; Yu-Lin Tian; Yu-Ting Dong

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To assess the clinicopathological significance of the expression of the apoptosis-inhibitory Bcl-2 protein (pBcl-2) and the apoptosis-promoting Bax protein (pBax) in human invasive ductal carcinomas (IDCs) of the pancreas. METHODS: Fifty-nine surgical specimens of IDCs of the pancreas were stained immunohistochemically to detectpBcl-2 and pBax expressions whose correlation to tumor classification, staging, and prognosis was analyzed by univariate and multivariate analyses. RESULTS: The expression of pBcl-2 and pBax was detected in 21 of 59 (35.6%) and in 29 of 59 (49.2%) patients with IDCs of the pancreas, respectively. Neither pBcl-2 nor pBax alone was correlated to TNM staging and differentiation degree of IDCs of the pancreas according to univariate analysis. By Mantel-Cox test, the median survival time after surgery for pBcl-2(+) and pBcl-2(-) groups were 14.3 and 7.3 mo, respectively (χ2= 9.357, P = 0.002) and that for pBax(+) and pBax(-) groups were 12.9 and 10.2 mo, respectively (χ2= 0.285, P>0.05).Contingency coefficient between pBd-2 and pBax expression was 0.298, indicating that there was correlation between them (χ2= 5.74, P<0.05). The median survival time after surgery for pBd-2(+)pBax(+) and pBcl-2(+)pBax(-) groups were 14.3 and 14.1 mo, respectively, and that for pBcl-2 (-)pBax(+) and pBcl-2(-)pBax(-) groups were 5.9 and 9.9 mo, respectively. There was a significant difference between pBcl-2(+)pBax(+) and pBcl-2(-)pBax(+) (χ2 = 5.06,P<0.05), such was the case for pBcl-2(+)pBax(+) andpBcl-2(-)pBax(-) (χ2= 7.18, P<0.01). Cox proportional hazards model for multivariate analysis was applied, indicating that pBcl-2, TNM staging, age and pBax were high risk factors of post-surgical survival time. CONCLUSION: Both pBcl-2 and pBax have high expression in IDCs of the pancreas, indicating that co-expression of pBcl-2 and pBax is a good indicator of favorable prognosis in IDCs of the pancreas.

  1. Protein folding, protein homeostasis, and cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John H. Van Drie

    2011-01-01

    Proteins fold into their functional 3-dimensional structures from a linear amino acid sequence. In vitro this process is spontaneous; while in vivo it is orchestrated by a specialized set of proteins, called chaperones. Protein folding is an ongoing cellular process, as cellular proteins constantly undergo synthesis and degradation. Here emerging links between this process and cancer are reviewed. This perspective both yields insights into the current struggle to develop novel cancer chemotherapeutics and has implications for future chemotherapy discovery.

  2. Limited Value of KAI1/CD82 Protein Expression as a Prognostic Marker in Human Gastric Cancer

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    Maximilian Knoener

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The cell surface glycoprotein KAI1/CD82 suppresses tumor growth and metastasis in animal models. This study aimed to evaluate the prognostic relevance of KAI1/CD82 protein expression in human gastric cancer. Primary gastric carcinomas (n = 271 with amean clinical follow-up time of 48months were immunostained using the monoclonal anti-KAI1/CD82 antibody G2. Staining was evaluated as negative versus positive for statistical analysis. KAI1/CD82 immunoreactivity was absent in 103/271 (38% cases. There was a trend towards KAI1/CD82 negativity in poorly differentiated cases (p = 0.0679. Moreover, KAI1/CD82-negative carcinomas were associated with a higher pT status (p = 0.0222, metastatic lymph node involvement (p = 0.0018 and a higher clinical tumor stage (p = 0.0050. The median overall survival times of KAI1/CD82-negative and KAI1/CD82-positive gastric carcinomas were 20 and 37 months, respectively (p = 0.2305. These results are in line with the proposed function of KAI1/CD82 as a suppressor of tumor growth and metastasis. However, these data suggest that KAI1/CD82, as detected by immunohistochemistry, is of limited value as a prognostic marker for gastric cancer in routine histological workup.

  3. Effects of exogenous human leptin on heat shock protein 70 expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells and breast carcinoma of nude mice xenograft model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Rong-quan; GU Jun-chao; YU Wei; WANG Yu; ZHANG Zhong-tao; MA Xue-mei

    2012-01-01

    Background It is important to identify the multiple sites of leptin activity in obese women with breast cancer.In this study,we examined the effect of exogenous human leptin on heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) expression in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and in a breast carcinoma xenograft model of nude mice.Methods We cultured MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and established nude mice bearing xenograffs of these cells,and randomly divided them into experimental and control groups.The experimental group was treated with human leptin,while the control group was treated with the same volume of normal saline.A real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was developed to quantify the mRNA expression of HSP70 in the MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and in tumor tissues.Western blotting analysis was applied to quantify the protein expression of HSP70 in the MCF-7 cells.Immunohistochemical staining was done to assess the positive rate of HSP70 expression in the tumor tissues.Results Leptin activated HSP70 in a dose-dependent manner in vitro:leptin upregulated significantly the expression of HSP70 at mRNA and protein levels in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells (P <0.001).There was no significant difference in expression of HSP70 mRNA in the implanted tumors between the leptin-treated group and the control group (P>0.05).Immunohistochemical staining revealed no significant difference in tumor HSP70 expression between the leptin-treated group and the control group (P>0.05).Conclusions A nude mouse xenograft model can be safely and efficiently treated with human leptin by subcutaneous injections around the tumor.HSP70 may be target of leptin in breast cancer.Leptin can significantly upregulate the expression of HSP70 in a dose-dependent manner in vitro.

  4. Increased expression of osteonectin and osteopontin, two bone matrix proteins, in human breast cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Bellahcène, A.; Castronovo, V

    1995-01-01

    Microcalcifications are a common phenomenon associated with breast cancer and are often the only mammographic sign of a malignant breast disease. Although microcalcifications are not restricted to breast cancer and can be also associated with benign lesions, it is noteworthy that they are composed exclusively of hydroxyapatite in breast carcinoma. Hydroxyapatite is the bone-associated phosphocalcic crystal the deposition of which in bone tissue requires the coordinated expression of several m...

  5. Binding and inhibition of drug transport proteins by heparin: a potential drug transporter modulator capable of reducing multidrug resistance in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunliang; Scully, Michael; Petralia, Gloria; Kakkar, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    A major problem in cancer treatment is the development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, multidrug resistance (MDR), associated with increased activity of transmembrane drug transporter proteins which impair cytotoxic treatment by rapidly removing the drugs from the targeted cells. Previously, it has been shown that heparin treatment of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy increases survival. In order to determine whether heparin is capable reducing MDR and increasing the potency of chemotherapeutic drugs, the cytoxicity of a number of agents toward four cancer cell lines (a human enriched breast cancer stem cell line, two human breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and a human lung cancer cell line A549) was tested in the presence or absence of heparin. Results demonstrated that heparin increased the cytotoxicity of a range of chemotherapeutic agents. This effect was associated with the ability of heparin to bind to several of the drug transport proteins of the ABC and non ABC transporter systems. Among the ABC system, heparin treatment caused significant inhibition of the ATPase activity of ABCG2 and ABCC1, and of the efflux function observed as enhanced intracellular accumulation of specific substrates. Doxorubicin cytoxicity, which was enhanced by heparin treatment of MCF-7 cells, was found to be under the control of one of the major non-ABC transporter proteins, lung resistance protein (LRP). LRP was also shown to be a heparin-binding protein. These findings indicate that heparin has a potential role in the clinic as a drug transporter modulator to reduce multidrug resistance in cancer patients.

  6. Recombinant lentivirus with enhanced expression of caudal-related homeobox protein 2 inhibits human colorectal cancer cell proliferation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Sai; Sun, Xue-Jun; Zheng, Jian-Bao; Qi, Jie; Chen, Nan-Zheng; Wang, Wei; Wei, Guang-Bing; Liu, Dong; Yu, Jun-Hui; Lu, Shao-Ying; Wang, Hui

    2015-08-01

    Caudal-related homeobox protein 2 (CDX2), a tumor suppressor in the adult colon, is overexpressed under a non-cancer specific cytomegalovirus promoter in certain tumor cells; furthermore, non-specific expression of CDX2 may result in aberrant side effects in normal cells. The human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter is active in the majority of cancer cells but not in normal cells. Hypoxia is a key feature of solid tumors, and targeted genes may be significantly upregulated by five copies of hypoxia-response elements (HREs) under hypoxic conditions. However, the effect of CDX2 overexpression, as controlled by five copies of HREs and the hTERT promoter, on human colorectal cancer (CRC) cell proliferation in vitro remains to be fully elucidated. In the current study, a recombinant lentivirus containing the CDX2 gene under the control of five HREs and the hTERT promoter was generated. An immunofluorescence assay was used to detect CDX2 expression by the 5 HhC lentivirus, whereas an MTT assay was used to detect the effects of CoCl2 on the viability of LoVo cells. Western blot analysis was conducted in order to determine the relative ratios of recombinant CDX2 protein to the internal control β-actin, following 5 HhC/LoVo cell culture under normoxic and hypoxic conditions (100, 200, 300, 400 or 500 µmol/l CoCl2) for 24 h, then for 12, 24 or 36 h with the optimal concentration (300 µmol/l) of CoCl2. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to determine the transcription of recombinant CDX2 mRNA following culture of 5 HhC/LoVo cells under normoxic or hypoxic conditions. Finally, a cloning assay was used to detect the proliferative ability of 5 HhC/LoVo and 5 Hh cells. High CDX2 expression was observed in hTERT-positive LoVo cells under hypoxic conditions, an effect which was mimicked by treatment with CoCl2 to inhibit LoVo cell proliferation in vitro. High expression of CDX2 therefore provides a promising strategy for the

  7. HCSD: the human cancer secretome database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feizi, Amir; Banaei-Esfahani, Amir; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The human cancer secretome database (HCSD) is a comprehensive database for human cancer secretome data. The cancer secretome describes proteins secreted by cancer cells and structuring information about the cancer secretome will enable further analysis of how this is related with tumor biology. The secreted proteins from cancer cells are believed to play a deterministic role in cancer progression and therefore may be the key to find novel therapeutic targets and biomarkers for many cancers. Consequently, huge data on cancer secretome have been generated in recent years and the lack of a coherent database is limiting the ability to query the increasing community knowledge. We therefore developed the Human Cancer Secretome Database (HCSD) to fulfil this gap. HCSD contains >80 000 measurements for about 7000 nonredundant human proteins collected from up to 35 high-throughput studies on 17 cancer types. It has a simple and user friendly query system for basic and advanced search based on gene name, cancer type and data type as the three main query options. The results are visualized in an explicit and interactive manner. An example of a result page includes annotations, cross references, cancer secretome data and secretory features for each identified protein. Database URL: www.cancersecretome.org. PMID:26078477

  8. Inhibition of breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2 in human myeloid dendritic cells induces potent tolerogenic functions during LPS stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-O Jin

    Full Text Available Breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2, a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporters has been identified as a major determinant of multidrug resistance (MDR in cancer cells, but ABC transporter inhibition has limited therapeutic value in vivo. In this research, we demonstrated that inhibition of efflux transporters ABCG2 induced the generation of tolerogenic DCs from human peripheral blood myeloid DCs (mDCs. ABCG2 expression was present in mDCs and was further increased by LPS stimulation. Treatment of CD1c+ mDCs with an ABCG2 inhibitor, Ko143, during LPS stimulation caused increased production of IL-10 and decreased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and decreased expression of CD83 and CD86. Moreover, inhibition of ABCG2 in monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs abrogated the up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in these cells in response to LPS. Furthermore, CD1c+ mDCs stimulated with LPS plus Ko143 inhibited the proliferation of allogeneic and superantigen-specific syngenic CD4+ T cells and promoted expansion of CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T (Treg cells in an IL-10-dependent fashion. These tolerogenic effects of ABCG2 inhibition could be abolished by ERK inhibition. Thus, we demonstrated that inhibition of ABCG2 in LPS-stimulated mDCs can potently induce tolerogenic potentials in these cells, providing crucial new information that could lead to development of better strategies to combat MDR cancer.

  9. Protein Ubiquitylation in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Bonacci

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is one of the worst, as almost 100% of patients will die within 5 years after diagnosis. The tumors are characterized by an early, invasive, and metastatic phenotype, and extreme resistance to all known anticancer therapies. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop new investigative strategies in order to identify new molecular targets and, possibly, new drugs to fight this disease efficiently. Whereas it has been known for more than 3 decades now, ubiquitylation is a post-translational modification of protein that only recently emerged as a major regulator of many biological functions, dependent and independent on the proteasome, whose failure is involved in many human diseases, including cancer. Indeed, despite its role in promoting protein degradation through the proteasome, ubiquitylation is now known to regulate diverse cellular processes, such as membrane protein endocytosis and intracellular trafficking, assembly of protein complexes, gene transcription, and activation or inactivation of enzymes. Taking into account that ubiquitylation machinery is a three-step process involving hundreds of proteins, which is countered by numerous ubiquitin hydrolases, and that the function of ubiquitylation relies on the recognition of the ubiquitin signals by hundreds of proteins containing a ubiquitin binding domain (including the proteasome, the number of possible therapeutic targets is exceptionally vast and will need to be explored carefully for each disease. In the case of pancreatic cancer, the study and the identification of specific alteration(s in protein ubiquitylation may help to explain its severity and may furnish more specific targets for more efficient therapies.

  10. The effect of curcumol on protein expression of JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway in human ovarian cancer line SKOV3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-juan HAN

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effects of curcumol on the protein expression of JAK2 and STAT3 in SKOV3 and to investigate its treatment on molecular mechanism of ovarian cancer. Methods: Choose curcumol of different concentrations to act on human ovarian cancer cell line SKOV3, and extract the corresponding cell protein, and detect the protein expression of JAK2 and STAT3 by western blotting. Results: The protein expression of JAK2 and STAT3 in SKOV3 are significantly inhabited by curcumol, and its strength will enhance with the increase in drug concentration, and it shows in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusion: Curcumol can significantly inhabit the proliferation of SKOV3 cells, and induce apoptosis, and achieve its mechanism by regulating the protein expression of JAK2 and STAT3.

  11. HspB1, HspB5 and HspB4 in Human Cancers: Potent Oncogenic Role of Some of Their Client Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André-Patrick Arrigo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Human small heat shock proteins are molecular chaperones that regulate fundamental cellular processes in normal unstressed cells as well as in many cancer cells where they are over-expressed. These proteins are characterized by cell physiology dependent changes in their oligomerization and phosphorylation status. These structural changes allow them to interact with many different client proteins that subsequently display modified activity and/or half-life. Nowdays, the protein interactomes of small Hsps are under intense investigations and will represent, when completed, key parameters to elaborate therapeutic strategies aimed at modulating the functions of these chaperones. Here, we have analyzed the potential pro-cancerous roles of several client proteins that have been described so far to interact with HspB1 (Hsp27 and its close members HspB5 (αB-crystallin and HspB4 (αA-crystallin.

  12. Naïve Bayes QSDR classification based on spiral-graph Shannon entropies for protein biomarkers in human colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar-Pulido, Vanessa; Munteanu, Cristian R; Seoane, José A; Fernández-Blanco, Enrique; Pérez-Montoto, Lázaro G; González-Díaz, Humberto; Dorado, Julián

    2012-06-01

    Fast cancer diagnosis represents a real necessity in applied medicine due to the importance of this disease. Thus, theoretical models can help as prediction tools. Graph theory representation is one option because it permits us to numerically describe any real system such as the protein macromolecules by transforming real properties into molecular graph topological indices. This study proposes a new classification model for proteins linked with human colon cancer by using spiral graph topological indices of protein amino acid sequences. The best quantitative structure-disease relationship model is based on eleven Shannon entropy indices. It was obtained with the Naïve Bayes method and shows excellent predictive ability (90.92%) for new proteins linked with this type of cancer. The statistical analysis confirms that this model allows diagnosing the absence of human colon cancer obtaining an area under receiver operating characteristic of 0.91. The methodology presented can be used for any type of sequential information such as any protein and nucleic acid sequence.

  13. Human enhancer of filamentation 1-induced colorectal cancer cell migration: Role of serine phosphorylation and interaction with the breast cancer anti-estrogen resistance 3 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Rama; Lemoine, Antoinette; Bertoglio, Jacques; Raingeaud, Joël

    2015-07-01

    Human enhancer of filamentation 1 (HEF1) is a member of the p130Cas family of docking proteins involved in integrin-mediated cytoskeleton reorganization associated with cell migration. Elevated expression of HEF1 promotes invasion and metastasis in multiple cancer cell types. To date, little is known on its role in CRC tumor progression. HEF1 is phosphorylated on several Ser/Thr residues but the effects of these post-translational modifications on the functions of HEF1 are poorly understood. In this manuscript, we investigated the role of HEF1 in migration of colorectal adeno-carcinoma cells. First, we showed that overexpression of HEF1 in colo-carcinoma cell line HCT116 increases cell migration. Moreover, in these cells, HEF1 increases Src-mediated phosphorylation of FAK on Tyr-861 and 925. We then showed that HEF1 mutation on Ser-369 enhances HEF1-induced migration and FAK phosphorylation as a result of protein stabilization. We also, for the first time characterized a functional mutation of HEF1 on Arg-367 which mimics the effect of Ser-369 to Ala mutation. Finally through mass spectrometry experiments, we identified BCAR3 as an essential interactor and mediator of HEF1-induced migration. We demonstrated that single amino acid mutations that prevent formation of the HEF1-BCAR3 complex impair HEF1-mediated migration. Therefore, amino-acid substitutions that impede Ser-369 phosphorylation stabilize HEF1 which increases the migration of CRC cells and this latter effect requires the interaction of HEF1 with the NSP family adaptor protein BCAR3. Collectively, these data reveal the importance of HEF1 expression level in cancer cell motility and then support the utilization of HEF1 as a biomarker of tumor progression.

  14. Engineering a Cytolytic Human Protein into a Novel Prostate Cancer Protoxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Models of (a) wild type C5; (b) Mut -5 protein described by Ogata et al; (c) PAC5-1 mutant with HSSKLQ at the cleavage site; (d) PAC5-2 mutant with...would serve two purposes: first, it would be necessary to know the sites of proteolysis so we could mutate them and make them non-substrates of PSA

  15. Role of Crk Adaptor Proteins in Cellular Migration and Invasion in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    adapter protein. Mol Cell Biol. 19(12):8169-79. 22. Cabodi S, Tinnirello A, Di Stefano P, Bisaro B, Ambrosino E, Castellano I, Sapino A, Arisio R...Vande Woude GF. Met, metastasis, motility and more. Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 2003;4:915 –25. 3. Rosario M, Birchmeier W. How to make tubes: signaling by

  16. Downregulation of tight junction-associated MARVEL protein marvelD3 during epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Takashi; Takasawa, Akira; Kyuno, Daisuke; Ito, Tatsuya; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Hirata, Koichi; Tsujiwaki, Mitsuhiro; Murata, Masaki; Tanaka, Satoshi; Sawada, Norimasa

    2011-10-01

    The novel tight junction protein marvelD3 contains a conserved MARVEL (MAL and related proteins for vesicle trafficking and membrane link) domain like occludin and tricellulin. However, little is yet known about the detailed role and regulation of marvelD3 in normal epithelial cells and cancer cells, including pancreatic cancer. In the present study, we investigated marvelD3 expression in well and poorly differentiated human pancreatic cancer cell lines and normal pancreatic duct epithelial cells in which the hTERT gene was introduced into human pancreatic duct epithelial cells in primary culture, and the changes of marvelD3 during Snail-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) under hypoxia, TGF-β treatment and knockdown of FOXA2 in well differentiated pancreatic cancer HPAC cells. MarvelD3 was transcriptionally downregulated in poorly differentiated pancreatic cancer cells and during Snail-induced EMT of pancreatic cancer cells in which Snail was highly expressed and the fence function downregulated, whereas it was maintained in well differentiated human pancreatic cancer cells and normal pancreatic duct epithelial cells. Depletion of marvelD3 by siRNAs in HPAC cells resulted in downregulation of barrier functions indicated as a decrease in transepithelial electric resistance and an increase of permeability to fluorescent dextran tracers, whereas it did not affect fence function of tight junctions. In conclusion, marvelD3 is transcriptionally downregulated in Snail-induced EMT during the progression for the pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Expression of polarity genes in human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wan-Hsin; Asmann, Yan W; Anastasiadis, Panos Z

    2015-01-01

    Polarity protein complexes are crucial for epithelial apical-basal polarity and directed cell migration. Since alterations of these processes are common in cancer, polarity proteins have been proposed to function as tumor suppressors or oncogenic promoters. Here, we review the current understanding of polarity protein functions in epithelial homeostasis, as well as tumor formation and progression. As most previous studies focused on the function of single polarity proteins in simplified model systems, we used a genomics approach to systematically examine and identify the expression profiles of polarity genes in human cancer. The expression profiles of polarity genes were distinct in different human tissues and classified cancer types. Additionally, polarity expression profiles correlated with disease progression and aggressiveness, as well as with identified cancer types, where specific polarity genes were commonly altered. In the case of Scribble, gene expression analysis indicated its common amplification and upregulation in human cancer, suggesting a tumor promoting function.

  18. Prognostic implications of carboxyl-terminus of Hsc70 interacting protein and lysyl-oxidase expression in human breast cancer

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    Patani Neill

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ubiquitin modification of proteins influences cellular processes relevant to carcinogenesis. CHIP (carboxyl-terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein is a chaperone-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase, regulating the stability of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90 interacting proteins. CHIP is implicated in the modulation of estrogen receptor (ESR1 and Her-2/neu (ERBB2 stability. LOX (lysyl-oxidase serves intracellular roles and catalyses the cross-linking of extracellular matrix (ECM collagens and elastin. LOX expression is altered in human malignancies and their peri-tumoral stroma. However, paradoxical roles are reported. In this study, the level of mRNA expression of CHIP and LOX were assessed in normal and malignant breast tissue and correlated with clinico-pathological parameters. Materials and Methods: Breast cancer (BC tissues (n = 127 and normal tissues (n = 33 underwent RNA extraction and reverse transcription; transcript levels were determined using real-time quantitative PCR and normalized against CK-19. Transcript levels were analyzed against TNM stage, nodal involvement, tumor grade and clinical outcome over a ten-year follow-up period. Results: CHIP expression decreased with increasing Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI: NPI-1 vs. NPI-3 (12.2 vs. 0.2, P = 0.0264, NPI-2 vs. NPI-3 (3 vs. 0.2, P = 0.0275. CHIP expression decreased with increasing TNM stage: TNM-1 vs. TNM-2 (12 vs. 0, P = 0.0639, TNM-1 vs. TNM-2-4 (12 vs. 0, P = 0.0434. Lower transcript levels were associated with increasing tumor grade: grade 1 vs. grade 3 (17.7 vs. 0.3, P = 0.0266, grade 2 vs. grade 3 (5 vs. 0.3, P = 0.0454. The overall survival (OS for tumors classified as ′low-level expression′, was poorer than those with ′high-level expression′ (118.1 vs. 152.3 months, P = 0.039. LOX expression decreased with increasing NPI: NPI-1 vs. NPI-2 (3 vs. 0, P = 0.0301 and TNM stage: TNM-1 = 3854639, TNM-2 = 908900, TNM-3 = 329, TNM-4 = 1.232 (P = NS. Conclusion: CHIP

  19. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies recognizing 130 kDa surface proteins on human embryonic stem cells and cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jum-Ji; Choi, Hong Seo; Lee, Mi-Young; Ryu, Chun Jeih

    2013-04-01

    To study cell surface proteins expressed on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), we generated a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against undifferentiated hESCs by a decoy immunization strategy in a previous study. Two of the MAbs, 63-B6 and 246-D7, bound to human pluripotent stem cells but not to human primary cells such as human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and human lung fibroblasts. They did not bind to either mouse embryonic stem cells or mouse embryonic fibroblasts. The two MAbs had similar binding profiles for many various cancer cells, with few exceptions. Expression of antigens recognized by the two MAbs was rapidly decreased during embryoid body formation of hESCs and gradually increased after initial decrease. The MAbs recognized approximately 130 kDa proteins on the surface of hESCs. Cloning and sequence analysis of antibody genes showed that although the MAbs had exactly the same light chain sequences, they had different heavy chain sequences. Taken together, the results suggest that the two MAbs may recognize two different epitopes of the same or different 130 kDa surface proteins involved in regulating the early differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells and cancer cells.

  20. A preliminary study on ras protein expression in human esophageal cancer and precancerous lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Li; Chang Wei Feng; Zhi Guo Zhao; Qi Zhou; Li Dong Wang

    2000-01-01

    @@INTRODUCTION The esophageal carcinoma is a common malignant tumor in Linzhou City (Linxian) of Henan Province in northern China. Although the etiology and natural history of esophageal carcinoma are not clear, a substantial amount of evidence has been provided to suggest that the development of human esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) is a multistage progressive process[1-4] An early indicator of abnormality in persons predisposed to esophageal SCC is an increased proliferation of esophageal epithelial cells,morphologically manifested as basal cell hyperplasia (BCH), and dysplasia (DYS), and carcinoma in situ, which could be considered precancerous lesions of esophageal SCC[1-4].

  1. Role of Crk Adaptor Proteins in Cellular Migration and Invasion in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    0.0001349 1.280209 0.00657 cholesterol 25- hydroxylase ZNF539 2.225650467 0.0042638 1.295457 0.03133 zinc finger protein 254 PRSS7 2.233104326 0.0239284...4.98281  6.27E‐07  Toll‐like receptor signaling pathway  ‐3.51463  0.00044  Caprolactam degradation  ‐0.99768  0.318433  Phenylalanine , tyrosine and...Escherichia coli infection – EHEC  ‐1.38214  0.166928  Phenylalanine  metabolism  ‐2.08135  0.037401  Pathogenic Escherichia coli infection – EPEC  ‐0.48134

  2. Dauricine inhibits insulin-like growth factor-Ⅰ-induced hypoxia inducible factor 1α protein accumulation and vascular endothelial growth factor expression in human breast cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu-dong TANG; Xin ZHOU; Ke-yuan ZHOU

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of dauricine (Dau) on insulin-like growth factor-Ⅰ (IGF-Ⅰ)-induced hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7).Methods: Serum-starved MCF-7 cells were pretreated for 1 h with different concentrations of Dau, followed by incubation with IGF-Ⅰ for 6 h. HIF-1α and VEGF protein expression levels were analyzed by Western blotting and ELISA, respectively.HIF-1α and VEGF mRNA levels were determined by real-time PCR. In vitro angiogenesis was observed via the human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) tube formation assay. An in vitro invasion assay on HUVECs was performed.Results: Dau significantly inhibited IGF-Ⅰ-induced HIF-1α protein expression but had no effect on HIF-1α mRNA expression. However, Dau remarkably suppressed VEGF expression at both protein and mRNA levels in response to IGF-Ⅰ.Mechanistically, Dau suppressed IGF-Ⅰ-induced HIF-1α and VEGF protein expression mainly by blocking the activation of PI-3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. In addition, Dan reduced IGF-Ⅰ-induced HIF-1α protein accumulation by inhibiting its synthesis as well as by promoting its degradation. Functionally, Dau inhibited angiogenesis in vitro. Moreover, Dau had a direct effect on IGF-Ⅰ-induced invasion of HUVECs.Conclusion: Dau inhibits human breast cancer angiogenesis by suppressing HIF-1α protein accumulation and VEGF expression, which may provide a novel potential mechanism for the anticancer activities of Dau in human breast cancer.

  3. Recombinant human milk proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2006-01-01

    Human milk provides proteins that benefit newborn infants. They not only provide amino acids, but also facilitate the absorption of nutrients, stimulate growth and development of the intestine, modulate immune function, and aid in the digestion of other nutrients. Breastfed infants have a lower prevalence of infections than formula-fed infants. Since many women in industrialized countries choose not to breastfeed, and an increasing proportion of women in developing countries are advised not to breastfeed because of the risk of HIV transmission, incorporation of recombinant human milk proteins into infant foods is likely to be beneficial. We are expressing human milk proteins known to have anti-infective activity in rice. Since rice is a normal constituent of the diet of infants and children, limited purification of the proteins is required. Lactoferrin has antimicrobial and iron-binding activities. Lysozyme is an enzyme that is bactericidal and also acts synergistically with lactoferrin. These recombinant proteins have biological activities identical to their native counterparts. They are equally resistant to heat processing, which is necessary for food applications, and to acid and proteolytic enzymes which are needed to maintain their biological activity in the gastrointestinal tract of infants. These recombinant human milk proteins may be incorporated into infant formulas, baby foods and complementary foods, and used with the goal to reduce infectious diseases.

  4. Effects of silencing the ATP-binding cassette protein E1 gene by electroporation on the proliferation and migration of EC109 human esophageal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Rui; Yang, Liu-Zhong; Huo, Xiao-Qing; Wang, Ying; Yang, Qing-Hui; Zhang, Qing-Qin

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, the gene expression of ATP-binding cassette protein E1 (ABCE1) in the EC109 human esophageal cancer cell line was silenced using electroporation to examine the effect if the ABCE1 gene on the growth migration and cell cycle of cancer cells. The small interference (si)RNA sequence of ABCE1 was designed and synthesized to transfect the EC109 cells by electroporation. The mRNA and protein expression levels of ABCE1 were then detected by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blot analysis. The analysis of the cell cycle and apoptosis was performed using flow cytometry. The effect of silencing the ABCE1 gene on the proliferation, migration and invasive ability of the EC109 human esophageal cancer cells were assessed using a Cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) and with proliferation, wound-healing and cell invasion assays. The mRNA and protein expression levels of ABCE1 were significantly lower in the experimental group compared with the control group (Pmigration capacity of the cells in the experimental group was significantly decreased (Pmigration in esophageal cancer and silencing the ABCE1 gene by electroporation can significantly reduce the proliferation, invasion and migration capacity of EC109 cells in vitro.

  5. A comparative study of protein patterns of human estrogen receptor positive (MCF-7) and negative (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flodrova, Dana; Toporova, Lucia; Macejova, Dana; Lastovickova, Marketa; Brtko, Julius; Bobalova, Janette

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, we analyzed the cell lysates of human tumour cell lines representing two major clinically different types of breast cancer. Our main goal was to show the differences between them on proteomic level. Gel electrophoresis followed by MALDI-TOF MS analysis was used for proteins determination. Exactly 98 proteins were unequivocally identified and 60 of them were expressed differentially between MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cell lines. Among the proteins reported here, some well-known breast cancer markers (e.g., annexin A1, annexin A2 and vimentin) were identified in the MDA-MB-231 cell line and thus we were able to distinguish both cell lines sufficiently.

  6. Expression of cell cycle regulator p57kip2, cyclinE protein and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in human pancreatic cancer: An immunohistochemical study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Yue; Hui-Yong Jiang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of p57kip2, cyclinE protein and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) on occurrence and progression of human pancreatic cancer.METHODS: The expression of p57kip2, cyclinE protein and PCNA in tumor tissues and adjacent tissues from 32patients with pancreatic cancer was detected by SP immunohistochemical technique.RESULTS: The positive expression rate of p57kip2 protein in tumor tissues was 46.9%, which was lower than that in adjacent pancreatic tissues (x2 = 5.317, P<0.05). P57kip2protein positive expression remarkably correlated with tumor cell differentiation (P<0.05), but not with lymph node metastasis (P>0.05). The positive expression rate of cyclinE protein in tumor tissues was 68.8%, which was higher than that in adjacent pancreatic tissues (x2 = 4.063,P<0.05). CyclinE protein positive expression significantly correlated with tumor cell differentiation and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05). The positive expression rate of PCNA in the tumor tissues was 71.9%, which was higher than that in adjacent pancreatic tissues (x2 = 5.189, P<0.05).PCNA positive expression remarkably correlated with tumor cell differentiation and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: The decreased expression of p57kip2 and/or overexpression of cyclinE protein and PCNA may contribute to the occurrence and progression of pancreatic cancer.p57kip2, cyclinE protein, and PCNA play an important role in occurrence and progression of pancreatic cancer.

  7. In Vivo Selection Against Human Colorectal Cancer Xenografts Identifies an Aptamer That Targets RNA Helicase Protein DHX9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Mi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to selectively target disease-related tissues with molecules is critical to the design of effective therapeutic and diagnostic reagents. Recognizing the differences between the in vivo environment and in vitro conditions, we employed an in vivo selection strategy to identify RNA aptamers (targeting motifs that could localize to tumor in situ. One of the selected molecules is an aptamer that binds to the protein DHX9, an RNA helicase that is known to be upregulated in colorectal cancer. Upon systemic administration, the aptamer preferentially localized to the nucleus of cancer cells in vivo and thus has the potential to be used for targeted delivery.

  8. Antagonists of IAP proteins as cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynek, Jasmin N; Vucic, Domagoj

    2013-05-28

    Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins play pivotal roles in cellular survival by blocking apoptosis, modulating signal transduction, and affecting cellular proliferation. Through their interactions with inducers and effectors of apoptosis IAP proteins can effectively suppress apoptosis triggered by diverse stimuli including death receptor signaling, irradiation, chemotherapeutic agents, or growth factor withdrawal. Evasion of apoptosis, in part due to the action of IAP proteins, enhances resistance of cancer cells to treatment with chemotherapeutic agents and contributes to tumor progression. Additionally, IAP genes are known to be subject to amplification, mutation, and chromosomal translocation in human malignancies and autoimmune diseases. In this review we will discuss the role of IAP proteins in cancer and the development of antagonists targeting IAP proteins for cancer treatment.

  9. Accelerated Degradation of Caspase-8 Protein Correlates with TRAIL Resistance in a DLD1 Human Colon Cancer Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidong Zhang

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The tumor-selective cytotoxic effect of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL makes TRAIL an attractive candidate as an anticancer agent. However, resistance to TRAIL poses a challenge in anticancer therapy with TRAIL. Therefore, characterizing the mechanisms of resistance and developing strategies to overcome the resistance are important steps toward successful TRAIL-mediated cancer therapy. In this study, we investigated mechanisms of acquired TRAIL resistance in a colon cancer DLD1 cell line. Compared with the TRAIL-susceptible DLD1 cell line, TRAIL-resistant DLD1/TRAIL-R cells have a low level of caspase-8 protein, but not its mRNA. Suppression of caspase-8 expression by siRNA in parental DLD1 cells led to TRAIL resistance. Restoration of caspase-8 protein expression by stable transfection rendered the DLD1/TRAIL-R cell line fully sensitive to TRAIL protein, suggesting that the low level of caspase-8 protein expression might be the culprit in TRAIL resistance in DLDl/TRAIL-R cells. Sequencing analysis of the caspase-8 coding region revealed a missense mutation that is present in both TRAILsensitive and TRAIL-resistant DLD1 cells. Subsequent study showed that the degradation of caspase-8 protein was accelerated in DLDl/TRAIL-R cells compared to parental DLD1 cells. Thus, accelerated degradation of caspase-8 protein is one of the mechanisms that lead to TRAIL resistance.

  10. Low-level lasers on microRNA and uncoupling protein 2 mRNA levels in human breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuto, K. S.; Teixeira, A. F.; Rodrigues, J. A.; Paoli, F.; Nogueira, E. M.; Mencalha, A. L.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2017-06-01

    MicroRNA is short non-coding RNA and is a mediator of post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. In addition, uncoupling proteins (UCPs) regulate thermogenesis, metabolic and energy balance, and decrease reactive oxygen species production. Both microRNA and UCP2 expression can be altered in cancer cells. At low power, laser wavelength, frequency, fluence and emission mode deternube photobiological responses, which are the basis of low-level laser therapy. There are few studies on miRNA and UCP mRNA levels after low-level laser exposure on cancer cells. In this work, we evaluate the micrRNA (mir-106b and mir-15a) and UCP2 mRNA levels in human breast cancer cells exposed to low-level lasers. MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells were exposed to low-level red and infrared lasers, total RNA was extracted for cDNA synthesis and mRNA levels by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction were evaluated. Data show that mir-106b and mir-15a relative levels are not altered, but UCP2 mRNA relative levels are increased in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells exposed to low-level red and infrared lasers at fluences used in therapeutic protocols.

  11. Lysophosphatidic acid induces reactive oxygen species generation by activating protein kinase C in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chu-Cheng; Lin, Chuan-En; Lin, Yueh-Chien [Institute of Zoology, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Ju, Tsai-Kai [Instrumentation Center, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Technology Commons, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Huang, Yuan-Li [Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lee, Ming-Shyue [Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Jiun-Hong [Institute of Zoology, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Life Science, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lee, Hsinyu, E-mail: hsinyu@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Zoology, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Life Science, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Center for Biotechnology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Research Center for Developmental Biology and Regenerative Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •LPA induces ROS generation through LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3}. •LPA induces ROS generation by activating PLC. •PKCζ mediates LPA-induced ROS generation. -- Abstract: Prostate cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in males, and PC-3 is a cell model popularly used for investigating the behavior of late stage prostate cancer. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lysophospholipid that mediates multiple behaviors in cancer cells, such as proliferation, migration and adhesion. We have previously demonstrated that LPA enhances vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C expression in PC-3 cells by activating the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is known to be an important mediator in cancer progression. Using flow cytometry, we showed that LPA triggers ROS generation within 10 min and that the generated ROS can be suppressed by pretreatment with the NADPH oxidase (Nox) inhibitor diphenylene iodonium. In addition, transfection with LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3} siRNA efficiently blocked LPA-induced ROS production, suggesting that both receptors are involved in this pathway. Using specific inhibitors and siRNA, phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC) were also suggested to participate in LPA-induced ROS generation. Overall, we demonstrated that LPA induces ROS generation in PC-3 prostate cancer cells and this is mediated through the PLC/PKC/Nox pathway.

  12. Inhibition of human MCF-7 breast cancer cells and HT-29 colon cancer cells by rice-produced recombinant human insulin-like growth binding protein-3 (rhIGFBP-3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley C K Cheung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3 is a multifunctional molecule which is closely related to cell growth, apoptosis, angiogenesis, metabolism and senescence. It combines with insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I to form a complex (IGF-I/IGFBP-3 that can treat growth hormone insensitivity syndrome (GHIS and reduce insulin requirement in patients with diabetes. IGFBP-3 alone has been shown to have anti-proliferation effect on numerous cancer cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We reported here an expression method to produce functional recombinant human IGFBP-3 (rhIGFBP-3 in transgenic rice grains. Protein sorting sequences, signal peptide and endoplasmic reticulum retention tetrapeptide (KDEL were included in constructs for enhancing rhIGFBP-3 expression. Western blot analysis showed that only the constructs with signal peptide were successfully expressed in transgenic rice grains. Both rhIGFBP-3 proteins, with or without KDEL sorting sequence inhibited the growth of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells (65.76 ± 1.72% vs 45.00 ± 0.86%, p < 0.05; 50.84 ± 1.97% vs 45.00 ± 0.86%, p < 0.01 respectively and HT-29 colon cancer cells (65.14 ± 3.84% vs 18.01 ± 13.81%, p < 0.05 and 54.7 ± 9.44% vs 18.01 ± 13.81%, p < 0.05 respectively when compared with wild type rice. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings demonstrated the feasibility of producing biological active rhIGFBP-3 in rice using a transgenic approach, which will definitely encourage more research on the therapeutic use of hIGFBP-3 in future.

  13. Nicotine enhances the malignant potential of human pancreatic cancer cells via activation of atypical protein kinase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanaki, Takehiko; Horikoshi, Yosuke; Nakaso, Kazuhiro; Nakasone, Masato; Kitagawa, Yoshinori; Amisaki, Masataka; Arai, Yosuke; Tokuyasu, Naruo; Sakamoto, Teruhisa; Honjo, Soichiro; Saito, Hiroaki; Ikeguchi, Masahide; Yamashita, Kazunari; Ohno, Shigeo; Matsura, Tatsuya

    2016-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the most lethal malignancy among solid tumors, and the most common risk factor for its development is cigarette smoking. Atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) isozymes function in cell polarity, proliferation, and survival, and have also been implicated in carcinogenesis. However, the involvement of aPKC in PC progression and the effect of nicotine, a major component of cigarette smoke, on the biological activities of aPKC remain to be fully elucidated. We investigated the effects of nicotine on the proliferation, migration and invasion of the human PC cell lines Panc1 and BxPC3. We analyzed aPKC localization and activity by immunohistochemistry and in vitro kinase assays, respectively, to assess their involvement in the regulation of PC progression. Moreover, we examined the effect of nicotine on implanted peritoneal tumors of PC cells in mice. Nicotine enhanced cell proliferation, migration and invasion in Panc1 and BxPC3 cells. In nicotine-treated PC cells, the aPKC was significantly activated. We also found that nicotine induced phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signal activation, and a specific inhibitor of the nicotine acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) as well as knockdown of nAChR prevented nicotine-mediated Akt phosphorylation and aPKC activation. In a peritoneal dissemination model of PC, nicotine-treated mice had larger tumors and increased numbers of nodules. Immunohistochemistry showed enhanced expression levels of aPKC and phosphorylated Akt in nodules from nicotine-treated mice. Nicotine induces aberrant activation of aPKC via nAChR/PI3K signaling in PC cells, resulting in enhancement of cellular proliferation, migration and invasion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. LIBP-Pred: web server for lipid binding proteins using structural network parameters; PDB mining of human cancer biomarkers and drug targets in parasites and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Díaz, Humberto; Munteanu, Cristian R; Postelnicu, Lucian; Prado-Prado, Francisco; Gestal, Marcos; Pazos, Alejandro

    2012-03-01

    Lipid-Binding Proteins (LIBPs) or Fatty Acid-Binding Proteins (FABPs) play an important role in many diseases such as different types of cancer, kidney injury, atherosclerosis, diabetes, intestinal ischemia and parasitic infections. Thus, the computational methods that can predict LIBPs based on 3D structure parameters became a goal of major importance for drug-target discovery, vaccine design and biomarker selection. In addition, the Protein Data Bank (PDB) contains 3000+ protein 3D structures with unknown function. This list, as well as new experimental outcomes in proteomics research, is a very interesting source to discover relevant proteins, including LIBPs. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are no general models to predict new LIBPs based on 3D structures. We developed new Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models based on 3D electrostatic parameters of 1801 different proteins, including 801 LIBPs. We calculated these electrostatic parameters with the MARCH-INSIDE software and they correspond to the entire protein or to specific protein regions named core, inner, middle, and surface. We used these parameters as inputs to develop a simple Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) classifier to discriminate 3D structure of LIBPs from other proteins. We implemented this predictor in the web server named LIBP-Pred, freely available at , along with other important web servers of the Bio-AIMS portal. The users can carry out an automatic retrieval of protein structures from PDB or upload their custom protein structural models from their disk created with LOMETS server. We demonstrated the PDB mining option performing a predictive study of 2000+ proteins with unknown function. Interesting results regarding the discovery of new Cancer Biomarkers in humans or drug targets in parasites have been discussed here in this sense.

  15. Establishment of a paclitaxel resistant human breast cancer cell strain (MCF-7/Taxol) and intracellular paclitaxel binding protein analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, K-Q; Zhang, X-P; Zou, J; Li, D; Lv, Z-W

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug resistance of tumours is one of the most important factors that leads to chemotherapy failure. A multidrug-resistant breast cancer cell line, MCF-7/Taxol, was established from the drug-sensitive parent cell line MCF-7. The biological properties of MCF-7/Taxol, including its drug resistance profile and profile of paclitaxel binding proteins, were analysed and compared with the parent cell line. A number of paclitaxel binding proteins were present in MCF-7 cells but absent from MCF-7/Taxol cells, namely heat shock protein 90, actinin and dermcidin precursor. The identification of differential paclitaxel binding proteins between the multidrug-resistant MCF-7/Taxol cell line and the parent drug-sensitive cell line MCF-7 provides insight into possible mechanisms involved in resistance to these chemotherapy drugs.

  16. An antisense oligodeoxynucleotide that depletes RI alpha subunit of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase induces growth inhibition in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokozaki, H; Budillon, A; Tortora, G; Meissner, S; Beaucage, S L; Miki, K; Cho-Chung, Y S

    1993-02-15

    Enhanced expression of the RI alpha subunit of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase type I has been correlated with cancer cell growth. We provide evidence that RI alpha is a growth-inducing protein that may be essential for neoplastic cell growth. Human colon, breast, and gastric carcinoma and neuroblastoma cell lines exposed to a 21-mer human RI alpha antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide (S-oligodeoxynucleotide) exhibited growth inhibition with no sign of cytotoxicity. Mismatched sequence (random) S-oligodeoxynucleotides of the same length exhibited no effect. The growth inhibitory effect of RI alpha antisense oligomer correlated with a decrease in the RI alpha mRNA and protein levels and with an increase in RII beta (the regulatory subunit of protein kinase type II) expression. The growth inhibition was abolished, however, when cells were exposed simultaneously to both RI alpha and RII beta antisense S-oligodeoxynucleotides. The RII beta antisense S-oligodeoxynucleotide alone, exhibiting suppression of RII beta along with enhancement of RI alpha expression, led to slight stimulation of cell growth. These results demonstrate that two isoforms of cyclic AMP receptor proteins, RI alpha and RII beta, are reciprocally related in the growth control of cancer cells and that the RI alpha antisense oligodeoxynucleotide, which efficiently depletes the growth stimulatory RI alpha, is a powerful biological tool toward suppression of malignancy.

  17. Targeted Knockdown of the Kinetochore Protein D40/Knl-1 Inhibits Human Cancer in a p53 Status-Independent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urata, Yuri N; Takeshita, Fumitaka; Tanaka, Hiroki; Ochiya, Takahiro; Takimoto, Masato

    2015-09-08

    The D40 gene encodes a kinetochore protein that plays an essential role in kinetochore formation during mitosis. Short inhibitory RNA against D40, D40 siRNA, has been shown to deplete the D40 protein in the human cancer cell line HeLa, which harbors wild-type p53, and this activity was followed by the significant inhibition of cell growth and induction of apoptotic cell death. The p53-null cancer cell line, PC-3M-luc, is also sensitive to the significant growth inhibition and cell death induced by D40 siRNA. The growth of PC-3M-luc tumors transplanted into nude mice was inhibited by the systemic administration of D40 siRNA and the atelocollagen complex. Furthermore, D40 siRNA significantly inhibited growth and induced apoptotic cell death in a cell line with a gain-of-function (GOF) mutation in p53, MDA-MB231-luc, and also inhibited the growth of tumors transplanted into mice when administered as a D40 siRNA/atelocollagen complex. These results indicated that D40 siRNA induced apoptotic cell death in human cancer cell lines, and inhibited their growth in vitro and in vivo regardless of p53 status. Therefore, D40 siRNA is a potential candidate anti-cancer reagent.

  18. Human Viruses and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail Morales-Sánchez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The first human tumor virus was discovered in the middle of the last century by Anthony Epstein, Bert Achong and Yvonne Barr in African pediatric patients with Burkitt’s lymphoma. To date, seven viruses -EBV, KSHV, high-risk HPV, MCPV, HBV, HCV and HTLV1- have been consistently linked to different types of human cancer, and infections are estimated to account for up to 20% of all cancer cases worldwide. Viral oncogenic mechanisms generally include: generation of genomic instability, increase in the rate of cell proliferation, resistance to apoptosis, alterations in DNA repair mechanisms and cell polarity changes, which often coexist with evasion mechanisms of the antiviral immune response. Viral agents also indirectly contribute to the development of cancer mainly through immunosuppression or chronic inflammation, but also through chronic antigenic stimulation. There is also evidence that viruses can modulate the malignant properties of an established tumor. In the present work, causation criteria for viruses and cancer will be described, as well as the viral agents that comply with these criteria in human tumors, their epidemiological and biological characteristics, the molecular mechanisms by which they induce cellular transformation and their associated cancers.

  19. Protein expression profile of HT-29 human colon cancer cells after treatment with a cytotoxic daunorubicin-GnRH-III derivative bioconjugate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Natalie Schreier

    Full Text Available Targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic agents is a new approach for the treatment of cancer, which provides increased selectivity and decreased systemic toxicity. We have recently developed a promising drug delivery system, in which the anticancer drug daunorubicin (Dau was attached via oxime bond to a gonadotropin-releasing hormone-III (GnRH-III derivative used as a targeting moiety (Glp-His-Trp-Lys(Ac-His-Asp-Trp-Lys(Da  = Aoa-Pro-Gly-NH2; Glp = pyroglutamic acid, Ac = acetyl; Aoa = aminooxyacetyl. This bioconjugate exerted in vitro cytostatic/cytotoxic effect on human breast, prostate and colon cancer cells, as well as significant in vivo tumor growth inhibitory effect on colon carcinoma bearing mice. In our previous studies, H-Lys(Dau = Aoa-OH was identified as the smallest metabolite produced in the presence of rat liver lysosomal homogenate, which was able to bind to DNA in vitro. To get a deeper insight into the mechanism of action of the bioconjugate, changes in the protein expression profile of HT-29 human colon cancer cells after treatment with the bioconjugate or free daunorubicin were investigated by mass spectrometry-based proteomics. Our results indicate that several metabolism-related proteins, molecular chaperons and proteins involved in signaling are differently expressed after targeted chemotherapeutic treatment, leading to the conclusion that the bioconjugate exerts its cytotoxic action by interfering with multiple intracellular processes.

  20. Human papillomaviruses and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haedicke, Juliane; Iftner, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are small oncogenic DNA viruses of which more than 200 types have been identified to date. A small subset of these is etiologically linked to the development of anogenital malignancies such as cervical cancer. In addition, recent studies established a causative relationship between these high-risk HPV types and tonsillar and oropharyngeal cancer. Clinical management of cervical cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) is largely standardized and involves surgical removal of the tumor tissue as well as adjuvant chemoradiation therapy. Notably, the response to therapeutic intervention of HPV-positive HNSCCs has been found to be better as compared to HPV-negative tumors. Although the existing HPV vaccine is solely licensed for the prevention of cervical cancer, it might also have prophylactic potential for the development of high-risk HPV-associated HNSCCs. Another group of viruses, which belongs to the beta-HPV subgroup, has been implicated in nonmelanoma skin cancer, however, the etiology remains to be established. Treatment of HPV-induced nonmelanoma skin cancer is based on local excision. However, topically applied immune-modulating substances represent non-surgical alternatives for the management of smaller cutaneous tumors. In this review we present the current knowledge of the role of HPV in cancer development and discuss clinical management options as well as targets for the development of future intervention therapies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Investigation of human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18), lactoferrin and CD163 as potential biomarkers for ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lim, Ratana; Lappas, Martha; Riley, Clyde

    2013-01-01

    and plasma concentrations of three putative ovarian cancer biomarkers: human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18); lactoferrin; and CD163 in normal healthy women and women with ovarian cancer. METHODS: In this case-control cohort study, ovarian tissue and blood samples were obtained from 164 women (73...... and peripheral blood. Individually, the 3 biomarkers display only modest diagnostic efficiency as assessed by AUC. When combined in a multivariate index assay, however, diagnostic efficiency increases significantly. As such, the utility of the biomarker panel, as an aid in the diagnosis of cancer in symptomatic...... sensitivity and specificity to be implemented as community-based screening tests. The identification of additional biomarkers may improve the diagnostic efficiency of multivariate index assays. The aims of this study were to characterise and compare the ovarian tissue immunohistochemical localisation...

  2. Toward high sequence coverage of proteins in human breast cancer cells using on-line monolith-based HPLC-ESI-TOF MS compared to CE MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Chul; Pal, Manoj; Miller, Fred R; Barder, Timothy J; Huber, Christian; Lubman, David M

    2006-06-01

    A method is developed toward high sequence coverage of proteins isolated from human breast cancer MCF10 cell lines using a 2-D liquid separations. Monolithic-capillary columns prepared by copolymerizing styrene with divinylbenzene are used to achieve high-resolution separation of peptides from protein digests. This separation is performed with minimal sample preparation directly from the 2-D liquid fractionation of the cell lysate. The monolithic column separation is directly interfaced to ESI-TOF MS to obtain a peptide map. The protein digests were also analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS and an accurate M(r) of the intact protein was obtained using an HPLC-ESI-TOF MS. The result is that these techniques provide complementary information where nearly complete sequence coverage of the protein is obtained and can be compared to the experimental M(r) value. The high sequence coverage provides information on isoforms and other post-translational modifications that would not be available from methods that result in low sequence coverage. The results from the use of monolithic columns are compared to that obtained by CE-MS. The monolithic column separations provide a rugged and highly reproducible method for separating protein digests prior to MS analysis and is suited to confidently identify biomarkers associated with cancer progression.

  3. LGALS3BP, lectin galactoside-binding soluble 3 binding protein, induces vascular endothelial growth factor in human breast cancer cells and promotes angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccolo, Enza; Tinari, Nicola; Semeraro, Daniela; Traini, Sara; Fichera, Imma; Cumashi, Albana; La Sorda, Rossana; Spinella, Francesca; Bagnato, Anna; Lattanzio, Rossano; D'Egidio, Maurizia; Di Risio, Annalisa; Stampolidis, Pavlos; Piantelli, Mauro; Natoli, Clara; Ullrich, Axel; Iacobelli, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Elevated serum or tissue levels of lectin galactoside-binding soluble 3 binding protein (LGALS3BP) have been associated with short survival and development of metastasis in a variety of human cancers. However, the role of LGALS3BP, particularly in the context of tumor-host relationships, is still missing. Here, we show that LGALS3BP knockdown in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells leads to a decreased adhesion to fibronectin, a reduced transendothelial migration and, more importantly, a reduced expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Production of VEGF, that was restored by exposure of silenced cells to recombinant LGALS3BP, required an intact PI3k/Akt signaling. Furthermore, we show that LGALS3BP was able to directly stimulate HUVEC tubulogenesis in a VEGF-independent, galectin-3-dependent manner. Immunohistochemical analysis of human breast cancer tissues revealed a correlation among LGALS3BP expression, VEGF expression, and blood vessel density. We propose that in addition to its prometastatic role, LGALS3BP secreted by breast cancer cells functions critically as a pro-angiogenic factor through a dual mechanism, i.e by induction of tumor VEGF and stimulation of endothelial cell tubulogenesis.

  4. Septin mutations in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias T Spiliotis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Septins are GTP-binding proteins that are evolutionarily and structurally related to the RAS oncogenes. Septin expression levels are altered in many cancers and new advances point to how abnormal septin expression may contribute to the progression of cancer. In contrast to the RAS GTPases, which are frequently mutated and actively promote tumorigenesis, little is known about the occurrence and role of septin mutations in human cancers. Here, we review septin missense mutations that are currently in the Catalog of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC database. The majority of septin mutations occur in tumors of the large intestine, skin, endometrium and stomach. Over 25% of the annotated mutations in SEPT2, SEPT4 and SEPT9 belong to large intestine tumors. From all septins, SEPT9 and SEPT14 exhibit the highest mutation frequencies in skin, stomach and large intestine cancers. While septin mutations occur with frequencies lower than 3%, recurring mutations in several invariant and highly conserved amino acids are found across different septin paralogs and tumor types. Interestingly, a significant number of these mutations occur in the GTP-binding pocket and septin dimerization interfaces. Future studies may determine how these somatic mutations affect septin structure and function, whether they contribute to the progression of specific cancers and if they could serve as tumor-specific biomarkers.

  5. Long interspersed nucleotide acid element-1 ORF-1 protein promotes proliferation and invasion of human colorectal cancer LoVo cells through enhancing ETS-1 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M Y; Zhu, M; Feng, F; Cai, F Y; Fan, K C; Jiang, H; Wang, Z Q; Linghu, E Q

    2014-04-14

    The human proto-oncogene long interspersed nucleotide acid element-1 (LINE-1) open reading frame-1 protein (ORF-1p) is involved in the progress of several cancers. The transcription factor ETS-1 can mediate the transcription of some downstream genes that play specific roles in the regulation of cancerous cell invasion and metastasis. In this study, the effects of LINE-1 ORF-1p on ETS-1 activity and on the proliferation and invasion of human colorectal cancer LoVo cells were investigated. Results showed that the overexpression of LINE-1 ORF-1p enhanced the transcription of ETS-1 downstream genes and increased their protein levels, and downregulation of the LINE-1 ORF-1p level by small interfering RNA (siRNA) reduced the transcriptional activation of ETS-1. In addition, overexpression of LINE-1 ORF-1p promoted LoVo cell proliferation and anchor-independent growth, and a knockdown of the LINE-1 protein level by siRNA reduced the proliferation and anchor-independent growth ability of LoVo cells. In vivo data revealed that LINE-1 ORF-1p overexpression increased LoVo tumor growth in nude mice, whereas the siRNA knockdown of endogenous LINE-1 ORF-1p expression decreased LoVo cell growth in nude mice. Therefore, LINE- 1 ORF-1p could promote LoVo cell proliferation and invasion both in vitro and in vivo, indicating that it might be a useful molecular target for the treatment of human colorectal cancer.

  6. Bisdemethoxycurcumin induces DNA damage and inhibits DNA repair associated protein expressions in NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chien-Chih; Yang, Su-Tso; Huang, Wen-Wen; Peng, Shu-Fen; Huang, An-Cheng; Tang, Nou-Ying; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Yang, Mei-Due; Lai, Kuang-Chi; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2016-12-01

    Nonsmall cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is a devastating primary lung tumor resistant to conventional therapies. Bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC) is one of curcumin derivate from Turmeric and has been shown to induce NSCLC cell death. Although there is one report to show BDMC induced DNA double strand breaks, however, no available information to show BDMC induced DNA damage action with inhibited DNA repair protein in lung cancer cells in detail. In this study, we tested BDMC-induced DNA damage and condensation in NCI-H460 cells by using Comet assay and DAPI staining examinations, respectively and we found BDMC induced DNA damage and condension. Western blotting was used to examine the effects of BDMC on protein expression associated with DNA damage and repair and results indicated that BDMC suppressed the protein levels associated with DNA damage and repair, such as 14-3-3σ (an important checkpoint keeper of DDR), O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, DNA repair proteins breast cancer 1, early onset, mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 but activate phosphorylated p53 and p-H2A.X (phospho Ser140) in NCI-H460 cells. Confocal laser systems microscopy was used for examining the protein translocation and results show that BDMC increased the translocation of p-p53 and p-H2A.X (phospho Ser140) from cytosol to nuclei in NCI-H460 cells. In conclusion, BDMC induced DNA damage and condension and affect DNA repair proteins in NCI-H460 cells in vitro. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1859-1868, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Arctigenin induces cell cycle arrest by blocking the phosphorylation of Rb via the modulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins in human gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jin Boo; Hong, Se Chul; Jeong, Hyung Jin; Koo, Jin Suk

    2011-10-01

    Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths, worldwide being second only to lung cancer as a cause of death. Arctigenin, a representative dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan, occurs in a variety of plants. However, the molecular mechanisms of arctigenin for anti-tumor effect on gastric cancer have not been examined. This study examined the biological effects of arctigenin on the human gastric cancer cell line SNU-1 and AGS. Cell proliferation was determined by MTT assay. In MTT assay, the proliferation of SNU-1 and AGS cells was significantly inhibited by arctigenin in a time and dose dependent manner, as compared with SNU-1 and AGS cells cultured in the absence of arctigenin. Inhibition of cell proliferation by arctigenin was in part associated with apoptotic cell death, as shown by changes in the expression ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax by arctigenin. Also, arctigenin blocked cell cycle arrest from G(1) to S phase by regulating the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins such as Rb, cyclin D1, cyclin E, CDK4, CDK2, p21Waf1/Cip1 and p15 INK4b. The antiproliferative effect of arctigenin on SNU-1 and AGS gastric cancer cells revealed in this study suggests that arctigenin has intriguing potential as a chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic agent.

  8. The induction of heme oxygenase-1 suppresses heat shock protein 90 and the proliferation of human breast cancer cells through its byproduct carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wen-Ying [Department of Pathology, Chi-Mei Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yen-Chou [Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Shih, Chwen-Ming; Lin, Chun-Mao; Cheng, Chia-Hsiung; Chen, Ku-Chung [Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Cheng-Wei, E-mail: cwlin@tmu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-1 is an oxidative stress-response enzyme which catalyzes the degradation of heme into bilirubin, ferric ion, and carbon monoxide (CO). Induction of HO-1 was reported to have antitumor activity; the inhibitory mechanism, however, is still unclear. In the present study, we found that treatment with [Ru(CO){sub 3}Cl{sub 2}]{sub 2} (RuCO), a CO-releasing compound, reduced the growth of human MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Analysis of growth-related proteins showed that treatment with RuCO down-regulated cyclinD1, CDK4, and hTERT protein expressions. Interestingly, RuCO treatment resulted in opposite effects on wild-type and mutant p53 proteins. These results were similar to those of cells treated with geldanamycin (a heat shock protein (HSP)90 inhibitor), suggesting that RuCO might affect HSP90 activity. Moreover, RuCO induced mutant p53 protein destabilization accompanied by promotion of ubiquitination and proteasome degradation. The induction of HO-1 by cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPP) showed consistent results, while the addition of tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPP), an HO-1 enzymatic inhibitor, diminished the RuCO-mediated effect. RuCO induction of HO-1 expression was reduced by a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor (SB203580). Additionally, treatment with a chemopreventive compound, curcumin, induced HO-1 expression accompanied with reduction of HSP90 client protein expression. The induction of HO-1 by curcumin inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoyl-13-acetate (TPA)-elicited matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression and tumor invasion. In conclusion, we provide novel evidence underlying HO-1's antitumor mechanism. CO, a byproduct of HO-1, suppresses HSP90 protein activity, and the induction of HO-1 may possess potential as a cancer therapeutic. - Highlights: • CO and HO-1 inhibited the growth of human breast cancer cells. • CO and HO-1 attenuated HSP90 and its client proteins expression. • CO induced mutant p53 protein

  9. HCSD: the human cancer secretome database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feizi, Amir; Banaei-Esfahani, Amir; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    database is limiting the ability to query the increasing community knowledge. We therefore developed the Human Cancer Secretome Database (HCSD) to fulfil this gap. HCSD contains >80 000 measurements for about 7000 nonredundant human proteins collected from up to 35 high-throughput studies on 17 cancer...... types. It has a simple and user friendly query system for basic and advanced search based on gene name, cancer type and data type as the three main query options. The results are visualized in an explicit and interactive manner. An example of a result page includes annotations, cross references, cancer...

  10. High-quality NMR structure of human anti-apoptotic protein domain Mcl-1(171-327 for cancer drug design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaohua Liu

    Full Text Available A high-quality NMR solution structure is presented for protein hMcl-1(171-327 which comprises residues 171-327 of the human anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 (hMcl-1. Since this construct contains the three Bcl-2 homology (BH sequence motifs which participate in forming a binding site for inhibitors of hMcl-1, it is deemed to be crucial for structure-based design of novel anti-cancer drugs blocking the Mcl1 related anti-apoptotic pathway. While the coordinates of an NMR solution structure for a corresponding construct of the mouse homologue (mMcl-1 are publicly available, our structure is the first atomic resolution structure reported for the 'apo form' of the human protein. Comparison of the two structures reveals that hMcl-1(171-327 exhibits a somewhat wider ligand/inhibitor binding groove as well as a different charge distribution within the BH3 binding groove. These findings strongly suggest that the availability of the human structure is of critical importance to support future design of cancer drugs.

  11. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase by 3,3'-Diindolylmethane (DIM is associated with human prostate cancer cell death in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Chen

    Full Text Available There is a large body of scientific evidence suggesting that 3,3'-Diindolylmethane (DIM, a compound derived from the digestion of indole-3-carbinol, which is abundant in cruciferous vegetables, harbors anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Accumulating evidence suggests that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK plays an essential role in cellular energy homeostasis and tumor development and that targeting AMPK may be a promising therapeutic option for cancer treatment in the clinic. We previously reported that a formulated DIM (BR-DIM; hereafter referred as B-DIM with higher bioavailability was able to induce apoptosis and inhibit cell growth, angiogenesis, and invasion of prostate cancer cells. However, the precise molecular mechanism(s for the anti-cancer effects of B-DIM have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we investigated whether AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK is a molecular target of B-DIM in human prostate cancer cells. Our results showed, for the first time, that B-DIM could activate the AMPK signaling pathway, associated with suppression of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, down-regulation of androgen receptor (AR expression, and induction of apoptosis in both androgen-sensitive LNCaP and androgen-insensitive C4-2B prostate cancer cells. B-DIM also activates AMPK and down-regulates AR in androgen-independent C4-2B prostate tumor xenografts in SCID mice. These results suggest that B-DIM could be used as a potential anti-cancer agent in the clinic for prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer regardless of androgen responsiveness, although functional AR may be required.

  12. [Immunohistochemical research on human breast tumors using monoclonal antibodies to intermediate filament proteins. Cancer of the breast].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gel'shteĭn, V I; Chipysheva, T A; Ermilova, V D; Litvinova, L V; Bannikov, G A

    1986-01-01

    Immunomorphologic study of 29 breast cancer cases using monoclonal antibodies to proteins of intermediate filaments shown to differentiate the lining epithelium from myoepithelium in the non-proliferating epithelial structures of the mamma, has shown the cells in the majority of tumours (according to the International WHO Classification defined as infiltrating ductal, lobular, and tubular cancer forms) to contain prekeratin (PK) C12, specific for normal lining epithelium, but not for the myoepithelium. In cases of cancer with chondroid metaplasia (a malignant variant of the so-called "mixed tumour") the cells contained PK E3, vimentin and structural myosin, normally specific for myoepithelium. The cell heterogenicity in PK C12 content or its absence noted in the infiltrating cancers with predominance of a solid component can indicate a high degree of tumour anaplasia. It is concluded that usage of monoclonal antibodies to PK C12, invariably found in the cells of fibrotic invasion foci, can be a useful indicator for early diagnosis of infiltrative tumour growth.

  13. Down-regulation of cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (Long Form contributes to apoptosis induced by Hsp90 inhibition in human lung cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Qilin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular FLICE-Inhibitory Protein (long form, c-FLIPL is a critical negative regulator of death receptor-mediated apoptosis. Overexpression of c-FLIPL has been reported in many cancer cell lines and is associated with chemoresistance. In contrast, down-regulation of c-FLIP may drive cancer cells into cellular apoptosis. This study aims to demonstrate that inhibition of the heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 either by inhibitors geldanamycin/17-N-Allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (GA/17-AAG or siRNA technique in human lung cancer cells induces c-FLIPL degradation and cellular apoptosis through C-terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP-mediated mechanisms. Methods Calu-1 and H157 cell lines (including H157-c-FLIPL overexpressing c-FLIPL and control cell H157-lacZ were treated with 17-AAG and the cell lysates were prepared to detect the given proteins by Western Blot and the cell survival was assayed by SRB assay. CHIP and Hsp90 α/β proteins were knocked down by siRNA technique. CHIP and c-FLIPL plasmids were transfected into cells and immunoprecipitation experiments were performed to testify the interactions between c-FLIPL, CHIP and Hsp90. Results c-FLIPL down-regulation induced by 17-AAG can be reversed with the proteasome inhibitor MG132, which suggested that c-FLIPL degradation is mediated by a ubiquitin-proteasome system. Inhibition of Hsp90α/β reduced c-FLIPL level, whereas knocking down CHIP expression with siRNA technique inhibited c-FLIPL degradation. Furthermore, c-FLIPL and CHIP were co-precipitated in the IP complexes. In addition, overexpression of c-FLIPL can rescue cancer cells from apoptosis. When 17-AAG was combined with an anti-cancer agent celecoxib(CCB, c-FLIPL level declined further and there was a higher degree of caspase activation. Conclusion We have elucidated c-FLIPL degradation contributes to apoptosis induced by Hsp90 inhibition, suggesting c-FLIP and Hsp90 may be the promising combined targets

  14. BET Bromodomain Proteins as Cancer Therapeutic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Shaokun; Polyak, Kornelia

    2017-01-06

    Epigenetic regulators are emerging therapeutic targets in a wide variety of human cancers. BET bromodomain proteins have been identified as key regulators of oncogenic transcription factors including MYC; therefore, their inhibition might provide a way to block these "undruggable" targets. Several BET bromodomain inhibitors are in clinical development with promising preliminary findings. However, tumors acquire resistance to these agents in several different ways. In this review, we summarize the role that BET bromodomain proteins play in tumorigenesis as well as the molecular mechanisms underlying therapeutic responses and resistance to their inhibition with emphasis on BRD4 and breast cancer.

  15. Effect of gastrin on protein kinase C and its subtype in human colon cancer cell line SW480

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Xie; Shuang Wu He; Xiao Dong Wang

    2000-01-01

    @@INTRODUCTION Gastrin is a trophic gastrointestinal hormone which is secreted by G cell. Gastrin has long been considered a growth stimulatory hormone for mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract[1]. The growth responses of certain colorectal cancer cells, and xenografts, can be stimulated by endogenous gastrin[2]. Protein kinase C (PKC) is a family of isozymes that plays a crucial role in transducing signals of many hormones, growth peptides,neurotransmitters, and its activation is crucial in tumor promotion[3]. PKC is also involved in regulating cellular proliferation[4].

  16. A potential peptide vector that allows targeted delivery of a desired fusion protein into the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei Qing; Yang, Jun; Hong, Min; Gao, Chang E; Dong, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Effective control of breast cancer has been primarily hampered by a lack of tumor specificity in treatments. One potential way to improve targeting specificity is to develop novel vectors that specifically bind to and are internalized by tumor cells. Through a phage display library, an 11-L-amino acid peptide, PI (sequence, CASPSGALRSC), was selected. PI was labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and named PI-FITC. Subsequently, the specific affinity of PI-FITC to MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells and other cancer cell lines was observed by confocal microscopy. Our previous study established that PI-FITC also shows affinity to Calu-1 human lung carcinoma cells and major histocompatibility complex class I antigen molecules; therefore, the cytomembrane proteins of the cell lines were analyzed to determine those that were common to the two cell lines and may be associated with transmembrane transduction. To further test the delivery ability of PI to MDA-MB-231 cells, PI-glutathione-S-transferase (GST) was constructed and the internalization of this fusion protein was visualized by immunofluorescence microscopy. The results revealed that PI exhibited specific affinity to MDA-MB-231 cells. Use of membrane transport inhibitors indicated that macropinocytosis and caveolin-mediated endocytosis may be involved in the endocytosis of PI. In addition, 11 membrane proteins common to MDA-MB-231 and Calu-1 may be associated with transmembrane transduction. In summary, PI was able to deliver PI-GST into MDA-MB-231 cells. Thus, PI could be modified to be a potential vector, and may contribute to the development of targeted therapeutic strategies for breast cancer.

  17. Quercetin induces p53-independent apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells by modulating Bcl-2-related proteins: a possible mediation by IGFBP-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayababu, Marati R; Kanagaraj, P; Arunkumar, A; Ilangovan, R; Dharmarajan, A; Arunakaran, J

    2006-01-01

    Quercetin, a flavonoid found in onion, grapes, green vegetables, etc., has been shown to possess potent antiproliferative effects against various malignant cells. We report insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) as an effector of quercetin-induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer cell lines in a p53-independent manner. We evaluated the production of IGFBP-3 in quercetin-treated cells. Apoptosis was studied in quercetin-treated cells to study the IGFBP-3-mediated role with flow cytometry and DNA fragmentation. Protein expressions of Bcl-2, Bcl-x(L), and Bax were studied by Western blot. Increased production of IGFBP-3 was associated with the increased ratio of proapoptotic to antiapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family. In quercetin-treated PC-3 cells, an increase in Bax protein expression and a decrease in Bcl-x(L) protein and Bcl-2 protein were observed. As PC-3 is a p53-negative cell line, these modulations of proapoptotic proteins and induction of apoptosis were independent of p53. The level of IGFBP-3 on the response of PC-3 cells to quercetin was examined. There was a twofold increase in IGFBP-3 level in conditioned media of 100 microM quercetin-treated cells. Quercetin also brought a peak at sub-G1 in PC-3 cells. Thus, increased level of IGFBP-3 was associated with increased proapoptotic proteins and apoptosis in response to quercetin, suggesting it may be a p53-independent effector of apoptosis in prostate cancer cells via its modulation of the Bax/Bcl-2 protein ratio.

  18. Short-hairpin RNA-mediated Heat shock protein 90 gene silencing inhibits human breast cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuo, Keqiang [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai 10th People' s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200072 (China); Li, Dan [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai 10th People' s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200072 (China); Pulli, Benjamin [Center for Systems Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 185 Cambridge Street, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Yu, Fei; Cai, Haidong; Yuan, Xueyu [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai 10th People' s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200072 (China); Zhang, Xiaoping, E-mail: zxpsibs@163.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai 10th People' s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200072 (China); Lv, Zhongwei, E-mail: heyixue163@163.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai 10th People' s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200072 (China)

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hsp90 is over-expressed in human breast cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The shRNA-mediated gene silencing of Hsp90 resulted in inhibition of cell growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Akt and NF-kB were down-regulation after transfection due to Hsp90 silencing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The tumor growth ratio was decline due to Hsp90 silencing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The PCNA expression was down-regulation due to Hsp90 silencing. -- Abstract: Hsp90 interacts with proteins that mediate signaling pathways involved in the regulation of essential processes such as proliferation, cell cycle control, angiogenesis and apoptosis. Hsp90 inhibition is therefore an attractive strategy for blocking abnormal pathways that are crucial for cancer cell growth. In the present study, the role of Hsp90 in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells was examined by stably silencing Hsp90 gene expression with an Hsp90-silencing vector (Hsp90-shRNA). RT-PCR and Western blot analyses showed that Hsp90-shRNA specifically and markedly down-regulated Hsp90 mRNA and protein expression. NF-kB and Akt protein levels were down-regulated in Hsp90-shRNA transfected cells, indicating that Hsp90 knockout caused a reduction of survival factors and induced apoptosis. Treatment with Hsp90-shRNA significantly increased apoptotic cell death and caused cell cycle arrest in the G1/S phase in MCF-7 cells, as shown by flow cytometry. Silencing of Hsp90 also reduced cell viability, as determined by MTT assay. In vivo experiments showed that MCF-7 cells stably transfected with Hsp90-shRNA grew slowly in nude mice as compared with control groups. In summary, the Hsp90-shRNA specifically silenced the Hsp90 gene, and inhibited MCF-7 cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Possible molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of Hsp90-shRNA include the degradation of Hsp90 breast cancer-related client proteins, the inhibition of survival signals and the upregulation of apoptotic

  19. Human Thyroid Cancer-1 (TC-1 is a vertebrate specific oncogenic protein that protects against copper and pro-apoptotic genes in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie K. Jones

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The human Thyroid Cancer-1 (hTC-1 protein, also known as C8orf4 was initially identified as a gene that was up-regulated in human thyroid cancer. Here we show that hTC-1 is a peptide that prevents the effects of over-expressing Bax in yeast. Analysis of the 106 residues of hTC-1 in available protein databases revealed direct orthologues in jawed-vertebrates, including mammals, frogs, fish and sharks. No TC-1 orthologue was detected in lower organisms, including yeast. Here we show that TC-1 is a general pro-survival peptide since it prevents the growth- and cell death-inducing effects of copper in yeast. Human TC-1 also prevented the deleterious effects that occur due to the over-expression of a number of key pro-apoptotic peptides, including YCA1, YBH3, NUC1, and AIF1. Even though the protective effects were more pronounced with the over-expression of YBH3 and YCA1, hTC-1 could still protect yeast mutants lacking YBH3 and YCA1 from the effects of copper sulfate. This suggests that the protective effects of TC-1 are not limited to specific pathways or processes. Taken together, our results indicate that hTC-1 is a pro-survival protein that retains its function when heterologously expressed in yeast. Thus yeast is a useful model to characterize the potential roles in cell death and survival of cancer related genes.

  20. Effect of phosphorothioate modifications on the ability of GTn oligodeoxynucleotides to specifically recognize single-stranded DNA-binding proteins and to affect human cancer cellular growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morassutti, C; Scaggiante, B; Dapas, B; Xodo, L; Tell, G; Quadrifoglio, F

    1999-12-01

    We have previously identified phosphodiester oligonucleotides exclusively made of G and T bases, named GTn, that significantly inhibit human cancer cell growth and recognize specific nuclear single-stranded DNA binding proteins. We wished to examine the ability of the modified GTn oligonucleotides with different degrees of phosphorothioate modifications to bind specifically to the same nuclear proteins recognized by the GTn phosphodiester analogues and their cytotoxic effect on the human T-lymphoblastic CCRF-CEM cell line. We showed that the full phosphorothioate GTn oligonucleotide was neither able to specifically recognize those nuclear proteins, nor cytotoxic. In contrast, the 3'-phosphorothioate-protected GTn oligonucleotides can maintain the specific protein-binding activity. The end-modified phosphorothioate oligonucleotides were also able to elicit the dose-dependent cell growth inhibition effect, but a loss in the cytotoxic ability was observed increasing the extent of sulphur modification of the sequences. Our results indicate that phosphorothioate oligonucleotides directed at specific single-stranded DNA-binding proteins should contain a number of phosphorothioate end-linkages which should be related to the length of the sequence, in order to maintain the same biological activities exerted by their phosphodiester analogues.

  1. Investigation of human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18, lactoferrin and CD163 as potential biomarkers for ovarian cancer

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    Lim Ratana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epithelial ovarian cancer is one of the leading causes of gynaecological cancer morbidity and mortality in women. Early stage ovarian cancer is usually asymptomatic, therefore, is often first diagnosed when it is widely disseminated. Currently available diagnostics lack the requisite sensitivity and specificity to be implemented as community-based screening tests. The identification of additional biomarkers may improve the diagnostic efficiency of multivariate index assays. The aims of this study were to characterise and compare the ovarian tissue immunohistochemical localisation and plasma concentrations of three putative ovarian cancer biomarkers: human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18; lactoferrin; and CD163 in normal healthy women and women with ovarian cancer. Methods In this case–control cohort study, ovarian tissue and blood samples were obtained from 164 women (73 controls, including 28 women with benign pelvic masses; 91 cancer, including 21 women with borderline tumours. Localisation of each antigen within the ovary was assessed by immunohistochemistry and serum concentrations determined by ELISA assays. Results Immunoreactive (ir hCAP-18 and lactoferrin were identified in epithelial cells, while CD163 was predominately localised in stromal cells. Tissue ir CD163 increased significantly (PP Conclusions The data obtained in this study establishes the localisation and concentrations of CD163, hCAP-18, and lactoferrin in ovarian tumours and peripheral blood. Individually, the 3 biomarkers display only modest diagnostic efficiency as assessed by AUC. When combined in a multivariate index assay, however, diagnostic efficiency increases significantly. As such, the utility of the biomarker panel, as an aid in the diagnosis of cancer in symptomatic women, is worthy of further investigation in a larger phase 2 biomarker trial.

  2. Polyphyllin G induce apoptosis and autophagy in human nasopharyngeal cancer cells by modulation of AKT and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jui-Chieh; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Chen, Chih-Jung; Lin, Jen-Tsun; Lo, Yu-Sheng; Chuang, Yi-Ching; Chien, Su-Yu; Chen, Mu-Kuan

    2016-10-25

    Polyphyllin G (also call polyphyllin VII), extract from rhizomes of Paris yunnanensis Franch, has been demonstrated to have strong anticancer activities in a wide variety of human cancer cell lines. Previous studies found that Polyphyllin G induced apoptotic cell death in human hepatoblastoma cancer and lung cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of autophagy in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) remain unclear. In this study, Polyphyllin G can potently induced apoptosis dependent on the activations of caspase-8, -3, and -9 and the changes of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Bax protein expression in different human NPC cell lines (HONE-1 and NPC-039). The amount of both LC3-II and Beclin-1 was intriguingly increased suggest that autophagy was induced in Polyphyllin G-treated NPC cells. To further clarify whether Polyphyllin G-induced apoptosis and autophagy depended on AKT/ERK/JNK/p38 MAPK signaling pathways, cells were combined treated with AKT inhibitor (LY294002), ERK1/2 inhibitor (U0126), p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB203580), or JNK inhibitor (SP600125). These results demonstrated that Polyphyllin G induced apoptosis in NPC cells through activation of ERK, while AKT, p38 MAPK and JNK were responsible for Polyphyllin G-induced autophagy. Finally, an administration of Polyphyllin G effectively suppressed the tumor growth in the NPC carcinoma xenograft model in vivo. In conclusion, our results reveal that Polyphyllin G inhibits cell viability and induces apoptosis and autophagy in NPC cancer cells, suggesting that Polyphyllin G is an attractive candidate for tumor therapies. Polyphyllin G may promise candidate for development of antitumor drugs targeting nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

  3. Effects of quercetin on insulin-like growth factors (IGFs and their binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3 secretion and induction of apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells

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    Vijayababu Marati R

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quercetin, the predominant flavonoid, has been reported to lower the risk of several cancers. This flavonoid found in onion, grapes, green vegetables, etc. has been shown to possess potent antiproliferative effects against various malignant cells. This study was designed to investigate its effects on insulin-like growth factors (IGFs and their binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3 proteins secretion and also apoptosis induction in the human prostate cancer cell line, PC-3. Methods We evaluated the secretion of IGF-I, -II and IGFBP-3 in quercetin treated cells by immunoradiometric (IRMA method. Apoptosis was studied in quercetin treated cells by TUNEL and DNA fragmentation. Protein expressions of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Bax and caspase-3 were studied by western blot. Results At a dose of 100 μM concentration, we observed increased IGFBP-3 accumulation in PC-3 cells conditioned medium with a dose dependent increase with 2 fold over a base line, and significantly reduced the both IGF-I and IGF-II levels. Apoptosis induction was also confirmed by TUNEL assay. Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL protein expressions were significantly decreased and Bax and caspase-3 were increased. Conclusion These results suggest that the decreased level of IGFs could be due to the increased levels of IGFBP-3, because of the high binding affinity towards IGFs, thereby decreasing the cell proliferation. The increased level of IGFBP-3 was associated with increased pro-apoptotic proteins and apoptosis in response to quercetin, suggesting it may be a p53-independent effector of apoptosis in prostate cancer cells.

  4. Up-regulation of human arrest-defective 1 protein is correlated with metastatic phenotype and poor prognosis in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ze-Hua; Gong, Jun-Li; Yu, M; Yang, H; Lai, J H; Ma, M X; Wu, H; Li, L; Tan, D Y

    2011-01-01

    Human arrest defective 1 protein (ARD1), as a N-terminal acetyltransferase, has been reported to play a crucial role in tumorigenesis, but the results are somewhat controversial. To explore the clinical and pathological significance of ARD1 in breast tumorigenesis, we analyzed ARD1 status in multiple types of breast disease. The expression of ARD1 protein was assessed by immunohistochemistry in 356 cases including 82 invasive ductal carcinomas (IDC), 159 fibroadenomas, 66 hyperplasia of mammary glands, 19 inflammatory breast disease, 30 breast cysts, and in 29 postoperative treatment patients. We assessed the relationship of ARD1 protein with clinical and pathological characteristics using χ2 test. ARD1 protein was observed at 61.0% (50/82), 54.7% (87/159), 37.9% (25/66), 36.8% (7/19) in IDC, fibroadenoma, hyperplasia, and inflammation, respectively, and less than 30.0% for breast cyst. Thus, high ARD1 expression correlated with breast cancer (relative risk = 1.32, P < 0.005). Moreover, the level of ARD1 protein in carcinoma patients was distinctly related to lymph node metastasis and ER status, with 94.0% (47/50) as copmpared to 6.0% (3/50) in metastatic and non-metastatic (P < 0.001), and 84.0% (42/50) and 16.0% (8/50) for ER + and ER - (P < 0.01), respectively. In addition, the level of ARD1 appeared to have potential for evaluation of prognosis in breast cancer patients after postoperative therapy. These results suggest that ARD1 expression may be as a potential target for exploring the mechanism of breast cancer metastasic to lymph nodes and hormone-responsive regulation.

  5. Antiproliferative crude soy saponin extract modulates the expression of IkappaBalpha, protein kinase C, and cyclooxygenase-2 in human colon cancer cells.

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    Kim, Hwa-Young; Yu, Rina; Kim, Jeong-Sang; Kim, Young-Kyoon; Sung, Mi-Kyung

    2004-07-08

    Frequent consumption of soy and soy-based products is associated with reduced cancer incidence particularly for breast, colon, and prostate cancer. In this study, we examined the effect of crude soy saponin extract on PMA (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate)-induced inflammatory responses. Human adenocarcinoma cells (HT-29) were treated with various concentrations of saponin extract for 72 h. Cell growth was measured at 24, 48 and 72 h of incubation, and the PMA-induced expressions of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), protein kinase C (PKC), and IkappaBalpha were determined. The results indicate that crude saponin extract decreased cell growth in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Crude soy saponin extract suppressed the degradation of IkappaBalpha in PMA-stimulated cells, while COX-2 and PKC expressions were significantly down-regulated. These findings support the hypothesis that the soy saponins reduce the risk of colon tumorigenesis possibly by suppressing inflammatory responses.

  6. Recombinant viral capsid protein VP1 suppresses migration and invasion of human cervical cancer by modulating phosphorylated prohibitin in lipid rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Ching-Feng; Peng, Jei-Ming; Hung, Shao-Wen; Liang, Chi-Ming; Liang, Shu-Mei

    2012-07-28

    Recombinant capsid protein VP1 (rVP1) of foot-and-mouth disease virus inhibits invasion/metastasis of cancer cells. Here we studied its mechanism of action on human cervical cancer cells. The inhibition of cell invasion by rVP1 was accompanied with reduction in phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate (PIP3), phospho-Akt S473, phosphorylated prohibitin (phospho-PHB) T258 in lipid rafts, dissociation of phospho-PHB T258 with Raf-1 and the inactivation of Raf-1/ERK. Addition of PIP3 or overexpression of constitutively active Akt and raft-anchored PHB T258 but not PHB T258I mutant protein reversed the inhibitory effects of rVP1. rVP1 inhibited cervical tumor growth and metastasis, and prolonged survival in xenograft mouse models. These results suggest that rVP1 inhibits cancer metastasis via de-phosphorylation of Akt and PHB T258 in lipid rafts to downregulate Raf/ERK signaling.

  7. Effects of matrine on the growth inhibition, c-myc and hTERT protein expression in human adenocarcinoma lung cancer cell line A549

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    Qiong CHEN

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It was reported that telomerase was associated with the oncogenesis and progression of cancer, and to be the common targets of cancer therapy. The mechanism of matrine on lung cancer in vitro is not clear. We studied the effect of matrine on growth of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells and the mechanism related with telomerase. Methods MTT was used for measuring A549 cells viability, Hoechst 33342-propidium iodide fluorescent staining for observing apoptotic cells, flow cytometry (FCM for analyzing cell cycle and apoptosis, and immunocytochemistry for measuring the protein expressions of c-myc and hTERT in A549 cells. Results Matrine inhibited the proliferation of A549 cells with a time-dose-dependent manner (P<0.05. Hoechst 33342-propidium iodide staining showed apoptotic cells with chromatin condensation and fragmentation of nuclei. FCM analysis indicated elevating rate of cells in G0/G1 phase, lowering rate of that in S phase and the highering apoptotic rate. The levels of c-myc and hTERT protein expression in the matrine group was lower than that in the control group (P<0.05, and AOD of c-myc showed positive correlation with AOD of hTERT (r=0.633, P<0.01 Conclusion The inhibitory effect of matrine on A549 cells may be related to the lower expression of c-myc and hTERT.

  8. CDC25A Protein Stability Represents a Previously Unrecognized Target of HER2 Signaling in Human Breast Cancer: Implication for a Potential Clinical Relevance in Trastuzumab Treatment

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    Emanuela Brunetto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The CDC25A-CDK2 pathway has been proposed as critical for the oncogenic action of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 in mammary epithelial cells. In particular, transgenic expression of CDC25A cooperates with HER2 in promoting mammary tumors, whereas CDC25A hemizygous loss attenuates the HER2-induced tumorigenesis penetrance. On the basis of this evidence of a synergism between HER2 and the cell cycle regulator CDC25A in a mouse model of mammary tumorigenesis, we investigated the role of CDC25A in human HER2-positive breast cancer and its possible implications in therapeutic response. HER2 status and CDC25A expression were assessed in 313 breast cancer patients and we found statistically significant correlation between HER2 and CDC25A (P = .007. Moreover, an HER2-positive breast cancer subgroup with high levels of CDC25A and very aggressive phenotype was identified (P = .005. Importantly, our in vitro studies on breast cancer cell lines showed that the HER2 inhibitor efficacy on cell growth and viability relied also on CDC25A expression and that such inhibition induces CDC25A down-regulation through phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway and DNA damage response activation. In line with this observation, we found a statistical significant association between CDC25A overexpression and trastuzumab-combined therapy response rate in two different HER2-positive cohorts of trastuzumab-treated patients in either metastatic or neoadjuvant setting (P = .018 for the metastatic cohort and P = .021 for the neoadjuvant cohort. Our findings highlight a link between HER2 and CDC25A that positively modulates HER2- targeted therapy response, suggesting that, in HER2-positive breast cancer patients, CDC25A overexpression affects trastuzumab sensitivity.

  9. CDC25A Protein Stability Represents a Previously Unrecognized Target of HER2 Signaling in Human Breast Cancer: Implication for a Potential Clinical Relevance in Trastuzumab Treatment1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetto, Emanuela; Ferrara, Anna Maria; Rampoldi, Francesca; Talarico, Anna; Cin, Elena Dal; Grassini, Greta; Spagnuolo, Lorenzo; Sassi, Isabella; Ferro, Antonella; Cuorvo, Lucia Veronica; Barbareschi, Mattia; Piccinin, Sara; Maestro, Roberta; Pecciarini, Lorenza; Doglioni, Claudio; Cangi, Maria Giulia

    2013-01-01

    The CDC25A-CDK2 pathway has been proposed as critical for the oncogenic action of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) in mammary epithelial cells. In particular, transgenic expression of CDC25A cooperates with HER2 in promoting mammary tumors, whereas CDC25A hemizygous loss attenuates the HER2-induced tumorigenesis penetrance. On the basis of this evidence of a synergism between HER2 and the cell cycle regulator CDC25A in a mouse model of mammary tumorigenesis, we investigated the role of CDC25A in human HER2-positive breast cancer and its possible implications in therapeutic response. HER2 status and CDC25A expression were assessed in 313 breast cancer patients and we found statistically significant correlation between HER2 and CDC25A (P = .007). Moreover, an HER2-positive breast cancer subgroup with high levels of CDC25A and very aggressive phenotype was identified (P = .005). Importantly, our in vitro studies on breast cancer cell lines showed that the HER2 inhibitor efficacy on cell growth and viability relied also on CDC25A expression and that such inhibition induces CDC25A down-regulation through phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway and DNA damage response activation. In line with this observation, we found a statistical significant association between CDC25A overexpression and trastuzumab-combined therapy response rate in two different HER2-positive cohorts of trastuzumab-treated patients in either metastatic or neoadjuvant setting (P = .018 for the metastatic cohort and P = .021 for the neoadjuvant cohort). Our findings highlight a link between HER2 and CDC25A that positively modulates HER2-targeted therapy response, suggesting that, in HER2-positive breast cancer patients, CDC25A overexpression affects trastuzumab sensitivity. PMID:23730206

  10. Loss of tricellular tight junction protein LSR promotes cell invasion and migration via upregulation of TEAD1/AREG in human endometrial cancer

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    Shimada, Hiroshi; Abe, Shyuetsu; Kohno, Takayuki; Satohisa, Seiro; Konno, Takumi; Takahashi, Syunta; Hatakeyama, Tsubasa; Arimoto, Chihiro; Kakuki, Takuya; Kaneko, Yakuto; Takano, Ken-ichi; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Kojima, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) is a unique molecule of tricellular contacts of normal and cancer cells. We investigated how the loss of LSR induced cell migration, invasion and proliferation in endometrial cancer cell line Sawano. mRNAs of amphiregulin (AREG) and TEA domain family member 1 (TEAD1) were markedly upregulated by siRNA-LSR. In endometrial cancer tissues, downregulation of LSR and upregulation of AREG were observed together with malignancy, and Yes-associated protein (YAP) was present in the nuclei. siRNA-AREG prevented the cell migration and invasion induced by siRNA-LSR, whereas treatment with AREG induced cell migration and invasion. LSR was colocalized with TRIC, angiomotin (AMOT), Merlin and phosphorylated YAP (pYAP). siRNA-LSR increased expression of pYAP and decreased that of AMOT and Merlin. siRNA-YAP prevented expression of the mRNAs of AREG and TEAD1, and the cell migration and invasion induced by siRNA-LSR. Treatment with dobutamine and 2-deoxy-D-glucose and glucose starvation induced the pYAP expression and prevented the cell migration and invasion induced by siRNA-LSR. siRNA-AMOT decreased the Merlin expression and prevented the cell migration and invasion induced by siRNA-LSR. The loss of LSR promoted cell invasion and migration via upregulation of TEAD1/AREG dependent on YAP/pYAP and AMOT/Merlin in human endometrial cancer cells. PMID:28071680

  11. Prostaglandin E2 and the protein kinase A pathway mediate arachidonic acid induction of c-fos in human prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    2000-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is the precursor for prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis and increases growth of prostate cancer cells. To further elucidate the mechanisms involved in AA-induced prostate cell growth, induction of c-fos expression by AA was investigated in a human prostate cancer cell line, PC-3. c-fos mRNA was induced shortly after addition of AA, along with a remarkable increase in PGE2 production. c-fos expression and PGE2 production induced by AA was blocked by a cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, flurbiprofen, suggesting that PGE2 mediated c-fos induction. Protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor H-89 abolished induction of c-fos expression by AA, and partially inhibited PGE2 production. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor GF109203X had no significant effect on c-fos expression or PGE2 production. Expression of prostaglandin (EP) receptors, which mediate signal transduction from PGE2 to the cells, was examined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in several human prostate cell lines. EP4 and EP2, which are coupled to the PKA signalling pathway, were expressed in all cells tested. Expression of EP1, which activates the PKC pathway, was not detected. The current study showed that induction of the immediate early gene c-fos by AA is mediated by PGE2, which activates the PKA pathway via the EP2/4 receptor in the PC-3 cells.

  12. Inhibition of fibroblast growth factor 2-induced apoptosis involves survivin expression, protein kinase Cα activation and subcellular translocation of Smac in human small cell lung cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Desheng Xiao; Kuansong Wang; Jianhua Zhou; Huiqiu Cao; Zhenghao Deng; Yongbin Hu; Xiahui Qu; Jifang Wen

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism by which fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) inhibits apoptosis in the human small cell lung cancer cell line H446 subjected to serum starvation,apoptosis was evaluated by flow cytometry, Hoechst 33258 staining, caspase-3 activity, and DNA fragmentation.Survivin expression induced by FGF-2 and protein kinase Cα (PKCα) translocation was detected by subcellular fractionation and Western blot analysis. In addition, FGF-2-induced release of Smac from mitochondria to the cytoplasm was analyzed by Western blotting and immunofluorescence.FGF-2 reduced apoptosis induced by serum starvation and up-regulated survivin expression in H446 cells in a dosedependent and time-dependent manner, and inhibited caspase-3 activity. FGF-2 also inhibited the release of Smac from mitochondria to the cytoplasm induced by serum starvation and increased PKCα translocation from the cytoplasm to the cell membrane. In addition, PKC inhibitor inhibited the expression of survivin. FGF-2 up-regulates the expression of survivin protein in H446 cells and blocks the release of Smac from mitochondria to the cytoplasm. PKCα regulated FGF-2-induced survivin expression. Thus, survivin, Smac,and PKCα might play important roles in the inhibition of apoptosis by FGF-2 in human small cell lung cancer cells.

  13. Prostaglandin E2 and the protein kinase A pathway mediate arachidonic acid induction of c-fos in human prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    2000-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is the precursor for prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis and increases growth of prostate cancer cells. To further elucidate the mechanisms involved in AA-induced prostate cell growth, induction of c-fos expression by AA was investigated in a human prostate cancer cell line, PC-3. c-fos mRNA was induced shortly after addition of AA, along with a remarkable increase in PGE2 production. c-fos expression and PGE2 production induced by AA was blocked by a cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, flurbiprofen, suggesting that PGE2 mediated c-fos induction. Protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor H-89 abolished induction of c-fos expression by AA, and partially inhibited PGE2 production. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor GF109203X had no significant effect on c-fos expression or PGE2 production. Expression of prostaglandin (EP) receptors, which mediate signal transduction from PGE2 to the cells, was examined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in several human prostate cell lines. EP4 and EP2, which are coupled to the PKA signalling pathway, were expressed in all cells tested. Expression of EP1, which activates the PKC pathway, was not detected. The current study showed that induction of the immediate early gene c-fos by AA is mediated by PGE2, which activates the PKA pathway via the EP2/4 receptor in the PC-3 cells.

  14. Ribosomal protein genes are overexpressed in colorectal cancer: isolation of a cDNA clone encoding the human S3 ribosomal protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogue-Geile, K; Geiser, J R; Shu, M; Miller, C; Wool, I G; Meisler, A I; Pipas, J M

    1991-08-01

    We have isolated a cDNA clone encoding the human S3 ribosomal protein from a normal human colon cDNA library. The clone was identified as one of many that detected genes whose level of expression was increased in adenocarcinoma of the colon relative to normal colonic mucosa. Increased levels of the S3 transcript were present in the tumors of all eight patients examined. Moreover, the S3 mRNA was also more abundant in 7 of 10 adenomatous polyps, the presumed precursor of carcinoma. Additional studies demonstrated that increased levels of mRNAs encoding several other ribosomal proteins, including S6, S8, S12, L5, and P0, were present in colorectal tumors and polyps. These results suggest that there is increased synthesis of ribosomes in colorectal tumors and that this increase is an early event in colon neoplasia.

  15. Comparative proteomics analysis of human gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Li; Jian-Fang Li; Ying Qu; Xue-Hua Chen; Jian-Min Qin; Qin-Long Gu; Min Yan; Zheng-Gang Zhu; Bing-Ya Liu

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To isolate and identify differentially expressed proteins between cancer and normal tissues of gastric cancer by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS).METHODS: Soluble fraction proteins of gastric cancer tissues and paired normal tissues were separated by 2-DE.The differentially expressed proteins were selected and identified by MALDI-TOF-MS and database search.RESULTS: 2-DE profiles with high resolution and reproducibility were obtained.Twenty-three protein spots were excised from sliver staining gel and digested in gel by trypsin,in which fifteen protein spots were identified successfully.Among the identified proteins,there were ten over-expressed and five under-expressed proteins in stomach cancer tissues compared with normal tissues.CONCLUSION: In this study,the well-resolved,reproducible 2-DE patterns of human gastric cancer tissue and paired normal tissue were established and optimized and certain differentially-expressed proteins were identified.The combined use of 2-DE and MS provides an effective approach to screen for potential tumor markers.

  16. Reduced expression of DNA repair and redox signaling protein APE1/Ref-1 impairs human pancreatic cancer cell survival, proliferation, and cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanlin; Zhou, Shaoyu; Sandusky, George E; Kelley, Mark R; Fishel, Melissa L

    2010-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a deadly disease that is virtually never cured. Understanding the chemoresistance intrinsic to this cancer will aid in developing new regimens. High expression of APE1/Ref-1, a DNA repair and redox signaling protein, is associated with resistance, poor outcome, and angiogenesis; little is known in pancreatic cancer. Immunostaining of adenocarcinoma shows greater APE1/Ref-1 expression than in normal pancreas tissue. A decrease in APE1/Ref-1 protein levels results in pancreatic cancer cell growth inhibition, increased apoptosis, and altered cell cycle progression. Endogenous cell cycle inhibitors increase when APE1/ Ref-1 is reduced, demonstrating its importance to proliferation and growth of pancreatic cancer.

  17. Short-term treatment with glucosamine hydrochloride specifically downregulates hypoxia-inducible factor-1α at the protein level in YD-8 human tongue cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Jeong-Rang; Park, Yu-Kyoung; Jang, Byeong-Churl

    2014-05-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a tumor angiogenic transcription factor composed of an α and β subunit. We investigated the effect of glucosamine hydrochloride (GS-HCl) on the expression of HIF-1α and HIF-1β in serum‑treated YD-8 human tongue cancer cells. While long-term (24 h) treatment with GS-HCl strongly repressed the expression of HIF-1α and HIF-1β at both the protein and mRNA levels, short-term (4 h) GS-HCl treatment inhibited HIF-1α at the protein level. Short-term GS-HCl treatment also decreased phosphorylation of p70S6K and S6, translation-related proteins. However, the results of subsequent pharmacological inhibition and protein stability analyses indicated that HIF-1α protein downregulation induced by short-term GS-HCl treatment was not through modulation of the mTOR/p70S6K/S6 signaling pathways, the 26S proteasomal and lysosomal activities and HIF-1α protein stability. Importantly, our further analyses identified that HIF-1α protein downregulation induced by short-term GS-HCl treatment was blunted by exogenous administration of the citric acid cycle metabolites citrate and 2-oxoglutarate, but not the glycolytic end byproducts pyruvate and lactate. These findings demonstrate firstly that short-term GS treatment selectively downregulates HIF-1α at the protein level in YD-8 cells via interference of production of the citric acid cycle metabolites. It is proposed that short-term GS-HCl exposure may be applied for the treatment of oral tumors with high expression of HIF-1α.

  18. Functional cyclic AMP response element in the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) promoter modulates epidermal growth factor receptor pathway- or androgen withdrawal-mediated BCRP/ABCG2 transcription in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yi; Nakanishi, Takeo; Natarajan, Karthika; Safren, Lowell; Hamburger, Anne W; Hussain, Arif; Ross, Douglas D

    2015-03-01

    Phosphorylated cyclic-AMP (cAMP) response element binding protein (p-CREB) is a downstream effector of a variety of important signaling pathways. We investigated whether the human BCRP promoter contains a functional cAMP response element (CRE). 8Br-cAMP, a cAMP analogue, increased the activity of a BCRP promoter reporter construct and BCRP mRNA in human carcinoma cells. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway activation also led to an increase in p-CREB and in BCRP promoter reporter activity via two major downstream EGFR signaling pathways: the phosphotidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. EGF treatment increased the phosphorylation of EGFR, AKT, ERK and CREB, while simultaneously enhancing BCRP mRNA and functional protein expression. EGF-stimulated CREB phosphorylation and BCRP induction were diminished by inhibition of EGFR, PI3K/AKT or RAS/MAPK signaling. CREB silencing using RNA interference reduced basal levels of BCRP mRNA and diminished the induction of BCRP by EGF. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed that a putative CRE site on the BCRP promoter bound p-CREB by a point mutation of the CRE site abolished EGF-induced stimulation of BCRP promoter reporter activity. Furthermore, the CREB co-activator, cAMP-regulated transcriptional co-activator (CRTC2), is involved in CREB-mediated BCRP transcription: androgen depletion of LNCaP human prostate cancer cells increased both CREB phosphorylation and CRTC2 nuclear translocation, and enhanced BCRP expression. Silencing CREB or CRTC2 reduced basal BCRP expression and BCRP induction under androgen-depletion conditions. This novel CRE site plays a central role in mediating BCRP gene expression in several human cancer cell lines following activation of multiple cancer-relevant signaling pathways.

  19. Epidermal Growth Factor Cytoplasmic Domain Affects ErbB Protein Degradation by the Lysosomal and Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway in Human Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Glogowska

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The cytoplasmic domains of EGF-like ligands, including EGF cytoplasmic domain (EGFcyt, have important biological functions. Using specific constructs and peptides of human EGF cytoplasmic domain, we demonstrate that EGFcyt facilitates lysosomal and proteasomal protein degradation, and this coincided with growth inhibition of human thyroid and glioma carcinoma cells. EGFcyt and exon 22–23-encoded peptide (EGF22.23 enhanced procathepsin B (procathB expression and procathB-mediated lysosomal degradation of EGFR/ErbB1 as determined by inhibitors for procathB and the lysosomal ATPase inhibitor BafA1. Presence of mbEGFctF, EGFcyt, EGF22.23, and exon 23-encoded peptides suppressed the expression of the deubiqitinating enzyme ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1. This coincided with hyperubiquitination of total cellular proteins and ErbB1/2 and reduced proteasome activity. Upon small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of endogenously expressed UCH-L1, a similar hyperubiquitinylation phenotype, reduced ErbB1/2 content, and attenuated growth was observed. The exon 23-encoded peptide region of EGFcyt was important for these biologic actions. Structural homology modeling of human EGFcyt showed that this molecular region formed an exposed surface loop. Peptides derived from this EGFcyt loop structure may aid in the design of novel peptide therapeutics aimed at inhibiting growth of cancer cells.

  20. Colon cancer associated transcripts in human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yincong; Xie, Haibiao; Gao, Qunjun; Zhan, Hengji; Xiao, Huizhong; Zou, Yifan; Zhang, Fuyou; Liu, Yuchen; Li, Jianfa

    2017-08-02

    Long non-coding RNAs serve as important regulators in complicated cellular activities, including cell differentiation, proliferation and death. Dysregulation of long non-coding RNAs occurs in the formation and progression of cancers. The family of colon cancer associated transcripts, long non-coding RNAs colon cancer associated transcript-1 and colon cancer associated transcript-2 are known as oncogenes involved in various cancers. Colon cancer associated transcript-1 is a novel lncRNA located in 8q24.2, and colon cancer associated transcript-2 maps to the 8q24.21 region encompassing rs6983267. Colon cancer associated transcripts have close associations with clinical characteristics, such as lymph node metastasis, high TNM stage and short overall survival. Knockdown of them can reverse the malignant phenotypes of cancer cells, including proliferation, migration, invasion and apoptosis. Moreover, they can increase the expression level of c-MYC and oncogenic microRNAs via activating a series of complex mechanisms. In brief, the family of colon cancer associated transcripts may serve as potential biomarkers or therapeutic targets for human cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Overexpression of nuclear protein kinase CK2 α catalytic subunit (CK2α as a poor prognosticator in human colorectal cancer.

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    Kai-Yuan Lin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the most common malignancies but the current therapeutic approaches for advanced CRC are less efficient. Thus, novel therapeutic approaches are badly needed. The purpose of this study is to investigate the involvement of nuclear protein kinase CK2 α subunit (CK2α in tumor progression, and in the prognosis of human CRC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Expression levels of nuclear CK2α were analyzed in 245 colorectal tissues from patients with CRC by immunohistochemistry, quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot. We correlated the expression levels with clinicopathologic parameters and prognosis in human CRC patients. Overexpression of nuclear CK2α was significantly correlated with depth of invasion, nodal status, American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC staging, degree of differentiation, and perineural invasion. Patients with high expression levels of nuclear CK2α had a significantly poorer overall survival rate compared with patients with low expression levels of nuclear CK2α. In multi-variate Cox regression analysis, overexpression of nuclear CK2α was proven to be an independent prognostic marker for CRC. In addition, DLD-1 human colon cancer cells were employed as a cellular model to study the role of CK2α on cell growth, and the expression of CK2α in DLD-1 cells was inhibited by using siRNA technology. The data indicated that CK2α-specific siRNA treatment resulted in growth inhibition. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, overexpression of nuclear CK2α can be a useful marker for predicting the outcome of patients with CRC.

  2. Dynamic protein-protein interaction subnetworks of lung cancer in cases with smoking history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wei; He, Li-Ran; Zhao, Yan-Chao; Chan, Man-Him; Zhang, Meng; He, Miao

    2013-02-01

    Smoking is the primary cause of lung cancer and is linked to 85% of lung cancer cases. However, how lung cancer develops in patients with smoking history remains unclear. Systems approaches that combine human protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks and gene expression data are superior to traditional methods. We performed these systems to determine the role that smoking plays in lung cancer development and used the support vector machine (SVM) model to predict PPIs. By defining expression variance (EV), we found 520 dynamic proteins (EV>0.4) using data from the Human Protein Reference Database and Gene Expression Omnibus Database, and built 7 dynamic PPI subnetworks of lung cancer in patients with smoking history. We also determined the primary functions of each subnetwork: signal transduction, apoptosis, and cell migration and adhesion for subnetwork A; cell-sustained angiogenesis for subnetwork B; apoptosis for subnetwork C; and, finally, signal transduction and cell replication and proliferation for subnetworks D-G. The probability distribution of the degree of dynamic protein and static protein differed, clearly showing that the dynamic proteins were not the core proteins which widely connected with their neighbor proteins. There were high correlations among the dynamic proteins, suggesting that the dynamic proteins tend to form specific dynamic modules. We also found that the dynamic proteins were only correlated with the expression of selected proteins but not all neighbor proteins when cancer occurred.

  3. New, highly potent and non-toxic, chromone inhibitors of the human breast cancer resistance protein ABCG2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Amanda do Rocio Andrade; Lecerf-Schmidt, Florine; Guragossian, Nathalie; Pazinato, Jaqueline; Gozzi, Gustavo Jabor; Winter, Evelyn; Valdameri, Glaucio; Veale, Alexander; Boumendjel, Ahcène; Di Pietro, Attilio; Pérès, Basile

    2016-10-21

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) is one of the major transporters involved in the efflux of anticancer compounds, contributing to multidrug resistance (MDR). Inhibition of ABCG2-mediated transport is then considered a promising strategy for overcoming MDR in tumors. We recently identified a chromone derivative, namely MBL-II-141 as a selective ABCG2 inhibitor, with relevant in vivo activity. Here, we report the pharmacomodulation of MBL-II-141, with the aim of identifying key pharmacophoric elements to design more potent selective and non-toxic inhibitors. Through rational structural modifications of MBL-II-141, using simple and affordable chemistry, we obtained highly active and easily-made inhibitors of ABCG2. Among the investigated compounds, derivative 4a, was found to be 3-fold more potent than MBL-II-141. It was similarly efficient as the reference inhibitor Ko143 but with the advantage of a lower intrinsic cytotoxicity, and therefore constitutes the best ABCG2 inhibitor ever reported displaying a very high therapeutic ratio. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  4. Mapping the human protein interactome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniel Figeys

    2008-01-01

    Interactions are the essence of all biomolecules because they cannot fulfill their roles without interacting with other molecules. Hence, mapping the interactions of biomolecules can be useful for understanding their roles and functions. Furthermore, the development of molecular based systems biology requires an understanding of the biomolecular interactions. In recent years, the mapping of protein-protein interactions in different species has been reported, but few reports have focused on the large-scale mapping of protein-protein interactions in human. Here, we review the developments in protein interaction mapping and we discuss issues and strategies for the mapping of the human protein interactome.

  5. Eriodictyol-induced anti-cancer and apoptotic effects in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells are associated with cell cycle arrest and modulation of apoptosis-related proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate the anti-cancer effects of eriodictyol in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (Hep-G2 and normal liver hepatocyte cell line (AML12 along with evaluating its mode of action. Sulforhodamine B assay was used to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of the compound while as fluorescence microscopy was involved to demonstrate the effect of eriodictyol on cellular apoptosis. Flow cytometry was used to investigate the effect of eriodictyol on cell cycle while Western blot analysis revealed the effect on apoptosis-related protein expressions. Results indicate that eriodictyol-induced selective and concentration-dependent cytotoxic effect on Hep-G2 cancer cells while AML12 normal liver cells were very less susceptible to its effect. Eriodictyol-induced apoptosis related morphological changes including chromatin condensation and nuclear fragmentation. It also induced G2/M cell cycle arrest in these cells. Eriodictyol led to up-regulation of Bax and PARP and down-regulation of Bcl-2 protein.

  6. Bioactive hyaluronan fragment (hexasaccharide) detects specific hexa-binding proteins in human breast and stomach cancer: possible role in tumorogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Prashanth; Kollapalli, Srinivas Prasad; Thomas, Anil; Mortha, Karuna Kumar; Banerjee, Shib Das

    2012-08-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is a component of extracellular matrix that influences cell-proliferation, migration, development, regeneration, normal tissue remodeling, tissues undergoing malignancy and tumor cell interaction. The widespread occurrence of HA binding proteins, their involvement in tissue organization and the control of cellular behavior are well documented. The low molecular mass HA fragments can also induce a variety of biological events, including chemokine gene expression, transcription factor expression and angiogenesis. It is believed that these fragments are more potent in cellular activities than high molecular mass HA. In this study, we isolated the various fragments by gel permeation chromatography of hyaluronidase digested HA and characterized by fluoro assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis (FACE) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization analysis (MALDI). Detection and distribution of cellular receptors in invasive tumor tissues for HA polymer and HA fragments were determined both by Western blot and histochemistry. The study demonstrated the overexpression of HA-hexa binding protein in human tumors of breast and stomach and its involvement in tumorogenesis.

  7. Report: Human cancer genetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Marilyn; ALBERTSON Donna

    2006-01-01

    The short report will be focused on the genetic basis and possible mechanisms of tumorigenesis, common types of cancer, the importance of genetic diagnosis of cancer, and the methodology of cancer genetic diagnosis. They will also review presymptomatic testing of hereditary cancers, and the application of expression profiling to identify patients likely to benefit from particular therapeutic approaches.

  8. Human cancer genetics*

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The short report will be focused on the genetic basis and possible mechanisms of tumorigenesis, common types of cancer, the importance of genetic diagnosis of cancer, and the methodology of cancer genetic diagnosis. They will also review presymptomatic testing of hereditary cancers, and the application of expression profiling to identify patients likely to benefit from particular therapeutic approaches.

  9. Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins

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    Guangshun Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As the key components of innate immunity, human host defense antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs play a critical role in warding off invading microbial pathogens. In addition, AMPs can possess other biological functions such as apoptosis, wound healing, and immune modulation. This article provides an overview on the identification, activity, 3D structure, and mechanism of action of human AMPs selected from the antimicrobial peptide database. Over 100 such peptides have been identified from a variety of tissues and epithelial surfaces, including skin, eyes, ears, mouths, gut, immune, nervous and urinary systems. These peptides vary from 10 to 150 amino acids with a net charge between −3 and +20 and a hydrophobic content below 60%. The sequence diversity enables human AMPs to adopt various 3D structures and to attack pathogens by different mechanisms. While α-defensin HD-6 can self-assemble on the bacterial surface into nanonets to entangle bacteria, both HNP-1 and β-defensin hBD-3 are able to block cell wall biosynthesis by binding to lipid II. Lysozyme is well-characterized to cleave bacterial cell wall polysaccharides but can also kill bacteria by a non-catalytic mechanism. The two hydrophobic domains in the long amphipathic α-helix of human cathelicidin LL-37 lays the basis for binding and disrupting the curved anionic bacterial membrane surfaces by forming pores or via the carpet model. Furthermore, dermcidin may serve as ion channel by forming a long helix-bundle structure. In addition, the C-type lectin RegIIIα can initially recognize bacterial peptidoglycans followed by pore formation in the membrane. Finally, histatin 5 and GAPDH(2-32 can enter microbial cells to exert their effects. It appears that granulysin enters cells and kills intracellular pathogens with the aid of pore-forming perforin. This arsenal of human defense proteins not only keeps us healthy but also inspires the development of a new generation of personalized

  10. Human leucine zipper protein sLZIP induces migration and invasion of cervical cancer cells via expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyereen; Jang, Sung-Wuk; Ko, Jesang

    2011-12-01

    Extracellular proteolysis mediates tissue homeostasis. In cancer, altered proteolysis leads to abnormal tumor growth, inflammation, tissue invasion, and metastasis. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) represents one of the most prominent proteinases associated with inflammation and tumorigenesis. The recently identified human transcription factor sLZIP is a member of the leucine zipper transcription factor family. Although sLZIP is known to function in ligand-induced transactivation of the glucocorticoid receptor, its exact functions and target genes are not known. In this study, we investigated the role of sLZIP in MMP-9 expression and its involvement in cervical cancer development. Our results show that sLZIP increased the expression of MMP-9 at both the mRNA and protein levels and the proteolytic activity of MMP-9 in HeLa and SiHa cells. sLZIP also increased the transcriptional activity of MMP-9 by binding directly to the cAMP-responsive element of the MMP-9 promoter region. Involvement of sLZIP in MMP-9 expression was further supported by the fact that ME-180 cells expressing sLZIP siRNA were refractory to MMP-9 expression. Results from wound healing and invasion assays showed that sLZIP enhanced both the migration and invasion of cervical cancer cells. The increased migration and invasion of HeLa and SiHa cells that were induced by sLZIP were abrogated by inhibition of the proteolytic activity of MMP-9. These results indicate that sLZIP plays a critical role in MMP-9 expression and is probably involved in invasion and metastasis of cervical cancer.

  11. Enhanced sensitivity to mitomycin C by abating heat shock protein 70 expression in human bladder cancer cell line of BIU-87

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Ling-feng; GUAN Kao-peng; YAN Zheng; YE Hai-yun; XU Ke-xin; REN Liang; HOU Shu-kun

    2005-01-01

    Background Bladder cancer is a relatively common tumor in the urinary system, in which mitomycin C (MMC)-based chemotherapy or combination chemotherapy has been mainly used to treat patients with advanced bladder cancer. The prognosis of patients with advanced bladder cancer is still extremely poor in spite of recent therapeutic advances. To improve the prognosis, the sensitivity of tumor cells to mitomycin C by the induction of apoptosis with the abating heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) expression in human bladder cancer cell lines of BIU-87 was investigated. Methods HSP70 expression was abated in BIU-87 cells by HSP mRNA antisense oligomers. MTT assay and the clone-forming test were used for evaluating the sensitivity of cells to MMC. Apoptosis was assessed using both fluorescent microscopy after staining the cells with Hoechst 33258 and DNA fragment ladder agarose electrophoresis. Thirty-two male six-week-old BALB/c nude mice, at the beginning of the experiment, were used to evaluate the effect of antisense oligomers (ASO) on the tumor formation in vivo. Results HSP70 expression in BIU-87 was effectively abated by HSP70 mRNA antisense oligomers. The percentage of apoptotic cells in ASO group was greater than in sense oligomers (SO) [P50%) was more than that of ASO or MMC group alone (all P<0.05). Conclusions The abating level of HSP70 expression can strengthen the sensitivity of BIU-87 to MMC. One of this effect might be related to the induction of apoptosis by abating HSP70 expression.

  12. p16、ESR3蛋白在HPV相关宫颈癌中的表达及意义%Expressions and significances of p16 protein and estrogen receptor β protein in human papillomavirus- related cervical cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    古雅丽; 李新敏; 郭华峰

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the expressions and significances of pl6 protein and estrogen receptor (3 protein in human papil-lomavirus ( HPV) - related cervical cancer. Methods: Surface plasma resonance method was used to detect the types and loads of HPV in-fection in 90 cases with cervical cancer, immunohistochemical method was used to detect the expression levels of pl6 protein and estrogen receptor p protein in 90 cases with cervical cancer (cervical cancer group) and 30 cases with normal cervical tissue ( control group) , then the results were analyzed. Results; The main type of HPV infection was HPV 51 subtype, but the average loads of HPV 16 subtype and HPV 18 subtype were higher, compared with other HPV subtypes, there was significant difference (P<0. 05) . The positive expression rates of pl6 protein in cervical cancer group and control group were 100. 00% and 20. 00% , respectively, there was significant difference between the two groups ( P < 0. 05) ; the positive expression rates of estrogen receptor p protein in cervical cancer group and control group were 14. 44% and 76. 67% , respectively, there was significant difference between the two groups (P<0. 05) . Conclusion; HPV, pl6 protein, and estrogen receptor p protein play important roles in th occurrence and development of cervical cancer, the detections of the three indicators are helpful to diagnosis and prognosis of cervical cancer in clinic.%目的:探讨p16、ESRβ蛋白在HPV相关宫颈癌中的表达及临床意义.方法:采用表面等离子谐振法检测90例宫颈癌中感染HPV类型及载量,用免疫组化方法分别检测90例宫颈癌和30例对照组宫颈组织中p16、ESRβ蛋白的表达并分析结果.结果:HPV感染类型以51亚型为主,但16亚型和18亚型的平均载量较高,与其他类型相比差异有统计学意义(P<0.05); p16蛋白的表达在宫颈癌组和对照组中的阳性率分别为100.00%和20.00%,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);ESRβ蛋白

  13. Human papilloma viruses (HPV and breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Sutherland Lawson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Human papillomaviruses (HPV may have a role in some breast cancers. The purpose of this study is to fill important gaps in the evidence. These gaps are: (i confirmation of the presence of high risk for cancer HPVs in breast cancers, (ii evidence of HPV infections in benign breast tissues prior to the development of HPV positive breast cancer in the same patients, (iii evidence that HPVs are biologically active and not harmless passengers in breast cancer.Methods: RNA-seq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA was used to identify HPV RNA sequences in breast cancers. We also conducted a retrospective cohort study based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR analyses to identify HPVs in archival specimens from Australian women with benign breast biopsies who later developed breast cancer. To assess whether HPVs in breast cancer were biologically active, the expression of the oncogenic protein HPV E7 was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC.Results: Thirty (3.5% low risk and 20 (2.3% high risk HPV types were identified in 855 breast cancers from the TCGA data base. The high risk types were HPV 18 (48%, HPV 113 (24%, HPV 16 (10%, HPV 52 (10%. Data from the PCR cohort study, indicated that HPV type 18 was the most common type identified in breast cancer specimens (55% of 40 breast cancer specimens followed by HPV 16 (13%. The same HPV type was identified in both the benign and subsequent breast cancer in 15 patients. HPV E7 proteins were identified in 72% of benign breast specimens and 59% of invasive breast cancer specimens.Conclusions: There were 4 observations of particular interest: (i confirmation by both NGS and PCR of the presence of high risk HPV gene sequences in breast cancers, (ii a correlation between high risk HPV in benign breast specimens and subsequent HPV positive breast cancer in the same patient, (iii HPVs in breast cancer are likely to be biologically active (as shown by transcription of HPV DNA to RNA plus the expression of

  14. Role of Human Breast Cancer Related Protein versus P-Glycoprotein as an Efflux Transporter for Benzylpenicillin: Potential Importance at the Blood-Brain Barrier.

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    Yangfang Li

    Full Text Available While the blood-brain barrier (BBB protects the brain by controlling the access of solutes and toxic substances to brain, it also limits drug entry to treat central nervous system disorders. Many drugs are substrates for ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters at the BBB that limit their entry into the brain. The role of those transporters in limiting the entry of the widely prescribed therapeutic, benzylpenicillin, has produced conflicting results. This study investigated the possible potential involvement of P-glycoprotein (P-gp and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, two ABC transporters, in benzylpenicillin transport at BBB in human using MDCKII cells overexpressing those transporters as well as pharmacological inhibition. MDCKII cells overexpressing human BCRP (MDCKII-BCRP but not those overexpressing human P-gp (MDCKII-MDR cells had reduced [3H]benzylpenicillin uptake. Similarly, inhibiting BCRP increased [3H]benzylpenicillin uptake in MDCKII-BCRP cells, while inhibiting P-gp in MDCKII-MDR cells had no effect on uptake although there was evidence that benzylpenicillin is a substrate for canine P-gp. While inhibiting BCRP affected [3H]benzylpenicillin cell concentrations it did not affect transepithelial flux in MDCKII-BCRP cells. In summary, the results indicate that human BCRP and not human P-gp is involved in benzylpenicillin transport. However, targeting BCRP alone was not sufficient to alter transepithelial flux in MDCKII cells. Whether it would be sufficient to alter blood-to-brain flux at the human BBB remains to be investigated.

  15. ERBB2 in cat mammary neoplasias disclosed a positive correlation between RNA and protein low expression levels: a model for erbB-2 negative human breast cancer.

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    Sara Santos

    Full Text Available Human ERBB2 is a proto-oncogene that codes for the erbB-2 epithelial growth factor receptor. In human breast cancer (HBC, erbB-2 protein overexpression has been repeatedly correlated with poor prognosis. In more recent works, underexpression of this gene has been described in HBC. Moreover, it is also recognised that oncogenes that are commonly amplified or deleted encompass point mutations, and some of these are associated with HBC. In cat mammary lesions (CMLs, the overexpression of ERBB2 (27%-59.6% has also been described, mostly at the protein level and although cat mammary neoplasias are considered to be a natural model of HBC, molecular information is still scarce. In the present work, a cat ERBB2 fragment, comprising exons 10 to 15 (ERBB2_10-15 was achieved for the first time. Allelic variants and genomic haplotype analyses were also performed, and differences between normal and CML populations were observed. Three amino acid changes, corresponding to 3 non-synonymous genomic sequence variants that were only detected in CMLs, were proposed to damage the 3D structure of the protein. We analysed the cat ERBB2 gene at the DNA (copy number determination, mRNA (expression levels assessment and protein levels (in extra- and intra protein domains in CML samples and correlated the last two evaluations with clinicopathological features. We found a positive correlation between the expression levels of the ERBB2 RNA and erbB-2 protein, corresponding to the intracellular region. Additionally, we detected a positive correlation between higher mRNA expression and better clinical outcome. Our results suggest that the ERBB2 gene is post-transcriptionally regulated and that proteins with truncations and single point mutations are present in cat mammary neoplastic lesions. We would like to emphasise that the recurrent occurrence of low erbB-2 expression levels in cat mammary tumours, suggests the cat mammary neoplasias as a valuable model for erbB-2

  16. Effects of sodium lactate Ringer's injection on transfection of human protein kinase C-α antisense oligonucleotide in A549 lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z H; Sun, W W; Han, Y L; Ma, Z

    2016-08-26

    In the present study, we evaluated the effects of four solutions [Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM), sodium lactate Ringer's injection (SLRI), phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), and NaCl] on the transfection of the human protein kinase C-a antisense oligonucleotide (PKC-a ASO) aprinocarsen in human lung carcinoma A549 cells. Specifically, SLRI, DMEM, PBS, or NaCl were used as the growth solutions for A549 cells, and OPTI-MEM was used as the PKC-a ASO diluent for transfection. Additionally, SLRI, DMEM, PBS, or NaCl were used as both the growth solutions and diluents for transfection. The cell viability and transfection efficiency were determined. The results demonstrated that when SLRI was used as either the growth solution or both the growth solution and diluent for aprinocarsen transfection in A549 cells, the effects were close to the best effects observed with DMEM as the growth solution and OPTI-MEM as the diluent, which supported the transfection of aprinocarsen into the cells. Moreover, SLRI resulted in higher transfection efficiency than those of PBS and NaCl. In in vitro experiments, aprinocarsen effectively induced apoptosis in A549 cells. In conclusion, SLRI may replace PBS or NaCl in clinical trials as a transfection solution readily accepted by the human body. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the use of SLRI as a transfection solution in lung-cancer cell lines.

  17. Human breast cancer resistance protein : Interactions with steroid drugs, hormones, the dietary carcinogen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo(4,5-b)pyridine, and transport of cimetidine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavek, P; Merino, G; Wagenaar, E; Bolscher, E; Novotna, M; Jonker, JW; Schinkel, AH

    2005-01-01

    The breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) is an ATP-binding cassette drug efflux transporter that extrudes xenotoxins from cells, mediating drug resistance and affecting the pharmacological behavior of many compounds. To study the interaction of human wild-type BCRP with steroid drugs, hormo

  18. BCAR1, a human homologue of the adapter protein p130Cas, and antiestrogen resistance in breast cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Brinkman (Arend); S. van der Flier (Silvia); E.M. Kok (Elisabeth); L.C.J. Dorssers (Lambert)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Treatment of breast cancer with the antiestrogen tamoxifen is effective in approximately one half of the patients with estrogen receptor-positive disease, but tumors recur frequently because of the development of metastases that are resistant to

  19. BCAR1, a human homologue of the adapter protein p130Cas, and antiestrogen resistance in breast cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Brinkman (Arend); S. van der Flier (Silvia); E.M. Kok (Elisabeth); L.C.J. Dorssers (Lambert)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Treatment of breast cancer with the antiestrogen tamoxifen is effective in approximately one half of the patients with estrogen receptor-positive disease, but tumors recur frequently because of the development of metastases that are resistant to

  20. The Subcellular Localisation of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV 16 E7 Protein in Cervical Cancer Cells and Its Perturbation by RNA Aptamers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Cesur

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV is the most common viral infection of the reproductive tract, affecting both men and women. High-risk oncogenic types are responsible for almost 90% of anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers including cervical cancer. Some of the HPV “early” genes, particularly E6 and E7, are known to act as oncogenes that promote tumour growth and malignant transformation. Most notably, HPV-16 E7 interacts with the tumour suppressor protein pRb, promoting its degradation, leading to cell cycle dysregulation in infected cells. We have previously shown that an RNA aptamer (termed A2 selectively binds to HPV16 E7 and is able to induce apoptosis in HPV16-transformed cervical carcinoma cell lines (SiHa through reduction of E7 levels. In this study, we investigated the effects of the A2 aptamer on E7 localisation in order to define its effects on E7 activity. We demonstrate for the first time that E7 localised to the plasma membrane. In addition, we show that A2 enhanced E7 localisation in the ER and that the A2-mediated reduction of E7 was not associated with proteasomal degradation. These data suggest that A2 perturbs normal E7 trafficking through promoting E7 ER retention.

  1. Complications and cancer rates in spine fusion with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavken, Julia; Mameghani, Alexander; Vavken, Patrick; Schaeren, Stefan

    2016-12-01

    To quantitatively synthesize the available best evidence for general complications, heterotopic ossification (HO), retrograde ejaculation, cervical swelling, and cancer rates with the use of rhBMP-2 in lumbar and cervical spine fusion. We conducted an online search for relevant controlled trials and extracted data on the abovementioned endpoints. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they reported on spinal fusion with rhBMP-2 in humans. Publication bias and heterogeneity were assessed mathematically. These data were synthesized in a meta-analysis using DerSimonian-Laird random effects modeling to calculate pooled odds ratios. We identified 26 studies reporting on a total of 184,324 patients (28,815 experimental, 155,509 controls) with a mean age of 51.1 ± 1.8 years. There was a significantly higher risk of general complications with rhBMP-2 compared to iliac crest bone graft (ICBG) with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.78 (95 %CI 1.20-2.63), (p = 0.004). The odds ratio for HO was 5.57 (95 %CI 1.90-16.36), (p = 0.002), for retrograde ejaculation 3.31 (95 %CI 1.20-9.09), (p = 0.020), and for cervical swelling 4.72 (95 %CI 1.42-15.67), (p = 0.011), all significantly higher in the rhBMP-2 group. The pooled odds ratio for new onset of tumor was 1.35 (95 %CI 0.93-1.96), which represents no statistically significant difference between the groups (p = 0.111). rhBMP-2 is associated with a higher rate of general complications as well as retrograde ejaculation, HO, and cervical tissue swelling in spine fusion. There is a slightly increased risk of new onset of tumors, however, without statistical significance.

  2. HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER RISK FACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prostate cancer has the highest prevalence of any non-skin cancer in the human body, with similar likelihood of neoplastic foci found within the prostates of men around the world regardless of diet, occupation, lifestyle, or other factors. Essentially all men with circulating an...

  3. Manganese superoxide dismutase: effect of the ala16val polymorphism on protein, activity, and mRNA levels in human breast cancer cell lines and stably transfected mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAtee, Britt L; Yager, James D

    2010-02-01

    The manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) ala16val polymorphism has been associated with various diseases including breast cancer. In the present study, we investigated levels of MnSOD protein, enzymatic activity, and mRNA with respect to MnSOD genotype in several human breast carcinoma cell lines and in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF), developed from the MnSOD knockout mouse, stably expressing human MnSOD-ala and MnSOD-val. In human breast cell lines, the MnSOD-ala allele was associated with increased levels of MnSOD protein and MnSOD protein per unit mRNA. In the MEF transformants, MnSOD activity correlated fairly well with MnSOD protein levels. MnSOD mRNA expression was significantly lower in MnSOD-ala versus MnSOD-val lines. MnSOD protein and activity levels were not related to MnSOD genotype in the transformed MEF, although, as observed in the human breast cell lines, the MEF human MnSOD-ala lines produced significantly more human MnSOD protein per unit mRNA than the human MnSOD-val lines. This suggests that there is more efficient production of MnSOD-ala protein compared to MnSOD-val protein. Examination of several indicators of reactive oxygen species levels, including superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, in wild-type MEF and in MEF expressing similar elevated amounts of MnSOD-ala or val activity did not show differences related to the levels of MnSOD protein expression. In conclusion, in both human breast carcinoma cell lines and MEF cell lines stably transfected with human MnSOD, the MnSOD-ala allele was associated with increased production of MnSOD protein per unit mRNA indicating a possible imbalance in MnSOD protein production from the MnSOD-val mRNA.

  4. The synthesis and characterization of cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns for the study of human multidrug resistant proteins MRP1, MRP2 and human breast cancer resistant protein BCRP using membranes obtained from Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) insect cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Prateek A; Moaddel, Ruin; Wainer, Irving W

    2010-06-15

    CMAC (cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns) have been developed for the study of the human multidrug transporters MRP1, MRP2 and the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). The columns were constructed using the immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) stationary phase and cellular membrane fragments obtained from Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells that had been stably transfected with human Mrp1, Mrp2 or Bcrp cDNA, using a baculovirus expression system. The resulting CMAC(Sf9(MRP1)), CMAC(Sf9(MRP2)) and CMAC(Sf9(BCRP)) columns and a control column produced using membrane fragments from non-transfected Sf9 cells, CMAC(Sf9), were characterized using frontal affinity chromatography using [(3)H]-etoposide as the marker ligand and etoposide, benzbromarone and MK571 as the displacers on the CMAC(Sf9(MRP1)) column, etoposide and furosemide on the CMAC(Sf9(MRP2)) column and etoposide and fumitremorgin C on the CMAC(Sf9(BCPR)) column. The binding affinities (K(i) values) obtained from the chromatographic studies were consistent with the data obtained using non-chromatographic techniques and the results indicate that the immobilized MRP1, MRP2 and BCRP transporters retained their ability to selectively bind known ligands. (S)-verapamil displaced [(3)H]-etoposide on the CMAC(Sf9(MRP1)) column to a greater extent than (R)-verapamil and the relative IC(50) values of the enantiomers were calculated using the changes in the retention times of the marker. The observed enantioselectivity and calculated IC(50) values were consistent with previously reported data. The results indicated that the CMAC(Sf9(MRP1)), CMAC(Sf9(MRP2)) and CMAC(Sf9(BCRP)) columns can be used for the study of binding to the MRP1, MRP2 and BCRP transporters and that membranes from the Sf9 cell line can be used to prepare CMAC columns. This is the first example of the use of membranes from a non-mammalian cell line in an affinity chromatographic system.

  5. The effects of vitamin E succinate on the expression of c-jun gene and protein in human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Zhao; Kun Wu; Wei Xia; Yu-Juan Shan; Li-Jie Wu; Wei-Ping Yu

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of vitamin E succinate (VES) on the expression of c-jun gene and protein in human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells.METHODS: After SGC-7901 cells were treated with VES at different doses (5,10,20 mg@L-1) at different time, reverse transcription-PCR technique was used to detect the level of c-jun mRNA; Western Blot was applied to measure the expression of c-jun protei n/RESULTS: After the cells were treated with VES at 20 mg@L-1 for 3 h, the expression rapidly reached its maximum that was 3.5 times of UT control (P<0.01). The level of c-jun mRNA was also increased following treatment of VES for 6 h.However, the expression after treatment of VES at 5 mg@L-1for 24 h was 1.6 times compared with UT control (P<0.01).Western blot analysis showed that the level of c-jun protein was obviously elevated in VES-treated SGC-7901 cells at 20 mg@L-1 for 3 h. The expression of c-jun protein was gradually increased after treatment of VES at 20 mg@L-1 for 3, 6, 12 and 24 h, respectively, with an evident time-effect relationship. CONCLUSION: The levels of c-jun mRNA and protein in VES-treated SGC-7901 cells were increased in a dose- and time-dependent manner; the expression of c-jun was prolonged by VES, indicating that c-jun is involved in VESinduced apoptosis in SGC-7901 cells.

  6. Progesterone receptor (PR) isoforms PRA and PRB differentially regulate expression of the breast cancer resistance protein in human placental choriocarcinoma BeWo cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Honggang; Lee, Eun-Woo; Zhou, Lin; Leung, Peter C K; Ross, Douglas D; Unadkat, Jashvant D; Mao, Qingcheng

    2008-03-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) plays a significant role in drug disposition and in conferring multidrug resistance in cancer cells. Previous studies have shown that steroid hormones such as 17beta-estradiol and progesterone can affect BCRP expression in cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism by which BCRP expression in human placental choriocarcinoma BeWo cells is regulated by progesterone. Transfection of the progesterone receptor (PR) isoforms PRA and PRB resulted in a similarly increased expression of PRA and PRB, respectively. However, progesterone significantly increased BCRP expression and activity only in PRB-transfected cells. This stimulatory effect of progesterone was abrogated by the PR antagonist mifepristone (RU-486). Consistently, transcriptional activity of the BCRP promoter was induced 2- to 6-fold by 10(-8) to 10(-5) M progesterone in PRB-transfected cells. Progesterone had little effect on BCRP expression and activity and transcriptional activity of the BCRP promoter in PRA-transfected cells; however, cotransfection of PRA and PRB significantly decreased the progesterone-response compared with that in cells transfected with only PRB. Mutations in a novel progesterone response element (PRE) identified between -243 to -115 bp of the BCRP promoter region significantly attenuated the progesterone-response in PRB-transfected cells, and deletion of the PRE nearly completely abrogated the progesterone effect. Specific binding of both PRA and PRB to the BCRP promoter through the identified PRE was confirmed using the electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Collectively, progesterone induces BCRP expression in BeWo cells via PRB but not PRA. PRA represses the PRB activity. Thus, PRA and PRB differentially regulate BCRP expression in BeWo cells.

  7. Impact of protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6) on human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) signalling in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludyga, Natalie; Anastasov, Nataša; Gonzalez-Vasconcellos, Iria; Ram, Manuela; Höfler, Heinz; Aubele, Michaela

    2011-05-01

    PTK6, also known as Brk, is highly expressed in over 80% of breast cancers. In the last decade several substrates and interaction partners were identified localising PTK6 downstream of HER receptors. PTK6 seems to be involved in progression of breast tumours, in particular in HER receptor signalling. Here, we show the down-regulation effects of PTK6 in the T47D, BT474 and JIMT-1 breast cancer cell lines. PTK6 knockdown leads to a decreased phosphorylation of HER2, PTEN, MAPK (ERK), p38 MAPK, STAT3 and to a reduced expression of cyclin E. Our findings show that silencing PTK6 impairs the downstream targets of HER receptors and consequently the activation of signalling molecules. Furthermore, lower levels of PTK6 result in reduced migration of T47D and JIMT-1 breast cancer cells. Due to decreased migration, the PTK6 RNA interference might contribute to reduced metastasis and malignant potential of breast cancer cells. Since PTK6 plays an important role in HER receptor signal transduction, its down-regulation might be suitable for future therapy approaches in breast cancer.

  8. The far-upstream element-binding protein 2 is correlated with proliferation and doxorubicin resistance in human breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying-Ying; Gu, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Chao; Wang, Hua; Ni, Qi-Chao; Zhang, Chun-Hui; Yu, Xia-Fei; Yang, Li-Yi; He, Zhi-Xian; Mao, Guo-Xin; Yang, Shu-Yun

    2016-07-01

    Far-upstream element (FUSE)-binding protein 2 (FBP2) was a member of single-stranded DNA-binding protein family; it played an important role in regulating transcription and post-transcription and is involved in the regulation of C-MYC gene expression in liver tumors. However, the role of FBP2 in breast cancer and its mechanism has not been studied yet. Here, we discovered that FBP2 was up-regulated in breast cancer tissues and breast cancer cell lines. Moreover, immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrated that up-regulated FBP2 was highly associated with tumor grade, Ki-67, and poor prognosis, which was an independent prognostic factor for survival of breast cancer patients. At the cellular level, we found that FBP2 was correlated with cell cycle progression by accelerating G1/S transition, and knockdown of FBP2 could weaken cell proliferation, anchorage-independent cell growth, while enhancing the sensitivity of breast cancer cells to doxorubicin. More importantly, we found that activation of PI3K/AKT pathway could phosphorylate FBP2, and then make FBP2 shuttle from cytoplasm into the nucleus, which was the main mechanism of breast cancer cell proliferation and drug resistance. Taken together, our findings supported the notion that FBP2 might via PI3K/AKT pathway influence breast cancer progression and drug resistance, which might provide a new target for the design of anti-cancer drugs for breast cancer patients.

  9. Spatial-temporal protein expression of inhibitor of differentiation-1 (Id1) during fetal embryogenesis and in different mouse and human cancer types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redrado, Miriam; Bodegas, Elena; Villaro, Ana Cristina; Nguewa, Paul A; Lopez, Ines; Gil-Bazo, Ignacio; Calvo, Alfonso

    2013-08-01

    Inhibitor of differentiation-1 (Id1) plays a role in cell proliferation, acquisition of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) features and angiogenesis. Id1 was shown to be expressed in some tumor types, mainly in advanced dedifferentiated stages. However, recent studies using a validated and highly specific monoclonal antibody against Id1 have challenged many of the results obtained by immunohistochemistry. The goal of our work was to perform a thorough analysis of Id1 expression in mouse embryos and adult tissues, as well as healthy and malignant mouse and human samples using this validated antibody (Perk et al., 2006). Our results show that Id1 was highly expressed in the oropharyngeal cavity, lung, cartilage and skin of E14 and E15 mouse embryos, but expression was progressively reduced in more developed embryos. Immunostaining only remained in epithelial cells of the gut and uterus of adult mice. Mammary MMTV-Myc and MMTV-Myc/VEGF transgenic mouse tumors, and squamous cell carcinomas of the lung induced by N-nitroso-tris-chloroethylurea (NTCU) were highly positive for Id1, unlike their respective healthy counterparts. Id1 immunostaining in a human tissue microarray (TMA) revealed strong expression in cancers of the oral cavity, bladder and cervix. Some tumor specimens of esophagus, thyroid and breast were also strongly positive. Our results suggest that Id1 is an oncofetal protein highly expressed in particular tumor types that should be reanalyzed in future studies using large cohorts of patients to reassess its diagnostic/prognostic value. Moreover, MMTV-Myc- and NTCU-induced tumors could serve as appropriate mouse models to study Id1 functions in breast and lung cancer, respectively.

  10. GPNMB/OA protein increases the invasiveness of human metastatic prostate cancer cell lines DU145 and PC3 through MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorentini, Chiara; Bodei, Serena; Bedussi, Francesca; Fragni, Martina; Bonini, Sara Anna [Section of Pharmacology, Department of Molecular and Translational Medicine, University of Brescia, V.le Europa 11, 25124 Brescia (Italy); Simeone, Claudio; Zani, Danilo [Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Radiology and Public Health, University of Brescia, P.le Spedali Civili 1, 25124 Brescia (Italy); Berruti, Alfredo [Medical Oncology, Department of Surgery, Radiology, and Public Health, University of Brescia, P.le Spedali Civili 1, 25124 Brescia (Italy); Missale, Cristina; Memo, Maurizio; Spano, PierFranco [Section of Pharmacology, Department of Molecular and Translational Medicine, University of Brescia, V.le Europa 11, 25124 Brescia (Italy); Sigala, Sandra, E-mail: sigala@med.unibs.it [Section of Pharmacology, Department of Molecular and Translational Medicine, University of Brescia, V.le Europa 11, 25124 Brescia (Italy)

    2014-04-15

    Non-metastatic glycoprotein melanoma protein B (GPNMB), also known as osteoactivin (OA) is expressed in a wide array of tumors and represents an emerging target for drug development. In this study, we investigated the role of GPNMB/OA in the progression of human metastatic DU145 and PC3 prostate cancer cells. GPNMB/OA contribution in PCa malignant phenotype has been analyzed by small interfering RNA-induced GPNMB/OA silencing. We found that following GPNMB/OA silencing the migration capability of both DU145 and PC3 cells, evaluated by using in vitro invasivity assay, as well as the metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity were equally strongly inhibited. By contrast knocking down GPNMB/OA weakly attenuated cell proliferation rate of DU145, an effect that paralleled with an increase number of apoptotic cells. However, PC3 cell growth seems to be not affected by GPNMB/OA. Together, these data reveal that GPNMB/OA acts as a critical molecular mediator promoting the acquisition of the more aggressive, pro-metastatic phenotype distinctive of human DU145 and PC3 cell lines. - Highlights: • GPNMB/OA expression correlates with DU145 and PC3 cells malignant phenotype. • GPNMB/OA silencing affects the migration capability of both DU145 and PC3 cells. • GPNMB/OA increases invasiveness by up-regulating MMPs activity. • GPNMB/OA promotes DU145 and PC3 cells progression into a more aggressive phenotype.

  11. Cobalt Chloride Induces Expression and Function of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP/ABCG2) in Human Renal Proximal Tubular Epithelial Cell Line HK-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishihashi, Katsuki; Kawashima, Kei; Nomura, Takami; Urakami-Takebayashi, Yumiko; Miyazaki, Makoto; Takano, Mikihisa; Nagai, Junya

    2017-01-01

    The human breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2), a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter family, is a drug transporter restricting absorption and enhancing excretion of many compounds including anticancer drugs. The cis-regulatory elements in the BCRP promoter include a hypoxia response element, i.e., the DNA binding site for hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1). In this study, we investigated the effect of cobalt chloride, a chemical inducer of HIF-1α, on the expression and function of BCRP in human renal proximal tubular cell line HK-2. Cobalt chloride treatment significantly increased the mRNA expression of not only glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), a typical HIF-1 target gene mRNA, but also ABCG2 mRNA in HK-2 cells. The BCRP inhibitor Ko143-sensitive accumulation of BCRP substrates such as Hoechst33342 and mitoxantrone was significantly enhanced by cobalt chloride treatment. In addition, treatment with cobalt chloride significantly increased the Ko143-sensitive accumulation of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled methotrexate in HK-2 cells. Furthermore, cobalt chloride treatment attenuated the cytotoxicity induced by mitoxantrone and methotrexate, which might be, at least in part, due to the increase in BCRP-mediated transport activity via HIF-1 activation. These findings indicate that HIF-1 activation protects renal proximal tubular cells against BCRP substrate-induced cytotoxicity by enhancing the expression and function of BCRP in renal proximal tubular cells.

  12. Identification of high-risk patients by human epididymis protein 4 levels during follow-up of ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl Steffensen, Karina; Waldstrøm, Marianne; Brandslund, Ivan;

    2016-01-01

    The majority of ovarian cancer patients with advanced disease at diagnosis will relapse following primary treatment, with a dismal prognosis. Monitoring the levels of serum markers in patients under follow-up may be essential for the early detection of relapse, and for distinguishing high-risk pa...

  13. Proteins of human urine. II. Identification by two-dimensional electrophoresis of a new candidate marker for prostatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, J.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL); Anderson, N.G.; Tollaksen, S.L.; von Eschenbach, A.C.; Guevara, J. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A protein series common to the urine and prostatic tissue of 16 of 17 patients with prostatic adenocarcinoma has been identified by high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. These proteins, designated PCA-1, have a relative molecular mass in sodium dodecyl sulfate of about 40,000. Analyses of urines from eight age-matched controls, seven patients with other types of urogenital malignancies, two patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia, and five patients with malignancies not associated with the urogenital system failed to show PCA-1 in the patterns. These preliminary findings suggest that this protein should be systematically investigated as a candidate marker for prostatic adenocarcinoma in man.

  14. Regulation of progesterone-binding breast cyst protein GCDFP-24 secretion by estrogens and androgens in human breast cancer cells: a new marker of steroid action in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, J; Dauvois, S; Haagensen, D E; Lévesque, C; Mérand, Y; Labrie, F

    1990-06-01

    We have previously demonstrated that androgens are potent inhibitors of breast cancer cell proliferation under both basal and estrogen-induced incubation conditions, while they suppress expression of the estrogen and progesterone receptors. To better understand the mechanisms responsible for the antagonism between androgens and estrogens in breast cancer and to obtain a new tumor marker for the actions of these two steroids, we have investigated the effects of androgens and estrogens on expression of the major protein found in human breast gross cystic disease fluid, namely GCDFP-24. This study was performed in ZR-75-1 and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. After a 9-day incubation period, physiological concentrations of 17 beta-estradiol stimulated proliferation of ZR-75-1 and MCF-7 cells by 2- to 3.5-fold while simultaneously exerting a marked 70-90% inhibition of GCDFP-24 secretion. The estrogenic effects on GCDFP-24 secretion and cell proliferation were both competitively blocked by simultaneous incubation with the new steroidal pure antiestrogen EM-139. On the other hand, a maximal concentration (10 nM) of the nonaromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone decreased by 50% the proliferation of ZR-75-1 cells; the half-maximal inhibitory effect was exerted at 0.01 nM. The androgen exerted a 3- to 4-fold stimulatory effect on GCDFP-24 secretion at an EC50 value of 0.01 nM. The effect of dihydrotestosterone on these parameters was competitively blocked by simultaneous incubation with the pure antiandrogen OH-flutamide. The present data show that the effects of estrogens and androgens in ZR-75-1 cells on GCDFP-24 secretion and cell growth are opposite. Similarly, in MCF-7 cells, estrogens stimulate cell growth, while GCDFP-24 secretion is inhibited. The present data also suggest that GCDFP-24 could well be a good biochemical marker for monitoring the response to androgenic and antiestrogenic compounds in the therapy of advanced breast cancer.

  15. Application of fusion protein 4D5 scFv-dibarnase:barstar-gold complex for studying P185HER2 receptor distribution in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Julia L; Edelweiss, Evelina F; Leonova, Olga G; Balandin, Taras G; Popenko, Vladimir I; Deyev, Sergey M

    2012-08-01

    Overexpression of the P185(HER2) protein determines the malignancy and unfavorable prognosis of ovarian and breast tumors. In this work, the distribution of P185(HER2) in human cancer cells was studied by electron microscopy, using a novel approach. It is based on the interaction between barnase (a ribonuclease from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens) and its specific inhibitor barstar. The monoclonal antibody 4D5 scFv to extracellular P185(HER2) domain fused with two molecules of barnase was used as a recognizing agent, and the conjugate of colloidal gold with barstar, as an electron dense label for electron microscopic visualization. For labeling, we used supramolecular complexes 4D5 scFv-dibarnase:barstar-Au. The distribution of P185(HER2) in human ovarian carcinoma cells SKOV-3 and breast carcinoma cells BT-474 was studied at 4 °C and 37 °C. It was shown that at 4 °C the protein P185(HER2) occurs exclusively on the cell surface, mainly on protrusions or close to their bases. At 37 °C, the internalization of P185(HER2) caused by its interaction with 4D5 scFv-dibarnase was observed. Inside the cells, P185(HER2) was located in the coated pits and vesicles, endosomes and multivesicular bodies. The data obtained indicate that the supramolecular 4D5 scFv-dibarnase:barstar-gold complex can be used as a new immunodetection system for exploring the P185(HER2) distribution.

  16. Structure and function of Helicobacter pylori CagA, the first-identified bacterial protein involved in human cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    HATAKEYAMA, Masanori

    2017-01-01

    .... The cagA gene-encoded CagA protein is delivered into gastric epithelial cells via bacterial type IV secretion, where it undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation at the Glu-Pro-Ile-Tyr-Ala (EPIYA) motifs...

  17. Difference in protein expression profile and chemotherapy drugs response of different progression stages of LNCaP sublines and other human prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ping Lin

    Full Text Available Androgen ablation therapy is the primary treatment for metastatic prostate cancer. However, 80-90% of the patients who receive androgen ablation therapy ultimately develop recurrent tumors in 12-33 months after treatment with a median overall survival time of 1-2 years after relapse. LNCaP is a commonly used cell line established from a human lymph node metastatic lesion of prostatic adenocarcinoma. We previously established two relapsed androgen receptor (AR-rich androgen-independent LNCaP sublines 104-R1 (androgen depleted for 12 months and 104-R2 cells (androgen depleted for 24 months from AR-positive androgen-dependent LNCaP 104-S cells. LNCaP 104-R1 and 104-R2 mimics the AR-positive hormone-refractory relapsed tumors in patients receiving androgen ablation therapy. Androgen treatment stimulates proliferation of 104-S cells, but causes growth inhibition and G1 cell cycle arrest in 104-R1 and 104-R2 cells. We investigated the protein expression profile difference between LNCaP 104-S vs. LNCaP 104-R1, 104-R2, PC-3, and DU-145 cells as well as examined the sensitivity of these prostate cancer cells to different chemotherapy drugs and small molecule inhibitors. Compared to 104-S cells, 104-R1 and 104-R2 cells express higher protein levels of AR, PSA, c-Myc, Skp2, BCL-2, P53, p-MDM2 S166, Rb, and p-Rb S807/811. The 104-R1 and 104-R2 cells express higher ratio of p-Akt S473/Akt, p-EGFR/EGFR, and p-Src/Src, but lower ratio of p-ERK/ERK than 104-S cells. PC-3 and DU-145 cells express higher c-Myc, Skp2, Akt, Akt1, and phospho-EGFR but less phospho-Akt and phospho-ERK. Overexpression of Skp2 increased resistance of LNCaP cells to chemotherapy drugs. Paclitaxel, androgen, and inhibitors for PI3K/Akt, EGFR, Src, or Bcl-2 seem to be potential choices for treatment of advanced prostate cancers. Our study provides rationale for targeting Akt, EGFR, Src, Bcl-2, and AR signaling as a treatment for AR-positive relapsed prostate tumors after hormone therapy.

  18. Human conglutinin-like protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensenius, J C; Thiel, S; Baatrup, G

    1985-01-01

    The presence in human plasma of a molecule homologous to bovine conglutinin is indicated by the results of biological and immunochemical analysis. The human conglutinin-like protein shows calcium-dependent binding to complement-treated solid phase IgG and immunological cross-reaction with chicken...... anti-bovine conglutinin. The binding of the human protein to complement-treated IgG was inhibited by N-acetyl-D-glucosamine but not by other sugars. Analysis by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting showed reaction of anti-conglutinin with molecules of similar mobility to the monomer and hexamer of bovine...

  19. Protein tyrosine kinase, JNK, and ERK involvement in p seudolaric acid B-induced apoptosis of human breast cancer MCF-7 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-hua YU; Hong-jun WANG; Xiang-ru LI; Shin-ichi TASHIRO; Satoshi ONODERA; Takashi IKEJIMA

    2008-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the apoptotic mechanism ofpseudolaric acid B (PAB) in hu-man breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Methods: 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-di-phenyltetrazolium bromide analysis and morphological changes were applied to detect apoptosis. The percentage of apoptotic and necrotic cells were calculated by the lactate dehydrogenase activity-based cytotoxicity assay, and the protein expression was examined by Western blot analysis. Results: PAB and/or the mitogen-activated protein kinases, including p38, c-Jun-N-terrninal kinase (JNK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), did not participate in necrosis. P38 had no obvious function on apoptosis after 4 μmol/L PAB treatment for 36 h, but PAB induced JNK phosphorylation and inhibited ERK phosphorylation in the apoptotic process. In this study the inhibitor of protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) genistein inverted the inhibitory effect of PAB, instead promoting the survival of MCF-7 cells. Like genistein, another PTK inhibitor AG1024 had a similar ef-fect on PAB-treated MCF-7 cells, indicating that PAB activated PTK to induce apoptosis. Together with PAB, genistein increased the expression of p-ERK, and decreased the expressions of JNK and p-JNK in PAB-treated MCF-7 cells at 36 h. And it is considered that the p-ERK and p-JNK were active patterns of ERK and JNK, respectively. Conclusion: PTK were upstream of ERK and JNK, and PTK induced apoptosis through activating JNK and inactivating ERK in PAB-treated MCF-7 cells.

  20. Downregulation of wild-type p53 protein by HER-2/neu mediated PI3K pathway activation in human breast cancer cells:its effect on cell proliferation and implication for therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li ZHENG; Jia Qiang REN; Hua LI; Zhao Lu KONG; Hong Guang ZHU

    2004-01-01

    Overexpression and activation of HER-2/neu (also known as c-erbB-2), a proto-oncogene, was found in about 30%of human breast cancers, promoting cancer growth and making cancer cells resistant to chemo- and radio-therapy.Wild-type p53 is crucial in regulating cell growth and apoptosis and is found to be mutated or deleted in 60-70% of human cancers. And some cancers with a wild-type p53 do not have normal p53 function, suggesting that it is implicated in a complex process regulated by many factors. In the present study, we showed that the overexpression of HER-2/neu could decrease the amount of wild-type p53 protein via activating PI3K pathway, as well as inducing MDM2 nuclear translocation in MCF7 human breast cancer ceils. Blockage of PI3K pathway with its specific inhibitor LY294002 caused G1-S phase arrest, decreased cell growth rate and increased chemo- and radio-therapeutic sensitivity in MCF7 cells expressing wild-type p53. However, it did not increase the sensitivity to adriamycin in MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells containing mutant p53. Our study indicates that blocking PI3K pathway activation mediated by HER-2/neu overexpression may be useful in the treatment of breast tumors with HER-2/neu overexpression and wild-type p53.

  1. The Effect of Protein Kinase C Modulation with Bryostatin 1 on Paclitaxel-Induced Growth Inhibition and Apoptosis in Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    need for new therapies is critical. These studies evaluated the therapeutic potential of a novel agent, the protein kinase C modulator, Bryostatin 1 in...agents to determine synergistic combinations. The combination of bryostatin 1 and paclitaxel was studied in four breast cancer cell lines utilizing...fluorouracil, & vinorelbine) were also tested in combination with bryostatin 1 using two breast cancer cell lines and three treatment schedules. Again, no

  2. EXPRESSION OF Fas LIGAND IN HUMAN COLON CANCER CELL LINES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建军; 丁尔迅; 王强; 陈学云; 付志仁

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the expression of Fas ligand in human colon carcinoma cell lines. Methods: A total of six human colon cancer cell lines were examined for the expression of Fas ligand mRNA and cell surface protein by using RT-PCR and flow cytometry respectively. Results: The results showed that Fas ligand mRNA was expressed in all of the six cancer cell lines and Fas ligand cell surface protein was expressed in part of them. Conclusion: These data suggest that Fas ligand was expressed, at least in part, in human colon cancer cell lines and might facilitate to escape from immune surveillance of the host.

  3. Aberrant Cytoplasm Localization and Protein Stability of SIRT1 is Regulated by PI3K/IGF-1R Signaling in Human Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Byles, Laura K. Chmilewski, Joyce Wang, Lijia Zhu, Lora W. Forman, Douglas V. Faller, Yan Dai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available SIRT1, an NAD-dependent histone/protein deacetylase, has classically been thought of as a nuclear protein. In this study, we demonstrate that SIRT1 is mainly localized in the nucleus of normal cells, but is predominantly localized in the cytoplasm of the cancer / transformed cells we tested. We found this predominant cytoplasmic localization of SIRT1 is regulated by elevated mitotic activity and PI3K/IGF-1R signaling in cancer cells. We show that aberrant cytoplasmic localization of SIRT1 is due to increased protein stability and is regulated by PI3K/IGF-1R signaling. In addition, we determined that SIRT1 is required for PI3K-mediated cancer cell growth. Our study represents the first identification that aberrant cytoplasm localization is one of the specific alternations to SIRT1 that occur in cancer cells, and PI3K/IGF-1R signaling plays an important role in the regulation of cytoplasmic SIRT1 stability. Our findings suggest that the over-expressed cytoplasmic SIRT1 in cancer cells may greatly contribute to its cancer-specific function by working downstream of the PI3K/IGF-1R signaling pathway.

  4. G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Bar-Shavit

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are the largest signal-conveying receptor family and mediate many physiological processes, their role in tumor biology is underappreciated. Numerous lines of evidence now associate GPCRs and their downstream signaling targets in cancer growth and development. Indeed, GPCRs control many features of tumorigenesis, including immune cell-mediated functions, proliferation, invasion and survival at the secondary site. Technological advances have further substantiated GPCR modifications in human tumors. Among these are point mutations, gene overexpression, GPCR silencing by promoter methylation and the number of gene copies. At this point, it is imperative to elucidate specific signaling pathways of “cancer driver” GPCRs. Emerging data on GPCR biology point to functional selectivity and “biased agonism”; hence, there is a diminishing enthusiasm for the concept of “one drug per GPCR target” and increasing interest in the identification of several drug options. Therefore, determining the appropriate context-dependent conformation of a functional GPCR as well as the contribution of GPCR alterations to cancer development remain significant challenges for the discovery of dominant cancer genes and the development of targeted therapeutics.

  5. Protein Kinase A in Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caretta, Antonio; Mucignat-Caretta, Carla, E-mail: carla.mucignat@unipd.it [Department of Human Anatomy and Physiology, University of Padova, Via Marzolo 3, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2011-02-28

    In the past, many chromosomal and genetic alterations have been examined as possible causes of cancer. However, some tumors do not display a clear molecular and/or genetic signature. Therefore, other cellular processes may be involved in carcinogenesis. Genetic alterations of proteins involved in signal transduction have been extensively studied, for example oncogenes, while modifications in intracellular compartmentalization of these molecules, or changes in the expression of unmodified genes have received less attention. Yet, epigenetic modulation of second messenger systems can deeply modify cellular functioning and in the end may cause instability of many processes, including cell mitosis. It is important to understand the functional meaning of modifications in second messenger intracellular pathways and unravel the role of downstream proteins in the initiation and growth of tumors. Within this framework, the cAMP system has been examined. cAMP is a second messenger involved in regulation of a variety of cellular functions. It acts mainly through its binding to cAMP-activated protein kinases (PKA), that were suggested to participate in the onset and progression of various tumors. PKA may represent a biomarker for tumor detection, identification and staging, and may be a potential target for pharmacological treatment of tumors.

  6. Proteins aggregation and human diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-04-01

    Many human diseases and the death of most supercentenarians are related to protein aggregation. Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), frontotemporallobar degeneration, etc. Such diseases are due to progressive loss of structure or function of neurons caused by protein aggregation. For example, AD is considered to be related to aggregation of Aβ40 (peptide with 40 amino acids) and Aβ42 (peptide with 42 amino acids) and HD is considered to be related to aggregation of polyQ (polyglutamine) peptides. In this paper, we briefly review our recent discovery of key factors for protein aggregation. We used a lattice model to study the aggregation rates of proteins and found that the probability for a protein sequence to appear in the conformation of the aggregated state can be used to determine the temperature at which proteins can aggregate most quickly. We used molecular dynamics and simple models of polymer chains to study relaxation and aggregation of proteins under various conditions and found that when the bending-angle dependent and torsion-angle dependent interactions are zero or very small, then protein chains tend to aggregate at lower temperatures. All atom models were used to identify a key peptide chain for the aggregation of insulin chains and to find that two polyQ chains prefer anti-parallel conformation. It is pointed out that in many cases, protein aggregation does not result from protein mis-folding. A potential drug from Chinese medicine was found for Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Suppression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 expression induces inhibition of cell proliferation and tumor growth in human esophageal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xin; Ma, Ping; Sui, Cheng-Guang; Meng, Fan-Dong; Li, Yan; Fu, Li-Ye; Jiang, Tao; Wang, Yang; Jiang, You-Hong

    2014-06-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 (TRAP1) is a molecular chaperone involved in multidrug resistance and antiapoptosis in some human tumors, but its regulatory mechanisms have not been revealed in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). In this study, 138 specimens of ESCC were analyzed. TRAP1 was overexpressed in ESCC, particularly in poorly differentiated tumors. To further explore the molecular regulatory mechanism, we constructed specific small interfering RNA-expressing vectors targeting Trap1, and knocked down Trap1 expression in the esophageal cancer cell lines ECA109 and EC9706. Knockdown of Trap1 induced increases in reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial depolarization, which have been proposed as critical regulators of apoptosis. The cell cycle was arrested in G2/M phase, and in vitro inhibition of cell proliferation was confirmed with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide and bromodeoxyuridine assays. Furthermore, re-expression of TRAP1 in Trap1 small interfering RNA-transfected ESCC cells restored cell proliferation and cell apoptosis. Bioluminescence of subcutaneously xenografted ESCC tumor cells demonstrated significant inhibition of in vivo tumor growth by Trap1 knockdown. This study shows that TRAP1 was overexpressed in most patients with ESCC, and caused an increase in antiapoptosis potency. TRAP1 may be regarded as a target in ESCC biotherapy.

  8. Oncogenes and human cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C.P. Heisterkamp (Nora); J.H.C. Groffen (John)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractThe first demonstrations that cancer could have an infectious nature was by Ellerman and Bang (1) ~ who showed that leukemia in chickens was transmissible with cell-free extracts and by Rous (2), who found in a similar fashion that naturally occurring chicken sarcomas were transmissible.

  9. Quantitative analysis of BTF3, HINT1, NDRG1 and ODC1 protein over-expression in human prostate cancer tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Symes

    Full Text Available Prostate carcinoma is the most common cancer in men with few, quantifiable, biomarkers. Prostate cancer biomarker discovery has been hampered due to subjective analysis of protein expression in tissue sections. An unbiased, quantitative immunohistochemical approach provided here, for the diagnosis and stratification of prostate cancer could overcome this problem. Antibodies against four proteins BTF3, HINT1, NDRG1 and ODC1 were used in a prostate tissue array (> 500 individual tissue cores from 82 patients, 41 case pairs matched with one patient in each pair had biochemical recurrence. Protein expression, quantified in an unbiased manner using an automated analysis protocol in ImageJ software, was increased in malignant vs non-malignant prostate (by 2-2.5 fold, p<0.0001. Operating characteristics indicate sensitivity in the range of 0.68 to 0.74; combination of markers in a logistic regression model demonstrates further improvement in diagnostic power. Triple-labeled immunofluorescence (BTF3, HINT1 and NDRG1 in tissue array showed a significant (p<0.02 change in co-localization coefficients for BTF3 and NDRG1 co-expression in biochemical relapse vs non-relapse cancer epithelium. BTF3, HINT1, NDRG1 and ODC1 could be developed as epithelial specific biomarkers for tissue based diagnosis and stratification of prostate cancer.

  10. Crystal Structure of Crataeva tapia Bark Protein (CrataBL and Its Effect in Human Prostate Cancer Cell Lines.

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    Rodrigo da Silva Ferreira

    Full Text Available A protein isolated from the bark of Crataeva tapia (CrataBL is both a Kunitz-type plant protease inhibitor and a lectin. We have determined the amino acid sequence and three-dimensional structure of CrataBL, as well as characterized its selected biochemical and biological properties. We found two different isoforms of CrataBL isolated from the original source, differing in positions 31 (Pro/Leu; 92 (Ser/Leu; 93 (Ile/Thr; 95 (Arg/Gly and 97 (Leu/Ser. CrataBL showed relatively weak inhibitory activity against trypsin (Kiapp = 43 µM and was more potent against Factor Xa (Kiapp = 8.6 µM, but was not active against a number of other proteases. We have confirmed that CrataBL contains two glycosylation sites and forms a dimer at high concentration. The high-resolution crystal structures of two different crystal forms of isoform II verified the β-trefoil fold of CrataBL and have shown the presence of dimers consisting of two almost identical molecules making extensive contacts (∼645 Å(2. The structure differs from those of the most closely related proteins by the lack of the N-terminal β-hairpin. In experiments aimed at investigating the biological properties of CrataBL, we have shown that addition of 40 µM of the protein for 48 h caused maximum growth inhibition in MTT assay (47% of DU145 cells and 43% of PC3 cells. The apoptosis of DU145 and PC3 cell lines was confirmed by flow cytometry using Annexin V/FITC and propidium iodide staining. Treatment with CrataBL resulted in the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c and in the activation of caspase-3 in DU145 and PC3 cells.

  11. EXPRESSION AND SIGNIFICANCE OF ERK PROTEIN IN HUMAN BREAST CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张秀梅; 李柏林; 宋敏; 宋继谒

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of ERK and p-ERK protein in human breast cancer and their corresponding tissue, to assess the significance of ERK signal pathway in tumorigenesis and progression of breast carcinoma. Methods: 40 breast cancer cases were used in S-P immunohistochemistry technique and Western Blot study. Results: The expression of ERK1, ERK2, and p- ERK protein levels increased remarkably in breast cancer tissues in comparison to normal tissues (P<0.01). The expression was upregulated by 1.32-, 1.53-and 4.27-fold, respectively. The overexpressions of ERK1, ERK2, and p- ERK proteins were obviously correlated with clinical stage of breast cancer. Protein levels of ERK and p-ERK were higher in stage III patients than in stage I and stage II patients (P<0.05). These proteins were strongly related with axillary lymph node metastasis of breast cancer, but not correlated with histopathological type and status of ER and PR of breast cancer. Expression of ERK1, and ERK2, protein showed a positive linear correlation. Conclusion: ERK signal transduction pathway is a key factor during human breast tumorigenesis and breast cancer progression.

  12. Localization and translocation of RhoA protein in the human gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the localization of RhoA in gastric SGC-7901 cancer cells and its translocation by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and/or 8-chlorophenylthio cAMP (CPT-cAMP). METHODS: Immunofluorescence microscopy was used to determine the localization of RhoA. Western blotting was used to detect both endogenous and exogenous RhoA in different cellular compartments (membrane, cytosol, nucleus) and the translocation of RhoA following treatment with LPA, CPT-cAMP, or CPT-cAMP+LPA. RESULTS: Immunofluorescence staining revealed endogenous RhoA to be localized in the membrane, the cytosol, and the nucleus, and its precise localization within the nucleus to be the nucleolus. Western blotting identified both endogenous and exogenous RhoA within different cellular compartments (membrane, cytosol, nucleus, nucleolus). After stimulation with LPA, the amount of RhoA within membrane and nuclear extracts increased, while it decreased in the cytosol fractions. After treatment with CPT-cAMP the amount of RhoA within the membrane and the nuclear extracts decreased, while it increased within the cytosol fraction. Treatment with a combination of both substances led to a decrease in RhoA in the membrane and the nucleus but to an increase in the cytosol. CONCLUSION: In SGC-7901 cells RhoA was found to be localized within the membrane, the cytosol, and the nucleus. Within the nucleus its precise localization could be demonstrated to be the nucleolus. Stimulation with LPA caused a translocation of RhoA from the cytosol towards the membrane and the nucleus; treatment with CPT-cAMP caused the opposite effect. Furthermore, pre-treatment with CPT-cAMP was found to block the effect of LPA.

  13. CHARACTER OF TUMOR ASSOCIATED PROTEIN RECOGNIZED BY MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY AGAINST YUNNAN GEJIU LUNG CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objectives: To identify and characterize lung cancer associated protein N35 and attempt to learn the prospective possibility of the clinical application of the protein N35. Methods: Immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting, differential centrifigation and subcellular assay, immunohistochemistry, N-glycanase digestion, mitotic cell immunoflourescence and multiple methods of affinity chromatography have been used with the monoclonal antibody N-35 to detect the distribution of the protein N35 among the various cancer cell lines and normal human tissue, the relationship between the protein N35 and glycoprotein, the location of the subcellular structure and chromosomal domain of the protein N35,the most effective way of purification of tumor associated protein N35. Results: The protein N35 is a glycoprotein, distributes to the human lung cancer cell line GLC-82, human cervical cancer cell line Hela, human hepatic cancer cell line HepG-2 and human breast cancer cell line PMC with different relative molecular mass(Mr), but no expression of the protein ingredient in normal human fresh tissue; concentrates at the nuclei significantly ,much more than at the mitochondrail and membrane, locates at the centriole of the chromosomal domain. Conclusions: The lung cancer associated protein N35 might be expressed only by the cancer cells and related with the proliferation of cancer cells as a role of tumor cell growth regulator.

  14. Immunization strategy against cervical cancer involving an alphavirus vector expressing high levels of a stable fusion protein of human papillomavirus 16 E6 and E7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daemen, T; Regts, J; Holtrop, M; Wilschut, J

    2002-01-01

    We are developing immunization strategies against cervical carcinoma and premalignant disease, based on the use of recombinant Semliki Forest virus (SFV) encoding the onco-proteins E6 and E7 from high-risk human papilloma viruses (HPV). Thus far, protein-based, as well as genetic immunization studie

  15. Involvement of cysteine-rich protein 61 in the epidermal growth factor-induced migration of human anaplastic thyroid cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Li-Han; Hsu, Sung-Po; Zhong, Wen-Bin; Liang, Yu-Chih

    2016-05-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is among the most aggressive types of malignant cancer. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of ATC, and patients with thyroid carcinoma typically exhibit increased cysteine-rich protein 61 (Cyr61). In this study, we found that EGF treatment induced cell migration, stress fiber formation, Cyr61 mRNA and protein expressions, and Cyr61 protein secretion in ATC cells. The recombinant Cyr61 protein significantly induced cell migration; however, inhibition of Cyr61 activity by a Cyr61-specific antibody abrogated EGF-induced cell migration. EGF treatment also affected epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related marker protein expression, as evidenced by an increase in vimentin and a decrease in E-cadherin expression. Inhibition of Cyr61 expression by Cyr61 siRNA decreased cell migration and reversed the EMT-related marker protein expression. EGF treatment increased the phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and finally activated Cyr61 promoter plasmid activity. Our results suggest that Cyr61 is induced by EGF through the ERK/CREB signal pathway and that it plays a crucial role in the migration and invasion of ATC cells; moreover, Cyr61 might be a therapeutic target for metastatic ATC.

  16. Viruses and human cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallo, R.C.; Haseltine, W.; Klein, G.; Zur Hausen, H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers on the following topics: Immunology and Epidemiology, Biology and Pathogenesis, Models of Pathogenesis and Treatment, Simian and Bovine Retroviruses, Human Papilloma Viruses, EBV and Herpesvirus, and Hepatitis B Virus.

  17. XB130: A novel adaptor protein in cancer signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZHANG, RUIYAO; ZHANG, JINGYAO; WU, QIFEI; MENG, FANDI; LIU, CHANG

    2016-01-01

    Adaptor proteins are functional proteins that contain two or more protein-binding modules to link signaling proteins together, which affect cell growth and shape and have no enzymatic activity. The actin filament-associated protein (AFAP) family is an important member of the adaptor proteins, including AFAP1, AFAP1L1 and AFAP1L2/XB130. AFAP1 and AFAP1L1 share certain common characteristics and function as an actin-binding protein and a cSrc-activating protein. XB130 exhibits certain unique features in structure and function. The mRNA of XB130 is expressed in human spleen, thyroid, kidney, brain, lung, pancreas, liver, colon and stomach, and the most prominent disease associated with XB130 is cancer. XB130 has a controversial effect on cancer. Studies have shown that XB130 can promote cancer progression and downregulation of XB130-reduced growth of tumors derived from certain cell lines. A higher mRNA level of XB130 was shown to be associated with a better survival in non-small cell lung cancer. Previous studies have shown that XB130 can regulate cell growth, migration and invasion and possibly has the effect through the cAMP-cSrc-phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt pathway. Except for cancer, XB130 is also associated with other pathological or physiological procedures, such as airway repair and regeneration. PMID:26998266

  18. The peptide derived from the Ig-like domain of human herpesvirus 8 K1 protein induces death in hematological cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniluk Urszula

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although significant progress has been made in the treatment of lymphomas, many lymphomas exhibit resistance to cell death, suggesting a defective Fas signaling, which remains poorly understood. We previously reported that cells expressing the K1 protein of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8 resist death through the complex formation of the Ig-like domain of K1 with Fas. Recently, we investigated whether peptides derived from the Ig-like domain of the K1 protein may affect cell death. Methods K1 positive and negative cell lines were incubated with the K1-derived peptides, and cell death (apoptotic and necrotic was assessed by flow cytometry and LDH assay. Activation of caspases was assessed by fluorometric assay and flow cytometry. Fas receptor-independent, peptide-mediated cell killing was tested in the Fas-resistant Daudi cell line and Jurkat cell clones deficient in caspase-8 and FADD functionality. Activation of TNF receptors I and II was blocked by pre-incubation with corresponding blocking antibodies. The effect of the K1 peptide in vivo was tested in a mouse xenograft model. Results We observed that the peptide S20-3 enhanced cell death in K1-positive BJAB cells and HHV-8 positive primary effusion lymphoma (PEL cell lines. Similar effects of this peptide were observed in B-cell lymphoma and T-lymphoblastic leukemia cells without K1 expression but not in normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. A single intratumoral injection of the S20-3 peptide decreased the growth of Jurkat xenografts in SCID mice. The mechanism of tumor cell death induced by the S20-3 peptide was associated with activation of caspases, but this activity was only partially inhibited by the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD. Furthermore, the K1 peptide also killed Fas-resistant Daudi cells, and this killing effect was inhibited by pre-incubation of cells with antibodies blocking TNFRI. Conclusion Taken together, these findings indicate that the S20

  19. ATAD3B is a human embryonic stem cell specific mitochondrial protein, re-expressed in cancer cells, that functions as dominant negative for the ubiquitous ATAD3A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, Nicolas; Féraud, Olivier; Gilquin, Benoit; Hubstenberger, Arnaud; Kieffer-Jacquinot, Sylvie; Assard, Nicole; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Honnorat, Jérôme; Baudier, Jacques

    2012-07-01

    Here we report on the identification of a human pluripotent embryonic stem cell (hESC) specific mitochondrial protein that is re-expressed in cancer cells, ATAD3B. ATAD3B belongs to the AAA+ ATPase ATAD3 protein family of mitochondrial proteins specific to multicellular eukaryotes. Using loss- and gain-of-function approaches, we show that ATAD3B associates with the ubiquitous ATAD3A species, negatively regulates the interaction of ATAD3A with matrix nucleoid complexes and contributes to a mitochondria fragmentation phenotype. We conclude that ATAD3B is a negative regulator of ATAD3A and may function as an adaptor of mitochondrial homeostasis and metabolism in hESCs and cancer cells.

  20. Two serine residues of non-metastasis protein 23-H1 are critical in inhibiting signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activity in human lung cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhihao; Guo, Lili; Ge, Jiangnan; Zhang, Zhijian; Wei, Huijun; Zhou, Qinghua

    2017-01-01

    Constitutive activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in numerous cancers, including lung cancer, is one of the major mechanisms of tumor progression and metastasis. The authors previously reported that the metastasis suppressor non-metastasis protein 23-H1 (Nm23-H1) negatively regulates STAT3 activity by inhibiting its phosphorylation on Tyr705. Nm23-H1 is a multifunction protein that has three different kinase activities. By transfecting the five mutants that inactivated three different kinase activities respectively into Nm23-H1 deficient lung cancer cell lines, it was identified that Nm23-H1S44A (Ser44 to Ala) and Nm23-H1S120G (Ser120 to Gly) mutant forms were unable to suppress STAT3 phosphorylation on Tyr705, resulting in increased expression of fibronectin and matrix metalloproteinase-9. Notably, protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 was also involved in Nm23-H1S44A- and Nm23-H1S120G-mediated suppression of STAT3 phosphorylation. The present results indicated that Ser44 and Ser120 sites of Nm23-H1 may be responsible for its biological suppressive effects of STAT3 and tumor metastasis, which may contribute to illuminate the metastasis suppression function of Nm23-H1 in lung cancer. PMID:28781685

  1. Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosbie, Emma J; Einstein, Mark H; Franceschi, Silvia; Kitchener, Henry C

    2013-09-07

    Cervical cancer is caused by human papillomavirus infection. Most human papillomavirus infection is harmless and clears spontaneously but persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (especially type 16) can cause cancer of the cervix, vulva, vagina, anus, penis, and oropharynx. The virus exclusively infects epithelium and produces new viral particles only in fully mature epithelial cells. Human papillomavirus disrupts normal cell-cycle control, promoting uncontrolled cell division and the accumulation of genetic damage. Two effective prophylactic vaccines composed of human papillomavirus type 16 and 18, and human papillomavirus type 16, 18, 6, and 11 virus-like particles have been introduced in many developed countries as a primary prevention strategy. Human papillomavirus testing is clinically valuable for secondary prevention in triaging low-grade cytology and as a test of cure after treatment. More sensitive than cytology, primary screening by human papillomavirus testing could enable screening intervals to be extended. If these prevention strategies can be implemented in developing countries, many thousands of lives could be saved.

  2. Phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II at T286 enhances invasion and migration of human breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Mengna; Evans, Hamish; Gilchrist, Jackson; Mayhew, Jack; Hoffman, Alexander; Pearsall, Elizabeth Ann; Jankowski, Helen; Brzozowski, Joshua Stephen; Skelding, Kathryn Anne

    2016-01-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a multi-functional kinase that controls a range of cellular functions, including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. The biological properties of CaMKII are regulated by multi-site phosphorylation. However, the role that CaMKII phosphorylation plays in cancer cell metastasis has not been examined. We demonstrate herein that CaMKII expression and phosphorylation at T286 is increased in breast cancer when compared to normal breast tissue, and that increased CAMK2 mRNA is associated with poor breast cancer patient prognosis (worse overall and distant metastasis free survival). Additionally, we show that overexpression of WT, T286D and T286V forms of CaMKII in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells increases invasion, migration and anchorage independent growth, and that overexpression of the T286D phosphomimic leads to a further increase in the invasive, migratory and anchorage independent growth capacity of these cells. Pharmacological inhibition of CaMKII decreases MDA-MB-231 migration and invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrate that overexpression of T286D, but not WT or T286V-CaMKII, leads to phosphorylation of FAK, STAT5a, and Akt. These results demonstrate a novel function for phosphorylation of CaMKII at T286 in the control of breast cancer metastasis, offering a promising target for the development of therapeutics to prevent breast cancer metastasis. PMID:27605043

  3. Integrated proteomic analysis of human cancer cells and plasma from tumor bearing mice for ovarian cancer biomarker discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon J Pitteri

    Full Text Available The complexity of the human plasma proteome represents a substantial challenge for biomarker discovery. Proteomic analysis of genetically engineered mouse models of cancer and isolated cancer cells and cell lines provide alternative methods for identification of potential cancer markers that would be detectable in human blood using sensitive assays. The goal of this work is to evaluate the utility of an integrative strategy using these two approaches for biomarker discovery.We investigated a strategy that combined quantitative plasma proteomics of an ovarian cancer mouse model with analysis of proteins secreted or shed by human ovarian cancer cells. Of 106 plasma proteins identified with increased levels in tumor bearing mice, 58 were also secreted or shed from ovarian cancer cells. The remainder consisted primarily of host-response proteins. Of 25 proteins identified in the study that were assayed, 8 mostly secreted proteins common to mouse plasma and human cancer cells were significantly upregulated in a set of plasmas from ovarian cancer patients. Five of the eight proteins were confirmed to be upregulated in a second independent set of ovarian cancer plasmas, including in early stage disease.Integrated proteomic analysis of cancer mouse models and human cancer cell populations provides an effective approach to identify potential circulating protein biomarkers.

  4. Biological stoichiometry in human cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Elser

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A growing tumor in the body can be considered a complex ecological and evolutionary system. A new eco-evolutionary hypothesis (the "Growth Rate Hypothesis", GRH proposes that tumors have elevated phosphorus (P demands due to increased allocation to P-rich nucleic acids, especially ribosomal RNA, to meet the protein synthesis demands of accelerated proliferation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We determined the elemental (C, N, P and nucleic acid contents of paired malignant and normal tissues from colon, lung, liver, or kidney for 121 patients. Consistent with the GRH, lung and colon tumors were significantly higher (by approximately two-fold in P content (fraction of dry weight and RNA content and lower in nitrogen (N:P ratio than paired normal tissue, and P in RNA contributed a significantly larger fraction of total biomass P in malignant relative to normal tissues. Furthermore, patient-specific differences for %P between malignant and normal tissues were positively correlated with such differences for %RNA, both for the overall data and within three of the four organ sites. However, significant differences in %P and %RNA between malignant and normal tissues were not seen in liver and kidney and, overall, RNA contributed only approximately 11% of total tissue P content. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Data for lung and colon tumors provide support for the GRH in human cancer. The two-fold amplification of P content in colon and lung tumors may set the stage for potential P-limitation of their proliferation, as such differences often do for rapidly growing biota in ecosystems. However, data for kidney and liver do not support the GRH. To account for these conflicting observations, we suggest that local environments in some organs select for neoplastic cells bearing mutations increasing cell division rate ("r-selected," as in colon and lung while conditions elsewhere may select for reduced mortality rate ("K-selected," as in liver and

  5. Chromatin-modifying proteins in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fog, Cathrine K; Jensen, Klaus T; Lund, Anders Henrik

    2007-01-01

    Chromatin-modifying proteins mold the genome into areas that are accessible for transcriptional activity and areas that are transcriptionally silent. This epigenetic gene regulation allows for different transcriptional programs to be conducted in different cell types at different timepoints......-despite the fact that all cells in the organism contain the same genetic information. A large amount of data gathered over the last decades has demonstrated that deregulation of chromatin-modifying proteins is etiologically involved in the development and progression of cancer. Here we discuss how epigenetic...... alterations influence cancer development and review known cancer-associated alterations in chromatin-modifying proteins....

  6. Serum human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) and Risk for Ovarian Malignancy Algorithm (ROMA) as new diagnostic and prognostic tools for epithelial ovarian cancer management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandiera, Elisabetta; Romani, Chiara; Specchia, Claudia; Zanotti, Laura; Galli, Claudio; Ruggeri, Giuseppina; Tognon, Germana; Bignotti, Eliana; Tassi, Renata A.; Odicino, Franco; Caimi, Luigi; Sartori, Enrico; Santin, Alessandro D.; Pecorelli, Sergio; Ravaggi, Antonella

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this work was to analyze the diagnostic and prognostic value of serum human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) and Risk for Ovarian Malignancy Algorithm (ROMA) in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). METHODS Preoperative serum samples of 419 women (140 healthy controls, 131 ovarian benign cysts, 34 endometriosis, 114 EOC) were tested for CA125 and HE4 using fully automated methods (Abbott ARCHITECT) and validated cut-off values. RESULTS For the discrimination of benign masses from EOC, in pre-menopausal women the sensitivity and specificity were 92.3% and 59.4% for CA125, 84.6% and 94.2% for HE4, and 84.6% and 81.2% for ROMA while in post-menopausal women the sensitivity and specificity were 94.3% and 82.3% for CA125, 78.2% and 99.0% for HE4, 93.1% and 84.4% for ROMA. In patients with EOC, elevated CA125, HE4 and ROMA levels were associated with advanced FIGO stage, sub-optimally debulking, ascites, positive cytology, lymph node involvement and advanced age (all p≤0.05). Elevated HE4 and ROMA (both p≤0.01), but not CA125 (p=0.0579), were associated with undifferentiated tumours. In multivariable analysis, elevated HE4 and ROMA (all p≤0.05) were independent prognostic factors for shorter overall survival, disease free survival and progression free survival. CONCLUSIONS and IMPACT This study underlines the high specificity of HE4 in discriminating endometriosis and ovarian benign cysts from EOC and the high sensitivity of CA125 in detecting EOC. We demonstrated HE4 and ROMA as independent prognostic factors. Multicenter studies are needed to draw firm conclusions about the applicability of HE4 and ROMA in clinical practice. PMID:22028406

  7. DBGC: A Database of Human Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Jun; Cai, Mingdeng; Zhu, Zhenggang; Gu, Wenjie; Yu, Yingyan; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    The Database of Human Gastric Cancer (DBGC) is a comprehensive database that integrates various human gastric cancer-related data resources. Human gastric cancer-related transcriptomics projects, proteomics projects, mutations, biomarkers and drug-sensitive genes from different sources were collected and unified in this database. Moreover, epidemiological statistics of gastric cancer patients in China and clinicopathological information annotated with gastric cancer cases were also integrated into the DBGC. We believe that this database will greatly facilitate research regarding human gastric cancer in many fields. DBGC is freely available at http://bminfor.tongji.edu.cn/dbgc/index.do.

  8. Construction of a cancer-perturbed protein-protein interaction network for discovery of apoptosis drug targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Bor-Sen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer is caused by genetic abnormalities, such as mutations of oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes, which alter downstream signal transduction pathways and protein-protein interactions. Comparisons of the interactions of proteins in cancerous and normal cells can shed light on the mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Results We constructed initial networks of protein-protein interactions involved in the apoptosis of cancerous and normal cells by use of two human yeast two-hybrid data sets and four online databases. Next, we applied a nonlinear stochastic model, maximum likelihood parameter estimation, and Akaike Information Criteria (AIC to eliminate false-positive protein-protein interactions in our initial protein interaction networks by use of microarray data. Comparisons of the networks of apoptosis in HeLa (human cervical carcinoma cells and in normal primary lung fibroblasts provided insight into the mechanism of apoptosis and allowed identification of potential drug targets. The potential targets include BCL2, caspase-3 and TP53. Our comparison of cancerous and normal cells also allowed derivation of several party hubs and date hubs in the human protein-protein interaction networks involved in caspase activation. Conclusion Our method allows identification of cancer-perturbed protein-protein interactions involved in apoptosis and identification of potential molecular targets for development of anti-cancer drugs.

  9. Up-regulation of glutathione-related genes, enzyme activities and transport proteins in human cervical cancer cells treated with doxorubicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozd, Ewa; Krzysztoń-Russjan, Jolanta; Marczewska, Jadwiga; Drozd, Janina; Bubko, Irena; Bielak, Magda; Lubelska, Katarzyna; Wiktorska, Katarzyna; Chilmonczyk, Zdzisław; Anuszewska, Elżbieta; Gruber-Bzura, Beata

    2016-10-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX), one of the most effective anticancer drugs, acts in a variety of ways including DNA damage, enzyme inhibition and generation of reactive oxygen species. Glutathione (GSH) and glutathione-related enzymes including: glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GSR) and glutathione S-transferases (GST) may play a role in adaptive detoxification processes in response to the oxidative stress, thus contributing to drug resistance phenotype. In this study, we investigated effects of DOX treatment on expression and activity of GSH-related enzymes and multidrug resistance-associated proteins in cultured human cervical cancer cells displaying different resistance against this drug (HeLa and KB-V1). Determination of expression level of genes encoding GST isoforms and MRP proteins (GCS, GPX, GSR, GSTA1-3, GSTM1, GSTP1, ABCC1-3, MGST1-3) was performed using StellARray™ Technology. Enzymatic activities of GPX and GSR were measured using biochemical methods. Expression of MRP1 was examined by immunofluorescence microscopy. This study showed that native expression levels of GSTM1 and GSTA3 were markedly higher in KB-V1 cells (2000-fold and 200-fold) compared to HeLa cells. Resistant cells have also shown significantly elevated expression of GSTA1 and GSTA2 genes (200-fold and 50-fold) as a result of DOX treatment. In HeLa cells, exposure to DOX increased expression of all genes: GSTM1 (7-fold) and GSTA1-3 (550-fold, 150-fold and 300-fold). Exposure to DOX led to the slight increase of GCS expression as well as GPX activity in KB-V1 cells, while in HeLa cells it did not. Expression of ABCC1 (MRP1) was not increased in any of the tested cell lines. Our results indicate that expression of GSTM1 and GSTA1-3 genes is up-regulated by DOX treatment and suggest that activity of these genes may be associated with drug resistance of the tested cells. At the same time, involvement of MRP1 in DOX resistance in the given experimental conditions is unlikely

  10. Human plasminogen binding protein tetranectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, J S; Rasmussen, H; Nielsen, B B;

    1997-01-01

    The recombinant human plasminogen binding protein tetranectin (TN) and the C-type lectin CRD of this protein (TN3) have been crystallized. TN3 crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4(2)2(1)2 with cell dimensions a = b = 64.0, c = 75.7 A and with one molecule per asymmetric unit. The crystals...... to at least 2.5 A. A full data set has been collected to 3.0 A. The asymmetric unit contains one monomer of TN. Molecular replacement solutions for TN3 and TN have been obtained using the structure of the C-type lectin CRD of rat mannose-binding protein as search model. The rhombohedral space group indicates...

  11. Unfoldomics of prostate cancer: on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Kevin S; Na, Insung; Schenck, Ryan O; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic diseases such as prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia are highly prevalent among men. The number of studies focused on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer is rather limited. The goal of this study is to analyze the prevalence and degree of disorder in proteins that were previously associated with the prostate cancer pathogenesis and to compare these proteins to the entire human proteome. The analysis of these datasets provides means for drawing conclusions on the roles of disordered proteins in this common male disease. We also hope that the results of our analysis can potentially lead to future experimental studies of these proteins to find novel pathways associated with this disease.

  12. Protein-Protein Interaction Reagents | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CTD2 Center at Emory University has a library of genes used to study protein-protein interactions in mammalian cells. These genes are cloned in different mammalian expression vectors. A list of available cancer-associated genes can be accessed below. Emory_CTD^2_PPI_Reagents.xlsx Contact: Haian Fu

  13. Protein-Protein Interactions (PPI) reagents: | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CTD2 Center at Emory University has a library of genes used to study protein-protein interactions in mammalian cells. These genes are cloned in different mammalian expression vectors. A list of available cancer-associated genes can be accessed below.

  14. Protein-Protein Interactions (PPI) reagents: | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CTD2 Center at Emory University has a library of genes used to study protein-protein interactions in mammalian cells. These genes are cloned in different mammalian expression vectors. A list of available cancer-associated genes can be accessed below.

  15. Human papillomavirus-associated diseases and cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan Yang; Jianbo Zhu Co-first author; Xiaoyue Song; Yan Qi; Xiaobin Cui; Feng Li 

    2015-01-01

    Human papilomaviruses (HPVs) have been detected in cervical cancer cels and skin papiloma cels, which have a variety of types, including low-risk and high-risk types. HPV genome replication requires the host cel’s DNA synthesis machinery, and HPVs encode proteins that maintain diferentiated epithelial cels in a replication-competent state. HPV types are tissue-specific and generaly produce diferent types of le-sions, either benign or malignant. This review examines diferent HPV types and their associated diseases and presents therapeutic options for the treatment of HPV-positive diseases.

  16. Sensitization of human colon cancer cells to sodium butyrate-induced apoptosis by modulation of sphingosine kinase 2 and protein kinase D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Min [Department of Occupational Health and Occupational Medicine, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Liu, Yungang [Department of Toxicology, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Zou, Fei, E-mail: ZouFeiMed@gmail.com [Department of Occupational Health and Occupational Medicine, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China)

    2012-01-01

    Sphingosine kinases (SphKs) have been recognized as important proteins regulating cell proliferation and apoptosis. Of the two isoforms of SphK (SphK1 and SphK2), little is known about the functions of SphK2. Sodium butyrate (NaBT) has been established as a promising chemotherapeutic agent, but the precise mechanism for its effects is unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of SphK2 in NaBT-induced apoptosis of HCT116 colon cancer cells. The results indicated that following NaBT treatment SphK2 was translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, leading to its accumulation in the cytoplasm; in the meantime, only mild apoptosis occurred. However, downregulation of SphK2 resulted in sensitized apoptosis, and overexpression of SphK2 led to even lighter apoptosis; these strongly indicate an inhibitory role of SphK2 in cell apoptosis induced by NaBT. After knocking down protein kinase D (PKD), another protein reported to be critical in cell proliferation/apoptosis process, by using siRNA, blockage of cytoplasmic accumulation of SphK2 and sensitized apoptosis following NaBT treatment were observed. The present study suggests that PKD and SphK2 may form a mechanism for the resistance of cancer cells to tumor chemotherapies, such as HCT116 colon cancer cells to NaBT, and these two proteins may become molecular targets for designation of new tumor-therapeutic drugs. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the present study sodium butyrate (10 mM) induced mild apoptosis of cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The apoptosis was negatively regulated by cytoplasmic Sphingosine Kinase 2 (SphK2). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Translocation of SphK2 from nucleus to cytoplasm was mediated by protein kinase D. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Downregulation of SphK2 or protein kinase D leads to sensitized cell apoptosis.

  17. Bacterial proteins and peptides in cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Ananda M; Bernardes, Nuno; Fialho, Arsenio M

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most deadly diseases worldwide. In the last three decades many efforts have been made focused on understanding how cancer grows and responds to drugs. The dominant drug-development paradigm has been the “one drug, one target.” Based on that, the two main targeted therapies developed to combat cancer include the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. Development of drug resistance and side effects represent the major limiting factors for their use in cancer treatment. Nowadays, a new paradigm for cancer drug discovery is emerging wherein multi-targeted approaches gain ground in cancer therapy. Therefore, to overcome resistance to therapy, it is clear that a new generation of drugs is urgently needed. Here, regarding the concept of multi-targeted therapy, we discuss the challenges of using bacterial proteins and peptides as a new generation of effective anti-cancer drugs. PMID:24875003

  18. The role of oestrogen receptor {alpha} in human thyroid cancer: contributions from coregulatory proteins and the tyrosine kinase receptor HER2.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kavanagh, Dara O

    2012-02-01

    Epidemiological, clinical, and molecular studies suggest a role for oestrogen in thyroid cancer. How oestrogen mediates its effects and the consequence of it on clinical outcome has not been fully elucidated. The participation of coregulatory proteins in modulating oestrogen receptor (ER) function and input of crosstalk with the tyrosine kinase receptor HER2 was investigated. Oestrogen induced cell proliferation in the follicular thyroid cancer (FTC)-133 cells, but not in the anaplastic 8305C cell line. Knockdown of the coactivator steroid receptor coactivator (SRC)-1 inhibited FTC-133 basal, but not oestrogen induced, cell proliferation. Oestrogen also increased protein expression of SRC-1 and the ER target gene cyclin D1 in the FTC-133 cell line. ERalpha, ERbeta, the coregulatory proteins SRC-1 and nuclear corepressor (NCoR), and the tyrosine kinase receptor HER2 were localised by immunohistochemistry and immnofluorescence in paraffin-embedded tissue from thyroid tumour patients (n=111). ERalpha was colocalised with both SRC-1 and NCoR to the nuclei of the tumour epithelial cells. Expression of ERalpha and NCoR was found predominantly in non-anaplastic tumours and was significantly associated with well-differentiated tumours and reduced incidence of disease recurrence. In non-anaplastic tumours, HER2 was significantly associated with SRC-1, and these proteins were associated with poorly differentiated tumours, capsular invasion and disease recurrence. Totally, 87% of anaplastic tumours were positive for SRC-1. Kaplan-Meier estimates of disease-free survival indicated that in thyroid cancer, SRC-1 strongly correlates with reduced disease-free survival (P<0.001), whereas NCoR predicted increased survival (P<0.001). These data suggest opposing roles for the coregulators SRC-1 and NCoR in thyroid tumour progression.

  19. Sensitization of human colon cancer cells to sodium butyrate-induced apoptosis by modulation of sphingosine kinase 2 and protein kinase D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Min; Liu, Yungang; Zou, Fei

    2012-01-01

    Sphingosine kinases (SphKs) have been recognized as important proteins regulating cell proliferation and apoptosis. Of the two isoforms of SphK (SphK1 and SphK2), little is known about the functions of SphK2. Sodium butyrate (NaBT) has been established as a promising chemotherapeutic agent, but the precise mechanism for its effects is unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of SphK2 in NaBT-induced apoptosis of HCT116 colon cancer cells. The results indicated that following NaBT treatment SphK2 was translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, leading to its accumulation in the cytoplasm; in the meantime, only mild apoptosis occurred. However, downregulation of SphK2 resulted in sensitized apoptosis, and overexpression of SphK2 led to even lighter apoptosis; these strongly indicate an inhibitory role of SphK2 in cell apoptosis induced by NaBT. After knocking down protein kinase D (PKD), another protein reported to be critical in cell proliferation/apoptosis process, by using siRNA, blockage of cytoplasmic accumulation of SphK2 and sensitized apoptosis following NaBT treatment were observed. The present study suggests that PKD and SphK2 may form a mechanism for the resistance of cancer cells to tumor chemotherapies, such as HCT116 colon cancer cells to NaBT, and these two proteins may become molecular targets for designation of new tumor-therapeutic drugs.

  20. Prostate apoptosis response protein 4 sensitizes human colon cancer cells to chemotherapeutic 5-FU through mediation of an NFκB and microRNA network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weirauch Matthew T

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diminished expression or activity of prostate apoptosis response protein 4 (Par-4 has been demonstrated in a number of cancers, although reports on Par-4 expression during colon cancer progression are lacking. An understanding of the molecular events in conjunction with the genetic networks affected by Par-4 is warranted. Results Colon cancer specimens derived from patients have significantly diminished expression of Par-4 mRNA relative to paired normal colon. Hence, the functional consequences of reintroducing Par-4 into HT29 colon cancer cells were assessed. Overexpression augmented the interaction of Par-4 with NFκB in the cytosol but not nucleus, and facilitated apoptosis in the presence of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU. Analogous findings were obtained when AKT1 pro-survival signaling was inhibited. Transcriptome profiling identified ~700 genes differentially regulated by Par-4 overexpression in HT29 cells. Nearly all Par-4-regulated genes were shown by promoter analysis to contain cis-binding sequences for NFκB, and meta-analysis of patient expression data revealed that one-third of these genes exist as a recurrent co-regulated network in colon cancer specimens. Sets of genes involved in programmed cell death, cell cycle regulation and interestingly the microRNA pathway were found overrepresented in the network. Noteworthy, Par-4 overexpression decreased NFκB occupancy at the promoter of one particular network gene DROSHA, encoding a microRNA processing enzyme. The resulting down-regulation of DROSHA was associated with expression changes in a cohort of microRNAs. Many of these microRNAs are predicted to target mRNAs encoding proteins with apoptosis-related functions. Western and functional analyses were employed to validate several predictions. For instance, miR-34a up-regulation corresponded with a down-regulation of BCL2 protein. Treating Par-4-overexpressing HT29 cells with a miR-34a antagomir functionally reversed both

  1. Human Monocyte-derived Dendritic Cells Pulsed with Wild-field name="type" p53 Protein Efficiently Induce Cytotoxic T-lymphocytes against p53 overexpressing Human Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    德永, 尚之

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: Dendritic cells are the most potent antigen-presenting cells for initiating cellular immune responses. Dendritic cells are attractive immunoregulatory cells for cancer immunotherapy, and their efficacy has been investigated in clinical trials. The tumor suppressor gene p53 is pivotal in the regulation of apoptosis, and p53-based immunization is an attractive approach to cancer immunotherapy because of the accumulation of p53 protein in malignant but not in normal cells. It has been s...

  2. A Technical Assessment of the Utility of Reverse Phase Protein Arrays for the Study of the Functional Proteome in Non-microdissected Human Breast Cancers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hennessy, Bryan T

    2010-12-01

    INTRODUCTION: The lack of large panels of validated antibodies, tissue handling variability, and intratumoral heterogeneity potentially hamper comprehensive study of the functional proteome in non-microdissected solid tumors. The purpose of this study was to address these concerns and to demonstrate clinical utility for the functional analysis of proteins in non-microdissected breast tumors using reverse phase protein arrays (RPPA). METHODS: Herein, 82 antibodies that recognize kinase and steroid signaling proteins and effectors were validated for RPPA. Intraslide and interslide coefficients of variability were <15%. Multiple sites in non-microdissected breast tumors were analyzed using RPPA after intervals of up to 24 h on the benchtop at room temperature following surgical resection. RESULTS: Twenty-one of 82 total and phosphoproteins demonstrated time-dependent instability at room temperature with most variability occurring at later time points between 6 and 24 h. However, the 82-protein functional proteomic "fingerprint" was robust in most tumors even when maintained at room temperature for 24 h before freezing. In repeat samples from each tumor, intratumoral protein levels were markedly less variable than intertumoral levels. Indeed, an independent analysis of prognostic biomarkers in tissue from multiple tumor sites accurately and reproducibly predicted patient outcomes. Significant correlations were observed between RPPA and immunohistochemistry. However, RPPA demonstrated a superior dynamic range. Classification of 128 breast cancers using RPPA identified six subgroups with markedly different patient outcomes that demonstrated a significant correlation with breast cancer subtypes identified by transcriptional profiling. CONCLUSION: Thus, the robustness of RPPA and stability of the functional proteomic "fingerprint" facilitate the study of the functional proteome in non-microdissected breast tumors.

  3. Calorimetric signatures of human cancer cells and their nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todinova, S. [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl. 21, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Stoyanova, E. [Department of Molecular Immunology, Institute of Biology and Immunology of Reproduction, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tzarigradsko shose Blvd. 73, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Krumova, S., E-mail: sakrumo@gmail.com [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl. 21, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Iliev, I. [Institute of Experimental Morphology, Pathology and Anthropology with Museum, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl. 25, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Taneva, S.G. [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl. 21, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria)

    2016-01-10

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Two temperature ranges are distinguished in the thermograms of cells/nuclei. • Different thermodynamic properties of cancer and normal human cells/nuclei. • Dramatic reduction of the enthalpy of the low-temperature range in cancer cells. • Oxaliplatin and 5-FU affect the nuclear matrix proteins and the DNA stability. - Abstract: The human cancer cell lines HeLa, JEG-3, Hep G2, SSC-9, PC-3, HT-29, MCF7 and their isolated nuclei were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry. The calorimetric profiles differed from normal human fibroblast (BJ) cells in the two well distinguished temperature ranges—the high-temperature range (H{sub T}, due to DNA-containing structures) and the low-temperature range (L{sub T}, assigned to the nuclear matrix and cellular proteins). The enthalpy of the L{sub T} range, and, respectively the ratio of the enthalpies of the L{sub T}- vs. H{sub T}-range, ΔH{sub L}/ΔH{sub H}, is strongly reduced for all cancer cells compared to normal fibroblasts. On the contrary, for most of the cancer nuclei this ratio is higher compared to normal nuclei. The HT-29 human colorectal cancer cells/nuclei differed most drastically from normal human fibroblast cells/nuclei. Our data also reveal that the treatment of HT-29 cancer cells with cytostatic drugs affects not only the DNA replication but also the cellular proteome.

  4. Food extracts consumed in Mediterranean countries and East Asia reduce protein concentrations of androgen receptor, phospho-protein kinase B, and phospho-cytosolic phospholipase A(2)alpha in human prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jaskirat; Xie, Chanlu; Yao, Mu; Hua, Sheng; Vignarajan, Soma; Jardine, Greg; Hambly, Brett D; Sved, Paul; Dong, Qihan

    2010-04-01

    Active surveillance is an emerging management option for the rising number of men with low-grade, clinically localized prostate cancer. However, 30-40% of men on active surveillance will progress to high-grade disease over 5 y. With the ultimate aim of developing a food-based chemoprevention strategy to retard cancer progression in these otherwise healthy men, we have developed a blend of food extracts commonly consumed in Mediterranean countries and East Asia. The effect of the food extracts known as Blueberry Punch (BBP) on prostate cancer cell growth and key signaling pathways were examined in vitro and in vivo. BBP reduced prostate cancer cell growth in a dose-dependent manner (0.08-2.5%) at 72 h in vitro due to the reduction in cell proliferation and viability. Prostate cancer cell xenograft-bearing mice, administered 10% BBP in drinking water for 2 wk, had a 25% reduction in tumor volume compared with the control (water only). In vitro, BBP reduced protein concentrations in 3 signaling pathways necessary for the proliferation and survival of prostate cancer cells, namely androgen receptor, phospho-protein kinase B/protein kinase B, and phospho-cytosolic phospholipase A(2)alpha. The downstream effectors of these pathways, including prostate-specific antigen and glycogen synthase kinase 3beta, were also reduced. Thus, this palatable food supplement is a potential candidate for testing in clinical trials and may ultimately prove effective in retarding the progression of low-grade, early-stage prostate cancer in men managed by active surveillance.

  5. Inositol hexaphosphate (IP6) blocks proliferation of human breast cancer cells through a PKCdelta-dependent increase in p27Kip1 and decrease in retinoblastoma protein (pRb) phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vucenik, Ivana; Ramakrishna, Gayatri; Tantivejkul, Kwanchanit; Anderson, Lucy M; Ramljak, Danica

    2005-05-01

    Inositol hexaphosphate (IP6) is a naturally occurring polyphosphorylated carbohydrate with demonstrated anti-proliferative and anti-cancer activity in mammary cells. We hypothesized that IP6 modulates cell cycle proteins by action on cytoplasmic signaling molecules. The effects of both pharmacological (2 mM) and physiological (100 microM) doses of IP6 on major PKC isoforms (PKCalpha, delta, epsilon, beta and zeta), PI3-K/Akt and ras/Erk1/2 were evaluated. Treatment of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells with 2 mM IP6 for 24 h caused a 3.1-fold increase in the expression of anti-proliferative PKCdelta. Similar results were observed with 100 microM IP6 at only 30-60 min post-treatment. IP6 also caused an increase in PKCdelta activity, shown by its translocation from cytosol to membrane. No changes in expression of PKC alpha, delta, epsilon, beta and zeta were detected. Additionally, IP6 caused a decrease of Erk1/2 and Akt activity. Among cell cycle control proteins, IP6 resulted in increased p27Kip1 protein levels and marked reduction of pRb phosphorylation. Specificity of the IP6 effects on p27Kip1 and pRb in MCF-7 cells (hormone-dependent) were additionally confirmed in highly invasive hormone-independent MDA-MB 231 breast cancer cells. Use of specific pharmaclogical inhibitors of PKC delta, MEK/Erk, and PI3K/Akt pathways indicated that the IP6-mediated effects on PKC delta were responsible for up-regulation of p27Kip, and pRb hypo-phosphorylation. In addition, IP6-induced apoptosis detected in MCF-7 cells appeared also to be PKC delta-dependent. Our data suggest potential usefulness of IP6 as a novel therapeutic modulator of PKC delta and p27Kip1, an important prognostic factor in human breast cancers.

  6. Selective modulation of protein kinase isozymes by the site-selective analog 8-chloroadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate provides a biological means for control of human colon cancer cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ally, S.; Tortora, G.; Clair, T.; Grieco, D.; Merlo, G.; Katsaros, D.; Ogreid, D.; Doeskeland, S.O.; Jahnsen, T.; Cho-Chung, Yoonsang

    1988-09-01

    Differential expression of type I and type II cAMP-dependent protein kinase isozymes has been linked to growth regulation and differentiation. The authors examined the expression of protein kinase isozymes in the LS 174T human colon cancer cell line during 8-chloroadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Cl-cAMP)-induced growth inhibition. Two species of R/sup II/ (the regulatory subunit of protein kinase type II) with apparent M/sub r/ 52,000 (R/sup II//sub 52/) and M/sub r/ 56,000 (R/sup II//sub 56/) and a single species of R/sup I/ (the regulatory subunit of protein kinase type I) with M/sub r/ 48,000 were identified in the cancer cells. R/sup I/ and both forms of R/sup II/ were covalently labeled with 8-azidoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic (/sup 32/P)monophosphate, and two anti-R/sup II/ antibodies that exclusively recognize either R/sup II//sub 52/ or R/sup II//sub 56/ resolved two forms of the R/sup II/ receptors. 8-Cl-cAMP caused transcriptional activation of the R/sup II//sub 52/ receptor gene and inactivation of the R/sup I/ receptor gene. Thus, differential regulation of various forms of cAMP receptor proteins is involved in 8-Cl-cAMP-induced regulation of cancer cell growth, and nuclear translocation of R/sup II//sub 52/ receptor protein appears to be an early event in such differential regulation.

  7. Valproic acid and butyrate induce apoptosis in human cancer cells through inhibition of gene expression of Akt/protein kinase B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Qiao

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In eukaryotic cells, the genomic DNA is packed with histones to form the nucleosome and chromatin structure. Reversible acetylation of the histone tails plays an important role in the control of specific gene expression. Mounting evidence has established that histone deacetylase inhibitors selectively induce cellular differentiation, growth arrest and apoptosis in variety of cancer cells, making them a promising class of anticancer drugs. However, the molecular mechanisms of the anti-cancer effects of these inhibitors have yet to be understood. Results Here, we report that a key determinant for the susceptibility of cancer cells to histone deacetylase inhibitors is their ability to maintain cellular Akt activity in response to the treatment. Also known as protein kinase B, Akt is an essential pro-survival factor in cell proliferation and is often deregulated during tumorigenesis. We show that histone deacetylase inhibitors, such as valproic acid and butyrate, impede Akt1 and Akt2 expression, which leads to Akt deactivation and apoptotic cell death. In addition, valproic acid and butyrate induce apoptosis through the caspase-dependent pathway. The activity of caspase-9 is robustly activated upon valproic acid or butyrate treatment. Constitutively active Akt is able to block the caspase activation and rescues cells from butyrate-induced apoptotic cell death. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that although the primary target of histone deacetylase inhibitors is transcription, it is the capacity of cells to maintain cellular survival networks that determines their fate of survival.

  8. Crystal Structure of Human Retinoblastoma Binding Protein 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorobiev, S.; Su, M; Seetharaman, J; Huang, Y; Chen, C; Maglaqui, M; Janjua, H; Montelione, G; Tong, L; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    As a step towards better integrating protein three-dimensional (3D) structural information in cancer systems biology, the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (NESG) (www.nesg.org) has constructed a Human Cancer Pathway Protein Interaction Network (HCPIN) by analysis of several classical cancer-associated signaling pathways and their physical protein-protein interactions. Many well-known cancer-associated proteins play central roles as hubs or bottlenecks in the HCPIN (http://nmr.cabm.rutgers.edu/hcpin). NESG has selected more than 1000 human proteins and protein domains from the HCPIN for sample production and 3D structure determination. The long-range goal of this effort is to provide a comprehensive 3D structure-function database for human cancer-associated proteins and protein complexes, in the context of their interaction networks. Human retinoblastoma binding protein 9 (RBBP9) is one of the HCPIN proteins targeted by NESG. RBBP9 was initially identified as the product of a new gene, Bog (for B5T over-expressed gene), in several transformed rat liver epithelial cell lines resistant to the growth-inhibitory effect of TGF-1 as well as in primary human liver tumors. RBBP9 contains the retinoblastoma (Rb) binding motif LxCxE in its sequence, and was shown to interact with Rb by yeast two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Mutation of the Leu residue in this motif to Gln blocked the binding to Rb. RBBP9 can displace E2F1 from E2F1-Rb complexes, and over expression of RBBP9 overcomes TGF-1 induced growth arrest and results in transformation of rat liver epithelial cells leading to hepatoblastoma-like tumors in nude mice. RBBP9 may also play a role in cellular responses to chronic low dose radiation. A close homolog of RBBP9, sharing 93% amino acid sequence identity and also known as RBBP10, interacts with a protein with sua5-yciO-yrdC domains.

  9. TRPM4 protein expression in prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper Drimer; Soldini, Davide; Jung, Maria;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 4 (TRPM4) messenger RNA (mRNA) has been shown to be upregulated in prostate cancer (PCa) and might be a new promising tissue biomarker. We evaluated TRPM4 protein expression and correlated the expression level with bioch......BACKGROUND: Transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 4 (TRPM4) messenger RNA (mRNA) has been shown to be upregulated in prostate cancer (PCa) and might be a new promising tissue biomarker. We evaluated TRPM4 protein expression and correlated the expression level.......79-2.62; p = 0.01-0.03 for the two observers) when compared to patients with a lower staining intensity. CONCLUSIONS: TRPM4 protein expression is widely expressed in benign and cancerous prostate tissue, with highest staining intensities found in PCa. Overexpression of TRPM4 in PCa (combination of high...

  10. Overproduction and biophysical characterization of human HSP70 proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell-Casteel, Rebba C; Johnson, Jennifer M; Duggan, Kelli D; Tsutsui, Yuko; Hays, Franklin A

    2015-02-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSP) perform vital cellular functions and modulate cell response pathways to physical and chemical stressors. A key feature of HSP function is the ability to interact with a broad array of protein binding partners as a means to potentiate downstream response pathways or facilitate protein folding. These binding interactions are driven by ATP-dependent conformational rearrangements in HSP proteins. The HSP70 family is evolutionarily conserved and is associated with diabetes and cancer progression and the etiopathogenesis of hepatic, cardiovascular, and neurological disorders in humans. However, functional characterization of human HSP70s has been stymied by difficulties in obtaining large quantities of purified protein. Studies of purified human HSP70 proteins are essential for downstream investigations of protein-protein interactions and in the rational design of novel family-specific therapeutics. Within this work, we present optimized protocols for the heterologous overexpression and purification of either the nucleotide binding domain (NBD) or the nucleotide and substrate binding domains of human HSPA9, HSPA8, and HSPA5 in either Escherichia coli or Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We also include initial biophysical characterization of HSPA9 and HSPA8. This work provides the basis for future biochemical studies of human HSP70 protein function and structure.

  11. Human Cancer Models Initiative | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Human Cancer Models Initiative (HCMI) is an international consortium that is generating novel human tumor-derived culture models, which are annotated with genomic and clinical data. In an effort to advance cancer research and more fully understand how in vitro findings are related to clinical biology, HCMI-developed models and related data will be available as a community resource for cancer research.

  12. Transforming growth factor-β1 regulation of ATF-3, c-Jun and JunB proteins for activation of matrix metalloproteinase-13 gene in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokulnath, M; Swetha, R; Thejaswini, G; Shilpa, P; Selvamurugan, N

    2017-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1) plays a significant role in breast cancer mediated bone metastasis, and it stimulated expression of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13; an invasive and metastasis gene) via activating transcription factor-3 (ATF-3) in human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB231). We further dissected the role of ATF-3 and its interacting proteins (activator protein-1; AP-1) for TGF-β1-stimulation of MMP-13 expression in these cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiment identified the TGF-β1-stimulation of ATF-3 interaction at the AP-1 site of the MMP-13 promoter in a sustained and prolonged manner in MDA-MB231 cells. In silico protein-protein interaction, co-immunoprecipitation and western blot experiments identified the ATF-3 interaction and regulation of c-Jun and JunB proteins in these cells. The sequential ChIP assay confirmed the presence of c-Jun/ATF-3 complex at the AP-1 site of the MMP-13 promoter in MDA-MB231 cells upon TGF-β1-treatment. Hence, our results suggested that TGF-β1-treatment stimulated a sustained and prolonged expression of ATF-3, and its interaction and regulation of c-Jun protein and their assembly as a protein complex at the AP-1 site of the MMP-13 promoter could be responsible for MMP-13 gene activation in MDA-MB231 cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Role of Uncoupling Proteins in Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle, Adamo; Oliver, Jordi; Roca, Pilar, E-mail: pilar.roca@uib.es [Grupo Multidisciplinar de Oncología Traslacional, Institut Universitari d' Investigació en Ciències de la Salut, Universitat de les Illes Balears/Cra. Valldemossa km 7.5, E-07122, Palma de Mallorca, Illes Balears (Spain)

    2010-04-16

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) are a family of inner mitochondrial membrane proteins whose function is to allow the re-entry of protons to the mitochondrial matrix, by dissipating the proton gradient and, subsequently, decreasing membrane potential and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Due to their pivotal role in the intersection between energy efficiency and oxidative stress, UCPs are being investigated for a potential role in cancer. In this review we compile the latest evidence showing a link between uncoupling and the carcinogenic process, paying special attention to their involvement in cancer initiation, progression and drug chemoresistance.

  14. Glycosylation status of vitamin D binding protein in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehder, Douglas S; Nelson, Randall W; Borges, Chad R

    2009-10-01

    On the basis of the results of activity studies, previous reports have suggested that vitamin D binding protein (DBP) is significantly or even completely deglycosylated in cancer patients, eliminating the molecular precursor of the immunologically important Gc macrophage activating factor (GcMAF), a glycosidase-derived product of DBP. The purpose of this investigation was to directly determine the relative degree of O-linked trisaccharide glycosylation of serum-derived DBP in human breast, colorectal, pancreatic, and prostate cancer patients. Results obtained by electrospray ionization-based mass spectrometric immunoassay showed that there was no significant depletion of DBP trisaccharide glycosylation in the 56 cancer patients examined relative to healthy controls. These results suggest that alternative hypotheses regarding the molecular and/or structural origins of GcMAF must be considered to explain the relative inability of cancer patient serum to activate macrophages.

  15. Comparative expression study of the endo-G protein coupled receptor (GPCR repertoire in human glioblastoma cancer stem-like cells, U87-MG cells and non malignant cells of neural origin unveils new potential therapeutic targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Fève

    Full Text Available Glioblastomas (GBMs are highly aggressive, invasive brain tumors with bad prognosis and unmet medical need. These tumors are heterogeneous being constituted by a variety of cells in different states of differentiation. Among these, cells endowed with stem properties, tumor initiating/propagating properties and particularly resistant to chemo- and radiotherapies are designed as the real culprits for tumor maintenance and relapse after treatment. These cells, termed cancer stem-like cells, have been designed as prominent targets for new and more efficient cancer therapies. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs, a family of membrane receptors, play a prominent role in cell signaling, cell communication and crosstalk with the microenvironment. Their role in cancer has been highlighted but remains largely unexplored. Here, we report a descriptive study of the differential expression of the endo-GPCR repertoire in human glioblastoma cancer stem-like cells (GSCs, U-87 MG cells, human astrocytes and fetal neural stem cells (f-NSCs. The endo-GPCR transcriptome has been studied using Taqman Low Density Arrays. Of the 356 GPCRs investigated, 138 were retained for comparative studies between the different cell types. At the transcriptomic level, eight GPCRs were specifically expressed/overexpressed in GSCs. Seventeen GPCRs appeared specifically expressed in cells with stem properties (GSCs and f-NSCs. Results of GPCR expression at the protein level using mass spectrometry and proteomic analysis are also presented. The comparative GPCR expression study presented here gives clues for new pathways specifically used by GSCs and unveils novel potential therapeutic targets.

  16. Telomerase activity in human cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, J.

    2000-10-01

    The overall goal of this collaborative project was to investigate the role in malignant cells of both chromosome telomeres, and telomerase, the enzyme that replicates telomeres. Telomeres are highly conserved nucleoprotein complexes located at the ends of eucaryotic chromosomes. Telomere length in somatic cells is reduced by 40--50 nucleotide pairs with every cell division due to incomplete replication of terminal DNA sequences and the absence of telomerase, the ribonucleoprotein that adds telomere DNA to chromosome ends. Although telomerase is active in cells with extended proliferative capacities, including more than 85% of tumors, work performed under this contract demonstrated that the telomeres of human cancer cells are shorter than those of paired normal cells, and that the length of the telomeres is characteristic of particular types of cancers. The extent of telomere shortening ostensibly is related to the number of cell divisions the tumor has undergone. It is believed that ongoing cell proliferation leads to the accumulation and fixation of new mutations in tumor cell lineages.Therefore, it is not unreasonable to assume that the degree of phenotypic variability is related to the proliferative history of the tumor, and therefore to telomere length, implying a correlation with prognosis. In some human tumors, short telomeres are also correlated with genomic instabilities, including interstitial chromosome translocation, loss of heterozygosity, and aneuoploidy. Moreover, unprotected chromosome ends are highly recombinogenic and telomere shortening in cultured human cells correlates with the formation of dicentric chromosomes, suggesting that critically short telomeres not only identify, but also predispose, cells to genomic instability, again implying a correlation with prognosis. Therefore, telomere length or content could be an important predictor of metastatic potential or responsiveness to various therapeutic modalities.

  17. Expression of Robo protein in bladder cancer tissues and its effect on the growth of cancer cells by blocking Robo protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Cheng, Hepeng; Xu, Weibo; Tian, Xin; Li, Xiaodong; Zhu, Chaoyang

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to detect the expression of Slit signaling protein ligand Robo protein in human bladder cancer and para-carcinoma tissue, and observe the tumor cell survival and growth by inoculating the bladder cancer cells with the blocked signaling protein into the subcutaneous tissue of nude mice. The expression of Robo protein was detected in T24 cells in human bladder uroepithelium carcinoma and cultivated human bladder uroepithelium carcinoma confirmed by pathological diagnosis. The cultivated T24 cells were coated by the protein antibody and human bladder uroepithelium carcinoma T24 tumor-bearing mice model was established. The tumor cell survival and growth were observed in the antibody coating group and non-coating group. The tumor body size was measured. The immunohistochemical detection showed that Robo protein isoforms Robo1 and Robo 4 were expressed in T24 cells of cancer tissues, paracarcinoma tissues and cultured human uroepithelium carcinoma. The expression of Robo1 was significantly higher than that of Robo4 (PRobo4 antibody coating group and non-coating group (P>0.05); The difference was statistically significant compared with the anti-Robo1 antibody coating group (PRobo protein isoforms Robo1 and Robo4 were expressed in human bladder cancer T24 cells. To block Robo4 signal protein had little effect on the survival and growth of the transplantation tumor and to block Robo1 signal protein would seriously affect the survival and growth of the transplantation tumor, suggesting that Robo1 might play an important role in the growth and metastasis of bladder cancer, and might become a new target for the treatment of human bladder cancer and drug research.

  18. The novel pterostilbene derivative ANK-199 induces autophagic cell death through regulating PI3 kinase class III/beclin 1/Atg‑related proteins in cisplatin‑resistant CAR human oral cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Min-Tsang; Chen, Hao-Ping; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Wu, Tian-Shung; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Huang, Li-Jiau; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Yang, Jai-Sing

    2014-08-01

    Pterostilbene is an effective chemopreventive agent against multiple types of cancer cells. A novel pterostilbene derivative, ANK-199, was designed and synthesized by our group. Its antitumor activity and mechanism in cisplatin-resistant CAR human oral cancer cells were investigated in this study. Our results show that ANK-199 has an extremely low toxicity in normal oral cell lines. The formation of autophagic vacuoles and acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs) was observed in the ANK-199-treated CAR cells by monodansylcadaverine (MDC) and acridine orange (AO) staining, suggesting that ANK-199 is able to induce autophagic cell death in CAR cells. Neither DNA fragmentation nor DNA condensation was observed, which means that ANK-199-induced cell death is not triggered by apoptosis. In accordance with morphological observation, 3-MA, a specific inhibitor of PI3K kinase class III, can inhibit the autophagic vesicle formation induced by ANK-199. In addition, ANK-199 is also able to enhance the protein levels of autophagic proteins, Atg complex, beclin 1, PI3K class III and LC3-II, and mRNA expression of autophagic genes Atg7, Atg12, beclin 1 and LC3-II in the ANK-199-treated CAR cells. A molecular signaling pathway induced by ANK-199 was therefore summarized. Results presented in this study show that ANK-199 may become a novel therapeutic reagent for the treatment of oral cancer in the near future (patent pending).

  19. Co-localization of the heat shock protein and human immunoglobulin G in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Chun-guang; LIU Yan-fang; LI Kai-nan; YU Lu; CUI Ji-hong; LI Jing; YANG Shou-jing

    2005-01-01

    @@ Elevated levels of serum immunoglobulin observed in patients with cancers of epithelial origin, including carcinomas of breast, colon, and liver1,2 have been interpreted as humoral responses of host to cancer growth.3 Recently, Qiu et al4 described in detail that human cancers of epithelial origin, including carcinomas of breast, colon, liver, lung, established epithelial cancer lines, produce immunoglobulin G (IgG) in their cytoplasm. Under normal conditions, heat shock proteins (HSPs) have multiple cellular functions, such as folding and translocating newly synthesized proteins. When a cell is injured or under stress, HSPs refold damaged protein or facilitate degradation of proteins. In most cancers, heat shock proteins can capture tumour specific peptide to inhibit the growth of cancer. This study demonstrated that human IgG and HSPs are co-localized in hepatocellular carcinoma.

  20. Establishment of two human small cell lung cancer cell lines: the evidence of accelerated production of parathyroid hormone-related protein with tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidaka, N; Nishimura, M; Nagao, K

    1998-03-13

    Two small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines have been established from malignant effusions obtained from an SCLC patient with hypercalcemia during a 3-month follow-up period. The two cell lines established were shown to transcribe the parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) gene and to constantly secrete fairly large amounts of PTHrP into the culture medium. The efficiency of PTHrP gene transcription and secretion was greater in the cell line established in the late stage (KOT-2) as compared with that obtained in the early stage (KOT-1). Immunohistochemical studies showed that these cells also coexpress neuroendocrine (NE) products such as chromogranin A and neuron-specific enolase (NSE).

  1. The Emerging Mutational Landscape of G-proteins and G-protein Coupled Receptors in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    O’Hayre, Morgan; Vázquez-Prado, José; Kufareva, Irina; Stawiski, Eric W.; Handel, Tracy M.; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Gutkind, J. Silvio

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant expression and activity of G proteins and G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are frequently associated with tumorigenesis. Deep sequencing studies show that 4.2% of tumors carry activating mutations in GNAS (encoding Gαs), and that oncogenic activating mutants in genes encoding Gαq family members (GNAQ or GNA11) are present in ~66% and ~6% of melanomas arising in the eye and skin, respectively. Furthermore, nearly 20% of human tumors harbor mutations in GPCRs. Many human cancer-asso...

  2. O-Linked glycome and proteome of high-molecular-mass proteins in human ovarian cancer ascites: Identification of sulfation, disialic acid and O-linked fucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Niclas G; McGuckin, Michael A

    2012-07-01

    The O-linked glycosylation of the main acidic high-molecular-weight glycoprotein from ascites fluid from patients with ovarian cancer were analyzed. The O-linked oligosaccharides were shown to consist of mainly highly sialylated core 1 and 2 structures with a smaller amount of sulfated core 2 structures. These structures were shown to be able to be further extended into small keratan sulfate (KS)-type oligosaccharides with up to four N-acetyllactosamine units. Proteomic studies of the acidic fraction of ascites fluid from patients with ovarian cancer showed that this fraction was enriched in proteoglycans. Among them, lumican, agrin, versican and dystroglycans were potential candidates, with threonine- and serine-rich domains that could carry a significant amount of O-linked glycosylation, including also the O-linked KS. Glycomic analysis using liquid chromatography (LC)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) also showed that the disialic acid NeuAc-NeuAc- was frequently found as the terminating structure on the O-linked core 1 and 2 oligosaccharides from one ascites sample. Also, a small amount of the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-associated O-linked fucose structure Gal-GlcNAc-Fucitol was detected with and without sialic acid in the LC-MS/MS analysis. Candidate proteins containing O-linked fucose were suggested to be proteoglycan-type molecules containing the O-linked fucose EGF consensus domain.

  3. Differential network analysis in human cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Ryan; Datta, Somnath; Datta, Susmita

    2014-01-01

    A complex disease like cancer is hardly caused by one gene or one protein singly. It is usually caused by the perturbation of the network formed by several genes or proteins. In the last decade several research teams have attempted to construct interaction maps of genes and proteins either experimentally or reverse engineer interaction maps using computational techniques. These networks were usually created under a certain condition such as an environmental condition, a particular disease, or a specific tissue type. Lately, however, there has been greater emphasis on finding the differential structure of the existing network topology under a novel condition or disease status to elucidate the perturbation in a biological system. In this review/tutorial article we briefly mention some of the research done in this area; we mainly illustrate the computational/statistical methods developed by our team in recent years for differential network analysis using publicly available gene expression data collected from a well known cancer study. This data includes a group of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and a group with acute myeloid leukemia. In particular, we describe the statistical tests to detect the change in the network topology based on connectivity scores which measure the association or interaction between pairs of genes. The tests under various scores are applied to this data set to perform a differential network analysis on gene expression for human leukemia. We believe that, in the future, differential network analysis will be a standard way to view the changes in gene expression and protein expression data globally and these types of tests could be useful in analyzing the complex differential signatures.

  4. The fruit juice of Morinda citrifolia (noni) downregulates HIF-1α protein expression through inhibition of PKB, ERK-1/2, JNK-1 and S6 in manganese-stimulated A549 human lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Byeong-Churl

    2012-03-01

    High exposure of manganese is suggested to be a risk factor for many lung diseases. Evidence suggests anticancerous and antiangiogenic effects by products derived from Morinda citrifolia (noni) fruit. In this study, we investigated the effect of noni fruit juice (NFJ) on the expression of HIF-1α, a tumor angiogenic transcription factor in manganese-chloride (manganese)-stimulated A549 human lung carcinoma cells. Treatment with manganese largely induced expression of HIF-1α protein but did not affect HIF-1α mRNA expression in A549 cells, suggesting the metal-mediated co- and/or post-translational HIF-1α upregulation. Manganese treatment also led to increased phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated protein kinase-1/2 (ERK-1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinase-1 (JNK-1), protein kinase B (PKB), S6 and eukaryotic translation initiation factor-2α (eIF-2α) in A549 cells. Of note, the exposure of NFJ inhibited the manganese-induced HIF-1α protein upregulation in a concentration-dependent manner. Importantly, as assessed by results of pharmacological inhibition and siRNA transfection studies, the effect of NFJ on HIF-1α protein downregulation seemed to be largely associated with the ability of NFJ to interfere with the metal's signaling to activate PKB, ERK-1/2, JNK-1 and S6 in A549 cells. It was further shown that NFJ could repress the induction of HIF-1α protein by desferoxamine or interleukin-1β (IL-1β), another HIF-1α inducer in A549 cells. Thus, the present study provides the first evidence that NFJ has the ability to strongly downregulate manganese-induced HIF-1α protein expression in A549 human lung cancer cells, which may suggest the NFJ-mediated beneficial effects on lung pathologies in which manganese and HIF-1α overexpression play pathogenic roles.

  5. Heat shock protein 90: the cancer chaperone

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Len Neckers

    2007-04-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a molecular chaperone required for the stability and function of a number of conditionally activated and/or expressed signalling proteins, as well as multiple mutated, chimeric, and/or over-expressed signalling proteins, that promote cancer cell growth and/or survival. Hsp90 inhibitors are unique in that, although they are directed towards a specific molecular target, they simultaneously inhibit multiple cellular signalling pathways. By inhibiting nodal points in multiple overlapping survival pathways utilized by cancer cells, combination of an Hsp90 inhibitor with standard chemotherapeutic agents may dramatically increase the in vivo efficacy of the standard agent. Hsp90 inhibitors may circumvent the characteristic genetic plasticity that has allowed cancer cells to eventually evade the toxic effects of most molecularly targeted agents. The mechanism-based use of Hsp90 inhibitors, both alone and in combination with other drugs, should be effective toward multiple forms of cancer. Further, because Hsp90 inhibitors also induce Hsf-1-dependent expression of Hsp70, and because certain mutated Hsp90 client proteins are neurotoxic, these drugs display ameliorative properties in several neurodegenerative disease models, suggesting a novel role for Hsp90 inhibitors in treating multiple pathologies involving neurodegeneration.

  6. Cancer stem cells in human gastrointestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Moriya, Chiharu; Igarashi, Hisayoshi; Saitoh, Anri; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Adachi, Yasushi; Imai, Kohzoh

    2016-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to be responsible for tumor initiation, drug and radiation resistance, invasive growth, metastasis, and tumor relapse, which are the main causes of cancer-related deaths. Gastrointestinal cancers are the most common malignancies and still the most frequent cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Because gastrointestinal CSCs are also thought to be resistant to conventional therapies, an effective and novel cancer treatment is imperative. The first reported CSCs in a gastrointestinal tumor were found in colorectal cancer in 2007. Subsequently, CSCs were reported in other gastrointestinal cancers, such as esophagus, stomach, liver, and pancreas. Specific phenotypes could be used to distinguish CSCs from non-CSCs. For example, gastrointestinal CSCs express unique surface markers, exist in a side-population fraction, show high aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 activity, form tumorspheres when cultured in non-adherent conditions, and demonstrate high tumorigenic potential in immunocompromised mice. The signal transduction pathways in gastrointestinal CSCs are similar to those involved in normal embryonic development. Moreover, CSCs are modified by the aberrant expression of several microRNAs. Thus, it is very difficult to target gastrointestinal CSCs. This review focuses on the current research on gastrointestinal CSCs and future strategies to abolish the gastrointestinal CSC phenotype.

  7. Human papillomaviruses and skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smola, Sigrun

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) infect squamous epithelia and can induce hyperproliferative lesions. More than 120 different HPV types have been characterized and classified into five different genera. While mucosal high-risk HPVs have a well-established causal role in anogenital carcinogenesis, the biology of cutaneous HPVs is less well understood. The clinical relevance of genus beta-PV infection has clearly been demonstrated in patients suffering from epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV), a rare inherited disease associated with ahigh rate of skin cancer. In the normal population genus beta-PV are suspected to have an etiologic role in skin carcinogenesis as well but this is still controversially discussed. Their oncogenic potency has been investigated in mouse models and in vitro. In 2009, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified the genus beta HPV types 5 and 8 as "possible carcinogenic" biological agents (group 2B) in EV disease. This chapter will give an overview on the knowns and unknowns of infections with genus beta-PV and discuss their potential impact on skin carcinogenesis in the general population.

  8. Protein-bound polysaccharide from Phellinus linteus inhibits tumor growth, invasion, and angiogenesis and alters Wnt/β-catenin in SW480 human colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Hae-Duck

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polysaccharides extracted from the Phellinus linteus (PL mushroom are known to possess anti-tumor effects. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the anti-tumor properties of PL remain to be explored. Experiments were carried out to unravel the anticancer effects of PL. Methods The anti-cancer effects of PL were examined in SW480 colon cancer cells by evaluating cell proliferation, invasion and matrix metallo-proteinase (MMP activity. The anti-angiogenic effects of PL were examined by assessing human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC proliferation and capillary tube formation. The in vivo effect of PL was evaluated in an athymic nude mouse SW480 tumor engraft model. Results PL (125-1000 μg/mL significantly inhibited cell proliferation and decreased β-catenin expression in SW480 cells. Expression of cyclin D1, one of the downstream-regulated genes of β-catenin, and T-cell factor/lymphocyte enhancer binding factor (TCF/LEF transcription activity were also significantly reduced by PL treatment. PL inhibited in vitro invasion and motility as well as the activity of MMP-9. In addition, PL treatment inhibited HUVEC proliferation and capillary tube formation. Tumor growth of SW480 cells implanted into nude mice was significantly decreased as a consequence of PL treatment, and tumor tissues from treated animals showed an increase in the apoptotic index and a decrease in β-catenin expression. Moreover, the proliferation index and microvessel density were significantly decreased. Conclusions These data suggest that PL suppresses tumor growth, invasion, and angiogenesis through the inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in certain colon cancer cells.

  9. A Novel Role for a Major Component of the Vitamin D Axis: Vitamin D Binding Protein-Derived Macrophage Activating Factor Induces Human Breast Cancer Cell Apoptosis through Stimulation of Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Ruggiero

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The role of vitamin D in maintaining health appears greater than originally thought, and the concept of the vitamin D axis underlines the complexity of the biological events controlled by biologically active vitamin D (1,25(OH(2D3, its two binding proteins that are the vitamin D receptor (VDR and the vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF. In this study we demonstrate that GcMAF stimulates macrophages, which in turn attack human breast cancer cells, induce their apoptosis and eventually phagocytize them. These results are consistent with the observation that macrophages infiltrated implanted tumors in mice after GcMAF injections. In addition, we hypothesize that the last 23 hydrophobic amino acids of VDR, located at the inner part of the plasma membrane, interact with the first 23 hydrophobic amino acids of the GcMAF located at the external part of the plasma membrane. This al1ows 1,25(OH(2D3 and oleic acid to become sandwiched between the two vitamin D-binding proteins, thus postulating a novel molecular mode of interaction between GcMAF and VDR. Taken together, these results support and reinforce the hypothesis that GcMAF has multiple biological activities that could be responsible for its anti-cancer effects, possibly through molecular interaction with the VDR that in turn is responsible for a multitude of non-genomic as well as genomic effects.

  10. A novel role for a major component of the vitamin D axis: vitamin D binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor induces human breast cancer cell apoptosis through stimulation of macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyer, Lynda; Ward, Emma; Smith, Rodney; Fiore, Maria Giulia; Magherini, Stefano; Branca, Jacopo J V; Morucci, Gabriele; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco; Pacini, Stefania

    2013-07-08

    The role of vitamin D in maintaining health appears greater than originally thought, and the concept of the vitamin D axis underlines the complexity of the biological events controlled by biologically active vitamin D (1,25(OH)(2)D3), its two binding proteins that are the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and the vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF). In this study we demonstrate that GcMAF stimulates macrophages, which in turn attack human breast cancer cells, induce their apoptosis and eventually phagocytize them. These results are consistent with the observation that macrophages infiltrated implanted tumors in mice after GcMAF injections. In addition, we hypothesize that the last 23 hydrophobic amino acids of VDR, located at the inner part of the plasma membrane, interact with the first 23 hydrophobic amino acids of the GcMAF located at the external part of the plasma membrane. This allows 1,25(OH)(2)D3 and oleic acid to become sandwiched between the two vitamin D-binding proteins, thus postulating a novel molecular mode of interaction between GcMAF and VDR. Taken together, these results support and reinforce the hypothesis that GcMAF has multiple biological activities that could be responsible for its anti-cancer effects, possibly through molecular interaction with the VDR that in turn is responsible for a multitude of non-genomic as well as genomic effects.

  11. Integrating Structure to Protein-Protein Interaction Networks That Drive Metastasis to Brain and Lung in Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    H Billur Engin; Emre Guney; Ozlem Keskin; Baldo Oliva; Attila Gursoy

    2013-01-01

    Integrating Structure to Protein-Protein Interaction Networks That Drive Metastasis to Brain and Lung in Breast Cancer H. Billur Engin1, Emre Guney2, Ozlem Keskin1, Baldo Oliva2, Attila Gursoy1* 1 Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics and College of Engineering, Koc University, Istanbul, Turkey, 2 Structural Bioinformatics Group (GRIB), Universitat Pompeu Fabra Abstract Blocking specific protein interactions can lead to human diseases. Accordingly, protein i...

  12. A pilot study exploring the molecular architecture of the tumor microenvironment in human prostate cancer using laser capture microdissection and reverse phase protein microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pin, Elisa; Stratton, Steven; Belluco, Claudio; Liotta, Lance; Nagle, Ray; Hodge, K Alex; Deng, Jianghong; Dong, Ting; Baldelli, Elisa; Petricoin, Emanuel; Pierobon, Mariaelena

    2016-12-01

    The cross-talk between tumor epithelium and surrounding stromal/immune microenvironment is essential to sustain tumor growth and progression and provides new opportunities for the development of targeted treatments focused on disrupting the tumor ecology. Identification of novel approaches to study these interactions is of primary importance. Using laser capture microdissection (LCM) coupled with reverse phase protein microarray (RPPA) based protein signaling activation mapping we explored the molecular interconnection between tumor epithelium and surrounding stromal microenvironment in 18 prostate cancer (PCa) specimens. Four specimen-matched cellular compartments (normal-appearing epithelium and its adjacent stroma, and malignant epithelium and its adjacent stroma) were isolated for each case. The signaling network analysis of the four compartments unraveled a number of molecular mechanisms underlying the communication between tumor cells and stroma in the context of the tumor microenvironment. In particular, differential expression of inflammatory mediators like IL-8 and IL-10 by the stroma cells appeared to modulate specific cross-talks between the tumor cells and surrounding microenvironment. Copyright © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Structural studies of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A., E-mail: oasojo@unmc.edu [College of Medicine, Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-6495 (United States); Koski, Raymond A.; Bonafé, Nathalie [L2 Diagnostics LLC, 300 George Street, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); College of Medicine, Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-6495 (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Structural analysis of a truncated soluble domain of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1, a membrane protein implicated in the proliferation of aggressive brain cancer, is presented. Human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1 (GLIPR1) is a membrane protein that is highly upregulated in brain cancers but is barely detectable in normal brain tissue. GLIPR1 is composed of a signal peptide that directs its secretion, a conserved cysteine-rich CAP (cysteine-rich secretory proteins, antigen 5 and pathogenesis-related 1 proteins) domain and a transmembrane domain. GLIPR1 is currently being investigated as a candidate for prostate cancer gene therapy and for glioblastoma targeted therapy. Crystal structures of a truncated soluble domain of the human GLIPR1 protein (sGLIPR1) solved by molecular replacement using a truncated polyalanine search model of the CAP domain of stecrisp, a snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP), are presented. The correct molecular-replacement solution could only be obtained by removing all loops from the search model. The native structure was refined to 1.85 Å resolution and that of a Zn{sup 2+} complex was refined to 2.2 Å resolution. The latter structure revealed that the putative binding cavity coordinates Zn{sup 2+} similarly to snake-venom CRISPs, which are involved in Zn{sup 2+}-dependent mechanisms of inflammatory modulation. Both sGLIPR1 structures have extensive flexible loop/turn regions and unique charge distributions that were not observed in any of the previously reported CAP protein structures. A model is also proposed for the structure of full-length membrane-bound GLIPR1.

  14. Phosphorylated 4E-binding protein 1 overexpression in human cancer%磷酸化4E-BP1与恶性肿瘤研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常成; 谷金宇

    2011-01-01

    4E-BP1是真核细胞翻译起始因子4E(eIF4E)的特异性抑制物,近年研究显示,磷酸化形式的4E-BP1(P-4E-BP1)在多种恶性肿瘤如乳腺癌、宫颈癌、甲状腺、前列腺癌、大肠癌等中存在过表达,并且其表达与肿瘤的大小、侵袭、转移能力、预后等临床病理特征密切相关。因此,阐明P-4E-BP1的表达与肿瘤的生物学行为将有助于全面了解恶性肿瘤的发生、发展、侵袭及转移机制,同时对指导临床诊断和治疗,判断预后有重大意义。更重要的是,P-4E-BP1有可能成为治疗肿瘤的新靶点,为临床治疗肿瘤提供新思路。%4E-BP1 is the specific inhibitor of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E, recent studies have shown, phosphorylated 4E-binding protein 1(P-4E-BP1)overexpression has been observed in a variety of human cancers, including breast cancer, cervical cancer, thyroid cancer, prostate cancer, colorectal cancer, et al. Its expression level is associated with tumor size, invasion, metastasis, prognosis and other clinical and pathological features. Thus evaluate P-4E-BP1 expression level which is associated with tumor biological behavior will help us better understand the etiology, development, invasion and metastasis mechanisms of cancer.Moreover, P-4E-BP1 may become a new target for cancer treatment and provide new ideas for the clinical cancer treatment.

  15. Optimization of human cancer radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Swan, George W

    1981-01-01

    The mathematical models in this book are concerned with a variety of approaches to the manner in which the clinical radiologic treatment of human neoplasms can be improved. These improvements comprise ways of delivering radiation to the malignan­ cies so as to create considerable damage to tumor cells while sparing neighboring normal tissues. There is no unique way of dealing with these improvements. Accord­ ingly, in this book a number of different presentations are given. Each presentation has as its goal some aspect of the improvement, or optimization, of radiotherapy. This book is a collection of current ideas concerned with the optimization of human cancer radiotherapy. It is hoped that readers will build on this collection and develop superior approaches for the understanding of the ways to improve therapy. The author owes a special debt of thanks to Kathy Prindle who breezed through the typing of this book with considerable dexterity. TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter GENERAL INTRODUCTION 1. 1 Introduction 1...

  16. Protein expression changes in breast cancer and their importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuğba Semerci Sevimli

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies about nucleic acids have increased after thepublication of DNA’s three dimensional structure by Watsonand Crick. Nucleic acids are the heritable moleculeswhich contain codes for proteins. Proteins are the mostimportant elements in molecular world because they arethe basic structural and functional components of a livingorganism. Clarifying the celluler events that involve proteinsare important in many areas for example diagnosisand treatment determination of diseases or developmentof new drugs. Proteome that comes from a combinationof the terms protein and genome, is one of the importantfield in these days. The studies in this area have acceleratedand gained a different place especially with afterthe completion of human genome project. In synthesis ofa protein just only genetic information is not enough. Atthe same time the change or changes of a protein afterthe synthesis, the final version and transporting to finallocalization of it also important. Because having defects inmailing cells of breast cancer, the first targets of treatmentmust be proteins. In this way the studies on proteins areimportant to determine prognostic and diagnostic diseasemarkers and also significant for identifying new treatmentstrategies.Key words: Genom, proteom, breast cancer

  17. Protein Misfolding and Human Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels; Bross, Peter Gerd; Vang, Søren

    2006-01-01

    phenylketonuria, Parkinson's disease, α-1-antitrypsin deficiency, familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus, and short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. Despite the differences, an emerging paradigm suggests that the cellular effects of protein misfolding provide a common framework that may contribute......Protein misfolding is a common event in living cells. In young and healthy cells, the misfolded protein load is disposed of by protein quality control (PQC) systems. In aging cells and in cells from certain individuals with genetic diseases, the load may overwhelm the PQC capacity, resulting...... in accumulation of misfolded proteins. Dependent on the properties of the protein and the efficiency of the PQC systems, the accumulated protein may be degraded or assembled into toxic oligomers and aggregates. To illustrate this concept, we discuss a number of very different protein misfolding diseases including...

  18. Propofol induces proliferation partially via downregulation of p53 protein and promotes migration via activation of the Nrf2 pathway in human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Chao; Song, Linlin; Wang, Juan; Li, Di; Liu, Yanhong; Cui, Xiaoguang

    2017-02-01

    Antioxidants induce the proliferation of cancers by decreasing the expression of p53. Propofol, one of the most extensively used intravenous anesthetics, provides its antioxidative activity via activation of the nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) pathway, but the mechanisms involved in the effects remain unknown. Thus, we aimed to investigate the function of p53 and Nrf2 in the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 following treatment with propofol. The cells were treated with propofol (2, 5 and 10 µg/ml) for 1, 4 and 12 h, and MTT assay was used to evaluate cell proliferation, and a wound healing assay was used to evaluate cell migration. Cell apoptosis, caspase-3 activity, and western blot analysis for p53 and Nrf2 protein were also assessed. Finally, PIK-75, a potent Nrf2 inhibitor, was used to confirm the effects of Nrf2 after treatment with propofol. Treatment of MDA-MB‑231 cells with propofol resulted in increased proliferation and migration in a dose- and time-dependent manner. After treatment with propofol for 12 h, the Nrf2 protein expression was increased, while the percentage of apoptotic cells, caspase-3 activity, and expression of p53 were significantly decreased. Additionally, treatment with the Nrf2 inhibitor increased the percentage of apoptotic cells, inhibited the migration almost completely, and decreased the degree of proliferation, while the expression of p53 was not affected. In conclusion, propofol increased the proliferation of human breast cancer MDA-MB‑231 cells, which was at least partially associated with the inhibition of the expression of p53, and induced cell migration, which was involved in the activation of the Nrf2 pathway.

  19. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in endometrial cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Tina Bech; Svahn, Malene Frøsig; Faber, Mette Tuxen

    2014-01-01

    HPV is a common sexually transmitted infection and is considered to be a necessary cause of cervical cancer. The anatomical proximity to the cervix has led researchers to investigate whether Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has a role in the etiology of endometrial cancer.......HPV is a common sexually transmitted infection and is considered to be a necessary cause of cervical cancer. The anatomical proximity to the cervix has led researchers to investigate whether Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has a role in the etiology of endometrial cancer....

  20. An Anticancer Role of Hydrogen Sulfide in Human Gastric Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S can be synthesized in mammalian cells by cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE and/or cystathionine β-synthase (CBS. Both CSE and CBS are expressed in rat gastric tissues but their role in human gastric neoplasia has been unclear. The aims of the present study were to detect CSE and CBS proteins in human gastric cancer and determine the effect of exogenous NaHS on the proliferation of gastric cancer cells. We found that both CSE and CBS proteins were expressed in human gastric cancer cells and upregulated in human gastric carcinoma mucosa compared with those in noncancerous gastric samples. NaHS induced apoptosis of gastric cancer cells by regulating apoptosis related proteins. Also, NaHS inhibited cancer cell migration and invasion. An antigastric cancer role of H2S is thus indicated.

  1. The RNA helicase/transcriptional co-regulator, p68 (DDX5), stimulates expression of oncogenic protein kinase, Polo-like kinase-1 (PLK1), and is associated with elevated PLK1 levels in human breast cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, R Sumanth; Nicol, Samantha M; Quinlan, Philip R; Thompson, Alastair M; Meek, David W; Fuller-Pace, Frances V

    2014-01-01

    p68 (DDX5) acts both as an ATP-dependent RNA helicase and as a transcriptional co-activator of several cancer-associated transcription factors, including the p53 tumor suppressor. p68 is aberrantly expressed in a high proportion of cancers, but the oncogenic drive for, or the consequences of, these expression changes remain unclear. Here we show that elevated p68 expression in a cohort of human breast cancers is associated significantly with elevated levels of the oncogenic protein kinase, Polo-like kinase-1 (PLK1). Patients expressing detectable levels of both p68 and PLK1 have a poor prognosis, but only if they also have mutation in the TP53 gene (encoding p53), suggesting that p68 can regulate PLK1 levels in a manner that is suppressed by p53. In support of this hypothesis, we show that p68 stimulates expression from the PLK1 promoter, and that silencing of endogenous p68 expression downregulates endogenous PLK1 gene expression. In the absence of functional p53, p68 stimulates the expression of PLK1 both at basal levels and in response to the clinically relevant drug, etoposide. In keeping with a role as a transcriptional activator/co-activator, chromatin immuno-precipitation analysis shows that p68 is associated with the PLK1 promoter, irrespective of the p53 status. However, its recruitment is stimulated by etoposide in cells lacking p53, suggesting that p53 can oppose association of p68 with the PLK1 promoter. These data provide a model in which p68 and p53 interplay regulates PLK1 expression, and which describes the behavior of these molecules, and the outcome of their interaction, in human breast cancer. PMID:24626184

  2. Gene transcriptional networks integrate microenvironmental signals in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ren; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2011-04-01

    A significant amount of evidence shows that microenvironmental signals generated from extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, soluble factors, and cell-cell adhesion complexes cooperate at the extra- and intracellular level. This synergetic action of microenvironmental cues is crucial for normal mammary gland development and breast malignancy. To explore how the microenvironmental genes coordinate in human breast cancer at the genome level, we have performed gene co-expression network analysis in three independent microarray datasets and identified two microenvironment networks in human breast cancer tissues. Network I represents crosstalk and cooperation of ECM microenvironment and soluble factors during breast malignancy. The correlated expression of cytokines, chemokines, and cell adhesion proteins in Network II implicates the coordinated action of these molecules in modulating the immune response in breast cancer tissues. These results suggest that microenvironmental cues are integrated with gene transcriptional networks to promote breast cancer development.

  3. Human cancer long non-coding RNA transcriptomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewan A Gibb

    Full Text Available Once thought to be a part of the 'dark matter' of the genome, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs are emerging as an integral functional component of the mammalian transcriptome. LncRNAs are a novel class of mRNA-like transcripts which, despite no known protein-coding potential, demonstrate a wide range of structural and functional roles in cellular biology. However, the magnitude of the contribution of lncRNA expression to normal human tissues and cancers has not been investigated in a comprehensive manner. In this study, we compiled 272 human serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE libraries to delineate lncRNA transcription patterns across a broad spectrum of normal human tissues and cancers. Using a novel lncRNA discovery pipeline we parsed over 24 million SAGE tags and report lncRNA expression profiles across a panel of 26 different normal human tissues and 19 human cancers. Our findings show extensive, tissue-specific lncRNA expression in normal tissues and highly aberrant lncRNA expression in human cancers. Here, we present a first generation atlas for lncRNA profiling in cancer.

  4. Insulin, CCAAT/Enhancer-Binding Proteins and Lactate Regulate the Human 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 2 Gene Expression in Colon Cancer Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alikhani-Koupaei, Rasoul; Ignatova, Irena D.; Guettinger, Andreas; Frey, Felix J.; Frey, Brigitte M.

    2014-01-01

    11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (11beta-HSD) modulate mineralocorticoid receptor transactivation by glucocorticoids and regulate access to the glucocorticoid receptor. The isozyme 11beta-HSD2 is selectively expressed in mineralocorticoid target tissues and its activity is reduced in various disease states with abnormal sodium retention and hypertension, including the apparent mineralocorticoid excess. As 50% of patients with essential hypertension are insulin resistant and hyperinsulinemic, we hypothesized that insulin downregulates the 11beta-HSD2 activity. In the present study we show that insulin reduced the 11beta-HSD2 activity in cancer colon cell lines (HCT116, SW620 and HT-29) at the transcriptional level, in a time and dose dependent manner. The downregulation was reversible and required new protein synthesis. Pathway analysis using mRNA profiling revealed that insulin treatment modified the expression of the transcription factor family C/EBPs (CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins) but also of glycolysis related enzymes. Western blot and real time PCR confirmed an upregulation of C/EBP beta isoforms (LAP and LIP) with a more pronounced increase in the inhibitory isoform LIP. EMSA and reporter gene assays demonstrated the role of C/EBP beta isoforms in HSD11B2 gene expression regulation. In addition, secretion of lactate, a byproduct of glycolysis, was shown to mediate insulin-dependent HSD11B2 downregulation. In summary, we demonstrate that insulin downregulates HSD11B2 through increased LIP expression and augmented lactate secretion. Such mechanisms are of interest and potential significance for sodium reabsorption in the colon. PMID:25133511

  5. Insulin, CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins and lactate regulate the human 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 gene expression in colon cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Andrieu

    Full Text Available 11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (11beta-HSD modulate mineralocorticoid receptor transactivation by glucocorticoids and regulate access to the glucocorticoid receptor. The isozyme 11beta-HSD2 is selectively expressed in mineralocorticoid target tissues and its activity is reduced in various disease states with abnormal sodium retention and hypertension, including the apparent mineralocorticoid excess. As 50% of patients with essential hypertension are insulin resistant and hyperinsulinemic, we hypothesized that insulin downregulates the 11beta-HSD2 activity. In the present study we show that insulin reduced the 11beta-HSD2 activity in cancer colon cell lines (HCT116, SW620 and HT-29 at the transcriptional level, in a time and dose dependent manner. The downregulation was reversible and required new protein synthesis. Pathway analysis using mRNA profiling revealed that insulin treatment modified the expression of the transcription factor family C/EBPs (CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins but also of glycolysis related enzymes. Western blot and real time PCR confirmed an upregulation of C/EBP beta isoforms (LAP and LIP with a more pronounced increase in the inhibitory isoform LIP. EMSA and reporter gene assays demonstrated the role of C/EBP beta isoforms in HSD11B2 gene expression regulation. In addition, secretion of lactate, a byproduct of glycolysis, was shown to mediate insulin-dependent HSD11B2 downregulation. In summary, we demonstrate that insulin downregulates HSD11B2 through increased LIP expression and augmented lactate secretion. Such mechanisms are of interest and potential significance for sodium reabsorption in the colon.

  6. Human mammary microenvironment better regulates the biology of human breast cancer in humanized mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ming-Jie; Wang, Jue; Xu, Lu; Zha, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Yi; Ling, Li-Jun; Wang, Shui

    2015-02-01

    During the past decades, many efforts have been made in mimicking the clinical progress of human cancer in mouse models. Previously, we developed a human breast tissue-derived (HB) mouse model. Theoretically, it may mimic the interactions between "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin and human breast cancer cells. However, detailed evidences are absent. The present study (in vivo, cellular, and molecular experiments) was designed to explore the regulatory role of human mammary microenvironment in the progress of human breast cancer cells. Subcutaneous (SUB), mammary fat pad (MFP), and HB mouse models were developed for in vivo comparisons. Then, the orthotopic tumor masses from three different mouse models were collected for primary culture. Finally, the biology of primary cultured human breast cancer cells was compared by cellular and molecular experiments. Results of in vivo mouse models indicated that human breast cancer cells grew better in human mammary microenvironment. Cellular and molecular experiments confirmed that primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model showed a better proliferative and anti-apoptotic biology than those from SUB to MFP mouse models. Meanwhile, primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model also obtained the migratory and invasive biology for "species-specific" tissue metastasis to human tissues. Comprehensive analyses suggest that "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin better regulates the biology of human breast cancer cells in our humanized mouse model of breast cancer, which is more consistent with the clinical progress of human breast cancer.

  7. Chestnut extract induces apoptosis in AGS human gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Sook; Kim, Eun Ji; Kim, Sun Hyo

    2011-06-01

    In Korea, chestnut production is increasing each year, but consumption is far below production. We investigated the effect of chestnut extracts on antioxidant activity and anticancer effects. Ethanol extracts of raw chestnut (RCE) or chestnut powder (CPE) had dose-dependent superoxide scavenging activity. Viable numbers of MDA-MD-231 human breast cancer cells, DU145 human prostate cancer cells, and AGS human gastric cancer cells decreased by 18, 31, and 69%, respectively, following treatment with 200 µg/mL CPE for 24 hr. CPE at various concentrations (0-200 µg/mL) markedly decreased AGS cell viability and increased apoptotic cell death dose and time dependently. CPE increased the levels of cleaved caspase-8, -7, -3, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase in a dose-dependent manner but not cleaved caspase-9. CPE exerted no effects on Bcl-2 and Bax levels. The level of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein decreased within a narrow range following CPE treatment. The levels of Trail, DR4, and Fas-L increased dose-dependently in CPE-treated AGS cells. These results show that CPE decreases growth and induces apoptosis in AGS gastric cancer cells and that activation of the death receptor pathway contributes to CPE-induced apoptosis in AGS cells. In conclusion, CPE had more of an effect on gastric cancer cells than breast or prostate cancer cells, suggesting that chestnuts would have a positive effect against gastric cancer.

  8. Imaging Proteolysis by Living Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Sameni

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant progression is accompanied by degradation of extracellular matrix proteins. Here we describe a novel confocal assay in which we can observe proteolysis by living human breast cancer cells (BT20 and BT549 through the use of quenchedfluorescent protein substrates. Degradation thus was imaged, by confocal optical sectioning, as an accumulation of fluorescent products. With the BT20 cells, fluorescence was localized to pericellular focal areas that coincide with pits in the underlying matrix. In contrast, fluorescence was localized to intracellular vesicles in the BT549 cells, vesicles that also label for lysosomal markers. Neither intracellular nor pericellular fluorescence was observed in the BT549 cells in the presence of cytochalasin B, suggesting that degradation occurred intracellularly and was dependent on endocytic uptake of substrate. In the presence of a cathepsin 13-selective cysteine protease inhibitor, intracellular fluorescence was decreased ~90% and pericellular fluorescence decreased 67% to 96%, depending on the protein substrate. Matrix metallo protease inhibitors reduced pericellular fluorescence ~50%, i.e., comparably to a serine and a broad spectrum cysteine protease inhibitor. Our results suggest that: 1 a proteolytic cascade participates in pericellular digestion of matrix proteins by living human breast cancer cells, and 2 the cysteine protease cathepsin B participates in both pericellular and intracellular digestion of matrix proteins by living human breast cancer cells.

  9. Targeting IAP proteins for therapeutic intervention in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulda, Simone; Vucic, Domagoj

    2012-02-01

    Evasion of apoptosis is one of the crucial acquired capabilities used by cancer cells to fend off anticancer therapies. Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins exert a range of biological activities that promote cancer cell survival and proliferation. X chromosome-linked IAP is a direct inhibitor of caspases - pro-apoptotic executioner proteases - whereas cellular IAP proteins block the assembly of pro-apoptotic protein signalling complexes and mediate the expression of anti-apoptotic molecules. Furthermore, mutations, amplifications and chromosomal translocations of IAP genes are associated with various malignancies. Among the therapeutic strategies that have been designed to target IAP proteins, the most widely used approach is based on mimicking the IAP-binding motif of second mitochondria-derived activator of caspase (SMAC), which functions as an endogenous IAP antagonist. Alternative strategies include transcriptional repression and the use of antisense oligonucleotides. This Review provides an update on IAP protein biology as well as current and future perspectives on targeting IAP proteins for therapeutic intervention in human malignancies.

  10. Modern criteria to establish human cancer etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Michele; Klein, George; Gruber, Jack; Wong, May

    2004-08-01

    The Cancer Etiology Branch of the National Cancer Institute hosted a workshop, "Validation of a causal relationship: criteria to establish etiology," to determine whether recent technological advances now make it possible to delineate improved or novel criteria for the rapid establishment for cancer causation. The workshop was held in Washington, D.C., December 11-12, 2003, and participants were among the international leaders in the fields of epidemiology, chemistry, biochemistry, microbiology, virology, environmental and chemical carcinogenesis, immunology, pathology, molecular pathology, genetics, oncology, and surgical oncology. There was a general consensus that the rapid identification of human carcinogens and their removal (when possible) or the establishment of specific preventive and therapeutic measures was the most desirable and effective way to have a rapid and positive impact in the fight against cancer. From a clinical perspective, it may be as important to target initiators, cocarcinogens and promoters, if by removing any one of them tumor growth can be prevented. Future studies should focus on interactions among and between different biological, chemical, and physical agents. Analyses of single agents can at times miss their carcinogenic potential when such agents are carcinogenic only in subgroups of individuals because of their genetic background, diet, exposure to other carcinogens, or microbial infection. Epidemiology, molecular pathology (including chemistry, biochemistry, molecular biology, molecular virology, molecular genetics, epigenetics, genomics, proteomics, and other molecular-based approaches), and animal and tissue culture experiments should all be seen as important integrating evidence in the determination of human carcinogenicity. Concerning the respective roles of epidemiology and molecular pathology, it was noted that epidemiology allows the determination of the overall effect of a given carcinogen in the human population (e

  11. Antiangiogenic Steroids in Human Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Despite advances in the early detection of tumors and in the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery for disease management, the worldwide mortality from human cancer remains unacceptably high. The treatment of cancer may benefit from the introduction of novel therapies derived from natural products. Natural products have served to provide a basis for many of the pharmaceutical agents in current use in cancer therapy. Emerging research indicates that progressive growth and spread of ...

  12. G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rachel Bar-Shavit; Myriam Maoz; Arun Kancharla; Jeetendra Kumar Nag; Daniel Agranovich; Sorina Grisaru-Granovsky; Beatrice Uziely

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest signal-conveying receptor family and mediate many physiological processes, their role in tumor biology is underappreciated. Numerous lines of evidence now associate GPCRs and their downstream signaling targets in cancer growth and development. Indeed, GPCRs control many features of tumorigenesis, including immune cell-mediated functions, proliferation, invasion and survival at the secondary site. Technological advances ...

  13. RNA-binding protein L1TD1 interacts with LIN28 via RNA and is required for human embryonic stem cell self-renewal and cancer cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Närvä, Elisa; Rahkonen, Nelly; Emani, Maheswara Reddy; Lund, Riikka; Pursiheimo, Juha-Pekka; Nästi, Juuso; Autio, Reija; Rasool, Omid; Denessiouk, Konstantin; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Rao, Anjana; Lahesmaa, Riitta

    2012-03-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) have a unique capacity to self-renew and differentiate into all the cell types found in human body. Although the transcriptional regulators of pluripotency are well studied, the role of cytoplasmic regulators is still poorly characterized. Here, we report a new stem cell-specific RNA-binding protein L1TD1 (ECAT11, FLJ10884) required for hESC self-renewal and cancer cell proliferation. Depletion of L1TD1 results in immediate downregulation of OCT4 and NANOG. Furthermore, we demonstrate that OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG all bind to the promoter of L1TD1. Moreover, L1TD1 is highly expressed in seminomas, and depletion of L1TD1 in these cancer cells influences self-renewal and proliferation. We show that L1TD1 colocalizes and interacts with LIN28 via RNA and directly with RNA helicase A (RHA). LIN28 has been reported to regulate translation of OCT4 in complex with RHA. Thus, we hypothesize that L1TD1 is part of the L1TD1-RHA-LIN28 complex that could influence levels of OCT4. Our results strongly suggest that L1TD1 has an important role in the regulation of stemness.

  14. CD147蛋白在前列腺癌中的表达及临床意义%Expression and Clinical Significance of CD 147 Protein in Human Prostate Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡崇岳; 伍彩云; 杨宇峰; 李宋荣; 史向民; 莫仰骐; 郑志涛

    2015-01-01

    Objective]To investigate the expression and clinical significance of CD147 protein in human prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia tissues .[Methods]The immunohistochemical S‐P method was used to detect the expression of CD147 protein in 56 patients of prostate cancer tissues and 22 patients of be‐nign prostatic hyperplasia tissues so as To analyze the correlation between CD 147 protein and the clinical bio‐logical characteristics of prostate cancer .[Results]The positive rate of CD147 protein in the observation group was 9 1.% ,which was significantly higher than that in the control group ,the difference was statistically sig‐nificant ( P 0 0.5) .The positive expression of CD147 protein in different stages of Gleason staging and pathological grading was significantly different ( P <0 0.5) ,The positive expression rate of CD147 protein in each grade group was statistically significant ( P <0 0.5) .[Conclusions] The high expression of CD147 in prostate cancer tissues is related to its pathological stage and clinical stage .CD147 has the potential to be an important indica‐tor to judge the invasion of prostate cancer ,and to block the expression of CD147 may become a new target for the treatment of prostate cancer .%【目的】研究前列腺癌及前列腺增生组织中CD147蛋白的表达及其临床意义。【方法】采用免疫组化S‐P法检测56例前列腺癌组织及22例前列腺增生组织中CD147蛋白的表达情况,分析其与前列腺癌临床生物学特性的相关性。【结果】观察组CD147蛋白阳性率为643.%显著高于对照组的91.%,差异具有统计学意义( P <00.1)。不同年龄段患者CD147蛋白的阳性表达无显著性差异( P >00.5),不同 T N M 分期及病理分级 Gleason评分CD147蛋白的阳性表达有显著性差异( P <00.5),各级别组CD147蛋白阳性表达率差异有统计学意义( P <00.5)。【结论】前列腺癌组织中CD147

  15. HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTIONS IN LARYNGEAL CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torrente, Mariela C.; Rodrigo, Juan P.; Haigentz, Missak; Dikkers, Frederik G.; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Takes, Robert P.; Olofsson, Jan; Ferlito, Alfio

    2011-01-01

    Although the association and clinical significance of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections with a subset of head and neck cancers, particularly for oropharyngeal carcinoma, has recently been well documented, the involvement of HPV in laryngeal cancer has been inadequately evaluated. Herein we revie

  16. HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTIONS IN LARYNGEAL CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torrente, Mariela C.; Rodrigo, Juan P.; Haigentz, Missak; Dikkers, Frederik G.; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Takes, Robert P.; Olofsson, Jan; Ferlito, Alfio

    2011-01-01

    Although the association and clinical significance of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections with a subset of head and neck cancers, particularly for oropharyngeal carcinoma, has recently been well documented, the involvement of HPV in laryngeal cancer has been inadequately evaluated. Herein we revie

  17. Human papillomavirus infections in laryngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torrente, M.C.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Haigentz Jr., M.; Dikkers, F.G.; Rinaldo, A.; Takes, R.P.; Olofsson, J.; Ferlito, A.

    2011-01-01

    Although the association and clinical significance of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections with a subset of head and neck cancers, particularly for oropharyngeal carcinoma, has recently been well documented, the involvement of HPV in laryngeal cancer has been inadequately evaluated. Herein we revie

  18. Human papillomavirus infections in laryngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torrente, M.C.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Haigentz Jr., M.; Dikkers, F.G.; Rinaldo, A.; Takes, R.P.; Olofsson, J.; Ferlito, A.

    2011-01-01

    Although the association and clinical significance of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections with a subset of head and neck cancers, particularly for oropharyngeal carcinoma, has recently been well documented, the involvement of HPV in laryngeal cancer has been inadequately evaluated. Herein we

  19. HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTIONS IN LARYNGEAL CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torrente, Mariela C.; Rodrigo, Juan P.; Haigentz, Missak; Dikkers, Frederik G.; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Takes, Robert P.; Olofsson, Jan; Ferlito, Alfio

    Although the association and clinical significance of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections with a subset of head and neck cancers, particularly for oropharyngeal carcinoma, has recently been well documented, the involvement of HPV in laryngeal cancer has been inadequately evaluated. Herein we

  20. Human telomeric proteins occupy selective interstitial sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Yang; Yuanyan Xiong; Hyyeung Kim; Quanyuan He; Yumei Li; Rui Chen; Zhou Songyang

    2011-01-01

    Human telomeres are bound and protected by protein complexes assembled around the six core telomeric proteins RAP1, TRF1, TRF2, TIN2, TPP1, and POT1. The function of these proteins on telomeres has been studied extensively. Recently, increasing evidence has suggested possible roles for these proteins outside of telomeres. However, the non-canonical (extra-telomeric) function of human telomeric proteins remains poorly understood. To this end, we systematically investigated the binding sites of telomeric proteins along human chromosomes, by performing wholegenome chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) for RAP1 and TRF2. ChIP sequencing (ChIP-seq) revealed that RAP1 and TRF2 could be found on a small number of interstitial sites, including regions that are proximal to genes. Some of these binding sites contain short telomere repeats, suggesting that telomeric proteins could directly bind to interstitial sites. Interestingly, only a small fraction of the available interstitial telomere repeat-containing regions were occupied by RAP1 and TRF2. Ectopically expressed TRF2 was able to occupy additional interstitial telomere repeat sites, suggesting that protein concentration may dictate the selective targeting of telomeric proteins to interstitial sites. Reducing RAP1 and TRF2 expression by RNA interference led to altered transcription of RAP1- and TRF2-targeted genes. Our results indicate that human telomeric proteins could occupy a limited number of interstitial sites and regulate gene transcription.

  1. Potential Prognostic Markers for Human Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-03-01

    Prostate 35: 185-192, 1998 osteoblasts on prostate carcinoma proliferation and chemo- 32. Trikha M, Cai Y, Grignon D, Honn KV: Identification taxis ...Markers for Human Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Bruce R. Zetter, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Children’s Hospital Boston, Massachusetts...March 2001 Final (1 Sep 98 - 28 Feb 01) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Potential Prognostic Markers for Human Prostate Cancer DAMD17-98-1

  2. DHA alters expression of target proteins of cancer therapy in chemotherapy resistant SW620 colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagsvold, Jens E; Pettersen, Caroline H H; Størvold, Gro L; Follestad, Turid; Krokan, Hans E; Schønberg, Svanhild A

    2010-01-01

    Diets rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been associated with a reduced risk of several types of cancer. Recent reports have suggested that these PUFAs enhance the cytotoxic effect of cancer chemoradiotherapy. The effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on key cell cycle regulators and target proteins of cancer therapy was investigated in the human malign colon cancer cell line SW620. Cell cycle check point proteins such as p21 and stratifin (14-3-3 sigma) increased at mRNA and protein level, whereas cell cycle progression proteins such as cell division cycle 25 homolog and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 decreased after DHA treatment. Protein levels of inhibitors of apoptosis family members associated with chemotherapy resistance and cancer malignancy, survivin and livin, decreased after the same treatment: likewise the expression of NF-kappaB. Levels of the proapoptotic proteins phosphorylated p38 MAPK and growth arrest-inducible and DNA damage-inducible gene 153/C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP) increased. The results indicate that DHA treatment causes simultaneous cell cycle arrest in both the G1 and G2 phase. In conclusion, DHA affects several target proteins of chemotherapy in a favorable way. This may explain the observed enhanced chemosensitivity in cancer cells supplemented with n-3 PUFAs and encourage further studies investigating the role of n-3 PUFAs as adjuvant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy in vivo.

  3. Regulation of deleted in liver cancer-1 gene domains on the proliferation of human colon cancer HT29 cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴平平

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the role of deleted in liver cancer-1(DLC-1) gene main domains on the regulation of hu-man colon cancer HT29 cell proliferation. Methods Subcloning recombinant plasmid vectors with Rho GTPase activating protein(RhoGAP),sterile alpha motif(SAM)

  4. Membrane Proteins : The Key Players of a Cancer Cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, Kim R.

    2011-01-01

    Membrane proteins are involved in the prognosis of the most common forms of cancer. Membrane proteins are the hallmark of a cancer cell. The overexpressed membrane receptors are becoming increasingly important in cancer cell therapy. Current renewing therapy approaches based on receptor overexpressi

  5. Membrane Proteins : The Key Players of a Cancer Cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, Kim R.

    Membrane proteins are involved in the prognosis of the most common forms of cancer. Membrane proteins are the hallmark of a cancer cell. The overexpressed membrane receptors are becoming increasingly important in cancer cell therapy. Current renewing therapy approaches based on receptor

  6. RNA-binding protein Lin28 in cancer and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shuai; Baltimore, David

    2016-05-28

    The highly conserved RNA-binding protein, Lin28, is involved in many biological processes, including development, reprogramming, pluripotency, and metabolism. Importantly, Lin28 functions as an oncogene, promoting tumor progression and metastasis in various human cancers. Lin28 can regulate gene expression either by directly binding to mRNAs or by blocking microRNA biogenesis, and the underlying mechanisms include Let-7-dependent and Let-7-independent modes of action. Recent evidence shows that Lin28 also plays a fundamental role in immunity. The roles of Lin28 in disease are complex and require characterization of its physiological functions in cancer and immunological contexts. Here we review emerging information on the role of Lin28 in cancer and immunity and the molecular mechanisms it uses. We discuss our present knowledge of the system and highlight remaining mysteries related to the functions of this small RNA-binding protein. This knowledge may lead to Lin28 becoming a diagnostic marker for cancer or immune-related diseases and a possible therapeutic target.

  7. Clinicopathological significance of PTPN12 expression in human breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Xunyi [Breast Disease Diagnosis and Treatment Centre, Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Qingdao University, Qingdao Shandong Province (China); Yuan, Zhentao [Department of Anesthesiology, Shengli Oilfield Central Hospital, Dongying Shandong Province (China); Jiang, Dandan; Li, Funian [Breast Disease Diagnosis and Treatment Centre, Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Qingdao University, Qingdao Shandong Province (China)

    2012-10-15

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 12 (PTPN12) is a recently identified tumor suppressor gene (TSG) that is frequently compromised in human triple-negative breast cancer. In the present study, we investigated the expression of PTPN12 protein by patients with breast cancer in a Chinese population and the relationship between PTPN12 expression levels and patient clinicopathological features and prognosis. Additionally, we explored the underlying down-regulation mechanism from the perspective of an epigenetic alteration. We examined PTPN12 mRNA expression in five breast cancer cell lines using semi-quantitative reverse-transcription PCR, and detected PTPN12 protein expression using immunohistochemistry in 150 primary invasive breast cancer cases and paired adjacent non-tumor tissues. Methylation-specific PCR was performed to analyze the promoter CpG island methylation status of PTPN12. PTPN12 was significantly down-regulated in breast cancer cases (48/150) compared to adjacent noncancerous tissues (17/150; P < 0.05). Furthermore, low expression of PTPN12 showed a significant positive correlation with tumor size (P = 0.047), lymph node metastasis (P = 0.001), distant metastasis (P = 0.009), histological grade (P = 0.012), and survival time (P = 0.019). Additionally, promoter CpG island hypermethylation occurs more frequently in breast cancer cases and breast cancer cell lines with low PTPN12 expression. Our findings suggest that PTPN12 is potentially a methylation-silenced TSG for breast cancer that may play an important role in breast carcinogenesis and could potentially serve as an independent prognostic factor for invasive breast cancer patients.

  8. Heat Shock Proteins, Autoimmunity, and Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart K. Calderwood

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock proteins (HSPs have been linked to the therapy of both cancer and inflammatory diseases, approaches that utilize contrasting immune properties of these proteins. It would appear that HSP family members Hsp60 and Hsp70, whether from external sources or induced locally during inflammation, can be processed by antigen-presenting cells and that HSP-derived epitopes then activate regulatory T cells and suppress inflammatory diseases. These effects also extend to the HSP-rich environments of cancer cells where elevated HSP concentrations may participate in the immunosuppressive tumor milieu. However, HSPs can also be important mediators of tumor immunity. Due to their molecular chaperone properties, some HSPs can bind tumor-specific peptides and deliver them deep into the antigen-processing pathways of antigen-presenting cells (APCs. In this context, HSP-based vaccines can activate tumor-specific immunity, trigger the proliferation and CTL capabilities of cancer-specific CD8+ T cells, and inhibit tumor growth. Further advances in HSP-based anticancer immunotherapy appear to involve improving the properties of the molecular chaperone vaccines by enhancing their antigen-binding properties and combating the immunosuppressive tumor milieu to permit programming of active CTL capable of penetrating the tumor milieu and specifically targeting tumor cells.

  9. 耐药相关蛋白P-gp、MRP、LRP在非小细胞肺癌组织中的表达及意义%The expression and significance of the multidrug resistance-related proteins P-gp, MRP and LRP in human non-small cell lung cancer tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the expression and significance of the multidrug resistance-related proteins P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance-related protein (MRP), lung resistance protein (LRP) in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissues and paratumor tissues. Methods: Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to examine the expression level of proteins P-gp, MRP and LRP in 43 samples of NSCLC and 15 samples of paratumor tissues. Results: The expression rates of P-gp, MRP and LRP in 43 tumor tissues were 74.42% (32/43), 67.44% (29/43) and 88.37% (38/43), respectively, while in 15 paratumor tissues were 13.33% (2/15), 20.00% (3/15) and 6.67% (1/15), respectively. There was significant difference in the expression of proteins (P-gp, MRP and LRP) between lung cancer tissues and paratumor tissues (P < 0.05). The expression of proteins P-gp, LRP in lung adenocarcinoma were higher than that in other pathological carcinomas (P < 0.05). The expression of protein MRP was not related to pathological type, clinical stage and classification of histodifferentiation (P >0.05). Conclusion: Multidrug resistance is more common in NSCLC. The proteins of P-gp, MRP and LRP participated in the formation of multidrug resistance in lung cancer. Detection of multidrug resistance-related proteins in lung cancer tissues may be useful to choice drugs.

  10. Lectins in human cancer: both a devil and an angel?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Xiu Li; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2013-09-01

    Lectins are a group of proteins which could recognize different sugar structures and specifically initiate reversible binding with them. Lectins are universally expressed in different organisms and undertake important biological roles. Understanding of their inherent roles and mechanisms that they employ has inspired researches with new ideas and applications. For example, along with the revelation of their anti-insect function, plant lectins exhibit great potential in agriculture. In human beings, lectins shoulder great missions in cell communication, differentiation and vesicle trafficking etc., aberrant expression of lectins is always associated with diseases. Mannan-binding lectin deficiency leads to immune disorder and liver sinusoidal endothelial cell lectin is involved in colorectal carcinoma liver metastasis. In this review, we present two contradictory roles of lectins in human cancer: the promotive roles of homologous lectins and suppressive roles of heterologous lectins in cancer development. Hopefully, this review will facilitate a better understanding of tumorigenesis and provide references for cancer treatment.

  11. Novel innate cancer killing activity in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovato James

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study, we pilot tested an in vitro assay of cancer killing activity (CKA in circulating leukocytes of 22 cancer cases and 25 healthy controls. Methods Using a human cervical cancer cell line, HeLa, as target cells, we compared the CKA in circulating leukocytes, as effector cells, of cancer cases and controls. The CKA was normalized as percentages of total target cells during selected periods of incubation time and at selected effector/target cell ratios in comparison to no-effector-cell controls. Results Our results showed that CKA similar to that of our previous study of SR/CR mice was present in human circulating leukocytes but at profoundly different levels in individuals. Overall, males have a significantly higher CKA than females. The CKA levels in cancer cases were lower than that in healthy controls (mean ± SD: 36.97 ± 21.39 vs. 46.28 ± 27.22. Below-median CKA was significantly associated with case status (odds ratio = 4.36; 95% Confidence Interval = 1.06, 17.88 after adjustment of gender and race. Conclusions In freshly isolated human leukocytes, we were able to detect an apparent CKA in a similar manner to that of cancer-resistant SR/CR mice. The finding of CKA at lower levels in cancer patients suggests the possibility that it may be of a consequence of genetic, physiological, or pathological conditions, pending future studies with larger sample size.

  12. Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is responsible for production of bone metastasis, but not visceral metastasis, by human small cell lung cancer SBC-5 cells in natural killer cell-depleted SCID mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Toyokazu; Yano, Seiji; Hanibuchi, Masaki; Kanematsu, Takanori; Muguruma, Hiroaki; Sone, Saburo

    2004-02-10

    We previously established an osteolytic bone metastasis model with multiorgan dissemination in natural killer (NK) cell-depleted severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice using human small cell lung cancer cells (SBC-5), which highly express the parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP). In our present study, we evaluated the role of PTHrP on bone metastasis by SBC-5 cells using anti-PTHrP neutralizing antibody (Ab). Anti-PTHrP Ab did not affect the proliferation or cytokine production of SBC-5 cells in vitro. Repeated intravenous injection with anti-PTHrP Ab inhibited the formation of bone metastasis in a dose-dependent manner, while the same treatment had no significant effect on the metastasis to visceral organs (lung, liver, kidney and lymph node). In addition, treatment with anti-PTHrP Ab improved the elevated serum calcium level, associated with inhibition of osteolytic bone metastasis, suggesting that anti-PTHrP Ab inhibited bone metastasis via suppression of bone resorption probably by neutralizing PTHrP. These findings suggest that PTHrP is essential for bone metastasis, but not visceral metastasis, by small cell lung cancer SBC-5 cells.

  13. Trefoil factor-3 expression in human colon cancer liver metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babyatsky, Mark; Lin, Jing; Yio, Xianyang; Chen, Anli; Zhang, Jie-yu; Zheng, Yan; Twyman, Christina; Bao, Xiuliang; Schwartz, Myron; Thung, Swan; Lawrence Werther, J; Itzkowitz, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Deaths from colorectal cancer are often due to liver metastasis. Trefoil factor-3 (TFF3) is expressed by normal intestinal epithelial cells and its expression is maintained throughout the colon adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Our previous work demonstrated a correlation between TFF3 expression and metastatic potential in an animal model of colon cancer. The aim of this study was to determine whether TFF3 is expressed in human colon cancer liver metastasis (CCLM) and whether inhibiting TFF3 expression in colon cancer cells would alter their invasive potential in vitro. Human CCLMs were analyzed at the mRNA and protein level for TFF3 expression. Two highly metastatic rat colon cancer cell lines that either natively express TFF3 (LN cells) or were transfected with TFF3 (LPCRI-2 cells), were treated with two rat TFF3 siRNA constructs (si78 and si365), and analyzed in an in vitro invasion assay. At the mRNA and protein level, TFF3 was expressed in 17/17 (100%) CCLMs and 10/11 (91%) primary colon cancers, but not in normal liver tissue. By real time PCR, TFF3 expression was markedly inhibited by both siRNA constructs in LN and LPCRI-2 cells. The si365 and si78 constructs inhibited invasion by 44% and 53%, respectively, in LN cells, and by 74% and 50%, respectively, in LPCRI-2 cells. These results provide further evidence that TFF3 contributes to the malignant behavior of colon cancer cells. These observations may have relevance for designing new diagnostic and treatment approaches to colorectal cancer.

  14. Loss of Bloom syndrome protein destabilizes human gene cluster architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, Michael W; Stults, Dawn M; Adachi, Noritaka; Hanakahi, Les; Pierce, Andrew J

    2009-09-15

    Bloom syndrome confers strong predisposition to malignancy in multiple tissue types. The Bloom syndrome patient (BLM) protein defective in the disease biochemically functions as a Holliday junction dissolvase and human cells lacking functional BLM show 10-fold elevated rates of sister chromatid exchange. Collectively, these phenomena suggest that dysregulated mitotic recombination drives the genomic instability underpinning the development of cancer in these individuals. Here we use physical analysis of the highly repeated, highly self-similar human ribosomal RNA gene clusters as sentinel biomarkers for dysregulated homologous recombination to demonstrate that loss of BLM protein function causes a striking increase in spontaneous molecular level genomic restructuring. Analysis of single-cell derived sub-clonal populations from wild-type human cell lines shows that gene cluster architecture is ordinarily very faithfully preserved under mitosis, but is so unstable in cell lines derived from BLMs as to make gene cluster architecture in different sub-clonal populations essentially unrecognizable one from another. Human cells defective in a different RecQ helicase, the WRN protein involved in the premature aging Werner syndrome, do not exhibit the gene cluster instability (GCI) phenotype, indicating that the BLM protein specifically, rather than RecQ helicases generally, holds back this recombination-mediated genomic instability. An ataxia-telangiectasia defective cell line also shows elevated rDNA GCI, although not to the extent of BLM defective cells. Genomic restructuring mediated by dysregulated recombination between the abundant low-copy repeats in the human genome may prove to be an important additional mechanism of genomic instability driving the initiation and progression of human cancer.

  15. Anti-cancer effects of Kochia scoparia fruit in human breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Yeon Han

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The fruit of Kochia scoparia Scharder is widely used as a medicinal ingredient for the treatment of dysuria and skin diseases in China, Japan and Korea. Especially, K. scoparia had been used for breast masses and chest and flank pain. Objective: To investigate the anti-cancer effect of K. scoparia on breast cancer. Materials and Methods: We investigated the anti-cancer effects of K. scoparia, methanol extract (MEKS in vitro. We examined the effects of MEKS on the proliferation rate, cell cycle arrest, reactive oxygen species (ROS generation and activation of apoptosis-associated proteins in MDA-MB-231, human breast cancer cells. Results: MTT assay results demonstrated that MEKS decreased the proliferation rates of MDA-MB-231 cells in a dose-dependent manner with an IC 50 value of 36.2 μg/ml. MEKS at 25 μg/ml significantly increased the sub-G1 DNA contents of MDA-MB-231 cells to 44.7%, versus untreated cells. In addition, MEKS induced apoptosis by increasing the levels of apoptosis-associated proteins such as cleaved caspase 3, cleaved caspase 8, cleaved caspase 9 and cleaved Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. Conclusion: These results suggest that MEKS inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells and that MEKS may have potential chemotherapeutic value for the treatment of human breast cancer.

  16. Expression and clinical significance of EZH2 and p53 protein in human prostate cancer%EZH2和p53蛋白在前列腺癌中的表达及其临床意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李江; 邱雁; 邱梁

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the expression of EZH2 and p53 protein in primary prostate cancer (Pca) and its clinical significance.Methods High-throughput tissue microarray technique and immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of EZH2 and p53 protein in 48 human prostate cancer specimens without a history of chemo-radiation therapy and 15 cases of benign prostate hyperplasic (BPH) tissues. The pathological characteristics and the relationship of the expression of EZH2 and p53 protein in primary prostate cancer was analyzed. Results Immunohistochemical results showed that the positive rates of EZH2 and p53 protein in prostate cancer were 87.50 % (42/48) and 33.33 % (16/48), respectively, which were significantly higher than that in BPH tissues[13.33 % (2/15) and 0 (0/15)](x2=26.429, x2=5.058,P <0.05). The expression of EZH2 and p53 protein was significantly related to Gleason score, TNM stage (P <0.05), but not to age and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level (P >0.05). The positive expression in patients with Gleason>6 was higher than that with Gleason≤6 (P <0.05). The positive expression in patients with T3-T4 stage was higher than that with T1-T2 stage (P <0.05). Spearman rank correlation showed a significantly positive correlation between EZH2 and p53 protein (r=0.294, P <0.05). Conclusion EZH2 and p53 protein may participate in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer. The overexpression of EZH2 and p53 protein could become an index for the evaluation of the level of malignancy and progression of prostate cancer.Furthermore, combining detection of EZH2 and p53 protein may provide a new theoretical basis for the treatment of prostate cancer.%目的 探讨EZH2和p53蛋白在前列腺癌组织中的表达及其临床意义。方法通过组织芯片技术,应用EnVision免疫组织化学法检测48例术前无放化疗史的前列腺癌标本和15例良性前列腺增生组织中EZH2、p53蛋白的表达情况,并分析EZH2和p53

  17. Prevalence of Telomerase Activity in Human Cancer

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    Chi-Hau Chen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase activity has been measured in a wide variety of cancerous and non-cancerous tissue types, and the vast majority of clinical studies have shown a direct correlation between it and the presence of cancerous cells. Telomerase plays a key role in cellular immortality and tumorigenesis. Telomerase is activated in 80–90% of human carcinomas, but not in normal somatic cells, therefore, its detection holds promise as a diagnostic marker for cancer. Measurable levels of telomerase have been detected in malignant cells from various samples: tissue from gestational trophoblastic neoplasms; squamous carcinoma cells from oral rinses; lung carcinoma cells from bronchial washings; colorectal carcinoma cells from colonic luminal washings; bladder carcinoma cells from urine or bladder washings; and breast carcinoma or thyroid cancer cells from fine needle aspirations. Such clinical tests for telomerase can be useful as non-invasive and cost-effective methods for early detection and monitoring of cancer. In addition, telomerase activity has been shown to correlate with poor clinical outcome in late-stage diseases such as non-small cell lung cancer, colorectal cancer, and soft tissue sarcomas. In such cases, testing for telomerase activity can be used to identify patients with a poor prognosis and to select those who might benefit from adjuvant treatment. Our review of the latest medical advances in this field reveals that telomerase holds great promise as a biomarker for early cancer detection and monitoring, and has considerable potential as the basis for developing new anticancer therapies.

  18. Cancer Metabolomics and the Human Metabolome Database

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    David S. Wishart

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The application of metabolomics towards cancer research has led to a renewed appreciation of metabolism in cancer development and progression. It has also led to the discovery of metabolite cancer biomarkers and the identification of a number of novel cancer causing metabolites. The rapid growth of metabolomics in cancer research is also leading to challenges. In particular, with so many cancer-associate metabolites being identified, it is often difficult to keep track of which compounds are associated with which cancers. It is also challenging to track down information on the specific pathways that particular metabolites, drugs or drug metabolites may be affecting. Even more frustrating are the difficulties associated with identifying metabolites from NMR or MS spectra. Fortunately, a number of metabolomics databases are emerging that are designed to address these challenges. One such database is the Human Metabolome Database (HMDB. The HMDB is currently the world’s largest and most comprehensive, organism-specific metabolomics database. It contains more than 40,000 metabolite entries, thousands of metabolite concentrations, >700 metabolic and disease-associated pathways, as well as information on dozens of cancer biomarkers. This review is intended to provide a brief summary of the HMDB and to offer some guidance on how it can be used in metabolomic studies of cancer.

  19. Expression and activity of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) in de novo and relapsed acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vellenga, E; Scheffer, GL; Muller, M; Bates, SE; Scheper, RJ; de Vries, EGE

    2002-01-01

    Overexpression of the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) efflux pump In human cancer cell lines results in resistance to a variety of cytostatic agents. The aim of this study was to analyze BCRP protein expression and activity In acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples and to determine whether it

  20. Inferring high-confidence human protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xueping

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As numerous experimental factors drive the acquisition, identification, and interpretation of protein-protein interactions (PPIs, aggregated assemblies of human PPI data invariably contain experiment-dependent noise. Ascertaining the reliability of PPIs collected from these diverse studies and scoring them to infer high-confidence networks is a non-trivial task. Moreover, a large number of PPIs share the same number of reported occurrences, making it impossible to distinguish the reliability of these PPIs and rank-order them. For example, for the data analyzed here, we found that the majority (>83% of currently available human PPIs have been reported only once. Results In this work, we proposed an unsupervised statistical approach to score a set of diverse, experimentally identified PPIs from nine primary databases to create subsets of high-confidence human PPI networks. We evaluated this ranking method by comparing it with other methods and assessing their ability to retrieve protein associations from a number of diverse and independent reference sets. These reference sets contain known biological data that are either directly or indirectly linked to interactions between proteins. We quantified the average effect of using ranked protein interaction data to retrieve this information and showed that, when compared to randomly ranked interaction data sets, the proposed method created a larger enrichment (~134% than either ranking based on the hypergeometric test (~109% or occurrence ranking (~46%. Conclusions From our evaluations, it was clear that ranked interactions were always of value because higher-ranked PPIs had a higher likelihood of retrieving high-confidence experimental data. Reducing the noise inherent in aggregated experimental PPIs via our ranking scheme further increased the accuracy and enrichment of PPIs derived from a number of biologically relevant data sets. These results suggest that using our high

  1. Human Papillomavirus in Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rosa Garbuglia

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV is currently considered to be a major etiologic factor, in addition to tobacco and alcohol, for oropharyngeal cancer (OPC development. HPV positive OPCs are epidemiologically distinct from HPV negative ones, and are characterized by younger age at onset, male predominance, and strong association with sexual behaviors. HPV16 is the most prevalent types in oral cavity cancer (OCC, moreover the prevalence of beta, and gamma HPV types is higher than that of alpha HPV in oral cavity.

  2. Oral contraceptives, human papillomavirus and cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Vecchia, Carlo; Boccia, Stefania

    2014-03-01

    Oncogenic human papillomavirus is the key determinant of cervical cancer, but other risk factors interact with it to define individual risk. Among these, there is oral contraceptive (OC) use. A quantitative review of the link between OCs and cervical cancer was performed. Long-term (>5 year) current or recent OC use has been related to an about two-fold excess risk of cervical cancer. Such an excess risk, however, levels off after stopping use, and approaches unity 10 or more years after stopping. The public health implications of OC use for cervical cancer are limited. In any case, such implications are greater in middle-income and low-income countries, as well as in central and eastern Europe and Latin America, where cervical cancer screening and control remain inadequate.

  3. Radiobiology of human cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    The author has systematically collected and collated the scientific literature correlating the basic and clinical sciences in this field in order to produce a definitive treatise. The book thoroughly reviews the biology and biochemistry relevant to radiobiology and describes the critical locus for the extinction of cell reproductive capacity. Extensive coverage is given to oxygen effect, hyperthermia, high linear energy transfer, cell populations, and similar topics. Separate sections cover time, dose, and fractionation; radiation hematology; cancer chemotherapy; and cancer immunology. The book also contains invaluable discussions of techniques for optimizing radiotherapy alone and in combination with other therapies.

  4. Water pipe smoking and human oral cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastam, Samer; Li, Fu-Min; Fouad, Fouad M; Al Kamal, Haysam M; Akil, Nizar; Al Moustafa, Ala-Eddin

    2010-03-01

    While cigarette smoking is recognized as an important risk factor in human oral cancers, the effect of water pipe smoking (WPS) on these cancers is not known. WPS is very common in the young adult population, especially in the Middle East, and has been associated with several respiratory problems. However, to date, there have been no studies examining the association between WPS and the progression of human oral cancers. Currently, the role of WPS in human oral cancers remains uncertain because of the limited number of investigations. This raises the question of whether WPS plays a significant role in the development of human oral carcinomas. In this paper, we propose the hypothesis that human oral normal epithelial cells are vulnerable to persistent WPS; moreover, WPS could play an important role in the initiation of a neoplastic transformation of human normal oral epithelial cells. Therefore, we believe that an international collaboration of epidemiological and clinical studies as well as cellular and molecular biology investigations is necessary to answer this important question.

  5. Production of tissue microarrays, immunohistochemistry staining and digitalization within the human protein atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampf, Caroline; Olsson, Ingmarie; Ryberg, Urban; Sjöstedt, Evelina; Pontén, Fredrik

    2012-05-31

    The tissue microarray (TMA) technology provides the means for high-throughput analysis of multiple tissues and cells. The technique is used within the Human Protein Atlas project for global analysis of protein expression patterns in normal human tissues, cancer and cell lines. Here we present the assembly of 1 mm cores, retrieved from microscopically selected representative tissues, into a single recipient TMA block. The number and size of cores in a TMA block can be varied from approximately forty 2 mm cores to hundreds of 0.6 mm cores. The advantage of using TMA technology is that large amount of data can rapidly be obtained using a single immunostaining protocol to avoid experimental variability. Importantly, only limited amount of scarce tissue is needed, which allows for the analysis of large patient cohorts (1 2). Approximately 250 consecutive sections (4 μm thick) can be cut from a TMA block and used for immunohistochemical staining to determine specific protein expression patterns for 250 different antibodies. In the Human Protein Atlas project, antibodies are generated towards all human proteins and used to acquire corresponding protein profiles in both normal human tissues from 144 individuals and cancer tissues from 216 different patients, representing the 20 most common forms of human cancer. Immunohistochemically stained TMA sections on glass slides are scanned to create high-resolution images from which pathologists can interpret and annotate the outcome of immunohistochemistry. Images together with corresponding pathology-based annotation data are made publically available for the research community through the Human Protein Atlas portal (www.proteinatlas.org) (Figure 1) (3 4). The Human Protein Atlas provides a map showing the distribution and relative abundance of proteins in the human body. The current version contains over 11 million images with protein expression data for 12.238 unique proteins, corresponding to more than 61% of all proteins

  6. Heat-shock protein 27 (Hsp27) as a target of methylglyoxal in gastrointestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oya-Ito, Tomoko; Naito, Yuji; Takagi, Tomohisa; Handa, Osamu; Matsui, Hirofumi; Yamada, Masaki; Shima, Keisuke; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2011-07-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the posttranslational modification of proteins in gastrointestinal cancer are still unknown. Here, we investigated the role of methylglyoxal modifications in gastrointestinal tumors. Methylglyoxal is a reactive dicarbonyl compound produced from cellular glycolytic intermediates that reacts non-enzymatically with proteins. By using a monoclonal antibody to methylglyoxal-modified proteins, we found that murine heat-shock protein 25 and human heat-shock protein 27 were the major adducted proteins in rat gastric carcinoma mucosal cell line and human colon cancer cell line, respectively. Furthermore, we found that heat-shock protein 27 was modified by methylglyoxal in ascending colon and rectum of patients with cancer. However, methylglyoxal-modified heat-shock protein 25/heat-shock protein 27 was not detected in non cancerous cell lines or in normal subject. Matrix-associated laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry analysis of peptide fragments identified Arg-75, Arg-79, Arg-89, Arg-94, Arg-127, Arg-136, Arg-140, Arg-188, and Lys-123 as methylglyoxal modification sites in heat-shock protein 27 and in phosphorylated heat-shock protein 27. The transfer of methylglyoxal-modified heat-shock protein 27 into rat intestinal epithelial cell line RIE was even more effective in preventing apoptotic cell death than that of native control heat-shock protein 27. Furthermore, methylglyoxal modification of heat-shock protein 27 protected the cells against both the hydrogen peroxide- and cytochrome c-mediated caspase activation, and the hydrogen peroxide-induced production of intracellular reactive oxygen species. The levels of lactate converted from methylglyoxal were increased in carcinoma mucosal cell lines. Our results suggest that posttranslational modification of heat-shock protein 27 by methylglyoxal may have important implications for epithelial cell injury in gastrointestinal cancer.

  7. Unravelling the Complexity and Functions of MTA Coregulators in Human Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Da-Qiang; Kumar, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Since the initial recognition of the metastasis-associated protein 1 (MTA1) as a metastasis-relevant gene approximately 20 years ago, our appreciation for the complex role of the MTA family of coregulatory proteins in human cancer has profoundly grown. MTA proteins consist of six family members with similar structural units and act as central signaling nodes for integrating upstream signals into regulatory chromatin-remodeling networks, leading to regulation of gene expression in cancer cells. Substantial experimental and clinical evidence demonstrates that MTA proteins, particularly MTA1, are frequently deregulated in a wide range of human cancers. The MTA family governs cell survival, the invasive and metastatic phenotypes of cancer cells, and the aggressiveness of cancer and the prognosis of patients with MTA1 overexpressing cancers. Our discussion here highlights our current understanding of the regulatory mechanisms and functional roles of MTA proteins in cancer progression and expands upon the potential implications of MTA proteins in cancer biology and cancer therapeutics.

  8. Differentially Expressed Genes and Signature Pathways of Human Prostate Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S Myers

    Full Text Available Genomic technologies including microarrays and next-generation sequencing have enabled the generation of molecular signatures of prostate cancer. Lists of differentially expressed genes between malignant and non-malignant states are thought to be fertile sources of putative prostate cancer biomarkers. However such lists of differentially expressed genes can be highly variable for multiple reasons. As such, looking at differential expression in the context of gene sets and pathways has been more robust. Using next-generation genome sequencing data from The Cancer Genome Atlas, differential gene expression between age- and stage- matched human prostate tumors and non-malignant samples was assessed and used to craft a pathway signature of prostate cancer. Up- and down-regulated genes were assigned to pathways composed of curated groups of related genes from multiple databases. The significance of these pathways was then evaluated according to the number of differentially expressed genes found in the pathway and their position within the pathway using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis and Signaling Pathway Impact Analysis. The "transforming growth factor-beta signaling" and "Ran regulation of mitotic spindle formation" pathways were strongly associated with prostate cancer. Several other significant pathways confirm reported findings from microarray data that suggest actin cytoskeleton regulation, cell cycle, mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, and calcium signaling are also altered in prostate cancer. Thus we have demonstrated feasibility of pathway analysis and identified an underexplored area (Ran for investigation in prostate cancer pathogenesis.

  9. Study on Invasion of Artesunate on Inhibiting Human Colon Cancer Cell SW620

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Fan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the invasive effect of Chinese extraction artesunate on human colon cancer cell SW620 and explore its possible mechanisms. Methods: Colon cancer cell SW620 was managed by different concentrations of artesunate, and soft agar colony-cultivating trial was applied to detect anchorage independent proliferation of cancer cells, Boyden chamber model method to detect the invasive capability of cancer cells and Western blot method to detect the change of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 proteins. Results: Artesunate can effectively inhibit malignant proliferation and invasive capability of colon cancer cell SW620, and was dose-dependent (P < 0.01. Artesunate can effectively inhibit the expression of cancer cell ICAM-1 gene proteins, and was time- and concentration-dependant (P <0.01. Conclusion: Artesunate can significantly inhibit the invasion of colon cancer cell SW620, which can be related to down-regulation of ICAM-1 protein level.

  10. Serum protein fingerprint of patients with gastric cancer by SELDI ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-04-12

    Apr 12, 2010 ... To study the serum protein fingerprint of patients with gastric cancer and to screen for protein molecules closely ..... warning for tumors, and the advantage of the SELDI ... Compared with similar studies abroad (Bhattacharyya.

  11. Cancer-associated mutations are preferentially distributed in protein kinase functional sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izarzugaza, Jose M G; Redfern, Oliver C; Orengo, Christine A; Valencia, Alfonso

    2009-12-01

    Protein kinases are a superfamily involved in many crucial cellular processes, including signal transmission and regulation of cell cycle. As a consequence of this role, kinases have been reported to be associated with many types of cancer and are considered as potential therapeutic targets. We analyzed the distribution of pathogenic somatic point mutations (drivers) in the protein kinase superfamily with respect to their location in the protein, such as in structural, evolutionary, and functionally relevant regions. We find these driver mutations are more clearly associated with key protein features than other somatic mutations (passengers) that have not been directly linked to tumor progression. This observation fits well with the expected implication of the alterations in protein kinase function in cancer pathogenicity. To explain the relevance of the detected association of cancer driver mutations at the molecular level in the human kinome, we compare these with genetically inherited mutations (SNPs). We find that the subset of nonsynonymous SNPs that are associated to disease, but sufficiently mild to the point of being widespread in the population, tend to avoid those key protein regions, where they could be more detrimental for protein function. This tendency contrasts with the one detected for cancer associated-driver-mutations, which seems to be more directly implicated in the alteration of protein function. The detailed analysis of protein kinase groups and a number of relevant examples, confirm the relation between cancer associated-driver-mutations and key regions for protein kinase structure and function.

  12. Adaptor protein Crk Ⅰ mediates malignant potential of human ovarian cancer%接合物蛋白CrkⅠ在卵巢癌恶性潜能中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    车亚玲; 王瑾; 令狐华

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the role of adaptor protein Crk Ⅰ in malignant potential of human ovarian cancer. Methods Crk and Dock180 expression were detected by Western blotting in ovarian cancer tissues (EOC, n =28), benign ovarian tumors (BOT, n =13) and normal ovary tissues (Normal, n =10). Co-precipitation was performed to evaluate the in vivo protein-protein interaction of Dock180 and Crk Ⅰn 3 different ovarian cancer cell lines ( SKOV3, MCAS and RMUG-L cells). The expression of Crk Ⅰn SKOV3 cells were silenced by using siRNA interference, and then Rac1 activity and cell invasion in the transfected cells were observed. Results The intensity of Crk Ⅰ and Dock180 expression was consistent with each other in EOC tissues. Both were observed to be significantly higher in EOC than those in the BOT and normal ovary tissues(P < 0. 05 ). No significant difference was found between BOT and Normal group either for Crk Ⅰ or Dock180 expression (P > 0. 05 ). In consistent with this result, Dock180 preferred to combine with Crk Ⅰ rather than with Crk Ⅱ in all 3 ovarian cancer cell lines. Furthermore, Crk knockdown celIs presented with sustainable Crk Ⅰ expression depletion, significantly decreased Rac1 activity and cell invasion. Conclusion Crk might be involved in malignant potential of human EOC mainly through Crk Ⅰ/Dock180/Rac1 pathway.%目的 证实接合物蛋白CrkⅠ在卵巢癌恶性潜能中的作用.方法 采用Western blot法检测卵巢癌组织、卵巢良性肿瘤组织、正常卵巢组织中Crk和Dock180蛋白的表达;用免疫沉淀法检测3种卵巢癌细胞株中Crk与Dock180蛋白的内源性结合;用小干扰RNA敲低SKOV3细胞中内源性的Crk,检测Crk表达缺失性细胞Crk蛋白表达水平、Rac1酶活性和侵袭力的变化.结果 Dock180与CrkⅠ的表达强度呈现明显的一致性,卵巢癌组织中二者的表达均显著高于卵巢良性肿瘤组织和正常卵巢组织(P0.05).3个卵巢癌细胞株中Dock180主要

  13. [Research progress in roles of high-risk human papillomavirus E2 protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, En-Qi; Tang, Yuan-Yu

    2014-03-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is the principal cause of various cancers including cervical cancer, anal cancer, vulvar cancer, and some head and neck cancers. In the viral life cycle, by interacting with both viral and host DNA and proteins, the HPV E2 protein plays a pivotal role in viral transcriptional regulation and DNA replication, and it is also associated with modification of various cellular processes, including host gene transcription, RNA processing, apoptosis, ubiquitination, and intracellular trafficking, to create a convenient environment for a replicative cycle of the virus and contribute to the HPV pathogenesis. Elucidating the roles of E2 protein throughout the viral life cycle will improve our understanding of the viral life cycle and pathogenesis and help us identify novel antiviral agents with therapeutic potential. This article reviews the research progress in the structure, roles, and activity of high-risk HPV E2 protein, particularly that of HPV-16.

  14. Systematic analysis of human protein complexes identifies chromosome segregation proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, James R A; Toyoda, Yusuke; Hegemann, Björn; Poser, Ina; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Sykora, Martina M; Augsburg, Martina; Hudecz, Otto; Buschhorn, Bettina A; Bulkescher, Jutta; Conrad, Christian; Comartin, David; Schleiffer, Alexander; Sarov, Mihail; Pozniakovsky, Andrei; Slabicki, Mikolaj Michal; Schloissnig, Siegfried; Steinmacher, Ines; Leuschner, Marit; Ssykor, Andrea; Lawo, Steffen; Pelletier, Laurence; Stark, Holger; Nasmyth, Kim; Ellenberg, Jan; Durbin, Richard; Buchholz, Frank; Mechtler, Karl; Hyman, Anthony A; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2010-04-30

    Chromosome segregation and cell division are essential, highly ordered processes that depend on numerous protein complexes. Results from recent RNA interference screens indicate that the identity and composition of these protein complexes is incompletely understood. Using gene tagging on bacterial artificial chromosomes, protein localization, and tandem-affinity purification-mass spectrometry, the MitoCheck consortium has analyzed about 100 human protein complexes, many of which had not or had only incompletely been characterized. This work has led to the discovery of previously unknown, evolutionarily conserved subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex and the gamma-tubulin ring complex--large complexes that are essential for spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. The approaches we describe here are generally applicable to high-throughput follow-up analyses of phenotypic screens in mammalian cells.

  15. Novel Antibody-Based Proteins for Cancer Immunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuenmayor, Jaheli; Montaño, Ramon F., E-mail: jfuenmay@ivic.gob.ve [Laboratorio de Patología Celular y Molecular, Centro de Medicina Experimental, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas. Caracas, 1020-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2011-08-19

    The relative success of monoclonal antibodies in cancer immunotherapy and the vast manipulation potential of recombinant antibody technology have encouraged the development of novel antibody-based antitumor proteins. Many insightful reagents have been produced, mainly guided by studies on the mechanisms of action associated with complete and durable remissions, results from experimental animal models, and our current knowledge of the human immune system. Strikingly, only a small percent of these new reagents has demonstrated clinical value. Tumor burden, immune evasion, physiological resemblance, and cell plasticity are among the challenges that cancer therapy faces, and a number of antibody-based proteins are already available to deal with many of them. Some of these novel reagents have been shown to specifically increase apoptosis/cell death of tumor cells, recruit and activate immune effectors, and reveal synergistic effects not previously envisioned. In this review, we look into different approaches that have been followed during the past few years to produce these biologics and analyze their relative success, mainly in terms of their clinical performance. The use of antibody-based antitumor proteins, in combination with standard or novel therapies, is showing significant improvements in objective responses, suggesting that these reagents will become important components of the antineoplastic protocols of the future.

  16. Abrogation of heat-shock protein (HSP)70 expression induced cell growth inhibition and apoptosis in human androgen-independent prostate cancer cell line PC-3m

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-GangZhao; Qing-ZhengMa; Chun-XiaoXu

    2004-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of abrogating heat shock protein (HSP) 70 expression by antisense HSP70 oligonucleotides treatment on human androgen-independent prostate cancer cell line PC-3m growth. Methods: PC3m cells were treated with 0-16μmol/L antisense HSP70 oligomers for 0-100 hr. Cell growth inhibition was analyzed using a trypan blue dye exclusion test. Apoptotic cells were detected and confirmed by flow cytometric analysis and DNA fragmentation analysis. The protein expression of HSP70 and bcl-2 affected by antisense HSP70 oligomers were determined using Western blot. Results: Antisense HSP70 oligomer induced apoptosis and then inhibited proliferation of PC-3m cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Ladder-like patterns of DNA fragments were observed in PC-3m cells treated with 10μmol/L antisense HSP70 oligomer for 48 hr or 8μtmol/L for 72 hr on agarose gel electrophoresis. Antisense HSP70 oligomer pretreatment enhanced the subsequent induction of apoptosis by heat shock in PC-3m cells. In addition, undetectable HSP70 expression was observed at a concentration of 10μtmol/L antisense HSP70 oligomer treatment for 48 hr or 8μtmol/L for 72 hr in Western blot, which was paralleled by decreased expression levels of anti-apoptotic protein bcl-2. Conclusion: HSP70 antisense oligomer treatment abro-gates the expression of HSP70, which may disrupt HSP70-bcl-2-interactions and further down-regulate bcl-2 expression,in turn inducing apoptosis and inhibiting cell growth in PC-3m cells. (Asian JAndro12004 Dec;6:319-324)

  17. Clinical significance of PHPT1 protein expression in lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU An-jian; XIA Xiang-hou; DU Song-tao; GU Jun-chao

    2010-01-01

    Background in our previous studies, we found the expression of 14-kD phosphohistidine phosphatase (PHPT1) was associated with lung cancer cells migration and invasion, and PHPT1 mRNA expression level in lung cancer tissues clinically correlated with lymph node metastasis. in the present study, we aimed to further investigate the expression of PHPT1 protein in lung cancer.Methods Expression of PHPT1 protein in tissue samples from 146 lung cancers and 30 normal tissues adjacent to lung cancers was assessed using immunohistochemical method. Fisher's exact test was used to analyze expression patterns of PHPT1 protein in these tissue types. Meanwhile, we studied the correlation between expression of PHPT1 protein and clinicopathological features in lung cancer.Results Significantly higher expression levels of PHPT1 protein were found in lung cancer samples (53.42%) than in normal tissues adjacent to lung cancer (23.33%) (P=0.003). Fisher's exact test showed that lung cancer stage positively correlated with expression of PHPT1 protein (P=0.02), and lung cancer samples with lymph node metastasis showed higher PHPT1 protein expression (P=0.016) than the samples without lymph node metastasis.Conclusions The results of this study agree with findings from our previous study of PHPT1 mRNA expression in lung cancer tissues, and strongly suggest that PHPT1 protein is closely associated with the carcinogenesis and metastasis of lung cancer. Thus, therapy targeting PHPT1 (inhibition or silencing) could be potentially benefited for lung cancer patients.

  18. Prevalence and genotype identification of human JC virus in colon cancer in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Paul Yann; Fung, Chiung-Yau; Chang, Fang-Pei; Huang, Wen-Shih; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Wang, Jeng-Yi; Chang, Deching

    2008-10-01

    Although JC virus (JCV), a human polyomavirus, has been detected in colon cancers, the association between JCV and colon cancer remains controversial. In Taiwan, the prevalence of JCV infection in colon cancer patients has not been reported. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate JCV infection in colon cancers in Taiwan. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues from 22 colon cancer patients were examined in this study. Nested PCR was performed to detect viral genomic DNA. The product of the nested PCR flanking the JCV regulatory region was sequenced further. Viral large tumor protein, LT, and late capsid protein, VP1, were examined by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Nested PCR revealed JCV genomic DNA in 86.4% (19/22) of the colon cancer tissue samples. Both rearranged and archetypal genotypes of JCV were identified. Expression of JCV LT was positive in 63.6% (14/22) of the examined colon cancer tissue samples but not in any adjacent normal region. Expression of viral capsid protein VP1 was not detected in any of the tissues examined. The current study demonstrates that JCV genomic DNA was present in the examined colon cancer tissues. The genotypes of JCV in colon cancer tissues were also identified. Expression of viral early protein but not structural capsid protein was detected in the examined colon cancer tissues. Furthermore, a high prevalence of JCV infection in colon cancer tissues in Taiwan was also demonstrated.

  19. Aberrant expression of nuclear matrix proteins during HMBA-induced differentiation of gastric cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the aberrant expression of nuclear matrix proteins in human gastric cancer cells before and after hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA) treatment.METHODS: Proteomics analysis of differential nuclear matrix proteins was performed by two dimensional electrophoresis polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.The expression levels of three nuclear matrix proteins were further confirmed by Western blotting and their location...

  20. A tool to facilitate clinical biomarker studies - a tissue dictionary based on the Human Protein Atlas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kampf Caroline

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The complexity of tissue and the alterations that distinguish normal from cancer remain a challenge for translating results from tumor biological studies into clinical medicine. This has generated an unmet need to exploit the findings from studies based on cell lines and model organisms to develop, validate and clinically apply novel diagnostic, prognostic and treatment predictive markers. As one step to meet this challenge, the Human Protein Atlas project has been set up to produce antibodies towards human protein targets corresponding to all human protein coding genes and to map protein expression in normal human tissues, cancer and cells. Here, we present a dictionary based on microscopy images created as an amendment to the Human Protein Atlas. The aim of the dictionary is to facilitate the interpretation and use of the image-based data available in the Human Protein Atlas, but also to serve as a tool for training and understanding tissue histology, pathology and cell biology. The dictionary contains three main parts, normal tissues, cancer tissues and cells, and is based on high-resolution images at different magnifications of full tissue sections stained with H & E. The cell atlas is centered on immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy images, using different color channels to highlight the organelle structure of a cell. Here, we explain how this dictionary can be used as a tool to aid clinicians and scientists in understanding the use of tissue histology and cancer pathology in diagnostics and biomarker studies.

  1. B-1 cells and naturally occuring antibodies: influencing the immunogenicity of recombinant human therapeutic proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sauerborn, M.S.; Schellekens, H.

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant human therapeutic proteins are increasingly being used to treat serious and life-threatening diseases like multiple sclerosis, diabetes mellitus, and cancer. An important side effect of these proteins is the development of antidrug antibodies, which can be neutralizing and thus interfere

  2. [Cow's milk protein allergy through human milk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, M; Loras-Duclaux, I; Lachaux, A

    2012-03-01

    Cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) is the first allergy that affects infants. In this population, the incidence rate reaches 7.5%. The multiplicity and aspecificity of the symptoms makes its diagnosis sometimes complicated, especially in the delayed type (gastrointestinal, dermatological, and cutaneous). CMPA symptoms can develop in exclusively breastfed infants with an incidence rate of 0.5%. It, therefore, raises questions about sensitization to cow's milk proteins through breast milk. Transfer of native bovine proteins such as β-lactoglobulin into the breast milk is controversial: some authors have found bovine proteins in human milk but others point to cross-reactivity between human milk proteins and cow's milk proteins. However, it seems that a small percentage of dietary proteins can resist digestion and become potentially allergenic. Moreover, some authors suspect the transfer of some of these dietary proteins from the maternal bloodstream to breast milk, but the mechanisms governing sensitization are still being studied. Theoretically, CMPA diagnosis is based on clinical observations, prick-test or patch-test results, and cow's milk-specific IgE antibody concentration. A positive food challenge test usually confirms the diagnosis. No laboratory test is available to make a certain diagnosis, but the detection of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) in the mother's milk, for example, seems to be advantageous since it is linked to CMA. Excluding cow's milk from the mother's diet is the only cure when she still wants to breastfeed. Usually, cow's milk proteins are reintroduced after 6 months of exclusion. Indeed, the prognosis for infants is very good: 80% acquire a tolerance before the age of 3 or 4 years. Mothers should not avoid dairy products during pregnancy and breastfeeding as preventive measures against allergy.

  3. Isolation of Cancer Stem Cells From Human Prostate Cancer Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Samuel J.; Quinn, S. Aidan; de la Iglesia-Vicente, Janis; Bonal, Dennis M.; Rodriguez-Bravo, Veronica; Firpo-Betancourt, Adolfo; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Domingo-Domenech, Josep

    2014-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model has been considerably revisited over the last two decades. During this time CSCs have been identified and directly isolated from human tissues and serially propagated in immunodeficient mice, typically through antibody labeling of subpopulations of cells and fractionation by flow cytometry. However, the unique clinical features of prostate cancer have considerably limited the study of prostate CSCs from fresh human tumor samples. We recently reported the isolation of prostate CSCs directly from human tissues by virtue of their HLA class I (HLAI)-negative phenotype. Prostate cancer cells are harvested from surgical specimens and mechanically dissociated. A cell suspension is generated and labeled with fluorescently conjugated HLAI and stromal antibodies. Subpopulations of HLAI-negative cells are finally isolated using a flow cytometer. The principal limitation of this protocol is the frequently microscopic and multifocal nature of primary cancer in prostatectomy specimens. Nonetheless, isolated live prostate CSCs are suitable for molecular characterization and functional validation by transplantation in immunodeficient mice. PMID:24686446

  4. Emerging roles of deubiquitinating enzymes in human cancer1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-ming YANG

    2007-01-01

    Protein modifications by the covalent linkage of ubiquitin have significant in-volvement in many cellular processes, including stress response, oncogenesis,viral infection, transcription, protein turnover, organelle biogenesis, DNA repair,cellular differentiation, and cell cycle control. Protein ubiquitination and subse-quent degradation by the proteasome require the participation of both ubiquitinating enzymes and deubiquitinating enzymes. Although deubiquitinatingenzymes constitute a large family in the ubiquitin system, the study of this class of proteins is still in its infant stage. Recent studies have revealed a variety of molecular and biological functions of deubiquitinating enzymes and their associa-tion with human diseases. In this review we will discuss the possible roles that deubiquitinating enzymes may play in cancers.

  5. ProKinO: an ontology for integrative analysis of protein kinases in cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurinder Gosal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein kinases are a large and diverse family of enzymes that are genomically altered in many human cancers. Targeted cancer genome sequencing efforts have unveiled the mutational profiles of protein kinase genes from many different cancer types. While mutational data on protein kinases is currently catalogued in various databases, integration of mutation data with other forms of data on protein kinases such as sequence, structure, function and pathway is necessary to identify and characterize key cancer causing mutations. Integrative analysis of protein kinase data, however, is a challenge because of the disparate nature of protein kinase data sources and data formats. RESULTS: Here, we describe ProKinO, a protein kinase-specific ontology, which provides a controlled vocabulary of terms, their hierarchy, and relationships unifying sequence, structure, function, mutation and pathway information on protein kinases. The conceptual representation of such diverse forms of information in one place not only allows rapid discovery of significant information related to a specific protein kinase, but also enables large-scale integrative analysis of protein kinase data in ways not possible through other kinase-specific resources. We have performed several integrative analyses of ProKinO data and, as an example, found that a large number of somatic mutations (∼288 distinct mutations associated with the haematopoietic neoplasm cancer type map to only 8 kinases in the human kinome. This is in contrast to glioma, where the mutations are spread over 82 distinct kinases. We also provide examples of how ontology-based data analysis can be used to generate testable hypotheses regarding cancer mutations. CONCLUSION: We present an integrated framework for large-scale integrative analysis of protein kinase data. Navigation and analysis of ontology data can be performed using the ontology browser available at: http://vulcan.cs.uga.edu/prokino.

  6. Human RECQ helicases: roles in cancer, aging, and inherited disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidorova JM

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Julia M Sidorova,1,* Raymond J Monnat Jr,1,2,* 1Department of Pathology, 2Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA *The authors contributed equally to this review Abstract: DNA helicases use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to disrupt DNA base pairing and displace proteins from DNA in order to facilitate replication, recombination, transcription, and repair. This article focuses on the human RECQ helicases, five DNA-dependent helicases that play key roles in cellular physiology and disease. Loss of function of three RECQ helicases causes the cancer predisposition syndromes Bloom syndrome, Werner syndrome, and Rothmund–Thomson and related syndromes. We summarize recent work on these syndromes and proteins and discuss disease pathogenesis in light of RECQ helicase biochemical activities and in vivo functions. Keywords: ATP-dependent DNA helicase, Bloom syndrome, Werner syndrome, Rothmund–Thomson syndrome, DNA replication, DNA repair, genetic instability, cancer predisposition syndrome

  7. Expression of protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha (RPTPalpha) in human breast cancer correlates with low tumor grade, and inhibits tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ardini, E; Agresti, R; Tagliabue, E;

    2000-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation is controlled by a balance of tyrosine kinases (PTKs) and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Whereas the contribution of PTKs to breast tumorigenesis is the subject of intense scrutiny, the potential role of PTPs is poorly known. RPTPalpha is implicated in the activation......% of cases manifesting significant overexpression. High RPTPalpha protein levels correlated significantly with low tumor grade and positive estrogen receptor status. Expression of RPTPalpha in breast carcinoma cells led to growth inhibition, associated with increased accumulation in G0 and G1, and delayed...

  8. Expression and biochemical characterization of recombinant human epididymis protein 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Ling; Liu, Yunhui; Zhen, Shuai; Wan, Deyou; Cao, Jiyue; Gao, Xin

    2014-10-01

    Whey acidic proteins (WAP) belong to a large gene family of antibacterial peptides that perform critical immune system functions. The function of human epididymis protein 4 (HE4), a 124-amino acid long polypeptide that has two whey acidic protein four-disulfide core (WFDC) domains, is not well studied. Here, a fusion gene encoding the HE4 protein fused to an IgG1 Fc domain was constructed. The recombinant HE4 protein was expressed as a secretory protein in Pichia pastoris and mammalian HEK293-F cells and was subsequently purified. Our data suggested that the HE4 protein produced by these two expression systems bound to both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, but demonstrated slightly inhibitory activity towards the growth of Staphylococcus aureus. Moreover, HE4 exhibited proteinase inhibitory activity towards trypsin, elastase, matrix metallopeptidase 9, and the secretory proteinases from Bacillus subtilis. The effects of glycosylation on the biochemical characterization of HE4 were also investigated. LC-ESI-MS glycosylation analysis showed that the high-mannose glycosylated form of HE4 expressed by P. pastoris has lower biological activity when compared to its complex-glycosylated form produced from HEK293-F cells. The implications of this are discussed, which may be provide theoretical basis for its important role in the development of cancer and innate immune system.

  9. The mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway mediates growth arrest or E1A-dependent apoptosis in SKBR3 human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagosklonny, M V

    1998-11-09

    Previously, we have shown that phorbol ester (PMA) induces p21(WAF1/CIP1)-dependent growth arrest in SKBr3 breast cancer and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Here, I demonstrate that inhibition of Raf-1 kinase by dominant-negative Raf-1 or pharmacological depletion of Raf-1 prevented PMA-mediated induction of p21(WAF1/CIP1). Similarly, PD98059, a specific inhibitor of MEK, abolished p21(WAF1/CIP1) induction and PMA-induced growth arrest. Like PMA, the H-ras oncogene, another activator of the Raf-1/MEK/MAPK pathway, transactivated p21(WAF1/CIP1) in SKBr3 cells. I further investigated PMA-induced growth arrest following infection of SKBr3 cells with 12S E1A-expressing adenovirus. Although high levels of E1A oncoprotein prevented both PMA-induced p21(WAF1/CIP1) and growth arrest, smaller amounts of E1A abrogated growth arrest without down-regulation of p21(WAF1/CIP1). Therefore, E1A can stimulate proliferation downstream of p21(WAF1/CIP1). Albeit less effective than full activity, either Rb- or p300-binding activity of E1A was sufficient for the abrogation of PMA-mediated growth arrest. E1A-driven proliferation of PMA-treated SKBr3 cells was accompanied by apoptosis. New therapeutic approaches can be envisioned that would utilize stimulation of the Raf-1/MEK/MAPK pathway to inhibit growth of PMA-sensitive cancer cells.

  10. Biochemical characterization of riboflavin carrier protein (RCP) in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tanya; Ouhtit, Allal; Gaur, Rajiv; Fernando, Augusta; Schwarzenberger, Paul; Su, Joseph; Ismail, Mohamed F; El-Sayyad, Hassan I; Karande, Anjali; Elmageed, Zakaria Abd; Rao, Prakash; Raj, Madhwa

    2009-01-01

    Riboflavin carrier protein (RCP) is a growth- and development-specific protein. Here, we characterized the expression of this protein in prostate cancer by polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against chicken RCP. RCP was localized to both androgen-dependent and independent prostate cancer cell lines. Compared to controls, RCP was over-expressed in all 45 prostate adenocarcinomas, irrespective of the Gleason's score or the stage of the disease. The identified RCP had a molecular weight of 38 kDa, similar to RCP purified from chicken. Presence of this protein was also confirmed by siRNA inhibition analysis. Antibodies to chicken RCP inhibited incorporation of tritiated thymidine into DNA and prevented riboflavin uptake in PC3 prostate cancer cells, suggesting a critical function of this protein in prostate cancer cell growth. These data suggest that RCP can be used as a tumor biomarker in prostate cancer.

  11. Nitrogen and protein components of human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambraeus, L; Lönnerdal, B; Forsum, E; Gebre-Medhin, M

    1978-09-01

    The true protein content of human milk is 0.9%, in well-nourished as well as malnourished mothers. Casein constitutes only about 20% of the protein nitrogen in human milk. The remaining 80% is derived from the whey proteins, the three dominant components being alpha-lactalbumin, lactoferrin and secretory IgA. alpha-lactalbumin is a subunit of lactose synthetase. Lactoferrin is an iron-binding glycoprotein which plays a role in the defence against gastro-intestinal infections and is probably also involved in iron transport in the gut. Secretory IgA is comparatively stable at low pH; it is resistant to proteolytic enzymes and plays an essential role in the immunological defence against gastro-intestinal infections. Lysozyme is a minor component of the whey proteins and represents an active enzyme with a bactericidal effect. The nutritional and immunological significance of the marked differences with respect to the nitrogen and protein compositions of human milk and cow's milk should not be underestimated, but need further elucidation.

  12. Loss of fragile histidine triad protein in human hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Po Zhao; Xin Song; Yuan-Yuan Nin; Ya-Li Lu; Xiang-Hong Li

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of fragile histidine triad (FHIT) gene protein, Fhit, which is recently thought to be a candidate tumor suppressor. Abnormal expression of fragile histidine triad has been found in a variety of human cancers,but little is known about its expression in human hepatocellular carcinogenesis and evolution.METHODS: Sections of 83 primary human hepatocellular carcionoma with corresponding para-neoplastic liver tissue and 10 normal liver tissue were evaluated immunohistochemically for Fhit protein expression.RESULTS: All normal liver tissue and para-neoplastic liver tissue showed a strong expression of Fhit, whereas 50 of 83(65.0 %) carcinomas showed a marked loss or absence of Fhit expression. The differences of Fhit expression between carcinoma and normal or para-neoplastic liver tissue werehighly significant (P=0.000). The proportion of carcinomas with reduced Fhit expression showed an increasing trend (a) with decreasing differentiation or higher histological grade (P=0.219); (b) in tumors with higher clinical stage Ⅲ and ⅣV (91.3 %, P=0.000), compared with tumors with lower stage Ⅰ and Ⅱ (27.6 %); and (c) in cancers with bigger tumor size (>50 mm) (75.0 %, P=0.017), compared withsmaller tumor size (≤ 50 mm). CONCLUSION: FHIT inactivation seems to be both an earlyand a later event, associated with carcinogenesis andprogression to more aggressive hepatocellular carcinomas.Thus, evaluation of Fhit expression by immunohistochemistryin hepatocellular carcinoma may provide important diagnosticand prognostic information in clinical application.

  13. Alterations of p63 and p73 in human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Kazushi; Fry, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    p53 and its related genes, p63 and p73 constitute the p53 gene family. While p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human tumors, p63 and p73 are rarely mutated or deleted in cancers. Many studies have reported p63/p73 overexpression in human cancers while others showed that a loss of p63/p73 is associated with tumor progression and metastasis. Thus, whether p63 or p73 is a tumor suppressor gene or an oncogene has been a matter of debate. This controversy has been attributed to the existence of multiple splicing isoforms with distinct functions; the full-length TA isoform of p63 has structural and functional similarity to wild-type p53, whereas the ΔNp63 acts primarily in dominant-negative fashion against all family members of p53. Differential activities of TA and ΔN isoforms have been shown in vivo by creating isform-specific gene knockout mice. All p53, p63, p73 proteins bind to and activate target genes with p53-response elements; p63 also binds to distinct p63-response elements and regulate expression of specific target genes involved in skin, limb, and craniofacial development. Interestingly, several studies have shown that both p63 and p73 are involved in cellular response to cancer therapy and others have indicated that both of these molecules are required for p53-induced apoptosis, suggesting functional interplay among p53 family proteins. Consistent with these findings, aberrant splicing that result in ΔNp63 or ΔNp73 overexpression are frequently found in human cancers, and is associated with poor clinical outcomes of patients in the latter. Thus immunohistochemical staining of tumor specimen with ΔNp73-specific antibody might have diagnostic values in cancer clinics.

  14. Protoapigenone, a natural derivative of apigenin, induces mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent apoptosis in human breast cancer cells associated with induction of oxidative stress and inhibition of glutathione S-transferase π.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Ying; Hsieh, Yu-An; Tsai, Ching-I; Kang, Ya-Fei; Chang, Fang-Rong; Wu, Yang-Chang; Wu, Chin-Chung

    2011-12-01

    Protoapigenone, a natural derivative of the flavonoid apigenin, has been shown to exhibit potent antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo; the precise mechanism of action, however, is not fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated and compared the mechanisms by which protoapigenone and apigenin caused cell death in the human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that protoapigenone induced apoptosis with 10-fold greater potency than apigenin. Cancer cells treated with protoapigenone resulted in persistent activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) ERK, JNK, and p38, hyperphosphorylation of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). The MAPK inhibitors effectively prevented the loss of MMP and apoptosis induced by protoapigenone. Treatment of cells with protoapigenone led to increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreased levels of intracellular glutathione. The thiol-antioxidant N-acetylcysteine abolished protoapigenone-induced MAPK activation, mitochondrial dysfunction, and apoptosis. These results suggest that the induction of oxidative stress preceding the activation of MAPK is required to initiate the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis induced by protoapigenone. Additionally, protoapigenone-induced JNK activation was linked to thiol modification of glutathione S-transferase π (GSTpi), which impeded GSTpi inhibition of JNK. In contrast to protoapigenone, apigenin-induced apoptosis was neither dependent on ROS nor on MAPK. Structure-activity relationship studies suggested that the thiol reacting effect of protoapigenone might be associated with an α, β-unsaturated ketone moiety in the structure of ring B.

  15. The Inhibitory Effect of C-phycocyanin Containing Protein Extract (C-PC Extract) on Human Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) in Hepatocellular Cancer Cell Line (HepG2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunte, Mugdha; Desai, Krutika

    2017-03-30

    Spirulina platensis :have been studied for several biological activities. In the current study C-phycocyanin containing protein extract (C-PC extract) of Spirulina platensis have been studied for its effect on human matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-1, MMP-2 and MMP-9) and tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2). In the present study, breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB 231) and hepatocellular cancer cell line (HepG2) were examined for inhibition of MMPs at different levels of expression after C-PC extract treatment. Herein, we have demonstrated that C-PC extract significantly reduced activity of MMP-2 by 55.13% and MMP-9 by 57.9% in HepG2 cells at 15 μg concentration. Additionally, the treatment has reduced mRNA expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 at 20 μg concentration by 1.65-folds and 1.66-folds respectively. The C-PC extract treatment have also downregulated a mRNA expression of TIMP-2 by 1.12 folds at 20 μg concentration in HepG2 cells. Together, these results indicate that C-PC, extract successfully inhibited MMP-2 and -9 at different levels of expression and TIMP-2 at a mRNA expression level; however, extract did not have any effect on MMP-1 expressed in MDA-MB231 and TIMP-1 expressed in HepG2 cells as well as the exact mechanism of inhibition of MMP-2, MMP-9 and TIMP-2 remained unclear.

  16. Ectopic Expression of Testis Germ Cell Proteins in Cancer and Its Potential Role in Genomic Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaraby Yoheswaran Nielsen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Genomic instability is a hallmark of human cancer and an enabling factor for the genetic alterations that drive cancer development. The processes involved in genomic instability resemble those of meiosis, where genetic material is interchanged between homologous chromosomes. In most types of human cancer, epigenetic changes, including hypomethylation of gene promoters, lead to the ectopic expression of a large number of proteins normally restricted to the germ cells of the testis. Due to the similarities between meiosis and genomic instability, it has been proposed that activation of meiotic programs may drive genomic instability in cancer cells. Some germ cell proteins with ectopic expression in cancer cells indeed seem to promote genomic instability, while others reduce polyploidy and maintain mitotic fidelity. Furthermore, oncogenic germ cell proteins may indirectly contribute to genomic instability through induction of replication stress, similar to classic oncogenes. Thus, current evidence suggests that testis germ cell proteins are implicated in cancer development by regulating genomic instability during tumorigenesis, and these proteins therefore represent promising targets for novel therapeutic strategies.

  17. Transgenic rabbits as therapeutic protein bioreactors and human disease models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jianglin; Watanabe, Teruo

    2003-09-01

    Genetically modified laboratory animals provide a powerful approach for studying gene expression and regulation and allow one to directly examine structure-function and cause-and-effect relationships in pathophysiological processes. Today, transgenic mice are available as a research tool in almost every research institution. On the other hand, the development of a relatively large mammalian transgenic model, transgenic rabbits, has provided unprecedented opportunities for investigators to study the mechanisms of human diseases and has also provided an alternative way to produce therapeutic proteins to treat human diseases. Transgenic rabbits expressing human genes have been used as a model for cardiovascular disease, AIDS, and cancer research. The recombinant proteins can be produced from the milk of transgenic rabbits not only at lower cost but also on a relatively large scale. One of the most promising and attractive recombinant proteins derived from transgenic rabbit milk, human alpha-glucosidase, has been successfully used to treat the patients who are genetically deficient in this enzyme. Although the pronuclear microinjection is still the major and most popular method for the creation of transgenic rabbits, recent progress in gene targeting and animal cloning has opened new avenues that should make it possible to produce transgenic rabbits by somatic cell nuclear transfer in the future. Based on a computer-assisted search of the studies of transgenic rabbits published in the English literature here, we introduce to the reader the achievements made thus far with transgenic rabbits, with emphasis on the application of these rabbits as human disease models and live bioreactors for producing human therapeutic proteins and on the recent progress in cloned rabbits.

  18. Human Progesterone A-Form as a Target for New Drug Discovery in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    Voltz et al’(ii 3 altered recycling, and impaired regulation of the PDGFR TR4 chloride transporter by hormones. Most recent studies suggest that CFTR ...growth transporters, and other proteins localized at or near the factor receptor and ion transporters such as CFTR , plasma membrane. Consistent with this...overexpression in human breast cancers cytoskeleton. This review will focus on the signaling and mutations in NHERF targets, such as CFTR and paradigms

  19. Viral Etiology Relationship between Human Papillomavirus and Human Breast Cancer and Target of Gene Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Chen; TENG Zhi Ping; CHEN Yun Xin; SHEN Dan Hua; LI Jin Tao; ZENG Yi

    2016-01-01

    ObjectiveTo explore the viral etiology of human breast cancer to determine whether there are novel molecular targets for gene therapy of breast cancer and provide evidence for the research of gene therapy and vaccine development for breast cancer. MethodsPCR was used to screen HPV16 and HPV18 oncogenesE6 andE7 in the SKBR3 cell line andin 76 paraffin embedded breast cancer tissue samples. RNA interference was used to knock down the expression of HPV18E6 andE7 in SKBR3 cells, then the changes in the expression of cell-cycle related proteins, cell viability, colony formation, metastasis, and cell cycle progression were determined. ResultsHPV18 oncogenesE6 andE7 were amplified and sequenced from the SKBR3 cells. Ofthe patient samples, 6.58% and 23.68% were tested to bepositivefor HPV18E6 and HPV18E7. In the cell culture models, the knockdown of HPV18E6 andE7 inhibited the proliferation, metastasis, and cell cycle progression of SKBR3 cell. The knockdown also clearly affected the expression levels of cell cycle related proteins. ConclusionHPV was a contributor to virus causedhuman breast cancer, suggesting that the oncogenes in HPV were potential targets for gene therapy of breast cancer.

  20. Proteome of human colon cancer stem cells: A comparative analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Zou; Xiao-Feng Yu; Zhi-Jun Bao; Jie Dong

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To isolate and identify the biological characteristics of human colon cancer stem cells (SW1116 cells) and further study their proteome. METHODS: SW1116 cells were isolated and cultured with a serum-free medium (SFM). Sphere formation was assayed to observe the formation of colon cancer stem cell spheres. SW1116 cells were inoculated into a serum-containing medium for observing their differentiation characteristics. Proliferation curve and cross-resistance of SW1116 cells to different drugs were detected by MTT. Percentage of SP cells in SW1116 cells was detected with Hoechst33342 staining. Telomerase activity in SW1116cells was checked by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Expressions of stem cell relevant genes and proteins were detected by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Total protein was isolated from SW1116 cells by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and differentially expressed proteins were identified by tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF). RESULTS: The isolated SW1116 cells presented as spheroid and suspension growths in SFM with a strong self-renewal, proliferation, differentiation and drug-resistance ability. The percentage of SP cells in SW1116 cells was 38.9%. The SW1116 cells co-expressed the CD133 and CD29 proteins. The telomerase activity in SW1116 cells was increased. The expressions of different stem cell relevant genes and proteins were detected. The proteomic analysis showed that the 26 protein spots were differently expressed in SW1116 cells and 10 protein spots were identified as ubiquitin fusiondegradation 1-like protein, nuclear chloride channel protein, tubulin b, Raichu404X, stratifin, F-actin capping protein a-1 subunit, eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 delta isoform 2, hypothetical protein, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and guanine nucleotide binding protein b polypeptide 2-like 1, respectively. CONCLUSION: SW1116 cells are biologically

  1. Expression of IL-18, IL-18 Binding Protein, and IL-18 Receptor by Normal and Cancerous Human Ovarian Tissues: Possible Implication of IL-18 in the Pathogenesis of Ovarian Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liat Medina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Proinflammatory cytokine IL-18 has been shown to be elevated in the sera of ovarian carcinoma patients. The aim of the study was to examine the levels and cellular origin of IL-18, IL-18 binding protein, and IL-18 receptor in normal and cancerous ovarian tissues. Ovarian tissue samples were examined by immunohistochemical staining for IL-18, IL-18BP, and IL-18R and mRNA of these cytokines was analyzed with semiquantitative PT-PCR. IL-18 levels were significantly higher in cancerous ovarian tissues (P=0.0007, IL-18BP levels were significantly higher in normal ovarian tissues (P=0.04, and the ratio of IL-18/IL-18BP was significantly higher in cancerous ovarian tissues (P=0.036. Cancerous ovarian tissues expressed significantly higher IL-18 mRNA levels (P=0.025, while there was no difference in the expression of IL-18BP mRNA and IL-18R mRNA between cancerous and normal ovarian tissues. IL-18 and IL-18BP were expressed dominantly in the epithelial cells of both cancerous and normal ovarian tissues, while IL-18R was expressed dominantly in the epithelial cells of cancerous ovarian tissues but expressed similarly in the epithelial and stromal cells of normal cancerous tissues. This study indicates a possible role of IL-18, IL-18BP, and IL-18R in the pathogenesis of epithelial ovarian carcinoma.

  2. HABP2 is a novel regulator of hyaluronan-mediated human lung cancer progression

    OpenAIRE

    Tamara eMirzapoiazova; Nurbek eMambetsariev; Frances E Lennon; Bolot eMambetsariev; Joshua E. Berlind; Ravi eSalgia; Singleton, Patrick A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is a devastating disease with limited treatment options. Many lung cancers have changes in their microenvironment including upregulation of the extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycan, hyaluronan (HA), which we have previously demonstrated can regulate the activity of the extracellular serine protease, Hyaluronan Binding Protein 2 (HABP2). This study examined the functional role of HABP2 on HA-mediated human lung cancer dynamics.Methods: Immunohistochemical analysis was...

  3. HABP2 is a Novel Regulator of Hyaluronan-Mediated Human Lung Cancer Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Mirzapoiazova, Tamara; Mambetsariev, Nurbek; Frances E Lennon; Mambetsariev, Bolot; Joshua E. Berlind; Salgia, Ravi; Singleton, Patrick A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is a devastating disease with limited treatment options. Many lung cancers have changes in their microenvironment including upregulation of the extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycan, hyaluronan (HA), which we have previously demonstrated can regulate the activity of the extracellular serine protease, hyaluronan binding protein 2 (HABP2). This study examined the functional role of HABP2 on HA-mediated human lung cancer dynamics. Methods Immunohistochemical an...

  4. CD147 Expression in Human Gastric Cancer Is Associated with Tumor Recurrence and Prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Dake Chu; Shaojun Zhu; Jipeng Li; Gang Ji; Weizhong Wang; Guosheng Wu; Jianyong Zheng

    2014-01-01

    CD147 is correlated with tumor aggressiveness in various human malignancies. Here, we investigated CD147 protein expression in 223 patients with gastric cancer by immunohistochemistry and analyzed its association with disease-free and overall survival. CD147 was increased in gastric cancer compared to normal tissues. Additionally, CD147 expression was associated with gastric cancer invasion, metastasis and TNM stage, whereas it was not related to age, sex, differentiation status, tumor site o...

  5. Protein kinase CK2 in human diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, Barbara; Issinger, Olaf-Georg

    2008-01-01

    in various disease processes including cancer has been gained in recent years, and the present review may help to further elucidate its aberrant role in many disease states. Its peculiar structural features [3-9] may be advantageous in designing tailor-made compounds with the possibility to specifically...... target this protein kinase [10]. Since not all the aspects of what has been published on CK2 can be covered in this review, we would like to recommend the following reviews; (i) for general information on CK2 [11-18] and (ii) with a focus on aberrant CK2 [19-22]....

  6. Differential BCCIP gene expression in primary human ovarian cancer, renal cell carcinoma and colorectal cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoxia; Cao, Lingling; Ni, Jinsong; Liu, Ning; Zhao, Xiaoming; Wang, Yanfang; Zhu, Lin; Wang, Lingyao; Wang, Jin; Yue, Ying; Cai, Yong; Jin, Jingji

    2013-12-01

    Human BCCIP, a protein which interacts with BRCA2 and CDKN1A (Cip1, p21), has been implicated in many cellular processes including cell cycle regulation, DNA recombination and damage repair, telomere maintenance, embryonic development and genomic stability. BCCIP gene expression, which is an important BRCA2 cofactor in tumor suppression, has been identified in some primary cancers. Thus, we investigated the role of BCCIP expression in a large sample of clinically diagnosed primary ovarian cancer, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues. Using clinically diagnosed frozen primary cancer tissues, quantitative PCR (qPCR), western blot analysis (WB) and immunohistochemical staining (IHC) approaches were used to detect and measure gene expression. Reduced BCCIP gene expression in ovarian cancer, RCC and CRC tissues occurred in 74, 89 and 75% of tissue samples, respectively. qPCR analysis of mRNA expression in 54 ovarian cancer, 50 RCC and 44 CRC samples revealed significant (>2-fold decreased) BCCIP downregulation in 56, 70 and 46% of tissue samples, respectively. Although BCCIP expression in three different tumor tissues decreased, the relationship between BCCIP expression and clinicopathological features of each cancer was distinct. Compared to normal tissues, BCCIP expression in ovarian cancers was significantly downregulated in serous, endometrioid and mucinous carcinomas. Downregulation of BCCIP expression was strongly associated with clear cell RCC (ccRCC) and Fuhrman tumor grading, but significant differences in BCCIP expression between CRC and matched normal tissues occurred only in male CRC tissues (ptissue with a T4 tumor stage (ptissue samples (phuman ovarian cancer, RCC and CRC tissues, suggesting a role for the gene in the pathogenesis of these cancers.

  7. Regulatory T Cells in Human Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Jun Peng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple layers of suppressive components including regulatory T (TReg cells, suppressive antigen-presenting cells, and inhibitory cytokines form suppressive networks in the ovarian cancer microenvironment. It has been demonstrated that as a major suppressive element, TReg cells infiltrate tumor, interact with several types of immune cells, and mediate immune suppression through different molecular and cellular mechanisms. In this paper, we focus on human ovarian cancer and will discuss the nature of TReg cells including their subsets, trafficking, expansion, and function. We will briefly review the development of manipulation of TReg cells in preclinical and clinical settings.

  8. Dietary Protein Sources and Incidence of Breast Cancer: A Dose-Response Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Jing Wu; Rong Zeng; Junpeng Huang; Xufeng Li; Jiren Zhang; James Chung-Man Ho; Yanfang Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Protein is important to the human body, and different sources of protein may have different effects on the risk of breast cancer. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the association between different dietary protein sources and breast cancer risk. PubMed and several databases were searched until December 2015. Relevant articles were retrieved according to specific searching criteria. Forty-six prospective studies were included. The summary relative risk (RR) for highest versus l...

  9. The Role of Matrine and Mitogen-Ativated Protein Kinase/Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signal Transduction in the Inhibition of the Proliferation and Migration of Human Umbilical Veins Endothelial Cells Induced by Lung Cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming BAI

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Matrine, one of the major alkaloid components of the traditional Chinese medicine Sophora roots, has a wide range of pharmacological effects including anti-inflammatory activities, growth inhibition and induction of cell differentiation and apoptosis. Motigen-activated protein kinase (MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK has found to be a crucial signaling pathway in endothelial cells. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of Matrine and MAPK/ERK signal transduction in the inhibition of the proliferation and migration of human umbilical veins endothelial cells (HUVECs induced by lung cancer cells. Methods HUVECs were cultured with A549CM. Mat or PD98059 (i.e PD, specific inhibitor of MAPK/ERK, was added into the A549CM. The proliferation of the HUVECs was measured by cell counting. The migration of the HUVECs was observed by wound healing assay. The expression levels of ERK and p-ERK protein were detected by Western Blot analysis. Results On 24 hours after intervention, the A549CM significantly stimulated the proliferation, migration and expression of p-ERK of HUVECs. Compared with the A549CM group, Mat significantly inhibited the proliferation, migration and p-ERK expression of HUVECs induced by A549CM. While PD only decreased the proliferation and p-ERK expression of HUVECs induced by A549CM. PD had no effect in the migration of HUVECs. Conclusion The results demonstrated that Mat and PD98059 can effectively decrease proliferation and expression of p-ERK of HUVECs induced by A549CM. Furthermore Mat can also inhibit migration of HUVECs induced by A549CM that did not changed by PD98059. These data implied that suppressing MAPK/ERK signal transduction may play the crucial role in resisting lung cacinoma angiogenesis with Mat.

  10. Combination Efficacy of Astragalus membranaceus and Curcuma wenyujin at Different Stages of Tumor Progression in an Imageable Orthotopic Nude Mouse Model of Metastatic Human Ovarian Cancer Expressing Red Fluorescent Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Gang; Tang, Decai; Dai, Jianguo; Liu, Min; Wu, Mianhua; Sun, Y U; Yang, Zhijian; Hoffman, Robert M; Li, Lin; Zhang, Shuo; Guo, Xiuxia

    2015-06-01

    The present study determined the efficacy of extracts of Astragalus membranaceus (AM) and Curcuma wenyujin (CW), a traditional Chinese medicine herbal mixture, at different tumor stages of an orthotopic nude mouse model of human ovarian cancer expressing red fluorescent protein. The tumor-bearing mice were treated with cisplatinum (CDDP), AM, CW, or a combination of AM and CW in each of three tumor stages, using the same regimen. Group 1 received saline as negative control. Group 2 received CDDP i.p. as positive control with a dose of 2 mg/kg, every three days. Group 3 received AM daily via oral gavage, at a dose of 9120 mg/kg. Group 4 received CW daily via oral gavage, at a dose of 4560 mg/kg. Groups 5, 6 and 7 received combinations of AM and CW daily via oral gavage at low (AM, 2280 mg/kg; CW, 1140 mg/kg), medium (AM, 4560 mg/kg; CW 2280 mg/kg), and high (AM, 9120 mg/kg; CW, 4560 mg/kg) doses. The expression of angiogenesis- and apoptosis-related genes in the tumors were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2), B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox-2), and by polymerase chain reaction for MMP-2, FGF-2 and Bcl-2. CDDP, AM, and its combination with CW-induced significant growth inhibition of Stage I tumors. Strong efficacy of the combination of AM and CW at high dose was observed. Monotherapy with CDDP, AM, CW, and the combination treatments did not significantly inhibit Stage II and III tumors. The expression of MMP-2, VEGF, FGF-2, and Cox-2 was significantly reduced in Stage I tumors treated with AM, CW, and their combination, suggesting a possible role of these angiogenesis- and apoptosis-related genes in the observed efficacy of the agents tested. This study is the first report on the efficacy of anticancer agents at different stages of ovarian cancer in an orthotopic mouse model. As the tumor progressed, it became treatment

  11. Prediction of 492 human protein kinase substrate specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei, Javad; Maňuch, Ján; Gupta, Arvind; Stacho, Ladislav; Pelech, Steven

    2011-10-14

    Complex intracellular signaling networks monitor diverse environmental inputs to evoke appropriate and coordinated effector responses. Defective signal transduction underlies many pathologies, including cancer, diabetes, autoimmunity and about 400 other human diseases. Therefore, there is high impetus to define the composition and architecture of cellular communications networks in humans. The major components of intracellular signaling networks are protein kinases and protein phosphatases, which catalyze the reversible phosphorylation of proteins. Here, we have focused on identification of kinase-substrate interactions through prediction of the phosphorylation site specificity from knowledge of the primary amino acid sequence of the catalytic domain of each kinase. The presented method predicts 488 different kinase catalytic domain substrate specificity matrices in 478 typical and 4 atypical human kinases that rely on both positive and negative determinants for scoring individual phosphosites for their suitability as kinase substrates. This represents a marked advancement over existing methods such as those used in NetPhorest (179 kinases in 76 groups) and NetworKIN (123 kinases), which consider only positive determinants for kinase substrate prediction. Comparison of our predicted matrices with experimentally-derived matrices from about 9,000 known kinase-phosphosite substrate pairs revealed a high degree of concordance with the established preferences of about 150 well studied protein kinases. Furthermore for many of the better known kinases, the predicted optimal phosphosite sequences were more accurate than the consensus phosphosite sequences inferred by simple alignment of the phosphosites of known kinase substrates. Application of this improved kinase substrate prediction algorithm to the primary structures of over 23, 000 proteins encoded by the human genome has permitted the identification of about 650, 000 putative phosphosites, which are posted on the

  12. A monoclonal antibody against human MUDENG protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagley, Yadav; Choi, Jun-Ha; Wickramanayake, Dimuthu Dhammika; Choi, Geun-Yeol; Kim, Chang-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Hyoung; Oh, Jae-Wook

    2013-08-01

    MUDENG (mu-2-related death-inducing gene, MuD) encodes a predicted ∼54-kDa protein in humans, considered to be involved in trafficking proteins from endosomes toward other membranous compartments as well as in inducing cell death. Here we report on the generation of a mouse monoclonal antibody (MAb) against the middle domain of human (h) MuD. This IgG sub 1 MAb, named M3H9, recognizes residues 244-326 in the middle domain of the MuD protein. Thus, the MuD proteins expressed in an astroglioma cell line and primary astrocytes can be detected by the M3H9 MAb. We showed that M3H9 MAb can be useful in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblot experiments. In addition, M3H9 MAb can detect the expression of the MuD protein in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded mouse ovary and uterus tissues. These results indicate that the MuD MAb M3H9 could be useful as a new biomarker of hereditary spastic paraplegia and other related diseases.

  13. Shedding light on proteins, nucleic acids, cells, humans and fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlow, Richard B.

    2002-01-01

    I was trained as a physicist in graduate school. Hence, when I decided to go into the field of biophysics, it was natural that I concentrated on the effects of light on relatively simple biological systems, such as proteins. The wavelengths absorbed by the amino acid subunits of proteins are in the ultraviolet (UV). The wavelengths that affect the biological activities, the action spectra, also are in the UV, but are not necessarily parallel to the absorption spectra. Understanding these differences led me to investigate the action spectra for affecting nucleic acids, and the effects of UV on viruses and cells. The latter studies led me to the discovery of the important molecular nature of the damages affecting DNA (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and to the discovery of nucleotide excision repair. Individuals with the genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are extraordinarily sensitive to sunlight-induced skin cancer. The finding, by James Cleaver, that their skin cells were defective in DNA repair strongly suggested that DNA damage was a key step in carcinogenesis. Such information was important for estimating the wavelengths in sunlight responsible for human skin cancer and for predicting the effects of ozone depletion on the incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer. It took experiments with backcross hybrid fish to call attention to the probable role of the longer UV wavelengths not absorbed by DNA in the induction of melanoma. These reflections trace the biophysicist's path from molecules to melanoma.

  14. Proteomic profiling of human colon cancer cells treated with the histone deacetylase inhibitor belinostat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Hans Christian; Petersen, Jørgen; Nielsen, Søren Jensby

    2010-01-01

    in the human colon cancer cell line HCT116. Protein extracts from untreated HCT116 cells, and cells grown for 24 h in the presence of 1 and 10 muM belinostat were analysed by 2-D gel electrophoresis. Proteins were visualized by colloidal Coomassie blue staining and quantitative analysis of gel images revealed...

  15. Proteomic profiling of human colon cancer cells treated with the histone deacetylase inhibitor belinostat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Hans Christian; Petersen, Jørgen; Nielsen, Søren Jensby;

    2010-01-01

    in the human colon cancer cell line HCT116. Protein extracts from untreated HCT116 cells, and cells grown for 24 h in the presence of 1 and 10 muM belinostat were analysed by 2-D gel electrophoresis. Proteins were visualized by colloidal Coomassie blue staining and quantitative analysis of gel images revealed...

  16. Expression of 5-Lipoxygenase in human colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Labile Togba Soumaoro; Satoru Iida; Hiroyuki Uetake; Megumi Ishiguro; Yoko Takagi; Tetsuro Higuchi; Masamichi Yasuno; Masayuki Enomoto; Kenichi Sugihara

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the 5-lipoxygenases (Loxs) expression level in human colorectal cancer specimens in order to determine its clinicopathologic significance in human tumorigenesis.METHODS: The relative quantity of 5-Lox mRNA in paired 91 colorectal tumor and adjacent normal mucosa samples was determined by real time quantitative PCR. Additionally, the expression of 5-Lox and cyclooxygenase (Cox)-2 proteins was also examined using immunohistochemical staining methods.RESULTS: There was a marked increase in 5-Lox mRNA levels in the tumor compared with paired normal mucosa samples (P < 0.0001). Sixty six (72.5%) tumors showed high 5-Lox mRNA levels. The positivity rate of 5-Lox and Cox-2 protein expression was 68.7% and 79.1%respectively. There was a significant association between tumoral 5-Lox mRNA level and tumor size (Rho = 0.392,P = 0.0002), depth or vessel invasion.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that 5-Lox is up-regulated in colorectal cancer and that inhibition of its expression might be valuable in the prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer.

  17. Mortalin sensitizes human cancer cells to MKT-077-induced senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deocaris, Custer C; Widodo, Nashi; Shrestha, Bhupal G; Kaur, Kamaljit; Ohtaka, Manami; Yamasaki, Kazuhiko; Kaul, Sunil C; Wadhwa, Renu

    2007-07-18

    Mortalin is a chaperone protein that functions in many cellular processes such as mitochondrial biogenesis, intracellular trafficking, cell proliferation and signaling. Its upregulation in many human cancers makes it a candidate target for therapeutic intervention by small molecule drugs. In continuation to our earlier studies showing mortalin as a cellular target of MKT-077, a mitochondrion-seeking delocalized cationic dye that causes selective death of cancer cells, in this work, we report that MKT-077 binds to the nucleotide-binding domain of mortalin, causes tertiary structural changes in the protein, inactivates its chaperone function, and induces senescence in human tumor cell lines. Interestingly, in tumor cells with elevated level of mortalin expression, fairly low drug doses were sufficient to induce senescence. Guided by molecular screening for mortalin in tumor cells, our results led to the idea that working at low doses of the drug could be an alternative senescence-inducing cancer therapeutic strategy that could, in theory, avoid renal toxicities responsible for the abortion of MKT-077 clinical trials. Our work may likely translate to a re-appraisal of the therapeutic benefits of low doses of several classes of anti-tumor drugs, even of those that had been discontinued due to adverse effects.

  18. Annexin 1: differential expression in tumor and mast cells in human larynx cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Silistino-Souza, Rosana [UNESP; RODRIGUES-LISONI, Flavia C.; CURY, Patricia M.; MANIGLIA, Jose V.; Raposo, Luis S.; Eloiza H. Tajara; Christian, Helen C.; Oliani, Sonia Maria

    2007-01-01

    Annexin 1 protein (ANXA1) expression was evaluated in tumor and mast cells in human larynx cancer and control epithelium. The effect of the exogenous ANXA1 (peptide Ac 2-26) was also examined during the cellular growth of the Hep-2 human larynx epidermoid carcinoma cell line. This peptide inhibited the proliferation of the Hep-2 cells within 144 hr. In surgical tissue specimens from 20 patients with larynx cancer, ultrastructural immunocytochemistry analysis showed in vivo down-regulation of ...

  19. Immunohistochemical analysis of oxidative stress and DNA repair proteins in normal mammary and breast cancer tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nardulli Ann M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the course of normal cellular metabolism, oxygen is consumed and reactive oxygen species (ROS are produced. If not effectively dissipated, ROS can accumulate and damage resident proteins, lipids, and DNA. Enzymes involved in redox regulation and DNA repair dissipate ROS and repair the resulting damage in order to preserve a functional cellular environment. Because increased ROS accumulation and/or unrepaired DNA damage can lead to initiation and progression of cancer and we had identified a number of oxidative stress and DNA repair proteins that influence estrogen responsiveness of MCF-7 breast cancer cells, it seemed possible that these proteins might be differentially expressed in normal mammary tissue, benign hyperplasia (BH, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS and invasive breast cancer (IBC. Methods Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the expression of a number of oxidative stress proteins, DNA repair proteins, and damage markers in 60 human mammary tissues which were classified as BH, DCIS or IBC. The relative mean intensity was determined for each tissue section and ANOVA was used to detect statistical differences in the relative expression of BH, DCIS and IBC compared to normal mammary tissue. Results We found that a number of these proteins were overexpressed and that the cellular localization was altered in human breast cancer tissue. Conclusions Our studies suggest that oxidative stress and DNA repair proteins not only protect normal cells from the damaging effects of ROS, but may also promote survival of mammary tumor cells.

  20. Human papillomavirus and gastrointestinal cancer: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucchi, Dania; Stracci, Fabrizio; Buonora, Nicola; Masanotti, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide. Exposure to HPV is very common, and an estimated 65%-100% of sexually active adults are exposed to HPV in their lifetime. The majority of HPV infections are asymptomatic, but there is a 10% chance that individuals will develop a persistent infection and have an increased risk of developing a carcinoma. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has found that the following cancer sites have a strong causal relationship with HPV: cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx, including the base of the tongue and the tonsils. However, studies of the aetiological role of HPV in colorectal and esophageal malignancies have conflicting results. The aim of this review was to organize recent evidence and issues about the association between HPV infection and gastrointestinal tumours with a focus on esophageal, colorectal and anal cancers. The ultimate goal was to highlight possible implications for prognosis and prevention. PMID:27672265

  1. Guanine nucleotide binding protein-like 3 is a potential prognosis indicator of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Dong, Shuang; Hu, Jiangfeng; Duan, Bensong; Yao, Jian; Zhang, Ruiyun; Zhou, Hongmei; Sheng, Haihui; Gao, Hengjun; Li, Shunlong; Zhang, Xianwen

    2015-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide binding protein-like 3 (GNL3) is a GIP-binding nuclear protein that has been reported to be involved in various biological processes, including cell proliferation, cellular senescence and tumorigenesis. This study aimed to investigate the expression level of GNL3 in gastric cancer and to evaluate the relationship between its expression and clinical variables and overall survival of gastric cancer patients. The expression level of GNL3 was examined in 89 human gastric cancer samples using immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining. GNL3 in gastric cancer tissues was significantly upregulated compared with paracancerous tissues. GNL3 expression in adjacent non-cancerous tissues was associated with sex and tumor size. Survival analyses showed that GNL3 expression in both gastric cancer and adjacent non-cancerous tissues were not related to overall survival. However, in the subgroup of patients with larger tumor size (≥ 6 cm), a close association was found between GNL3 expression in gastric cancer tissues and overall survival. GNL3-positive patients had a shorter survival than GNL3-negative patients. Our study suggests that GNL3 might play an important role in the progression of gastric cancer and serve as a biomarker for poor prognosis in gastric cancer patients.

  2. A gene-protein assay for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2: brightfield tricolor visualization of HER2 protein, the HER2 gene, and chromosome 17 centromere (CEN17 in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded breast cancer tissue sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitta Hiroaki

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The eligibility of breast cancer patients for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2-directed therapies is determined by the HER2 gene amplification and/or HER2 protein overexpression status of the breast tumor as determined by in situ hybridization (ISH or immunohistochemistry (IHC, respectively. Our objective was to combine the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved HER2 & chromosome 17 centromere (CEN17 brightfield ISH (BISH and HER2 IHC assays into a single automated HER2 gene-protein assay allowing simultaneous detection of all three targets in a single tissue section. Methods The HER2 gene-protein assay was optimized using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE samples of the xenograft tumors MCF7 [HER2 negative (non-amplified gene, protein negative] and Calu-3 [HER2 positive (amplified gene, protein positive]. HER2 IHC was performed using a rabbit monoclonal anti-HER2 antibody (clone 4B5 and a conventional 3,3'-diaminobenzidine IHC detection. The HER2 & CEN17 BISH signals were visualized using horseradish peroxidase-based silver and alkaline phosphatase-based red detection systems, respectively with a cocktail of 2,4-dinitrophenyl-labeled HER2 and digoxigenin-labeled CEN17 probes. The performance of the gene-protein assay on tissue microarray slides containing 189 randomly selected FFPE clinical breast cancer tissue cores was compared to that of the separate HER2 IHC and HER2 & CEN17 BISH assays. Results HER2 protein detection was optimal when the HER2 IHC protocol was used before (rather than after the BISH protocol. The sequential use of HER2 IHC and HER2 & CEN17 BISH detection steps on FFPE xenograft tumor sections appropriately co-localized the HER2 protein, HER2 gene, and CEN17 signals after mitigating the silver background staining by using a naphthol phosphate-containing hybridization buffer for the hybridization step. The HER2 protein and HER2 gene status obtained using the multiplex HER2 gene-protein

  3. Inactivation of the FoxO3a transcription factor is associated with the production of reactive oxygen species during protein kinase CK2 downregulation-mediated senescence in human colon cancer and breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seong-Yeol; Bae, Young-Seuk, E-mail: ysbae@knu.ac.kr

    2016-09-09

    We previously showed that protein kinase CK2 downregulation mediates senescence through the reactive oxygen species (ROS)–p53–p21{sup Cip1/WAF1} pathway in various human cells. In the present study, we investigated whether the FoxO3a transcription factor is associated with ROS production during CK2 downregulation-induced senescence in human colon cancer HCT116 and breast cancer MCF-7 cells. FoxO3a overexpression suppressed ROS production and p53 stabilization induced by a CK2α knockdown. CK2α downregulation induced nuclear export of FoxO3a through stimulation of AKT-mediated phosphorylation of FoxO3a and decreased transcription of its target genes (Cu/ZnSOD, MnSOD, and catalase). In contrast, CK2α overexpression inhibited AKT-mediated FoxO3a phosphorylation. This resulted in nuclear accumulation of FoxO3a, and elevated expression of its target genes. Therefore, these data indicate for the first time that CK2 downregulation stimulates ROS generation by inhibiting FoxO3a during premature senescence in human colon and breast cancer cells. - Highlights: • FoxO3a overexpression inhibited ROS production mediated by CK2α knockdown. • CK2α downregulation induced nuclear export of FoxO3a via AKT activation. • CK2α downregulation reduced transcription of FoxO3a target genes including SOD. • CK2α upregulation elevated nuclear import and target gene expression of FoxO3a. • This study indicates that CK2 can modulate the intracellular ROS level via FoxO3a.

  4. A novel experimental platform for investigating cancer growth and anti-cancer therapy in a human tissue microenvironment derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzukerman, Maty; Skorecki, Karl L

    2006-01-01

    There is no available experimental system wherein human cancer cells can be grown in the context of a mixed population of normal differentiated human cells for testing biological aspects of cancer cell growth (tumor cell invasion, angiogenesis) or response to anti-cancer therapies. Human embryonic stem cells when implanted into immunocompromised mice develop teratomas containing complex structures, comprising differentiated cell types representing the major germline-derived lineages. We sought to determine whether human cancer cells would grow within such teratomas and display properties associated with malignancy such as invasiveness and recruitment of blood vessels. Ovarian cancer cells (HEY), stably expressing an H2A-GFP fusion protein, which allows tracking of tumor cells, were injected into mature teratomas and developed into tumors. The growth, proliferation capacity, invasion, and induction of blood vessel formation were examined. We propose using the novel experimental platform we have described, consisting of human tumor cells growing within a human cellular microenvironment derived from human embryonic stem cells, to develop a preclinical model for investigating and manipulating the stromal response in tumor cell growth, as an additional tool in cancer research.

  5. Human Colon Cancer Cells Cultivated in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Within five days, bioreactor cultivated human colon cancer cells (shown) grown in Microgravity on the STS-70 mission in 1995, had grown 30 times the volume of the control specimens on Earth. The samples grown in space had a higher level of cellular organization and specialization. Because they more closely resemble tumors found in the body, microgravity grown cell cultures are ideal for research purposes.

  6. Cow's milk proteins in human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coscia, A; Orrù, S; Di Nicola, P; Giuliani, F; Rovelli, I; Peila, C; Martano, C; Chiale, F; Bertino, E

    2012-01-01

    Cow's milk proteins (CMPs) are among the best characterized food allergens. Cow's milk contains more than twenty five different proteins, but only whey proteins alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin (BSA), and lactoferrin, as well as the four caseins, have been identified as allergens. Aim of this study was to investigate by proteomics techniques cow's milk allergens in human colostrum of term and preterm newborns' mothers, not previously detected, in order to understand if such allergens could be cause of sensitization during lactation. Term colostrum samples from 62 healthy mothers and preterm colostrum samples from 11 healthy mothers were collected for this purpose. The most relevant finding was the detection of the intact bovine alpha-S1-casein in both term and preterm colostrum. Using this method, which allows direct proteins identification, beta-lactoglobulin was not detected in any of colostrum samples. According to our results bovine alpha 1 casein that is considered a major cow's milk allergen is readily secreted in human milk: further investigations are needed in order to clarify if alpha-1-casein has a major role in sensitization or tolerance to cow's milk of exclusively breastfed predisposed infants.

  7. Aspartame bioassay findings portend human cancer hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, James; LaDou, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) should reevaluate its position on aspartame as being safe under all conditions. Animal bioassay results predict human cancer risks, and a recent animal study confirms that there is a potential aspartame risk to humans. Aspartame is produced and packaged in China for domestic use and global distribution. Japan, France, and the United States are also major producers. No study of long-term adverse occupational health effects on aspartame workers have been conducted. The FDA should consider sponsoring a prospective epidemiologic study of aspartame workers.

  8. 1. HUMAN POPULATION MONITORING FOR CANCER PREVENTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Most of the chemicals classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as human carcinogens are mutagenic across test systems, cf. [www.epa.gov/gapdb ] and induce tumors at multiple sites in rodent species. They are therefore readity detected in short term tests for gene-tic and related effects (GRE), in animal carcinogenesis bioassays and in human monitoring studies. Carcinogens that are not genotoxic may be studied using new toxicogenomic approaches as will be discussed. A Chemical Effects in Biological Systems (CEBS) database is planned by the National Center for Toxicogenomics to contain information on such compounds. The 1992 Preamble to the IARC Monographs

  9. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ isoforms as transcriptional regulators of the pro-invasive CDH3/P-cadherin gene in human breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Albergaria

    Full Text Available P-cadherin is a cell-cell adhesion molecule codified by the CDH3 gene, which expression is highly associated with undifferentiated cells in normal adult epithelial tissues, as well as with poorly differentiated carcinomas. In breast cancer, P-cadherin is frequently overexpressed in high-grade tumours and is a well-established indicator of aggressive tumour behaviour and poor patient prognosis. However, till now, the mechanisms controlling CDH3 gene activation have been poorly explored. Since we recently described the existence of several CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein β (C/EBPβ transcription factor binding sites at the CDH3 promoter, the aim of this study was to assess if the distinct C/EBPβ isoforms were directly involved in the transcriptional activation of the CDH3 gene in breast cancer cells. DNA-protein interactions, mutation analysis and luciferase reporter assay studies have been performed. We demonstrated that C/EBPβ is co-expressed with P-cadherin in breast cancer cells and all the three isoforms function as transcriptional regulators of the CDH3 gene, directly interacting with specific regions of its promoter. Interestingly, this transcriptional activation was only reflected at the P-cadherin protein level concerning the LIP isoform. Taken together, our data show that CDH3 is a newly defined transcriptional target gene of C/EBPβ isoforms in breast cancer, and we also identified the binding sites that are relevant for this activation.

  10. Prognostic value of metastin expression in human pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kawaguchi Yoshiya; Masui Toshihiko; Koizumi Masayuki; Kida Atsushi; Ito Tatsuo; Katagiri Fumihiko; Doi Ryuichiro; Nagai Kazuyuki; Tomita Kenji; Oishi Shinya; Fujii Nobutaka; Uemoto Shinji

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background KiSS-1 was identified as a metastasis-suppressing gene in melanoma cells. The KiSS-1 gene product (metastin) was isolated from human placenta as the ligand of GPR54, a G-protein-coupled receptor. The role of metastin and GPR54 in tumor progression is not fully understood. Methods We investigated the clinical significance of metastin and GPR54 expression in pancreatic cancer. We evaluated immunohistochemical expression of metastin and GPR54 in pancreatic ductal adenocarcino...

  11. Prognostic value of metastin expression in human pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nagai, Kazuyuki; Doi, Ryuichiro; Katagiri, Fumihiko; Ito, Tatsuo; Kida, Atsushi; Koizumi, Masayuki; Masui, Toshihiko; Kawaguchi, Yoshiya; Tomita, Kenji; Oishi, Shinya; Fujii, Nobutaka; Uemoto, Shinji

    2009-01-01

    Background KiSS-1 was identified as a metastasis-suppressing gene in melanoma cells. The KiSS-1 gene product (metastin) was isolated from human placenta as the ligand of GPR54, a G-protein-coupled receptor. The role of metastin and GPR54 in tumor progression is not fully understood. Methods We investigated the clinical significance of metastin and GPR54 expression in pancreatic cancer. We evaluated immunohistochemical expression of metastin and GPR54 in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tissue...

  12. Prognostic value of metastin expression in human pancreatic cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Nagai, Kazuyuki; Doi, Ryuichiro; Katagiri, Fumihiko; Ito, Tatsuo; Kida, Atsushi; Koizumi, Masayuki; Masui, Toshihiko; Kawaguchi, Yoshiya; Tomita, Kenji; Oishi, Shinya; Fujii, Nobutaka; Uemoto, Shinji

    2009-01-01

    [Background]KiSS-1 was identified as a metastasis-suppressing gene in melanoma cells. The KiSS-1 gene product (metastin) was isolated from human placenta as the ligand of GPR54, a G-protein-coupled receptor. The role of metastin and GPR54 in tumor progression is not fully understood. [Methods]We investigated the clinical significance of metastin and GPR54 expression in pancreatic cancer. We evaluated immunohistochemical expression of metastin and GPR54 in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tiss...

  13. Targeting p97 to Disrupt Protein Homeostasis in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekaria, Pratikkumar Harsukhbhai; Home, Trisha; Weir, Scott; Schoenen, Frank J.; Rao, Rekha

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells are addicted to numerous non-oncogenic traits that enable them to thrive. Proteotoxic stress is one such non-oncogenic trait that is experienced by all tumor cells owing to increased genomic abnormalities and the resulting synthesis and accumulation of non-stoichiometric amounts of cellular proteins. This imbalance in the amounts of proteins ultimately culminates in proteotoxic stress. p97, or valosin-containing protein (VCP), is an ATPase whose function is essential to restore protein homeostasis in the cells. Working in concert with the ubiquitin proteasome system, p97 promotes the retrotranslocation from cellular organelles and/or degradation of misfolded proteins. Consequently, p97 inhibition has emerged as a novel therapeutic target in cancer cells, especially those that have a highly secretory phenotype. This review summarizes our current understanding of the function of p97 in maintaining protein homeostasis and its inhibition with small molecule inhibitors as an emerging strategy to target cancer cells. PMID:27536557

  14. MicroRNA regulation of F-box proteins and its role in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhao-Hui; Pfeffer, Lawrence M

    2016-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small endogenous non-coding RNAs, which play critical roles in cancer development by suppressing gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In general, oncogenic miRNAs are upregulated in cancer, while miRNAs that act as tumor suppressors are downregulated, leading to decreased expression of tumor suppressors and upregulated oncogene expression, respectively. F-box proteins function as the substrate-recognition components of the SKP1-CUL1-F-box (SCF)-ubiquitin ligase complex for the degradation of their protein targets by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Therefore F-box proteins and miRNAs both negatively regulate target gene expression post-transcriptionally. Since each miRNA is capable of fine-tuning the expression of multiple target genes, multiple F-box proteins may be suppressed by the same miRNA. Meanwhile, one F-box proteins could be regulated by several miRNAs in different cancer types. In this review, we will focus on miRNA-mediated downregulation of various F-box proteins, the resulting stabilization of F-box protein substrates and the impact of these processes on human malignancies. We provide insight into how the miRNA: F-box protein axis may regulate cancer progression and metastasis. We also consider the broader role of F-box proteins in the regulation of pathways that are independent of the ubiquitin ligase complex and how that impacts on oncogenesis. The area of miRNAs and the F-box proteins that they regulate in cancer is an emerging field and will inform new strategies in cancer treatment.

  15. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) affects global protein synthesis in dividing human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol, Anna; Galluzzo, Paola; Liang, Shuang; Rambo, Brittany; Skucha, Sylvia; Weber, Megan J; Alani, Sara; Bocchetta, Maurizio

    2015-05-01

    Hypoxic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is dependent on Notch-1 signaling for survival. Targeting Notch-1 by means of γ-secretase inhibitors (GSI) proved effective in killing hypoxic NSCLC. Post-mortem analysis of GSI-treated, NSCLC-burdened mice suggested enhanced phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 at threonines 37/46 in hypoxic tumor tissues. In vitro dissection of this phenomenon revealed that Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) inhibition was responsible for a non-canonical 4E-BP1 phosphorylation pattern rearrangement-a process, in part, mediated by APP regulation of the pseudophosphatase Styx. Upon APP depletion we observed modifications of eIF-4F composition indicating increased recruitment of eIF-4A to the mRNA cap. This phenomenon was supported by the observation that cells with depleted APP were partially resistant to silvestrol, an antibiotic that interferes with eIF-4A assembly into eIF-4F complexes. APP downregulation in dividing human cells increased the rate of global protein synthesis, both cap- and IRES-dependent. Such an increase seemed independent of mTOR inhibition. After administration of Torin-1, APP downregulation and Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC-1) inhibition affected 4E-BP1 phosphorylation and global protein synthesis in opposite fashions. Additional investigations indicated that APP operates independently of mTORC-1. Key phenomena described in this study were reversed by overexpression of the APP C-terminal domain. The presented data suggest that APP may be a novel regulator of protein synthesis in dividing human cells, both cancerous and primary. Furthermore, APP appears to affect translation initiation using mechanisms seemingly dissimilar to mTORC-1 regulation of cap-dependent protein synthesis.

  16. Human endogenous retroviruses and cancer prevention: evidence and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cegolon Luca

    2013-01-01

    as other tumors like sarcoma, lymphoma, bladder and breast cancer. An amino acid sequence similar to HERV-K-MEL, recognized to cause a significant protective effect against melanoma, is shared by the antigenic determinants expressed by some vaccines such as BCG, vaccinia virus and the yellow fever virus. HERV-K are also reactivated in the majority of human breast cancers. Monoclonal and single-chain antibodies against the HERV-K Env protein recently proved capable of blocking the proliferation of human breast cancer cells in vitro, inhibiting tumor growth in mice bearing xenograft tumors. Summary A recent epidemiological study provided provisional evidence of how melanoma risk could possibly be reduced if the yellow fever virus vaccine (YFV were received at least 10 years before, possibly preventing tumor initiation rather than culling melanoma cells already compromised. Further research is recommended to confirm the temporal pattern of this protection and eliminate/attenuate the potential role of relevant confounders as socio-economic status and other vaccinations. It appears also appropriate to examine the potential protective effect of YFV against other malignancies expressing high levels of HERV-K antigens, namely breast cancer, sarcoma, lymphoma and bladder cancer. Tumor immune-therapy, as described for the monoclonal antibodies against breast cancer, is indeed considered more complex and less advantageous than immune-prevention. Cellular immunity possibly triggered by vaccines as for YFV might also be involved in anti-cancer response, in addition to humoral immunity.

  17. Effect of regulatory factor of cell cycle p27kip1 and cyclinE proteins on the genesis and progression of human pancreatic cancer%细胞周期调控因子P27kip1和周期蛋白E在胰腺癌发生发展中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Objective To investigate effect of p27kip1 and cyclinE proteins on the genesis and progression of human pancreatic cancer. Methods The expression of p27kip1 and cyclinE in tumor tissue and adjacent tissue of 32 patients with pancreatic cancer were detected by SP immunohistochemical technique.Results p27kip1 protein positive expression rate in tumor tissue of pancreatic cancer was 56% , which was lower than that in adjacent pancreatic tissue (P< 0.05),p27kip1 protein positive expression correlated significantly with tumor cell differentiation and lymphy node metastasis(P< 0.05);cyclinE positive expression rate was 69% , which was higher than that in adjacent pancreatic tissue(P< 0.05), cyclinE positive expression also correlated significantly with tumor cell differentiation and lymphy node metastasis(P<0.05). Conclusions p27kip1 and cyclinE proteins may play an important role in genesis and progression of pancreatic cancer.

  18. TET proteins and 5-methylcytosine oxidation in hematological cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Myunggon; An, Jungeun; Pastor, William A; Koralov, Sergei B; Rajewsky, Klaus; Rao, Anjana

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation has pivotal regulatory roles in mammalian development, retrotransposon silencing, genomic imprinting, and X-chromosome inactivation. Cancer cells display highly dysregulated DNA methylation profiles characterized by global hypomethylation in conjunction with hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands that presumably lead to genome instability and aberrant expression of tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. The recent discovery of ten-eleven-translocation (TET) family dioxygenases that oxidize 5mC to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC), and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) in DNA has led to profound progress in understanding the mechanism underlying DNA demethylation. Among the three TET genes, TET2 recurrently undergoes inactivating mutations in a wide range of myeloid and lymphoid malignancies. TET2 functions as a bona fide tumor suppressor particularly in the pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies resembling chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) in human. Here we review diverse functions of TET proteins and the novel epigenetic marks that they generate in DNA methylation/demethylation dynamics and normal and malignant hematopoietic differentiation. The impact of TET2 inactivation in hematopoiesis and various mechanisms modulating the expression or activity of TET proteins are also discussed. Furthermore, we also present evidence that TET2 and TET3 collaborate to suppress aberrant hematopoiesis and hematopoietic transformation. A detailed understanding of the normal and pathological functions of TET proteins may provide new avenues to develop novel epigenetic therapies for treating hematological malignancies.

  19. Prioritizing cancer-related genes with aberrant methylation based on a weighted protein-protein interaction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv Jie

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As an important epigenetic modification, DNA methylation plays a crucial role in the development of mammals and in the occurrence of complex diseases. Genes that interact directly or indirectly may have the same or similar functions in the biological processes in which they are involved and together contribute to the related disease phenotypes. The complicated relations between genes can be clearly represented using network theory. A protein-protein interaction (PPI network offers a platform from which to systematically identify disease-related genes from the relations between genes with similar functions. Results We constructed a weighted human PPI network (WHPN using DNA methylation correlations based on human protein-protein interactions. WHPN represents the relationships of DNA methylation levels in gene pairs for four cancer types. A cancer-associated subnetwork (CASN was obtained from WHPN by selecting genes associated with seed genes which were known to be methylated in the four cancers. We found that CASN had a more densely connected network community than WHPN, indicating that the genes in CASN were much closer to seed genes. We prioritized 154 potential cancer-related genes with aberrant methylation in CASN by neighborhood-weighting decision rule. A function enrichment analysis for GO and KEGG indicated that the optimized genes were mainly involved in the biological processes of regulating cell apoptosis and programmed cell death. An analysis of expression profiling data revealed that many of the optimized genes were expressed differentially in the four cancers. By examining the PubMed co-citations, we found 43 optimized genes were related with cancers and aberrant methylation, and 10 genes were validated to be methylated aberrantly in cancers. Of 154 optimized genes, 27 were as diagnostic markers and 20 as prognostic markers previously identified in literature for cancers and other complex diseases by searching Pub

  20. Enhanced expression of G-protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPER/GPR30 in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jala Venkatakrishna Rao

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER/GPR30 was reported to bind 17β-estradiol (E2, tamoxifen, and ICI 182,780 (fulvestrant and promotes activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-mediated signaling in breast, endometrial and thyroid cancer cells. Although lung adenocarcinomas express estrogen receptors α and β (ERα and ERβ, the expression of GPER in lung cancer has not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to examine the expression of GPER in lung cancer. Methods The expression patterns of GPER in various lung cancer lines and lung tumors were investigated using standard quantitative real time PCR (at mRNA levels, Western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC methods (at protein levels. The expression of GPER was scored and the pairwise comparisons (cancer vs adjacent tissues as well as cancer vs normal lung tissues were performed. Results Analysis by real-time PCR and Western blotting revealed a significantly higher expression of GPER at both mRNA and protein levels in human non small cell lung cancer cell (NSCLC lines relative to immortalized normal lung bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs. The virally immortalized human small airway epithelial cell line HPL1D showed higher expression than HBECs and similar expression to NSCLC cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of tissue sections of murine lung adenomas as well as human lung adenocarcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas and non-small cell lung carcinomas showed consistently higher expression of GPER in the tumor relative to the surrounding non-tumor tissue. Conclusion The results from this study demonstrate increased GPER expression in lung cancer cells and tumors compared to normal lung. Further evaluation of the function and regulation of GPER will be necessary to determine if GPER is a marker of lung cancer progression.

  1. Recapitulating Human Gastric Cancer Pathogenesis: Experimental Models of Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Lin; El Zaatari, Mohamad

    2017-01-01

    Overview Gastric cancer has been traditionally defined by the Correa paradigm as a progression of sequential pathological events that begins with chronic inflammation [1]. Infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the typical explanation for why the stomach becomes chronically inflamed. Acute gastric inflammation then leads to chronic gastritis, atrophy particularly of acid-secreting parietal cells, metaplasia due to mucous neck cell expansion from trans-differentiation of zymogenic cells to dysplasia and eventually carcinoma [2]. The chapter contains an overview of gastric anatomy and physiology to set the stage for signaling pathways that play a role in gastric tumorigenesis. Finally, the major known mouse models of gastric transformation are critiqued in terms of the rationale behind their generation and contribution to our understanding of human cancer subtypes. PMID:27573785

  2. HUMAN CANCER IS A PARASITE SPREAD VIA INTRUSION IN GENOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey N. Rumyantsev

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The present article is devoted to further development of new paradigm about the biology of human cancer: the hypothesis of parasitic nature, origin and evolution of the phenomenon. The study included integrative reconsidering, and reinterpretation of the make-ups, traits and processes existing both in human and animal cancers. It was demonstrated that human cancer possesses nearly analogous set of traits characteristic of transmissible animal cancer. Undoubted analogies are seen in the prevalence, clinical exposure, progression of disease, origin of causative agents, immune response against invasion and especially in the intrinsic deviations of the leading traits of cancerous cells. Both human and animal cancers are highly exceptional pathogens. But in contrast to contagious animal cancers the cells of of human cancer can not pass between individuals as usual infectious agents. Exhaustive evidence of the parasitic nature and evolutionary origin of human cancer was revealed and interpreted. In contrast to animal cancer formed of solitary cell lineage, human cancer consists of a couple of lineages constructed under different genetic regulations and performed different structural and physiological functions. The complex make-up of cancer composition remains stable over sequential propagation. The subsistence of human cancer regularly includes obligatory interchange of its successive forms. Human cancer possesses its own biological watch and the ability to gobble its victim, transmit via the intrusion of the genome, perform intercommunications within the tumor components and between the dispersed subunits of cancer. Such intrinsic traits characterize human cancer as a primitively structured parasite that can be classified in Class Mammalians, Species Genomeintruder malevolent (G.malevolent.

  3. Expression and roles of Slit/Robo in human ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Cai Feng; Jiang, Yi Zhou; Li, Yan; Wang, Kai; Liu, Pei Shu; Patankar, Manish S; Zheng, Jing

    2011-05-01

    The Slit glycoproteins and their Roundabout (Robo) receptors regulate migration and growth of many types of cells including human cancer cells. However, little is known about the expression and roles of Slit/Robo in human ovarian cancer. Herein, we examined the expression of Slit/Robo in human normal and malignant ovarian tissues and its potential participation in regulating migration and proliferation of human ovarian cancer cells using two ovarian cancer cell lines, OVCAR-3 and SKOV-3. We demonstrated that Slit2/3 and Robo1 were immunolocalized primarily in stromal cells in human normal ovaries and in cancer cells in many histotypes of ovarian cancer tissues. Protein expression of Slit2/3 and Robo1/4 was also identified in OVCAR-3 and SKOV-3 cells. However, recombinant human Slit2 did not significantly affect SKOV-3 cell migration, and OVCAR-3 and SKOV-3 cell proliferation. Slit2 also did not induce ERK1/2 and AKT1 phosphorylation in OVCAR-3 and SKOV-3 cells. The current findings indicate that three major members (Slit2/3 and Robo1) of Slit/Robo family are widely expressed in the human normal and malignant ovarian tissues and in OVCAR-3 and SKOV-3 cells. However, Slit/Robo signaling may not play an important role in regulating human ovarian cancer cell proliferation and migration.

  4. Protein found to promote DNA repair, prevent cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ An abundant chromosomal protein that binds to damaged DNA prevents cancer development by enhancing DNA repair, researchers at University of Texas reported on-line in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Science.

  5. Chemometrics of differentially expressed proteins from colorectal cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lay-Chin Yeoh; Saravanan Dharmaraj; Boon-Hui Gooi; Manjit Singh; Lay-Harn Gam

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the usefulness of differentially expressed proteins from colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues for differentiating cancer and normal tissues. METHODS: A Proteomic approach was used to identify the differentially expressed proteins between CRC and normal tissues. The proteins were extracted using Tris buffer and thiourea lysis buffer (TLB) for extraction of aqueous soluble and membrane-associated proteins, respectively. Chemometrics, namely principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA), were used to assess the usefulness of these proteins for identifying the cancerous state of tissues. RESULTS: Differentially expressed proteins identified were 37 aqueous soluble proteins in Tris extracts and 24 membrane-associated proteins in TLB extracts. Based on the protein spots intensity on 2D-gel images, PCA by applying an eigenvalue > 1 was successfully used to reduce the number of principal components (PCs) into 12 and seven PCs for Tris and TLB extracts, respectively, and subsequently six PCs, respectively from both the extracts were used for LDA. The LDA classification for Tris extract showed 82.7% of original samples were correctly classified, whereas 82.7% were correctly classified for the cross-validated samples. The LDA for TLB extract showed that 78.8% of original samples and 71.2% of the cross-validated samples were correctly classified. CONCLUSION: The classification of CRC tissues by PCA and LDA provided a promising distinction between normal and cancer types. These methods can possibly be used for identification of potential biomarkers among the differentially expressed proteins identified.

  6. Evaluation of complement proteins as screening markers for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Line; Christensen, Ib J; Jensenius, Jens C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Lack of symptoms results in late detection and increased mortality. Inflammation, including complement activation, plays an important role in tumorigenesis. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The concentrations of nine proteins......, M-ficolin and MAp44 in combination discriminate between CRC and patients without cancer. The markers did not have sufficient discriminatory value for CRC detection, but may prove useful for screening when combined with other markers....

  7. Human Nanog pseudogene8 promotes the proliferation of gastrointestinal cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, Keita, E-mail: uchino13@intmed1.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Hirano, Gen [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Hirahashi, Minako [Department of Anatomic Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Isobe, Taichi; Shirakawa, Tsuyoshi; Kusaba, Hitoshi; Baba, Eishi [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Tsuneyoshi, Masazumi [Department of Anatomic Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Akashi, Koichi [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2012-09-10

    There is emerging evidence that human solid tumor cells originate from cancer stem cells (CSCs). In cancer cell lines, tumor-initiating CSCs are mainly found in the side population (SP) that has the capacity to extrude dyes such as Hoechst 33342. We found that Nanog is expressed specifically in SP cells of human gastrointestinal (GI) cancer cells. Nucleotide sequencing revealed that NanogP8 but not Nanog was expressed in GI cancer cells. Transfection of NanogP8 into GI cancer cell lines promoted cell proliferation, while its inhibition by anti-Nanog siRNA suppressed the proliferation. Immunohistochemical staining of primary GI cancer tissues revealed NanogP8 protein to be strongly expressed in 3 out of 60 cases. In these cases, NanogP8 was found especially in an infiltrative part of the tumor, in proliferating cells with Ki67 expression. These data suggest that NanogP8 is involved in GI cancer development in a fraction of patients, in whom it presumably acts by supporting CSC proliferation. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog maintains pluripotency by regulating embryonic stem cells differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog is expressed in cancer stem cells of human gastrointestinal cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nucleotide sequencing revealed that Nanog pseudogene8 but not Nanog was expressed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog pseudogene8 promotes cancer stem cells proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog pseudogene8 is involved in gastrointestinal cancer development.

  8. Study on Invasion of Artesunate on Inhibiting Human Colon Cancer Cell SW620

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Yu; Zhang Youli; Yao Guangtao; Li Yikui

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To observe the invasive effect of Chinese extraction artesunate on human colon cancer cell SW620 and explore its possible mechanisms. Methods:Colon cancer cell SW620 was managed by different concentrations of artesunate, and soft agar colony-cultivating trial was applied to detect anchorage independent proliferation of cancer cells, Boyden chamber model method to detect the invasive capability of cancer cells and Western blot method to detect the change of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) proteins. Results:Artesunate can effectively inhibit malignant proliferation and invasive capability of colon cancer cell SW620, and was dose-dependent (P Conclusion:Artesunate can signiifcantly inhibit the invasion of colon cancer cell SW620, which can be related to down-regulation of ICAM-1 protein level.

  9. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer: heat shock protein 90 overexpression, Ki67 proliferative index, and topoisomerase II-α co-amplification as predictors of pathologic complete response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy with trastuzumab and docetaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bria, Emilio; Furlanetto, Jenny; Carbognin, Luisa; Brunelli, Matteo; Caliolo, Chiara; Nortilli, Rolando; Massari, Francesco; Pedron, Serena; Manfrin, Erminia; Pellini, Francesca; Bonetti, Franco; Sperduti, Isabella; Pollini, Giovanni Paolo; Scarpa, Aldo; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2015-02-01

    The combination of trastuzumab and chemotherapy is currently considered the standard of care for patients with locally advanced/operable human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer. The potential correlation between the pathologic complete response (pCR) and the overexpression of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), Ki67, and the amplification of topoisomerase II-α (TOPO2A) was investigated in a series of patients who received neoadjuvant treatment. HER2-amplified patients who received neoadjuvant trastuzumab-docetaxel were gathered. Baseline and postsurgical Hsp90 immunoscore, Ki67 proliferation index, and TOPO2A amplification were determined together with classic clinical-pathologic predictors and correlated with pCR and imaging data. A total of 24 patients were evaluated for response; pCR, clinical, and radiologic response were found in 4 patients (16.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7-31.5), 9 patients (37.5%; 95% CI, 18.1-56.8), and 6 patients (25.0%; 95% CI, 7.6-42.3) patients, respectively. pCR was significantly higher in premenopausal (60.0% vs. 5.3%, P = .02) and negative hormonal receptor patients (50.0% vs. 5.6%, P = .03). A trend for patients with high Ki67 and TOPO2A/HER2 co-amplification was found (21.1% vs. none, P = .54; 50.0% vs. 12%, P = .16). pCR was significantly higher in patients with Hsp90 score 3+, in comparison with score 2+ and score 1+ (50.0% vs. 14.3% vs. none, P = .05). After treatment, a statistically significant lower Ki67 staining (30.0% vs. 17.5%, P = .005) and a trend for the decreased expression of high (score 3+) and moderate (score 2+) Hsp90 immunostaining (McNemar P = .25, Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney P = .08) were found. Although underpowered, our data suggest that patients with HER2-positive breast cancer overexpressing Hsp90 should be investigated as a "newer" molecular subtype with a significantly higher chance of pCR when receiving anti-Her2 agents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  10. Screening and analysis of breast cancer genes regulated by the human mammary microenvironment in a humanized mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Mingjie; Wang, Jue; Ling, Lijun; Xue, Dandan; Wang, Shui; Zhao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Tumor microenvironments play critical regulatory roles in tumor growth. Although mouse cancer models have contributed to the understanding of human tumor biology, the effectiveness of mouse cancer models is limited by the inability of the models to accurately present humanized tumor microenvironments. Previously, a humanized breast cancer model in severe combined immunodeficiency mice was established, in which human breast cancer tissue was implanted subcutaneously, followed by injection of human breast cancer cells. It was demonstrated that breast cancer cells showed improved growth in the human mammary microenvironment compared with a conventional subcutaneous mouse model. In the present study, the novel mouse model and microarray technology was used to analyze changes in the expression of genes in breast cancer cells that are regulated by the human mammary microenvironment. Humanized breast and conventional subcutaneous mouse models were established, and orthotopic tumor cells were obtained from orthotopic tumor masses by primary culture. An expression microarray using Illumina HumanHT-12 v4 Expression BeadChip and database analyses were performed to investigate changes in gene expression between tumors from each microenvironment. A total of 94 genes were differentially expressed between the primary cells cultured from the humanized and conventional mouse models. Significant upregulation of genes that promote cell proliferation and metastasis or inhibit apoptosis, such as SH3-domain binding protein 5 (BTK-associated), sodium/chloride cotransporter 3 and periostin, osteoblast specific factor, and genes that promote angiogenesis, such as KIAA1618, was also noted. Other genes that restrain cell proliferation and accelerate cell apoptosis, including tripartite motif containing TRIM36 and NES1, were downregulated. The present results revealed differences in various aspects of tumor growth and metabolism between the two model groups and indicated the functional

  11. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan protein is stimulated by interleukin 11 and promotes endometrial epithelial cancer cell proliferation and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winship, Amy; Van Sinderen, Michelle; Heffernan-Marks, Ariella; Dimitriadis, Eva

    2017-03-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecological cancer. We identified interleukin 11 (IL11) as a critical mediator of endometrial tumourigenesis and demonstrated that IL11 regulates chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG4) in human placental trophoblasts. CSPG4 is a cell membrane protein overexpressed in numerous human cancers, although its role in endometrial cancer has not been investigated. We examined CSPG4 expression and localization in primary human type I endometrioid grade (G) 1-3 tumours by qPCR and immunohistochemistry and determined whether IL11 stimulated CSPG4. IL11 upregulated CSPG4 mRNA in HEC1A (G2-derived endometrial epithelial cancer cell line) cells. IL11 administration to BALB/c nude mice enhanced HEC1A xenograft tumour growth and increased CSPG4 protein in tumours. CSPG4 mRNA was unchanged between human G1-3 endometrial cancer and control tissues. CSPG4 protein levels were elevated in the epithelium of G2 and G3 endometrial cancer and in the tumour-associated stroma of G3 tumour tissues compared to proliferative phase or post-menopausal endometrium. CSPG4 knockdown by siRNA reduced HEC1A proliferation and migration in vitro and reduced gene expression of the key epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) regulator SNAIL. Our data suggest that CSPG4 inhibition may impair endometrial cancer progression by reducing cancer cell proliferation, migration and potentially EMT.

  12. Double-transduced MDCKII cells to study human P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) interplay in drug transport across the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poller, Birk; Wagenaar, Els; Tang, Seng Chuan; Schinkel, Alfred H

    2011-04-04

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp/ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) combination knockout mice display disproportionately increased brain penetration of shared substrates, including topotecan and several tyrosine kinase inhibitors, compared to mice deficient for only one transporter. To better study the interplay of both transporters also in vitro, we generated a transduced polarized MDCKII cell line stably coexpressing substantial levels of human ABCB1 and ABCG2 (MDCKII-ABCB1/ABCG2). Next, we measured concentration-dependent transepithelial transport of topotecan, sorafenib and sunitinib. By blocking either one or both of the transporters simultaneously, using specific inhibitors, we aimed to mimic the ABCB1-ABCG2 interplay at the blood-brain barrier in wild-type, single or combination knockout mice. ABCB1 and ABCG2 contributed to similar extents to topotecan transport, which was only partly saturable. For sorafenib transport, ABCG2 was the major determinant at low concentrations. However, saturation of ABCG2-mediated transport occurred at higher sorafenib concentrations, where ABCB1 was still fully active. Furthermore, sunitinib was transported equally by ABCB1 and ABCG2 at low concentrations, but ABCG2-mediated transport became saturated at lower concentrations than ABCB1-mediated transport. The relative impact of these transporters can thus be affected by the applied drug concentrations. A comparison of the in vitro observed (inverse) transport ratios and cellular accumulation of the drugs at low concentrations with in vivo brain penetration data from corresponding Abcb1a/1b⁻/⁻, Abcg2⁻/⁻ and Abcb1a/1b;Abcg2⁻/⁻ mouse strains revealed very similar qualitative patterns for each of the tested drugs. MDCKII-ABCB1/ABCG2 cells thus present a useful in vitro model to study the interplay of ABCB1 and ABCG2.

  13. Exoskeletal proteins from the crab, Cancer pagurus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Svend Olav

    1999-01-01

    Crustacea; decapods; cuticle; exoskeleton; structural protein; amino acid sequence; mass spectrometry......Crustacea; decapods; cuticle; exoskeleton; structural protein; amino acid sequence; mass spectrometry...

  14. Antiangiogenic Steroids in Human Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Pietras

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in the early detection of tumors and in the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery for disease management, the worldwide mortality from human cancer remains unacceptably high. The treatment of cancer may benefit from the introduction of novel therapies derived from natural products. Natural products have served to provide a basis for many of the pharmaceutical agents in current use in cancer therapy. Emerging research indicates that progressive growth and spread of many solid tumors depends, in part, on the formation of an adequate blood supply, and this process of tumor-associated angiogenesis is reported to have prognostic significance in several human cancers. This review focuses on the potential application in antitumor therapy of naturally-occurring steroids that target tumor-associated angiogenesis. Squalamine, a 7,24 dihydroxylated 24-sulfated cholestane steroid conjugated to a spermidine at position C-3, is known to have strong antiangiogenic activity in vitro, and it significantly disrupts tumor proliferation and progression in laboratory studies. Work on the interactions of squalamine with vascular endothelial cells indicate that it binds with cell membranes, inhibits the membrane Na+/H+ exchanger and may further function as a calmodulin chaperone. These primary actions appear to promote inhibition of several vital steps in angiogenesis, such as blockade of mitogen-induced actin polymerization, cell–cell adhesion and cell migration, leading to suppression of endothelial cell proliferation. Preclinical studies with squalamine have shown additive benefits in tumor growth delay when squalamine is combined with cisplatin, paclitaxel, cyclophosphamide, genistein or radiation therapy. This compound has also been assessed in early phase clinical trials in cancer; squalamine was found to exhibit little systemic toxicity and was generally well tolerated by treated patients with various solid tumor malignancies

  15. Antiangiogenic Steroids in Human Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietras, Richard J; Weinberg, Olga K

    2005-03-01

    Despite advances in the early detection of tumors and in the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery for disease management, the worldwide mortality from human cancer remains unacceptably high. The treatment of cancer may benefit from the introduction of novel therapies derived from natural products. Natural products have served to provide a basis for many of the pharmaceutical agents in current use in cancer therapy. Emerging research indicates that progressive growth and spread of many solid tumors depends, in part, on the formation of an adequate blood supply, and this process of tumor-associated angiogenesis is reported to have prognostic significance in several human cancers. This review focuses on the potential application in antitumor therapy of naturally-occurring steroids that target tumor-associated angiogenesis. Squalamine, a 7,24 dihydroxylated 24-sulfated cholestane steroid conjugated to a spermidine at position C-3, is known to have strong antiangiogenic activity in vitro, and it significantly disrupts tumor proliferation and progression in laboratory studies. Work on the interactions of squalamine with vascular endothelial cells indicate that it binds with cell membranes, inhibits the membrane Na(+)/H(+) exchanger and may further function as a calmodulin chaperone. These primary actions appear to promote inhibition of several vital steps in angiogenesis, such as blockade of mitogen-induced actin polymerization, cell-cell adhesion and cell migration, leading to suppression of endothelial cell proliferation. Preclinical studies with squalamine have shown additive benefits in tumor growth delay when squalamine is combined with cisplatin, paclitaxel, cyclophosphamide, genistein or radiation therapy. This compound has also been assessed in early phase clinical trials in cancer; squalamine was found to exhibit little systemic toxicity and was generally well tolerated by treated patients with various solid tumor malignancies, including ovarian, non

  16. A genecentric Human Protein Atlas for expression profiles based on antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Lisa; Björling, Erik; Oksvold, Per; Fagerberg, Linn; Asplund, Anna; Szigyarto, Cristina Al-Khalili; Persson, Anja; Ottosson, Jenny; Wernérus, Henrik; Nilsson, Peter; Lundberg, Emma; Sivertsson, Asa; Navani, Sanjay; Wester, Kenneth; Kampf, Caroline; Hober, Sophia; Pontén, Fredrik; Uhlén, Mathias

    2008-10-01

    An attractive path forward in proteomics is to experimentally annotate the human protein complement of the genome in a genecentric manner. Using antibodies, it might be possible to design protein-specific probes for a representative protein from every protein-coding gene and to subsequently use the antibodies for systematical analysis of cellular distribution and subcellular localization of proteins in normal and disease tissues. A new version (4.0) of the Human Protein Atlas has been developed in a genecentric manner with the inclusion of all human genes and splice variants predicted from genome efforts together with a visualization of each protein with characteristics such as predicted membrane regions, signal peptide, and protein domains and new plots showing the uniqueness (sequence similarity) of every fraction of each protein toward all other human proteins. The new version is based on tissue profiles generated from 6120 antibodies with more than five million immunohistochemistry-based images covering 5067 human genes, corresponding to approximately 25% of the human genome. Version 4.0 includes a putative list of members in various protein classes, both functional classes, such as kinases, transcription factors, G-protein-coupled receptors, etc., and project-related classes, such as candidate genes for cancer or cardiovascular diseases. The exact antigen sequence for the internally generated antibodies has also been released together with a visualization of the application-specific validation performed for each antibody, including a protein array assay, Western blot analysis, immunohistochemistry, and, for a large fraction, immunofluorescence-based confocal microscopy. New search functionalities have been added to allow complex queries regarding protein expression profiles, protein classes, and chromosome location. The new version of the protein atlas thus is a resource for many areas of biomedical research, including protein science and biomarker discovery.

  17. Protein Biomarkers for the Early Detection of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E. Misek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in breast cancer control will be greatly aided by early detection so as to diagnose and treat breast cancer in its preinvasive state prior to metastasis. For breast cancer, the second leading cause of cancer-related death among women in the United States, early detection does allow for increased treatment options, including surgical resection, with a corresponding better patient response. Unfortunately, however, many patients' tumors are diagnosed following metastasis, thus making it more difficult to successfully treat the malignancy. There are, at present, no existing validated plasma/serum biomarkers for breast cancer. Only a few biomarkers (such as HER-2/neu, estrogen receptor, and progesterone receptor have utility for diagnosis and prognosis. Thus, there is a great need for new biomarkers for breast cancer. This paper will focus on the identification of new serum protein biomarkers with utility for the early detection of breast cancer.

  18. Inferring modules from human protein interactome classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaurasia Gautam

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The integration of protein-protein interaction networks derived from high-throughput screening approaches and complementary sources is a key topic in systems biology. Although integration of protein interaction data is conventionally performed, the effects of this procedure on the result of network analyses has not been examined yet. In particular, in order to optimize the fusion of heterogeneous interaction datasets, it is crucial to consider not only their degree of coverage and accuracy, but also their mutual dependencies and additional salient features. Results We examined this issue based on the analysis of modules detected by network clustering methods applied to both integrated and individual (disaggregated data sources, which we call interactome classes. Due to class diversity, we deal with variable dependencies of data features arising from structural specificities and biases, but also from possible overlaps. Since highly connected regions of the human interactome may point to potential protein complexes, we have focused on the concept of modularity, and elucidated the detection power of module extraction algorithms by independent validations based on GO, MIPS and KEGG. From the combination of protein interactions with gene expressions, a confidence scoring scheme has been proposed before proceeding via GO with further classification in permanent and transient modules. Conclusions Disaggregated interactomes are shown to be informative for inferring modularity, thus contributing to perform an effective integrative analysis. Validation of the extracted modules by multiple annotation allows for the assessment of confidence measures assigned to the modules in a protein pathway context. Notably, the proposed multilayer confidence scheme can be used for network calibration by enabling a transition from unweighted to weighted interactomes based on biological evidence.

  19. Bringing Down Cancer Aircraft: Searching for Essential Hypomutated Proteins in Skin Melanoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Pyatnitskiy

    Full Text Available We propose an approach to detection of essential genes/proteins required for cancer cell survival. A gene is considered essential if a mutation with high impact upon the function of encoded protein causes death of the cancer cell. We draw an analogy between essential cancer proteins and well-known Abraham Wald's work on estimating the plane critical areas using data on survivability of aircraft encountering enemy fire. Wald reasoned that parts with no bullet holes on the airplanes returned to the airbase from a combat flight are the most crucial ones for the airplane functioning: a hit in one of these parts downs an airplane, so it does not return back for the survey. We have envisaged that the airplane surface is a cancer genome and the bullets are somatic mutations with high impact upon protein function. Similarly we propose that genes specifically essential for tumor cell survival should carry less high-impact mutations in cancer cells compared to polymorphisms found in normal cells. We used data on mutations from the Cancer Genome Atlas and polymorphisms found in healthy humans (from 1000 Genomes Project to predict 91 protein-coding genes essential for melanoma. These genes were selected according to several criteria, including negative selection, expression in melanocytes and decrease in the proportion of high-impact mutations in cancer compared with normal cells. The Gene Ontology analysis revealed enrichment of essential proteins related to membrane and cell periphery. We speculate that this could be a sign of immune system-driven negative selection of cancer neo-antigens. Another finding is the overrepresentation of semaphorin receptors, which can mediate distinctive signaling cascades and are involved in various aspects of tumor development. Cytokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR1 were also identified as cancer essential proteins and this is confirmed by other studies. Overall, our goal was to illustrate the idea of detecting proteins whose

  20. Changes of Nuclear Matrix Proteins Following the Differentiation of Human Osteosarcoma MG-63 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Hong Zhao; Qi-Fu Li; Yan Zhao; Jing-Wen Niu; Zhi-Xing Li; Jin-An Chen

    2006-01-01

    Human osteosarcoma MG-63 cells were induced into differentiation by 5 mmol/L hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA). Their nuclear matrix proteins (NMPs) were selectively extracted and subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis.The results of protein patterns were analyzed by Melanie software. The spots of differentially expressed NMPs were excised and subjected to in situ digestion with trypsin. The maps of peptide mass fingerprinting were obtained by MALDI-TOFMS analysis, and were submitted for NCBI database searches by Mascot tool.There were twelve spots changed remarkably during the differentiation induced by HMBA, nine of which were identified. The roles of the regulated proteins during the MG-63 differentiation were analyzed. This study suggests that the induced differentiation of cancer cells is accompanied by the changes of NMPs, and confirms the presence of some specific NMPs related to the cancer cell proliferation and differentiation. The changed NMPs are potential markers for cancer diagnosis or targets for cancer therapy.

  1. Epidemiologic studies of the human microbiome and cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vogtmann, Emily; Goedert, James J

    2016-01-01

    .... Previously detected associations of individual bacteria (e.g., Helicobacter pylori), periodontal disease, and inflammation with specific cancers have motivated studies considering the association between the human microbiome and cancer risk...

  2. A novel model for evaluating therapies targeting human tumor vasculature and human cancer stem-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos-Ojeda, Daniela; McLean, Karen; Bai, Shoumei; Pulaski, Heather; Gong, Yusong; Silva, Ines; Skorecki, Karl; Tzukerman, Maty; Buckanovich, Ronald J

    2013-06-15

    Human tumor vessels express tumor vascular markers (TVM), proteins that are not expressed in normal blood vessels. Antibodies targeting TVMs could act as potent therapeutics. Unfortunately, preclinical in vivo studies testing anti-human TVM therapies have been difficult to do due to a lack of in vivo models with confirmed expression of human TVMs. We therefore evaluated TVM expression in a human embryonic stem cell-derived teratoma (hESCT) tumor model previously shown to have human vessels. We now report that in the presence of tumor cells, hESCT tumor vessels express human TVMs. The addition of mouse embryonic fibroblasts and human tumor endothelial cells significantly increases the number of human tumor vessels. TVM induction is mostly tumor-type-specific with ovarian cancer cells inducing primarily ovarian TVMs, whereas breast cancer cells induce breast cancer specific TVMs. We show the use of this model to test an anti-human specific TVM immunotherapeutics; anti-human Thy1 TVM immunotherapy results in central tumor necrosis and a three-fold reduction in human tumor vascular density. Finally, we tested the ability of the hESCT model, with human tumor vascular niche, to enhance the engraftment rate of primary human ovarian cancer stem-like cells (CSC). ALDH(+) CSC from patients (n = 6) engrafted in hESCT within 4 to 12 weeks whereas none engrafted in the flank. ALDH(-) ovarian cancer cells showed no engraftment in the hESCT or flank (n = 3). Thus, this model represents a useful tool to test anti-human TVM therapy and evaluate in vivo human CSC tumor biology.

  3. Quercetin inhibits human breast cancer cell proliferation and induces apoptosis via Bcl-2 and Bax regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duo, Jian; Ying, Guo-Guang; Wang, Guo-Wen; Zhang, Li

    2012-06-01

    Breast cancer is a disease in which cancer cells form in the tissues of the breast. The present study aimed to explore the effect of the flavonoid compound quercetin on the growth and apoptosis of human breast cancer cells. Varying concentrations (12.5, 25, 50, 100, 200 µM) of quercetin were applied to cultured MCF-7 human breast cancer cells for defined lengths of time. At 50 to 200 µM doses, quercetin significantly inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 cells assessed by MTT colorimetry, in both dose- and time-dependent manners (Papoptosis after 48 h of exposure (Pquercetin treatment Bcl-2 expression decreased significantly while Bax expression increased significantly (Pquercetin inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. The mechanisms behind these effects may stem from the downregulation of Bcl-2 protein expression and upregulation of Bax expression.

  4. New insights into estrogenic regulation of O(6)-methylguanine DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) in human breast cancer cells: Co-degradation of ER-α and MGMT proteins by fulvestrant or O(6)-benzylguanine indicates fresh avenues for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranjpe, Ameya; Bailey, Nathan I; Konduri, Santhi; Bobustuc, George C; Ali-Osman, Francis; Yusuf, Mohd A; Punganuru, Surendra R; Madala, Hanumantha Rao; Basak, Debasish; Mostofa, Agm; Srivenugopal, Kalkunte S

    2016-09-01

    Endocrine therapy using estrogen receptor-α (ER-α) antagonists for attenuating horm2one-driven cell proliferation is a major treatment modality for breast cancers. To exploit any DNA repair deficiencies associated with endocrine therapy, we investigated the functional and physical interactions of ER-α with O(6)-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), a unique DNA repair protein that confers tumor resistance to various anticancer alkylating agents. The ER-α -positive breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D) and ER- negative cell lines (MDAMB-468, MDAMB-231), and established inhibitors of ER-α and MGMT, namely, ICI-182,780 (Faslodex) and O(6)-benzylguanine, respectively, were used to study MGMT- ER interactions. The MGMT gene promoter was found to harbor one full and two half estrogen-responsive elements (EREs) and two antioxidant-responsive elements (AREs). MGMT expression was upregulated by estrogen, downregulated by tamoxifen in Western blot and promoter-linked reporter assays. Similarly, both transient and stable transfections of Nrf-2 (nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor-2) increased the levels of MGMT protein and activity 3 to 4-fold reflecting novel regulatory nodes for this drug-resistance determinant. Of the different ER-α antagonists tested, the pure anti-estrogen fulvestrant was most potent in inhibiting the MGMT activity in a dose, time and ER-α dependent manner, similar to O(6)-benzylguanine. Interestingly, fulvestrant exposure led to a degradation of both ER-α and MGMT proteins and O(6)-benzylguanine also induced a specific loss of ER-α and MGMT proteins in MCF-7 and T47D breast cancer cells with similar kinetics. Immunoprecipitation revealed a specific association of ER-α and MGMT proteins in breast cancer cells. Furthermore, silencing of MGMT gene expression triggered a decrease in the levels of both MGMT and ER-α proteins. The involvement of proteasome in the drug-induced degradation of both proteins was also demonstrated

  5. New insights into estrogenic regulation of O6-methylguanine DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) in human breast cancer cells: Co-degradation of ER-α and MGMT proteins by fulvestrant or O6-benzylguanine indicates fresh avenues for therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranjpe, Ameya; Bailey, Nathan I.; Konduri, Santhi; Bobustuc, George C.; Ali-Osman, Francis; Yusuf, Mohd. A.; Punganuru, Surendra R.; Madala, Hanumantha Rao; Basak, Debasish; Mostofa, AGM; Srivenugopal, Kalkunte S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Endocrine therapy using estrogen receptor-α (ER-α) antagonists for attenuating horm2one-driven cell proliferation is a major treatment modality for breast cancers. To exploit any DNA repair deficiencies associated with endocrine therapy, we investigated the functional and physical interactions of ER-α with O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), a unique DNA repair protein that confers tumor resistance to various anticancer alkylating agents. The ER-α -positive breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D) and ER- negative cell lines (MDAMB-468, MDAMB-231), and established inhibitors of ER-α and MGMT, namely, ICI-182,780 (Faslodex) and O6-benzylguanine, respectively, were used to study MGMT- ER interactions. The MGMT gene promoter was found to harbor one full and two half estrogen-responsive elements (EREs) and two antioxidant-responsive elements (AREs). MGMT expression was upregulated by estrogen, downregulated by tamoxifen in Western blot and promoter-linked reporter assays. Similarly, both transient and stable transfections of Nrf-2 (nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor-2) increased the levels of MGMT protein and activity 3 to 4-fold reflecting novel regulatory nodes for this drug-resistance determinant. Of the different ER-α antagonist