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Sample records for human cancer pathogenesis

  1. Recapitulating Human Gastric Cancer Pathogenesis: Experimental Models of Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Lin; El Zaatari, Mohamad

    2017-01-01

    Overview Gastric cancer has been traditionally defined by the Correa paradigm as a progression of sequential pathological events that begins with chronic inflammation [1]. Infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the typical explanation for why the stomach becomes chronically inflamed. Acute gastric inflammation then leads to chronic gastritis, atrophy particularly of acid-secreting parietal cells, metaplasia due to mucous neck cell expansion from trans-differentiation of zymogenic cells to dysplasia and eventually carcinoma [2]. The chapter contains an overview of gastric anatomy and physiology to set the stage for signaling pathways that play a role in gastric tumorigenesis. Finally, the major known mouse models of gastric transformation are critiqued in terms of the rationale behind their generation and contribution to our understanding of human cancer subtypes. PMID:27573785

  2. Pathogenesis of Human Enterovirulent Bacteria: Lessons from Cultured, Fully Differentiated Human Colon Cancer Cell Lines

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    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Hosts are protected from attack by potentially harmful enteric microorganisms, viruses, and parasites by the polarized fully differentiated epithelial cells that make up the epithelium, providing a physical and functional barrier. Enterovirulent bacteria interact with the epithelial polarized cells lining the intestinal barrier, and some invade the cells. A better understanding of the cross talk between enterovirulent bacteria and the polarized intestinal cells has resulted in the identification of essential enterovirulent bacterial structures and virulence gene products playing pivotal roles in pathogenesis. Cultured animal cell lines and cultured human nonintestinal, undifferentiated epithelial cells have been extensively used for understanding the mechanisms by which some human enterovirulent bacteria induce intestinal disorders. Human colon carcinoma cell lines which are able to express in culture the functional and structural characteristics of mature enterocytes and goblet cells have been established, mimicking structurally and functionally an intestinal epithelial barrier. Moreover, Caco-2-derived M-like cells have been established, mimicking the bacterial capture property of M cells of Peyer's patches. This review intends to analyze the cellular and molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis of human enterovirulent bacteria observed in infected cultured human colon carcinoma enterocyte-like HT-29 subpopulations, enterocyte-like Caco-2 and clone cells, the colonic T84 cell line, HT-29 mucus-secreting cell subpopulations, and Caco-2-derived M-like cells, including cell association, cell entry, intracellular lifestyle, structural lesions at the brush border, functional lesions in enterocytes and goblet cells, functional and structural lesions at the junctional domain, and host cellular defense responses. PMID:24006470

  3. Aberrant expression of zinc transporter ZIP4 (SLC39A4) significantly contributes to human pancreatic cancer pathogenesis and progression.

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    Li, Min; Zhang, Yuqing; Liu, Zijuan; Bharadwaj, Uddalak; Wang, Hao; Wang, Xinwen; Zhang, Sheng; Liuzzi, Juan P; Chang, Shou-Mei; Cousins, Robert J; Fisher, William E; Brunicardi, F Charles; Logsdon, Craig D; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi

    2007-11-20

    Zinc is an essential trace element and catalytic/structural component used by many metalloenzymes and transcription factors. Recent studies indicate a possible correlation of zinc levels with the cancer risk; however, the exact role of zinc and zinc transporters in cancer progression is unknown. We have observed that a zinc transporter, ZIP4 (SLC39A4), was substantially overexpressed in 16 of 17 (94%) clinical pancreatic adenocarcinoma specimens compared with the surrounding normal tissues, and ZIP4 mRNA expression was significantly higher in human pancreatic cancer cells than human pancreatic ductal epithelium (HPDE) cells. This indicates that aberrant ZIP4 up-regulation may contribute to the pancreatic cancer pathogenesis and progression. We studied the effects of ZIP4 overexpression in pancreatic cancer cell proliferation in vitro and pancreatic cancer progression in vivo. We found that forced expression of ZIP4 increased intracellular zinc levels, increased cell proliferation by 2-fold in vitro, and significantly increased tumor volume by 13-fold in the nude mice model with s.c. xenograft compared with the control cells. In the orthotopic nude mice model, overexpression of ZIP4 not only increased the primary tumor weight (7.2-fold), it also increased the peritoneal dissemination and ascites incidence. Moreover, increased cell proliferation and higher zinc content were also observed in the tumor tissues that overexpressed ZIP4. These data reveal an important outcome of aberrant ZIP4 expression in contributing to pancreatic cancer pathogenesis and progression. It may suggest a therapeutic strategy whereby ZIP4 is targeted to control pancreatic cancer growth.

  4. Epidemiologic aspects of exogenous progestagens in relation to their role in pathogenesis of human breast cancer.

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    van Leeuwen, F E

    1991-01-01

    This review focuses on epidemiologic studies of the relationship between breast cancer risk and exogenous progestagens, as present in oral contraceptives, injectable contraceptives and hormone replacement therapy. Subsequently, it will be discussed whether the present findings are consistent with one of the hypotheses that have been postulated for the role of hormones in breast cancer pathogenesis. The relationship between oral contraceptives and breast cancer is still controversial. Several studies have found that prolonged oral contraceptives use at young ages is associated with increased risk to develop breast cancer at an early age, i.e. before age 35. None of these studies, however, has been able to attribute the increased risk to specific formulations of oral contraceptives, or to the progestagen content of the preparations. This may be largely due to the fact that there is no good method to calculate progestagen potencies of different formulations. There are no reliable data regarding the effect of progestagen-only oral contraceptives on breast cancer risk. Studies conducted so far included only few women who used these preparations exclusively and for an extended period. Use of injectable contraceptives, mainly depot-medroxy-progesterone acetate, may slightly increase breast cancer, but current findings are inconclusive. There is suggestive evidence that the addition of progestagens to estrogen replacement therapy may increase breast cancer risk over that associated with exposure to estrogens alone. However, the data are not sufficient to warrant any recommendation about changes in clinical practice, and more studies of estrogen-progestagen replacement therapy are needed to settle this issue. It is argued that the "unopposed estrogen" hypothesis for breast cancer is not consistent with the known effects of oral contraceptives and estrogen replacement therapy. The "estrogen plus progestagen" hypothesis seems to be more consistent with current epidemiologic

  5. Obesity and cancer pathogenesis

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    Berger, Nathan A.

    2015-01-01

    Overweight and obesity have reached pandemic levels on a worldwide basis and are associated with increased risk and worse prognosis for many but not all malignancies. Pathophysiologic processes that affect this association are reviewed, with a focus on the relation of type 2 diabetes mellitus with cancer, lessons learned from the use of murine models to study the association, the impact of obesity on pancreatic cancer, the effect of dietary fats and cholesterol as cancer promoters, and the mechanisms by which the intestinal microbiome affects obesity and cancer. PMID:24725147

  6. Obesity and cancer pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Nathan A

    2014-04-01

    Overweight and obesity have reached pandemic levels on a worldwide basis and are associated with increased risk and worse prognosis for many but not all malignancies. Pathophysiologic processes that affect this association are reviewed, with a focus on the relationship between type 2 diabetes mellitus and cancer, lessons learned from the use of murine models to study the association, the impact of obesity on pancreatic cancer, the effects of dietary fats and cholesterol on cancer promotion, and the mechanisms by which the intestinal microbiome affects obesity and cancer. © 2014 New York Academy of Sciences.

  7. Translating discovery in zebrafish pancreatic development to human pancreatic cancer: biomarkers, targets, pathogenesis, and therapeutics.

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    Yee, Nelson S; Kazi, Abid A; Yee, Rosemary K

    2013-06-01

    Abstract Experimental studies in the zebrafish have greatly facilitated understanding of genetic regulation of the early developmental events in the pancreas. Various approaches using forward and reverse genetics, chemical genetics, and transgenesis in zebrafish have demonstrated generally conserved regulatory roles of mammalian genes and discovered novel genetic pathways in exocrine pancreatic development. Accumulating evidence has supported the use of zebrafish as a model of human malignant diseases, including pancreatic cancer. Studies have shown that the genetic regulators of exocrine pancreatic development in zebrafish can be translated into potential clinical biomarkers and therapeutic targets in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Transgenic zebrafish expressing oncogenic K-ras and zebrafish tumor xenograft model have emerged as valuable tools for dissecting the pathogenetic mechanisms of pancreatic cancer and for drug discovery and toxicology. Future analysis of the pancreas in zebrafish will continue to advance understanding of the genetic regulation and biological mechanisms during organogenesis. Results of those studies are expected to provide new insights into how aberrant developmental pathways contribute to formation and growth of pancreatic neoplasia, and hopefully generate valid biomarkers and targets as well as effective and safe therapeutics in pancreatic cancer.

  8. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer Pathogenesis

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    Bardhan, Kankana; Liu, Kebin, E-mail: Kliu@gru.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical College of Georgia, and Cancer Center, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA 30912 (United States)

    2013-06-05

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops through a multistage process that results from the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations, and frequently as a result of mutations in the Wnt signaling pathway. However, it has become evident over the past two decades that epigenetic alterations of the chromatin, particularly the chromatin components in the promoter regions of tumor suppressors and oncogenes, play key roles in CRC pathogenesis. Epigenetic regulation is organized at multiple levels, involving primarily DNA methylation and selective histone modifications in cancer cells. Assessment of the CRC epigenome has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and that the average CRC methylome has thousands of abnormally methylated genes. Although relatively less is known about the patterns of specific histone modifications in CRC, selective histone modifications and resultant chromatin conformation have been shown to act, in concert with DNA methylation, to regulate gene expression to mediate CRC pathogenesis. Moreover, it is now clear that not only DNA methylation but also histone modifications are reversible processes. The increased understanding of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the context of CRC pathogenesis has led to development of epigenetic biomarkers for CRC diagnosis and epigenetic drugs for CRC therapy.

  9. Helicobacter pylori virulence and cancer pathogenesis.

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    Yamaoka, Yoshio; Graham, David Y

    2014-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori is human gastric pathogen that causes chronic and progressive gastric mucosal inflammation and is responsible for the gastric inflammation-associated diseases, gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease. Specific outcomes reflect the interplay between host-, environmental- and bacterial-specific factors. Progress in understanding putative virulence factors in disease pathogenesis has been limited and many false leads have consumed scarce resources. Few in vitro-in vivo correlations or translational applications have proved clinically relevant. Reported virulence factor-related outcomes reflect differences in relative risk of disease rather than specificity for any specific outcome. Studies of individual virulence factor associations have provided conflicting results. Since virulence factors are linked, studies of groups of putative virulence factors are needed to provide clinically useful information. Here, the authors discuss the progress made in understanding the role of H. pylori virulence factors CagA, vacuolating cytotoxin, OipA and DupA in disease pathogenesis and provide suggestions for future studies.

  10. Apoptosis in cancer: from pathogenesis to treatment

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    Wong Rebecca SY

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Apoptosis is an ordered and orchestrated cellular process that occurs in physiological and pathological conditions. It is also one of the most studied topics among cell biologists. An understanding of the underlying mechanism of apoptosis is important as it plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of many diseases. In some, the problem is due to too much apoptosis, such as in the case of degenerative diseases while in others, too little apoptosis is the culprit. Cancer is one of the scenarios where too little apoptosis occurs, resulting in malignant cells that will not die. The mechanism of apoptosis is complex and involves many pathways. Defects can occur at any point along these pathways, leading to malignant transformation of the affected cells, tumour metastasis and resistance to anticancer drugs. Despite being the cause of problem, apoptosis plays an important role in the treatment of cancer as it is a popular target of many treatment strategies. The abundance of literature suggests that targeting apoptosis in cancer is feasible. However, many troubling questions arise with the use of new drugs or treatment strategies that are designed to enhance apoptosis and critical tests must be passed before they can be used safely in human subjects.

  11. Aetio-pathogenesis of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Haruna Abdulkareem

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a literature review on the aetiology and pathogenesis of breast cancer, which is the most common cancer worldwide, and the second leading cause of cancer death, especially in Western countries. Several aetiological factors have been implicated in its pathogenesis, and include age, genetics, family history, diet, alcohol, obesity, lifestyle, physical inactivity, as well as endocrine factors. These factors act separately or together in the causation of breast cancer. More recently, triple negative breast cancer has been described in certain categories of patients and is associated with poorer prognosis and earlier recurrence compared with the conventional breast cancer. Therefore, adequate knowledge of these factors is important in identifying high risk groups and individuals, which will help in screening, early detection and follow-up. This will help to decrease the morbidity and mortality from this life-threatening disease.

  12. Molecular pathogenesis ofsporadic colorectal cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HidetsuguYamagishi; HajimeKuroda; YasuoImai; HideyukiHiraishi

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) results from the progressive accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations that lead to the transformation of normal colonic mucosa to adenocarcinoma. Approximately 75% of CRCs are sporadic and occur in people without genetic predisposition or family history of CRC. During the past two decades, sporadic CRCs were classiifed into three major groups according to frequently altered/mutated genes. These genes have been identiifed by linkage analyses of cancer-prone families and by individual mutation analyses of candidate genes selected on the basis of functional data. In the ifrst half of this review, we describe the genetic pathways of sporadic CRCs and their clinicopathologic features. Recently, large-scale genome analyses have detected many infrequently mutated genes as well as a small number of frequently mutated genes. These infrequently mutated genes are likely described in a lim-ited number of pathways. Gene-oriented models of CRC progression are being replaced by pathway-oriented models. In the second half of this review, we summarize the present knowledge of this research ifeld and discuss its prospects.

  13. Arginine Metabolism in Bacterial Pathogenesis and Cancer Therapy

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    Lifeng Xiong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Antibacterial resistance to infectious diseases is a significant global concern for health care organizations; along with aging populations and increasing cancer rates, it represents a great burden for government healthcare systems. Therefore, the development of therapies against bacterial infection and cancer is an important strategy for healthcare research. Pathogenic bacteria and cancer have developed a broad range of sophisticated strategies to survive or propagate inside a host and cause infection or spread disease. Bacteria can employ their own metabolism pathways to obtain nutrients from the host cells in order to survive. Similarly, cancer cells can dysregulate normal human cell metabolic pathways so that they can grow and spread. One common feature of the adaption and disruption of metabolic pathways observed in bacterial and cancer cell growth is amino acid pathways; these have recently been targeted as a novel approach to manage bacterial infections and cancer therapy. In particular, arginine metabolism has been illustrated to be important not only for bacterial pathogenesis but also for cancer therapy. Therefore, greater insights into arginine metabolism of pathogenic bacteria and cancer cells would provide possible targets for controlling of bacterial infection and cancer treatment. This review will summarize the recent progress on the relationship of arginine metabolism with bacterial pathogenesis and cancer therapy, with a particular focus on arginase and arginine deiminase pathways of arginine catabolism.

  14. The fascinating germ theories on cancer pathogenesis.

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    Tsoucalas, G; Laios, K; Karamanou, M; Gennimata, V; Androutsos, G

    2014-01-01

    For more than 100 years, the germ theory of cancer, proposing that microorganisms were at the origin of the disease, dominated medicine. Several eminent scientists like Etienne Burnet, Mikhail Stepanovich Voronin, Charles-Louis Malassez, and Francis-Peyton Rous argued on the pathogenesis presenting their theories that implicated cocci, fungi and parasites. The impact of these theories was culminated by the Nobel Prize in 1926 that was attributed to the Danish scientist Johannes Fibiger for his work on the nematode Spiroptera as a causative agent in cancer. Even if those theories were the result of fantasy and misinterpretation, they paved the way for the scientific research in oncology.

  15. Obesity, cholesterol metabolism, and breast cancer pathogenesis.

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    McDonnell, Donald P; Park, Sunghee; Goulet, Matthew T; Jasper, Jeff; Wardell, Suzanne E; Chang, Ching-Yi; Norris, John D; Guyton, John R; Nelson, Erik R

    2014-09-15

    Obesity and altered lipid metabolism are risk factors for breast cancer in pre- and post-menopausal women. These pathologic relationships have been attributed in part to the impact of cholesterol on the biophysical properties of cell membranes and to the influence of these changes on signaling events initiated at the membrane. However, more recent studies have indicated that the oxysterol 27-hydroxycholesterol (27HC), and not cholesterol per se, may be the primary biochemical link between lipid metabolism and cancer. The enzyme responsible for production of 27HC from cholesterol, CYP27A1, is expressed primarily in the liver and in macrophages. In addition, significantly elevated expression of this enzyme within breast tumors has also been observed. It is believed that 27HC, acting through the liver X receptor in macrophages and possibly other cells, is involved in maintaining organismal cholesterol homeostasis. It has also been shown recently that 27HC is an estrogen receptor agonist in breast cancer cells and that it stimulates the growth and metastasis of tumors in several models of breast cancer. These findings provide the rationale for the clinical evaluation of pharmaceutical approaches that interfere with cholesterol/27HC synthesis as a means to mitigate the impact of cholesterol on breast cancer pathogenesis. Cancer Res; 74(18); 4976-82. ©2014 AACR. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Obesity, Cholesterol Metabolism and Breast Cancer Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Donald P.; Park, Sunghee; Goulet, Matthew T.; Jasper, Jeff; Wardell, Suzanne E.; Chang, Ching-yi; Norris, John D.; Guyton, John R.; Nelson, Erik R.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and altered lipid metabolism are risk factors for breast cancer in pre- and post-menopausal women. These pathologic relationships have been attributed in part to the impact of cholesterol on the biophysical properties of cell membranes and to the influence of these changes on signaling events initiated at the membrane. However, more recent studies have indicated that the oxysterol 27-hydroxycholesterol (27HC), and not cholesterol per se, may be the primary biochemical link between lipid metabolism and cancer. The enzyme responsible for production of 27HC from cholesterol, CYP27A1, is expressed primarily in the liver and in macrophages. In addition significantly elevated expression of this enzyme within breast tumors has also been observed. It is believed that 27HC, acting through the liver X receptor (LXR) in macrophages and possibly other cells is involved in maintaining organismal cholesterol homeostasis. It has also been shown recently that 27HC is an estrogen receptor (ER) agonist in breast cancer cells and that it stimulates the growth and metastasis of tumors in several models of breast cancer. These findings provide the rationale for the clinical evaluation of pharmaceutical approaches that interfere with cholesterol/27HC synthesis as a means to mitigate the impact of cholesterol on breast cancer pathogenesis. PMID:25060521

  17. Chromosomal rearrangements and the pathogenesis of differentiated thyroid cancer

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    Stefan K.G. Grebe

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The majority of thyroid cancers arise from the follicular cells of the thyroid gland, which yield a wide variety of distinct morphotypes, ranging from relatively indolent lesions to the most malignant forms of cancer known. The remaining primary thyroid cancers arise from C cells within the gland and result primarily from mutations of the RET protooncogene, germ line mutations of which give rise to the various forms of multiple endocrine neoplasia. The most common of the follicular cell-derived cancers are papillary carcinomas, (PTC, followed by follicular carcinomas (FTC and its Hurthle cell variant (HCC and finally anaplastic carcinomas (ATC. The pathogenesis of many thyroid cancers, of both PTC and FTC morphotype, involves chromosomal translocations. Rearrangements of the RET protoconcogene are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of ca. 50% of PTC. A similar proportion of FTC have been associated with a t(2;3(q13;p25 translocation, fusing the thyroid-specific transcription factor PAX8 with the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ nuclear receptor, a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor. These rearrangements have analogy with translocations in erythropoetic cells, which form the only other known group of human malignancies that are largely the result of chromosomal translocation events. In this review we compare and contrast the oncogenic properties of thyroid and erythroid chromosomal transformations and speculate on mechanisms leading to their formation.

  18. Fibroblasts as architects of cancer pathogenesis.

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    Marsh, Timothy; Pietras, Kristian; McAllister, Sandra S

    2013-07-01

    Studies of epithelial cancers (i.e., carcinomas) traditionally focused on transformation of the epithelium (i.e., the cancer cells) and how aberrant signaling within the cancer cells modulates the surrounding tissue of origin. In more recent decades, the normal cells, blood vessels, molecules, and extracellular components that surround the tumor cells, collectively known as the "tumor microenvironment" or "stroma", have received increasing attention and are now thought to be key regulators of tumor initiation and progression. Of particular relevance to the work reviewed herein are the fibroblasts, which make up the major cell type within the microenvironment of most carcinomas. Due to their inherent heterogeneity, plasticity, and function, it is perhaps not surprising that fibroblasts are ideal modulators of normal and cancerous epithelium; however, these aspects also present challenges if we are to interrupt their tumor-supportive functions. Here, we review the current body of knowledge and the many questions that still remain about the special entity known as the cancer-associated fibroblast. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Fibrosis: Translation of basic research to human disease.

  19. Structural studies of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1

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    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A., E-mail: oasojo@unmc.edu [College of Medicine, Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-6495 (United States); Koski, Raymond A.; Bonafé, Nathalie [L2 Diagnostics LLC, 300 George Street, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); College of Medicine, Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-6495 (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Structural analysis of a truncated soluble domain of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1, a membrane protein implicated in the proliferation of aggressive brain cancer, is presented. Human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1 (GLIPR1) is a membrane protein that is highly upregulated in brain cancers but is barely detectable in normal brain tissue. GLIPR1 is composed of a signal peptide that directs its secretion, a conserved cysteine-rich CAP (cysteine-rich secretory proteins, antigen 5 and pathogenesis-related 1 proteins) domain and a transmembrane domain. GLIPR1 is currently being investigated as a candidate for prostate cancer gene therapy and for glioblastoma targeted therapy. Crystal structures of a truncated soluble domain of the human GLIPR1 protein (sGLIPR1) solved by molecular replacement using a truncated polyalanine search model of the CAP domain of stecrisp, a snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP), are presented. The correct molecular-replacement solution could only be obtained by removing all loops from the search model. The native structure was refined to 1.85 Å resolution and that of a Zn{sup 2+} complex was refined to 2.2 Å resolution. The latter structure revealed that the putative binding cavity coordinates Zn{sup 2+} similarly to snake-venom CRISPs, which are involved in Zn{sup 2+}-dependent mechanisms of inflammatory modulation. Both sGLIPR1 structures have extensive flexible loop/turn regions and unique charge distributions that were not observed in any of the previously reported CAP protein structures. A model is also proposed for the structure of full-length membrane-bound GLIPR1.

  20. Aetio-pathogenesis of breast cancer | Abdulkareem | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is a literature review on the aetiology and pathogenesis of breast cancer, ... diet, alcohol, obesity, lifestyle, physical inactivity, as well as endocrine factors. ... in certain categories of patients and is associated with poorer prognosis and ...

  1. The Infectious Pathogenesis of Prostate Cancer

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    2008-03-01

    Ferlay J. Cancer and infections: estimates of the attributable fraction in 1990. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention 1997;6:387-400. 10...Signorello LB, Adami HO. Prostate Cancer. In: Adami HO, Hunter DJ, Trichopoulos D, eds. Textbook of Cancer Epidemiology . New York: Oxford University...prostate cancer. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention 2006;15: 939-45. 12. Urisman A, Molinaro RJ, Fischer N, et al. Identification of a novel

  2. The Role of Gammaherpesviruses in Cancer Pathogenesis

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    Hem Chandra Jha

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, one fifth of cancers in the population are associated with viral infections. Among them, gammaherpesvirus, specifically HHV4 (EBV and HHV8 (KSHV, are two oncogenic viral agents associated with a large number of human malignancies. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms related to EBV and KSHV infection and their ability to induce cellular transformation. We describe their strategies for manipulating major cellular systems through the utilization of cell cycle, apoptosis, immune modulation, epigenetic modification, and altered signal transduction pathways, including NF-kB, Notch, Wnt, MAPK, TLR, etc. We also discuss the important EBV latent antigens, namely EBNA1, EBNA2, EBNA3’s and LMP’s, which are important for targeting these major cellular pathways. KSHV infection progresses through the engagement of the activities of the major latent proteins LANA, v-FLIP and v-Cyclin, and the lytic replication and transcription activator (RTA. This review is a current, comprehensive approach that describes an in-depth understanding of gammaherpes viral encoded gene manipulation of the host system through targeting important biological processes in viral-associated cancers.

  3. Gallbladder cancer epidemiology, pathogenesis and molecular genetics: Recent update.

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    Sharma, Aarti; Sharma, Kiran Lata; Gupta, Annapurna; Yadav, Alka; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-06-14

    Gallbladder cancer is a malignancy of biliary tract which is infrequent in developed countries but common in some specific geographical regions of developing countries. Late diagnosis and deprived prognosis are major problems for treatment of gallbladder carcinoma. The dramatic associations of this orphan cancer with various genetic and environmental factors are responsible for its poorly defined pathogenesis. An understanding to the relationship between epidemiology, molecular genetics and pathogenesis of gallbladder cancer can add new insights to its undetermined pathophysiology. Present review article provides a recent update regarding epidemiology, pathogenesis, and molecular genetics of gallbladder cancer. We systematically reviewed published literature on gallbladder cancer from online search engine PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed). Various keywords used for retrieval of articles were Gallbladder, cancer Epidemiology, molecular genetics and bullion operators like AND, OR, NOT. Cross references were manually searched from various online search engines (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed,https://scholar.google.co.in/, http://www.medline.com/home.jsp). Most of the articles published from 1982 to 2015 in peer reviewed journals have been included in this review.

  4. Multidisciplinary approach to understand the pathogenesis of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Shang; AS Pe(n)a

    2005-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma remains a common disease worldwide with a dismal prognosis. Therefore, it represents a very important health problem. It occurs with a high incidence in Asia and is one of the leading causes of cancer death in the world. Although the incidence and mortality of gastric carcinoma are decreasing in many countries,gastric cancer still represents the second most frequent malignancies in the world and the fourth in Europe. The 5-year survival rate of gastric carcinoma is low. The etiology and pathogenesis are not yet fully known. The study of gastric cancer is important in clinical medicine as well as in public health. Over the past 15 years,integrated research in molecular pathology has clarified the details of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities of cancer-related genes in the course of the development and progression of gastric cancer. Gastric cancer, as all cancers, is the end result of the interplay of many risk factors as well as protective factors. Although epidemiological evidence indicates that environmental factors play a major role in gastric carcinogenesis, the role of immunological, genetic, and immunogenetic factors are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of gastric carcinoma. Among the environmental factors,diet and Helicobacter pylori are more amenable to intervention aimed at the prevention of gastric cancer.The aim of the present paper is to review and include the most recent published evidence to demonstrate that only a multidisciplinary approach will lead to the advancement of the pathogenesis and prevention of gastric cancer. On the immunogenetic research it is clear that evidence is accumulating to suggest that a genetic profile favoring the proinflammatory response increases the risk of gastric carcinoma.

  5. Viruses and human cancer

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    Gallo, R.C.; Haseltine, W.; Klein, G.; Zur Hausen, H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers on the following topics: Immunology and Epidemiology, Biology and Pathogenesis, Models of Pathogenesis and Treatment, Simian and Bovine Retroviruses, Human Papilloma Viruses, EBV and Herpesvirus, and Hepatitis B Virus.

  6. The roles of tumor-derived exosomes in cancer pathogenesis.

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    Yang, Chenjie; Robbins, Paul D

    2011-01-01

    Exosomes are endosome-derived, 30-100 nm small membrane vesicles released by most cell types including tumor cells. They are enriched in a selective repertoire of proteins and nucleic acids from parental cells and are thought to be actively involved in conferring intercellular signals. Tumor-derived exosomes have been viewed as a source of tumor antigens that can be used to induce antitumor immune responses. However, tumor-derived exosomes also have been found to possess immunosuppressive properties and are able to facilitate tumor growth, metastasis, and the development of drug resistance. These different effects of tumor-derived exosomes contribute to the pathogenesis of cancer. This review will discuss the roles of tumor-derived exosomes in cancer pathogenesis, therapy, and diagnostics.

  7. The Roles of Tumor-Derived Exosomes in Cancer Pathogenesis

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    Chenjie Yang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are endosome-derived, 30–100 nm small membrane vesicles released by most cell types including tumor cells. They are enriched in a selective repertoire of proteins and nucleic acids from parental cells and are thought to be actively involved in conferring intercellular signals. Tumor-derived exosomes have been viewed as a source of tumor antigens that can be used to induce antitumor immune responses. However, tumor-derived exosomes also have been found to possess immunosuppressive properties and are able to facilitate tumor growth, metastasis, and the development of drug resistance. These different effects of tumor-derived exosomes contribute to the pathogenesis of cancer. This review will discuss the roles of tumor-derived exosomes in cancer pathogenesis, therapy, and diagnostics.

  8. Liver immune-pathogenesis and therapy of human liver tropic virus infection in humanized mouse models.

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    Bility, Moses T; Li, Feng; Cheng, Liang; Su, Lishan

    2013-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infect and replicate primarily in human hepatocytes. Few reliable and easy accessible animal models are available for studying the immune system's contribution to the liver disease progression during hepatitis virus infection. Humanized mouse models reconstituted with human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been developed to study human immunology, human immunodeficiency virus 1 infection, and immunopathogenesis. However, a humanized mouse model engrafted with both human immune and human liver cells is needed to study infection and immunopathogenesis of HBV/HCV infection in vivo. We have recently developed the humanized mouse model with both human immune and human liver cells (AFC8-hu HSC/Hep) to study immunopathogenesis and therapy of HCV infection in vivo. In this review, we summarize the current models of HBV/HCV infection and their limitations in immunopathogenesis. We will then present our recent findings of HCV infection and immunopathogenesis in the AFC8-hu HSC/Hep mouse, which supports HCV infection, human T-cell response and associated liver pathogenesis. Inoculation of humanized mice with primary HCV isolates resulted in long-term HCV infection. HCV infection induced elevated infiltration of human immune cells in the livers of HCV-infected humanized mice. HCV infection also induced HCV-specific T-cell immune response in lymphoid tissues of humanized mice. Additionally, HCV infection induced liver fibrosis in humanized mice. Anti-human alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA) staining showed elevated human hepatic stellate cell activation in HCV-infected humanized mice. We discuss the limitation and future improvements of the AFC8-hu HSC/Hep mouse model and its application in evaluating novel therapeutics, as well as studying both HCV and HBV infection, human immune responses, and associated human liver fibrosis and cancer.

  9. The outcome of Cryptococcus neoformans intracellular pathogenesis in human monocytes

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    Pirofski Liise-anne

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cryptococcus neoformans is an encapsulated yeast that is a facultative intracellular pathogen. The interaction between macrophages and C. neoformans is critical for extrapulmonary dissemination of this pathogenic yeast. C. neoformans can either lyse macrophages or escape from within them through a process known as phagosomal extrusion. However, most studies of intracellular pathogenesis have been made with mouse cells and their relevance to human infection is uncertain. In this study we extended studies of C. neoformans-macrophage cellular interaction/s to human peripheral blood monocytes. Results This study demonstrated that C. neoformans can shed polysaccharide within human monocytes, spread from cell to cell, and be extruded from them. Furthermore, human monocytes responded to ingestion of C. neoformans with cell cycle progression from G1 to S. Conclusion Similarities between mouse and human cells support the suitability of mouse cells for the study of intracellular pathogenesis mechanisms. Given that these hosts diverged over 70 million years ago, the similar pathogenic strategies for C. neoformans in murine and human cells supports the hypothesis that the mechanism that underlies the mammalian intracellular pathogenesis of C. neoformans originated from interactions with a third host, possibly soil amoeboid predators, before the mammalian radiation.

  10. Cancer anorexia: clinical implications, pathogenesis, and therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laviano, Alessandro; Meguid, Michael M; Rossi-Fanelli, Filippo

    2003-11-01

    Anorexia and reduced food intake are important issues in the management of patients with cancer because they contribute to the development of malnutrition, increase morbidity and mortality, and impinge on quality of life. Accumulating evidence indicates that cancer anorexia is multifactorial in its pathogenesis, and most of the hypothalamic neuronal signalling pathways modulating energy intake are likely to be involved. Several factors are considered to be putative mediators of cancer anorexia, including hormones (eg, leptin), neuropeptides (eg, neuropeptide Y), cytokines (eg, interleukin 1 and 6, and tumour necrosis factor), and neurotransmitters (eg, serotonin and dopamine). These pathways are not isolated and distinct pathogenic mechanisms but are closely inter-related. However, convincing evidence suggests that cytokines have a vital role, triggering the complex neurochemical cascade which leads to the onset of cancer anorexia. Increased expression of cytokines during tumour growth prevents the hypothalamus from responding appropriately to peripheral signals, by persistently activating anorexigenic systems and inhibiting prophagic pathways. Hypothalamic monoaminergic neurotransmission may contribute to these effects. Thus, the optimum therapeutic approach to anorectic cancer patients should include changes in dietary habits, achieved via nutritional counselling, and drug therapy, aimed at interfering with cytokine expression or hypothalamic monoaminergic neurotransmission.

  11. Role of leptin in the pathogenesis of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thayse Fachin Cormanique

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Leptin is a small polypeptide codified by the Obese Gene (OB, deeply related with the body fat mass and energetic balance. Due to its diverse biological effects and downstream signal transducers, multiple classifications have been attributed to leptin, as hormone, cytokine, adypokine, growth factor, and developmental factor, among others. This scenario gives us an idea of the size of the potential biological effects generated by this molecule. The concentration of leptin in the body is determined by the amount of adipose tissue; therefore, hyperleptinemia is a common finding in obese individuals. In addition, high levels of circulating leptin may confer a poor prognosis for any pathological condition. Although leptin history has been reported for more than 20 years, its relationship with cancer has gained notoriety in the past ten years, where studies focused on discussing the issue of obesity as a strong risk factor for cancer developing. Further, growing evidences have pointed leptin as a pivotal mediator of immune response, which aggravates the scenario of cancer occurrence in the presence of obesity. Therefore, leptin can present at least two faces in the pathogenesis of breast cancer, acting by immune and non-immune mechanisms. In this paper we review the dynamic of the leptin axis in breast cancer and further discuss its role in disease, immunopathogenesis and prognosis.

  12. Angiogenesis-Related Pathways in the Pathogenesis of Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristotle Bamias

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian Cancer represents the most fatal type of gynecological malignancies. A number of processes are involved in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer, especially within the tumor microenvironment. Angiogenesis represents a hallmark phenomenon in cancer, and it is responsible for tumor spread and metastasis in ovarian cancer, among other tumor types, as it leads to new blood vessel formation. In recent years angiogenesis has been given considerable attention in order to identify targets for developing effective anti-tumor therapies. Growth factors have been identified to play key roles in driving angiogenesis and, thus, the formation of new blood vessels that assist in “feeding” cancer. Such molecules include the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, the platelet derived growth factor (PDGF, the fibroblast growth factor (FGF, and the angiopoietin/Tie2 receptor complex. These proteins are key players in complex molecular pathways within the tumor cell and they have been in the spotlight of the development of anti-angiogenic molecules that may act as stand-alone therapeutics, or in concert with standard treatment regimes such as chemotherapy. The pathways involved in angiogenesis and molecules that have been developed in order to combat angiogenesis are described in this paper.

  13. Obesity, autophagy and the pathogenesis of liver and pancreatic cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghajan, Mariam; Li, Ning; Karin, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Liver and pancreatic cancers are both highly lethal diseases with limited to no therapeutic options for patients. Recent studies suggest that deregulated autophagy plays a role in the pathogenesis of these diseases by perturbing cellular homeostasis and laying the foundation for disease development. While accumulation of p62 upon impaired autophagy has been implicated in hepatocellular carcinoma, its role in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains less clear. This review will focus on recent studies illustrating the role of autophagy in liver and pancreatic cancers. The relationships between autophagy, nuclear factor-κB signaling and obesity in hepatocellular carcinoma will be discussed, as well as the dual role of autophagy in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. © 2012 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Comparative Aspects of Osteosarcoma Pathogenesis in Humans and Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy M. Fan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma (OS is a primary and aggressive bone sarcoma affecting the skeleton of two principal species, human beings and canines. The biologic behavior of OS is conserved between people and dogs, and evidence suggests that fundamental discoveries in OS biology can be facilitated through detailed and comparative studies. In particular, the relative genetic homogeneity associated with specific dog breeds can provide opportunities to facilitate the discovery of key genetic drivers involved in OS pathogenesis, which, to-date, remain elusive. In this review, known causative factors that predispose to the development OS in human beings and dogs are summarized in detail. Based upon the commonalities shared in OS pathogenesis, it is likely that foundational discoveries in one species will be translationally relevant to the other and emphasizes the unique opportunities that might be gained through comparative scientific approaches.

  15. Studying Herpesvirus Pathogenesis Using SCID Mice Implanted With Human Tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marvin; Sommer; Shannon; Taylor; Stacey; Leisenfelder; Robert; Morton; Ann; Arvin; Jennifer; Moffat

    2005-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus(HCMV)and Varicella Zoster virus(VZV)are belongto herpesvirusfamily.HCMVrarelycaus-es symptomatic diseaseinanimmunocompetent host;however,itis a major cause of infectious morbidityand mortalityinimmunocompromised individuals and developingfetuses.VZVinfectioncauses chickenpoxandshingles.Sincethese spe-cies-specific herpesviruses do notinfect other animals,noanimal model is availablefor pathogenesis studies.Severe com-binedimmunodeficient(SCID)mice implanted with humantissues(SCID-hu)pro...

  16. Role of Notch signaling pathway in gastric cancer pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Notch signaling pathway is activated dynamically during evolution playing significant role in cell fate determination and differentiation. It has been known that alterations of this pathway may lead to human malignancies, including gastric cancer. Despite a decline in the overall incidence, this disease still remains an important global health problem. Therefore, a better understanding of the molecular alterations underlying gastric cancer may contribute to the development of rationally desig...

  17. Expression of IL-18, IL-18 Binding Protein, and IL-18 Receptor by Normal and Cancerous Human Ovarian Tissues: Possible Implication of IL-18 in the Pathogenesis of Ovarian Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liat Medina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Proinflammatory cytokine IL-18 has been shown to be elevated in the sera of ovarian carcinoma patients. The aim of the study was to examine the levels and cellular origin of IL-18, IL-18 binding protein, and IL-18 receptor in normal and cancerous ovarian tissues. Ovarian tissue samples were examined by immunohistochemical staining for IL-18, IL-18BP, and IL-18R and mRNA of these cytokines was analyzed with semiquantitative PT-PCR. IL-18 levels were significantly higher in cancerous ovarian tissues (P=0.0007, IL-18BP levels were significantly higher in normal ovarian tissues (P=0.04, and the ratio of IL-18/IL-18BP was significantly higher in cancerous ovarian tissues (P=0.036. Cancerous ovarian tissues expressed significantly higher IL-18 mRNA levels (P=0.025, while there was no difference in the expression of IL-18BP mRNA and IL-18R mRNA between cancerous and normal ovarian tissues. IL-18 and IL-18BP were expressed dominantly in the epithelial cells of both cancerous and normal ovarian tissues, while IL-18R was expressed dominantly in the epithelial cells of cancerous ovarian tissues but expressed similarly in the epithelial and stromal cells of normal cancerous tissues. This study indicates a possible role of IL-18, IL-18BP, and IL-18R in the pathogenesis of epithelial ovarian carcinoma.

  18. Roles and mechanisms of copper transporting ATPases in cancer pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuqing; Li, Min; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Changyi

    2009-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is an essential trace element for cell metabolism as a cofactor to many key metabolic enzymes. Numerous physiological processes rely on the adequate and timely transport of copper ions mediated by copper-transporting ATPases (Cu-ATPases), which are essential for human cell growth and development. Inherited gene mutations of ATP7A and ATP7B result in clinical diseases related to damage in the multiple organ systems. Increased expression of these genes has been recently observed in some human cancer specimens, and may be associated with tumorigenesis and chemotherapy resistance. However, underlying mechanisms of Cu-ATPases in human cancer progression and treatment are largely unknown. In this review, we summarize current progress on the copper transport system, the structural and functional properties of the Cu-ATPases, ATP7A and ATP7B, in copper homeostasis, and their roles in anti-tumor drug resistance and cancer metastasis. This review provides valuable information for clinicians and researchers who want to recognize the newest advances in this new field and identify possible lines of investigation in copper transport as important mediators in human physiology and cancer.

  19. Pathogenesis, developmental consequences, and clinical correlations of human embryo fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Victor Y; Browne, Richard W; Bloom, Michael S; Sakkas, Denny; Alikani, Mina

    2011-03-15

    This narrative review summarizes the current state of knowledge about human embryo fragmentation during IVF. The clinical relevance of fragmentation is discussed and evidence supporting a central role for the oocyte in the pathogenesis of fragmentation is presented. A mechanism of fragmentation as aberrant cell division involving the cytoskeleton is described along with the novel concept of membrane instability in relation to follicular high-density lipoprotein metabolism and cholesterol transport. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Human evolutionary history: consequences for the pathogenesis of otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluestone, Charles D; Swarts, J Douglas

    2010-12-01

    The pathogenesis of otitis media is multifactorial, but the role of evolution on its development has not been addressed. We posit that the high prevalence of middle-ear disease is most likely restricted to humans, in contrast to other wild species, because the associated hearing loss would have reduced the fitness of affected individuals as a result of predation. We present here the possible consequences of two human adaptations that may have resulted in ubiquitous otitis media: the interaction of bipedalism and increased brain size, and the loss of facial prognathism resulting from speech or cooking. As a consequence of our adaptation for bipedalism, the female pelvic outlet is constricted, which, in the context of a rapidly enlarging brain, results in humans being born 12 months too soon. Significantly, immature eustachian tube structure and function, in conjunction with an immature immune system, helps to explain the high incidence of otitis media in the first year of life. But the persistence of middle-ear disease beyond this stage is not explained by "immaturity." The morphology of the palate changed with the adaptations that produced facial flattening, with concomitant effects on eustachian tube function. These changes resulted in relatively poor human physiologic tubal function in comparison to the nonhuman primate.

  1. The immunogenetics and pathogenesis of gastric cancer. Highlights of the First Sino-European Workshop on the Immunogenetics and Pathogenesis of Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, K; Crusius, J B A; Fan, D; Peña, A S

    2002-06-01

    Clinical scientists from eight European countries and China gathered in the ancient Chinese capital of Xi'an on April 26-28, 2001 to discuss collaboration on a modern approach to gastric cancer prevention. Participants at the First Sino-European Workshop on Immunogenetics and Pathogenesis of Gastric Cancer presented their most up-to-date research results on topics ranging from epidemiology and immune mechanisms to Helicobacter pylori and vaccine development. Researchers then formed groups with their Chinese or European counterparts to plan future research endeavors which will benefit Chinese and European populations alike. After 3 years of organization between the Institute of Digestive Diseases of the Fourth Medical University in Xi'an, China and the Laboratory of Immunogenetics, VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam, the first workshop came into being under the joint sponsorship of the Commission of the European Union, National Natural Science Foundation of China and the Institute of Digestive Diseases, Xi'an, China. As gastric cancer is the most prevalent malignant tumor in China, the workshop was of special significance to the Chinese researchers and to the Chinese population in general. During the workshop, presentations on the epidemiology of gastric cancer showed that this disease is in fact common the world over: it is the second most common cancer next to lung cancer and about 1 million new cases were diagnosed in 2000. Three-quarters of the cases of gastric cancer occur in Asia, and approximately 80% of these cases are in China and Japan. Genetic factors and environmental factors such as diet and H. pylori infection play a role in gastric carcinogenesis. As a recognized cause of gastric cancer, H. pylori was the subject of various presentations ranging from immunological studies, molecular analysis of strains and pathogenesis to vaccine development. Specific areas of discussion included bacterial-epithelial interactions in H. pylori infection

  2. FOXP1 forkhead transcription factor is associated with the pathogenesis of endometrial cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makito Mizunuma

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial cancers are mostly estrogen-dependent. FOXP1 is a P subfamily of forkhead box (FOX, and known as an estrogen-responsive transcription factor. The aims of this study were to examine histological location of FOXP1 in normal and malignant endometrium, and to investigate a possible association between FOXP1 and other factors considered to be involved in pathogenesis of endometrial cancer. The levels of FOXP1, estrogen receptor (ERα, and ERβ expression were examined immunohistochemically in normal and malignant endometrium obtained from 75 women (8 normal, 8 atypical endometrial hyperplasia, and 59 endometrial cancers from grade 1 to 3. The effects of estrogen on ERα, FOXP1, KRAS, and PTEN expression were analyzed in telomerase-immortalized human endometrial stromal cells (T HESCs by Western blotting. Western blotting was also used to examine the effect of FOXP1 plasmid DNA or siRNA transfection on KRAS and PTEN expression in Ishikawa cells (well differentiated endometrioid adenocarcinoma, HEC-50B cells (poorly differentiated endometrioid adenocarcinoma, and T HESCs, respectively. FOXP1 was expressed in normal and malignant endometrium, but the rate of expression was different depending upon menstrual cycle and pathological grade of malignancy. FOXP1 expression in nucleus and cytoplasm of grade 3 endometrioid cancers was significantly lower than that of grade 1 and 2 ones. Estradiol increased levels of FOXP1 and KRAS expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner in T HESCs cells, and FOXP1 transfection or knockdown led to increase or decrease of KRAS expression but not PTEN. KRAS expression level was significantly related to FOXP1 and ERα levels in cancer tissues. Estradiol did not affect KRAS expression in T HESCs cells transfected with FOXP1 siRNA. These results suggest that FOXP1 is involved in estrogen dependent endometrial cancers through KRAS pathway.

  3. Topoisomerase I in Human Disease Pathogenesis and Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian topoisomerase 1 (TOP1 is an essential enzyme for normal development. TOP1 relaxes supercoiled DNA to remove helical constraints that can otherwise hinder DNA replication and transcription and thus block cell growth. Unfortunately, this exact activity can covalently trap TOP1 on the DNA that could lead to cell death or mutagenesis, a precursor for tumorigenesis. It is therefore important for cells to find a proper balance between the utilization of the TOP1 catalytic activity to maintain DNA topology and the risk of accumulating the toxic DNA damages due to TOP1 trapping that prevents normal cell growth. In an apparent contradiction to the negative attribute of the TOP1 activity to genome stability, the detrimental effect of the TOP1-induced DNA lesions on cell survival has made this enzyme a prime target for cancer therapies to kill fast-growing cancer cells. In addition, cumulative evidence supports a direct role of TOP1 in promoting transcriptional progression independent of its topoisomerase activity. The involvement of TOP1 in transcriptional regulation has recently become a focus in developing potential new treatments for a subtype of autism spectrum disorders. Clearly, the impact of TOP1 on human health is multifold. In this review, we will summarize our current understandings on how TOP1 contributes to human diseases and how its activity is targeted for disease treatments.

  4. Topoisomerase I in Human Disease Pathogenesis and Treatments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Li; Yilun Liu

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian topoisomerase 1 (TOP1) is an essential enzyme for normal development. TOP1 relaxes supercoiled DNA to remove helical constraints that can otherwise hinder DNA repli-cation and transcription and thus block cell growth. Unfortunately, this exact activity can covalently trap TOP1 on the DNA that could lead to cell death or mutagenesis, a precursor for tumorigenesis. It is therefore important for cells to find a proper balance between the utilization of the TOP1 cat-alytic activity to maintain DNA topology and the risk of accumulating the toxic DNA damages due to TOP1 trapping that prevents normal cell growth. In an apparent contradiction to the negative attribute of the TOP1 activity to genome stability, the detrimental effect of the TOP1-induced DNA lesions on cell survival has made this enzyme a prime target for cancer therapies to kill fast-growing cancer cells. In addition, cumulative evidence supports a direct role of TOP1 in pro-moting transcriptional progression independent of its topoisomerase activity. The involvement of TOP1 in transcriptional regulation has recently become a focus in developing potential new treat-ments for a subtype of autism spectrum disorders. Clearly, the impact of TOP1 on human health is multifold. In this review, we will summarize our current understandings on how TOP1 contributes to human diseases and how its activity is targeted for disease treatments.

  5. The pathogenesis and treatment of cardiac atrophy in cancer cachexia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murphy, Kate T

    2016-01-01

    .... In addition to a loss of skeletal muscle mass and function, many patients with cancer cachexia also experience cardiac atrophy, remodeling, and dysfunction, which in the field of cancer cachexia...

  6. Obesity Exposure Across the Lifespan on Ovarian Cancer Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    trial of metformin/paclitaxel/carboplatin in ovarian cancer patients. NOTE: This grant is to be reviewed on October 5th, 2015. REFERENCES 1...Obesity and the risk of epithelial ovarian cancer : a systematic review and meta-analysis. Eur J Cancer . 2007;43(4):690-709. PubMed PMID: 17223544. 4...cal months, 3% effort). Dr. Damania is a Professor in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology and a member of the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer

  7. Clues to the pathogenesis of familial colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, L.A.; Peltomaeki, P.; Pylkkaenen, L.; Chappelle, A. de la (Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)); Leach, F.S.; Powell, S.M.; Jen, J.; Hamilton, S.R.; Petersen, G.M.; Kinzler, K.W.; Vogelstein, B. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States) Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Sistonen, P. (Univ. of Helsinki (Finland) Finnish Red Cross Blood Transfusion Service, Helsinki (Finland)); Mecklin, J.P. (Jyvaeskylae Central Hospital (Finland)); Jaervinen, H. (Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland))

    1993-05-07

    A predisposition to colorectal cancer is shown to be linked to markers on chromosome 2 in some families. Molecular features of familial cancers were compared with those of sporadic colon cancers. Neither the familial nor sporadic cancers showed loss of heterozygosity for chromosome 2 markers, and the incidence of mutations in KRAS, P53, and APC was similar in the two groups of tumors. Most of the familial cancers, however, had widespread alterations in short repeated DNA sequences, suggesting that numerous replication errors had occurred during tumor development. Thirteen percent of sporadic cancers had identical abnormalities and these cancers shared biologic properties with the familial cases. These data suggest a mechanism for familial tumorigenesis different from that mediated by classic tumor suppressor genes. 22 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Preclinical and Clinical Investigation of the Impact of Obesity on Ovarian Cancer Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0426 TITLE: Preclinical and Clinical Investigation of the Impact of Obesity on Ovarian Cancer Pathogenesis PRINCIPAL...ANNUAL 25 Sep 2013 - 24 Sep 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Pre-clinical and Clinical Investigation of the Impact of Obesity on Ovarian...metabolic consequences of obesity may be critical in the development of ovarian cancer (OC), resulting in biologically different cancers than those that

  9. The pathogenesis and treatment of cardiac atrophy in cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kate T

    2016-02-15

    Cancer cachexia is a multifactorial syndrome characterized by a progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass associated with significant functional impairment. In addition to a loss of skeletal muscle mass and function, many patients with cancer cachexia also experience cardiac atrophy, remodeling, and dysfunction, which in the field of cancer cachexia is described as cardiac cachexia. The cardiac alterations may be due to underlying heart disease, the cancer itself, or problems initiated by the cancer treatment and, unfortunately, remains largely underappreciated by clinicians and basic scientists. Despite recent major advances in the treatment of cancer, little progress has been made in the treatment of cardiac cachexia in cancer, and much of this is due to lack of information regarding the mechanisms. This review focuses on the cardiac atrophy associated with cancer cachexia, describing some of the known mechanisms and discussing the current and future therapeutic strategies to treat this condition. Above all else, improved awareness of the condition and an increased focus on identification of mechanisms and therapeutic targets will facilitate the eventual development of an effective treatment for cardiac atrophy in cancer cachexia. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Malnutrition in lung cancer: incidence, prognostic implications, and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisner, D L

    1982-01-01

    Malnutrition and weight loss are common in patients with lung cancer. Weight loss is an independent prognostic factor for survival in lung cancer treatment studies. Metabolic disturbances probably play a dominant role in weight loss in these patients rather than reduced food intake. The identification of the pertinent etiologic metabolic abnormalities and development of specific therapeutic intervention should be goals for future research.

  11. Connexins and Cadherin Crosstalk in the Pathogenesis of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    and challenges of connexin connections to cancer. Nat Rev Cancer, 10, 435-441. 5. Plante ,I., Stewart,M.K.G., Barr,K., Allan,A.L., and Laird,D.W...Gap junction protein connexin32 interacts with the Src homology 3/hook do- main of Discs large homolog 1. J. Biol. Chem. 282, 9789–9796 45. Stauch, K

  12. Pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension: lessons from cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guignabert, Christophe; Tu, Ly; Le Hiress, Morane; Ricard, Nicolas; Sattler, Caroline; Seferian, Andrei; Huertas, Alice; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David

    2013-12-01

    Although the causal pathomechanisms contributing to remodelling of the pulmonary vascular bed in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are still unclear, several analogous features with carcinogenesis have led to the emergence of the cancer-like concept. The major similarities concern the altered crosstalk between cells from different tissue types, unexplained proliferation and survival of pulmonary smooth muscle and endothelial cells, the metabolic (glycolytic) shifts, and the association with the immune system. However, major differences between PAH and cancer exist, including the absence of invasion and metastasis, as well as the pathogenic genes involved and the degrees of angiogenesis impairment and genetic instability. It is clear that PAH is not a cancer, but this cancer-like concept has opened a new field of investigation and raises the possibility that antiproliferative and/or oncological drugs may exert therapeutic effects not only in cancer, but also in PAH. Such analogies and differences are discussed here.

  13. Pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension: lessons from cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Guignabert

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Although the causal pathomechanisms contributing to remodelling of the pulmonary vascular bed in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH are still unclear, several analogous features with carcinogenesis have led to the emergence of the cancer-like concept. The major similarities concern the altered crosstalk between cells from different tissue types, unexplained proliferation and survival of pulmonary smooth muscle and endothelial cells, the metabolic (glycolytic shifts, and the association with the immune system. However, major differences between PAH and cancer exist, including the absence of invasion and metastasis, as well as the pathogenic genes involved and the degrees of angiogenesis impairment and genetic instability. It is clear that PAH is not a cancer, but this cancer-like concept has opened a new field of investigation and raises the possibility that antiproliferative and/or oncological drugs may exert therapeutic effects not only in cancer, but also in PAH. Such analogies and differences are discussed here.

  14. Prevalence of human papillomavirus in epithelial ovarian cancer tissue. A meta-analysis of observational studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svahn, Malene F; Faber, Mette Tuxen; Christensen, Jane

    2014-01-01

    The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is controversial, and conflicting results have been published. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the prevalence of HPV in epithelial ovarian cancer tissue.......The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is controversial, and conflicting results have been published. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the prevalence of HPV in epithelial ovarian cancer tissue....

  15. Angiogenesis factors involved in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalache, A; Rogoveanu, I

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer stands at the top of oncologic pathology in the world, and in the same measure in Romania because is the third most frequent cancer diagnosed in men and women. Colorectal cancer develops as a result of mutations in genes that control proliferation and cell death. It was established that in the development of a tumor there is originally a prevascular phase followed by a phase of tumor angiogenesis. In the future it is necessary to develop new clinical protocols that angiogenesis inhibitors are associated with chemo or radiotherapy, conventional or other methods such as immunotherapy and gene therapy.

  16. The Isolation and Characterization of Human Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    IGF1, SOX15, BMPR1B, TGFBR1, etc), which fall into distinct GO categories including SC, development, stress response, and wound healing (unpublished...prostate cancer through the elucidation of the role of cancer stem cells in the pathogenesis of the disease. During the past year, we have made the...studies, ii) in vitro co-culture of human prostate cancer cells (established cell lines and primary patient samples) with human prostate fibroblasts

  17. The progress of study on pathogenesis in ovarian cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Yu-bin; LI Hai-jiao; YU Lei; LIU Guang-da; PANG Lin-lin; YANG Hai-fan

    2008-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the three malignant tumors in female reproductive system, the death rate locates in the first place of gynecological cancer. Most patients are already at the advanced stage when examine their bodies, five-year survival rate are only about 20 % to 30 %. So gynecological cancer has bedome one of tumor which the most waiting to be considered. It happens refer to the incidence of chromosomal abnormalities, cancer gene change. The inactivation of tumor suppressor gene, inhibitor of apoptosis and other genetic changes, the imbalance in the regulatory network due to the interaction of multiple genes and their product. Chromosomal abnormalities play an important role in the development of ovarian cancer, the chromosomes of common characteristic and non-random changes are 1,3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 11, 12, 15, 17, 18, 20, 22 etc. Cancer gene including K-ras, c-erb-B2/HER-2, D1 (CyclinD1), AIB1 etc. K-ras coded protein p21 is activated through point mutation, cause the enzyme activity deprivation of GMP, slowed down the speed of GTP degrdn into GMP, activate target molecule persistently, make cells proliferate persistently, then leading to cancer. HER-2 gene amplification result in the over expression of HER-2 protein, made cells over proliferate,Protein over expression convey the strong signal of proliferation, over activate the early transcription factor and certain gene in the nuclear, then promote the occurrence of cancer. Cyclin D1 promote cells enter from S to Gl phase, thus contribute to the proliferation of cell division, then canceration. AIB1 gene over express, will cause tumor cells immortalized. Tumor suppressor gene, such as BRCA1, p53, p73, p16 etc. The expression depl of BRCA1 protein in ovarian Cystadenocarcinoma prompt that the reduction of BRCA1 protein synthesis, resulting in apoptosis decreased, the cell proliferation disinhibit, then disorder and proliferate, thus leading to cancer, p53 mutation happened in about 30 percents to 80 percents

  18. Pathogenesis and consequences of uniparental disomy in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makishima, Hideki; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P

    2011-06-15

    The systematic application of new genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism arrays has demonstrated that somatically acquired regions of loss of heterozygosity without changes in copy number frequently occur in many types of cancer. Until recently, the ubiquity of this type of chromosomal defect had gone unrecognized because it cannot be detected by routine cytogenetic technologies. Random and recurrent patterns of copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity, also referred to as uniparental disomy, can be found in specific cancer types and probably contribute to clonal outgrowth owing to various mechanisms. In this review we explore the types, topography, genesis, pathophysiological consequences, and clinical implications of uniparental disomy.

  19. Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer: A Review of Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govardhanan Nagaiah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC is an uncommon malignancy of the thyroid. Only 1-2% of thyroid cancers are anaplastic, but the disease contributes to 14–50% of the mortality with a median survival of 3 to 5 months. Most patients diagnosed with this disease are 65 years of age or older. The incidence of anaplastic thyroid cancer is decreasing worldwide. Most patients present with a rapidly growing neck mass, dysphagia, or voice change. We performed a comprehensive literature search using PubMed focusing on the treatment of anaplastic thyroid cancer including historical review of treatment and outcomes and investigations of new agents and approaches. A total of sixteen chart review and retrospective studies and eleven prospective studies and/or clinical trials were reviewed. The current standard therapeutic approach is to consider the disease as systemic at time of diagnosis and pursue combined modality therapy incorporating cytoreductive surgical resection where feasible and/or chemoradiation either concurrently or sequentially. Doxorubicin is the most commonly used agent, with a response rate of 22%. Several new agents are currently under investigation. Referral of patients for participation in clinical trials is needed.

  20. Immune escape mechanisms in colorectal cancer pathogenesis and liver metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancione, Massimo; Giordano, Guido; Remo, Andrea; Febbraro, Antonio; Sabatino, Lina; Manfrin, Erminia; Ceccarelli, Michele; Colantuoni, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, growing evidence indicates that the tumor microenvironment (TME) contributes with genomic/epigenomic aberrations of malignant cells to enhance cancer cells survival, invasion, and dissemination. Many factors, produced or de novo synthesized by immune, stromal, or malignant cells, acting in a paracrine and autocrine fashion, remodel TME and the adaptive immune response culminating in metastasis. Taking into account the recent accomplishments in the field of immune oncology and using metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) as a model, we propose that the evasion of the immune surveillance and metastatic spread can be achieved through a number of mechanisms that include (a) intrinsic plasticity and adaptability of immune and malignant cells to paracrine and autocrine stimuli or genotoxic stresses; (b) alteration of positional schemes of myeloid-lineage cells, produced by factors controlling the balance between tumour-suppressing and tumour-promoting activities; (c) acquisition by cancer cells of aberrant immune-phenotypic traits (NT5E/CD73, CD68, and CD163) that enhance the interactions among TME components through the production of immune-suppressive mediators. These properties may represent the driving force of metastatic progression and thus clinically exploitable for cancer prevention and therapy. In this review we summarize results and suggest new hypotheses that favour the growing impact of tumor-infiltrating immune cells on tumour progression, metastasis, and therapy resistance.

  1. Current humanized mouse models for studying human immunology and HIV-1 immuno-pathogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MEISSNER; Eric

    2010-01-01

    A robust animal model for "hypothesis-testing/mechanistic" research in human immunology and immuno-pathology should meet the following criteria.First,it has well-studied hemato-lymphoid organs and target cells similar to those of humans.Second,the human pathogens establish infection and lead to relevant diseases.Third,it is genetically inbred and can be manipulated via genetic,immunological and pharmacological means.Many human-tropic pathogens such as HIV-1 fail to infect murine cells due to the blocks at multiple steps of their life cycle.The mouse with a reconstituted human immune system and other human target organs is a good candidate.A number of human-mouse chimeric models with human immune cells have been developed in the past 20 years,but most with only limited success due to the selective engraftment of xeno-reactive human T cells in hu-PBL-SCID mice or the lack of significant human immune responses in the SCID-hu Thy/Liv mouse.This review summarizes the current understanding of HIV-1 immuno-pathogenesis in human patients and in SIV-infected primate models.It also reviews the recent progress in the development of humanized mouse models with a functional human immune system,especially the recent progress in the immunodeficient mice that carry a defective gammaC gene.NOD/SCID/gammaC-/(NOG or NSG) or the Rag2-/-/gammaC-/double knockout (DKO) mice,which lack NK as well as T and B cells (NTB-null mice),have been used to reconstitute a functional human immune system in central and peripheral lymphoid organs with human CD34+ HSC.These NTB-hu HSC humanized models have been used to investigate HIV-1 infection,immuno-pathogenesis and therapeutic interventions.Such models,with further improvements,will contribute to study human immunology,human-tropic pathogens as well as human stem cell biology in the tissue development and function in vivo.

  2. Transforming growth factor-β in the pathogenesis of breast cancer metastasis and fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petersen, Maj

    2010-01-01

    Since the discovery and cloning of TGF-β tremendous scientific effort has led to a so- phisticated understanding of the multifunctional actions of this pleiotropic growth factor. TGF-β regulates a myriad of processes in normal tissues and in disease pathogenesis. In cancer, TGF-β often suppress earl

  3. Polymorphisms In The Nitric-Oxide Synthase 2 Gene And Prostate Cancer Pathogenesis

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    Charlotta Ryk

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: Nitric oxide can induce proliferation as well as apoptosis depending on cellular context. Our results suggest that NOS2 polymorphisms may influence the risk of aggressive prostate cancer and that these polymorphisms could have an impact on disease pathogenesis, possibly by affecting intracellular nitric oxide levels.

  4. Human teratogens and genetic phenocopies. Understanding pathogenesis through human genes mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassina, Matteo; Cagnoli, Giulia A; Zuccarello, Daniela; Di Gianantonio, Elena; Clementi, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to teratogenic drugs during pregnancy is associated with a wide range of embryo-fetal anomalies and sometimes results in recurrent and recognizable patterns of malformations; however, the comprehension of the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of drug-induced birth defects is difficult, since teratogenesis is a multifactorial process which is always the result of a complex interaction between several environmental factors and the genetic background of both the mother and the fetus. Animal models have been extensively used to assess the teratogenic potential of pharmacological agents and to study their teratogenic mechanisms; however, a still open issue concerns how the information gained through animal models can be translated to humans. Instead, significant information can be obtained by the identification and analysis of human genetic syndromes characterized by clinical features overlapping with those observed in drug-induced embryopathies. Until now, genetic phenocopies have been reported for the embryopathies/fetopathies associated with prenatal exposure to warfarin, leflunomide, mycophenolate mofetil, fluconazole, thalidomide and ACE inhibitors. In most cases, genetic phenocopies are caused by mutations in genes encoding for the main targets of teratogens or for proteins belonging to the same molecular pathways. The aim of this paper is to review the proposed teratogenic mechanisms of these drugs, by the analysis of human monogenic disorders and their molecular pathogenesis.

  5. Contribution of Neuroinflammation to the Pathogenesis of Cancer Cachexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Molfino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation characterizes the course of acute and chronic diseases and is largely responsible for the metabolic and behavioral changes occurring during the clinical journey of patients. Robust data indicate that, during cancer, functional modifications within brain areas regulating energy homeostasis contribute to the onset of anorexia, reduced food intake, and increased catabolism of muscle mass and adipose tissue. In particular, functional changes are associated with increased hypothalamic concentration of proinflammatory cytokines, which suggests that neuroinflammation may represent the adaptive response of the brain to peripheral challenges, including tumor growth. Within this conceptual framework, the vagus nerve appears to be involved in conveying alert signals to the hypothalamus, whereas hypothalamic serotonin appears to contribute to triggering catabolic signals.

  6. Human Viruses and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail Morales-Sánchez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The first human tumor virus was discovered in the middle of the last century by Anthony Epstein, Bert Achong and Yvonne Barr in African pediatric patients with Burkitt’s lymphoma. To date, seven viruses -EBV, KSHV, high-risk HPV, MCPV, HBV, HCV and HTLV1- have been consistently linked to different types of human cancer, and infections are estimated to account for up to 20% of all cancer cases worldwide. Viral oncogenic mechanisms generally include: generation of genomic instability, increase in the rate of cell proliferation, resistance to apoptosis, alterations in DNA repair mechanisms and cell polarity changes, which often coexist with evasion mechanisms of the antiviral immune response. Viral agents also indirectly contribute to the development of cancer mainly through immunosuppression or chronic inflammation, but also through chronic antigenic stimulation. There is also evidence that viruses can modulate the malignant properties of an established tumor. In the present work, causation criteria for viruses and cancer will be described, as well as the viral agents that comply with these criteria in human tumors, their epidemiological and biological characteristics, the molecular mechanisms by which they induce cellular transformation and their associated cancers.

  7. Endometriosis-Associated Ovarian Cancer: A Review of Pathogenesis

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    Shu-Wing Ng

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is classically defined as the presence of endometrial glands and stroma outside of the endometrial lining and uterine musculature. With an estimated frequency of 5%–10% among women of reproductive age, endometriosis is a common gynecologic disorder. While in itself a benign lesion, endometriosis shares several characteristics with invasive cancer, has been shown to undergo malignant transformation, and has been associated with an increased risk of epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC. Numerous epidemiologic studies have shown an increased risk of EOC among women with endometriosis. This is particularly true for women with endometrioid and clear cell ovarian carcinoma. However, the carcinogenic pathways by which endometriosis associated ovarian carcinoma (EAOC develops remain poorly understood. Current molecular studies have sought to link endometriosis with EAOC through pathways related to oxidative stress, inflammation and hyperestrogenism. In addition, numerous studies have sought to identify an intermediary lesion between endometriosis and EAOC that may allow for the identification of endometriosis at greatest risk for malignant transformation or for the prevention of malignant transformation of this common gynecologic disorder. The objective of the current article is to review the current data regarding the molecular events associated with EAOC development from endometriosis, with a primary focus on malignancies of the endometrioid and clear cell histologic sub-types.

  8. Human papillomaviruses and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haedicke, Juliane; Iftner, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are small oncogenic DNA viruses of which more than 200 types have been identified to date. A small subset of these is etiologically linked to the development of anogenital malignancies such as cervical cancer. In addition, recent studies established a causative relationship between these high-risk HPV types and tonsillar and oropharyngeal cancer. Clinical management of cervical cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) is largely standardized and involves surgical removal of the tumor tissue as well as adjuvant chemoradiation therapy. Notably, the response to therapeutic intervention of HPV-positive HNSCCs has been found to be better as compared to HPV-negative tumors. Although the existing HPV vaccine is solely licensed for the prevention of cervical cancer, it might also have prophylactic potential for the development of high-risk HPV-associated HNSCCs. Another group of viruses, which belongs to the beta-HPV subgroup, has been implicated in nonmelanoma skin cancer, however, the etiology remains to be established. Treatment of HPV-induced nonmelanoma skin cancer is based on local excision. However, topically applied immune-modulating substances represent non-surgical alternatives for the management of smaller cutaneous tumors. In this review we present the current knowledge of the role of HPV in cancer development and discuss clinical management options as well as targets for the development of future intervention therapies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Ectopic endometrium in human foetuses is a common event and sustains the theory of müllerianosis in the pathogenesis of endometriosis, a disease that predisposes to cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signorile Pietro G

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endometriosis is a gynecological disease defined by the histological presence of endometrial glands and stroma outside the uterine cavity. Women with endometriosis have an increased risk of different types of malignancies, especially ovarian cancer and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Though there are several theories, researchers remain unsure as to the definitive cause of endometriosis. Our objective was to test the validity of the theory of müllerianosis for endometriosis, that is the misplacing of primitive endometrial tissue along the migratory pathway of foetal organogenesis Methods We have collected at autopsy 36 human female foetuses at different gestational age. We have performed a morphological and immunohistochemical study (expression of oestrogen receptor and CA125 on the pelvic organs of the 36 foetuses included en-block and totally analyzed. Results In 4 out of 36 foetuses we found presence of misplaced endometrium in five different ectopic sites: in the recto-vaginal septum, in the proximity of the Douglas pouch, in the mesenchimal tissue close to the posterior wall of the uterus, in the rectal tube at the level of muscularis propria, and in the wall of the uterus. All these sites are common location of endometriosis in women. Conclusion We propose that a cause of endometriosis is the dislocation of primitive endometrial tissue outside the uterine cavity during organogenesis.

  10. [Human papillomaviruses in the pathogenesis of intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) and carcinoma of the anus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Knebel Doeberitz, M; Reuschenbach, M

    2010-01-01

    HPV infections have been implicated in the pathogenesis of anal cancers. The mode of infection and subsequent transformation resembles very much the pathogenesis of cervical and other HPV-associated cancers. The molecular dissection of individual steps required to achieve cellular transformation within an HPV-infected cell led to the identification of novel biomarkers that make it possible to identify HPV-transformed cells with substantially higher precision in comparison to conventional methods. Since effective antiretroviral therapy allows for possible long-term survival of HIV-infected individuals who are at very high risk to develop HPV-associated cancers in the anogenital tract, these new developments have become increasingly relevant for practicing dermatologists and proctologists. We here briefly review the basic concepts and some clinical applications of this recent research.

  11. Serglycin in human cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Jian Li; Chao-Nan Qian

    2011-01-01

    Serglycin belongs to a family of small proteoglycans with Ser-Gly dipeptide repeats,and it is modified with different types of glycosaminoglycan side chains.Intracellular serglycin affects the retention and secretion of proteases,chemokines,or other cytokines by physically binding to these factors in secretory granules.Extracellular serglycin has been found to be released by several types of human cancer cells,and it is able to promote the metastasis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.Serglycin can bind to CD44,which is another glycoprotein located in cellular membrane.Serglycin's function of promoting cancer cell metastasis depends on glycosylation of its core protein,which can be achieved by autocrine as well as paracrine secretion mechanisms.Further investigations are warranted to elucidate serglycin signaling mechanisms with the goal of targeting them to prevent cancer cell metastasis.

  12. The Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Infectivity and Mechanisms of Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauci, Anthony S.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how the infection of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) results in a profound immunosuppression due predominantly to a selective depletion of helper/inducer T lymphocytes that express the receptor for the virus, as well as neuropsychiatric abnormalities in the brain. (TW)

  13. Spina Bifida: Pathogenesis, Mechanisms, and Genes in Mice and Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti W. Mohd-Zin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Spina bifida is among the phenotypes of the larger condition known as neural tube defects (NTDs. It is the most common central nervous system malformation compatible with life and the second leading cause of birth defects after congenital heart defects. In this review paper, we define spina bifida and discuss the phenotypes seen in humans as described by both surgeons and embryologists in order to compare and ultimately contrast it to the leading animal model, the mouse. Our understanding of spina bifida is currently limited to the observations we make in mouse models, which reflect complete or targeted knockouts of genes, which perturb the whole gene(s without taking into account the issue of haploinsufficiency, which is most prominent in the human spina bifida condition. We thus conclude that the need to study spina bifida in all its forms, both aperta and occulta, is more indicative of the spina bifida in surviving humans and that the measure of deterioration arising from caudal neural tube defects, more commonly known as spina bifida, must be determined by the level of the lesion both in mouse and in man.

  14. Spina Bifida: Pathogenesis, Mechanisms, and Genes in Mice and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd-Zin, Siti W; Marwan, Ahmed I; Abou Chaar, Mohamad K; Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina; Abdul-Aziz, Noraishah M

    2017-01-01

    Spina bifida is among the phenotypes of the larger condition known as neural tube defects (NTDs). It is the most common central nervous system malformation compatible with life and the second leading cause of birth defects after congenital heart defects. In this review paper, we define spina bifida and discuss the phenotypes seen in humans as described by both surgeons and embryologists in order to compare and ultimately contrast it to the leading animal model, the mouse. Our understanding of spina bifida is currently limited to the observations we make in mouse models, which reflect complete or targeted knockouts of genes, which perturb the whole gene(s) without taking into account the issue of haploinsufficiency, which is most prominent in the human spina bifida condition. We thus conclude that the need to study spina bifida in all its forms, both aperta and occulta, is more indicative of the spina bifida in surviving humans and that the measure of deterioration arising from caudal neural tube defects, more commonly known as spina bifida, must be determined by the level of the lesion both in mouse and in man.

  15. Spina Bifida: Pathogenesis, Mechanisms, and Genes in Mice and Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Chaar, Mohamad K.; Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina

    2017-01-01

    Spina bifida is among the phenotypes of the larger condition known as neural tube defects (NTDs). It is the most common central nervous system malformation compatible with life and the second leading cause of birth defects after congenital heart defects. In this review paper, we define spina bifida and discuss the phenotypes seen in humans as described by both surgeons and embryologists in order to compare and ultimately contrast it to the leading animal model, the mouse. Our understanding of spina bifida is currently limited to the observations we make in mouse models, which reflect complete or targeted knockouts of genes, which perturb the whole gene(s) without taking into account the issue of haploinsufficiency, which is most prominent in the human spina bifida condition. We thus conclude that the need to study spina bifida in all its forms, both aperta and occulta, is more indicative of the spina bifida in surviving humans and that the measure of deterioration arising from caudal neural tube defects, more commonly known as spina bifida, must be determined by the level of the lesion both in mouse and in man. PMID:28286691

  16. Clinical implications of miRNAs in the pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Macha, Muzafar A; Heimann, Nicholas; Seshacharyulu, Parthasarathy; Haridas, Dhanya; Chugh, Seema; Batra, Surinder K

    2015-01-01

    Despite considerable progress being made in understanding pancreatic cancer (PC) pathogenesis, it still remains the 10th most often diagnosed malignancy in the world and 4th leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States with a five year survival rate of only 6%. The aggressive nature, lack of early diagnostic and prognostic markers, late clinical presentation, and limited efficacy of existing treatment regimens make PC a lethal cancer with high mortality and poor prognosis. Therefore, novel reliable biomarkers and molecular targets are urgently needed to combat this deadly disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short (19-24 nucleotides) non-coding RNA molecules implicated in the regulation of gene expression at post-transcriptional level and play significant roles in various physiological and pathological conditions. Aberrant expression of miRNAs has been reported in several cancers including PC and is implicated in PC pathogenesis and progression, suggesting their utility in diagnosis, prognosis and therapy. In this review, we summarize the role of several miRNAs that regulate various oncogenes (KRAS) and tumor suppressor genes (p53, p16, SMAD4, etc.) involved in PC development, their prospective roles as diagnostic and prognostic markers and as a therapeutic targets.

  17. Hantavirus-induced pathogenesis in mice with a humanized immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobak, Lidija; Raftery, Martin J; Voigt, Sebastian; Kühl, Anja A; Kilic, Ergin; Kurth, Andreas; Witkowski, Peter; Hofmann, Jörg; Nitsche, Andreas; Schaade, Lars; Krüger, Detlev H; Schönrich, Günther

    2015-06-01

    Hantaviruses are emerging zoonotic pathogens that can cause severe disease in humans. Clinical observations suggest that human immune components contribute to hantavirus-induced pathology. To address this issue we generated mice with a humanized immune system. Hantavirus infection of these animals resulted in systemic infection associated with weight loss, decreased activity, ruffled fur and inflammatory infiltrates of lung tissue. Intriguingly, after infection, humanized mice harbouring human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I-restricted human CD8+ T cells started to lose weight earlier (day 10) than HLA class I-negative humanized mice (day 15). Moreover, in these mice the number of human platelets dropped by 77 % whereas the number of murine platelets did not change, illustrating how differences between rodent and human haemato-lymphoid systems may contribute to disease development. To our knowledge this is the first description of a humanized mouse model of hantavirus infection, and our results indicate a role for human immune cells in hantaviral pathogenesis.

  18. A hypusine-eIF5A-PEAK1 switch regulates the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Ken; Wright, Tracy; Strnadel, Jan; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Metildi, Cristina; Lowy, Andrew M; Bouvet, Michael; Kelber, Jonathan A; Klemke, Richard L

    2014-11-15

    Deregulation of protein synthesis is a hallmark of cancer cell proliferation, survival, and metastatic progression. eIF5A1 and its highly related isoform eIF5A2 are translation initiation factors that have been implicated in a range of human malignancies, but how they control cancer development and disease progression is still poorly understood. Here, we investigated how eIF5A proteins regulate pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) pathogenesis. eIF5A proteins are the only known proteins regulated by a distinct posttranslational modification termed hypusination, which is catalyzed by two enzymes, deoxyhypusine synthase (DHPS) and deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (DOHH). The highly selective nature of the hypusine modification and its amenability to pharmacologic inhibition make eIF5A proteins attractive therapeutic targets. We found that the expression and hypusination of eIF5A proteins are upregulated in human PDAC tissues and in premalignant pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia tissues isolated from Pdx-1-Cre: LSL-KRAS(G12D) mice. Knockdown of eIF5A proteins in PDAC cells inhibited their growth in vitro and orthotopic tumor growth in vivo, whereas amplification of eIF5A proteins increased PDAC cell growth and tumor formation in mice. Small-molecule inhibitors of DHPS and DOHH both suppressed eIF5A hypusination, preventing PDAC cell growth. Interestingly, we found that eIF5A proteins regulate PDAC cell growth by modulating the expression of PEAK1, a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase essential for PDAC cell growth and therapy resistance. Our findings suggest that eIF5A proteins utilize PEAK1 as a downstream effector to drive PDAC pathogenesis and that pharmacologic inhibition of the eIF5A-hypusine-PEAK1 axis may provide a novel therapeutic strategy to combat this deadly disease. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Alterations of 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine in Human Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Yesilkanal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Prior to 2009, 5-methylcytosine (5-mC was thought to be the only biologically significant cytosine modification in mammalian DNA. With the discovery of the TET enzymes, which convert 5-methylcytosine (5-mC to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC, however, intense interest has emerged in determining the biological function of 5-hmC. Here, we review the techniques used to study 5-hmC and evidence that alterations to 5-hmC physiology play a functional role in the molecular pathogenesis of human cancers.

  20. Genetic alterations in Krebs cycle and its impact on cancer pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajnani, Karishma; Islam, Farhadul; Smith, Robert Anthony; Gopalan, Vinod; Lam, Alfred King-Yin

    2017-04-01

    Cancer cells exhibit alterations in many cellular processes, including oxygen sensing and energy metabolism. Glycolysis in non-oxygen condition is the main energy production process in cancer rather than mitochondrial respiration as in benign cells. Genetic and epigenetic alterations of Krebs cycle enzymes favour the shift of cancer cells from oxidative phosphorylation to anaerobic glycolysis. Mutations in genes encoding aconitase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, fumarate hydratase, and citrate synthase are noted in many cancers. Abnormalities of Krebs cycle enzymes cause ectopic production of Krebs cycle intermediates (oncometabolites) such as 2-hydroxyglutarate, and citrate. These oncometabolites stabilize hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF1), nuclear factor like 2 (Nrf2), inhibit p53 and prolyl hydroxylase 3 (PDH3) activities as well as regulate DNA/histone methylation, which in turn activate cell growth signalling. They also stimulate increased glutaminolysis, glycolysis and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Additionally, genetic alterations in Krebs cycle enzymes are involved with increased fatty acid β-oxidations and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) induction. These altered phenomena in cancer could in turn promote carcinogenesis by stimulating cell proliferation and survival. Overall, epigenetic and genetic changes of Krebs cycle enzymes lead to the production of oncometabolite intermediates, which are important driving forces of cancer pathogenesis and progression. Understanding and applying the knowledge of these mechanisms opens new therapeutic options for patients with cancer.

  1. Pathogenesis of cerebral malformations in human fetuses with meningomyelocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brouwer Oebele F

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fetal spina bifida aperta (SBA is characterized by a spinal meningomyelocele (MMC and associated with cerebral pathology, such as hydrocephalus and Chiari II malformation. In various animal models, it has been suggested that a loss of ventricular lining (neuroepithelial/ependymal denudation may trigger cerebral pathology. In fetuses with MMC, little is known about neuroepithelial/ependymal denudation and the initiating pathological events. The objective of this study was to investigate whether neuroepithelial/ependymal denudation occurs in human fetuses and neonates with MMC, and if so, whether it is associated with the onset of hydrocephalus. Methods Seven fetuses and 1 neonate (16–40 week gestational age, GA with MMC and 6 fetuses with normal cerebral development (22–41 week GA were included in the study. Identification of fetal MMC and clinical surveillance of fetal head circumference and ventricular width was performed by ultrasound (US. After birth, MMC was confirmed by histology. We characterized hydrocephalus by increased head circumference in association with ventriculomegaly. The median time interval between fetal cerebral ultrasound and fixing tissue for histology was four days. Results At 16 weeks GA, we observed neuroepithelial/ependymal denudation in the aqueduct and telencephalon together with sub-cortical heterotopias in absence of hydrocephalus and/or Chiari II malformation. At 21–34 weeks GA, we observed concurrence of aqueductal neuroepithelial/ependymal denudation and progenitor cell loss with the Chiari II malformation, whereas hydrocephalus was absent. At 37–40 weeks GA, neuroepithelial/ependymal denudation coincided with Chiari II malformation and hydrocephalus. Sub-arachnoidal fibrosis at the convexity was absent in all fetuses but present in the neonate. Conclusion In fetal SBA, neuroepithelial/ependymal denudation in the telencephalon and the aqueduct can occur before Chiari II malformation

  2. Evaluation of the role of H pylori infection in pathogenesis of gastric cancer by immunoblot assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kuo-Ching Yang; Alexander Chu; Chao-Sheng Liao; Yu-Min Lin; Gen-Min Wang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the different serological reactions to H pylori using the immunoblotting technique for further understanding of its pathogenic role in gastric cancer.METHODS: A total of 54 patients were divided into two groups after upper gastrointestinal endoscopy: normal control group (25 patients) and gastric cancer group (29 patients). Both groups were further divided into H pylori (+) and H pylori (-) subgroups based on the results of CLO test, Giemsa staining and culture. Sera were further analyzed with the immunoblotting technique (HelicoBlot 2.0, Genelabs Diagnostics, Singapore).RESULTS: The positive rate of the immunoblotting test was as high as 88.9% in the H pylori (-) gastric cancer group and only 14.3% in the H pylori (-) normal control group with a statistically significant difference.CONCLUSION: The prevalence of H pylori infection is higher in gastric cancer patients than in the normal controls, suggesting that H pylori may play a role in the pathogenesis of gastric cancer.

  3. The role of human papillomavirus in the pathogenesis of head & neck squamous cell carcinoma: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Muzio Lorenzo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer statistics report an increased incidence of OSCC and OPSCC around the world. Though improvements in screening and early diagnosis have dramatically reduced the incidence of this neoplasm in recent years, the 5-year-disease-free survival, is still poor, specially for oropharyngeal cancer, despite the great scientific and financial efforts. Recently, several papers showed that HPV may be involved at least in the pathogenesis of a subgroup of oral and cervical SCC, leading to distinct molecular characteristics compared with HPV-negative ones. Nevertheless, OPSCCs associated with HPV infection seem to show a better prognosis and affect younger patients ( Comparing findings reported in the recent literature, the data of this state of the art about HPV might add useful informations concerning oropharyngeal carcinogenesis. Moreover, our review would be useful in order to define novel perspectives of treatment choice for Head & Neck cancer patients, by combining well known chemotherapeutical drugs with new molecular "target" therapy.

  4. Colon cancer associated transcripts in human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yincong; Xie, Haibiao; Gao, Qunjun; Zhan, Hengji; Xiao, Huizhong; Zou, Yifan; Zhang, Fuyou; Liu, Yuchen; Li, Jianfa

    2017-08-02

    Long non-coding RNAs serve as important regulators in complicated cellular activities, including cell differentiation, proliferation and death. Dysregulation of long non-coding RNAs occurs in the formation and progression of cancers. The family of colon cancer associated transcripts, long non-coding RNAs colon cancer associated transcript-1 and colon cancer associated transcript-2 are known as oncogenes involved in various cancers. Colon cancer associated transcript-1 is a novel lncRNA located in 8q24.2, and colon cancer associated transcript-2 maps to the 8q24.21 region encompassing rs6983267. Colon cancer associated transcripts have close associations with clinical characteristics, such as lymph node metastasis, high TNM stage and short overall survival. Knockdown of them can reverse the malignant phenotypes of cancer cells, including proliferation, migration, invasion and apoptosis. Moreover, they can increase the expression level of c-MYC and oncogenic microRNAs via activating a series of complex mechanisms. In brief, the family of colon cancer associated transcripts may serve as potential biomarkers or therapeutic targets for human cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Human Papilloma Virus as a Possible Factor in the Pathogenesis of Oral Lichen Planus

    OpenAIRE

    Sayed Mohammad Razavi; Parichehr Ghalayani; Mohammad Reza Salehi; Hajar Attarzadeh; Mahdi Shahmoradi

    2009-01-01

    Background: Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a common chronic inflammatory mucocutaneous disease. Clinical diagnosis of OLP requires clinical work-up and histologic examination to rule out possible dysplasia and carcinoma. It is possible that oral mucosal viral infections including HPV infection may have a causative role in OLP pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to examine the co-incidence of human papilloma virus type 18 and oral lichen planus. Methods: This study was a case-control stud...

  6. Tissue Transglutaminase (TG2)-Induced Inflammation in Initiation, Progression, and Pathogenesis of Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, Kapil, E-mail: kmehta@mdanderson.org; Han, Amy [Department of Experimental Therapeutics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2011-02-25

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is among the deadliest cancers, with a median survival of six months. It is generally believed that infiltrating PC arises through the progression of early grade pancreatic intraepithelial lesions (PanINs). In one model of the disease, the K-ras mutation is an early molecular event during progression of pancreatic cancer; it is followed by the accumulation of additional genetic abnormalities. This model has been supported by animal studies in which activated K-ras and p53 mutations produced metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in mice. According to this model, oncogenic K-ras induces PanIN formation but fails to promote the invasive stage. However, when these mice are subjected to caerulein treatment, which induces a chronic pancreatitis-like state and inflammatory response, PanINs rapidly progress to invasive carcinoma. These results are consistent with epidemiologic studies showing that patients with chronic pancreatitis have a much higher risk of developing PC. In line with these observations, recent studies have revealed elevated expression of the pro-inflammatory protein tissue transglutaminase (TG2) in early PanINs, and its expression increases even more as the disease progresses. In this review we discuss the implications of increased TG2 expression in initiation, progression, and pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer.

  7. Report: Human cancer genetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Marilyn; ALBERTSON Donna

    2006-01-01

    The short report will be focused on the genetic basis and possible mechanisms of tumorigenesis, common types of cancer, the importance of genetic diagnosis of cancer, and the methodology of cancer genetic diagnosis. They will also review presymptomatic testing of hereditary cancers, and the application of expression profiling to identify patients likely to benefit from particular therapeutic approaches.

  8. Human cancer genetics*

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The short report will be focused on the genetic basis and possible mechanisms of tumorigenesis, common types of cancer, the importance of genetic diagnosis of cancer, and the methodology of cancer genetic diagnosis. They will also review presymptomatic testing of hereditary cancers, and the application of expression profiling to identify patients likely to benefit from particular therapeutic approaches.

  9. Impaired nucleotide excision repair pathway as a possible factor in pathogenesis of head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sliwinski, T. [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Lodz (Poland); Markiewicz, L. [Department of Clinical Chemistry and Biochemistry, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz (Poland); Rusin, P. [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Lodz (Poland); Department of Clinical Chemistry and Biochemistry, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz (Poland); Kabzinski, J. [Department of Clinical Chemistry and Biochemistry, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz (Poland); Dziki, L. [Department of General and Colorectal Surgery, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz (Poland); Milonski, J.; Olszewski, J. [Department of Otolaryngology and Oncology, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz (Poland); Blaszczyk, J. [Department of Human Physiology, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz (Poland); Szemraj, J. [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz (Poland); Majsterek, I., E-mail: ireneusz.majsterek@umed.lodz.pl [Department of Clinical Chemistry and Biochemistry, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz (Poland)

    2011-11-01

    Tobacco smoking is one of the major risk factors in pathogenesis of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). Many of the chemical compounds present in tobacco are well-known carcinogens which form adducts with DNA. Cells remove these adducts mainly by the nucleotide excision repair pathway (NER). NER also eliminates a broad spectrum of pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and photo-products (6-4PP) induced by UV-radiation or DNA cross-links after cisplatin anti-cancer treatment. In this study DNA damage and repair was examined in peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from 20 HNSCC patients and 20 healthy controls as well as HTB-43 larynx and SSC-25 tongue cancer cell lines. DNA repair kinetics in the examined cells after cisplatin or UV-radiation treatment were investigated using alkaline comet assay during 240 min of post-treatment incubation. MTT assay was used to analyse cell viability and the Annexin V-FITC kit specific for kinase-3 was employed to determine apoptosis after treating the cells with UV-radiation at dose range from 0.5 to 60 J/m{sup 2}. NER capability was assessed in vitro with cell extracts by the use of a bacterial plasmid irradiated with UV-light as a substrate for the repair. The results show that lymphocytes from HNSCC patients and HTB-43 or SSC-25 cancer cells were more sensitive to genotoxic treatment with UV-radiation and displayed impaired DNA repair. Also evidenced was a higher rate of apoptosis induction after UV-radiation treatment of lymphocytes from the HNSCC patients and the HTB-43 cancer cells than after treatment of those from healthy donors. Finally, our results showed that there was a significant decrease in NER capacity in HTB-43 or SSC-25 cancer cells as well as in peripheral blood lymphocytes of HNSCC patients compared to controls. In conclusion, we suggest that the impaired NER pathway might be a critical factor in pathogenesis of head and neck cancer.

  10. P53 mutations in colorectal cancer - molecular pathogenesis and pharmacological reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Lan; Zhou, Jianbiao; Chen, Zhi-Rong; Chng, Wee-Joo

    2015-01-07

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies with high prevalence and low 5-year survival. CRC is a heterogeneous disease with a complex, genetic and biochemical background. It is now generally accepted that a few important intracellular signaling pathways, including Wnt/β-catenin signaling, Ras signaling, and p53 signaling are frequently dysregulated in CRC. Patients with mutant p53 gene are often resistant to current therapies, conferring poor prognosis. Tumor suppressor p53 protein is a transcription factor inducing cell cycle arrest, senescence, and apoptosis under cellular stress. Emerging evidence from laboratories and clinical trials shows that some small molecule inhibitors exert anti-cancer effect via reactivation and restoration of p53 function. In this review, we summarize the p53 function and characterize its mutations in CRC. The involvement of p53 mutations in pathogenesis of CRC and their clinical impacts will be highlighted. Moreover, we also describe the current achievements of using p53 modulators to reactivate this pathway in CRC, which may have great potential as novel anti-cancer therapy.

  11. Human papillomavirus in the HIV-infected host: epidemiology and pathogenesis in the antiretroviral era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickman, Cristina; Palefsky, Joel M

    2015-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is associated with essentially all cervical cancers, 80-90 % of anal cancers, and a high proportion of oropharyngeal, vaginal, penile, and vulvar cancers. Malignancy is preceded by the development of precancerous lesions termed high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). Men and women with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are at high risk of HPV-related malignancies. The incidence of anal cancer in particular has markedly risen during the antiretroviral era due to the increased longevity of patients with HIV and the absence of anal malignancy screening programs. HIV infection may facilitate initial HPV infection by disrupting epithelial cell tight junctions. Once infection is established, HIV may promote HSIL development via the up-regulation of HPV oncogene expression and impairment of the immune response needed to clear the lesion. HIV-infected women should be screened for cervical HSIL and cancer, and HIV-infected men and women should be considered for anal screening programs.

  12. The CS1 segment of fibronectin is involved in human OSCC pathogenesis by mediating OSCC cell spreading, migration, and invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Silva Nisha J

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The alternatively spliced V region or type III connecting segment III (IIICS of fibronectin is important in early development, wound healing, and tumorigenesis, however, its role in oral cancer has not been fully investigated. Thus, we investigated the role of CS-1, a key site within the CSIII region of fibronectin, in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. Methods To determine the expression of CS-1 in human normal and oral SCC tissue specimens immunohistochemical analyses were performed. The expression of CS1 was then associated with clinicopathological factors. To investigate the role of CS-1 in regulating OSCC cell spreading, migration and invasion, OSCC cells were assayed for spreading and migration in the presence of a CS-1 peptide or a CS-1 blocking peptide, and for invasion using Matrigel supplemented with these peptides. In addition, integrin α4siRNA or a focal adhesion kinase (FAK anti-sense oligonucleotide was transfected into OSCC cells to examine the mechanistic role of integrin α4 or FAK in CS1-mediated cell spreading and migration, respectively. Results CS-1 expression levels were significantly higher in OSCC tissues compared to normal tissues (p Conclusion These data indicate that the CS-1 site of fibronectin is involved in oral cancer pathogenesis and in regulating OSCC cell spreading, migration and invasion.

  13. Human Hemorrhagic Fever Causing Arenaviruses: Molecular Mechanisms Contributing to Virus Virulence and Disease Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Shao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Arenaviruses include multiple human pathogens ranging from the low-risk lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV to highly virulent hemorrhagic fever (HF causing viruses such as Lassa (LASV, Junin (JUNV, Machupo (MACV, Lujo (LUJV, Sabia (SABV, Guanarito (GTOV, and Chapare (CHPV, for which there are limited preventative and therapeutic measures. Why some arenaviruses can cause virulent human infections while others cannot, even though they are isolated from the same rodent hosts, is an enigma. Recent studies have revealed several potential pathogenic mechanisms of arenaviruses, including factors that increase viral replication capacity and suppress host innate immunity, which leads to high viremia and generalized immune suppression as the hallmarks of severe and lethal arenaviral HF diseases. This review summarizes current knowledge of the roles of each of the four viral proteins and some known cellular factors in the pathogenesis of arenaviral HF as well as of some human primary cell-culture and animal models that lend themselves to studying arenavirus-induced HF disease pathogenesis. Knowledge gained from these studies can be applied towards the development of novel therapeutics and vaccines against these deadly human pathogens.

  14. HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER RISK FACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prostate cancer has the highest prevalence of any non-skin cancer in the human body, with similar likelihood of neoplastic foci found within the prostates of men around the world regardless of diet, occupation, lifestyle, or other factors. Essentially all men with circulating an...

  15. Endothelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EndoMT in the Pathogenesis of Human Fibrotic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonsoles Piera-Velazquez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fibrotic diseases encompass a wide spectrum of clinical entities including systemic fibrotic diseases such as systemic sclerosis, sclerodermatous graft versus host disease, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, and IgG4-associated sclerosing disease, as well as numerous organ-specific disorders including radiation-induced fibrosis, and cardiac, pulmonary, liver, and kidney fibrosis. Although their causative mechanisms are quite diverse, these diseases share the common feature of an uncontrolled and progressive accumulation of fibrous tissue macromolecules in affected organs leading to their dysfunction and ultimate failure. The pathogenesis of fibrotic diseases is complex and despite extensive investigation has remained elusive. Numerous studies have identified myofibroblasts as the cells responsible for the establishment and progression of the fibrotic process. Tissue myofibroblasts in fibrotic diseases originate from several sources including quiescent tissue fibroblasts, circulating CD34+ fibrocytes, and the phenotypic conversion of various cell types including epithelial and endothelial cells into activated myofibroblasts. However, the role of the phenotypic transition of endothelial cells into mesenchymal cells (Endothelial to Mesenchymal Transition or EndoMT in the pathogenesis of fibrotic disorders has not been fully elucidated. Here, we review the evidence supporting EndoMT’s contribution to human fibrotic disease pathogenesis.

  16. Endothelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EndoMT) in the Pathogenesis of Human Fibrotic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piera-Velazquez, Sonsoles; Mendoza, Fabian A.; Jimenez, Sergio A.

    2016-01-01

    Fibrotic diseases encompass a wide spectrum of clinical entities including systemic fibrotic diseases such as systemic sclerosis, sclerodermatous graft versus host disease, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, and IgG4-associated sclerosing disease, as well as numerous organ-specific disorders including radiation-induced fibrosis, and cardiac, pulmonary, liver, and kidney fibrosis. Although their causative mechanisms are quite diverse, these diseases share the common feature of an uncontrolled and progressive accumulation of fibrous tissue macromolecules in affected organs leading to their dysfunction and ultimate failure. The pathogenesis of fibrotic diseases is complex and despite extensive investigation has remained elusive. Numerous studies have identified myofibroblasts as the cells responsible for the establishment and progression of the fibrotic process. Tissue myofibroblasts in fibrotic diseases originate from several sources including quiescent tissue fibroblasts, circulating CD34+ fibrocytes, and the phenotypic conversion of various cell types including epithelial and endothelial cells into activated myofibroblasts. However, the role of the phenotypic transition of endothelial cells into mesenchymal cells (Endothelial to Mesenchymal Transition or EndoMT) in the pathogenesis of fibrotic disorders has not been fully elucidated. Here, we review the evidence supporting EndoMT’s contribution to human fibrotic disease pathogenesis. PMID:27077889

  17. Laminopathies: involvement of structural nuclear proteins in the pathogenesis of an increasing number of human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraldi, Nadir M; Squarzoni, Stefano; Sabatelli, Patrizia; Capanni, Cristina; Mattioli, Elisabetta; Ognibene, Andrea; Lattanzi, Giovanna

    2005-05-01

    Just at the beginning of the millennium the neologism laminopathies has been introduced in the scientific vocabulary. An exponential increase of interest on the subject started concomitantly, so that a formerly quite neglected group of rare human diseases is now widely investigated. This review will cover the history of the identification of the molecular basis for fourteen (since now) hereditary diseases arising from defects in genes that encode nuclear envelope and nuclear lamina-associated proteins and will also consider the hypotheses that can account for the role of structural nuclear proteins in the pathogenesis of diseases affecting a wide spectrum of tissues.

  18. Avian influenza A (H7N9) virus infection in humans: epidemiology, evolution, and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Matloob

    2014-12-01

    New human influenza A virus strains regularly emerge causing seasonal epidemics and occasional pandemics. Lately, several zoonotic avian influenza A strains have been reported to directly infect humans. In early 2013, a novel avian influenza A virus (H7N9) strain was discovered in China to cause severe respiratory disease in humans. Since then, over 450 human cases of H7N9 infection have been discovered and 165 of them have died. Multiple epidemiological, phylogenetic, in vivo, and in vitro studies have been done to determine the origin and pathogenesis of novel H7N9 strain. This article reviews the literature related to the epidemiology, evolution, and pathogenesis of the H7N9 strain since its discovery in February 2013 till August 2014. The data available so far indicate that H7N9 was originated by a two-step reassortment process in birds and transmitted to humans through direct contact with live-bird markets. H7N9 is a low-pathogenic avian virus and contains several molecular signatures for adaptation in mammals. The severity of the respiratory disease caused by novel H7N9 virus in humans can be partly attributed to the age, sex, and underlying medical conditions of the patients. A universal influenza vaccine is not available, though several strain-specific H7N9 candidate vaccine viruses have been developed. Further, novel H7N9 virus is resistant to antiviral drug amantadine and some H7N9 isolates have acquired the resistance to neuraminidase-inhibitors. Therefore, constant surveillance and prompt control measures combined with novel research approaches to develop alternative and effective anti-influenza strategies are needed to overcome influenza A virus.

  19. Liver immune-pathogenesis and therapy of human liver tropic virus infection in humanized mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Bility, Moses T.; Li, Feng; Cheng, Liang; Su, Lishan

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infect and replicate primarily in human hepatocytes. Few reliable and easy accessible animal models are available for studying the immune system’s contribution to the liver disease progression during hepatitis virus infection. Humanized mouse models reconstituted with human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been developed to study human immunology, human immunodeficiency virus 1 infection, and immunopathogenesis. However, a humanized mous...

  20. Duckweed (Lemna minor as a model plant system for the study of human microbial pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plant infection models provide certain advantages over animal models in the study of pathogenesis. However, current plant models face some limitations, e.g., plant and pathogen cannot co-culture in a contained environment. Development of such a plant model is needed to better illustrate host-pathogen interactions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We describe a novel model plant system for the study of human pathogenic bacterial infection on a large scale. This system was initiated by co-cultivation of axenic duckweed (Lemna minor plants with pathogenic bacteria in 24-well polystyrene cell culture plate. Pathogenesis of bacteria to duckweed was demonstrated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus as two model pathogens. P. aeruginosa PAO1 caused severe detriment to duckweed as judged from inhibition to frond multiplication and chlorophyll formation. Using a GFP-marked PAO1 strain, we demonstrated that bacteria colonized on both fronds and roots and formed biofilms. Virulence of PAO1 to duckweed was attenuated in its quorum sensing (QS mutants and in recombinant strains overexpressing the QS quenching enzymes. RN4220, a virulent strain of S. aureus, caused severe toxicity to duckweed while an avirulent strain showed little effect. Using this system for antimicrobial chemical selection, green tea polyphenols exhibited inhibitory activity against S. aureus virulence. This system was further confirmed to be effective as a pathogenesis model using a number of pathogenic bacterial species. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that duckweed can be used as a fast, inexpensive and reproducible model plant system for the study of host-pathogen interactions, could serve as an alternative choice for the study of some virulence factors, and could also potentially be used in large-scale screening for the discovery of antimicrobial chemicals.

  1. Oncogenes and human cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C.P. Heisterkamp (Nora); J.H.C. Groffen (John)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractThe first demonstrations that cancer could have an infectious nature was by Ellerman and Bang (1) ~ who showed that leukemia in chickens was transmissible with cell-free extracts and by Rous (2), who found in a similar fashion that naturally occurring chicken sarcomas were transmissible.

  2. 肠道菌群在结直肠癌发病过程中的作用%Role of intestinal flora in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈硕; 陈飞; 邹兆伟; 黄宗海

    2014-01-01

    结直肠癌是常见消化道恶性疾病,在我国其发病率有上升趋势.人类肠道中共生的肠道菌群不仅在营养和能量代谢、免疫功能等方面扮演重要作用,而且在结直肠癌发病过程具有重要的作用.本文就肠道菌群在结直肠癌发病过程中的作用进行综述.%Colorectal cancer is one of common gastrointestinal malignant diseases,with a rising incidence in our country.Human gut is colonized by intestinal flora which impacts host nutrient and energy metabolism,immune function.And there is an emerging concept that intestinal flora also plays an important role in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer.In this paper,the role of intestinal flora in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer and possible mechanisms were reviewed.

  3. Immunoproteasome overexpression underlies the pathogenesis of thyroid oncocytes and primary hypothyroidism: studies in humans and mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki J Kimura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oncocytes of the thyroid gland (Hürthle cells are found in tumors and autoimmune diseases. They have a unique appearance characterized by abundant granular eosinophilic cytoplasm and hyperchromatic nucleus. Their pathogenesis has remained, thus far, unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using transgenic mice chronically expressing IFNgamma in thyroid gland, we showed changes in the thyroid follicular epithelium reminiscent of the human oncocyte. Transcriptome analysis comparing transgenic to wild type thyrocytes revealed increased levels of immunoproteasome subunits like LMP2 in transgenics, suggesting an important role of the immunoproteasome in oncocyte pathogenesis. Pharmacologic blockade of the proteasome, in fact, ameliorated the oncocytic phenotype. Genetic deletion of LMP2 subunit prevented the development of the oncocytic phenotype and primary hypothyroidism. LMP2 was also found expressed in oncocytes from patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis and Hürthle cell tumors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In summary, we report that oncocytes are the result of an increased immunoproteasome expression secondary to a chronic inflammatory milieu, and suggest LMP2 as a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of oncocytic lesions and autoimmune hypothyroidism.

  4. Antibodies against Human Cytomegalovirus in the Pathogenesis of Systemic Sclerosis: A Gene Array Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune disease characterized by immunological abnormalities, vascular damage, and fibroblast proliferation. We have previously shown that a molecular mimicry mechanism links antibodies against the human-cytomegalovirus-derived protein UL94 to the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis. The UL94 epitope shows homology with NAG-2, a surface molecule highly expressed on endothelial cells. Anti-UL94 peptide antibodies purified from patients' sera induce apoptosis of endothelial cells upon engagement of the NAG-2-integrin complex. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We show here that NAG-2 is expressed on dermal fibroblasts and that anti-UL94 antibodies bind to fibroblasts. We have used the gene array strategy (Affimetrix oligonucleotide microarrays to analyze the transcriptional profile in response to a 4-h and an 8-h treatment with antibodies against the UL94 peptide in endothelial cells and dermal fibroblasts. Exposure of endothelial cells to anti-UL94 antibodies had a profound impact on gene expression, resulting in the upregulation of 1,645 transcripts. Several gene clusters were upregulated including genes encoding adhesion molecules, chemokines, colony-stimulating factors (CSFs, growth factors, and molecules involved in apoptosis. Following antibody stimulation, dermal fibroblasts showed an upregulation of 989 transcripts and acquired a "scleroderma-like" phenotype. Indeed, genes involved in extracellular matrix deposition, growth factors, chemokines, and cytokines were upregulated. We confirmed the microarray results by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and by measuring some of the corresponding proteins with ELISA and Western blotting. CONCLUSION: Our results show that anti-human-cytomegalovirus antibodies may be linked to the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis not only by inducing endothelial cell activation and apoptosis but also by causing activation of fibroblasts, one of the hallmarks of the disease.

  5. Antibodies against human cytomegalovirus in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis: a gene array approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Lunardi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune disease characterized by immunological abnormalities, vascular damage, and fibroblast proliferation. We have previously shown that a molecular mimicry mechanism links antibodies against the human-cytomegalovirus-derived protein UL94 to the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis. The UL94 epitope shows homology with NAG-2, a surface molecule highly expressed on endothelial cells. Anti-UL94 peptide antibodies purified from patients' sera induce apoptosis of endothelial cells upon engagement of the NAG-2-integrin complex. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We show here that NAG-2 is expressed on dermal fibroblasts and that anti-UL94 antibodies bind to fibroblasts. We have used the gene array strategy (Affimetrix oligonucleotide microarrays to analyze the transcriptional profile in response to a 4-h and an 8-h treatment with antibodies against the UL94 peptide in endothelial cells and dermal fibroblasts. Exposure of endothelial cells to anti-UL94 antibodies had a profound impact on gene expression, resulting in the upregulation of 1,645 transcripts. Several gene clusters were upregulated including genes encoding adhesion molecules, chemokines, colony-stimulating factors (CSFs, growth factors, and molecules involved in apoptosis. Following antibody stimulation, dermal fibroblasts showed an upregulation of 989 transcripts and acquired a "scleroderma-like" phenotype. Indeed, genes involved in extracellular matrix deposition, growth factors, chemokines, and cytokines were upregulated. We confirmed the microarray results by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and by measuring some of the corresponding proteins with ELISA and Western blotting. CONCLUSION: Our results show that anti-human-cytomegalovirus antibodies may be linked to the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis not only by inducing endothelial cell activation and apoptosis but also by causing activation of fibroblasts, one of the hallmarks of the disease.

  6. Early response genes in the pathogenesis of cancer of the cervix uteri: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Kurmyshkina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Early response genes are a group of proto-oncogenes that are the first to be activated in cell stimulation with different growth factors and to be involved in the regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation. Large amount of information supporting that altered expression of these genes is one of the central and earliest events of carcinogenesis has been accumulated. In this connection, it is promising to use early response genes as diagnostic and prognostic markers for the detection and combination therapy of cancer of the cervix uteri, one of the most common gynecological malignancies characterized by high mortality rates and difficulties in early diagnosis. The theoretical basis for these promises is the found mechanisms for the interaction of early response genes with human papillomavirus genome, the main cause of cervix uteri cancer.

  7. Genotypic and phenotypic diversity of the noncapsulated Haemophilus influenzae: adaptation and pathogenesis in the human airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmendia, Junkal; Martí-Lliteras, Pau; Moleres, Javier; Puig, Carmen; Bengoechea, José A

    2012-12-01

    The human respiratory tract contains a highly adapted microbiota including commensal and opportunistic pathogens. Noncapsulated or nontypable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a human-restricted member of the normal airway microbiota in healthy carriers and an opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised individuals. The duality of NTHi as a colonizer and as a symptomatic infectious agent is closely related to its adaptation to the host, which in turn greatly relies on the genetic plasticity of the bacterium and is facilitated by its condition as a natural competent. The variable genotype of NTHi accounts for its heterogeneous gene expression and variable phenotype, leading to differential host-pathogen interplay among isolates. Here we review our current knowledge of NTHi diversity in terms of genotype, gene expression, antigenic variation, and the phenotypes associated with colonization and pathogenesis. The potential benefits of NTHi diversity studies discussed herein include the unraveling of pathogenicity clues, the generation of tools to predict virulence from genomic data, and the exploitation of a unique natural system for the continuous monitoring of long-term bacterial evolution in human airways exposed to noxious agents. Finally, we highlight the challenge of monitoring both the pathogen and the host in longitudinal studies, and of applying comparative genomics to clarify the meaning of the vast NTHi genetic diversity and its translation to virulence phenotypes.

  8. Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosbie, Emma J; Einstein, Mark H; Franceschi, Silvia; Kitchener, Henry C

    2013-09-07

    Cervical cancer is caused by human papillomavirus infection. Most human papillomavirus infection is harmless and clears spontaneously but persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (especially type 16) can cause cancer of the cervix, vulva, vagina, anus, penis, and oropharynx. The virus exclusively infects epithelium and produces new viral particles only in fully mature epithelial cells. Human papillomavirus disrupts normal cell-cycle control, promoting uncontrolled cell division and the accumulation of genetic damage. Two effective prophylactic vaccines composed of human papillomavirus type 16 and 18, and human papillomavirus type 16, 18, 6, and 11 virus-like particles have been introduced in many developed countries as a primary prevention strategy. Human papillomavirus testing is clinically valuable for secondary prevention in triaging low-grade cytology and as a test of cure after treatment. More sensitive than cytology, primary screening by human papillomavirus testing could enable screening intervals to be extended. If these prevention strategies can be implemented in developing countries, many thousands of lives could be saved.

  9. Septin mutations in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias T Spiliotis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Septins are GTP-binding proteins that are evolutionarily and structurally related to the RAS oncogenes. Septin expression levels are altered in many cancers and new advances point to how abnormal septin expression may contribute to the progression of cancer. In contrast to the RAS GTPases, which are frequently mutated and actively promote tumorigenesis, little is known about the occurrence and role of septin mutations in human cancers. Here, we review septin missense mutations that are currently in the Catalog of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC database. The majority of septin mutations occur in tumors of the large intestine, skin, endometrium and stomach. Over 25% of the annotated mutations in SEPT2, SEPT4 and SEPT9 belong to large intestine tumors. From all septins, SEPT9 and SEPT14 exhibit the highest mutation frequencies in skin, stomach and large intestine cancers. While septin mutations occur with frequencies lower than 3%, recurring mutations in several invariant and highly conserved amino acids are found across different septin paralogs and tumor types. Interestingly, a significant number of these mutations occur in the GTP-binding pocket and septin dimerization interfaces. Future studies may determine how these somatic mutations affect septin structure and function, whether they contribute to the progression of specific cancers and if they could serve as tumor-specific biomarkers.

  10. DBGC: A Database of Human Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Jun; Cai, Mingdeng; Zhu, Zhenggang; Gu, Wenjie; Yu, Yingyan; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    The Database of Human Gastric Cancer (DBGC) is a comprehensive database that integrates various human gastric cancer-related data resources. Human gastric cancer-related transcriptomics projects, proteomics projects, mutations, biomarkers and drug-sensitive genes from different sources were collected and unified in this database. Moreover, epidemiological statistics of gastric cancer patients in China and clinicopathological information annotated with gastric cancer cases were also integrated into the DBGC. We believe that this database will greatly facilitate research regarding human gastric cancer in many fields. DBGC is freely available at http://bminfor.tongji.edu.cn/dbgc/index.do.

  11. Heme Oxygenase-1 Modulates Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Replication and Lung Pathogenesis during Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Janyra A; León, Miguel A; Céspedes, Pablo F; Gómez, Roberto S; Canedo-Marroquín, Gisela; Riquelme, Sebastían A; Salazar-Echegarai, Francisco J; Blancou, Phillipe; Simon, Thomas; Anegon, Ignacio; Lay, Margarita K; González, Pablo A; Riedel, Claudia A; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2017-07-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infections in children. The development of novel prophylactic and therapeutic antiviral drugs against hRSV is imperative to control the burden of disease in the susceptible population. In this study, we examined the effects of inducing the activity of the host enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) on hRSV replication and pathogenesis on lung inflammation induced by this virus. Our results show that after hRSV infection, HO-1 induction with metalloporphyrin cobalt protoporphyrin IX significantly reduces the loss of body weight due to hRSV-induced disease. Further, HO-1 induction also decreased viral replication and lung inflammation, as evidenced by a reduced neutrophil infiltration into the airways, with diminished cytokine and chemokine production and reduced T cell function. Concomitantly, upon cobalt protoporphyrin IX treatment, there is a significant upregulation in the production of IFN-α/β mRNAs in the lungs. Furthermore, similar antiviral and protective effects occur by inducing the expression of human HO-1 in MHC class II(+) cells in transgenic mice. Finally, in vitro data suggest that HO-1 induction can modulate the susceptibility of cells, especially the airway epithelial cells, to hRSV infection. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  12. Cross Talk between NOTCH Signaling and Biomechanics in Human Aortic Valve Disease Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Godby

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aortic valve disease is a burgeoning public health problem associated with significant mortality. Loss of function mutations in NOTCH1 cause bicuspid aortic valve (BAV and calcific aortic valve disease. Because calcific nodules manifest on the fibrosa side of the cusp in low fluidic oscillatory shear stress (OSS, elucidating pathogenesis requires approaches that consider both molecular and mechanical factors. Therefore, we examined the relationship between NOTCH loss of function (LOF and biomechanical indices in healthy and diseased human aortic valve interstitial cells (AVICs. An orbital shaker system was used to apply cyclic OSS, which mimics the cardiac cycle and hemodynamics experienced by AVICs in vivo. NOTCH LOF blocked OSS-induced cell alignment in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs, whereas AVICs did not align when subjected to OSS under any conditions. In healthy AVICs, OSS resulted in decreased elastin (ELN and α-SMA (ACTA2. NOTCH LOF was associated with similar changes, but in diseased AVICs, NOTCH LOF combined with OSS was associated with increased α-SMA expression. Interestingly, AVICs showed relatively higher expression of NOTCH2 compared to NOTCH1. Biomechanical interactions between endothelial and interstitial cells involve complex NOTCH signaling that contributes to matrix homeostasis in health and disorganization in disease.

  13. Intracellular protozoan parasites of humans: the role of molecular chaperones in development and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shonhai, Addmore; Maier, Alexander G; Przyborski, Jude M; Blatch, Gregory L

    2011-02-01

    Certain kinetoplastid (Leishmania spp. and Tryapnosoma cruzi) and apicomplexan parasites (Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii) are capable of invading human cells as part of their pathology. These parasites appear to have evolved a relatively expanded or diverse complement of genes encoding molecular chaperones. The gene families encoding heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) chaperones show significant expansion and diversity (especially for Leishmania spp. and T. cruzi), and in particular the Hsp40 family appears to be an extreme example of phylogenetic radiation. In general, Hsp40 proteins act as co-chaperones of Hsp70 chaperones, forming protein folding pathways that integrate with Hsp90 to ensure proteostasis in the cell. It is tempting to speculate that the diverse environmental insults that these parasites endure have resulted in the evolutionary selection of a diverse and expanded chaperone network. Hsp90 is involved in development and growth of all of these intracellular parasites, and so far represents the strongest candidate as a target for chemotherapeutic interventions. While there have been some excellent studies on the molecular and cell biology of Hsp70 proteins, relatively little is known about the biological function of Hsp70-Hsp40 interactions in these intracellular parasites. This review focuses on intracellular protozoan parasites of humans, and provides a critique of the role of heat shock proteins in development and pathogenesis, especially the molecular chaperones Hsp90, Hsp70 and Hsp40.

  14. THE ROLE OF CALCIUM ION IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF HUMAN PITUITARY GH-SECRETING ADENOMAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓洁英; 史轶蘩; 尹娟娟

    1996-01-01

    To study the role of Ca2+ in the pathogenesis of pituitary growth hormone secreting adenornas,the function of Ca2+ in 23 cases of human pituitary GH-secreting adenoma was investigated in monolayer cell culture.It was found that Ca2- channel blockers nicardipin and nifedipin inhibited hasal and growth hormone releasing hormone (GRH)-stimulated GH secretion in 87.5% and 100.0% of the GH adenomas.respectively,demonstrating that in most human pituitary GH agonist octreotide regulated the processes of GH secretion via Ca2+ had defects in different steps including receptor.postreceptor Ca2+ channel and Ca2+-GH secreting coupling in 6(66.6%)and 5(55.5%) cases of 9 GH adenomas respectively.Among them,the defects in GRH receptor and SRIF regulated Ca2+ channel are the main causes of the dysfunction of GH adenomas.These defects may be related to GH hypersecretion in GH adenomas.Our data provides advance evidences for intrinsic defects of GH adenomas.

  15. Human papilloma virus as a possible factor in the pathogenesis of oral lichen planus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Mohammad Razavi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral lichen planus (OLP is a common chronic inflammatory mucocutaneous disease. Clinical diagnosis of OLP requires clinical work-up and histologic examination to rule out possible dysplasia and carcinoma. It is possible that oral mucosal viral infections including HPV infection may have a causative role in OLP pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to examine the co-incidence of human papilloma virus type 18 and oral lichen planus. Methods: This study was a case-control study. Twenty nine paraffinized specimens of previously diagnosed oral lichen planus and 14 paraffinized specimens of nonpathogenic mucosa were studied. Polymerase Chain Reaction ( PCR analyze used for detection of DNA HPV 18 .The data were ana-lyzed with SPSS software and Fisher′s exact test was used to find the possible relation between HPV18 infection and oral lichen planus. Results: Nine out of 29 (31.0% lichen planus samples and one out of 14 (7.1% controls were HPV 18 positive. No significant correlation (P = 0.128 was observed between HPV18 infection and oral lichen planus. Conclusion: According to the findings there might be a coincidence of human papilloma virus type 18 and oral lichen planus.

  16. Examining the pathogenesis of breast cancer using a novel agent-based model of mammary ductal epithelium dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquin Chapa

    Full Text Available The study of the pathogenesis of breast cancer is challenged by the long time-course of the disease process and the multi-factorial nature of generating oncogenic insults. The characterization of the longitudinal pathogenesis of malignant transformation from baseline normal breast duct epithelial dynamics may provide vital insight into the cascading systems failure that leads to breast cancer. To this end, extensive information on the baseline behavior of normal mammary epithelium and breast cancer oncogenesis was integrated into a computational model termed the Ductal Epithelium Agent-Based Model (DEABM. The DEABM is composed of computational agents that behave according to rules established from published cellular and molecular mechanisms concerning breast duct epithelial dynamics and oncogenesis. The DEABM implements DNA damage and repair, cell division, genetic inheritance and simulates the local tissue environment with hormone excretion and receptor signaling. Unrepaired DNA damage impacts the integrity of the genome within individual cells, including a set of eight representative oncogenes and tumor suppressors previously implicated in breast cancer, with subsequent consequences on successive generations of cells. The DEABM reproduced cellular population dynamics seen during the menstrual cycle and pregnancy, and demonstrated the oncogenic effect of known genetic factors associated with breast cancer, namely TP53 and Myc, in simulations spanning ∼40 years of simulated time. Simulations comparing normal to BRCA1-mutant breast tissue demonstrated rates of invasive cancer development similar to published epidemiologic data with respect to both cumulative incidence over time and estrogen-receptor status. Investigation of the modeling of ERα-positive (ER+ tumorigenesis led to a novel hypothesis implicating the transcription factor and tumor suppressor RUNX3. These data suggest that the DEABM can serve as a potentially valuable framework to

  17. Examining the pathogenesis of breast cancer using a novel agent-based model of mammary ductal epithelium dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapa, Joaquin; Bourgo, Ryan J; Greene, Geoffrey L; Kulkarni, Swati; An, Gary

    2013-01-01

    The study of the pathogenesis of breast cancer is challenged by the long time-course of the disease process and the multi-factorial nature of generating oncogenic insults. The characterization of the longitudinal pathogenesis of malignant transformation from baseline normal breast duct epithelial dynamics may provide vital insight into the cascading systems failure that leads to breast cancer. To this end, extensive information on the baseline behavior of normal mammary epithelium and breast cancer oncogenesis was integrated into a computational model termed the Ductal Epithelium Agent-Based Model (DEABM). The DEABM is composed of computational agents that behave according to rules established from published cellular and molecular mechanisms concerning breast duct epithelial dynamics and oncogenesis. The DEABM implements DNA damage and repair, cell division, genetic inheritance and simulates the local tissue environment with hormone excretion and receptor signaling. Unrepaired DNA damage impacts the integrity of the genome within individual cells, including a set of eight representative oncogenes and tumor suppressors previously implicated in breast cancer, with subsequent consequences on successive generations of cells. The DEABM reproduced cellular population dynamics seen during the menstrual cycle and pregnancy, and demonstrated the oncogenic effect of known genetic factors associated with breast cancer, namely TP53 and Myc, in simulations spanning ∼40 years of simulated time. Simulations comparing normal to BRCA1-mutant breast tissue demonstrated rates of invasive cancer development similar to published epidemiologic data with respect to both cumulative incidence over time and estrogen-receptor status. Investigation of the modeling of ERα-positive (ER+) tumorigenesis led to a novel hypothesis implicating the transcription factor and tumor suppressor RUNX3. These data suggest that the DEABM can serve as a potentially valuable framework to augment the

  18. Oxidative Stress in the Pathogenesis of Colorectal Cancer: Cause or Consequence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Perše

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing support for the concept that reactive oxygen species, which are known to be implicated in a range of diseases, may be important progenitors in carcinogenesis, including colorectal cancer (CRC. CRC is one of the most common cancers worldwide, with the highest incidence rates in western countries. Sporadic human CRC may be attributable to various environmental and lifestyle factors, such as dietary habits, obesity, and physical inactivity. In the last decades, association between oxidative stress and CRC has been intensively studied. Recently, numerous genetic and lifestyle factors that can affect an individual's ability to respond to oxidative stress have been identified. The aim of this paper is to review evidence linking oxidative stress to CRC and to provide essential background information for accurate interpretation of future research on oxidative stress and CRC risk. Brief introduction of different endogenous and exogenous factors that may influence oxidative status and modulate the ability of gut epithelial cells to cope with damaging metabolic challenges is also provided.

  19. Differentially Expressed Genes and Signature Pathways of Human Prostate Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S Myers

    Full Text Available Genomic technologies including microarrays and next-generation sequencing have enabled the generation of molecular signatures of prostate cancer. Lists of differentially expressed genes between malignant and non-malignant states are thought to be fertile sources of putative prostate cancer biomarkers. However such lists of differentially expressed genes can be highly variable for multiple reasons. As such, looking at differential expression in the context of gene sets and pathways has been more robust. Using next-generation genome sequencing data from The Cancer Genome Atlas, differential gene expression between age- and stage- matched human prostate tumors and non-malignant samples was assessed and used to craft a pathway signature of prostate cancer. Up- and down-regulated genes were assigned to pathways composed of curated groups of related genes from multiple databases. The significance of these pathways was then evaluated according to the number of differentially expressed genes found in the pathway and their position within the pathway using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis and Signaling Pathway Impact Analysis. The "transforming growth factor-beta signaling" and "Ran regulation of mitotic spindle formation" pathways were strongly associated with prostate cancer. Several other significant pathways confirm reported findings from microarray data that suggest actin cytoskeleton regulation, cell cycle, mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, and calcium signaling are also altered in prostate cancer. Thus we have demonstrated feasibility of pathway analysis and identified an underexplored area (Ran for investigation in prostate cancer pathogenesis.

  20. CCR5 Expression Influences the Progression of Human Breast Cancer in a p53-dependent Manner

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Chemokines are implicated in tumor pathogenesis, although it is unclear whether they affect human cancer progression positively or negatively. We found that activation of the chemokine receptor CCR5 regulates p53 transcriptional activity in breast cancer cells through pertussis toxin–, JAK2-, and p38 mitogen–activated protein kinase–dependent mechanisms. CCR5 blockade significantly enhanced proliferation of xenografts from tumor cells bearing wild-type p53, but did not affect proliferation...

  1. Bone diseases associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection: pathogenesis, risk factors and clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongiovanni, Marco; Tincati, Camilla

    2006-06-01

    Bone disorders such as osteopenia and osteoporosis have been recently reported in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but their etiology remains still unknown. The prevalence estimates vary widely among the different studies and can be affected by concomitant factors such as the overlapping of other possible conditions inducing bone loss as lypodystrophy, advanced HIV-disease, advanced age, low body weight or concomitant use of other drugs. All the reports at the moment available in the literature showed a higher than expected prevalence of reduced bone mineral density (BMD) in HIV-infected subjects both naïve and receiving potent antiretroviral therapy compared to healthy controls. This controversial can suggest a double role played by both antiretroviral drugs and HIV itself due to immune activation and/or cytokines disregulation. An improved understanding of the pathogenesis of bone disorders can result in better preventative and therapeutic measures. However, the clinical relevance and the risk of fractures remains undefined in HIV-population. The clinical management of osteopenia and osteoporosis in HIV-infected subjects is still being evaluated. Addressing potential underlying bone disease risk factors (e.g., smoking and alcohol intake, use of corticosteroids, advanced age, low body weight), evaluating calcium and vitamin D intake, and performing dual x-ray absorptiometry in HIV-infected individuals who have risk factors for bone disease can be important strategies to prevent osteopenia and osteoporosis in this population. The administration of bisphosphonates (e.g., alendronate), with calcium and vitamin D supplementation, may be a reasonable and effective option to treat osteoporosis in these subjects.

  2. Fyn is an important molecule in cancer pathogenesis and drug resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elias, Daniel; Ditzel, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    and breast cancers. Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of Fyn in the resistance or susceptibility of cancer cells to some anti-cancer treatments. We have recently shown that Fyn is upregulated in tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cell lines and demonstrated that it plays a key role...... in the resistance mechanism. Further, we found that the cellular localization of Fyn within cancer cells of primary ER+ breast tumor tissue may serve as a prognostic marker. Understanding the role of Fyn in initiation and progression of cancer and its contribution to resistance against anti-cancer therapeutic...... agents may facilitate the development and use of novel drugs targeting Fyn for better management of malignancies....

  3. The role of human papillomavirus infection in the pathogenesis of penile squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaux, Alcides; Cubilla, Antonio L

    2012-05-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that penile cancer follows 2 etiologic pathways, 1 related to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and the other related to other factors including phimosis, chronic inflammation, and lichen sclerosus. HPV DNA is found in 47% to 48% of all penile tumors, and most of these cases correspond to high-risk genotypes, preferentially HPV-16. HPV status is associated with histologic subtype, with higher detection ratios in warty-basaloid carcinomas and lower detection ratios in keratinizing variants (ie, verrucous, papillary, and usual squamous cell carcinomas). It is the cell type, rather than a distinctive architecture, that is more strongly associated with HPV presence. The detection ratio is higher in tumors composed entirely or partially of cells with basaloid features. In addition, a few studies have evaluated the impact of HPV infection on the prognosis of patients with penile cancer. However, results are controversial, and more data are needed to clarify this matter. A proper understanding of the role of HPV in penile carcinogenesis might help in planning intervention strategies such as vaccination against HPV infection.

  4. HCSD: the human cancer secretome database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feizi, Amir; Banaei-Esfahani, Amir; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The human cancer secretome database (HCSD) is a comprehensive database for human cancer secretome data. The cancer secretome describes proteins secreted by cancer cells and structuring information about the cancer secretome will enable further analysis of how this is related with tumor biology. The secreted proteins from cancer cells are believed to play a deterministic role in cancer progression and therefore may be the key to find novel therapeutic targets and biomarkers for many cancers. Consequently, huge data on cancer secretome have been generated in recent years and the lack of a coherent database is limiting the ability to query the increasing community knowledge. We therefore developed the Human Cancer Secretome Database (HCSD) to fulfil this gap. HCSD contains >80 000 measurements for about 7000 nonredundant human proteins collected from up to 35 high-throughput studies on 17 cancer types. It has a simple and user friendly query system for basic and advanced search based on gene name, cancer type and data type as the three main query options. The results are visualized in an explicit and interactive manner. An example of a result page includes annotations, cross references, cancer secretome data and secretory features for each identified protein. Database URL: www.cancersecretome.org. PMID:26078477

  5. Human Cancer Models Initiative | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Human Cancer Models Initiative (HCMI) is an international consortium that is generating novel human tumor-derived culture models, which are annotated with genomic and clinical data. In an effort to advance cancer research and more fully understand how in vitro findings are related to clinical biology, HCMI-developed models and related data will be available as a community resource for cancer research.

  6. Molecular Profiles for Lung Cancer Pathogenesis and Detection in U.S. Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-18

    profiles have been described in the normal-appearing bronchial epithelium of healthy smokers (9) including those that were diagnostic of lung cancer...expression is modulated in a site- and a time-dependent manner in the bronchial epithelium of early stage lung cancer patients. • Identified several...in airway epithelium and promotes lung inflammation and tumorigenesis. Cancer Prev Res (Phila). 2010;3(4):424-37. PMID: 20354164. 17. Fujimoto J

  7. Telomerase activity in human cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, J.

    2000-10-01

    The overall goal of this collaborative project was to investigate the role in malignant cells of both chromosome telomeres, and telomerase, the enzyme that replicates telomeres. Telomeres are highly conserved nucleoprotein complexes located at the ends of eucaryotic chromosomes. Telomere length in somatic cells is reduced by 40--50 nucleotide pairs with every cell division due to incomplete replication of terminal DNA sequences and the absence of telomerase, the ribonucleoprotein that adds telomere DNA to chromosome ends. Although telomerase is active in cells with extended proliferative capacities, including more than 85% of tumors, work performed under this contract demonstrated that the telomeres of human cancer cells are shorter than those of paired normal cells, and that the length of the telomeres is characteristic of particular types of cancers. The extent of telomere shortening ostensibly is related to the number of cell divisions the tumor has undergone. It is believed that ongoing cell proliferation leads to the accumulation and fixation of new mutations in tumor cell lineages.Therefore, it is not unreasonable to assume that the degree of phenotypic variability is related to the proliferative history of the tumor, and therefore to telomere length, implying a correlation with prognosis. In some human tumors, short telomeres are also correlated with genomic instabilities, including interstitial chromosome translocation, loss of heterozygosity, and aneuoploidy. Moreover, unprotected chromosome ends are highly recombinogenic and telomere shortening in cultured human cells correlates with the formation of dicentric chromosomes, suggesting that critically short telomeres not only identify, but also predispose, cells to genomic instability, again implying a correlation with prognosis. Therefore, telomere length or content could be an important predictor of metastatic potential or responsiveness to various therapeutic modalities.

  8. Human RECQ helicases: roles in cancer, aging, and inherited disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidorova JM

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Julia M Sidorova,1,* Raymond J Monnat Jr,1,2,* 1Department of Pathology, 2Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA *The authors contributed equally to this review Abstract: DNA helicases use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to disrupt DNA base pairing and displace proteins from DNA in order to facilitate replication, recombination, transcription, and repair. This article focuses on the human RECQ helicases, five DNA-dependent helicases that play key roles in cellular physiology and disease. Loss of function of three RECQ helicases causes the cancer predisposition syndromes Bloom syndrome, Werner syndrome, and Rothmund–Thomson and related syndromes. We summarize recent work on these syndromes and proteins and discuss disease pathogenesis in light of RECQ helicase biochemical activities and in vivo functions. Keywords: ATP-dependent DNA helicase, Bloom syndrome, Werner syndrome, Rothmund–Thomson syndrome, DNA replication, DNA repair, genetic instability, cancer predisposition syndrome

  9. Is aromatase cytochrome P450 involved in the pathogenesis of endometrioid endometrial cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, VHWM; Thijssen, JHH; Hollema, H; Donker, GH; Santema, JG; Van Der Zee, AGJ; Heineman, MJ

    2005-01-01

    Prospectively, the relationship between androgen levels in the utero-ovarian circulation, aromatase activity in endometrial and body fat tissue, and the presence or absence of endometrioid endometrial cancer was studied in postmenopausal women. In 43 women with endometrioid endometrial cancer and 8

  10. Inflammation, Autophagy, and Obesity: Common Features in the Pathogenesis of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gukovsky, Ilya; Li, Ning; Todoric, Jelena; Gukovskaya, Anna; Karin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation and autophagy are cellular defense mechanisms. When these processes are deregulated (deficient or overactivated) they produce pathologic effects, such as oxidative stress, metabolic impairments, and cell death. Unresolved inflammation and disrupted regulation of autophagy are common features of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, obesity, a risk factor for pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, promotes inflammation and inhibits or deregulates autophagy, creating an env...

  11. Molecular Profiles for Lung Cancer Pathogenesis and Detection in US Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    serve as potential targets for chemoprevention. Table 1. Clinico -pathological features of NSCLCs cases examined in the Field Cancerization Study... Clinico -pathological features of NSCLCs cases examined in the Field Cancerization Study Covariate Levels N (%) Covariate Levels N (%) Gender Female 11...Anderson institutional review board (IRB)-approved protocol. A summary of the clinicopathological characteristics of the studied patient cases is

  12. DREW-UCLA Breast Cancer Research and Training Program: Molecular/Cellular Pathogenesis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    including the Na+-dependent amino acid transporters system A, ASC, N, B0, XAG, Gly, andβ-Alanine/ Taurine , and the Na+-independent amino acid transporters L...initial de- naturation at 94◦C for 2 min, then cycle at 94◦C for 1 min, 58◦C for 1 min and 72◦C for 1 min for 28 cycles and finally extension at 72◦C...anticancer agents. Cell 74:957–967 28. Thompson CB (1995) Apoptosis in the pathogenesis and treatment of disease. Nature 1456–1462 29. Cotran RS, Kumar V

  13. Cancer stem cells in human gastrointestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Moriya, Chiharu; Igarashi, Hisayoshi; Saitoh, Anri; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Adachi, Yasushi; Imai, Kohzoh

    2016-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to be responsible for tumor initiation, drug and radiation resistance, invasive growth, metastasis, and tumor relapse, which are the main causes of cancer-related deaths. Gastrointestinal cancers are the most common malignancies and still the most frequent cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Because gastrointestinal CSCs are also thought to be resistant to conventional therapies, an effective and novel cancer treatment is imperative. The first reported CSCs in a gastrointestinal tumor were found in colorectal cancer in 2007. Subsequently, CSCs were reported in other gastrointestinal cancers, such as esophagus, stomach, liver, and pancreas. Specific phenotypes could be used to distinguish CSCs from non-CSCs. For example, gastrointestinal CSCs express unique surface markers, exist in a side-population fraction, show high aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 activity, form tumorspheres when cultured in non-adherent conditions, and demonstrate high tumorigenic potential in immunocompromised mice. The signal transduction pathways in gastrointestinal CSCs are similar to those involved in normal embryonic development. Moreover, CSCs are modified by the aberrant expression of several microRNAs. Thus, it is very difficult to target gastrointestinal CSCs. This review focuses on the current research on gastrointestinal CSCs and future strategies to abolish the gastrointestinal CSC phenotype.

  14. Human papillomaviruses and skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smola, Sigrun

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) infect squamous epithelia and can induce hyperproliferative lesions. More than 120 different HPV types have been characterized and classified into five different genera. While mucosal high-risk HPVs have a well-established causal role in anogenital carcinogenesis, the biology of cutaneous HPVs is less well understood. The clinical relevance of genus beta-PV infection has clearly been demonstrated in patients suffering from epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV), a rare inherited disease associated with ahigh rate of skin cancer. In the normal population genus beta-PV are suspected to have an etiologic role in skin carcinogenesis as well but this is still controversially discussed. Their oncogenic potency has been investigated in mouse models and in vitro. In 2009, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified the genus beta HPV types 5 and 8 as "possible carcinogenic" biological agents (group 2B) in EV disease. This chapter will give an overview on the knowns and unknowns of infections with genus beta-PV and discuss their potential impact on skin carcinogenesis in the general population.

  15. BRCA1 deficient Mouse Models to Study Pathogenesis and Therapy of Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Diaz-Cruz, Edgar S.; Cabrera, Marina C.; Nakles, Rebecca; Rutstein, Beth H.; Furth, Priscilla A

    2010-01-01

    Genetically engineered mice along with allograft and xenograft models can be used to effectively model triple negative breast cancer both for studies of pathophysiology as well as preclinical prevention and therapeutic drug studies. In this review eight distinct genetically engineered mouse models of BRCA1 deficiency are discussed in relationship to the generation of triple negative mammary cancer. Allograft models derived from some of these genetically engineered mice are considered and xeno...

  16. History, Pathogenesis, and Management of Familial Gastric Cancer: Original Study of John XXIII's Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Corso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer is associated with the E-cadherin germline mutations, but genetic determinants have not been identified for familial intestinal gastric carcinoma. The guidelines for hereditary diffuse gastric cancer are clearly established; however, there are no defined recommendations for the management of familial intestinal gastric carcinoma. Methods. In this study we describe Pope John XXIII's pedigree that harboured gastric cancer as well as six other family members. Family history was analysed according to the International Gastric Cancer Linkage Consortium criteria, and gastric tumours were classified in accord with the last Japanese guidelines. Results. Seven out of 109 members in this pedigree harboured gastric cancer, affecting two consecutive generations. John XXIII's clinical tumour (cTN was classified as cT4bN3a (IV stage. In two other cases, gastric carcinomas were classified as intestinal histotype and staged as pT1bN0 and pT2N2, respectively. Conclusions. Pope John XXIII's family presents a strong aggregation for gastric cancer affecting almost seven members; it spreads through two consecutive generations. In absence of defined genetic causes and considering the increased risk of gastric cancer’s development in these families, as well as the high mortality rates and advanced stages, we propose an intensive surveillance protocol for asymptomatic members.

  17. Differential BCCIP gene expression in primary human ovarian cancer, renal cell carcinoma and colorectal cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoxia; Cao, Lingling; Ni, Jinsong; Liu, Ning; Zhao, Xiaoming; Wang, Yanfang; Zhu, Lin; Wang, Lingyao; Wang, Jin; Yue, Ying; Cai, Yong; Jin, Jingji

    2013-12-01

    Human BCCIP, a protein which interacts with BRCA2 and CDKN1A (Cip1, p21), has been implicated in many cellular processes including cell cycle regulation, DNA recombination and damage repair, telomere maintenance, embryonic development and genomic stability. BCCIP gene expression, which is an important BRCA2 cofactor in tumor suppression, has been identified in some primary cancers. Thus, we investigated the role of BCCIP expression in a large sample of clinically diagnosed primary ovarian cancer, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues. Using clinically diagnosed frozen primary cancer tissues, quantitative PCR (qPCR), western blot analysis (WB) and immunohistochemical staining (IHC) approaches were used to detect and measure gene expression. Reduced BCCIP gene expression in ovarian cancer, RCC and CRC tissues occurred in 74, 89 and 75% of tissue samples, respectively. qPCR analysis of mRNA expression in 54 ovarian cancer, 50 RCC and 44 CRC samples revealed significant (>2-fold decreased) BCCIP downregulation in 56, 70 and 46% of tissue samples, respectively. Although BCCIP expression in three different tumor tissues decreased, the relationship between BCCIP expression and clinicopathological features of each cancer was distinct. Compared to normal tissues, BCCIP expression in ovarian cancers was significantly downregulated in serous, endometrioid and mucinous carcinomas. Downregulation of BCCIP expression was strongly associated with clear cell RCC (ccRCC) and Fuhrman tumor grading, but significant differences in BCCIP expression between CRC and matched normal tissues occurred only in male CRC tissues (ptissue with a T4 tumor stage (ptissue samples (phuman ovarian cancer, RCC and CRC tissues, suggesting a role for the gene in the pathogenesis of these cancers.

  18. Optimization of human cancer radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Swan, George W

    1981-01-01

    The mathematical models in this book are concerned with a variety of approaches to the manner in which the clinical radiologic treatment of human neoplasms can be improved. These improvements comprise ways of delivering radiation to the malignan­ cies so as to create considerable damage to tumor cells while sparing neighboring normal tissues. There is no unique way of dealing with these improvements. Accord­ ingly, in this book a number of different presentations are given. Each presentation has as its goal some aspect of the improvement, or optimization, of radiotherapy. This book is a collection of current ideas concerned with the optimization of human cancer radiotherapy. It is hoped that readers will build on this collection and develop superior approaches for the understanding of the ways to improve therapy. The author owes a special debt of thanks to Kathy Prindle who breezed through the typing of this book with considerable dexterity. TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter GENERAL INTRODUCTION 1. 1 Introduction 1...

  19. Acinetobacter baumannii: human infections, factors contributing to pathogenesis and animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Michael J; Actis, Luis; Pachón, Jerónimo

    2013-03-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a medically important pathogen because of the increasing number of infections produced by this organism over the preceding three decades and the global spread of strains with resistance to multiple antibiotic classes. In spite of its clinical relevance, until recently, there have been few studies addressing the factors that contribute to the pathogenesis of this organism. The availability of complete genome sequences, molecular tools for manipulating the bacterial genome, and animal models of infection have begun to facilitate the identification of factors that play a role in A. baumannii persistence and infection. This review summarizes the characteristics of A. baumannii that contribute to its pathogenesis, with a focus on motility, adherence, biofilm formation, and iron acquisition. In addition, the virulence factors that have been identified to date, which include the outer membrane protein OmpA, phospholipases, membrane polysaccharide components, penicillin-binding proteins, and outer membrane vesicles, are discussed. Animal models systems that have been developed during the last 15 years for the study of A. baumannii infection are overviewed, and the recent use of these models to identify factors involved in virulence and pathogenesis is highlighted.

  20. Cancer-induced cardiac cachexia: Pathogenesis and impact of physical activity (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloum, Yassine; Rannou-Bekono, Françoise; Favier, François B

    2017-05-01

    Cachexia is a wasting syndrome observed in many patients suffering from several chronic diseases including cancer. In addition to the progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass, cancer cachexia results in cardiac function impairment. During the severe stage of the disease, patients as well as animals bearing cancer cells display cardiac atrophy. Cardiac energy metabolism is also impeded with disruption of mitochondrial homeostasis and reduced oxidative capacity, although the available data remain equivocal. The release of inflammatory cytokines by tumor is a key mechanism in the initiation of heart failure. Oxidative stress, which results from the combination of chemotherapy, inadequate antioxidant consumption and chronic inflammation, will further foster heart failure. Protein catabolism is due to the concomitant activation of proteolytic systems and inhibition of protein synthesis, both processes being triggered by the deactivation of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. The reduction in oxidative capacity involves AMP-activated protein kinase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1α dysregulation. The nuclear factor-κB transcription factor plays a prominent role in the coordination of these alterations. Physical exercise appears as an interesting non-pharmaceutical way to counteract cancer cachexia-induced-heart failure. Indeed, aerobic training has anti-inflammatory effects, increases anti-oxidant defenses, prevents atrophy and promotes oxidative metabolism. The present review points out the importance of better understanding the concurrent structural and metabolic changes within the myocardium during cancer and the protective effects of exercise against cardiac cachexia.

  1. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in endometrial cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Tina Bech; Svahn, Malene Frøsig; Faber, Mette Tuxen

    2014-01-01

    HPV is a common sexually transmitted infection and is considered to be a necessary cause of cervical cancer. The anatomical proximity to the cervix has led researchers to investigate whether Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has a role in the etiology of endometrial cancer.......HPV is a common sexually transmitted infection and is considered to be a necessary cause of cervical cancer. The anatomical proximity to the cervix has led researchers to investigate whether Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has a role in the etiology of endometrial cancer....

  2. HCSD: the human cancer secretome database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feizi, Amir; Banaei-Esfahani, Amir; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    database is limiting the ability to query the increasing community knowledge. We therefore developed the Human Cancer Secretome Database (HCSD) to fulfil this gap. HCSD contains >80 000 measurements for about 7000 nonredundant human proteins collected from up to 35 high-throughput studies on 17 cancer...... types. It has a simple and user friendly query system for basic and advanced search based on gene name, cancer type and data type as the three main query options. The results are visualized in an explicit and interactive manner. An example of a result page includes annotations, cross references, cancer...

  3. Malnutrition, anorexia and cachexia in cancer patients: A mini-review on pathogenesis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini, Andrea; Ferrari, Paola; Masoni, Maria Chiara; Fini, Milena; Pagani, Stefania; Giampietro, Ottavio; Carpi, Angelo

    2013-10-01

    Malnutrition, anorexia and cachexia are a common finding in cancer patients. They become more evident with tumor growth and spread. However, the mechanisms by which they are sustained often arise early in the history of cancer. For malnutrition, these mechanisms can involve primary tumor or damage by specific treatment such as anticancer therapies (surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy) also in cancers that usually are not directly responsible for nutritional and metabolic status alterations (i.e. bone tumors). For anorexia, meal-related neural or hormonal signals and humoral signals related to body fat or energy storage and the interaction of these signals with the hypothalamus or the hypothalamic inappropriate response play a pathogenetic role. Some cytokines are probably involved in these mechanisms. For cachexia, the production of proinflammatory cytokines by tumour cells is the initial mechanism; the main biochemical mechanisms involved include the ubiquitine proteasome-dependent proteolysis and heat shock proteins. Treatment includes pharmaceutical and nutritional interventions.

  4. Understanding the molecular pathogenesis and prognostics of bladder cancer: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; He, Xiang-Lei; Teng, Xiao-Dong

    2016-02-01

    The knowledge of cellular mechanisms in malignances of the bladder has grown exponentially. Molecular technologies have led to the discovery of the molecular pathways distinguishing low-and high-grade urothelial neoplasms. This trend portends the future in which the classification and diagnosis of the bladder tumors through morphologic analysis will be supported by molecular information correlating with prognosis and targeted therapy. This article outlines tumor molecular pathology of bladder cancer with an emphasis on several promising candidate biomarkers that may soon make their transition to the realm of clinical management of bladder cancer.

  5. Molecular Profiles for Lung Cancer Pathogenesis and Detection in US Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    inflammation and lung cancer risk in cigarette smokers. Inhal Toxicol 2006;18:667-677 63. Dubinett SM, Sharma S, Huang M, Dohadwala M, Pold M, Mao JT...L, et al. COX-2-dependent stabilization of survivin in non- small cell lung cancer. FASEB J. 2004;18:206-208 76. Pold M, Krysan K, Pold A, et al...Annual Report: Reporting Period 20 Sept 2010 – 19 Sept 2011 48 78. Pold M, Zhu LX, Sharma S, et al. Cyclooxygenase-2-dependent expression

  6. Review of colorectal cancer and its metastases in rodent models: comparative aspects with those in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobaek-Larsen, M; Thorup, I; Diederichsen, Axel Cosmus Pyndt;

    2000-01-01

    that human trials become more directed, with greater chances of success. The orthotopic transplantation of colon cancer cells into the cecum of syngeneic animals or intraportal inoculation appears to resemble the human metastatic disease most closely, providing a model for study of the treatment......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains one of the most common cancer forms developing in industrialized countries, and its incidence appears to be rising. Studies of human population groups provide insufficient information about carcinogenesis, pathogenesis, and treatment of CRC...... models approximate many of the characteristics of human colonic carcinogenesis and metastasis. So far few comparative evaluations of the various animal models of CRC have been made. CONCLUSION: Animal studies cannot replace human clinical trials, but they can be used as a pre-screening tool, so...

  7. Noncoding Genomics in Gastric Cancer and the Gastric Precancerous Cascade: Pathogenesis and Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Sandoval-Bórquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is the fifth most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer-related death, whose patterns vary among geographical regions and ethnicities. It is a multifactorial disease, and its development depends on infection by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, host genetic factors, and environmental factors. The heterogeneity of the disease has begun to be unraveled by a comprehensive mutational evaluation of primary tumors. The low-abundance of mutations suggests that other mechanisms participate in the evolution of the disease, such as those found through analyses of noncoding genomics. Noncoding genomics includes single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, regulation of gene expression through DNA methylation of promoter sites, miRNAs, other noncoding RNAs in regulatory regions, and other topics. These processes and molecules ultimately control gene expression. Potential biomarkers are appearing from analyses of noncoding genomics. This review focuses on noncoding genomics and potential biomarkers in the context of gastric cancer and the gastric precancerous cascade.

  8. THE ROLE OF CHRONIC PROSTATITIS IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Pere

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The review of current insights into the role of the previous inflammation in the prostate gland and the development of prostate cancer are presented. The consecutive changes of cellular structures are characterized by proliferative inflammatory atrophy and prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia.

  9. THE ROLE OF CHRONIC PROSTATITIS IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Pere

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The review of current insights into the role of the previous inflammation in the prostate gland and the development of prostate cancer are presented. The consecutive changes of cellular structures are characterized by proliferative inflammatory atrophy and prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia.

  10. Human mammary microenvironment better regulates the biology of human breast cancer in humanized mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ming-Jie; Wang, Jue; Xu, Lu; Zha, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Yi; Ling, Li-Jun; Wang, Shui

    2015-02-01

    During the past decades, many efforts have been made in mimicking the clinical progress of human cancer in mouse models. Previously, we developed a human breast tissue-derived (HB) mouse model. Theoretically, it may mimic the interactions between "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin and human breast cancer cells. However, detailed evidences are absent. The present study (in vivo, cellular, and molecular experiments) was designed to explore the regulatory role of human mammary microenvironment in the progress of human breast cancer cells. Subcutaneous (SUB), mammary fat pad (MFP), and HB mouse models were developed for in vivo comparisons. Then, the orthotopic tumor masses from three different mouse models were collected for primary culture. Finally, the biology of primary cultured human breast cancer cells was compared by cellular and molecular experiments. Results of in vivo mouse models indicated that human breast cancer cells grew better in human mammary microenvironment. Cellular and molecular experiments confirmed that primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model showed a better proliferative and anti-apoptotic biology than those from SUB to MFP mouse models. Meanwhile, primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model also obtained the migratory and invasive biology for "species-specific" tissue metastasis to human tissues. Comprehensive analyses suggest that "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin better regulates the biology of human breast cancer cells in our humanized mouse model of breast cancer, which is more consistent with the clinical progress of human breast cancer.

  11. Interleukin-13 and transforming growth factor β synergise in the pathogenesis of human intestinal fistulae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharl, Michael; Frei, Sandra; Pesch, Theresa; Kellermeier, Silvia; Arikkat, Joba; Frei, Pascal; Fried, Michael; Weber, Achim; Jehle, Ekkehard; Rühl, Anne; Rogler, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) seems to play an important role in the pathogenesis of fistulae, a common clinical complication of Crohn's disease (CD). TGFβ and interleukin-13 (IL-13) have been correlated with the onset of EMT-associated organ fibrosis and high levels of TGFβ have been shown in transitional cells (TCs) lining CD fistula tracts. This study investigated whether IL-13 could be involved in the pathogenesis of CD-associated fistulae. Protein or mRNA levels in HT29 intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) or colonic lamina propria fibroblasts (CLPFs) were studied by western blotting or real-time PCR. CLPFs were isolated from non-inflammatory disease controls or patients with CD with or without fistulae and IL-13 levels were analysed in surgically removed fistula specimens by immunohistochemistry. TGFβ induced IL-13 secretion in CLPFs from patients with fistulising CD. In fistula specimens high levels of IL-13 were detected in TCs covering fistula tracts. In HT29 IEC monolayers, IL-13 induced SLUG and β6-integrin mRNA, which are associated with cell invasion. HT29 spheroids completely disintegrated when treated with TGFβ for 7 days, whereas IL-13-treated spheroids did not show morphological changes. Here, TGFβ induced mRNA expression of SNAIL1 and IL-13, whereas IL-13 elevated SLUG and β6-integrin mRNA. An anti-IL-13 antibody was able to prevent IL-13-induced SLUG expression in HT29 IECs. TGFβ induces IL-13 expression and an EMT-like phenotype of IECs, while IL-13 promotes the expression of genes associated with cell invasion. These findings suggest that TGFβ and IL-13 play a synergistic role in the pathogenesis of fistulae and inhibition of IL-13 might represent a novel therapeutic approach for fistula treatment.

  12. Expression of polarity genes in human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wan-Hsin; Asmann, Yan W; Anastasiadis, Panos Z

    2015-01-01

    Polarity protein complexes are crucial for epithelial apical-basal polarity and directed cell migration. Since alterations of these processes are common in cancer, polarity proteins have been proposed to function as tumor suppressors or oncogenic promoters. Here, we review the current understanding of polarity protein functions in epithelial homeostasis, as well as tumor formation and progression. As most previous studies focused on the function of single polarity proteins in simplified model systems, we used a genomics approach to systematically examine and identify the expression profiles of polarity genes in human cancer. The expression profiles of polarity genes were distinct in different human tissues and classified cancer types. Additionally, polarity expression profiles correlated with disease progression and aggressiveness, as well as with identified cancer types, where specific polarity genes were commonly altered. In the case of Scribble, gene expression analysis indicated its common amplification and upregulation in human cancer, suggesting a tumor promoting function.

  13. Autophagy in lung disease pathogenesis and therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan W. Ryter

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy, a cellular pathway for the degradation of damaged organelles and proteins, has gained increasing importance in human pulmonary diseases, both as a modulator of pathogenesis and as a potential therapeutic target. In this pathway, cytosolic cargos are sequestered into autophagosomes, which are delivered to the lysosomes where they are enzymatically degraded and then recycled as metabolic precursors. Autophagy exerts an important effector function in the regulation of inflammation, and immune system functions. Selective pathways for autophagic degradation of cargoes may have variable significance in disease pathogenesis. Among these, the autophagic clearance of bacteria (xenophagy may represent a crucial host defense mechanism in the pathogenesis of sepsis and inflammatory diseases. Our recent studies indicate that the autophagic clearance of mitochondria, a potentially protective program, may aggravate the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by activating cell death programs. We report similar findings with respect to the autophagic clearance of cilia components, which can contribute to airways dysfunction in chronic lung disease. In certain diseases such as pulmonary hypertension, autophagy may confer protection by modulating proliferation and cell death. In other disorders, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and cystic fibrosis, impaired autophagy may contribute to pathogenesis. In lung cancer, autophagy has multiple consequences by limiting carcinogenesis, modulating therapeutic effectiveness, and promoting tumor cell survival. In this review we highlight the multiple functions of autophagy and its selective autophagy subtypes that may be of significance to the pathogenesis of human disease, with an emphasis on lung disease and therapeutics.

  14. Antiangiogenic Steroids in Human Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Despite advances in the early detection of tumors and in the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery for disease management, the worldwide mortality from human cancer remains unacceptably high. The treatment of cancer may benefit from the introduction of novel therapies derived from natural products. Natural products have served to provide a basis for many of the pharmaceutical agents in current use in cancer therapy. Emerging research indicates that progressive growth and spread of ...

  15. Pathogenesis of morbidity after fast-track laparoscopic colonic cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stottmeier, S; Harling, H; Wille-Jørgensen, P

    2011-01-01

    AIM: Analysis of the nature and time course of early complications after laparoscopic colonic surgery is required to allow rational strategies for their prevention and management. METHOD: One hundred and four consecutive patients who underwent elective fast-track laparoscopic colonic cancer surgery...... were analysed prospectively from the Danish Colorectal Cancer Database, supplemented by data from the medical records. We studied in detail the time course of morbidity and reasons for prolonged stay (> 3 days). RESULTS: Seventeen (16.3%) patients had one or more complications. Surgical complications...... occurred in 14 patients, of which four were preceded by medical complications. Three patients had only medical complications. Median length of stay was 3 days (range 1-44). CONCLUSION: Further improvement of outcomes after fast-track laparoscopic colonic surgery might be obtained by improved surgical...

  16. Inflammation, autophagy, and obesity: common features in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gukovsky, Ilya; Li, Ning; Todoric, Jelena; Gukovskaya, Anna; Karin, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Inflammation and autophagy are cellular defense mechanisms. When these processes are deregulated (deficient or overactivated) they produce pathologic effects, such as oxidative stress, metabolic impairments, and cell death. Unresolved inflammation and disrupted regulation of autophagy are common features of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, obesity, a risk factor for pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, promotes inflammation and inhibits or deregulates autophagy, creating an environment that facilitates the induction and progression of pancreatic diseases. However, little is known about how inflammation, autophagy, and obesity interact to promote exocrine pancreatic disorders. We review the roles of inflammation and autophagy, and their deregulation by obesity, in pancreatic diseases. We discuss the connections among disordered pathways and important areas for future research. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Involvement of epigenetic modifiers in the pathogenesis of testicular dysgenesis and germ cell cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawaetz, Andreas C.; Almstrup, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Testicular germ cell cancer manifests mainly in young adults as a seminoma or non-seminoma. The solid tumors are preceded by the presence of a non-invasive precursor cell, the carcinoma in situ cell (CIS), which shows great similarity to fetal germ cells. It is therefore hypothesized that the CIS...... of epigenetic modifiers with a focus on jumonji C enzymes in the development of testicular dysgenesis and germ cell cancer in men....... cell is a fetal germ cell that has been arrested during development due to testicular dysgenesis. CIS cells retain a fetal and open chromatin structure, and recently several epigenetic modifiers have been suggested to be involved in testicular dysgenesis in mice. We here review the possible involvement...

  18. Calcium Nutrition and Extracellular Calcium Sensing: Relevance for the Pathogenesis of Osteoporosis, Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meinrad Peterlik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Through a systematic search in Pubmed for literature, on links between calcium malnutrition and risk of chronic diseases, we found the highest degree of evidence for osteoporosis, colorectal and breast cancer, as well as for hypertension, as the only major cardiovascular risk factor. Low calcium intake apparently has some impact also on cardiovascular events and disease outcome. Calcium malnutrition can causally be related to low activity of the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR. This member of the family of 7-TM G-protein coupled receptors allows extracellular Ca2+ to function as a “first messenger” for various intracellular signaling cascades. Evidence demonstrates that Ca2+/CaSR signaling in functional linkage with vitamin D receptor (VDR-activated pathways (i promotes osteoblast differentiation and formation of mineralized bone; (ii targets downstream effectors of the canonical and non-canonical Wnt pathway to inhibit proliferation and induce differentiation of colorectal cancer cells; (iii evokes Ca2+ influx into breast cancer cells, thereby activating pro-apoptotic intracellular signaling. Furthermore, Ca2+/CaSR signaling opens Ca2+-sensitive K+ conductance channels in vascular endothelial cells, and also participates in IP3-dependent regulation of cytoplasmic Ca2+, the key intermediate of cardiomyocyte functions. Consequently, impairment of Ca2+/CaSR signaling may contribute to inadequate bone formation, tumor progression, hypertension, vascular calcification and, probably, cardiovascular disease.

  19. Helicobacter pylori associated chronic gastritis, clinical syndromes, precancerous lesions, and pathogenesis of gastric cancer development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Jiro; Chen, Nancy; Amenta, Peter S; Fukui, Hirokazu; Oshima, Tadayuki; Tomita, Toshihiko; Miwa, Hiroto; Lim, Kheng-Jim; Das, Kiron M

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is well known to be associated with the development of precancerous lesions such as chronic atrophic gastritis (AG), or gastric intestinal metaplasia (GIM), and cancer. Various molecular alterations are identified not only in gastric cancer (GC) but also in precancerous lesions. H. pylori treatment seems to improve AG and GIM, but still remains controversial. In contrast, many studies, including meta-analysis, show that H. pylori eradication reduces GC. Molecular markers detected by genetic and epigenetic alterations related to carcinogenesis reverse following H. pylori eradication. This indicates that these changes may be an important factor in the identification of high risk patients for cancer development. Patients who underwent endoscopic treatment of GC are at high risk for development of metachronous GC. A randomized controlled trial from Japan concluded that prophylactic eradication of H. pylori after endoscopic resection should be used to prevent the development of metachronous GC, but recent retrospective studies did not show the tendency. Patients with precancerous lesions (molecular alterations) that do not reverse after H. pylori treatment, represent the “point of no return” and may be at high risk for the development of GC. Therefore, earlier H. pylori eradication should be considered for preventing GC development prior to the appearance of precancerous lesions. PMID:24833876

  20. Helicobacter pylori associated chronic gastritis, clinical syndromes, precancerous lesions, and pathogenesis of gastric cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Jiro; Chen, Nancy; Amenta, Peter S; Fukui, Hirokazu; Oshima, Tadayuki; Tomita, Toshihiko; Miwa, Hiroto; Lim, Kheng-Jim; Das, Kiron M

    2014-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is well known to be associated with the development of precancerous lesions such as chronic atrophic gastritis (AG), or gastric intestinal metaplasia (GIM), and cancer. Various molecular alterations are identified not only in gastric cancer (GC) but also in precancerous lesions. H. pylori treatment seems to improve AG and GIM, but still remains controversial. In contrast, many studies, including meta-analysis, show that H. pylori eradication reduces GC. Molecular markers detected by genetic and epigenetic alterations related to carcinogenesis reverse following H. pylori eradication. This indicates that these changes may be an important factor in the identification of high risk patients for cancer development. Patients who underwent endoscopic treatment of GC are at high risk for development of metachronous GC. A randomized controlled trial from Japan concluded that prophylactic eradication of H. pylori after endoscopic resection should be used to prevent the development of metachronous GC, but recent retrospective studies did not show the tendency. Patients with precancerous lesions (molecular alterations) that do not reverse after H. pylori treatment, represent the "point of no return" and may be at high risk for the development of GC. Therefore, earlier H. pylori eradication should be considered for preventing GC development prior to the appearance of precancerous lesions.

  1. HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTIONS IN LARYNGEAL CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torrente, Mariela C.; Rodrigo, Juan P.; Haigentz, Missak; Dikkers, Frederik G.; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Takes, Robert P.; Olofsson, Jan; Ferlito, Alfio

    2011-01-01

    Although the association and clinical significance of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections with a subset of head and neck cancers, particularly for oropharyngeal carcinoma, has recently been well documented, the involvement of HPV in laryngeal cancer has been inadequately evaluated. Herein we revie

  2. HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTIONS IN LARYNGEAL CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torrente, Mariela C.; Rodrigo, Juan P.; Haigentz, Missak; Dikkers, Frederik G.; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Takes, Robert P.; Olofsson, Jan; Ferlito, Alfio

    2011-01-01

    Although the association and clinical significance of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections with a subset of head and neck cancers, particularly for oropharyngeal carcinoma, has recently been well documented, the involvement of HPV in laryngeal cancer has been inadequately evaluated. Herein we revie

  3. Human papillomavirus infections in laryngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torrente, M.C.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Haigentz Jr., M.; Dikkers, F.G.; Rinaldo, A.; Takes, R.P.; Olofsson, J.; Ferlito, A.

    2011-01-01

    Although the association and clinical significance of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections with a subset of head and neck cancers, particularly for oropharyngeal carcinoma, has recently been well documented, the involvement of HPV in laryngeal cancer has been inadequately evaluated. Herein we revie

  4. Human papillomavirus infections in laryngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torrente, M.C.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Haigentz Jr., M.; Dikkers, F.G.; Rinaldo, A.; Takes, R.P.; Olofsson, J.; Ferlito, A.

    2011-01-01

    Although the association and clinical significance of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections with a subset of head and neck cancers, particularly for oropharyngeal carcinoma, has recently been well documented, the involvement of HPV in laryngeal cancer has been inadequately evaluated. Herein we

  5. HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTIONS IN LARYNGEAL CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torrente, Mariela C.; Rodrigo, Juan P.; Haigentz, Missak; Dikkers, Frederik G.; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Takes, Robert P.; Olofsson, Jan; Ferlito, Alfio

    Although the association and clinical significance of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections with a subset of head and neck cancers, particularly for oropharyngeal carcinoma, has recently been well documented, the involvement of HPV in laryngeal cancer has been inadequately evaluated. Herein we

  6. Potential Prognostic Markers for Human Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-03-01

    Prostate 35: 185-192, 1998 osteoblasts on prostate carcinoma proliferation and chemo- 32. Trikha M, Cai Y, Grignon D, Honn KV: Identification taxis ...Markers for Human Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Bruce R. Zetter, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Children’s Hospital Boston, Massachusetts...March 2001 Final (1 Sep 98 - 28 Feb 01) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Potential Prognostic Markers for Human Prostate Cancer DAMD17-98-1

  7. Importance of epigenetic changes in cancer etiology, pathogenesis, clinical profiling, and treatment: what can be learned from hematologic malignancies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchio, Lorella; Seke Etet, Paul Faustin; Kipanyula, Maulilio John; Krampera, Mauro; Nwabo Kamdje, Armel Hervé

    2013-08-01

    Epigenetic alterations represent a key cancer hallmark, even in hematologic malignancies (HMs) or blood cancers, whose clinical features display a high inter-individual variability. Evidence accumulated in recent years indicates that inactivating DNA hypermethylation preferentially targets the subset of polycomb group (PcG) genes that are regulators of developmental processes. Conversely, activating DNA hypomethylation targets oncogenic signaling pathway genes, but outcomes of both events lead in the overexpression of oncogenic signaling pathways that contribute to the stem-like state of cancer cells. On the basis of recent evidence from population-based, clinical and experimental studies, we hypothesize that factors associated with risk for developing a HM, such as metabolic syndrome and chronic inflammation, trigger epigenetic mechanisms to increase the transcriptional expression of oncogenes and activate oncogenic signaling pathways. Among others, signaling pathways associated with such risk factors include pro-inflammatory nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), and mitogenic, growth, and survival Janus kinase (JAK) intracellular non-receptor tyrosine kinase-triggered pathways, which include signaling pathways such as transducer and activator of transcription (STAT), Ras GTPases/mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs)/extracellular signal-related kinases (ERKs), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and β-catenin pathways. Recent findings on epigenetic mechanisms at work in HMs and their importance in the etiology and pathogenesis of these diseases are herein summarized and discussed. Furthermore, the role of epigenetic processes in the determination of biological identity, the consequences for interindividual variability in disease clinical profile, and the potential of epigenetic drugs in HMs are also considered.

  8. Molecular Profiles for Lung Cancer Pathogenesis and Detection in U.S. Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Association for Cancer research; April 5- 9 2014; San Diego, CA. Abstract #2352. • Ooi AT, Gower AC, Zhang K, Vick J, Hong LS, Fishbein M, Nagao B, Wallace...Hong LS, Pagano PC, Liclican EL, Krysan K, Larsen JE, Fishbein MC, Minna JD, Lenburg ME, Spira A, Dubinett SM. The impact of e-cigarettes exposure on...Krysan K, Walser T, Seki A, Tran L, Spira A, Fishbein M, Dubinett S. The mutational landscape of pulmonary premalignancy in the context of lung

  9. Cancer driver-passenger distinction via sporadic human and dog cancer comparison: a proof-of-principle study with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, J; Li, Y; Lyon, K; Camps, J; Dalton, S; Ried, T; Zhao, S

    2014-02-13

    Herein we report a proof-of-principle study illustrating a novel dog-human comparison strategy that addresses a central aim of cancer research, namely cancer driver-passenger distinction. We previously demonstrated that sporadic canine colorectal cancers (CRCs) share similar molecular pathogenesis mechanisms as their human counterparts. In this study, we compared the genome-wide copy number abnormalities between 29 human and 10 canine sporadic CRCs. This led to the identification of 73 driver candidate genes (DCGs), altered in both species, and with 27 from the whole genome and 46 from dog-human genomic rearrangement breakpoint (GRB) regions, as well as 38 passenger candidate genes (PCGs), altered in humans only and located in GRB regions. We noted that DCGs significantly differ from PCGs in every analysis conducted to assess their cancer relevance and biological functions. Importantly, although PCGs are not enriched in any specific functions, DCGs possess significantly enhanced functionality closely associated with cell proliferation and death regulation, as well as with epithelial cell apicobasal polarity establishment/maintenance. These observations support the notion that, in sporadic CRCs of both species, cell polarity genes not only contribute in preventing cancer cell invasion and spreading, but also likely serve as tumor suppressors by modulating cell growth. This pilot study validates our novel strategy and has uncovered four new potential cell polarity and colorectal tumor suppressor genes (RASA3, NUPL1, DENND5A and AVL9). Expansion of this study would make more driver-passenger distinctions for cancers with large genomic amplifications or deletions, and address key questions regarding the relationship between cancer pathogenesis and epithelial cell polarity control in mammals.

  10. Recurrent integration of human papillomaviruses 16, 45, and 67 near translocation breakpoints in new cervical cancer cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, L A; Szuhai, K; van Eendenburg, J D; Bezrookove, V; Kenter, G G; Schuuring, E; Tanke, H; Fleuren, G J

    1999-01-01

    Progressive chromosomal changes and integration of human papillomavirus (HPV) sequences mark the development of invasive cervical cancer. Chromosomal localization of HPV integration is essential to the study of genomic regions involved in HPV-induced pathogenesis. Yet, the available information abou

  11. Experimental mouse tumour models: what can be learnt about human cancer immunology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dranoff, Glenn

    2011-12-02

    The recent demonstration that cancer immunotherapy extends patient survival has reinvigorated interest in elucidating the role of immunity in tumour pathogenesis. Experimental mouse tumour models have provided key mechanistic insights into host antitumour immune responses, and these have guided the development of novel treatment strategies. To accelerate the translation of these findings into clinical benefits, investigators need to gain a better understanding of the strengths and limitations of mouse model systems as tools for deciphering human antitumour immune responses.

  12. microRNAs and ceRNAs: RNA networks in pathogenesis of cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangqian Su; Jiadi Xing; Zaozao Wang; Lei Chen; Ming Cui; Beihai Jiang

    2013-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous,single-stranded non-coding RNAs of 20-23 nucleotides in length,functioning as negative regulators of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level.The dysregulation of miRNAs has been demonstrated to play critical roles in tumorigenesis,either through inhibiting tumor suppressor genes or activating oncogenes inappropriately.Besides their promising clinical applications in cancer diagnosis and treatment,recent studies have uncovered that miRNAs could act as a regulatory language,through which messenger RNAs,transcribed pseudogenes,and long noncoding RNAs crosstalk with each other and form a novel regulatory network.RNA transcripts involved in this network have been termed as competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs),since they influence each other's level by competing for the same pool of miRNAs through miRNA response elements (MREs) on their target transcripts.The discovery of miRNA-ceRNA network not only provides the possibility of an additional level of post-transcriptional regulation,but also dictates a reassessment of the existing regulatory pathways involved in cancer initiation and progression.

  13. Potential Role of Peptidylarginine Deiminase Enzymes and Protein Citrullination in Cancer Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunish Mohanan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs are a family of posttranslational modification enzymes that catalyze the conversion of positively charged protein-bound arginine and methylarginine residues to the uncharged, nonstandard amino acid citrulline. This enzymatic activity is referred to as citrullination or, alternatively, deimination. Citrullination can significantly affect biochemical pathways by altering the structure and function of target proteins. Five mammalian PAD family members (PADs 1–4 and 6 have been described and show tissue-specific distribution. Recent reviews on PADs have focused on their role in autoimmune diseases. Here, we will discuss the potential role of PADs in tumor progression and tumor-associated inflammation. In the context of cancer, increasing clinical evidence suggests that PAD4 (and possibly PAD2 has important roles in tumor progression. The link between PADs and cancer is strengthened by recent findings showing that treatment of cell lines and mice with PAD inhibitors significantly suppresses tumor growth and, interestingly, inflammatory symptoms. At the molecular level, transcription factors, coregulators, and histones are functional targets for citrullination by PADs, and citrullination of these targets can affect gene expression in multiple tumor cell lines. Next generation isozyme-specific PAD inhibitors may have therapeutic potential to regulate both the inflammatory tumor microenvironment and tumor cell growth.

  14. Biological stoichiometry in human cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Elser

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A growing tumor in the body can be considered a complex ecological and evolutionary system. A new eco-evolutionary hypothesis (the "Growth Rate Hypothesis", GRH proposes that tumors have elevated phosphorus (P demands due to increased allocation to P-rich nucleic acids, especially ribosomal RNA, to meet the protein synthesis demands of accelerated proliferation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We determined the elemental (C, N, P and nucleic acid contents of paired malignant and normal tissues from colon, lung, liver, or kidney for 121 patients. Consistent with the GRH, lung and colon tumors were significantly higher (by approximately two-fold in P content (fraction of dry weight and RNA content and lower in nitrogen (N:P ratio than paired normal tissue, and P in RNA contributed a significantly larger fraction of total biomass P in malignant relative to normal tissues. Furthermore, patient-specific differences for %P between malignant and normal tissues were positively correlated with such differences for %RNA, both for the overall data and within three of the four organ sites. However, significant differences in %P and %RNA between malignant and normal tissues were not seen in liver and kidney and, overall, RNA contributed only approximately 11% of total tissue P content. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Data for lung and colon tumors provide support for the GRH in human cancer. The two-fold amplification of P content in colon and lung tumors may set the stage for potential P-limitation of their proliferation, as such differences often do for rapidly growing biota in ecosystems. However, data for kidney and liver do not support the GRH. To account for these conflicting observations, we suggest that local environments in some organs select for neoplastic cells bearing mutations increasing cell division rate ("r-selected," as in colon and lung while conditions elsewhere may select for reduced mortality rate ("K-selected," as in liver and

  15. Promoter hypermethylation of MGMT gene may contribute to the pathogenesis of gastric cancer: A PRISMA-compliant meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zongxin; Xin, Shaojun; Gao, Min; Cai, Yunxiang

    2017-04-01

    The association of MGMT (O-methyguanine deoxyribonucleic acid methyltransferase) promoter hypermethylation with gastric cancer (GC) risk has been studied extensively, but the results remained unclear. Here, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate whether promoter hypermethylation of the MGMT gene contributed to gastric pathogenesis. Relevant studies were identified by retrieving the PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases. The Newcastle-Ottawa Scale was applied to assess methodological quality of the included studies. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated to evaluate the association of MGMT promoter hypermethylation with gastric pathogenesis. Moreover, STATA 12.0 software was used to summarize the extracted data in this meta-analysis. Seventeen studies, comprising 1736 cases and 1291 controls, were included in this meta-analysis. The frequency of MGMT promoter hypermethylation in the GC group (32.97%) was significantly higher than those in the control group (18.00%) (OR = 2.83, CI = 1.93-4.15, P < .05). When stratified by cancer subtype, the results indicated that the frequency of MGMT promoter hypermethylation was significantly higher in gastric adenocarcinoma than in control group (OR = 3.47, CI = 1.06-11.35, P < .05). In addition, MGMT promoter hypermethylation significantly promoted distant metastasis and lymph node (LN) metastasis of gastric tumor (for distant metastasis, OR = 4.22, CI = 2.42-7.37, P < .05; for LN metastasis, OR = 1.56, CI = 1.14-2.13, P < .05). A significant association between MGMT promoter hypermethylation and TNM-stage was also found in the present meta-analysis (OR = 2.70, CI = 1.79-4.08, P < .05). The results of this meta-analysis suggested that MGMT gene-promoter hypermethylation was significantly associated with an increased risk of GC, especially in Asians. Furthermore, MGMT gene

  16. Molecular Profiles for Lung Cancer Pathogenesis and Detection in U.S. Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    former smokers and appeared to have persisted for many years after smoking cessation. In addition, LOH was detected in DNA obtained from bronchial... recombi - nant adenoviruses to express the 110a subunit of PI3K in primary human epithelial cells (43). The PI3K pathway activation sig- nature was...double stranded cDNA, DNA was amplified using the SPIATM amplification method, a linear isothermal DNA amplification process developed by the vendor

  17. Eosinophil degranulation. An immunologic determinant in the pathogenesis of the Mazzotti reaction in human onchocerciasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, S J; Kephart, G M; Francis, H; Awadzi, K; Gleich, G J; Ottesen, E A

    1990-05-15

    Onchocerciasis patients treated with diethylcarbamazine often undergo a severe inflammatory response, the Mazzotti reaction. To assess the eosinophil's role in the pathogenesis of the Mazzotti reaction, we obtained serial blood, plasma, and skin biopsy specimens from 21 heavily infected patients and 3 endemic controls, both before and during therapy with diethylcarbamazine. Samples were analyzed for blood eosinophils, plasma levels of eosinophil granule major basic protein (MBP) and eosinophil-derived neurotoxin, eosinophil infiltration and eosinophil and mast cell degranulation in the skin. After the first dose of diethylcarbamazine, blood eosinophils fell from a pre-treatment level of 888 +/- 111 to 203 +/- 42 cells/mm3 at 8 h. This decrease was followed by a marked eosinophilia developing over the remaining 7 days of treatment and 14 days of follow-up. Plasma eosinophil-derived neurotoxin levels increased from 56 +/- 4 ng/ml pretreatment to a peak of 82 +/- 9 ng/ml at 8 h and returned to pretreatment levels by 48 h. Beginning at 12 h, plasma MBP levels increased from 730 +/- 74 ng/ml pretreatment to a peak of 1140 +/- 74 ng/ml after 5 days. Pretreatment skin biopsies stained for MBP by immunofluorescence showed a bright fibrillar pattern in the dermis consistent with chronic eosinophil degranulation; the MBP was localized on elastic tissue fibers. After treatment, skin biopsy specimens showed both the pretreatment fibrillar MBP staining pattern as well as focal eosinophil degranulation. Deposition of MBP around microfilariae in the papillary dermis was visible as early as 1.5 h. The lowest blood eosinophil levels and peak plasma eosinophil-derived neurotoxin levels coincided with the infiltration and degranulation of eosinophils in the skin. Mast cell degranulation in the skin was maximal by the first posttreatment biopsy (1.5 h) coincident with the beginning of eosinophil degranulation. Although the pathogenesis of the Mazzotti reaction is clearly complex, our

  18. PRDM1 expression via human parvovirus B19 infection plays a role in the pathogenesis of Hashimoto thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Zhang, Wei-Ping; Yao, Li; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Jin; Zhang, Wei-Chen; Zhang, Yue-Hua; Wang, Zhe; Yan, Qing-Guo; Guo, Ying; Fan, Lin-Ni; Liu, Yi-Xiong; Huang, Gao-Sheng

    2015-12-01

    Ectopic lymphoid follicle infiltration is a key event in Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT). Positive regulatory domain zinc finger protein 1 (PRDM1), which is induced by antigen stimulation, can regulate all lymphocyte lineages. Several groups independently demonstrated that human parvovirus B19 (PVB19) is closely associated with HT. Hence, we determined whether PRDM1 is expressed in HT thyroid tissue and whether there is any correlation between PRDM1 expression and PVB19 in the pathogenesis of HT. We detected PRDM1 expression in HT (n = 86), normal thyroid tissue (n = 30), and nontoxic nodular goiter (n = 20) samples using immunohistochemistry. We also detected PVB19 protein in HT samples in a double-blind manner and analyzed the correlation between the 2 proteins using immunofluorescence confocal detection and coimmunoprecipitation. Furthermore, we detected changes of the expression levels of PRDM1 and PVB19 in transfected primary thyroid follicular epithelial cells using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We found that PRDM1 protein is significantly highly expressed in the injured follicular epithelial cells in HT (83/86 cases) than in normal thyroid cells (0/30 cases) or in nontoxic nodular goiter cells (0/20 cases) (P thyroid epithelial cells also showed PRDM1 up-regulation after PVB19 NS1 transfection. Our findings suggest a previously unrecognized role of PRDM1 and PVB19 in the pathogenesis of HT.

  19. Inactivation of X-linked tumor suppressor genes in human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Runhua; Kain, Mandy; Wang, Lizhong

    2012-04-01

    Cancer cells silence autosomal tumor suppressor genes by Knudson's two-hit mechanism in which loss-of-function mutations and then loss of heterozygosity occur at the tumor suppressor gene loci. However, the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes has challenged the traditional theory of 'two-hit inactivation' in tumor suppressor genes, introducing the novel concept that a single genetic hit can cause loss of tumor suppressor function. The mechanism through which these genes are silenced in human cancer is unclear, but elucidating the details will greatly enhance our understanding of the pathogenesis of human cancer. Here, we review the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes and discuss the potential mechanisms of their inactivation. In addition, we also discuss how the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes can potentially lead to new approaches in cancer therapy.

  20. Novel innate cancer killing activity in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovato James

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study, we pilot tested an in vitro assay of cancer killing activity (CKA in circulating leukocytes of 22 cancer cases and 25 healthy controls. Methods Using a human cervical cancer cell line, HeLa, as target cells, we compared the CKA in circulating leukocytes, as effector cells, of cancer cases and controls. The CKA was normalized as percentages of total target cells during selected periods of incubation time and at selected effector/target cell ratios in comparison to no-effector-cell controls. Results Our results showed that CKA similar to that of our previous study of SR/CR mice was present in human circulating leukocytes but at profoundly different levels in individuals. Overall, males have a significantly higher CKA than females. The CKA levels in cancer cases were lower than that in healthy controls (mean ± SD: 36.97 ± 21.39 vs. 46.28 ± 27.22. Below-median CKA was significantly associated with case status (odds ratio = 4.36; 95% Confidence Interval = 1.06, 17.88 after adjustment of gender and race. Conclusions In freshly isolated human leukocytes, we were able to detect an apparent CKA in a similar manner to that of cancer-resistant SR/CR mice. The finding of CKA at lower levels in cancer patients suggests the possibility that it may be of a consequence of genetic, physiological, or pathological conditions, pending future studies with larger sample size.

  1. Proteomic analysis of human substantia nigra identifies novel candidates involved in Parkinson's disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licker, Virginie; Turck, Natacha; Kövari, Enikö; Burkhardt, Karim; Côte, Mélanie; Surini-Demiri, Maria; Lobrinus, Johannes A; Sanchez, Jean-Charles; Burkhard, Pierre R

    2014-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) pathology spreads throughout the brain following a region-specific process predominantly affecting the substantia nigra (SN) pars compacta. SN exhibits a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons responsible for the major cardinal motor symptoms, along with the occurrence of Lewy bodies in the surviving neurons. To gain new insights into the underlying pathogenic mechanisms in PD, we studied postmortem nigral tissues dissected from pathologically confirmed PD cases (n = 5) and neurologically intact controls (n = 8). Using a high-throughput shotgun proteomic strategy, we simultaneously identified 1795 proteins with concomitant quantitative data. To date, this represents the most extensive catalog of nigral proteins. Of them, 204 proteins displayed significant expression level changes in PD patients versus controls. These were involved in novel or known pathogenic processes including mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, or cytoskeleton impairment. We further characterized four candidates that might be relevant to PD pathogenesis. We confirmed the differential expression of ferritin-L and seipin by Western blot and demonstrated the neuronal localization of gamma glutamyl hydrolase and nebulette by immunohistochemistry. Our preliminary findings suggest a role for nebulette overexpression in PD neurodegeneration, through mechanisms that may involve cytoskeleton dynamics disruption. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000427 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000427).

  2. The pathogenesis of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in humans: insights from splenic physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safeukui, Innocent; Deplaine, Guillaume; Brousse, Valentine; Prendki, Virginie; Thellier, Marc; Turner, Gareth D.; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile

    2011-01-01

    Clinical manifestations of Plasmodium falciparum infection are induced by the asexual stages of the parasite that develop inside red blood cells (RBCs). Because splenic microcirculatory beds filter out altered RBCs, the spleen can innately clear subpopulations of infected or uninfected RBC modified during falciparum malaria. The spleen appears more protective against severe manifestations of malaria in naïve than in immune subjects. The spleen-specific pitting function accounts for a large fraction of parasite clearance in artemisinin-treated patients. RBC loss contributes to malarial anemia, a clinical form associated with subacute progression, frequent splenomegaly, and relatively low parasitemia. Stringent splenic clearance of ring-infected RBCs and uninfected, but parasite-altered, RBCs, may altogether exacerbate anemia and reduce the risks of severe complications associated with high parasite loads, such as cerebral malaria. The age of the patient directly influences the risk of severe manifestations. We hypothesize that coevolution resulting in increased splenic clearance of P. falciparum–altered RBCs in children favors the survival of the host and, ultimately, sustained parasite transmission. This analysis of the RBC–spleen dynamic interactions during P falciparum infection reflects both data and hypotheses, and provides a framework on which a more complete immunologic understanding of malaria pathogenesis may be elaborated. PMID:20852127

  3. [ACE and AGTR1 genes polymorphisms in left ventricular hypertrophy pathogenesis in humans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makeeva, O A; Puzyrev, K V; Pavliukova, E N; Koshel'skaia, O A; Golubenko, M V; Efimova, E V; Kucher, A N; Tsimbaliuk, I V; Karpov, R S; Puzyrev, V P

    2004-01-01

    The role of A2350G polymorphism in exon 17 of the ACE gene and A1166C - in 3'-UTR of the AGTR1 in the pathogenesis of left ventricular hypertrophy was studied in patients with essential hypertension (EH) and arterial hypertension combined with diabetes mellitus type 2 (AH + DM2). Patients with EH and AH + DM2 did not differ from the control sample of healthy individuals by allele or genotype frequencies. However, an association of both polymorphisms with LVH was detected in EH patients. The frequency of 1166C allele was higher in patients with LVH (33.6% vs 20.7% without LVH). A1166C polymorphism determined the magnitude of left ventricular mass index (LVMI) in EH patients as well (p = 0.007). 2350G allele frequency of the ACE gene was in 1.5, and GG genotype--in 3.5-fold higher in EH patients with LVH, as compared without LVH. LVMI was significantly higher in patients with GG genotype as compared with heterozygotes and AA homozygotes (p = 0.002). Thus the presence of 1166C allele of AGTR1 and 2350G allele of ACE can be considered as predisposing factors for LVH development in EH. In contrast, association of studied polymorphisms with presence or LVH degree was not detected in patients with arterial hypertension combined with DM2. This may indicate another structure of genetic component of predisposition to LVH in different causes.

  4. Human papilloma viruses (HPV and breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Sutherland Lawson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Human papillomaviruses (HPV may have a role in some breast cancers. The purpose of this study is to fill important gaps in the evidence. These gaps are: (i confirmation of the presence of high risk for cancer HPVs in breast cancers, (ii evidence of HPV infections in benign breast tissues prior to the development of HPV positive breast cancer in the same patients, (iii evidence that HPVs are biologically active and not harmless passengers in breast cancer.Methods: RNA-seq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA was used to identify HPV RNA sequences in breast cancers. We also conducted a retrospective cohort study based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR analyses to identify HPVs in archival specimens from Australian women with benign breast biopsies who later developed breast cancer. To assess whether HPVs in breast cancer were biologically active, the expression of the oncogenic protein HPV E7 was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC.Results: Thirty (3.5% low risk and 20 (2.3% high risk HPV types were identified in 855 breast cancers from the TCGA data base. The high risk types were HPV 18 (48%, HPV 113 (24%, HPV 16 (10%, HPV 52 (10%. Data from the PCR cohort study, indicated that HPV type 18 was the most common type identified in breast cancer specimens (55% of 40 breast cancer specimens followed by HPV 16 (13%. The same HPV type was identified in both the benign and subsequent breast cancer in 15 patients. HPV E7 proteins were identified in 72% of benign breast specimens and 59% of invasive breast cancer specimens.Conclusions: There were 4 observations of particular interest: (i confirmation by both NGS and PCR of the presence of high risk HPV gene sequences in breast cancers, (ii a correlation between high risk HPV in benign breast specimens and subsequent HPV positive breast cancer in the same patient, (iii HPVs in breast cancer are likely to be biologically active (as shown by transcription of HPV DNA to RNA plus the expression of

  5. Prevalence of Telomerase Activity in Human Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Hau Chen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase activity has been measured in a wide variety of cancerous and non-cancerous tissue types, and the vast majority of clinical studies have shown a direct correlation between it and the presence of cancerous cells. Telomerase plays a key role in cellular immortality and tumorigenesis. Telomerase is activated in 80–90% of human carcinomas, but not in normal somatic cells, therefore, its detection holds promise as a diagnostic marker for cancer. Measurable levels of telomerase have been detected in malignant cells from various samples: tissue from gestational trophoblastic neoplasms; squamous carcinoma cells from oral rinses; lung carcinoma cells from bronchial washings; colorectal carcinoma cells from colonic luminal washings; bladder carcinoma cells from urine or bladder washings; and breast carcinoma or thyroid cancer cells from fine needle aspirations. Such clinical tests for telomerase can be useful as non-invasive and cost-effective methods for early detection and monitoring of cancer. In addition, telomerase activity has been shown to correlate with poor clinical outcome in late-stage diseases such as non-small cell lung cancer, colorectal cancer, and soft tissue sarcomas. In such cases, testing for telomerase activity can be used to identify patients with a poor prognosis and to select those who might benefit from adjuvant treatment. Our review of the latest medical advances in this field reveals that telomerase holds great promise as a biomarker for early cancer detection and monitoring, and has considerable potential as the basis for developing new anticancer therapies.

  6. Cancer Metabolomics and the Human Metabolome Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Wishart

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The application of metabolomics towards cancer research has led to a renewed appreciation of metabolism in cancer development and progression. It has also led to the discovery of metabolite cancer biomarkers and the identification of a number of novel cancer causing metabolites. The rapid growth of metabolomics in cancer research is also leading to challenges. In particular, with so many cancer-associate metabolites being identified, it is often difficult to keep track of which compounds are associated with which cancers. It is also challenging to track down information on the specific pathways that particular metabolites, drugs or drug metabolites may be affecting. Even more frustrating are the difficulties associated with identifying metabolites from NMR or MS spectra. Fortunately, a number of metabolomics databases are emerging that are designed to address these challenges. One such database is the Human Metabolome Database (HMDB. The HMDB is currently the world’s largest and most comprehensive, organism-specific metabolomics database. It contains more than 40,000 metabolite entries, thousands of metabolite concentrations, >700 metabolic and disease-associated pathways, as well as information on dozens of cancer biomarkers. This review is intended to provide a brief summary of the HMDB and to offer some guidance on how it can be used in metabolomic studies of cancer.

  7. The pathogenesis of tropical spastic paraparesis/human T-cell leukemia type I-associated myelopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casseb J.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Tropical spastic paraparesis/human T-cell leukemia type I-associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM is caused by a human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I after a long incubation period. TSP/HAM is characterized by a chronic progressive paraparesis with sphincter disturbances, no/mild sensory loss, the absence of spinal cord compression and seropositivity for HTLV-I antibodies. The pathogenesis of this entity is not completely known and involves a multivariable phenomenon of immune system activation against the presence of HTLV-I antigens, leading to an inflammatory process and demyelination, mainly in the thoracic spinal cord. The current hypothesis about the pathogenesis of TSP/HAM is: 1 presence of HTLV-I antigens in the lumbar spinal cord, noted by an increased DNA HTLV-I load; 2 CTL either with their lytic functions or release/production of soluble factors, such as CC-chemokines, cytokines, and adhesion molecules; 3 the presence of Tax gene expression that activates T-cell proliferation or induces an inflammatory process in the spinal cord; 4 the presence of B cells with neutralizing antibody production, or complement activation by an immune complex phenomenon, and 5 lower IL-2 and IFN-gamma production and increased IL-10, indicating drive to a cytokine type 2 pattern in the TSP/HAM subjects and the existence of a genetic background such as some HLA haplotypes. All of these factors should be implicated in TSP/HAM and further studies are necessary to investigate their role in the development of TSP/HAM.

  8. Human Papillomavirus in Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rosa Garbuglia

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV is currently considered to be a major etiologic factor, in addition to tobacco and alcohol, for oropharyngeal cancer (OPC development. HPV positive OPCs are epidemiologically distinct from HPV negative ones, and are characterized by younger age at onset, male predominance, and strong association with sexual behaviors. HPV16 is the most prevalent types in oral cavity cancer (OCC, moreover the prevalence of beta, and gamma HPV types is higher than that of alpha HPV in oral cavity.

  9. Oral contraceptives, human papillomavirus and cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Vecchia, Carlo; Boccia, Stefania

    2014-03-01

    Oncogenic human papillomavirus is the key determinant of cervical cancer, but other risk factors interact with it to define individual risk. Among these, there is oral contraceptive (OC) use. A quantitative review of the link between OCs and cervical cancer was performed. Long-term (>5 year) current or recent OC use has been related to an about two-fold excess risk of cervical cancer. Such an excess risk, however, levels off after stopping use, and approaches unity 10 or more years after stopping. The public health implications of OC use for cervical cancer are limited. In any case, such implications are greater in middle-income and low-income countries, as well as in central and eastern Europe and Latin America, where cervical cancer screening and control remain inadequate.

  10. Radiobiology of human cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    The author has systematically collected and collated the scientific literature correlating the basic and clinical sciences in this field in order to produce a definitive treatise. The book thoroughly reviews the biology and biochemistry relevant to radiobiology and describes the critical locus for the extinction of cell reproductive capacity. Extensive coverage is given to oxygen effect, hyperthermia, high linear energy transfer, cell populations, and similar topics. Separate sections cover time, dose, and fractionation; radiation hematology; cancer chemotherapy; and cancer immunology. The book also contains invaluable discussions of techniques for optimizing radiotherapy alone and in combination with other therapies.

  11. Water pipe smoking and human oral cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastam, Samer; Li, Fu-Min; Fouad, Fouad M; Al Kamal, Haysam M; Akil, Nizar; Al Moustafa, Ala-Eddin

    2010-03-01

    While cigarette smoking is recognized as an important risk factor in human oral cancers, the effect of water pipe smoking (WPS) on these cancers is not known. WPS is very common in the young adult population, especially in the Middle East, and has been associated with several respiratory problems. However, to date, there have been no studies examining the association between WPS and the progression of human oral cancers. Currently, the role of WPS in human oral cancers remains uncertain because of the limited number of investigations. This raises the question of whether WPS plays a significant role in the development of human oral carcinomas. In this paper, we propose the hypothesis that human oral normal epithelial cells are vulnerable to persistent WPS; moreover, WPS could play an important role in the initiation of a neoplastic transformation of human normal oral epithelial cells. Therefore, we believe that an international collaboration of epidemiological and clinical studies as well as cellular and molecular biology investigations is necessary to answer this important question.

  12. Candidate genes expressed in human islets and their role in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storling, Joachim; Brorsson, Caroline Anna

    2013-01-01

    In type 1 diabetes (T1D), the insulin-producing β cells are destroyed by an immune-mediated process leading to complete insulin deficiency. There is a strong genetic component in T1D. Genes located in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region are the most important genetic determinants of disease...... exposure to proinflammatory cytokines highlighting that these genes may be involved in the response of β cells to immune attack. In this review, the compiling evidence that many of the candidate genes are expressed in islets and β cells will be presented. Further, we perform the first systematic human...... islet expression analysis of all genes located in 50 T1D-associated GWAS loci using a published RNA sequencing dataset. We find that 336 out of 857 genes are expressed in human islets and that many of these interact in protein networks. Finally, the potential pathogenetic roles of some candidate genes...

  13. Expression of MALT1 oncogene in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells recapitulates the pathogenesis of human lymphoma in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Fontán, Lorena; Gonzalez-Herrero, Ines; Romero-Camarero, Isabel; Segura, Victor; Aznar, M Angela; Alonso-Escudero, Esther; Campos-Sanchez, Elena; Ruiz-Roca, Lucía; Barajas-Diego, Marcos; Sagardoy, Ainara; Martinez-Ferrandis, Jose I; Abollo-Jimenez, Fernando; Bertolo, Cristina; Peñuelas, Ivan; Garcia-Criado, Francisco J; García-Cenador, María B; Tousseyn, Thomas; Agirre, Xabier; Prosper, Felipe; Garcia-Bragado, Federico; McPhail, Ellen D; Lossos, Izidore S; Du, Ming-Qing; Flores, Teresa; Hernandez-Rivas, Jesus M; Gonzalez, Marcos; Salar, Antonio; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Conde, Eulogio; Siebert, Reiner; Sagaert, Xavier; Cobaleda, Cesar; Sanchez-Garcia, Isidro; Martinez-Climent, Jose A

    2012-06-26

    Chromosomal translocations involving the MALT1 gene are hallmarks of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. To date, targeting these translocations to mouse B cells has failed to reproduce human disease. Here, we induced MALT1 expression in mouse Sca1(+)Lin(-) hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, which showed NF-κB activation and early lymphoid priming, being selectively skewed toward B-cell differentiation. These cells accumulated in extranodal tissues and gave rise to clonal tumors recapitulating the principal clinical, biological, and molecular genetic features of MALT lymphoma. Deletion of p53 gene accelerated tumor onset and induced transformation of MALT lymphoma to activated B-cell diffuse large-cell lymphoma (ABC-DLBCL). Treatment of MALT1-induced lymphomas with a specific inhibitor of MALT1 proteolytic activity decreased cell viability, indicating that endogenous Malt1 signaling was required for tumor cell survival. Our study shows that human-like lymphomas can be modeled in mice by targeting MALT1 expression to hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, demonstrating the oncogenic role of MALT1 in lymphomagenesis. Furthermore, this work establishes a molecular link between MALT lymphoma and ABC-DLBCL, and provides mouse models to test MALT1 inhibitors. Finally, our results suggest that hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells may be involved in the pathogenesis of human mature B-cell lymphomas.

  14. Zika Virus Infection of the Human Glomerular Cells: Implications for Viral Reservoirs and Renal Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcendor, Donald J

    2017-07-15

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in the human renal compartment has not been reported. Several clinical reports have describe high-level persistent viral shedding in the urine of infected patients, but the associated mechanisms have not been explored until now. The current study examined cellular components of the glomerulus of the human kidney for ZIKV infectivity. I infected primary human podocytes, renal glomerular endothelial cells (GECs), and mesangial cells with ZIKV. Viral infectivity was analyzed by means of microscopy, immunofluorescence, real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), and the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 1β, interferon β, and RANTES (regulated on activation of normal T cells expressed and secreted) were assessed using qRT-PCR. I show that glomerular podocytes, renal GECs, and mesangial cells are permissive for ZIKV infection. ZIKV infectivity was confirmed in all 3 cell types by means of immunofluorescence staining, RT-PCR, and qRT-PCR, and qRT-PCR analysis revealed increased transcriptional induction of interleukin 1β, interferon β, and RANTES in ZIKV-infected podocytes at 72 hours, compared with renal GECs and mesangial cells. The findings of this study support the notion that the glomerulus may serve as an amplification reservoir for ZIKV in the renal compartment. The impact of ZIKV infection in the human renal compartment is unknown and will require further study.

  15. Novel aspects of the pathogenesis of aneurysms of the abdominal aorta in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Martin-Ventura, José-Luis; Egido, Jesus

    2011-01-01

    and the adventitial response in the development of human AAA. The intraluminal thrombus exerts its pathogenic effect through platelet activation, fibrin formation, binding of plasminogen and its activators, and trapping of erythrocytes and neutrophils, leading to oxidative and proteolytic injury of the arterial wall...... into diagnostic and therapeutic applications....

  16. Human upright spinopelvic alignment and the etio-pathogenesis of idiopathic scoliosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M.M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic scoliosis is a classic and intriguing orthopedic disorder in which the spine, usually during the pubertal growth spurt, collapses into a three-dimensional deformity without any known cause. Despite many anatomical similarities between the human spine and other spines in nature, idiopathic

  17. An ex-vivo human intestinal model to study Entamoeba histolytica pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devendra Bansal

    Full Text Available Amoebiasis (a human intestinal infection affecting 50 million people every year is caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. To study the molecular mechanisms underlying human colon invasion by E. histolytica, we have set up an ex vivo human colon model to study the early steps in amoebiasis. Using scanning electron microscopy and histological analyses, we have established that E. histolytica caused the removal of the protective mucus coat during the first two hours of incubation, detached the enterocytes, and then penetrated into the lamina propria by following the crypts of Lieberkühn. Significant cell lysis (determined by the release of lactodehydrogenase and inflammation (marked by the secretion of pro-inflammatory molecules such as interleukin 1 beta, interferon gamma, interleukin 6, interleukin 8 and tumour necrosis factor were detected after four hours of incubation. Entamoeba dispar (a closely related non-pathogenic amoeba that also colonizes the human colon was unable to invade colonic mucosa, lyse cells or induce an inflammatory response. We also examined the behaviour of trophozoites in which genes coding for known virulent factors (such as amoebapores, the Gal/GalNAc lectin and the cysteine protease 5 (CP-A5, which have major roles in cell death, adhesion (to target cells or mucus and mucus degradation, respectively were silenced, together with the corresponding tissue responses. Our data revealed that the signalling via the heavy chain Hgl2 or via the light chain Lgl1 of the Gal/GalNAc lectin is not essential to penetrate the human colonic mucosa. In addition, our study demonstrates that E. histolytica silenced for CP-A5 does not penetrate the colonic lamina propria and does not induce the host's pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion.

  18. An ex-vivo human intestinal model to study Entamoeba histolytica pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Devendra; Ave, Patrick; Kerneis, Sophie; Frileux, Pascal; Boché, Olivier; Baglin, Anne Catherine; Dubost, Geneviève; Leguern, Anne-Sophie; Prevost, Marie-Christine; Bracha, Rivka; Mirelman, David; Guillén, Nancy; Labruyère, Elisabeth

    2009-11-17

    Amoebiasis (a human intestinal infection affecting 50 million people every year) is caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. To study the molecular mechanisms underlying human colon invasion by E. histolytica, we have set up an ex vivo human colon model to study the early steps in amoebiasis. Using scanning electron microscopy and histological analyses, we have established that E. histolytica caused the removal of the protective mucus coat during the first two hours of incubation, detached the enterocytes, and then penetrated into the lamina propria by following the crypts of Lieberkühn. Significant cell lysis (determined by the release of lactodehydrogenase) and inflammation (marked by the secretion of pro-inflammatory molecules such as interleukin 1 beta, interferon gamma, interleukin 6, interleukin 8 and tumour necrosis factor) were detected after four hours of incubation. Entamoeba dispar (a closely related non-pathogenic amoeba that also colonizes the human colon) was unable to invade colonic mucosa, lyse cells or induce an inflammatory response. We also examined the behaviour of trophozoites in which genes coding for known virulent factors (such as amoebapores, the Gal/GalNAc lectin and the cysteine protease 5 (CP-A5), which have major roles in cell death, adhesion (to target cells or mucus) and mucus degradation, respectively) were silenced, together with the corresponding tissue responses. Our data revealed that the signalling via the heavy chain Hgl2 or via the light chain Lgl1 of the Gal/GalNAc lectin is not essential to penetrate the human colonic mucosa. In addition, our study demonstrates that E. histolytica silenced for CP-A5 does not penetrate the colonic lamina propria and does not induce the host's pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion.

  19. Possible pathophysiological roles of transglutaminase-catalyzed reactions in the pathogenesis of human neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrica Serretiello

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Transglutaminases (TG, E.C. 2.3.2.13 are related and ubiquitous enzymes that catalyze the cross linking of a glutaminyl residue of a protein/peptide substrate to a lysyl residue of a protein/peptide co-substrate. These enzymes are also capable of catalyzing other post-translational reactions important for cell life. The distribution and the physiological roles of human TGs have been widely studied in numerous cell types and tissues and recently their roles in several diseases have begun to be identified. It has been hypothesized that transglutaminase activity is directly involved in the pathogenetic mechanisms responsible for several human diseases. In particular, tissue TG (tTG, TG2, a member of the TG enzyme family, has been recently shown to be involved in the molecular mechanisms responsible for a very widespread human pathology, Celiac Disease (CD, one of the most common food intolerances described in the western population. The main food agent that provokes the strong and diffuse clinical symptoms has been known for several years to be gliadin, a protein present in a very large number of human foods derived from vegetables. Recently, some biochemical and immunological aspects of this very common disease have been clarified, and “tissue” transglutaminase, a multifunctional and ubiquitous enzyme, has been identified as one of the major factors. The aim of this review is to summarize the most recent findings concerning the relationships between the biochemical properties of the transglutaminase activity and the basic molecular mechanisms responsible for some human diseases, with particular reference to neuropsychiatric disorders. Possible molecular links between CD and neuropsychiatric disorders, and the use of transglutaminase inhibitors are also discussed.

  20. Impact of Human Immunodeficiency Virus in the Pathogenesis and Outcome of Patients with Glioblastoma Multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Choy, Winward; Lagman, Carlito; Lee, Seung J.; Bui, Timothy T; Safaee, Michael; Yang, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    Background Improvement in antiviral therapies have been accompanied by an increased frequency of non-Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) defining malignancies, such as glioblastoma multiforme. Here, we investigated all reported cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients with glioblastoma and evaluated their clinical outcomes. A comprehensive review of the molecular pathogenetic mechanisms underlying glioblastoma development in the setting of HIV/AIDS is provided. Met...

  1. BRG1 is a prognostic marker and potential therapeutic target in human breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Bai

    Full Text Available BRG1, a core component of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex, has been implicated in cancer development; however, the biological significance of BRG1 in breast cancer remains unknown. We explored the role of BRG1 in human breast cancer pathogenesis. Using tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry, we evaluated BRG1 staining in 437 breast cancer specimens and investigated its role in breast cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Our Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed that high BRG1 expression is inversely correlated with both overall (P = 0.000 and disease-specific (P = 0.000 5-year patient survival. Furthermore, we found that knockdown of BRG1 by RNA interference markedly inhibits cell proliferation and causes cessation of cell cycle. This reduced cell proliferation is due to G1 phase arrest as cyclin D1 and cyclin E are diminished whereas p27 is upregulated. Moreover, BRG1 depletion induces the expression of TIMP-2 but reduces MMP-2, thereby inhibiting the ability of cells to migrate and to invade. These results highlight the importance of BRG1 in breast cancer pathogenesis and BRG1 may serve as a prognostic marker as well as a potentially selective therapeutic target.

  2. Infection and pathogenesis of canine, equine, and human influenza viruses in canine tracheas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Gaelle; Marshall, John F; Morrell, Joanna; Robb, David; McCauley, John W; Perez, Daniel R; Parrish, Colin R; Murcia, Pablo R

    2014-08-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) can jump species barriers and occasionally cause epidemics, epizootics, pandemics, and panzootics. Characterizing the infection dynamics at the target tissues of natural hosts is central to understanding the mechanisms that control host range, tropism, and virulence. Canine influenza virus (CIV; H3N8) originated after the transfer of an equine influenza virus (EIV) into dogs. Thus, comparing CIV and EIV isolates provides an opportunity to study the determinants of influenza virus emergence. Here we characterize the replication of canine, equine, and human IAVs in the trachea of the dog, a species to which humans are heavily exposed. We define a phenotype of infection for CIV, which is characterized by high levels of virus replication and extensive tissue damage. CIV was compared to evolutionarily distinct EIVs, and the early EIV isolates showed an impaired ability to infect dog tracheas, while EIVs that circulated near the time of CIV emergence exhibited a CIV-like infection phenotype. Inoculating dog tracheas with various human IAVs (hIAVs) showed that they infected the tracheal epithelium with various efficiencies depending on the virus tested. Finally, we show that reassortant viruses carrying gene segments of CIV and hIAV are viable and that addition of the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) of CIV to the 2009 human pandemic virus results in a virus that replicates at high levels and causes significant lesions. This provides important insights into the role of evolution on viral emergence and on the role of HA and NA as determinants of pathogenicity. Influenza A viruses (IAVs) have entered new host species in recent history, sometimes with devastating consequences. Canine influenza virus (CIV) H3N8 originated from a direct transfer of an equine influenza virus (EIV) in the early 2000s. We studied the infection patterns of IAVs that circulate in dogs or to which dogs are commonly exposed and showed that CIV emergence was likely

  3. Some novel insights on HPV16 related cervical cancer pathogenesis based on analyses of LCR methylation, viral load, E7 and E2/E4 expressions.

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    Damayanti Das Ghosh

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to decipher the interdependent roles of (i methylation within E2 binding site I and II (E2BS-I/II and replication origin (nt 7862 in the long control region (LCR, (ii expression of viral oncogene E7, (iii expression of the transcript (E7-E1/E4 that encodes E2 repressor protein and (iv viral load, in human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16 related cervical cancer (CaCx pathogenesis. The results revealed over-representation (p<0.001 of methylation at nucleotide 58 of E2BS-I among E2-intact CaCx cases compared to E2-disrupted cases. Bisulphite sequencing of LCR revealed overrepresentation of methylation at nucleotide 58 or other CpGs in E2BS-I/II, among E2-intact cases than E2-disrupted cases and lack of methylation at replication origin in case of both. The viral transcript (E7-E1/E4 that produces the repressor E2 was analyzed by APOT (amplification of papillomavirus oncogenic transcript-coupled-quantitative-RT-PCR (of E7 and E4 genes to distinguish episomal (pure or concomitant with integrated from purely integrated viral genomes based on the ratio, E7 C(T/E4 C(T. Relative quantification based on comparative C(T (threshold cycle method revealed 75.087 folds higher E7 mRNA expression in episomal cases over purely integrated cases. Viral load and E2 gene copy numbers were negatively correlated with E7 C(T (p = 0.007 and E2 C(T (p<0.0001, respectively, each normalized with ACTB C(T, among episomal cases only. The k-means clustering analysis considering E7 C(T from APOT-coupled-quantitative-RT-PCR assay, in conjunction with viral load, revealed immense heterogeneity among the HPV16 positive CaCx cases portraying integrated viral genomes. The findings provide novel insights into HPV16 related CaCx pathogenesis and highlight that CaCx cases that harbour episomal HPV16 genomes with intact E2 are likely to be distinct biologically, from the purely integrated viral genomes in terms of host genes and/or pathways involved in cervical

  4. Isolation of Cancer Stem Cells From Human Prostate Cancer Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Samuel J.; Quinn, S. Aidan; de la Iglesia-Vicente, Janis; Bonal, Dennis M.; Rodriguez-Bravo, Veronica; Firpo-Betancourt, Adolfo; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Domingo-Domenech, Josep

    2014-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model has been considerably revisited over the last two decades. During this time CSCs have been identified and directly isolated from human tissues and serially propagated in immunodeficient mice, typically through antibody labeling of subpopulations of cells and fractionation by flow cytometry. However, the unique clinical features of prostate cancer have considerably limited the study of prostate CSCs from fresh human tumor samples. We recently reported the isolation of prostate CSCs directly from human tissues by virtue of their HLA class I (HLAI)-negative phenotype. Prostate cancer cells are harvested from surgical specimens and mechanically dissociated. A cell suspension is generated and labeled with fluorescently conjugated HLAI and stromal antibodies. Subpopulations of HLAI-negative cells are finally isolated using a flow cytometer. The principal limitation of this protocol is the frequently microscopic and multifocal nature of primary cancer in prostatectomy specimens. Nonetheless, isolated live prostate CSCs are suitable for molecular characterization and functional validation by transplantation in immunodeficient mice. PMID:24686446

  5. Using human intestinal biopsies to study the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser, Y; Boeckxstaens, G E; Wouters, M M; Schemann, M; Vanner, S

    2014-04-01

    Although animal models of the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have provided important insights, there are no models that fully express the features of this complex condition. One alternative approach is the use of human intestinal biopsies obtained during endoscopic procedures to examine peripheral mechanisms in this disorder. These studies have served to confirm the existence of peripheral pathways in humans with IBS and have provided many new mechanistic insights. Two general approaches have been employed; one approach has been to examine the biological activity of mediators within the mucosal tissue of IBS patients and the other has been to examine changes in the structural properties of key signaling pathways contained within the biopsies. Using these approaches, important changes have been discovered involving the enteric nervous system and the extrinsic sensory pathway (dorsal root ganglia neurons), the immune system, and epithelial signaling in IBS patients compared to healthy subjects. This review will systematically explore these mechanistic pathways, highlight the implications of these novel findings and discuss some of the important limitations of this approach. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Characterization of the Usage of the Serine Metabolic Network in Human Cancer

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    Mahya Mehrmohamadi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The serine, glycine, one-carbon (SGOC metabolic network is implicated in cancer pathogenesis, but its general functions are unknown. We carried out a computational reconstruction of the SGOC network and then characterized its expression across thousands of cancer tissues. Pathways including methylation and redox metabolism exhibited heterogeneous expression indicating a strong context dependency of their usage in tumors. From an analysis of coexpression, simultaneous up- or downregulation of nucleotide synthesis, NADPH, and glutathione synthesis was found to be a common occurrence in all cancers. Finally, we developed a method to trace the metabolic fate of serine using stable isotopes, high-resolution mass spectrometry, and a mathematical model. Although the expression of single genes didn’t appear indicative of flux, the collective expression of several genes in a given pathway allowed for successful flux prediction. Altogether, these findings identify expansive and heterogeneous functions for the SGOC metabolic network in human cancer.

  7. The genetic architecture of the human immune system: a bioresource for autoimmunity and disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roederer, Mario; Quaye, Lydia; Mangino, Massimo; Beddall, Margaret H; Mahnke, Yolanda; Chattopadhyay, Pratip; Tosi, Isabella; Napolitano, Luca; Terranova Barberio, Manuela; Menni, Cristina; Villanova, Federica; Di Meglio, Paola; Spector, Tim D; Nestle, Frank O

    2015-04-09

    Despite recent discoveries of genetic variants associated with autoimmunity and infection, genetic control of the human immune system during homeostasis is poorly understood. We undertook a comprehensive immunophenotyping approach, analyzing 78,000 immune traits in 669 female twins. From the top 151 heritable traits (up to 96% heritable), we used replicated GWAS to obtain 297 SNP associations at 11 genetic loci, explaining up to 36% of the variation of 19 traits. We found multiple associations with canonical traits of all major immune cell subsets and uncovered insights into genetic control for regulatory T cells. This data set also revealed traits associated with loci known to confer autoimmune susceptibility, providing mechanistic hypotheses linking immune traits with the etiology of disease. Our data establish a bioresource that links genetic control elements associated with normal immune traits to common autoimmune and infectious diseases, providing a shortcut to identifying potential mechanisms of immune-related diseases.

  8. Interaction between fragile histamine triad and protein kinase C alpha in human non-small cell lung cancer tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng-hui Zhuang; Zhao-hui Liu; Xiao-gang Jiang; Cheng-en Pan

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the interaction between fragile histamine triad (FHIT) and protein kinase C alpha (PKCα) in human non-small cell lung cancer tissues. Methods FHIT and PKC伪 double positive samples were screened by immunohistochemical staining from 13 human non-small cell lung cancer tissues. Co-immunoprecipitation was performed by using anti-FHIT and anti-PKCα. The immune precipitate was analyzed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Results Immune precipitate staining detection showed that 3 samples out of the 13 cases were double positive for FHIT and PKCα. FHIT protein was present in the immune precipitate of anti-PKCα while there was PKCα in the immune precipitate of anti-FHITmAb. Conclusion FHIT and PKCα exist as a complex in human non-small cell lung cancer tissues, which will provide a new route for studying the pathogenesis and immunotherapy of human non-small cell lung cancer.

  9. Experimental study on the pathogenesis of epithelial tumors (VI report)

    OpenAIRE

    Fujiki, Hirota; Ichikawa, Koichi; Yamagiwa, Katsusaburo; Maruyama, Koshichiro; Lee, Kunsei; Fukuda,Tamotsu; Kinoshita, Riojun; Kashiwagi, Masatoshi; Ogawa, Juntaro

    2014-01-01

    The concept of cancer and inflammation has a long history. Virchow's irritation theory based on human cancer engendered the essential role of inflammation in carcinogenesis. Drs. Yamagiwa and Ichikawa first published a comprehensive paper entitled “Experimental study on the pathogenesis of epithelial tumors” (I report) in 1915 in German, and went on to publish five more reports (1915–1924) under the same title. They succeeded in demonstrating that inflammation is an important carcinogenic fac...

  10. Roles of human papillomavirus infection and stathmin in the pathogenesis of sinonasal inverted papilloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hai; Lin, Dong; Xiong, Xi-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate roles of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and stathmin in sinonasal inverted papilloma (SNIP). HPV DNA detection was performed by the fluorescence-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Stathmin protein expression was investigated by the immunohistochemistry method and mRNA expression of stathmin, Kif2a, and cyclin D1 were assessed by real-time PCR in SNIP and control subjects. The positive rate of HPV DNA detected in SNIP was about 53.6% (15 of 28). Recurrent cases showed a higher rate of HPV infection compared with initial cases and higher Krouse stage (T3 + T4) cases showed higher rate of HPV infection than lower Krouse stage (T1 + T2) cases. Stronger expression of stathmin, Kif2a, and cyclin D1 were observed in SNIP, especially HPV(+) SNIP. HPV infection was closely associated with recurrence and progression of SNIP. Stathmin is a valuable prognostic marker and could be considered as a therapeutic target in patients with SNIP. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The cytogenetic theory of the pathogenesis of human adult male germ cell tumors. Review article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaganti, R S; Houldsworth, J

    1998-01-01

    Human male germ cell tumors (GCTs) represent a biological paradox because, in order to develop into a pluripotential tumor, a germ cell destined to a path of limited or no proliferation must acquire the potential for unlimited proliferation. In addition, it must acquire the ability to elicit embryonal differentiation patterns without the reciprocal inputs from fertilization and the imprinting-associated genomic changes which are a part of normal embryonal development. Although much speculated about, the genetic mechanisms underlying these properties of male GCTs remain enigmatic. Recent cytogenetic and molecular genetic analyses of these tumors are providing new insights and new testable hypotheses. Based on our recent work, we propose two such hypotheses. One relates to the mechanism of germ cell transformation and germ cell tumor development. We suggest that the invariable 12p amplification noted as early as in carcinoma in situ/intratubular germ cell neoplasia (CIS/ITGCN) lesions leads to deregulated overexpression of cyclin D2, a cell cycle G1/S checkpoint regulator with oncogeneic potential. Such overexpression reinitiates the cell cycle. We visualize this happening during the pachytene stage of meiosis through aberrant recombinational events which lead to 12p amplification. The other hypothesis relates to the origin of primary extragonadal GCTs. By comparing cytogenetic changes in primary mediastinal versus gonadal lesions, we propose that, in contrast to long-standing speculation that primary extra-gonadal tumors arise from embryonally misplaced primordial germ cells, these lesions arise from migration of transformed gonadal germ cells.

  12. Pathogenesis and Antifungal Drug Resistance of the Human Fungal Pathogen Candida glabrata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Kuchler

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Candida glabrata is a major opportunistic human fungal pathogen causing superficial as well as systemic infections in immunocompromised individuals and several other patient cohorts. C. glabrata represents the second most prevalent cause of candidemia and a better understanding of its virulence and drug resistance mechanisms is thus of high medical relevance. In contrast to the diploid dimorphic pathogen C. albicans, whose ability to undergo filamentation is considered a major virulence trait, C. glabrata has a haploid genome and lacks the ability to switch to filamentous growth. A major impediment for the clinical therapy of C. glabrata infections is its high intrinsic resistance to several antifungal drugs, especially azoles. Further, the development of antifungal resistance, particularly during prolonged and prophylactic therapies is diminishing efficacies of therapeutic interventions. In addition, C. glabrata harbors a large repertoire of adhesins involved in the adherence to host epithelia. Interestingly, genome plasticity, phenotypic switching or the remarkable ability to persist and survive inside host immune cells further contribute to the pathogenicity of C. glabrata. In this comprehensive review, we want to emphasize and discuss the mechanisms underlying virulence and drug resistance of C. glabrata, and discuss its ability to escape from the host immune surveillance or persist inside host cells.

  13. A study on the pathogenesis of human cerebral malaria and cerebral babesiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masamichi Aikawa

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral complications are important, but poorly understood pathological features of infections caused by some species of Plasmodium and Babesia. Patients dying from P. falciparum were classified as cerebral or non-cerebral cases according to the cerebral malaria coma scale. Light microscopy revealed that cerebral microvessels of cerebral malaria patients were field with a mixture of parazited and unparazited erythrocytes, with 94% of the vessels showing parasitized red blood cell (PRBC sequestration. Some degree of PRBC sequestration was also found in non-cerebral malaria patients, but the percentage of microvessls with sequestered PRBC was only 13% Electron microscopy demonstrated knobs on the membrane of PRBC that formed focal junctions with the capillary endothelium. A number of host cell molecules such as CD36, thrombospondim (TSP and intracellular adhesion molecule I (ICAM-1 may function as endothelial cell surfacereports for P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes. Affinity labeling of CD36 and TSP to the PRBC surface showed these molecules specifically bind to the knobs. Babesia bovis infected erythrocytes procedure projections of the erythrocyte membrane that are similar to knobs. When brain tissue from B. bovis-infected cattle was examined, cerebral capillaries were packed with PRBC. Infected erythrocytes formed focal attachments with cerebral endothelial cells at the site of these knob-like projections. These findings indicate that cerebral pathology caused by B. bovis is similar to human cerebral malaria. A search for cytoadherence proteins in the endothelial cells may lead to a better understanding of the pathogenisis of cerebral babesiosis.

  14. DksA and (p)ppGpp have unique and overlapping contributions to Haemophilus ducreyi pathogenesis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, Concerta L; Zhang, Xinjun; Fortney, Kate R; Ellinger, Sheila; Johnson, Paula; Baker, Beth; Liu, Yunlong; Janowicz, Diane M; Katz, Barry P; Munson, Robert S; Spinola, Stanley M

    2015-08-01

    The (p)ppGpp-mediated stringent response is important for bacterial survival in nutrient limiting conditions. For maximal effect, (p)ppGpp interacts with the cofactor DksA, which stabilizes (p)ppGpp's interaction with RNA polymerase. We previously demonstrated that (p)ppGpp was required for the virulence of Haemophilus ducreyi in humans. Here, we constructed an H. ducreyi dksA mutant and showed it was also partially attenuated for pustule formation in human volunteers. To understand the roles of (p)ppGpp and DksA in gene regulation in H. ducreyi, we defined genes potentially altered by (p)ppGpp and DksA deficiency using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq). In bacteria collected at stationary phase, lack of (p)ppGpp and DksA altered expression of 28% and 17% of H. ducreyi open reading frames, respectively, including genes involved in transcription, translation, and metabolism. There was significant overlap in genes differentially expressed in the (p)ppGpp mutant relative to the dksA mutant. Loss of (p)ppGpp or DksA resulted in the dysregulation of several known virulence determinants. Deletion of dksA downregulated lspB and rendered the organism less resistant to phagocytosis and increased its sensitivity to oxidative stress. Both mutants had reduced ability to attach to human foreskin fibroblasts; the defect correlated with reduced expression of the Flp adhesin proteins in the (p)ppGpp mutant but not in the dksA mutant, suggesting that DksA regulates the expression of an unknown cofactor(s) required for Flp-mediated adherence. We conclude that both (p)ppGpp and DksA serve as major regulators of H. ducreyi gene expression in stationary phase and have both overlapping and unique contributions to pathogenesis.

  15. Overexpression and knock-down studies highlight that a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 28 controls proliferation and migration in human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnicka, Caroline; Mochizuki, Satsuki; Okada, Yasunori; McLaughlin, Claire; Leedman, Peter J; Stuart, Lisa; Epis, Michael; Hoyne, Gerard; Boulos, Sherif; Johnson, Liam; Schlaich, Markus; Matthews, Vance

    2016-10-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in men. It is critical to identify and characterize oncogenes that drive the pathogenesis of human prostate cancer. The current study builds upon previous research showing that a disintegrin and metallproteinase (ADAM)28 is involved in the pathogenesis of numerous cancers. Our novel study used overexpression, pharmacological, and molecular approaches to investigate the biological function of ADAM28 in human prostate cancer cells, with a focus on cell proliferation and migration. The results of this study provide important insights into the role of metalloproteinases in human prostate cancer.The expression of ADAM28 protein levels was assessed within human prostate tumors and normal adjacent tissue by immunohistochemistry. Immunocytochemistry and western blotting were used to assess ADAM28 protein expression in human prostate cancer cell lines. Functional assays were conducted to assess proliferation and migration in human prostate cancer cells in which ADAM28 protein expression or activity had been altered by overexpression, pharmacological inhibition, or by siRNA gene knockdown.The membrane bound ADAM28 was increased in human tumor biopsies and prostate cancer cell lines. Pharmacological inhibition of ADAM28 activity and/or knockdown of ADAM28 significantly reduced proliferation and migration of human prostate cancer cells, while overexpression of ADAM28 significantly increased proliferation and migration.ADAM28 is overexpressed in primary human prostate tumor biopsies, and it promotes human prostate cancer cell proliferation and migration. This study supports the notion that inhibition of ADAM28 may be a potential novel therapeutic strategy for human prostate cancer.

  16. Migraine Pathogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nabih M. M.D. Ramadan

    2000-01-01

    @@Introduction Various theories of migraine pathogenesis have been developed over the years. To this date, none fully explains all the migraine phenomena. A complete description of each proposed theory is beyond the scope of this chapter. Nonetheless, a brief description of the arguments for and against the leading theories is noteworthy

  17. Regulatory T Cells in Human Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Jun Peng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple layers of suppressive components including regulatory T (TReg cells, suppressive antigen-presenting cells, and inhibitory cytokines form suppressive networks in the ovarian cancer microenvironment. It has been demonstrated that as a major suppressive element, TReg cells infiltrate tumor, interact with several types of immune cells, and mediate immune suppression through different molecular and cellular mechanisms. In this paper, we focus on human ovarian cancer and will discuss the nature of TReg cells including their subsets, trafficking, expansion, and function. We will briefly review the development of manipulation of TReg cells in preclinical and clinical settings.

  18. A pathology atlas of the human cancer transcriptome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhlén, Mathias; Zhang, Xi-Cheng; Lee, Sunjae

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death, and there is great interest in understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis and progression of individual tumors. We used systems-level approaches to analyze the genome-wide transcriptome of the protein-coding genes...

  19. Pathogenesis of disseminated intravascular coagulation in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia, and its treatment using recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikezoe, Takayuki

    2014-07-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is an uncommon subtype of acute myelogenous leukemia characterized by the proliferation of blasts with distinct morphology, a specific balanced reciprocal translocation t(15;17), and life-threatening hemorrhage caused mainly by enhanced fibrinolytic-type disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). The introduction of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) into anthracycline-based induction chemotherapy regimens has dramatically improved overall survival of individuals with APL, although hemorrhage-related death during the early phase of therapy remains a serious problem. Moreover, population-based studies have shown that the incidence of early death during induction chemotherapy is nearly 30 %, and the most common cause of death is associated with hemorrhage. Thus, development of a novel treatment strategy to alleviate abnormal coagulation in APL patients is urgently required. Recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin (rTM) comprises the active extracellular domain of TM, and has been used for treatment of DIC since 2008 in Japan. Use of rTM in combination with remission induction chemotherapy, including ATRA, produces potent resolution of DIC without exacerbation of bleeding tendency in individuals with APL. This review article discusses the pathogenesis and features of DIC caused by APL, as well as the possible anticoagulant and anti-leukemic action of rTM in APL patients.

  20. The role of Toxoplasma gondii as a possible inflammatory agent in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aus Molan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM continues to be a major challenge for public health authorities worldwide. While potential causes such as obesity, physical inactivity, and dietary patterns have been proposed to explain the growing epidemic, there may also be unidentified environmental determinants. An emerging field of research is starting to examine the association of infectious and environmental pathogens with diabetes. In particular, the potential of these pathogens to cause low-grade inflammation that facilitates the risk and development of T2DM. An understudied pathogen of potential interest is the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii. There is limited clinical evidence supporting the association between chronic T. gondii infection and the development of many disorders, including T2DM, in both animals and humans. This review (1 addresses the existing knowledge of the role of T. gondii in the inflammation process leading to T2DM, (2 examines the current studies describing the relationship between T. gondii and T2DM, and (3 makes recommendations for future studies to determine the role of T. gondii in the pathogenesis of T2DM. We believe that T. gondii may be an important target for T2DM intervention, and propose a new field of study, “toxoplasmic type 2 diabetes.”

  1. Polymorphisms of Exon 17 of Insulin-Receptor Gene in Pathogenesis of Human Disorders With Insulin Resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU WANG; JIE MI; XIAO-YUAN ZHAO; JIAN-XIN WU; HONG CHENG; ZHI-KUN ZHANG; XIU-YUAN DING; DONG-QING HOU; HUILI

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between polymorphisms of insulin-receptor (INSR) gene and insulin resistance in a population-based study in China. Methods Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) was used to the amplify Exon 17 of INSR gene and all amplified products were analyzed by direct sequencing. Results Six single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were found at the following loci: T to TC at the locus of 10699 (Tyr984), G to GC at the locus of 10731 (Glu994), Deletion G at the locus of 10798 (Asp1017), C to T/TC at the locus of 10923 (His1058), C to CA at the locus of 10954 (Leu1069), and T to TA at the locus of 10961 (Phe1071), which might not change the amino acid sequence. The data were in agreement with the test of Hardy-Weinberg balance (P>0.05). Among the 345 cases, all clinical indices were higher in males than in females except for HDL cholesterol (P0.05). After sex stratification in analysis,all allele frequencies on the six loci of SNPs of Exon 17 had different distributions between the insulin resistant group and the control group, but P>0.05. Conclusion SNPs of Exon 17 of INSR gene are unlikely to play a direct role in the pathogenesis of human disorders with insulin resistance.

  2. Molecular biology of human herpesvirus 8: novel functions and virus-host interactions implicated in viral pathogenesis and replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, Emily; Nicholas, John

    2014-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), also known as Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), is the second identified human gammaherpesvirus. Like its relative Epstein-Barr virus, HHV-8 is linked to B-cell tumors, specifically primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman's disease, in addition to endothelial-derived KS. HHV-8 is unusual in its possession of a plethora of "accessory" genes and encoded proteins in addition to the core, conserved herpesvirus and gammaherpesvirus genes that are necessary for basic biological functions of these viruses. The HHV-8 accessory proteins specify not only activities deducible from their cellular protein homologies but also novel, unsuspected activities that have revealed new mechanisms of virus-host interaction that serve virus replication or latency and may contribute to the development and progression of virus-associated neoplasia. These proteins include viral interleukin-6 (vIL-6), viral chemokines (vCCLs), viral G protein-coupled receptor (vGPCR), viral interferon regulatory factors (vIRFs), and viral antiapoptotic proteins homologous to FLICE (FADD-like IL-1β converting enzyme)-inhibitory protein (FLIP) and survivin. Other HHV-8 proteins, such as signaling membrane receptors encoded by open reading frames K1 and K15, also interact with host mechanisms in unique ways and have been implicated in viral pathogenesis. Additionally, a set of micro-RNAs encoded by HHV-8 appear to modulate expression of multiple host proteins to provide conditions conducive to virus persistence within the host and could also contribute to HHV-8-induced neoplasia. Here, we review the molecular biology underlying these novel virus-host interactions and their potential roles in both virus biology and virus-associated disease.

  3. Human papillomavirus and gastrointestinal cancer: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucchi, Dania; Stracci, Fabrizio; Buonora, Nicola; Masanotti, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide. Exposure to HPV is very common, and an estimated 65%-100% of sexually active adults are exposed to HPV in their lifetime. The majority of HPV infections are asymptomatic, but there is a 10% chance that individuals will develop a persistent infection and have an increased risk of developing a carcinoma. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has found that the following cancer sites have a strong causal relationship with HPV: cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx, including the base of the tongue and the tonsils. However, studies of the aetiological role of HPV in colorectal and esophageal malignancies have conflicting results. The aim of this review was to organize recent evidence and issues about the association between HPV infection and gastrointestinal tumours with a focus on esophageal, colorectal and anal cancers. The ultimate goal was to highlight possible implications for prognosis and prevention. PMID:27672265

  4. Comparative proteomics analysis of human gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Li; Jian-Fang Li; Ying Qu; Xue-Hua Chen; Jian-Min Qin; Qin-Long Gu; Min Yan; Zheng-Gang Zhu; Bing-Ya Liu

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To isolate and identify differentially expressed proteins between cancer and normal tissues of gastric cancer by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS).METHODS: Soluble fraction proteins of gastric cancer tissues and paired normal tissues were separated by 2-DE.The differentially expressed proteins were selected and identified by MALDI-TOF-MS and database search.RESULTS: 2-DE profiles with high resolution and reproducibility were obtained.Twenty-three protein spots were excised from sliver staining gel and digested in gel by trypsin,in which fifteen protein spots were identified successfully.Among the identified proteins,there were ten over-expressed and five under-expressed proteins in stomach cancer tissues compared with normal tissues.CONCLUSION: In this study,the well-resolved,reproducible 2-DE patterns of human gastric cancer tissue and paired normal tissue were established and optimized and certain differentially-expressed proteins were identified.The combined use of 2-DE and MS provides an effective approach to screen for potential tumor markers.

  5. Human Colon Cancer Cells Cultivated in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Within five days, bioreactor cultivated human colon cancer cells (shown) grown in Microgravity on the STS-70 mission in 1995, had grown 30 times the volume of the control specimens on Earth. The samples grown in space had a higher level of cellular organization and specialization. Because they more closely resemble tumors found in the body, microgravity grown cell cultures are ideal for research purposes.

  6. Aspartame bioassay findings portend human cancer hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, James; LaDou, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) should reevaluate its position on aspartame as being safe under all conditions. Animal bioassay results predict human cancer risks, and a recent animal study confirms that there is a potential aspartame risk to humans. Aspartame is produced and packaged in China for domestic use and global distribution. Japan, France, and the United States are also major producers. No study of long-term adverse occupational health effects on aspartame workers have been conducted. The FDA should consider sponsoring a prospective epidemiologic study of aspartame workers.

  7. 1. HUMAN POPULATION MONITORING FOR CANCER PREVENTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Most of the chemicals classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as human carcinogens are mutagenic across test systems, cf. [www.epa.gov/gapdb ] and induce tumors at multiple sites in rodent species. They are therefore readity detected in short term tests for gene-tic and related effects (GRE), in animal carcinogenesis bioassays and in human monitoring studies. Carcinogens that are not genotoxic may be studied using new toxicogenomic approaches as will be discussed. A Chemical Effects in Biological Systems (CEBS) database is planned by the National Center for Toxicogenomics to contain information on such compounds. The 1992 Preamble to the IARC Monographs

  8. Immunotherapy for human papillomavirus-associated disease and cervical cancer: review of clinical and translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Jong; Yang, Andrew; Wu, T C; Hung, Chien Fu

    2016-09-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most lethal women's cancer worldwide. Current treatments against cervical cancer include surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and anti-angiogenic agents. However, despite the various treatments utilized for the treatment of cervical cancer, its disease burden remains a global issue. Persistent infection of human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified as an essential step of pathogenesis of cervical cancer and many other cancers, and nation-wide HPV screening as well as preventative HPV vaccination program have been introduced globally. However, even though the commercially available prophylactic HPV vaccines, Gardasil (Merck) and Cervarix (GlaxoSmithKline), are effective in blocking the entry of HPV into the epithelium of cervix through generation of HPV-specific neutralizing antibodies, they cannot eliminate the pre-existing HPV infection. For these reason, other immunotherapeutic options against HPV-associated diseases, including therapeutic vaccines, have been continuously explored. Therapeutic HPV vaccines enhance cell-mediated immunity targeting HPV E6 and E7 antigens by modulating primarily dendritic cells and cytotoxic T lymphocyte. Our review will cover various therapeutic vaccines in development for the treatment of HPV-associated lesions and cancers. Furthermore, we will discuss the potential of immune checkpoint inhibitors that have recently been adopted and tested for their treatment efficacy against HPV-induced cervical cancer.

  9. CYLD Promotes TNF-α-Induced Cell Necrosis Mediated by RIP-1 in Human Lung Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xing; Chen, Qianshun; Huang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Cylindromatosis (CYLD) is a deubiquitination enzyme and contributes to the degradation of ubiquitin chains on RIP1. The aim of the present study is to investigate the levels of CYLD in lung cancer patients and explore the molecular mechanism of CYLD in the lung cancer pathogenesis. The levels of CYLD were detected in human lung cancer tissues and the paired paracarcinoma tissues by real-time PCR and western blotting analysis. The proliferation of human lung cancer cells was determined by MTT assay. Cell apoptosis and necrosis were determined by FACS assay. The results demonstrated that low levels of CYLD were detected in clinical lung carcinoma specimens. Three pairs of siRNA were used to knock down the endogenous CYLD in lung cancer cells. Knockdown of CYLD promoted cell proliferation of lung cancer cells. Otherwise overexpression of CYLD induced TNF-α-induced cell death in A549 cells and H460 cells. Moreover, CYLD-overexpressed lung cancer cells were treated with 10 μM of z-VAD-fmk for 12 hours and the result revealed that TNF-α-induced cell necrosis was significantly enhanced. Additionally, TNF-α-induced cell necrosis in CYLD-overexpressed H460 cells was mediated by receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP-1) kinase. Our findings suggested that CYLD was a potential target for the therapy of human lung cancers.

  10. HUMAN CANCER IS A PARASITE SPREAD VIA INTRUSION IN GENOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey N. Rumyantsev

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The present article is devoted to further development of new paradigm about the biology of human cancer: the hypothesis of parasitic nature, origin and evolution of the phenomenon. The study included integrative reconsidering, and reinterpretation of the make-ups, traits and processes existing both in human and animal cancers. It was demonstrated that human cancer possesses nearly analogous set of traits characteristic of transmissible animal cancer. Undoubted analogies are seen in the prevalence, clinical exposure, progression of disease, origin of causative agents, immune response against invasion and especially in the intrinsic deviations of the leading traits of cancerous cells. Both human and animal cancers are highly exceptional pathogens. But in contrast to contagious animal cancers the cells of of human cancer can not pass between individuals as usual infectious agents. Exhaustive evidence of the parasitic nature and evolutionary origin of human cancer was revealed and interpreted. In contrast to animal cancer formed of solitary cell lineage, human cancer consists of a couple of lineages constructed under different genetic regulations and performed different structural and physiological functions. The complex make-up of cancer composition remains stable over sequential propagation. The subsistence of human cancer regularly includes obligatory interchange of its successive forms. Human cancer possesses its own biological watch and the ability to gobble its victim, transmit via the intrusion of the genome, perform intercommunications within the tumor components and between the dispersed subunits of cancer. Such intrinsic traits characterize human cancer as a primitively structured parasite that can be classified in Class Mammalians, Species Genomeintruder malevolent (G.malevolent.

  11. Differential cell line susceptibility to the emerging Zika virus: implications for disease pathogenesis, non-vector-borne human transmission and animal reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jasper Fuk-Woo; Yip, Cyril Chik-Yan; Tsang, Jessica Oi-Ling; Tee, Kah-Meng; Cai, Jian-Piao; Chik, Kenn Ka-Heng; Zhu, Zheng; Chan, Chris Chung-Sing; Choi, Garnet Kwan-Yue; Sridhar, Siddharth; Zhang, Anna Jinxia; Lu, Gang; Chiu, Kin; Lo, Amy Cheuk-Yin; Tsao, Sai-Wah; Kok, Kin-Hang; Jin, Dong-Yan; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2016-08-24

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is unique among human-pathogenic flaviviruses by its association with congenital anomalies and trans-placental and sexual human-to-human transmission. Although the pathogenesis of ZIKV-associated neurological complications has been reported in recent studies, key questions on the pathogenesis of the other clinical manifestations, non-vector-borne transmission and potential animal reservoirs of ZIKV remain unanswered. We systematically characterized the differential cell line susceptibility of 18 human and 15 nonhuman cell lines to two ZIKV isolates (human and primate) and dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2). Productive ZIKV replication (⩾2 log increase in viral load, ZIKV nonstructural protein-1 (NS1) protein expression and cytopathic effects (CPE)) was found in the placental (JEG-3), neuronal (SF268), muscle (RD), retinal (ARPE19), pulmonary (Hep-2 and HFL), colonic (Caco-2),and hepatic (Huh-7) cell lines. These findings helped to explain the trans-placental transmission and other clinical manifestations of ZIKV. Notably, the prostatic (LNCaP), testicular (833KE) and renal (HEK) cell lines showed increased ZIKV load and/or NS1 protein expression without inducing CPE, suggesting their potential roles in sexual transmission with persistent viral replication at these anatomical sites. Comparatively, none of the placental and genital tract cell lines allowed efficient DENV-2 replication. Among the nonhuman cell lines, nonhuman primate (Vero and LLC-MK2), pig (PK-15), rabbit (RK-13), hamster (BHK21) and chicken (DF-1) cell lines supported productive ZIKV replication. These animal species may be important reservoirs and/or potential animal models for ZIKV. The findings in our study help to explain the viral shedding pattern, transmission and pathogenesis of the rapidly disseminating ZIKV, and are useful for optimizing laboratory diagnostics and studies on the pathogenesis and counter-measures of ZIKV.

  12. Critical role of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 accessory proteins in viral replication and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Björn; Lairmore, Michael D

    2002-09-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection is associated with a diverse range of lymphoproliferative and neurodegenerative diseases, yet pathogenic mechanisms induced by the virus remain obscure. This complex retrovirus contains typical structural and enzymatic genes but also unique regulatory and accessory genes in four open reading frames (ORFs) of the pX region of the viral genome (pX ORFs I to IV). The regulatory proteins encoded by pX ORFs III and IV, Tax and Rex, respectively, have been extensively characterized. In contrast the contribution of the four accessory proteins p12(I), p27(I), p13(II), and p30(II), encoded by pX ORFs I and II, to viral replication and pathogenesis remained unclear. Proviral clones that are mutated in either pX ORF I or II, while fully competent in cell culture, are severely limited in their replicative capacity in a rabbit model. Emerging evidence indicates that the HTLV-1 accessory proteins are critical for establishment of viral infectivity, enhance T-lymphocyte activation, and potentially alter gene transcription and mitochondrial function. HTLV-1 pX ORF I expression is critical to the viral infectivity in resting primary lymphocytes, suggesting a role for p12(I) in lymphocyte activation. The endoplasmic reticulum and cis-Golgi localizing p12(I), encoded from pX ORF I, activates NFAT, a key T-cell transcription factor, through calcium-mediated signaling pathways and may lower the threshold of lymphocyte activation via the JAK/STAT pathway. In contrast p30(II) localizes to the nucleus and represses viral promoter activity, but may regulate cellular gene expression through p300/CBP or related coactivators of transcription. p13(II) targets mitochondrial proteins, where it alters the organelle morphology and may influence energy metabolism. Collectively, studies of the molecular functions of the HTLV-1 accessory proteins provide insight into strategies used by retroviruses that are associated with lymphoproliferative

  13. Antiangiogenic Steroids in Human Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Pietras

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in the early detection of tumors and in the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery for disease management, the worldwide mortality from human cancer remains unacceptably high. The treatment of cancer may benefit from the introduction of novel therapies derived from natural products. Natural products have served to provide a basis for many of the pharmaceutical agents in current use in cancer therapy. Emerging research indicates that progressive growth and spread of many solid tumors depends, in part, on the formation of an adequate blood supply, and this process of tumor-associated angiogenesis is reported to have prognostic significance in several human cancers. This review focuses on the potential application in antitumor therapy of naturally-occurring steroids that target tumor-associated angiogenesis. Squalamine, a 7,24 dihydroxylated 24-sulfated cholestane steroid conjugated to a spermidine at position C-3, is known to have strong antiangiogenic activity in vitro, and it significantly disrupts tumor proliferation and progression in laboratory studies. Work on the interactions of squalamine with vascular endothelial cells indicate that it binds with cell membranes, inhibits the membrane Na+/H+ exchanger and may further function as a calmodulin chaperone. These primary actions appear to promote inhibition of several vital steps in angiogenesis, such as blockade of mitogen-induced actin polymerization, cell–cell adhesion and cell migration, leading to suppression of endothelial cell proliferation. Preclinical studies with squalamine have shown additive benefits in tumor growth delay when squalamine is combined with cisplatin, paclitaxel, cyclophosphamide, genistein or radiation therapy. This compound has also been assessed in early phase clinical trials in cancer; squalamine was found to exhibit little systemic toxicity and was generally well tolerated by treated patients with various solid tumor malignancies

  14. Antiangiogenic Steroids in Human Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietras, Richard J; Weinberg, Olga K

    2005-03-01

    Despite advances in the early detection of tumors and in the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery for disease management, the worldwide mortality from human cancer remains unacceptably high. The treatment of cancer may benefit from the introduction of novel therapies derived from natural products. Natural products have served to provide a basis for many of the pharmaceutical agents in current use in cancer therapy. Emerging research indicates that progressive growth and spread of many solid tumors depends, in part, on the formation of an adequate blood supply, and this process of tumor-associated angiogenesis is reported to have prognostic significance in several human cancers. This review focuses on the potential application in antitumor therapy of naturally-occurring steroids that target tumor-associated angiogenesis. Squalamine, a 7,24 dihydroxylated 24-sulfated cholestane steroid conjugated to a spermidine at position C-3, is known to have strong antiangiogenic activity in vitro, and it significantly disrupts tumor proliferation and progression in laboratory studies. Work on the interactions of squalamine with vascular endothelial cells indicate that it binds with cell membranes, inhibits the membrane Na(+)/H(+) exchanger and may further function as a calmodulin chaperone. These primary actions appear to promote inhibition of several vital steps in angiogenesis, such as blockade of mitogen-induced actin polymerization, cell-cell adhesion and cell migration, leading to suppression of endothelial cell proliferation. Preclinical studies with squalamine have shown additive benefits in tumor growth delay when squalamine is combined with cisplatin, paclitaxel, cyclophosphamide, genistein or radiation therapy. This compound has also been assessed in early phase clinical trials in cancer; squalamine was found to exhibit little systemic toxicity and was generally well tolerated by treated patients with various solid tumor malignancies, including ovarian, non

  15. Whole-Genome Bisulfite Sequencing of Human Pancreatic Islets Reveals Novel Differentially Methylated Regions in Type 2 Diabetes Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Petr; Bacos, Karl; Ofori, Jones K; Esguerra, Jonathan Lou S; Eliasson, Lena; Rönn, Tina; Ling, Charlotte

    2017-04-01

    Current knowledge about the role of epigenetics in type 2 diabetes (T2D) remains limited. Only a few studies have investigated DNA methylation of selected candidate genes or a very small fraction of genomic CpG sites in human pancreatic islets, the tissue of primary pathogenic importance for diabetes. Our aim was to characterize the whole-genome DNA methylation landscape in human pancreatic islets, to identify differentially methylated regions (DMRs) in diabetic islets, and to investigate the function of DMRs in islet biology. Here, we performed whole-genome bisulfite sequencing, which is a comprehensive and unbiased method to study DNA methylation throughout the genome at a single nucleotide resolution, in pancreatic islets from donors with T2D and control subjects without diabetes. We identified 25,820 DMRs in islets from individuals with T2D. These DMRs cover loci with known islet function, e.g., PDX1, TCF7L2, and ADCY5 Importantly, binding sites previously identified by ChIP-seq for islet-specific transcription factors, enhancer regions, and different histone marks were enriched in the T2D-associated DMRs. We also identified 457 genes, including NR4A3, PARK2, PID1, SLC2A2, and SOCS2, that had both DMRs and significant expression changes in T2D islets. To mimic the situation in T2D islets, candidate genes were overexpressed or silenced in cultured β-cells. This resulted in impaired insulin secretion, thereby connecting differential methylation to islet dysfunction. We further explored the islet methylome and found a strong link between methylation levels and histone marks. Additionally, DNA methylation in different genomic regions and of different transcript types (i.e., protein coding, noncoding, and pseudogenes) was associated with islet expression levels. Our study provides a comprehensive picture of the islet DNA methylome in individuals with and without diabetes and highlights the importance of epigenetic dysregulation in pancreatic islets and T2D

  16. Epidemiologic studies of the human microbiome and cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vogtmann, Emily; Goedert, James J

    2016-01-01

    .... Previously detected associations of individual bacteria (e.g., Helicobacter pylori), periodontal disease, and inflammation with specific cancers have motivated studies considering the association between the human microbiome and cancer risk...

  17. [The role of the adaptive stress response in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, cancer and diabetes mellitus type 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozpędek, Wioletta; Markiewicz, Łukasz; Diehl, J Alan; Pytel, Dariusz; Majsterek, Ireneusz

    2015-12-01

    The ER (Endoplasmatic Reticulum) an intricate intracellular membrane system is responsible for many functions within cells; including folding and post-translational modifications of secretory proteins biosynthesis of ceramides, phospholipids and coordination of cell homeostasis. Perturbation of these ER processes leads to high levels unfolded and misfolded proteins within the lumen of the ER. These disturbances lead to activation of three primary receptors: PERK (Protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase), IRE1 (Inositol-Requiring-Enzyme 1) and ATF6 (Activating Transcription Factor 6). These signal transducers are responsible for inducing signalling pathways termed UPR (Unfolded Protein Response) restoring cell homeostasis. In contrast, unresolved ER stress contributes to cell death by apoptosis. Recent research allows for a conclusion that the deregulation of UPR is the main causative factor for functional cell loss and moreover, cell death by apoptosis, which is strictly linked to the pathology of human diseases to include: cancer, diabetes mellitus type 2 and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and prion diseases.

  18. Prevention of the Angiogenic Switch in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    chronic myeloid leukaemia | colorectal cancer | Down syndrome | infantile haemangiomas | multiple myeloma | non-small-cell lung cancer | rheumatoid...Human Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Donald Ingber, M.D., Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Children’s Hospital...From - To) 15 FEB 2004 - 14 FEB 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Prevention of the Angiogenic Switch in Human Breast Cancer 5b

  19. Progress in Cancer Cachexia Pathogenesis and Treatment%癌症恶病质发病机制与治疗研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温宏升; 阎飞(综述); 秦贤举(审校)

    2016-01-01

    癌症恶病质( CC)是晚期恶性肿瘤常见并发症。近十年,尽管 CC 发生机制的研究取得了一些新进展,但其治疗尚缺乏理想的方法。 CC病理生理机制复杂,涉及系统性炎症反应、脂肪代谢和蛋白质代谢等多种因素。 CC的成功治疗也有赖于多途径干预,包括营养支持和多种药物联合运用。目前临床上用于治疗CC的药物有沙利度胺、非甾体消炎药类、孕酮类等;另外,一些根据其发病机制设计的新药尚处于临床研究阶段(如ALD518、OHR/AVR118等)。%Cancer cachexia is a common complication of advanced cancer.Over the last decade,we have gained new insight into the pathophysiology of cancer cachexia.Unfortunately,its treatment remains a chal-lenge.Cancer cachexia is a multifactorial syndrome,which is mainly related to systemic inflammatory reac-tion,lipid metabolism and protein metabolism ,etc.The successful management of cancer cachexia will likely require the multimodal approaches that include nutritional support and combination of pharmaceutical inter-ventions.The current drugs in clinic for treatment of cancer cachexia include thalidomide,nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs,progesterone drugs,etc.In addition,some new drugs designed according to the cancer cachexia pathogenesis are still in the clinical research stage,such as ALD518,OHR/AVR118,etc.

  20. Establishing of the Transplanted Animal Models for Human Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xingli Zhang; Jinchang Wu

    2009-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide.Even with the applications of excision,radiotherapy,chemotherapy,and gene therapy,the 5 year survival rate is only 15% in the USA.Clinically relevant laboratory animal models of the disease could greatly facilitate understanding of the pathogenesis of lung cancer,its progression,invasion and metastasis.Transplanted lung cancer models are of special interest and are widely used today.Such models are essential tools in accelerating development of new therapies for lung cancer.In this communication we will present a brief overview of the hosts,sites and pathways used to establish transplanted animal lung tumor models.

  1. Gene profile identifies zinc transporters differentially expressed in normal human organs and human pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J; Zhang, Y; Cui, X; Yao, W; Yu, X; Cen, P; Hodges, S E; Fisher, W E; Brunicardi, F C; Chen, C; Yao, Q; Li, M

    2013-03-01

    Deregulated expression of zinc transporters was linked to several cancers. However, the detailed expression profile of all human zinc transporters in normal human organs and in human cancer, especially in pancreatic cancer is not available. The objectives of this study are to investigate the complete expression patterns of 14 ZIP and 10 ZnT transporters in a large number of normal human organs and in human pancreatic cancer tissues and cell lines. We examined the expression patterns of ZIP and ZnT transporters in 22 different human organs and tissues, 11 pairs of clinical human pancreatic cancer specimens and surrounding normal/benign tissues, as well as 10 established human pancreatic cancer cell lines plus normal human pancreatic ductal epithelium (HPDE) cells, using real time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The results indicate that human zinc transporters have tissue specific expression patterns, and may play different roles in different organs or tissues. Almost all the ZIPs except for ZIP4, and most ZnTs were down-regulated in human pancreatic cancer tissues compared to the surrounding benign tissues. The expression patterns of individual ZIPs and ZnTs are similar among different pancreatic cancer lines. Those results and our previous studies suggest that ZIP4 is the only zinc transporter that is significantly up-regulated in human pancreatic cancer and might be the major zinc transporter that plays an important role in pancreatic cancer growth. ZIP4 might serve as a novel molecular target for pancreatic cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  2. Human papillomavirus-associated diseases and cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan Yang; Jianbo Zhu Co-first author; Xiaoyue Song; Yan Qi; Xiaobin Cui; Feng Li 

    2015-01-01

    Human papilomaviruses (HPVs) have been detected in cervical cancer cels and skin papiloma cels, which have a variety of types, including low-risk and high-risk types. HPV genome replication requires the host cel’s DNA synthesis machinery, and HPVs encode proteins that maintain diferentiated epithelial cels in a replication-competent state. HPV types are tissue-specific and generaly produce diferent types of le-sions, either benign or malignant. This review examines diferent HPV types and their associated diseases and presents therapeutic options for the treatment of HPV-positive diseases.

  3. Assessing global transitions in human development and colorectal cancer incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Miranda M; Bray, Freddie; Vaccarella, Salvatore; Soerjomataram, Isabelle

    2017-06-15

    Colorectal cancer incidence has paralleled increases in human development across most countries. Yet, marked decreases in incidence are now observed in countries that have attained very high human development. Thus, in this study, we explored the relationship between human development and colorectal cancer incidence, and in particular assessed whether national transitions to very high human development are linked to temporal patterns in colorectal cancer incidence. For these analyses, we utilized the Human Development Index (HDI) and annual incidence data from regional and national cancer registries. Truncated (30-74 years) age-standardized incidence rates were calculated. Yearly incidence rate ratios and HDI ratios, before and after transitioning to very high human development, were also estimated. Among the 29 countries investigated, colorectal cancer incidence was observed to decrease after reaching the very high human development threshold for 12 countries; decreases were also observed in a further five countries, but the age-standardized incidence rates remained higher than that observed at the threshold. Such declines or stabilizations are likely due to colorectal cancer screening in some populations, as well as varying levels of exposure to protective factors. In summary, it appears that there is a threshold at which human development predicts a stabilization or decline in colorectal cancer incidence, though this pattern was not observed for all countries assessed. Future cancer planning must consider the increasing colorectal cancer burden expected in countries transitioning towards higher levels of human development, as well as possible declines in incidence among countries reaching the highest development level. © 2017 UICC.

  4. Involvement of eicosanoids in the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer: the roles of cyclooxygenase-2 and 5-lipoxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knab, Lawrence M; Grippo, Paul J; Bentrem, David J

    2014-08-21

    The interplay between inflammation and cancer progression is a growing area of research. A combination of clinical, epidemiological, and basic science investigations indicate that there is a relationship between inflammatory changes in the pancreas and neoplastic progression. Diets high in ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids provide increased substrate for arachidonic acid metabolism by cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) to form eicosanoids. These eicosanoids directly contribute to pancreatic cancer cell proliferation. Both COX-2 and 5-LOX are upregulated in multiple cancer types, including pancreatic cancer. In vitro studies using pancreatic cancer cell lines have demonstrated upregulation of COX-2 and 5-LOX at both the mRNA and protein levels. When COX-2 and 5-LOX are blocked via a variety of mechanisms, cancer cell proliferation is abrogated both in vitro and in vivo. The mechanism of COX-2 has been shown to include effects on apoptosis as well as angiogenesis. 5-LOX has been implicated in apoptosis. The use of COX-2 and 5-LOX inhibitors in clinical studies in patients with pancreatic cancer has been limited. Patient enrollment has been restricted to those with advanced disease which makes evaluation of these drugs as chemopreventive agents difficult. COX-2 and 5-LOX expression have been shown to be present during the early neoplastic changes of pancreatic cancer, well before progression to invasive disease. This indicates that the ideal role for these interventions is early in the disease process as preventive agents, perhaps in patients with chronic pancreatitis or hereditary pancreatitis.

  5. Human retroviruses, cancer, and AIDS: Approaches to prevention and therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolognesi, D.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains eight sections, each consisting of several papers. The section titles are: New Human Retroviruses and Their Properties; Biology and Genetics of HIV; Products of the HIV Genome; Viral Pathogenesis; HIV and Its Receptor; Vaccine Approaches Against HIV; Treatment Approaches Against HIV; and Closing Remarks.

  6. Endogenous retroviral promoter exaptation in human cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artem Babaian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer arises from a series of genetic and epigenetic changes, which result in abnormal expression or mutational activation of oncogenes, as well as suppression/inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Aberrant expression of coding genes or long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs with oncogenic properties can be caused by translocations, gene amplifications, point mutations or other less characterized mechanisms. One such mechanism is the inappropriate usage of normally dormant, tissue-restricted or cryptic enhancers or promoters that serve to drive oncogenic gene expression. Dispersed across the human genome, endogenous retroviruses (ERVs provide an enormous reservoir of autonomous gene regulatory modules, some of which have been co-opted by the host during evolution to play important roles in normal regulation of genes and gene networks. This review focuses on the “dark side” of such ERV regulatory capacity. Specifically, we discuss a growing number of examples of normally dormant or epigenetically repressed ERVs that have been harnessed to drive oncogenes in human cancer, a process we term onco-exaptation, and we propose potential mechanisms that may underlie this phenomenon.

  7. Modern criteria to establish human cancer etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Michele; Klein, George; Gruber, Jack; Wong, May

    2004-08-01

    The Cancer Etiology Branch of the National Cancer Institute hosted a workshop, "Validation of a causal relationship: criteria to establish etiology," to determine whether recent technological advances now make it possible to delineate improved or novel criteria for the rapid establishment for cancer causation. The workshop was held in Washington, D.C., December 11-12, 2003, and participants were among the international leaders in the fields of epidemiology, chemistry, biochemistry, microbiology, virology, environmental and chemical carcinogenesis, immunology, pathology, molecular pathology, genetics, oncology, and surgical oncology. There was a general consensus that the rapid identification of human carcinogens and their removal (when possible) or the establishment of specific preventive and therapeutic measures was the most desirable and effective way to have a rapid and positive impact in the fight against cancer. From a clinical perspective, it may be as important to target initiators, cocarcinogens and promoters, if by removing any one of them tumor growth can be prevented. Future studies should focus on interactions among and between different biological, chemical, and physical agents. Analyses of single agents can at times miss their carcinogenic potential when such agents are carcinogenic only in subgroups of individuals because of their genetic background, diet, exposure to other carcinogens, or microbial infection. Epidemiology, molecular pathology (including chemistry, biochemistry, molecular biology, molecular virology, molecular genetics, epigenetics, genomics, proteomics, and other molecular-based approaches), and animal and tissue culture experiments should all be seen as important integrating evidence in the determination of human carcinogenicity. Concerning the respective roles of epidemiology and molecular pathology, it was noted that epidemiology allows the determination of the overall effect of a given carcinogen in the human population (e

  8. Exploring the Mechanisms of Pathogenesis in Prostate Cancer Involving TMPRSS2-ERG (Or ETV1) Gene Rearrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Esther Baena, PhD; Zhe Li, PhD. Conclusion: We planned to use both a series of mouse models and biochemical approaches to study the mechanisms of...Apr 1, 2006). 9. S. A. Tomlins et al., Science 310, 644 (Oct 28, 2005). 10. J. Wang , Y. Cai, C. Ren, M. Ittmann, Cancer Res 66, 8347 (Sep 1, 2006...Cancer Res 68, 3584 (May 15, 2008). 23. S. Wang et al., Cancer Cell 4, 209 (Sep, 2003). 24. Y. Y. Kisanuki et al., Dev Biol 230, 230 (Feb 15, 2001

  9. Modelling mutational landscapes of human cancers in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Magali; Weninger, Annette; Ardin, Maude; Huskova, Hana; Castells, Xavier; Vallée, Maxime P.; McKay, James; Nedelko, Tatiana; Muehlbauer, Karl-Rudolf; Marusawa, Hiroyuki; Alexander, John; Hazelwood, Lee; Byrnes, Graham; Hollstein, Monica; Zavadil, Jiri

    2014-03-01

    Experimental models that recapitulate mutational landscapes of human cancers are needed to decipher the rapidly expanding data on human somatic mutations. We demonstrate that mutation patterns in immortalised cell lines derived from primary murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) exposed in vitro to carcinogens recapitulate key features of mutational signatures observed in human cancers. In experiments with several cancer-causing agents we obtained high genome-wide concordance between human tumour mutation data and in vitro data with respect to predominant substitution types, strand bias and sequence context. Moreover, we found signature mutations in well-studied human cancer driver genes. To explore endogenous mutagenesis, we used MEFs ectopically expressing activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and observed an excess of AID signature mutations in immortalised cell lines compared to their non-transgenic counterparts. MEF immortalisation is thus a simple and powerful strategy for modelling cancer mutation landscapes that facilitates the interpretation of human tumour genome-wide sequencing data.

  10. BAK overexpression mediates p53-independent apoptosis inducing effects on human gastric cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Jun

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background BAK (Bcl-2 homologous antagonist/killer is a novel pro-apoptotic gene of the Bcl-2 family. It has been reported that gastric tumors have reduced BAK levels when compared with the normal mucosa. Moreover, mutations of the BAK gene have been identified in human gastrointestinal cancers, suggesting that a perturbation of BAK-mediated apoptosis may contribute to the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. In this study, we explored the therapeutic effects of gene transfer mediated elevations in BAK expression on human gastric cancer cells in vitro. Methods Eukaryotic expression vector for the BAK gene was constructed and transferred into gastric cancer cell lines, MKN-45 (wild-type p53 and MKN-28 (mutant-type p53. RT-PCR and Western Blotting detected cellular BAK gene expression. Cell growth activities were detected by MTT colorimetry and flow cytometry, while apoptosis was assayed by electronic microscopy and TUNEL. Western Blotting and colorimetry investigated cellular caspase-3 activities. Results BAK gene transfer could result in significant BAK overexpression, decreased in vitro growth, cell cycle G0/G1 arrest, and induced apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. In transferred cells, inactive caspase-3 precursor was cleaved into the active subunits p20 and p17, during BAK overexpression-induced apoptosis. In addition, this process occurred equally well in p53 wild-type (MKN-45, or in p53 mutant-type (MKN-28 gastric cancer cells. Conclusions The data presented suggests that overexpression of the BAK gene can lead to apoptosis of gastric cancer cells in vitro, which does not appear to be dependent on p53 status. The action mechanism of BAK mediated apoptosis correlates with activation of caspase-3. This could be served as a potential strategy for further development of gastric cancer therapies.

  11. Anthrax Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moayeri, Mahtab; Leppla, Stephen H; Vrentas, Catherine; Pomerantsev, Andrei P; Liu, Shihui

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax is caused by the spore-forming, gram-positive bacterium Bacillus anthracis. The bacterium's major virulence factors are (a) the anthrax toxins and (b) an antiphagocytic polyglutamic capsule. These are encoded by two large plasmids, the former by pXO1 and the latter by pXO2. The expression of both is controlled by the bicarbonate-responsive transcriptional regulator, AtxA. The anthrax toxins are three polypeptides-protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema factor (EF)-that come together in binary combinations to form lethal toxin and edema toxin. PA binds to cellular receptors to translocate LF (a protease) and EF (an adenylate cyclase) into cells. The toxins alter cell signaling pathways in the host to interfere with innate immune responses in early stages of infection and to induce vascular collapse at late stages. This review focuses on the role of anthrax toxins in pathogenesis. Other virulence determinants, as well as vaccines and therapeutics, are briefly discussed.

  12. DEK蛋白在宫颈癌病因学中的意义研究%Significance of DEK protein in pathogenesis of cervical cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘岿然; 赵敏; 张淑兰

    2011-01-01

    Objective :To detect DEK protein in cervical cancer, ceevical intraepithelial neoplasia ( CIN) and normai cervix and to explore the pathogenesis of cervical cancer. Methods :To detect DEK expression in 35 cases of cervical cancer , 30 cases of CIN and 20 cases of normal cervical tissue by immunohistochemistry to inquire the relationship between DEK protein and the carcinogenon of cervical cancer. Results :The expression of DEK protein of cervical cancer tissue ( 74. 3% ) waa higher than that of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (23. 3% ) and normal tissue ( 15. 0% ) , the difference was significant ( P < 0. 05 ) . No significant difference between CIN and in normal tissue ( P >0. 05 ) was observed. Conclusion : The expression of DEK protein in cervical cancer was increased which indicated the expression of DEK protein took part in the carcinogenesis of cervical cancer. It can be used as a new diagnostic indicators of cervical cancer.%目的:检测DEK蛋白在正常宫颈、宫颈上皮内瘤变(CIN)及宫颈癌组织中的表达情况,探讨其在宫颈癌发病机制中的作用.方法:采用免疫组织化学方法检测DEK蛋白在35例宫颈癌组织,30例宫颈上皮内瘤变(CIN)及20例正常宫颈组织的表达情况,分析DEK蛋白的表达与宫颈癌发生的关系.结果:宫颈癌组织中DEK蛋白表达率(74. 3%)高于宫颈上皮内瘤变组织(23.3%)和正常组织(15.0%),差异具有显著性意义(P0.05).结论:DEK蛋白在宫颈癌中表达升高,可能与宫颈癌的发生有关,DEK蛋白可作为宫颈癌病因学的一个新指标.

  13. Apoptosis of human pancreatic cancer cells induced by Triptolide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Xiong Zhou; Xiao-Ling Ding; Jie-Fei Huang; Hong Zhang; Sheng-Bao Wu; Jian-Ping Cheng; Qun Wei

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To investigate apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer ceils induced by Triptolide (TL),and the relationship between this apoptosis and expression of caspase-3' bcl-2 and bax.METHODS:Human pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990 was cultured in DIEM media for this study.MTT assay was used to determine the cell growth inhibitory rate in vitro.Flow cytometry and TUNEL assay were used to detect the apoptosis of human pancreatic cancer cells before and after TL treatment.RT-PCR was used to detect the expression of apoptosis-associated gene caspase-3' bcl-2 and bax.RESULTS:TL inhibited the growth of human pancreatic cancer cells in a dose-and time-dependent manner.TL induced human pancreatic cancer cells to undergo apoptosis with typically apoptotic characteristics.TUNEL assay showed that after the treatment of human pancreatic cancer cells with 40 ng/mL TL for 12 h and 24 h,the apoptotic rates of human pancreatic cancer cells increased significantly.RT-PCR demonstrated that caspase-3 and bax were significantly up-regulated in SW1990 cells treated with TL while bcl-2 mRNA was not.CONCLUSION:TL is able to induce the apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells.This apoptosis may be mediated by up-regulating the expression of apoptosisassociated caspase-3 and bax gene.

  14. Alterations of EGFR, p53 and PTEN that mimic changes found in basal-like breast cancer promote transformation of human mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Maira M; Hopkins, Benjamin D; Saal, Lao H; Parsons, Ramon E

    2013-03-01

    Breast cancer can be classified into different molecular subtypes with varying clinical and pathological characteristics. The basal-like breast cancer subtype represents one of the most aggressive and lethal types of breast cancer, and due to poor mechanistic understanding, it lacks targeted therapy. Many basal-like breast cancer patient samples display alterations of established drivers of cancer development, including elevated expression of EGFR, p53 inactivating mutations and loss of expression of the tumor suppressor PTEN; however, their contribution to human basal-like breast cancer pathogenesis remains ill-defined. Using non-transformed human mammary epithelial cells, we set out to determine whether altering EGFR, p53 and PTEN in different combinations could contribute to basal-like breast cancer progression through transformation of cells. Altering PTEN in combination with either p53 or EGFR in contrast to any of the single alterations caused increased growth of transformed colonies in soft agar. Concomitantly modifying all three genes led to the highest rate of cellular proliferation and the greatest degree of anchorage-independent colony formation. Results from our effort to engineer a model of BBC expressing alterations of EGFR, p53 and PTEN suggest that these changes are cooperative and likely play a causal role in basal-like breast cancer pathogenesis. Consideration should be given to targeting EGFR and restoring p53 and PTEN signaling simultaneously as a strategy for treatment of this subtype of breast cancer.

  15. Matrix metalloproteinase and G protein coupled receptors: co-conspirators in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, Sarah M; Blackburn, Jessica S; Schmucker, Adam C; Burrage, Peter S; Brinckerhoff, Constance E

    2009-01-01

    Similarities in the pathologies of autoimmune diseases and cancer have been noted for at least 30 years. Inflammatory cytokines and growth factors mediate cell proliferation, and proteinases, especially the collagenase, Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), contribute to disease progression by remodeling the extracellular matrix and modulating the microenvironment. This review focuses on two cancers (melanoma and breast) and on the autoimmune disorder, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and discusses the activated stromal cells found in these diseases. MMP-1 was originally thought to function only to degrade interstitial collagens, but recent studies have revealed novel roles for MMP-1 involving the G protein-coupled receptors: the chemokine receptor, CXCR-4, and Protease Activated Receptor-1 (PAR-1). Cooperativity between MMP-1 and CXCR4/SDF-1 signaling influences the behavior of activated fibroblasts in both RA and cancer. Further, MMP-1 is a vital part of an autocrine/paracrine MMP-1/PAR-1 signal transduction axis, a function that amplifies its potential to remodel the matrix and to modify cell behavior. Finally, new therapeutic agents directed at MMP-1 and G protein-coupled receptors are emerging. Even though these agents are more specific in their targets than past therapies, these targets are often shared between RA and cancer, underscoring fundamental similarities between autoimmune disorders and some cancers.

  16. Bacterial protein toxins in human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosadi, Francesca; Fiorentini, Carla; Fabbri, Alessia

    2016-02-01

    Many bacteria causing persistent infections produce toxins whose mechanisms of action indicate that they could have a role in carcinogenesis. Some toxins, like CDT and colibactin, directly attack the genome by damaging DNA whereas others, as for example CNF1, CagA and BFT, impinge on key eukaryotic processes, such as cellular signalling and cell death. These bacterial toxins, together with other less known toxins, mimic carcinogens and tumour promoters. The aim of this review is to fulfil an up-to-date analysis of toxins with carcinogenic potential that have been already correlated to human cancers. Bacterial toxins-induced carcinogenesis represents an emerging aspect in bacteriology, and its significance is increasingly recognized.

  17. Identification and characterization of locus specific methylation patterns within novel loci undergoing hypermethylation during breast cancer pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wojdacz, Tomasz K; Windeløv, Johanne Agerlin; Thestrup, Britta Boserup

    2014-01-01

    biomarkers for early cancer detection and stratification of patients. METHODS: We used ultrahigh-resolution microarrays to compare genomewide methylation patterns of breast carcinomas (n = 20) and nonmalignant breast tissue (n = 5). Biomarker properties of a subset of discovered differentially methylated......INTRODUCTION: Despite similar clinical and pathological features, large numbers of breast cancer patients experience different outcomes of the disease. This, together with the fact that the incidence of breast cancer is growing worldwide, emphasizes an urgent need for identification of new...... regions (DMRs) were validated using methylation-sensitive high-resolution melting (MS-HRM) in a case-control study on a panel of breast carcinomas (n = 275) and non-malignant controls (n = 74). RESULTS: On the basis of microarray results, we selected 19 DMRs for large-scale screening of cases and controls...

  18. Genomic organization of the human heparan sulfate-N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase gene: Exclusion from a causative role in the pathogenesis of Treacher Collins syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladwin, A.J.; Dixon, J.; Loftus, S.K.; Wasmuth, J.J.; Dixon, M.J. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom)]|[Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    1996-03-05

    Heparan sulfate-N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase (HSST) catalyzes both the N-deacetylation and the N-sulfation of heparan sulfate. Previous studies have resulted in the isolation of the human HSST gene from within the Treacher Collins syndrome locus (TCOF1) critical region on 5q. In the present study, the genomic organization of the HSST gene has been elucidated, and the 14 exons identified have been tested for TCOF1-specific mutations. As a result of these studies, mutations within the coding sequence and adjacent splice junctions of HSST can be excluded from a causative role in the pathogenesis of Treacher Collins syndrome. 13 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  19. Glomerular expression of myxovirus resistance protein 1 in human mesangial cells: possible activation of innate immunity in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shojiro; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu; Tsuruga, Kazushi; Aizawa, Tomomi; Ito, Tatsuya; Matsumiya, Tomoh; Yoshida, Hidemi; Joh, Kensuke; Ito, Etsuro; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    Since viral infections activate type I interferon (IFN) pathways and cause subsequent release of IFN-dependent proinflammatory chemokines and cytokines, the innate immune system plays an important role in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis (LN). It has been reported that human myxovirus resistance protein 1 (Mx1), a type I IFN-dependent transcript, acts against a wide range of RNA viruses. Although the expression of Mx1 in biopsy specimens obtained from patients with dermatomyositis and cutaneous lupus has been described, the expression of Mx1 in human mesangial cells (MCs) has remained largely unknown. We treated normal human MCs in culture with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly IC), an authentic double-stranded RNA, and analyzed the expression of Mx1 by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. To elucidate the poly IC-signalling pathway, we subjected the cells to RNA interference against IFN-β. We also conducted an immunofluorescence study to examine mesangial Mx1 expression in biopsy specimens from patients with LN. Poly IC-induced Mx1 expression in MCs are shown both time- and dose-dependently, and RNA interference against IFN-β inhibited poly IC-induced Mx1 expression. Intense glomerular Mx1 expression was observed in biopsy specimens from patients with LN, whereas negative staining occurred in specimens from patients with IgA nephropathy or purpura nephritis. These preliminary observations support, at least in part, the theory of innate immune system activation in the pathogenesis of LN.

  20. Characterizing metabolic changes in human colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michael D; Zhang, Xing; Park, Jeong-Jin; Siems, William F; Gang, David R; Resar, Linda M S; Reeves, Raymond; Hill, Herbert H

    2015-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a leading cause of cancer death worldwide, despite the fact that it is a curable disease when diagnosed early. The development of new screening methods to aid in early diagnosis or identify precursor lesions at risk for progressing to CRC will be vital to improving the survival rate of individuals predisposed to CRC. Metabolomics is an advancing area that has recently seen numerous applications to the field of cancer research. Altered metabolism has been studied for many years as a means to understand and characterize cancer. However, further work is required to establish standard procedures and improve our ability to identify distinct metabolomic profiles that can be used to diagnose CRC or predict disease progression. The present study demonstrates the use of direct infusion traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry to distinguish metabolic profiles from CRC samples and matched non-neoplastic epithelium as well as metastatic and primary tumors at different stages of disease (T1-T4). By directly infusing our samples, the analysis time was reduced significantly, thus increasing the speed and efficiency of this method compared to traditional metabolomics platforms. Partial least squares discriminant analysis was used to visualize differences between the metabolic profiles of sample types and to identify the specific m/z features that led to this differentiation. Identification of the distinct m/z features was made using the human metabolome database. We discovered alterations in fatty acid biosynthesis and oxidative, glycolytic, and polyamine pathways that distinguish tumors from non-malignant colonic epithelium as well as various stages of CRC. Although further studies are needed, our results indicate that colonic epithelial cells undergo metabolic reprogramming during their evolution to CRC, and the distinct metabolites could serve as diagnostic tools or potential targets in therapy or primary prevention. Graphical Abstract

  1. JC virus in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer, an etiological agent or another component in a multistep process?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazo Pedro A

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract JCV infection occurs early in childhood and last throughout life. JCV has been associated to colorectal cancer and might contribute to the cancer phenotype by several mechanisms. Among JCV proteins, particularly two of them, large T-antigen and agnoprotein, can interfere with cell cycle control and genomic instability mechanisms, but other viral proteins might also contribute to the process. Part of viral DNA sequences are detected in carcinoma lesions, but less frequently in adenomas, and not in the normal surrounding tissue, suggesting they are integrated in the host cell genome and these integrations have been selected; in addition viral integration can cause a gene, or chromosomal damage. The inflammatory infiltration caused by a local chronic viral infection in the intestine can contribute to the selection and expansion of a tumor prone cell in a cytokine rich microenvironment. JCV may not be the cause of colorectal cancer, but it can be a relevant risk factor and able to facilitate progression at one or several stages in tumor progression. JCV transient effects might lead to selective expansion of tumor cells. Since there is not a direct cause and effect relationship, JCV infection may be an alternative to low frequency cancer predisposition genes.

  2. Vitamin D and pancreas: The role of sunshine vitamin in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, Barbara; Grant, William B; Della Casa, Silvia; Orio, Francesco; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Colao, Annamaria; Sarno, Gerardo; Muscogiuri, Giovanna

    2017-11-02

    Increasing evidence suggests that vitamin D exerts multiple effects beyond bone and calcium metabolism. Vitamin D seems to play a role in pancreatic disease, including type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus as well as pancreatic cancer. Vitamin D's immune-modulatory action suggests that it could help prevent type 1 diabetes. In type 2 diabetes, vitamin D may influence β-cell function, insulin sensitivity, and systematic inflammation-all characteristic pathways of that disease. Data from observational studies correlated vitamin D deficiency with risk of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Prospective and ecological studies of pancreatic cancer incidence generally support a beneficial effect of higher 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration as well as inverse correlations between UVB dose or exposure and incidence and/or mortality rate of pancreatic cancer. This review discusses the literature regarding vitamin D's role in risk of diabetes and pancreatic cancer. The results to date generally satisfy Hill's criteria for causality regarding vitamin D and incidence of these pancreatic diseases. However, large randomized, blinded, prospective studies are required to more fully evaluate the potential therapeutic role of vitamin D in preventing pancreatic diseases.

  3. The role of OXCT1 in the pathogenesis of cancer as a rate-limiting enzyme of ketone body metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Song; Xie, Caifeng

    2017-08-15

    Cancer cells are well documented to reprogram their metabolism in order to support the maintenance and reproduction. 3-oxoacid CoA-transferase 1 (OXCT1) is a key enzyme in ketone body metabolism that catalyzes the first and rate-determining step of ketolysis. The product of OXCT1 converts to acetyl-CoA and finally fed into the tricarboxylic acid cycle for oxidation and ATP production. However, little is known of its regulation right now. Recently, some studies suggested that OXCT1 participates in tumorigenesis and signaling in cancer cells. Furthermore, our recent work showed that a marked elevation of OXCT1 expression in different categories of cancer cells. Here we review the metabolic functions of OXCT1 and its surprising roles in supporting the biological hallmarks of malignancy. We also review recent efforts in exploring the mechanism responsible for the tumor promoting effect of OXCT1 and suggest a novel therapeutic target for cancer therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The role of oestrogen in the pathogenesis of obesity, type 2 diabetes, breast cancer and prostate disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Graeme P

    2010-07-01

    A detailed review of the literature was performed in a bid to identify the presence of a common link between specific hormone interactions and the increasing prevalence of global disease. The synergistic action of unopposed oestrogen and leptin, compounded by increasing insulin, cortisol and xeno-oestrogen exposure directly initiate, promote and exacerbate obesity, type 2 diabetes, uterine overgrowth, prostatic enlargement, prostate cancer and breast cancer. Furthermore these hormones significantly contribute to the incidence and intensity of anxiety and depression, Alzheimer's disease, heart disease and stroke. This review, in collaboration with hundreds of evidence-based clinical researchers, correlates the significant interactions these hormones exert upon the upregulation of p450 aromatase, oestrogen, leptin and insulin receptor function; the normal status quo of their binding globulins; and how adduct formation alters DNA sequencing to ultimately produce an array of metabolic conditions ranging from menopausal symptoms and obesity to Alzheimer's disease and breast and prostate cancer. It reveals the way that poor diet, increased stress, unopposed endogenous oestrogens, exogenous oestrogens, pesticides, xeno-oestrogens and leptin are associated with increased aromatase activity, and how its products, increased endogenous oestrogen and lowered testosterone, are associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer's disease and oestrogenic disease. This controversial break-through represents a paradigm shift in medical thinking, which can prevent the raging pandemic of diabetes, obesity and cancer currently sweeping the world, and as such, it will reshape health initiatives, reduce suffering, prevent waste of government expenditure and effectively transform preventative medicine and global health care for decades.

  5. Reprogramming of human cancer cells to pluripotency for models of cancer progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungsun; Zaret, Kenneth S

    2015-01-01

    The ability to study live cells as they progress through the stages of cancer provides the opportunity to discover dynamic networks underlying pathology, markers of early stages, and ways to assess therapeutics. Genetically engineered animal models of cancer, where it is possible to study the consequences of temporal-specific induction of oncogenes or deletion of tumor suppressors, have yielded major insights into cancer progression. Yet differences exist between animal and human cancers, such as in markers of progression and response to therapeutics. Thus, there is a need for human cell models of cancer progression. Most human cell models of cancer are based on tumor cell lines and xenografts of primary tumor cells that resemble the advanced tumor state, from which the cells were derived, and thus do not recapitulate disease progression. Yet a subset of cancer types have been reprogrammed to pluripotency or near-pluripotency by blastocyst injection, by somatic cell nuclear transfer and by induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS) technology. The reprogrammed cancer cells show that pluripotency can transiently dominate over the cancer phenotype. Diverse studies show that reprogrammed cancer cells can, in some cases, exhibit early-stage phenotypes reflective of only partial expression of the cancer genome. In one case, reprogrammed human pancreatic cancer cells have been shown to recapitulate stages of cancer progression, from early to late stages, thus providing a model for studying pancreatic cancer development in human cells where previously such could only be discerned from mouse models. We discuss these findings, the challenges in developing such models and their current limitations, and ways that iPS reprogramming may be enhanced to develop human cell models of cancer progression. PMID:25712212

  6. CONSTRUCTION AND EXPRESSION OF A HUMAN-MOUSE CHIMERIC ANTIBODY AGAINST HUMAN BLADDER CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白银; 王琰; 周丽君; 俞莉章

    2001-01-01

    To construct and express a human-mouse chimeric antibody against human bladder cancer. Method: The variable region genes of anti-human bladder cancer monoclonal antibody BDI-1 were cloned by RT-PCR. A human-mouse chimeric antibody expression vector was constructed and transfected into CHO cells. The chimeric antibody against bladder cancer was expressed and characterized. Result: Eukaryotic expression vector of the chimeric antibody against human bladder carcinoma was successfully constructed, and was expressed in eukaryotic cells; the expressed chimeric antibody ch-BDI showed same specificity as its parent McAb against human bladder cancer cells. Conclusion: The constructed chimeric antibody was expressed successfully in eukaryotic cells, and the chimeric antibody had desired affinity against human bladder cancer cells.

  7. Qualitative analysis of cancer patients' experiences using donated human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rough, Susanne M; Sakamoto, Pauline; Fee, Caroline H; Hollenbeck, Clarie B

    2009-05-01

    This represents the first published account from the patient's perspective of the use of human milk as cancer therapy. Purposive sampling was used to select a sample of 10 participants. Five were patients and 5 were family proxies. Individual interviews were conducted using confirmatory interviewing technique to obtain individual perspectives on the motivation for cancer patients to take donated human milk. Human milk therapy improved the quality of life (QOL) measures in the physical, psychological, and spiritual domains for most patients interviewed. The patients continued their use of human milk despite cost, taste, and discouragement from the conventional medical community. The study results support the theory that QOL may be more important to cancer patients than cancer outcomes and may improve patient medical care overall. These interviews offer information to cancer patients, their practitioners, and donor milk banks on outcomes and symptom relief from this therapy.

  8. The global cancer burden and human development: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Miranda M; Bray, Freddie; Soerjomataram, Isabelle

    2017-06-01

    This review examines the links between human development and cancer overall and for specific types of cancer, as well as cancer-related risk-factors and outcomes, such as disability and life expectancy. To assess human development, the Human Development Index was utilized continuously and according to four levels (low, medium, high, very high), where the low and very high categories include the least and most developed countries, respectively. All studies that assessed aspects of the global cancer burden using this measure were reviewed. Although the present cancer incidence burden is greater in higher Human Development Index countries, a greater proportion of the global mortality burden is observed in less developed countries, with a higher mean fatality rate in the latter countries. Further, the future cancer burden is expected to disproportionally affect less developed regions; in particular, it has been estimated that low and medium Human Development Index countries will experience a 100% and 81% increase in cancer incidence from 2008 to 2030, respectively. Disparities were also observed in risk factors and average health outcomes, such as a greater number of years of life lost prematurely and fewer cancer-related gains in life expectancy observed in lower versus higher Human Development Index settings. From a global perspective, there remain clear disparities in the cancer burden according to national Human Development Index scores. International efforts are needed to aid countries in social and economic transition in order to efficiently plan, implement and evaluate cancer control initiatives as a means to reduce the widening gap in cancer occurrence and survival worldwide.

  9. Identification and characterization of locus specific methylation patterns within novel loci undergoing hypermethylation during breast cancer pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wojdacz, Tomasz K; Windeløv, Johanne Agerlin; Thestrup, Britta Boserup;

    2014-01-01

    biomarkers for early cancer detection and stratification of patients. METHODS: We used ultrahigh-resolution microarrays to compare genomewide methylation patterns of breast carcinomas (n = 20) and nonmalignant breast tissue (n = 5). Biomarker properties of a subset of discovered differentially methylated....... Analysis of the screening results showed that all DMRs tested displayed significant gains of methylation in the cancer tissue compared to the levels in control tissue. Interestingly, we observed two types of locus-specific methylation, with loci undergoing either predominantly full or heterogeneous...... methylation during carcinogenesis. Almost all tested DMRs (17 of 19) displayed low-level methylation in nonmalignant breast tissue, independently of locus-specific methylation patterns in cases. CONCLUSIONS: Specific loci can undergo either heterogeneous or full methylation during carcinogenesis, and loci...

  10. T Cell Coinhibition and Immunotherapy in Human Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Janakiram, Murali; Abadi, Yael M.; Sparano, Joseph A.; Zang, Xingxing

    2012-01-01

    Costimulation and coinhibition generated by the B7 family and their receptor CD28 family have key roles in regulating T lymphocyte activation and tolerance. These pathways are very attractive therapeutic targets for human cancers including breast cancer. Gene polymorphisms of B7x (B7-H4/B7S1), PD-1 (CD279), and CTLA-4 (CD152) are associated with increased risk of developing breast cancer although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. In human breast cancer microenvironment, up-regulation of ...

  11. Human LINE1 endonuclease domain as a putative target of SARS-associated autoantibodies involved in the pathogenesis of severe acute respiratory syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Wei-ping; SHU Cui-li; LI Bo-an; ZHAO Jun; CHENG Yun

    2008-01-01

    Background Severe acute respiratory syndrome(SARS)is a disease with a mortality of 9.56%.Although SARS is etiologically linked to a new coronavirus(SARS-CoV)and functional cell receptor has been identified,the pathogenesis of the virus infection is largely unclear.Methods The clinical specimens were processed and analyzed using an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in-house.Further investigations of target antigen included reviews of phage display technique,rapid amplification of cDNA ends(RACE)technique,protein expression and purification,Western blotting validation,serological and immunohistochemical staining in postmortem tissue.Results A type of medium or low titer anti-lung tissue antibodies were found in the sera of SARS patients at the early stage of the disease.Human long interspersed nuclear element 1(LINE1)gene endonuclease(EN)domain protein was one of the target autoantigens and it was aberrantly expressed in the lung tissue of SARS patients.Anti-EN antibody was positive in the sera of 40.9% of SARS patients.Conclusions Human LINE1 endonuclease domain was identified as a putative target of SARS-associated autoantibodies,which were presented in the serum of SARS patients and may be involved in the pathogenesis of SARS.

  12. Differential network analysis in human cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Ryan; Datta, Somnath; Datta, Susmita

    2014-01-01

    A complex disease like cancer is hardly caused by one gene or one protein singly. It is usually caused by the perturbation of the network formed by several genes or proteins. In the last decade several research teams have attempted to construct interaction maps of genes and proteins either experimentally or reverse engineer interaction maps using computational techniques. These networks were usually created under a certain condition such as an environmental condition, a particular disease, or a specific tissue type. Lately, however, there has been greater emphasis on finding the differential structure of the existing network topology under a novel condition or disease status to elucidate the perturbation in a biological system. In this review/tutorial article we briefly mention some of the research done in this area; we mainly illustrate the computational/statistical methods developed by our team in recent years for differential network analysis using publicly available gene expression data collected from a well known cancer study. This data includes a group of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and a group with acute myeloid leukemia. In particular, we describe the statistical tests to detect the change in the network topology based on connectivity scores which measure the association or interaction between pairs of genes. The tests under various scores are applied to this data set to perform a differential network analysis on gene expression for human leukemia. We believe that, in the future, differential network analysis will be a standard way to view the changes in gene expression and protein expression data globally and these types of tests could be useful in analyzing the complex differential signatures.

  13. EXPRESSION OF Fas LIGAND IN HUMAN COLON CANCER CELL LINES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建军; 丁尔迅; 王强; 陈学云; 付志仁

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the expression of Fas ligand in human colon carcinoma cell lines. Methods: A total of six human colon cancer cell lines were examined for the expression of Fas ligand mRNA and cell surface protein by using RT-PCR and flow cytometry respectively. Results: The results showed that Fas ligand mRNA was expressed in all of the six cancer cell lines and Fas ligand cell surface protein was expressed in part of them. Conclusion: These data suggest that Fas ligand was expressed, at least in part, in human colon cancer cell lines and might facilitate to escape from immune surveillance of the host.

  14. One Health and cancer: A comparative study of human and canine cancers in Nairobi

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    Nyariaro Kelvin Momanyi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Recent trends in comparative animal and human research inform us that collaborative research plays a key role in deciphering and solving cancer challenges. Globally, cancer is a devastating diagnosis with an increasing burden in both humans and dogs and ranks as the number three killer among humans in Kenya. This study aimed to provide comparative information on cancers affecting humans and dogs in Nairobi, Kenya. Materials and Methods: Dog data collection was by cancer case finding from five veterinary clinics and two diagnostic laboratories, whereas the human dataset was from the Nairobi Cancer Registry covering the period 2002-2012. The analysis was achieved using IBM SPSS Statistics® v.20 (Dog data and CanReg5 (human data. The human population was estimated from the Kenya National Census, whereas the dog population was estimated from the human using a human:dog ratio of 4.1:1. Results: A total of 15,558 human and 367 dog cancer cases were identified. In humans, females had higher cancer cases 8993 (an age-standardized rate of 179.3 per 100,000 compared to 6565 in males (122.1 per 100,000. This order was reversed in dogs where males had higher cases 198 (14.9 per 100,000 compared to 169 (17.5 per 100,000 in females. The incident cancer cases increased over the 11-year study period in both species. Common cancers affecting both humans and dogs were: Prostate (30.4, 0.8, the respiratory tract (8.3, 1.3, lymphoma (5.6, 1.4, and liver and biliary tract (6.3, 0.5, whereas, in females, they were: Breast (44.5, 3.6, lip, oral cavity, and pharynx (8.8, 0.6, liver and biliary tract (6.5, 1.2, and lymphoma (6.0, 0.6, respectively, per 100,000. Conclusion: The commonality of some of the cancers in both humans and dogs fortifies that it may be possible to use dogs as models and sentinels in studying human cancers in Kenya and Africa. We further infer that developing joint animalhuman cancer registries and integrated cancer surveillance systems may

  15. Pathogenesis of solitary right aortic arch: a mass effect hypothesis based on observations of serial human embryonic sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhe W; Yamada, Tomonori; Kim, Ji H; Rodríguez-Vázquez, José F; Murakami, Gen; Arakawa, Keiji

    2017-03-01

    In general, solitary right aortic arch carries the left-sided ductus arteriosus communicating between the left subclavian and pulmonary arteries or the right-sided ductus connecting the descending aorta to the left pulmonary artery. Serial sections of fifteen 5- to 6-week-old embryos and ten 8- to 9-week-old fetuses suggested that the pathogenesis was unrelated to inversion due to dysfunction in gene cascades that control the systemic left/right axis. With inversion, conversely, the ductus or the sixth pharyngeal arch artery should connect to the right pulmonary artery. The disappearance of the right aortic arch started before the caudal migration of the aortic attachment of the ductus. Sympathetic nerve ganglia developed immediately posterior to both aortae, with a single embryonic specimen showing a large ganglion at the midline close to the union of the aortic arches. These ganglia may interfere with blood flow through the distal left arch, resulting in the ductus ending at the descending aorta behind the oesophagus. In another fetus examined, a midline shift of the ductus course resulted in the trachea curving posteriorly. Therefore, solitary right arch is likely to accompany abnormalities of the surrounding structures. The timing and site of the obstruction should be different between types: an almost midline obstruction near the aortic union needed for the development of the left-sided ductus and a distal obstruction near the left subclavian arterial origin needed for the development of the right-sided ductus. A mass effect of the sympathetic ganglia may explain the pathogenesis of any type of anomalous ductus arteriosus shown in previous reports of the solitary right arch.

  16. Dysfunctions at human intestinal barrier by water-borne protozoan parasites: lessons from cultured human fully differentiated colon cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa

    2013-06-01

    Some water-borne protozoan parasites induce diseases through their membrane-associated functional structures and virulence factors that hijack the host cellular molecules and signalling pathways leading to structural and functional lesions in the intestinal barrier. In this Microreview we analyse the insights on the mechanisms of pathogenesis of Entamoeba intestinalis, Giardia and Cryptosporidium observed in the human colon carcinoma fully differentiated colon cancer cell lines, cell subpopulations and clones expressing the structural and functional characteristics of highly specialized fully differentiated epithelial cells lining the intestinal epithelium and mimicking structurally and functionally an intestinal barrier. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Pathogenesis of Lassa fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Nadezhda E; Walker, David H

    2012-10-09

    Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus (family Arenaviridae), is the etiological agent of Lassa fever, a severe human disease that is reported in more than 100,000 patients annually in the endemic regions of West Africa with mortality rates for hospitalized patients varying between 5-10%. Currently, there are no approved vaccines against Lassa fever for use in humans. Here, we review the published literature on the life cycle of Lassa virus with the specific focus put on Lassa fever pathogenesis in humans and relevant animal models. Advancing knowledge significantly improves our understanding of Lassa virus biology, as well as of the mechanisms that allow the virus to evade the host's immune system. However, further investigations are required in order to design improved diagnostic tools, an effective vaccine, and therapeutic agents.

  18. Pathogenesis of Lassa Fever

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    David H. Walker

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus (family Arenaviridae, is the etiological agent of Lassa fever, a severe human disease that is reported in more than 100,000 patients annually in the endemic regions of West Africa with mortality rates for hospitalized patients varying between 5-10%. Currently, there are no approved vaccines against Lassa fever for use in humans. Here, we review the published literature on the life cycle of Lassa virus with the specific focus put on Lassa fever pathogenesis in humans and relevant animal models. Advancing knowledge significantly improves our understanding of Lassa virus biology, as well as of the mechanisms that allow the virus to evade the host’s immune system. However, further investigations are required in order to design improved diagnostic tools, an effective vaccine, and therapeutic agents.

  19. [Human papillomavirus detection in cervical cancer prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picconi, María Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC), which is strongly associated to high-risk human papillomavirus (hr-HPV) infection, continues being a significant health problem in Latin America. The use of conventional cytology to detect precancerous cervical lesions has had no major impact on reducing CC incidence and mortality rates, which are still high in the region. New screening tools to detect precancerous lesions became available, which provide great opportunities for CC prevention, as do highly efficacious HPV vaccines able to prevent nearly all lesions associated with HPV-16 and -18 when applied before viral exposure. Currently, hr-HPV testing represents an invaluable component of clinical guidelines for screening, management and treatment of CC and their precursor lesions. Many testing strategies have been developed that can detect a broad spectrum of hr-HPV types in a single assay; however, only a small subset of them has documented clinical performance for any of the standard HPV testing indications. HPV tests that have not been validated and lack proof of reliability, reproducibility and accuracy should not be used in clinical management. Once incorporated into the lab, it is essential to submit the whole procedure of HPV testing to continuous and rigorous quality assurance to avoid sub-optimal, potentially harmful practices. Recent progress and current status of these methods are discussed in this article.

  20. Towards the human colorectal cancer microbiome.

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    Julian R Marchesi

    Full Text Available Multiple factors drive the progression from healthy mucosa towards sporadic colorectal carcinomas and accumulating evidence associates intestinal bacteria with disease initiation and progression. Therefore, the aim of this study was to provide a first high-resolution map of colonic dysbiosis that is associated with human colorectal cancer (CRC. To this purpose, the microbiomes colonizing colon tumor tissue and adjacent non-malignant mucosa were compared by deep rRNA sequencing. The results revealed striking differences in microbial colonization patterns between these two sites. Although inter-individual colonization in CRC patients was variable, tumors consistently formed a niche for Coriobacteria and other proposed probiotic bacterial species, while potentially pathogenic Enterobacteria were underrepresented in tumor tissue. As the intestinal microbiota is generally stable during adult life, these findings suggest that CRC-associated physiological and metabolic changes recruit tumor-foraging commensal-like bacteria. These microbes thus have an apparent competitive advantage in the tumor microenvironment and thereby seem to replace pathogenic bacteria that may be implicated in CRC etiology. This first glimpse of the CRC microbiome provides an important step towards full understanding of the dynamic interplay between intestinal microbial ecology and sporadic CRC, which may provide important leads towards novel microbiome-related diagnostic tools and therapeutic interventions.

  1. Mechanisms underlying the role of intestinal microbiota in pathogenesis of colorectal cancer%肠道菌群参与结直肠癌发生的模式

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾盛佼; 王莉莉; 于新娟; 董开芯; 田字彬; 董全江

    2013-01-01

    The homeostatic equilibrium of the intestinal microbiota plays a key role in digestion, assimilation, immuno-inflammatory reactions, regulation of intestinal epithelial proliferation, and resistance to infection. Under the influence of internal and external factors, some pathogens alter in number and functions. This directly or indirectly affects the intestinal epithelium and the enteric environment, which is closely associated with the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. This paper summarizes the characteristics of the normal intestinal microbiota, describes the "alpha-bug" hypothesis and the "driver-passenger" model, and discusses the adaptive alteration of the intestinal microbiota from a dynamic perspective. This will aid us in understanding the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer, providing a theoretical basis for the prevention and treatment of this disease.%健康状态下肠道菌群与人体和肠道微环境维持平衡状态,对食物的消化吸收、调节肠道上皮细胞增殖、抵抗病原体和炎症免疫反应等具有重要意义.在体内外因素影响下某些细菌先后发生数目及功能的变化引起肠道菌群改变进而影响肠上皮细胞和肠腔环境,与结直肠癌的发生发展密切相关.本文对肠道正常菌群特征作一综述,并深入分析了菌群-结直肠癌的两个发病模型“Alpha-bug”和“driverpassenger”,从菌群动态变化的角度探讨了肠道菌群在结直肠癌发生发展中的适应性变化和致病机制,有利于深入理解结直肠癌发病机制,并为指导临床治疗及预防工作提供了理论依据.

  2. MTA1 promotes proliferation and invasion in human gastric cancer cells

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    Yao Y

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Yuan Yao,1 Shuting Feng,1 Mingming Xiao,2 Yan Li,1 Li Yang,1 Jiao Gong1 1Digestive System Department, 2Department of Pathology, The People’s Hospital of Liaoning Province, Shenyang, Liaoning, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Although metastasis-associated protein 1 (MTA1 has been widely li­nked to tumor metastasis, the relevant mechanisms remain to be elucidated, especially in gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to examine whether the MTA1 gene is associated with the process of proliferation and invasion by regulating several molecular targets in gastric cancer. MTA1 expression in 61 gastric cancer tissue and adjacent noncancerous tissues was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The prognostic value of MTA1 for overall survival and disease-free survival was determined by Kaplan–Meier estimates, and the significance of differences between curves was evaluated by the log-rank test. Furthermore, overexpression of MTA1 in SGC7901 and BGC823 cells promoted cell cycle progression, cell adhesion, and cell invasion. Our study found that MTA1 is overexpressed in gastric cancers, which contributes to malignant cell growth by facilitating cell cycle progression through upregulation of cyclin D1 and accelerates the migration and invasion of human gastric cancer cells by regulating expression of fibronectin and MMP2/MMP9. Taken together, MTA1 was involved in the pathogenesis of gastric cancer and might be a candidate therapeutic target in gastric cancer. Keywords: cell cycle, cell adhesion, migration

  3. Catalog of genetic progression of human cancers: breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmedt, Christine; Yates, Lucy; Kulka, Janina

    2016-03-01

    With the rapid development of next-generation sequencing, deeper insights are being gained into the molecular evolution that underlies the development and clinical progression of breast cancer. It is apparent that during evolution, breast cancers acquire thousands of mutations including single base pair substitutions, insertions, deletions, copy number aberrations, and structural rearrangements. As a consequence, at the whole genome level, no two cancers are identical and few cancers even share the same complement of "driver" mutations. Indeed, two samples from the same cancer may also exhibit extensive differences due to constant remodeling of the genome over time. In this review, we summarize recent studies that extend our understanding of the genomic basis of cancer progression. Key biological insights include the following: subclonal diversification begins early in cancer evolution, being detectable even in in situ lesions; geographical stratification of subclonal structure is frequent in primary tumors and can include therapeutically targetable alterations; multiple distant metastases typically arise from a common metastatic ancestor following a "metastatic cascade" model; systemic therapy can unmask preexisting resistant subclones or influence further treatment sensitivity and disease progression. We conclude the review by describing novel approaches such as the analysis of circulating DNA and patient-derived xenografts that promise to further our understanding of the genomic changes occurring during cancer evolution and guide treatment decision making.

  4. Role of ARPC2 in Human Gastric Cancer

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    Jun Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer continues to be the second most frequent cause of cancer deaths worldwide. However, the exact molecular mechanisms are still unclear. Further research to find potential targets for therapy is critical and urgent. In this study, we found that ARPC2 promoted cell proliferation and invasion in the human cancer cell line MKN-28 using a cell total number assay, MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide assay, cell colony formation assay, migration assay, invasion assay, and wound healing assay. For downstream pathways, CTNND1, EZH2, BCL2L2, CDH2, VIM, and EGFR were upregulated by ARPC2, whereas PTEN, BAK, and CDH1 were downregulated by ARPC2. In a clinical study, we examined the expression of ARPC2 in 110 cases of normal human gastric tissues and 110 cases of human gastric cancer tissues. ARPC2 showed higher expression in gastric cancer tissues than in normal gastric tissues. In the association analysis of 110 gastric cancer tissues, ARPC2 showed significant associations with large tumor size, lymph node invasion, and high tumor stage. In addition, ARPC2-positive patients exhibited lower RFS and OS rates compared with ARPC2-negative patients. We thus identify that ARPC2 plays an aneretic role in human gastric cancer and provided a new target for gastric cancer therapy.

  5. Human Papillomavirus and the Development of Different Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ge; Smith, David I

    2017-03-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are responsible for the development of almost all cervical cancers. HPV is also found in 85% of anal cancer and in 50% of penile, vulvar, and vaginal cancers, and they are increasingly found in a subset of head and neck cancers, i.e., oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCC). The model for how HPV causes cancer is derived from several decades of study on cervical cancer, and it is just presumed that this model is not only completely valid for cervical cancer but for all other HPV-driven cancers as well. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has now provided the necessary tools to characterize genomic alterations in cancer cells and can precisely determine the physical status of HPV in those cells as well. We discuss recent discoveries from different applications of NGS in both cervical cancer and OPSCCs, including whole-genome sequencing and mate-pair NGS. We also discuss what NGS studies have revealed about the different ways that HPV can be involved in cancer formation, specifically comparing cervical cancer and OPSCC.

  6. Human T Lymphotropic Virus Type I (HTLV-I Oncogenesis: Molecular Aspects of Virus and Host Interactions in Pathogenesis of Adult T cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATL

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    Sanaz Ahmadi Ghezeldasht

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available     The study of tumor viruses paves the way for understanding the mechanisms of virus pathogenesis, including those involved in establishing infection and dissemination in the host tumor affecting immune-compromised patients. The processes ranging from viral infection to progressing malignancy are slow and usually insufficient for establishment of transformed cells that develop cancer in only a minority of infected subjects. Therefore, viral infection is usually not the only cause of cancer, and further environmental and host factors, may be implicated. HTLV-I, in particular, is considered as an oncovirus cause of lymphoproliferative disease such as adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL and disturbs the immune responses which results in HTLV-I associated meylopathy/tropical spastic parapresis (HAM/TSP. HTLV-I infection causes ATL in a small proportion of infected subjects (2-5% following a prolonged incubation period (15-30 years despite a strong adaptive immune response against the virus.   Overall, these conditions offer a prospect to study the molecular basis of tumorgenicity in mammalian cells. In this review, the oncogencity of HTLV-I is being considered as an oncovirus in context of ATL.    

  7. Calorimetric signatures of human cancer cells and their nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todinova, S. [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl. 21, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Stoyanova, E. [Department of Molecular Immunology, Institute of Biology and Immunology of Reproduction, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tzarigradsko shose Blvd. 73, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Krumova, S., E-mail: sakrumo@gmail.com [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl. 21, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Iliev, I. [Institute of Experimental Morphology, Pathology and Anthropology with Museum, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl. 25, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Taneva, S.G. [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl. 21, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria)

    2016-01-10

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Two temperature ranges are distinguished in the thermograms of cells/nuclei. • Different thermodynamic properties of cancer and normal human cells/nuclei. • Dramatic reduction of the enthalpy of the low-temperature range in cancer cells. • Oxaliplatin and 5-FU affect the nuclear matrix proteins and the DNA stability. - Abstract: The human cancer cell lines HeLa, JEG-3, Hep G2, SSC-9, PC-3, HT-29, MCF7 and their isolated nuclei were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry. The calorimetric profiles differed from normal human fibroblast (BJ) cells in the two well distinguished temperature ranges—the high-temperature range (H{sub T}, due to DNA-containing structures) and the low-temperature range (L{sub T}, assigned to the nuclear matrix and cellular proteins). The enthalpy of the L{sub T} range, and, respectively the ratio of the enthalpies of the L{sub T}- vs. H{sub T}-range, ΔH{sub L}/ΔH{sub H}, is strongly reduced for all cancer cells compared to normal fibroblasts. On the contrary, for most of the cancer nuclei this ratio is higher compared to normal nuclei. The HT-29 human colorectal cancer cells/nuclei differed most drastically from normal human fibroblast cells/nuclei. Our data also reveal that the treatment of HT-29 cancer cells with cytostatic drugs affects not only the DNA replication but also the cellular proteome.

  8. TP53 mutations, expression and interaction networks in human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaosheng; Sun, Qingrong

    2017-01-03

    Although the associations of p53 dysfunction, p53 interaction networks and oncogenesis have been widely explored, a systematic analysis of TP53 mutations and its related interaction networks in various types of human cancers is lacking. Our study explored the associations of TP53 mutations, gene expression, clinical outcomes, and TP53 interaction networks across 33 cancer types using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). We show that TP53 is the most frequently mutated gene in a number of cancers, and its mutations appear to be early events in cancer initiation. We identified genes potentially repressed by p53, and genes whose expression correlates significantly with TP53 expression. These gene products may be especially important nodes in p53 interaction networks in human cancers. This study shows that while TP53-truncating mutations often result in decreased TP53 expression, other non-truncating TP53 mutations result in increased TP53 expression in some cancers. Survival analyses in a number of cancers show that patients with TP53 mutations are more likely to have worse prognoses than TP53-wildtype patients, and that elevated TP53 expression often leads to poor clinical outcomes. We identified a set of candidate synthetic lethal (SL) genes for TP53, and validated some of these SL interactions using data from the Cancer Cell Line Project. These predicted SL genes are promising candidates for experimental validation and the development of personalized therapeutics for patients with TP53-mutated cancers.

  9. Telmisartan inhibits human urological cancer cell growth through early apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    MATSUYAMA, MASAHIDE; FUNAO, KIYOAKI; KURATSUKURI, KATSUYUKI; TANAKA, TOMOAKI; KAWAHITO, YUTAKA; SANO, HAJIME; CHARGUI, JAMEL; TOURAINE, JEAN-LOUIS; YOSHIMURA, NORIO; YOSHIMURA, RIKIO

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) are widely used as hypertensive therapeutic agents. In addition, studies have provided evidence that ARBs have the potential to inhibit the growth of several types of cancer cells. It was reported that telmisartan (a type of ARB) has peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ activation activity. We previously reported that the PPAR-γ ligand induces growth arrest in human urological cancer cells through apoptosis. In this study, we evaluated the effects of telmisartan and other ARBs on cell proliferation in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), bladder cancer (BC), prostate cancer (PC) and testicular cancer (TC) cell lines. The inhibitory effects of telmisartan and other ARBs (candesartan, valsartan, irbesartan and losartan) on the growth of the RCC, BC, PC and TC cell lines was investigated using an MTT assay. Flow cytometry and Hoechst staining were used to determine whether the ARBs induced apoptosis. Telmisartan caused marked growth inhibition in the urological cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Urological cancer cells treated with 100 μM telmisartan underwent early apoptosis and DNA fragmentation. However, the other ARBs had no effect on cell proliferation in any of the urological cancer cell lines. Telmisartan may mediate potent anti-proliferative effects in urological cancer cells through PPAR-γ. Thus, telmisartan is a potent target for the prevention and treatment of human urological cancer. PMID:22993542

  10. Pathogenesis of bone metastasis

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    Erdinc Nayir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone metastases are more frequently seen as a complication of cancer than primary bone tumors. For example, it can be seen in as many as 70% of advanced stage breast and prostate cancer cases. Metastatic bone disease is generally categorized as osteoblastic, and osteolytic disease. However most of the cancer types demonstrate a wide spectrum between these two extremes. Paracrine interaction between parathyroid hormone–related protein (PTHrP which increases the rate of bone osteolysis, and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β plays a role in osteolytic metastasis. Increased local bone PTHrP concentration increases expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL with resultant activation of osteoclastogenesis. Endothelin – 1 (ET-1, and dickkopf homolog -1 (DKK-1 produced by tumor involve in osteoblastic metastasis. DKK-1 is the central regulator of osteoblastic activity, and osteoblastic bone metastasis. For the elaboration of treatment strategies against frequently seen complication, that is, bone metastases, targets involving in pathogenesis of these complications should be taken into consideration.

  11. Is There a Link between Human Herpesvirus Infection and Toll-like Receptors in the Pathogenesis of Pityriasis Rosea? A Case-control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ela, Mostafa Abou; Shaarawy, Eman; El-Komy, Mohamed; Fawzy, Marwa; Hay, Rania Abdel; Hegazy, Rehab; Sharobim, Amin; Moustafa, Nadine; Rashed, Laila; Sayed Amr, Khalda Sayed

    2016-12-01

    Human herpesvirus (HHV) 6 and 7 are involved in the pathogenesis of pityriasis rosea (PR). Our aim was to evaluate the role of the innate immune response in PR through the detection of Toll-like receptors (TLR) 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, and 9 expression in the skin of affected patients and to detect the possibility of being induced by HHV-6 and/or HHV-7 viral coexistence in these patients. Twenty-four patients with PR and 24 healthy controls were included in this case-control study. Biopsy was obtained from the PR lesion and from the healthy skin of controls for detection of HHV-6 and 7 as well as TLRs 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, and 9 gene expression using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Significantly elevated expression of all studied TLRs and significantly higher viral load of HHV-6 and 7 in PR cases were detected. A significant higher expression of TLR2 and 4 in HHV-7 positive cases and a significant positive correlation between TLR9 and HHV-7 viral load were documented. HHV6 and 7 may also be involved in the pathogenesis of PR via TLR pathways.

  12. A novel SCID mouse model for studying spontaneous metastasis of human lung cancer to human tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teraoka, S; Kyoizumi, S; Seyama, T; Yamakido, M; Akiyama, M

    1995-05-01

    We established a novel severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model for the study of human lung cancer metastasis to human lung. Implantation of both human fetal and adult lung tissue into mammary fat pads of SCID mice showed a 100% rate of engraftment, but only fetal lung implants revealed normal morphology of human lung tissue. Using these chimeric mice, we analyzed human lung cancer metastasis to both mouse and human lungs by subcutaneous inoculation of human squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma cell lines into the mice. In 60 to 70% of SCID mice injected with human-lung squamous-cell carcinoma, RERF-LC-AI, cancer cells were found to have metastasized to both mouse lungs and human fetal lung implants but not to human adult lung implants 80 days after cancer inoculation. Furthermore, human-lung adenocarcinoma cells, RERF-LC-KJ, metastasized to the human lung implants within 90 days in about 40% of SCID mice, whereas there were no metastases to the lungs of the mice. These results demonstrate the potential of this model for the in vivo study of human lung cancer metastasis.

  13. Impact of Female Personality on the Pathogenesis of Breast Cancer%女性人格特征对其乳腺癌发病的影响研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岂怀华; 张景华; 姚三巧; 李景武

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨女性人格特征与乳腺癌发病的关系.方法 通过1:1配对的病例对照研究设计,采用国际通用的明尼苏达多相人格测试量表(MMPI)对女性乳腺癌患者的个性因素及人格特征进行调查分析及评价.结果 将P<0.05的一般危险因素与MMPI临床量表中的疑病、抑郁、癔症、精神病态、男子气、偏执、精神衰弱、精神分裂症、轻躁狂和社会内向10项个性特征一起进行条件Logistic回归分析发现,除了体质指数、口服避孕药、不参加体育锻炼、肿瘤家族史和既往灾难经历以外,女性乳腺癌患者所表现出的精神病态、轻躁狂和癔症的人格特征是乳腺癌发病的影响因素(OR值分别为0.865、1.714和0.860,P<0.05).结论 精神病态、轻躁狂和癔症人格特征与女性乳腺癌的发病可能存在一定的联系.%Objective To explore the relationship between female breast cancer and personality. Methods A 1: 1 matched case - control study was designed to investigate the relationship between female breast cancer and personality using Minnesota Multiphase Personality Inventory ( MMPI ) . Results After introducing risk factors ( P < 0. 05 ) and 10 clinical scales of MMPI together into conditional logistic regression model, it was found that besides BMI, acyeterion use, lack of physical exercise , family history and catastrophic experience, personalities of psychopathic deviate, hypomania and hysteria were among the risk factors of breast cancer ( OR = 0. 865 , 1. 714 and 0. 860 respectively, P < 0. 05 ) . Conclusion Personalities of psychopathic deviate, hypomania and hysteria might be correlated with the pathogenesis of breast cancer.

  14. Human Papilloma Viruses and Breast Cancer – Assessment of Causality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, James Sutherland; Glenn, Wendy K.; Whitaker, Noel James

    2016-01-01

    High risk human papilloma viruses (HPVs) may have a causal role in some breast cancers. Case–control studies, conducted in many different countries, consistently indicate that HPVs are more frequently present in breast cancers as compared to benign breast and normal breast controls (odds ratio 4.02). The assessment of causality of HPVs in breast cancer is difficult because (i) the HPV viral load is extremely low, (ii) HPV infections are common but HPV associated breast cancers are uncommon, and (iii) HPV infections may precede the development of breast and other cancers by years or even decades. Further, HPV oncogenesis can be indirect. Despite these difficulties, the emergence of new evidence has made the assessment of HPV causality, in breast cancer, a practical proposition. With one exception, the evidence meets all the conventional criteria for a causal role of HPVs in breast cancer. The exception is “specificity.” HPVs are ubiquitous, which is the exact opposite of specificity. An additional reservation is that the prevalence of breast cancer is not increased in immunocompromised patients as is the case with respect to HPV-associated cervical cancer. This indicates that HPVs may have an indirect causal influence in breast cancer. Based on the overall evidence, high-risk HPVs may have a causal role in some breast cancers. PMID:27747193

  15. Epigenetic changes in virus-associated human cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hsin Pai LI; Yu Wei LEU; Yu Sun CHANG

    2005-01-01

    Epigenetics of human cancer becomes an area of emerging research direction due to a growing understanding of specific epigenetic pathways and rapid development of detection technologies. Aberrant promoter hypermethylation is a prevalent phenonmena in human cancers. Tumor suppressor genes are often hypermethylated due to the increased activity or deregulation of DNMTs. Increasing evidence also reveals that viral genes are one of the key players in regulating DNA methylation. In this review, we will focus on hypermethylation and tumor suppressor gene silencing and the signal pathways that are involved, particularly in cancers closely associated with the hepatitis B virus, simian virus 40 (SV40), and Epstein-Barr virus. In addition, we will discuss current technologies for genome-wide detection of epigenetically regulated targets, which allow for systematic DNA hypermethylation analysis. The study of epigenetic changes should provide a global view of gene profile in cancer, and epigenetic markers could be used for early detection,prognosis, and therapy of cancer.

  16. Tea and cancer prevention: studies in animals and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Fung-Lung; Schwartz, Joel; Herzog, Christopher R; Yang, Yang-Ming

    2003-10-01

    The role of tea in protection against cancer has been supported by ample evidence from studies in cell culture and animal models. However, epidemiological studies have generated inconsistent results, some of which associated tea with reduced risk of cancer, whereas others found that tea lacks protective activity against certain human cancers. These results raise questions about the actual role of tea in human cancer that needs to be addressed. This article is intended to provide a better perspective on this controversy by summarizing the laboratory studies in animals and humans with emphasis on animal tumor bioassays on skin, lung, mammary glands and colon, and the molecular and cellular mechanisms affected by tea. Finally, a recent small pilot intervention study with green tea in smokers is presented.

  17. Cancer cachexia demonstrates the energetic impact of gluconeogenesis in human metabolism.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongaerts, G.P.A.; Halteren, H.K. van; Verhagen, C.A.H.H.V.; Wagener, D.J.T.

    2006-01-01

    A review-based hypothesis is presented on the energy flow in cancer patients. This hypothesis centres on the hypoxic condition of tumours, the essential metabolic consequences, especially the gluconeogenesis, the adaptation of the body, and the pathogenesis of cancer cachexia. In growing tumours the

  18. Defining the cellular precursors to human breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Patricia J.; Arendt, Lisa M.; Skibinski, Adam; Logvinenko, Tanya; Klebba, Ina; Dong, Shumin; Smith, Avi E.; Prat, Aleix; Perou, Charles M.; Gilmore, Hannah; Schnitt, Stuart; Naber, Stephen P.; Garlick, Jonathan A.; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    Human breast cancers are broadly classified based on their gene-expression profiles into luminal- and basal-type tumors. These two major tumor subtypes express markers corresponding to the major differentiation states of epithelial cells in the breast: luminal (EpCAM+) and basal/myoepithelial (CD10+). However, there are also rare types of breast cancers, such as metaplastic carcinomas, where tumor cells exhibit features of alternate cell types that no longer resemble breast epithelium. Until now, it has been difficult to identify the cell type(s) in the human breast that gives rise to these various forms of breast cancer. Here we report that transformation of EpCAM+ epithelial cells results in the formation of common forms of human breast cancer, including estrogen receptor-positive and estrogen receptor-negative tumors with luminal and basal-like characteristics, respectively, whereas transformation of CD10+ cells results in the development of rare metaplastic tumors reminiscent of the claudin-low subtype. We also demonstrate the existence of CD10+ breast cells with metaplastic traits that can give rise to skin and epidermal tissues. Furthermore, we show that the development of metaplastic breast cancer is attributable, in part, to the transformation of these metaplastic breast epithelial cells. These findings identify normal cellular precursors to human breast cancers and reveal the existence of a population of cells with epidermal progenitor activity within adult human breast tissues. PMID:21940501

  19. Endocrine therapy of human breast cancer grown in nude mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brünner, N; Osborne, C K; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1987-01-01

    mice bearing transplanted human breast tumors have been proposed as such a model. This review therefore discusses the use of the athymic nude mouse model of the study of human breast cancer biology, and focuses on four subjects: 1. biological characteristics of heterotransplanted breast tumors; 2...

  20. Human cancer long non-coding RNA transcriptomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewan A Gibb

    Full Text Available Once thought to be a part of the 'dark matter' of the genome, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs are emerging as an integral functional component of the mammalian transcriptome. LncRNAs are a novel class of mRNA-like transcripts which, despite no known protein-coding potential, demonstrate a wide range of structural and functional roles in cellular biology. However, the magnitude of the contribution of lncRNA expression to normal human tissues and cancers has not been investigated in a comprehensive manner. In this study, we compiled 272 human serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE libraries to delineate lncRNA transcription patterns across a broad spectrum of normal human tissues and cancers. Using a novel lncRNA discovery pipeline we parsed over 24 million SAGE tags and report lncRNA expression profiles across a panel of 26 different normal human tissues and 19 human cancers. Our findings show extensive, tissue-specific lncRNA expression in normal tissues and highly aberrant lncRNA expression in human cancers. Here, we present a first generation atlas for lncRNA profiling in cancer.

  1. A pathology atlas of the human cancer transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlen, Mathias; Zhang, Cheng; Lee, Sunjae; Sjöstedt, Evelina; Fagerberg, Linn; Bidkhori, Gholamreza; Benfeitas, Rui; Arif, Muhammad; Liu, Zhengtao; Edfors, Fredrik; Sanli, Kemal; von Feilitzen, Kalle; Oksvold, Per; Lundberg, Emma; Hober, Sophia; Nilsson, Peter; Mattsson, Johanna; Schwenk, Jochen M; Brunnström, Hans; Glimelius, Bengt; Sjöblom, Tobias; Edqvist, Per-Henrik; Djureinovic, Dijana; Micke, Patrick; Lindskog, Cecilia; Mardinoglu, Adil; Ponten, Fredrik

    2017-08-18

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death, and there is great interest in understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis and progression of individual tumors. We used systems-level approaches to analyze the genome-wide transcriptome of the protein-coding genes of 17 major cancer types with respect to clinical outcome. A general pattern emerged: Shorter patient survival was associated with up-regulation of genes involved in cell growth and with down-regulation of genes involved in cellular differentiation. Using genome-scale metabolic models, we show that cancer patients have widespread metabolic heterogeneity, highlighting the need for precise and personalized medicine for cancer treatment. All data are presented in an interactive open-access database (www.proteinatlas.org/pathology) to allow genome-wide exploration of the impact of individual proteins on clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  2. Cellular respiration: replicating in vivo systems biology for in vitro exploration of human exposome, microbiome, and disease pathogenesis biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    This editorial develops a philosophy for expanding the scope of Journal of Breath Research (JBR) into the realm of cellular level study, and links certain topics back to more traditional systemic research for understanding human health based on exhaled breath constituents. The ex...

  3. Modeling Zika plasma viral dynamics in non-human primates: insights into viral pathogenesis and antiviral strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Best, Katharine [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Guedj, Jeremie [Univ. of Paris (France). IAME; Madelain, Vincent [Univ. of Paris (France); de Lamballerie, Xavier [Aix-Marseille Univ. (France); L, So-Yonim [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Center for Virology and Vaccine Research; Osuna, Christa E [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Center for Virology and Vaccine Research; Whitney, James [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Center for Virology and Vaccine Research; Perelson, Alan S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-24

    The recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) has been associated with fetal abnormalities and neurological complications, prompting global concern. Here we present the first mathematical analysis of the within-host dynamics of plasma ZiKV burden in a non-human primate model, allowing for characterization of the growth and clearance of ZIKV within an individual macaque.

  4. Cellular respiration: replicating in vivo systems biology for in vitro exploration of human exposome, microbiome, and disease pathogenesis biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    This editorial develops a philosophy for expanding the scope of Journal of Breath Research (JBR) into the realm of cellular level study, and links certain topics back to more traditional systemic research for understanding human health based on exhaled breath constituents. The ex...

  5. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and Oropharyngeal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... HPV? People get HPV from another person during intimate sexual contact. Most of the time, people get ... 17, 2017 Page last updated: July 17, 2017 Content source: Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers ...

  6. Study of apoptosis in human liver cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Min Shan; Juan Li

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the action of apoptosis in occurrence ofliver cacinornas in vivo and the biological effect of Solanumlyratum Thumb on BEL-7404 cell line inducing apoptosis invitro.METHODS: The apoptosis in the liver carcinoma wasdetected with terminal deoxynucl neotidyl transferasemediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL); the cancer cellscultured in DMED medium were treated with extract ofSolanum lyratum Thumb and observed under microscope,and their DNA was assayed by gel electrophoresis.RESULTS: In vivo apoptotic cells in the cancer adjacenttissues inceased; in vitro treatment of liver cancers withextract of Solanum lyratum Thumb could induce the cells tomanifest a typical apoptotic morphology. Their DNA wasfractured and a characteristic ladder pattem could be foundusing electrophoresis.CONCLUSION: In vivo the apoptosis of carcinomas waslower; maybe the cells divided quickly and then the cancersoccurred. In the cancer adjacent tissues, the apoptosispricked up, and in vitro Solarium lyratum Thumb couldinduce the apoptosis of BEL-7404 cells.

  7. Comparison of breast cancer mucin (BCM) and CA 15-3 in human breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia, M.B.; Blankenstein, M.A.; Wall, E. van der; Nortier, J.W.R.; Schornagel, J.H.; Thijssen, J.H.H.

    1990-01-01

    The Breast Cancer Mucin (BCM) enzyme immunoassay utilizes two monoclonal antibodies (Mab), M85/34 and F36/22, for the identification of a mucin-like glycoprotein in serum of breast cancer patients. We have compared BCM with CA 15-3, another member of the human mammary epithelial antigen

  8. Distribution of trace metal concentrations in paired cancerous and non-cancerous human stomach tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mehmet Yaman; Gokce Kaya; Hayrettin Yekeler

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether trace metal concentrations (which influence metabolism as both essential and non-essential elements) are increased or decreased in cancerous tissues and to understand the precise role of these metals in carcinogenesis.METHODS: Concentrations of trace metals including Cd,Ni, Cu, Zn, Fe, Mg and Ca in both cancerous and noncancerous stomach tissue samples were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Tissue samples were digested using microwave energy. Slotted tube atom trap was used to improve the sensitivity of copper and cadmium in flame AAS determinations.RESULTS: From the obtained data in this study,the concentrations of nickel, copper and iron in the cancerous human stomach were found to be significantly higher than those in the non-cancerous tissues, by using t-test for the paired samples. Furthermore, the average calcium concentrations in the cancerous stomach tissue samples were found to be significantly lower than those in the non-cancerous stomach tissue samples by using t-test. Exceedingly high Zn concentrations (207-826 mg/kg) were found in two paired stomach tissue samples from both cancerous and non-cancerous parts.CONCLUSION: In contrast to the literature data for Cu and Fe, the concentrations of copper, iron and nickel in cancerous tissue samples are higher than those in the non-cancerous samples. Furthermore, the Ca levels are lower in cancerous tissue samples than in non-cancerous tissue samples.

  9. Human papillomavirus in cervical cancer and oropharyngeal cancer: One cause, two diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Tara A; Schiller, John T

    2017-06-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes greater than 5% of cancers worldwide, including all cervical cancers and an alarmingly increasing proportion of oropharyngeal cancers (OPCs). Despite markedly reduced cervical cancer incidence in industrialized nations with organized screening programs, cervical cancer remains the second most common cause of death from cancer in women worldwide, as developing countries lack resources for universal, high-quality screening. In the United States, HPV-related OPC is only 1 of 5 cancers with a rising incidence since 1975 and now has taken over the cervix as the most common site of HPV-related cancer. Similar trends follow throughout North America and Europe. The need for early detection and prevention is paramount. Despite the common etiologic role of HPV in the development of cervical cancer and HPV-associated OPC, great disparity exists between incidence, screening modalities (or lack thereof), treatment, and prevention in these 2 very distinct cohorts. These differences in cervical cancer and HPV-associated OPC and their impact are discussed here. Cancer 2017;123:2219-2229. © 2017 American Cancer Society. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  10. Chestnut extract induces apoptosis in AGS human gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Sook; Kim, Eun Ji; Kim, Sun Hyo

    2011-06-01

    In Korea, chestnut production is increasing each year, but consumption is far below production. We investigated the effect of chestnut extracts on antioxidant activity and anticancer effects. Ethanol extracts of raw chestnut (RCE) or chestnut powder (CPE) had dose-dependent superoxide scavenging activity. Viable numbers of MDA-MD-231 human breast cancer cells, DU145 human prostate cancer cells, and AGS human gastric cancer cells decreased by 18, 31, and 69%, respectively, following treatment with 200 µg/mL CPE for 24 hr. CPE at various concentrations (0-200 µg/mL) markedly decreased AGS cell viability and increased apoptotic cell death dose and time dependently. CPE increased the levels of cleaved caspase-8, -7, -3, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase in a dose-dependent manner but not cleaved caspase-9. CPE exerted no effects on Bcl-2 and Bax levels. The level of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein decreased within a narrow range following CPE treatment. The levels of Trail, DR4, and Fas-L increased dose-dependently in CPE-treated AGS cells. These results show that CPE decreases growth and induces apoptosis in AGS gastric cancer cells and that activation of the death receptor pathway contributes to CPE-induced apoptosis in AGS cells. In conclusion, CPE had more of an effect on gastric cancer cells than breast or prostate cancer cells, suggesting that chestnuts would have a positive effect against gastric cancer.

  11. Dietary Acrylamide and Human Cancer: A Systematic Review of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Tim R.; Barnes, Stephen; Groopman, John

    2014-01-01

    Cancer remains the second leading cause of death in the United States, and the numbers of cases are expected to continue to rise worldwide. Cancer prevention strategies are crucial for reducing the cancer burden. The carcinogenic potential of dietary acrylamide exposure from cooked foods is unknown. Acrylamide is a by-product of the common Maillard reaction where reducing sugars (i.e., fructose and glucose) react with the amino acid, asparagine. Based on the evidence of acrylamide carcinogenicity in animals, the International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified acrylamide as a group 2A carcinogen for humans. Since the discovery of acrylamide in foods in 2002, a number of studies have explored its potential as a human carcinogen. This paper outlines a systematic review of dietary acrylamide and human cancer, acrylamide exposure and internal dose, exposure assessment methods in the epidemiologic studies, existing data gaps, and future directions. A majority of the studies reported no statistically significant association between dietary acrylamide intake and various cancers, and few studies reported increased risk for renal, endometrial, and ovarian cancers; however, the exposure assessment has been inadequate leading to potential misclassification or underestimation of exposure. Future studies with improved dietary acrylamide exposure assessment are encouraged. PMID:24875401

  12. Immunohistochemistry of human Hsp60 in health and disease: from autoimmunity to cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappello, Francesco; de Macario, Everly Conway; Zummo, Giovanni; Macario, Alberto J L

    2011-01-01

    Hsp60 (also called Cpn60) is a chaperonin with essential functions for cell physiology and survival. Additionally, its involvement in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases (e.g., some autoimmune disorders and cancer) is becoming evident with new research. For example, the distribution and levels of Hsp60 in cells and tissues have been found altered in many pathologic conditions, and the significance of these alterations is being investigated in a number of laboratories. The aim of this ongoing research is to determine the meaning of these Hsp60 alterations with regard to pathogenetic mechanisms, diagnosis, classification of lesions, and assessing of prognosis and response to treatment. Hsp60 occurs in the mitochondria, i.e., its typical residence according to classic knowledge, and also in other locales, such as the cytosol, the cell membrane, the intercellular space, and biological fluids (e.g., blood and cerebrospinal fluid). Detection and quantitative determinations in all these locations are becoming essential components of laboratory pathology in clinics and research. Consequently, immunohistochemistry targeting Hsp60 is also becoming essential for pathologists and researchers interested in disorders involving this chaperonin. In this chapter, we briefly summarize some recent discoveries on the participation of Hsp60 in the pathogenesis of human diseases and describe in detail how to perform immunohistochemical reactions for detecting the chaperonin, determining its location, and measuring its levels of expression.

  13. Decorin in Human Colon Cancer: Localization In Vivo and Effect on Cancer Cell Behavior In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Marie C; Sainio, Annele O; Pennanen, Mirka M; Lund, Riikka J; Vuorikoski, Sanna; Sundström, Jari T T; Järveläinen, Hannu T

    2015-09-01

    Decorin is generally recognized as a tumor suppressing molecule. Nevertheless, although decorin has been shown to be differentially expressed in malignant tissues, it has often remained unclear whether, in addition to non-malignant stromal cells, cancer cells also express it. Here, we first used two publicly available databases to analyze the current information about decorin expression and immunoreactivity in normal and malignant human colorectal tissue samples. The analyses demonstrated that decorin expression and immunoreactivity may vary in cancer cells of human colorectal tissues. Therefore, we next examined decorin expression in normal, premalignant and malignant human colorectal tissues in more detail using both in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry for decorin. Our results invariably demonstrate that malignant cells within human colorectal cancer tissues are devoid of both decorin mRNA and immunoreactivity. Identical results were obtained for cells of neuroendocrine tumors of human colon. Using RT-qPCR, we showed that human colon cancer cell lines are also decorin negative, in accordance with the above in vivo results. Finally, we demonstrate that decorin transduction of human colon cancer cell lines causes a significant reduction in their colony forming capability. Thus, strategies to develop decorin-based adjuvant therapies for human colorectal malignancies are highly rational. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. A review of the role of alcohol in the pathogenesis of oral cancer and the link between alcohol-containing mouthrinses and oral cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reidy, John T

    2011-08-01

    This article will review the most recent literature on the effects of alcohol on the oral mucosa, and the possible mechanisms by which alcohol is thought to act as a carcinogen. The article will also consider the possible link between alcohol-containing mouthrinses and oral cancer. The authors recommend that the use of alcohol-containing mouthrinses in high-risk populations should be restricted, pending the outcome of further research.

  15. Identification of the Gene for Scleroderma in the Tsk/2 Mouse Strain: Implications for Human Scleroderma Pathogenesis and Subset Distinctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    subsets. Methods Gene expression measured in skin from mice with sclerodermatous graft-versus-host disease (sclGVHD), bleomycin-induced fibrosis, Tsk1... penetrant .) In) addition) to) a) readily) apparent) skin ) fibrosis) resulting) from) ECM) anomalies,) Tsk2/+) mice) show) more) autoimmune) and... penetrant in Tsk2/þ heterozygotes and it is homozygous embryonic lethal. Tsk2/þ mice have many features of human disease including tight skin , dysregulated

  16. Expression of MALT1 oncogene in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells recapitulates the pathogenesis of human lymphoma in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Campos-Sánchez, Elena; González, Marcos; Cobaleda, César; Abollo-Jiménez, Fernando; Martínez-Climent, José Ángel

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations involving the MALT1 gene are hallmarks of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. To date, targeting these translocations to mouse B cells has failed to reproduce human disease. Here, we induced MALT1 expression in mouse Sca1(+)Lin(-) hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, which showed NF-κB activation and early lymphoid priming, being selectively skewed toward B-cell differentiation. These cells accumulated in extranodal tissues and gave rise to clonal tum...

  17. Loss of inhibitor of growth (ING-4) is implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of human astrocytomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klironomos, George; Bravou, Vasiliki; Papachristou, Dionysios J; Gatzounis, George; Varakis, John; Parassi, Ekaterini; Repanti, Maria; Papadaki, Helen

    2010-03-01

    Inhibitor of growth 4 (ING-4) is a tumor suppressor gene that interacts with nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and represses its transcriptional activity. Several lines of evidence suggest that the tumor suppressor gene ING-4, the transcription factor NF-kappaB and its target genes matrix metalloproteases MMP-2, MMP-9 and urokinase plasminogen activator (u-PA) are critically involved in tumor invasion. The aim of the present study was to investigate immunohistochemically the expression pattern of ING-4, NF-kappaB and the NF-kappaB downstream targets MMP-2, MMP-9 and u-PA in human astrocytomas from 101 patients. We found that ING-4 expression was significantly decreased in astrocytomas, and ING-4 loss was associated with tumor grade progression. Expression of p65, a NF-kappaB subunit, was significantly higher in grade IV than in grade III and grade I/II tumors, and a statistical significant negative correlation between expression of ING-4 and expression of nuclear p65 was noticed. MMP-9, MMP-2 and u-PA were overexpressed in human astrocytomas. Of note, astrocytomas of advanced histologic grades (grade III, IV) displayed significantly higher expression levels of these proteins compared to tumors of lower grades (grade I, II). Collectively, our data suggest an essential role for ING-4 in human astrocytoma development and progression possibly through regulation of the NF-kappaB-dependent expression of genes involved in tumor invasion.

  18. Crossover fungal pathogens: the biology and pathogenesis of fungi capable of crossing kingdoms to infect plants and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Gregory M; Keller, Nancy P

    2013-12-01

    The outbreak of fungal meningitis associated with contaminated methylprednisolone acetate has thrust the importance of fungal infections into the public consciousness. The predominant pathogen isolated from clinical specimens, Exserohilum rostratum (teleomorph: Setosphaeria rostrata), is a dematiaceous fungus that infects grasses and rarely humans. This outbreak highlights the potential for fungal pathogens to infect both plants and humans. Most crossover or trans-kingdom pathogens are soil saprophytes and include fungi in Ascomycota and Mucormycotina phyla. To establish infection, crossover fungi must overcome disparate, host-specific barriers, including protective surfaces (e.g. cuticle, skin), elevated temperature, and immune defenses. This review illuminates the underlying mechanisms used by crossover fungi to cause infection in plants and mammals, and highlights critical events that lead to human infection by these pathogens. Several genes including veA, laeA, and hapX are important in regulating biological processes in fungi important for both invasive plant and animal infections. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 in human cancer: concise review and rationale for development of IMC-18F1 (Human antibody targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jonathan D; Rowinsky, Eric K; Youssoufian, Hagop; Pytowski, Bronislaw; Wu, Yan

    2010-02-15

    The human vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (VEGFR-1, or Flt-1) is widely expressed in normal and pathologic tissue and contributes to the pathogenesis of both neoplastic and inflammatory diseases. In human cancer, VEGFR-1 mediated signaling is responsible for both direct tumor activation and angiogenesis. VEGFR-1 mediated activation of nonmalignant supporting cells, particularly stromal, dendritic, hematopoietic cells, and macrophages, is also likely important for cancer pathogenesis. VEGFR-1 is also hypothesized to enable the development of cancer metastases by means of activation and premetastatic localization in distant organs of bone marrow-derived hematopoietic progenitor cells, which express VEGFR-1. IMC-18F1 is a fully human IgG(1) antibody that binds to VEGFR-1 and has been associated with the inhibition of cancer growth in multiple in vitro and human tumor xenograft models. The preliminary results of phase 1 investigations have also indicated a favorable safety profile for IMC-18F1 at doses that confer antibody concentrations that are associated with relevant antitumor activity in preclinical models.

  20. Growth-stimulatory effect of resveratrol in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Masayuki; Yamabe, Noriko; Kang, Ki Sung; Zhu, Bao Ting

    2010-08-01

    Earlier studies have shown that resveratrol could induce death in several human cancer cell lines in culture. Here we report our observation that resveratrol can also promote the growth of certain human cancer cells when they are grown either in culture or in athymic nude mice as xenografts. At relatively low concentrations (cells, but this effect was not observed in several other human cell lines tested. Analysis of cell signaling molecules showed that resveratrol induced the activation of JNK, p38, Akt, and NF-kappaB signaling pathways in these cells. Further analysis using pharmacological inhibitors showed that only the NF-kappaB inhibitor (BAY11-7082) abrogated the growth-stimulatory effect of resveratrol in cultured cells. In athymic nude mice, resveratrol at 16.5 mg/kg body weight enhanced the growth of MDA-MB-435s xenografts compared to the control group, while resveratrol at the 33 mg/kg body weight dose did not have a similar effect. Additional analyses confirmed that resveratrol stimulated cancer cell growth in vivo through activation of the NF-kappaB signaling pathway. Taken together, these observations suggest that resveratrol at low concentrations could stimulate the growth of certain types of human cancer cells in vivo. This cell type-specific mitogenic effect of resveratrol may also partly contribute to the procarcinogenic effect of alcohol consumption (rich in resveratrol) in the development of certain human cancers.

  1. Deregulation of the miRNAs Expression in Cervical Cancer: Human Papillomavirus Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazmín Gómez-Gómez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small non coding RNAs of 18–25 nucleotides in length. The temporal or short-lived expression of the miRNAs modulates gene expression post transcriptionally. Studies have revealed that miRNAs deregulation correlates and is involved with the initiation and progression of human tumors. Cervical cancer (CC displays notably increased or decreased expression of a large number of cellular oncogenic or tumor suppressive miRNAs, respectively. However, understanding the potential role of miRNAs in CC is still limited. In CC, the high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs infection can affect the miRNAs expression through oncoprotein E6 and E7 that contribute to viral pathogenesis, although other viral proteins might also be involved. This deregulation in the miRNAs expression has an important role in the hallmarks of CC. Interestingly, the miRNA expression profile in CC can discriminate between normal and tumor tissue and the extraordinary stability of miRNAs makes it suitable to serve as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of cancer. In this review, we will summarize the role of the HR-HPVs in miRNA expression, the role of miRNAs in the hallmarks of CC, and the use of miRNAs as potential prognostic biomarkers in CC.

  2. The oncogenic potential of human cytomegalovirus and breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges eHerbein

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is among the leading causes of cancer-related death among women. The vast majority of breast cancers are carcinomas that originate from cells lining the milk-forming ducts of the mammary gland. Numerous articles indicate that breast tumors exhibit diverse phenotypes depending on their distinct physiopathological signatures, clinical courses and therapeutic possibilities. The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is a multifaceted highly host specific betaherpesvirus that is regarded as asymptomatic or mildly pathogenic virus in immunocompetent host. HCMV may cause serious in utero infections as well as acute and chronic complications in immunocompromised individual. The involvement of HCMV in late inflammatory complications underscores its possible role in inflammatory diseases and cancer. HCMV targets a variety of cell types in vivo, including macrophages, epithelial cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, stromal cells, neuronal cells, smooth muscle cells, and hepatocytes. HCMV can be detected in the milk after delivery and thereby HCMV could spread to adjacent mammary epithelial cells. HCMV also infects macrophages and induces an atypical M1/M2 phenotype, close to the tumor associated macrophage phenotype, which is associated with the release of cytokines involved in cancer initiation or promotion and breast cancer of poor prognosis. HCMV antigens and DNA have been detected in tissue biopsies of breast cancers and elevation in serum HCMV IgG antibody levels has been reported to precede the development of breast cancer in some women. In this review, we will discuss the potential role of HCMV in the initiation and progression of breast cancer.

  3. Frequency of TERT promoter mutations in human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinagre, João; Almeida, Ana; Pópulo, Helena; Batista, Rui; Lyra, Joana; Pinto, Vasco; Coelho, Ricardo; Celestino, Ricardo; Prazeres, Hugo; Lima, Luis; Melo, Miguel; da Rocha, Adriana Gaspar; Preto, Ana; Castro, Patrícia; Castro, Ligia; Pardal, Fernando; Lopes, José Manuel; Santos, Lúcio Lara; Reis, Rui Manuel; Cameselle-Teijeiro, José; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Lima, Jorge; Máximo, Valdemar; Soares, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Reactivation of telomerase has been implicated in human tumorigenesis, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we report the presence of recurrent somatic mutations in the TERT promoter in cancers of the central nervous system (43%), bladder (59%), thyroid (follicular cell-derived, 10%) and skin (melanoma, 29%). In thyroid cancers, the presence of TERT promoter mutations (when occurring together with BRAF mutations) is significantly associated with higher TERT mRNA expression, and in glioblastoma we find a trend for increased telomerase expression in cases harbouring TERT promoter mutations. Both in thyroid cancers and glioblastoma, TERT promoter mutations are significantly associated with older age of the patients. Our results show that TERT promoter mutations are relatively frequent in specific types of human cancers, where they lead to enhanced expression of telomerase.

  4. Pre-clinical Orthotopic Murine Model of Human Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahryari, Varahram; Nip, Hannah; Saini, Sharanjot; Dar, Altaf A; Yamamura, Soichiro; Mitsui, Yozo; Colden, Melissa; Bucay, Nathan; Tabatabai, Laura Z; Greene, Kirsten; Deng, Guoren; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Dahiya, Rajvir; Majid, Shahana

    2016-08-29

    To study the multifaceted biology of prostate cancer, pre-clinical in vivo models offer a range of options to uncover critical biological information about this disease. The human orthotopic prostate cancer xenograft mouse model provides a useful alternative approach for understanding the specific interactions between genetically and molecularly altered tumor cells, their organ microenvironment, and for evaluation of efficacy of therapeutic regimens. This is a well characterized model designed to study the molecular events of primary tumor development and it recapitulates the early events in the metastatic cascade prior to embolism and entry of tumor cells into the circulation. Thus it allows elucidation of molecular mechanisms underlying the initial phase of metastatic disease. In addition, this model can annotate drug targets of clinical relevance and is a valuable tool to study prostate cancer progression. In this manuscript we describe a detailed procedure to establish a human orthotopic prostate cancer xenograft mouse model.

  5. [Use of human recombinant erythropoietin in children with cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyot, D; Margueritte, G

    2005-09-01

    Eighty percent of children with cancer suffer from anemia at the time of diagnosis. The physiopathology of anemia is complex. Although anemia can be life threatening, its consequences on the physical, psychological and social state of the child are often minimized. Blood transfusion is the main treatment of anemia: its efficacy is immediate but shortlasting, and it involves infectious and hemolytic risks. The human recombinant erythropoietin has been used for more than 25-years, and is often prescribed to adults with cancer and anemia. The human recombinant erythropoietin rHuEPO is nowadays used when blood transfusion is contra-indicated because of religious or cultural considerations, although several promising studies have been conducted about rHuEPO and children with cancer since 1996: it might be soon the preferential alternative treatment to anemia in children with cancer.

  6. Gene transcriptional networks integrate microenvironmental signals in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ren; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2011-04-01

    A significant amount of evidence shows that microenvironmental signals generated from extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, soluble factors, and cell-cell adhesion complexes cooperate at the extra- and intracellular level. This synergetic action of microenvironmental cues is crucial for normal mammary gland development and breast malignancy. To explore how the microenvironmental genes coordinate in human breast cancer at the genome level, we have performed gene co-expression network analysis in three independent microarray datasets and identified two microenvironment networks in human breast cancer tissues. Network I represents crosstalk and cooperation of ECM microenvironment and soluble factors during breast malignancy. The correlated expression of cytokines, chemokines, and cell adhesion proteins in Network II implicates the coordinated action of these molecules in modulating the immune response in breast cancer tissues. These results suggest that microenvironmental cues are integrated with gene transcriptional networks to promote breast cancer development.

  7. Between Scylla and Charybdis: the role of the human immune system in the pathogenesis of hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spengler, Ulrich; Nischalke, Hans Dieter; Nattermann, Jacob; Strassburg, Christian P

    2013-11-28

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) frequently elicits only mild immune responses so that it can often establish chronic infection. In this case HCV antigens persist and continue to stimulate the immune system. Antigen persistence then leads to profound changes in the infected host's immune responsiveness, and eventually contributes to the pathology of chronic hepatitis. This topic highlight summarizes changes associated with chronic hepatitis C concerning innate immunity (interferons, natural killer cells), adaptive immune responses (immunoglobulins, T cells, and mechanisms of immune regulation (regulatory T cells). Our overview clarifies that a strong anti-HCV immune response is frequently associated with acute severe tissue damage. In chronic hepatitis C, however, the effector arms of the immune system either become refractory to activation or take over regulatory functions. Taken together these changes in immunity may lead to persistent liver damage and cirrhosis. Consequently, effector arms of the immune system will not only be considered with respect to antiviral defence but also as pivotal mechanisms of inflammation, necrosis and progression to cirrhosis. Thus, avoiding Scylla - a strong, sustained antiviral immune response with inital tissue damage - takes the infected host to virus-triggered immunopathology, which ultimately leads to cirrhosis and liver cancer - the realm of Charybdis.

  8. Lipid raft facilitated ligation of K-{alpha}1-tubulin by specific antibodies on epithelial cells: Role in pathogenesis of chronic rejection following human lung transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiriveedhi, Venkataswarup; Angaswamy, Nataraju [Department of Surgery, Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Weber, Joseph [Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Mohanakumar, T., E-mail: kumart@wustl.edu [Department of Surgery, Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Addition of KAT Abs (+) sera to NHBE culture causes upregulation of growth factors. {yields} Cholesterol depletion causes down regulation of growth factor expression. {yields} Cholesterol depletion is accompanied by loss of membrane bound caveolin. {yields} Thus, we demonstrate lipid raft are critical for efficient ligation of the KAT Abs. -- Abstract: Long term function of human lung allografts is hindered by development of chronic rejection manifested as Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome (BOS). We have previously identified the development of antibodies (Abs) following lung transplantation to K-{alpha}1-tubulin (KAT), an epithelial surface gap junction cytoskeletal protein, in patients who develop BOS. However, the biochemical and molecular basis of the interactions and signaling cascades mediated by KAT Abs are yet to be defined. In this report, we investigated the biophysical basis of the epithelial cell membrane surface interaction between KAT and its specific Abs. Towards this, we analyzed the role of the lipid raft-domains in the membrane interactions which lead to cell signaling and ultimately increased growth factor expression. Normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells, upon specific ligation with Abs to KAT obtained either from the serum of BOS(+) patients or monoclonal KAT Abs, resulted in upregulation of growth factors VEGF, PDGF, and bFGF (6.4 {+-} 1.1-, 3.2 {+-} 0.9-, and 3.4 {+-} 1.1-fold increase, respectively) all of which are important in the pathogenesis of BOS. To define the role for lipid raft in augmenting surface interactions, we analyzed the changes in the growth factor expression pattern upon depletion and enrichment with lipid raft following the ligation of the epithelial cell membranes with Abs specific for KAT. NHBE cells cultured in the presence of {beta}-methyl cyclodextran ({beta}MCD) had significantly reduced growth factor expression (1.3 {+-} 0.3, vs {beta}MCD untreated being 6.4 {+-} 1.1-fold

  9. MicroRNAs function primarily in the pathogenesis of human anencephaly via the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W D; Yu, X; Fu, X; Huang, S; Jin, S J; Ning, Q; Luo, X P

    2014-02-20

    Anencephaly is one of the most serious forms of neural tube defects (NTDs), a group of congenital central nervous system (CNS) malformations. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in diverse biological processes via the post-transcriptional regulation of target mRNAs. Although miRNAs play important roles in the development of mammalian CNS, their function in human NTDs remains unknown. Using a miRNA microarray, we identified a unique expression profile in fetal anencephalic brain tissues, characterized by 70 upregulated miRNAs (ratio ≥ 2) and 7 downregulated miRNAs (ratio ≤ 0.5) compared with healthy human samples. Ten miRNAs with altered expression were selected from the microarray findings for validation with real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. We found that in anencephalic tissues, miR-22, miR-23a, miR-34a, miR-103, miR-125a, miR-132, miR-134, miR-138, and miR-185 were significantly upregulated, while miR-149 was significantly downregulated. Furthermore, 459 potential target genes within the validated miRNAs were revealed using combined four target prediction algorithms in the human genome, and subsequently analyzed with the Molecule Annotation System 3.0. A total of 119 target genes were ultimately identified, including those involved in 22 singular annotations (i.e., transcription, signal transduction, and cell cycle) and 55 functional pathways [i.e., mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway, and actin cytoskeleton regulation]. Six target genes (HNRPU, JAG1, FMR1, EGR3, RUNX1T1, and NDEL1) were chosen as candidate genes and associated with congenital birth abnormalities of the brain structure. Our results, therefore, suggest that miRNA maladjustment mainly contributes to the etiopathogenesis of anencephaly via the MAPK signaling pathway.

  10. Genome-wide analysis of alternative transcripts in human breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ji; Toomer, Kevin H.

    2016-01-01

    Transcript variants play a critical role in diversifying gene expression. Alternative splicing is a major mechanism for generating transcript variants. A number of genes have been implicated in breast cancer pathogenesis with their aberrant expression of alternative transcripts. In this study, we performed genome-wide analyses of transcript variant expression in breast cancer. With RNA-Seq data from 105 patients, we characterized the transcriptome of breast tumors, by pairwise comparison of gene expression in the breast tumor versus matched healthy tissue from each patient. We identified 2839 genes, ~10 % of protein-coding genes in the human genome, that had differential expression of transcript variants between tumors and healthy tissues. The validity of the computational analysis was confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR assessment of transcript variant expression from four top candidate genes. The alternative transcript profiling led to classification of breast cancer into two subgroups and yielded a novel molecular signature that could be prognostic of patients’ tumor burden and survival. We uncovered nine splicing factors (FOX2, MBNL1, QKI, PTBP1, ELAVL1, HNRNPC, KHDRBS1, SFRS2, and TIAR) that were involved in aberrant splicing in breast cancer. Network analyses for the coordinative patterns of transcript variant expression identified twelve “hub” genes that differentiated the cancerous and normal transcriptomes. Dysregulated expression of alternative transcripts may reveal novel biomarkers for tumor development. It may also suggest new therapeutic targets, such as the “hub” genes identified through the network analyses of transcript variant expression, or splicing factors implicated in the formation of the tumor transcriptome. PMID:25913416

  11. M062 is a host range factor essential for myxoma virus pathogenesis and functions as an antagonist of host SAMD9 in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Wennier, Sonia; Zhang, Leiliang; McFadden, Grant

    2011-04-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) M062R is a functional homolog of the C7L family of host range genes from orthopoxviruses. We constructed a targeted M062R-knockout-MYXV (vMyxM062-KO) and characterized its properties in vitro and in vivo. In European rabbits, infection by vMyxM062-KO was completely asymptomatic. The surviving rabbits did not gain full protection against the subsequent lethal-dose challenge with wild-type MYXV. We also looked for cellular tropism defects in a variety of cultured cells. In all of the rabbit cells tested, vMyxM062-KO conducts an abortive infection, although it initiates viral DNA replication. In many, but not all, human cancer cells that are permissive for wild-type MYXV, vMyxM062-KO exhibited a profound replication defect. We categorized human cells tested into two groups: (i) type A, which support productive replication for wild-type MYXV but are unable to produce significant levels of progeny virus by vMyxM062-KO, and (ii) type B, which are permissive to infections by both wild-type MYXV and vMyxM062-KO. Furthermore, using proteomic strategies, we identified sterile α motif domain containing 9 (SAMD9), an interferon-regulated cellular protein implicated in human inflammatory disorders, as a unique host binding partner of M062 in human cells. Significantly, knocking down SAMD9 in type A human cancer cells led to a substantial rescue of vMyxM062-KO infection. In summary, M062 is a novel host range factor that controls productive MYXV replication in rabbit cells and in a wide variety of human cells. M062 also binds and antagonizes cellular SAMD9 in human cells, suggesting that SAMD9 is a novel innate antiviral factor against poxviruses.

  12. Anticancer Properties of Capsaicin Against Human Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Ruth; Lee, Seong-Ho

    2016-03-01

    There is persuasive epidemiological and experimental evidence that dietary phytochemicals have anticancer activity. Capsaicin is a bioactive phytochemical abundant in red and chili peppers. While the preponderance of the data strongly indicates significant anticancer benefits of capsaicin, more information to highlight molecular mechanisms of its action is required to improve our knowledge to be able to propose a potential therapeutic strategy for use of capsaicin against cancer. Capsaicin has been shown to alter the expression of several genes involved in cancer cell survival, growth arrest, angiogenesis and metastasis. Recently, many research groups, including ours, found that capsaicin targets multiple signaling pathways, oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes in various types of cancer models. In this review article, we highlight multiple molecular targets responsible for the anticancer mechanism of capsaicin. In addition, we deal with the benefits of combinational use of capsaicin with other dietary or chemotherapeutic compounds, focusing on synergistic anticancer activities.

  13. Differential cell line susceptibility to the emerging novel human betacoronavirus 2c EMC/2012: implications for disease pathogenesis and clinical manifestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jasper Fuk-Woo; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Choi, Garnet Kwan-Yue; To, Kelvin Kai-Wang; Tse, Herman; Cai, Jian-Piao; Yeung, Man Lung; Cheng, Vincent Chi-Chung; Chen, Honglin; Che, Xiao-Yan; Lau, Susanna Kar-Pui; Woo, Patrick Chiu-Yat; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2013-06-01

    The emerging novel human betacoronavirus 2c EMC/2012 (HCoV-EMC) was recently isolated from patients with severe pneumonia and renal failure and was associated with an unexplained high crude fatality rate of 56%. We performed a cell line susceptibility study with 28 cell lines. HCoV-EMC was found to infect the human respiratory tract (polarized airway epithelium cell line Calu-3, embryonic fibroblast cell line HFL, and lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549), kidney (embryonic kidney cell line HEK), intestinal tract (colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line Caco-2), liver cells (hepatocellular carcinoma cell line Huh-7), and histiocytes (malignant histiocytoma cell line His-1), as evident by detection of high or increasing viral load in culture supernatants, detection of viral nucleoprotein expression by immunostaining, and/or detection of cytopathic effects. Although an infected human neuronal cell line (NT2) and infected monocyte and T lymphocyte cell lines (THP-1, U937, and H9) had increased viral loads, their relatively lower viral production corroborated with absent nucleoprotein expression and cytopathic effects. This range of human tissue tropism is broader than that for all other HCoVs, including SARS coronavirus, HCoV-OC43, HCoV-HKU1, HCoV-229E, and HCoV-NL63, which may explain the high mortality associated with this disease. A recent cell line susceptibility study showed that HCoV-EMC can infect primate, porcine, and bat cells and therefore may jump interspecies barriers. We found that HCoV-EMC can also infect civet lung fibroblast and rabbit kidney cell lines. These findings have important implications for the diagnosis, pathogenesis, and transmission of HCoV-EMC.

  14. Transcriptional regulation of microsomal prostaglandin E synthase 1 by the proto-oncogene, c-myc, in the pathogenesis of inflammation and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanan, M; Pilli, V S; Aradhyam, G K; Doble, M

    2017-01-22

    Pro-inflammatory molecules play a key role in the progression of various types of cancers highlighting the importance of studying the pathways that regulate the inflammatory cytokine production. To this end, prostaglandins have been reported to correlate with exacerbated cancer phenotypes that may be prevented by using anti-inflammatory drugs in humans. To understand how the prostaglandin E synthase 1 (mPGES1) may be regulated we analyzed its promoter sequence and identified myc-binding sites. Functional validation was performed by mutating the sites that led to attenuated promoter activation of mPGES1. The known c-myc inhibitor (10058-F4) also blocked PGE2 activity, indicating the importance of c-Myc in PGE2 synthesis. Isocoumarin analogs were able to reduce the expressions of both c-myc as well as mPGES1 and also inhibit the production of PGE2. Based on these data and the well-established role of c-myc in oncogenesis, we have demonstrated an additional role of c-myc in exacerbating cancers via PGE2 production, which may provide a therapeutic opportunity to treat these diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Role of ARPC2 in Human Gastric Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Zhang; Yi Liu; Chang-Jun Yu; Fu Dai; Jie Xiong; Hong-Jun Li; Zheng-Sheng Wu; Rui Ding; Hong Wang

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer continues to be the second most frequent cause of cancer deaths worldwide. However, the exact molecular mechanisms are still unclear. Further research to find potential targets for therapy is critical and urgent. In this study, we found that ARPC2 promoted cell proliferation and invasion in the human cancer cell line MKN-28 using a cell total number assay, MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide) assay, cell colony formation assay, migration assay...

  16. Immune and Inflammatory Cell Composition of Human Lung Cancer Stroma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G-Andre Banat

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate that the abnormal microenvironment of tumors may play a critical role in carcinogenesis, including lung cancer. We comprehensively assessed the number of stromal cells, especially immune/inflammatory cells, in lung cancer and evaluated their infiltration in cancers of different stages, types and metastatic characteristics potential. Immunohistochemical analysis of lung cancer tissue arrays containing normal and lung cancer sections was performed. This analysis was combined with cyto-/histomorphological assessment and quantification of cells to classify/subclassify tumors accurately and to perform a high throughput analysis of stromal cell composition in different types of lung cancer. In human lung cancer sections we observed a significant elevation/infiltration of total-T lymphocytes (CD3+, cytotoxic-T cells (CD8+, T-helper cells (CD4+, B cells (CD20+, macrophages (CD68+, mast cells (CD117+, mononuclear cells (CD11c+, plasma cells, activated-T cells (MUM1+, B cells, myeloid cells (PD1+ and neutrophilic granulocytes (myeloperoxidase+ compared with healthy donor specimens. We observed all of these immune cell markers in different types of lung cancers including squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, adenosquamous cell carcinoma, small cell carcinoma, papillary adenocarcinoma, metastatic adenocarcinoma, and bronchioloalveolar carcinoma. The numbers of all tumor-associated immune cells (except MUM1+ cells in stage III cancer specimens was significantly greater than those in stage I samples. We observed substantial stage-dependent immune cell infiltration in human lung tumors suggesting that the tumor microenvironment plays a critical role during lung carcinogenesis. Strategies for therapeutic interference with lung cancer microenvironment should consider the complexity of its immune cell composition.

  17. Autophagy Therapeutic Potential of Garlic in Human Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Lin Chu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the deadliest diseases against humans. To tackle this menace, humans have developed several high-technology therapies, such as chemotherapy, tomotherapy, targeted therapy, and antibody therapy. However, all these therapies have their own adverse side effects. Therefore, recent years have seen increased attention being given to the natural food for complementary therapy, which have less side effects. Garlic 大 蒜 Dà Suàn; Allium sativum, is one of most powerful food used in many of the civilizations for both culinary and medicinal purpose. In general, these foods induce cancer cell death by apoptosis, autophagy, or necrosis. Studies have discussed how natural food factors regulate cell survival or death by autophagy in cancer cells. From many literature reviews, garlic could not only induce apoptosis but also autophagy in cancer cells. Autophagy, which is called type-II programmed cell death, provides new strategy in cancer therapy. In conclusion, we wish that garlic could be the pioneer food of complementary therapy in clinical cancer treatment and increase the life quality of cancer patients.

  18. Expression of Obesity Hormone Leptin in Human Colorectal Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-chun Cong; Xian-wei Dai; Ming-yang Shen; Jun-jiang Wang; Chun-sheng Chen; Hong Zhang; Lei Qiao

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The obesity hormone, leptin, has been found to participate in the development and proliferation of normal and malignant tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of leptin in human colorectal cancer.Methods: Serum leptin levels were measured via ABC-ELLSA in 30 colorectal cancers and 24 normal controls. Leptin concentration in colorectal cancer was analyzed in terms of selected clinicopathological features and some oncogenes.Results: The mean concentration of leptin was significantly higher for colorectal cancers(3.54±1.46 ng/ml) than normal controls(2.27±0.99 ng/ml), no gender difference was observed in this study. Leptin expression in poorly differentiated tumors was obviously lower than those in moderately and well differentiated tumors. There were no statistically significant correlations between leptin and the serum CEA and CA199 in colorectal cancers (P>0.05), and between leptin and the expressions of K-RAS, P53, APC, DCC genes in tumor tissues (P>0.05).Conclusion: Leptin is overexpressed in human colorectal cancer, which is related to the differentiation degrees of the tumor. There is no correlation between leptin expression and chages of oncogenes in colorectal cancers.

  19. Aberrant free radical biology is a unifying theme in the etiology and pathogenesis of major human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domann, Frederick E

    2013-04-17

    The seemingly disparate areas of oxygen toxicity, radiation exposure, and aging are now recognized to share a common feature-the aberrant production and/or removal of biologically derived free radicals and other reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS). Advances in our understanding of the effects of free radicals in biology and medicine have been, and continue to be, actively translated into clinically tractable diagnostic and therapeutic applications. This issue is dedicated to recent advances, both basic discoveries and clinical applications, in the field of free radicals in biology and medicine. As more is understood about the proximal biological targets of aberrantly produced or removed reactive species, their sensors, and effectors of compensatory response, a great deal more will be learned about the commonalities in mechanisms underlying seemingly disparate disease states. Together with this deeper understanding, opportunities will arise to devise rational therapeutic interventions to decrease the incidence and severity of these diseases and positively impact the human healthspan.

  20. Bionutrition and oral cancer in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enwonwu, C O; Meeks, V I

    1995-01-01

    Tobacco (smoking and smokeless) use and excessive consumption of alcohol are considered the main risk factors for oral cancer (ICD9 140-149). Conspicuous national and international variations in oral cancer incidence and mortality rates, as well as observations in migrant populations, raise the possibility that diet and nutritional status could be an important etiologic factor in oral carcinogenesis. As shown in this report, abuse of alcohol and tobacco has serious nutritional implications for the host, and generates increased production of reactive free radicals as well as eliciting immunosuppression. Maintenance of optimal competence of the immune system is critical for cancer surveillance. Active oxygen species and other reactive free radicals mediate phenotypic and genotypic alterations that lead from mutation to neoplasia. Consequently, the most widely used chemopreventive agents against oral cancer (e.g., vitamins A, E, C, and beta-carotene) are anti-oxidants/free radical scavengers. These anti-oxidants, both natural and synthetic, neutralize metabolic products (including reactive oxygen species), interfere with activation of procarcinogens, prevent binding of carcinogens to DNA, inhibit chromosome aberrations, restrain replication of the transformed cell, suppress actions of cancer promoters, and may even induce regression of precancerous oral lesions such as leukoplakia and erythroplakia. Malnutrition is characterized by marked tissue depletion of anti-oxidant nutrients, including GSH (gamma-glutamyl-cysteinyl-glycine), a key cellular anti-oxidant as well as a modulator of T-cell activation. GSH or its precursor cysteine inhibits activation of the nuclear transcription factor kB(NFkB), and has been shown to be protective against chemically induced oral cancer and leukoplakia. Alcohol-, tobacco-, and/or malnutrition-induced immunosuppression promotes impaired salivary gland function and oral mucosal immunity, a prominent reduction in the number of helper CD4

  1. Arsenic Exposure and the Induction of Human Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor D. Martinez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic is a metalloid, that is, considered to be a human carcinogen. Millions of individuals worldwide are chronically exposed through drinking water, with consequences ranging from acute toxicities to development of malignancies, such as skin and lung cancer. Despite well-known arsenic-related health effects, the molecular mechanisms involved are not fully understood; however, the arsenic biotransformation process, which includes methylation changes, is thought to play a key role. This paper explores the relationship of arsenic exposure with cancer development and summarizes current knowledge of the potential mechanisms that may contribute to the neoplastic processes observed in arsenic exposed human populations.

  2. Cytotoxicity of dietary flavonoids on different human cancer types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Sak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Flavonoids are ubiquitous in nature. They are also in food, providing an essential link between diet and prevention of chronic diseases including cancer. Anticancer effects of these polyphenols depend on several factors: Their chemical structure and concentration, and also on the type of cancer. Malignant cells from different tissues reveal somewhat different sensitivity toward flavonoids and, therefore, the preferences of the most common dietary flavonoids to various human cancer types are analyzed in this review. While luteolin and kaempferol can be considered as promising candidate agents for treatment of gastric and ovarian cancers, respectively, apigenin, chrysin, and luteolin have good perspectives as potent antitumor agents for cervical cancer; cells from main sites of flavonoid metabolism (colon and liver reveal rather large fluctuations in anticancer activity probably due to exposure to various metabolites with different activities. Anticancer effect of flavonoids toward blood cancer cells depend on their myeloid, lymphoid, or erythroid origin; cytotoxic effects of flavonoids on breast and prostate cancer cells are highly related to the expression of hormone receptors. Different flavonoids are often preferentially present in certain food items, and knowledge about the malignant tissue-specific anticancer effects of flavonoids could be purposely applied both in chemoprevention as well as in cancer treatment.

  3. Immunological responses against human papilloma virus and human papilloma virus induced laryngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitose, Shun-ichi; Sakazaki, T; Ono, T; Kurita, T; Mihashi, H; Nakashima, T

    2010-06-01

    This study aimed to clarify the local immune status in the larynx in the presence of infection or carcinogenesis associated with human papilloma virus. Cytological samples (for human papilloma virus detection) and laryngeal secretions (for immunoglobulin assessment) were obtained from 31 patients with laryngeal disease, during microscopic laryngeal surgery. On histological examination, 12 patients had squamous cell carcinoma, four had laryngeal papilloma and 15 had other benign laryngeal disease. Cytological samples were tested for human papilloma virus DNA using the Hybrid Capture 2 assay. High risk human papilloma virus DNA was detected in 25 per cent of patients (three of 12) with laryngeal cancer. Low risk human papilloma virus DNA was detected only in three laryngeal papilloma patients. The mean laryngeal secretion concentrations of immunoglobulins M, G and A and secretory immunoglobulin A in human papilloma virus DNA positive patients were more than twice those in human papilloma virus DNA negative patients. A statistically significant difference was observed between the secretory immunoglobulin A concentrations in the two groups. Patients with laryngeal cancer had higher laryngeal secretion concentrations of each immunoglobulin type, compared with patients with benign laryngeal disease. The study assessed the mean laryngeal secretion concentrations of each immunoglobulin type in the 12 laryngeal cancer patients, comparing human papilloma virus DNA positive patients (n = 3) and human papilloma virus DNA negative patients (n = 9); the mean concentrations of immunoglobulins M, G and A and secretory immunoglobulin A tended to be greater in human papilloma virus DNA positive cancer patients, compared with human papilloma virus DNA negative cancer patients. These results suggest that the local laryngeal immune response is activated by infection or carcinogenesis due to human papilloma virus. The findings strongly suggest that secretory IgA has inhibitory activity

  4. Aberrant Free Radical Biology Is a Unifying Theme in the Etiology and Pathogenesis of Major Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick E. Domann

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The seemingly disparate areas of oxygen toxicity, radiation exposure, and aging are now recognized to share a common feature—the aberrant production and/or removal of biologically derived free radicals and other reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS. Advances in our understanding of the effects of free radicals in biology and medicine have been, and continue to be, actively translated into clinically tractable diagnostic and therapeutic applications. This issue is dedicated to recent advances, both basic discoveries and clinical applications, in the field of free radicals in biology and medicine. As more is understood about the proximal biological targets of aberrantly produced or removed reactive species, their sensors, and effectors of compensatory response, a great deal more will be learned about the commonalities in mechanisms underlying seemingly disparate disease states. Together with this deeper understanding, opportunities will arise to devise rational therapeutic interventions to decrease the incidence and severity of these diseases and positively impact the human healthspan.

  5. Tissue-engineered models of human tumors for cancer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villasante, Aranzazu; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Drug toxicity often goes undetected until clinical trials, which are the most costly and dangerous phase of drug development. Both the cultures of human cells and animal studies have limitations that cannot be overcome by incremental improvements in drug-testing protocols. A new generation of bioengineered tumors is now emerging in response to these limitations, with potential to transform drug screening by providing predictive models of tumors within their tissue context, for studies of drug safety and efficacy. An area that could greatly benefit from these models is cancer research. Areas covered In this review, the authors first describe the engineered tumor systems, using Ewing's sarcoma as an example of human tumor that cannot be predictably studied in cell culture and animal models. Then, they discuss the importance of the tissue context for cancer progression and outline the biomimetic principles for engineering human tumors. Finally, they discuss the utility of bioengineered tumor models for cancer research and address the challenges in modeling human tumors for use in drug discovery and testing. Expert opinion While tissue models are just emerging as a new tool for cancer drug discovery, they are already demonstrating potential for recapitulating, in vitro, the native behavior of human tumors. Still, numerous challenges need to be addressed before we can have platforms with a predictive power appropriate for the pharmaceutical industry. Some of the key needs include the incorporation of the vascular compartment, immune system components, and mechanical signals that regulate tumor development and function. PMID:25662589

  6. Contribution of Fcγ receptors to human respiratory syncytial virus pathogenesis and the impairment of T-cell activation by dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Roberto S; Ramirez, Bruno A; Céspedes, Pablo F; Cautivo, Kelly M; Riquelme, Sebastián A; Prado, Carolina E; González, Pablo A; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the leading cause of infant hospitalization related to respiratory disease. Infection with hRSV produces abundant infiltration of immune cells into the airways, which combined with an exacerbated pro-inflammatory immune response can lead to significant damage to the lungs. Human RSV re-infection is extremely frequent, suggesting that this virus may have evolved molecular mechanisms that interfere with host adaptive immunity. Infection with hRSV can be reduced by administering a humanized neutralizing antibody against the virus fusion protein in high-risk infants. Although neutralizing antibodies against hRSV effectively block the infection of airway epithelial cells, here we show that both, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) and lung DCs undergo infection with IgG-coated virus (hRSV-IC), albeit abortive. Yet, this is enough to negatively modulate DC function. We observed that such a process is mediated by Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) expressed on the surface of DCs. Remarkably, we also observed that in the absence of hRSV-specific antibodies FcγRIII knockout mice displayed significantly less cellular infiltration in the lungs after hRSV infection, compared with wild-type mice, suggesting a potentially harmful, IgG-independent role for this receptor in hRSV disease. Our findings support the notion that FcγRs can contribute significantly to the modulation of DC function by hRSV and hRSV-IC. Further, we provide evidence for an involvement of FcγRIII in the development of hRSV pathogenesis.

  7. Benzyl Isothiocyanate Inhibits Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Cultured and Xenografted Human Breast Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sehrawat, Anuradha; Singh, Shivendra V.

    2011-01-01

    We showed previously that cruciferous vegetable constituent benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) inhibits growth of cultured and xenografted human breast cancer cells, and suppresses mammary cancer development in a transgenic mouse model. We now demonstrate, for the first time, that BITC inhibits epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in human breast cancer cells. Exposure of estrogen-independent MDA-MB-231 and estrogen-responsive MCF-7 human breast cancer cell lines and a pancreatic cancer cell ...

  8. IMMUNORESPONSES OF HUMANIZED SCID MICE TO HUMAN LUNG CANCER CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈力真; 王树蕙; 张云; 王世真

    1996-01-01

    HuPBL-SCID mice were used to explore how they would response to human ttmoor cells of 801/MLC.Living 801/MLC cells appeared to be fetal to the the mice due to the production of human TNF. The huP-BL-SCID rniee did not generate any noticeable amotmt of specific human immunoglobttlin either by single immunization with living 801/MLC cells or by repeated immunization with irradiated 801/MLC cells. Our preliminary experiments with huPBL-SCID mice showed that such chimeras would he a very useful models for tumor immunological researches.

  9. Epigenetic modifications and human pathologies: cancer and CVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duthie, Susan J

    2011-02-01

    Epigenetic changes are inherited alterations in DNA that affect gene expression and function without altering the DNA sequence. DNA methylation is one epigenetic process implicated in human disease that is influenced by diet. DNA methylation involves addition of a 1-C moiety to cytosine groups in DNA. Methylated genes are not transcribed or are transcribed at a reduced rate. Global under-methylation (hypomethylation) and site-specific over-methylation (hypermethylation) are common features of human tumours. DNA hypomethylation, leading to increased expression of specific proto-oncogenes (e.g. genes involved in proliferation or metastasis) can increase the risk of cancer as can hypermethylation and reduced expression of tumour suppressor (TS) genes (e.g. DNA repair genes). DNA methyltransferases (DNMT), together with the methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), facilitate DNA methylation. Abnormal DNA methylation is implicated not only in the development of human cancer but also in CVD. Polyphenols, a group of phytochemicals consumed in significant amounts in the human diet, effect risk of cancer. Flavonoids from tea, soft fruits and soya are potent inhibitors of DNMT in vitro, capable of reversing hypermethylation and reactivating TS genes. Folates, a group of water-soluble B vitamins found in high concentration in green leafy vegetables, regulate DNA methylation through their ability to generate SAM. People who habitually consume the lowest level of folate or with the lowest blood folate concentrations have a significantly increased risk of developing several cancers and CVD. This review describes how flavonoids and folates in the human diet alter DNA methylation and may modify the risk of human colon cancer and CVD.

  10. CERVICAL CANCER AND THE HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    as Mexico, Columbia and many developed nations), the reduction in ..... detection among human immunodeficiency virus-infected pregnant Thai women: implications ... Moscicki A. Impact of HPV infection in adolescent populations. J Adolesc ...

  11. Synchrotron refractive-index microradiography of human liver cancer tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Yongpeng; ZHANG Guilin; LI Yan; HWU Yeukuang; TSAI Wenli; JE Jung Ho; Margaritondo G.; YUAN Dong

    2005-01-01

    Three human liver tissue samples (~5 mm × 40 mm × 20 mm) were excised from a cancer patient's liver during surgery. The microradiology analysis was performed with a non-standard approach on a synchrotron. High-resolution refractive-index edge-enhanced microradiographs that cover a larger volume of the liver tissue sample were obtained. The cancer tissue and normal tissue could be clearly identified and distinguished based on their different textures. Furthermore, new blood vessel hyperplasia was found near the cancer area. Blood vessels with a diameter smaller than 20 μm could be identified. These findings were fully consistent with the histopathological examination of the same area. Microradiographs of the newly formed blood vessels at different angles were also obtained. This result shows that it is possible to further develop this approach into a technique of microradiographic imaging for clinic diagnosis of liver cancer at the early stage.

  12. Silencing human cancer: identification and uses of microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Francisco E; Lopez-Gomollon, Sara; Lopez-Martinez, Alfonso F; Dalmay, Tamas

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a new class of negative regulators that repress gene expression by pairing with their target messenger RNAs (mRNAs). There are hundreds of miRNAs coded in the human genome and thousands of target mRNAs participating in a wide variety of physiological processes such as development and cell identity. It is therefore not surprising that several recent reports involved deregulated miRNAs in the complex mechanism of human carcinogenesis, and proposed them as new key regulators to correct the unbalanced expression of oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes exhibited in cancer cells. This review summarises most of the recent patents related to the use of miRNA signatures in cancer diagnosis and prognosis, the detection and profiling of miRNAs from tumour samples and the identification of oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes targeted by miRNAs, as well as new cancer therapies based on miRNA modulators.

  13. Lectins in human cancer: both a devil and an angel?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Xiu Li; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2013-09-01

    Lectins are a group of proteins which could recognize different sugar structures and specifically initiate reversible binding with them. Lectins are universally expressed in different organisms and undertake important biological roles. Understanding of their inherent roles and mechanisms that they employ has inspired researches with new ideas and applications. For example, along with the revelation of their anti-insect function, plant lectins exhibit great potential in agriculture. In human beings, lectins shoulder great missions in cell communication, differentiation and vesicle trafficking etc., aberrant expression of lectins is always associated with diseases. Mannan-binding lectin deficiency leads to immune disorder and liver sinusoidal endothelial cell lectin is involved in colorectal carcinoma liver metastasis. In this review, we present two contradictory roles of lectins in human cancer: the promotive roles of homologous lectins and suppressive roles of heterologous lectins in cancer development. Hopefully, this review will facilitate a better understanding of tumorigenesis and provide references for cancer treatment.

  14. Strategies of functional food for cancer prevention in human beings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ya-Wen; Yang, Jia-Zheng; Pu, Xiao-Ying; Du, Juan; Yang, Tao; Yang, Shu-Ming; Zhu, Wei-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Functional food for prevention of chronic diseases is one of this century's key global challenges. Cancer is not only the first or second leading cause of death in China and other countries across the world, but also has diet as one of the most important modifiable risk factors. Major dietary factors now known to promote cancer development are polished grain foods and low intake of fresh vegetables, with general importance for an unhealthy lifestyle and obesity. The strategies of cancer prevention in human being are increased consumption of functional foods like whole grains (brown rice, barley, and buckwheat) and by-products, as well some vegetables (bitter melon, garlic, onions, broccoli, and cabbage) and mushrooms (boletes and Tricholoma matsutake). In addition some beverages (green tea and coffee) may be protective. Southwest China (especially Yunnan Province) is a geographical area where functional crop production is closely related to the origins of human evolution with implications for anticancer influence.

  15. Effect of S1P5 on proliferation and migration of human esophageal cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Wei-Min; Li, Li; Jing, Bao-Qian; Zhao, Yong-Sheng; Wang, Chao-Li; Feng, Li; Xie, Yong-En

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor expression profile in human esophageal cancer cells and the effects of S1P5 on proliferation and migration of human esophageal cancer cells.

  16. Microbial dysbiosis is associated with human breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caiyun Xuan

    Full Text Available Breast cancer affects one in eight women in their lifetime. Though diet, age and genetic predisposition are established risk factors, the majority of breast cancers have unknown etiology. The human microbiota refers to the collection of microbes inhabiting the human body. Imbalance in microbial communities, or microbial dysbiosis, has been implicated in various human diseases including obesity, diabetes, and colon cancer. Therefore, we investigated the potential role of microbiota in breast cancer by next-generation sequencing using breast tumor tissue and paired normal adjacent tissue from the same patient. In a qualitative survey of the breast microbiota DNA, we found that the bacterium Methylobacterium radiotolerans is relatively enriched in tumor tissue, while the bacterium Sphingomonas yanoikuyae is relatively enriched in paired normal tissue. The relative abundances of these two bacterial species were inversely correlated in paired normal breast tissue but not in tumor tissue, indicating that dysbiosis is associated with breast cancer. Furthermore, the total bacterial DNA load was reduced in tumor versus paired normal and healthy breast tissue as determined by quantitative PCR. Interestingly, bacterial DNA load correlated inversely with advanced disease, a finding that could have broad implications in diagnosis and staging of breast cancer. Lastly, we observed lower basal levels of antibacterial response gene expression in tumor versus healthy breast tissue. Taken together, these data indicate that microbial DNA is present in the breast and that bacteria or their components may influence the local immune microenvironment. Our findings suggest a previously unrecognized link between dysbiosis and breast cancer which has potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

  17. Human Papillomavirus Testing in the Prevention of Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wacholder, Sholom; Kinney, Walter; Gage, Julia C.; Castle, Philip E.

    2011-01-01

    Strong evidence now supports the adoption of cervical cancer prevention strategies that explicitly focus on persistent infection with the causal agent, human papillomavirus (HPV). To inform an evidence-based transition to a new public health approach for cervical cancer screening, we summarize the natural history and cervical carcinogenicity of HPV and discuss the promise and uncertainties of currently available screening methods. New HPV infections acquired at any age are virtually always benign, but persistent infections with one of approximately 12 carcinogenic HPV types explain virtually all cases of cervical cancer. In the absence of an overtly persistent HPV infection, the risk of cervical cancer is extremely low. Thus, HPV test results predict the risk of cervical cancer and its precursors (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3) better and longer than cytological or colposcopic abnormalities, which are signs of HPV infection. The logical and inevitable move to HPV-based cervical cancer prevention strategies will require longer screening intervals that will disrupt current gynecologic and cytology laboratory practices built on frequent screening. A major challenge will be implementing programs that do not overtreat HPV-positive women who do not have obvious long-term persistence of HPV or treatable lesions at the time of initial evaluation. The greatest potential for reduction in cervical cancer rates from HPV screening is in low-resource regions that can implement infrequent rounds of low-cost HPV testing and treatment. PMID:21282563

  18. The natural immunity to evolutionary atavistic endotoxin for human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncevičiūtė-Eringienė, Elena; Rotkevič, Kristina; Grikienis, Ruta Grikienyte

    2015-11-01

    We propose a new theory of the immunological control of cancer corresponding to the hypothesis that the specific natural immunity to evolutionary atavistic endotoxin has a potential role in human cancer prevention. The results of our studies have shown that IgMNAE, i.e. endogenous or spontaneous IgM class antibodies to enterobacterial lipopolysaccharide molecules (lipid A), control the immune mechanisms responsible for the internal medium stability not only against the damaging impact of the carcinogenic factors, but also against the malignant transformation of its own degenerated cells. Among people who in 1979 and 1982 had IgMNAE in their blood serum, after 15-30years fell ill with cancer 10%, versus 15% among people who had no IgMNAE (pimmunity to endotoxin it is possible to see the formation of the respective evolutionary protective reactions which protect the damaged cells from acquiring resistance to damaging factors and thus from becoming an independent new parasitic population. Thereby the presented theory of the immunological control of cancer has a causal connection with our evolutionary resistance theory of the origin of cancer. Collectively, these data suggest that activation of natural immunity to endotoxin and production of vaccines against evolutionary atavistic endotoxin or gram-negative bacterial endotoxin can be helpful when applied in cancer prophylaxis for persons with a low level of natural immunity to endotoxin and perhaps in creating immunotherapeutic methods for stopping the endogenous parasitism of tumour cells by binding IgMNAE to atavistic endotoxin in cancer patients.

  19. Endothelium specific matrilysin (MMP-7) expression in human cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sier, C.F.M.; Hawinkels, L.J.A.C.; Zijlmans, H.J.M.A.A.; Zuidwijk, K.; Jonge de; Muller, E.S.M.; Ferreira, V.; Hanemaaijer, R.; Mulder-Stapel, A.A.; Kenter, G.G.; Verspaget, H.W.; Gorter, A.

    2008-01-01

    Over-expression of matrilysin (MMP-7) is predominantly associated with epithelial (pre)malignant cells. In the present study MMP-7 expression is also found in endothelial cells in various human cancer types. Endothelial MMP-7 was associated with CD34 and/or CD105 expression. These immunohistochemica

  20. Hanging drop cultures of human testis and testis cancer samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anne; Young, J; Nielsen, J E

    2014-01-01

    limited by the lack of experimental models. The aim of this study was to establish an experimental tissue culture model to maintain normal and malignant germ cells within their niche and allow investigation of treatment effects. METHODS: Human testis and testis cancer specimens from orchidectomies were...

  1. Identification of cancer risk lncRNAs and cancer risk pathways regulated by cancer risk lncRNAs based on genome sequencing data in human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiran; Li, Wan; Liang, Binhua; Li, Liansheng; Wang, Li; Huang, Hao; Guo, Shanshan; Wang, Yahui; He, Yuehan; Chen, Lina; He, Weiming

    2016-12-19

    Cancer is a group of diseases involving abnormal cell growth with the potential to invade or spread to other parts of the body. The complexity of cancer can be reduced to a small number of underlying principles like cancer hallmarks which could govern the transformation of normal cells to cancer. Besides, the growth and metastasis of cancer often relate to combined effects of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Here, we performed comprehensive analysis for lncRNA expression profiles and clinical data of six types of human cancer patients from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), and identified six risk pathways and twenty three lncRNAs. In addition, twenty three cancer risk lncRNAs which were closely related to the occurrence or development of cancer had a good classification performance for samples of testing datasets of six cancer datasets. More important, these lncRNAs were able to separate samples in the entire cancer dataset into high-risk group and low-risk group with significantly different overall survival (OS), which was further validated in ten validation datasets. In our study, the robust and effective cancer biomarkers were obtained from cancer datasets which had information of normal-tumor samples. Overall, our research can provide a new perspective for the further study of clinical diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

  2. Trefoil factor-3 expression in human colon cancer liver metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babyatsky, Mark; Lin, Jing; Yio, Xianyang; Chen, Anli; Zhang, Jie-yu; Zheng, Yan; Twyman, Christina; Bao, Xiuliang; Schwartz, Myron; Thung, Swan; Lawrence Werther, J; Itzkowitz, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Deaths from colorectal cancer are often due to liver metastasis. Trefoil factor-3 (TFF3) is expressed by normal intestinal epithelial cells and its expression is maintained throughout the colon adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Our previous work demonstrated a correlation between TFF3 expression and metastatic potential in an animal model of colon cancer. The aim of this study was to determine whether TFF3 is expressed in human colon cancer liver metastasis (CCLM) and whether inhibiting TFF3 expression in colon cancer cells would alter their invasive potential in vitro. Human CCLMs were analyzed at the mRNA and protein level for TFF3 expression. Two highly metastatic rat colon cancer cell lines that either natively express TFF3 (LN cells) or were transfected with TFF3 (LPCRI-2 cells), were treated with two rat TFF3 siRNA constructs (si78 and si365), and analyzed in an in vitro invasion assay. At the mRNA and protein level, TFF3 was expressed in 17/17 (100%) CCLMs and 10/11 (91%) primary colon cancers, but not in normal liver tissue. By real time PCR, TFF3 expression was markedly inhibited by both siRNA constructs in LN and LPCRI-2 cells. The si365 and si78 constructs inhibited invasion by 44% and 53%, respectively, in LN cells, and by 74% and 50%, respectively, in LPCRI-2 cells. These results provide further evidence that TFF3 contributes to the malignant behavior of colon cancer cells. These observations may have relevance for designing new diagnostic and treatment approaches to colorectal cancer.

  3. CAP1 is overexpressed in human epithelial ovarian cancer and promotes cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Minhui; Yan, Sujuan; Deng, Yan; Xi, Qinghua; Liu, Rong; Yang, Shuyun; Liu, Jian; Tang, Chunhui; Wang, Yingying; Zhong, Jianxin

    2015-04-01

    Adenylate cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1) regulates both actin filaments and the Ras/cAMP pathway in yeast, and has been found play a role in cell motility and in the development of certain types of cancer. In the present study, we investigated CAP1 gene expression in human epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry were performed using EOC tissue samples and the results revealed that CAP1 expression increased with the increasing grade of EOC. In the normal ovarian tissue samples however, CAP1 expression was barely detected. Using Pearson's χ2 test, it was demonstrated that CAP1 expression was associated with the histological grade and Ki-67 expression. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that a higher CAP1 expression in patients with EOC was associated with a poorer prognosis. In in vitro experiments using HO-8910 EOC cells, the expression of CAP1 was knocked down using siRNA. The proliferation of the HO-8910 cells was then determined by cell cycle analysis and cell proliferation assay using the cell counting kit-8 and flow cytometry. The results revealed that the loss of CAP1 expression inhibited cell cycle progression. These findings suggest that a high expression of CAP1 is involved in the pathogenesis of EOC, and that the downregulation of CAP1 in tumor cells may be a therapeutic target for the treatment of patients with EOC.

  4. Inhibition of human lung cancer cell growth by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma agonists through induction of apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubouchi, Y; Sano, H; Kawahito, Y; Mukai, S; Yamada, R; Kohno, M; Inoue, K; Hla, T; Kondo, M

    2000-04-13

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), members of the nuclear hormone receptors superfamily, have an important regulatory role in adipogenesis and inflammation. PPAR-gamma ligands induce terminal differentiation and growth inhibition of human breast cancer cells and prostatic cancer cells. In this study, we demonstrated that PPAR-gamma, but not PPAR-alpha, was expressed in human lung cancer cell lines by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis. We also found that the synthetic PPAR-gamma agonist thiazolidinedione compounds (troglitazone) and the endogenous PPAR-gamma ligand, 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)), inhibited the growth of human lung cancer cells through the induction of apoptosis. However, PPAR-alpha agonist (bezafibrate) and other prostanoids (PGE(2), PGF(2alpha)) did not induce apoptosis. These findings suggest that PPAR-gamma may play an important role in the pathogenesis of lung cancer and that PPAR-gamma agonist may be useful therapeutic agents in the treatment of human lung cancer. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  5. A new humanized ataxin-3 knock-in mouse model combines the genetic features, pathogenesis of neurons and glia and late disease onset of SCA3/MJD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switonski, Pawel M; Szlachcic, Wojciech J; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J; Figiel, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3/MJD) is a neurodegenerative disease triggered by the expansion of CAG repeats in the ATXN3 gene. Here, we report the generation of the first humanized ataxin-3 knock-in mouse model (Ki91), which provides insights into the neuronal and glial pathology of SCA3/MJD. First, mutant ataxin-3 accumulated in cell nuclei across the Ki91 brain, showing diffused immunostaining and forming intranuclear inclusions. The humanized allele revealed expansion and contraction of CAG repeats in intergenerational transmissions. CAG mutation also exhibited age-dependent tissue-specific expansion, which was most prominent in the cerebellum, pons and testes of Ki91 animals. Moreover, Ki91 mice displayed neuroinflammatory processes, showing astrogliosis in the cerebellar white matter and the substantia nigra that paralleled the transcriptional deregulation of Serpina3n, a molecular sign of neurodegeneration and brain damage. Simultaneously, the cerebellar Purkinje cells in Ki91 mice showed neurodegeneration, a pronounced decrease in Calbindin D-28k immunoreactivity and a mild decrease in cell number, thereby modeling the degeneration of the cerebellum observed in SCA3. Moreover, these molecular and cellular neuropathologies were accompanied by late behavioral deficits in motor coordination observed in rotarod and static rod tests in heterozygous Ki91 animals. In summary, we created an ataxin-3 knock-in mouse model that combines the molecular and behavioral disease phenotypes with the genetic features of SCA3. This model will be very useful for studying the pathogenesis and responses to therapy of SCA3/MJD and other polyQ disorders.

  6. Pathogenesis of arenavirus hemorrhagic fevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraz, Marie-Laurence; Kunz, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) caused by arenaviruses belong to the most devastating emerging human diseases and represent serious public health problems. Arenavirus VHFs in humans are acute diseases characterized by fever and, in severe cases, different degrees of hemorrhages associated with a shock syndrome in the terminal stage. Over the past years, much has been learned about the pathogenesis of arenaviruses at the cellular level, in particular their ability to subvert the host cell's innate antiviral defenses. Clinical studies and novel animal models have provided important new information about the interaction of hemorrhagic arenaviruses with the host's adaptive immune system, in particular virus-induced immunosuppression, and have provided the first hints towards an understanding of the terminal hemorrhagic shock syndrome. The scope of this article is to review our current knowledge on arenavirus VHF pathogenesis with an emphasis on recent developments.

  7. Clinicopathological significance of PTPN12 expression in human breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Xunyi [Breast Disease Diagnosis and Treatment Centre, Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Qingdao University, Qingdao Shandong Province (China); Yuan, Zhentao [Department of Anesthesiology, Shengli Oilfield Central Hospital, Dongying Shandong Province (China); Jiang, Dandan; Li, Funian [Breast Disease Diagnosis and Treatment Centre, Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Qingdao University, Qingdao Shandong Province (China)

    2012-10-15

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 12 (PTPN12) is a recently identified tumor suppressor gene (TSG) that is frequently compromised in human triple-negative breast cancer. In the present study, we investigated the expression of PTPN12 protein by patients with breast cancer in a Chinese population and the relationship between PTPN12 expression levels and patient clinicopathological features and prognosis. Additionally, we explored the underlying down-regulation mechanism from the perspective of an epigenetic alteration. We examined PTPN12 mRNA expression in five breast cancer cell lines using semi-quantitative reverse-transcription PCR, and detected PTPN12 protein expression using immunohistochemistry in 150 primary invasive breast cancer cases and paired adjacent non-tumor tissues. Methylation-specific PCR was performed to analyze the promoter CpG island methylation status of PTPN12. PTPN12 was significantly down-regulated in breast cancer cases (48/150) compared to adjacent noncancerous tissues (17/150; P < 0.05). Furthermore, low expression of PTPN12 showed a significant positive correlation with tumor size (P = 0.047), lymph node metastasis (P = 0.001), distant metastasis (P = 0.009), histological grade (P = 0.012), and survival time (P = 0.019). Additionally, promoter CpG island hypermethylation occurs more frequently in breast cancer cases and breast cancer cell lines with low PTPN12 expression. Our findings suggest that PTPN12 is potentially a methylation-silenced TSG for breast cancer that may play an important role in breast carcinogenesis and could potentially serve as an independent prognostic factor for invasive breast cancer patients.

  8. Organoid cultures derived from patients with advanced prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, Dong; Vela, Ian; Sboner, Andrea; Iaquinta, Phillip J; Karthaus, Wouter R; Gopalan, Anuradha; Dowling, Catherine; Wanjala, Jackline N; Undvall, Eva A; Arora, Vivek K; Wongvipat, John; Kossai, Myriam; Ramazanoglu, Sinan; Barboza, Luendreo P; Di, Wei; Cao, Zhen; Zhang, Qi Fan; Sirota, Inna; Ran, Leili; MacDonald, Theresa Y; Beltran, Himisha; Mosquera, Juan-Miguel; Touijer, Karim A; Scardino, Peter T; Laudone, Vincent P; Curtis, Kristen R; Rathkopf, Dana E; Morris, Michael J; Danila, Daniel C; Slovin, Susan F; Solomon, Stephen B; Eastham, James A; Chi, Ping; Carver, Brett; Rubin, Mark A; Scher, Howard I; Clevers, Hans; Sawyers, Charles L; Chen, Yu

    2014-01-01

    The lack of in vitro prostate cancer models that recapitulate the diversity of human prostate cancer has hampered progress in understanding disease pathogenesis and therapy response. Using a 3D organoid system, we report success in long-term culture of prostate cancer from biopsy specimens and circu

  9. Salinomycin as a Drug for Targeting Human Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cord Naujokat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs represent a subpopulation of tumor cells that possess self-renewal and tumor initiation capacity and the ability to give rise to the heterogenous lineages of malignant cells that comprise a tumor. CSCs possess multiple intrinsic mechanisms of resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, novel tumor-targeted drugs, and radiation therapy, allowing them to survive standard cancer therapies and to initiate tumor recurrence and metastasis. Various molecular complexes and pathways that confer resistance and survival of CSCs, including expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC drug transporters, activation of the Wnt/β-catenin, Hedgehog, Notch and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways, and acquisition of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, have been identified recently. Salinomycin, a polyether ionophore antibiotic isolated from Streptomyces albus, has been shown to kill CSCs in different types of human cancers, most likely by interfering with ABC drug transporters, the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and other CSC pathways. Promising results from preclinical trials in human xenograft mice and a few clinical pilote studies reveal that salinomycin is able to effectively eliminate CSCs and to induce partial clinical regression of heavily pretreated and therapy-resistant cancers. The ability of salinomycin to kill both CSCs and therapy-resistant cancer cells may define the compound as a novel and an effective anticancer drug.

  10. High prevalence of human cytomegalovirus proteins and nucleic acids in primary breast cancer and metastatic sentinel lymph nodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chato Taher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is a leading cause of death among women worldwide. Increasing evidence implies that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection is associated with several malignancies. We aimed to examine whether HCMV is present in breast cancer and sentinel lymph node (SLN metastases. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue specimens from breast cancer and paired sentinel lymph node (SLN samples were obtained from patients with (n = 35 and without SLN metastasis (n = 38. HCMV immediate early (IE and late (LA proteins were detected using a sensitive immunohistochemistry (IHC technique and HCMV DNA by real-time PCR. RESULTS: HCMV IE and LA proteins were abundantly expressed in 100% of breast cancer specimens. In SLN specimens, 94% of samples with metastases (n = 34 were positive for HCMV IE and LA proteins, mostly confined to neoplastic cells while some inflammatory cells were HCMV positive in 60% of lymph nodes without metastases (n = 35. The presence of HCMV DNA was confirmed in 12/12 (100% of breast cancer and 10/11 (91% SLN specimens from the metastatic group, but was not detected in 5/5 HCMV-negative, SLN-negative specimens. There was no statistically significant association between HCMV infection grades and progesterone receptor, estrogen receptor alpha and Elston grade status. CONCLUSIONS: The role of HCMV in the pathogenesis of breast cancer is unclear. As HCMV proteins were mainly confined to neoplastic cells in primary breast cancer and SLN samples, our observations raise the question whether HCMV contributes to the tumorigenesis of breast cancer and its metastases.

  11. Human RecQL4 helicase plays critical roles in prostate carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, Yanrong; Meador, Jarah A; Calaf, Gloria M

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-associated deaths among men in the western countries. Here, we report that human RecQL4 helicase, which is implicated in the pathogenesis of a subset of cancer-prone Rothmund-Thomson syndrome, is highly elevated in metastatic prostate cancer c...

  12. Human Papillomavirus 16E6 Oncogene Mutation in Cervical Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Sun; Xiao-qin Ha; Tong-de Lv; Chuan-ping Xing; Bin Liu; Xiao-zhe Cao

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Cervical cancer (CC) is the second most common type of cancer in women worldwide, after breast cancer. High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) are considered to be the major causes of cervical cancer. HPV16 is the most common type of HR-HPVs and HPV16 E6 gene is one of the major oncogenes. Specific mutations are considered as dangerous factors causing CC. This study was designed to find mutations of HPV16 E6 and the relationship between the mutations and the happening of CC.Methods: The tissue DNA was extracted from 15 biopsies of CC. Part of HPV16 E6 gene (nucleotide 201-523) was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from the CC tissue DNA. The PCR fragments were sequenced and analyzed.Results: The result of PCR showed that the positive rate of HPV16 E6 was 93.33% (14/15). After sequencing and analyzing, in the 13 out of 14 PCR fragments, 4 maintained prototype (30.77%), 8 had a same 350G mutation (61.54%), and 1 had a 249G mutation (7.69%).Conclusion: This study suggest that there is a high infection rate of HPV in cervical cancer and most of the HPV16 E6 gene has mutations. Those mutations may have an association with the development of cervical cancer.

  13. [HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) implication in other cancers than gynaecological].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badoual, C; Tartour, E; Roussel, H; Bats, A S; Pavie, J; Pernot, S; Weiss, L; Mohamed, A Si; Thariat, J; Hoffmann, C; Péré, H

    2015-08-01

    Worldwide, approximately 5 to 10% of the population is infected by a Human Papilloma Virus (HPV). Some of these viruses, with a high oncogenic risk (HPV HR), are responsible for about 5% of cancer. It is now accepted that almost all carcinomas of the cervix and the vulva are due to an HPV HR (HPV16 and 18) infection. However, these viruses are known to be involved in the carcinogenesis of many other cancers (head and neck [SCCHN], penis, anus). For head and neck cancer, HPV infection is considered as a good prognostic factor. The role of HPV HR in anal cancer is also extensively studied in high-risk patient's population. The role of HPV infection in the carcinogenesis of esophageal, bladder, lung, breast or skin cancers is still debated. Given the multiple possible locations of HPV HR infection, the question of optimizing the management of patients with a HPV+ cancer arises in the implementation of a comprehensive clinical and biological monitoring. It is the same in therapeutics with the existence of a preventive vaccination, for example.

  14. Marker evaluation of human breast and bladder cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayall, B.H.; Carroll, P.R.; Chen, Ling-Chun; Cohen, M.B.; Goodson, W.H. III; Smith, H.S.; Waldman, F.M. (California Univ., San Francisco, CA (USA))

    1990-11-02

    We are investigating multiple markers in human breast and bladder cancers. Our aim is to identify markers that are clinically relevant and that contribute to our understanding of the disease process in individual patients. Good markers accurately assess the malignant potential of a cancer in an individual patient. Thus, they help identify those cancers that will recur, and they may be used to predict more accurately time to recurrence, response to treatment, and overall prognosis. Therapy and patient management may then be optimized to the individual patient. Relevant markers reflect the underlying pathobiology of individual tumors. As a tissue undergoes transformation from benign to malignant, the cells lose their differentiated phenotype. As a generalization, the more the cellular phenotype, cellular proliferation and cellular genotype depart from normal, the more advanced is the tumor in its biological evolution and the more likely it is that the patient has a poor prognosis. We use three studies to illustrate our investigation of potential tumor markers. Breast cancers are labeled in vivo with 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) to give a direct measure of the tumor labeling index. Bladder cancers are analyzed immunocytochemically using an antibody against proliferation. Finally, the techniques of molecular genetics are used to detect allelic loss in breast cancers. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  15. ANALYSES ON DIFFERENTIALLY EXPRESSED GENES ASSOCIATED WITH HUMAN BREAST CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Xu-li; DING Xiao-wen; XU Xiao-hong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the molecular etiology of breast cancer by way of studying the differential expression and initial function of the related genes in the occurrence and development of breast cancer. Methods: Two hundred and eighty-eight human tumor related genes were chosen for preparation of the oligochips probe. mRNA was extracted from 16 breast cancer tissues and the corresponding normal breast tissues, and cDNA probe was prepared through reverse-transcription and hybridized with the gene chip. A laser focused fluorescent scanner was used to scan the chip. The different gene expressions were thereafter automatically compared and analyzed between the two sample groups. Cy3/Cy5>3.5 meant significant up-regulation. Cy3/Cy5<0.25 meant significant down-regulation. Results: The comparison between the breast cancer tissues and their corresponding normal tissues showed that 84 genes had differential expression in the Chip. Among the differently expressed genes, there were 4 genes with significant down-regulation and 6 with significant up-regulation. Compared with normal breast tissues, differentially expressed genes did partially exist in the breast cancer tissues. Conclusion: Changes in multi-gene expression regulations take place during the occurrence and development of breast cancer; and the research on related genes can help understanding the mechanism of tumor occurrence.

  16. KiSS-1 expression in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Tracey A; Watkins, Gareth; Jiang, Wen G

    2005-01-01

    The KiSS-1 gene encodes a 145 amino acid residue peptide that is further processed to a final peptide, metastin, a ligand to a G-coupled orphan receptor (OT7T175/AXOR12). KiSS-1 has been identified as a putative human metastasis suppressor gene in melanomas and in breast cancer cell lines. This study aimed to determine the expression and distribution of KiSS-1 and its receptor in human breast cancer tissues and to identify a possible link between expression levels and patient prognosis. Frozen sections from breast cancer primary tumours (matched tumour 124 and background 33) were immuno-stained with KiSS-1 antibody. RNA was reverse transcribed and analyzed by Q-PCR (standardized using beta-actin, and normalized with cytokeratin-19 levels). Levels of expression of KiSS-1 were higher in tumour compared to background tissues (3,124+/-1,262 vs 2,397+/-1,181) and significantly increased in node positive tumours compared to node negative (3,637+/-1,719 vs 2,653+/-1,994, P = 0.02). KiSS-1 expression was also increased with increasing grade and TNM status. There were no such trends with the KiSS-1 receptor. Expression of KiSS-1 was higher in patients who had died from breast cancer than those who had remained healthy (4,631+/-3,024 vs 2,280+/-1,403) whereas expression of the receptor was reduced (480+/-162 vs 195+/-134). Immunohistochemical staining showed increased expression of KiSS-1 in tumour sections. Insertion of the KiSS-1 gene into the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, resulted in cells that were significantly more motile and invasive in behaviour, with reduced adhesion to matrix, using respective assays. In conclusion, KiSS-1 expression is increased in human breast cancer, particularly in patients with aggressive tumours and with mortality. Over-expression of KiSS-1 in breast cancer cells result in more aggressive phenotype. Together, it suggests that KiSS-1 plays a role beyond the initial metastasis repressor in this cancer type.

  17. Are 20 human papillomavirus types causing cervical cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Arbyn, Marc; Tommasino, Massimo; Depuydt, Christophe; Dillner, Joakim

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: In 2012, the International Agency for Research on Cancer concluded that there was consistent and sufficient epidemiological, experimental and mechanistic evidence of carcinogenicity to humans for 12 HPV types (HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV39, HPV45, HPV51, HPV52, HPV56, HPV58 and HPV59) for cervical cancer. Therefore, these types were considered as 1A carcinogens. They all belong to the family of the -Papillomaviridae, in particular to the species 5 (HPV51), 6 (HPV56), 7 (H...

  18. Aurora-A Oncogene in Human Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    in Human Ovarian Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-05-1-0021 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Jin Q. Cheng, M.D...this project : 1) examine the clinicalpathological significance and the mechanism of Aurora-A overexpression/activation in ovarian cancer; 2) determine...kinase is required to localize D-TACC to centro- somes and to regulate astral microtubules. J Cell Biol 2002;156:437–51. 33. Castro A, Mandart E, Lorca T

  19. Moving Forward in Human Cancer Risk Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Paules, Richard S.; Aubrecht, Jiri; Corvi, Raffaella; Garthoff, Bernward; Kleinjans, Jos C.

    2010-01-01

    Background The current safety paradigm for assessing carcinogenic properties of drugs, cosmetics, industrial chemicals, and environmental exposures relies mainly on in vitro genotoxicity testing followed by 2-year rodent bioassays. This testing battery is extremely sensitive but has low specificity. Furthermore, rodent bioassays are associated with high costs, high animal burden, and limited predictive value for human risks. Objectives We provide a response to a growing appeal for a paradigm ...

  20. Human endogenous retroviruses and cancer prevention: evidence and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cegolon Luca

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer is a significant and growing problem worldwide. While this increase may, in part, be attributed to increasing longevity, improved case notifications and risk-enhancing lifestyle (such as smoking, diet and obesity, hygiene-related factors resulting in immuno-regulatory failure may also play a major role and call for a revision of vaccination strategies to protect against a range of cancers in addition to infections. Discussion Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs are a significant component of a wider family of retroelements that constitutes part of the human genome. They were originated by the integration of exogenous retroviruses into the human genome millions of years ago. HERVs are estimated to comprise about 8% of human DNA and are ubiquitous in somatic and germinal tissues. Physiologic and pathologic processes are influenced by some biologically active HERV families. HERV antigens are only expressed at low levels by the host, but in circumstances of inappropriate control their genes may initiate or maintain pathological processes. Although the precise mechanism leading to abnormal HERVs gene expression has yet to be clearly elucidated, environmental factors seem to be involved by influencing the human immune system. HERV-K expression has been detected in different types of tumors. Among the various human endogenous retroviral families, the K series was the latest acquired by the human species. Probably because of its relatively recent origin, the HERV-K is the most complete and biologically active family. The abnormal expression of HERV-K seemingly triggers pathological processes leading to melanoma onset, but also contributes to the morphological and functional cellular modifications implicated in melanoma maintenance and progression. The HERV-K-MEL antigen is encoded by a pseudo-gene incorporated in the HERV-K env-gene. HERV-K-MEL is significantly expressed in the majority of dysplastic and normal naevi, as well

  1. Regional differences of physiological functions and cancer susceptibility in the human large intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cats, A; DeVries, EGE; Mulder, NH; Kleibeuker, JH

    1996-01-01

    Regional differences in function, metabolism and morphology between proximal colon, distal colon and rectum may be important in the pathogenesis and biologic behaviour of tumours originating from these segments. Thus, the effect of primary prevention of colorectal cancer may also differ from one lar

  2. Apoptosis mechanisms of human gastric cancer cell line MKN-45 infected with human mutant p27

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Shui Zhu; Long Wang; Guo-Qiang Cheng; Qin Li; Zu-Ming Zhu; Li Zhu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To explore the inducing effect of human mutant p27 gene on the apoptosis of the human gastric cancer cell line MKN-45 and its associated mechanisms. METHODS: The recombinant adenovirus Ad-p27mt was constructed to infect the human gastric cancer cell line MKN-45. Using flow cytometry, TUNEL assay and DNA fragment analysis, we measured the apoptotic effect of Ad-p27mt on the human gastric cancer cells. RESULTS: Ad-p27mt was successfully constructed and the infection efficiency reached 100%. After 18 h of infection, we observed an apoptotic hypodiploid peak on the flow cytometer before G1-S and apoptotic characteristic bands in the DNA electrophoresis. The apoptotic rate detected by TUNEL method was significantly higher in the Ad-p27mt group (89.4±3.12%)compared to the control group (3.12±0.13%, P < 0.01).CONCLUSION: Human mutant p27 can induce apoptosis of the human gastric cancer cells in vitro.

  3. MicroRNA in human cancer and chronic inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanwar, Jagat R; Mahidhara, Ganesh; Kanwar, Rupinder K

    2010-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are the non-coding RNAs that act as post-translational regulators to their complimentary messenger RNAs (mRNA). Due to their specific gene silencing property, miRNAs have been implicated in a number of cellular and developmental processes. Also, it has been proposed that a particular set of miRNA spectrum is expressed only in a particular type of tissue. Many interesting findings related to the differential expression of miRNAs in various human diseases including several types of cancers, neurodegenerative diseases and metabolic diseases have been reported. Deregulation of miRNA expression in different types of human diseases and the roles various miRNAs play as tumour suppressors as well as oncogenes, suggest their contribution to cancer and/or in other disease development. These findings have possible implications in the development of diagnostics and/or therapeutics in human malignancies. In this review, we discuss various miRNAs that are differentially expressed in human chronic inflammatory diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, cancer and the further prospective development of miRNA based diagnostics and therapeutics.

  4. MicroRNA Regulation of Human Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Shimono

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are involved in virtually all biological processes, including stem cell maintenance, differentiation, and development. The dysregulation of miRNAs is associated with many human diseases including cancer. We have identified a set of miRNAs differentially expressed between human breast cancer stem cells (CSCs and non-tumorigenic cancer cells. In addition, these miRNAs are similarly upregulated or downregulated in normal mammary stem/progenitor cells. In this review, we mainly describe the miRNAs that are dysregulated in human breast CSCs directly isolated from clinical specimens. The miRNAs and their clusters, such as the miR-200 clusters, miR-183 cluster, miR-221-222 cluster, let-7, miR-142 and miR-214, target the genes and pathways important for stem cell maintenance, such as the self-renewal gene BMI1, apoptosis, Wnt signaling, Notch signaling, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. In addition, the current evidence shows that metastatic breast CSCs acquire a phenotype that is different from the CSCs in a primary site. Thus, clarifying the miRNA regulation of the metastatic breast CSCs will further advance our understanding of the roles of human breast CSCs in tumor progression.

  5. ETS2 mediated tumor suppressive function and MET oncogene inhibition in human non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabbout, Mohamed; Garcia, Melinda M.; Fujimoto, Junya; Liu, Diane D.; Woods, Denise; Chow, Chi-Wan; Mendoza, Gabriela; Momin, Amin A.; James, Brian P.; Solis, Luisa; Behrens, Carmen; Lee, J. Jack

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The ETS2 transcription factor is an evolutionarily conserved gene that is deregulated in cancer. We analyzed the transcriptome of lung adenocarcinomas and normal lung tissue by expression profiling and found that ETS2 was significantly down-regulated in adenocarcinomas. In this study, we probed the yet unknown functional role of ETS2 in lung cancer pathogenesis. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN Lung adenocarcinomas (n=80) and normal lung tissues (n=30) were profiled using the Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST platform. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis was performed to determine ETS2 protein expression in NSCLC histological tissue specimens (n=201). Patient clinical outcome, based on ETS2 IHC expression, was statistically assessed using the log-rank and Kaplan-Meier tests. RNA interference and over-expression strategies were employed to assess effects of ETS2 expression on the transcriptome and on various malignant phenotypes. RESULTS ETS2 expression was significantly reduced in lung adenocarcinomas compared to normal lung (precurrence in NSCLC (p=0.009, HR=1.89) and adenocarcinoma (p=0.03, HR=1.86). Moreover, ETS2 was found to significantly inhibit lung cancer cell growth, migration and invasion (p<0.05), and microarray and pathways analysis revealed significant (p<0.001) activation of the HGF pathway following ETS2 knockdown. In addition, ETS2 was found to suppress MET phosphorylation and knockdown of MET expression significantly attenuated (p<0.05) cell invasion mediated by ETS2-specific siRNA. Furthermore, knockdown of ETS2 augmented HGF-induced MET phosphorylation, cell migration and invasion. CONCLUSION(S) Our findings point to a tumor suppressor role for ETS2 in human NSCLC pathogenesis through inhibition of the MET proto-oncogene. PMID:23659968

  6. Anti-cancer effects of Kochia scoparia fruit in human breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Yeon Han

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The fruit of Kochia scoparia Scharder is widely used as a medicinal ingredient for the treatment of dysuria and skin diseases in China, Japan and Korea. Especially, K. scoparia had been used for breast masses and chest and flank pain. Objective: To investigate the anti-cancer effect of K. scoparia on breast cancer. Materials and Methods: We investigated the anti-cancer effects of K. scoparia, methanol extract (MEKS in vitro. We examined the effects of MEKS on the proliferation rate, cell cycle arrest, reactive oxygen species (ROS generation and activation of apoptosis-associated proteins in MDA-MB-231, human breast cancer cells. Results: MTT assay results demonstrated that MEKS decreased the proliferation rates of MDA-MB-231 cells in a dose-dependent manner with an IC 50 value of 36.2 μg/ml. MEKS at 25 μg/ml significantly increased the sub-G1 DNA contents of MDA-MB-231 cells to 44.7%, versus untreated cells. In addition, MEKS induced apoptosis by increasing the levels of apoptosis-associated proteins such as cleaved caspase 3, cleaved caspase 8, cleaved caspase 9 and cleaved Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. Conclusion: These results suggest that MEKS inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells and that MEKS may have potential chemotherapeutic value for the treatment of human breast cancer.

  7. Role of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines and Biochemical Markers in the Pathogenesis of Type 1 Diabetes: Correlation with Age and Glycemic Condition in Diabetic Human Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubair, Swaleha; Ajmal, Mohd; Siddiqui, Sheelu Shafiq; Moin, Shagufta; Owais, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background Type 1 diabetes mellitus is a chronic inflammatory disease involving insulin producing β-cells destroyed by the conjoined action of auto reactive T-cells, inflammatory cytokines and monocytic cells. The aim of this study was to elucidate the status of pro-inflammatory cytokines and biochemical markers and possible correlation of these factors towards outcome of the disease. Methods The study was carried out on 29 T1D subjects and 20 healthy subjects. Plasma levels of oxidative stress markers, enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants were estimated employing biochemical assays. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as by IL-1β & IL-17 in the serum were determined by ELISA, while the expression of TNF-α, IL-23 & IFN-γ was ascertained by qRT-PCR. Results The onset of T1D disease was accompanied with elevation in levels of Plasma malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl content and nitric oxide while plasma vitamin C, reduced glutathione and erythrocyte sulfhydryl groups were found to be significantly decreased in T1D patients as compared to healthy control subjects. Activity of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase and glutathione-s-transferase showed a significant suppression in the erythrocytes of T1D patients as compared to healthy subjects. Nevertheless, the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-17A were significantly augmented (***p≤.001) on one hand, while expression of T cell based cytokines IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-23 was also up-regulated (*p≤.05) as compared to healthy human subjects. Conclusion The level of pro-inflammatory cytokines and specific biochemical markers in the serum of the patient can be exploited as potential markers for type 1 diabetes pathogenesis. The study suggests that level of inflammatory markers is up-regulated in T1D patients in an age dependent manner. PMID:27575603

  8. The role of EBV in MS pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tove

    2006-01-01

    Environmental factors operate on a background of genetic susceptibility in the pathogenesis of MS. Human herpesviruses, notably Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and human endogenous retroviruses are factors associated with MS. EBV association is found in epidemiological surveys where late EBV infection ....... EBV cannot stand alone as a causal factor of MS, but is likely to play an indirect role as an activator of the underlying disease process.......Environmental factors operate on a background of genetic susceptibility in the pathogenesis of MS. Human herpesviruses, notably Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and human endogenous retroviruses are factors associated with MS. EBV association is found in epidemiological surveys where late EBV infection...

  9. Lnc2Cancer: a manually curated database of experimentally supported lncRNAs associated with various human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Shangwei; Zhang, Jizhou; Wang, Peng; Zhi, Hui; Wang, Jianjian; Liu, Yue; Gao, Yue; Guo, Maoni; Yue, Ming; Wang, Lihua; Li, Xia

    2016-01-04

    Lnc2Cancer (http://www.bio-bigdata.net/lnc2cancer) is a manually curated database of cancer-associated long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) with experimental support that aims to provide a high-quality and integrated resource for exploring lncRNA deregulation in various human cancers. LncRNAs represent a large category of functional RNA molecules that play a significant role in human cancers. A curated collection and summary of deregulated lncRNAs in cancer is essential to thoroughly understand the mechanisms and functions of lncRNAs. Here, we developed the Lnc2Cancer database, which contains 1057 manually curated associations between 531 lncRNAs and 86 human cancers. Each association includes lncRNA and cancer name, the lncRNA expression pattern, experimental techniques, a brief functional description, the original reference and additional annotation information. Lnc2Cancer provides a user-friendly interface to conveniently browse, retrieve and download data. Lnc2Cancer also offers a submission page for researchers to submit newly validated lncRNA-cancer associations. With the rapidly increasing interest in lncRNAs, Lnc2Cancer will significantly improve our understanding of lncRNA deregulation in cancer and has the potential to be a timely and valuable resource.

  10. Fenton reaction induced cancer in wild type rats recapitulates genomic alterations observed in human cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Akatsuka

    Full Text Available Iron overload has been associated with carcinogenesis in humans. Intraperitoneal administration of ferric nitrilotriacetate initiates a Fenton reaction in renal proximal tubules of rodents that ultimately leads to a high incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC after repeated treatments. We performed high-resolution microarray comparative genomic hybridization to identify characteristics in the genomic profiles of this oxidative stress-induced rat RCCs. The results revealed extensive large-scale genomic alterations with a preference for deletions. Deletions and amplifications were numerous and sometimes fragmented, demonstrating that a Fenton reaction is a cause of such genomic alterations in vivo. Frequency plotting indicated that two of the most commonly altered loci corresponded to a Cdkn2a/2b deletion and a Met amplification. Tumor sizes were proportionally associated with Met expression and/or amplification, and clustering analysis confirmed our results. Furthermore, we developed a procedure to compare whole genomic patterns of the copy number alterations among different species based on chromosomal syntenic relationship. Patterns of the rat RCCs showed the strongest similarity to the human RCCs among five types of human cancers, followed by human malignant mesothelioma, an iron overload-associated cancer. Therefore, an iron-dependent Fenton chemical reaction causes large-scale genomic alterations during carcinogenesis, which may result in distinct genomic profiles. Based on the characteristics of extensive genome alterations in human cancer, our results suggest that this chemical reaction may play a major role during human carcinogenesis.

  11. Alterations of p63 and p73 in human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Kazushi; Fry, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    p53 and its related genes, p63 and p73 constitute the p53 gene family. While p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human tumors, p63 and p73 are rarely mutated or deleted in cancers. Many studies have reported p63/p73 overexpression in human cancers while others showed that a loss of p63/p73 is associated with tumor progression and metastasis. Thus, whether p63 or p73 is a tumor suppressor gene or an oncogene has been a matter of debate. This controversy has been attributed to the existence of multiple splicing isoforms with distinct functions; the full-length TA isoform of p63 has structural and functional similarity to wild-type p53, whereas the ΔNp63 acts primarily in dominant-negative fashion against all family members of p53. Differential activities of TA and ΔN isoforms have been shown in vivo by creating isform-specific gene knockout mice. All p53, p63, p73 proteins bind to and activate target genes with p53-response elements; p63 also binds to distinct p63-response elements and regulate expression of specific target genes involved in skin, limb, and craniofacial development. Interestingly, several studies have shown that both p63 and p73 are involved in cellular response to cancer therapy and others have indicated that both of these molecules are required for p53-induced apoptosis, suggesting functional interplay among p53 family proteins. Consistent with these findings, aberrant splicing that result in ΔNp63 or ΔNp73 overexpression are frequently found in human cancers, and is associated with poor clinical outcomes of patients in the latter. Thus immunohistochemical staining of tumor specimen with ΔNp73-specific antibody might have diagnostic values in cancer clinics.

  12. Pathogenesis of listeriosis during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Keith P; Czuprynski, Charles J

    2013-06-01

    Listeria monocytogenes causes several clinical manifestations in humans and domestic animals. This bacterium is a saprophyte in soil and ensiled feeds, which are sources of infection for food producing animals (i.e. ruminants). The most common route of infection for people is via ingestion of contaminated ready-to-eat food products such as produce, soft cheeses and deli meats. In the United States, L. monocytogenes causes relatively few cases of clinical disease compared to other food-borne pathogens. However, clinical listeriosis is associated with high mortality, especially in immunocompromised patients, pregnant women, neonates, and the elderly. Listeria is an intracellular pathogen, which has been widely used in basic research to elucidate mechanisms of molecular pathogenesis and protective cell-mediated immunity. Despite the sizeable knowledge on L. monocytogenes pathogenesis, key points regarding listeriosis during pregnancy and the perinatal period remain unknown. This review summarizes listeriosis in humans and domestic animals during pregnancy, and animal models used to study the pathogenesis and immune response to L. monocytogenes infection during these periods.

  13. Cadmium-induced cancers in animals and in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, James; Lunn, Ruth M; Waalkes, Michael P; Tomatis, Lorenzo; Infante, Peter F

    2007-01-01

    Discovered in the early 1800s, the use of cadmium and various cadmium salts started to become industrially important near the close of the 19th century, rapidly thereafter began to flourish, yet has diminished more recently. Most cadmium used in the United States is a byproduct from the smelting of zinc, lead, or copper ores, and is used to manufacture batteries. Carcinogenic activity of cadmium was discovered first in animals and only subsequently in humans. Cadmium and cadmium compounds have been classified as known human carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer and the National Toxicology Program based on epidemiologic studies showing a causal association with lung cancer, and possibly prostate cancer, and studies in experimental animals, demonstrating that cadmium causes tumors at multiple tissue sites, by various routes of exposure, and in several species and strains. Epidemiologic studies published since these evaluations suggest that cadmium is also associated with cancers of the breast, kidney, pancreas, and urinary bladder. The basic metal cationic portion of cadmium is responsible for both toxic and carcinogenic activity, and the mechanism of carcinogenicity appears to be multifactorial. Available information about the carcinogenicity of cadmium and cadmium compounds is reviewed, evaluated, and discussed.

  14. The Epidemiology of Human Papillomavirus Infection and Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Xavier Bosch

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer has been recognized as a rare outcome of a common Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI. The etiologic association is restricted to a limited number of viral types of the family of the Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs. The association is causal in nature and under optimal testing systems, HPV DNA can be identified in all specimens of invasive cervical cancer. As a consequence, it has been claimed that HPV infection is a necessary cause of cervical cancer. The evidence is consistent worldwide and implies both the Squamous Cell Carcinomas (SCC, the adenocarcinomas and the vast majority (i.e. > 95% of the immediate precursors, namely High Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions (HSIL/Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia 3 (CIN3/Carcinoma in situ. Co-factors that modify the risk among HPV DNA positive women include the use of oral contraceptives (OC for five or more years, smoking, high parity (five or more full term pregnancies and previous exposure to other sexually transmitted diseases such as Chlamydia Trachomatis (CT and Herpes Simplex Virus type 2 (HSV-2. Women exposed to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV are at high risk for HPV infection, HPV DNA persistency and progression of HPV lesions to cervical cancer.

  15. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilo, Vania; Sugiyama, Toshiro; Touati, Eliette

    2017-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is responsible for the most commonly found infection in the world's population. It is the major risk factor for gastric cancer development. Numerous studies published over the last year provide new insights into the strategies employed by H. pylori to adapt to the extreme acidic conditions of the gastric environment, to establish persistent infection and to deregulate host functions, leading to gastric pathogenesis and cancer. In this review, we report recent data on the mechanisms involved in chemotaxis, on the essential role of nickel in acid resistance and gastric colonization, on the importance of adhesins and Hop proteins and on the role of CagPAI-components and CagA. Among the host functions, a special focus has been made on the escape from immune response, the ability of bacteria to induce genetic instability and modulate telomeres, the mechanism of autophagy and the deregulation of micro RNAs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Cancer genes hypermethylated in human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Calvanese

    Full Text Available Developmental genes are silenced in embryonic stem cells by a bivalent histone-based chromatin mark. It has been proposed that this mark also confers a predisposition to aberrant DNA promoter hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs in cancer. We report here that silencing of a significant proportion of these TSGs in human embryonic and adult stem cells is associated with promoter DNA hypermethylation. Our results indicate a role for DNA methylation in the control of gene expression in human stem cells and suggest that, for genes repressed by promoter hypermethylation in stem cells in vivo, the aberrant process in cancer could be understood as a defect in establishing an unmethylated promoter during differentiation, rather than as an anomalous process of de novo hypermethylation.

  17. Oncogenic potential of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and its relation with cervical cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Idrees Muhammad; Khan Khalida; Zahra Amreen; Faridi Rabia

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common cause of cervical cancer. Cervical cancer being the second most common cancer after lung cancer, affecting women of different age groups; has a prevalence of about 20% in young sexually active women. Among different types of HPV, HPV16 the major strain causing this cancer and is sexually transmitted had been unnoticed for decades. Keeping in mind the multiple risk factors related with cervical cancer such as early age sexual activities, t...

  18. Expression of Axl and its prognostic significance in human breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Gaoyuan; Wang, Zhenzhen; Wang, Jianguang; Zhang, Like; CHEN Yanbin; Yuan, Pengfei; Liu, Dechun

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignant cancer and second leading cause of cancer-related death among women, and its prevalence continues to increase. Axl overexpression has been identified in the many types of human cancer, and it has been demonstrated to participate in signaling pathways related to carcinogenesis and cancer development. In the present study, Axl expression was examined by performing immunohistochemical staining in 60 breast cancer tumors and 40 benign breast lesions (25 ...

  19. Human papillomavirus vaccination guideline update: American Cancer Society guideline endorsement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saslow, Debbie; Andrews, Kimberly S; Manassaram-Baptiste, Deana; Loomer, Lacey; Lam, Kristina E; Fisher-Borne, Marcie; Smith, Robert A; Fontham, Elizabeth T H

    2016-09-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The American Cancer Society (ACS) reviewed and updated its guideline on human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination based on a methodologic and content review of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) HPV vaccination recommendations. A literature review was performed to supplement the evidence considered by the ACIP and to address new vaccine formulations and recommendations as well as new data on population outcomes since publication of the 2007 ACS guideline. The ACS Guideline Development Group determined that the evidence supports ACS endorsement of the ACIP recommendations, with one qualifying statement related to late vaccination. The ACS recommends vaccination of all children at ages 11 and 12 years to protect against HPV infections that lead to several cancers and precancers. Late vaccination for those not vaccinated at the recommended ages should be completed as soon as possible, and individuals should be informed that vaccination may not be effective at older ages. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:375-385. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  20. EMT is the dominant program in human colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tollenaar Rob AEM

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colon cancer has been classically described by clinicopathologic features that permit the prediction of outcome only after surgical resection and staging. Methods We performed an unsupervised analysis of microarray data from 326 colon cancers to identify the first principal component (PC1 of the most variable set of genes. PC1 deciphered two primary, intrinsic molecular subtypes of colon cancer that predicted disease progression and recurrence. Results Here we report that the most dominant pattern of intrinsic gene expression in colon cancer (PC1 was tightly correlated (Pearson R = 0.92, P -135 with the EMT signature-- both in gene identity and directionality. In a global micro-RNA screen, we further identified the most anti-correlated microRNA with PC1 as MiR200, known to regulate EMT. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the biology underpinning the native, molecular classification of human colon cancer--previously thought to be highly heterogeneous-- was clarified through the lens of comprehensive transcriptome analysis.

  1. Analyzing the regulation of metabolic pathways in human breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schramm Gunnar

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor therapy mainly attacks the metabolism to interfere the tumor's anabolism and signaling of proliferative second messengers. However, the metabolic demands of different cancers are very heterogeneous and depend on their origin of tissue, age, gender and other clinical parameters. We investigated tumor specific regulation in the metabolism of breast cancer. Methods For this, we mapped gene expression data from microarrays onto the corresponding enzymes and their metabolic reaction network. We used Haar Wavelet transforms on optimally arranged grid representations of metabolic pathways as a pattern recognition method to detect orchestrated regulation of neighboring enzymes in the network. Significant combined expression patterns were used to select metabolic pathways showing shifted regulation of the aggressive tumors. Results Besides up-regulation for energy production and nucleotide anabolism, we found an interesting cellular switch in the interplay of biosynthesis of steroids and bile acids. The biosynthesis of steroids was up-regulated for estrogen synthesis which is needed for proliferative signaling in breast cancer. In turn, the decomposition of steroid precursors was blocked by down-regulation of the bile acid pathway. Conclusion We applied an intelligent pattern recognition method for analyzing the regulation of metabolism and elucidated substantial regulation of human breast cancer at the interplay of cholesterol biosynthesis and bile acid metabolism pointing to specific breast cancer treatment.

  2. Identification of differentially expressed circular RNAs in human colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peili; Zuo, Zhigui; Shang, Wenjing; Wu, Aihua; Bi, Ruichun; Wu, Jianbo; Li, Shaotang; Sun, Xuecheng; Jiang, Lei

    2017-03-01

    Circular RNA, a class of non-coding RNA, is a new group of RNAs and is related to tumorigenesis. Circular RNAs are suggested to be ideal candidate biomarkers with potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications. However, little is known about their expression in human colorectal cancer. In our study, differentially expressed circular RNAs were detected using circular RNA array in paired tumor and adjacent non-tumorous tissues from six colorectal cancer patients. Expression levels of selected circular RNAs (hsa_circRNA_103809 and hsa_circRNA_104700) were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction in 170 paired colorectal cancer samples for validation. Statistical analyses were conducted to investigate the association between hsa_circRNA_103809 and hsa_circRNA_104700 expression levels and respective patient clinicopathological features. Receiver operating characteristic curve was constructed to evaluate the diagnostic values. Our results indicated that there were 125 downregulated and 76 upregulated circular RNAs in colorectal cancer tissues compared with normal tissues. We also first demonstrated that the expression levels of hsa_circRNA_103809 ( p colorectal cancer than in normal tissues. The expression level of hsa_circRNA_103809 was significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis ( p = 0.021) and tumor-node-metastasis stage ( p = 0.011), and the expression level of hsa_circRNA_104700 was significantly correlated with distal metastasis ( p = 0.036). The area under receiver operating characteristic curves of hsa_circRNA_103809 and hsa_circRNA_104700 were 0.699 ( p colorectal cancer and serve as potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

  3. Integrated proteomic analysis of human cancer cells and plasma from tumor bearing mice for ovarian cancer biomarker discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon J Pitteri

    Full Text Available The complexity of the human plasma proteome represents a substantial challenge for biomarker discovery. Proteomic analysis of genetically engineered mouse models of cancer and isolated cancer cells and cell lines provide alternative methods for identification of potential cancer markers that would be detectable in human blood using sensitive assays. The goal of this work is to evaluate the utility of an integrative strategy using these two approaches for biomarker discovery.We investigated a strategy that combined quantitative plasma proteomics of an ovarian cancer mouse model with analysis of proteins secreted or shed by human ovarian cancer cells. Of 106 plasma proteins identified with increased levels in tumor bearing mice, 58 were also secreted or shed from ovarian cancer cells. The remainder consisted primarily of host-response proteins. Of 25 proteins identified in the study that were assayed, 8 mostly secreted proteins common to mouse plasma and human cancer cells were significantly upregulated in a set of plasmas from ovarian cancer patients. Five of the eight proteins were confirmed to be upregulated in a second independent set of ovarian cancer plasmas, including in early stage disease.Integrated proteomic analysis of cancer mouse models and human cancer cell populations provides an effective approach to identify potential circulating protein biomarkers.

  4. Imaging Proteolysis by Living Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Sameni

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant progression is accompanied by degradation of extracellular matrix proteins. Here we describe a novel confocal assay in which we can observe proteolysis by living human breast cancer cells (BT20 and BT549 through the use of quenchedfluorescent protein substrates. Degradation thus was imaged, by confocal optical sectioning, as an accumulation of fluorescent products. With the BT20 cells, fluorescence was localized to pericellular focal areas that coincide with pits in the underlying matrix. In contrast, fluorescence was localized to intracellular vesicles in the BT549 cells, vesicles that also label for lysosomal markers. Neither intracellular nor pericellular fluorescence was observed in the BT549 cells in the presence of cytochalasin B, suggesting that degradation occurred intracellularly and was dependent on endocytic uptake of substrate. In the presence of a cathepsin 13-selective cysteine protease inhibitor, intracellular fluorescence was decreased ~90% and pericellular fluorescence decreased 67% to 96%, depending on the protein substrate. Matrix metallo protease inhibitors reduced pericellular fluorescence ~50%, i.e., comparably to a serine and a broad spectrum cysteine protease inhibitor. Our results suggest that: 1 a proteolytic cascade participates in pericellular digestion of matrix proteins by living human breast cancer cells, and 2 the cysteine protease cathepsin B participates in both pericellular and intracellular digestion of matrix proteins by living human breast cancer cells.

  5. A 2015 survey of established or potential epigenetic biomarkers for the accurate detection of human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amacher, David E

    2016-07-01

    Context The silencing or activation of cancer-associated genes by epigenetic mechanisms can ultimately lead to the clonal expansion of cancer cells. Objective The aim of this review is to summarize all relevant epigenetic biomarkers that have been proposed to date for the diagnosis of some prevalent human cancers. Methods A Medline search for the terms epigenetic biomarkers, human cancers, DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNAs was performed. Results One hundred fifty-seven relevant publications were found and reviewed. Conclusion To date, a significant number of potential epigenetic cancer biomarkers of human cancer have been investigated, and some have advanced to clinical implementation.

  6. Candidate serological biomarkers for cancer identified from the secretomes of 23 cancer cell lines and the human protein atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chih-Ching; Hsu, Chia-Wei; Chen, Chi-De; Yu, Chia-Jung; Chang, Kai-Ping; Tai, Dar-In; Liu, Hao-Ping; Su, Wen-Hui; Chang, Yu-Sun; Yu, Jau-Song

    2010-06-01

    Although cancer cell secretome profiling is a promising strategy used to identify potential body fluid-accessible cancer biomarkers, questions remain regarding the depth to which the cancer cell secretome can be mined and the efficiency with which researchers can select useful candidates from the growing list of identified proteins. Therefore, we analyzed the secretomes of 23 human cancer cell lines derived from 11 cancer types using one-dimensional SDS-PAGE and nano-LC-MS/MS performed on an LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer to generate a more comprehensive cancer cell secretome. A total of 31,180 proteins was detected, accounting for 4,584 non-redundant proteins, with an average of 1,300 proteins identified per cell line. Using protein secretion-predictive algorithms, 55.8% of the proteins appeared to be released or shed from cells. The identified proteins were selected as potential marker candidates according to three strategies: (i) proteins apparently secreted by one cancer type but not by others (cancer type-specific marker candidates), (ii) proteins released by most cancer cell lines (pan-cancer marker candidates), and (iii) proteins putatively linked to cancer-relevant pathways. We then examined protein expression profiles in the Human Protein Atlas to identify biomarker candidates that were simultaneously detected in the secretomes and highly expressed in cancer tissues. This analysis yielded 6-137 marker candidates selective for each tumor type and 94 potential pan-cancer markers. Among these, we selectively validated monocyte differentiation antigen CD14 (for liver cancer), stromal cell-derived factor 1 (for lung cancer), and cathepsin L1 and interferon-induced 17-kDa protein (for nasopharyngeal carcinoma) as potential serological cancer markers. In summary, the proteins identified from the secretomes of 23 cancer cell lines and the Human Protein Atlas represent a focused reservoir of potential cancer biomarkers.

  7. University Students' Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Cervical Cancer, Human Papillomavirus, and Human Papillomavirus Vaccines in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koç, Zeliha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The current descriptive study aimed to determine university students' knowledge and attitudes regarding cervical cancer, human papillomavirus (HPV), and HPV vaccines in Turkey. Participants: A total of 800 students participated. Methods: This study was carried out between September 1, 2012, and October 30, 2012, in 8 female…

  8. University Students' Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Cervical Cancer, Human Papillomavirus, and Human Papillomavirus Vaccines in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koç, Zeliha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The current descriptive study aimed to determine university students' knowledge and attitudes regarding cervical cancer, human papillomavirus (HPV), and HPV vaccines in Turkey. Participants: A total of 800 students participated. Methods: This study was carried out between September 1, 2012, and October 30, 2012, in 8 female…

  9. The Pathogenesis of Autism

    OpenAIRE

    Watts, Timothy John

    2008-01-01

    Autism is well known as a complex developmental disorder with a seemingly confusing and uncertain pathogenesis. The definitive mechanisms that promote autism are poorly understood and mostly unknown, yet available theories do appear to focus on the disruption of normal cerebral development and its subsequent implications on the functional brain unit. This mini-review aims solely to discuss and evaluate the most prominent current theories regarding the pathogenesis of autism. The main conclusi...

  10. Predicting human genetic interactions from cancer genome evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowen Lu

    Full Text Available Synthetic Lethal (SL genetic interactions play a key role in various types of biological research, ranging from understanding genotype-phenotype relationships to identifying drug-targets against cancer. Despite recent advances in empirical measuring SL interactions in human cells, the human genetic interaction map is far from complete. Here, we present a novel approach to predict this map by exploiting patterns in cancer genome evolution. First, we show that empirically determined SL interactions are reflected in various gene presence, absence, and duplication patterns in hundreds of cancer genomes. The most evident pattern that we discovered is that when one member of an SL interaction gene pair is lost, the other gene tends not to be lost, i.e. the absence of co-loss. This observation is in line with expectation, because the loss of an SL interacting pair will be lethal to the cancer cell. SL interactions are also reflected in gene expression profiles, such as an under representation of cases where the genes in an SL pair are both under expressed, and an over representation of cases where one gene of an SL pair is under expressed, while the other one is over expressed. We integrated the various previously unknown cancer genome patterns and the gene expression patterns into a computational model to identify SL pairs. This simple, genome-wide model achieves a high prediction power (AUC = 0.75 for known genetic interactions. It allows us to present for the first time a comprehensive genome-wide list of SL interactions with a high estimated prediction precision, covering up to 591,000 gene pairs. This unique list can potentially be used in various application areas ranging from biotechnology to medical genetics.

  11. Characterizing cancer cells with cancer stem cell-like features in 293T human embryonic kidney cells

    OpenAIRE

    Buchholz Thomas A; Lacerda Lara; Xu Wei; Robertson Fredika; Ueno Naoto T; Lucci Anthony; Landis Melissa D; Rodriguez Angel A; Li Li; Cohen Evan; Gao Hui; Krishnamurthy Savitri; Zhang Xiaomei; Debeb Bisrat G; Cristofanilli Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Since the first suggestion of prospectively identifiable cancer stem cells in solid tumors, efforts have been made to characterize reported cancer stem cell surrogates in existing cancer cell lines, and cell lines rich with these surrogates have been used to screen for cancer stem cell targeted agents. Although 293T cells were derived from human embryonic kidney, transplantation of these cells into the mammary fat pad yields aggressive tumors that self-renew as evidenced b...

  12. Are 20 human papillomavirus types causing cervical cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbyn, Marc; Tommasino, Massimo; Depuydt, Christophe; Dillner, Joakim

    2014-12-01

    In 2012, the International Agency for Research on Cancer concluded that there was consistent and sufficient epidemiological, experimental and mechanistic evidence of carcinogenicity to humans for 12 HPV types (HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV39, HPV45, HPV51, HPV52, HPV56, HPV58 and HPV59) for cervical cancer. Therefore, these types were considered as 1A carcinogens. They all belong to the family of the α-Papillomaviridae, in particular to the species α5 (HPV51), α6 (HPV56), α7 (HPV18, HPV39, HPV45, HPV59) and α9 (HPV16, HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV52, HPV58). Less evidence is available for a thirteenth type (HPV68, α7), which is classified as a 2A carcinogen (probably carcinogenic). Moreover, seven other phylogenetically related types (HPV26, HPV53, HPV66, HPV67, HPV68, HPV70 and HPV73) were identified as single HPV infections in certain rare cases of cervical cancer and were considered possibly carcinogenic (2B carcinogens). Recently, Halec et al [7] demonstrated that the molecular signature of HPV-induced carcinogenesis (presence of type-specific spliced E6*| mRNA; increased expression of p16; and decreased expression of cyclin D1, p53 and Rb) was similar in cervical cancers containing single infections with one of the eight afore-mentioned 2A or 2B carcinogens to those in cancers with single infections with group 1 carcinogens. Ninety six percent of cervical cancers are attributable to one of the 13 most common HPV types (groups 1 and 2A). Including the additional seven HPV types (group 2B) added 2.6%, to reach a total of 98.7% of all HPV-positive cervical cancers. From recently updated meta-analyses, it was shown that HPV68, HPV26, HPV66, HPV67, HPV73 and HPV82 were significantly more common in cancer cases than in women with normal cervical cytology, suggesting that for these HPV types, an upgrading of the carcinogen classification could be considered. However, there is no need to include them in HPV screening tests or vaccines, given their rarity in

  13. Pathogenesis of varicelloviruses in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouwendijk, Werner J D; Verjans, Georges M G M

    2015-01-01

    Varicelloviruses in primates comprise the prototypic human varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and its non-human primate homologue, simian varicella virus (SVV). Both viruses cause varicella as a primary infection, establish latency in ganglionic neurons and reactivate later in life to cause herpes zoster in their respective hosts. VZV is endemic worldwide and, although varicella is usually a benign disease in childhood, VZV reactivation is a significant cause of neurological disease in the elderly and in immunocompromised individuals. The pathogenesis of VZV infection remains ill-defined, mostly due to the species restriction of VZV that impedes studies in experimental animal models. SVV infection of non-human primates parallels virological, clinical, pathological and immunological features of human VZV infection, thereby providing an excellent model to study the pathogenesis of varicella and herpes zoster in its natural host. In this review, we discuss recent studies that provided novel insight in both the virus and host factors involved in the three elementary stages of Varicellovirus infection in primates: primary infection, latency and reactivation.

  14. Human brain cancer studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-Hui; Sun, Yi; Pu, Yang; Boydston-White, Susie; Liu, Yulong; Alfano, Robert R.

    2012-11-01

    The resonance Raman (RR) spectra of six types of human brain tissues are examined using a confocal micro-Raman system with 532-nm excitation in vitro. Forty-three RR spectra from seven subjects are investigated. The spectral peaks from malignant meningioma, stage III (cancer), benign meningioma (benign), normal meningeal tissues (normal), glioblastoma multiforme grade IV (cancer), acoustic neuroma (benign), and pituitary adenoma (benign) are analyzed. Using a 532-nm excitation, the resonance-enhanced peak at 1548 cm-1 (amide II) is observed in all of the tissue specimens, but is not observed in the spectra collected using the nonresonance Raman system. An increase in the intensity ratio of 1587 to 1605 cm-1 is observed in the RR spectra collected from meningeal cancer tissue as compared with the spectra collected from the benign and normal meningeal tissue. The peak around 1732 cm-1 attributed to fatty acids (lipids) are diminished in the spectra collected from the meningeal cancer tumors as compared with the spectra from normal and benign tissues. The characteristic band of spectral peaks observed between 2800 and 3100 cm-1 are attributed to the vibrations of methyl (-CH3) and methylene (-CH2-) groups. The ratio of the intensities of the spectral peaks of 2935 to 2880 cm-1 from the meningeal cancer tissues is found to be lower in comparison with that of the spectral peaks from normal, and benign tissues, which may be used as a distinct marker for distinguishing cancerous tissues from normal meningeal tissues. The statistical methods of principal component analysis and the support vector machine are used to analyze the RR spectral data collected from meningeal tissues, yielding a diagnostic sensitivity of 90.9% and specificity of 100% when two principal components are used.

  15. Combination of salinomycin and silver nanoparticles enhances apoptosis and autophagy in human ovarian cancer cells: an effective anticancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang XF

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Xi-Feng Zhang,1 Sangiliyandi Gurunathan2 1College of Biological and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Wuhan Polytechnic University, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Konkuk University, Seoul, South Korea Abstract: Ovarian cancer is one of the most important malignancies, and the origin, detection, and pathogenesis of epithelial ovarian cancer remain elusive. Although many cancer drugs have been developed to dramatically reduce the size of tumors, most cancers eventually relapse, posing a critical problem to overcome. Hence, it is necessary to identify possible alternative therapeutic approaches to reduce the mortality rate of this devastating disease. To identify alternative approaches, we first synthesized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs using a novel bacterium called Bacillus clausii. The synthesized AgNPs were homogenous and spherical in shape, with an average size of 16–20 nm, which are known to cause cytotoxicity in various types of human cancer cells, whereas salinomycin (Sal is able to kill cancer stem cells. Therefore, we selected both Sal and AgNPs to study their combined effect on apoptosis and autophagy in ovarian cancer cells. The cells treated with either Sal or AgNPs showed a dose-dependent effect with inhibitory concentration (IC-50 values of 6.0 µM and 8 µg/mL for Sal and AgNPs, respectively. To determine the combination effect, we measured the IC25 values of both Sal and AgNPs (3.0 µM and 4 µg/mL, which showed a more dramatic inhibitory effect on cell viability and cell morphology than either Sal or AgNPs alone. The combination of Sal and AgNPs had more pronounced effect on cytotoxicity and expression of apoptotic genes and also significantly induced the accumulation of autophagolysosomes, which was associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and loss of cell viability. Our data show a strong synergistic interaction between Sal and AgNPs in tested cancer cells. The combination

  16. Tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1 induce expression of the verocytotoxin receptor globotriaosylceramide on human endothelial cells: Implications for the pathogenesis of the hemolytic uremic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kar, N.C.A.J. van de; Monnens, L.A.H.; Karmali, M.A.; Hinsbergh, V.W.M. van

    1992-01-01

    The epidemic form of the hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), beginning with an acute gastroenteritis, has been associated with a verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli infection. The endothelial cell is believed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of HUS. Endothelial cell damage by

  17. AFM-based analysis of human metastatic cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Sarah E.; Jin, Yu-Sheng; Tondre, Julianne; Wong, Roger; Rao, Jian Yu; Gimzewski, James K.

    2008-09-01

    Recently biomechanics of cancer cells, in particular stiffness or elasticity, has been identified as an important factor relating to cancer cell function, adherence, motility, transformation and invasion. We report on the nanomechanical responses of metastatic cancer cells and benign mesothelial cells taken from human body cavity fluids using atomic force microscopy. Following our initial study (Cross et al 2007 Nat. Nanotechnol. 2 780-3), we report on the biophysical properties of patient-derived effusion cells and address the influence of cell morphology on measured cell stiffness. Using a cytocentrifugation method, which yields morphologically indistinguishable cells that can be prepared in 1 min and avoids any possible artifacts due to 12 h ex vivo culture, we find that metastatic tumor cells are more than 80% softer than benign cells with a distribution over six times narrower than that of normal cells. Consistent with our previous study, which yielded distinguishable cell populations based on ex vivo growth and morphological characteristics, our results show it is unlikely that morphology alone is sufficient to explain the difference in elastic moduli for these two cell types. Moreover, analysis of non-specific cell adhesion inherent to tumor and normal cells collected from patients show surface adhesion of tumor cells is ~33% less adhesive compared to that of normal cells. Our findings indicate that biomechanical-based functional analysis may provide an additional platform for cytological evaluation and diagnosis of cancer in the future.

  18. AFM-based analysis of human metastatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, Sarah E; Gimzewski, James K [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Jin Yusheng; Tondre, Julianne; Wong, Roger [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Rao Jianyu [California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)], E-mail: jrao@mednet.ucla.edu, E-mail: gim@chem.ucla.edu

    2008-09-24

    Recently biomechanics of cancer cells, in particular stiffness or elasticity, has been identified as an important factor relating to cancer cell function, adherence, motility, transformation and invasion. We report on the nanomechanical responses of metastatic cancer cells and benign mesothelial cells taken from human body cavity fluids using atomic force microscopy. Following our initial study (Cross et al 2007 Nat. Nanotechnol. 2 780-3), we report on the biophysical properties of patient-derived effusion cells and address the influence of cell morphology on measured cell stiffness. Using a cytocentrifugation method, which yields morphologically indistinguishable cells that can be prepared in 1 min and avoids any possible artifacts due to 12 h ex vivo culture, we find that metastatic tumor cells are more than 80% softer than benign cells with a distribution over six times narrower than that of normal cells. Consistent with our previous study, which yielded distinguishable cell populations based on ex vivo growth and morphological characteristics, our results show it is unlikely that morphology alone is sufficient to explain the difference in elastic moduli for these two cell types. Moreover, analysis of non-specific cell adhesion inherent to tumor and normal cells collected from patients show surface adhesion of tumor cells is {approx}33% less adhesive compared to that of normal cells. Our findings indicate that biomechanical-based functional analysis may provide an additional platform for cytological evaluation and diagnosis of cancer in the future.

  19. Human papillomavirus detection in paraffin-embedded colorectal cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanzi, Elisabetta; Bianchi, Silvia; Frati, Elena R; Amicizia, Daniela; Martinelli, Marianna; Bragazzi, Nicola L; Brisigotti, Maria Pia; Colzani, Daniela; Fasoli, Ester; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Panatto, Donatella; Gasparini, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has a well-recognized aetiological role in the development of cervical cancer and other anogenital tumours. Recently, an association between colorectal cancer and HPV infection has been suggested, although this is still controversial. This study aimed at detecting and characterizing HPV infection in 57 paired biopsies from colorectal cancers and adjacent intact tissues using a degenerate PCR approach. All amplified fragments were genotyped by means of sequencing. Overall, HPV prevalence was 12.3 %. In particular, 15.8 % of tumour tissues and 8.8 % of non-cancerous tissue samples were HPV DNA-positive. Of these samples, 85.7 % were genotyped successfully, with 41.7 % of sequences identifying four genotypes of the HR (high oncogenic risk) clade Group 1; the remaining 58.3 % of HPV-genotyped specimens had an unclassified β-HPV. Examining additional cases and analysing whole genomes will help to outline the significance of these findings.

  20. Expression of 5-Lipoxygenase in human colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Labile Togba Soumaoro; Satoru Iida; Hiroyuki Uetake; Megumi Ishiguro; Yoko Takagi; Tetsuro Higuchi; Masamichi Yasuno; Masayuki Enomoto; Kenichi Sugihara

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the 5-lipoxygenases (Loxs) expression level in human colorectal cancer specimens in order to determine its clinicopathologic significance in human tumorigenesis.METHODS: The relative quantity of 5-Lox mRNA in paired 91 colorectal tumor and adjacent normal mucosa samples was determined by real time quantitative PCR. Additionally, the expression of 5-Lox and cyclooxygenase (Cox)-2 proteins was also examined using immunohistochemical staining methods.RESULTS: There was a marked increase in 5-Lox mRNA levels in the tumor compared with paired normal mucosa samples (P < 0.0001). Sixty six (72.5%) tumors showed high 5-Lox mRNA levels. The positivity rate of 5-Lox and Cox-2 protein expression was 68.7% and 79.1%respectively. There was a significant association between tumoral 5-Lox mRNA level and tumor size (Rho = 0.392,P = 0.0002), depth or vessel invasion.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that 5-Lox is up-regulated in colorectal cancer and that inhibition of its expression might be valuable in the prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer.

  1. Mortalin sensitizes human cancer cells to MKT-077-induced senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deocaris, Custer C; Widodo, Nashi; Shrestha, Bhupal G; Kaur, Kamaljit; Ohtaka, Manami; Yamasaki, Kazuhiko; Kaul, Sunil C; Wadhwa, Renu

    2007-07-18

    Mortalin is a chaperone protein that functions in many cellular processes such as mitochondrial biogenesis, intracellular trafficking, cell proliferation and signaling. Its upregulation in many human cancers makes it a candidate target for therapeutic intervention by small molecule drugs. In continuation to our earlier studies showing mortalin as a cellular target of MKT-077, a mitochondrion-seeking delocalized cationic dye that causes selective death of cancer cells, in this work, we report that MKT-077 binds to the nucleotide-binding domain of mortalin, causes tertiary structural changes in the protein, inactivates its chaperone function, and induces senescence in human tumor cell lines. Interestingly, in tumor cells with elevated level of mortalin expression, fairly low drug doses were sufficient to induce senescence. Guided by molecular screening for mortalin in tumor cells, our results led to the idea that working at low doses of the drug could be an alternative senescence-inducing cancer therapeutic strategy that could, in theory, avoid renal toxicities responsible for the abortion of MKT-077 clinical trials. Our work may likely translate to a re-appraisal of the therapeutic benefits of low doses of several classes of anti-tumor drugs, even of those that had been discontinued due to adverse effects.

  2. Princess takamatsu symposium on DNA repair and human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Lawrence A; Nishimura, Susumu

    2010-06-01

    The 40th International Symposium of the Princess Takamatsu Cancer Research Fund, entitled "DNA Repair and Human Cancers," was held on November 10-12, 2009 at Hotel Grand Palace, Tokyo, Japan. The meeting focused on the role of DNA repair in preventing mutations by endogenous and exogenous DNA damage and increasing the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents by interfering with DNA repair. The 14 presentations by the speakers from the United States, four from the United Kingdom, one each from Italy, The Netherlands, and France, and 13 from Japan, covered most aspects of DNA repair, spanning DNA damage, molecular structures of repair enzymes, and clinical studies on inhibition of DNA repair processes. Extensive time was reserved for discussions with the active participation of the 150 invited Japanese scientists. The choice of a symposium on DNA repair in human cancers resulted in part from the excellent basic and clinical studies that have been carried out for many years in Japan, and the general lack of recognition versus the importance of DNA repair in understanding carcinogenesis. Copyright 2010 AACR.

  3. Pancreatic Cancer Cell Lines Can Induce Prostaglandin E2 Production from Human Blood Mononuclear Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana P. Grekova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggests an important role for cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 in the pathogenesis of a wide range of malignancies. The protumorigenic properties of COX-2 are generally thought to be mediated by its product, PGE2, which is shown to promote tumor spread and growth by multiple mechanisms but most importantly through modulation of the local immune response in the tumor. Pancreatic tumor cells produce various amounts of PGE2, some of them being even deficient in COX enzymes or other PGE2 synthases. Here we describe that, beside pancreatic tumor cells or stromal fibroblasts, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells can also produce PGE2 upon coculture with pancreatic cancer cells. Stimulating of cellular cPLA2 within PBMCs by secreted factors, presumably sPLA2, from tumor cells appeared crucial, while the direct contact between PBMCs and PDACs seemed to be dispensable for this effect. Our data is emphasizing the complex interactions participating in the formation of the tolerogenic immune milieu within pancreatic tumors.

  4. In vitro and in vivo growth suppression of human papillomavirus 16-positive cervical cancer cells by CRISPR/Cas9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhen, Shuai, E-mail: usa_2002@163.com [Baoji Maternal and Child Health Hospital, 2 Xinjian Road East, WeiBin District, Baoji City, 721000, Shanxi Province (China); Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an (China); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Hua, Ling [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); Takahashi, Y.; Narita, S. [Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Liu, Yun-Hui [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); Li, Yan [Baoji Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, No 43, BaoFu Road, Baoji City, Shanxi Province (China)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Established CRISPR/Cas9 targeting promoter of HPV 16 and targeting E6, E7 transcript. • CRISPR/Cas9 resulted in accumulation of p53 and p21, reduced the proliferation of cervical cancer cells. • Finding inhibited tumorigenesis and growth of mice incubated by cells with CRISPR/Cas9. • CRISPR/Cas9 will be a new treatment strategy, in cervical and other HPV-associated cancer therapy. - Abstract: Deregulated expression of high-risk human papillomavirus oncogenes (E6 and E7) is a pivotal event for pathogenesis and progression in cervical cancer. Both viral oncogenes are therefore regarded as ideal therapeutic targets. In the hope of developing a gene-specific therapy for HPV-related cancer, we established CRISPR/Cas9 targeting promoter of HPV 16 E6/E7 and targeting E6, E7 transcript, transduced the CRISPR/Cas9 into cervical HPV-16-positive cell line SiHa. The results showed that CRISPR/Cas9 targeting promoter, as well as targeting E6 and E7 resulted in accumulation of p53 and p21 protein, and consequently remarkably reduced the abilities of proliferation of cervical cancer cells in vitro. Then we inoculated subcutaneously cells into nude mice to establish the transplanted tumor animal models, and found dramatically inhibited tumorigenesis and growth of mice incubated by cells with CRISPR/Cas9 targeting (promoter+E6+E7)-transcript. Our results may provide evidence for application of CRISPR/Cas9 targeting HR-HPV key oncogenes, as a new treatment strategy, in cervical and other HPV-associated cancer therapy.

  5. Growth suppressive efficacy of human lak cells against human lung-cancer implanted into scid mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teraoka, S; Kyoizumi, S; Suzuki, T; Yamakido, M; Akiyama, M

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine the efficacy of immunotherapy using human lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cells against a human-lung squamous-cell carcinoma cell line (RERF-LC-AI) implanted into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. A statistically significant growth suppressive effect on RERF-LC-AI implanted into SCID mice was observed when human LAK cells were administered into the caudal vein of the mice treated with a continuous supply (initiated prior to LAK cells injection) of rIL-2. The human LAK cells stained with PKH 2, a fluorescent dye, for later detection using flow cytometry were administered into the caudal vein of RERF-LC-AI bearing SCID mice; the cells persisted for 7 days in the implanted lung cancer tissue and in the mouse peripheral blood, but for 5 days in the mouse spleen. The number of infiltrated human LAK cells in each tissue increased dose-dependently with the number of injected cells. The results indicate that the antitumor effect most likely occurred during the early implantation period of the human LAK cells. These results demonstrate the applicability of this model to the in vivo study of human lung cancer therapy.

  6. Cancer in human immunodeficiency virus-infected children : A case series from the Children's Cancer Group and the National Cancer Institute

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granovsky, MO; Mueller, BU; Nicholson, HS; Rosenberg, PS; Rabkin, CS

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the spectrum of malignancies in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children and the clinical outcome of patients with these tumors. Methods: We retrospectively surveyed the Children's Cancer Group (CCG) and the National Cancer institute (NCI) for cases of cancer that oc

  7. Cancer in human immunodeficiency virus-infected children : A case series from the Children's Cancer Group and the National Cancer Institute

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granovsky, MO; Mueller, BU; Nicholson, HS; Rosenberg, PS; Rabkin, CS

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the spectrum of malignancies in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children and the clinical outcome of patients with these tumors. Methods: We retrospectively surveyed the Children's Cancer Group (CCG) and the National Cancer institute (NCI) for cases of cancer that oc

  8. Cancer in human immunodeficiency virus-infected children : A case series from the Children's Cancer Group and the National Cancer Institute

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granovsky, MO; Mueller, BU; Nicholson, HS; Rosenberg, PS; Rabkin, CS

    Purpose: To describe the spectrum of malignancies in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children and the clinical outcome of patients with these tumors. Methods: We retrospectively surveyed the Children's Cancer Group (CCG) and the National Cancer institute (NCI) for cases of cancer that

  9. Viral Etiology Relationship between Human Papillomavirus and Human Breast Cancer and Target of Gene Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Chen; TENG Zhi Ping; CHEN Yun Xin; SHEN Dan Hua; LI Jin Tao; ZENG Yi

    2016-01-01

    ObjectiveTo explore the viral etiology of human breast cancer to determine whether there are novel molecular targets for gene therapy of breast cancer and provide evidence for the research of gene therapy and vaccine development for breast cancer. MethodsPCR was used to screen HPV16 and HPV18 oncogenesE6 andE7 in the SKBR3 cell line andin 76 paraffin embedded breast cancer tissue samples. RNA interference was used to knock down the expression of HPV18E6 andE7 in SKBR3 cells, then the changes in the expression of cell-cycle related proteins, cell viability, colony formation, metastasis, and cell cycle progression were determined. ResultsHPV18 oncogenesE6 andE7 were amplified and sequenced from the SKBR3 cells. Ofthe patient samples, 6.58% and 23.68% were tested to bepositivefor HPV18E6 and HPV18E7. In the cell culture models, the knockdown of HPV18E6 andE7 inhibited the proliferation, metastasis, and cell cycle progression of SKBR3 cell. The knockdown also clearly affected the expression levels of cell cycle related proteins. ConclusionHPV was a contributor to virus causedhuman breast cancer, suggesting that the oncogenes in HPV were potential targets for gene therapy of breast cancer.

  10. Biological role of β-arrestin1 in human gastric cancer BGC-823 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王旭

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of β-arrestin1 on proliferation,migration,invasion and apoptosis of human gastric cancer BGC-823 cell line. Methods The expression of β-arrestin1 in human gastric epithelial cell line GES, human gastric cancer cell line BGC-823, MKN-28 and SGC-7901 was detected

  11. AXL is an oncotarget in human colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Erika; Troiani, Teresa; Liguori, Giuseppina; Vitagliano, Donata; Napolitano, Stefania; Morgillo, Floriana; Rinaldi, Barbara; Melillo, Rosa Marina; Liotti, Federica; Nappi, Anna; Bianco, Roberto; Berrino, Liberato; Ciuffreda, Loreta Pia; Ciardiello, Davide; Iaffaioli, Vincenzo; Botti, Gerardo; Ferraiolo, Fiorella; Ciardiello, Fortunato

    2015-01-01

    AXL is a tyrosine kinase receptor activated by GAS6 and regulates cancer cell proliferation migration and angiogenesis. We studied AXL as new therapeutic target in colorectal cancer (CRC). Expression and activation of AXL and GAS6 were evaluated in a panel of human CRC cell lines. AXL gene silencing or pharmacologic inhibition with foretinib suppressed proliferation, migration and survival in CRC cells. In an orthotopic colon model of human HCT116 CRC cells overexpressing AXL, foretinib treatment caused significant inhibition of tumour growth and peritoneal metastatic spreading. AXL and GAS6 overexpression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) were found in 76,7% and 73.5%, respectively, of 223 human CRC specimens, correlating with less differentiated histological grading. GAS6 overexpression was associated with nodes involvement and tumour stage. AXL gene was found amplified by Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in 8/146 cases (5,4%) of CRC samples. Taken together, AXL inhibition could represent a novel therapeutic approach in CRC. PMID:25966280

  12. Poverty eradication and decreased human papilloma virus related cancer of the penis and vulva in Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, H M; Hanchard, B

    2008-04-01

    Human papilloma virus causes genital cancers. Decreases in cervical cancer have been reported to be due to comprehensive screening programmes difficult to replicate in poorer countries. HPV cancer may be related to poverty. In Jamaica, we have seen decreases in cancer of the penis and vulva and there has also been a decrease in poverty. The decrease cannot be attributed to screening. We believe elimination of poverty has decreased HPV persistence and decreased cancer rates.

  13. Oncogenic KRAS activates an embryonic stem cell-like program in human colon cancer initiation

    OpenAIRE

    Le Rolle, Anne-France; Chiu, Thang K; ZENG, ZHAOSHI; Shia, Jinru; Weiser, Martin R; Paty, Philip B.; Chiu, Vi K

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most frequently diagnosed cancer worldwide. Prevention of colorectal cancer initiation represents the most effective overall strategy to reduce its associated morbidity and mortality. Activating KRAS mutation (KRASmut ) is the most prevalent oncogenic driver in colorectal cancer development, and KRASmut inhibition represents an unmet clinical need. We apply a systems-level approach to study the impact of KRASmut on stem cell signaling during human colon cancer i...

  14. Prognostic value of metastin expression in human pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawaguchi Yoshiya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background KiSS-1 was identified as a metastasis-suppressing gene in melanoma cells. The KiSS-1 gene product (metastin was isolated from human placenta as the ligand of GPR54, a G-protein-coupled receptor. The role of metastin and GPR54 in tumor progression is not fully understood. Methods We investigated the clinical significance of metastin and GPR54 expression in pancreatic cancer. We evaluated immunohistochemical expression of metastin and GPR54 in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tissues obtained from 53 consecutive patients who underwent resection between July 2003 and May 2007 at Kyoto University Hospital. In 23 consecutive patients, the plasma metastin level was measured before surgery by enzyme immunoassay. Results Strong immunohistochemical expression of metastin was detected in 13 tumors (24.5%, while strong expression of GPR54 was detected in 30 tumors (56.6%. Tumors that were negative for both metastin and GPR54 expression were significantly larger than tumors that were positive for either metastin or GPR54 (p = 0.047. Recurrence was less frequent in patients who had metastin-positive tumors compared with those who had metastin-negative tumors (38.5% versus 70.0%, p = 0.04. Strong expression of metastin and GPR54 was significantly correlated with longer survival (p = 0.02. Metastin expression by pancreatic cancer was an independent prognostic factor for longer survival (hazard ratio, 2.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.1–4.7; p = 0.03, and the patients with a high plasma metastin level (n = 6 did not die after surgical resection. Conclusion Strong expression of metastin and GPR54 by pancreatic cancer is associated with longer survival. Metastin expression is an independent prognostic factor for the survival of pancreatic cancer patients. The plasma metastin level could become a noninvasive prognostic factor for the assessment of pancreatic cancer.

  15. Human Papillomavirus and Tonsillar and Base of Tongue Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torbjörn Ramqvist

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In 2007, human papillomavirus (HPV type 16 was recognized as a risk factor by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, where tonsillar and base of tongue cancer (TSCC and BOTSCC dominate. Furthermore, patients with HPV-positive TSCC and BOTSCC, had a much better clinical outcome than those with corresponding HPV-negative cancer and other head and neck cancer. More specifically, survival was around 80% for HPV-positive TSCC and BOTSCC vs. 40% five-year disease free survival, for the corresponding HPV-negative tumors with conventional radiotherapy and surgery, while this could not be observed for HPV-positive OSCC at other sites. In addition, the past 20–40 years in many Western Countries, the incidence of HPV-positive TSCC and BOTSCC has risen, and >70% are men. This has resulted in a relative increase of patients with HPV-positive TSCC and BOTSCC that may not need the intensified chemo-radiotherapy (with many more severe debilitating side effects often given today to patients with head and neck cancer. However, before tapering therapy, one needs to enable selection of patients for such treatment, by identifying clinical and molecular markers that together with HPV-positive status will better predict patient prognosis and response to therapy. To conclude, there is a new increasing group of patients with HPV-positive TSCC and BOTSCC with good clinical outcome, where options for better-tailored therapy are needed. For prevention, it would be of benefit to vaccinate both girls and boys against HPV16 infection. For potential future screening the ways to do so need optimizing.

  16. Combination of salinomycin and silver nanoparticles enhances apoptosis and autophagy in human ovarian cancer cells: an effective anticancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi-Feng; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the most important malignancies, and the origin, detection, and pathogenesis of epithelial ovarian cancer remain elusive. Although many cancer drugs have been developed to dramatically reduce the size of tumors, most cancers eventually relapse, posing a critical problem to overcome. Hence, it is necessary to identify possible alternative therapeutic approaches to reduce the mortality rate of this devastating disease. To identify alternative approaches, we first synthesized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using a novel bacterium called Bacillus clausii. The synthesized AgNPs were homogenous and spherical in shape, with an average size of 16-20 nm, which are known to cause cytotoxicity in various types of human cancer cells, whereas salinomycin (Sal) is able to kill cancer stem cells. Therefore, we selected both Sal and AgNPs to study their combined effect on apoptosis and autophagy in ovarian cancer cells. The cells treated with either Sal or AgNPs showed a dose-dependent effect with inhibitory concentration (IC)-50 values of 6.0 µM and 8 µg/mL for Sal and AgNPs, respectively. To determine the combination effect, we measured the IC25 values of both Sal and AgNPs (3.0 µM and 4 µg/mL), which showed a more dramatic inhibitory effect on cell viability and cell morphology than either Sal or AgNPs alone. The combination of Sal and AgNPs had more pronounced effect on cytotoxicity and expression of apoptotic genes and also significantly induced the accumulation of autophagolysosomes, which was associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and loss of cell viability. Our data show a strong synergistic interaction between Sal and AgNPs in tested cancer cells. The combination treatment increased the therapeutic potential and demonstrated the relevant targeted therapy for the treatment of ovarian cancer. Furthermore, we provide, for the first time, a mode of action for Sal and AgNPs in ovarian cancer cells: enhanced apoptosis and autophagy.

  17. A rising cancer prevention target of RSK2 in human skin cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arul eNarayanasamy

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available RSK2 is a p90 ribosomal S6 kinase family (p90RSK member regulating cell proliferation and transformation induced by tumor promoters such as epithelial growth factor (EGF and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA. This family of p90RSK has classified as a serine/threonine kinase that respond to many growth factors, peptide hormones, neurotransmitters, and environmental stresses such as ultraviolet light (UV. Our recent study demonstrates that RSK2 plays a key role in human skin cancer development. Activation of RSK2 by EGF and UV through ERKs signaling pathway induces cell cycle progression, cell proliferation and anchorage-independent cell transformation. Moreover, knockdown of RSK2 by si-RNA or sh-RNA abrogates cell proliferation and cell transformation of non-malignant human skin keratinocyte, and colony growth of malignant melanoma cells in soft agar. Importantly, activated and total RSK2 protein levels are highly detected in human skin cancer tissues including squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma. Kaempferol and eriodictyol are natural substances to inhibit kinase activity of the RSK2 N-terminal kinase domain, which is a critical kinase domain to transducer their activation signals to the substrates by phosphorylation. In this review, we discuss the role of RSK2 in skin cancer particularly, in activation of signaling pathways and potent natural substances to target RSK2 as chemopreventive and therapeutic agents.

  18. Phase I study of anticolon cancer humanized antibody A33.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welt, Sydney; Ritter, Gerd; Williams, Clarence; Cohen, Leonard S; John, Mary; Jungbluth, Achim; Richards, Elizabeth A; Old, Lloyd J; Kemeny, Nancy E

    2003-04-01

    Humanized A33 (huA33; IgG1) monoclonal antibody detects a determinant expressed by 95% of colorectal cancers and can activate immune cytolytic mechanisms. The present study was designed to (a) define the toxicities and maximum tolerated dose of huA33 and (b) determine huA33 immunogenicity. Patients (n = 11) with advanced chemotherapy-resistant colorectal cancer received 4-week cycles of huA33 at 10, 25, or 50 mg/m(2)/week. Serum samples were analyzed using biosensor technology for evidence of human antihuman antibody (HAHA) response. Eight of 11 patients developed a HAHA response. Significant toxicity was limited to four patients who developed high HAHA titers. In two of these cases, infusion-related reactions such as fevers, rigors, facial flushing, and changes in blood pressure were observed, whereas in the other two cases, toxicity consisted of skin rash, fever, or myalgia. Of three patients who remained HAHA negative, one achieved a radiographic partial response, with reduction of serum carcinoembryonic antigen from 80 to 3 ng/ml. Four patients had radiographic evidence of stable disease (2, 4, 6, and 12 months), with significant reductions (>25%) in serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels in two cases. The complementarity-determining region-grafted huA33 antibody is immunogenic in the majority of colon cancer patients (73%). HAHA activity can be measured reproducibly and quantitatively by BIACORE analysis. Whereas the huA33 construct tested here may be too immunogenic for further clinical development, the antitumor effects observed in the absence of antibody-mediated toxicity and in this heavily pretreated patient population warrant clinical testing of other IgG1 humanized versions of A33 antibody.

  19. Prognostic value of metastin expression in human pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kawaguchi Yoshiya; Masui Toshihiko; Koizumi Masayuki; Kida Atsushi; Ito Tatsuo; Katagiri Fumihiko; Doi Ryuichiro; Nagai Kazuyuki; Tomita Kenji; Oishi Shinya; Fujii Nobutaka; Uemoto Shinji

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background KiSS-1 was identified as a metastasis-suppressing gene in melanoma cells. The KiSS-1 gene product (metastin) was isolated from human placenta as the ligand of GPR54, a G-protein-coupled receptor. The role of metastin and GPR54 in tumor progression is not fully understood. Methods We investigated the clinical significance of metastin and GPR54 expression in pancreatic cancer. We evaluated immunohistochemical expression of metastin and GPR54 in pancreatic ductal adenocarcino...

  20. Prognostic value of metastin expression in human pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nagai, Kazuyuki; Doi, Ryuichiro; Katagiri, Fumihiko; Ito, Tatsuo; Kida, Atsushi; Koizumi, Masayuki; Masui, Toshihiko; Kawaguchi, Yoshiya; Tomita, Kenji; Oishi, Shinya; Fujii, Nobutaka; Uemoto, Shinji

    2009-01-01

    Background KiSS-1 was identified as a metastasis-suppressing gene in melanoma cells. The KiSS-1 gene product (metastin) was isolated from human placenta as the ligand of GPR54, a G-protein-coupled receptor. The role of metastin and GPR54 in tumor progression is not fully understood. Methods We investigated the clinical significance of metastin and GPR54 expression in pancreatic cancer. We evaluated immunohistochemical expression of metastin and GPR54 in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tissue...

  1. Prognostic value of metastin expression in human pancreatic cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Nagai, Kazuyuki; Doi, Ryuichiro; Katagiri, Fumihiko; Ito, Tatsuo; Kida, Atsushi; Koizumi, Masayuki; Masui, Toshihiko; Kawaguchi, Yoshiya; Tomita, Kenji; Oishi, Shinya; Fujii, Nobutaka; Uemoto, Shinji

    2009-01-01

    [Background]KiSS-1 was identified as a metastasis-suppressing gene in melanoma cells. The KiSS-1 gene product (metastin) was isolated from human placenta as the ligand of GPR54, a G-protein-coupled receptor. The role of metastin and GPR54 in tumor progression is not fully understood. [Methods]We investigated the clinical significance of metastin and GPR54 expression in pancreatic cancer. We evaluated immunohistochemical expression of metastin and GPR54 in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tiss...

  2. Synthesis and bioevaluation of novel 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzylbenzimidazole derivatives that inhibit Helicobacter pylori-induced pathogenesis in human gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Shiang; Liu, Ju-Fang; Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Lin, Chia-Der; Tang, Chih-Hsin; Lu, Dah-Yuu; Sing, Yu-Ting; Chen, Li-Yu; Kao, Min-Chuan; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2012-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer, and even gastric malignancy. H. pylori's antibiotic resistance is the major obstacle preventing its eradication. A series of 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzylbenzimidazole derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their anti-H. pylori activity. The compound, 2-fluorophenyl-5-methyl-1-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzyl)benzimidazole (FMTMB), was determined as the most potent in the inhibition of H. pylori growth and pathogenesis of host cells. An in vitro H. pylori infection model revealed that FMTMB inhibited H. pylori adhesion and invasion of gastric epithelial cells. Results from this study provide evidence that FMTMB is a potent therapeutic agent that exhibits both anti-H. pylori growth properties and anti-H. pylori-induced pathogenesis of cells.

  3. Differential Cytotoxic Potential of Silver Nanoparticles in Human Ovarian Cancer Cells and Ovarian Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Jung Choi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC hypothesis postulates that cancer cells are composed of hierarchically-organized subpopulations of cells with distinct phenotypes and tumorigenic capacities. As a result, CSCs have been suggested as a source of disease recurrence. Recently, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs have been used as antimicrobial, disinfectant, and antitumor agents. However, there is no study reporting the effects of AgNPs on ovarian cancer stem cells (OvCSCs. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of AgNPs and their mechanism of causing cell death in A2780 (human ovarian cancer cells and OvCSCs derived from A2780. In order to examine these effects, OvCSCs were isolated and characterized using positive CSC markers including aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH and CD133 by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. The anticancer properties of the AgNPs were evaluated by assessing cell viability, leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, reactive oxygen species (ROS, and mitochondrial membrane potential (mt-MP. The inhibitory effect of AgNPs on the growth of ovarian cancer cells and OvCSCs was evaluated using a clonogenic assay. Following 1–2 weeks of incubation with the AgNPs, the numbers of A2780 (bulk cells and ALDH+/CD133+ colonies were significantly reduced. The expression of apoptotic and anti-apoptotic genes was measured by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. Our observations showed that treatment with AgNPs resulted in severe cytotoxicity in both ovarian cancer cells and OvCSCs. In particular, AgNPs showed significant cytotoxic potential in ALDH+/CD133+ subpopulations of cells compared with other subpopulation of cells and also human ovarian cancer cells (bulk cells. These findings suggest that AgNPs can be utilized in the development of novel nanotherapeutic molecules for the treatment of ovarian cancers by specific targeting of the ALDH+/CD133+ subpopulation of cells.

  4. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Ciećko-Michalska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy.

  5. 外泌体在乳腺癌发病中的作用机制%Mechanism of exosome in the pathogenesis of breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    晏芾; 于韶荣; 曹海霞; 冯继锋

    2016-01-01

    Researches show that exosome can take park in the development and progression of breast cancer by means of mediating the intercellular communication,which can promote cancer metastasis and drug resistance,thus influencing the treatment effect of patients with cancers.Exosome is closely related with clinical stage and prognosis of breast cancer,which has a potential value in the early diagnosis and biological therapy of breast cancer and provides a new hope for the treatment of breast cancer.%研究表明外泌体可通过介导细胞间通讯参与乳腺癌的发生发展过程,促进肿瘤转移和耐药,影响肿瘤患者的治疗效果.外泌体与乳腺癌临床分期及预后的关系密切,在乳腺癌早期诊断和生物治疗中具有潜在的临床应用价值,可为乳腺癌的治疗提供新的希望.

  6. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer Non-Hodgkin lymphoma Ovarian cancer Pancreatic cancer Testicular cancer Thyroid cancer Uterine cancer Symptoms Symptoms of cancer ... tumor Obesity Pancreatic cancer Prostate cancer Stomach cancer Testicular cancer Throat or larynx cancer Thyroid cancer Patient Instructions ...

  7. Functional characterization of human cancer-derived TRKB mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R Geiger

    Full Text Available Cancer originates from cells that have acquired mutations in genes critical for controlling cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. Often, tumors continue to depend on these so-called driver mutations, providing the rationale for targeted anticancer therapies. To date, large-scale sequencing analyses have revealed hundreds of mutations in human tumors. However, without their functional validation it remains unclear which mutations correspond to driver, or rather bystander, mutations and, therefore, whether the mutated gene represents a target for therapeutic intervention. In human colorectal tumors, the neurotrophic receptor TRKB has been found mutated on two different sites in its kinase domain (TRKB(T695I and TRKB(D751N. Another site, in the extracellular part of TRKB, is mutated in a human lung adenocarcinoma cell line (TRKB(L138F. Lastly, our own analysis has identified one additional TRKB point mutation proximal to the kinase domain (TRKB(P507L in a human melanoma cell line. The functional consequences of all these point mutations, however, have so far remained elusive. Previously, we have shown that TRKB is a potent suppressor of anoikis and that TRKB-expressing cells form highly invasive and metastatic tumors in nude mice. To assess the functional consequences of these four TRKB mutations, we determined their potential to suppress anoikis and to form tumors in nude mice. Unexpectedly, both colon cancer-derived mutants, TRKB(T695I and TRKB(D751N, displayed reduced activity compared to that of wild-type TRKB. Consistently, upon stimulation with the TRKB ligand BDNF, these mutants were impaired in activating TRKB and its downstream effectors AKT and ERK. The two mutants derived from human tumor cell lines (TRKB(L138F and TRKB(P507L were functionally indistinguishable from wild-type TRKB in both in-vitro and in-vivo assays. In conclusion, we fail to detect any gain-of-function of four cancer-derived TRKB point mutations.

  8. Proteasome inhibition as a novel therapeutic target in human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, S Vincent; Richardson, Paul G; Hideshima, Teru; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2005-01-20

    The 26S proteasome is a large intracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate-dependent protease that identifies and degrades proteins tagged for destruction by the ubiquitin system. The orderly degradation of cellular proteins is critical for normal cell cycling and function, and inhibition of the proteasome pathway results in cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. Dysregulation of this enzymatic system may also play a role in tumor progression, drug resistance, and altered immune surveillance, making the proteasome an appropriate and novel therapeutic target in cancer. Bortezomib (formerly known as PS-341) is the first proteasome inhibitor to enter clinical practice. It is a boronic aid dipeptide that binds directly with and inhibits the enzymatic complex. Bortezomib has recently shown significant preclinical and clinical activity in several cancers, confirming the therapeutic value of proteasome inhibition in human malignancy. It was approved in 2003 for the treatment of advanced multiple myeloma (MM), with approximately one third of patients with relapsed and refractory MM showing significant clinical benefit in a large clinical trial. Its mechanism of action is partly mediated through nuclear factor-kappa B inhibition, resulting in apoptosis, decreased angiogenic cytokine expression, and inhibition of tumor cell adhesion to stroma. Additional mechanisms include c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation and effects on growth factor expression. Several clinical trials are currently ongoing in MM as well as several other malignancies. This article discusses proteasome inhibition as a novel therapeutic target in cancer and focuses on the development, mechanism of action, and current clinical experience with bortezomib.

  9. Absolute quantification of somatic DNA alterations in human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Scott L; Cibulskis, Kristian; Helman, Elena; McKenna, Aaron; Shen, Hui; Zack, Travis; Laird, Peter W; Onofrio, Robert C; Winckler, Wendy; Weir, Barbara A; Beroukhim, Rameen; Pellman, David; Levine, Douglas A; Lander, Eric S; Meyerson, Matthew; Getz, Gad

    2012-05-01

    We describe a computational method that infers tumor purity and malignant cell ploidy directly from analysis of somatic DNA alterations. The method, named ABSOLUTE, can detect subclonal heterogeneity and somatic homozygosity, and it can calculate statistical sensitivity for detection of specific aberrations. We used ABSOLUTE to analyze exome sequencing data from 214 ovarian carcinoma tumor-normal pairs. This analysis identified both pervasive subclonal somatic point-mutations and a small subset of predominantly clonal and homozygous mutations, which were overrepresented in the tumor suppressor genes TP53 and NF1 and in a candidate tumor suppressor gene CDK12. We also used ABSOLUTE to infer absolute allelic copy-number profiles from 3,155 diverse cancer specimens, revealing that genome-doubling events are common in human cancer, likely occur in cells that are already aneuploid, and influence pathways of tumor progression (for example, with recessive inactivation of NF1 being less common after genome doubling). ABSOLUTE will facilitate the design of clinical sequencing studies and studies of cancer genome evolution and intra-tumor heterogeneity.

  10. Human papillomavirus genotypes and cervical cancer in northeast Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natphopsuk, Sitakan; Settheetham-Ishida, Wannapa; Pientong, Chamsai; Sinawat, Supat; Yuenyao, Pissamai; Ishida, Takafumi; Settheetham, Dariwan

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major cause of cervical cancer. More than 100 HPV genotypes have been identified; however the distribution varies geographically and according to ethnicity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and distribution of HPV subtypes among Northeast Thai women. Subjects included 198 cases of SCCA and 198 age-matched, healthy controls. HPV-DNA was amplified by PCR using the consensus primers GP5+/6+ system followed by reverse line blot hybridization genotyping. The prevalence of high-risk HPV infection was 21 (10.1%) and 152 (76.8%) in the controls and in the cases, respectively. High-risk HPV significantly increased the risk for cervical cancer with an OR of 42.4 (95%CI: 22.4-81.4, p<0.001) and an adjusted OR of 40.7-fold (95%CI: 21.5-76.8, p <0.001). HPV-16 was the most prevalent HPV type in the SCCA (56.2%) followed by HPV-58 (17.8%) and HPV-18 (13.6%); whereas HPV-58 (46.4%) was a prominent genotype in the controls followed by HPV-16 (39.3%) and unidentified HPV types (25.0%). These findings indicate that HPV infection remains a critical risk factor for SCCA; particularly, HPV-16, HPV-58 and HPV-18. In order to eradicate cervical cancer, sustained health education, promoted use of prophylactics and a HPV-58 vaccine should be introduced in this region.

  11. Expression and alternative splicing pattern of human telomerase reverse transcriptase in human lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Masachika; Kamma, Hiroshi; Wu, Wenwen; Hamasaki, Makoto; Kaneko, Setsuko; Horiguchi, Hisashi; Matsui-Horiguchi, Miwa; Satoh, Hiroaki

    2004-04-01

    Telomerase activity is generally considered to be necessary for cancer cells to avoid senescence. The expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is believed to be a rate-limiting step in telomerase activation. Recently, it has been proposed that the alternative splicing of hTERT is also involved in regulation of telomerase activity. However, the regulatory mechanism of telomerase in cancer cells has not been thoroughly investigated. To clarify it in lung cancer cells, we measured the expression of the hTERT transcript, analyzed its alternative splicing by RT-PCR, and compared it with telomerase activity and telomere length. The expression of the hTERT transcript was positively correlated with telomerase activity in lung cancer cells. Cancer cells with high telomerase activity contained 4 splicing variants of hTERT, and the full-length variant was 31.3-54.2% of the total transcripts. Cells of the TKB-20 cell line, which has extremely low telomerase activity, showed a different splicing pattern of hTERT in addition to low expression. The functional full-length variant was scarcely detected in TKB-20 cells, suggesting that the telomerase activity was repressed by alternative splicing of hTERT. Telomere length was not necessarily correlated with telomerase activity or hTERT expression in lung cancer cells. Cells of the TKB-4 cell line that also showed relatively low telomerase activity (as TKB-20 cells) had long telomeres. In conclusion, hTERT expression is regulated at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels in lung cancer cells, and the alternative splicing of hTERT is involved in the control of telomerase activity.

  12. A taxonomy of epithelial human cancer and their metastases

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    De Moor Bart

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray technology has allowed to molecularly characterize many different cancer sites. This technology has the potential to individualize therapy and to discover new drug targets. However, due to technological differences and issues in standardized sample collection no study has evaluated the molecular profile of epithelial human cancer in a large number of samples and tissues. Additionally, it has not yet been extensively investigated whether metastases resemble their tissue of origin or tissue of destination. Methods We studied the expression profiles of a series of 1566 primary and 178 metastases by unsupervised hierarchical clustering. The clustering profile was subsequently investigated and correlated with clinico-pathological data. Statistical enrichment of clinico-pathological annotations of groups of samples was investigated using Fisher exact test. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA and DAVID functional enrichment analysis were used to investigate the molecular pathways. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and log-rank tests were used to investigate prognostic significance of gene signatures. Results Large clusters corresponding to breast, gastrointestinal, ovarian and kidney primary tissues emerged from the data. Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma clustered together with follicular differentiated thyroid carcinoma, which supports recent morphological descriptions of thyroid follicular carcinoma-like tumors in the kidney and suggests that they represent a subtype of chromophobe carcinoma. We also found an expression signature identifying primary tumors of squamous cell histology in multiple tissues. Next, a subset of ovarian tumors enriched with endometrioid histology clustered together with endometrium tumors, confirming that they share their etiopathogenesis, which strongly differs from serous ovarian tumors. In addition, the clustering of colon and breast tumors correlated with clinico-pathological characteristics

  13. The Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in Cervical Cancer in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, SH; Zali, MR; Raoufi, M; Nadji, M; Kowsarian, P; Nowroozi, A

    2002-01-01

    Background: The human papiloma virus (HPV), which is sexually transmitted, and most commonly causes genital warts, has been linked to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive carcinoma. Of ninety plus types of HPV, HPV-16 is the most prevalent in cervical cancer, followed by HPV-18, and HPV-33. As HPV's implication has not been assessed in the Middle East the main focus of this retrospective study was to determine the prevalence of HPV -16,18, and 33 in cases of cervical cancer from Iran. Material and Methods: This retrospective study covered 100 patients with uterine cervical carcinomas who were referred to two referral centers for cancer in Tehran-Iran. Pathological blocks were collected for these cases and initial review of the blocks showed poor specimens in 18 cases, which left 82 cases for the study. These samples were histologically examined to verify the presence and the type of carcinoma. The next step was in situ hybridzation for the detection of HPV common DNA. In Situ hybridization was preformed on all samples. Finally, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) was preformed for the HPV types 16, 18, and 33. PCR amplification of exon 5 of the p53 gene was used as an internal control for the integrity of DNA. Takara PCR Human papilloma Detection method was used which includes primer for HPV 16, 18, and 33. Three primers were used alone, or in combination, in order to increase the sensitivity of the detection. Results: The majority of tumors were squamous cell carcinomas (87%). The rest were adenosquamous carcinoma and adenocarcinomas. None of the 82 different cervical carcinoma tissue samples were found to be positive by in situ hybridization. In the PCR samples, amplification of DNA was observed for 69 tumor specimens. In the remainning13 cases, the DNA in fixed tissue was degraded, as verified by the absence of an internal control band (p53). Out of the total 69 tumors (85.5%) with adequate DNA contained HPV band on PCR. The majority (73.9%) of HPV

  14. Human Progesterone A-Form as a Target for New Drug Discovery in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    Voltz et al’(ii 3 altered recycling, and impaired regulation of the PDGFR TR4 chloride transporter by hormones. Most recent studies suggest that CFTR ...growth transporters, and other proteins localized at or near the factor receptor and ion transporters such as CFTR , plasma membrane. Consistent with this...overexpression in human breast cancers cytoskeleton. This review will focus on the signaling and mutations in NHERF targets, such as CFTR and paradigms

  15. Molecular Pathogenesis of Spondyloarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Thomas Gelsing

    This dissertation includes a presentation of knowledge on the molecular pathogenesis of spondyloarthritis achieved through a PhD programme at Aalborg University from 1.12.2011 - 1.12.2014. Work was carried out in the Laboratory of Medical Mass Spectrometry, headed by: Professor Svend Birkelund...

  16. Inflammatory bowel disease: pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Zhen; Li, Yong-Yu

    2014-01-07

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, is characterized by chronic relapsing intestinal inflammation. It has been a worldwide health-care problem with a continually increasing incidence. It is thought that IBD results from an aberrant and continuing immune response to the microbes in the gut, catalyzed by the genetic susceptibility of the individual. Although the etiology of IBD remains largely unknown, it involves a complex interaction between the genetic, environmental or microbial factors and the immune responses. Of the four components of IBD pathogenesis, most rapid progress has been made in the genetic study of gut inflammation. The latest internationally collaborative studies have ascertained 163 susceptibility gene loci for IBD. The genes implicated in childhood-onset and adult-onset IBD overlap, suggesting similar genetic predispositions. However, the fact that genetic factors account for only a portion of overall disease variance indicates that microbial and environmental factors may interact with genetic elements in the pathogenesis of IBD. Meanwhile, the adaptive immune response has been classically considered to play a major role in the pathogenesis of IBD, as new studies in immunology and genetics have clarified that the innate immune response maintains the same importance in inducing gut inflammation. Recent progress in understanding IBD pathogenesis sheds lights on relevant disease mechanisms, including the innate and adaptive immunity, and the interactions between genetic factors and microbial and environmental cues. In this review, we provide an update on the major advances that have occurred in above areas.

  17. Roles of the Y chromosome genes in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuo Kido

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Male and female differ genetically by their respective sex chromosome composition, that is, XY as male and XX as female. Although both X and Y chromosomes evolved from the same ancestor pair of autosomes, the Y chromosome harbors male-specific genes, which play pivotal roles in male sex determination, germ cell differentiation, and masculinization of various tissues. Deletions or translocation of the sex-determining gene, SRY, from the Y chromosome causes disorders of sex development (previously termed as an intersex condition with dysgenic gonads. Failure of gonadal development results not only in infertility, but also in increased risks of germ cell tumor (GCT, such as gonadoblastoma and various types of testicular GCT. Recent studies demonstrate that either loss of Y chromosome or ectopic expression of Y chromosome genes is closely associated with various male-biased diseases, including selected somatic cancers. These observations suggest that the Y-linked genes are involved in male health and diseases in more frequently than expected. Although only a small number of protein-coding genes are present in the male-specific region of Y chromosome, the impacts of Y chromosome genes on human diseases are still largely unknown, due to lack of in vivo models and differences between the Y chromosomes of human and rodents. In this review, we highlight the involvement of selected Y chromosome genes in cancer development in men.

  18. Glyphosate induces human breast cancer cells growth via estrogen receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongprakaisang, Siriporn; Thiantanawat, Apinya; Rangkadilok, Nuchanart; Suriyo, Tawit; Satayavivad, Jutamaad

    2013-09-01

    Glyphosate is an active ingredient of the most widely used herbicide and it is believed to be less toxic than other pesticides. However, several recent studies showed its potential adverse health effects to humans as it may be an endocrine disruptor. This study focuses on the effects of pure glyphosate on estrogen receptors (ERs) mediated transcriptional activity and their expressions. Glyphosate exerted proliferative effects only in human hormone-dependent breast cancer, T47D cells, but not in hormone-independent breast cancer, MDA-MB231 cells, at 10⁻¹² to 10⁻⁶M in estrogen withdrawal condition. The proliferative concentrations of glyphosate that induced the activation of estrogen response element (ERE) transcription activity were 5-13 fold of control in T47D-KBluc cells and this activation was inhibited by an estrogen antagonist, ICI 182780, indicating that the estrogenic activity of glyphosate was mediated via ERs. Furthermore, glyphosate also altered both ERα and β expression. These results indicated that low and environmentally relevant concentrations of glyphosate possessed estrogenic activity. Glyphosate-based herbicides are widely used for soybean cultivation, and our results also found that there was an additive estrogenic effect between glyphosate and genistein, a phytoestrogen in soybeans. However, these additive effects of glyphosate contamination in soybeans need further animal study.

  19. Human Papillomavirus Genotype Distribution in Invasive Cervical Cancer in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loya, Asif; Serrano, Beatriz; Rasheed, Farah; Tous, Sara; Hassan, Mariam; Clavero, Omar; Raza, Muhammad; De Sanjosé, Silvia; Bosch, F Xavier; Alemany, Laia

    2016-07-30

    Few studies have assessed the burden of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in Pakistan. We aim to provide specific information on HPV-type distribution in invasive cervical cancer (ICC) in the country. A total of 280 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks were consecutively selected from Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre (Lahore, Pakistan). HPV-DNA was detected by SPF10 broad-spectrum PCR followed by DNA enzyme immunoassay and genotyping by LiPA25. HPV-DNA prevalence was 87.5% (95%CI: 83.0-91.1), with 96.1% of cases histologically classified as squamous cell carcinoma. Most of the HPV-DNA positive cases presented single infections (95.9%). HPV16 was the most common type followed by HPV18 and 45. Among HPV-DNA positive, a significantly higher contribution of HPV16/18 was detected in Pakistan (78.4%; 72.7-83.3), compared to Asia (71.6%; 69.9-73.4) and worldwide (70.8%; 69.9-71.8) and a lower contribution of HPVs31/33/45/52/58 (11.1%; 7.9-15.7 vs. 19.8%; 18.3-21.3 and 18.5%; 17.7-19.3). HPV18 or HPV45 positive ICC cases were significantly younger than cases infected by HPV16 (mean age: 43.3, 44.4, 50.5 years, respectively). A routine cervical cancer screening and HPV vaccination program does not yet exist in Pakistan; however, the country could benefit from national integrated efforts for cervical cancer prevention and control. Calculated estimations based on our results show that current HPV vaccine could potentially prevent new ICC cases.

  20. Immune therapy for human papillomaviruses-related cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Ricardo; Rosales, Carlos

    2014-12-10

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a large family of double strand DNA viruses comprising more than 180 types. Infection with HPV is very common and it is associated with benign and malignant proliferation of skin and squamous mucosae. Many HPVs, considered low-risk such as HPV 6 and 11, produce warts; while high-risk viruses, such as HPVs 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, and 58, induce tumors. About 5% of all cancers in men and women are associated with HPV infection. Because there are not antiviral drugs for HPV infection, current therapies for low-risk HPV infections involve physical removal of the lesion by cryotherapy, trichloracetic acid, laser, or surgical removal. Surgical procedures are effective in the treatment of pre-cancerous lesions, however after these procedures, many recurrences appear due to new re-infections, or to failure of the procedure to eliminate the HPV. In addition, HPV can inhibit recognition of malignant cells by the immune system, leading to the development of cancer lesions. When this occurs, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are then used. Unfortunately, about 50% of the HPV-cancer patients still die. In the past decade, a better knowledge of the natural history of the virus-host interaction and of the immune response against this viral infection has brought new therapeutic strategies geared to modulate the immune system to generate an efficient virus-specific cytotoxic response. Novel HPV protein-expressing vaccines have shown some significant clinical efficacy and systemic HPV-specific cytotoxic T cell responses. This review will describe the current status of the several therapeutic strategies used to treat HPV-induced lesions, and discuss the various new therapies now being tested.

  1. A Gene Regulatory Program in Human Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Renhua; Campos, John; Iida, Joji

    2015-12-01

    Molecular heterogeneity in human breast cancer has challenged diagnosis, prognosis, and clinical treatment. It is well known that molecular subtypes of breast tumors are associated with significant differences in prognosis and survival. Assuming that the differences are attributed to subtype-specific pathways, we then suspect that there might be gene regulatory mechanisms that modulate the behavior of the pathways and their interactions. In this study, we proposed an integrated methodology, including machine learning and information theory, to explore the mechanisms. Using existing data from three large cohorts of human breast cancer populations, we have identified an ensemble of 16 master regulator genes (or MR16) that can discriminate breast tumor samples into four major subtypes. Evidence from gene expression across the three cohorts has consistently indicated that the MR16 can be divided into two groups that demonstrate subtype-specific gene expression patterns. For example, group 1 MRs, including ESR1, FOXA1, and GATA3, are overexpressed in luminal A and luminal B subtypes, but lowly expressed in HER2-enriched and basal-like subtypes. In contrast, group 2 MRs, including FOXM1, EZH2, MYBL2, and ZNF695, display an opposite pattern. Furthermore, evidence from mutual information modeling has congruently indicated that the two groups of MRs either up- or down-regulate cancer driver-related genes in opposite directions. Furthermore, integration of somatic mutations with pathway changes leads to identification of canonical genomic alternations in a subtype-specific fashion. Taken together, these studies have implicated a gene regulatory program for breast tumor progression.

  2. Review article: loss of the calcium-sensing receptor in colonic epithelium is a key event in the pathogenesis of colon cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rogers, Ailín C

    2012-03-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is expressed abundantly in normal colonic epithelium and lost in colon cancer, but its exact role on a molecular level and within the carcinogenesis pathway is yet to be described. Epidemiologic studies show that inadequate dietary calcium predisposes to colon cancer; this may be due to the ability of calcium to bind and upregulate the CaSR. Loss of CaSR expression does not seem to be an early event in carcinogenesis; indeed it is associated with late stage, poorly differentiated, chemo-resistant tumors. Induction of CaSR expression in neoplastic colonocytes arrests tumor progression and deems tumors more sensitive to chemotherapy; hence CaSR may be an important target in colon cancer treatment. The CaSR has a complex role in colon cancer; however, more investigation is required on a molecular level to clarify its exact function in carcinogenesis. This review describes the mechanisms by which the CaSR is currently implicated in colon cancer and identifies areas where further study is needed.

  3. 微小RNA与卵巢癌的发病机制研究进展%Small RNA research progress and the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪春年; 王红卫; 李征

    2015-01-01

    Small RNA (miRNAs) as a short chain, non-coding RNA transcription is the important regulatory factors in the regulation of network. Studies have shown that miRNAs play important roles in the formation and progress of ovarian cancer, may become the new target for ovarian cancer treatment. This paper summarize the miRNAs in its role in the development of ovarian cancer.%微小RNA(miRNAs)作为一种短链非编码RNA,是转录后调控网络中重要的调控因子。研究表明miRNAs在卵巢癌形成与进展中发挥着重要作用,可能成为卵巢癌治疗的新靶点。本文就近年来miRNAs在卵巢癌发生发展中的作用做一综述。

  4. Fallen angels or risen apes? A tale of the intricate complexities of imbalanced immune responses in the pathogenesis and progression of immune-mediated and viral cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Omusiro Ondondo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Excessive immune responses directed against foreign pathogens, self-antigens or commensal microflora can cause cancer establishment and progression if the execution of tight immuno-regulatory mechanisms fails. On the other hand, induction of potent tumour antigen-specific immune responses together with stimulation of the innate immune system is a pre-requisite for effective antitumour immunity, and if suppressed by the strong immuno-regulatory mechanisms can lead to cancer progression. Therefore, it is crucial that the inevitable co-existence of these fundamental, yet conflicting roles of immune-regulatory cells is carefully streamlined as imbalances can be detrimental to the host. Infection with chronic persistent viruses is characterised by severe immune dysfunction resulting in T cell exhaustion and sometimes deletion of antigen-specific T cells. More often this is due to increased immuno-regulatory processes which are triggered to down-regulate immune responses and limit immunopathology. However, such heightened levels of immune disruption cause a concomitant loss of tumour immune-surveillance and create a permissive microenvironment for cancer establishment and progression, as demonstrated by increased incidences of cancer in immunosuppressed hosts. Paradoxically, while some cancers arise as a consequence of increased immuno-regulatory mechanisms that inhibit protective immune responses and impinge on tumour surveillance, other cancers arise due to impaired immuno-regulatory mechanisms and failure to limit pathogenic inflammatory responses. This intricate complexity, where immuno-regulatory cells can be beneficial in certain immune settings but detrimental in other settings underscores the need for carefully formulated interventions to equilibrate the balance between immuno-stimulatory and immuno-regulatory processes.

  5. How companion animals contribute to the fight against cancer in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Thamm, VMD

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Companion animals and their human guardians suffer from many of the same types of cancer and are often treated with many of the same drugs. Moreover, the overall tumour biology is much more similar between humans and companion animals than between humans and rodent tumor models. Therefore, it is proposed that pre-clinical evaluation of novel cancer therapeutics should more often include appropriately designed trials in companion animals with cancer to more accurately predict efficacy and toxicity in humans. For example, studies in dogs with cancer have been used to assess efficacy and design human clinical trials of immunotherapy, gene therapy, sustained release drug delivery and liposomal drug delivery. In the future, such studies will ultimately benefit not only humans, but also companion animals with cancer.

  6. A novel experimental platform for investigating cancer growth and anti-cancer therapy in a human tissue microenvironment derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzukerman, Maty; Skorecki, Karl L

    2006-01-01

    There is no available experimental system wherein human cancer cells can be grown in the context of a mixed population of normal differentiated human cells for testing biological aspects of cancer cell growth (tumor cell invasion, angiogenesis) or response to anti-cancer therapies. Human embryonic stem cells when implanted into immunocompromised mice develop teratomas containing complex structures, comprising differentiated cell types representing the major germline-derived lineages. We sought to determine whether human cancer cells would grow within such teratomas and display properties associated with malignancy such as invasiveness and recruitment of blood vessels. Ovarian cancer cells (HEY), stably expressing an H2A-GFP fusion protein, which allows tracking of tumor cells, were injected into mature teratomas and developed into tumors. The growth, proliferation capacity, invasion, and induction of blood vessel formation were examined. We propose using the novel experimental platform we have described, consisting of human tumor cells growing within a human cellular microenvironment derived from human embryonic stem cells, to develop a preclinical model for investigating and manipulating the stromal response in tumor cell growth, as an additional tool in cancer research.

  7. Regulation of deleted in liver cancer-1 gene domains on the proliferation of human colon cancer HT29 cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴平平

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the role of deleted in liver cancer-1(DLC-1) gene main domains on the regulation of hu-man colon cancer HT29 cell proliferation. Methods Subcloning recombinant plasmid vectors with Rho GTPase activating protein(RhoGAP),sterile alpha motif(SAM)

  8. Galangin induces human colon cancer cell death via the mitochondrial dysfunction and caspase-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Tae Kwun; Kim, Mi Eun; Yoon, Ju Hwa; Bae, Sung Jin; Yeom, Jihye; Lee, Jun Sik

    2013-09-01

    Galangin is a member of flavonols and found in Alpinia officinarum, galangal root, and propolis. Previous studies have demonstrated that galangin has anti-cancer effects on several cancers, including melanoma, hepatoma, and leukaemia cells. However, anti-cancer activity of galangin on human colon cancer has not been established yet. In this study, we investigated the anti-cancer effects of galangin on two types of human colon cancer cells (HCT-15 and HT-29). We found that galangin induced apoptosis and DNA condensation of human colon cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. We also determined that galangin increased the activation of caspase-3 and -9, and release of apoptosis inducing factor from the mitochondria into the cytoplasm by Western blot analysis. In addition, galangin induced human colon cancer cell death through the alteration of mitochondria membrane potential and dysfunction. These results suggest that galangin induces apoptosis of HCT-15 and HT-29 human colon cancer cells and may prove useful in the development of therapeutic agents for human colon cancer.

  9. Gene expression analysis in human breast cancer associated blood vessels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan T Jones

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is essential for solid tumour growth, whilst the molecular profiles of tumour blood vessels have been reported to be different between cancer types. Although presently available anti-angiogenic strategies are providing some promise for the treatment of some cancers it is perhaps not surprisingly that, none of the anti-angiogenic agents available work on all tumours. Thus, the discovery of novel anti-angiogenic targets, relevant to individual cancer types, is required. Using Affymetrix microarray analysis of laser-captured, CD31-positive blood vessels we have identified 63 genes that are upregulated significantly (5-72 fold in angiogenic blood vessels associated with human invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC of the breast as compared with blood vessels in normal human breast. We tested the angiogenic capacity of a subset of these genes. Genes were selected based on either their known cellular functions, their enriched expression in endothelial cells and/or their sensitivity to anti-VEGF treatment; all features implicating their involvement in angiogenesis. For example, RRM2, a ribonucleotide reductase involved in DNA synthesis, was upregulated 32-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels; ATF1, a nuclear activating transcription factor involved in cellular growth and survival was upregulated 23-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels and HEX-B, a hexosaminidase involved in the breakdown of GM2 gangliosides, was upregulated 8-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels. Furthermore, in silico analysis confirmed that AFT1 and HEX-B also were enriched in endothelial cells when compared with non-endothelial cells. None of these genes have been reported previously to be involved in neovascularisation. However, our data establish that siRNA depletion of Rrm2, Atf1 or Hex-B had significant anti-angiogenic effects in VEGF-stimulated ex vivo mouse aortic ring assays. Overall, our results provide proof-of-principle that our approach can identify a cohort of

  10. Siah1 proteins enhance radiosensitivity of human breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engenhart-Cabillic Rita

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Siah proteins play an important role in cancer progression. We evaluated the effect of Siah1, its splice variants Siah1L and the Siah1 mutant with the RING finger deleted (Siah1ΔR on radiosensitization of human breast cancer cells. Methods The status of Siah1 and Siah1L was analysed in five breast cancer cell lines. To establish stable cells, SKBR3 cells were transfected with Siah1, Siah-1L and Siah1ΔR. Siah1 function was suppressed by siRNA in MCF-7 cells. The impact of Siah1 overexpression and silencing on apoptosis, proliferation, survival, invasion ability and DNA repair was assessed in SKBR3 and MCF-7 cells, also in regards to radiation. Results Siah1 and Siah1L mRNA expression was absent in four of five breast cancer cells lines analysed. Overexpression of Siah1 and Siah1L enhanced radiation-induced apoptosis in stable transfected SKBR3 cells, while Siah1ΔR failed to show this effect. In addition, Siah1 and Siah1L significantly reduced cell clonogenic survival and proliferation. Siah1L sensitization enhancement ratio values were over 1.5 and 4.0 for clonogenic survival and proliferation, respectively, pointing to a highly cooperative and potentially synergistic fashion with radiation. Siah1 or Siah1L significantly reduced invasion ability of SKBR3 and suppressed Tcf/Lef factor activity. Importantly, Siah1 siRNA demonstrated opposite effects in MCF-7 cells. Siah1 and Siah1L overexpression resulted in inhibition of DNA repair as inferred by increased levels of DNA double-strand breaks in irradiated SKBR3 cells. Conclusion Our results reveal for the first time how overexpression of Siah1L and Siah1 can determine radiosensitivity of breast cancer cells. These findings suggest that development of drugs augmenting Siah1 and Siah1L activity could be a novel approach in improving tumor cell kill.

  11. Screening and analysis of breast cancer genes regulated by the human mammary microenvironment in a humanized mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Mingjie; Wang, Jue; Ling, Lijun; Xue, Dandan; Wang, Shui; Zhao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Tumor microenvironments play critical regulatory roles in tumor growth. Although mouse cancer models have contributed to the understanding of human tumor biology, the effectiveness of mouse cancer models is limited by the inability of the models to accurately present humanized tumor microenvironments. Previously, a humanized breast cancer model in severe combined immunodeficiency mice was established, in which human breast cancer tissue was implanted subcutaneously, followed by injection of human breast cancer cells. It was demonstrated that breast cancer cells showed improved growth in the human mammary microenvironment compared with a conventional subcutaneous mouse model. In the present study, the novel mouse model and microarray technology was used to analyze changes in the expression of genes in breast cancer cells that are regulated by the human mammary microenvironment. Humanized breast and conventional subcutaneous mouse models were established, and orthotopic tumor cells were obtained from orthotopic tumor masses by primary culture. An expression microarray using Illumina HumanHT-12 v4 Expression BeadChip and database analyses were performed to investigate changes in gene expression between tumors from each microenvironment. A total of 94 genes were differentially expressed between the primary cells cultured from the humanized and conventional mouse models. Significant upregulation of genes that promote cell proliferation and metastasis or inhibit apoptosis, such as SH3-domain binding protein 5 (BTK-associated), sodium/chloride cotransporter 3 and periostin, osteoblast specific factor, and genes that promote angiogenesis, such as KIAA1618, was also noted. Other genes that restrain cell proliferation and accelerate cell apoptosis, including tripartite motif containing TRIM36 and NES1, were downregulated. The present results revealed differences in various aspects of tumor growth and metabolism between the two model groups and indicated the functional

  12. An Anticancer Role of Hydrogen Sulfide in Human Gastric Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S can be synthesized in mammalian cells by cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE and/or cystathionine β-synthase (CBS. Both CSE and CBS are expressed in rat gastric tissues but their role in human gastric neoplasia has been unclear. The aims of the present study were to detect CSE and CBS proteins in human gastric cancer and determine the effect of exogenous NaHS on the proliferation of gastric cancer cells. We found that both CSE and CBS proteins were expressed in human gastric cancer cells and upregulated in human gastric carcinoma mucosa compared with those in noncancerous gastric samples. NaHS induced apoptosis of gastric cancer cells by regulating apoptosis related proteins. Also, NaHS inhibited cancer cell migration and invasion. An antigastric cancer role of H2S is thus indicated.

  13. Cancer Secretome May Influence BSP and DSP Expression in Human Salivary Gland Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Samantha Lynn; Ferando, Blake; Eapen, Asha Sarah; Yu, Jennifer Chian; Joy, Anita Rose

    2017-03-01

    One of the biggest challenges in managing head and neck cancers, especially salivary gland cancers, is the identification of secreted biomarkers of the disease that can be evaluated noninvasively. A relevant source of enriched tumor markers could potentially be found in the tumor secretome. Although numerous studies have evaluated secretomes from various cancers, the influence of the cancer secretome derived from salivary gland cancers on the behavior of normal cells has not yet been elucidated. Our data indicate that secretome derived from salivary gland cancer cells can influence the expression of two potential biomarkers of oral cancer-namely, bone sialoprotein (BSP) and dentin sialoprotein (DSP)-in normal salivary gland cells. Using routine immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting techniques, we demonstrate an enrichment of BSP and DSP in human salivary gland (HSG) cancer tissue, unique localizations of BSP and DSP in HSG cancer cells, and enriched expression of BSP and DSP in normal salivary gland cells exposed to a cancer secretome. The secretome domain of the cancer microenvironment could alter signaling cascades responsible for normal cell proliferation, migration, and invasion, thus enhancing cancer cell survival and the potential for cancer progression. The cancer secretome may be critical in maintaining and stimulating "cancer-ness," thus potentially promoting specific hallmarks of metastasis.

  14. Immune and Inflammatory Cell Composition of Human Lung Cancer Stroma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Banat, G-Andre; Tretyn, Aleksandra; Pullamsetti, Soni Savai; Wilhelm, Jochen; Weigert, Andreas; Olesch, Catherine; Ebel, Katharina; Stiewe, Thorsten; Grimminger, Friedrich; Seeger, Werner; Fink, Ludger; Savai, Rajkumar

    2015-01-01

    .... We comprehensively assessed the number of stromal cells, especially immune/inflammatory cells, in lung cancer and evaluated their infiltration in cancers of different stages, types and metastatic...

  15. Aberrant rel/nfkb genes and activity in human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayet, B; Gélinas, C

    1999-11-22

    Rel/NF-kappaB transcription factors are key regulators of immune, inflammatory and acute phase responses and are also implicated in the control of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Remarkable progress has been made in understanding the signal transduction pathways that lead to the activation of Rel/NF-kappaB factors and the consequent induction of gene expression. Evidence linking deregulated Rel/NF-kappaB activity to oncogenesis in mammalian systems has emerged in recent years, consistent with the acute oncogenicity of the viral oncoprotein v-Rel in animal models. Chromosomal amplification, overexpression and rearrangement of genes coding for Rel/NF-kappaB factors have been noted in many human hematopoietic and solid tumors. Persistent nuclear NF-kappaB activity was also described in several human cancer cell types, as a result of constitutive activation of upstream signaling kinases or mutations inactivating inhibitory IkappaB subunits. Studies point to a correlation between the activation of cellular gene expression by Rel/NF-kappaB factors and their participation in the malignant process. Experiments implicating NF-kappaB in the control of the apoptotic response also support a role in oncogenesis and in the resistance of tumor cells to chemotherapy. This review focuses on the status of the rel, nfkb and ikb genes and their activity in human tumors and their association with the onset or progression of malignancies.

  16. A novel model for evaluating therapies targeting human tumor vasculature and human cancer stem-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos-Ojeda, Daniela; McLean, Karen; Bai, Shoumei; Pulaski, Heather; Gong, Yusong; Silva, Ines; Skorecki, Karl; Tzukerman, Maty; Buckanovich, Ronald J

    2013-06-15

    Human tumor vessels express tumor vascular markers (TVM), proteins that are not expressed in normal blood vessels. Antibodies targeting TVMs could act as potent therapeutics. Unfortunately, preclinical in vivo studies testing anti-human TVM therapies have been difficult to do due to a lack of in vivo models with confirmed expression of human TVMs. We therefore evaluated TVM expression in a human embryonic stem cell-derived teratoma (hESCT) tumor model previously shown to have human vessels. We now report that in the presence of tumor cells, hESCT tumor vessels express human TVMs. The addition of mouse embryonic fibroblasts and human tumor endothelial cells significantly increases the number of human tumor vessels. TVM induction is mostly tumor-type-specific with ovarian cancer cells inducing primarily ovarian TVMs, whereas breast cancer cells induce breast cancer specific TVMs. We show the use of this model to test an anti-human specific TVM immunotherapeutics; anti-human Thy1 TVM immunotherapy results in central tumor necrosis and a three-fold reduction in human tumor vascular density. Finally, we tested the ability of the hESCT model, with human tumor vascular niche, to enhance the engraftment rate of primary human ovarian cancer stem-like cells (CSC). ALDH(+) CSC from patients (n = 6) engrafted in hESCT within 4 to 12 weeks whereas none engrafted in the flank. ALDH(-) ovarian cancer cells showed no engraftment in the hESCT or flank (n = 3). Thus, this model represents a useful tool to test anti-human TVM therapy and evaluate in vivo human CSC tumor biology.

  17. Subamolide A Induces Mitotic Catastrophe Accompanied by Apoptosis in Human Lung Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jen-Yu Hung; Ching-Wen Wen; Ya-Ling Hsu; En-Shyh Lin; Ming-Shyan Huang; Chung-Yi Chen; Po-Lin Kuo

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the anticancer effects of subamolide A (Sub-A), isolated from Cinnamomum subavenium, on human nonsmall cell lung cancer cell lines A549 and NCI-H460. Treatment of cancer cells with Sub-A resulted in decreased cell viability of both lung cancer cell lines. Sub-A induced lung cancer cell death by triggering mitotic catastrophe with apoptosis. It triggered oxidant stress, indicated by increased cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and decreased glutathione le...

  18. Quantitative proteomics of extracellular vesicles derived from human primary and metastatic colorectal cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gho, Yong Song; Choi, Dong-Sic; Choi, Do-Young; Hong, Bok Sil; Jang, Su Chul; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Lee, Jaewook; Kim, Yoon-Keun; Kim, Kwang Pyo

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cells actively release extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes and microvesicles, into surrounding tissues. These EVs play pleiotropic roles in cancer progression and metastasis, including invasion, angiogenesis, and immune modulation. However, the proteomic differences between primary and metastatic cancer cell-derived EVs remain unclear. Here, we conducted comparative proteomic analysis between EVs derived from human primary colorectal cancer cells (SW480) and their metastat...

  19. Kinase Mediated Regulation of 40S Ribosome Assembly in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0009 TITLE: PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John Cleveland CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center...so designated by other documentation. Kinase-Mediated Regulation of 40S Ribosome Assembly in Human Breast Cancer REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Kinase-Mediated Regulation of 40S Ribosome Assembly in Human Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0009 5c

  20. Kinase-Mediated Regulation of 40S Ribosome Assembly in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0008 TITLE: Kinase-Mediated Regulation of 40S Ribosome Assembly in Human Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Jan 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Kinase-Mediated Regulation of 40S Ribosome Assembly in Human Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH...Investigator [PI], Scripps) and John Cleveland (Collaborating/Partnering PI, Moffitt Cancer Center) seek to validate 40S ribosome assembly as a therapeutic

  1. [Expressions and significance of NDRG2 and Bcl-2 in human gastric cancer tissues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ruixue; Shi, Yongquan; Zhang, Lianfeng

    2015-04-01

    To analyze the expressions of N-myc downstream regulated gene 2 (NDRG2) and B cell lymphoma/leukemia-2 (Bcl-2) in human gastric cancer in an attempt to explore their correlation and clinical significance. Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect the expression of NDRG2 and Bcl-2 in human gastric cancer, para-carcinoma tissues and normal tissues. The correlation between their expressions and clinicopathologic data were analyzed using statistical software in gastric cancer tissues. The tissue microarray consisting of 64 gastric cancer and 10 normal gastric tissues showed NDRG2 expression in gastric cancer tissues was significantly lower than that in normal tissues, whereas Bcl-2 expression in gastric cancer tissues was significantly higher than that in normal tissues. It was also indicated that NDRG2 was negatively correlated with Bcl-2 in gastric cancer tissues. NDRG2 and Bcl-2 were further analyzed in 206 gastric cancer and paired para-carcinoma tissues. It was displayed that the expression levels of NDRG2 and Bcl-2 in human gastric cancer were not associated with age and sex, but significantly associated with tumor differentiation, clinical stage and lymph node metastasis. There is a negative correlation between NDRG2 and Bcl-2 expressions in human gastric cancer, suggesting they might be synergistically involved in the development of gastric cancer.

  2. Glucose Metabolism of Human Prostate Cancer Mouse Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Jadvar

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that the glucose metabolism of prostate cancer is modulated by androgen. We performed in vivo biodistribution and imaging studies of [F-18] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG accumulation in androgen-sensitive (CWR-22 and androgen-independent (PC-3 human prostate cancer xenografts implanted in castrated and noncastrated male athymic mice. The growth pattern of the CWR-22 tumor was best approximated by an exponential function (tumor size in mm3 = 14.913 e0.108 × days, R2 = .96, n = 5. The growth pattern of the PC-3 tumor was best approximated by a quadratic function (tumor size in mm3 = 0.3511 × days2 + 49.418 × day −753.33, R2 = .96, n = 3. The FDG accumulation in the CWR-22 tumor implanted in the castrated mice was significantly lower, by an average of 55%, in comparison to that implanted in the noncastrated host (1.27 vs. 2.83, respectively, p < .05. The 3-week maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax was 0.99 ± 0.43 (mean ± SD for CWR-22 and 1.21 ± 0.32 for PC-3, respectively. The 5-week SUVmax was 1.22 ± 0.08 for CWR-22 and 1.35 ± 0.17 for PC-3, respectively. The background muscle SUVmax was 0.53 ± 0.11. Glucose metabolism was higher in the PC-3 tumor than in the CWR-22 tumor at both the 3-week (by 18% and the 5-week (by 9.6% micro-PET imaging sessions. Our results support the notions that FDG PET may be useful in the imaging evaluation of response to androgen ablation therapy and in the early prediction of hormone refractoriness in men with metastatic prostate cancer.

  3. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgouras, Dionyssios N.; Trang, Tran Thi Huyen; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Three decades have passed since Warren and Marshall described the successful isolation and culture of Helicobacter pylori, the Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the stomach of half the human population worldwide. Although it is documented that H. pylori infection is implicated in a range of disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract, as well as associated organs, many aspects relating to host colonization, successful persistence and the pathophysiological mechanisms of this bacteria still remain controversial and are constantly being explored. Unceasing efforts to decipher the pathophysiology of H. pylori infection have illuminated the crucially important contribution of multifarious bacterial factors for H. pylori pathogenesis, in particular the cag pathogenicity island (PAI), the effector protein CagA and the vacuolating cytotoxin VacA. In addition, recent studies have provided insight into the importance of the gastrointestinal microbiota on the cumulative pathophysiology associated with H. pylori infections. This review focuses on the key findings of publications related to the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection published during the last year, with an emphasis on factors affecting colonization efficiency, cag PAI, CagA, VacA and gastrointestinal microbiota. PMID:26372819

  4. Single and Multiple Gene Manipulations in Mouse Models of Human Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Heather L; Stairs, Douglas B

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models of human cancer play a critical role in understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms of tumorigenesis. Advances continue to be made in modeling human disease in a mouse, though the relevance of a mouse model often relies on how closely it is able to mimic the histologic, molecular, and physiologic characteristics of the respective human cancer. A classic use of a genetically engineered mouse in studying cancer is through the overexpression or deletion of a gene. However, the manipulation of a single gene often falls short of mimicking all the characteristics of the carcinoma in humans; thus a multiple gene approach is needed. Here we review genetic mouse models of cancers and their abilities to recapitulate human carcinoma with single versus combinatorial approaches with genes commonly involved in cancer. PMID:26380553

  5. Current status of cancer immunodetection with radiolabeled human monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jager, R; Abdel-Nabi, H; Serafini, A; Pecking, A; Klein, J L; Hanna, M G

    1993-04-01

    The use of radiolabeled murine monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) for cancer immunodetection has been limited by the development of human antimouse antibodies (HAMA). Human monoclonal antibodies do not elicit a significant human antihuman (HAHA) response. The generation and production of human monoclonal antibodies met with technical difficulties that resulted in delaying their clinical testing. Human monoclonal antibodies of all isotypes have been obtained. Most were immunoglobulin (Ig) M directed against intracellular antigens. Two antibodies, 16.88 (IgM) and 88BV59 (IgG3k), recognize different epitopes on a tumor-associated antigen, CTA 16.88, homologous to cytokeratins 8, 18, and 19. CTA 16.88 is expressed by most epithelial-derived tumors including carcinomas of the colon, pancreas, breast, ovary, and lung. The in vivo targeting by these antibodies is related to their localization in nonnecrotic areas of tumors. Repeated administration of 16.88 over 5 weeks to a cumulative dose of 1,000 mg did not elicit a HAHA response. Two of 53 patients developed a low titer of HAHA 1 to 3 months after a single administration of 88BV59. Planar imaging of colorectal cancer with Iodine-131 (131I)-16.88 was positive in two studies in 9 of 12 and 16 of 20 patients preselected by immunohistochemistry. Tumors less than 2 cm in diameter are usually not detected. The lack of immunogenicity and long tumor residence time (average = 17 days) makes 16.88 a good candidate for therapy. Radioimmunlymphoscintigraphy with indium-111 (111In)-LiLo-16.88 administered by an intramammary route was used in the presurgical staging of primary breast cancer. The negative predictive value of lymph node metastases for tumors less than 3 cm was 90.5%. Planar and single photon emission computed tomography imaging of colorectal carcinoma with technetium-99m (99mTc) 88BV59 was compared with computed tomography (CT) scan in 36 surgical patients. The antibody scan was more sensitive than the CT scan in detecting

  6. Hypoxia-regulated microRNAs in human cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guomin SHEN; Xiaobo LI; Yong-feng JIA; Gary A PIAZZA; Yaguang XI

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia plays an important role in the tumor microenvironment by allowing the development and maintenance of cancer cells,but the regulatory mechanisms by which tumor cells adapt to hypoxic conditions are not yet well understood.MicroRNAs are recognized as a new class of master regulators that control gene expression and are responsible for many normal and pathological cellular processes.Studies have shown that hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF1) regulates a panel of microRNAs,whereas some of microRNAs target HIF1.The interaction between microRNAs and HIF1 can account for many vital events relevant to tumorigenesis,such as angiogenesis,metabolism,apoptosis,cell cycle regulation,proliferation,metastasis,and resistance to anticancer therapy.This review will summarize recent findings on the roles of hypoxia and microRNAs in human cancer and illustrate the machinery by which microRNAs interact with hypoxia in tumor cells,It is expected to update our knowledge about the regulatory roles of microRNAs in regulating tumor microenvironments and thus benefit the development of new anticancer drugs.

  7. Is Human Papillomavirus Associated with Prostate Cancer Survival?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariarosa Pascale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of human papillomavirus (HPV in prostate carcinogenesis is highly controversial: some studies suggest a positive association between HPV infection and an increased risk of prostate cancer (PCa, whereas others do not reveal any correlation. In this study, we investigated the prognostic impact of HPV infection on survival in 150 primary PCa patients. One hundred twelve (74.67% patients had positive expression of HPV E7 protein, which was evaluated in tumour tissue by immunohistochemistry. DNA analysis on a subset of cases confirmed HPV infection and revealed the presence of genotype 16. In Kaplan-Meier analysis, HPV-positive cancer patients showed worse overall survival (OS (median 4.59 years compared to HPV-negative (median 8.24 years, P=0.0381. In multivariate analysis age (P<0.001, Gleason score (P<0.001, nuclear grading (P=0.002, and HPV status (P=0.034 were independent prognostic factors for OS. In our cohort, we observed high prevalence of HPV nuclear E7 oncoprotein and an association between HPV infection and PCa survival. In the debate about the oncogenic activity of HPV in PCa, our results further confirm the need for additional studies to clarify the possible role of HPV in prostate carcinogenesis.

  8. Deoxyribonucleic-binding homeobox proteins are augmented in human cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Mercurio, A M; Chung, S Y;

    1990-01-01

    the highly conserved 60 amino acid homeodomain. This peptide antiserum recognized a protein species of molecular weight 63,000 in immunoblots of nuclear extracts obtained from several tumor cell lines. The predominant molecular weight 63,000 nuclear protein recognized by the peptide antiserum...... the same patients exhibited little immunoreactivity. Both the peptide antiserum and the polyclonal antiserum against the native protein immunoblotted a molecular weight 63,000 protein in nuclear extracts of tumor tissue, but not significantly in extracts of normal tissue. At the molecular level......Homeobox genes encode sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins that are involved in the regulation of gene expression during embryonic development. In this study, we examined the expression of homeobox proteins in human cancer. Antiserum was obtained against a synthetic peptide derived from...

  9. Emerging roles of deubiquitinating enzymes in human cancer1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-ming YANG

    2007-01-01

    Protein modifications by the covalent linkage of ubiquitin have significant in-volvement in many cellular processes, including stress response, oncogenesis,viral infection, transcription, protein turnover, organelle biogenesis, DNA repair,cellular differentiation, and cell cycle control. Protein ubiquitination and subse-quent degradation by the proteasome require the participation of both ubiquitinating enzymes and deubiquitinating enzymes. Although deubiquitinatingenzymes constitute a large family in the ubiquitin system, the study of this class of proteins is still in its infant stage. Recent studies have revealed a variety of molecular and biological functions of deubiquitinating enzymes and their associa-tion with human diseases. In this review we will discuss the possible roles that deubiquitinating enzymes may play in cancers.

  10. Targeting Notch1 inhibits invasion and angiogenesis of human breast cancer cells via inhibition Nuclear Factor-κB signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Su, Chuanfu; Shan, Yuqing; Yang, Shouxiang; Ma, Guifeng

    2016-01-01

    Notch-1, a type-1 transmembrane protein, plays critical roles in the pathogenesis and progression of human malignancies, including breast cancer; however, the precise mechanism by which Notch-1 causes tumor cell invasion and angiogenesis remain unclear. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), interleukin-8 (IL-8), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) are critically involved in the processes of tumor cell invasion and metastasis, we investigated whether targeting Notch-1 could be mechanistically associated with the down-regulation of NF-κB, IL-8, VEGF, and MMP-9, resulting in the inhibition of invasion and angiogenesis of breast cancer cells. Our data showed that down-regulation of Notch-1 leads to the inactivation of NF-κB activity and inhibits the expression of its target genes, such as IL-8, VEGF and MMP-9. We also found that down-regulation of Notch-1 decreased cell invasion, and vice versa Consistent with these results, we also found that the down-regulation of Notch-1 not only decreased MMP-9 mRNA and its protein expression but also inhibited MMP-9 active form. Moreover, conditioned medium from Notch-1 siRNA-transfected breast cancer cells showed reduced levels of IL-8 and VEGF and, in turn, inhibited the tube formation of HUVECs, suggesting that down-regulation of Notch-1 leads to the inhibition of angiogenesis. Furthermore, conditioned medium from Notch-1 cDNA-transfected breast cancer cells showed increased levels of IL-8 and VEGF and, in turn, promoted the tube formation of HUVECs, suggesting that Notch-1 overexpression leads to the promotion of angiogenesis.We therefore concluded that down-regulation of Notch-1 leads to the inactivation NF-κB and its target genes (IL-8, MMP-9 and VEGF), resulting in the inhibition of invasion and angiogenesis.

  11. Emerging of fractal geometry on surface of human cervical epithelial cells during progression towards cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokukin, M. E.; Guz, N. V.; Woodworth, C.D.; Sokolov, I.

    2015-01-01

    Despite considerable advances in understanding the molecular nature of cancer, many biophysical aspects of malignant development are still unclear. Here we study physical alterations of the surface of human cervical epithelial cells during stepwise in vitro