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Sample records for human breast cancer-associated

  1. Gene expression analysis in human breast cancer associated blood vessels.

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    Dylan T Jones

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is essential for solid tumour growth, whilst the molecular profiles of tumour blood vessels have been reported to be different between cancer types. Although presently available anti-angiogenic strategies are providing some promise for the treatment of some cancers it is perhaps not surprisingly that, none of the anti-angiogenic agents available work on all tumours. Thus, the discovery of novel anti-angiogenic targets, relevant to individual cancer types, is required. Using Affymetrix microarray analysis of laser-captured, CD31-positive blood vessels we have identified 63 genes that are upregulated significantly (5-72 fold in angiogenic blood vessels associated with human invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC of the breast as compared with blood vessels in normal human breast. We tested the angiogenic capacity of a subset of these genes. Genes were selected based on either their known cellular functions, their enriched expression in endothelial cells and/or their sensitivity to anti-VEGF treatment; all features implicating their involvement in angiogenesis. For example, RRM2, a ribonucleotide reductase involved in DNA synthesis, was upregulated 32-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels; ATF1, a nuclear activating transcription factor involved in cellular growth and survival was upregulated 23-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels and HEX-B, a hexosaminidase involved in the breakdown of GM2 gangliosides, was upregulated 8-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels. Furthermore, in silico analysis confirmed that AFT1 and HEX-B also were enriched in endothelial cells when compared with non-endothelial cells. None of these genes have been reported previously to be involved in neovascularisation. However, our data establish that siRNA depletion of Rrm2, Atf1 or Hex-B had significant anti-angiogenic effects in VEGF-stimulated ex vivo mouse aortic ring assays. Overall, our results provide proof-of-principle that our approach can identify a cohort of

  2. Human breast cancer associated fibroblasts exhibit subtype specific gene expression profiles

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    Tchou Julia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease for which prognosis and treatment strategies are largely governed by the receptor status (estrogen, progesterone and Her2 of the tumor cells. Gene expression profiling of whole breast tumors further stratifies breast cancer into several molecular subtypes which also co-segregate with the receptor status of the tumor cells. We postulated that cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs within the tumor stroma may exhibit subtype specific gene expression profiles and thus contribute to the biology of the disease in a subtype specific manner. Several studies have reported gene expression profile differences between CAFs and normal breast fibroblasts but in none of these studies were the results stratified based on tumor subtypes. Methods To address whether gene expression in breast cancer associated fibroblasts varies between breast cancer subtypes, we compared the gene expression profiles of early passage primary CAFs isolated from twenty human breast cancer samples representing three main subtypes; seven ER+, seven triple negative (TNBC and six Her2+. Results We observed significant expression differences between CAFs derived from Her2+ breast cancer and CAFs from TNBC and ER + cancers, particularly in pathways associated with cytoskeleton and integrin signaling. In the case of Her2+ breast cancer, the signaling pathways found to be selectively up regulated in CAFs likely contribute to the enhanced migration of breast cancer cells in transwell assays and may contribute to the unfavorable prognosis of Her2+ breast cancer. Conclusions These data demonstrate that in addition to the distinct molecular profiles that characterize the neoplastic cells, CAF gene expression is also differentially regulated in distinct subtypes of breast cancer.

  3. Cancer Associated Fibroblasts express pro-inflammatory factors in human breast and ovarian tumors

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    Erez, Neta, E-mail: netaerez@post.tau.ac.il [Department of Pathology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Glanz, Sarah [Department of Pathology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Raz, Yael [Department of Pathology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, LIS Maternity Hospital, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, affiliated with Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Avivi, Camilla [Department of Pathology, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, affiliated with Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Barshack, Iris [Department of Pathology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Department of Pathology, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, affiliated with Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •CAFs in human breast and ovarian tumors express pro-inflammatory factors. •Expression of pro-inflammatory factors correlates with tumor invasiveness. •Expression of pro-inflammatory factors is associated with NF-κb activation in CAFs. -- Abstract: Inflammation has been established in recent years as a hallmark of cancer. Cancer Associated Fibroblasts (CAFs) support tumorigenesis by stimulating angiogenesis, cancer cell proliferation and invasion. We previously demonstrated that CAFs also mediate tumor-enhancing inflammation in a mouse model of skin carcinoma. Breast and ovarian carcinomas are amongst the leading causes of cancer-related mortality in women and cancer-related inflammation is linked with both these tumor types. However, the role of CAFs in mediating inflammation in these malignancies remains obscure. Here we show that CAFs in human breast and ovarian tumors express high levels of the pro-inflammatory factors IL-6, COX-2 and CXCL1, previously identified to be part of a CAF pro-inflammatory gene signature. Moreover, we show that both pro-inflammatory signaling by CAFs and leukocyte infiltration of tumors are enhanced in invasive ductal carcinoma as compared with ductal carcinoma in situ. The pro-inflammatory genes expressed by CAFs are known NF-κB targets and we show that NF-κB is up-regulated in breast and ovarian CAFs. Our data imply that CAFs mediate tumor-promoting inflammation in human breast and ovarian tumors and thus may be an attractive target for stromal-directed therapeutics.

  4. Carbonic anhydrase-9 expression levels and prognosis in human breast cancer: association with treatment outcome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Span, P.N.; Bussink, J.; Manders, P.; Beex, L.V.A.M.; Sweep, C.G.J.

    2003-01-01

    Here, we set out to assess CA9 expression levels by real-time quantitative RT-PCR in breast cancer tissue samples obtained from 253 patients, and correlated those with relapse-free (RFS) survival. The median follow-up time was 75 months (range 2-168 months). CA9 expression was mainly found in high-g

  5. Screening a Novel Human Breast Cancer-Associated Antigen from a cDNA Expression Library of Breast Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuhua Yang; Lin Zhang; Ruifang Niu; Defa Wang; Yurong Shi; Xiyin Wei; Yi Yang

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this research was to clone and express the antigen of the previously prepared monoclonal antibody named M4G3.METHODS Western blots were used to screen a breast cancer cell line that overexpresses the M4G3-associated antigen. A λ zap cDNA expression library of breast cancer cells was constructed and screened using M4G3 as a probe to clone the antigen. The positive clones were subcloned and identified by homologous comparison using BLAST.RESULTS The λ zap cDNA expression library had 1.0x106 independent clones. Fifteen positive clones were isolated following 3 rounds of immunoscreening and identified as being from Mycoplasma pulmonis.CONCLUSION The specific antigen that matched the monoclonal M4G3 antibody is an unknown protein of M. pulmonis. This work is helpful for the further study of the association of M. pulmonis infection with breast cancer.

  6. Colon cancer associated transcripts in human cancers.

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    Chen, Yincong; Xie, Haibiao; Gao, Qunjun; Zhan, Hengji; Xiao, Huizhong; Zou, Yifan; Zhang, Fuyou; Liu, Yuchen; Li, Jianfa

    2017-08-02

    Long non-coding RNAs serve as important regulators in complicated cellular activities, including cell differentiation, proliferation and death. Dysregulation of long non-coding RNAs occurs in the formation and progression of cancers. The family of colon cancer associated transcripts, long non-coding RNAs colon cancer associated transcript-1 and colon cancer associated transcript-2 are known as oncogenes involved in various cancers. Colon cancer associated transcript-1 is a novel lncRNA located in 8q24.2, and colon cancer associated transcript-2 maps to the 8q24.21 region encompassing rs6983267. Colon cancer associated transcripts have close associations with clinical characteristics, such as lymph node metastasis, high TNM stage and short overall survival. Knockdown of them can reverse the malignant phenotypes of cancer cells, including proliferation, migration, invasion and apoptosis. Moreover, they can increase the expression level of c-MYC and oncogenic microRNAs via activating a series of complex mechanisms. In brief, the family of colon cancer associated transcripts may serve as potential biomarkers or therapeutic targets for human cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. No evidence of clonal somatic genetic alterations in cancer-associated fibroblasts from human breast and ovarian carcinomas.

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    Qiu, Wen; Hu, Min; Sridhar, Anita; Opeskin, Ken; Fox, Stephen; Shipitsin, Michail; Trivett, Melanie; Thompson, Ella R; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Gorringe, Kylie L; Polyak, Kornelia; Haviv, Izhak; Campbell, Ian G

    2008-05-01

    There is increasing evidence showing that the stromal cells surrounding cancer epithelial cells, rather than being passive bystanders, might have a role in modifying tumor outgrowth. The molecular basis of this aspect of carcinoma etiology is controversial. Some studies have reported a high frequency of genetic aberrations in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), whereas other studies have reported very low or zero mutation rates. Resolution of this contentious area is of critical importance in terms of understanding both the basic biology of cancer as well as the potential clinical implications of CAF somatic alterations. We undertook genome-wide copy number and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analysis of CAFs derived from breast and ovarian carcinomas using a 500K SNP array platform. Our data show conclusively that LOH and copy number alterations are extremely rare in CAFs and cannot be the basis of the carcinoma-promoting phenotypes of breast and ovarian CAFs.

  8. Breast cancer associated with type 1 neurofibromatosis.

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    Salemis, Nikolaos S; Nakos, Georgios; Sambaziotis, Dimitrios; Gourgiotis, Stavros

    2010-10-01

    The association between breast cancer and type 1 neurofibromatosis (NF1) is a rare clinical entity. We herein present the case of a 59-year-old woman, with typical clinical manifestations of NF1, who presented with a painless lump in her right breast, which she had first noticed 8 months earlier. Clinical examination and diagnostic workup were suggestive of a breast carcinoma, and a modified radical mastectomy was performed. Histopathological examination revealed a poorly differentiated invasive ductal breast carcinoma and multiple neurofibromas. The pathological staging was pT2N1a according to TNM/UICC. Delayed presentation of the patient was the result of her mistakenly identifying the breast tumor as a manifestation of NF1 neurofibromatosis.

  9. Alternative splicing of breast cancer associated gene BRCA1 from breast cancer cell line.

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    Lixia, Miao; Zhijian, Cao; Chao, Shen; Chaojiang, Gu; Congyi, Zheng

    2007-01-31

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women, and mutations in the BRCA1 gene produce increased susceptibility to these malignancies in certain families. In this study, the forward 1-13 exons of breast cancer associated gene BRCA1 were cloned from breast cancer cell line ZR-75-30 by RT-PCR method. Sequence analysis showed that nine BRCA1 splice forms were isolated and characterized, compared with wild-type BRCA1 gene, five splice forms of which were novel. These splice isoforms were produced from the molecular mechanism of 5' and 3' alternative splicing. All these splice forms deleting exon 11b and the locations of alternative splicing were focused on two parts:one was exons 2 and 3, and the other was exons 9 and 10. These splice forms accorded with GT-AG rule. Most these BRCA1 splice variants still kept the original reading frame. Western blot analysis indicated that some BRCA1 splice variants were expressed in ZR-75-30 cell line at the protein level. In addition, we confirmed the presence of these new transcripts of BRCA1 gene in MDA-MB-435S, K562, Hela, HLA, HIC, H9, Jurkat and human fetus samples by RT-PCR analysis. These results suggested that breast cancer associated gene BRCA1 may have unexpectedly a large number of splice variants. We hypothesized that alternative splicing of BRCA1 possibly plays a major role in the tumorigenesis of breast and/or ovarian cancer. Thus, the identification of cancer-specific splice forms will provide a novel source for the discovery of diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers and tumor antigens suitable as targets for therapeutic intervention.

  10. Breast cancer cells induce cancer-associated fibroblasts to secrete hepatocyte growth factor to enhance breast tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiaw-Wei Tyan

    Full Text Available It has been well documented that microenvironment consisting of stroma affects breast cancer progression. However, the mechanisms by which cancer cells and fibroblasts, the major cell type in stroma, interact with each other during tumor development remains to be elucidated. Here, we show that the human cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs had higher activity in enhancing breast tumorigenecity compared to the normal tissue-associated fibroblasts (NAFs isolated from the same patients. The expression level of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF in these fibroblasts was positively correlated with their ability to enhance breast tumorigenesis in mice. Deprivation of HGF using a neutralizing antibody reduced CAF-mediated colony formation of human breast cancer cells, indicating that CAFs enhanced cancer cell colony formation mainly through HGF secretion. Co-culture with human breast cancer MDA-MB-468 cells in a transwell system enhanced NAFs to secret HGF as well as promote tumorigenecity. The newly gained ability of these "educated" NAFs became irreversible after continuing this process till fourth passage. These results suggested that breast cancer cells could alter the nature of its surrounding fibroblasts to secrete HGF to support its own progression through paracrine signaling.

  11. c-Ski activates cancer-associated fibroblasts to regulate breast cancer cell invasion.

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    Wang, Liyang; Hou, Yixuan; Sun, Yan; Zhao, Liuyang; Tang, Xi; Hu, Ping; Yang, Jiajia; Zeng, Zongyue; Yang, Guanglun; Cui, Xiaojiang; Liu, Manran

    2013-12-01

    Aberrant expression of c-Ski oncoprotein in some tumor cells has been shown to be associated with cancer development. However, the role of c-Ski in cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) of tumor microenvironment has not been characterized. In the current study, we found that c-Ski is highly expressed in CAFs derived from breast carcinoma microenvironment and this CAF-associated c-Ski expression is associated with invasion and metastasis of human breast tumors. We showed that c-Ski overexpression in immortalized breast normal fibroblasts (NFs) induces conversion to breast CAFs by repressing p53 and thereby upregulating SDF-1 in NFs. SDF-1 treatment or p53 knockdown in NFs had similar effects on the activation of NFs as c-Ski overexpression. The c-Ski-activated CAFs show increased proliferation, migration, invasion and contraction compared with NFs. Furthermore, c-Ski-activated CAFs facilitated the migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Our data suggest that c-Ski is an important regulator in the activation of CAFs and may serve as a potential therapeutic target to block breast cancer progression.

  12. Secretome analysis of breast cancer-associated adipose tissue to identify paracrine regulators of breast cancer growth

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    Lore, Lapeire; An, Hendrix; Evelyne, Lecoutere; Mieke, Van Bockstal; Jo, Vandesompele; Dawn, Maynard; Geert, Braems; Rudy, Van Den Broecke; Cathérine, Müller; Marc, Bracke; Véronique, Cocquyt; Hannelore, Denys; Olivier, De Wever

    2017-01-01

    Adipose tissue secretes a plethora of adipokines as evidenced by characterization of subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue secretomes. However, adipose tissue composition and secretion pattern is depot and disease dependent, influencing the adipose tissue secretome. We investigated the secretome of cancer-associated adipose tissue (CAAT) explants from breast cancer patients and explored its role in breast cancer proliferation. CAAT proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS and human protein antibody arrays and stimulated proliferation of three breast cancer cell lines. Kinomics and transcriptomics of MCF-7 breast cancer cells treated with the secretome of CAAT revealed activation of Akt-, ERK- and JNK-pathways and differential expression of activator protein 1 (AP-1) and cAMP responsive element-binding protein (CREB) target genes. The cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)4/6-inhibitor palbociclib significantly abrogated CAAT-enhanced breast cancer cell proliferation. Our work characterizes the specific breast CAAT protein secretome and reveals its pro-proliferative potency in breast cancer. PMID:28525384

  13. Proteome profiling of breast cancer biopsies reveals a wound healing signature of cancer-associated fibroblasts.

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    Groessl, Michael; Slany, Astrid; Bileck, Andrea; Gloessmann, Kerstin; Kreutz, Dominique; Jaeger, Walter; Pfeiler, Georg; Gerner, Christopher

    2014-11-07

    Breast cancer is still the most common type of cancer in women; an important role in carcinogenesis is actually attributed to cancer-associated fibroblasts. In this study, we investigated whether it is possible to assess the functional state of cancer-associated fibroblasts through tumor tissue proteome profiling. Tissue proteomics was performed on tumor-central, tumor-near, and tumor-distant biopsy sections from breast adenocarcinoma patients, which allowed us to identify 2074 proteins. Data were interpreted referring to reference proteome profiles generated from primary human mammary fibroblasts comprising 4095 proteins. These cells were analyzed in quiescent cell state as well as after in vitro treatment with TGFβ or IL-1β, stimulating wound healing or inflammatory processes, respectively. Representative for cancer cells, we investigated the mammary carcinoma cell line ZR-75-1, identifying 5212 proteins. All mass analysis data have been made fully accessible via ProteomeXchange, DOI PXD001311 and PXD001323-8. Comparison of tissue proteomics data with all of those reference profiles revealed predominance of cancer cell-derived proteins within the tumor and fibroblast-derived proteins in the tumor-distant tissue sections. Remarkably, proteins characteristic for acute inflammation were hardly identified in the tissue samples. In contrast, several proteins found by us to be induced by TGFβ in mammary fibroblasts, including fibulin-5, SLC2A1, and MUC18, were positively identified in all tissue samples, with relatively higher abundance in tumor neighboring tissue sections. These findings indicate a predominance of cancer-associated fibroblasts with wound healing activities localized around tumors.

  14. Family history of cancer associated with breast tumor clinicopathological features.

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    Ricks, Luisel J; Ewing, Altovise; Thompson, Nicole; Harrison, Barbara; Wilson, Bradford; Richardson, Finie; Carter-Nolan, Pamela; Spencer, Cherie; Laiyemo, Adeyinka; Williams, Carla

    2014-07-01

    Hereditary breast cancers have unique clinicopathological characteristics. Therefore, the objective of this study was to establish the relationship between self-reported family history of cancer and clinicopathological features in breast cancer patients from Washington, DC. Data on incident breast cancer cases from 2000 to 2010 were obtained from the Washington, DC Cancer Registry. Variables such as estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), and human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) receptor status, as well as stage and grade, were analyzed in those that self-reported with (n = 1,734) and without a family history of cancer (n = 1,712). The breast cancer molecular subtypes were compared when ER, PR, and HER2 statuses were available. Furthermore, tumor characteristics were compared by race/ethnicity. Regression and chi-square analyses were performed. A report of family history was associated with age (OR = 1.27 95 % CI: 1.09-1.48; p PR negative breast cancer (OR = 1.26 95 % CI: 1.02-1.57; p = 0.029). When tumor characteristics were compared by race/ethnicity, those that self-reported as African American with a family history had a higher frequency of ER negative tumors (OR = 1.51 95 % CI: 1.09-2.08; p = 0.008), PR negative tumors (OR = 1.46 95 % CI: 1.09-1.94; p = 0.028), grade 3 tumors (OR = 1.42 95 % CI: 1.05-1.93; p PR negative tumors (OR = 1.5 95 % CI: 1.088-2.064; p = 0.01). These results suggest that a positive family history of cancer in African Americans should increase suspicions of hereditary cancer. Therefore, behavioral risk reduction activities, such as collecting a family history, may reduce late stage diagnosis and cancer mortality.

  15. 9q31.2-rs865686 as a susceptibility locus for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer: Evidence from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Warren (Helen); F. Dudbridge (Frank); O. Fletcher (Olivia); N. Orr (Nick); N. Johnson (Nichola); J.L. Hopper (John); C. Apicella (Carmel); M.C. Southey (Melissa); M. Mahmoodi (Maryam); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); A. Broeks (Annegien); S. Cornelissen (Sten); L.M. Braaf (Linde); K.R. Muir (Kenneth); A. Lophatananon (Artitaya); A. Chaiwerawattana (Arkom); S. Wiangnon (Surapon); P.A. Fasching (Peter); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); A.B. Ekici (Arif); R. Schulz-Wendtland (Rüdiger); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); F. Marme (Federick); A. Schneeweiss (Andreas); C. Sohn (Christof); P. Guénel (Pascal); T. Truong (Thérèse); P. Laurent-Puig (Pierre); C. Mulot (Claire); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); H. Flyger (Henrik); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); R.L. Milne (Roger); J. Benítez (Javier); J.I. Arias Pérez (José Ignacio); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); A. Ziogas (Argyrios); L. Bernstein (Leslie); C.C. Dur (Christina Clarke); H. Brenner (Hermann); H. Müller (Heike); V. Arndt (Volker); A. Langheinz (Anne); A. Meindl (Alfons); M. Golatta (Michael); C.R. Bartram (Claus); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); C. Justenhoven (Christina); T. Brüning (Thomas); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); U. Eilber (Ursula); T. Dörk (Thilo); P. Schürmann (Peter); M. Bremer (Michael); P. Hillemanns (Peter); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); T.A. Muranen (Taru); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C. Blomqvist (Carl); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); N.N. Antonenkova (Natalia); Y.I. Rogov (Yuri); M. Bermisheva (Marina); D. Prokofyeva (Darya); G. Zinnatullina (Guzel); E.K. Khusnutdinova (Elza); A. Lindblom (Annika); S. Margolin (Sara); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J. Hartikainen (Jaana); V. Kataja (Vesa); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); J. Beesley (Jonathan); X. Chen (Xiaoqing); D. Lambrechts (Diether); A. Smeets (Ann); R. Paridaens (Robert); C. Weltens (Caroline); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); K. Buck (Katharina); T.W. Behrens (Timothy); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); L. Bernard (Loris); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); P. Radice (Paolo); F.J. Couch (Fergus); C. Vachon (Celine); X. Wang (Xing); J.E. Olson (Janet); G.G. Giles (Graham); L. Baglietto (Laura); C.A. McLean (Cariona); G. Severi (Gianluca); E.M. John (Esther); A. Miron (Alexander); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); N. Weerasooriya (Nayana); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); J.W.M. Martens (John); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); A. Jager (Agnes); M.M.A. Tilanus-Linthorst (Madeleine); P. Hall (Per); K. Czene (Kamila); J. Liu (Jianjun); J. Li (Jingmei); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); I.W. Brock (Ian); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); F. Blows (Fiona); A.M. Dunning (Alison); M. Ghoussaini (Maya); A. Ashworth (Alan); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); M. Jones (Marta); M. Schoemaker (Minouk); D.F. Easton (Douglas); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); J. Peto (Julian); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Our recent genome-wide association study identified a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 9q31.2 (rs865686). Methods: To further investigate the rs865686-breast cancer association, we conducted a replication study within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, which

  16. 9q31.2-rs865686 as a susceptibility locus for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer: Evidence from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Warren (Helen); F. Dudbridge (Frank); O. Fletcher (Olivia); N. Orr (Nick); N. Johnson (Nichola); J.L. Hopper (John); C. Apicella (Carmel); M.C. Southey (Melissa); M. Mahmoodi (Maryam); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); A. Broeks (Annegien); S. Cornelissen (Sten); L.M. Braaf (Linde); K.R. Muir (Kenneth); A. Lophatananon (Artitaya); A. Chaiwerawattana (Arkom); S. Wiangnon (Surapon); P.A. Fasching (Peter); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); A.B. Ekici (Arif); R. Schulz-Wendtland (Rüdiger); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); F. Marme (Federick); A. Schneeweiss (Andreas); C. Sohn (Christof); P. Guénel (Pascal); T. Truong (Thérèse); P. Laurent-Puig (Pierre); C. Mulot (Claire); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); H. Flyger (Henrik); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); R.L. Milne (Roger); J. Benítez (Javier); J.I. Arias Pérez (José Ignacio); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); A. Ziogas (Argyrios); L. Bernstein (Leslie); C.C. Dur (Christina Clarke); H. Brenner (Hermann); H. Müller (Heike); V. Arndt (Volker); A. Langheinz (Anne); A. Meindl (Alfons); M. Golatta (Michael); C.R. Bartram (Claus); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); C. Justenhoven (Christina); T. Brüning (Thomas); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); U. Eilber (Ursula); T. Dörk (Thilo); P. Schürmann (Peter); M. Bremer (Michael); P. Hillemanns (Peter); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); T.A. Muranen (Taru); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C. Blomqvist (Carl); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); N.N. Antonenkova (Natalia); Y.I. Rogov (Yuri); M. Bermisheva (Marina); D. Prokofyeva (Darya); G. Zinnatullina (Guzel); E.K. Khusnutdinova (Elza); A. Lindblom (Annika); S. Margolin (Sara); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J. Hartikainen (Jaana); V. Kataja (Vesa); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); J. Beesley (Jonathan); X. Chen (Xiaoqing); D. Lambrechts (Diether); A. Smeets (Ann); R. Paridaens (Robert); C. Weltens (Caroline); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); K. Buck (Katharina); T.W. Behrens (Timothy); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); L. Bernard (Loris); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); P. Radice (Paolo); F.J. Couch (Fergus); C. Vachon (Celine); X. Wang (Xing); J.E. Olson (Janet); G.G. Giles (Graham); L. Baglietto (Laura); C.A. McLean (Cariona); G. Severi (Gianluca); E.M. John (Esther); A. Miron (Alexander); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); N. Weerasooriya (Nayana); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); J.W.M. Martens (John); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); A. Jager (Agnes); M.M.A. Tilanus-Linthorst (Madeleine); P. Hall (Per); K. Czene (Kamila); J. Liu (Jianjun); J. Li (Jingmei); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); I.W. Brock (Ian); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); F. Blows (Fiona); A.M. Dunning (Alison); M. Ghoussaini (Maya); A. Ashworth (Alan); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); M. Jones (Marta); M. Schoemaker (Minouk); D.F. Easton (Douglas); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); J. Peto (Julian); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Our recent genome-wide association study identified a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 9q31.2 (rs865686). Methods: To further investigate the rs865686-breast cancer association, we conducted a replication study within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, which

  17. Breast cancer-associated metastasis is significantly increased in a model of autoimmune arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das Roy, Lopamudra; Pathangey, Latha B; Tinder, Teresa L; Schettini, Jorge L; Gruber, Helen E; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Sites of chronic inflammation are often associated with the establishment and growth of various malignancies including breast cancer. A common inflammatory condition in humans is autoimmune arthritis (AA) that causes inflammation and deformity of the joints. Other systemic effects associated with arthritis include increased cellular infiltration and inflammation of the lungs. Several studies have reported statistically significant risk ratios between AA and breast cancer. Despite this knowledge, available for a decade, it has never been questioned if the site of chronic inflammation linked to AA creates a milieu that attracts tumor cells to home and grow in the inflamed bones and lungs which are frequent sites of breast cancer metastasis. Methods To determine if chronic inflammation induced by autoimmune arthritis contributes to increased breast cancer-associated metastasis, we generated mammary gland tumors in SKG mice that were genetically prone to develop AA. Two breast cancer cell lines, one highly metastatic (4T1) and the other non-metastatic (TUBO) were used to generate the tumors in the mammary fat pad. Lung and bone metastasis and the associated inflammatory milieu were evaluated in the arthritic versus the non-arthritic mice. Results We report a three-fold increase in lung metastasis and a significant increase in the incidence of bone metastasis in the pro-arthritic and arthritic mice compared to non-arthritic control mice. We also report that the metastatic breast cancer cells augment the severity of arthritis resulting in a vicious cycle that increases both bone destruction and metastasis. Enhanced neutrophilic and granulocytic infiltration in lungs and bone of the pro-arthritic and arthritic mice and subsequent increase in circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines, such as macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), interleukin-17 (IL-17), interleukin-6 (IL-6), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and tumor necrosis factor

  18. Diagnosis and Treatment Experience of 14 Cases of Breast Cancer Associated with Pregnancy or Lactation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Zhixiang; WU Zhiyong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the diagnosis and treatment experience of breast cancer associated with pregnancy or lactation. Methods: From January 1990 to December 2005, 14 cases with breast cancer associated with pregnancy or lactation were analyzed retrospectively (TNM stage Ⅱ, 2 cases; stage Ⅲ, 11 cases; stage Ⅳ, 1 case). Diagnosis was established by fine needle aspiration biopsy primarily or routine pathological method if necessary. Abortion was used for discontinuation of pregnancy in 1 case with early pregnancy and 1 case with meddle pregnancy. 2 patients with late pregnancy received cesarean section,10patients of breast cancer associated with lactation received multidisciplinary and-tumor treatment after discontinuation of lactation. Results: Diagnosis was confirmed by fine noodle aspiration biopsy in 9 cases and by secondary routine pathological method in the other 5 cases, 12 cases were followed up, 1 case of stage Ⅳ died of metastasis 5 months after diagnosis. 3-, 5-year survival rates in 10 cases of stage Ⅲ were 66% and 30% respectively. One case remained alive without recurrence for 8 years up to now. Conclusion: A thorough breast examination is necessary at the first antenatal visit physicians should aggressively pursue work-up in women with a palpable breast tass. In the patients during the second and third trimness,the various modalities available for treatment inholding abortion and their risks and beneath modalities available for treatment including abortion and their risks and benefits must be discussed openly with patients and their families.

  19. Cancer-associated adipocytes promotes breast tumor radioresistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bochet, Ludivine; Meulle, Aline [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, BP 64182, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, INSERM U1048, 1 Avenue du Pr Jean Poulhes, BP 84225, F-31432 Toulouse Cedex (France); Imbert, Sandrine [CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, BP 64182, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Salles, Bernard [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, BP 64182, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Valet, Philippe [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, INSERM U1048, 1 Avenue du Pr Jean Poulhes, BP 84225, F-31432 Toulouse Cedex (France); Muller, Catherine, E-mail: muller@ipbs.fr [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, BP 64182, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France)

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} Tumor-surrounding adipocytes contribute to breast cancer progression. {yields} Breast tumor cells previously co-cultivated with mature adipocytes exhibit radioresistance. {yields} Increased in Chk1 phosphorylation is observed in irradiated co-cultivated tumor cells. {yields} IL-6 is over-expressed in tumor cells co-cultivated with adipocytes. {yields} IL-6 exposure confers increased Chk1 phosphorylation and radioresistance in tumor cells. -- Abstract: Mature adipocytes are excellent candidates to influence tumor behavior through heterotypic signaling processes since these cells produce hormones, growth factors, cytokines and other molecules, a heterogeneous group of molecules named adipokines. Using a 2D coculture system, we demonstrate that breast tumor cells previously co-cultivated with mature adipocytes exhibit radioresistance and an earlier and higher increase in the effector kinase Chk1, a phenotype that was associated with decreased cell death as compared to tumor cells grown alone. Interestingly, the adipocytes-induced tumor changes taking place during the coculture time preceding the exposure to IR were sufficient to confer the radioresistant effect. Notorious among the changes brought by adipocytes was the significant increase of IL-6 expression in tumor cells, whose activity may well account for the observed tumor cell protection from IR toxicity. Indeed, our data confirmed the protective role of this cytokine as tumor cells incubated after irradiation with recombinant IL-6 exhibit an increased in Chk1 phosphorylation and a radioresistant phenotype, thus far recapitulating the effects observed in the presence of adipocytes. Our current study sheds light on a new role of tumor-surrounding adipocytes in fostering a radioresistant phenotype in breast tumors, a finding that might have important clinical implications in obese patients that frequently exhibit aggressive diseases.

  20. Genome-wide transcript profiling reveals novel breast cancer-associated intronic sense RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Woo; Fishilevich, Elane; Arango-Argoty, Gustavo; Lin, Yuefeng; Liu, Guodong; Li, Zhihua; Monaghan, A Paula; Nichols, Mark; John, Bino

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) play major roles in development and cancer progression. To identify novel ncRNAs that may identify key pathways in breast cancer development, we performed high-throughput transcript profiling of tumor and normal matched-pair tissue samples. Initial transcriptome profiling using high-density genome-wide tiling arrays revealed changes in over 200 novel candidate genomic regions that map to intronic regions. Sixteen genomic loci were identified that map to the long introns of five key protein-coding genes, CRIM1, EPAS1, ZEB2, RBMS1, and RFX2. Consistent with the known role of the tumor suppressor ZEB2 in the cancer-associated epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), in situ hybridization reveals that the intronic regions deriving from ZEB2 as well as those from RFX2 and EPAS1 are down-regulated in cells of epithelial morphology, suggesting that these regions may be important for maintaining normal epithelial cell morphology. Paired-end deep sequencing analysis reveals a large number of distinct genomic clusters with no coding potential within the introns of these genes. These novel transcripts are only transcribed from the coding strand. A comprehensive search for breast cancer associated genes reveals enrichment for transcribed intronic regions from these loci, pointing to an underappreciated role of introns or mechanisms relating to their biology in EMT and breast cancer.

  1. Genome-wide transcript profiling reveals novel breast cancer-associated intronic sense RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Woo Kim

    Full Text Available Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs play major roles in development and cancer progression. To identify novel ncRNAs that may identify key pathways in breast cancer development, we performed high-throughput transcript profiling of tumor and normal matched-pair tissue samples. Initial transcriptome profiling using high-density genome-wide tiling arrays revealed changes in over 200 novel candidate genomic regions that map to intronic regions. Sixteen genomic loci were identified that map to the long introns of five key protein-coding genes, CRIM1, EPAS1, ZEB2, RBMS1, and RFX2. Consistent with the known role of the tumor suppressor ZEB2 in the cancer-associated epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT, in situ hybridization reveals that the intronic regions deriving from ZEB2 as well as those from RFX2 and EPAS1 are down-regulated in cells of epithelial morphology, suggesting that these regions may be important for maintaining normal epithelial cell morphology. Paired-end deep sequencing analysis reveals a large number of distinct genomic clusters with no coding potential within the introns of these genes. These novel transcripts are only transcribed from the coding strand. A comprehensive search for breast cancer associated genes reveals enrichment for transcribed intronic regions from these loci, pointing to an underappreciated role of introns or mechanisms relating to their biology in EMT and breast cancer.

  2. Potential utility of natural products as regulators of breast cancer-associated aromatase promoters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Larry A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aromatase, the key enzyme in estrogen biosynthesis, converts androstenedione to estrone and testosterone to estradiol. The enzyme is expressed in various tissues such as ovary, placenta, bone, brain, skin, and adipose tissue. Aromatase enzyme is encoded by a single gene CYP 19A1 and its expression is controlled by tissue-specific promoters. Aromatase mRNA is primarily transcribed from promoter I.4 in normal breast tissue and physiological levels of aromatase are found in breast adipose stromal fibroblasts. Under the conditions of breast cancer, as a result of the activation of a distinct set of aromatase promoters (I.3, II, and I.7 aromatase expression is enhanced leading to local overproduction of estrogen that promotes breast cancer. Aromatase is considered as a potential target for endocrine treatment of breast cancer but due to nonspecific reduction of aromatase activity in other tissues, aromatase inhibitors (AIs are associated with undesirable side effects such as bone loss, and abnormal lipid metabolism. Inhibition of aromatase expression by inactivating breast tumor-specific aromatase promoters can selectively block estrogen production at the tumor site. Although several synthetic chemical compounds and nuclear receptor ligands are known to inhibit the activity of the tumor-specific aromatase promoters, further development of more specific and efficacious drugs without adverse effects is still warranted. Plants are rich in chemopreventive agents that have a great potential to be used in chemotherapy for hormone dependent breast cancer which could serve as a source for natural AIs. In this brief review, we summarize the studies on phytochemicals such as biochanin A, genistein, quercetin, isoliquiritigenin, resveratrol, and grape seed extracts related to their effect on the activation of breast cancer-associated aromatase promoters and discuss their aromatase inhibitory potential to be used as safer chemotherapeutic agents for

  3. Hereditary breast cancer associated with Cowden syndrome-related PTEN mutation with Lhermitte-Duclos disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Fuyo; Ueda, Ai; Sato, Eiichi; Akimoto, Jiro; Kaise, Hiroshi; Yamada, Kimito; Hosonaga, Mari; Kawai, Yuko; Teraoka, Saeko; Okazaki, Miki; Ishikawa, Takashi

    2017-12-01

    Cowden syndrome is characterized by multiple hamartomas in various tissues, including the skin, brain, breast, thyroid, mucous membrane, and gastrointestinal tract, and is reported to increase the risk of malignant disease. We describe the case of a 52-year-old woman in whom a tumor was diagnosed in the left cerebellar hemisphere and treated by surgical resection. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) mutation in exon 8 insertion was found in the brain tumor tissue and leukocytes. This finding supported the diagnosis of Cowden syndrome. She consequently developed endometrial cancer and underwent abdominal total hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Four years later, hormone receptor-positive breast cancer was found in the right breast, and breast-conserving surgery with radiation therapy and sentinel lymph node biopsy was performed. Herein, we describe a patient who was diagnosed as having familial breast cancer associated with PTEN mutation-related Cowden syndrome. We also reviewed reports of this syndrome in the literature for disease appraisal.

  4. Quantifying the Role of Circulating Unconjugated Estradiol in Mediating the Body Mass Index-Breast Cancer Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schairer, Catherine; Fuhrman, Barbara J; Boyd-Morin, Jennifer; Genkinger, Jeanine M; Gail, Mitchell H; Hoover, Robert N; Ziegler, Regina G

    2016-01-01

    Higher body mass index (BMI) and circulating estrogen levels each increase postmenopausal breast cancer risk, particularly estrogen receptor-positive (ER(+)) tumors. Higher BMI also increases estrogen production. We estimated the proportion of the BMI-ER(+) breast cancer association mediated through estrogen in a case-control study nested within the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. Participants included 143 women with invasive ER(+) breast cancer and 268 matched controls, all postmenopausal and never having used hormone therapy at baseline. We used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to measure 15 estrogens and estrogen metabolites in baseline serum. We calculated BMI from self-reported height and weight at baseline. We estimated the mediating effect of unconjugated estradiol on the BMI-ER(+) breast cancer association using Aalen additive hazards and Cox regression models. All estrogens and estrogen metabolites were statistically significantly correlated with BMI, with unconjugated estradiol most strongly correlated [Pearson correlation (r) = 0.45]. Approximately 7% to 10% of the effect of overweight, 12% to 15% of the effect of obesity, and 19% to 20% of the effect of a 5 kg/m(2) BMI increase on ER(+) breast cancer risk was mediated through unconjugated estradiol. The BMI-breast cancer association, once adjusted for unconjugated estradiol, was not modified by further adjustment for two metabolic ratios statistically significantly associated with both breast cancer and BMI. Circulating unconjugated estradiol levels partially mediate the BMI-breast cancer association, but other potentially important estrogen mediators (e.g., bioavailable estradiol) were not evaluated. Further research is required to identify mechanisms underlying the BMI-breast cancer association. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Breast cancer associated a2 isoform vacuolar ATPase immunomodulates neutrophils: potential role in tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Safaa A; Katara, Gajendra K; Kulshrestha, Arpita; Jaiswal, Mukesh K; Amin, Magdy A; Beaman, Kenneth D

    2015-10-20

    In invasive breast cancer, tumor associated neutrophils (TAN) represent a significant portion of the tumor mass and are associated with increased angiogenesis and metastasis. Identifying the regulatory factors that control TAN behavior will help in developing ideal immunotherapies. Vacuolar ATPases (V-ATPases), multi-subunit proton pumps, are highly expressed in metastatic breast cancer cells. A cleaved peptide from a2 isoform V-ATPase (a2NTD) has immunomodulatory role in tumor microenvironment. Here, we report for the first time the role of V-ATPase in neutrophils modulation. In invasive breast cancer cells, a2NTD was detected and a2V was highly expressed on the surface. Immunohistochemical analysis of invasive breast cancer tissues revealed that increased neutrophil recruitment and blood vessel density correlated with increased a2NTD levels. In order to determine the direct regulatory role of a2NTD on neutrophils, recombinant a2NTD was used for the treatment of neutrophils isolated from the peripheral blood of healthy volunteers. Neutrophils treated with a2NTD (a2Neuɸ) showed increased secretion of IL-1RA, IL-10, CCL-2 and IL-6 that are important mediators in cancer related inflammation. Moreover, a2Neuɸ exhibited an increased production of protumorigenic factors including IL-8, matrix metaloprotinase-9 and vascular endothelial growth factor. Further, functional characterization of a2Neuɸ revealed that a2Neuɸ derived products induce in vitro angiogenesis as well as increase the invasiveness of breast cancer cells. This study establishes the modulatory effect of breast cancer associated a2V on neutrophils, by the action of a2NTD, which has a positive impact on tumor progression, supporting that a2V can be a potential selective target for breast cancer therapy.

  6. Five polymorphisms and breast cancer risk: results from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaudet, Mia M; Milne, Roger L; Cox, Angela

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that minor alleles for ERCC4 rs744154, TNF rs361525, CASP10 rs13010627, PGR rs1042838, and BID rs8190315 may influence breast cancer risk, but the evidence is inconclusive due to their small sample size. These polymorphisms were genotyped in more than 30,000 breast...

  7. Gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography of the breast: Is breast cancer associated with ipsilateral higher vascularity?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahfouz, A.E.; Sherif, H. [Dept. of Radiology, Charite Medical Center, Humboldt-Univ. zu Berlin (Germany); Dept. of Radiology, Cairo University Hospital, Cairo (Egypt); Saad, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Charite Medical Center, Humboldt-Univ. zu Berlin (Germany); Dept. of Public Health and Environmental Medicine, National Research Center, Cairo (Egypt); Taupitz, M.; Filimonow, S.; Kivelitz, D.; Hamm, B. [Dept. of Radiology, Charite Medical Center, Humboldt-Univ. zu Berlin (Germany)

    2001-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess a possible association between breast malignancy and ipsilateral higher vascularity on gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography. One hundred six patients were examined by dynamic gadolinium-enhanced 3D MR imaging. Magnetic resonance angiographic views were generated by image subtraction and maximum intensity projection. The study included 85 patients with unilateral malignant breast neoplasms and 21 with unilateral benign lesions. Three blinded readers independently reviewed the MR angiograms after masking the lesions and the corresponding contralateral sites. The readers were asked to determine whether vascularity was higher on the right side, higher on the left side, or equal on both sides. The results were analyzed by the Kappa statistic and Pearson's chi-square test. The blood vessels of the breasts were clearly seen in all cases. There was good agreement among the observers (kappa > 0.54) in assessing vascularity on both sides. Breasts harboring malignant neoplasms were found to have a higher vascularity than the contralateral breasts (p < 0.005). This sign of malignancy had a sensitivity of 76.5 %, a specificity of 57 %, and an accuracy of 72.6 %. Blood vessels of the breast can be depicted by MR angiography. Unilateral malignant neoplasms are associated with a higher ipsilateral vascularity. In conjunction with other indications of malignancy on gadolinium-enhanced MR images, a higher ipsilateral vascularity may serve as an additional sign of malignancy. (orig.)

  8. The Action of Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 in Basal Tumor Cells and Stromal Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts Is Critical for Breast Cancer Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsa, Callie A S; Brenot, Audrey; Grither, Whitney R; Van Hove, Samantha; Loza, Andrew J; Zhang, Kun; Ponik, Suzanne M; Liu, Yuming; DeNardo, David G; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Keely, Patricia J; Longmore, Gregory D

    2016-06-14

    High levels of collagen deposition in human and mouse breast tumors are associated with poor outcome due to increased local invasion and distant metastases. Using a genetic approach, we show that, in mice, the action of the fibrillar collagen receptor discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) in both tumor and tumor-stromal cells is critical for breast cancer metastasis yet does not affect primary tumor growth. In tumor cells, DDR2 in basal epithelial cells regulates the collective invasion of tumor organoids. In stromal cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), DDR2 is critical for extracellular matrix production and the organization of collagen fibers. The action of DDR2 in CAFs also enhances tumor cell collective invasion through a pathway distinct from the tumor-cell-intrinsic function of DDR2. This work identifies DDR2 as a potential therapeutic target that controls breast cancer metastases through its action in both tumor cells and tumor-stromal cells at the primary tumor site.

  9. Identification of novel breast cancer-associated transcripts by UniGene database mining and gene expression analysis in normal and malignant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laversin, Stéphanie A-S; Phatak, Vinaya M; Powe, Des G; Li, Geng; Miles, Amanda K; Hughes, David C; Ball, Graham R; Ellis, Ian O; Gritzapis, Angelos D; Missitzis, Ioannis; McArdle, Stéphanie E B; Rees, Robert C

    2013-03-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous and complex disease. Although the use of tumor biomarkers has improved individualized breast cancer care, i.e., assessment of risk, diagnosis, prognosis, and prediction of treatment outcome, new markers are required to further improve patient clinical management. In the present study, a search for novel breast cancer-associated genes was performed by mining the UniGene database for expressed sequence tags (ESTs) originating from human normal breast, breast cancer tissue, or breast cancer cell lines. Two hundred and twenty-eight distinct breast-associated UniGene Clusters (BUC1-228) matched the search criteria. Four BUC ESTs (BUC6, BUC9, BUC10, and BUC11) were subsequently selected for extensive in silico database searches, and in vitro analyses through sequencing and RT-PCR based assays on well-characterized cell lines and tissues of normal and cancerous origin. BUC6, BUC9, BUC10, and BUC11 are clustered on 10p11.21-12.1 and showed no homology to any known RNAs. Overall, expression of the four BUC transcripts was high in normal breast and testis tissue, and in some breast cancers; in contrast, BUC was low in other normal tissues, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and other cancer cell lines. Results to-date suggest that BUC11 and BUC9 translate to protein and BUC11 cytoplasmic and nuclear protein expression was detected in a large cohort of breast cancer samples using immunohistochemistry. This study demonstrates the discovery and expression analysis of a tissue-restricted novel transcript set which is strongly expressed in breast tissue and their application as clinical cancer biomarkers clearly warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Targeting the cancer-associated fibroblasts as a treatment in triple-negative breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Ken; Le, Annie; Weaver, Valerie M.; Werb, Zena

    2016-01-01

    Increased collagen expression in tumors is associated with increased risk of metastasis, and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has the highest propensity to develop distant metastases when there is evidence of central fibrosis. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) ligands regulated by cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) promote accumulation of fibrosis and cancer progression. In the present study, we have evaluated TNBC tumors with enhanced collagen to determine whether we can reduce metastasis by targeting the CAFs with Pirfenidone (PFD), an anti-fibrotic agent as well as a TGF-β antagonist. In patient-derived xenograft models, TNBC tumors exhibited accumulated collagen and activated TGF-β signaling, and developed lung metastasis. Next, primary CAFs were established from 4T1 TNBC homograft tumors, TNBC xenograft tumors and tumor specimens of breast cancer patients. CAFs promoted primary tumor growth with more fibrosis and TGF-β activation and lung metastasis in 4T1 mouse model. We then examined the effects of PFD in vitro and in vivo. We found that PFD had inhibitory effects on cell viability and collagen production of CAFs in 2D culture. Furthermore, CAFs enhanced tumor growth and PFD inhibited the tumor growth induced by CAFs by causing apoptosis in the 3D co-culture assay of 4T1 tumor cells and CAFs. In vivo, PFD alone inhibited tumor fibrosis and TGF-β signaling but did not inhibit tumor growth and lung metastasis. However, PFD inhibited tumor growth and lung metastasis synergistically in combination with doxorubicin. Thus, PFD has great potential for a novel clinically applicable TNBC therapy that targets tumor-stromal interaction. PMID:27756881

  11. Associations of breast cancer risk factors with tumor subtypes: a pooled analysis from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaohong R; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Goode, Ellen L; Couch, Fergus J; Nevanlinna, Heli; Milne, Roger L; Gaudet, Mia; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Cox, Angela; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Rebecca; Spurdle, Amanda B; Blows, Fiona; Driver, Kristy; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Heinz, Judith; Sinn, Peter; Vrieling, Alina; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Heikkilä, Päivi; Blomqvist, Carl; Lissowska, Jolanta; Peplonska, Beata; Chanock, Stephen; Figueroa, Jonine; Brinton, Louise; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Humphreys, Keith; Darabi, Hatef; Liu, Jianjun; Van 't Veer, Laura J; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Knight, Julia A; Mulligan, Anna Marie; O'Malley, Frances P; Weerasooriya, Nayana; John, Esther M; Beckmann, Matthias W; Hartmann, Arndt; Weihbrecht, Sebastian B; Wachter, David L; Jud, Sebastian M; Loehberg, Christian R; Baglietto, Laura; English, Dallas R; Giles, Graham G; McLean, Catriona A; Severi, Gianluca; Lambrechts, Diether; Vandorpe, Thijs; Weltens, Caroline; Paridaens, Robert; Smeets, Ann; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Wang, Xianshu; Olson, Janet E; Cafourek, Victoria; Fredericksen, Zachary; Kosel, Matthew; Vachon, Celine; Cramp, Helen E; Connley, Daniel; Cross, Simon S; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P; Reed, Malcolm W R; Dörk, Thilo; Bremer, Michael; Meyer, Andreas; Karstens, Johann H; Ay, Aysun; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Hillemanns, Peter; Arias Pérez, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez Rodríguez, Primitiva; Zamora, Pilar; Benítez, Javier; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Hamann, Ute; Pesch, Beate; Brüning, Thomas; Justenhoven, Christina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Eccles, Diana M; Tapper, William J; Gerty, Sue M; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian P; Jones, Angela; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; McInerney, Niall; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yang, Show-Lin; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Chen, Shou-Tung; Hsu, Giu-Cheng; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubiński, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Górski, Bohdan; Gronwald, Jacek; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Jager, Agnes; Kriege, Mieke; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M A; Collée, Margriet; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Mononen, Kari; Grip, Mervi; Hirvikoski, Pasi; Winqvist, Robert; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kauppinen, Jaana; Kataja, Vesa; Auvinen, Päivi; Soini, Ylermi; Sironen, Reijo; Bojesen, Stig E; Ørsted, David Dynnes; Kaur-Knudsen, Diljit; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Holland, Helene; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Radice, Paolo; Hankinson, Susan E; Hunter, David J; Tamimi, Rulla; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Odefrey, Fabrice; Gaborieau, Valerie; Devilee, Peter; Huijts, P E A; Tollenaar, R A E M; Seynaeve, C; Dite, Gillian S; Apicella, Carmel; Hopper, John L; Hammet, Fleur; Tsimiklis, Helen; Smith, Letitia D; Southey, Melissa C; Humphreys, Manjeet K; Easton, Douglas; Pharoah, Paul; Sherman, Mark E; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2011-02-02

    Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer risk factors are associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors. We pooled tumor marker and epidemiological risk factor data from 35,568 invasive breast cancer case patients from 34 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Logistic regression models were used in case-case analyses to estimate associations between epidemiological risk factors and tumor subtypes, and case-control analyses to estimate associations between epidemiological risk factors and the risk of developing specific tumor subtypes in 12 population-based studies. All statistical tests were two-sided. In case-case analyses, of the epidemiological risk factors examined, early age at menarche (≤12 years) was less frequent in case patients with PR(-) than PR(+) tumors (P = .001). Nulliparity (P = 3 × 10(-6)) and increasing age at first birth (P = 2 × 10(-9)) were less frequent in ER(-) than in ER(+) tumors. Obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) in younger women (≤50 years) was more frequent in ER(-)/PR(-) than in ER(+)/PR(+) tumors (P = 1 × 10(-7)), whereas obesity in older women (>50 years) was less frequent in PR(-) than in PR(+) tumors (P = 6 × 10(-4)). The triple-negative (ER(-)/PR(-)/HER2(-)) or core basal phenotype (CBP; triple-negative and cytokeratins [CK]5/6(+) and/or epidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR](+)) accounted for much of the heterogeneity in parity-related variables and BMI in younger women. Case-control analyses showed that nulliparity, increasing age at first birth, and obesity in younger women showed the expected associations with the risk of ER(+) or PR(+) tumors but not triple-negative (nulliparity vs parity, odds ratio [OR] = 0.94, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.75 to 1.19, P = .61; 5-year increase in age at first full-term birth, OR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.86 to 1.05, P = .34; obesity in younger women, OR = 1.36, 95% CI = 0.95 to 1

  12. High‐throughput automated scoring of Ki67 in breast cancer tissue microarrays from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howat, William J; Daley, Frances; Zabaglo, Lila; McDuffus, Leigh‐Anne; Blows, Fiona; Coulson, Penny; Raza Ali, H; Benitez, Javier; Milne, Roger; Brenner, Herman; Stegmaier, Christa; Mannermaa, Arto; Chang‐Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Sinn, Peter; Couch, Fergus J; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; Devilee, Peter; Figueroa, Jonine; Sherman, Mark E; Lissowska, Jolanta; Hewitt, Stephen; Eccles, Diana; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; WM Martens, John; HM van Deurzen, Carolien; Investigators, kConFab; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Jones, Michael; Schoemaker, Minouk; Broeks, Annegien; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Van't Veer, Laura; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Orr, Nick; Dowsett, Mitch; Easton, Douglas; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Pharoah, Paul D; Garcia‐Closas, Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Automated methods are needed to facilitate high‐throughput and reproducible scoring of Ki67 and other markers in breast cancer tissue microarrays (TMAs) in large‐scale studies. To address this need, we developed an automated protocol for Ki67 scoring and evaluated its performance in studies from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We utilized 166 TMAs containing 16,953 tumour cores representing 9,059 breast cancer cases, from 13 studies, with information on other clinical and pathological characteristics. TMAs were stained for Ki67 using standard immunohistochemical procedures, and scanned and digitized using the Ariol system. An automated algorithm was developed for the scoring of Ki67, and scores were compared to computer assisted visual (CAV) scores in a subset of 15 TMAs in a training set. We also assessed the correlation between automated Ki67 scores and other clinical and pathological characteristics. Overall, we observed good discriminatory accuracy (AUC = 85%) and good agreement (kappa = 0.64) between the automated and CAV scoring methods in the training set. The performance of the automated method varied by TMA (kappa range= 0.37–0.87) and study (kappa range = 0.39–0.69). The automated method performed better in satisfactory cores (kappa = 0.68) than suboptimal (kappa = 0.51) cores (p‐value for comparison = 0.005); and among cores with higher total nuclei counted by the machine (4,000–4,500 cells: kappa = 0.78) than those with lower counts (50–500 cells: kappa = 0.41; p‐value = 0.010). Among the 9,059 cases in this study, the correlations between automated Ki67 and clinical and pathological characteristics were found to be in the expected directions. Our findings indicate that automated scoring of Ki67 can be an efficient method to obtain good quality data across large numbers of TMAs from multicentre studies. However, robust algorithm development and rigorous pre‐ and post

  13. Exploring the Structural Requirements for Inhibition of the Ubiquitin E3 Ligase Breast Cancer Associated Protein 2 (BCA2)a as a Treatment for Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Brahemi, Ghali; Kona, Fathima R; Fiasella, Annalisa; Buac, Daniela; Soukupová, Jitka; Brancale, Andrea; Burger, Angelika M; Westwell, Andrew D.

    2010-01-01

    The zinc-ejecting aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) inhibitory drug disulfiram (DSF) was found to be a breast cancer-associated protein 2 (BCA2) inhibitor with potent antitumor activity. We herein describe our work in the synthesis and evaluation of new series of zinc-affinic molecules to explore the structural requirements for selective BCA2-inhibitory antitumor activity. An N(C=S)S-S motif was found to be required, based on selective activity in BCA2-expressing breast cancer cell lines and agai...

  14. Low ERK phosphorylation in cancer-associated fibroblasts is associated with tamoxifen resistance in pre-menopausal breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susann Busch

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate ERK phosphorylation as a stromal biomarker for breast cancer prognosis and tamoxifen treatment prediction within a randomized tamoxifen trial. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Tissue microarrays of two breast cancer cohorts including in total 743 invasive breast cancer samples were analyzed for ERK phosphorylation (pERK and smooth muscle actin-alpha expression (SMAα in cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs and links to clinico-pathological data and treatment-predictive values were delineated. RESULTS: By analyzing a unique randomized tamoxifen trial including breast cancer patients receiving no adjuvant treatment we show for the first time that patients low in ERK phosphorylation in CAFs did not respond to tamoxifen treatment despite having estrogen-receptor alpha (ERα-positive tumors compared to patients with high pERK levels in CAFs (P = 0.015, multivariate Cox regression interaction analysis. In both clinical materials we further show a significant association between pERK and SMAα, a characteristic marker for activated fibroblasts. SMAα expression however was not linked to treatment-predictive information but instead had prognostic qualities. CONCLUSION: The data suggests that the presence of a subpopulation of CAFs, defined by minimal activated ERK signaling, is linked to an impaired tamoxifen response. Thus, this report illustrates the importance of the stroma for monitoring treatment effects in pre-menopausal breast cancer.

  15. Regulation of DNA Damage Response by Estrogen Receptor β-Mediated Inhibition of Breast Cancer Associated Gene 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Hao Lee

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggests that ubiquitin E3 ligases are involved in cancer development as their mutations correlate with genomic instability and genetic susceptibility to cancer. Despite significant findings of cancer-driving mutations in the BRCA1 gene, estrogen receptor (ER-positive breast cancers progress upon treatment with DNA damaging-cytotoxic therapies. In order to understand the underlying mechanism by which ER-positive breast cancer cells develop resistance to DNA damaging agents, we employed an estrogen receptor agonist, Erb-041, to increase the activity of ERβ and negatively regulate the expression and function of the estrogen receptor α (ERα in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Upon Erb-041-mediated ERα down-regulation, the transcription of an ERα downstream effector, BCA2 (Breast Cancer Associated gene 2, correspondingly decreased. The ubiquitination of chromatin-bound BCA2 was induced by ultraviolet C (UVC irradiation but suppressed by Erb-041 pretreatment, resulting in a blunted DNA damage response. Upon BCA2 silencing, DNA double-stranded breaks increased with Rad51 up-regulation and ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM activation. Mechanistically, UV-induced BCA2 ubiquitination and chromatin binding were found to promote DNA damage response and repair via the interaction of BCA2 with ATM, γH2AX and Rad51. Taken together, this study suggests that Erb-041 potentiates BCA2 dissociation from chromatin and co-localization with Rad51, resulting in inhibition of homologous recombination repair.

  16. The Action of Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 in Basal Tumor Cells and Stromal Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts Is Critical for Breast Cancer Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callie A.S. Corsa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available High levels of collagen deposition in human and mouse breast tumors are associated with poor outcome due to increased local invasion and distant metastases. Using a genetic approach, we show that, in mice, the action of the fibrillar collagen receptor discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2 in both tumor and tumor-stromal cells is critical for breast cancer metastasis yet does not affect primary tumor growth. In tumor cells, DDR2 in basal epithelial cells regulates the collective invasion of tumor organoids. In stromal cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs, DDR2 is critical for extracellular matrix production and the organization of collagen fibers. The action of DDR2 in CAFs also enhances tumor cell collective invasion through a pathway distinct from the tumor-cell-intrinsic function of DDR2. This work identifies DDR2 as a potential therapeutic target that controls breast cancer metastases through its action in both tumor cells and tumor-stromal cells at the primary tumor site.

  17. Gene expression profile of normal and cancer-associated fibroblasts according to intratumoral inflammatory cells phenotype from breast cancer tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Lucía; Eiro, Noemi; Fernandez-Garcia, Belen; González, Luis O; Dominguez, Francisco; Vizoso, Francisco J

    2016-11-01

    The biological heterogeneity of breast cancer leads to the need for finding new approaches to understand the mechanisms implicated in breast cancer progression. The tumor stroma appears as a key in the progression of solid tumors towards a malignant phenotype. Cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) may orchestrate a functional "corrupted" stroma which in turn helps metastatic spread. In this study, we investigated by real-time PCR, the expression of 19 factors by normal breast-associated fibroblasts (NAFs) and CAFs, which were implicated in several actions promoting tumor growth, such as extracellular matrix remodeling, inflammation and invasion. Also, we explored the influence of inflammatory cells phenotypes (MMP11 status) and breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) on the molecular profile of CAFs. If we consider that one of the major sources of CAFs are resident NAFs, the transition of NAFs into CAFs is associated with molecular changes involving the overexpression of some molecular factors of biological importance in tumor progression. In addition, the characterization of the tumor stroma regarding to the MMP11 status by MICs reflects a type of fibroblasts which contribute even more to tumor progression. Moreover, different patterns in the induction of the expression of factors by CAFs were observed, depending on the tumor cell line which they were co-cultured with. Furthermore, CAFs influence TGFβ expression in both cancer cell lines. Therefore, this study can help to a better characterization of tumor stroma in order to improve the prognostic evaluation, as well as to define the different populations of CAFs as potential therapeutic targets in breast cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Caffeine mediates sustained inactivation of breast cancer-associated myofibroblasts via up-regulation of tumor suppressor genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mysoon M Al-Ansari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Active cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs or myofibroblasts play important roles not only in the development and progression of breast carcinomas, but also in their prognosis and treatment. Therefore, targeting these cells through suppressing their supportive procarcinogenic paracrine effects is mandatory for improving the current therapies that are mainly targeting tumor cells. To this end, we investigated the effect of the natural and pharmacologically safe molecule, caffeine, on CAF cells and their various procarcinogenic effects. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have shown here that caffeine up-regulates the tumor suppressor proteins p16, p21, p53 and Cav-1, and reduces the expression/secretion of various cytokines (IL-6, TGF-β, SDF-1 and MMP-2, and down-regulates α-SMA. Furthermore, caffeine suppressed the migratory/invasiveness abilities of CAF cells through PTEN-dependent Akt/Erk1/2 inactivation. Moreover, caffeine reduced the paracrine pro-invasion/-migration effects of CAF cells on breast cancer cells. These results indicate that caffeine can inactivate breast stromal myofibroblasts. This has been confirmed by showing that caffeine also suppresses the paracrine pro-angiogenic effect of CAF cells through down-regulating HIF-1αand its downstream effector VEGF-A. Interestingly, these effects were sustained in absence of caffeine. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The present findings provide a proof of principle that breast cancer myofibroblasts can be inactivated, and thereby caffeine may provide a safe and effective prevention against breast tumor growth/recurrence through inhibition of the procarcinogenic effects of active stromal fibroblasts.

  19. Caffeine Mediates Sustained Inactivation of Breast Cancer-Associated Myofibroblasts via Up-Regulation of Tumor Suppressor Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ansari, Mysoon M.; Aboussekhra, Abdelilah

    2014-01-01

    Background Active cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) or myofibroblasts play important roles not only in the development and progression of breast carcinomas, but also in their prognosis and treatment. Therefore, targeting these cells through suppressing their supportive procarcinogenic paracrine effects is mandatory for improving the current therapies that are mainly targeting tumor cells. To this end, we investigated the effect of the natural and pharmacologically safe molecule, caffeine, on CAF cells and their various procarcinogenic effects. Methodology/Principal Findings We have shown here that caffeine up-regulates the tumor suppressor proteins p16, p21, p53 and Cav-1, and reduces the expression/secretion of various cytokines (IL-6, TGF-β, SDF-1 and MMP-2), and down-regulates α-SMA. Furthermore, caffeine suppressed the migratory/invasiveness abilities of CAF cells through PTEN-dependent Akt/Erk1/2 inactivation. Moreover, caffeine reduced the paracrine pro-invasion/−migration effects of CAF cells on breast cancer cells. These results indicate that caffeine can inactivate breast stromal myofibroblasts. This has been confirmed by showing that caffeine also suppresses the paracrine pro-angiogenic effect of CAF cells through down-regulating HIF-1αand its downstream effector VEGF-A. Interestingly, these effects were sustained in absence of caffeine. Conclusion/Significance The present findings provide a proof of principle that breast cancer myofibroblasts can be inactivated, and thereby caffeine may provide a safe and effective prevention against breast tumor growth/recurrence through inhibition of the procarcinogenic effects of active stromal fibroblasts. PMID:24595168

  20. Cancer associated fibroblasts promote tumor growth and metastasis by modulating the tumor immune microenvironment in a 4T1 murine breast cancer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie Liao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Local inflammation associated with solid tumors commonly results from factors released by tumor cells and the tumor stroma, and promotes tumor progression. Cancer associated fibroblasts comprise a majority of the cells found in tumor stroma and are appealing targets for cancer therapy. Here, our aim was to determine the efficacy of targeting cancer associated fibroblasts for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrate that cancer associated fibroblasts are key modulators of immune polarization in the tumor microenvironment of a 4T1 murine model of metastatic breast cancer. Elimination of cancer associated fibroblasts in vivo by a DNA vaccine targeted to fibroblast activation protein results in a shift of the immune microenvironment from a Th2 to Th1 polarization. This shift is characterized by increased protein expression of IL-2 and IL-7, suppressed recruitment of tumor-associated macrophages, myeloid derived suppressor cells, T regulatory cells, and decreased tumor angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. Additionally, the vaccine improved anti-metastatic effects of doxorubicin chemotherapy and enhanced suppression of IL-6 and IL-4 protein expression while increasing recruitment of dendritic cells and CD8(+ T cells. Treatment with the combination therapy also reduced tumor-associated Vegf, Pdgfc, and GM-CSF mRNA and protein expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings demonstrate that cancer associated fibroblasts promote tumor growth and metastasis through their role as key modulators of immune polarization in the tumor microenvironment and are valid targets for therapy of metastatic breast cancer.

  1. Curcumin Triggers p16-Dependent Senescence in Active Breast Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts and Suppresses Their Paracrine Procarcinogenic Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti-Fauziah Hendrayani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Activated cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs or myofibroblasts not only facilitate tumor growth and spread but also affect tumor response to therapeutic agents. Therefore, it became clear that efficient therapeutic regimens should also take into account the presence of these supportive cells and inhibit their paracrine effects. To this end, we tested the effect of low concentrations of curcumin, a pharmacologically safe natural product, on patient-derived primary breast CAF cells. We have shown that curcumin treatment upregulates p16INK4A and other tumor suppressor proteins while inactivates the JAK2/STAT3 pathway. This reduced the level of alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA and the migration/invasion abilities of these cells. Furthermore, curcumin suppressed the expression/secretion of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1, interleukin-6 (IL-6, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2, MMP-9, and transforming growth factor-β, which impeded their paracrine procarcinogenic potential. Intriguingly, these effects were sustained even after curcumin withdrawal and cell splitting. Therefore, using different markers of senescence [senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal activity, Ki-67 and Lamin B1 levels, and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation], we have shown that curcumin markedly suppresses Lamin B1 and triggers DNA damage-independent senescence in proliferating but not quiescent breast stromal fibroblasts. Importantly, this curcumin-related senescence was p16INK4A-dependent and occurred with no associated inflammatory secretory phenotype. These results indicate the possible inactivation of cancer-associated myofibroblasts and present the first indication that curcumin can trigger DNA damage-independent and safe senescence in stromal fibroblasts.

  2. NOTCH2 in breast cancer: association of SNP rs11249433 with gene expression in ER-positive breast tumors without TP53 mutations

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    Ambs Stefan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS has identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs11249433 in the 1p11.2 region as a novel genetic risk factor for breast cancer, and this association was stronger in patients with estrogen receptor (ER+ versus ER- cancer. Results We found association between SNP rs11249433 and expression of the NOTCH2 gene located in the 1p11.2 region. Examined in 180 breast tumors, the expression of NOTCH2 was found to be lowest in tumors with TP53 mutations and highest in TP53 wild-type/ER+ tumors (p = 0.0059. In the latter group, the NOTCH2 expression was particularly increased in carriers of the risk genotypes (AG/GG of rs11249433 when compared to the non-risk AA genotype (p = 0.0062. Similar association between NOTCH2 expression and rs11249433 was observed in 60 samples of purified monocytes from healthy controls (p = 0.015, but not in total blood samples from 302 breast cancer patients and 76 normal breast tissue samples. We also identified the first possible dominant-negative form of NOTCH2, a truncated version of NOTCH2 consisting of only the extracellular domain. Conclusion This is the first study to show that the expression of NOTCH2 differs in subgroups of breast tumors and by genotypes of the breast cancer-associated SNP rs11249433. The NOTCH pathway has key functions in stem cell differentiation of ER+ luminal cells in the breast. Therefore, increased expression of NOTCH2 in carriers of rs11249433 may promote development of ER+ luminal tumors. Further studies are needed to investigate possible mechanisms of regulation of NOTCH2 expression by rs11249433 and the role of NOTCH2 splicing forms in breast cancer development.

  3. Breast cancer risk and 6q22.33: combined results from Breast Cancer Association Consortium and Consortium of Investigators on Modifiers of BRCA1/2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Kirchhoff

    Full Text Available Recently, a locus on chromosome 6q22.33 (rs2180341 was reported to be associated with increased breast cancer risk in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ population, and this association was also observed in populations of non-AJ European ancestry. In the present study, we performed a large replication analysis of rs2180341 using data from 31,428 invasive breast cancer cases and 34,700 controls collected from 25 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC. In addition, we evaluated whether rs2180341 modifies breast cancer risk in 3,361 BRCA1 and 2,020 BRCA2 carriers from 11 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA. Based on the BCAC data from women of European ancestry, we found evidence for a weak association with breast cancer risk for rs2180341 (per-allele odds ratio (OR = 1.03, 95% CI 1.00-1.06, p = 0.023. There was evidence for heterogeneity in the ORs among studies (I(2 = 49.3%; p = <0.004. In CIMBA, we observed an inverse association with the minor allele of rs2180341 and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele OR = 0.89, 95%CI 0.80-1.00, p = 0.048, indicating a potential protective effect of this allele. These data suggest that that 6q22.33 confers a weak effect on breast cancer risk.

  4. Associations of Breast Cancer Risk Factors With Tumor Subtypes : A Pooled Analysis From the Breast Cancer Association Consortium Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Xiaohong R.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Goode, Ellen L.; Couch, Fergus J.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Milne, Roger L.; Gaudet, Mia; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Cox, Angela; Fasching, Peter A.; Hein, Rebecca; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Blows, Fiona; Driver, Kristy; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Heinz, Judith; Sinn, Peter; Vrieling, Alina; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomaeki, Kristiina; Heikkilae, Paeivi; Blomqvist, Carl; Lissowska, Jolanta; Peplonska, Beata; Chanock, Stephen; Figueroa, Jonine; Brinton, Louise; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Humphreys, Keith; Darabi, Hatef; Liu, Jianjun; Van 't Veer, Laura J.; Van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Knight, Julia A.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; O'Malley, Frances P.; Weerasooriya, Nayana; John, Esther M.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hartmann, Arndt; Weihbrecht, Sebastian B.; Wachter, David L.; Jud, Sebastian M. S.; Loehberg, Christian R.; Baglietto, Laura; English, Dallas R.; Giles, Graham G.; McLean, Catriona A.; Severi, Gianluca; Lambrechts, Diether; Vandorpe, Thijs; Weltens, Caroline; Paridaens, Robert; Smeets, Ann; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Wang, Xianshu; Olson, Janet E.; Cafourek, Victoria; Fredericksen, Zachary; Kosel, Matthew; Vachon, Celine; Cramp, Helen E.; Connley, Daniel; Cross, Simon S.; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Doerk, Thilo; Bremer, Michael; Meyer, Andreas; Karstens, Johann H.; Ay, Aysun; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Hillemanns, Peter; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menendez Rodriguez, Primitiva; Zamora, Pilar; Bentez, Javier; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Hamann, Ute; Pesch, Beate; Bruening, Thomas; Justenhoven, Christina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Eccles, Diana M.; Tapper, William J.; Gerty, Sue M.; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian P.; Jones, Angela; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; McInerney, Niall; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yang, Show-Lin; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Chen, Shou-Tung; Hsu, Giu-Cheng; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gorski, Bohdan; Gronwald, Jacek; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Jager, Agnes; Kriege, Mieke; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M. A.; Collee, Margriet; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Pylkaes, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Mononen, Kari; Grip, Mervi; Hirvikoski, Pasi; Winqvist, Robert; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kauppinen, Jaana; Kataja, Vesa; Auvinen, Paeivi; Soini, Ylermi; Sironen, Reijo; Bojesen, Stig E.; Orsted, David Dynnes; Kaur-Knudsen, Diljit; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Holland, Helene; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Radice, Paolo; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hunter, David J.; Tamimi, Rulla; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Brennan, Paul; Mckay, James; Odefrey, Fabrice; Gaborieau, Valerie; Devilee, Peter; Huijts, P. E. A.; Tollenaar, R. A. E. M.; Seynaeve, C.; Dite, Gillian S.; Apicella, Carmel; Hopper, John L.; Hammet, Fleur; Tsimiklis, Helen; Smith, Letitia D.; Southey, Melissa C.; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Easton, Douglas; Pharoah, Paul; Sherman, Mark E.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    Background Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer risk factors are associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors. Methods We pooled tumor marker and epidemiological risk factor data from 35 568 invasive breast cancer case patients

  5. Associations of breast cancer risk factors with tumor subtypes: a pooled analysis from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xiaohong R; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Goode, Ellen L;

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer risk factors are associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors.......Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer risk factors are associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors....

  6. Associations of Breast Cancer Risk Factors With Tumor Subtypes : A Pooled Analysis From the Breast Cancer Association Consortium Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Xiaohong R.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Goode, Ellen L.; Couch, Fergus J.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Milne, Roger L.; Gaudet, Mia; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Cox, Angela; Fasching, Peter A.; Hein, Rebecca; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Blows, Fiona; Driver, Kristy; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Heinz, Judith; Sinn, Peter; Vrieling, Alina; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomaeki, Kristiina; Heikkilae, Paeivi; Blomqvist, Carl; Lissowska, Jolanta; Peplonska, Beata; Chanock, Stephen; Figueroa, Jonine; Brinton, Louise; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Humphreys, Keith; Darabi, Hatef; Liu, Jianjun; Van 't Veer, Laura J.; Van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Knight, Julia A.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; O'Malley, Frances P.; Weerasooriya, Nayana; John, Esther M.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hartmann, Arndt; Weihbrecht, Sebastian B.; Wachter, David L.; Jud, Sebastian M. S.; Loehberg, Christian R.; Baglietto, Laura; English, Dallas R.; Giles, Graham G.; McLean, Catriona A.; Severi, Gianluca; Lambrechts, Diether; Vandorpe, Thijs; Weltens, Caroline; Paridaens, Robert; Smeets, Ann; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Wang, Xianshu; Olson, Janet E.; Cafourek, Victoria; Fredericksen, Zachary; Kosel, Matthew; Vachon, Celine; Cramp, Helen E.; Connley, Daniel; Cross, Simon S.; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Doerk, Thilo; Bremer, Michael; Meyer, Andreas; Karstens, Johann H.; Ay, Aysun; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Hillemanns, Peter; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menendez Rodriguez, Primitiva; Zamora, Pilar; Bentez, Javier; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Hamann, Ute; Pesch, Beate; Bruening, Thomas; Justenhoven, Christina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Eccles, Diana M.; Tapper, William J.; Gerty, Sue M.; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian P.; Jones, Angela; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; McInerney, Niall; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yang, Show-Lin; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Chen, Shou-Tung; Hsu, Giu-Cheng; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gorski, Bohdan; Gronwald, Jacek; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Jager, Agnes; Kriege, Mieke; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M. A.; Collee, Margriet; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Pylkaes, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Mononen, Kari; Grip, Mervi; Hirvikoski, Pasi; Winqvist, Robert; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kauppinen, Jaana; Kataja, Vesa; Auvinen, Paeivi; Soini, Ylermi; Sironen, Reijo; Bojesen, Stig E.; Orsted, David Dynnes; Kaur-Knudsen, Diljit; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Holland, Helene; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Radice, Paolo; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hunter, David J.; Tamimi, Rulla; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Brennan, Paul; Mckay, James; Odefrey, Fabrice; Gaborieau, Valerie; Devilee, Peter; Huijts, P. E. A.; Tollenaar, R. A. E. M.; Seynaeve, C.; Dite, Gillian S.; Apicella, Carmel; Hopper, John L.; Hammet, Fleur; Tsimiklis, Helen; Smith, Letitia D.; Southey, Melissa C.; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Easton, Douglas; Pharoah, Paul; Sherman, Mark E.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer risk factors are associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors. Methods We pooled tumor marker and epidemiological risk factor data from 35 568 invasive breast cancer case patients f

  7. Breast cancer cell cyclooxygenase-2 expression alters extracellular matrix structure and function and numbers of cancer associated fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamachary, Balaji; Stasinopoulos, Ioannis; Kakkad, Samata; Penet, Marie-France; Jacob, Desmond; Wildes, Flonne; Mironchik, Yelena; Pathak, Arvind P; Solaiyappan, Meiyappan; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2017-01-31

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a critically important mediator of inflammation that significantly influences tumor angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. We investigated the role of COX-2 expressed by triple negative breast cancer cells in altering the structure and function of the extracellular matrix (ECM). COX-2 downregulation effects on ECM structure and function were investigated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy of tumors derived from triple negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, and a derived clone stably expressing a short hairpin (shRNA) molecule downregulating COX-2. MRI of albumin-GdDTPA was used to characterize macromolecular fluid transport in vivo and SHG microscopy was used to quantify collagen 1 (Col1) fiber morphology. COX-2 downregulation decreased Col1 fiber density and altered macromolecular fluid transport. Immunohistochemistry identified significantly fewer activated cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in low COX-2 expressing tumors. Metastatic lung nodules established by COX-2 downregulated cells were infrequent, smaller, and contained fewer Col1 fibers.COX-2 overexpression studies were performed with tumors derived from triple negative SUM-149 breast cancer cells lentivirally transduced to overexpress COX-2. SHG microscopy identified significantly higher Col1 fiber density in COX-2 overexpressing tumors with an increase of CAFs. These data expand upon the roles of COX-2 in shaping the structure and function of the ECM in primary and metastatic tumors, and identify the potential role of COX-2 in modifying the number of CAFs in tumors that may have contributed to the altered ECM.

  8. Heterogeneity of breast cancer associations with five susceptibility loci by clinical and pathological characteristics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Garcia-Closas

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A three-stage genome-wide association study recently identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in five loci (fibroblast growth receptor 2 (FGFR2, trinucleotide repeat containing 9 (TNRC9, mitogen-activated protein kinase 3 K1 (MAP3K1, 8q24, and lymphocyte-specific protein 1 (LSP1 associated with breast cancer risk. We investigated whether the associations between these SNPs and breast cancer risk varied by clinically important tumor characteristics in up to 23,039 invasive breast cancer cases and 26,273 controls from 20 studies. We also evaluated their influence on overall survival in 13,527 cases from 13 studies. All participants were of European or Asian origin. rs2981582 in FGFR2 was more strongly related to ER-positive (per-allele OR (95%CI = 1.31 (1.27-1.36 than ER-negative (1.08 (1.03-1.14 disease (P for heterogeneity = 10(-13. This SNP was also more strongly related to PR-positive, low grade and node positive tumors (P = 10(-5, 10(-8, 0.013, respectively. The association for rs13281615 in 8q24 was stronger for ER-positive, PR-positive, and low grade tumors (P = 0.001, 0.011 and 10(-4, respectively. The differences in the associations between SNPs in FGFR2 and 8q24 and risk by ER and grade remained significant after permutation adjustment for multiple comparisons and after adjustment for other tumor characteristics. Three SNPs (rs2981582, rs3803662, and rs889312 showed weak but significant associations with ER-negative disease, the strongest association being for rs3803662 in TNRC9 (1.14 (1.09-1.21. rs13281615 in 8q24 was associated with an improvement in survival after diagnosis (per-allele HR = 0.90 (0.83-0.97. The association was attenuated and non-significant after adjusting for known prognostic factors. Our findings show that common genetic variants influence the pathological subtype of breast cancer and provide further support for the hypothesis that ER-positive and ER-negative disease are biologically distinct. Understanding

  9. Aluminium and the human breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbre, P D

    2016-06-01

    The human population is exposed to aluminium (Al) from diet, antacids and vaccine adjuvants, but frequent application of Al-based salts to the underarm as antiperspirant adds a high additional exposure directly to the local area of the human breast. Coincidentally the upper outer quadrant of the breast is where there is also a disproportionately high incidence of breast cysts and breast cancer. Al has been measured in human breast tissues/fluids at higher levels than in blood, and experimental evidence suggests that at physiologically relevant concentrations, Al can adversely impact on human breast epithelial cell biology. Gross cystic breast disease is the most common benign disorder of the breast and evidence is presented that Al may be a causative factor in formation of breast cysts. Evidence is also reviewed that Al can enable the development of multiple hallmarks associated with cancer in breast cells, in particular that it can cause genomic instability and inappropriate proliferation in human breast epithelial cells, and can increase migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells. In addition, Al is a metalloestrogen and oestrogen is a risk factor for breast cancer known to influence multiple hallmarks. The microenvironment is established as another determinant of breast cancer development and Al has been shown to cause adverse alterations to the breast microenvironment. If current usage patterns of Al-based antiperspirant salts contribute to causation of breast cysts and breast cancer, then reduction in exposure would offer a strategy for prevention, and regulatory review is now justified. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. A pilot, prospective evaluation of a novel alternative for maintenance therapy of breast cancer-associated lymphedema [ISRCTN76522412

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rockson Stanley G

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prospective investigations of complete decongestive lymphatic physiotherapy (CDPT, including manual lymphatic drainage (MLD, have validated the efficacy of these interventions for the initial reduction of edema and long-term maintenance of limb volume in lymphedema. However, CDPT demands substantial time and effort from patients to maintain these benefits; the treatments are not always well-accepted, and patients may suffer from a deterioration in quality-of-life or a time-dependent loss of initial treatment benefits. A new device designed for home use by the patient, the Flexitouch™, has been developed to mechanically simulate MLD. We have undertaken a prospective, randomized, crossover study of the efficacy of the Flexitouch™, when compared to massage, in the self-administered maintenance therapy of lymphedema. Methods A prospective, randomized, crossover study of maintenance therapy was performed in 10 patients with unilateral breast cancer-associated lymphedema of the arm. Each observation phase included self-administered treatment with the Flexitouch™ or massage, 1 hour daily for 14 days, respectively, followed by crossover to the alternate treatment phase. Each treatment phase was preceded by a 1 week treatment washout, with use of garment only. The sequence of treatment was randomly assigned. The potential impact of treatment modality on quality of life was assessed with serial administration of the SF-36. Results Statistical analysis disclosed that the order of treatment had no outcome influence, permitting 10 comparisons within each treatment group. Post-treatment arm volume reduced significantly after the Flexitouch™, but not after self-administered massage. The patients' mean weight decreased significantly with Flexitouch™ use, but not with massage. The Flexitouch™ device was apparently well-tolerated and accepted by patients. Serial SF-36 administration showed no deterioration in physical or

  11. The role of TGFBI in mesothelioma and breast cancer: association with tumor suppression

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    Li Bingyan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transforming growth factor β induced (TGFBI product, an extracellular matrix (ECM protein, has been implicated as a putative tumor suppressor in recent studies. Our previous findings revealed that expression of TGFBI gene is down-regulated in a variety of cancer cell lines and clinical tissue samples. In this study, ectopic expression of TGFBI was used to ascertain its role as a tumor suppressor and to determine the underlying mechanism of mesothelioma and breast cancer. Methods Cells were stably transfected with pRc/CMV2-TGFBI and pRc/CMV2-empty vector with Lipofectamine Plus. Ectopic expression of TGFBI was quantified by using quantitative PCR and Western-blotting. Characterization of cell viability was assessed using growth curve, clonogenic survival and soft agar growth. The potential of tumor formation was evaluated by an in vivo mouse model. Cell cycle was analyzed via flow cytometry. Expressions of p21, p53, p16 and p14 were examined using Western-blotting. Senescent cells were sorted by using a Senescence β-Galactosidase Staining Kit. Telomerase activity was measured using quantitative telomerase detection kit. Results In this study, an ectopic expression of TGFBI in two types of cancer cell lines, a mesothelioma cell line NCI-H28 and a breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 was found to have reduced the cellular growth, plating efficiency, and anchorage-independent growth. The tumorigenicity of these cancer cell lines as determined by subcutaneous inoculation in nude mice was similarly suppressed by TGFBI expression. Likewise, TGFBI expression reduced the proportion of S-phase while increased the proportion of G1 phase in these cells. The redistribution of cell cycle phase after re-expression of TGFBI was correspondent with transiently elevated expression of p21 and p53. The activities of senescence-associated β-galactosidase and telomerase were enhanced in TGFBI-transfected cells. Conclusion Collectively, these

  12. Interactions between the breast cancer-associated MUC1 mucins and C-type lectin characterized by optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjialirezaei, Soosan; Picco, Gianfranco; Beatson, Richard; Burchell, Joy; Stokke, Bjørn Torger; Sletmoen, Marit

    2017-01-01

    Carbohydrate-protein interactions govern many crucial processes in biological systems including cell recognition events. We have used the sensitive force probe optical tweezers to quantify the interactions occurring between MGL lectins and MUC1 carrying the cancer-associated glycan antigens mucins Tn and STn. Unbinding forces of 7.6 pN and 7.1 pN were determined for the MUC1(Tn)-MGL and MUC1(STn)-MGL interactions, at a force loading rate of ~40 pN/s. The interaction strength increased with increasing force loading rate, to 27 and 37 pN at a force loading rate of ~ 310 pN/s. No interactions were detected between MGL and MUC1(ST), a glycoform of MUC1 also expressed by breast carcinoma cells. Interestingly, this glycan (ST) can be found on proteins expressed by normal cells, although in this case not on MUC1. Additionally, GalNAc decorated polyethylene glycol displayed similar rupture forces as observed for MUC1(Tn) and MUC1(STn) when forced to unbind from MGL, indicating that GalNAc is an essential group in these interactions. Since the STn glycan decoration is more frequently found on the surface of carcinomas than the Tn glycan, the binding of MUC1 carrying STn to MGL may be more physiologically relevant and may be in part responsible for some of the characteristics of STn expressing tumours.

  13. Patient survival and tumor characteristics associated with CHEK2:p.I157T - findings from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muranen, Taru A; Blomqvist, Carl; Dörk, Thilo; Jakubowska, Anna; Heikkilä, Päivi; Fagerholm, Rainer; Greco, Dario; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Bojesen, Stig E; Shah, Mitul; Dunning, Alison M; Rhenius, Valerie; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Brand, Judith S; Darabi, Hatef; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Couch, Fergus J; Hart, Steven N; Figueroa, Jonine; García-Closas, Montserrat; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Andrulis, Irene L; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Lubinski, Jan; Dubrowinskaja, Natalia; Bolla, Manjeet K; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Wang, Qin; Easton, Douglas F; Pharoah, Paul D P; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Nevanlinna, Heli

    2016-10-03

    P.I157T is a CHEK2 missense mutation associated with a modest increase in breast cancer risk. Previously, another CHEK2 mutation, the protein truncating c.1100delC has been associated with poor prognosis of breast cancer patients. Here, we have investigated patient survival and characteristics of breast tumors of germ line p.I157T carriers. We included in the analyses 26,801 European female breast cancer patients from 15 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We analyzed the association between p.I157T and the clinico-pathological breast cancer characteristics by comparing the p.I157T carrier tumors to non-carrier and c.1100delC carrier tumors. Similarly, we investigated the p.I157T associated risk of early death, breast cancer-associated death, distant metastasis, locoregional relapse and second breast cancer using Cox proportional hazards models. Additionally, we explored the p.I157T-associated genomic gene expression profile using data from breast tumors of 183 Finnish female breast cancer patients (ten p.I157T carriers) (GEO: GSE24450). Differential gene expression analysis was performed using a moderated t test. Functional enrichment was investigated using the DAVID functional annotation tool and gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA). The tumors were classified into molecular subtypes according to the St Gallen 2013 criteria and the PAM50 gene expression signature. P.I157T was not associated with increased risk of early death, breast cancer-associated death or distant metastasis relapse, and there was a significant difference in prognosis associated with the two CHEK2 mutations, p.I157T and c.1100delC. Furthermore, p.I157T was associated with lobular histological type and clinico-pathological markers of good prognosis, such as ER and PR expression, low TP53 expression and low grade. Gene expression analysis suggested luminal A to be the most common subtype for p.I157T carriers and CDH1 (cadherin 1) target genes to be significantly

  14. Differential expression of cancer associated proteins in breast milk based on age at first full term pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Wenyi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background First full term pregnancy (FFTP completed at a young age has been linked to low long term breast cancer risk, whereas late FFTP pregnancy age confers high long term risk, compared to nulliparity. Our hypothesis was that proteins linked to breast cancer would be differentially expressed in human milk collected at three time points during lactation based on age at FFTP. Methods We analyzed breast milk from 72 lactating women. Samples were collected within 10 days of the onset of lactation (baseline-BL, two months after lactation started and during breast weaning (W. We measured 16 proteins (11 kallikreins (KLKs, basic fibroblast growth factor, YKL-40, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and transforming growth factor (TGF β-1 and -2 associated with breast cancer, most known to be secreted into milk. Results During lactation there was a significant change in the expression of 14 proteins in women = 26 at FFTP. The most significant (p = 26 were in KLK3,6, 8, and TGFβ2 in women = 26. There was a significant increase (p = .022 in KLK8 expression from BL to W depending on FFTP age. Examination of DNA methylation in the promoter region of KLK6 revealed high levels of methylation that did not explain the observed changes in protein levels. On the other hand, KLK6 and TGFβ1 expression were significantly associated (r2 = .43, p = .0050. Conclusions The expression profile of milk proteins linked to breast cancer is influenced by age at FFTP. These proteins may play a role in future cancer risk.

  15. Common non-synonymous SNPs associated with breast cancer susceptibility: findings from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Roger L; Burwinkel, Barbara; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Arias-Perez, Jose-Ignacio; Zamora, M Pilar; Menéndez-Rodríguez, Primitiva; Hardisson, David; Mendiola, Marta; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Bolla, Manjeet K; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Li, Jingmei; Brand, Judith S; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Lambrechts, Diether; Peuteman, Gilian; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Smeets, Ann; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katazyna; Hartman, Mikael; Hui, Miao; Yen Lim, Wei; Wan Chan, Ching; Marme, Federick; Yang, Rongxi; Bugert, Peter; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; García-Closas, Montserrat; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; Hooning, Maartje J; Kriege, Mieke; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Koppert, Linetta B; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Peto, Julian; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha J; Long, Jirong; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Cornelissen, Sten; Braaf, Linde; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K; Noh, Dong-Young; Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Azzollini, Jacopo; Barile, Monica; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; Hopper, John L; Schmidt, Daniel F; Makalic, Enes; Southey, Melissa C; Hwang Teo, Soo; Har Yip, Cheng; Sivanandan, Kavitta; Tay, Wan-Ting; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Therese; Sanchez, Marie; Mulot, Claire; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Wu, Anna H; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zhang, Ben; Couch, Fergus J; Toland, Amanda E; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; McKay, James; Wang, Xianshu; Olson, Janet E; Vachon, Celine; Purrington, Kristen; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Czene, Kamila; Eriksson, Mikael; Humphreys, Keith; Darabi, Hatef; Ahmed, Shahana; Shah, Mitul; Pharoah, Paul D P; Hall, Per; Giles, Graham G; Benítez, Javier; Dunning, Alison M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F

    2014-11-15

    Candidate variant association studies have been largely unsuccessful in identifying common breast cancer susceptibility variants, although most studies have been underpowered to detect associations of a realistic magnitude. We assessed 41 common non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) for which evidence of association with breast cancer risk had been previously reported. Case-control data were combined from 38 studies of white European women (46 450 cases and 42 600 controls) and analyzed using unconditional logistic regression. Strong evidence of association was observed for three nsSNPs: ATXN7-K264R at 3p21 [rs1053338, per allele OR = 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.04-1.10, P = 2.9 × 10(-6)], AKAP9-M463I at 7q21 (rs6964587, OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.03-1.07, P = 1.7 × 10(-6)) and NEK10-L513S at 3p24 (rs10510592, OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.07-1.12, P = 5.1 × 10(-17)). The first two associations reached genome-wide statistical significance in a combined analysis of available data, including independent data from nine genome-wide association studies (GWASs): for ATXN7-K264R, OR = 1.07 (95% CI = 1.05-1.10, P = 1.0 × 10(-8)); for AKAP9-M463I, OR = 1.05 (95% CI = 1.04-1.07, P = 2.0 × 10(-10)). Further analysis of other common variants in these two regions suggested that intronic SNPs nearby are more strongly associated with disease risk. We have thus identified a novel susceptibility locus at 3p21, and confirmed previous suggestive evidence that rs6964587 at 7q21 is associated with risk. The third locus, rs10510592, is located in an established breast cancer susceptibility region; the association was substantially attenuated after adjustment for the known GWAS hit. Thus, each of the associated nsSNPs is likely to be a marker for another, non-coding, variant causally related to breast cancer risk. Further fine-mapping and functional studies are required to identify the underlying risk-modifying variants and the genes through which they act.

  16. Common non-synonymous SNPs associated with breast cancer susceptibility: findings from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Roger L.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Arias-Perez, Jose-Ignacio; Zamora, M. Pilar; Menéndez-Rodríguez, Primitiva; Hardisson, David; Mendiola, Marta; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M. Rosario; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Li, Jingmei; Brand, Judith S.; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Lambrechts, Diether; Peuteman, Gilian; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Smeets, Ann; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katazyna; Hartman, Mikael; Hui, Miao; Yen Lim, Wei; Wan Chan, Ching; Marme, Federick; Yang, Rongxi; Bugert, Peter; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; García-Closas, Montserrat; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Flyger, Henrik; Hooning, Maartje J.; Kriege, Mieke; van den Ouweland, Ans M.W.; Koppert, Linetta B.; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Peto, Julian; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha J.; Long, Jirong; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Cornelissen, Sten; Braaf, Linde; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K.; Noh, Dong-Young; Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Fasching, Peter A.; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Azzollini, Jacopo; Barile, Monica; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; Hopper, John L.; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Makalic, Enes; Southey, Melissa C.; Hwang Teo, Soo; Har Yip, Cheng; Sivanandan, Kavitta; Tay, Wan-Ting; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Therese; Sanchez, Marie; Mulot, Claire; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Wu, Anna H.; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zhang, Ben; Couch, Fergus J.; Toland, Amanda E.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; McKay, James; Wang, Xianshu; Olson, Janet E.; Vachon, Celine; Purrington, Kristen; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Czene, Kamila; Eriksson, Mikael; Humphreys, Keith; Darabi, Hatef; Ahmed, Shahana; Shah, Mitul; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Hall, Per; Giles, Graham G.; Benítez, Javier; Dunning, Alison M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Berchuck, Andrew; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Benlloch, Sara; Antoniou, Antonis; McGuffog, Lesley; Offit, Ken; Lee, Andrew; Dicks, Ed; Luccarini, Craig; Tessier, Daniel C.; Bacot, Francois; Vincent, Daniel; LaBoissière, Sylvie; Robidoux, Frederic; Nielsen, Sune F.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Windebank, Sharon A.; Hilker, Christopher A.; Meyer, Jeffrey; Angelakos, Maggie; Maskiell, Judi; van der Schoot, Ellen; Rutgers, Emiel; Verhoef, Senno; Hogervorst, Frans; Boonyawongviroj, Prat; Siriwanarungsan, Pornthep; Schrauder, Michael; Rübner, Matthias; Oeser, Sonja; Landrith, Silke; Williams, Eileen; Ryder-Mills, Elaine; Sargus, Kara; McInerney, Niall; Colleran, Gabrielle; Rowan, Andrew; Jones, Angela; Sohn, Christof; Schneeweiß, Andeas; Bugert, Peter; Álvarez, Núria; Lacey, James; Wang, Sophia; Ma, Huiyan; Lu, Yani; Deapen, Dennis; Pinder, Rich; Lee, Eunjung; Schumacher, Fred; Horn-Ross, Pam; Reynolds, Peggy; Nelson, David; Ziegler, Hartwig; Wolf, Sonja; Hermann, Volker; Lo, Wing-Yee; Justenhoven, Christina; Baisch, Christian; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Brüning, Thomas; Pesch, Beate; Rabstein, Sylvia; Lotz, Anne; Harth, Volker; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Erkkilä, Irja; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; von Smitten, Karl; Antonenkova, Natalia; Hillemanns, Peter; Christiansen, Hans; Myöhänen, Eija; Kemiläinen, Helena; Thorne, Heather; Niedermayr, Eveline; Bowtell, D; Chenevix-Trench, G; deFazio, A; Gertig, D; Green, A; Webb, P; Green, A.; Parsons, P.; Hayward, N.; Webb, P.; Whiteman, D.; Fung, Annie; Yashiki, June; Peuteman, Gilian; Smeets, Dominiek; Brussel, Thomas Van; Corthouts, Kathleen; Obi, Nadia; Heinz, Judith; Behrens, Sabine; Eilber, Ursula; Celik, Muhabbet; Olchers, Til; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Scuvera, Giulietta; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Bonanni, Bernardo; Feroce, Irene; Maniscalco, Angela; Rossi, Alessandra; Bernard, Loris; Tranchant, Martine; Valois, Marie-France; Turgeon, Annie; Heguy, Lea; Sze Yee, Phuah; Kang, Peter; Nee, Kang In; Mariapun, Shivaani; Sook-Yee, Yoon; Lee, Daphne; Ching, Teh Yew; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Otsukka, Meeri; Mononen, Kari; Selander, Teresa; Weerasooriya, Nayana; staff, OFBCR; Krol-Warmerdam, E.; Molenaar, J.; Blom, J.; Brinton, Louise; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Peplonska, Beata; Zatonski, Witold; Chao, Pei; Stagner, Michael; Bos, Petra; Blom, Jannet; Crepin, Ellen; Nieuwlaat, Anja; Heemskerk, Annette; Higham, Sue; Cross, Simon; Cramp, Helen; Connley, Dan; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy; Brock, Ian; Luccarini, Craig; Conroy, Don; Baynes, Caroline; Chua, Kimberley

    2014-01-01

    Candidate variant association studies have been largely unsuccessful in identifying common breast cancer susceptibility variants, although most studies have been underpowered to detect associations of a realistic magnitude. We assessed 41 common non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) for which evidence of association with breast cancer risk had been previously reported. Case-control data were combined from 38 studies of white European women (46 450 cases and 42 600 controls) and analyzed using unconditional logistic regression. Strong evidence of association was observed for three nsSNPs: ATXN7-K264R at 3p21 [rs1053338, per allele OR = 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.04–1.10, P = 2.9 × 10−6], AKAP9-M463I at 7q21 (rs6964587, OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.03–1.07, P = 1.7 × 10−6) and NEK10-L513S at 3p24 (rs10510592, OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.07–1.12, P = 5.1 × 10−17). The first two associations reached genome-wide statistical significance in a combined analysis of available data, including independent data from nine genome-wide association studies (GWASs): for ATXN7-K264R, OR = 1.07 (95% CI = 1.05–1.10, P = 1.0 × 10−8); for AKAP9-M463I, OR = 1.05 (95% CI = 1.04–1.07, P = 2.0 × 10−10). Further analysis of other common variants in these two regions suggested that intronic SNPs nearby are more strongly associated with disease risk. We have thus identified a novel susceptibility locus at 3p21, and confirmed previous suggestive evidence that rs6964587 at 7q21 is associated with risk. The third locus, rs10510592, is located in an established breast cancer susceptibility region; the association was substantially attenuated after adjustment for the known GWAS hit. Thus, each of the associated nsSNPs is likely to be a marker for another, non-coding, variant causally related to breast cancer risk. Further fine-mapping and functional studies are required to identify the underlying risk-modifying variants and the genes through which they act

  17. Applying of hierarchical clustering to analysis of protein patterns in the human cancer-associated liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia A Petushkova

    Full Text Available There are two ways that statistical methods can learn from biomedical data. One way is to learn classifiers to identify diseases and to predict outcomes using the training dataset with established diagnosis for each sample. When the training dataset is not available the task can be to mine for presence of meaningful groups (clusters of samples and to explore underlying data structure (unsupervised learning.We investigated the proteomic profiles of the cytosolic fraction of human liver samples using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE. Samples were resected upon surgical treatment of hepatic metastases in colorectal cancer. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of 2DE gel images (n = 18 revealed a pair of clusters, containing 11 and 7 samples. Previously we used the same specimens to measure biochemical profiles based on cytochrome P450-dependent enzymatic activities and also found that samples were clearly divided into two well-separated groups by cluster analysis. It turned out that groups by enzyme activity almost perfectly match to the groups identified from proteomic data. Of the 271 reproducible spots on our 2DE gels, we selected 15 to distinguish the human liver cytosolic clusters. Using MALDI-TOF peptide mass fingerprinting, we identified 12 proteins for the selected spots, including known cancer-associated species.Our results highlight the importance of hierarchical cluster analysis of proteomic data, and showed concordance between results of biochemical and proteomic approaches. Grouping of the human liver samples and/or patients into differing clusters may provide insights into possible molecular mechanism of drug metabolism and creates a rationale for personalized treatment.

  18. PGE2 promotes breast cancer-associated lymphangiogenesis by activation of EP4 receptor on lymphatic endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Pinki; Girish, Gannareddy V; Majumder, Mousumi; Xin, Xiping; Tutunea-Fatan, Elena; Lala, Peeyush K

    2017-01-05

    Lymphatic metastasis, facilitated by lymphangiogenesis is a common occurrence in breast cancer, the molecular mechanisms remaining incompletely understood. We had earlier shown that cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression by human or murine breast cancer cells promoted lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis by upregulating VEGF-C/D production by tumor cells or tumor-associated macrophages primarily due to activation of the prostaglandin receptor EP4 by endogenous PGE2. It is not clear whether tumor or host-derived PGE2 has any direct effect on lymphangiogenesis, and if so, whether EP4 receptors on lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC) play any role. Here, we address these questions employing in vitro studies with a COX-2-expressing and VEGF-C/D-producing murine breast cancer cell line C3L5 and a rat mesenteric (RM) LEC line and in vivo studies in nude mice. RMLEC responded to PGE2, an EP4 agonist PGE1OH, or C3L5 cell-conditioned media (C3L5-CM) by increased proliferation, migration and accelerated tube formation on growth factor reduced Matrigel. Native tube formation by RMLEC on Matrigel was abrogated in the presence of a selective COX-2 inhibitor or an EP4 antagonist. Addition of PGE2 or EP4 agonist, or C3L5-CM individually in the presence of COX-2 inhibitor, or EP4 antagonist, restored tube formation, reinforcing the role of EP4 on RMLEC in tubulogenesis. These results were partially duplicated with a human dermal LEC (HMVEC-dLyAd) and a COX-2 expressing human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. Knocking down EP4 with shRNA in RMLEC abrogated their tube forming capacity on Matrigel in the absence or presence of PGE2, EP4 agonist, or C3L5-CM. RMLEC tubulogenesis following EP4 activation by agonist treatment was dependent on PI3K/Akt and Erk signaling pathways and VEGFR-3 stimulation. Finally in a directed in vivo lymphangiogenesis assay (DIVLA) we demonstrated the lymphangiogenic as well as angiogenic capacity of PGE2 and EP4 agonist in vivo. These results demonstrate

  19. Ethanol exposure induces the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype and lethal tumor metabolism: Implications for breast cancer prevention

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sanchez-Alvarez, Rosa; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Lin, Zhao; Lamb, Rebecca; Hulit, James; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Rubin, Emanuel; Lisanti, Michael P

    2013-01-01

    ...) and hTERT-immortalized fibroblasts. Here, we show that ethanol treatment (100 mM) promotes ROS production and oxidative stress in cancer-associated fibroblasts, which is sufficient to induce myofibroblastic differentiation...

  20. Pharmacological and small interference RNA-mediated inhibition of breast cancer-associated fatty acid synthase (oncogenic antigen-519) synergistically enhances Taxol (paclitaxel)-induced cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, Javier A; Vellon, Luciano; Colomer, Ramon; Lupu, Ruth

    2005-05-20

    The relationship between breast cancer-associated fatty acid synthase (FAS; oncogenic antigen-519) and chemotherapy-induced cell damage has not been studied. We examined the ability of C75, a synthetic slow-binding inhibitor of FAS activity, to modulate the cytotoxic activity of the microtubule-interfering agent Taxol (paclitaxel) in SK-Br3, MDA-MB-231, MCF-7 and multidrug-resistant MDR-1 (P-Glycoprotein)-overexpressing MCF-7/AdrR breast cancer cells. When the combination of C75 with Taxol in either concurrent (C75 + Taxol 24 hr) or sequential (C75 24 hr --> Taxol 24 hr) schedules were tested for synergism, addition or antagonism using the isobologram and the median-effect plot analyses, co-exposure of C75 and Taxol mostly demonstrated synergistic effects, whereas sequential exposure to C75 followed by Taxol mainly showed additive or antagonistic interactions. Because the nature of the cytotoxic interactions was definitely schedule-dependent in MCF-7 cells, we next evaluated the effects of C75 on Taxol-induced apoptosis as well as Taxol-activated cell death and cell survival-signaling pathways in this breast cancer cell model. An ELISA for histone-associated DNA fragments demonstrated that C75 and Taxol co-exposure caused a synergistic enhancement of apoptotic cell death, whereas C75 pre-treatment did not enhance the apoptosis-inducing activity of Taxol. Co-exposure to C75 and Taxol induced a remarkable nuclear accumulation of activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), which was accompanied by a synergistic nuclear accumulation of the p53 tumor-suppressor protein that was phosphorylated at Ser46, a p38 MAPK-regulated pro-apoptotic modification of p53. As single agents, FAS blocker C75 and Taxol induced a significant stimulation of the proliferation and cell survival mitogen-activated protein kinase extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/ERK2 MAPK) activity, whereas, in combination, they interfered with ERK1/ERK2 activation. Moreover, the

  1. Comparison of 6q25 Breast Cancer Hits from Asian and European Genome Wide Association Studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Rebecca; Maranian, Melanie; Hopper, John L.; Kapuscinski, Miroslaw K.; Southey, Melissa C.; Park, Daniel J.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Bueno-de-Mesquit, H. Bas; Muir, Kenneth R.; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Rattanamongkongul, Suthee; Puttawibul, Puttisak; Fasching, Peter A.; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Peto, Julian; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; Marmee, Frederick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L.; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Zamora, M. Pilar; Benítez, Javier; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Clarke, Christina A.; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Rahman, Nazneen; Seal, Sheila; Turnbull, Clare; Renwick, Anthony; Meindl, Alfons; Schott, Sarah; Bartram, Claus R.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Dörk, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Karstens, Johann H.; Hillemanns, Peter; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Zalutsky, Iosif V.; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Bermisheva, Marina; Prokovieva, Darya; Farahtdinova, Albina; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Investigators, kConFab; Lambrechts, Diether; Zhao, Hui; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; McLean, Catriona A.; Severi, Gianluca; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Kristensen, Vessela; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alexander; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Figueroa, Jonine D.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sherman, Mark E.; Hooning, Maartje; Martens, John W. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Collée, Margriet; Hall, Per; Humpreys, Keith; Czene, Kamila; Liu, Jianjun; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian W.; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Ahmed, Shahana; Ghoussaini, Maya; Pharoah, Paul DP.; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Jakubowska, Anna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Złowocka, Elżbieta; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Shen, Chen-Yang; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsu, Huan-Ming; Hou, Ming-Feng; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly A.; Titus, Linda; Egan, Kathleen M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Morrison, Jonathan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Easton, Douglas F.; Dunning, Alison M.

    2012-01-01

    The 6q25.1 locus was first identified via a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in Chinese women and marked by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2046210, approximately 180 Kb upstream of ESR1. There have been conflicting reports about the association of this locus with breast cancer in Europeans, and a GWAS in Europeans identified a different SNP, tagged here by rs12662670. We examined the associations of both SNPs in up to 61,689 cases and 58,822 controls from forty-four studies collaborating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, of which four studies were of Asian and 39 of European descent. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Case-only analyses were used to compare SNP effects in Estrogen Receptor positive (ER+) versus negative (ER−) tumours. Models including both SNPs were fitted to investigate whether the SNP effects were independent. Both SNPs are significantly associated with breast cancer risk in both ethnic groups. Per-allele ORs are higher in Asian than in European studies [rs2046210: OR (A/G) = 1.36 (95% CI 1.26–1.48), p = 7.6×10−14 in Asians and 1.09 (95% CI 1.07–1.11), p = 6.8×10−18 in Europeans. rs12662670: OR (G/T) = 1.29 (95% CI 1.19–1.41), p = 1.2×10−9 in Asians and 1.12 (95% CI 1.08–1.17), p = 3.8×10−9 in Europeans]. SNP rs2046210 is associated with a significantly greater risk of ER− than ER+ tumours in Europeans [OR (ER−) = 1.20 (95% CI 1.15–1.25), p = 1.8×10−17 versus OR (ER+) = 1.07 (95% CI 1.04–1.1), p = 1.3×10−7, pheterogeneity = 5.1×10−6]. In these Asian studies, by contrast, there is no clear evidence of a differential association by tumour receptor status. Each SNP is associated with risk after adjustment for the other SNP. These results suggest the presence of two variants at 6q25.1 each independently associated with breast cancer risk in Asians and in Europeans. Of these two, the one

  2. Comparison of 6q25 breast cancer hits from Asian and European Genome Wide Association Studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Hein

    Full Text Available The 6q25.1 locus was first identified via a genome-wide association study (GWAS in Chinese women and marked by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs2046210, approximately 180 Kb upstream of ESR1. There have been conflicting reports about the association of this locus with breast cancer in Europeans, and a GWAS in Europeans identified a different SNP, tagged here by rs12662670. We examined the associations of both SNPs in up to 61,689 cases and 58,822 controls from forty-four studies collaborating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, of which four studies were of Asian and 39 of European descent. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI. Case-only analyses were used to compare SNP effects in Estrogen Receptor positive (ER+ versus negative (ER- tumours. Models including both SNPs were fitted to investigate whether the SNP effects were independent. Both SNPs are significantly associated with breast cancer risk in both ethnic groups. Per-allele ORs are higher in Asian than in European studies [rs2046210: OR (A/G = 1.36 (95% CI 1.26-1.48, p = 7.6 × 10(-14 in Asians and 1.09 (95% CI 1.07-1.11, p = 6.8 × 10(-18 in Europeans. rs12662670: OR (G/T = 1.29 (95% CI 1.19-1.41, p = 1.2 × 10(-9 in Asians and 1.12 (95% CI 1.08-1.17, p = 3.8 × 10(-9 in Europeans]. SNP rs2046210 is associated with a significantly greater risk of ER- than ER+ tumours in Europeans [OR (ER- = 1.20 (95% CI 1.15-1.25, p = 1.8 × 10(-17 versus OR (ER+ = 1.07 (95% CI 1.04-1.1, p = 1.3 × 10(-7, p(heterogeneity = 5.1 × 10(-6]. In these Asian studies, by contrast, there is no clear evidence of a differential association by tumour receptor status. Each SNP is associated with risk after adjustment for the other SNP. These results suggest the presence of two variants at 6q25.1 each independently associated with breast cancer risk in Asians and in Europeans. Of these two, the one tagged by rs2046210 is associated with a greater

  3. Aluminium and human breast diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbre, P D; Pugazhendhi, D; Mannello, F

    2011-11-01

    The human breast is exposed to aluminium from many sources including diet and personal care products, but dermal application of aluminium-based antiperspirant salts provides a local long-term source of exposure. Recent measurements have shown that aluminium is present in both tissue and fat of the human breast but at levels which vary both between breasts and between tissue samples from the same breast. We have recently found increased levels of aluminium in noninvasively collected nipple aspirate fluids taken from breast cancer patients (mean 268 ± 28 μg/l) compared with control healthy subjects (mean 131 ± 10 μg/l) providing evidence of raised aluminium levels in the breast microenvironment when cancer is present. The measurement of higher levels of aluminium in type I human breast cyst fluids (median 150 μg/l) compared with human serum (median 6 μg/l) or human milk (median 25 μg/l) warrants further investigation into any possible role of aluminium in development of this benign breast disease. Emerging evidence for aluminium in several breast structures now requires biomarkers of aluminium action in order to ascertain whether the presence of aluminium has any biological impact. To this end, we report raised levels of proteins that modulate iron homeostasis (ferritin, transferrin) in parallel with raised aluminium in nipple aspirate fluids in vivo, and we report overexpression of mRNA for several S100 calcium binding proteins following long-term exposure of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells in vitro to aluminium chlorhydrate.

  4. Associations of common variants at 1p11.2 and 14q24.1 (RAD51L1) with breast cancer risk and heterogeneity by tumor subtype: findings from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Jonine D.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Humphreys, Manjeet; Platte, Radka; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Apicella, Carmel; Hammet, Fleur; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; Van't Veer, Laura J.; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Strick, Reiner; Peto, Julian; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Federik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Bojesen, Stig; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Benítez, Javier; Milne, Roger L.; Ignacio Arias, Jose; Zamora, M. Pilar; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Rahman, Nazneen; Turnbull, Clare; Seal, Sheila; Renwick, Anthony; Brauch, Hiltrud; Justenhoven, Christina; Brüning, Thomas; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hein, Rebecca; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Dörk, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Bremer, Michael; Hillemanns, Peter; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia; Antonenkova, Natalia; Rogov, Yuri I.; Karstens, Johann Hinrich; Bermisheva, Marina; Prokofieva, Darya; Hanafievich Gantcev, Shamil; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Soini, Ylermi; Kataja, Vesa; Lambrechts, Diether; Yesilyurt, Betül T.; Chrisiaens, Marie-Rose; Peeters, Stephanie; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Couch, Fergus; Lee, Adam M.; Diasio, Robert; Wang, Xianshu; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Maclean, Catriona; Offit, Ken; Robson, Mark; Joseph, Vijai; Gaudet, Mia; John, Esther M.; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene; Knight, Julia A.; Marie Mulligan, Anna; O'Malley, Frances P.; Brinton, Louise A.; Sherman, Mark E.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Chanock, Stephen J.; Hooning, Maartje; Martens, John W.M.; van den Ouweland, Ans M.W.; Collée, J. Margriet; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian W.; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Cross, Simon S.; Pharoah, Paul; Dunning, Alison M.; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Shen, Chen-Yang; Ding, Shian-ling; Hsu, Huan-Ming; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Jones, Michael; Orr, Nick; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Egan, Kathleen; Newcomb, Polly; Titus-Ernstoff, Linda; Easton, Doug; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2011-01-01

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 1p11.2 and 14q24.1 (RAD51L1) as breast cancer susceptibility loci. The initial GWAS suggested stronger effects for both loci for estrogen receptor (ER)-positive tumors. Using data from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC), we sought to determine whether risks differ by ER, progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), grade, node status, tumor size, and ductal or lobular morphology. We genotyped rs11249433 at 1p.11.2, and two highly correlated SNPs rs999737 and rs10483813 (r2= 0.98) at 14q24.1 (RAD51L1), for up to 46 036 invasive breast cancer cases and 46 930 controls from 39 studies. Analyses by tumor characteristics focused on subjects reporting to be white women of European ancestry and were based on 25 458 cases, of which 87% had ER data. The SNP at 1p11.2 showed significantly stronger associations with ER-positive tumors [per-allele odds ratio (OR) for ER-positive tumors was 1.13, 95% CI = 1.10–1.16 and, for ER-negative tumors, OR was 1.03, 95% CI = 0.98–1.07, case-only P-heterogeneity = 7.6 × 10−5]. The association with ER-positive tumors was stronger for tumors of lower grade (case-only P= 6.7 × 10−3) and lobular histology (case-only P= 0.01). SNPs at 14q24.1 were associated with risk for most tumor subtypes evaluated, including triple-negative breast cancers, which has not been described previously. Our results underscore the need for large pooling efforts with tumor pathology data to help refine risk estimates for SNP associations with susceptibility to different subtypes of breast cancer. PMID:21852249

  5. GPER, IGF-IR, and EGFR transduction signaling are involved in stimulatory effects of zinc in breast cancer cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, Assunta; Santolla, Maria Francesca; De Francesco, Ernestina Marianna; De Marco, Paola; Rigiracciolo, Damiano Cosimo; Perri, Maria Grazia; Vivacqua, Adele; Abonante, Sergio; Cappello, Anna Rita; Dolce, Vincenza; Belfiore, Antonino; Maggiolini, Marcello; Lappano, Rosamaria

    2017-02-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential trace mineral that contributes to the regulation of several cellular functions; however, it may be also implicated in the progression of breast cancer through different mechanisms. It has been largely reported that the classical estrogen receptor (ER), as well as the G protein estrogen receptor (GPER, previously known as GPR30) can exert a main role in the development of breast tumors. In the present study, we demonstrate that zinc chloride (ZnCl2 ) involves GPER in the activation of insulin-like growth factor receptor I (IGF-IR)/epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mediated signaling, which in turn triggers downstream pathways like ERK and AKT in breast cancer cells, and main components of the tumor microenvironment namely cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). Further corroborating these findings, ZnCl2 stimulates a functional crosstalk of GPER with IGF-IR and EGFR toward the transcription of diverse GPER target genes. Then, we show that GPER contributes to the stimulatory effects induced by ZnCl2 on cell-cycle progression, proliferation, and migration of breast cancer cells as well as migration of CAFs. Together, our data provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms through which zinc may exert stimulatory effects in breast cancer cells and CAFs toward tumor progression. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Differential regulation of breast cancer-associated genes by progesterone receptor isoforms PRA and PRB in a new bi-inducible breast cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Junaid A; Bellance, Catherine; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Lombès, Marc; Loosfelt, Hugues

    2012-01-01

    Progesterone receptor isoforms (PRA and PRB) are expressed at equal levels in normal mammary cells. However, alteration in PRA/PRB expression is often observed in aggressive breast cancer suggesting differential contribution of PR isoforms in carcinogenesis. The mechanisms underlying such processes remain to be established mainly due to paucity of appropriate cellular models. To investigate the role of PR isoforms and the impact of imbalanced PRA/PRB ratio in transcriptional regulation, we have generated an original human breast cancer cell line conditionally expressing PRA and/or PRB in dose-dependence of non-steroid inducers. We first focused on PR-dependent transcriptional regulation of the paracrine growth factor gene amphiregulin (AREG) playing important role in cancer. Interestingly, unliganded PRA increases AREG expression, independently of estrogen receptor, yet inhibitable by antiprogestins. We show that functional outcome of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on such regulation is highly dependent on PRA/PRB ratio. Using this valuable model, genome-wide transcriptomic studies allowed us to determine the differential effects of PRA and PRB as a function of hormonal status. We identified a large number of novel PR-regulated genes notably implicated in breast cancer and metastasis and demonstrated that imbalanced PRA/PRB ratio strongly impact their expression predicting poor outcome in breast cancer. In sum, our unique cell-based system strongly suggests that PRA/PRB ratio is a critical determinant of PR target gene selectivity and responses to hormonal/growth factor stimuli. These findings provide molecular support for the aggressive phenotype of breast cancers with impaired expression of PRA or PRB.

  7. Differential regulation of breast cancer-associated genes by progesterone receptor isoforms PRA and PRB in a new bi-inducible breast cancer cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junaid A Khan

    Full Text Available Progesterone receptor isoforms (PRA and PRB are expressed at equal levels in normal mammary cells. However, alteration in PRA/PRB expression is often observed in aggressive breast cancer suggesting differential contribution of PR isoforms in carcinogenesis. The mechanisms underlying such processes remain to be established mainly due to paucity of appropriate cellular models. To investigate the role of PR isoforms and the impact of imbalanced PRA/PRB ratio in transcriptional regulation, we have generated an original human breast cancer cell line conditionally expressing PRA and/or PRB in dose-dependence of non-steroid inducers. We first focused on PR-dependent transcriptional regulation of the paracrine growth factor gene amphiregulin (AREG playing important role in cancer. Interestingly, unliganded PRA increases AREG expression, independently of estrogen receptor, yet inhibitable by antiprogestins. We show that functional outcome of epidermal growth factor (EGF on such regulation is highly dependent on PRA/PRB ratio. Using this valuable model, genome-wide transcriptomic studies allowed us to determine the differential effects of PRA and PRB as a function of hormonal status. We identified a large number of novel PR-regulated genes notably implicated in breast cancer and metastasis and demonstrated that imbalanced PRA/PRB ratio strongly impact their expression predicting poor outcome in breast cancer. In sum, our unique cell-based system strongly suggests that PRA/PRB ratio is a critical determinant of PR target gene selectivity and responses to hormonal/growth factor stimuli. These findings provide molecular support for the aggressive phenotype of breast cancers with impaired expression of PRA or PRB.

  8. Polyamines in Human Breast Milk

    OpenAIRE

    Nihal Büyükuslu

    2015-01-01

    Human milk is the ideal food for all newborns and infants. It involves macro nutrients and functional compounds for growth and development. The composition of breast milk differs between preterm and term milk. Polyamines are essential for cell proliferation and differentiation. In addition to their de novo polyamine synthesis, cells can take up polyamines from extracellular sources, such as food, and intestinal microbiota. Breast milk is the first source of exogenous polyamines...

  9. Identifying putative breast cancer-associated long intergenic non-coding RNA loci by high density SNP array analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengyu eJiang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent high-throughput transcript discoveries have yielded a growing recognition of long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs, a class of arbitrarily defined transcripts (>200 nt that are primarily produced from the intergenic space. LincRNAs have been increasingly acknowledged for their expressional dynamics and likely functional associations with cancers. However, differential gene dosage of lincRNA genes between cancer genomes is less studied. By using the high-density Human Omni5-Quad BeadChips (Illumina, we investigated genomic copy number aberrations in a set of seven tumor-normal paired primary human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs established from patients with invasive ductal carcinoma. This Beadchip platform includes a total of 2,435,915 SNP loci dispersed at an average interval of ~700 nt throughout the intergenic region of the human genome. We mapped annotated or putative lincRNA genes to a subset of 332,539 SNP loci, which were included in our analysis for lincRNA-associated copy number variations (CNV. We have identified 122 lincRNAs, which were affected by somatic CNV with overlapped aberrations ranging from 0.14% to 100% in length. LincRNA-associated aberrations were detected predominantly with copy number losses and preferential clustering to the ends of chromosomes. Interestingly, lincRNA genes appear to be much less susceptible to CNV in comparison to both protein-coding and intergenic regions (CNV affected segments in percentage: 1.8%, 37.5% and 60.6%, respectively. In summary, our study established a novel approach utilizing high-resolution SNP array to identify lincRNA candidates, which could functionally link to tumorigenesis, and provide new strategies for the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer.

  10. Oncological and genetic aspects of heriditary breast cancer associated with mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.C. Verhoog (Leon)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractIn western countries breast cancer affects approximately 1 in every 10 to 12 women. It is the leading cause of cancer death in women in these countries and the leading cause of overall mortality in women aged 35 to 55 years. Many risk factors for breast cancer have been identified includ

  11. Oncological and genetic aspects of heriditary breast cancer associated with mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.C. Verhoog (Leon)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractIn western countries breast cancer affects approximately 1 in every 10 to 12 women. It is the leading cause of cancer death in women in these countries and the leading cause of overall mortality in women aged 35 to 55 years. Many risk factors for breast cancer have been identified includ

  12. Usefulness of MRI in detecting occult breast cancer associated with Paget's disease of the nipple-areolar complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echevarria, J J; Lopez-Ruiz, J A; Martin, D; Imaz, I; Martin, M

    2004-12-01

    MRI allows for the detection of mammographically and clinically occult breast neoplasms. We analysed the ability of MRI to detect occult breast cancer in three patients with Paget's disease of the nipple-areolar complex, proven histologically. In all three cases we observed differences in the morphological and dynamic features of healthy and pathological nipples, and we also found enhancement foci in breast tissue, with suspicious kinetic and morphological characteristics, which in the case of two patients corresponded to ductal carcinoma in situ. The detection and location with MRI of underlying neoplastic foci may be of help in choosing the most reasonable and conservative treatment in these patients.

  13. Genetic variation in the immunosuppression pathway genes and breast cancer susceptibility: a pooled analysis of 42,510 cases and 40,577 controls from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jieping; Rudolph, Anja; Moysich, Kirsten B; Behrens, Sabine; Goode, Ellen L; Bolla, Manjeet K; Dennis, Joe; Dunning, Alison M; Easton, Douglas F; Wang, Qin; Benitez, Javier; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Fasching, Peter A; Haeberle, Lothar; Peto, Julian; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marmé, Frederik; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E; Flyger, Henrik; Nielsen, Sune F; Nordestgaard, Børge G; González-Neira, Anna; Menéndez, Primitiva; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Nevanlinna, Heli; Fagerholm, Rainer; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Mannermaa, Arto; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Van Dijck, Laurien; Smeets, Ann; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Eilber, Ursula; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Couch, Fergus J; Hallberg, Emily; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; Haiman, Christopher A; Schumacher, Fredrick; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Winqvist, Robert; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Czene, Kamila; Brand, Judith S; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Pharoah, Paul D P; Shah, Mitul; Kabisch, Maria; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Ambrosone, Christine B; Swerdlow, Anthony; Jones, Michael; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Immunosuppression plays a pivotal role in assisting tumors to evade immune destruction and promoting tumor development. We hypothesized that genetic variation in the immunosuppression pathway genes may be implicated in breast cancer tumorigenesis. We included 42,510 female breast cancer cases and 40,577 controls of European ancestry from 37 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (2015) with available genotype data for 3595 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 133 candidate genes. Associations between genotyped SNPs and overall breast cancer risk, and secondarily according to estrogen receptor (ER) status, were assessed using multiple logistic regression models. Gene-level associations were assessed based on principal component analysis. Gene expression analyses were conducted using RNA sequencing level 3 data from The Cancer Genome Atlas for 989 breast tumor samples and 113 matched normal tissue samples. SNP rs1905339 (A>G) in the STAT3 region was associated with an increased breast cancer risk (per allele odds ratio 1.05, 95 % confidence interval 1.03-1.08; p value = 1.4 × 10(-6)). The association did not differ significantly by ER status. On the gene level, in addition to TGFBR2 and CCND1, IL5 and GM-CSF showed the strongest associations with overall breast cancer risk (p value = 1.0 × 10(-3) and 7.0 × 10(-3), respectively). Furthermore, STAT3 and IL5 but not GM-CSF were differentially expressed between breast tumor tissue and normal tissue (p value = 2.5 × 10(-3), 4.5 × 10(-4) and 0.63, respectively). Our data provide evidence that the immunosuppression pathway genes STAT3, IL5, and GM-CSF may be novel susceptibility loci for breast cancer in women of European ancestry.

  14. Assessing interactions between the associations of common genetic susceptibility variants, reproductive history and body mass index with breast cancer risk in the breast cancer association consortium: a combined case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Roger L; Gaudet, Mia M; Spurdle, Amanda B; Fasching, Peter A; Couch, Fergus J; Benítez, Javier; Arias Pérez, José Ignacio; Zamora, M Pilar; Malats, Núria; Dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Gibson, Lorna J; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Figueroa, Jonine; Brinton, Louise; Sherman, Mark E; Lissowska, Jolanta; Hopper, John L; Dite, Gillian S; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C; Sigurdson, Alice J; Linet, Martha S; Schonfeld, Sara J; Freedman, D Michal; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Auvinen, Päivi; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Knight, Julia A; Weerasooriya, Nayana; Cox, Angela; Reed, Malcolm Wr; Cross, Simon S; Dunning, Alison M; Ahmed, Shahana; Shah, Mitul; Brauch, Hiltrud; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Brüning, Thomas; Lambrechts, Diether; Reumers, Joke; Smeets, Ann; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Liu, Jianjun; Irwanto, Astrid K; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Holland, Helene; Giles, Graham G; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; Bojensen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; John, Esther M; West, Dee W; Whittemore, Alice S; Vachon, Celine; Olson, Janet E; Fredericksen, Zachary; Kosel, Matthew; Hein, Rebecca; Vrieling, Alina; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Heinz, Judith; Beckmann, Matthias W; Heusinger, Katharina; Ekici, Arif B; Haeberle, Lothar; Humphreys, Manjeet K; Morrison, Jonathan; Easton, Doug F; Pharoah, Paul D; García-Closas, Montserrat; Goode, Ellen L; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    Several common breast cancer genetic susceptibility variants have recently been identified. We aimed to determine how these variants combine with a subset of other known risk factors to influence breast cancer risk in white women of European ancestry using case-control studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We evaluated two-way interactions between each of age at menarche, ever having had a live birth, number of live births, age at first birth and body mass index (BMI) and each of 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (10q26-rs2981582 (FGFR2), 8q24-rs13281615, 11p15-rs3817198 (LSP1), 5q11-rs889312 (MAP3K1), 16q12-rs3803662 (TOX3), 2q35-rs13387042, 5p12-rs10941679 (MRPS30), 17q23-rs6504950 (COX11), 3p24-rs4973768 (SLC4A7), CASP8-rs17468277, TGFB1-rs1982073 and ESR1-rs3020314). Interactions were tested for by fitting logistic regression models including per-allele and linear trend main effects for SNPs and risk factors, respectively, and single-parameter interaction terms for linear departure from independent multiplicative effects. These analyses were applied to data for up to 26,349 invasive breast cancer cases and up to 32,208 controls from 21 case-control studies. No statistical evidence of interaction was observed beyond that expected by chance. Analyses were repeated using data from 11 population-based studies, and results were very similar. The relative risks for breast cancer associated with the common susceptibility variants identified to date do not appear to vary across women with different reproductive histories or body mass index (BMI). The assumption of multiplicative combined effects for these established genetic and other risk factors in risk prediction models appears justified.

  15. Simultaneous Expression of Cancer Stem Cell-Like Properties and Cancer-Associated Fibroblast-Like Properties in a Primary Culture of Breast Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Mami; Inoue, Takahiro; Shirai, Takuma; Takamatsu, Kazuhiko; Kunihiro, Shiori; Ishii, Hirokazu [Frontiers of Innovative Research in Science and Technology (FIRST), Konan University, Kobe 650-0047 (Japan); Nishikata, Takahito, E-mail: nisikata@konan-u.ac.jp [Frontiers of Innovative Research in Science and Technology (FIRST), Konan University, Kobe 650-0047 (Japan); Frontier Institute for Biomolecular Engineering Research (FIBER), Konan University, Kobe 650-0047 (Japan)

    2014-07-31

    The importance of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in cancer biology has been recently highlighted owing to their critical roles in cancer growth, progression, metastasis, and therapeutic resistance. We have previously established a primary culture of breast cancer cells, which showed epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer stem cell-like properties. In this study, we found that the primary culture also showed CAF-like properties. For example, hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF1A) and its downstream genes, nuclear factor-kappa B2 (NF-κB2) and BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19 kd-interacting protein 3 (BNIP3), and many enzymes involved in glycolysis, such as GAPDH, LDH, PGAM1, and PKM2, were highly overexpressed in the primary culture. Moreover, media conditioned with the primary culture cells enhanced the growth of breast cancer cells. Similar to previous CAF studies, this enhancement suggested to be occurred through fibroblast growth factor signaling. This MCKH primary culture cell, which showed simultaneous expression of tumorigenic and CAF properties, offers a unique experimental system for studying the biology of CAFs.

  16. Low Trichorhinophalangeal Syndrome 1 Gene Transcript Levels in Basal-like Breast Cancer Associate with Mesenchymal-to-epithelial Transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Bao; Ling-juan Ruan; Juan-fen Mo

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate trichorhinophalangeal syndrome 1 gene (TRPS-1) expression patterns in different subtypes of breast cancer and its correlations with other genes and survival using microarray data sets. Methods The transcripts of TRPS-1 and its role in survival in breast cancer were analyzed using published microarray data sets-Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI) cohort andWang cohort. Results TRPS-1 expression was lower in basal-like breast cancer. The mRNA levels of TRPS-1 negatively correlated with Slug (Pearson correlation coefficient=−0.1366, P=0.0189 in NKI data set and Pearson correlation coefficient=−0.1571, P=0.0078 in Wang data set), FOXC1 (Pearson correlation coefficient=−0.1211, P=0.0376 in NKI data set and Pearson correlation coefficient=−0.1709, P=0.0037 in Wang data set), and CXCL1 (Pearson correlation coefficient=−0.1197, P=0.0399 in NKI data set and Pearson correlation coefficient=−0.3436, P Conclusion The strong expression of TRPS-1 may serve as a good prognostic marker in breast cancer.

  17. Peritumoral vascular invasion and NHERF1 expression define an immunophenotype of grade 2 invasive breast cancer associated with poor prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malfettone Andrea

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traditional determinants proven to be of prognostic importance in breast cancer include the TNM staging, histological grade, proliferative activity, hormone receptor status and HER2 overexpression. One of the limitations of the histological grading scheme is that a high percentage of breast cancers are still classified as grade 2, a category with ambiguous clinical significance. The aim of this study was to best characterize tumors scored as grade 2. Methods We investigated traditional prognostic factors and a panel of tumor markers not used in routine diagnosis, such as NHERF1, VEGFR1, HIF-1α and TWIST1, in 187 primary invasive breast cancers by immunohistochemistry, stratifying patients into good and poor prognostic groups by the Nottingham Prognostic Index. Results Grade 2 subgroup analysis showed that the PVI (p = 0.023 and the loss of membranous NHERF1 (p = 0.028 were adverse prognostic factors. Relevantly, 72% of grade 2 tumors were associated to PVI+/membranous NHERF1- expression phenotype, characterizing an adverse prognosis (p = 0.000. Multivariate logistic regression analysis in the whole series revealed poor prognosis correlated with PVI and MIB1 (p = 0.000 and p = 0.001, respectively. Furthermore, in the whole series of breast cancers we found cytoplasmic NHERF1 expression positively correlated to VEGFR1 (r = 0.382, p = 0.000, and in VEGFR1-overexpressing tumors the oncogenic receptor co-localized with NHERF1 at cytoplasmic level. Conclusions The PVI+/membranous NHERF1- expression phenotype identifies a category of grade 2 tumors with the worst prognosis, including patient subgroup with a family history of breast cancer. These observations support the idea of the PVI+/membranous NHERF1- expression immunophenotype as a useful marker, which could improve the accuracy of predicting clinical outcome in grade 2 tumors.

  18. Risk of gynecomastia and breast cancer associated with the use of 5-alpha reductase inhibitors for benign prostatic hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagberg KW

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Katrina Wilcox Hagberg,1 Hozefa A Divan,2 Shona C Fang,2 J Curtis Nickel,3 Susan S Jick1 1Boston Collaborative Drug Surveillance Program, Boston University School of Public Health, Lexington, 2New England Research Institutes, Inc., Watertown, MA, USA; 3Kingston General Hospital, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, Canada Background: Clinical trial results suggest that 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5ARIs for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH may increase the risk of gynecomastia and male breast cancer, but epidemiological studies have been limited. Patients and methods: We conducted a cohort study with nested case–control analyses using the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink. We identified men diagnosed with BPH who were free from Klinefelter syndrome, prostate, genital or urinary cancer, prostatectomy or orchiectomy, or evidence of gynecomastia or breast cancer. Patients entered the cohort at age ≥40 years and at least 3 years after the start of their electronic medical record. We classified exposure as 5ARIs (alone or in combination with alpha blockers [ABs], AB only, or unexposed to 5ARIs and ABs. Cases were men who had a first-time diagnosis of gynecomastia or breast cancer. Incidence rates and incidence rate ratios (IRRs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs in the gynecomastia analysis and crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs with 95% CIs in both analyses were calculated. Results: Compared to no exposure, gynecomastia risk was elevated for users of 5ARIs (alone or in combination with ABs in both the cohort (IRR=3.55, 95% CI 3.05–4.14 and case–control analyses (OR=3.31, 95% CI 2.66–4.10, whereas the risk was null for users of AB only. The increased risk of gynecomastia with the use of 5ARIs persisted regardless of the number of prescriptions, exposure timing, and presence or absence of concomitant prescriptions for drugs known to be associated with gynecomastia. The risk was higher for dutasteride than for

  19. Risk of gynecomastia and breast cancer associated with the use of 5-alpha reductase inhibitors for benign prostatic hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagberg, Katrina Wilcox; Divan, Hozefa A; Fang, Shona C; Nickel, J Curtis; Jick, Susan S

    2017-01-01

    Background Clinical trial results suggest that 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5ARIs) for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) may increase the risk of gynecomastia and male breast cancer, but epidemiological studies have been limited. Patients and methods We conducted a cohort study with nested case–control analyses using the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink. We identified men diagnosed with BPH who were free from Klinefelter syndrome, prostate, genital or urinary cancer, prostatectomy or orchiectomy, or evidence of gynecomastia or breast cancer. Patients entered the cohort at age ≥40 years and at least 3 years after the start of their electronic medical record. We classified exposure as 5ARIs (alone or in combination with alpha blockers [ABs]), AB only, or unexposed to 5ARIs and ABs. Cases were men who had a first-time diagnosis of gynecomastia or breast cancer. Incidence rates and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in the gynecomastia analysis and crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% CIs in both analyses were calculated. Results Compared to no exposure, gynecomastia risk was elevated for users of 5ARIs (alone or in combination with ABs) in both the cohort (IRR=3.55, 95% CI 3.05–4.14) and case–control analyses (OR=3.31, 95% CI 2.66–4.10), whereas the risk was null for users of AB only. The increased risk of gynecomastia with the use of 5ARIs persisted regardless of the number of prescriptions, exposure timing, and presence or absence of concomitant prescriptions for drugs known to be associated with gynecomastia. The risk was higher for dutasteride than for finasteride. 5ARI users did not have an increased risk of breast cancer compared to unexposed men (OR=1.52, 95% CI 0.61–3.80). Conclusion In men with BPH, 5ARIs significantly increased the risk of gynecomastia, but not breast cancer, compared to AB use and no exposure. PMID:28228662

  20. Low-risk susceptibility alleles in 40 human breast cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klijn Jan GM

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low-risk breast cancer susceptibility alleles or SNPs confer only modest breast cancer risks ranging from just over 1.0 to1.3 fold. Yet, they are common among most populations and therefore are involved in the development of essentially all breast cancers. The mechanism by which the low-risk SNPs confer breast cancer risks is currently unclear. The breast cancer association consortium BCAC has hypothesized that the low-risk SNPs modulate expression levels of nearby located genes. Methods Genotypes of five low-risk SNPs were determined for 40 human breast cancer cell lines, by direct sequencing of PCR-amplified genomic templates. We have analyzed expression of the four genes that are located nearby the low-risk SNPs, by using real-time RT-PCR and Human Exon microarrays. Results The SNP genotypes and additional phenotypic data on the breast cancer cell lines are presented. We did not detect any effect of the SNP genotypes on expression levels of the nearby-located genes MAP3K1, FGFR2, TNRC9 and LSP1. Conclusion The SNP genotypes provide a base line for functional studies in a well-characterized cohort of 40 human breast cancer cell lines. Our expression analyses suggest that a putative disease mechanism through gene expression modulation is not operative in breast cancer cell lines.

  1. Vitronectin in human breast carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaboe, Mads; Offersen, Birgitte Vrou; Christensen, Anni;

    2003-01-01

    We have analysed the occurrence of the extracellular glycoprotein vitronectin in carcinomas and normal tissue of human breast. Immunohistochemical analysis of carcinomas revealed a strong vitronectin accumulation in extracellular matrix (ECM) around some cancer cell clusters and in the subendothe......We have analysed the occurrence of the extracellular glycoprotein vitronectin in carcinomas and normal tissue of human breast. Immunohistochemical analysis of carcinomas revealed a strong vitronectin accumulation in extracellular matrix (ECM) around some cancer cell clusters...... and in the subendothelial area of some blood vessels. In normal tissue, vitronectin had a homogeneous periductal occurrence, with local accumulation much lower than that in the carcinomas. Using a new solid phase radioligand assay, the vitronectin concentrations of extracts of carcinomas and normal breast tissue were...... determined and found to be indistinguishable. Comparison of the vitronectin and the hemoglobin concentrations of the extracts showed that their vitronectin content was not derived from blood contamination. Vitronectin mRNA was undetectable in both carcinomas and normal tissue. We conclude that vitronectin...

  2. The effects of diet induced obesity on breast cancer associated pathways in mice deficient in SFRP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauger, Kelly J; Bassa, Lotfi M; Henchey, Elizabeth M; Wyman, Josephine; Ser-Dolansky, Jennifer; Shimono, Akihiko; Schneider, Sallie S

    2014-05-22

    Secreted frizzled-related proteins (SFRPs) are a family of proteins that block the Wnt signaling pathway and loss of Sfrp1 expression is observed in breast cancer. The molecular mechanisms by which obesity contributes to breast tumorigenesis are not well defined, but involve increased inflammation. Mice deficient in Sfrp1 show enhanced mammary gland inflammation in response to diet induced obesity (DIO). Furthermore, mammary glands from Sfrp1-/- mice exhibit increased Wnt signaling, decreased cell death responses, and excessive hyper branching. The work described here was initiated to investigate whether obesity exacerbates the aforementioned pathways, as they each play a key roles in the development of breast cancer. Wnt signaling is significantly affected by DIO and Sfrp1-/- loss as revealed by analysis of Myc mRNA expression and active β-catenin protein expression. Furthermore, Sfrp1-/- mice fed a high fat diet (HFD) exhibit an increase in mammary cell proliferation. The death response is also impaired in the mammary gland of Sfrp1-/- mice fed a normal diet (ND) as well as a HFD. In response to γ-irradiation, mammary glands from Sfrp1-/- mice express significantly less Bax and Bbc3 mRNA, caspase-3 positive cells, and p53 protein. The expression of Wnt4 and Tnfs11 are critical for normal progesterone mediated mammary gland development and in response to obesity, Sfrp1-/- mice express significantly more Wnt4 and Tnfs11 mRNA expression. Evaluation of progesterone receptor (PR) expression showed that DIO increases the number of PR positive cells. Our data indicate that the expression of Sfrp1 is a critical factor required for maintaining appropriate cellular homeostasis in response to the onset of obesity.

  3. Storage of Human Breast Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze Can

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Storage of human breast milk by freezing or refrigeration of milk has been recommended especially at some social circumstances of most mothers who are regularly separated from their infants because of work. The greatest fear that has hindered the prospects of in - vitro storage of breast milk for any considerable period of time is the possibility of bacterial contamination and growth of infectious pathogens in the stored milk, there by rendering them unsafe for human consumption. The storage container can influence the cell content of milk, as the cells adhere to the walls of a glass container but not to polyethylene or polypropylene containers. Bacteriological examination of refrigerated milks has proven their safety for human consumption for even up to 72 h. For a storage over longer periods up to 1 month, freezing at - 20 0C could be recommended, but the most preferred method, especially for longer storage would be fresh freezing at - 70 0C, if affordable or available. The nutrient value of human milk is essentially unchanged, but the immunological properties are reduced by various storage techniques. Boiling and microwave radiation have not been recommended. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(5.000: 375-379

  4. 癌症相关性视网膜病变在乳腺癌中的研究进展%Progress in the study of cancer-associated retinopathy in breast cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangyan Ji; Lei Xing; Jianbo Huang; Lingquan Kong; Ziwei Wang; Guosheng Ren; Kainan Wu

    2012-01-01

    Cancer-associated retinopathy (CAR) typically has a sudden or progressive onset of severe visual loss and an ominous association with an occult malignancy which contains breast cancer. Pathologically, CAR is the degeneration of photoreceptors. But the precise mechanism has not been fully established, CAR may result from autoimmune mediated apoptosis. And in recent years, there also have been some results demonstrating that tumor derived angiogenic factors such as VEGF may also confer the development of CAR, which may offer novel avenues for the therapeutic intervention in CAR.Early initiation of immunosuppressive therapy is critical for vision preservation. Future developments in rapid identification and longitudinal quantification of antibody levels would enable individualized management in these patients. The goal of this review was to analyze the epidemiology, the clinical features, the diagnosis and management of retinopathy in the context of recent advances in the elucidation of breast cancer-associated retinopathy (BCAR) pathogenesis.

  5. ANTI-TUMOR ACTIVITY AND IMMUNE RESPONSES INDUCED BY HUMAN CANCER-ASSOCIATED MUCIN CORE PEPTIDE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Yunguo; Yuan Mei; Fei Lihua; Li Li

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the immune responses induced by apomucin which is a mixture of mucin core peptide, in mice for elucidating the role of mucin core peptide in the modulation of cancers. Methods:Apomucin was isolated from human pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990. The mice were immunized with this apomucin (10μg/time×6) plus DETOX. Results: When immunized, all mice developed delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) after challenged with apomucin or synthetic peptide MUC-2 or MUC-3, while the mice immunized with apomucin alone did not develop DTH.No antibodies were detected by ELISA after immunization. When the spleen cells of vaccinated mice were cocultured with this apomucin (10-50μg/ml) and rhIL-2(50U/ml) in vitro, the proliferated lymphocytes showed cytotoxicity against human cancer cells, including colon cancer, gastric cancer, pancreatic cancer and leukemia as measured by Cr-51 release assay. Antibodies against MUC-2 and MUC-3 could block the cytotoxicity. Conclusion: It was identified that a vaccine combined of apomucin and immune adjuvant DETOX can induce cellular immune response and anti-tumor cytotoxicity in mice.

  6. Characterization of human lung cancer-associated fibroblasts in three-dimensional in vitro co-culture model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horie, Masafumi [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo (Japan); Saito, Akira, E-mail: asaitou-tky@umin.ac.jp [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo (Japan); Mikami, Yu [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo (Japan); Ohshima, Mitsuhiro [Department of Biochemistry, Ohu University School of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Japan); Morishita, Yasuyuki [Department of Molecular Pathology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo (Japan); Nakajima, Jun [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo (Japan); Kohyama, Tadashi; Nagase, Takahide [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We established three patient-paired sets of CAFs and NFs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CAFs and NFs were analyzed using three-dimensional co-culture experiments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CAFs clearly enhanced collagen gel contraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CAFs showed higher {alpha}-SMA expression than NFs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CAFs were implicated in invasion and differentiation of lung cancer cells. -- Abstract: Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Stromal cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play crucial roles in carcinogenesis, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis of non-small cell lung carcinoma, and targeting of CAFs could be a novel strategy for cancer treatment. However, the characteristics of human CAFs still remain to be better defined. In this study, we established patient-matched CAFs and normal fibroblasts (NFs), from tumoral and non-tumoral portions of resected lung tissue from lung cancer patients. CAFs showed higher {alpha}-smooth muscle actin ({alpha}-SMA) expression than NFs, and CAFs clearly enhanced collagen gel contraction. Furthermore, we employed three-dimensional co-culture assay with A549 lung cancer cells, where CAFs were more potent in inducing collagen gel contraction. Hematoxylin and eosin staining of co-cultured collagen gel revealed that CAFs had the potential to increase invasion of A549 cells compared to NFs. These observations provide evidence that lung CAFs have the tumor-promoting capacity distinct from NFs.

  7. Breast Cancer Risk and 6q22.33 : Combined Results from Breast Cancer Association Consortium and Consortium of Investigators on Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirchhoff, Tomas; Gaudet, Mia M.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; McGuffog, Lesley; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Dunning, Alison M.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Flyger, Henrik; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Dork, Thilo; Schuermann, Peter; Karstens, Johann H.; Hillemanns, Peter; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet; Vachon, Celine; Wang, Xianshu; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian; Elliott, Graeme; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Van 't Veer, Laura J.; Braaf, Linde M.; Johnson, Nichola; Fletcher, Olivia; Gibson, Lorna; Peto, Julian; Turnbull, Clare; Seal, Sheila; Renwick, Anthony; Rahman, Nazneen; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Shen, Chen-Yang; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Hammet, Fleur; Van Dorpe, Thijs; Dieudonne, Anne-Sophie; Hatse, Sigrid; Lambrechts, Diether; Andrulis, Irene L.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Antonenkova, Natalia; Rogov, Juri I.; Prokofieva, Daria; Bermisheva, Marina; Khusnutdinova, Elza; van Asperen, Christi J.; Tollenaar, Robert A. E. M.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Devilee, Peter; Margolin, Sara; Lindblom, Annika; Milne, Roger L.; Ignacio Arias, Jose; Pilar Zamora, M.; Benitez, Javier; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Giles, Graham G.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; Healey, Sue; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kauppinen, Jaana; Kataja, Vesa; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Caligo, Maria A.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Fredericksen, Zachary; Lindor, Noralane; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Loman, Niklas; Karlsson, Per; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Melin, Beatrice; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Verheus, Martijn; Rookus, Matti A.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Gille, Hans J. P.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Garcia, Encarna B. Gomez; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare T.; Frost, Debra; Luccarini, Craig; Pichert, Gabriella; Davidson, Rosemarie; Chu, Carol; Eccles, Diana; Ong, Kai-Ren; Cook, Jackie; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Rosalind; Gold, Bert; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Offit, Kenneth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a locus on chromosome 6q22.33 (rs2180341) was reported to be associated with increased breast cancer risk in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population, and this association was also observed in populations of non-AJ European ancestry. In the present study, we performed a large replication analy

  8. Breast cancer risk and 6q22.33: Combined results from breast cancer association consortium and consortium of investigators on modifiers of brca1/2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Kircchoff (Tomas); K. Offit (Kenneth); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); D.F. Easton (Douglas); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); L. McGuffog (Lesley); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); A.M. Dunning (Alison); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); H. Flyger (Henrik); D. Kang (Daehee); K-Y. Yoo (Keun-Young); D-Y. Noh (Dong-Young); S.-H. Ahn (Sei-Hyun); T. Dörk (Thilo); P. Schürmann (Peter); J.H. Karstens (Johann); P. Hillemanns (Peter); F.J. Couch (Fergus); J.E. Olson (Janet); C. Vachon (Celine); A. Cox (Angela); I.W. Brock (Ian); G. Elliott (Graeme); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); A. Meindl (Alfons); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); C. Justenhoven (Christina); U. Hamann (Ute); Y-D. Ko (Yon-Dschun); H.-P. Fischer; T. Brüning (Thomas); B. Pesch (Beate); V. Harth (Volker); S. Rabstein (Sylvia); A. Broeks (Annegien); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); L.J. van 't Veer (Laura); L.M. Braaf (Linde); N. Johnson (Nichola); O. Fletcher (Olivia); L.J. Gibson (Lorna); J. Peto (Julian); C. Turnbull (Clare); S. Seal (Sheila); A. Renwick (Anthony); N. Rahman (Nazneen); P.-E. Wu (Pei-Ei); J-C. Yu (Jyh-Cherng); C.-N. Hsiung (Chia-Ni); C-Y. Shen (Chen-Yang); M.C. Southey (Melissa); J.L. Hopper (John); F. Hammet (Fleur); T. van Dorpe (Thijs); A.-S. Dieudonné (Anne-Sophie); S. Hatse (Sigrid); D. Lambrechts (Diether); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); N.N. Antonenkova (Natalia); J.I. Rogov (Juri); D. Prokofieva (Daria); M. Bermisheva (Marina); E.K. Khusnutdinova (Elza); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); P. Devilee (Peter); S. Margolin (Sara); A. Lindblom (Annika); R.L. Milne (Roger); J.I. Arias Pérez (José Ignacio); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); J. Benítez (Javier); G. Severi (Gianluca); L. Baglietto (Laura); G.G. Giles (Graham); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); J. Beesley (Jonathan); X. Chen (Xiaoqing); H. Holland (Helene); S. Healey (Sue); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J. Kauppinen (Jaana); V. Kataja (Vesa); B.A. Agnarsson (Bjarni); M.A. Caligo (Maria); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); T. Heikinen (Tuomas); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); N. Loman (Niklas); P. Karlsson (Per); M.S. Askmalm (Marie); B. Melin (Beatrice); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); M. Verheus (Martijn); M.A. Rookus (Matti); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); R.A. Oldenburg (Rogier); M.J. Ligtenberg (Marjolijn); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); C.M. Aalfs (Cora); H.J.P. Gille (Hans); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); S. Peock (Susan); M. Cook (Margaret); C.T. Oliver (Clare); D. Frost (Debra); C. Luccarini (Craig); G. Pichert (Gabriella); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); D. Eccles (Diana); K.-R. Ong (Kai-Ren); J. Cook (Jackie); F. Douglas (Fiona); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); D.G. Evans (Gareth); R. Eeles (Rosalind); B. Gold (Bert); X. Wang (Xianshu); C. Chu (Carol)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractRecently, a locus on chromosome 6q22.33 (rs2180341) was reported to be associated with increased breast cancer risk in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population, and this association was also observed in populations of non-AJ European ancestry. In the present study, we performed a large repli

  9. Comparison of 6q25 Breast Cancer Hits from Asian and European Genome Wide Association Studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hein, Rebecca; Maranian, Melanie; Hopper, John L.; Kapuscinski, Miroslaw K.; Southey, Melissa C.; Park, Daniel J.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Bueno-de-Mesquit, H. Bas; Muir, Kenneth R.; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Rattanamongkongul, Suthee; Puttawibul, Puttisak; Fasching, Peter A.; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Peto, Julian; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; Marmee, Frederick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guenel, Pascal; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Truong, Therese; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L.; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Pilar Zamora, M.; Benitez, Javier; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Clarke, Christina A.; Brenner, Hermann; Mueller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Rahman, Nazneen; Seal, Sheila; Turnbull, Clare; Renwick, Anthony; Meindl, Alfons; Schott, Sarah; Bartram, Claus R.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Doerk, Thilo; Schuermann, Peter; Karstens, Johann H.; Hillemanns, Peter; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Zalutsky, Iosif V.; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Bermisheva, Marina; Prokovieva, Darya; Farahtdinova, Albina; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Lambrechts, Diether; Zhao, Hui; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; McLean, Catriona A.; Severi, Gianluca; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Alnaes, Grethe Grenaker; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alexander; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkas, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sherman, Mark E.; Hooning, Maartje; Martens, John W. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Collee, Margriet; Hall, Per; Humpreys, Keith; Czene, Kamila; Liu, Jianjun; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian W.; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Ahmed, Shahana; Ghoussaini, Maya; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Jakubowska, Anna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Zlowocka, Elzbieta; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Shen, Chen-Yang; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsu, Huan-Ming; Hou, Ming-Feng; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly A.; Titus, Linda; Egan, Kathleen M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Morrison, Jonathan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Easton, Douglas F.; Dunning, Alison M.

    2012-01-01

    The 6q25.1 locus was first identified via a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in Chinese women and marked by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2046210, approximately 180 Kb upstream of ESR1. There have been conflicting reports about the association of this locus with breast cancer in Europea

  10. Breast cancer risk and 6q22.33: Combined results from breast cancer association consortium and consortium of investigators on modifiers of brca1/2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Kircchoff (Tomas); K. Offit (Kenneth); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); D.F. Easton (Douglas); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); L. McGuffog (Lesley); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); A.M. Dunning (Alison); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); H. Flyger (Henrik); D. Kang (Daehee); K-Y. Yoo (Keun-Young); D-Y. Noh (Dong-Young); S.-H. Ahn (Sei-Hyun); T. Dörk (Thilo); P. Schürmann (Peter); J.H. Karstens (Johann); P. Hillemanns (Peter); F.J. Couch (Fergus); J.E. Olson (Janet); C. Vachon (Celine); A. Cox (Angela); I.W. Brock (Ian); G. Elliott (Graeme); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); A. Meindl (Alfons); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); C. Justenhoven (Christina); U. Hamann (Ute); Y-D. Ko (Yon-Dschun); H.-P. Fischer; T. Brüning (Thomas); B. Pesch (Beate); V. Harth (Volker); S. Rabstein (Sylvia); A. Broeks (Annegien); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); L.J. Van 't Veer (Laura); L.M. Braaf (Linde); N. Johnson (Nichola); O. Fletcher (Olivia); L.J. Gibson (Lorna); J. Peto (Julian); C. Turnbull (Clare); S. Seal (Sheila); A. Renwick (Anthony); N. Rahman (Nazneen); P.-E. Wu (Pei-Ei); J-C. Yu (Jyh-Cherng); C.-N. Hsiung (Chia-Ni); C-Y. Shen (Chen-Yang); M.C. Southey (Melissa); J.L. Hopper (John); F. Hammet (Fleur); T. van Dorpe (Thijs); A.-S. Dieudonné (Anne-Sophie); S. Hatse (Sigrid); D. Lambrechts (Diether); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); N.N. Antonenkova (Natalia); J.I. Rogov (Juri); D. Prokofieva (Daria); M. Bermisheva (Marina); E.K. Khusnutdinova (Elza); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); P. Devilee (Peter); S. Margolin (Sara); A. Lindblom (Annika); R.L. Milne (Roger); J.I. Arias Pérez (José Ignacio); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); J. Benítez (Javier); G. Severi (Gianluca); L. Baglietto (Laura); G.G. Giles (Graham); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); J. Beesley (Jonathan); X. Chen (Xiaoqing); H. Holland (Helene); S. Healey (Sue); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J. Kauppinen (Jaana); V. Kataja (Vesa); B.A. Agnarsson (Bjarni); M.A. Caligo (Maria); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); T. Heikinen (Tuomas); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); N. Loman (Niklas); P. Karlsson (Per); M.S. Askmalm (Marie); B. Melin (Beatrice); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); M. Verheus (Martijn); M.A. Rookus (Matti); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); R.A. Oldenburg (Rogier); M.J. Ligtenberg (Marjolijn); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); C.M. Aalfs (Cora); H.J.P. Gille (Hans); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); S. Peock (Susan); M. Cook (Margaret); C.T. Oliver (Clare); D. Frost (Debra); C. Luccarini (Craig); G. Pichert (Gabriella); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); D. Eccles (Diana); K.-R. Ong (Kai-Ren); J. Cook (Jackie); F. Douglas (Fiona); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); D.G. Evans (Gareth); R. Eeles (Rosalind); B. Gold (Bert); X. Wang (Xianshu); C. Chu (Carol)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractRecently, a locus on chromosome 6q22.33 (rs2180341) was reported to be associated with increased breast cancer risk in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population, and this association was also observed in populations of non-AJ European ancestry. In the present study, we performed a large repli

  11. Aluminium in human breast tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, Christopher; Charles, Lisa M; Barr, Lester; Martin, Claire; Polwart, Anthony; Darbre, Philippa D

    2007-09-01

    Aluminium is omnipresent in everyday life and increased exposure is resulting in a burgeoning body burden of this non-essential metal. Personal care products are potential contributors to the body burden of aluminium and recent evidence has linked breast cancer with aluminium-based antiperspirants. We have used graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) to measure the aluminium content in breast biopsies obtained following mastectomies. The aluminium content of breast tissue and breast tissue fat were in the range 4-437 nmol/g dry wt. and 3-192 nmol/g oil, respectively. The aluminium content of breast tissue in the outer regions (axilla and lateral) was significantly higher (P=0.033) than the inner regions (middle and medial) of the breast. Whether differences in the regional distribution of aluminium in the breast are related to the known higher incidence of tumours in the outer upper quadrant of the breast remains to be ascertained.

  12. Recent advances in the research for the homolog of breast cancer associated gene AtROW1 in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yue; Zhang, Yuzhou; Zhu, Yu-Xian

    2016-08-01

    BARD1 (BRCA1 associated RING domain protein 1), as an important animal tumor suppressor gene associated with many kinds of cancers, has been intensively studied for decades. Surprisingly, homolog of BARD1 was found in plants and it was renamed AtROW1 (repressor of Wuschel-1) according to its extremely important function with regard to plant stem cell homeostasis. Although great advances have been made in human BARD1, the function of this animal tumor-suppressor like gene in plant is not well studied and need to be further elucidated. Here, we review and summarize past and present work regarding this protein. Apart from its previously proposed role in DNA repair, recently it is found essential for shoot and root stem cell development and differentiation in plants. The study of AtROW1 in plant may provide an ideal model for further elucidating the functional mechanism of BARD1 in mammals.

  13. Human papilloma viruses (HPV and breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Sutherland Lawson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Human papillomaviruses (HPV may have a role in some breast cancers. The purpose of this study is to fill important gaps in the evidence. These gaps are: (i confirmation of the presence of high risk for cancer HPVs in breast cancers, (ii evidence of HPV infections in benign breast tissues prior to the development of HPV positive breast cancer in the same patients, (iii evidence that HPVs are biologically active and not harmless passengers in breast cancer.Methods: RNA-seq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA was used to identify HPV RNA sequences in breast cancers. We also conducted a retrospective cohort study based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR analyses to identify HPVs in archival specimens from Australian women with benign breast biopsies who later developed breast cancer. To assess whether HPVs in breast cancer were biologically active, the expression of the oncogenic protein HPV E7 was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC.Results: Thirty (3.5% low risk and 20 (2.3% high risk HPV types were identified in 855 breast cancers from the TCGA data base. The high risk types were HPV 18 (48%, HPV 113 (24%, HPV 16 (10%, HPV 52 (10%. Data from the PCR cohort study, indicated that HPV type 18 was the most common type identified in breast cancer specimens (55% of 40 breast cancer specimens followed by HPV 16 (13%. The same HPV type was identified in both the benign and subsequent breast cancer in 15 patients. HPV E7 proteins were identified in 72% of benign breast specimens and 59% of invasive breast cancer specimens.Conclusions: There were 4 observations of particular interest: (i confirmation by both NGS and PCR of the presence of high risk HPV gene sequences in breast cancers, (ii a correlation between high risk HPV in benign breast specimens and subsequent HPV positive breast cancer in the same patient, (iii HPVs in breast cancer are likely to be biologically active (as shown by transcription of HPV DNA to RNA plus the expression of

  14. Cancer-associated fibroblasts from human NSCLC survive ablative doses of radiation but their invasive capacity is reduced

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellevik Turid

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts (CAFs are significant components of solid malignancies and play central roles in cancer sustainability, invasion and metastasis. In this study we have investigated the invasive capacity and matrix remodelling properties of human lung CAFs after exposure to ablative doses of ionizing radiation (AIR, equivalent to single fractions delivered by stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SART for medically inoperable stage-I/II non-small-cell lung cancers. Methods CAFs were isolated from lung tumour specimens from 16 donors. Initially, intrinsic radiosensitivity was evaluated by checking viability and extent of DNA-damage response (DDR at different radiation doses. The migrative and invasive capacities of CAFs were thereafter determined after a sub-lethal single radiation dose of 18 Gy. To ascertain the mechanisms behind the altered invasive capacity of cells, expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and their endogenous inhibitors (TIMPs were measured in the conditioned media several days post-irradiation, along with expression of cell surface integrins and dynamics of focal contacts by vinculin-staining. Results Exposing CAFs to 1 × 18 Gy resulted in a potent induction of multiple nuclear DDR foci (> 9/cell with little resolution after 120 h, induced premature cellular senescence and inhibition of the proliferative, migrative and invasive capacity. AIR promoted MMP-3 and inhibited MMP-1 appearance to some extent, but did not affect expression of other major MMPs. Furthermore, surface expression of integrins α2, β1 and α5 was consistently enhanced, and a dramatic augmentation and redistribution of focal contacts was observed. Conclusions Our data indicate that ablative doses of radiation exert advantageous inhibitory effects on the proliferative, migratory and invasive capacity of lung CAFs. The reduced motility of irradiated CAFs might be a consequence of stabilized focal contacts via integrins.

  15. CHEK2*1100delC Heterozygosity in Women With Breast Cancer Associated With Early Death, Breast Cancer-Specific Death, and Increased Risk of a Second Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weischer, Maren; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Pharoah, Paul

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE We tested the hypotheses that CHEK2*1100delC heterozygosity is associated with increased risk of early death, breast cancer-specific death, and risk of a second breast cancer in women with a first breast cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS From 22 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Assoc...

  16. CHEK2*1100delC heterozygosity in women with breast cancer associated with early death, breast cancer-specific death, and increased risk of a second breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Weischer (Maren); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); L.J. van 't Veer (Laura); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); J.L. Hopper (John); P. Hall (Per); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); P. Devilee (Peter); P.A. Fasching (Peter); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); D. Lambrechts (Diether); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Cox (Angela); G.G. Giles (Graham); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); A. Lindblom (Annika); F.J. Couch (Fergus); A. Mannermaa (Arto); G.G. Alnæs (Grethe); E.M. John (Esther); T. Dörk (Thilo); H. Flyger (Henrik); A.M. Dunning (Alison); Q. Wang (Qing); T.A. Muranen (Taru); R.R. van Hien (Richard); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); M.C. Southey (Melissa); K. Czene (Kamila); J.A. Knight (Julia); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); A. Ziogas (Argyrios); M.R. Christiaens (Marie Rose); J.M. Collee (Margriet); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); G. Severi (Gianluca); F. Marme (Federick); S. Margolin (Sara); J.E. Olson (Janet); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); V. Kristensen (Vessela); A. Miron (Alexander); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); M. Shah (Mitul); C. Blomqvist (Carl); A. Broeks (Annegien); M.E. Sherman (Mark); K. Phillips (Kelly); J. Li (Jingmei); J. Liu (Jianjun); G. Glendon (Gord); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); A.B. Ekici (Arif); K. Leunen; M. Kriege (Mieke); S.S. Cross (Simon); L. Baglietto (Laura); C. Sohn (Christof); X. Wang (Xing); V. Kataja (Vesa); A.L. Børresen-Dale (Anne Lise); A. Meyer (Andreas); D.F. Easton (Douglas); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); S.E. Bojesen (Stig)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: We tested the hypotheses that CHEK2*1100delC heterozygosity is associated with increased risk of early death, breast cancer-specific death, and risk of a second breast cancer in women with a first breast cancer. Patients and Methods: From 22 studies participating in the Breast C

  17. CHEK2*1100delC heterozygosity in women with breast cancer associated with early death, breast cancer-specific death, and increased risk of a second breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Weischer (Maren); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); L.J. van 't Veer (Laura); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); J.L. Hopper (John); P. Hall (Per); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); P. Devilee (Peter); P.A. Fasching (Peter); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); D. Lambrechts (Diether); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Cox (Angela); G.G. Giles (Graham); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); A. Lindblom (Annika); F.J. Couch (Fergus); A. Mannermaa (Arto); G.G. Alnæs (Grethe); E.M. John (Esther); T. Dörk (Thilo); H. Flyger (Henrik); A.M. Dunning (Alison); Q. Wang (Qing); T.A. Muranen (Taru); R.R. van Hien (Richard); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); M.C. Southey (Melissa); K. Czene (Kamila); J.A. Knight (Julia); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); A. Ziogas (Argyrios); M.R. Christiaens (Marie Rose); J.M. Collee (Margriet); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); G. Severi (Gianluca); F. Marme (Federick); S. Margolin (Sara); J.E. Olson (Janet); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); V. Kristensen (Vessela); A. Miron (Alexander); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); M. Shah (Mitul); C. Blomqvist (Carl); A. Broeks (Annegien); M.E. Sherman (Mark); K. Phillips (Kelly); J. Li (Jingmei); J. Liu (Jianjun); G. Glendon (Gord); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); A.B. Ekici (Arif); K. Leunen; M. Kriege (Mieke); S.S. Cross (Simon); L. Baglietto (Laura); C. Sohn (Christof); X. Wang (Xing); V. Kataja (Vesa); A.L. Børresen-Dale (Anne Lise); A. Meyer (Andreas); D.F. Easton (Douglas); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); S.E. Bojesen (Stig)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: We tested the hypotheses that CHEK2*1100delC heterozygosity is associated with increased risk of early death, breast cancer-specific death, and risk of a second breast cancer in women with a first breast cancer. Patients and Methods: From 22 studies participating in the Breast

  18. Analysis of segmental duplications, mouse genome synteny and recurrent cancer-associated amplicons in human chromosome 6p21-p12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J W; Yoshimoto, M; Ludkovski, O; Thorner, P S; Zielenska, M; Squire, J A; Nuin, P A S

    2010-06-01

    It has been proposed that regions of microhomology in the human genome could facilitate genomic rearrangements, copy number transitions, and rapid genomic change during tumor progression. To investigate this idea, this study examines the role of repetitive sequence elements, and corresponding syntenic mouse genomic features, in targeting cancer-associated genomic instability of specific regions of the human genome. Automated database-mining algorithms designed to search for frequent copy number transitions and genomic breakpoints were applied to 2 publicly-available online databases and revealed that 6p21-p12 is one of the regions of the human genome most frequently involved in tumor-specific alterations. In these analyses, 6p21-p12 exhibited the highest frequency of genomic amplification in osteosarcomas. Analysis of repetitive elements in regions of homology between human chromosome 6p and the syntenic regions of the mouse genome revealed a strong association between the location of segmental duplications greater than 5 kilobase-pairs and the position of discontinuities at the end of the syntenic region. The presence of clusters of segmental duplications flanking these syntenic regions also correlated with a high frequency of amplification and genomic alteration. Collectively, the experimental findings, in silico analyses, and comparative genomic studies presented here suggest that segmental duplications may facilitate cancer-associated copy number transitions and rearrangements at chromosome 6p21-p12. This process may involve homology-dependent DNA recombination and/or repair, which may also contribute towards the overall plasticity of the human genome.

  19. Epigenetic Effects of Human Breast Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Verduci

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A current aim of nutrigenetics is to personalize nutritional practices according to genetic variations that influence the way of digestion and metabolism of nutrients introduced with the diet. Nutritional epigenetics concerns knowledge about the effects of nutrients on gene expression. Nutrition in early life or in critical periods of development, may have a role in modulating gene expression, and, therefore, have later effects on health. Human breast milk is well-known for its ability in preventing several acute and chronic diseases. Indeed, breastfed children may have lower risk of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis, infectious diseases, and also of non-communicable diseases, such as obesity and related-disorders. Beneficial effects of human breast milk on health may be associated in part with its peculiar components, possible also via epigenetic processes. This paper discusses about presumed epigenetic effects of human breast milk and components. While evidence suggests that a direct relationship may exist of some components of human breast milk with epigenetic changes, the mechanisms involved are still unclear. Studies have to be conducted to clarify the actual role of human breast milk on genetic expression, in particular when linked to the risk of non-communicable diseases, to potentially benefit the infant’s health and his later life.

  20. STUDY ON NUCLEAR MATRIX PROTEINS FROM HUMAN BREAST CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Qian; ZHANG Shu-qun; CHU Yong-lie; JIA Xiao-li; JIANG Jian-tao

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the marker protein of human breast carcinoma from nuclear matrix proteins (NMPs).Methods NMPs were injected subcutaneously into rabbit to get antiserum, which was used to detect the NMPs specificity for breast carcinoma.Results There was an apparent positive band (100kD) in the NMPs of breast carcinoma, which did not exist in normal breast and other tumors that were detected.Conclusion One or one group of 100kD NMPs were found to be related to human breast carcinoma, which may be involved in the carcinogenesis and development of human breast carcinoma and valuable for breast carcinoma diagnosis.

  1. Human mammary microenvironment better regulates the biology of human breast cancer in humanized mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ming-Jie; Wang, Jue; Xu, Lu; Zha, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Yi; Ling, Li-Jun; Wang, Shui

    2015-02-01

    During the past decades, many efforts have been made in mimicking the clinical progress of human cancer in mouse models. Previously, we developed a human breast tissue-derived (HB) mouse model. Theoretically, it may mimic the interactions between "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin and human breast cancer cells. However, detailed evidences are absent. The present study (in vivo, cellular, and molecular experiments) was designed to explore the regulatory role of human mammary microenvironment in the progress of human breast cancer cells. Subcutaneous (SUB), mammary fat pad (MFP), and HB mouse models were developed for in vivo comparisons. Then, the orthotopic tumor masses from three different mouse models were collected for primary culture. Finally, the biology of primary cultured human breast cancer cells was compared by cellular and molecular experiments. Results of in vivo mouse models indicated that human breast cancer cells grew better in human mammary microenvironment. Cellular and molecular experiments confirmed that primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model showed a better proliferative and anti-apoptotic biology than those from SUB to MFP mouse models. Meanwhile, primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model also obtained the migratory and invasive biology for "species-specific" tissue metastasis to human tissues. Comprehensive analyses suggest that "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin better regulates the biology of human breast cancer cells in our humanized mouse model of breast cancer, which is more consistent with the clinical progress of human breast cancer.

  2. Stem cells in the human breast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ole William; Polyak, Kornelia

    2010-01-01

    The origins of the epithelial cells participating in the development, tissue homeostasis, and cancer of the human breast are poorly understood. However, emerging evidence suggests a role for adult tissue-specific stem cells in these processes. In a hierarchical manner, these generate the two main...

  3. Human milk oligosaccharides: only the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVeagh, P; Miller, J B

    1997-08-01

    Over 100 years ago it was first deduced that a major component of human milk must be an unidentified carbohydrate that was not found in cows milk. At first this was thought to be a form of lactose and was called gynolactose. We now know that this was not a single carbohydrate but a complex mixture of approximately 130 different oligosaccharides. Although small amounts of a few oligosaccharides have been found in the milk of other mammals, this rich diversity of sugars is unique to human milk. The oligosaccharide content of human milk varies with the infant's gestation, the duration of lactation, diurnally and with the genetic makeup of the mother. Milk oligosaccharides have a number of functions that may protect the health of the breast fed infant. As they are not digested in the small intestine, they form the 'soluble' fibre of breast milk and their intact structure is available to act as competitive ligands protecting the breast-fed infant from pathogens. There is a growing list of pathogens for which a specific oligosaccharide ligand has been described in human milk. They are likely to form the model for future therapeutic and prophylactic anti-microbials. They provide substrates for bacteria in the infant colon and thereby contribute to the difference in faecal pH and faecal flora between breast and formula-fed infants. They may also be important as a source of sialic acid, essential for brain development.

  4. Patient survival and tumor characteristics associated with CHEK2:p.I157T - findings from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muranen, Taru A; Blomqvist, Carl; Dörk, Thilo

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: P.I157T is a CHEK2 missense mutation associated with a modest increase in breast cancer risk. Previously, another CHEK2 mutation, the protein truncating c.1100delC has been associated with poor prognosis of breast cancer patients. Here, we have investigated patient survival and charac...

  5. Human breast biomonitoring and environmental chemicals: use of breast tissues and fluids in breast cancer etiologic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaKind, Judy S; Wilkins, Amy A; Bates, Michael N

    2007-09-01

    Extensive research indicates that the etiology of breast cancer is complex and multifactorial and may include environmental risk factors. Breast cancer etiology and exposure to xenobiotic compounds, diet, electromagnetic fields, and lifestyle have been the subject of numerous scientific inquiries, but research has yielded inconsistent results. Biomonitoring has been used to explore associations between breast cancer and levels of environmental chemicals in the breast. Research using breast tissues and fluids to cast light on the etiology of breast cancer is, for the most part, predicated on the assumption that the tissue or fluid samples either contain measurable traces of the environmental agent(s) associated with the cancer or that they retain biological changes that are biomarkers of such exposure or precursors of carcinogenic effect. In this paper, we review breast cancer etiology research utilizing breast biomonitoring. We first provide a brief synopsis of the current state of understanding of associations between exposure to environmental chemicals and breast cancer etiology. We then describe the published breast cancer research on tissues and fluids, which have been used for biomonitoring, specifically human milk and its components, malignant and benign breast tissue, nipple aspirate fluid (NAF) and breast cyst fluid. We conclude with a discussion on recommendations for biomonitoring of breast tissues and fluids in future breast cancer etiology research. Both human milk and NAF fluids, and the cells contained therein, hold promise for future biomonitoring research into breast cancer etiology, but must be conducted with carefully delineated hypotheses and a scientifically supportable epidemiological approach.

  6. Endocrine therapy of human breast cancer grown in nude mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brünner, N; Osborne, C K; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1987-01-01

    mice bearing transplanted human breast tumors have been proposed as such a model. This review therefore discusses the use of the athymic nude mouse model of the study of human breast cancer biology, and focuses on four subjects: 1. biological characteristics of heterotransplanted breast tumors; 2...

  7. FAD binding overcomes defects in activity and stability displayed by cancer-associated variants of human NQO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pey, Angel L; Megarity, Clare F; Timson, David J

    2014-11-01

    NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 is involved in antioxidant defence and protection from cancer, stabilizing the apoptosis regulator p53 towards degradation. Here, we studied the enzymological, biochemical and biophysical properties of two cancer-associated variants (p.R139W and p.P187S). Both variants (especially p.187S) have lower thermal stability and greater susceptibility to proteolysis compared to the wild-type. p.P187S also has reduced activity due to a lower binding affinity for the FAD cofactor as assessed by activity measurements and direct titrations. Native gel electrophoresis and dynamic light scattering also suggest that p.P187S has a higher tendency to populate unfolded states under native conditions. Detailed thermal stability studies showed that all variants irreversibly denature causing dimer dissociation, while addition of FAD restores the stability of the polymorphic forms to wild-type levels. The kinetic destabilization induced by polymorphisms as well as the kinetic protection exerted by FAD was confirmed by measuring denaturation kinetics at temperatures close to physiological. Our data suggest that the main molecular mechanisms associated with these cancer-related variants are their low binding affinity for FAD and/or kinetic instability. Thus, pharmacological chaperones may be useful in the treatment of patients bearing these polymorphisms.

  8. Chemical Biomarkers of Human Breast Milk Pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedetta Marchi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Human milk is, without question, the best source of nutrition for infants containing the optimal balance of fats, carbohydrates and proteins for developing babies. Breastfeeding provides a range of benefits for growth, immunity and development building a powerful bond between mother and her child. Recognition of the manifold benefits of breast milk has led to the adoption of breast-feeding policies by numerous health and professional organizations such as the World Health Organization and American Academy of Pediatrics.In industrially developed as well as in developing nations, human milk contamination by toxic chemicals such as heavy metals, dioxins and organohalogen compounds, however, is widespread and is the consequence of decades of inadequately controlled pollution. Through breastfeeding, the mother may transfer to the suckling infant potentially toxic chemicals to which the mother has previously been exposed.In the present review, environmental exposure, acquisition and current levels of old and emerging classes of breast milk pollutants are systematically presented. Although scientific evidences indicated that the advantages of breast-feeding outweigh any risks from contaminants, it is important to identify contaminant trends, to locate disproportionately exposed populations, and to take public health measures to improve chemical BM pollution as possible.

  9. Excretion of drugs in human breast milk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, R.M.; Findlay, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    The present report briefly discusses some of the morphological, physiological, and compositional aspects of animal and human breast milk and how these characteristics might be important for the accumulation of drugs and foreign compounds. In addition, a study is described confirming the presence of caffeine, codeine, morphine, phenacetin, acetaminophen, and salicylic acid in the breast milk of a lactating mother following oral administration of a combination analgesic containing aspirin, phenacetin, caffeine, and codeine. Although the study is limited to one subject, it has provided critically needed data on the rates of appearance in, and elimination of these drugs from, breast milk. A similar amount of information is presented on phenacetin, also a component of the analgesic mixture, which has not been previously reported to enter human milk. The distribution of these drugs between the slightly more acidic breast milk and the relatively neutral plasma is consistent with their weakly basic, acidic, or relatively neutral properties. In general, the study shows that codeine and morphine milk concentrations are higher than, salicylic acid milk levels are much lower than, and phenacetin, caffeine, and acetaminophen milk concentrations are relatively similar to their respective plasma levels. It is projected, from estimated steady-state milk concentrations of the drugs and their metabolites studied, that very low percentages of the therapeutic dosages (less than 0.7%) would be excreted in mother's milk, too low an amount to be clinically significant to the infant.

  10. The right time, the right place: will targeting human cancer-associated mutations to the mouse provide the perfect preclinical model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyth, Karen; Morton, Jennifer P; Sansom, Owen J

    2012-02-01

    Over the past 10 years the realisation that genetic mouse models of cancer may play a key role in preclinical drug development has gained strong momentum. Moreover sequencing studies of human tumours have provided key insights into the mutational complexity of epithelial cancer, unleashing important clues for researchers to generate accurate genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models of cancer. Thus by targeting multiple cancer associated human mutations to the appropriate murine epithelia, mice develop tumours that more closely recapitulate the human disease. As a number of excellent models now exist, the next 5-10 years will ascertain whether these models will predict response of human cancer to intervention. If so they might become the 'gold standard' where all drugs are required to be tested in mouse models of disease before proceeding into the patient. However, although this principle is very attractive, it is relatively untested and here, using examples of prevalent human cancers, we will review the latest data on preclinical GEM studies and comment on what challenges are left to overcome.

  11. Defining the cellular precursors to human breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Patricia J.; Arendt, Lisa M.; Skibinski, Adam; Logvinenko, Tanya; Klebba, Ina; Dong, Shumin; Smith, Avi E.; Prat, Aleix; Perou, Charles M.; Gilmore, Hannah; Schnitt, Stuart; Naber, Stephen P.; Garlick, Jonathan A.; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    Human breast cancers are broadly classified based on their gene-expression profiles into luminal- and basal-type tumors. These two major tumor subtypes express markers corresponding to the major differentiation states of epithelial cells in the breast: luminal (EpCAM+) and basal/myoepithelial (CD10+). However, there are also rare types of breast cancers, such as metaplastic carcinomas, where tumor cells exhibit features of alternate cell types that no longer resemble breast epithelium. Until now, it has been difficult to identify the cell type(s) in the human breast that gives rise to these various forms of breast cancer. Here we report that transformation of EpCAM+ epithelial cells results in the formation of common forms of human breast cancer, including estrogen receptor-positive and estrogen receptor-negative tumors with luminal and basal-like characteristics, respectively, whereas transformation of CD10+ cells results in the development of rare metaplastic tumors reminiscent of the claudin-low subtype. We also demonstrate the existence of CD10+ breast cells with metaplastic traits that can give rise to skin and epidermal tissues. Furthermore, we show that the development of metaplastic breast cancer is attributable, in part, to the transformation of these metaplastic breast epithelial cells. These findings identify normal cellular precursors to human breast cancers and reveal the existence of a population of cells with epidermal progenitor activity within adult human breast tissues. PMID:21940501

  12. Molecular Portrait of the Normal Human Breast Tissue and Its Influence on Breast Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margan, Madalin Marius; Jitariu, Andreea Adriana; Cimpean, Anca Maria; Nica, Cristian; Raica, Marius

    2016-06-01

    Normal human breast tissue consists of epithelial and nonepithelial cells with different molecular profiles and differentiation grades. This molecular heterogeneity is known to yield abnormal clones that may contribute to the development of breast carcinomas. Stem cells that are found in developing and mature breast tissue are either positive or negative for cytokeratin 19 depending on their subtype. These cells are able to generate carcinogenesis along with mature cells. However, scientific data remains controversial regarding the monoclonal or polyclonal origin of breast carcinomas. The majority of breast carcinomas originate from epithelial cells that normally express BRCA1. The consecutive loss of the BRCA1 gene leads to various abnormalities in epithelial cells. Normal breast epithelial cells also express hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) 1α and HIF-2α that are associated with a high metastatic rate and a poor prognosis for malignant lesions. The nuclear expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) in normal human breast tissue is maintained in malignant tissue as well. Several controversies regarding the ability of ER and PR status to predict breast cancer outcome remain. Both ER and PR act as modulators of cell activity in normal human breast tissue. Ki-67 positivity is strongly correlated with tumor grade although its specific role in applied therapy requires further studies. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) oncoprotein is less expressed in normal human breast specimens but is highly expressed in certain malignant lesions of the breast. Unlike HER2, epidermal growth factor receptor expression is similar in both normal and malignant tissues. Molecular heterogeneity is not only found in breast carcinomas but also in normal breast tissue. Therefore, the molecular mapping of normal human breast tissue might represent a key research area to fully elucidate the mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis.

  13. Identification of prognostic molecular features in the reactive stroma of human breast and prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Planche

    Full Text Available Primary tumor growth induces host tissue responses that are believed to support and promote tumor progression. Identification of the molecular characteristics of the tumor microenvironment and elucidation of its crosstalk with tumor cells may therefore be crucial for improving our understanding of the processes implicated in cancer progression, identifying potential therapeutic targets, and uncovering stromal gene expression signatures that may predict clinical outcome. A key issue to resolve, therefore, is whether the stromal response to tumor growth is largely a generic phenomenon, irrespective of the tumor type or whether the response reflects tumor-specific properties. To address similarity or distinction of stromal gene expression changes during cancer progression, oligonucleotide-based Affymetrix microarray technology was used to compare the transcriptomes of laser-microdissected stromal cells derived from invasive human breast and prostate carcinoma. Invasive breast and prostate cancer-associated stroma was observed to display distinct transcriptomes, with a limited number of shared genes. Interestingly, both breast and prostate tumor-specific dysregulated stromal genes were observed to cluster breast and prostate cancer patients, respectively, into two distinct groups with statistically different clinical outcomes. By contrast, a gene signature that was common to the reactive stroma of both tumor types did not have survival predictive value. Univariate Cox analysis identified genes whose expression level was most strongly associated with patient survival. Taken together, these observations suggest that the tumor microenvironment displays distinct features according to the tumor type that provides survival-predictive value.

  14. Resistance to Taxanes in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Associates with the Dynamics of a CD49f+ Tumor-Initiating Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Gómez-Miragaya

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Taxanes are a mainstay of treatment for breast cancer, but resistance often develops followed by metastatic disease and mortality. Aiming to reveal the mechanisms underlying taxane resistance, we used breast cancer patient-derived orthoxenografts (PDX. Mimicking clinical behavior, triple-negative breast tumors (TNBCs from PDX models were more sensitive to docetaxel than luminal tumors, but they progressively acquired resistance upon continuous drug administration. Mechanistically, we found that a CD49f+ chemoresistant population with tumor-initiating ability is present in sensitive tumors and expands during the acquisition of drug resistance. In the absence of the drug, the resistant CD49f+ population shrinks and taxane sensitivity is restored. We describe a transcriptional signature of resistance, predictive of recurrent disease after chemotherapy in TNBC. Together, these findings identify a CD49f+ population enriched in tumor-initiating ability and chemoresistance properties and evidence a drug holiday effect on the acquired resistance to docetaxel in triple-negative breast cancer.

  15. Genome-Wide Meta-Analyses of Breast, Ovarian, and Prostate Cancer Association Studies Identify Multiple New Susceptibility Loci Shared by at Least Two Cancer Types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kar, S.P.; Beesley, J.; Olama, A. Amin Al; Michailidou, K.; Tyrer, J.; Kote-Jarai, Z.; Lawrenson, K.; Lindstrom, S.; Ramus, S.J.; Thompson, D.J.; Kibel, A.S.; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, A.; Michael, A.; Dieffenbach, A.K.; Gentry-Maharaj, A.; Whittemore, A.S.; Wolk, A.; Monteiro, A.; Peixoto, A.; Kierzek, A.; Cox, A; Rudolph, A.; Gonzalez-Neira, A.; Wu, A.H.; Lindblom, A.; Swerdlow, A.; Ziogas, A.; Ekici, A.B.; Burwinkel, B.; Karlan, B.Y.; Nordestgaard, B.G.; Blomqvist, C.; Phelan, C.; McLean, C.; Pearce, C.L.; Vachon, C.; Cybulski, C.; Slavov, C.; Stegmaier, C.; Maier, C.; Ambrosone, C.B.; Hogdall, C.K.; Teerlink, C.C.; Kang, D.; Tessier, D.C.; Schaid, D.J.; Stram, D.O.; Cramer, D.W; Neal, D.E.; Eccles, D.; Flesch-Janys, D.; Edwards, D.R.; Wokozorczyk, D.; Levine, D.A.; Yannoukakos, D.; Sawyer, E.J.; Bandera, E.V.; Poole, E.M.; Goode, E.L.; Khusnutdinova, E.; Hogdall, E.; Song, F.; Bruinsma, F.; Heitz, F.; Modugno, F.; Hamdy, F.C.; Wiklund, F.; Giles, G.G.; Olsson, H.; Wildiers, H.; Ulmer, H.U.; Pandha, H.; Risch, H.A.; Darabi, H.; Salvesen, H.B.; Nevanlinna, H.; Gronberg, H.; Brenner, H.; Brauch, H.; Anton-Culver, H.; Song, H.; Lim, H.Y.; McNeish, I.; Campbell, I.; Vergote, I.; Gronwald, J.; Lubinski, J.; Stanford, J.L.; Benitez, J.; Doherty, J.A.; Permuth, J.B.; Chang-Claude, J.; Donovan, J.L.; Dennis, J.; Schildkraut, J.M.; Schleutker, J.; Hopper, J.L.; Kupryjanczyk, J.; Park, J.Y.; Figueroa, J.; Kiemeney, L.A.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.

    2016-01-01

    Breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers are hormone-related and may have a shared genetic basis, but this has not been investigated systematically by genome-wide association (GWA) studies. Meta-analyses combining the largest GWA meta-analysis data sets for these cancers totaling 112,349 cases and

  16. Increased risk for invasive breast cancer associated with hormonal therapy: a nation-wide random sample of 65,723 women followed from 1997 to 2008.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Nien Lai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hormonal therapy (HT either estrogen alone (E-alone or estrogen plus progesterone (E+P appears to increase the risk for breast cancer in Western countries. However, limited information is available on the association between HT and breast cancer in Asian women characterized mainly by dietary phytoestrogens intake and low prevalence of contraceptive pills prescription. METHODOLOGY: A total of 65,723 women (20-79 years of age without cancer or the use of Chinese herbal products were recruited from a nation-wide one-million representative sample of the National Health Insurance of Taiwan and followed from 1997 to 2008. Seven hundred and eighty incidents of invasive breast cancer were diagnosed. Using a reference group that comprised 40,052 women who had never received a hormone prescription, Cox proportional hazard models were constructed to determine the hazard ratios for receiving different types of HT and the occurrence of breast cancer. CONCLUSIONS: 5,156 (20% women ever used E+P, 2,798 (10.8% ever used E-alone, and 17,717 (69% ever used other preparation types. The Cox model revealed adjusted hazard ratios (HRs of 2.05 (95% CI 1.37-3.07 for current users of E-alone and 8.65 (95% CI 5.45-13.70 for current users of E+P. Using women who had ceased to take hormonal medication for 6 years or more as the reference group, the adjusted HRs were significantly elevated and greater than current users and women who had discontinued hormonal medication for less than 6 years. Current users of either E-alone or E+P have an increased risk for invasive breast cancer in Taiwan, and precautions should be taken when such agents are prescribed.

  17. Heterogeneity of Breast Cancer Associations with Common Genetic Variants in FGFR2 according to the Intrinsic Subtypes in Southern Han Chinese Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiying Liang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available GWAS have identified variation in the FGFR2 locus as risk factors for breast cancer. Validation studies, however, have shown inconsistent results by ethnics and pathological characteristics. To further explore this inconsistency and investigate the associations of FGFR2 variants with breast cancer according to intrinsic subtype (Luminal-A, Luminal-B, ER−&PR−&HER2+, and triple negative among Southern Han Chinese women, we genotyped rs1078806, rs1219648, rs2420946, rs2981579, and rs2981582 polymorphisms in 609 patients and 882 controls. Significant associations with breast cancer risk were observed for rs2420946, rs2981579, and rs2981582 with OR (95% CI per risk allele of 1.19 (1.03–1.39, 1.24 (1.07–1.43, and 1.17 (1.01–1.36, respectively. In subtype specific analysis, above three SNPs were significantly associated with increased Luminal-A risk in a dose-dependent manner Ptrend<0.01; however, only rs2981579 was associated with Luminal-B, and none were linked to ER−&PR− subtypes (ER−&PR−&HER2+ and triple negative. Haplotype analyses also identified common haplotypes significantly associated with luminal-like subtypes (Luminal-A and Luminal-B, but not with ER−&PR− subtypes. Our results suggest that associations of FGFR2 SNPs with breast cancer were heterogeneous according to intrinsic subtype. Future studies stratifying patients by their intrinsic subtypes will provide new insights into the complex genetic mechanisms underlying breast cancer.

  18. Genome-Wide Meta-Analyses of Breast, Ovarian, and Prostate Cancer Association Studies Identify Multiple New Susceptibility Loci Shared by at Least Two Cancer Types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kar, Siddhartha P; Beesley, Jonathan; Amin Al Olama, Ali

    2016-01-01

    ,349 cases and 116,421 controls of European ancestry, all together and in pairs, identified at P risk loci......: We demonstrate that combining large-scale GWA meta-analysis findings across cancer types can identify completely new risk loci common to breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers. We show that the identification of such cross-cancer risk loci has the potential to shed new light on the shared biology...... (rs200182588/9q31/SMC2; rs8037137/15q26/RCCD1), and two breast and prostate cancer risk loci (rs5013329/1p34/NSUN4; rs9375701/6q23/L3MBTL3). Index variants in five additional regions previously associated with only one cancer also showed clear association with a second cancer type. Cell...

  19. Genome-wide Meta-analyses of Breast, Ovarian and Prostate Cancer Association Studies Identify Multiple New Susceptibility Loci Shared by At Least Two Cancer Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Siddhartha P.; Beesley, Jonathan; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan; Kote-Jarai, ZSofia; Lawrenson, Kate; Lindstrom, Sara; Ramus, Susan J.; Thompson, Deborah J.; Kibel, Adam S.; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Michael, Agnieszka; Dieffenbach, Aida K.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wolk, Alicja; Monteiro, Alvaro; Peixoto, Ana; Kierzek, Andrzej; Cox, Angela; Rudolph, Anja; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Wu, Anna H.; Lindblom, Annika; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ekici, Arif B.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Blomqvist, Carl; Phelan, Catherine; McLean, Catriona; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Vachon, Celine; Cybulski, Cezary; Slavov, Chavdar; Stegmaier, Christa; Maier, Christiane; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Høgdall, Claus K.; Teerlink, Craig C.; Kang, Daehee; Tessier, Daniel C.; Schaid, Daniel J.; Stram, Daniel O.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Neal, David E.; Eccles, Diana; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Velez Edwards, Digna R.; Wokozorczyk, Dominika; Levine, Douglas A.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Goode, Ellen L.; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Høgdall, Estrid; Song, Fengju; Bruinsma, Fiona; Heitz, Florian; Modugno, Francesmary; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Giles, Graham G.; Olsson, Håkan; Wildiers, Hans; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Pandha, Hardev; Risch, Harvey A.; Darabi, Hatef; Salvesen, Helga B.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Gronberg, Henrik; Brenner, Hermann; Brauch, Hiltrud; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Song, Honglin; Lim, Hui-Yi; McNeish, Iain; Campbell, Ian; Vergote, Ignace; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubiński, Jan; Stanford, Janet L.; Benítez, Javier; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Permuth, Jennifer B.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Donovan, Jenny L.; Dennis, Joe; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Schleutker, Johanna; Hopper, John L.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Park, Jong Y.; Figueroa, Jonine; Clements, Judith A.; Knight, Julia A.; Peto, Julian; Cunningham, Julie M.; Pow-Sang, Julio; Batra, Jyotsna; Czene, Kamila; Lu, Karen H.; Herkommer, Kathleen; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Matsuo, Keitaro; Muir, Kenneth; Offitt, Kenneth; Chen, Kexin; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Odunsi, Kunle; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Fitzgerald, Liesel M.; Cook, Linda S.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Hooning, Maartje J.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Luedeke, Manuel; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Goodman, Marc T.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Riggan, Marjorie; Aly, Markus; Rossing, Mary Anne; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Moisse, Matthieu; Sanderson, Maureen; Southey, Melissa C.; Jones, Michael; Lush, Michael; Hildebrandt, Michelle A. T.; Hou, Ming-Feng; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Bogdanova, Natalia; Rahman, Nazneen; Le, Nhu D.; Orr, Nick; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Pashayan, Nora; Peterlongo, Paolo; Guénel, Pascal; Brennan, Paul; Paulo, Paula; Webb, Penelope M.; Broberg, Per; Fasching, Peter A.; Devilee, Peter; Wang, Qin; Cai, Qiuyin; Li, Qiyuan; Kaneva, Radka; Butzow, Ralf; Kopperud, Reidun Kristin; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Stephenson, Robert A.; MacInnis, Robert J.; Hoover, Robert N.; Winqvist, Robert; Ness, Roberta; Milne, Roger L.; Travis, Ruth C.; Benlloch, Sara; Olson, Sara H.; McDonnell, Shannon K.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Maia, Sofia; Berndt, Sonja; Lee, Soo Chin; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Kjær, Susanne Krüger; Pejovic, Tanja; Tammela, Teuvo L.J.; Dörk, Thilo; Brüning, Thomas; Wahlfors, Tiina; Key, Tim J.; Edwards, Todd L.; Menon, Usha; Hamann, Ute; Mitev, Vanio; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Kristensen, Vessela; Arndt, Volker; Vogel, Walther; Zheng, Wei; Sieh, Weiva; Blot, William J.; Kluzniak, Wojciech; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Gao, Yu-Tang; Schumacher, Fredrick; Freedman, Matthew L.; Berchuck, Andrew; Dunning, Alison M.; Simard, Jacques; Haiman, Christopher A.; Spurdle, Amanda; Sellers, Thomas A.; Hunter, David J.; Henderson, Brian E.; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J.; Couch, Fergus J.; Hall, Per; Gayther, Simon A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Eeles, Rosalind; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Lambrechts, Diether

    2016-01-01

    Breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers are hormone-related and may have a shared genetic basis but this has not been investigated systematically by genome-wide association (GWA) studies. Meta-analyses combining the largest GWA meta-analysis data sets for these cancers totaling 112,349 cases and 116,421 controls of European ancestry, all together and in pairs, identified at P < 10−8 seven new cross-cancer loci: three associated with susceptibility to all three cancers (rs17041869/2q13/BCL2L11; rs7937840/11q12/INCENP; rs1469713/19p13/GATAD2A), two breast and ovarian cancer risk loci (rs200182588/9q31/SMC2; rs8037137/15q26/RCCD1), and two breast and prostate cancer risk loci (rs5013329/1p34/NSUN4; rs9375701/6q23/L3MBTL3). Index variants in five additional regions previously associated with only one cancer also showed clear association with a second cancer type. Cell-type specific expression quantitative trait locus and enhancer-gene interaction annotations suggested target genes with potential cross-cancer roles at the new loci. Pathway analysis revealed significant enrichment of death receptor signaling genes near loci with P < 10−5 in the three-cancer meta-analysis. PMID:27432226

  20. Estrogen Receptor Mutants/Variants in Human Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Human breast tissues and cell lines. Normal breast tissues were obtained from reduction mammoplastv surgical specimens collected at the Necker Hospital ...mammoplasty specimens collected at the laboratory of F. Kuttenn, Necker Hospital , France (4 cases) and at the Manitoba Breast Tumor Bank (4 cases). Human...method for the identification of mutations and polymorphisms in the gene for glycoprotein IIIa. Blood 1993, 8:2281-2288 2 Ikonen E, Aula P, Gron K

  1. Clinical relevance of loss of 11p15 in primary and metastatic breast cancer: association with loss of PRKCDBP expression in brain metastases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet Wikman

    Full Text Available The occurrence of brain metastases among breast cancer patients is currently rising with approximately 20-25% incidence rates, underlining the importance of the identification of new therapeutic and prognostic markers. We have previously screened for new markers for brain metastasis by array CGH. We found that loss of 11p15 is common among these patients. In this study, we investigated the clinical significance of loss of 11p15 in primary breast cancer (BC and breast cancer brain metastases (BCBM. 11p15 aberration patterns were assessed by allelic imbalance (AI analysis in primary BC (n = 78, BCBM (n = 21 and metastases from other distant sites (n = 6 using six different markers. AI at 11p15 was significantly associated with BCBM (p = 0.002. Interestingly, a subgroup of primary BC with a later relapse to the brain had almost equally high AI rates as the BCBM cases. In primary BC, AI was statistically significantly associated with high grade, negative hormone receptor status, and triple-negative (TNBC tumors. Gene expression profiling identified PRKCDBP in the 11p15 region to be significantly downregulated in both BCBM and primary BC with brain relapse compared to primary tumors without relapse or bone metastasis (fdr<0.05. qRT-PCR confirmed these results and methylation was shown to be a common way to silence this gene. In conclusion, we found loss at 11p15 to be a marker for TNBC primary tumors and BCBM and PRKCDBP to be a potential target gene in this locus.

  2. Bone metastases from breast cancer: associations between morphologic CT patterns and glycolytic activity on PET and bone scintigraphy as well as explorative search for influential factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihara, Tsutomu; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Koyama, Masamichi; Terauchi, Takashi; Gomi, Naoya; Ito, Yoshinori; Hatake, Kiyohiko; Sata, Naohiro

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to compare the detection of bone metastases from breast cancer on F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and bone scintigraphy (BS). An explorative search for factors influencing the sensitivity or uptake of BS and FDG-PET was also performed. Eighty-eight patients with bone metastases from breast cancer were eligible for this study. Histological confirmation of bone metastases was obtained in 31 patients. The bone metastases were visually classified into four types based on their computed tomography (CT) appearance: osteoblastic, osteolytic, mixed, and negative. The sensitivity of BS and FDG-PET were obtained regarding CT type, adjuvant therapy, and the primary tumor characteristics. The FDG maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was analyzed. The sensitivities of the three modalities (CT, BS, and FDG-PET) were 77, 89, and 94%, respectively. The sensitivity of FDG-PET for the osteoblastic type (69%) was significantly lower than that for the other types (P < 0.001), and the sensitivity of BS for the negative type (70%) was significantly lower than that for the others. Regarding tumor characteristics, the sensitivity of FDG-PET significantly differed between nuclear grade (NG)1 and NG2-3 (P = 0.032). The SUVmax of the osteoblastic type was significantly lower than that of the other types (P = 0.009). The SUVmax of NG1 was also significantly lower than that of NG2-3 (P = 0.011). No significant difference in FDG uptake (SUVmax) was detected between different histological types. Although FDG-PET is superior to BS for the detection of bone metastases from breast cancer, this technique has limitations in depicting osteoblastic bone metastases and NG1.

  3. Altered gene expression profiles of NIH3T3 cells regulated by human lung cancer associated gene CT120

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Huo HE; Jin Jun LI; Yi Hu XIE; Yun Tian TANG; Gen Fu YAO; Wen Xin QIN; Da Fang WAN; Jian Ren GU

    2004-01-01

    CT120, a novel membrane-associated gene implicated in lung carcinogenesis, was previously identified from chromosome 17p13.3 locus, a hot mutation spot involved in human malignancies. In the present study, we further determined that CT120 ectopic expression could promote cell proliferation activity of NIH3T3 cells using MTS assay, and monitored the downstream effects of CT120 in NIH3T3 cells with Atlas mouse cDNA expression arrays. Among 588known genes, 133 genes were found to be upregulated or downregulated by CT120. Two major signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation, cell survival and anti-apoptosis were overexpressed and activated in response to CT120:One is the Raf/MEK/Erk signal cascades and the other is the PI3K/Akt signal cascades, suggesting that CT120 might contribute, at least in part, to the constitutively activation of Erk and Akt in human lung caner cells. In addition, some tumor metastasis associated genes cathepsin B, cathepsin D, cathepsin L, MMP-2/TIMP-2 were also upregulated by CT120, upon which CT120 might be involved in tumor invasiveness and metastasis. In addition, CT120 might play an important role in tumor progression through modulating the expression of some candidate "Lung Tumor Progression"genes including B-Raf, Rab-2, BAX, BAG-1, YB-1, and Cdc42.

  4. Multicenter matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) identifies proteomic differences in breast-cancer-associated stroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Tim J A; Balluff, Benjamin D; Jones, Emrys A; Schöne, Cédrik D; Schmitt, Manfred; Aubele, Michaela; Kroep, Judith R; Smit, Vincent T H B M; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Mesker, Wilma E; Walch, Axel; McDonnell, Liam A

    2014-11-07

    MALDI mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has rapidly established itself as a powerful biomarker discovery tool. To date, no formal investigation has assessed the center-to-center comparability of MALDI MSI experiments, an essential step for it to develop into a new diagnostic method. To test such capabilities, we have performed a multicenter study focused on biomarkers of stromal activation in breast cancer. MALDI MSI experiments were performed in two centers using independent tissue banks, infrastructure, methods, and practitioners. One of the data sets was used for discovery and the other for validation. Areas of intra- and extratumoral stroma were selected, and their protein signals were compared. Four protein signals were found to be significantly associated with tumor-associated stroma in the discovery data set measured in Munich. Three of these peaks were also detected in the independent validation data set measured in Leiden, all of which were also significantly associated with intratumoral stroma. Hierarchical clustering displayed 100% accuracy in the Munich MSI data set and 80.9% accuracy in the Leiden MSI data set. The association of one of the identified mass signals (PA28) with stromal activation was confirmed with immunohistochemistry performed on 20 breast tumors. Independent and international MALDI MSI investigations could identify validated biomarkers of stromal activation.

  5. Skin vaccination against cervical cancer associated human papillomavirus with a novel micro-projection array in a mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly J Corbett

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Better delivery systems are needed for routinely used vaccines, to improve vaccine uptake. Many vaccines contain alum or alum based adjuvants. Here we investigate a novel dry-coated densely-packed micro-projection array skin patch (Nanopatch™ as an alternate delivery system to intramuscular injection for delivering an alum adjuvanted human papillomavirus (HPV vaccine (Gardasil® commonly used as a prophylactic vaccine against cervical cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Micro-projection arrays dry-coated with vaccine material (Gardasil® delivered to C57BL/6 mouse ear skin released vaccine within 5 minutes. To assess vaccine immunogenicity, doses of corresponding to HPV-16 component of the vaccine between 0.43 ± 0.084 ng and 300 ± 120 ng (mean ± SD were administered to mice at day 0 and day 14. A dose of 55 ± 6.0 ng delivered intracutaneously by micro-projection array was sufficient to produce a maximal virus neutralizing serum antibody response at day 28 post vaccination. Neutralizing antibody titres were sustained out to 16 weeks post vaccination, and, for comparable doses of vaccine, somewhat higher titres were observed with intracutaneous patch delivery than with intramuscular delivery with the needle and syringe at this time point. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Use of dry micro-projection arrays (Nanopatch™ has the potential to overcome the need for a vaccine cold chain for common vaccines currently delivered by needle and syringe, and to reduce risk of needle-stick injury and vaccine avoidance due to the fear of the needle especially among children.

  6. Human Papilloma Viruses and Breast Cancer – Assessment of Causality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, James Sutherland; Glenn, Wendy K.; Whitaker, Noel James

    2016-01-01

    High risk human papilloma viruses (HPVs) may have a causal role in some breast cancers. Case–control studies, conducted in many different countries, consistently indicate that HPVs are more frequently present in breast cancers as compared to benign breast and normal breast controls (odds ratio 4.02). The assessment of causality of HPVs in breast cancer is difficult because (i) the HPV viral load is extremely low, (ii) HPV infections are common but HPV associated breast cancers are uncommon, and (iii) HPV infections may precede the development of breast and other cancers by years or even decades. Further, HPV oncogenesis can be indirect. Despite these difficulties, the emergence of new evidence has made the assessment of HPV causality, in breast cancer, a practical proposition. With one exception, the evidence meets all the conventional criteria for a causal role of HPVs in breast cancer. The exception is “specificity.” HPVs are ubiquitous, which is the exact opposite of specificity. An additional reservation is that the prevalence of breast cancer is not increased in immunocompromised patients as is the case with respect to HPV-associated cervical cancer. This indicates that HPVs may have an indirect causal influence in breast cancer. Based on the overall evidence, high-risk HPVs may have a causal role in some breast cancers. PMID:27747193

  7. Molecular profiling of multiple human cancers defines an inflammatory cancer-associated molecular pattern and uncovers KPNA2 as a uniform poor prognostic cancer marker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh M Rachidi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Immune evasion is one of the recognized hallmarks of cancer. Inflammatory responses to cancer can also contribute directly to oncogenesis. Since the immune system is hardwired to protect the host, there is a possibility that cancers, regardless of their histological origins, endow themselves with a common and shared inflammatory cancer-associated molecular pattern (iCAMP to promote oncoinflammation. However, the definition of iCAMP has not been conceptually and experimentally investigated. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Genome-wide cDNA expression data was analyzed for 221 normal and 324 cancer specimens from 7 cancer types: breast, prostate, lung, colon, gastric, oral and pancreatic. A total of 96 inflammatory genes with consistent dysregulation were identified, including 44 up-regulated and 52 down-regulated genes. Protein expression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry for some of these genes. The iCAMP contains proteins whose roles in cancer have been implicated and others which are yet to be appreciated. The clinical significance of many iCAMP genes was confirmed in multiple independent cohorts of colon and ovarian cancer patients. In both cases, better prognosis correlated strongly with high CXCL13 and low level of GREM1, LOX, TNFAIP6, CD36, and EDNRA. An "Inflammatory Gene Integrated Score" was further developed from the combination of 18 iCAMP genes in ovarian cancer, which predicted overall survival. Noticeably, as a selective nuclear import protein whose immuno-regulatory function just begins to emerge, karyopherin alpha 2 (KPNA2 is uniformly up-regulated across cancer types. For the first time, the cancer-specific up-regulation of KPNA2 and its clinical significance were verified by tissue microarray analysis in colon and head-neck cancers. CONCLUSION: This work defines an inflammatory signature shared by seven epithelial cancer types and KPNA2 as a consistently up-regulated protein in cancer. Identification of iCAMP may not only

  8. Gene transcriptional networks integrate microenvironmental signals in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ren; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2011-04-01

    A significant amount of evidence shows that microenvironmental signals generated from extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, soluble factors, and cell-cell adhesion complexes cooperate at the extra- and intracellular level. This synergetic action of microenvironmental cues is crucial for normal mammary gland development and breast malignancy. To explore how the microenvironmental genes coordinate in human breast cancer at the genome level, we have performed gene co-expression network analysis in three independent microarray datasets and identified two microenvironment networks in human breast cancer tissues. Network I represents crosstalk and cooperation of ECM microenvironment and soluble factors during breast malignancy. The correlated expression of cytokines, chemokines, and cell adhesion proteins in Network II implicates the coordinated action of these molecules in modulating the immune response in breast cancer tissues. These results suggest that microenvironmental cues are integrated with gene transcriptional networks to promote breast cancer development.

  9. Assessing interactions between the associations of common genetic susceptibility variants, reproductive history and body mass index with breast cancer risk in the breast cancer association consortium: a combined case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milne, Roger L; Gaudet, Mia M; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2010-01-01

    Several common breast cancer genetic susceptibility variants have recently been identified. We aimed to determine how these variants combine with a subset of other known risk factors to influence breast cancer risk in white women of European ancestry using case-control studies participating...

  10. A large-scale assessment of two-way SNP interactions in breast cancer susceptibility using 46,450 cases and 42,461 controls from the breast cancer association consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milne, Roger L; Herranz, Jesús; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2014-01-01

    Part of the substantial unexplained familial aggregation of breast cancer may be due to interactions between common variants, but few studies have had adequate statistical power to detect interactions of realistic magnitude. We aimed to assess all two-way interactions in breast cancer susceptibil...

  11. Assessing interactions between the associations of common genetic susceptibility variants, reproductive history and body mass index with breast cancer risk in the breast cancer association consortium: a combined case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milne, Roger L; Gaudet, Mia M; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2010-01-01

    Several common breast cancer genetic susceptibility variants have recently been identified. We aimed to determine how these variants combine with a subset of other known risk factors to influence breast cancer risk in white women of European ancestry using case-control studies participating in th...

  12. Lubricin in human breast tissue expander capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheriyan, Thomas; Guo, Lifei; Orgill, Dennis P; Padera, Robert F; Schmid, Thomas M; Spector, Myron

    2012-10-01

    Capsular contraction is the most common complication of breast reconstruction surgery. While presence of the contractile protein alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) is considered among the causes of capsular contraction, the exact etiology and pathophysiology is not fully understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the possible role of lubricin in capsular formation and contraction by determining the presence and distribution of the lubricating protein lubricin in human breast tissue expander capsules. Related aims were to evaluate select histopathologic features of the capsules, and the percentage of cells expressing α-SMA, which reflects the myofibroblast phenotype. Capsules from tissue expanders were obtained from eight patients. Lubricin, at the tissue-implant interface, in the extracellular matrix, and in cells, and α-SMA-containing cells were evaluated immunohistochemically. The notable finding was that lubricin was identified in all tissue expander capsules: as a discrete layer at the tissue-implant interface, extracellular, and intracellular. There was a greater amount of lubricin in the extracellular matrix in the intimal-subintimal zone when compared with the tissue away from the implant. Varying degrees of synovial metaplasia were seen at the tissue-implant interface. α-SMA-containing cells were also seen in all but one patient. The findings might help us better understand factors involved in capsule formation.

  13. Comparison of breast cancer mucin (BCM) and CA 15-3 in human breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia, M.B.; Blankenstein, M.A.; Wall, E. van der; Nortier, J.W.R.; Schornagel, J.H.; Thijssen, J.H.H.

    1990-01-01

    The Breast Cancer Mucin (BCM) enzyme immunoassay utilizes two monoclonal antibodies (Mab), M85/34 and F36/22, for the identification of a mucin-like glycoprotein in serum of breast cancer patients. We have compared BCM with CA 15-3, another member of the human mammary epithelial antigen

  14. Sclerotium rolfsii lectin induces stronger inhibition of proliferation in human breast cancer cells than normal human mammary epithelial cells by induction of cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savanur, Mohammed Azharuddin; Eligar, Sachin M; Pujari, Radha; Chen, Chen; Mahajan, Pravin; Borges, Anita; Shastry, Padma; Ingle, Arvind; Kalraiya, Rajiv D; Swamy, Bale M; Rhodes, Jonathan M; Yu, Lu-Gang; Inamdar, Shashikala R

    2014-01-01

    Sclerotium rolfsii lectin (SRL) isolated from the phytopathogenic fungus Sclerotium rolfsii has exquisite binding specificity towards O-linked, Thomsen-Freidenreich (Galβ1-3GalNAcα1-Ser/Thr, TF) associated glycans. This study investigated the influence of SRL on proliferation of human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and ZR-75), non-tumorigenic breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A) and normal mammary epithelial cells (HMECs). SRL caused marked, dose-dependent, inhibition of proliferation of MCF-7 and ZR-75 cells but only weak inhibition of proliferation of non-tumorigenic MCF-10A and HMEC cells. The inhibitory effect of SRL on cancer cell proliferation was shown to be a consequence of SRL cell surface binding and subsequent induction of cellular apoptosis, an effect that was largely prevented by the presence of inhibitors against caspases -3, -8, or -9. Lectin histochemistry using biotin-labelled SRL showed little binding of SRL to normal human breast tissue but intense binding to cancerous tissues. In conclusion, SRL inhibits the growth of human breast cancer cells via induction of cell apoptosis but has substantially less effect on normal epithelial cells. As a lectin that binds specifically to a cancer-associated glycan, has potential to be developed as an anti-cancer agent.

  15. Sclerotium rolfsii Lectin Induces Stronger Inhibition of Proliferation in Human Breast Cancer Cells than Normal Human Mammary Epithelial Cells by Induction of Cell Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savanur, Mohammed Azharuddin; Eligar, Sachin M.; Pujari, Radha; Chen, Chen; Mahajan, Pravin; Borges, Anita; Shastry, Padma; Ingle, Arvind.; Kalraiya, Rajiv D.; Swamy, Bale M.; Rhodes, Jonathan M.; Yu, Lu-Gang; Inamdar, Shashikala R.

    2014-01-01

    Sclerotium rolfsii lectin (SRL) isolated from the phytopathogenic fungus Sclerotium rolfsii has exquisite binding specificity towards O-linked, Thomsen-Freidenreich (Galβ1-3GalNAcα1-Ser/Thr, TF) associated glycans. This study investigated the influence of SRL on proliferation of human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and ZR-75), non-tumorigenic breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A) and normal mammary epithelial cells (HMECs). SRL caused marked, dose-dependent, inhibition of proliferation of MCF-7 and ZR-75 cells but only weak inhibition of proliferation of non-tumorigenic MCF-10A and HMEC cells. The inhibitory effect of SRL on cancer cell proliferation was shown to be a consequence of SRL cell surface binding and subsequent induction of cellular apoptosis, an effect that was largely prevented by the presence of inhibitors against caspases -3, -8, or -9. Lectin histochemistry using biotin-labelled SRL showed little binding of SRL to normal human breast tissue but intense binding to cancerous tissues. In conclusion, SRL inhibits the growth of human breast cancer cells via induction of cell apoptosis but has substantially less effect on normal epithelial cells. As a lectin that binds specifically to a cancer-associated glycan, has potential to be developed as an anti-cancer agent. PMID:25364905

  16. Pathway-Centric Integrative Analysis Identifies RRM2 as a Prognostic Marker in Breast Cancer Associated with Poor Survival and Tamoxifen Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagireddy Putluri

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer (BCa molecular subtypes include luminal A, luminal B, normal-like, HER-2–enriched, and basal-like tumors, among which luminal B and basal-like cancers are highly aggressive. Biochemical pathways associated with patient survival or treatment response in these more aggressive subtypes are not well understood. With the limited availability of pathologically verified clinical specimens, cell line models are routinely used for pathway-centric studies. We measured the metabolome of luminal and basal-like BCa cell lines using mass spectrometry, linked metabolites to biochemical pathways using Gene Set Analysis, and developed a novel rank-based method to select pathways on the basis of their enrichment in patient-derived omics data sets and prognostic relevance. Key mediators of the pathway were then characterized for their role in disease progression. Pyrimidine metabolism was altered in luminal versus basal BCa, whereas the combined expression of its associated genes or expression of one key gene, ribonucleotide reductase subunit M2 (RRM2 alone, associated significantly with decreased survival across all BCa subtypes, as well as in luminal patients resistant to tamoxifen. Increased RRM2 expression in tamoxifen-resistant patients was verified using tissue microarrays, whereas the metabolic products of RRM2 were higher in tamoxifen-resistant cells and in xenograft tumors. Both genetic and pharmacological inhibition of this key enzyme in tamoxifen-resistant cells significantly decreased proliferation, reduced expression of cell cycle genes, and sensitized the cells to tamoxifen treatment. Our study suggests for evaluating RRM2-associated metabolites as noninvasive markers for tamoxifen resistance and its pharmacological inhibition as a novel approach to overcome tamoxifen resistance in BCa.

  17. Pathway-centric integrative analysis identifies RRM2 as a prognostic marker in breast cancer associated with poor survival and tamoxifen resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putluri, Nagireddy; Maity, Suman; Kommagani, Ramakrishna; Kommangani, Ramakrishna; Creighton, Chad J; Putluri, Vasanta; Chen, Fengju; Nanda, Sarmishta; Bhowmik, Salil Kumar; Terunuma, Atsushi; Dorsey, Tiffany; Nardone, Agostina; Fu, Xiaoyong; Shaw, Chad; Sarkar, Tapasree Roy; Schiff, Rachel; Lydon, John P; O'Malley, Bert W; Ambs, Stefan; Das, Gokul M; Michailidis, George; Sreekumar, Arun

    2014-05-01

    Breast cancer (BCa) molecular subtypes include luminal A, luminal B, normal-like, HER-2-enriched, and basal-like tumors, among which luminal B and basal-like cancers are highly aggressive. Biochemical pathways associated with patient survival or treatment response in these more aggressive subtypes are not well understood. With the limited availability of pathologically verified clinical specimens, cell line models are routinely used for pathway-centric studies. We measured the metabolome of luminal and basal-like BCa cell lines using mass spectrometry, linked metabolites to biochemical pathways using Gene Set Analysis, and developed a novel rank-based method to select pathways on the basis of their enrichment in patient-derived omics data sets and prognostic relevance. Key mediators of the pathway were then characterized for their role in disease progression. Pyrimidine metabolism was altered in luminal versus basal BCa, whereas the combined expression of its associated genes or expression of one key gene, ribonucleotide reductase subunit M2 (RRM2) alone, associated significantly with decreased survival across all BCa subtypes, as well as in luminal patients resistant to tamoxifen. Increased RRM2 expression in tamoxifen-resistant patients was verified using tissue microarrays, whereas the metabolic products of RRM2 were higher in tamoxifen-resistant cells and in xenograft tumors. Both genetic and pharmacological inhibition of this key enzyme in tamoxifen-resistant cells significantly decreased proliferation, reduced expression of cell cycle genes, and sensitized the cells to tamoxifen treatment. Our study suggests for evaluating RRM2-associated metabolites as noninvasive markers for tamoxifen resistance and its pharmacological inhibition as a novel approach to overcome tamoxifen resistance in BCa. Copyright © 2014 Neoplasia Press, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Microbial dysbiosis is associated with human breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caiyun Xuan

    Full Text Available Breast cancer affects one in eight women in their lifetime. Though diet, age and genetic predisposition are established risk factors, the majority of breast cancers have unknown etiology. The human microbiota refers to the collection of microbes inhabiting the human body. Imbalance in microbial communities, or microbial dysbiosis, has been implicated in various human diseases including obesity, diabetes, and colon cancer. Therefore, we investigated the potential role of microbiota in breast cancer by next-generation sequencing using breast tumor tissue and paired normal adjacent tissue from the same patient. In a qualitative survey of the breast microbiota DNA, we found that the bacterium Methylobacterium radiotolerans is relatively enriched in tumor tissue, while the bacterium Sphingomonas yanoikuyae is relatively enriched in paired normal tissue. The relative abundances of these two bacterial species were inversely correlated in paired normal breast tissue but not in tumor tissue, indicating that dysbiosis is associated with breast cancer. Furthermore, the total bacterial DNA load was reduced in tumor versus paired normal and healthy breast tissue as determined by quantitative PCR. Interestingly, bacterial DNA load correlated inversely with advanced disease, a finding that could have broad implications in diagnosis and staging of breast cancer. Lastly, we observed lower basal levels of antibacterial response gene expression in tumor versus healthy breast tissue. Taken together, these data indicate that microbial DNA is present in the breast and that bacteria or their components may influence the local immune microenvironment. Our findings suggest a previously unrecognized link between dysbiosis and breast cancer which has potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

  19. EXPRESSION AND SIGNIFICANCE OF ERK PROTEIN IN HUMAN BREAST CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张秀梅; 李柏林; 宋敏; 宋继谒

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of ERK and p-ERK protein in human breast cancer and their corresponding tissue, to assess the significance of ERK signal pathway in tumorigenesis and progression of breast carcinoma. Methods: 40 breast cancer cases were used in S-P immunohistochemistry technique and Western Blot study. Results: The expression of ERK1, ERK2, and p- ERK protein levels increased remarkably in breast cancer tissues in comparison to normal tissues (P<0.01). The expression was upregulated by 1.32-, 1.53-and 4.27-fold, respectively. The overexpressions of ERK1, ERK2, and p- ERK proteins were obviously correlated with clinical stage of breast cancer. Protein levels of ERK and p-ERK were higher in stage III patients than in stage I and stage II patients (P<0.05). These proteins were strongly related with axillary lymph node metastasis of breast cancer, but not correlated with histopathological type and status of ER and PR of breast cancer. Expression of ERK1, and ERK2, protein showed a positive linear correlation. Conclusion: ERK signal transduction pathway is a key factor during human breast tumorigenesis and breast cancer progression.

  20. Prevention of the Angiogenic Switch in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    chronic myeloid leukaemia | colorectal cancer | Down syndrome | infantile haemangiomas | multiple myeloma | non-small-cell lung cancer | rheumatoid...Human Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Donald Ingber, M.D., Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Children’s Hospital...From - To) 15 FEB 2004 - 14 FEB 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Prevention of the Angiogenic Switch in Human Breast Cancer 5b

  1. Exploring human breast milk composition by NMR-based metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praticò, Giulia; Capuani, Giorgio; Tomassini, Alberta; Baldassarre, Maria Elisabetta; Delfini, Maurizio; Miccheli, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Breast milk is a complex fluid evolutionarily adapted to satisfy the nutritional requirements of growing infants. In addition, milk biochemical and immunological components protect newborns against infective agents in the new environment. Human milk oligosaccharides, the third most abundant component of breast milk, are believed to modulate the microbiota composition, thus influencing a wide range of physiological processes of the infant. Human milk also contains a number of other bioactive compounds, the functional role of which has not yet been clearly elucidated. In this scenario, NMR-based metabolic profiling can provide a rapid characterisation of breast milk composition, thus allowing a better understanding of its nutritional properties.

  2. T Cell Coinhibition and Immunotherapy in Human Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Janakiram, Murali; Abadi, Yael M.; Sparano, Joseph A.; Zang, Xingxing

    2012-01-01

    Costimulation and coinhibition generated by the B7 family and their receptor CD28 family have key roles in regulating T lymphocyte activation and tolerance. These pathways are very attractive therapeutic targets for human cancers including breast cancer. Gene polymorphisms of B7x (B7-H4/B7S1), PD-1 (CD279), and CTLA-4 (CD152) are associated with increased risk of developing breast cancer although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. In human breast cancer microenvironment, up-regulation of ...

  3. The physiology of the normal human breast: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Dixie; Gordon, Eva J; Casano, Ashley; Lahti, Sarah Michelle; Nguyen, Tinh; Preston, Alex; Tondre, Julie; Wu, Kuan; Yanase, Tiffany; Chan, Henry; Chia, David; Esfandiari, Mahtash; Himmel, Tiffany; Love, Susan M

    2011-12-01

    The physiology of the nonlactating human breast likely plays a key role in factors that contribute to the etiology of breast cancer and other breast conditions. Although there has been extensive research into the physiology of lactation, few reports explore the physiology of the resting mammary gland, including mechanisms by which compounds such as hormones, drugs, and potential carcinogens enter the breast ducts. The purpose of this study was to explore transport of exogenous drugs into ductal fluid in nonlactating women and determine if their concentrations in the fluid are similar to those observed in the breast milk of lactating women. We selected two compounds that have been well characterized during lactation, caffeine and cimetidine. Caffeine passively diffuses into breast milk, but cimetidine is actively transported and concentrated in breast milk. After ingestion of caffeine and cimetidine, 14 nonlactating subjects had blood drawn and underwent ductal lavage at five time points over 12 h to measure drug levels in the fluid and blood. The concentrations of both caffeine and cimetidine in lavage fluid were substantially less than those observed in breast milk. Our results support recent evidence that the cimetidine transporter is not expressed in the nonlactating mammary gland, and highlight intriguing differences in the physiology and molecular transport of the lactating and nonlactating breast. The findings of this exploratory study warrant further exploration into the physiology of the nonlactating mammary gland to elucidate factors involved in disease initiation and progression.

  4. A large-scale assessment of two-way SNP interactions in breast cancer susceptibility using 46 450 cases and 42 461 controls from the breast cancer association consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Roger L.; Herranz, Jesús; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dennis, Joe; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Zamora, M. Pilar; Arias-Perez, José Ignacio; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M. Rosario; Wang, Qin; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Czene, Kamila; Eriksson, Mikael; Humphreys, Keith; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ziogas, Argyrios; Clarke, Christina A.; Hopper, John L.; Dite, Gillian S.; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nicholas; Schoemaker, Minouk; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Flyger, Henrik; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Wang, Xianshu; Olson, Janet E.; Vachon, Celine; Purrington, Kristen; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Sanchez, Marie; Mulot, Claire; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Collée, J. Margriet; Jager, Agnes; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian W.; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Soucy, Penny; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Hamann, Ute; Försti, Asta; Rüdiger, Thomas; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Fasching, Peter A.; Häberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Peto, Julian; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Mariani, Paolo; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; Marme, Federik; Burwinkel, Barbara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Lambrechts, Diether; Yesilyurt, Betul T.; Floris, Giuseppe; Leunen, Karin; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Kristensen, Vessela; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; García-Closas, Montserrat; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Verhoef, Senno; Rutgers, Emiel J.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Couch, Fergus J.; Toland, Amanda E.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Hall, Per; Benítez, Javier; Malats, Núria; Easton, Douglas F.

    2014-01-01

    Part of the substantial unexplained familial aggregation of breast cancer may be due to interactions between common variants, but few studies have had adequate statistical power to detect interactions of realistic magnitude. We aimed to assess all two-way interactions in breast cancer susceptibility between 70 917 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) selected primarily based on prior evidence of a marginal effect. Thirty-eight international studies contributed data for 46 450 breast cancer cases and 42 461 controls of European origin as part of a multi-consortium project (COGS). First, SNPs were preselected based on evidence (P 10−10). In summary, we observed little evidence of two-way SNP interactions in breast cancer susceptibility, despite the large number of SNPs with potential marginal effects considered and the very large sample size. This finding may have important implications for risk prediction, simplifying the modelling required. Further comprehensive, large-scale genome-wide interaction studies may identify novel interacting loci if the inherent logistic and computational challenges can be overcome. PMID:24242184

  5. Clinical impact of human breast milk metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesare Marincola, Flaminia; Dessì, Angelica; Corbu, Sara; Reali, Alessandra; Fanos, Vassilios

    2015-12-01

    Metabolomics is a research field concerned with the analysis of metabolome, the complete set of metabolites in a given cell, tissue, or biological sample. Being able to provide a molecular snapshot of biological systems, metabolomics has emerged as a functional methodology in a wide range of research areas such as toxicology, pharmacology, food technology, nutrition, microbial biotechnology, systems biology, and plant biotechnology. In this review, we emphasize the applications of metabolomics in investigating the human breast milk (HBM) metabolome. HBM is the recommended source of nutrition for infants since it contains the optimal balance of nutrients for developing babies, and it provides a range of benefits for growth, immunity, and development. The molecular mechanisms beyond the inter- and intra-variability of HBM that make its composition unique are yet to be well-characterized. Although still in its infancy, the study of HBM metabolome has already proven itself to be of great value in providing insights into this biochemical variability in relation to mother phenotype, diet, disease, and lifestyle. The results of these investigations lay the foundation for further developments useful to identify normal and aberrant biochemical changes as well as to develop strategies to promote healthy infant feeding practices.

  6. In vitro methods to culture primary human breast epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raouf, Afshin; Sun, Yu Jia

    2013-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that much like leukemia, breast tumors are maintained by a small subpopulation of tumor cells that have stem cell properties. These cancer stem cells are envisaged to be responsible for tumor formation and relapse. Therefore, knowledge about their nature will provide a platform to develop therapies to eliminate these breast cancer stem cells. This concept highlights the need to understand the mechanisms that regulate the normal functions of the breast stem cells and their immediate progeny as alterations to these same mechanisms can cause these primitive cells to act as cancer stem cells. The study of the primitive cell functions relies on the ability to isolate them from primary sources of breast tissue. This chapter describes processing of discarded tissue from reduction mammoplasty samples as sources of normal primary human breast epithelial cells and describes cell culture systems to grow single-cell suspensions prepared from these reduction samples in vitro.

  7. Infrared absorption of human breast tissues in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Chenglin [Department of Physics, Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key laboratory), Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Physics Department of Yancheng Teachers' College, Yancheng 224002 (China); Zhang Yuan [Department of Physics, Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key laboratory), Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Yan Xiaohui [Department of Physics, Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key laboratory), Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Zhang Xinyi [Department of Physics, Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key laboratory), Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China) and Shanghai Research Center of Acupuncture and Meridian, Pudong, Shanghai 201203 (China)]. E-mail: xy-zhang@fudan.edu.cn; Li Chengxiang [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029 (China); Yang Wentao [Cancer Hospital, Medical Center, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Shi Daren [Cancer Hospital, Medical Center, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2006-07-15

    The spectral characteristics of human breast tissues in normal status and during different cancerous stages have been investigated by synchrotron radiation based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) absorption spectroscopy. Thanks to the excellent synchrotron radiation infrared (IR) source, higher resolving power is achieved in SR-FTIR absorption spectra than in conventional IR absorption measurements. Obvious variations in IR absorption spectrum of breast tissues were found as they change from healthy to diseased, or say in progression to cancer. On the other hand, some specific absorption peaks were found in breast cancer tissues by SR-FTIR spectroscopic methods. These spectral characteristics of breast tissue may help us in early diagnosis of breast cancer.

  8. ANALYSES ON DIFFERENTIALLY EXPRESSED GENES ASSOCIATED WITH HUMAN BREAST CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Xu-li; DING Xiao-wen; XU Xiao-hong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the molecular etiology of breast cancer by way of studying the differential expression and initial function of the related genes in the occurrence and development of breast cancer. Methods: Two hundred and eighty-eight human tumor related genes were chosen for preparation of the oligochips probe. mRNA was extracted from 16 breast cancer tissues and the corresponding normal breast tissues, and cDNA probe was prepared through reverse-transcription and hybridized with the gene chip. A laser focused fluorescent scanner was used to scan the chip. The different gene expressions were thereafter automatically compared and analyzed between the two sample groups. Cy3/Cy5>3.5 meant significant up-regulation. Cy3/Cy5<0.25 meant significant down-regulation. Results: The comparison between the breast cancer tissues and their corresponding normal tissues showed that 84 genes had differential expression in the Chip. Among the differently expressed genes, there were 4 genes with significant down-regulation and 6 with significant up-regulation. Compared with normal breast tissues, differentially expressed genes did partially exist in the breast cancer tissues. Conclusion: Changes in multi-gene expression regulations take place during the occurrence and development of breast cancer; and the research on related genes can help understanding the mechanism of tumor occurrence.

  9. Relationship between cyclooxygenase-2 and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 in vascular endothelial growth factor C up-regulation and lymphangiogenesis in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Rabindra N; Timoshenko, Alexander V; Cai, Jing; Lala, Peeyush K

    2010-09-01

    Both cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)-2 promote breast cancer progression; however, the relationship between the two molecules remains unclear. We utilized human breast cancer tissues and cell lines to examine whether COX-2 and HER-2 played independent or interdependent roles in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C up-regulation and lymphangiogenesis. A paired correlation of immunodetectable levels of COX-2, VEGF-C, and HER-2 proteins and lymphovascular density (LVD; D2-40-immunolabeled) in 55 breast cancer specimens revealed a positive correlation between COX-2 and HER-2 irrespective of clinicopathological status. However COX-2 alone positively correlated with LVD. In 10 independent specimens, mRNA levels showed a positive correlation between HER-2 and COX-2 or VEGF-C but not LYVE-1 (lymphovascular endothelial marker). These findings implicate COX-2, but not HER-2, in breast cancer-associated lymphangiogenesis. Manipulation of the COX-2 or HER-2 genes in breast cancer cell lines varying widely in COX-2 and HER-2 expression revealed a direct role of COX-2 and an indirect COX-2 dependent role of HER-2 in VEGF-C up-regulation: (i) high VEGF-C expression in high COX-2/low HER-2 expressing MDA-MB-231 cells was reduced by siRNA-mediated down-regulation of COX-2, but not HER-2; (ii) integration of HER-2 in these cells simultaneously up-regulated COX-2 protein as well as VEGF-C secretion; and (iii) low VEGF-C secretion by high HER-2/low COX-2 expressing SK-BR-3 cells was stimulated by COX-2 overexpression. These findings of the primary role of COX-2 and the COX-2-dependent role of HER-2, if any, in VEGF-C up-regulation and lymphangiogenesis suggest that COX-2 inhibitors may abrogate lymphatic metastasis in breast cancer irrespective of HER-2 status. © 2010 Japanese Cancer Association.

  10. Cdx2 polymorphism affects the activities of vitamin D receptor in human breast cancer cell lines and human breast carcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Pulito

    Full Text Available Vitamin D plays a role in cancer development and acts through the vitamin D receptor (VDR. It regulates the action of hormone responsive genes and is involved in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and apoptosis. VDR is a critical component of the vitamin D pathway and different common single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism can play an important role in breast cancer, modulating the activity of VDR. The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between the Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and the activities of VDR in human breast cancer cell lines and carcinomas breast patients. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D treatment were investigated in a panel of estrogen receptor-positive (MCF7 and T-47D and estrogen receptor-negative (MDA-MB-231, SUM 159PT, SK-BR-3, BT549, MDA-MB-468, HCC1143, BT20 and HCC1954 human breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the potential relationship among Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and a number of biomarkers used in clinical management of breast cancer was assessed in an ad hoc set of breast cancer cases. Vitamin D treatment efficacy was found to be strongly dependent on the Cdx2 VDR status in ER-negative breast cancer cell lines tested. In our series of breast cancer cases, the results indicated that patients with variant homozygote AA were associated with bio-pathological characteristics typical of more aggressive tumours, such as ER negative, HER2 positive and G3. Our results may suggest a potential effect of Cdx2 VDR polymorphism on the efficacy of vitamin D treatment in aggressive breast cancer cells (estrogen receptor negative. These results suggest that Cdx2 polymorphism may be a potential biomarker for vitamin D treatment in breast cancer, independently of the VDR receptor expression.

  11. Cdx2 polymorphism affects the activities of vitamin D receptor in human breast cancer cell lines and human breast carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulito, Claudio; Terrenato, Irene; Di Benedetto, Anna; Korita, Etleva; Goeman, Frauke; Sacconi, Andrea; Biagioni, Francesca; Blandino, Giovanni; Strano, Sabrina; Muti, Paola; Mottolese, Marcella; Falvo, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D plays a role in cancer development and acts through the vitamin D receptor (VDR). It regulates the action of hormone responsive genes and is involved in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and apoptosis. VDR is a critical component of the vitamin D pathway and different common single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism can play an important role in breast cancer, modulating the activity of VDR. The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between the Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and the activities of VDR in human breast cancer cell lines and carcinomas breast patients. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D treatment were investigated in a panel of estrogen receptor-positive (MCF7 and T-47D) and estrogen receptor-negative (MDA-MB-231, SUM 159PT, SK-BR-3, BT549, MDA-MB-468, HCC1143, BT20 and HCC1954) human breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the potential relationship among Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and a number of biomarkers used in clinical management of breast cancer was assessed in an ad hoc set of breast cancer cases. Vitamin D treatment efficacy was found to be strongly dependent on the Cdx2 VDR status in ER-negative breast cancer cell lines tested. In our series of breast cancer cases, the results indicated that patients with variant homozygote AA were associated with bio-pathological characteristics typical of more aggressive tumours, such as ER negative, HER2 positive and G3. Our results may suggest a potential effect of Cdx2 VDR polymorphism on the efficacy of vitamin D treatment in aggressive breast cancer cells (estrogen receptor negative). These results suggest that Cdx2 polymorphism may be a potential biomarker for vitamin D treatment in breast cancer, independently of the VDR receptor expression.

  12. Cdx2 Polymorphism Affects the Activities of Vitamin D Receptor in Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines and Human Breast Carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Benedetto, Anna; Korita, Etleva; Goeman, Frauke; Sacconi, Andrea; Biagioni, Francesca; Blandino, Giovanni; Strano, Sabrina; Muti, Paola; Mottolese, Marcella; Falvo, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D plays a role in cancer development and acts through the vitamin D receptor (VDR). It regulates the action of hormone responsive genes and is involved in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and apoptosis. VDR is a critical component of the vitamin D pathway and different common single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism can play an important role in breast cancer, modulating the activity of VDR. The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between the Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and the activities of VDR in human breast cancer cell lines and carcinomas breast patients. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D treatment were investigated in a panel of estrogen receptor-positive (MCF7 and T-47D) and estrogen receptor-negative (MDA-MB-231, SUM 159PT, SK-BR-3, BT549, MDA-MB-468, HCC1143, BT20 and HCC1954) human breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the potential relationship among Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and a number of biomarkers used in clinical management of breast cancer was assessed in an ad hoc set of breast cancer cases. Vitamin D treatment efficacy was found to be strongly dependent on the Cdx2 VDR status in ER-negative breast cancer cell lines tested. In our series of breast cancer cases, the results indicated that patients with variant homozygote AA were associated with bio-pathological characteristics typical of more aggressive tumours, such as ER negative, HER2 positive and G3. Our results may suggest a potential effect of Cdx2 VDR polymorphism on the efficacy of vitamin D treatment in aggressive breast cancer cells (estrogen receptor negative). These results suggest that Cdx2 polymorphism may be a potential biomarker for vitamin D treatment in breast cancer, independently of the VDR receptor expression. PMID:25849303

  13. Comprehensive molecular portraits of human breast tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    We analysed primary breast cancers by genomic DNA copy number arrays, DNA methylation, exome sequencing, messenger RNA arrays, microRNA sequencing and reverse-phase protein arrays. Our ability to integrate information across platforms provided key insights into previously defined gene expression subtypes and demonstrated the existence of four main breast cancer classes when combining data from five platforms, each of which shows significant molecular heterogeneity. Somatic mutations in only three genes (TP53, PIK3CA and GATA3) occurred at >10% incidence across all breast cancers; however, there were numerous subtype-associated and novel gene mutations including the enrichment of specific mutations in GATA3, PIK3CA and MAP3K1 with the luminal A subtype. We identified two novel protein-expression-defined subgroups, possibly produced by stromal/microenvironmental elements, and integrated analyses identified specific signalling pathways dominant in each molecular subtype including a HER2/phosphorylated HER2/EGFR/phosphorylated EGFR signature within the HER2-enriched expression subtype. Comparison of basal-like breast tumours with high-grade serous ovarian tumours showed many molecular commonalities, indicating a related aetiology and similar therapeutic opportunities. The biological finding of the four main breast cancer subtypes caused by different subsets of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities raises the hypothesis that much of the clinically observable plasticity and heterogeneity occurs within, and not across, these major biological subtypes of breast cancer.

  14. Development of realistic physical breast phantoms matched to virtual breast phantoms based on human subject data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiarashi, Nooshin; Nolte, Adam C; Sturgeon, Gregory M; Segars, William P; Ghate, Sujata V; Nolte, Loren W; Samei, Ehsan; Lo, Joseph Y

    2015-07-01

    Physical phantoms are essential for the development, optimization, and evaluation of x-ray breast imaging systems. Recognizing the major effect of anatomy on image quality and clinical performance, such phantoms should ideally reflect the three-dimensional structure of the human breast. Currently, there is no commercially available three-dimensional physical breast phantom that is anthropomorphic. The authors present the development of a new suite of physical breast phantoms based on human data. The phantoms were designed to match the extended cardiac-torso virtual breast phantoms that were based on dedicated breast computed tomography images of human subjects. The phantoms were fabricated by high-resolution multimaterial additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology. The glandular equivalency of the photopolymer materials was measured relative to breast tissue-equivalent plastic materials. Based on the current state-of-the-art in the technology and available materials, two variations were fabricated. The first was a dual-material phantom, the Doublet. Fibroglandular tissue and skin were represented by the most radiographically dense material available; adipose tissue was represented by the least radiographically dense material. The second variation, the Singlet, was fabricated with a single material to represent fibroglandular tissue and skin. It was subsequently filled with adipose-equivalent materials including oil, beeswax, and permanent urethane-based polymer. Simulated microcalcification clusters were further included in the phantoms via crushed eggshells. The phantoms were imaged and characterized visually and quantitatively. The mammographic projections and tomosynthesis reconstructed images of the fabricated phantoms yielded realistic breast background. The mammograms of the phantoms demonstrated close correlation with simulated mammographic projection images of the corresponding virtual phantoms. Furthermore, power-law descriptions of the phantom images

  15. Development of realistic physical breast phantoms matched to virtual breast phantoms based on human subject data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiarashi, Nooshin [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Nolte, Adam C. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Ghate, Sujata V. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Segars, William P. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Nolte, Loren W. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Samei, Ehsan [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); and others

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Physical phantoms are essential for the development, optimization, and evaluation of x-ray breast imaging systems. Recognizing the major effect of anatomy on image quality and clinical performance, such phantoms should ideally reflect the three-dimensional structure of the human breast. Currently, there is no commercially available three-dimensional physical breast phantom that is anthropomorphic. The authors present the development of a new suite of physical breast phantoms based on human data. Methods: The phantoms were designed to match the extended cardiac-torso virtual breast phantoms that were based on dedicated breast computed tomography images of human subjects. The phantoms were fabricated by high-resolution multimaterial additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology. The glandular equivalency of the photopolymer materials was measured relative to breast tissue-equivalent plastic materials. Based on the current state-of-the-art in the technology and available materials, two variations were fabricated. The first was a dual-material phantom, the Doublet. Fibroglandular tissue and skin were represented by the most radiographically dense material available; adipose tissue was represented by the least radiographically dense material. The second variation, the Singlet, was fabricated with a single material to represent fibroglandular tissue and skin. It was subsequently filled with adipose-equivalent materials including oil, beeswax, and permanent urethane-based polymer. Simulated microcalcification clusters were further included in the phantoms via crushed eggshells. The phantoms were imaged and characterized visually and quantitatively. Results: The mammographic projections and tomosynthesis reconstructed images of the fabricated phantoms yielded realistic breast background. The mammograms of the phantoms demonstrated close correlation with simulated mammographic projection images of the corresponding virtual phantoms. Furthermore, power

  16. Hydroxytyrosol Protects against Oxidative DNA Damage in Human Breast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José J. Gaforio

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Over recent years, several studies have related olive oil ingestion to a low incidence of several diseases, including breast cancer. Hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol are two of the major phenols present in virgin olive oils. Despite the fact that they have been linked to cancer prevention, there is no evidence that clarifies their effect in human breast tumor and non-tumor cells. In the present work, we present hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol’s effects in human breast cell lines. Our results show that hydroxytyrosol acts as a more efficient free radical scavenger than tyrosol, but both fail to affect cell proliferation rates, cell cycle profile or cell apoptosis in human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A or breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7. We found that hydroxytyrosol decreases the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS level in MCF10A cells but not in MCF7 or MDA-MB-231 cells while very high amounts of tyrosol is needed to decrease the ROS level in MCF10A cells. Interestingly, hydroxytyrosol prevents oxidative DNA damage in the three breast cell lines. Therefore, our data suggest that simple phenol hydroxytyrosol could contribute to a lower incidence of breast cancer in populations that consume virgin olive oil due to its antioxidant activity and its protection against oxidative DNA damage in mammary cells.

  17. Hydroxytyrosol protects against oxidative DNA damage in human breast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warleta, Fernando; Quesada, Cristina Sánchez; Campos, María; Allouche, Yosra; Beltrán, Gabriel; Gaforio, José J

    2011-10-01

    Over recent years, several studies have related olive oil ingestion to a low incidence of several diseases, including breast cancer. Hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol are two of the major phenols present in virgin olive oils. Despite the fact that they have been linked to cancer prevention, there is no evidence that clarifies their effect in human breast tumor and non-tumor cells. In the present work, we present hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol's effects in human breast cell lines. Our results show that hydroxytyrosol acts as a more efficient free radical scavenger than tyrosol, but both fail to affect cell proliferation rates, cell cycle profile or cell apoptosis in human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) or breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7). We found that hydroxytyrosol decreases the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in MCF10A cells but not in MCF7 or MDA-MB-231 cells while very high amounts of tyrosol is needed to decrease the ROS level in MCF10A cells. Interestingly, hydroxytyrosol prevents oxidative DNA damage in the three breast cell lines. Therefore, our data suggest that simple phenol hydroxytyrosol could contribute to a lower incidence of breast cancer in populations that consume virgin olive oil due to its antioxidant activity and its protection against oxidative DNA damage in mammary cells.

  18. Combinations of parabens at concentrations measured in human breast tissue can increase proliferation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Amelia K; Darbre, Philippa D

    2013-05-01

    The alkyl esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (parabens), which are used as preservatives in consumer products, possess oestrogenic activity and have been measured in human breast tissue. This has raised concerns for a potential involvement in the development of human breast cancer. In this paper, we have investigated the extent to which proliferation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells can be increased by exposure to the five parabens either alone or in combination at concentrations as recently measured in 160 human breast tissue samples. Determination of no-observed-effect concentrations (NOEC), lowest-observed-effect concentrations (LOEC), EC50 and EC100 values for stimulation of proliferation of MCF-7 cells by five parabens revealed that 43/160 (27%) of the human breast tissue samples contained at least one paraben at a concentration ≥ LOEC and 64/160 (40%) > NOEC. Proliferation of MCF-7 cells could be increased by combining all five parabens at concentrations down to the 50(th) percentile (median) values measured in the tissues. For the 22 tissue samples taken at the site of ER + PR + primary cancers, 12 contained a sufficient concentration of one or more paraben to stimulate proliferation of MCF-7 cells. This demonstrates that parabens, either alone or in combination, are present in human breast tissue at concentrations sufficient to stimulate the proliferation of MCF-7 cells in vitro, and that functional consequences of the presence of paraben in human breast tissue should be assessed on the basis of all five parabens and not single parabens individually. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Clinicopathological significance of PTPN12 expression in human breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Xunyi [Breast Disease Diagnosis and Treatment Centre, Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Qingdao University, Qingdao Shandong Province (China); Yuan, Zhentao [Department of Anesthesiology, Shengli Oilfield Central Hospital, Dongying Shandong Province (China); Jiang, Dandan; Li, Funian [Breast Disease Diagnosis and Treatment Centre, Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Qingdao University, Qingdao Shandong Province (China)

    2012-10-15

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 12 (PTPN12) is a recently identified tumor suppressor gene (TSG) that is frequently compromised in human triple-negative breast cancer. In the present study, we investigated the expression of PTPN12 protein by patients with breast cancer in a Chinese population and the relationship between PTPN12 expression levels and patient clinicopathological features and prognosis. Additionally, we explored the underlying down-regulation mechanism from the perspective of an epigenetic alteration. We examined PTPN12 mRNA expression in five breast cancer cell lines using semi-quantitative reverse-transcription PCR, and detected PTPN12 protein expression using immunohistochemistry in 150 primary invasive breast cancer cases and paired adjacent non-tumor tissues. Methylation-specific PCR was performed to analyze the promoter CpG island methylation status of PTPN12. PTPN12 was significantly down-regulated in breast cancer cases (48/150) compared to adjacent noncancerous tissues (17/150; P < 0.05). Furthermore, low expression of PTPN12 showed a significant positive correlation with tumor size (P = 0.047), lymph node metastasis (P = 0.001), distant metastasis (P = 0.009), histological grade (P = 0.012), and survival time (P = 0.019). Additionally, promoter CpG island hypermethylation occurs more frequently in breast cancer cases and breast cancer cell lines with low PTPN12 expression. Our findings suggest that PTPN12 is potentially a methylation-silenced TSG for breast cancer that may play an important role in breast carcinogenesis and could potentially serve as an independent prognostic factor for invasive breast cancer patients.

  20. Dissecting genetic requirements of human breast tumorigenesis in a tissue transgenic model of human breast cancer in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min; Jung, Lina; Cooper, Adrian B; Fleet, Christina; Chen, Lihao; Breault, Lyne; Clark, Kimberly; Cai, Zuhua; Vincent, Sylvie; Bottega, Steve; Shen, Qiong; Richardson, Andrea; Bosenburg, Marcus; Naber, Stephen P; DePinho, Ronald A; Kuperwasser, Charlotte; Robinson, Murray O

    2009-04-28

    Breast cancer development is a complex pathobiological process involving sequential genetic alterations in normal epithelial cells that results in uncontrolled growth in a permissive microenvironment. Accordingly, physiologically relevant models of human breast cancer that recapitulate these events are needed to study cancer biology and evaluate therapeutic agents. Here, we report the generation and utilization of the human breast cancer in mouse (HIM) model, which is composed of genetically engineered primary human breast epithelial organoids and activated human breast stromal cells. By using this approach, we have defined key genetic events required to drive the development of human preneoplastic lesions as well as invasive adenocarcinomas that are histologically similar to those in patients. Tumor development in the HIM model proceeds through defined histological stages of hyperplasia, DCIS to invasive carcinoma. Moreover, HIM tumors display characteristic responses to targeted therapies, such as HER2 inhibitors, further validating the utility of these models in preclinical compound testing. The HIM model is an experimentally tractable human in vivo system that holds great potential for advancing our basic understanding of cancer biology and for the discovery and testing of targeted therapies.

  1. The oncogenic potential of human cytomegalovirus and breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges eHerbein

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is among the leading causes of cancer-related death among women. The vast majority of breast cancers are carcinomas that originate from cells lining the milk-forming ducts of the mammary gland. Numerous articles indicate that breast tumors exhibit diverse phenotypes depending on their distinct physiopathological signatures, clinical courses and therapeutic possibilities. The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is a multifaceted highly host specific betaherpesvirus that is regarded as asymptomatic or mildly pathogenic virus in immunocompetent host. HCMV may cause serious in utero infections as well as acute and chronic complications in immunocompromised individual. The involvement of HCMV in late inflammatory complications underscores its possible role in inflammatory diseases and cancer. HCMV targets a variety of cell types in vivo, including macrophages, epithelial cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, stromal cells, neuronal cells, smooth muscle cells, and hepatocytes. HCMV can be detected in the milk after delivery and thereby HCMV could spread to adjacent mammary epithelial cells. HCMV also infects macrophages and induces an atypical M1/M2 phenotype, close to the tumor associated macrophage phenotype, which is associated with the release of cytokines involved in cancer initiation or promotion and breast cancer of poor prognosis. HCMV antigens and DNA have been detected in tissue biopsies of breast cancers and elevation in serum HCMV IgG antibody levels has been reported to precede the development of breast cancer in some women. In this review, we will discuss the potential role of HCMV in the initiation and progression of breast cancer.

  2. MicroRNA Regulation of Human Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Shimono

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are involved in virtually all biological processes, including stem cell maintenance, differentiation, and development. The dysregulation of miRNAs is associated with many human diseases including cancer. We have identified a set of miRNAs differentially expressed between human breast cancer stem cells (CSCs and non-tumorigenic cancer cells. In addition, these miRNAs are similarly upregulated or downregulated in normal mammary stem/progenitor cells. In this review, we mainly describe the miRNAs that are dysregulated in human breast CSCs directly isolated from clinical specimens. The miRNAs and their clusters, such as the miR-200 clusters, miR-183 cluster, miR-221-222 cluster, let-7, miR-142 and miR-214, target the genes and pathways important for stem cell maintenance, such as the self-renewal gene BMI1, apoptosis, Wnt signaling, Notch signaling, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. In addition, the current evidence shows that metastatic breast CSCs acquire a phenotype that is different from the CSCs in a primary site. Thus, clarifying the miRNA regulation of the metastatic breast CSCs will further advance our understanding of the roles of human breast CSCs in tumor progression.

  3. CHL1 is involved in human breast tumorigenesis and progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Li-Hong [Medical Department of Breast Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Ma, Qin [Department of Oncology, The General Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin (China); Shi, Ye-Hui [Medical Department of Breast Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Ge, Jie; Zhao, Hong-Meng [Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Breast Surgery, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Li, Shu-Fen [Medical Department of Breast Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Tong, Zhong-Sheng, E-mail: 83352162@qq.com [Medical Department of Breast Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China)

    2013-08-23

    Highlights: •CHL1 is down-regulation in breast cancer tissues. •Down-regulation of CHL1 is related to high grade. •Overexpression of CHL1 inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro. •CHL1 deficiency induces breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion both in vitro and in vivo. -- Abstract: Neural cell adhesion molecules (CAM) play important roles in the development and regeneration of the nervous system. The L1 family of CAMs is comprised of L1, Close Homolog of L1 (CHL1, L1CAM2), NrCAM, and Neurofascin, which are structurally related trans-membrane proteins in vertebrates. Although the L1CAM has been demonstrated play important role in carcinogenesis and progression, the function of CHL1 in human breast cancer is limited. Here, we found that CHL1 is down-regulated in human breast cancer and related to lower grade. Furthermore, overexpression of CHL1 suppresses proliferation and invasion in MDA-MB-231 cells and knockdown of CHL1 expression results in increased proliferation and invasion in MCF7 cells in vitro. Finally, CHL1 deficiency promotes tumor formation in vivo. Our results may provide a strategy for blocking breast carcinogenesis and progression.

  4. Cancer-associated lysosomal changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallunki, T; Olsen, O D; Jaattela, Marja

    2013-01-01

    Rapidly dividing and invasive cancer cells are strongly dependent on effective lysosomal function. Accordingly, transformation and cancer progression are characterized by dramatic changes in lysosomal volume, composition and cellular distribution. Depending on one's point of view, the cancer-associated......-targeting anti-cancer drugs. In this review we compile our current knowledge on cancer-associated changes in lysosomal composition and discuss the consequences of these alterations to cancer progression and the possibilities they can bring to cancer therapy.Oncogene advance online publication, 9 July 2012; doi...

  5. Mutagens in human breast lipid and milk: the search for environmental agents that initiate breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, David H; Martin, Francis L; Williams, J Andrew; Wheat, Luise M C; Nolan, Lisa; Cole, Kathleen J; Grover, Philip L

    2002-01-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate the involvement of environmental factors in the etiology of breast cancer, but have not provided clear indications of the nature of the agents responsible. Several environmental carcinogens are known to induce mammary tumors in rodents, and the abundance of adipose tissue in the human breast suggests that the epithelial cells, from which breast tumors commonly arise, could be exposed to lipid-soluble carcinogens sequestered by the adipose tissue. In this report we review our studies in which we have examined human mammary lipid, obtained from elective reduction mammoplasties from healthy donors, and human milk from healthy mothers, for the presence of components with genotoxic activity in several in vitro assays. A significant proportion of lipid extracts induced mutations in bacteria and micronuclei in mammalian cells. They also caused DNA damage, detected as single-strand breaks in the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay, in both the MCL-5 cell line and in primary cultures of human mammary epithelial cells. Genotoxic activity was also found in a significant proportion of extracts of human breast milk. Viable cells recovered from milk samples showed evidence of DNA damage and were susceptible to comet formation by genotoxic agents in vitro. Genotoxic activity was found to be less prevalent in milk samples from countries of lower breast cancer incidence (the Far East) compared with that in samples from the UK. The agents responsible for the activity in milk appear to be moderately polar lipophilic compounds and of low molecular weight. Identification of these agents and their sources may hold clues to the origins of breast cancer.

  6. The Breast Cancer-Associated Glycoforms of MUC1, MUC1-Tn and sialyl-Tn, Are Expressed in COSMC Wild-Type Cells and Bind the C-Type Lectin MGL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Beatson

    Full Text Available Aberrant glycosylation occurs in the majority of human cancers and changes in mucin-type O-glycosylation are key events that play a role in the induction of invasion and metastases. These changes generate novel cancer-specific glyco-antigens that can interact with cells of the immune system through carbohydrate binding lectins. Two glyco-epitopes that are found expressed by many carcinomas are Tn (GalNAc-Ser/Thr and STn (NeuAcα2,6GalNAc-Ser/Thr. These glycans can be carried on many mucin-type glycoproteins including MUC1. We show that the majority of breast cancers carry Tn within the same cell and in close proximity to extended glycan T (Galβ1,3GalNAc the addition of Gal to the GalNAc being catalysed by the T synthase. The presence of active T synthase suggests that loss of the private chaperone for T synthase, COSMC, does not explain the expression of Tn and STn in breast cancer cells. We show that MUC1 carrying both Tn or STn can bind to the C-type lectin MGL and using atomic force microscopy show that they bind to MGL with a similar dead adhesion force. Tumour associated STn is associated with poor prognosis and resistance to chemotherapy in breast carcinomas, inhibition of DC maturation, DC apoptosis and inhibition of NK activity. As engagement of MGL in the absence of TLR triggering may lead to anergy, the binding of MUC1-STn to MGL may be in part responsible for some of the characteristics of STn expressing tumours.

  7. Comprehensive molecular portraits of human breast tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koboldt, Daniel C.; Fulton, Robert S.; McLellan, Michael D.; Schmidt, Heather; Kalicki-Veizer, Joelle; McMichael, Joshua F.; Fulton, Lucinda L.; Dooling, David J.; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Ally, Adrian; Balasundaram, Miruna; Butterfield, Yaron S. N.; Carlsen, Rebecca; Carter, Candace; Chu, Andy; Chuah, Eric; Chun, Hye-Jung E.; Coope, Robin J. N.; Dhalla, Noreen; Guin, Ranabir; Hirst, Carrie; Hirst, Martin; Holt, Robert A.; Lee, Darlene; Li, Haiyan I.; Mayo, Michael; Moore, Richard A.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Pleasance, Erin; Robertson, A. Gordon; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Shafiei, Arash; Sipahimalani, Payal; Slobodan, Jared R.; Stoll, Dominik; Tam, Angela; Thiessen, Nina; Varhol, Richard J.; Wye, Natasja; Zeng, Thomas; Zhao, Yongjun; Birol, Inanc; Jones, Steven J. M.; Marra, Marco A.; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Saksena, Gordon; Onofrio, Robert C.; Pho, Nam H.; Carter, Scott L.; Schumacher, Steven E.; Tabak, Barbara; Hernandez, Bryan; Gentry, Jeff; Nguyen, Huy; Crenshaw, Andrew; Ardlie, Kristin; Beroukhim, Rameen; Winckler, Wendy; Getz, Gad; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Meyerson, Matthew; Chin, Lynda; Park, Peter J.; Kucherlapati, Raju; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Auman, J. Todd; Fan, Cheng; Turman, Yidi J.; Shi, Yan; Li, Ling; Topal, Michael D.; He, Xiaping; Chao, Hann-Hsiang; Prat, Aleix; Silva, Grace O.; Iglesia, Michael D.; Zhao, Wei; Usary, Jerry; Berg, Jonathan S.; Adams, Michael; Booker, Jessica; Wu, Junyuan; Gulabani, Anisha; Bodenheimer, Tom; Hoyle, Alan P.; Simons, Janae V.; Soloway, Matthew G.; Mose, Lisle E.; Jefferys, Stuart R.; Balu, Saianand; Parker, Joel S.; Hayes, D. Neil; Perou, Charles M.; Malik, Simeen; Mahurkar, Swapna; Shen, Hui; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Triche, Timothy; Lai, Phillip H.; Bootwalla, Moiz S.; Maglinte, Dennis T.; Berman, Benjamin P.; Van den Berg, David J.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Laird, Peter W.; Creighton, Chad J.; Donehower, Lawrence A.; Getz, Gad; Noble, Michael; Voet, Doug; Saksena, Gordon; Gehlenborg, Nils; DiCara, Daniel; Zhang, Juinhua; Zhang, Hailei; Wu, Chang-Jiun; Liu, Spring Yingchun; Lawrence, Michael S.; Zou, Lihua; Sivachenko, Andrey; Lin, Pei; Stojanov, Petar; Jing, Rui; Cho, Juok; Sinha, Raktim; Park, Richard W.; Nazaire, Marc-Danie; Robinson, Jim; Thorvaldsdottir, Helga; Mesirov, Jill; Park, Peter J.; Chin, Lynda; Reynolds, Sheila; Kreisberg, Richard B.; Bernard, Brady; Bressler, Ryan; Erkkila, Timo; Lin, Jake; Thorsson, Vesteinn; Zhang, Wei; Shmulevich, Ilya; Ciriello, Giovanni; Weinhold, Nils; Schultz, Nikolaus; Gao, Jianjiong; Cerami, Ethan; Gross, Benjamin; Jacobsen, Anders; Sinha, Rileen; Aksoy, B. Arman; Antipin, Yevgeniy; Reva, Boris; Shen, Ronglai; Taylor, Barry S.; Ladanyi, Marc; Sander, Chris; Anur, Pavana; Spellman, Paul T.; Lu, Yiling; Liu, Wenbin; Verhaak, Roel R. G.; Mills, Gordon B.; Akbani, Rehan; Zhang, Nianxiang; Broom, Bradley M.; Casasent, Tod D.; Wakefield, Chris; Unruh, Anna K.; Baggerly, Keith; Coombes, Kevin; Weinstein, John N.; Haussler, David; Benz, Christopher C.; Stuart, Joshua M.; Benz, Stephen C.; Zhu, Jingchun; Szeto, Christopher C.; Scott, Gary K.; Yau, Christina; Paul, Evan O.; Carlin, Daniel; Wong, Christopher; Sokolov, Artem; Thusberg, Janita; Mooney, Sean; Ng, Sam; Goldstein, Theodore C.; Ellrott, Kyle; Grifford, Mia; Wilks, Christopher; Ma, Singer; Craft, Brian; Yan, Chunhua; Hu, Ying; Meerzaman, Daoud; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Bowen, Jay; Ramirez, Nilsa C.; Black, Aaron D.; Pyatt, Robert E.; White, Peter; Zmuda, Erik J.; Frick, Jessica; Lichtenberg, Taram.; Brookens, Robin; George, Myra M.; Gerken, Mark A.; Harper, Hollie A.; Leraas, Kristen M.; Wise, Lisa J.; Tabler, Teresa R.; McAllister, Cynthia; Barr, Thomas; Hart-Kothari, Melissa; Tarvin, Katie; Saller, Charles; Sandusky, George; Mitchell, Colleen; Iacocca, Mary V.; Brown, Jennifer; Rabeno, Brenda; Czerwinski, Christine; Petrelli, Nicholas; Dolzhansky, Oleg; Abramov, Mikhail; Voronina, Olga; Potapova, Olga; Marks, Jeffrey R.; Suchorska, Wiktoria M.; Murawa, Dawid; Kycler, Witold; Ibbs, Matthew; Korski, Konstanty; Spychala, Arkadiusz; Murawa, Pawel; Brzezinski, Jacek J.; Perz, Hanna; Lazniak, Radoslaw; Teresiak, Marek; Tatka, Honorata; Leporowska, Ewa; Bogusz-Czerniewicz, Marta; Malicki, Julian; Mackiewicz, Andrzej; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Van Le, Xuan; Kohl, Bernard; Viet Tien, Nguyen; Thorp, Richard; Van Bang, Nguyen; Sussman, Howard; Duc Phu, Bui; Hajek, Richard; Phi Hung, Nguyen; Viet The Phuong, Tran; Quyet Thang, Huynh; Khan, Khurram Zaki; Penny, Robert; Mallery, David; Curley, Erin; Shelton, Candace; Yena, Peggy; Ingle, James N.; Couch, Fergus J.; Lingle, Wilma L.; King, Tari A.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria; Mills, Gordon B.; Dyer, Mary D.; Liu, Shuying; Meng, Xiaolong; Patangan, Modesto; Waldman, Frederic; Stoeppler, Hubert; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Thorne, Leigh; Huang, Mei; Boice, Lori; Hill, Ashley; Morrison, Carl; Gaudioso, Carmelo; Bshara, Wiam; Daily, Kelly; Egea, Sophie C.; Pegram, Mark D.; Gomez-Fernandez, Carmen; Dhir, Rajiv; Bhargava, Rohit; Brufsky, Adam; Shriver, Craig D.; Hooke, Jeffrey A.; Campbell, Jamie Leigh; Mural, Richard J.; Hu, Hai; Somiari, Stella; Larson, Caroline; Deyarmin, Brenda; Kvecher, Leonid; Kovatich, Albert J.; Ellis, Matthew J.; King, Tari A.; Hu, Hai; Couch, Fergus J.; Mural, Richard J.; Stricker, Thomas; White, Kevin; Olopade, Olufunmilayo; Ingle, James N.; Luo, Chunqing; Chen, Yaqin; Marks, Jeffrey R.; Waldman, Frederic; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Bose, Ron; Chang, Li-Wei; Beck, Andrew H.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria; Pihl, Todd; Jensen, Mark; Sfeir, Robert; Kahn, Ari; Chu, Anna; Kothiyal, Prachi; Wang, Zhining; Snyder, Eric; Pontius, Joan; Ayala, Brenda; Backus, Mark; Walton, Jessica; Baboud, Julien; Berton, Dominique; Nicholls, Matthew; Srinivasan, Deepak; Raman, Rohini; Girshik, Stanley; Kigonya, Peter; Alonso, Shelley; Sanbhadti, Rashmi; Barletta, Sean; Pot, David; Sheth, Margi; Demchok, John A.; Shaw, Kenna R. Mills; Yang, Liming; Eley, Greg; Ferguson, Martin L.; Tarnuzzer, Roy W.; Zhang, Jiashan; Dillon, Laura A. L.; Buetow, Kenneth; Fielding, Peter; Ozenberger, Bradley A.; Guyer, Mark S.; Sofia, Heidi J.; Palchik, Jacqueline D.

    2012-01-01

    We analysed primary breast cancers by genomic DNA copy number arrays, DNA methylation, exome sequencing, messenger RNA arrays, microRNA sequencing and reverse-phase protein arrays. Our ability to integrate information across platforms provided key insights into previously defined gene expression sub

  8. Comprehensive molecular portraits of human breast tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koboldt, Daniel C.; Fulton, Robert S.; McLellan, Michael D.; Schmidt, Heather; Kalicki-Veizer, Joelle; McMichael, Joshua F.; Fulton, Lucinda L.; Dooling, David J.; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Ally, Adrian; Balasundaram, Miruna; Butterfield, Yaron S. N.; Carlsen, Rebecca; Carter, Candace; Chu, Andy; Chuah, Eric; Chun, Hye-Jung E.; Coope, Robin J. N.; Dhalla, Noreen; Guin, Ranabir; Hirst, Carrie; Hirst, Martin; Holt, Robert A.; Lee, Darlene; Li, Haiyan I.; Mayo, Michael; Moore, Richard A.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Pleasance, Erin; Robertson, A. Gordon; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Shafiei, Arash; Sipahimalani, Payal; Slobodan, Jared R.; Stoll, Dominik; Tam, Angela; Thiessen, Nina; Varhol, Richard J.; Wye, Natasja; Zeng, Thomas; Zhao, Yongjun; Birol, Inanc; Jones, Steven J. M.; Marra, Marco A.; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Saksena, Gordon; Onofrio, Robert C.; Pho, Nam H.; Carter, Scott L.; Schumacher, Steven E.; Tabak, Barbara; Hernandez, Bryan; Gentry, Jeff; Nguyen, Huy; Crenshaw, Andrew; Ardlie, Kristin; Beroukhim, Rameen; Winckler, Wendy; Getz, Gad; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Meyerson, Matthew; Chin, Lynda; Park, Peter J.; Kucherlapati, Raju; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Auman, J. Todd; Fan, Cheng; Turman, Yidi J.; Shi, Yan; Li, Ling; Topal, Michael D.; He, Xiaping; Chao, Hann-Hsiang; Prat, Aleix; Silva, Grace O.; Iglesia, Michael D.; Zhao, Wei; Usary, Jerry; Berg, Jonathan S.; Adams, Michael; Booker, Jessica; Wu, Junyuan; Gulabani, Anisha; Bodenheimer, Tom; Hoyle, Alan P.; Simons, Janae V.; Soloway, Matthew G.; Mose, Lisle E.; Jefferys, Stuart R.; Balu, Saianand; Parker, Joel S.; Hayes, D. Neil; Perou, Charles M.; Malik, Simeen; Mahurkar, Swapna; Shen, Hui; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Triche, Timothy; Lai, Phillip H.; Bootwalla, Moiz S.; Maglinte, Dennis T.; Berman, Benjamin P.; Van den Berg, David J.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Laird, Peter W.; Creighton, Chad J.; Donehower, Lawrence A.; Getz, Gad; Noble, Michael; Voet, Doug; Saksena, Gordon; Gehlenborg, Nils; DiCara, Daniel; Zhang, Juinhua; Zhang, Hailei; Wu, Chang-Jiun; Liu, Spring Yingchun; Lawrence, Michael S.; Zou, Lihua; Sivachenko, Andrey; Lin, Pei; Stojanov, Petar; Jing, Rui; Cho, Juok; Sinha, Raktim; Park, Richard W.; Nazaire, Marc-Danie; Robinson, Jim; Thorvaldsdottir, Helga; Mesirov, Jill; Park, Peter J.; Chin, Lynda; Reynolds, Sheila; Kreisberg, Richard B.; Bernard, Brady; Bressler, Ryan; Erkkila, Timo; Lin, Jake; Thorsson, Vesteinn; Zhang, Wei; Shmulevich, Ilya; Ciriello, Giovanni; Weinhold, Nils; Schultz, Nikolaus; Gao, Jianjiong; Cerami, Ethan; Gross, Benjamin; Jacobsen, Anders; Sinha, Rileen; Aksoy, B. Arman; Antipin, Yevgeniy; Reva, Boris; Shen, Ronglai; Taylor, Barry S.; Ladanyi, Marc; Sander, Chris; Anur, Pavana; Spellman, Paul T.; Lu, Yiling; Liu, Wenbin; Verhaak, Roel R. G.; Mills, Gordon B.; Akbani, Rehan; Zhang, Nianxiang; Broom, Bradley M.; Casasent, Tod D.; Wakefield, Chris; Unruh, Anna K.; Baggerly, Keith; Coombes, Kevin; Weinstein, John N.; Haussler, David; Benz, Christopher C.; Stuart, Joshua M.; Benz, Stephen C.; Zhu, Jingchun; Szeto, Christopher C.; Scott, Gary K.; Yau, Christina; Paul, Evan O.; Carlin, Daniel; Wong, Christopher; Sokolov, Artem; Thusberg, Janita; Mooney, Sean; Ng, Sam; Goldstein, Theodore C.; Ellrott, Kyle; Grifford, Mia; Wilks, Christopher; Ma, Singer; Craft, Brian; Yan, Chunhua; Hu, Ying; Meerzaman, Daoud; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Bowen, Jay; Ramirez, Nilsa C.; Black, Aaron D.; Pyatt, Robert E.; White, Peter; Zmuda, Erik J.; Frick, Jessica; Lichtenberg, Taram.; Brookens, Robin; George, Myra M.; Gerken, Mark A.; Harper, Hollie A.; Leraas, Kristen M.; Wise, Lisa J.; Tabler, Teresa R.; McAllister, Cynthia; Barr, Thomas; Hart-Kothari, Melissa; Tarvin, Katie; Saller, Charles; Sandusky, George; Mitchell, Colleen; Iacocca, Mary V.; Brown, Jennifer; Rabeno, Brenda; Czerwinski, Christine; Petrelli, Nicholas; Dolzhansky, Oleg; Abramov, Mikhail; Voronina, Olga; Potapova, Olga; Marks, Jeffrey R.; Suchorska, Wiktoria M.; Murawa, Dawid; Kycler, Witold; Ibbs, Matthew; Korski, Konstanty; Spychala, Arkadiusz; Murawa, Pawel; Brzezinski, Jacek J.; Perz, Hanna; Lazniak, Radoslaw; Teresiak, Marek; Tatka, Honorata; Leporowska, Ewa; Bogusz-Czerniewicz, Marta; Malicki, Julian; Mackiewicz, Andrzej; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Van Le, Xuan; Kohl, Bernard; Viet Tien, Nguyen; Thorp, Richard; Van Bang, Nguyen; Sussman, Howard; Duc Phu, Bui; Hajek, Richard; Phi Hung, Nguyen; Viet The Phuong, Tran; Quyet Thang, Huynh; Khan, Khurram Zaki; Penny, Robert; Mallery, David; Curley, Erin; Shelton, Candace; Yena, Peggy; Ingle, James N.; Couch, Fergus J.; Lingle, Wilma L.; King, Tari A.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria; Mills, Gordon B.; Dyer, Mary D.; Liu, Shuying; Meng, Xiaolong; Patangan, Modesto; Waldman, Frederic; Stoeppler, Hubert; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Thorne, Leigh; Huang, Mei; Boice, Lori; Hill, Ashley; Morrison, Carl; Gaudioso, Carmelo; Bshara, Wiam; Daily, Kelly; Egea, Sophie C.; Pegram, Mark D.; Gomez-Fernandez, Carmen; Dhir, Rajiv; Bhargava, Rohit; Brufsky, Adam; Shriver, Craig D.; Hooke, Jeffrey A.; Campbell, Jamie Leigh; Mural, Richard J.; Hu, Hai; Somiari, Stella; Larson, Caroline; Deyarmin, Brenda; Kvecher, Leonid; Kovatich, Albert J.; Ellis, Matthew J.; King, Tari A.; Hu, Hai; Couch, Fergus J.; Mural, Richard J.; Stricker, Thomas; White, Kevin; Olopade, Olufunmilayo; Ingle, James N.; Luo, Chunqing; Chen, Yaqin; Marks, Jeffrey R.; Waldman, Frederic; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Bose, Ron; Chang, Li-Wei; Beck, Andrew H.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria; Pihl, Todd; Jensen, Mark; Sfeir, Robert; Kahn, Ari; Chu, Anna; Kothiyal, Prachi; Wang, Zhining; Snyder, Eric; Pontius, Joan; Ayala, Brenda; Backus, Mark; Walton, Jessica; Baboud, Julien; Berton, Dominique; Nicholls, Matthew; Srinivasan, Deepak; Raman, Rohini; Girshik, Stanley; Kigonya, Peter; Alonso, Shelley; Sanbhadti, Rashmi; Barletta, Sean; Pot, David; Sheth, Margi; Demchok, John A.; Shaw, Kenna R. Mills; Yang, Liming; Eley, Greg; Ferguson, Martin L.; Tarnuzzer, Roy W.; Zhang, Jiashan; Dillon, Laura A. L.; Buetow, Kenneth; Fielding, Peter; Ozenberger, Bradley A.; Guyer, Mark S.; Sofia, Heidi J.; Palchik, Jacqueline D.

    2012-01-01

    We analysed primary breast cancers by genomic DNA copy number arrays, DNA methylation, exome sequencing, messenger RNA arrays, microRNA sequencing and reverse-phase protein arrays. Our ability to integrate information across platforms provided key insights into previously defined gene expression sub

  9. Detection of cellular senescence within human invasive breast carcinomas distinguishes different breast tumor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotarelo, Cristina L; Schad, Arno; Kirkpatrick, Charles James; Sleeman, Jonathan P; Springer, Erik; Schmidt, Marcus; Thaler, Sonja

    2016-11-15

    Oncogene-induced senescence is thought to act as a barrier to tumorigenesis by arresting cells at risk of malignant transformation. Nevertheless, numerous findings suggest that senescent cells may conversely promote tumor progression through the development of the senescence-associated secretome they produce. It is likely that the composition and the physiological consequences mediated by the senescence secretome are dependent on the oncogenes that trigger the senescence program. Breast cancer represents a heterogenous disease that can be divided into breast cancer subtypes due to different subsets of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities. As tumor initiation and progression of these breast cancer subtypes is triggered by diverse oncogenic stimuli, differences in the senescence secretomes within breast tumors might be responsible for tumor initiation, progression, metastasis and therapeutic response. Many studies have addressed the role of senescence as a barrier to tumor progression using murine xenograft models. However, few investigations have been performed to elucidate the degree to which senescent tumor cells are present within untreated human tumors, and if present, whether these senescent tumor cells may play a role in disease progression. In the present study we analysed the appearance of senescent cells within invasive breast cancers. Detection of cellular senescence by the use of SAβ-galactosidase (SAβ-gal) staining within invasive breast carcinoms from 129 untreated patients revealed differences in the amount of SAβ-gal+ tumor cells between breast cancer subtypes. The highest percentages of SAβ-gal+ tumor cells were found in HER2-positive and luminal A breast carcinomas whereas triple negative tumors showed either little or no positivity.

  10. Human breast milk: A review on its composition and bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreas, Nicholas J; Kampmann, Beate; Mehring Le-Doare, Kirsty

    2015-11-01

    Breast milk is the perfect nutrition for infants, a result of millions of years of evolution, finely attuning it to the requirements of the infant. Breast milk contains many complex proteins, lipids and carbohydrates, the concentrations of which alter dramatically over a single feed, as well as over lactation, to reflect the infant's needs. In addition to providing a source of nutrition for infants, breast milk contains a myriad of biologically active components. These molecules possess diverse roles, both guiding the development of the infants immune system and intestinal microbiota. Orchestrating the development of the microbiota are the human milk oligosaccharides, the synthesis of which are determined by the maternal genotype. In this review, we discuss the composition of breast milk and the factors that affect it during the course of breast feeding. Understanding the components of breast milk and their functions will allow for the improvement of clinical practices, infant feeding and our understanding of immune responses to infection and vaccination in infants.

  11. Vitamin D content in human breast milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Við Streym, Susanna; Højskov, Carsten S; Møller, Ulla Kristine

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Parents are advised to avoid the direct sun exposure of their newborns. Therefore, the vitamin D status of exclusively breastfed newborns is entirely dependent on the supply of vitamin D from breast milk. OBJECTIVES: We explored concentrations of ergocalciferol (vitamin D2......) and cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) (vitamin D) and 25-hydroxivitamin D2 plus D3 (25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]) in foremilk and hindmilk during the first 9 mo of lactation and identified indexes of importance to the concentrations. DESIGN: We collected blood and breast-milk samples from mothers at 2 wk (n = 107), 4 mo......, (n = 90), and 9 mo (n = 48) postpartum. Blood samples from infants were collected 4 and 9 mo after birth. We measured concentrations of vitamin D metabolites in blood and milk samples with the use of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. RESULTS: Concentrations of vitamin D and 25(OH)D...

  12. Detection of Volatile Metabolites of Garlic in Human Breast Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffler, Laura; Sauermann, Yvonne; Zeh, Gina; Hauf, Katharina; Heinlein, Anja; Sharapa, Constanze; Buettner, Andrea

    2016-06-06

    The odor of human breast milk after ingestion of raw garlic at food-relevant concentrations by breastfeeding mothers was investigated for the first time chemo-analytically using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/olfactometry (GC-MS/O), as well as sensorially using a trained human sensory panel. Sensory evaluation revealed a clear garlic/cabbage-like odor that appeared in breast milk about 2.5 h after consumption of garlic. GC-MS/O analyses confirmed the occurrence of garlic-derived metabolites in breast milk, namely allyl methyl sulfide (AMS), allyl methyl sulfoxide (AMSO) and allyl methyl sulfone (AMSO₂). Of these, only AMS had a garlic-like odor whereas the other two metabolites were odorless. This demonstrates that the odor change in human milk is not related to a direct transfer of garlic odorants, as is currently believed, but rather derives from a single metabolite. The formation of these metabolites is not fully understood, but AMSO and AMSO₂ are most likely formed by the oxidation of AMS in the human body. The excretion rates of these metabolites into breast milk were strongly time-dependent with large inter-individual differences.

  13. Detection of Volatile Metabolites of Garlic in Human Breast Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Scheffler

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The odor of human breast milk after ingestion of raw garlic at food-relevant concentrations by breastfeeding mothers was investigated for the first time chemo-analytically using gas chromatography−mass spectrometry/olfactometry (GC-MS/O, as well as sensorially using a trained human sensory panel. Sensory evaluation revealed a clear garlic/cabbage-like odor that appeared in breast milk about 2.5 h after consumption of garlic. GC-MS/O analyses confirmed the occurrence of garlic-derived metabolites in breast milk, namely allyl methyl sulfide (AMS, allyl methyl sulfoxide (AMSO and allyl methyl sulfone (AMSO2. Of these, only AMS had a garlic-like odor whereas the other two metabolites were odorless. This demonstrates that the odor change in human milk is not related to a direct transfer of garlic odorants, as is currently believed, but rather derives from a single metabolite. The formation of these metabolites is not fully understood, but AMSO and AMSO2 are most likely formed by the oxidation of AMS in the human body. The excretion rates of these metabolites into breast milk were strongly time-dependent with large inter-individual differences.

  14. Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies in human breast milk: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Elle; Robinson, Steven E; Amato, Carol; McMillan, Colette; Westcott, Jay; Wolf, Tiffany; Robinson, William A

    2014-04-01

    Recently, therapeutic monoclonal antibodies have been introduced for the treatment of advanced melanoma and other diseases. It remains unclear whether these drugs can be safely administered to women who are breast feeding because of the potential hazardous side effects for nursing infants. One such therapy for metastatic melanoma is ipilimumab, a human monoclonal antibody that blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-antigen-4, and is the preferred treatment for patients with metastatic melanoma when other molecular therapies are not viable. This study measured ipilimumab levels in the breast milk of a patient undergoing treatment that were enough to raise concerns for a nursing infant exposed to ipilimumab.

  15. Transposon insertional mutagenesis in mice identifies human breast cancer susceptibility genes and signatures for stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liming; Jenjaroenpun, Piroon; Pillai, Andrea Mun Ching; Ivshina, Anna V.; Ow, Ghim Siong; Efthimios, Motakis; Zhiqun, Tang; Lee, Song-Choon; Rogers, Keith; Ward, Jerrold M.; Mori, Seiichi; Adams, David J.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.; Ban, Kenneth Hon-Kim; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A.; Thiery, Jean Paul

    2017-01-01

    Robust prognostic gene signatures and therapeutic targets are difficult to derive from expression profiling because of the significant heterogeneity within breast cancer (BC) subtypes. Here, we performed forward genetic screening in mice using Sleeping Beauty transposon mutagenesis to identify candidate BC driver genes in an unbiased manner, using a stabilized N-terminal truncated β-catenin gene as a sensitizer. We identified 134 mouse susceptibility genes from 129 common insertion sites within 34 mammary tumors. Of these, 126 genes were orthologous to protein-coding genes in the human genome (hereafter, human BC susceptibility genes, hBCSGs), 70% of which are previously reported cancer-associated genes, and ∼16% are known BC suppressor genes. Network analysis revealed a gene hub consisting of E1A binding protein P300 (EP300), CD44 molecule (CD44), neurofibromin (NF1) and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), which are linked to a significant number of mutated hBCSGs. From our survival prediction analysis of the expression of human BC genes in 2,333 BC cases, we isolated a six-gene-pair classifier that stratifies BC patients with high confidence into prognostically distinct low-, moderate-, and high-risk subgroups. Furthermore, we proposed prognostic classifiers identifying three basal and three claudin-low tumor subgroups. Intriguingly, our hBCSGs are mostly unrelated to cell cycle/mitosis genes and are distinct from the prognostic signatures currently used for stratifying BC patients. Our findings illustrate the strength and validity of integrating functional mutagenesis screens in mice with human cancer transcriptomic data to identify highly prognostic BC subtyping biomarkers. PMID:28251929

  16. Characteristic Gene Expression Profiles of Human Fibroblasts and Breast Cancer Cells in a Newly Developed Bilateral Coculture System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Ueno

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The microenvironment of cancer cells has been implicated in cancer development and progression. Cancer-associated fibroblast constitutes a major stromal component of the microenvironment. To analyze interaction between cancer cells and fibroblasts, we have developed a new bilateral coculture system using a two-sided microporous collagen membrane. Human normal skin fibroblasts were cocultured with three different human breast cancer cell lines: MCF-7, SK-BR-3, and HCC1937. After coculture, mRNA was extracted separately from cancer cells and fibroblasts and applied to transcriptomic analysis with microarray. Top 500 commonly up- or downregulated genes were characterized by enrichment functional analysis using MetaCore Functional Analysis. Most of the genes upregulated in cancer cells were downregulated in fibroblasts while most of the genes downregulated in cancer cells were upregulated in fibroblasts, indicating that changing patterns of mRNA expression were reciprocal between cancer cells and fibroblasts. In coculture, breast cancer cells commonly increased genes related to mitotic response and TCA pathway while fibroblasts increased genes related to carbohydrate metabolism including glycolysis, glycogenesis, and glucose transport, indicating that fibroblasts support cancer cell proliferation by supplying energy sources. We propose that the bilateral coculture system using collagen membrane is useful to study interactions between cancer cells and stromal cells by mimicking in vivo tumor microenvironment.

  17. KiSS-1 expression in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Tracey A; Watkins, Gareth; Jiang, Wen G

    2005-01-01

    The KiSS-1 gene encodes a 145 amino acid residue peptide that is further processed to a final peptide, metastin, a ligand to a G-coupled orphan receptor (OT7T175/AXOR12). KiSS-1 has been identified as a putative human metastasis suppressor gene in melanomas and in breast cancer cell lines. This study aimed to determine the expression and distribution of KiSS-1 and its receptor in human breast cancer tissues and to identify a possible link between expression levels and patient prognosis. Frozen sections from breast cancer primary tumours (matched tumour 124 and background 33) were immuno-stained with KiSS-1 antibody. RNA was reverse transcribed and analyzed by Q-PCR (standardized using beta-actin, and normalized with cytokeratin-19 levels). Levels of expression of KiSS-1 were higher in tumour compared to background tissues (3,124+/-1,262 vs 2,397+/-1,181) and significantly increased in node positive tumours compared to node negative (3,637+/-1,719 vs 2,653+/-1,994, P = 0.02). KiSS-1 expression was also increased with increasing grade and TNM status. There were no such trends with the KiSS-1 receptor. Expression of KiSS-1 was higher in patients who had died from breast cancer than those who had remained healthy (4,631+/-3,024 vs 2,280+/-1,403) whereas expression of the receptor was reduced (480+/-162 vs 195+/-134). Immunohistochemical staining showed increased expression of KiSS-1 in tumour sections. Insertion of the KiSS-1 gene into the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, resulted in cells that were significantly more motile and invasive in behaviour, with reduced adhesion to matrix, using respective assays. In conclusion, KiSS-1 expression is increased in human breast cancer, particularly in patients with aggressive tumours and with mortality. Over-expression of KiSS-1 in breast cancer cells result in more aggressive phenotype. Together, it suggests that KiSS-1 plays a role beyond the initial metastasis repressor in this cancer type.

  18. Human breast milk and the gastrointestinal innate immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakaitis, Brett M; Denning, Patricia W

    2014-06-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a large potential portal for multiple infectious agents to enter the human body. The GI system performs multiple functions as part of the neonate's innate immune system, providing critical defense during a vulnerable period. Multiple mechanisms and actions are enhanced by the presence of human breast milk. Bioactive factors found in human milk work together to create and maintain an optimal and healthy environment, allowing the intestines to deliver ideal nutrition to the host and afford protection by a variety of mechanisms.

  19. Evaluation of a candidate breast cancer associated SNP in ERCC4 as a risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results from the consortium of investigators of modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2 (CIMBA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Osorio (Ana); R.L. Milne (Roger); G. Pita (G.); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); T. Heikinen (Tuomas); J. Simard (Jacques); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); J. Beesley (Jonathan); X.C. Chen (X. C.); S. Healey (Sue); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); F.J. Couch (Fergus); X. Wang (Xing); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); M. Barile (Monica); A. Viel (Alessandra); L. Tizzoni (Laura); C. Szabo (Csilla); L. Foretova (Lenka); M. Zikan (Michal); K. Claes (Kathleen); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); G. Rennert (Gad); F. Lejbkowicz (Flavio); O. Barnett-Griness (Ofra); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); N. Weerasooriya (Nayana); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); M. Thomassen (Mads); D. Cruger (Dorthe); M.A. Caligo (Maria); E. Friedman (Eitan); B. Kaufman (Bella); Y. Laitman (Yael); S. Cohen (Shimrit); T. Kontorovich (Tair); R. Gershoni-Baruch; E. Dagan (Efrat); H. Jernström (H.); M.S. Askmalm (Marie); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); B. Malmer (Beatrice); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); J. Brunet (Joan); T. Ramon Y Cajal; D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); U. Hamann (Ute); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); S. Verhoef; E.B.G. Garcíla (E.B. Gómez); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); D.F. Easton (Douglas); S. Peock (Susan); M. Cook (Margaret); C.T. Oliver (Clare); D. Frost (Debra); C. Luccarini (Craig); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); R. Eeles (Rosalind); G. Pichert (Gabriella); J. Cook (Jackie); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); F. Douglas (Fiona); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); L. Barjhoux (Laure); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); V. Moncoutier (Virginie); S. Giraud (Sophie); C. Cassini (C.); L. Faivre (Laurence); F. Révillion (Françoise); J.-P. Peyrat; D.W. Muller (Danièle); J.P. Fricker (Jean Pierre); H. Lynch (Henry); E.M. John (Esther); S.S. Buys (Saundra); M.B. Daly (Mary); J.L. Hopper (John); M.-B. Terry (Mary-Beth); A. Miron (Alexander); Y. Yassin (Yosuf); D. Goldgar (David); C.F. Singer (Christian); D. Gschwantler-Kaulich (Daphne); G. Pfeiler (Georg); E. Spiess (Eberhard); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); O.T. Johannson (Oskar); T. Kircchoff (Tomas); K. Offit (Kenneth); K. Kosarin (Kristi); M. Piedmonte (Marion); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); K. Wakeley (Katie); J.F. Boggess (John); J. Basil (Jack); P.E. Schwartz (Peter); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); A.E. Toland (Amanda); M. Montagna (Marco); C. Casella (Cinzia); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); A. Allavena (Anna); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Versmold (Beatrix); C. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); D. Niederacher (Dieter); H. Deiler (H.); B. Fiebig (Britta); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); D. Schaefer (D.); U.G. Froster (U.); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); L. McGuffog (Lesley); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); P. Radice (Paolo); J. Benítez (Javier)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of a SNP in intron 1 of the ERCC4 gene (rs744154), previously reported to be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in the general population, as a breast cancer risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Methods:

  20. Evaluation of a candidate breast cancer associated SNP in ERCC4 as a risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results from the consortium of investigators of modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2 (CIMBA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Osorio (Ana); R.L. Milne (Roger); G. Pita (G.); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); T. Heikinen (Tuomas); J. Simard (Jacques); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); J. Beesley (Jonathan); X.C. Chen (X. C.); S. Healey (Sue); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); F.J. Couch (Fergus); X. Wang (Xing); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); M. Barile (Monica); A. Viel (Alessandra); L. Tizzoni (Laura); C. Szabo (Csilla); L. Foretova (Lenka); M. Zikan (Michal); K. Claes (Kathleen); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); G. Rennert (Gad); F. Lejbkowicz (Flavio); O. Barnett-Griness (Ofra); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); N. Weerasooriya (Nayana); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); M. Thomassen (Mads); D. Cruger (Dorthe); M.A. Caligo (Maria); E. Friedman (Eitan); B. Kaufman (Bella); Y. Laitman (Yael); S. Cohen (Shimrit); T. Kontorovich (Tair); R. Gershoni-Baruch; E. Dagan (Efrat); H. Jernström (H.); M.S. Askmalm (Marie); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); B. Malmer (Beatrice); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); J. Brunet (Joan); T. Ramon Y Cajal; D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); U. Hamann (Ute); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); S. Verhoef; E.B.G. Garcíla (E.B. Gómez); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); D.F. Easton (Douglas); S. Peock (Susan); M. Cook (Margaret); C.T. Oliver (Clare); D. Frost (Debra); C. Luccarini (Craig); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); R. Eeles (Rosalind); G. Pichert (Gabriella); J. Cook (Jackie); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); F. Douglas (Fiona); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); L. Barjhoux (Laure); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); V. Moncoutier (Virginie); S. Giraud (Sophie); C. Cassini (C.); L. Faivre (Laurence); F. Révillion (Françoise); J.-P. Peyrat; D.W. Muller (Danièle); J.P. Fricker (Jean Pierre); H. Lynch (Henry); E.M. John (Esther); S.S. Buys (Saundra); M.B. Daly (Mary); J.L. Hopper (John); M.-B. Terry (Mary-Beth); A. Miron (Alexander); Y. Yassin (Yosuf); D. Goldgar (David); C.F. Singer (Christian); D. Gschwantler-Kaulich (Daphne); G. Pfeiler (Georg); E. Spiess (Eberhard); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); O.T. Johannson (Oskar); T. Kircchoff (Tomas); K. Offit (Kenneth); K. Kosarin (Kristi); M. Piedmonte (Marion); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); K. Wakeley (Katie); J.F. Boggess (John); J. Basil (Jack); P.E. Schwartz (Peter); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); A.E. Toland (Amanda); M. Montagna (Marco); C. Casella (Cinzia); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); A. Allavena (Anna); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Versmold (Beatrix); C. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); D. Niederacher (Dieter); H. Deiler (H.); B. Fiebig (Britta); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); D. Schaefer (D.); U.G. Froster (U.); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); L. McGuffog (Lesley); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); P. Radice (Paolo); J. Benítez (Javier)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of a SNP in intron 1 of the ERCC4 gene (rs744154), previously reported to be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in the general population, as a breast cancer risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Methods:

  1. Evaluation of a candidate breast cancer associated SNP in ERCC4 as a risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2 (CIMBA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osorio, A.; Milne, R.L.; Pita, G.

    2009-01-01

    genotyped rs744154 in 9408 BRCA1 and 5632 BRCA2 mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) and assessed its association with breast cancer risk using a retrospective weighted cohort approach. RESULTS: We found no evidence of association with breast cancer risk...

  2. Human exposure to endocrine disruptors and breast milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanidou, M; Maravelias, C; Spiliopoulou, C

    2009-09-01

    Endocrine system is one of the most sensitive communication networks of the human body which influences all aspects of human health and well-being, including reproductive potential, cognitive functions, thyroid and metabolism, digestion and hormonal balance. In recent years basic laboratory research has been focused on the potential relationship between environmental contaminants and cellular endocrine function. Environmental contaminants are ubiquitous in the environment, alter endocrine physiology and produce endocrine disruption without acting as classic toxicants. These endocrine disruptors (EDCs) are lipophilic and stored for long periods of time in the adipose tissue. Maternal exposure to EDCs during pregnancy and lactation has as a result the exposure of the fetus and neonate through placenta and breast milk. It has been recognized that human milk is the best natural food for neonates providing immunologic, developmental and practical advantages throughout childhood. However, contamination of human milk by the presence of environmental toxicants is widespread through the past decades due to inadequately controlled pollution. Persistent pesticides, chemical solvents and others tend to invade slowly the environment, to bioaccumulate in the food chain and to have long half-lives in animals and humans. During the past fifteen years, the scientific interest has been focused on xenoestrogens, i.e.,environmental chemicals with estrogen disrupting activity. Certain adverse health and reproductive outcomes are attributed to these chemicals in wildlife, in laboratory animals, as well as in humans. Although most toxic agents are hazardous in high doses, the human health risks associated with EDCs concern exposure to low doses. The human health risks that may be associated with these low-level but constant exposures are still largely unknown and highly controversial. In this paper, we review available data on environmental chemicals present in breast milk that may

  3. BreastDefend enhances effect of tamoxifen in estrogen receptor-positive human breast cancer in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shujie; Castillo, Victor; Welty, Matt; Alvarado, Mark; Eliaz, Isaac; Temm, Constance J; Sandusky, George E; Sliva, Daniel

    2017-02-16

    Tamoxifen (TAM) has been widely used for the treatment of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer and its combination with other therapies is being actively investigated as a way to increase efficacy and decrease side effects. Here, we evaluate the therapeutic potential of co-treatment with TAM and BreastDefend (BD), a dietary supplement formula, in ER-positive human breast cancer. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were determined in ER-positive human breast cancer cells MCF-7 by MTT assay, quantitation of cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragments and expression of cleaved PARP, respectively. The molecular mechanism was identified using RNA microarray analysis and western blotting. Tumor tissues from xenograft mouse model were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Our data clearly demonstrate that a combination of 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT) with BD lead to profound inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. This effect is consistent with the regulation of apoptotic and TAM resistant genes at the transcription and translation levels. Importantly, TAM and BD co-treatment significantly enhanced apoptosis, suppressed tumor growth and reduced tumor weight in a xenograft model of human ER-positive breast cancer. BD sensitized ER-positive human breast cancer cells to 4-OHT/TAM treatment in vitro and in vivo. BreastDefend can be used in an adjuvant therapy to increase the therapeutic effect of tamoxifen in patients with ER-positive breast cancer.

  4. GPER mediates estrogen-induced signaling and proliferation in human breast epithelial cells and normal and malignant breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaling, Allison L; Prossnitz, Eric R; Hathaway, Helen J

    2014-06-01

    17β-Estradiol (estrogen), through receptor binding and activation, is required for mammary gland development. Estrogen stimulates epithelial proliferation in the mammary gland, promoting ductal elongation and morphogenesis. In addition to a developmental role, estrogen promotes proliferation in tumorigenic settings, particularly breast cancer. The proliferative effects of estrogen in the normal breast and breast tumors are attributed to estrogen receptor α. Although in vitro studies have demonstrated that the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER, previously called GPR30) can modulate proliferation in breast cancer cells both positively and negatively depending on cellular context, its role in proliferation in the intact normal or malignant breast remains unclear. Estrogen-induced GPER-dependent proliferation was assessed in the immortalized nontumorigenic human breast epithelial cell line, MCF10A, and an ex vivo organ culture model employing human breast tissue from reduction mammoplasty or tumor resections. Stimulation by estrogen and the GPER-selective agonist G-1 increased the mitotic index in MCF10A cells and proportion of cells in the cell cycle in human breast and breast cancer explants, suggesting increased proliferation. Inhibition of candidate signaling pathways that may link GPER activation to proliferation revealed a dependence on Src, epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation by heparin-bound EGF and subsequent ERK phosphorylation. Proliferation was not dependent on matrix metalloproteinase cleavage of membrane-bound pro-HB-EGF. The contribution of GPER to estrogen-induced proliferation in MCF10A cells and breast tissue was confirmed by the ability of GPER-selective antagonist G36 to abrogate estrogen- and G-1-induced proliferation, and the ability of siRNA knockdown of GPER to reduce estrogen- and G-1-induced proliferation in MCF10A cells. This is the first study to demonstrate GPER-dependent proliferation in primary normal and malignant

  5. A Gene Regulatory Program in Human Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Renhua; Campos, John; Iida, Joji

    2015-12-01

    Molecular heterogeneity in human breast cancer has challenged diagnosis, prognosis, and clinical treatment. It is well known that molecular subtypes of breast tumors are associated with significant differences in prognosis and survival. Assuming that the differences are attributed to subtype-specific pathways, we then suspect that there might be gene regulatory mechanisms that modulate the behavior of the pathways and their interactions. In this study, we proposed an integrated methodology, including machine learning and information theory, to explore the mechanisms. Using existing data from three large cohorts of human breast cancer populations, we have identified an ensemble of 16 master regulator genes (or MR16) that can discriminate breast tumor samples into four major subtypes. Evidence from gene expression across the three cohorts has consistently indicated that the MR16 can be divided into two groups that demonstrate subtype-specific gene expression patterns. For example, group 1 MRs, including ESR1, FOXA1, and GATA3, are overexpressed in luminal A and luminal B subtypes, but lowly expressed in HER2-enriched and basal-like subtypes. In contrast, group 2 MRs, including FOXM1, EZH2, MYBL2, and ZNF695, display an opposite pattern. Furthermore, evidence from mutual information modeling has congruently indicated that the two groups of MRs either up- or down-regulate cancer driver-related genes in opposite directions. Furthermore, integration of somatic mutations with pathway changes leads to identification of canonical genomic alternations in a subtype-specific fashion. Taken together, these studies have implicated a gene regulatory program for breast tumor progression.

  6. Imaging Proteolysis by Living Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Sameni

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant progression is accompanied by degradation of extracellular matrix proteins. Here we describe a novel confocal assay in which we can observe proteolysis by living human breast cancer cells (BT20 and BT549 through the use of quenchedfluorescent protein substrates. Degradation thus was imaged, by confocal optical sectioning, as an accumulation of fluorescent products. With the BT20 cells, fluorescence was localized to pericellular focal areas that coincide with pits in the underlying matrix. In contrast, fluorescence was localized to intracellular vesicles in the BT549 cells, vesicles that also label for lysosomal markers. Neither intracellular nor pericellular fluorescence was observed in the BT549 cells in the presence of cytochalasin B, suggesting that degradation occurred intracellularly and was dependent on endocytic uptake of substrate. In the presence of a cathepsin 13-selective cysteine protease inhibitor, intracellular fluorescence was decreased ~90% and pericellular fluorescence decreased 67% to 96%, depending on the protein substrate. Matrix metallo protease inhibitors reduced pericellular fluorescence ~50%, i.e., comparably to a serine and a broad spectrum cysteine protease inhibitor. Our results suggest that: 1 a proteolytic cascade participates in pericellular digestion of matrix proteins by living human breast cancer cells, and 2 the cysteine protease cathepsin B participates in both pericellular and intracellular digestion of matrix proteins by living human breast cancer cells.

  7. FT-Raman spectroscopy study of human breast tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitar Carter, Renata A.; Martin, Airton A.; Netto, Mario M.; Soares, Fernando A.

    2004-07-01

    Optical spectroscopy has been extensively studied as a potential in vivo diagnostic tool to provide information about the chemical and morphologic structure of tissue. Raman Spectroscpy is an inelastic scattering process that can provide a wealth of spectral features that can be related to the specific molecular structure of the sample. This article reports results of an in vitro study of the FT-Raman human breast tissue spectra. An Nd:YAG laser at 1064nm was used as the excitation source in the FT-Raman Spectrometer. The neoplastic human breast samples, both Fibroadenoma and ICD, were obtained during therapeutical routine medical procedures required by the primary disease, and the non-diseased human tissue was obtained in plastic surgery. No sample preparation was needed for the FT-Raman spectra collection. The FT-Raman spectra were recorded from normal, benign (Fibroadenomas) and malignant (IDC-Intraductal Carcinoma) samples, adding up 51 different areas. The main spectral differences of a typical FT-Raman spectra of a Normal (Non-diseased), Fibroadenoma, and Infiltrating Ductal Carcinoma (IDC) breast tissue at the interval of 600 to 1800cm-1, which may differentiate diagnostically the sample, were found in the bands of 1230 to 1295cm-1, 1440 to 1460 cm-1 and 1650 to 1680 cm-1, assigned to the vibrational bands of the carbohydrate-amide III, proteins and lipids, and carbohydrate-amide I, respectively.

  8. Analyzing the regulation of metabolic pathways in human breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schramm Gunnar

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor therapy mainly attacks the metabolism to interfere the tumor's anabolism and signaling of proliferative second messengers. However, the metabolic demands of different cancers are very heterogeneous and depend on their origin of tissue, age, gender and other clinical parameters. We investigated tumor specific regulation in the metabolism of breast cancer. Methods For this, we mapped gene expression data from microarrays onto the corresponding enzymes and their metabolic reaction network. We used Haar Wavelet transforms on optimally arranged grid representations of metabolic pathways as a pattern recognition method to detect orchestrated regulation of neighboring enzymes in the network. Significant combined expression patterns were used to select metabolic pathways showing shifted regulation of the aggressive tumors. Results Besides up-regulation for energy production and nucleotide anabolism, we found an interesting cellular switch in the interplay of biosynthesis of steroids and bile acids. The biosynthesis of steroids was up-regulated for estrogen synthesis which is needed for proliferative signaling in breast cancer. In turn, the decomposition of steroid precursors was blocked by down-regulation of the bile acid pathway. Conclusion We applied an intelligent pattern recognition method for analyzing the regulation of metabolism and elucidated substantial regulation of human breast cancer at the interplay of cholesterol biosynthesis and bile acid metabolism pointing to specific breast cancer treatment.

  9. Cancer-associated retinopathy: an autoimmune retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurbuanto Tradjutrisno

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer-associated retinopathy (CAR is a paraneoplastic syndrome most commonly associated with small-cell carcinoma of the lung, but also less frequently reported in patients with breast, endometrial, and other cancers. A paraneoplastic syndrome (PNS is a secondary organ dysfunction occurring in a cancer patient at a site that is anatomically remote from the tumor. PNS is not due to a direct effect of the tumor itself or its metastases but caused by other mechanisms, commonly autoimmune mechanisms develop when malignant tumors express proteins, paraneoplastic antigens (PNA, which are normally present only in neurons. One retinal antigen implicated in the autoimmune mechanism of CAR is recoverin, a 23 kDa photoreceptor-specific calcium-binding protein modulating the activity of photoreceptor guanylyl cyclase. The anti-recoverin antibodies induced by the primary tumor may on contact with intraretinal recoverin initiate a photoreceptor degeneration and trigger photoreceptor death by apoptosis, thus causing blindness. Other circulating antibodies directed against a 46 kDa protein identified as retinol enolase and a 60 kDa retinal protein have been demonstrated in patients with clinically diagnosed CAR syndrome. In certain patients no specific antibody has been identified. This suggests that the CAR syndrome includes an heterogenous group of autoimmune conditions directed against various retinal proteins.

  10. A Mouse Model That Reproduces the Developmental Pathways and Site Specificity of the Cancers Associated With the Human BRCA1 Mutation Carrier State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Yen, Hai-Yun; Austria, Theresa; Pettersson, Jonas; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Maxson, Robert; Widschwendter, Martin; Dubeau, Louis

    2015-10-01

    Predisposition to breast and extrauterine Müllerian carcinomas in BRCA1 mutation carriers is due to a combination of cell-autonomous consequences of BRCA1 inactivation on cell cycle homeostasis superimposed on cell-nonautonomous hormonal factors magnified by the effects of BRCA1 mutations on hormonal changes associated with the menstrual cycle. We used the Müllerian inhibiting substance type 2 receptor (Mis2r) promoter and a truncated form of the Follicle stimulating hormone receptor (Fshr) promoter to introduce conditional knockouts of Brca1 and p53 not only in mouse mammary and Müllerian epithelia, but also in organs that control the estrous cycle. Sixty percent of the double mutant mice developed invasive Müllerian and mammary carcinomas. Mice carrying heterozygous mutations in Brca1 and p53 also developed invasive tumors, albeit at a lesser (30%) rate, in which the wild type alleles were no longer present due to loss of heterozygosity. While mice carrying heterozygous mutations in both genes developed mammary tumors, none of the mice carrying only a heterozygous p53 mutation developed such tumors (P < 0.0001), attesting to a role for Brca1 mutations in tumor development. This mouse model is attractive to investigate cell-nonautonomous mechanisms associated with cancer predisposition in BRCA1 mutation carriers and to investigate the merit of chemo-preventive drugs targeting such mechanisms.

  11. A Mouse Model That Reproduces the Developmental Pathways and Site Specificity of the Cancers Associated With the Human BRCA1 Mutation Carrier State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Predisposition to breast and extrauterine Müllerian carcinomas in BRCA1 mutation carriers is due to a combination of cell-autonomous consequences of BRCA1 inactivation on cell cycle homeostasis superimposed on cell-nonautonomous hormonal factors magnified by the effects of BRCA1 mutations on hormonal changes associated with the menstrual cycle. We used the Müllerian inhibiting substance type 2 receptor (Mis2r promoter and a truncated form of the Follicle stimulating hormone receptor (Fshr promoter to introduce conditional knockouts of Brca1 and p53 not only in mouse mammary and Müllerian epithelia, but also in organs that control the estrous cycle. Sixty percent of the double mutant mice developed invasive Müllerian and mammary carcinomas. Mice carrying heterozygous mutations in Brca1 and p53 also developed invasive tumors, albeit at a lesser (30% rate, in which the wild type alleles were no longer present due to loss of heterozygosity. While mice carrying heterozygous mutations in both genes developed mammary tumors, none of the mice carrying only a heterozygous p53 mutation developed such tumors (P < 0.0001, attesting to a role for Brca1 mutations in tumor development. This mouse model is attractive to investigate cell-nonautonomous mechanisms associated with cancer predisposition in BRCA1 mutation carriers and to investigate the merit of chemo-preventive drugs targeting such mechanisms.

  12. Benzyl Isothiocyanate Inhibits Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Cultured and Xenografted Human Breast Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sehrawat, Anuradha; Singh, Shivendra V.

    2011-01-01

    We showed previously that cruciferous vegetable constituent benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) inhibits growth of cultured and xenografted human breast cancer cells, and suppresses mammary cancer development in a transgenic mouse model. We now demonstrate, for the first time, that BITC inhibits epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in human breast cancer cells. Exposure of estrogen-independent MDA-MB-231 and estrogen-responsive MCF-7 human breast cancer cell lines and a pancreatic cancer cell ...

  13. Cancer-associated fibroblast promote transmigration through endothelial brain cells in three-dimensional in vitro models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Pyo; Lee, Joo Hyun; Gao, Ming-Qing; Kim, Baek Gil; Kang, Suki; Kim, Se Hoon; Cho, Nam Hoon

    2014-11-01

    Brain metastases are associated with high morbidity as well as with poor prognosis and survival in breast cancer patients. Despite its clinical importance, metastasis of breast cancer cells through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is poorly understood. The objective of our study was to investigate whether cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play crucial roles in breast cancer brain metastasis. Using a cell adhesion assays, in vitro BBB permeability and transmigration assays and soft agar colony formation assays, we investigated the physical roles of CAFs in breast cancer brain metastasis. We also performed immunofluorescence, flow cytometric analysis, Droplet Digital PCR and Simon™ Simple Western System to confirm changes in expression levels. We established two novel three-dimensional (3D) culture systems using a perpendicular slide chamber and applying 3D embedded culture method to reflect brain metastasis conditions. With a newly developed device, CAFs was proven to promote cell adhesion to human brain microvascular endothelial cells, in vitro BBB permeability and transmigration and colony formation of breast cancer cells. Furthermore, CAFs enhanced the invasive migration of breast cancer cells in two kinds of 3D cultures. These 3D models also reliably recapitulate the initial steps of BBB transmigration, micro-metastasis and colonization. Expression of integrin α5β1 and αvβ3, c-MET and α2,6-siayltransferase was increased in breast cancer cells that migrated through the BBB. In conclusion, based on our in vitro BBB and co-culture models, our data suggest that CAFs may play a role in breast cancer brain metastasis.

  14. Engineering targeted chromosomal amplifications in human breast epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Simeon; Yi, Kyung H; Park, Jeenah; Rajpurohit, Anandita; Price, Amanda J; Lauring, Josh

    2015-07-01

    Chromosomal amplifications are among the most common genetic alterations found in human cancers. However, experimental systems to study the processes that lead to specific, recurrent amplification events in human cancers are lacking. Moreover, some common amplifications, such as that at 8p11-12 in breast cancer, harbor multiple driver oncogenes, which are poorly modeled by conventional overexpression approaches. We sought to develop an experimental system to model recurrent chromosomal amplification events in human cell lines. Our strategy is to use homologous-recombination-mediated gene targeting to deliver a dominantly selectable, amplifiable marker to a specified chromosomal location. We used adeno-associated virus vectors to target human MCF-7 breast cancer cells at the ZNF703 locus, in the recurrent 8p11-12 amplicon, using the E. coli inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) enzyme as a marker. We applied selective pressure using IMPDH inhibitors. Surviving clones were found to have increased copy number of ZNF703 (average 2.5-fold increase) by droplet digital PCR and FISH. Genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization confirmed that amplifications had occurred on the short arm of chromosome 8, without changes on 8q or other chromosomes. Patterns of amplification were variable and similar to those seen in primary human breast cancers, including "sawtooth" patterns, distal copy number loss, and large continuous regions of copy number gain. This system will allow study of the cis- and trans-acting factors that are permissive for chromosomal amplification and provide a model to analyze oncogene cooperativity in amplifications harboring multiple candidate driver genes.

  15. Carbon nanotube electron field emitters for X-ray imaging of human breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gidcumb, Emily; Gao, Bo; Shan, Jing; Inscoe, Christy; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2014-01-01

    For imaging human breast cancer, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been shown to improve image quality and breast cancer detection in comparison to 2D mammography. Current DBT systems have limited spatial resolution and lengthy scan times. Stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT), utilizing an array of carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission X-ray sources, provides increased spatial resolution and potentially faster imaging than current DBT systems. This study presents...

  16. Evaluation of a candidate breast cancer associated SNP in ERCC4 as a risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2 (CIMBA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osorio, A; Milne, R L; Pita, G;

    2009-01-01

    Background:In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of a SNP in intron 1 of the ERCC4 gene (rs744154), previously reported to be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in the general population, as a breast cancer risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.Methods:We have...... genotyped rs744154 in 9408 BRCA1 and 5632 BRCA2 mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) and assessed its association with breast cancer risk using a retrospective weighted cohort approach.Results:We found no evidence of association with breast cancer risk...... for BRCA1 (per-allele HR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.93-1.04, P=0.5) or BRCA2 (per-allele HR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.89-1.06, P=0.5) mutation carriers.Conclusion:This SNP is not a significant modifier of breast cancer risk for mutation carriers, though weak associations cannot be ruled out.British Journal of Cancer advance...

  17. INHIBITION OF SPONTANEOUS APOPTOSIS IN HUMAN BREAST CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵志敏; 江明; 吴炅; 余黎民; 韩企夏; 张延璆; 沈镇宙

    1996-01-01

    Breast tumorigenesis proceeds through an accumulation of specific genetic alteration. Breast malignant transformation is dependent on not only the rate of cell production but also on apoptcsis,a genetically prograined process of autonomous ceil death. We investigated whether breast tumorigenesis involved an altered susceptibility to apoptosis and proliferation by examining normal breast epithelium and breast cancer sampies. We found there is a great inhibition of spontaneous apoptosis in breast cancer ceils compared with normal breast epithelium. The inhibition of apoptosis in breast cancer may contribute to neoplastic transformation.

  18. Viral Etiology Relationship between Human Papillomavirus and Human Breast Cancer and Target of Gene Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Chen; TENG Zhi Ping; CHEN Yun Xin; SHEN Dan Hua; LI Jin Tao; ZENG Yi

    2016-01-01

    ObjectiveTo explore the viral etiology of human breast cancer to determine whether there are novel molecular targets for gene therapy of breast cancer and provide evidence for the research of gene therapy and vaccine development for breast cancer. MethodsPCR was used to screen HPV16 and HPV18 oncogenesE6 andE7 in the SKBR3 cell line andin 76 paraffin embedded breast cancer tissue samples. RNA interference was used to knock down the expression of HPV18E6 andE7 in SKBR3 cells, then the changes in the expression of cell-cycle related proteins, cell viability, colony formation, metastasis, and cell cycle progression were determined. ResultsHPV18 oncogenesE6 andE7 were amplified and sequenced from the SKBR3 cells. Ofthe patient samples, 6.58% and 23.68% were tested to bepositivefor HPV18E6 and HPV18E7. In the cell culture models, the knockdown of HPV18E6 andE7 inhibited the proliferation, metastasis, and cell cycle progression of SKBR3 cell. The knockdown also clearly affected the expression levels of cell cycle related proteins. ConclusionHPV was a contributor to virus causedhuman breast cancer, suggesting that the oncogenes in HPV were potential targets for gene therapy of breast cancer.

  19. Mathematical analysis of mammary ducts in lactating human breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, S Negin; Geddes, Donna; Hassiotou, Foteini; Hassanipour, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    This work studies a simple model for milk transport through lactating human breast ducts, and describes mathematically the mass transfer from alveolar sacs through the mammary ducts to the nipple. In this model both the phenomena of diffusion in the sacs and conventional flow in ducts have been considered. The ensuing analysis reveals that there is an optimal range of bifurcation numbers leading to the easiest milk flow based on the minimum flow resistance. This model formulates certain difficult-to-measure values like diameter of the alveolar sacs, and the total length of the milk path as a function of easy-to-measure properties such as milk fluid properties and macroscopic measurements of the breast. Alveolar dimensions from breast tissues of six lactating women are measured and reported in this paper. The theoretically calculated alveoli diameters for optimum milk flow (as a function of bifurcation numbers) show excellent match with our biological data on alveolar dimensions. Also, the mathematical model indicates that for minimum milk flow resistance the glandular tissue must be within a short distance from the base of the nipple, an observation that matches well with the latest anatomical and physiological research.

  20. Marker evaluation of human breast and bladder cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayall, B.H.; Carroll, P.R.; Chen, Ling-Chun; Cohen, M.B.; Goodson, W.H. III; Smith, H.S.; Waldman, F.M. (California Univ., San Francisco, CA (USA))

    1990-11-02

    We are investigating multiple markers in human breast and bladder cancers. Our aim is to identify markers that are clinically relevant and that contribute to our understanding of the disease process in individual patients. Good markers accurately assess the malignant potential of a cancer in an individual patient. Thus, they help identify those cancers that will recur, and they may be used to predict more accurately time to recurrence, response to treatment, and overall prognosis. Therapy and patient management may then be optimized to the individual patient. Relevant markers reflect the underlying pathobiology of individual tumors. As a tissue undergoes transformation from benign to malignant, the cells lose their differentiated phenotype. As a generalization, the more the cellular phenotype, cellular proliferation and cellular genotype depart from normal, the more advanced is the tumor in its biological evolution and the more likely it is that the patient has a poor prognosis. We use three studies to illustrate our investigation of potential tumor markers. Breast cancers are labeled in vivo with 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) to give a direct measure of the tumor labeling index. Bladder cancers are analyzed immunocytochemically using an antibody against proliferation. Finally, the techniques of molecular genetics are used to detect allelic loss in breast cancers. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  1. High risk human papillomavirus and Epstein Barr virus in human breast milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Wendy K

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus, Epstein Barr virus (EBV and mouse mammary tumour virus have been identified in human milk. High risk human papillomavirus (HPV sequences have been identified in breast cancer. The aim of this study is to determine if viral sequences are present in human milk from normal lactating women. Findings Standard (liquid and in situ polymerase chain reaction (PCR techniques were used to identify HPV and EBV in human milk samples from normal lactating Australian women who had no history of breast cancer. High risk human papillomavirus was identified in milk samples of 6 of 40 (15% from normal lactating women - sequencing on four samples showed three were HPV 16 and one was HPV 18. Epstein Barr virus was identified in fourteen samples (33%. Conclusion The presence of high risk HPV and EBV in human milk suggests the possibility of milk transmission of these viruses. However, given the rarity of viral associated malignancies in young people, it is possible but unlikely, that such transmission is associated with breast or other cancers.

  2. Molecular Mechanisms of Metastasis Suppression in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-01

    and breast carcinoma metastasis, Wake Forest University Cancer Center, July 28 Molecular mechanisms controlling melanoma and breast carcinoma...Bowman Show, August 17 Molecular regulation of melanoma and breast carcinoma metastasis, Wake Forest University Cancer Center, July 28 Molecular...Institute, April 20, Pathology ofNeoplasia Cumberland Unit, American Cancer Society, April 19; Breast Cancer Research Ministerio de Sanidad y

  3. Glyphosate induces human breast cancer cells growth via estrogen receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongprakaisang, Siriporn; Thiantanawat, Apinya; Rangkadilok, Nuchanart; Suriyo, Tawit; Satayavivad, Jutamaad

    2013-09-01

    Glyphosate is an active ingredient of the most widely used herbicide and it is believed to be less toxic than other pesticides. However, several recent studies showed its potential adverse health effects to humans as it may be an endocrine disruptor. This study focuses on the effects of pure glyphosate on estrogen receptors (ERs) mediated transcriptional activity and their expressions. Glyphosate exerted proliferative effects only in human hormone-dependent breast cancer, T47D cells, but not in hormone-independent breast cancer, MDA-MB231 cells, at 10⁻¹² to 10⁻⁶M in estrogen withdrawal condition. The proliferative concentrations of glyphosate that induced the activation of estrogen response element (ERE) transcription activity were 5-13 fold of control in T47D-KBluc cells and this activation was inhibited by an estrogen antagonist, ICI 182780, indicating that the estrogenic activity of glyphosate was mediated via ERs. Furthermore, glyphosate also altered both ERα and β expression. These results indicated that low and environmentally relevant concentrations of glyphosate possessed estrogenic activity. Glyphosate-based herbicides are widely used for soybean cultivation, and our results also found that there was an additive estrogenic effect between glyphosate and genistein, a phytoestrogen in soybeans. However, these additive effects of glyphosate contamination in soybeans need further animal study.

  4. New mucin-like cancer-associated antigens (CA M 26, CA M 29 and CA 549) and a new proliferation marker (TPS) in patients with primary or advanced breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locker, G J; Mader, R M; Braun, J; Sieder, A E; Marosi, C; Rainer, H; Jakesz, R; Steger, G G

    1995-01-01

    In patients with breast cancer no tumor markers giving satisfactory results have been found yet. The aim of our investigation was to compare the usefulness of newly developed tumor markers with the most common used carcinoembryonic antigen and cancer antigen (CA) 15-3. We evaluated the concentrations of carcinoma-associated antigen (CA) 549, carcinoma-associated mucin antigen (CA M) 26 and CA M 29, and the proliferation markers tissue polypeptide antigen (TPA) and tissue polypeptide-specific antigen (TPS) in 84 breast cancer patients with disease progression and in 69 patients with no evidence of disease after surgery for breast cancer. Using receiver-operating characteristic curves (ROC curves) we were able to demonstrate increased sensitivity and specificity of all tested tumor markers in patients with metastatic disease compared with local disease. In our investigation TPA is superior to TPS in all disease states. In local disease, none of the tested markers shows satisfying results. In metastatic disease, the new mucin markers CA M 26 and CA M 29 show slightly better results than CA 15-3 although their ROC curves are nearly congruent. CA 549 is exceeded by the other mucin markers. The best results in this investigation were obtained with CA M 29. The overall results concerning the detection of small tumor masses (i.e. local disease) were unsatisfactory.

  5. Measurement of paraben concentrations in human breast tissue at serial locations across the breast from axilla to sternum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, L; Metaxas, G; Harbach, C A J; Savoy, L A; Darbre, P D

    2012-03-01

    The concentrations of five esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (parabens) were measured using HPLC-MS/MS at four serial locations across the human breast from axilla to sternum using human breast tissue collected from 40 mastectomies for primary breast cancer in England between 2005 and 2008. One or more paraben esters were quantifiable in 158/160 (99%) of the tissue samples and in 96/160 (60%) all five esters were measured. Variation was notable with respect to individual paraben esters, location within one breast and similar locations in different breasts. Overall median values in nanograms per gram tissue for the 160 tissue samples were highest for n-propylparaben [16.8 (range 0-2052.7)] and methylparaben [16.6 (range 0-5102.9)]; levels were lower for n-butylparaben [5.8 (range 0-95.4)], ethylparaben [3.4 (range 0-499.7)] and isobutylparaben 2.1 (range 0-802.9). The overall median value for total paraben was 85.5 ng g(-1) tissue (range 0-5134.5). The source of the paraben cannot be identified, but paraben was measured in the 7/40 patients who reported never having used underarm cosmetics in their lifetime. No correlations were found between paraben concentrations and age of patient (37-91 years), length of breast feeding (0-23 months), tumour location or tumour oestrogen receptor content. In view of the disproportionate incidence of breast cancer in the upper outer quadrant, paraben concentrations were compared across the four regions of the breast: n-propylparaben was found at significantly higher levels in the axilla than mid (P = 0.004 Wilcoxon matched pairs) or medial (P = 0.021 Wilcoxon matched pairs) regions (P = 0.010 Friedman ANOVA).

  6. Temporal Changes of Human Breast Milk Lipids of Chinese Mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Giuffrida

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acids (FA, phospholipids (PL, and gangliosides (GD play a central role in infant growth, immune and inflammatory responses. The aim of this study was to determine FA, PL, and GD compositional changes in human milk (HM during lactation in a large group of Chinese lactating mothers (540 volunteers residing in Beijing, Guangzhou, and Suzhou. HM samples were collected after full expression from one breast and while the baby was fed on the other breast. FA were assessed by direct methylation followed by gas chromatography (GC analysis. PL and GD were extracted using chloroform and methanol. A methodology employing liquid chromatography coupled with an evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD and with time of flight (TOF mass spectrometry was used to quantify PL and GD classes in HM, respectively. Saturated FA (SFA, mono-unsaturated FA (MUFA, and PL content decreased during lactation, while polyunsaturated FA (PUFA and GD content increased. Among different cities, over the lactation time, HM from Beijing showed the highest SFA content, HM from Guangzhou the highest MUFA content and HM from Suzhou the highest n-3PUFA content. The highest total PL and GD contents were observed in HM from Suzhou. In order to investigate the influence of the diet on maternal milk composition, a careful analyses of dietary habits of these population needs to be performed in the future.

  7. Expression of Axl and its prognostic significance in human breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Gaoyuan; Wang, Zhenzhen; Wang, Jianguang; Zhang, Like; CHEN Yanbin; Yuan, Pengfei; Liu, Dechun

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignant cancer and second leading cause of cancer-related death among women, and its prevalence continues to increase. Axl overexpression has been identified in the many types of human cancer, and it has been demonstrated to participate in signaling pathways related to carcinogenesis and cancer development. In the present study, Axl expression was examined by performing immunohistochemical staining in 60 breast cancer tumors and 40 benign breast lesions (25 ...

  8. Siah1 proteins enhance radiosensitivity of human breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engenhart-Cabillic Rita

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Siah proteins play an important role in cancer progression. We evaluated the effect of Siah1, its splice variants Siah1L and the Siah1 mutant with the RING finger deleted (Siah1ΔR on radiosensitization of human breast cancer cells. Methods The status of Siah1 and Siah1L was analysed in five breast cancer cell lines. To establish stable cells, SKBR3 cells were transfected with Siah1, Siah-1L and Siah1ΔR. Siah1 function was suppressed by siRNA in MCF-7 cells. The impact of Siah1 overexpression and silencing on apoptosis, proliferation, survival, invasion ability and DNA repair was assessed in SKBR3 and MCF-7 cells, also in regards to radiation. Results Siah1 and Siah1L mRNA expression was absent in four of five breast cancer cells lines analysed. Overexpression of Siah1 and Siah1L enhanced radiation-induced apoptosis in stable transfected SKBR3 cells, while Siah1ΔR failed to show this effect. In addition, Siah1 and Siah1L significantly reduced cell clonogenic survival and proliferation. Siah1L sensitization enhancement ratio values were over 1.5 and 4.0 for clonogenic survival and proliferation, respectively, pointing to a highly cooperative and potentially synergistic fashion with radiation. Siah1 or Siah1L significantly reduced invasion ability of SKBR3 and suppressed Tcf/Lef factor activity. Importantly, Siah1 siRNA demonstrated opposite effects in MCF-7 cells. Siah1 and Siah1L overexpression resulted in inhibition of DNA repair as inferred by increased levels of DNA double-strand breaks in irradiated SKBR3 cells. Conclusion Our results reveal for the first time how overexpression of Siah1L and Siah1 can determine radiosensitivity of breast cancer cells. These findings suggest that development of drugs augmenting Siah1 and Siah1L activity could be a novel approach in improving tumor cell kill.

  9. Fulvestrant radiosensitizes human estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing, E-mail: wangstella5@163.com [Department of Breast Surgery, Qilu Hospital, Shandong Univeristy, Wenhua Xi Road 107, Shandong Province (China); Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University Medical College, Shandong Province (China); Yang, Qifeng, E-mail: qifengy@gmail.com [Department of Breast Surgery, Qilu Hospital, Shandong Univeristy, Wenhua Xi Road 107, Shandong Province (China); Haffty, Bruce G., E-mail: hafftybg@umdnj.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson School of Medicine, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, NB (United States); Li, Xiaoyan, E-mail: xiaoyanli1219@gmail.com [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University Medical College, Shandong Province (China); Moran, Meena S., E-mail: meena.moran@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► Fulvestrant radiosensitizes MCF-7 cells. ► Fulvestrant increases G1 arrest and decreases S phase in MCF-7 cells. ► Fulvestrant down-regulates DNA-PKcs and RAD51 in MCF-7 cells. -- Abstract: The optimal sequencing for hormonal therapy and radiation are yet to be determined. We utilized fulvestrant, which is showing promise as an alternative to other agents in the clinical setting of hormonal therapy, to assess the cellular effects of concomitant anti-estrogen therapy (fulvestrant) with radiation (F + RT). This study was conducted to assess the effects of fulvestrant alone vs. F + RT on hormone-receptor positive breast cancer to determine if any positive or negative combined effects exist. The effects of F + RT on human breast cancer cells were assessed using MCF-7 clonogenic and tetrazolium salt colorimetric (MTT) assays. The assays were irradiated with a dose of 0, 2, 4, 6 Gy ± fulvestrant. The effects of F + RT vs. single adjuvant treatment alone on cell-cycle distribution were assessed using flow cytometry; relative expression of repair proteins (Ku70, Ku80, DNA-PKcs, Rad51) was assessed using Western Blot analysis. Cell growth for radiation alone vs. F + RT was 0.885 ± 0.013 vs. 0.622 ± 0.029 @2 Gy, 0.599 ± 0.045 vs. 0.475 ± 0.054 @4 Gy, and 0.472 ± 0.021 vs. 0.380 ± 0.018 @6 Gy RT (p = 0.003). While irradiation alone induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, the combination of F + RT induced cell redistribution in the G1 phase and produced a significant decrease in the proportion of cells in G2 phase arrest and in the S phase in breast cancer cells (p < 0.01). Furthermore, levels of repair proteins DNA-PKcs and Rad51 were significantly decreased in the cells treated with F + RT compared with irradiation alone. F + RT leads to a decrease in the surviving fraction, increased cell cycle arrest, down regulating of nonhomologous repair protein DNA-PKcs and homologous recombination repair protein RAD51. Thus, our findings suggest that F + RT

  10. Identification of differentially expressed microRNAs in human male breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schipper Elisa

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery of small non-coding RNAs and the subsequent analysis of microRNA expression patterns in human cancer specimens have provided completely new insights into cancer biology. Genetic and epigenetic data indicate oncogenic or tumor suppressor function of these pleiotropic regulators. Therefore, many studies analyzed the expression and function of microRNA in human breast cancer, the most frequent malignancy in females. However, nothing is known so far about microRNA expression in male breast cancer, accounting for approximately 1% of all breast cancer cases. Methods The expression of 319 microRNAs was analyzed in 9 primary human male breast tumors and in epithelial cells from 15 male gynecomastia specimens using fluorescence-labeled bead technology. For identification of differentially expressed microRNAs data were analyzed by cluster analysis and selected statistical methods. Expression levels were validated for the most up- or down-regulated microRNAs in this training cohort using real-time PCR methodology as well as in an independent test cohort comprising 12 cases of human male breast cancer. Results Unsupervised cluster analysis separated very well male breast cancer samples and control specimens according to their microRNA expression pattern indicating cancer-specific alterations of microRNA expression in human male breast cancer. miR-21, miR519d, miR-183, miR-197, and miR-493-5p were identified as most prominently up-regulated, miR-145 and miR-497 as most prominently down-regulated in male breast cancer. Conclusions Male breast cancer displays several differentially expressed microRNAs. Not all of them are shared with breast cancer biopsies from female patients indicating male breast cancer specific alterations of microRNA expression.

  11. The a3 isoform of subunit a of the vacuolar ATPase localizes to the plasma membrane of invasive breast tumor cells and is overexpressed in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Kristina; Liberman, Rachel; Sun-Wada, GeHong; Wada, Yoh; Sgroi, Dennis; Naber, Stephen; Brown, Dennis; Breton, Sylvie; Forgac, Michael

    2016-07-19

    The vacuolar (H+)-ATPases (V-ATPases) are a family of ATP-driven proton pumps that acidify intracellular compartments and transport protons across the plasma membrane. Previous work has demonstrated that plasma membrane V-ATPases are important for breast cancer invasion in vitro and that the V-ATPase subunit a isoform a3 is upregulated in and critical for MDA-MB231 and MCF10CA1a breast cancer cell invasion. It has been proposed that subunit a3 is present on the plasma membrane of invasive breast cancer cells and is overexpressed in human breast cancer. To test this, we used an a3-specific antibody to assess localization in breast cancer cells. Subunit a3 localizes to the leading edge of migrating breast cancer cells, but not the plasma membrane of normal breast epithelial cells. Furthermore, invasive breast cancer cells express a3 throughout all intracellular compartments tested, including endosomes, the Golgi, and lysosomes. Moreover, subunit a3 knockdown in MB231 breast cancer cells reduces in vitro migration. This reduction is not enhanced upon addition of a V-ATPase inhibitor, suggesting that a3-containing V-ATPases are critical for breast cancer migration. Finally, we have tested a3 expression in human breast cancer tissue and mRNA prepared from normal and cancerous breast tissue. a3 mRNA was upregulated 2.5-47 fold in all breast tumor cDNA samples tested relative to normal tissue, with expression generally correlated to cancer stage. Furthermore, a3 protein expression was increased in invasive breast cancer tissue relative to noninvasive cancer and normal breast tissue. These studies suggest that subunit a3 plays an important role in invasive human breast cancer.

  12. The Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS) and Potential Regulators in Normal, Benign and Malignant Human Breast Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    James Ryan; Curran, Catherine E.; Emer Hennessy; John Newell; Morris, John C.; Kerin, Michael J.; Dwyer, Roisin M

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The presence, relevance and regulation of the Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS) in human mammary tissue remains poorly understood. This study aimed to quantify relative expression of NIS and putative regulators in human breast tissue, with relationships observed further investigated in vitro. METHODS: Human breast tissue specimens (malignant n = 75, normal n = 15, fibroadenoma n = 10) were analysed by RQ-PCR targeting NIS, receptors for retinoic acid (RARα, RARβ), oestrogen (ERα), t...

  13. Quercetin inhibits human breast cancer cell proliferation and induces apoptosis via Bcl-2 and Bax regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duo, Jian; Ying, Guo-Guang; Wang, Guo-Wen; Zhang, Li

    2012-06-01

    Breast cancer is a disease in which cancer cells form in the tissues of the breast. The present study aimed to explore the effect of the flavonoid compound quercetin on the growth and apoptosis of human breast cancer cells. Varying concentrations (12.5, 25, 50, 100, 200 µM) of quercetin were applied to cultured MCF-7 human breast cancer cells for defined lengths of time. At 50 to 200 µM doses, quercetin significantly inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 cells assessed by MTT colorimetry, in both dose- and time-dependent manners (Papoptosis after 48 h of exposure (Pquercetin treatment Bcl-2 expression decreased significantly while Bax expression increased significantly (Pquercetin inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. The mechanisms behind these effects may stem from the downregulation of Bcl-2 protein expression and upregulation of Bax expression.

  14. Specific binding of benzodiazepines to human breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinlich, A; Strohmeier, R; Kaufmann, M; Kuhl, H

    1999-01-01

    Binding of [3H]Ro5-4864, a peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) agonist, to BT-20 human, estrogen- (ER) and progesterone- (PR) receptor negative breast cancer cells was characterized. It was found to be specific, dose-dependent and saturable with a single population of binding sites. Dissociation constant (K(D)) was 8.5 nM, maximal binding capacity (Bmax) 339 fM/10(6) cells. Ro5-4864 (IC50 17.3 nM) and PK 11195 (IC50 12.3 nM) were able to compete with [3H]Ro5-4864 for binding, indicating specificity of interaction with PBR. Diazepam was able to displace [3H]Ro5-4864 from binding only at high concentrations (>1 microM), while ODN did not compete for PBR binding. Thymidine-uptake assay showed a biphasic response of cell proliferation. While low concentrations (100 nM) of Ro5-4864, PK 11195 and diazepam increased cell growth by 10 to 20%, higher concentrations (10-100 microM) significantly inhibited cell proliferation. PK 11195, a potent PBR ligand, was able to attenuate growth of BT-20 cells stimulated by 100 nM Ro5-4864 and to reverse growth reduction caused by 1 and 10 microM Ro5-4864, but not by 50 microM and 100 microM. This indicates that the antimitotic activity of higher concentrations of Ro5-4864 is independent of PBR binding. It is suggested, that PBR are involved in growth regulation of certain human breast cancer cell lines, possibly by supplying proliferating cells with energy, as their endogenous ligand is a polypeptide transporting Acyl-CoA.

  15. Human Progesterone A-Form as a Target for New Drug Discovery in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    Voltz et al’(ii 3 altered recycling, and impaired regulation of the PDGFR TR4 chloride transporter by hormones. Most recent studies suggest that CFTR ...growth transporters, and other proteins localized at or near the factor receptor and ion transporters such as CFTR , plasma membrane. Consistent with this...overexpression in human breast cancers cytoskeleton. This review will focus on the signaling and mutations in NHERF targets, such as CFTR and paradigms

  16. DNA Replication Licensing and Progenitor Numbers Are Increased by Progesterone in Normal Human Breast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graham, J. Dinny; Mote, Patricia A.; Salagame, Usha; van Dijk, Jessica H.; Balleine, Rosemary L.; Huschtscha, Lily I.; Reddel, Roger R.; Clarke, Christine L.

    2009-01-01

    Proliferation in the nonpregnant human breast is highest in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle when serum progesterone levels are high, and exposure to progesterone analogues in hormone replacement therapy is known to elevate breast cancer risk, yet the proliferative effects of progesterone in

  17. The nude mouse as an in vivo model for human breast cancer invasion and metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brünner, N; Boysen, B; Rømer, J;

    1993-01-01

    Human breast cancer xenografts only rarely invade and metastasize in nude mice, and have therefore only had limited use as a model for studying mechanisms involved in breast cancer spreading. However, recent reports describe differences not only between various cell lines but also between strains...

  18. Risk of treatment-related esophageal cancer among breast cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morton, L M; Gilbert, E S; Hall, P

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy for breast cancer may expose the esophagus to ionizing radiation, but no study has evaluated esophageal cancer risk after breast cancer associated with radiation dose or systemic therapy use.......Radiotherapy for breast cancer may expose the esophagus to ionizing radiation, but no study has evaluated esophageal cancer risk after breast cancer associated with radiation dose or systemic therapy use....

  19. Human adipocytes stimulate invasion of breast cancer MCF-7 cells by secreting IGFBP-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Wang

    Full Text Available A better understanding of the effects of human adipocytes on breast cancer cells may lead to the development of new treatment strategies. We explored the effects of adipocytes on the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo.To study the reciprocal effects of adipocytes and cancer cells, we co-cultured human mature adipocytes and breast cancer cells in a system devoid of heterogeneous cell-cell contact. To analyze the factors that were secreted from adipocytes and that affected the invasive abilities of breast cancer cells, we detected different cytokines in various co-culture media. To study the communication of mature adipocytes and breast cancer cells in vivo, we chose 10 metastatic pathologic samples and 10 non-metastatic pathologic samples to do immunostaining.The co-culture media of human MCF-7 breast cancer cells and human mature adipocytes increased motility of MCF-7 cells. In addition, MMP-2 was remarkably up-regulated, whereas E-cadherin was down-regulated in these MCF-7 cells. Based on our co-culture medium chip results, we chose four candidate cytokines and tested their influence on metastasis individually. We found that IGFBP-2 enhanced the invasion ability of MCF-7 cells in vitro more prominently than did the other factors. In vivo, metastatic human breast tumors had higher levels of MMP-2 than did non-metastatic tumor tissue, whereas adipocytes around metastatic breast tumors had higher levels of IGFBP-2 than did adipocytes surrounding non-metastatic breast tumors.IGFBP-2 secreted by mature adipocytes plays a key role in promoting the metastatic ability of MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

  20. Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Xiaolan, E-mail: huxiaolan1998@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Zhang, Xianqi [The 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Qiu, Shuifeng [Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Yu, Daihua; Lin, Shuxin [Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China)

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Salidroside inhibits the growth of human breast cancer cells. {yields} Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest of human breast cancer cells. {yields} Salidroside induces apoptosis of human breast cancer cell lines. -- Abstract: Recently, salidroside (p-hydroxyphenethyl-{beta}-D-glucoside) has been identified as one of the most potent compounds isolated from plants of the Rhodiola genus used widely in traditional Chinese medicine, but pharmacokinetic data on the compound are unavailable. We were the first to report the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on cancer cell lines derived from different tissues, and we found that human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells (estrogen receptor negative) were sensitive to the inhibitory action of low-concentration salidroside. To further investigate the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on breast cancer cells and reveal possible ER-related differences in response to salidroside, we used MDA-MB-231 cells and MCF-7 cells (estrogen receptor-positive) as models to study possible molecular mechanisms; we evaluated the effects of salidroside on cell growth characteristics, such as proliferation, cell cycle duration, and apoptosis, and on the expression of apoptosis-related molecules. Our results demonstrated for the first time that salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells and may be a promising candidate for breast cancer treatment.

  1. c-MYC is a radiosensitive locus in human breast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, M A; Sunter, N J; Fordham, S E; Long, A; Masic, D; Russell, L J; Harrison, C J; Rand, V; Elstob, C; Bown, N; Rowe, D; Lowe, C; Cuthbert, G; Bennett, S; Crosier, S; Bacon, C M; Onel, K; Scott, K; Scott, D; Travis, L B; May, F E B; Allan, J M

    2015-09-17

    Ionising radiation is a potent human carcinogen. Epidemiological studies have shown that adolescent and young women are at increased risk of developing breast cancer following exposure to ionising radiation compared with older women, and that risk is dose-dependent. Although it is well understood which individuals are at risk of radiation-induced breast carcinogenesis, the molecular genetic mechanisms that underlie cell transformation are less clear. To identify genetic alterations potentially responsible for driving radiogenic breast transformation, we exposed the human breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A to fractionated doses of X-rays and examined the copy number and cytogenetic alterations. We identified numerous alterations of c-MYC that included high-level focal amplification associated with increased protein expression. c-MYC amplification was also observed in primary human mammary epithelial cells following exposure to radiation. We also demonstrate that the frequency and magnitude of c-MYC amplification and c-MYC protein expression is significantly higher in breast cancer with antecedent radiation exposure compared with breast cancer without a radiation aetiology. Our data also demonstrate extensive intratumor heterogeneity with respect to c-MYC copy number in radiogenic breast cancer, suggesting continuous evolution at this locus during disease development and progression. Taken together, these data identify c-MYC as a radiosensitive locus, implicating this oncogenic transcription factor in the aetiology of radiogenic breast cancer.

  2. Automated quantification of aligned collagen for human breast carcinoma prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy S Bredfeldt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mortality in cancer patients is directly attributable to the ability of cancer cells to metastasize to distant sites from the primary tumor. This migration of tumor cells begins with a remodeling of the local tumor microenvironment, including changes to the extracellular matrix and the recruitment of stromal cells, both of which facilitate invasion of tumor cells into the bloodstream. In breast cancer, it has been proposed that the alignment of collagen fibers surrounding tumor epithelial cells can serve as a quantitative image-based biomarker for survival of invasive ductal carcinoma patients. Specific types of collagen alignment have been identified for their prognostic value and now these tumor associated collagen signatures (TACS are central to several clinical specimen imaging trials. Here, we implement the semi-automated acquisition and analysis of this TACS candidate biomarker and demonstrate a protocol that will allow consistent scoring to be performed throughout large patient cohorts. Methods: Using large field of view high resolution microscopy techniques, image processing and supervised learning methods, we are able to quantify and score features of collagen fiber alignment with respect to adjacent tumor-stromal boundaries. Results: Our semi-automated technique produced scores that have statistically significant correlation with scores generated by a panel of three human observers. In addition, our system generated classification scores that accurately predicted survival in a cohort of 196 breast cancer patients. Feature rank analysis reveals that TACS positive fibers are more well-aligned with each other, are of generally lower density, and terminate within or near groups of epithelial cells at larger angles of interaction. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the utility of a supervised learning protocol for streamlining the analysis of collagen alignment with respect to tumor stromal boundaries.

  3. Tissue specific DNA methylation in normal human breast epithelium and in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avraham, Ayelet; Cho, Sean Soonweng; Uhlmann, Ronit; Polak, Mia Leonov; Sandbank, Judith; Karni, Tami; Pappo, Itzhak; Halperin, Ruvit; Vaknin, Zvi; Sella, Avishay; Sukumar, Saraswati; Evron, Ella

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a heterogeneous and tissue-specific disease. Thus, the tissue of origin reflects on the natural history of the disease and dictates the therapeutic approach. It is suggested that tissue differentiation, mediated mostly by epigenetic modifications, could guide tissue-specific susceptibility and protective mechanisms against cancer. Here we studied breast specific methylation in purified normal epithelium and its reflection in breast cancers. We established genome wide methylation profiles of various normal epithelial tissues and identified 110 genes that were differentially methylated in normal breast epithelium. A number of these genes also showed methylation alterations in breast cancers. We elaborated on one of them, TRIM29 (ATDC), and showed that its promoter was hypo-methylated in normal breast epithelium and heavily methylated in other normal epithelial tissues. Moreover, in breast carcinomas methylation increased and expression decreased whereas the reverse was noted for multiple other carcinomas. Interestingly, TRIM29 regulation in breast tumors clustered according to the PAM50 classification. Thus, it was repressed in the estrogen receptor positive tumors, particularly in the more proliferative luminal B subtype. This goes in line with previous reports indicating tumor suppressive activity of TRIM29 in estrogen receptor positive luminal breast cells in contrast to oncogenic function in pancreatic and lung cancers. Overall, these findings emphasize the linkage between breast specific epigenetic regulation and tissue specificity of cancer.

  4. Tropomyosin-1, A Putative Tumor-Suppressor and a Biomarker of Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-10-01

    cDNA. Lobular carcinoma - 2 A polyclonal pan-TM antibody that recognizes multiple TM Phyllodes tumor - 1 Not determined from the initial pathology...AD Award Number: DAMD17-98-1-8162 TITLE: Tropomyosin-1, A Putative Tumor -Suppressor and a Biomarker of Human Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Tropomyosin-l, A Putative Tumor -Suppressor and a Biomarker DAMD17-98-1-8162 of Human Breast Cancer 6. A UTHOR

  5. Kinase Mediated Regulation of 40S Ribosome Assembly in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0009 TITLE: PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John Cleveland CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center...so designated by other documentation. Kinase-Mediated Regulation of 40S Ribosome Assembly in Human Breast Cancer REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Kinase-Mediated Regulation of 40S Ribosome Assembly in Human Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0009 5c

  6. Kinase-Mediated Regulation of 40S Ribosome Assembly in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0008 TITLE: Kinase-Mediated Regulation of 40S Ribosome Assembly in Human Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Jan 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Kinase-Mediated Regulation of 40S Ribosome Assembly in Human Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH...Investigator [PI], Scripps) and John Cleveland (Collaborating/Partnering PI, Moffitt Cancer Center) seek to validate 40S ribosome assembly as a therapeutic

  7. Role of COX-2 in the regulation of the metastatic potential of human breast tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Taipov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The expression of СOX-2, VEGF, VEGFR-1, VEGFR-2, VEGFR-3, EGFR, endoglin (СD105, and IL-6 was analyzed in the human breast tumor cells having a varying metastatic potential. The role of these factors in the regulation of the metastatic potential of breast cancer cells, as well as that of COX-2 in the regulation of metastatic processes at the cellular level were examined. The potential capacity of human breast tumor cells to elaborate factors that stimulate tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis was evaluated.

  8. Iron sufficiency in breast-fed infants and the availability of iron from human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, J A; Landaw, S A; Oski, F A

    1976-11-01

    Four infants were studied who had been exclusively breast-fed for periods varying from 8 to 18 months. All had grown sufficiently to have exhausted their prenatally acquired iron endowment with respect to meeting current needs for maintaining normal hemoglobin levels. All infants had normal hemoglobin values and normal serum iron values. Studies of iron absorption from breast milk and cow's milk were performed in ten normal adults. The absorption of iron from the human milk was significantly higher. These findings suggest that the iron present in human milk is sufficient to meet the iron requirements of the exclusively breast-fed infant until he approximately triples his birthweight.

  9. Dissection of a stem cell hierarchy in the human breast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubner Fridriksdottir, Agla Jael

    and apoptosis during each menstrual cycle. These changes are most prominent during pregnancy, lactation and involution after breast feeding. These highly dynamic changes are thought to rely on the presence of a breast epithelial stem cell population (reviewed in (Fridriksdottir et al. 2005)). Nevertheless...... al. 2006) is highly warranted as this may lead to identification of those long-term breast resident(s) that accumulate enough genetic hits for clonal expansion and tumor development, i.e. the cellular origin(s) of breast cancer....

  10. Microbial dysbiosis is associated with human breast cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xuan, Caiyun; Shamonki, Jaime M; Chung, Alice; Dinome, Maggie L; Chung, Maureen; Sieling, Peter A; Lee, Delphine J

    2014-01-01

    .... In a qualitative survey of the breast microbiota DNA, we found that the bacterium Methylobacterium radiotolerans is relatively enriched in tumor tissue, while the bacterium Sphingomonas yanoikuyae...

  11. Antigen binding of human IgG Fabs mediate ERK-associated proliferation of human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yue-Jin; Mancino, Anne; Pashov, Anastas; Whitehead, Tracy; Stanley, Joseph; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2005-02-01

    Serum-circulating antibody can be linked to poor outcomes in some cancer patients. To investigate the role of human antibodies in regulating tumor cell growth, we constructed a recombinant cDNA expression library of human IgG Fab from a patient with breast cancer. Clones were screened from the library with breast tumor cell lysate. Sequence analysis of the clones showed somatic hypermutations when compared to their closest VH/VL germ-line genes. Initial characterizations focused on five clones. All tested clones displayed stronger binding to antigen derived from primary breast cancers and established breast cancer cell lines than to normal breast tissues. In vitro functional studies showed that four out of five tested clones could stimulate the growth of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines, and one out of five was able to promote MCF-7 cell growth as well. Involvement of ERK2 pathway was observed. By 1H-NMR spectra and Western blot analysis, it was evident that two tested antibody Fabs are capable of interacting with sialic acid. Our study suggests a possible role for human antibody in promoting tumor cell growth by direct binding of IgG Fab to breast tumor antigen. Such studies prompt speculation regarding the role of serum antibodies in mediating tumor growth as well as their contribution to disease progression.

  12. Simulated lesion, human observer performance comparison between thin-section dedicated breast CT images versus computed thick-section simulated projection images of the breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L.; Boone, J. M.; Abbey, C. K.; Hargreaves, J.; Bateni, C.; Lindfors, K. K.; Yang, K.; Nosratieh, A.; Hernandez, A.; Gazi, P.

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the lesion detection performance of human observers between thin-section computed tomography images of the breast, with thick-section (>40 mm) simulated projection images of the breast. Three radiologists and six physicists each executed a two alterative force choice (2AFC) study involving simulated spherical lesions placed mathematically into breast images produced on a prototype dedicated breast CT scanner. The breast image data sets from 88 patients were used to create 352 pairs of image data. Spherical lesions with diameters of 1, 2, 3, 5, and 11 mm were simulated and adaptively positioned into 3D breast CT image data sets; the native thin section (0.33 mm) images were averaged to produce images with different slice thicknesses; average section thicknesses of 0.33, 0.71, 1.5 and 2.9 mm were representative of breast CT; the average 43 mm slice thickness served to simulate simulated projection images of the breast. The percent correct of the human observer’s responses were evaluated in the 2AFC experiments. Radiologists lesion detection performance was significantly (p physicist observer, however trends in performance were similar. Human observers demonstrate significantly better mass-lesion detection performance on thin-section CT images of the breast, compared to thick-section simulated projection images of the breast.

  13. More than 97% of human papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16) was found with chrysotile asbestos & relatively smooth round tumor outline, and less than 3% was found with HPV-18 and tremolite asbestos & irregular sawtooth-like zigzag outline in breast cancer tissues in over 500 mammograms of female patients: their implications in diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omura, Yoshiaki; Jones, Marilyn K; Nihrane, Abdallah; Duvvi, Harsha; Shimotsuura, Yasuhiro; Ohki, Motomu

    2013-01-01

    In the past, Human Papillomavirus Type 16 (HPV-16) was considered to be the main cause of cancer in the oropharynx and genital organs. Cervical cancer of the uterus is the most well-known cancer associated with HPV-16. Among the oncogenic HPVs, types 16 and 18 are most responsible for the majority of the HPV-caused cancers. Recently, using EMF Resonance Phenomenon between 2 identical substances, we non-invasively measured HPV-16 and HPV-18 among 25 physicians and 25 dentists and found that all 50 have HPV-16 in oral cavities and oropharynx but not HPV-18. However most dentists have a stronger infection than physicians. Among them were 2 female dentists with breast cancer containing HPV-16 and strong infections of HPV-16 in the oral cavities and oropharynx. When the author checked their breast cancer positive areas as well as the mammograms of cancer positive areas, Chrysotile Asbestos co-existed with an infection of HPV-16. We then examined over 500 published mammograms of women with malignant breast cancer published by other institutes, and we found HPV-16 in more than 97% and HPV-18 in less than 3% of the breast cancer mammograms examined. Less than 0.4% of cases were found as a variety of combination of HPV-16 & HPV-18. We also discovered that breast cancer with HPV-16 always co-exists with increased Chrysotile Asbestos deposits, and the outline of the breast cancer positive area is a relatively smooth and round or oval shape, and breast cancer with HPV-18 always co-exists with increased Tremolite Asbestos, where the tumor outline is an irregular saw-tooth like zigzag pattern. Based on these findings, better methods of diagnosis, treatment and prevention with a vaccine can be developed.

  14. The T61 human breast cancer xenograft: an experimental model of estrogen therapy of breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner, N; Spang-Thomsen, M; Cullen, K

    1996-01-01

    Endocrine therapy is one of the principal treatment modalities of breast cancer, both in an adjuvant setting and in advanced disease. The T61 breast cancer xenograft described here provides an experimental model of the effects of estrogen treatment at a molecular level. T61 is an estrogen recepto...

  15. Human papilloma virus identification in breast cancer patients with previous cervical neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Sutherland Lawson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Women with human papilloma virus (HPV associated cervical neoplasia have a higher risk of developing breast cancer than the general female population. The purpose of this study was to (i identify high risk for cancer HPVs in cervical neoplasia and subsequent HPV positive breast cancers which developed in the same patients and (ii determine if these HPVs were biologically active.Methods: A range of polymerase chain reaction (PCR and immunohistochemical techniques were used to conduct a retrospective cohort study of cervical precancers and subsequent breast cancers in the same patients. Results: The same high risk HPV types were identified in both the cervical and breast specimens in 13 (46% of 28 patients. HPV type 18 was the most prevalent. HPVs appeared to be biologically active as demonstrated by the expression of HPV E7 proteins and the presence of HPV associated koilocytes. The average age of these patients diagnosed with breast cancer following prior cervical precancer was 51 years, as compared to 60 years for all women with breast cancer (p for difference = 0.001. Conclusions: These findings indicate that high risk HPVs can be associated with cervical neoplasia and subsequent young age breast cancer. However these associations are unusual and are a very small proportion of breast cancers. These outcomes confirm and extend the observations of 2 similar previous studies and offer one explanation for the increased prevalence of serious invasive breast cancer among young women.

  16. A feasibility study of soft embalmed human breast tissue for preclinical trials of HIFU- preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Joyce; Yang, Yang; Purdie, Colin; Eisma, Roos; Melzer, Andreas; Cochran, Sandy; Vinnicombe, Sarah

    2017-03-01

    Breast cancer is the commonest cancer in women in the UK, accounting for 30% of all new cancers in women, with an estimated 49,500 new cases in 20101. With the widespread negative publicity around over-diagnosis and over-treatment of low risk breast cancers, interest in the application of non-invasive treatments such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has increased. Development has begun of novel US transducers and platforms specifically designed for use with breast lesions, so as to improve the range of breast lesions that can be safely treated. However, before such transducers can be evaluated in patients in clinical trials, there is a need to establish their efficacy. A particular issue is the accuracy of temperature monitoring of FUS with MRI in the breast, since the presence of large amounts of surrounding fat can hinder temperature measurement. An appropriate anatomical model that imposes similar physical constraints to the breast and that responds to FUS in the same way would be extremely advantageous. The aim of this feasibility study is to explore the use of Thiel embalmed cadaveric tissue for these purposes. We report here the early results of laboratory-based experiments sonicating dissected breast samples from a Thiel embalmed soft human cadaver with high body mass index (BMI). A specially developed MRI compatible chamber and sample holder was developed to secure the sample and ensure reproducible sonications at the transducer focus. The efficacy of sonication was first studied with chicken breast and porcine tissue. The experiments were then repeated with the dissected fatty breast tissue samples from the soft-embalmed human cadavers. The sonicated Thiel breast tissue was examined histopathologically, which confirmed the absence of any discrete lesion. To investigate further, fresh chicken breast tissue was embalmed and the embalmed tissue was sonicated with the same parameters. The results confirmed the

  17. Identification of Claudin 1 Transcript Variants in Human Invasive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelinski, Teresa; Xie, Jiuyong; Cooper, Steven; Penner, Carla; Leygue, Etienne; Myal, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Background The claudin 1 tight junction protein, solely responsible for the barrier function of epithelial cells, is frequently down regulated in invasive human breast cancer. The underlying mechanism is largely unknown, and no obvious mutations in the claudin 1 gene (CLDN1) have been identified to date in breast cancer. Since many genes have been shown to undergo deregulation through splicing and mis-splicing events in cancer, the current study was undertaken to investigate the occurrence of transcript variants for CLDN1 in human invasive breast cancer. Methods RT-PCR analysis of CLDN1 transcripts was conducted on RNA isolated from 12 human invasive breast tumors. The PCR products from each tumor were resolved by agarose gel electrophoresis, cloned and sequenced. Genomic DNA was also isolated from each of the 12 tumors and amplified using PCR CLDN1 specific primers. Sanger sequencing and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analyses were conducted. Results A number of CLDN1 transcript variants were identified in these breast tumors. All variants were shorter than the classical CLDN1 transcript. Sequence analysis of the PCR products revealed several splice variants, primarily in exon 1 of CLDN1; resulting in truncated proteins. One variant, V1, resulted in a premature stop codon and thus likely led to nonsense mediated decay. Interestingly, another transcript variant, V2, was not detected in normal breast tissue samples. Further, sequence analysis of the tumor genomic DNA revealed SNPs in 3 of the 4 coding exons, including a rare missense SNP (rs140846629) in exon 2 which represents an Ala124Thr substitution. To our knowledge this is the first report of CLDN1 transcript variants in human invasive breast cancer. These studies suggest that alternate splicing may also be a mechanism by which claudin 1 is down regulated at both the mRNA and protein levels in invasive breast cancer and may provide novel insights into how CLDN1 is reduced or silenced in human breast

  18. Combined photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging of human breast in vivo in the mammographic geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhixing; Lee, Won-Mean; Hooi, Fong Ming; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Pinsky, Renee W.; Mueller, Dean; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L.

    2013-03-01

    This photoacoustic volume imaging (PAVI) system is designed to study breast cancer detection and diagnosis in the mammographic geometry in combination with automated 3D ultrasound (AUS). The good penetration of near-infrared (NIR) light and high receiving sensitivity of a broad bandwidth, 572 element, 2D PVDF array at a low center-frequency of 1MHz were utilized with 20 channel simultaneous acquisition. The feasibility of this system in imaging optically absorbing objects in deep breast tissues was assessed first through experiments on ex vivo whole breasts. The blood filled pseudo lesions were imaged at depths up to 49 mm in the specimens. In vivo imaging of human breasts has been conducted. 3D PAVI image stacks of human breasts were coregistered and compared with 3D ultrasound image stacks of the same breasts. Using the designed system, PAVI shows satisfactory imaging depth and sensitivity for coverage of the entire breast when imaged from both sides with mild compression in the mammographic geometry. With its unique soft tissue contrast and excellent sensitivity to the tissue hemodynamic properties of fractional blood volume and blood oxygenation, PAVI, as a complement to 3D ultrasound and digital tomosynthesis mammography, might well contribute to detection, diagnosis and prognosis for breast cancer.

  19. The Breast Cancer-Associated Glycoforms of MUC1, MUC1-Tn and sialyl-Tn, Are Expressed in COSMC Wild-Type Cells and Bind the C-Type Lectin MGL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beatson, Richard; Maurstad, Gjertrud; Picco, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation occurs in the majority of human cancers and changes in mucin-type O-glycosylation are key events that play a role in the induction of invasion and metastases. These changes generate novel cancer-specific glyco-antigens that can interact with cells of the immune system throu...

  20. High expression of miR-21 in tumor stroma correlates with increased cancer cell proliferation in human breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Lene; Balslev, Eva; Jørgensen, Stine

    2011-01-01

    Low-risk and high-risk breast cancer patients are stratified primarily according to their lymph node (LN) status and grading. However, some low-risk patients relapse, and some high-risk patients have a favorable clinical outcome, implying a need for better prognostic and predictive tests. Micro...... RNAs are often aberrantly expressed in cancer and microRNA-21 is upregulated in a variety of cancers, including breast cancer. High miR-21 levels have been associated with poor prognosis. To determine the cellular localization of miR-21 and to compare its expression levels with histopathological...... features, we performed in situ hybridization and semi-quantitative assessment of the miR-21 signal on 12 LN negative grade I (assumed low risk), and 12 LN positive grade II (high risk) breast cancers. miR-21 was predominantly seen in cancer associated fibroblast-like cells, with no difference in expression...

  1. Breast Cancer Cell Colonization of the Human Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue Niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zach S. Templeton

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Bone is a preferred site of breast cancer metastasis, suggesting the presence of tissue-specific features that attract and promote the outgrowth of breast cancer cells. We sought to identify parameters of human bone tissue associated with breast cancer cell osteotropism and colonization in the metastatic niche. METHODS: Migration and colonization patterns of MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP (luciferase-enhanced green fluorescence protein and MCF-7-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cells were studied in co-culture with cancellous bone tissue fragments isolated from 14 hip arthroplasties. Breast cancer cell migration into tissues and toward tissue-conditioned medium was measured in Transwell migration chambers using bioluminescence imaging and analyzed as a function of secreted factors measured by multiplex immunoassay. Patterns of breast cancer cell colonization were evaluated with fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Enhanced MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cell migration to bone-conditioned versus control medium was observed in 12/14 specimens (P = .0014 and correlated significantly with increasing levels of the adipokines/cytokines leptin (P = .006 and IL-1β (P = .001 in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry of fragments underscored the extreme adiposity of adult human bone tissues and revealed extensive breast cancer cell colonization within the marrow adipose tissue compartment. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that breast cancer cells migrate to human bone tissue-conditioned medium in association with increasing levels of leptin and IL-1β, and colonize the bone marrow adipose tissue compartment of cultured fragments. Bone marrow adipose tissue and its molecular signals may be important but understudied components of the breast cancer metastatic niche.

  2. Overexpression of peroxiredoxin I and thioredoxin1 in human breast carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Il-Han

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peroxiredoxins (Prxs are a novel group of peroxidases containing high antioxidant efficiency. The mammalian Prx family has six distinct members (Prx I-VI in various subcellular locations, including peroxisomes and mitochondria, places where oxidative stress is most evident. The function of Prx I in particular has been implicated in regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Since thioredoxin1 (Trx1 as an electron donor is functionally associated with Prx I, we investigated levels of expression of both Prx I and Trx1. Methods We investigated levels of expression of both Prx I and Trx1 in breast cancer by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and Western blot. Results Levels of messenger RNA (mRNA for both Prx I and Trx1 in normal human breast tissue were very low compared to other major human tissues, whereas their levels in breast cancer exceeded that in other solid cancers (colon, kidney, liver, lung, ovary, prostate, and thyroid. Among members of the Prx family (Prx I-VI and Trx family (Trx1, Trx2, Prx I and Trx1 were preferentially induced in breast cancer. Moreover, the expression of each was associated with progress of breast cancer and correlated with each other. Western blot analysis of different and paired breast tissues revealed consistent and preferential expression of Prx I and Trx1 protein in breast cancer tissue. Conclusion Prx I and Trx1 are overexpressed in human breast carcinoma and the expression levels are associated with tumor grade. The striking induction of Prx I and Trx1 in breast cancer may enable their use as breast cancer markers.

  3. Screening and analysis of breast cancer genes regulated by the human mammary microenvironment in a humanized mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Mingjie; Wang, Jue; Ling, Lijun; Xue, Dandan; Wang, Shui; Zhao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Tumor microenvironments play critical regulatory roles in tumor growth. Although mouse cancer models have contributed to the understanding of human tumor biology, the effectiveness of mouse cancer models is limited by the inability of the models to accurately present humanized tumor microenvironments. Previously, a humanized breast cancer model in severe combined immunodeficiency mice was established, in which human breast cancer tissue was implanted subcutaneously, followed by injection of human breast cancer cells. It was demonstrated that breast cancer cells showed improved growth in the human mammary microenvironment compared with a conventional subcutaneous mouse model. In the present study, the novel mouse model and microarray technology was used to analyze changes in the expression of genes in breast cancer cells that are regulated by the human mammary microenvironment. Humanized breast and conventional subcutaneous mouse models were established, and orthotopic tumor cells were obtained from orthotopic tumor masses by primary culture. An expression microarray using Illumina HumanHT-12 v4 Expression BeadChip and database analyses were performed to investigate changes in gene expression between tumors from each microenvironment. A total of 94 genes were differentially expressed between the primary cells cultured from the humanized and conventional mouse models. Significant upregulation of genes that promote cell proliferation and metastasis or inhibit apoptosis, such as SH3-domain binding protein 5 (BTK-associated), sodium/chloride cotransporter 3 and periostin, osteoblast specific factor, and genes that promote angiogenesis, such as KIAA1618, was also noted. Other genes that restrain cell proliferation and accelerate cell apoptosis, including tripartite motif containing TRIM36 and NES1, were downregulated. The present results revealed differences in various aspects of tumor growth and metabolism between the two model groups and indicated the functional

  4. Relation of cell proliferation to expression of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors in human breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinlich, A; Strohmeier, R; Kaufmann, M; Kuhl, H

    2000-08-01

    Peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) agonist [(3)H]Ro5-4864 has been shown to bind with high affinity to the human breast cancer cell line BT-20. Therefore, we investigated different human breast cancer cell lines with regard to binding to [(3)H]Ro5-4864 and staining with the PBR-specific monoclonal antibody 8D7. Results were correlated with cell proliferation characteristics. In flow cytometric analysis, the estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer cell lines BT-20, MDA-MB-435-S, and SK-BR-3 showed significantly higher PBR expression (relative fluorescence intensity) than the ER-positive cells T47-D, MCF-7 and BT-474 (Pdiazepam-binding inhibitor are possibly involved in the regulation of cell proliferation of human breast cancer cell lines.

  5. RecQL4 helicase amplification is involved in human breast tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbo Fang

    Full Text Available Breast cancer occur both in hereditary and sporadic forms, and the later one comprises an overwhelming majority of breast cancer cases among women. Numerical and structural alterations involving chromosome 8, with loss of short arm (8p and gain of long arm (8q, are frequently observed in breast cancer cells and tissues. In this study, we show that most of the human breast tumor cell lines examined display an over representation of 8q24, a chromosomal locus RecQL4 is regionally mapped to, and consequently, a markedly elevated level of RecQL4 expression. An increased RecQL4 mRNA level was also observed in a majority of clinical breast tumor samples (38/43 examined. shRNA-mediated RecQL4 suppression in MDA-MB453 breast cancer cells not only significantly inhibit the in vitro clonogenic survival and in vivo tumorigenicity. Further studies demonstrate that RecQL4 physically interacts with a major survival factor-survivin and its protein level affects survivin expression. Although loss of RecQL4 function due to gene mutations causally linked to occurrence of human RTS with features of premature aging and cancer predisposition, our studies provide the evidence that overexpression of RecQL4 due to gene amplification play a critical role in human breast tumor progression.

  6. Contamination status of persistent organochlorines in human breast milk from Japan: recent levels and temporal trend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunisue, Tatsuya; Muraoka, Masayoshi; Ohtake, Masako; Sudaryanto, Agus; Minh, Nguyen Hung; Ueno, Daisuke; Higaki, Yumi; Ochi, Miyuki; Tsydenova, Oyuna; Kamikawa, Satoko; Tonegi, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Yumi; Shimomura, Hiroshi; Nagayama, Junya; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2006-08-01

    Contamination levels of persistent organochlorines (OCs) such as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), dibenzofurans (PCDFs), biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCHs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and chlordane compounds (CHLs) was examined in human breast milk collected during 2001-2004 from Fukuoka prefecture in Japan. The concentrations of OCs such as dioxins and related compounds, DDTs, CHLs and HCB in human breast milk from primiparae were comparable to or slightly higher than the data obtained during 1998, indicating that the levels of these contaminants in Japanese human breast milk have not decreased since 1998 and Japanese are continuously exposed to these chemicals, presumably via fish intake. In addition, OC levels in human breast milk from primiparae were significantly higher than those from multiparae, implying elimination of OCs via lactation. Furthermore, significant positive correlations were observed between levels of OCs in human breast milk and the age of primiparae. These results indicate that the mothers with higher age may transfer higher amounts of OCs to the first infant than to the infants born afterwards through breast-feeding, and hence the first born children might be at higher risk by OCs.

  7. Compensated individually addressable array technology for human breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, D. Kent

    2003-01-01

    A method of forming broad bandwidth acoustic or microwave beams which encompass array design, array excitation, source signal preprocessing, and received signal postprocessing. This technique uses several different methods to achieve improvement over conventional array systems. These methods are: 1) individually addressable array elements; 2) digital-to-analog converters for the source signals; 3) inverse filtering from source precompensation; and 4) spectral extrapolation to expand the bandwidth of the received signals. The components of the system will be used as follows: 1) The individually addressable array allows scanning around and over an object, such as a human breast, without any moving parts. The elements of the array are broad bandwidth elements and efficient radiators, as well as detectors. 2) Digital-to-analog converters as the source signal generators allow virtually any radiated field to be created in the half-space in front of the array. 3) Preprocessing allows for corrections in the system, most notably in the response of the individual elements and in the ability to increase contrast and resolution of signal propagating through the medium under investigation. 4) Postprocessing allows the received broad bandwidth signals to be expanded in a process similar to analytic continuation. Used together, the system allows for compensation to create beams of any desired shape, control the wave fields generated to correct for medium differences, and improve contract and resolution in and through the medium.

  8. Development, fabrication and evaluation of a novel biomimetic human breast tissue derived breast implant surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, S; Hill, E W; Bayat, A

    2017-02-01

    Breast implant use has tripled in the last decade with over 320,000 breast implant based reconstructions and augmentations performed in the US per annum. Unfortunately a considerable number of women will experience capsular contracture, the irrepressible and disfiguring, tightening and hardening of the fibrous capsule that envelops the implant. Functionalising implant surfaces with biocompatible tissue-specific textures may improve in vivo performance. A novel biomimetic breast implant is presented here with anti-inflammatory in vitro abilities. Topographical assessment of native breast tissue facilitated the development of a statistical model of adipose tissue. 3D grayscale photolithography and ion etching were combined to successfully replicate a surface modelled upon the statistics of breast tissue. Pro-inflammatory genes ILβ1, TNFα, and IL6 were downregulated (p<0.001) and anti-inflammatory gene IL-10 were upregulated on the novel surface. Pro-inflammatory cytokines Gro-Alpha, TNFα and neutrophil chemoattractant IL8 were produced in lower quantities and anti-inflammatory IL-10 in higher quantities in culture with the novel surface (p<0.01). Immunocytochemistry and SEM demonstrated favourable fibroblast and macrophage responses to these novel surfaces. This study describes the first biomimetic breast tissue derived breast implant surface. Our findings attest to its potential translational ability to reduce the inflammatory phase of the implant driven foreign body reaction.

  9. HER2 induces expression of leptin in human breast epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aree Moon

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A close association between the obesity hormone leptin andbreast cancer progression has been suggested. The presentstudy investigated the molecular mechanism for enhancedleptin expression in breast cancer cells and its functionalsignificance in breast cancer aggressiveness. We examinedwhether leptin expression level is affected by the oncoproteinhuman epidermal growth factor receptor2 (HER2, which isoverexpressed in ∼30% of breast tumors. Here, we report, forthe first time, that HER2 induces transcriptional activation ofleptin in MCF10A human breast epithelial cells. We alsoshowed that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signalingwas involved in leptin expression induced by HER2. Weshowed a crucial role of leptin in the invasiveness ofHER2-MCF10A cells using an siRNA molecule targeting leptin.Taken together, the results indicate a molecular link betweenHER2 and leptin, providing supporting evidence that leptinrepresents a target for breast cancer therapy.

  10. Identification of vitamin D3 target genes in human breast cancer tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Lei; Anderson, Paul H; Turner, Andrew G; Pishas, Kathleen I; Dhatrak, Deepak J; Gill, Peter G; Morris, Howard A; Callen, David F

    2016-11-01

    Multiple epidemiological studies have shown that high vitamin D3 status is strongly associated with improved breast cancer survival. To determine the molecular pathways influenced by 1 alpha, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) in breast epithelial cells we isolated RNA from normal human breast and cancer tissues treated with 1,25D in an ex vivo explant system. RNA-Seq revealed 523 genes that were differentially expressed in breast cancer tissues in response to 1,25D treatment, and 127 genes with altered expression in normal breast tissues. GoSeq KEGG pathway analysis revealed 1,25D down-regulated cellular metabolic pathways and enriched pathways involved with intercellular adhesion. The highly 1,25D up-regulated target genes CLMN, SERPINB1, EFTUD1, and KLK6were selected for further analysis and up-regulation by 1,25D was confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis in breast cancer cell lines and in a subset of human clinical samples from normal and cancer breast tissues. Ketoconazole potentiated 1,25D-mediated induction of CLMN, SERPINB1, and KLK6 mRNA through inhibition of 24-hydroxylase (CYP24A1) activity. Elevated expression levels of CLMN, SERPINB1, and KLK6 are associated with prolonged relapse-free survival for breast cancer patients. The major finding of the present study is that exposure of both normal and malignant breast tissue to 1,25D results in changes in cellular adhesion, metabolic pathways and tumor suppressor-like pathways, which support epidemiological data suggesting that adequate vitamin D3 levels may improve breast cancer outcome.

  11. Expression of proto-oncogene Fra-1 in human neoplastic breast tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuhua Song; Jing Wang; Xiaoyun Yu; Santai Song; Zefei Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Invasion and metastasis are the most significant and intrinsic biological characteristics of cancers, also which are main factors of malignant tumor causing treatment failure and death. Recent studies have found that Fra-1 plays an important role on cell migration, invasion, and maintaining malignant phenotype of transformed cells. But there are few studies about the expression and location of Fra-1 in breast tissues and cells being reported This study just aims to discuss the expression and location of transcription factor Fra-1 in benign and malignant human breast tissues. Methods: The expression of Fra-1 was investigated by immunohistochemistry in neoplastic breast diseases ranging from benign fibroadenoma to very aggressive undifferentiated carcinoma. The correlations of Fra-1 expression with other indicators of breast carcinoma prognosis (ER, PR and ErbB2 receptors) were analyzed. Results: All neoplastic breast tissues, either benign or malignant breast tissues, were nuclear immunoreactive for Fra-1-recognizing antibody. In 85% of benign tumors (17/20), the immunoreactive for Fra-1-recognizing antibody as exclusively restricted to the nuclei. In three cases (3/20,15%), focal unequivocal cytoplas-mic staining was also exhibited. Strong positive nuclear staining for Fra-1 was easily seen in all types of breast carcinomas. However the nuclear/cytoplasmic concomitant immunoreactivity was observed in all types of breast carcinomas. A clear shift in Fra-1 immunoreactivity, from an exclusively nuclear to a simultaneous nuclear and cytoplasmic localization was noticed in 90.2% (37/41) of breast carcinomas. No inverse relationship between Fra-1 and ER and PR protein levels was noticed in malignant tumors. The relative expression level of Fra-1 was not correlated with the expression of ErbB2. Conclusion: The overall expression, pattern and intensity of Fra-1 proteins were correlated with breast oncogenesis. Overexpression of Fra-1, leading to a persistent

  12. Potential use of humanized antibodies in the treatment of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Niklaus G; Pestalozzi, Bernhard C; Knuth, Alexander; Renner, Christoph

    2006-07-01

    With the growing knowledge of key cellular pathways in tumor induction and evolution, targeted therapies make up an increasing proportion of new drugs entering clinical testing. In the treatment of breast cancer, humanized antibodies have become a major option. The humanized monoclonal antibody trastuzumab (Herceptin); Genentech, Inc., CA, USA) for HER2-overexpressing, metastatic breast cancer, represents a successful agent associated with impressive survival benefits when combined with chemotherapy. Based on impressive results, trastuzumab will become a standard in the adjuvant treatment of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer. The role of trastuzumab in the neoadjuvant setting is promising, but must be further evaluated in large prospective, randomized trials. However, there is still a large proportion of patients overexpressing HER2 that do not respond to trastuzumab. Regarding this patient cohort, the optimal combination of trastuzumab with other agents needs further evaluation. In breast cancer lacking HER2 amplification, the role of the new antibody pertuzumab remains to be defined. The role of antibodies interfering with angiogenesis, tumor stroma or glycoproteins is of a preliminary nature and warrants further investigation. Here, an overview of humanized antibodies in human breast cancer is provided, with emphasis on the recent advances and future prospects in treating malignant breast cancer.

  13. Significance of the detection of esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (parabens) in human breast tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Philip W; Everett, David J

    2004-01-01

    This issue of Journal of Applied Toxicology publishes the paper Concentrations of Parabens in Human Breast Tumours by Darbre et al. (2004), which reports that esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (parabens) can be detected in samples of tissue from human breast tumours. Breast tumour samples were supplied from 20 patients, in collaboration with the Edinburgh Breast Unit Research Group, and analysed by high-pressure liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. The parabens are used as antimicrobial preservatives in underarm deodorants and antiperspirants and in a wide range of other consumer products. The parabens also have inherent oestrogenic and other hormone related activity (increased progesterone receptor gene expression). As oestrogen is a major aetiological factor in the growth and development of the majority of human breast cancers, it has been previously suggested by Darbre that parabens and other chemicals in underarm cosmetics may contribute to the rising incidence of breast cancer. The significance of the finding of parabens in tumour samples is discussed here in terms of 1). Darbre et al's study design, 2). what can be inferred from this type of data (and what can not, such as the cause of these tumours), 3). the toxicology of these compounds and 4). the limitations of the existing toxicology database and the need to consider data that is appropriate to human exposures. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Analysis of CD83 antigen expression in human breast fibroadenoma and adjacent tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Nascimento Borges

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Dendritic cell maturation is considered essential for starting an immune response. The CD83 antigen is an important marker of dendritic cell maturation. The objectives here were to analyze CD83 antigen expression in human breast fibroadenoma and breast tissue adjacent to the lesion and to identify clinical factors that might influence this expression. DESIGN AND SETTING: This was a retrospective study at a public university hospital, in which 29 histopathological samples of breast fibroadenoma and adjacent breast tissue, from 28 women of reproductive age, were analyzed. METHODS: The immunohistochemistry method was used to analyze the cell expression of the antigen. The antigen expression in the cells was evaluated by means of random manual counting using an optical microscope. RESULTS: Positive expression of the CD83 antigen in the epithelial cells of the fibroadenoma (365.52; standard deviation ± 133.13 in relation to the adjacent breast tissue cells (189.59; standard deviation ± 140.75 was statistically larger (P < 0.001. Several clinical features were analyzed, but only parity was shown to influence CD83 antigen expression in the adjacent breast tissue, such that positive expression was more evident in nulliparous women (P = 0.042. CONCLUSIONS: The expression of the CD83 antigen in the fibroadenoma was positive and greater than in the adjacent breast tissue. Positive expression of the antigen in the adjacent breast tissue was influenced by parity, and was significantly more evident in nulliparous women.

  15. Comparative Proteome Analysis of Breast Cancer and Adjacent Normal Breast Tissues in Human

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-Shan Deng; Tian-Yong Xing; Hong-Ying Zhou; Ruo-Hong Xiong; You-Guang Lu; Bin Wen; Shang-Qing Liu; Hui-Jun Yang

    2006-01-01

    Two-dimensional polyacryiamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) and matrixassisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS), incorporated with online database searching, were performed to investigate differential proteins of breast cancer and adjacent normal breast tissues. Considering that serum albumin is abundantly presented in normal control samples, 15 differential spots detected in 11 out of 12 (91.7%) breast cancer samples were identified by online SIENA-2DPAGE database searching and MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS analysis. The results indicate that pathological changes of breast cancer are concerned with augmentation of substance metabolism, promotion of proteolytic activity, decline of activity of some inhibitors of enzymes, and so on. Some important proteins involved in the pathological process of breast cancer with changed expression may be useful biomarkers, such as alpha-1-antitrypsin, EF1-beta, cathepsin D, TCTP, SMT3A, RPS12, and PSMA1, among which SMT3A,RPS12, and PSMA1 were first reported for breast cancer in this study.

  16. Expression of Axl and its prognostic significance in human breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Gaoyuan; Wang, Zhenzhen; Wang, Jianguang; Zhang, Like; Chen, Yanbin; Yuan, Pengfei; Liu, Dechun

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignant cancer and second leading cause of cancer-related death among women, and its prevalence continues to increase. Axl overexpression has been identified in the many types of human cancer, and it has been demonstrated to participate in signaling pathways related to carcinogenesis and cancer development. In the present study, Axl expression was examined by performing immunohistochemical staining in 60 breast cancer tumors and 40 benign breast lesions (25 mammary dysplasia and 15 breast fibroadenoma). In total, 34 (56.67%) cancer tissues and 13 (32.5%) benign breast lesions were classified as exhibiting high levels of Axl expression, indicating a significant association between malignancy and high Axl expression. High Axl expression was also associated with estrogen receptor (ER) positivity (P=0.028), progesterone receptor (PR) positivity (P=0.007), and poor tumor differentiation (P=0.033). No significant associations were observed between Axl expression and age, tumor size, lymph node metastasis, tumor node metastasis staging, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 and Ki67 antigen. The Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard model both demonstrated that there was no statistical difference between Axl expression and breast cancer prognosis. However, it remains unclear whether the expression of Axl is correlated with the prognosis of luminal type breast cancer patients. PMID:28356938

  17. ADAMTS8 and ADAMTS15 expression predicts survival in human breast carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porter, Sarah; Span, Paul N; Sweep, Fred C G J;

    2006-01-01

    We recently undertook expression profiling of all 19 human ADAMTS metalloproteinases (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs) in malignant and non-neoplastic breast tissue and showed that 11 of the ADAMTS genes are dysregulated in breast carcinoma. We identified a subgroup......% C.I. = 2.16-13.5, p prediction of poor prognosis by ADAMTS8 and ADAMTS15 expression was found to be independent of other classical clinicopathological factors. Results observed in FVB-PyMT mice, a robust transgenic model of highly metastatic...... breast carcinoma, fitted the expectation that relatively high expression levels of ADAMTS8 together with low expression levels of ADAMTS15 seen in human breast carcinoma are associated with a poor clinical outcome. In summary, ADAMTS8 and ADAMTS15 have emerged as novel predictors of survival in patients...

  18. Recurrent Breast Abscesses due to Corynebacterium kroppenstedtii, a Human Pathogen Uncommon in Caucasian Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Le Flèche-Matéos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Corynebacterium kroppenstedtii (Ck was first described in 1998 from human sputum. Contrary to what is observed in ethnic groups such as Maori, Ck is rarely isolated from breast abscesses and granulomatous mastitis in Caucasian women. Case Presentation. We herein report a case of recurrent breast abscesses in a 46-year-old Caucasian woman. Conclusion. In the case of recurrent breast abscesses, even in Caucasian women, the possible involvement of Ck should be investigated. The current lack of such investigations, probably due to the difficulty to detect Ck, may cause the underestimation of such an aetiology.

  19. The distribution of tissue fibronectin and sialic acid in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Süer, S; Baloğlu, H; Güngör, Z; Sönmez, H; Kökoğlu, E

    1998-06-01

    Our findings indicate that sialic acid and fibronectin levels in breast tumors are higher than those in normal tissues. The mean tissue fibronectin and sialic acid concentrations for patients with breast cancer were 30.90 +/- 9.68 microg/mg protein and 21.60 +/- 9.35 microg/mg protein, respectively, and for normal controls were 12.47 +/- 5.69 microg/mg protein, respectively. Tissue fibronectin and sialic acid can be important markers for human breast cancer.

  20. Serum sialic acid and CEA concentrations in human breast cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Hogan-Ryan, A.; Fennelly, J J; Jones, M.; Cantwell, B; Duffy, M J

    1980-01-01

    The concentration of bound sialic acid in the sera of 56 normal subjects and 65 subjects with breast cancer was measured, in order to determine (1) whether serum sialic acid concentrations are raised in breast cancer and (2) whether the concentration of sialic acid in serum reflects tumour stage. The amount of sialic acid in serum was compared to serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) values. Urinary hydroxyproline and serum alkaline phosphatase concentrations were used as indicators of bone an...

  1. Myiasis secondary to Sermatobia hominis (human botfly) presenting as a long-standing breast mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, D G

    1999-09-01

    A case of a 54-year-old woman who presented with a breast mass is reported. Histologically, a chronic granulomatous inflammatory response was observed. The response was associated with an organism diagnosed as a fly larva, Dermatobia hominis (human botfly). The incidence of myiasis, infestation by fly larvae, presenting as a long-standing breast mass and mimicking a neoplasm is extremely rare, especially in the United States.

  2. Assessing a Drosophila Metastasis Model in Mouse and Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    lines that cause osteolytic lesions in vivo and produce parathyroid hormone related peptide ( PTHrP ), a major factor involved in tumor-induced...osteolysis in breast cancer, but not in the nonosteolytic and non PTHrP secreting cancer cell lines. Stable expression of GLI2 resulted in increased...production of PTHrP in vitro and enhanced osteolysis in vivo, suggesting that osteolysis in human breast cancer is driven at least in part by Gli226

  3. Human breast cancer cells share antigens with the myeloid monocyte lineage.

    OpenAIRE

    F. Calvo; Martin, P M; Jabrane, N.; de Cremoux, P; Magdelenat, H.

    1987-01-01

    We have examined the expression of several myeloid cell associated antigens, some of which are involved in myelomonocyte adhesion, in seven well characterized human breast cancer cell lines, since common properties of adhesiveness and migration are found in haemopoietic cells and epithelial cancer cells. Five of these cell lines were of metastatic origin and two were derived from primary breast carcinoma. Antigenic expression was evaluated by immunofluorescence (IF), flow cytometry (FCM), rad...

  4. Caveolin-1 expression in cancer-associated fibroblasts and its correlation with molecular typing of invasive ductal breast carcinoma%Caveolin-1在乳腺浸润性导管癌间质内癌相关成纤维细胞中的表达水平与乳腺癌分子亚型的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王善伟; 徐侃伦; 赵莉莉; 陈丽荣

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of caveolin-l (Cav-1) in breast cancer-associated fibroblasts(CAFs) and to indicate its correlation with molecular typing and gene copy number of HER-2/neu in invasive ductal breast carcinoma (IDC). Methods One hundred and forty-five cases of breast cancer molecular subtypes were enrolled in the study. En Vision immunohisto-chemical method was used to detect Cav-1 expression of 168 cases with breast cancer in CAFs situation. Fluorescence in situ hybridization ( FISH) was used to detect HER-2 gene amplification status of breast cancer. HER-2 gene amplification in breast cancer and the correlation with stromal expression of Cav-1 was analyzed. Results Cav-1 expression in CAFs in breast cancer with pathological closely related to molecular typing. The positive rates in HER-2 + type and Luminal B type groups were 83. 3% (35/42) ,83. 3% (20/24), significantly higher than that in Luminal A group(58. 1% ) and Basal-like type group(35. 3% ), the differences were statistically significant (P < 0. 05). Cav-1 expression in CAFs was positively correlated with HER-2 protein expression and HER-2 gene status. HER-2 gene status were detected by FISH, stromal Cav-1 positive rate of HER-2 gene amplification group was 83. 3% (55/66), higher than those without amplification group55. 9% (57/102), the differences were statistically significant (P <0.05). Cav-1 expression in CAFs was positively correlated with molecular typing, HER-2 protein expression and HER-2 gene status. Stromal caveolin-1 expression was significantly associated with prognosis (P = 0. 041). Conclusion Cav-1 expression in CAFs is positively correlated with molecular typing, HER-2 protein expression and HER-2 gene status. The over expression of Cav-1 in stromal CAFs of invasive breast cancer predicts good prognostic outcome.%目的 检测Caveolin-1(Gay-1)在乳腺浸润性导管癌间质内癌相关成纤维细胞(CAFs)中的表达,分析Cav-1与乳腺癌分子亚型、HER-2基

  5. The fractional viscoelastic response of human breast tissue cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, B.; Babahosseini, H.; Mahmoodi, S. N.; Agah, M.

    2015-07-01

    The mechanical response of a living cell is notoriously complicated. The complex, heterogeneous characteristics of cellular structure introduce difficulties that simple linear models of viscoelasticity cannot overcome, particularly at deep indentation depths. Herein, a nano-scale stress-relaxation analysis performed with an atomic force microscope reveals that isolated human breast cells do not exhibit simple exponential relaxation capable of being modeled by the standard linear solid (SLS) model. Therefore, this work proposes the application of the fractional Zener (FZ) model of viscoelasticity to extract mechanical parameters from the entire relaxation response, improving upon existing physical techniques to probe isolated cells. The FZ model introduces a new parameter that describes the fractional time-derivative dependence of the response. The results show an exceptional increase in conformance to the experimental data compared to that predicted by the SLS model, and the order of the fractional derivative (α) is remarkably homogeneous across the populations, with a median value of 0.48 ± 0.06 for the malignant population and 0.51 ± 0.07 for the benign. The cells’ responses exhibit power-law behavior and complexity not associated with simple relaxation (SLS, α = 1) that supports the application of a fractional model. The distributions of some of the FZ parameters also preserve the distinction between the malignant and benign sample populations seen from the linear model and previous results while including the contribution of fast-relaxation behavior. The resulting viscosity, measured by a composite relaxation time, exhibits considerably less dispersion due to residual error than the distribution generated by the linear model and therefore serves as a more powerful marker for cell differentiation.

  6. Inhibition of Notch1 increases paclitaxel sensitivity to human breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Li; Ma Yongjie; Gu Feng; Fu Li

    2014-01-01

    Background Paclitaxel (PAC) is the first-line chemotherapy drug for most breast cancer patients,but clinical studies showed that some breast cancer patients were insensitive to PAC,which led to chemotherapy failure.It was reported that Notch1 signaling participated in drug resistance of breast cancer.Here,we show whether Notch1 expression is related to PAC sensitivity of breast cancer.Methods We employed Notch1 siRNA and Notch1 inhibitor,N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-1-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butylester (DAPT),to down regulate Notch1 expression in human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231,and detected the inhibition effect by Western blotting and reverse trans cription-polymerase chain reaction,respectively.After 24 hours exposure to different concentration of PAC (0,1,5,10,15,20,and 25 μg/ml),the viability of the control group and experimental group cells was tested by MTT.We also examined the expression of Notch1 in PAC sensitive and nonsensitive breast cancer patients,respectively by immunohistochemistry (IHC).The PAC sensitivity of breast cancer patients were identified by collagen gel droplet embedded culture-drug sensitivity test (CD-DST).Results Down regulation of Notch1 expression by Notch1siRNA interference or Notch1 inhibitor increased the PAC sensitivity in MDA-MB-231 cells (P <0.05).Also,the expression of Notch1 in PAC sensitive patients was much lower than that of PAC non-sensitive patients (P <0.01).Conclusion Notch1 expression has an effect on PAC sensitivity in breast cancer patients,and the inhibition of Notch1 increases paclitaxel sensitivity to human breast cancer.

  7. Human biliverdin reductase promotes EMT through the ERK1/2 signal pathway in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Song, Shasha; Yi, Zhi; Zhao, Xijuan; Fu, Li; Wang, Lin; Ma, Cui; Mao, Min; Xing, Yan; Zhu, Daling

    2016-10-05

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays an important role in the development of the invasive and metastatic potentials of breast cancer cells during progression. Human biliverdin reductase (hBVR), an enzyme in the heme metabolism pathway, is involved in hypoxia-induced renal tubular EMT. However, whether hBVR contributes to the EMT of breast cancer remains unclear. Here, we used breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T-47D) and normal breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A) to explore the potential role of hBVR in the EMT of breast cancer. Western blot, RT-PCR and immunofluorescence were employed to test the expression and location of hBVR in the cell lines. Small interfering RNA of hBVR (si-hBVR) was used to knockdown the expression of hBVR, and U0126 was applied to inhibit the ERK1/2 signaling in MCF-7, T-47D cells. We found that hBVR highly expressed in MCF-7 and T-47D cells compared with MCF-10A cells, and had different cellular locations between them. Our results revealed that EMT occurred in tissues from breast cancer patients and breast cancer cell lines. However, the EMT in MCF-7 and T-47D cells was suppressed by si-hBVR and U0126. Furthermore, the expression of phosphorylated ERK1/2 was down-regulated by si-hBVR. In addition, hBVR regulated EMT through the ERK1/2 signaling, but bilirubin, which is a product of hBVR in the heme metabolism pathway in breast cancer, did not. Taken together, these findings provide new evidence that hBVR plays an important role in promoting EMT in human breast cancer through the ERK1/2 signaling pathway, and hBVR may be a therapeutic target for this disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Population of 224 realistic human subject-based computational breast phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, David W. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Wells, Jered R., E-mail: jered.wells@duke.edu [Clinical Imaging Physics Group and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Sturgeon, Gregory M. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Samei, Ehsan [Department of Radiology and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Departments of Physics, Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Biomedical Engineering, and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Dobbins, James T. [Department of Radiology and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Departments of Physics and Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Segars, W. Paul [Department of Radiology and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Lo, Joseph Y. [Department of Radiology and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: To create a database of highly realistic and anatomically variable 3D virtual breast phantoms based on dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) data. Methods: A tissue classification and segmentation algorithm was used to create realistic and detailed 3D computational breast phantoms based on 230 + dedicated bCT datasets from normal human subjects. The breast volume was identified using a coarse three-class fuzzy C-means segmentation algorithm which accounted for and removed motion blur at the breast periphery. Noise in the bCT data was reduced through application of a postreconstruction 3D bilateral filter. A 3D adipose nonuniformity (bias field) correction was then applied followed by glandular segmentation using a 3D bias-corrected fuzzy C-means algorithm. Multiple tissue classes were defined including skin, adipose, and several fractional glandular densities. Following segmentation, a skin mask was produced which preserved the interdigitated skin, adipose, and glandular boundaries of the skin interior. Finally, surface modeling was used to produce digital phantoms with methods complementary to the XCAT suite of digital human phantoms. Results: After rejecting some datasets due to artifacts, 224 virtual breast phantoms were created which emulate the complex breast parenchyma of actual human subjects. The volume breast density (with skin) ranged from 5.5% to 66.3% with a mean value of 25.3% ± 13.2%. Breast volumes ranged from 25.0 to 2099.6 ml with a mean value of 716.3 ± 386.5 ml. Three breast phantoms were selected for imaging with digital compression (using finite element modeling) and simple ray-tracing, and the results show promise in their potential to produce realistic simulated mammograms. Conclusions: This work provides a new population of 224 breast phantoms based on in vivo bCT data for imaging research. Compared to previous studies based on only a few prototype cases, this dataset provides a rich source of new cases spanning a wide range

  9. Differential expression of follistatin and FLRG in human breast proliferative disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaral Vania F

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activins are growth factors acting on cell growth and differentiation. Activins are expressed in high grade breast tumors and they display an antiproliferative effect inducing G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in breast cancer cell lines. Follistatin and follistatin- related gene (FLRG bind and neutralize activins. In order to establish if these activin binding proteins are involved in breast tumor progression, the present study evaluated follistatin and FLRG pattern of mRNA and protein expression in normal human breast tissue and in different breast proliferative diseases. Methods Paraffin embedded specimens of normal breast (NB - n = 8; florid hyperplasia without atypia (FH - n = 17; fibroadenoma (FIB - n = 17; ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS - n = 10 and infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC - n = 15 were processed for follistatin and FLRG immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. The area and intensity of chromogen epithelial and stromal staining were analyzed semi-quantitatively. Results Follistatin and FLRG were expressed both in normal tissue and in all the breast diseases investigated. Follistatin staining was detected in the epithelial cytoplasm and nucleus in normal, benign and malignant breast tissue, with a stronger staining intensity in the peri-alveolar stromal cells of FIB at both mRNA and protein levels. Conversely, FLRG area and intensity of mRNA and protein staining were higher both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus of IDC epithelial cells when compared to NB, while no significant changes in the stromal intensity were observed in all the proliferative diseases analyzed. Conclusion The present findings suggest a role for follistatin in breast benign disease, particularly in FIB, where its expression was increased in stromal cells. The up regulation of FLRG in IDC suggests a role for this protein in the progression of breast malignancy. As activin displays an anti-proliferative effect in human mammary cells, the

  10. Organophosphorus flame retardants (PFRs) in human breast milk from several Asian countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joon-Woo; Isobe, Tomohiko; Muto, Mamoru; Tue, Nguyen Minh; Katsura, Kana; Malarvannan, Govindan; Sudaryanto, Agus; Chang, Kwang-Hyeon; Prudente, Maricar; Viet, Pham Hung; Takahashi, Shin; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2014-12-01

    In this study, the concentrations of 10 organophosphorus flame retardants (PFRs) were determined in 89 human breast milk samples collected from Japan, the Philippines and Vietnam. Among the targeted PFRs, tris(2-chloroexyl) phosphate (TCEP) and triphenyl phosphate (TPHP) were the predominant compounds and were detected in more than 60% of samples in all three countries. The concentrations of PFRs in human breast milk were significantly higher (p<0.05) in the Philippines (median 70 ng g(-1) lipid wt.) than those in Japan (median 22 ng g(-1) lipid wt.) and Vietnam (median 10 ng g(-1) lipid wt.). The present results suggest that the usage of products containing PFRs in the Philippines is higher than those of Japan and Vietnam. Comparing with a previous literature survey in Sweden, the levels of PFRs in human breast milk from the Philippines were 1.5-2 times higher, whereas levels in Japan and Vietnam were 4-20 times lower, suggesting that these differences might be due to their variation in the usage of flame-retarded products utilized in each country. When daily intake of PFRs to infants via human breast milk was estimated, some individuals accumulated tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) and TCEP were close to reference dose (RfD). This is the first report to identify PFRs in human breast milk samples from Asian countries.

  11. The role of adipose tissue in cancer-associated cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaitkus, Janina A; Celi, Francesco S

    2017-03-01

    Adipose tissue (fat) is a heterogeneous organ, both in function and histology, distributed throughout the body. White adipose tissue, responsible for energy storage and more recently found to have endocrine and inflammation-modulatory activities, was historically thought to be the only type of fat present in adult humans. The recent demonstration of functional brown adipose tissue in adults, which is highly metabolic, shifted this paradigm. Additionally, recent studies demonstrate the ability of white adipose tissue to be induced toward the brown adipose phenotype - "beige" or "brite" adipose tissue - in a process referred to as "browning." While these adipose tissue depots are under investigation in the context of obesity, new evidence suggests a maladaptive role in other metabolic disturbances including cancer-associated cachexia, which is the topic of this review. This syndrome is multifactorial in nature and is an independent factor associated with poor prognosis. Here, we review the contributions of all three adipose depots - white, brown, and beige - to the development and progression of cancer-associated cachexia. Specifically, we focus on the local and systemic processes involving these adipose tissues that lead to increased energy expenditure and sustained negative energy balance. We highlight key findings from both animal and human studies and discuss areas within the field that need further exploration. Impact statement Cancer-associated cachexia (CAC) is a complex, multifactorial syndrome that negatively impacts patient quality of live and prognosis. This work reviews a component of CAC that lacks prior discussion: adipose tissue contributions. Uniquely, it discusses all three types of adipose tissue, white, beige, and brown, their interactions, and their contributions to the development and progression of CAC. Summarizing key bench and clinical studies, it provides information that will be useful to both basic and clinical researchers in designing

  12. The sodium iodide symporter (NIS) and potential regulators in normal, benign and malignant human breast tissue.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, James

    2011-01-01

    The presence, relevance and regulation of the Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS) in human mammary tissue remains poorly understood. This study aimed to quantify relative expression of NIS and putative regulators in human breast tissue, with relationships observed further investigated in vitro.

  13. Growth kinetics of four human breast carcinomas grown in nude mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spang-Thomsen, M; Rygaard, K; Hansen, L;

    1989-01-01

    The immune-deficient nude mouse with human tumor xenografts is an appropriate model system for performing detailed growth kinetic examinations. In the present study one estrogen and progesterone receptor-negative (T60) and three receptor-positive (Br-10, MCF-7, T61) human breast cancer xenografts...

  14. Presence of Toxic Heavy Metals in Human Breast Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Özçetin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available      Aim: In breast-fed infants, toxic chemicals previously been exposed to the mother are also a potential risk to the baby. The aim of this study is to investigate the presence of Ni, Cd, Pb and Sb in mother’s milk and to highlight the possible potential risks of toxic heavy metals in the light of published epidemiological studies and scientific literature. Material and Method: For the study, milk samples were collected from 58 breast-feeding mothers who were residing in their provinces for more than five years and gave birth here and applied to follow up in any time after the first month period. Ni, Cd, Pb and Sb levels of milk samples were measured by ICP (Inductively Coupled Plasma spectroscopy device. Results: In examined breast milks, 53.4% Ni, 17.2% Cd, 12.1% Pb and 15.5% Sb were found. Out of 58 mothers enrolled in the study, none of the heavy metals was detected in only 13 (22.4% mother’s milk, one or more heavy metal was found in the rest of the milks of mothers. Discusssion: In rural and urban areas, the environment is widely contaminated with heavy metals. This toxic substances come to be found in breast  milk. In the earth, the main source of environmental toxins that breast-feed infants faced with is breast milk. To minimize the exposure of toxins with breast milk, the risk of confrontation with mothers and toxic agents should be reduced.  

  15. Cellular growth and survival are mediated by beta 1 integrins in normal human breast epithelium but not in breast carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howlett, Anthony R; Bailey, Nina; Damsky, Caroline; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    1994-11-28

    We previously established a rapid three-dimensional assay for discrimination of normal and malignant human breast epithelial cells using a laminin-rich reconstituted basement membrane. In this assay, normal epithelial cells differentiate into well-organized acinar structures whereas tumor cells fail to recapitulate this process and produce large, disordered colonies. The data suggest that breast acinar morphogenesis and differentiation is regulated by cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions and that these interactions are altered in malignancy. Here, we investigated the role of ECM receptors (integrins) in these processes and report on the expression and function of potential laminin receptors in normal and tumorigenic breast epithelial cells. Immmunocytochemical analysis showed that normal and carcinoma cells in a three-dimensional substratum express profiles of integrins similar to normal and malignant breast tissues in situ. Normal cells express {alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}3, {alpha}6, {beta}1 and {beta}4 integrin subunits, whereas breast carcinoma cells show variable losses, disordered expression, or down regulation of these subunits. Function-blocking experiments using inhibitory antiintegrin subunit antibodies showed a >5-fold inhibition of the formation of acinar structures by normal cells in the presence of either anti-{beta}1 or anti-{alpha}3 antibodies, whereas anti-{alpha}2 or -{alpha}6 had little or no effect. In experiments where collagen type I gels were used instead of basement membrane, acinar morphogenesis was blocked by anti-{beta}1 and -{alpha}2 antibodies but not by anti-{alpha}3. These data suggest a specificity of integrin utilization dependent on the ECM ligands encountered by the cell. The interruption of normal acinar morphogenesis by anti-integrin antibodies was associated with an inhibition of cell growth and induction of apoptosis. Function-blocking antibodies had no inhibitory effect on the rate of tumor cell growth, survival or

  16. Label-free imaging of human breast tissues using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yaliang; Gao, Liang; Wang, Zhiyong; Thrall, Michael J.; Luo, Pengfei; Wong, Kelvin K.; Wong, Stephen T.

    2011-03-01

    Breast cancer is a common disease in women. Current imaging and diagnostic methods for breast cancer confront several limitations, like time-consuming, invasive and with a high cost. Alternative strategies are in high demand to alleviate patients' trauma and lower medical expenses. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging technique offers many advantages, including label-free, sub-wavelength spatial resolution and video-rate imaging speed. Therefore, it has been demonstrated as a powerful tool for various biomedical applications. In this study, we present a label-free fast imaging method to identify breast cancer and its subtypes using CARS microscopy. Human breast tissues, including normal, benign and invasive carcinomas, were imaged ex vivo using a custom-built CARS microscope. Compared with results from corresponding hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stains, the CARS technique has demonstrated its capability in identifying morphological features in a similar way as in H&E stain. These features can be used to distinguish breast cancer from normal and benign tissues, and further separate cancer subtypes from each other. Our pilot study suggests that CARS microscopy could be used as a routine examination tool to characterize breast cancer ex vivo. Moreover, its label-free and fast imaging properties render this technique as a promising approach for in vivo and real-time imaging and diagnosis of breast cancer.

  17. EVIDENCE FOR THE PRESENCE OF MUTAGENIC ARYL AMINES IN HUMAN BREAST MILK AND DNA ADDUCTS IN EXFOLIATED BREAST-DUCT EPITHELIAL CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aromatic (AA) and heterocyclic amines (HAA) are ubiquitous environmental mutagens present in combustions emissions, fried meats, tobacco smoke, etc., and are suspect human mammary carcinogens. To determine the presence of aryl amines in breast tissue and fluid, we examined exfol...

  18. The relationship between Human Papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus infections with breast cancer of Iranian patients

    OpenAIRE

    Zahra Tahmasebi fard

    2013-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the malignancy in humans and other mammals. Several risk factors are involved in their appearance such as higher hormone levels and obesity. Identification of a mouse mammary tumor virus supports a viral etiology for breast tumors in animals. Viruses have been implicated in the development of various cancers, but viral induction for formation breast cancer is controversial. The purpose of this study was investigation of the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) &...

  19. Parabens enable suspension growth of MCF-10A immortalized, non-transformed human breast epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Sugandha; Darbre, Philippa D

    2013-05-01

    Parabens (alkyl esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid) are used extensively as preservatives in consumer products, and intact esters have been measured in several human tissues. Concerns of a potential link between parabens and breast cancer have been raised, but mechanistic studies have centred on their oestrogenic activity and little attention has been paid to any carcinogenic properties. In the present study, we report that parabens can induce anchorage-independent growth of MCF-10A immortalized but non-transformed human breast epithelial cells, a property closely related to transformation and a predictor of tumour growth in vivo. In semi-solid methocel suspension culture, MCF-10A cells produced very few colonies and only of a small size but the addition of 5 × 10(-4) M methylparaben, 10(-5) M n-propylparaben or 10(-5) M n-butylparaben resulted in a greater number of colonies per dish (P paraben concentrations in human breast tissue samples from 40 mastectomies (Barr et al., 2012) showed that 22/40 of the patients had at least one of the parabens at the site of the primary tumour at or above these concentrations. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report that parabens can induce a transformed phenotype in human breast epithelial cells in vitro, and further investigation is now justified into a potential link between parabens and breast carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. The plasticity of human breast carcinoma cells is more than epithelial to mesenchymal conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ole William; Nielsen, Helga Lind; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn;

    2001-01-01

    The human breast comprises three lineages: the luminal epithelial lineage, the myoepithelial lineage, and the mesenchymal lineage. It has been widely accepted that human breast neoplasia pertains only to the luminal epithelial lineage. In recent years, however, evidence has accumulated that neopl......The human breast comprises three lineages: the luminal epithelial lineage, the myoepithelial lineage, and the mesenchymal lineage. It has been widely accepted that human breast neoplasia pertains only to the luminal epithelial lineage. In recent years, however, evidence has accumulated...... that neoplastic breast epithelial cells may be substantially more plastic in their differentiation repertoire than previously anticipated. Thus, along with an increasing availability of markers for the myoepithelial lineage, at least a partial differentiation towards this lineage is being revealed frequently....... It has also become clear that conversions towards the mesenchymal lineage actually occur, referred to as epithelial to mesenchymal transitions. Indeed, some of the so-called myofibroblasts surrounding the tumor may have an epithelial origin rather than a mesenchymal origin. Because myoepithelial cells...

  1. Effect of amlodipine on apoptosis of human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To elucidate the effects of amlodipine on the proliferation and apoptosis of human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells. Methods: Light microscopy was used to determine the effects of amiodipine on cell morphology; Flow cytometry was used to quantitate cells undergoing apoptosis; the expression of a cell cycle-related protein, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and an antiapoptosis protein, Bcl-2 were assessed by immunocytochemistry. Results: Amlodipine concentration of 8.25 Ixmol/L (1/2 of IC50) affected the morphology, decreased the expression of PCNA and Bcl-2 and induced apoptosis of human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells. Conclusion: The effect of amlodipine on the antiproliferation of human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells is related to inducement of apoptosis, and the decrease of the expression of Bcl-2 and PCNA may be the possible mechanism for proliferation inhibitory and inducement of apoptosis.

  2. Kinesin-1 Translocation along Human Breast Cancer Cell Microtubules in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojania Feizabadi, Mitra; Jun, Yonggun

    2015-03-01

    A principle approach to better understand intra-cellular microtubule based transport is to study such it in vitro. Such in vitro examinations have predominantly used microtubules polymerized from bovine brain tubulin, but motor function can also in principle be affected by the specific tubulin isotypes present in different cells. The human breast cancer cells carry different beta tubulin isotype distribution. However, it is entirely unknown whether transport along the microtubules is different in these cells. In this work we have characterized, for the first time, the translocation specifications of kinesin-1 along human breast cancer cell microtubules polymerized in vitro. We found that as compared with the translocation along bovine brain microtubules, kinesin-1 shows a fifty percent shorter processive run length and slightly slower velocity under similar experimental conditions. These first time results support the regulatory role of tubulin isotypes in regards to motor protein translocations, and quantify the translocation specifications of kinesin-1 along microtubules of human breast cancer cells.

  3. From Breast to Bone: Tracking Gene Expression Changes Responsible for Breast Cancer Metastasis in a Humanized Mouse Model with Molecular Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    to the date of euthanasia (Fig. 4, right panel). Normalization to the photon flux of the mammary tumors was not possible because they were resected... Humanized Mouse Model with Molecular Imaging PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Emily Powell CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: The University of Texas MD Anderson...Breast to Bone: Tracking Gene Expression Changes Responsible for Breast Cancer Metastasis in a Humanized Mouse Model with Molecular Imaging 5b. GRANT

  4. In vitro spontaneous differentiation of human breast cancer stem cells and methods to control this process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuc Van Pham

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer stem cells were considered as origins of breast cancer. Previously published studies showed that breast cancer stem cells exhibited high multi-drug resistance. This study aimed to evaluate the spontaneous differentiation of human breast cancer stem cells and investigate some in vitro conditions to control this process. Human breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs were sorted from primary culture of breast malignant tumors based on expression of CD44 and CD24. The in vitro spontaneous differentiation of BCSCs was evaluated in the popular culture medium DMEM/F12 supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS, 1% antibiotic-antimycotic. There were some different methods to control the spontaneous differentiation of BCSCs included free serum culture, mammosphere culture, basic fibroblast growth factor and epidermal growth factor supplement to serum medium, and hypoxia culture. The results showed that BCSCs always were spontaneously differentiated in vitro in the popular culture medium DMEM/F12 plus 10% FBS. The percentage of BCSCs gradually decreased according to sub-culture times and became stable after 20 sub-culture times. All investigated methods could not completely inhibit the spontaneous differentiation of BCSCs. Serum-free culture combined with hypoxia condition had strongest inhibition of this process. These results demonstrated that the spontaneous differentiation is nature process of BCSCs; therefore this process should be determined and suitably controlled depending on different experiments. [Biomed Res Ther 2015; 2(6.000: 290-296

  5. Serum sialic acid and CEA concentrations in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan-Ryan, A; Fennelly, J J; Jones, M; Cantwell, B; Duffy, M J

    1980-04-01

    The concentration of bound sialic acid in the sera of 56 normal subjects and 65 subjects with breast cancer was measured, in order to determine (1) whether serum sialic acid concentrations are raised in breast cancer and (2) whether the concentration of sialic acid in serum reflects tumour stage. The amount of sialic acid in serum was compared to serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) values. Urinary hydroxyproline and serum alkaline phosphatase concentrations were used as indicators of bone and liver involvement. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was also measured. Significantly elevated serum sialic acid concentrations were found in breast cancer, and showed correlation with tumour stage. Serum sialic acid values did not correlate with CEA values. The results suggest that measurement of serum sialic acid concentrations may be of adjunctive value in assessing tumour stage.

  6. Dissecting the Functions of Autophagy in Breast Cancer Associated Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    unclear. This proposal seeks to understand how stromal fibroblast specific ATG deletion effects mammary tumor progression, and seeks to determine the...the formation of a double membrane organelle, the autophagosome, which sequesters cytoplasmic contents and fuses with the lysosome for degradation...fibroblasts affects mammary tumor development, progression, and metastasis. Task 1: To determine the effects of stromal fibroblast specific atg deletion on

  7. Raman microspectroscopy of Hematoporphyrins. Imaging of the noncancerous and the cancerous human breast tissues with photosensitizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozek-Pluska, B.; Kopec, M.

    2016-12-01

    Raman microspectroscopy combined with fluorescence were used to study the distribution of Hematoporphyrin (Hp) in noncancerous and cancerous breast tissues. The results demonstrate the ability of Raman spectroscopy to distinguish between noncancerous and cancerous human breast tissue and to identify differences in the distribution and photodegradation of Hematoporphyrin, which is a photosensitizer in photodynamic therapy (PDT), photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) and photoimmunotherapy (PIT) of cancer. Presented results show that Hematoporphyrin level in the noncancerous breast tissue is lower compared to the cancerous one. We have proved also that the Raman intensity of lipids and proteins doesn't change dramatically after laser light irradiation, which indicates that the PDT treatment destroys preferably cancer cells, in which the photosensitizer is accumulated. The specific subcellular localization of photosensitizer for breast tissues samples soaked with Hematoporphyrin was not observed.

  8. Growth Factor Receptor-Directed Therapy in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-01

    ligands which bind to EGFR, including EGF, TGF- 4 a a a, amphiregulin, and cripto - 1, and by the capability of EGFR to transactivate other type-I tyrosine...amplification in breast cancer was recently reported by Watson et al. (69). In this analysis, encompassing over 5,000 breast tumors, the amplification rate was...activation of c-myc oncogene expression. Oncogene 7: 1587-1594. 58. Shiu, R., Watson , P. and Dubik, D. (1993) C-myc oncogene expression in estrogen

  9. Precancerous model of human breast epithelial cells induced by NNK for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardhana, Nalin; Choudhary, Shambhunath; Wang, Hwa-Chain Robert

    2008-06-01

    Epidemiological investigations have suggested that exposure to tobacco and environmental carcinogens increase the risk of developing human breast cancer. In light of the chronic exposure of human breast tissues to tobacco and environmental carcinogens, we have taken an approach of analyzing cellular changes of immortalized non-cancerous human breast epithelial MCF10A cells during the acquisition of cancerous properties induced by repeated exposure to the tobacco-specific carcinogen 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) at a low concentration of 100 pM. We found that accumulated exposures of MCF10A cells to NNK result in progressive development of cellular carcinogenesis from a stage of immortalization to precancerous sub-stages of acquiring a reduced dependence on growth factors and acquiring anchorage-independent growth. Using Matrigel for MCF10A cells to form size-restricted acini, we detected that exposures to NNK resulted in altered acinar conformation. Analysis of gene expression profiles by cDNA microarrays revealed up- and down-regulated genes associated with NNK-induced carcinogenesis. Using this cellular carcinogenesis model as a target system to identify anticancer agents, we detected that grape seed proanthocyanadin extract significantly suppressed NNK-induced carcinogenesis of MCF10A cells. Our studies provide a carcinogenesis-cellular model mimicking the accumulative exposure to carcinogens in the progression of human breast epithelial cells to increasingly acquire cancerous properties, as likely occurs in the development of precancerous human breast cells. Our cellular model also serves as a cost-efficient, in vitro system to identify preventive agents that inhibit human breast cell carcinogenesis induced by chronic exposures to carcinogens.

  10. Circulating interleukin-8 levels explain breast cancer osteolysis in mice and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalakar, Archana; Bendre, Manali S; Washam, Charity L; Fowler, Tristan W; Carver, Adam; Dilley, Joshua D; Bracey, John W; Akel, Nisreen S; Margulies, Aaron G; Skinner, Robert A; Swain, Frances L; Hogue, William R; Montgomery, Corey O; Lahiji, Parshawn; Maher, Jacqueline J; Leitzel, Kim E; Ali, Suhail M; Lipton, Alan; Nicholas, Richard W; Gaddy, Dana; Suva, Larry J

    2014-04-01

    Skeletal metastases of breast cancer and subsequent osteolysis connote a dramatic change in the prognosis for the patient and significantly increase the morbidity associated with disease. The cytokine interleukin 8 (IL-8/CXCL8) is able to directly stimulate osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption in mouse models of breast cancer bone metastasis. In this study, we determined whether circulating levels of IL-8 were associated with increased bone resorption and breast cancer bone metastasis in patients and investigated IL-8 action in vitro and in vivo in mice. Using breast cancer patient plasma (36 patients), we identified significantly elevated IL-8 levels in bone metastasis patients compared with patients lacking bone metastasis (pIL-8 and increased bone resorption (pIL-8 expression. In vitro, human MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MET breast cancer cell lines secrete two distinct IL-8 isoforms, both of which were found to stimulate osteoclastogenesis. However, the more osteolytic MDA-MET-derived full length IL-8(1-77) had significantly higher potency than the non-osteolytic MDA-MB-231-derived IL-8(6-77), via the CXCR1 receptor. MDA-MET breast cancer cells were injected into the tibia of nude mice and 7days later treated daily with a neutralizing IL-8 monoclonal antibody. All tumor-injected mice receiving no antibody developed large osteolytic bone tumors, whereas 83% of the IL-8 antibody-treated mice had no evidence of tumor at the end of 28days and had significantly increased survival. The pro-osteoclastogenic activity of IL-8 in vivo was confirmed when transgenic mice expressing human IL-8 were examined and found to have a profound osteopenic phenotype, with elevated bone resorption and inherently low bone mass. Collectively, these data suggest that IL-8 plays an important role in breast cancer osteolysis and that anti-IL-8 therapy may be useful in the treatment of the skeletal related events associated with breast cancer.

  11. Investigation on main source of dioxin analogues in human breast milk (second report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyata, H.; Nakao, T.; Aozasa, O.; Ohta, S. [Setsunan Univ., Hirakata (Japan); Iwamatsu, T. [Teijin Eco Science, Co. Ltd., Matsuyama (Japan); Fujimine, Y. [Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., Tokushima (Japan); Fukui, S. [Fukui Lactation Consultation, Amagasaki (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    In many countries, the breast milk sample has been used as a suitable indicator in order to examine human exposure level to Dioxins. In general, the breast milk level is considered to be reflecting to their accumulation level in the body. In addition, it is considered that ca. 60% of the accumulation amount of Dioxins is excreted to the baby through breast milk by nursing for a year. However, are these things true? In 1989, Frust et al. reported a time course of concentrations of Dioxins (abbreviated as Dioxins) in breast milk of one German during a period of 1 - 60 weeks after delivery. In the case of PCDFs, the level of 10 - 13 weeks after delivery was remarkably higher than that of 5 weeks. In addition, the PCBs level on the 10 to 13 weeks was also higher in comparison with on the 1 week. Thus, their pollution levels did not always decrease with a passing of time after childbirth. This suggests that all Dioxins in breast milk might be not derived from their storage in the body. Therefore, in 2001, we investigated the time alteration on the pollution level of Dioxins in breast milk from nine mothers and on their infants' daily intake of Dioxins by nursing. Consequently, it was revealed that the average daily intake of PCDD/DFs (PCDDs + PCDFs) was roughly constant during a period of 5 to 180 days after delivery. If all PCDD/DFs in breast milk are derived from only their body storage, the pollution level in milk must decrease in a linear course during a period of 5 to 180 days after delivery. However, thus linear decrease of pollution level was not observed in all tested mothers. These results indicated that PCDD/DFs in milk might be also delivered from other sources except for their storage in the body. Therefore, in this study, we tried to investigate the source of Dioxins in human breast milk.

  12. Relevance of breast cancer antiestrogen resistance genes in human breast cancer progression and tamoxifen resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Agthoven, Ton; Sieuwerts, Anieta M; Meijer-van Gelder, Marion E; Look, Maxime P; Smid, Marcel; Veldscholte, Jos; Sleijfer, Stefan; Foekens, John A; Dorssers, Lambert C J

    2009-02-01

    We have previously identified a set of breast cancer antiestrogen resistance (BCAR) genes causing estrogen independence and tamoxifen resistance in vitro using a functional genetic screen. Here, we explored whether these BCAR genes provide predictive value for tamoxifen resistance and prognostic information for tumor aggressiveness in breast cancer patients. mRNA levels of 10 BCAR genes (AKT1, AKT2, BCAR1, BCAR3, EGFR, ERBB2, GRB7, SRC, TLE3, and TRERF1) were measured in estrogen receptor-positive breast tumors using quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Normalized mRNA levels were evaluated for association with progression-free survival (PFS) in 242 patients receiving tamoxifen as first-line monotherapy for recurrent disease, and with distant metastasis-free survival (MFS) in 413 lymph node-negative (LNN) primary breast cancer patients who did not receive systemic adjuvant therapy. Concerning tamoxifen resistance, BCAR3, ERBB2, GRB7, and TLE3 mRNA levels were predictive for PFS, independent of traditional predictive factors. By combining GRB7 (or ERBB2) and TLE3 mRNA levels, patients could be classified in three subgroups with distinct PFS. For the evaluation of tumor aggressiveness, AKT2, EGFR, and TRERF1 mRNA levels were all significantly associated with MFS, independent of traditional prognostic factors. Using the combined AKT2 and EGFR mRNA status, four prognostic groups were identified with different MFS outcomes. The majority of BCAR genes, which were revealed to confer tamoxifen resistance and estrogen independence in vitro by functional screening, have clinical relevance, and associate with tamoxifen resistance and/or tumor aggressiveness in breast cancer patients.

  13. Re-evaluation of the prolactin receptor expression in human breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galsgaard, Elisabeth Douglas; Rasmussen, Birgitte Bruun; Folkesson, Charlotta Grånäs;

    2009-01-01

    and decidual cells in tissue sections of human placenta. Screening of 160 mammary adenocarcinomas demonstrated significant immunoreactivity in only four tumours, indicating that PRLR is generally not strongly upregulated in human breast cancer. However, even a very low level of PRLR expression was found......The pituitary hormone PRL is involved in tumorigenesis in rodents and humans. PRL promotes proliferation, survival and migration of cancer cells acting via the PRL receptor (PRLR). Aiming to perform a large-scale immunohistochemical (IHC) screening of human mammary carcinomas for PRLR expression...... specificity for PRLR and to rather recognise a PRLR-associated protein. The mAb U5 raised against the rat PRLR did not cross-react with the human receptor. Only one mAb, 1A2B1, was found useful for detection of PRLR in IHC applications. This antibody recognised PRLR expressed in human breast cancer cell lines...

  14. Evaluation of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in normal and breast tumor tissues and their link with breast cancer prognostic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furrer, Daniela; Lemieux, Julie; Côté, Marc-André; Provencher, Louise; Laflamme, Christian; Barabé, Frédéric; Jacob, Simon; Michaud, Annick; Diorio, Caroline

    2016-12-01

    Amplification of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) gene is associated with worse prognosis and decreased overall survival in breast cancer patients. The HER2 gene contains several polymorphisms; two of the best-characterized HER2 polymorphisms are Ile655Val and Ala1170Pro. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between these two HER2 polymorphisms in normal breast and breast cancer tissues and known breast cancer prognostic factors in a retrospective cohort study of 73 women with non-metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer. HER2 polymorphisms were assessed in breast cancer tissue and normal breast tissue using TaqMan assay. Ala1170Pro polymorphism in normal breast tissue was associated with age at diagnosis (p = 0.007), tumor size (p = 0.004) and lymphovascular invasion (p = 0.06). Similar significant associations in cancer tissues were observed. No association between the Ile655Val polymorphism and prognostic factors were observed. However, we found significant differences in the distribution of Ile655Val (p = 0.03) and Ala1170Pro (p = 0.01) genotypes between normal breast and breast tumor tissues. This study demonstrates that only the Ala1170Pro polymorphism is associated with prognostic factors in HER2-positive breast cancer patients. Moreover, our results suggest that both HER2 polymorphisms could play a significant role in carcinogenesis in non-metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer women.

  15. Timing of critical genetic changes in human breast disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, Rachel E; Ellsworth, Darrell L; Deyarmin, Brenda; Hoffman, Laurel R; Love, Brad; Hooke, Jeffrey A; Shriver, Craig D

    2005-12-01

    Breast cancer development has been characterized as a nonobligatory sequence of histological changes from normal epithelium through invasive malignancy. Although genetic alterations are thought to accumulate stochastically during tumorigenesis, little is known about the timing of critical mutations. This study examined allelic imbalance (AI) in tissue samples representing a continuum of breast cancer development to examine the evolution of genomic instability. Laser-microdissected DNA samples were collected from histologically normal breast specimens (n = 25), atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH, n = 16), ductal carcinoma-in-situ (DCIS, n = 37), and stage I to III invasive carcinomas (n = 72). Fifty-two microsatellite markers representing 26 chromosomal regions commonly deleted in breast cancer were used to assess patterns of AI. AI frequencies were .0001). DCIS lesions contain levels of genomic instability that are characteristic of advanced invasive tumors, and this suggests that the biology of a developing carcinoma may already be predetermined by the in situ stage. Observations that levels of AI in ADH lesions are similar to those in disease-free tissues provide a genomic rationale for why prevention strategies at the ADH level are successful and why cases with ADH involving surgical margins do not require further resection.

  16. Hard X-ray Microscopic Imaging Of Human Breast Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung H.; Kim, Hong T.; Kim, Jong K.; Jheon, Sang H.; Youn, Hwa S.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray microscopy with synchrotron radiation will be a useful tool for innovation of x-ray imaging in clinical and laboratory settings. It helps us observe detailed internal structure of material samples non-invasively in air. And, it also has the potential to solve some tough problems of conventional breast imaging if it could evaluate various conditions of breast tissue effectively. A new hard x-ray microscope with a spatial resolution better than 100 nm was installed at Pohang Light Source, a third generation synchrotron radiation facility in Pohang, Korea. The x-ray energy was set at 6.95 keV, and the x-ray beam was monochromatized by W/B4C monochromator. Condenser and objective zone plates were used as x-ray lenses. Zernike phase plate next to condenser zone plate was introduced for improved contrast imaging. The image of a sample was magnified 30 times by objective zone plate and 20 times by microscope objective, respectively. After additional 10 times digital magnification, the total magnifying power was up to 6000 times in the end. Phase contrast synchrotron images of 10-μm-thick female breast tissue of the normal, fibroadenoma, fibrocystic change and carcinoma cases were obtained. By phase contrast imaging, hard x-rays enable us to observe many structures of breast tissue without sample preparations such as staining or fixation.

  17. Estrogen Receptor Mutants/Variants in Human Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-01

    ment therapy (HRT) and increased breast cancer risk indicates that a direct analysis of HRT on mammary tissue is needed. Using ovariectomy -induced...the importance of oestrogen in bone matura- tion and mineralization in men as well as women (36). Point mutations have been identified in the ER in

  18. Human breast cancer: its genetics, biology and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Riaz (Muhammad)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractCancer is a major public health problem, being the second leading cause of death, after cardiovascular diseases1. Among women, breast cancer is the first neoplasm for incidence and the second for mortality all over the world. World-wide, an incidence of 1.4 million new cases and a mortal

  19. Membrane Estrogen and HER-2 Receptors in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-07-01

    H.R. Nusbaum, N. Razon , R. Kris, I. Lax, H. Soreq, N. Whittle, M.D. Waterfield, A. Ullrich and J. Schlessinger (1985). Amplification, enhanced...estrogen (41) are both known mito - antibodies and then immunoblotting with anti-ER antibod- gens for breast cancer cells. To assess the potential contri

  20. Human breast cancer: its genetics, biology and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Riaz (Muhammad)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractCancer is a major public health problem, being the second leading cause of death, after cardiovascular diseases1. Among women, breast cancer is the first neoplasm for incidence and the second for mortality all over the world. World-wide, an incidence of 1.4 million new cases and

  1. Molecular profiles of progesterone receptor loss in human breast tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Creighton; C. Kent Osborne; M.J. van de Vijver; J.A. Foekens; J.G. Klijn; H.M. Horlings; D. Nuyten; Y. Wang; Y. Zhang; G.C. Chamness; S.G. Hilsenbeck; A.V. Lee; R. Schiff

    2009-01-01

    Background Patient prognosis and response to endocrine therapy in breast cancer correlate with protein expression of both estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR), with poorer outcome in patients with ER+/PR- compared to ER+/PR+ tumors. Methods To better understand the underlying biolog

  2. Serological proteome analysis of dogs with breast cancer unveils common serum biomarkers with human counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani-Ahmadmahmudi, Mohamad; Nassiri, Seyed Mahdi; Rahbarghazi, Reza

    2014-03-01

    Canine mammary tumor is being touted as a model for investigating the human breast cancer. Breast cancer of the both species has similar biological behavior, histopathologic characteristics, and metastatic pattern. In this study, we used the serological proteome analysis to detect autoantigens that elicit a humoral response in dogs with mammary tumor in order to identify serum biomarkers with potential usefulness as diagnostic markers and to better understand molecular mechanisms underlying canine breast cancer development. Protein extract from a cell line was subject to 2DE followed by Western blotting using sera from 15 dogs with mammary tumor and sera from 15 healthy control dogs. Immunoreactive autoantigens were subsequently identified by the MALDI-TOF MS. Four autoantigens, including manganese-superoxide dismutase, triose phosphate isomerase, alpha-enolase, and phosphoglycerate mutase1, with significantly higher immunoreactivity in the tumor samples than in the normal samples were identified as biomarker candidates. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting revealed higher expression of these biomarkers in the malignant tumors than in the normal or benign tumors. The autoantigens found in this study have been reported to elicit autoantibody response in the human breast cancer, indicating the similarity of breast cancer proteome profile in dogs with that in human beings.

  3. Human achaete-scute homolog-1 expression in neuroendocrine breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righi, Luisella; Rapa, Ida; Votta, Arianna; Papotti, Mauro; Sapino, Anna

    2012-04-01

    Neuroendocrine (NE) breast carcinoma is defined by morphological features similar to those of NE tumors of other organs and NE marker expression in at least 50 % of neoplastic cells. However, a NE morphology may be observed even in breast carcinomas lacking NE markers. Human achaete-scute homolog-1 (hASH-1) is a transcription factor that plays a key role in the regulation of mammalian neural and NE cell development and has been identified in several human NE tumors. The aim of this study was to investigate hASH-1 expression in human breast cancers. hASH-1 expression was evaluated in 482 consecutive non-NE invasive breast carcinomas, in a series of 84 breast cancers with >50 % NE marker expression (high NE differentiation) and 21 carcinomas with NE histology but negative or focally (<50 %) positive for NE markers (low NE differentiation). hASH-1 protein was evaluated by a specific monoclonal antibody using immunohistochemistry and gene expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction. None of the non-NE invasive breast carcinomas expressed hASH-1 at any levels. hASH-1 was expressed in tumor cell nuclei of 63 and 38 % of cases with high and low NE differentiation, respectively. Strong correlation with protein and gene expression levels was observed (p < 0.0001). hASH-1 expression was correlated to a low mitotic count (p = 0.02) and a low Ki67 proliferative index (p = 0.0062). hASH-1 expression occurs in breast cancers with NE differentiation regardless of the extent of the NE cell population, and it is restricted to a subset of tumor cells having a low proliferative potential.

  4. Human breast cancer cell-mediated bone collagen degradation requires plasminogen activation and matrix metalloproteinase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Peter A

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer cells frequently metastasize to the skeleton and induce extensive bone destruction. Cancer cells produce proteinases, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and the plasminogen activator system (PAS which promote invasion of extracellular matrices, but whether these proteinases degrade bone matrix is unclear. To characterize the role that breast cancer cell proteinases play in bone degradation we compared the effects of three human breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231, ZR-75-1 and MCF-7 with those of a normal breast epithelial cell line, HME. The cell lines were cultured atop radiolabelled matrices of either mineralized or non-mineralized bone or type I collagen, the principal organic constituent of bone. Results The 3 breast cancer cell lines all produced significant degradation of the 3 collagenous extracellular matrices (ECMs whilst the normal breast cell line was without effect. Breast cancer cells displayed an absolute requirement for serum to dissolve collagen. Degradation of collagen was abolished in plasminogen-depleted serum and could be restored by the addition of exogenous plasminogen. Localization of plasmin activity to the cell surface was critical for the degradation process as aprotinin, but not α2 antiplasmin, prevented collagen dissolution. During ECM degradation breast cancer cell lines expressed urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA and uPA receptor, and MMPs-1, -3, -9,-13, and -14. The normal breast epithelial cell line expressed low levels of MMPs-1, and -3, uPA and uPA receptor. Inhibitors of both the PAS (aprotinin and PA inhibitor-1 and MMPs (CT1166 and tisue inhibitor of metalloproteinase blocked collagen degradation, demonstrating the requirement of both plasminogen activation and MMP activity for degradation. The activation of MMP-13 in human breast cancer cells was prevented by plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 but not by tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1, suggesting

  5. Expression of sialyl-Tn antigen in breast cancer cells transfected with the human CMP-Neu5Ac: GalNAc alpha2,6-sialyltransferase (ST6GalNac I) cDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, S; Krzewinski-Recchi, M A; Harduin-Lepers, A; Gouyer, V; Huet, G; Le Bourhis, X; Delannoy, P

    2001-01-01

    Sialyl-Tn antigen (STn) is a cancer associated carbohydrate antigen over-expressed in several cancers including breast cancer, and currently associated with more aggressive diseases and poor prognosis. However, the commonly used breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231, T47-D and MCF7) do not express STn antigen. The key step in the biosynthesis of STn is the transfer of a sialic acid residue in alpha2,6-linkage to GalNAc alpha-O-Ser/Thr. This reaction is mainly catalyzed by a CMP-Neu5Ac GalNAc alpha2,6-sialyltransferase: ST6GalNAc I. In order to generate STn-positive breast cancer cells, we have cloned a cDNA encoding the full-length human ST6GalNAc I from HT-29-MTX cells. The stable transfection of MDA-MB-231 with an expression vector encoding ST6GalNAc I induces the expression of STn antigen at the cell surface. The expression of STn short cuts the initial O-glycosylation pattern of these cell lines, by competing with the Core-1 beta1,3-galactosyltransferase, the first enzyme involved in the elongation of O-glycan chains. Moreover, we show that STn expression is associated with morphological changes, decreased growth and increased migration of MDA-MB-231 cells.

  6. Persistent organic pollutants in human breast milk collected from Dalian and Shenyang, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunisue, T.; Someya, M.; Tanabe, S. [Ehime Univ., Matsuyama (Japan); Kayama, F. [Jichi Medical School, Tochigi (Japan); Kayama, F. [CREST-JST, Kawaguchi (Japan); Jin Yihe [China Medical Univ., Shenyang (China)

    2004-09-15

    During the past few decades, numerous investigations on pollution of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as dioxins, PCBs and DDTs in human breast milk have been conducted in various countries with a view to assessing risks for infants. In developed countries, it was found that levels of POPs in human breast milk have decreased in recent decades. On the other hand, in some developing and former soviet countries, it is suspected that organochlorine insecticides such as DDT and HCH are still in use, and relatively high levels of these contaminants have been observed in human breast milk. China, which has the largest ground area among Asian countries, produced large quantities of technical HCH and DDT in the past and mainly used these organochlorine insecticides in agricultural fields. In fact, high levels of HCHs and DDTs have been detected in seawater, sediment and fish from China. In addition, relatively high levels of PCBs have been detected in aquatic media along industrialized areas. Thus, in China, because of anticipated higher levels of pollution by POPs in the environment, some investigations on pollution by these contaminants in environmental media have been recently conducted. However, no information on human exposure to POPs in northeastern parts of China is available, although a few investigations have been conducted in southeastern parts around Hong Kong. The present study attempted to elucidate the contamination status of POPs in human breast milk collected from primiparae in Dalian and Shenyang, northeastern China.

  7. Quantitative determination of the human breast milk macronutrients by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, Edlene d. C. M.; Zângaro, Renato A.; Silveira, Landulfo, Jr.

    2012-03-01

    This work proposes the evaluation of the macronutrient constitution of human breast milk based on the spectral information provided by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. Human breast milk (5 mL) from a subject was collected during the first two weeks of breastfeeding and stocked in -20°C freezer. Raman spectra were measured using a Raman spectrometer (830 nm excitation) coupled to a fiber based Raman probe. Spectra of human milk were dominated by bands of proteins, lipids and carbohydrates in the 600-1800 cm-1 spectral region. Raman spectroscopy revealed differences in the biochemical constitution of human milk depending on the time of breastfeeding startup. This technique could be employed to develop a classification routine for the milk in Human Milk Banking (HMB) depending on the nutritional facts.

  8. miRNA gene promoters are frequent targets of aberrant DNA methylation in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrba, Lukas; Muñoz-Rodríguez, José L; Stampfer, Martha R; Futscher, Bernard W

    2013-01-01

    miRNAs are important regulators of gene expression that are frequently deregulated in cancer, with aberrant DNA methylation being an epigenetic mechanism involved in this process. We previously identified miRNA promoter regions active in normal mammary cell types and here we analyzed which of these promoters are targets of aberrant DNA methylation in human breast cancer cell lines and breast tumor specimens. Using 5-methylcytosine immunoprecipitation coupled to miRNA tiling microarray hybridization, we performed comprehensive evaluation of DNA methylation of miRNA gene promoters in breast cancer. We found almost one third (55/167) of miRNA promoters were targets for aberrant methylation in breast cancer cell lines. Breast tumor specimens displayed DNA methylation of majority of these miRNA promoters, indicating that these changes in DNA methylation might be clinically relevant. Aberrantly methylated miRNA promoters were, similar to protein coding genes, enriched for promoters targeted by polycomb in normal cells. Detailed analysis of selected miRNA promoters revealed decreased expression of miRNA linked to increased promoter methylation for mir-31, mir-130a, let-7a-3/let-7b, mir-155, mir-137 and mir-34b/mir-34c genes. The proportion of miRNA promoters we found aberrantly methylated in breast cancer is several fold larger than that observed for protein coding genes, indicating an important role of DNA methylation in miRNA deregulation in cancer.

  9. Selective Human Estrogen Receptor Partial Agonists (ShERPAs) for Tamoxifen-Resistant Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Rui; Patel, Hitisha K; Gutgesell, Lauren M; Zhao, Jiong; Delgado-Rivera, Loruhama; Pham, Thao N D; Zhao, Huiping; Carlson, Kathryn; Martin, Teresa; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Moore, Terry W; Tonetti, Debra A; Thatcher, Gregory R J

    2016-01-14

    Almost 70% of breast cancers are estrogen receptor α (ERα) positive. Tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), represents the standard of care for many patients; however, 30-50% develop resistance, underlining the need for alternative therapeutics. Paradoxically, agonists at ERα such as estradiol (E2) have demonstrated clinical efficacy in patients with heavily treated breast cancer, although side effects in gynecological tissues are unacceptable. A drug that selectively mimics the actions of E2 in breast cancer therapy but minimizes estrogenic effects in other tissues is a novel, therapeutic alternative. We hypothesized that a selective human estrogen receptor partial agonist (ShERPA) at ERα would provide such an agent. Novel benzothiophene derivatives with nanomolar potency in breast cancer cell cultures were designed. Several showed partial agonist activity, with potency of 0.8-76 nM, mimicking E2 in inhibiting growth of tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cell lines. Three ShERPAs were tested and validated in xenograft models of endocrine-independent and tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer, and in contrast to E2, ShERPAs did not cause significant uterine growth.

  10. Prognostic Significance of Apoptosis Related Gene Family bcl-2 in Human Breast Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To study the prognostic effect of bcl-2 oncogene and its gene family members bax, bcl-x expression in breast cancer patients. Methods: expression of bcl-2, bax proteins in 91 human breast cancer tissue sections were studied by immunohistochemical method. Bcl-x1 mRNA expression in frozen tissues from 16 breast cancer patients were detected using Northern blot method. Results: bcl-2 protein positivity was found in 60/91 (65.9%) patients, and bax positivity 59/91 (64.8%). Bcl-2 and bax expression levels were associated with apoptotic index(AI), histological grade, axillary lymph node metastasis, postoperative local recurrence and metastasis. Bcl-2 expression was related to ER positivity. In univariate analysis for disease free survival (DFS), bcl-2 and bax protein levels, and Al were all found to have prognostic value. The result of Cox's model multivariate analysis showed that bcl-2 protein level was an independent prognostic factor. In 16 frozen breast cancer tissues, 8/16(50%) had higher level of bcl-x1 mRNA, which showed correlation with bcl-2 protein expression and axillary lymph node metastasis. Conclusion: The findings indicate that dysregulated expressions of bcl-2, bax and bcl-x1 apoptosis-related genes, suggestive of serious deregulation of apoptotic process, may contribute to the biologic aggressiveness of breast cancer. Bcl-2 protein is an independent indicator of prognosis in breast cancer patients.

  11. Human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) in fibroadenoma breast--a immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Ruchi; Shrivastava, Ashutosh; Tandon, Ashwani; Godbole, Madan M; Kumar, Sandeep; Das, Vinita; Dwivedi, Varsha; Pal, Lily

    2011-02-01

    Human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS), responsible for the active transport of iodine is an integral plasma membrane glycoprotein present in the thyroid cells and extrathyroid tissues like breast and salivary glands. If its functional form is unequivocally shown in benign or malignant breast tissues, then it may serve as a basis for diagnosis and treatment using radioactive iodine. With an aim to analyze the hNIS expression in a distinct benign breast condition of fibroadenoma, biopsy proven fibroadenoma tissues, normal non-lactating breast tissue and biopsy proven infiltrating duct carcinoma tissues were examined for hNIS expression using immunohistochemistry. Out of 20 biopsy proven fibroadenoma tissues, 19 (95%) showed positivity for hNIS protein and only one was negative. Of these 10% were mildly positive, 50% cases were moderately positive and 35% showed intense positivity. None of the control tissue obtained from reduction mammoplasty specimens or normal breast tissues samples (5 cms away from the tumor) were positive, hNIS was also intensely positive in 9 out of 10 (90%) infiltrating duct carcinoma tissues and moderately positive in one case. These preliminary results show that hNIS was present in high frequency as demonstrated by immunohistochemistry in fibroadenoma breast.

  12. Presence of human papilloma virus in a series of breast carcinoma from Argentina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Laura Pereira Suarez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The etiology and the molecular mechanisms related to breast carcinogenesis remain poorly understood. Some recent reports have examined the role of Human Papillomavirus (HPV in this disease. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of HPV in breast cancer. METHODS: Sixty one fresh frozen breast cancers samples were analyzed. Samples were tested for HPV by PCR, and products were automatically sequenced. Findings were correlated with clinical and pathological characteristics. RESULTS: The HPV DNA prevalence in the breast cancer samples was 26% (16/61. Clinical parameters were not statistically associated with HPV presence (p>0.05 χ(2 test. Sequence analysis in a subgroup of cases indicates the prevalence of low risk HPV11, followed by high risk HPV16. We found no HPV transcriptional activity. CONCLUSION: The present study demonstrated for the first time in Argentina the presence of HPV in a proportion of the malignant breast tissues. This finding suggests that HPV may have a biological significance in breast carcinogenesis.

  13. TEAD activity is restrained by MYC and stratifies human breast cancer subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elster, Dana; Jaenicke, Laura A; Eilers, Martin; von Eyss, Björn

    2016-10-01

    c-Myc (MYC) is an oncogenic transcription factor that is commonly overexpressed in a wide variety of human tumors. In breast cancer, MYC has recently been linked to the triple-negative subtype, a subtype that lacks any targeted therapy. Previously, we demonstrated that MYC behaves as a potent repressor of YAP and TAZ, 2 transcriptional coactivators that function as downstream transducers of the Hippo pathway. In this previous study, MYC repressed YAP/TAZ not only in primary breast epithelial cells but also in mouse models of triple-negative tumors. Here, we extend our previous bioinformatic and experimental analyses and demonstrate that MYC deregulation in primary breast epithelial cells leads to a robust repression of TEAD transcription factor activity, the transcription factor family mainly responsible for YAP/TAZ recruitment. Surprisingly, we find that MYC and TEAD activity is able to stratify different breast cancer subtypes in large panels of breast cancer patients. Thus, a deep understanding of the MYC-YAP/TAZ circuitry might yield new insights into the establishment and maintenance of specific breast cancer subtypes.

  14. Identification of p53 and Its Isoforms in Human Breast Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorka Milićević

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In breast carcinoma, disruption of the p53 pathway is one of the most common genetic alterations. The observation that the p53 can express multiple protein isoforms adds a novel level of complexity to the outcome of p53 mutations. p53 expression was analysed by Western immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies DO-7, Pab240, and polyclonal antiserum CM-1. The more frequently p53-positive nuclear staining has been found in the invasive breast tumors. One of the most intriguing findings is that mutant p53 appears as discrete dot-shaped regions within the nucleus of breast cancer cells. In many malignant cells, the nucleolar sequestration of p53 is evident. These observations support the view that the nucleolus is involved directly in the mediation of p53 function or indirectly by the control of the localization of p53 interplayers. p53 expressed in the nuclear fraction of breast cancer cells revealed a wide spectrum of isoforms. p53 isoforms ΔNp53 (47 kDa and Δ133p53β (35 kDa, known as dominant-negative repressors of p53 function, were detected as the most predominant variants in nuclei of invasive breast carcinoma cells. The isoforms expressed also varied between individual tumors, indicating potential roles of these p53 variants in human breast cancer.

  15. The Acinar Cage: Basement Membranes Determine Molecule Exchange and Mechanical Stability of Human Breast Cell Acini.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aljona Gaiko-Shcherbak

    Full Text Available The biophysical properties of the basement membrane that surrounds human breast glands are poorly understood, but are thought to be decisive for normal organ function and malignancy. Here, we characterize the breast gland basement membrane with a focus on molecule permeation and mechanical stability, both crucial for organ function. We used well-established and nature-mimicking MCF10A acini as 3D cell model for human breast glands, with ether low- or highly-developed basement membrane scaffolds. Semi-quantitative dextran tracer (3 to 40 kDa experiments allowed us to investigate the basement membrane scaffold as a molecule diffusion barrier in human breast acini in vitro. We demonstrated that molecule permeation correlated positively with macromolecule size and intriguingly also with basement membrane development state, revealing a pore size of at least 9 nm. Notably, an intact collagen IV mesh proved to be essential for this permeation function. Furthermore, we performed ultra-sensitive atomic force microscopy to quantify the response of native breast acini and of decellularized basement membrane shells against mechanical indentation. We found a clear correlation between increasing acinar force resistance and basement membrane formation stage. Most important native acini with highly-developed basement membranes as well as cell-free basement membrane shells could both withstand physiologically relevant loads (≤ 20 nN without loss of structural integrity. In contrast, low-developed basement membranes were significantly softer and more fragile. In conclusion, our study emphasizes the key role of the basement membrane as conductor of acinar molecule influx and mechanical stability of human breast glands, which are fundamental for normal organ function.

  16. Phospholipase C-beta 2 promotes mitosis and migration of human breast cancer-derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertagnolo, Valeria; Benedusi, Mascia; Brugnoli, Federica; Lanuti, Paola; Marchisio, Marco; Querzoli, Patrizia; Capitani, Silvano

    2007-08-01

    Like most human neoplasm, breast cancer has aberrations in signal transduction elements that can lead to increased proliferative potential, apoptosis inhibition, tissue invasion and metastasis. Due to the high heterogeneity of this tumor, currently, no markers are clearly associated with the insurgence of breast cancer, as well as with its progression from in situ lesion to invasive carcinoma. We have recently demonstrated an altered expression of the beta2 isoform of the phosphoinositide-dependent phospholipase C (PLC) in invasive breast tumors with different histopathological features. In primary breast tumor cells, elevated amounts of this protein are closely correlated with a poor prognosis of patients with mammary carcinoma, suggesting that PLC-beta2 may be involved in the development and worsening of the malignant phenotype. Here we demonstrate that PLC-beta2 may improve some malignant characteristics of tumor cells, like motility and invasion capability, but it fails to induce tumorigenesis in non-transformed breast-derived cells. We also report that, compared with the G(0)/G(1) phases of the cell cycle, the cells in S/G(2)/M phases show high PLC-beta2 expressions that reach the greatest levels during the late mitotic stages. In addition, even if unable to modify the proliferation rate and the expression of cell cycle-related enzymes of malignant cells, PLC-beta2 may promote the G(2)/M progression, a critical event in cancer evolution. Since phosphoinositides, substrates of PLC, are involved in regulating cytoskeleton architecture, PLC-beta2 in breast tumor cells may mediate the modification of cell shape that characterizes cell division, motility and invasion. On the basis of these data, PLC-beta2 may constitute a molecular marker of breast tumor cells able to monitor the progression to invasive cancers and a target for novel therapeutic breast cancer strategies.

  17. Effects of ambient particulate matter on human breast cancer: is xenogenesis responsible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Huo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recently, evidence from several studies has revealed that air pollution is associated with the increased morbidity and mortality of breast cancer patients. However, to date, the underlying mechanism remains largely unclear. Considering the high prevalence of air pollution and breast cancer in China, it is necessary to understand how air pollution may affect breast cancer. METHODS: We analyzed 1,832 female patients who had resided in the same cities for at least 10 years prior to their diagnosis. Variables including demographic data as well as clinical and tumor characteristics, including the patient's age at menarche, family history of breast cancer, tumor histopathological type, tumor size, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, histological grade, estrogen receptor (ER status, progesterone receptor (PR status and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2 status at the time of diagnosis were analyzed. RESULTS: Compared to patients residing in low-pollution areas, patients living in high-pollution areas demonstrated a younger age at menarche (p<0.001, a greater family history of breast cancer (p = 0.034 and more invasive cancers (p = 0.028 with higher tumor grades (p = 0.028 and estrogen receptor (ER-positive status (p = 0.022. Differences in tumor grade were only found in ER-positive cases. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings and clinical data indicate that long-term air pollution exposure may contribute to the development of breast cancer by playing the role of a xenoestrogen, and also provides new insight into the association between air pollution and the morbidity and mortality of breast cancer patients. Furthermore, it is urgently necessary to study the association between air pollution and breast cancer to improve the living quality and health of females, and applicable public health strategies may need to be established or modified as soon as possible.

  18. Transforming growth factor-β signalling controls human breast cancer metastasis in a zebrafish xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabsch, Yvette; He, Shuning; Zhang, Long; Snaar-Jagalska, B Ewa; ten Dijke, Peter

    2013-11-07

    The transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signalling pathway is known to control human breast cancer invasion and metastasis. We demonstrate that the zebrafish xenograft assay is a robust and dependable animal model for examining the role of pharmacological modulators and genetic perturbation of TGF-β signalling in human breast tumour cells. We injected cancer cells into the embryonic circulation (duct of cuvier) and examined their invasion and metastasis into the avascular collagenous tail. Various aspects of the TGF-β signalling pathway were blocked by chemical inhibition, small interfering RNA (siRNA), or small hairpin RNA (shRNA). Analysis was conducted using fluorescent microscopy. Breast cancer cells with different levels of malignancy, according to in vitro and in vivo mouse studies, demonstrated invasive and metastatic properties within the embryonic zebrafish model that nicely correlated with their differential tumourigenicity in mouse models. Interestingly, MCF10A M2 and M4 cells invaded into the caudal hematopoietic tissue and were visible as a cluster of cells, whereas MDA MB 231 cells invaded into the tail fin and were visible as individual cells. Pharmacological inhibition with TGF-β receptor kinase inhibitors or tumour specific Smad4 knockdown disturbed invasion and metastasis in the zebrafish xenograft model and closely mimicked the results we obtained with these cells in a mouse metastasis model. Inhibition of matrix metallo proteinases, which are induced by TGF-β in breast cancer cells, blocked invasion and metastasis of breast cancer cells. The zebrafish-embryonic breast cancer xenograft model is applicable for the mechanistic understanding, screening and development of anti-TGF-β drugs for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer in a timely and cost-effective manner.

  19. Epstein-Barr virus, human papillomavirus and mouse mammary tumour virus as multiple viruses in breast cancer.

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    Wendy K Glenn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The purpose of this investigation is to determine if Epstein Barr virus (EBV, high risk human papillomavirus (HPV, and mouse mammary tumour viruses (MMTV co-exist in some breast cancers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All the specimens were from women residing in Australia. For investigations based on standard PCR, we used fresh frozen DNA extracts from 50 unselected invasive breast cancers. For normal breast specimens, we used DNA extracts from epithelial cells from milk donated by 40 lactating women. For investigations based on in situ PCR we used 27 unselected archival formalin fixed breast cancer specimens and 18 unselected archival formalin fixed normal breast specimens from women who had breast reduction surgery. Thirteen of these fixed breast cancer specimens were ductal carcinoma in situ (dcis and 14 were predominantly invasive ductal carcinomas (idc. RESULTS: EBV sequences were identified in 68%, high risk HPV sequences in 50%, and MMTV sequences in 78% of DNA extracted from 50 invasive breast cancer specimens. These same viruses were identified in selected normal and breast cancer specimens by in situ PCR. Sequences from more than one viral type were identified in 72% of the same breast cancer specimens. Normal controls showed these viruses were also present in epithelial cells in human milk - EBV (35%, HPV, 20% and MMTV (32% of 40 milk samples from normal lactating women, with multiple viruses being identified in 13% of the same milk samples. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that (i EBV, HPV and MMTV gene sequences are present and co-exist in many human breast cancers, (ii the presence of these viruses in breast cancer is associated with young age of diagnosis and possibly an increased grade of breast cancer.

  20. Anti-cancer effects of Kochia scoparia fruit in human breast cancer cells

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    Hye-Yeon Han

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The fruit of Kochia scoparia Scharder is widely used as a medicinal ingredient for the treatment of dysuria and skin diseases in China, Japan and Korea. Especially, K. scoparia had been used for breast masses and chest and flank pain. Objective: To investigate the anti-cancer effect of K. scoparia on breast cancer. Materials and Methods: We investigated the anti-cancer effects of K. scoparia, methanol extract (MEKS in vitro. We examined the effects of MEKS on the proliferation rate, cell cycle arrest, reactive oxygen species (ROS generation and activation of apoptosis-associated proteins in MDA-MB-231, human breast cancer cells. Results: MTT assay results demonstrated that MEKS decreased the proliferation rates of MDA-MB-231 cells in a dose-dependent manner with an IC 50 value of 36.2 μg/ml. MEKS at 25 μg/ml significantly increased the sub-G1 DNA contents of MDA-MB-231 cells to 44.7%, versus untreated cells. In addition, MEKS induced apoptosis by increasing the levels of apoptosis-associated proteins such as cleaved caspase 3, cleaved caspase 8, cleaved caspase 9 and cleaved Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. Conclusion: These results suggest that MEKS inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells and that MEKS may have potential chemotherapeutic value for the treatment of human breast cancer.

  1. An in vitro model that recapitulates the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT in human breast cancer.

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    Elad Katz

    Full Text Available The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT is a developmental program in which epithelial cells down-regulate their cell-cell junctions, acquire spindle cell morphology and exhibit cellular motility. In human breast cancer, invasion into surrounding tissue is the first step in metastatic progression. Here, we devised an in vitro model using selected cell lines, which recapitulates many features of EMT as observed in human breast cancer. By comparing the gene expression profiles of claudin-low breast cancers with the experimental model, we identified a 9-gene signature characteristic of EMT. This signature was found to distinguish a series of breast cancer cell lines that have demonstrable, classical EMT hallmarks, including loss of E-cadherin protein and acquisition of N-cadherin and vimentin expression. We subsequently developed a three-dimensional model to recapitulate the process of EMT with these cell lines. The cells maintain epithelial morphology when encapsulated in a reconstituted basement membrane, but undergo spontaneous EMT and invade into surrounding collagen in the absence of exogenous cues. Collectively, this model of EMT in vitro reveals the behaviour of breast cancer cells beyond the basement membrane breach and recapitulates the in vivo context for further investigation into EMT and drugs that may interfere with it.

  2. DNMT3b overexpression contributes to a hypermethylator phenotype in human breast cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivenbark Ashley G

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA hypermethylation events and other epimutations occur in many neoplasms, producing gene expression changes that contribute to neoplastic transformation, tumorigenesis, and tumor behavior. Some human cancers exhibit a hypermethylator phenotype, characterized by concurrent DNA methylation-dependent silencing of multiple genes. To determine if a hypermethylation defect occurs in breast cancer, the expression profile and promoter methylation status of methylation-sensitive genes were evaluated among breast cancer cell lines. Results The relationship between gene expression (assessed by RT-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR, promoter methylation (assessed by methylation-specific PCR, bisulfite sequencing, and 5-aza-2'deoxycytidine treatment, and the DNA methyltransferase machinery (total DNMT activity and expression of DNMT1, DNMT3a, and DNMT3b proteins were examined in 12 breast cancer cell lines. Unsupervised cluster analysis of the expression of 64 methylation-sensitive genes revealed two groups of cell lines that possess distinct methylation signatures: (i hypermethylator cell lines, and (ii low-frequency methylator cell lines. The hypermethylator cell lines are characterized by high rates of concurrent methylation of six genes (CDH1, CEACAM6, CST6, ESR1, LCN2, SCNN1A, whereas the low-frequency methylator cell lines do not methylate these genes. Hypermethylator cell lines coordinately overexpress total DNMT activity and DNMT3b protein levels compared to normal breast epithelial cells. In contrast, most low-frequency methylator cell lines possess DNMT activity and protein levels that are indistinguishable from normal. Microarray data mining identified a strong cluster of primary breast tumors that express the hypermethylation signature defined by CDH1, CEACAM6, CST6, ESR1, LCN2, and SCNN1A. This subset of breast cancers represents 18/88 (20% tumors in the dataset analyzed, and 100% of these tumors were classified as basal

  3. Effects of exogenous human leptin on heat shock protein 70 expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells and breast carcinoma of nude mice xenograft model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Rong-quan; GU Jun-chao; YU Wei; WANG Yu; ZHANG Zhong-tao; MA Xue-mei

    2012-01-01

    Background It is important to identify the multiple sites of leptin activity in obese women with breast cancer.In this study,we examined the effect of exogenous human leptin on heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) expression in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and in a breast carcinoma xenograft model of nude mice.Methods We cultured MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and established nude mice bearing xenograffs of these cells,and randomly divided them into experimental and control groups.The experimental group was treated with human leptin,while the control group was treated with the same volume of normal saline.A real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was developed to quantify the mRNA expression of HSP70 in the MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and in tumor tissues.Western blotting analysis was applied to quantify the protein expression of HSP70 in the MCF-7 cells.Immunohistochemical staining was done to assess the positive rate of HSP70 expression in the tumor tissues.Results Leptin activated HSP70 in a dose-dependent manner in vitro:leptin upregulated significantly the expression of HSP70 at mRNA and protein levels in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells (P <0.001).There was no significant difference in expression of HSP70 mRNA in the implanted tumors between the leptin-treated group and the control group (P>0.05).Immunohistochemical staining revealed no significant difference in tumor HSP70 expression between the leptin-treated group and the control group (P>0.05).Conclusions A nude mouse xenograft model can be safely and efficiently treated with human leptin by subcutaneous injections around the tumor.HSP70 may be target of leptin in breast cancer.Leptin can significantly upregulate the expression of HSP70 in a dose-dependent manner in vitro.

  4. In vitro study on effect of germinated wheat on human breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    This research investigated the possible anti-cancer effects of germinated wheat flours (GWF) on cell growth and apoptosis of human breast cancer cells. In a series of in vitro experiments, estrogen receptor-positive (MCF-7) and negative (MDA-MB-231) cells were cultured and treated with GWF that wer...

  5. Role of Nuclear Matrix in Estrogen Regulated Gene Expression in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-08-01

    form of endocrine manipulative therapy, e.g., antiestrogen therapy. However, most human breast cancers originate as hormonally dependent tumors as...development. 49 "Proprietary Data - Distribution to Government Agencies Only" ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Pierre Chambon (Institut de Genetique et de Biologie

  6. Cytotoxicity screening of Melastoma malabathricum extracts on human breast cancer cell lines in vitro

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    Nurfariza Ahmad Roslen

    2014-07-01

    Conclusions: The extracts from leaves and flowers of M. malabathricum showed promising anticancer activity toward human breast cancer cell lines with the lowest IC50 at 7.14 μg/mL while the extracts from stems showed less growth inhibition activity.

  7. Evidence for a stem cell hierarchy in the adult human breast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, René; Fridriksdottir, Agla J; Rønnov-Jessen, Lone

    2007-01-01

    in situ confirmed this pattern. The proposal that the four cell types are indeed constituents of an as of yet undescribed stem cell hierarchy was assessed in long-term cultures in which senescence was bypassed. These findings identify an adult human breast ductal stem cell activity and its earliest...

  8. Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutic Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    SUBTITLE Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutic Decision Making Improve...to determine whether Fetal Mammary Stem Cell (fMaSC) signatures correlate with response to chemotherapy and metastasis in different breast cancer...positioned to achieve its aims. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Breast Cancer Prognosis, Mammary Stem Cells, Embryonic Development, Single Cell Transcriptomics 16

  9. A platform for interrogating cancer-associated p53 alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Brot, A; Kurtz, P; Regan, E; Jakubowski, B; Abrams, J M

    2017-01-12

    p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancer. Compelling evidence argues that full transformation involves loss of growth suppression encoded by wild-type p53 together with poorly understood oncogenic activity encoded by missense mutations. Furthermore, distinguishing disease alleles from natural polymorphisms is an important clinical challenge. To interrogate the genetic activity of human p53 variants, we leveraged the Drosophila model as an in vivo platform. We engineered strains that replace the fly p53 gene with human alleles, producing a collection of stocks that are, in effect, 'humanized' for p53 variants. Like the fly counterpart, human p53 transcriptionally activated a biosensor and induced apoptosis after DNA damage. However, all humanized strains representing common alleles found in cancer patients failed to complement in these assays. Surprisingly, stimulus-dependent activation of hp53 occurred without stabilization, demonstrating that these two processes can be uncoupled. Like its fly counterpart, hp53 formed prominent nuclear foci in germline cells but cancer-associated p53 variants did not. Moreover, these same mutant alleles disrupted hp53 foci and inhibited biosensor activity, suggesting that these properties are functionally linked. Together these findings establish a functional platform for interrogating human p53 alleles and suggest that simple phenotypes could be used to stratify disease variants.

  10. Regulatory mechanisms for abnormal expression of the human breast cancer specific gene 1 in breast cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU; Aiping; LI; Qing; LIU; Jingwen

    2006-01-01

    Breast cancer-specific gene 1 (BCSG1), also referred as synuclein γ, was originally isolated from a human breast cancer cDNA library and the protein is mainly localized to presynaptic terminals in the nervous system. BCSG1 is not expressed in normal or benign breast lesions, but expressed at an extremely high level in the vast majority of the advanced staged breast carcinomas and ovarian carcinomas. Overexpression of BCSG1 in cancer cells led to significant increase in cell proliferation, motility and invasiveness, and metastasis. To elucidate the molecular mechanism and regulation for abnormal transcription of BCSG1, a variety of BCSG1 promoter luciferase reporters were constructed including 3' end deleted sequences, Sp1 deleted, and activator protein-1 (AP1) domains mutated. Transient transfection assay was used to detect the transcriptional activation of BCSG1 promoters. Results showed that the Sp1 sequence in 5'-flanking region was involved in the basal transcriptional activities of BCSG1 without cell-type specificity. In comparison to pGL3-1249, the reporter activities of pGL3-1553 in BCSG1-negative MCF-7 cells and pGL3-1759 in HepG2 cells were notably decreased. Mutations at AP1 sites in BCSG1 intron 1 significantly reduced the promoter activity in all cell lines. Transcription factors, c-jun, c-fos and cyclin AMP-responsive element binding (CREB) protein, could markedly enhance the promoter activities. Thus, our results suggest that the abnormal expression of BCSG1 in breast cancer cells is likely regulated by multiple mechanisms. The 5' flanking region of BCSG1 provides the basal transcriptional activity without cell type specificity. A critical promoter element involved in abnormal expression of BCSG1 presents in the first exon. The cell type specificity of BCSG1 transcription is probably affected through intronic cis-regulatory sequences. AP1 domains in the first intron play an important role in control of BCSG1 transcription.

  11. Inhibitory and Cytotoxic Activities of Chrysin on Human Breast Adenocarcinoma Cells by Induction of Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarghandian, Saeed; Azimi-Nezhad, Mohsen; Borji, Abasalt; Hasanzadeh, Malihe; Jabbari, Farahzad; Farkhondeh, Tahereh; Samini, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Chrysin, an active natural bioflavonoid found in honey and many plant extracts, was first known for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. The fact that antioxidants have several inhibitory effects against different diseases, such as cancer, led to search for food rich in antioxidants. In this study, we investigated the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of chrysin on the cultured human breast cancer cells (MCF-7). Materials and Methods: Cells were cultured in Roswell Park Memorial Institute medium and treated with different chrysin concentrations for three consecutive days. Cell viability was quantitated by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The percentage of apoptotic cells was determined by flow cytometry using Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate. Results: The MTT assay showed that chrysin had an antiproliferative effect on MCF-7 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The 50% cell growth inhibition values for chrysin against MCF-7 cells were 19.5 and 9.2 μM after 48 and 72 h, respectively. Chrysin induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells as determined by flow cytometry. Chrysin inhibits the growth of the breast cancer cells by inducing cancer cell apoptosis which may, in part, explain its anticancer activity. Conclusion: This study shows that chrysin could also be considered as a promising chemotherapeutic agent and anticancer activity in treatment of the breast cancer cells in future. SUMMARY Chrysin had an antiproliferative effect on human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) cells in a dose- and time-dependent mannerChrysin induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells, as determined by flow cytometryChrysin inhibits the growth of the breast cancer cells by inducing cancer cell apoptosisChrysin may have anticancer activity. Abbreviations used: Human breast cancer cells (MCF-7), 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT), phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), normal fibroblast mouse (L929).

  12. High and low mammographic density human breast tissues maintain histological differential in murine tissue engineering chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, G L; Huang, D; Lin, S J; Huo, C; Blick, T; Henderson, M A; Hill, P; Cawson, J; Morrison, W A; Campbell, I G; Hopper, J L; Southey, M C; Haviv, I; Thompson, E W

    2012-08-01

    Mammographic density (MD) is the area of breast tissue that appears radiologically white on mammography. Although high MD is a strong risk factor for breast cancer, independent of BRCA1/2 mutation status, the molecular basis of high MD and its associated breast cancer risk is poorly understood. MD studies will benefit from an animal model, where hormonal, gene and drug perturbations on MD can be measured in a preclinical context. High and low MD tissues were selectively sampled by stereotactic biopsy from operative specimens of high-risk women undergoing prophylactic mastectomy. The high and low MD tissues were transferred into separate vascularised biochambers in the groins of SCID mice. Chamber material was harvested after 6 weeks for histological analyses and immunohistochemistry for cytokeratins, vimentin and a human-specific mitochondrial antigen. Within-individual analysis was performed in replicate mice, eliminating confounding by age, body mass index and process-related factors, and comparisons were made to the parental human tissue. Maintenance of differential MD post-propagation was assessed radiographically. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed the preservation of human glandular and stromal components in the murine biochambers, with maintenance of radiographic MD differential. Propagated high MD regions had higher stromal (p = 0.0002) and lower adipose (p = 0.0006) composition, reflecting the findings in the original human breast tissue, although glands appeared small and non-complex in both high and low MD groups. No significant differences were observed in glandular area (p = 0.4) or count (p = 0.4) between high and low MD biochamber tissues. Human mammary glandular and stromal tissues were viably maintained in murine biochambers, with preservation of differential radiographic density and histological features. Our study provides a murine model for future studies into the biomolecular basis of MD as a risk factor for breast cancer.

  13. Identification of Putative Metastasis Suppressor MicroRNA in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    Levels Correlate Inversely with Metastatic Ability in Breast Cell Lines (A) RT-PCR for miR-31 in seven human breast cell lines. 5S rRNA was a loading...control. NTC, no template control. n = 3. (B) miR-31 RT-PCR in eight murine mammary cell lines. 5S rRNA was a loading control. n = 3. (C) In situ...nondiseased individuals; metastasis-positive and -free: tumors of the indicated distant metastasis outcome. 5S rRNA was a loading control. n = 4 (normal

  14. A Role for the NFkB/Rel Transcription Factors in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-07-01

    mutated in serines 32 and 36, which results in a protein that can bind to NF-kB but which cannot be degraded) in the HT1080 fibrosarcoma cell line . This...hereditary susceptibility of women to breast cancer and on a role for estrogen in modulating cell growth of human breast cancers. It has been reported...members of the NF-kB family of proteins are related to the product of the c-Rel proto-oncogene which is found overexpressed in certain tumor cell lines

  15. Cadmium Malignantly Transforms Normal Human Breast Epithelial Cells into a Basal-like Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Background Breast cancer has recently been linked to cadmium exposure. Although not uniformly supported, it is hypothesized that cadmium acts as a metalloestrogenic carcinogen via the estrogen receptor (ER). Thus, we studied the effects of chronic exposure to cadmium on the normal human breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A, which is ER-negative but can convert to ER-positive during malignant transformation. Methods Cells were continuously exposed to low-level cadmium (2.5 μM) and checked in vi...

  16. Conjugated linoleic acid induces apoptosis through estrogen receptor alpha in human breast tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Suling

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA, a naturally occurring fatty acid found in ruminant products such as milk and beef, has been shown to possess anti-cancer activities in in vivo animal models and in vitro cell culture systems. In human breast cancer, the overall duration of estrogen exposure is the most important risk factor for developing estrogen-responsive breast cancer. Accordingly, it has been suggested that estrogen exposure reduces apoptosis through the up-regulation of the anti-apoptosis protein, Bcl-2. Bcl-2, an anti-apoptotic protein, regulates apoptosis and plays a crucial role in the development and growth regulation of normal and cancerous cells. Our research interest is to examine the effects of CLA on the induction of apoptosis in human breast tissues. Methods The localization of Bcl-2 in both normal and cancerous human breast tissues was determined by immunohistochemical staining and the Bcl-2 protein expression was tested by western blot analysis. Co-culture of epithelial cells and stromal cells was carried out in the presence or absence of CLA to evaluate apoptosis in the context of a cell-cell interaction. Results The results showed that both normal and cancerous breast tissues were positive for Bcl-2 staining, which was higher overall in mammary ducts but very low in the surrounding stromal compartment. Interestingly, by quantifying the western blot data, basal Bcl-2 protein levels were higher in normal breast epithelial cells than in cancerous epithelial cells. Furthermore, treatment with 17β-estradiol (E2 stimulated growth and up-regulated Bcl-2 expression in estrogen responsive breast epithelial cells; however, these carcinogenic effects were diminished by either CLA or 4-Hydroxytamoxifen (Tam and were suppressed further by the combination of CLA and Tam. In both one cell type cultured and co-culture systems, CLA induced cell apoptosis in ERα transfected MDA-MB-231 cells but not in the wild type MDA

  17. Production and characterisation of monoclonal antibodies against RAI3 and its expression in human breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiefer Hans

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RAI3 is an orphan G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR that has been associated with malignancy and may play a role in the proliferation of breast cancer cells. Although its exact function in normal and malignant cells remains unclear and evidence supporting its role in oncogenesis is controversial, its abundant expression on the surface of cancer cells would make it an interesting target for the development of antibody-based therapeutics. To investigate the link with cancer and provide more evidence for its role, we carried out a systematic analysis of RAI3 expression in a large set of human breast cancer specimens. Methods We expressed recombinant human RAI3 in bacteria and reconstituted the purified protein in liposomes to raise monoclonal antibodies using classical hybridoma techniques. The specific binding activity of the antibodies was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, western blot and immunocytochemistry. We carried out a systematic immunohistochemical analysis of RAI3 expression in human invasive breast carcinomas (n = 147 and normal breast tissues (n = 44 using a tissue microarray. In addition, a cDNA dot blot hybridisation assay was used to investigate a set of matched normal and cancerous breast tissue specimens (n = 50 as well as lymph node metastases (n = 3 for RAI3 mRNA expression. Results The anti-RAI3 monoclonal antibodies bound to recombinant human RAI3 protein with high specificity and affinity, as shown by ELISA, western blot and ICC. The cDNA dot blot and immunohistochemical experiments showed that both RAI3 mRNA and RAI3 protein were abundantly expressed in human breast carcinoma. However, there was no association between RAI3 protein expression and prognosis based on overall and recurrence-free survival. Conclusion We have generated a novel, highly-specific monoclonal antibody that detects RAI3 in formaldehyde-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. This is the first study to report a systematic

  18. Expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs in primary human breast cancer and breast cancer cell lines: New findings and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietl Johannes

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are a family of structural and functional related endopeptidases. They play a crucial role in tumor invasion and building of metastatic formations because of their ability to degrade extracellular matrix proteins. Under physiological conditions their activity is precisely regulated in order to prevent tissue disruption. This physiological balance seems to be disrupted in cancer making tumor cells capable of invading the tissue. In breast cancer different expression levels of several MMPs have been found. Methods To fill the gap in our knowledge about MMP expression in breast cancer, we analyzed the expression of all known human MMPs in a panel of twenty-five tissue samples (five normal breast tissues, ten grade 2 (G2 and ten grade 3 (G3 breast cancer tissues. As we found different expression levels for several MMPs in normal breast and breast cancer tissue as well as depending on tumor grade, we additionally analyzed the expression of MMPs in four breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-468, BT 20, ZR 75/1 commonly used in research. The results could thus be used as model for further studies on human breast cancer. Expression analysis was performed on mRNA and protein level using semiquantitative RT-PCR, Western blot, immunohistochemistry and immunocytochemistry. Results In summary, we identified several MMPs (MMP-1, -2, -8, -9, -10, -11, -12, -13, -15, -19, -23, -24, -27 and -28 with a stronger expression in breast cancer tissue compared to normal breast tissue. Of those, expression of MMP-8, -10, -12 and -27 is related to tumor grade since it is higher in analyzed G3 compared to G2 tissue samples. In contrast, MMP-7 and MMP-27 mRNA showed a weaker expression in tumor samples compared to healthy tissue. In addition, we demonstrated that the four breast cancer cell lines examined, are constitutively expressing a wide variety of MMPs. Of those, MDA-MB-468 showed the strongest mRNA and protein

  19. Trends in the enantiomeric composition of polychlorinated biphenyl atropisomers in human breast milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Yoshimasa; Kakimoto, Kensaku; Nagayoshi, Haruna; Nakano, Takeshi

    2016-02-01

    For the precise estimation of the risk to human health caused by persistent organic pollutants (POPs), it is important to discuss enantiomer fraction value (EF value) because it is reported that behaviors such as stability and toxicity of enantiomers are quite different in human body. Among POPs, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) is known as one of the most persistent compounds in human breast milk samples. The main exposure source of PCB for human body is mostly from food especially in seafood. The contamination of fish and shellfish has been a serious problem for the Japanese, who consume a large amount of fish in their diet. PCBs have 19 congeners which are chlorine-substituted in 3- or 4- ortho positions are known to have enantiomers. In this study, we analyzed PCB 183 (2,2',3,4,4',5',6-hepta CB) in human breast milk and fish samples enantioselectively and revealed the time trends of the EF value. Though EF value of PCB 183 in fish samples sustained close to racemate (EF = 0.5) from 1982 to 2012, that in breast milk increased over time. This fact indicates that (+)-PCB-183 has greater bioaccumulation potential than (-)-PCB-183 in human body; therefore, the toxicity of (+)-PCB-183 should be emphasized.

  20. Osthole inhibits proliferation of human breast cancer cells by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lintao Wang; Yanyan Peng; Kaikai Shi; Haixiao Wang; Jianlei Lu; Yanli Li; Changyan Ma

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that osthole,an active constituent isolated from the fruit of Cnidium monnieri (L.) Cusson,a traditional Chinese medicine,possesses anticancer activity.However,its effect on breast cancer cells so far has not been elucidated clearly.In the present study,we evaluated the effects of osthole on the proliferation,cell cycle and apoptosis of human breast cancer cells MDA-MB 435.We demonstrated that osthole is effective in inhibiting the proliferation of MDA-MB 435 cells,The mitochondrion-mediated apoptotic pathway was involved in apoptosis induced by osthole,as indicated by activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 followed by PARP degradation.The mechanism underlying its effect on the induction of G1 phase arrest was due to the up-regulation of p53 and p21 and down-regulation of Cdk2 and cyclin D1 expression.Were observed taken together,these findings suggest that the anticancer efficacy of osthole is mediated via induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells and osthole may be a potential chemotherapeutic agent against human breast cancer.

  1. Evaluation and Determination of Heavy Metals (Mercury, Lead and Cadmium in Human Breast Milk

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    Abdollahi Atousa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mercury, Lead and Cadmium were determined in 100 samples of human breast milk samples from urban and rural mothers in Isfahan (IRAN. A questionnaire about area of residence, nutrition, smoking habits, and dental fillings was filled out by the lactating mothers. The combination of nitric acid, hydrogen peroxide and perchloric acid was found to be one of the most suitable acids in wet digestion of milk. Cold vapor atomic absorption was used to determine the mercury content in milk after wet digestion. The effect of concentration of nitric acid, influence of flow rate and tin(П chloride were investigated. The mean concentration of mercury in human breast milk samples was 0.96 ppb. Extraction of Pb and Cd were performed with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC to methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK and were determined by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. The factors influencing, the complex formation, pH, time and buffer were optimized. The mean concentration of Pb and Cd in human breast milk was 0.0147 and 0.0121 ppm, respectively. The maximum concentrations were found in breast milk of rural mothers.

  2. Salidroside inhibits the growth of human breast cancer in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gang; Shi, Aiping; Fan, Zhimin; Du, Ye

    2015-05-01

    Salidroside has been identified as one of the most potent compounds isolated from the plant Rhodiola rosea, and was found to have several important biological properties, including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity; however, its anticancer effects are poorly understood. Thus, the present study focused on evaluating the effects of purified salidroside on the growth of human breast cancer in vitro and in vivo, and on further investigating its possible molecular mechanisms. The human breast cancer cell line, MCF-7, was incubated with various concentrations of salidroside, and cell proliferation, colony formation, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, migration and invasion were assayed by several in vitro approaches. As a result, it was found that salidroside treatment significantly inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion, as well as induced cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase in vitro. In addition, we also evaluated the effect of salidroside on tumor growth in a nude mouse model, and found that salidroside treatment significantly suppressed tumor growth in vivo. We also further disclosed that salidroside treatment significantly inhibited the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and MAPK pathway activation, which may contribute to the inhibition of tumor growth of breast cancer and reduction of oxidative stress. In conclusion, these findings suggest that salidroside may be a promising candidate target for the prevention and treatment of human breast cancer.

  3. Galangin potentiates human breast cancer to apoptosis induced by TRAIL through activating AMPK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Yan, Chong-Yang; Zhou, Qian-Qian; Zhen, Lin-Lin

    2017-03-06

    Breast cancer is reported as the most frequent tumor with limited treatments among the female worldwide. Galangin, a natural active compound 3, 5, 7-trihydroxyflavone, is a type of bioflavonoid isolated from the Alpinia galangal root and suggested to induce apoptosis in various cancers. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is an effective anti-tumor agent for human breast cancer. Promoted expression of CHOP, a down-streaming transcription factor for endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER stress), enhanced death factor 4 (DR4) activity and accelerated reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as cell death. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is crucial for various cancers mortality. In the present study, galangin regulated ER stress to augment CHOP and DR4 expression levels, sensitizing TRAIL activity, leading to human breast cancer cell apoptosis through Caspase-3 activation, which was associated with AMPK phosphorylation. In addition, AMPK inhibition and silence reduced anti-cancer activity of galangin and TRAIL in combinational treatment. Hence, our study indicated that galangin could effectively stimulate human breast cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis through TRAIL/Caspase-3/AMPK signaling pathway. AMPK signaling pathway activation by galangin might be of benefit for promoting the effects of TRAIL-regulated anti-tumor therapeutic strategy.

  4. Recovery of extracellular vesicles from human breast milk is influenced by sample collection and vesicle isolation procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonneveld, Marijke I.; Brisson, Alain R.; van Herwijnen, Martijn J. C.; Tan, Sisareuth; van de Lest, Chris H. A.; Redegeld, Frank A.; Garssen, Johan; Wauben, Marca H. M.; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther N. M.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) in breast milk carry immune relevant proteins and could play an important role in the instruction of the neonatal immune system. To further analyze these EV and to elucidate their function it is important that native populations of EV can be recovered from (stored) breast milk samples in a reproducible fashion. However, the impact of isolation and storage procedures on recovery of breast milk EV has remained underexposed. Here, we aimed to define parameters important for EV recovery from fresh and stored breast milk. To compare various protocols across different donors, breast milk was spiked with a well-defined murine EV population. We found that centrifugation of EV down into density gradients largely improved density-based separation and isolation of EV, compared to floatation up into gradients after high-force pelleting of EV. Using cryo-electron microscopy, we identified different subpopulations of human breast milk EV and a not previously described population of lipid tubules. Additionally, the impact of cold storage on breast milk EV was investigated. We determined that storing unprocessed breast milk at −80°C or 4°C caused death of cells present in breast milk, leading to contamination of the breast milk EV population with storage-induced EV. Here, an alternative method is proposed to store breast milk samples for EV analysis at later time points. The proposed adaptations to the breast milk storage and EV isolation procedures can be applied for EV-based biomarker profiling of breast milk and functional analysis of the role of breast milk EV in the development of the neonatal immune system. PMID:25206958

  5. Recovery of extracellular vesicles from human breast milk is influenced by sample collection and vesicle isolation procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonneveld, Marijke I; Brisson, Alain R; van Herwijnen, Martijn J C; Tan, Sisareuth; van de Lest, Chris H A; Redegeld, Frank A; Garssen, Johan; Wauben, Marca H M; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther N M

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) in breast milk carry immune relevant proteins and could play an important role in the instruction of the neonatal immune system. To further analyze these EV and to elucidate their function it is important that native populations of EV can be recovered from (stored) breast milk samples in a reproducible fashion. However, the impact of isolation and storage procedures on recovery of breast milk EV has remained underexposed. Here, we aimed to define parameters important for EV recovery from fresh and stored breast milk. To compare various protocols across different donors, breast milk was spiked with a well-defined murine EV population. We found that centrifugation of EV down into density gradients largely improved density-based separation and isolation of EV, compared to floatation up into gradients after high-force pelleting of EV. Using cryo-electron microscopy, we identified different subpopulations of human breast milk EV and a not previously described population of lipid tubules. Additionally, the impact of cold storage on breast milk EV was investigated. We determined that storing unprocessed breast milk at -80°C or 4°C caused death of cells present in breast milk, leading to contamination of the breast milk EV population with storage-induced EV. Here, an alternative method is proposed to store breast milk samples for EV analysis at later time points. The proposed adaptations to the breast milk storage and EV isolation procedures can be applied for EV-based biomarker profiling of breast milk and functional analysis of the role of breast milk EV in the development of the neonatal immune system.

  6. Recovery of extracellular vesicles from human breast milk is influenced by sample collection and vesicle isolation procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijke I. Zonneveld

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EV in breast milk carry immune relevant proteins and could play an important role in the instruction of the neonatal immune system. To further analyze these EV and to elucidate their function it is important that native populations of EV can be recovered from (stored breast milk samples in a reproducible fashion. However, the impact of isolation and storage procedures on recovery of breast milk EV has remained underexposed. Here, we aimed to define parameters important for EV recovery from fresh and stored breast milk. To compare various protocols across different donors, breast milk was spiked with a well-defined murine EV population. We found that centrifugation of EV down into density gradients largely improved density-based separation and isolation of EV, compared to floatation up into gradients after high-force pelleting of EV. Using cryo-electron microscopy, we identified different subpopulations of human breast milk EV and a not previously described population of lipid tubules. Additionally, the impact of cold storage on breast milk EV was investigated. We determined that storing unprocessed breast milk at −80°C or 4°C caused death of cells present in breast milk, leading to contamination of the breast milk EV population with storage-induced EV. Here, an alternative method is proposed to store breast milk samples for EV analysis at later time points. The proposed adaptations to the breast milk storage and EV isolation procedures can be applied for EV-based biomarker profiling of breast milk and functional analysis of the role of breast milk EV in the development of the neonatal immune system.

  7. In situ identification of CD44+/CD24- cancer cells in primary human breast carcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Perrone

    Full Text Available Breast cancer cells with the CD44+/CD24- phenotype have been reported to be tumourigenic due to their enhanced capacity for cancer development and their self-renewal potential. The identification of human tumourigenic breast cancer cells in surgical samples has recently received increased attention due to the implications for prognosis and treatment, although limitations exist in the interpretation of these studies. To better identify the CD44+/CD24- cells in routine surgical specimens, 56 primary breast carcinoma cases were analysed by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, and the results were compared using flow cytometry analysis to correlate the amount and distribution of the CD44+/CD24- population with clinicopathological features. Using these methods, we showed that the breast carcinoma cells displayed four distinct sub-populations based on the expression pattern of CD44 and CD24. The CD44+/CD24- cells were found in 91% of breast tumours and constituted an average of 6.12% (range, 0.11%-21.23% of the tumour. A strong correlation was found between the percentage of CD44+/CD24- cells in primary tumours and distant metastasis development (p = 0.0001; in addition, there was an inverse significant association with ER and PGR status (p = 0.002 and p = 0.001, respectively. No relationship was evident with tumour size (T and regional lymph node (N status, differentiation grade, proliferative index or HER2 status. In a multivariate analysis, the percentage of CD44+/CD24- cancer cells was an independent factor related to metastasis development (p = 0.004. Our results indicate that confocal analysis of fluorescence-labelled breast cancer samples obtained at surgery is a reliable method to identify the CD44+/CD24- tumourigenic cell population, allowing for the stratification of breast cancer patients into two groups with substantially different relapse rates on the basis of CD44+/CD24- cell percentage.

  8. Bromodomain inhibition shows antitumoral activity in mice and human luminal breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Salvia, Montserrat; Simó-Riudalbas, Laia; Llinàs-Arias, Pere; Roa, Laura; Setien, Fernando; Soler, Marta; de Moura, Manuel Castro; Bradner, James E.; Gonzalez-Suarez, Eva; Moutinho, Catia; Esteller, Manel

    2017-01-01

    BET bromodomain inhibitors, which have an antitumoral effect against various solid cancer tumor types, have not been studied in detail in luminal breast cancer, despite the prevalence of this subtype of mammary malignancy. Here we demonstrate that the BET bromodomain inhibitor JQ1 exerts growth-inhibitory activity in human luminal breast cancer cell lines associated with a depletion of the C-MYC oncogene, but does not alter the expression levels of the BRD4 bromodomain protein. Interestingly, expression microarray analyses indicate that, upon JQ1 administration, the antitumoral phenotype also involves downregulation of relevant breast cancer oncogenes such as the Breast Carcinoma-Amplified Sequence 1 (BCAS1) and the PDZ Domain-Containing 1 (PDZK1). We have also applied these in vitro findings in an in vivo model by studying a transgenic mouse model representing the luminal B subtype of breast cancer, the MMTV-PyMT, in which the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter is used to drive the expression of the polyoma virus middle T-antigen to the mammary gland. We have observed that the use of the BET bromodomain inhibitor for the treatment of established breast neoplasms developed in the MMTV-PyMT model shows antitumor potential. Most importantly, if JQ1 is given before the expected time of tumor detection in the MMTV-PyMT mice, it retards the onset of the disease and increases the survival of these animals. Thus, our findings indicate that the use of bromodomain inhibitors is of great potential in the treatment of luminal breast cancer and merits further investigation. PMID:28881673

  9. Paeonol reverses paclitaxel resistance in human breast cancer cells by regulating the expression of transgelin 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jiangxia; Chen, Siying; Zhang, Weipeng; Hu, Sasa; Lu, Jun; Xing, Jianfeng; Dong, Yalin

    2014-06-15

    Paclitaxel (PTX) is a first-line antineoplastic drug that is commonly used in clinical chemotherapy for breast cancer treatment. However, the occurrence of drug resistance in chemotherapeutic treatment has greatly restricted its use. There is thus an urgent need to find ways of reversing paclitaxel chemotherapy resistance in breast cancer. Plant-derived agents have great potential in preventing the onset of the carcinogenic process and enhancing the efficacy of mainstream antitumor drugs. Paeonol, a main compound derived from the root bark of Paeonia suffruticosa, has various biological activities, and is reported to have reversal drug resistance effects. This study established a paclitaxel-resistant human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7/PTX) and applied the dual-luciferase reporter gene assay, MTT assay, flow cytometry, transfection assay, Western blotting and the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to investigate the reversing effects of paeonol and its underlying mechanisms. It was found that transgelin 2 may mediate the resistance of MCF-7/PTX cells to paclitaxel by up-regulating the expressions of the adenosine-triphosphate binding cassette transporter proteins, including P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance associated protein 1 (MRP1), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). Furthermore, the ability of paeonol to reverse paclitaxel resistance in breast cancer was confirmed, with a superior 8.2-fold reversal index. In addition, this study found that paeonol down-regulated the transgelin 2-mediated paclitaxel resistance by reducing the expressions of P-gp, MRP1, and BCRP in MCF-7/PTX cells. These results not only provide insight into the potential application of paeonol to the reversal of paclitaxel resistance, thus facilitating the sensitivity of breast cancer chemotherapy, but also highlight a potential role of transgelin 2 in the development of paclitaxel resistance in breast cancer.

  10. Anticancer Effects of Different Seaweeds on Human Colon and Breast Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghislain Moussavou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Seafoods and seaweeds represent some of the most important reservoirs of new therapeutic compounds for humans. Seaweed has been shown to have several biological activities, including anticancer activity. This review focuses on colorectal and breast cancers, which are major causes of cancer-related mortality in men and women. It also describes various compounds extracted from a range of seaweeds that have been shown to eradicate or slow the progression of cancer. Fucoidan extracted from the brown algae Fucus spp. has shown activity against both colorectal and breast cancers. Furthermore, we review the mechanisms through which these compounds can induce apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. By considering the ability of compounds present in seaweeds to act against colorectal and breast cancers, this review highlights the potential use of seaweeds as anticancer agents.

  11. An early history of human breast cancer:West meets East

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shou-He Yan

    2013-01-01

    Cancer has been increasingly recognized as a global issue. This is especially true in countries like China, where cancer incidence has increased likely because of changes in environment and lifestyle. However, cancer is not a modern disease; early cases have been recorded in ancient medical books in the West and in China. Here, we provide a brief history of cancer, focusing on cancer of the breast, and review the etymology of ai, the Chinese character for cancer. Notable findings from both Western and Chinese traditional medicine are presented to give an overview of the most important, early contributors to our evolving understanding of human breast cancer. We also discuss the earliest historical documents to record patients with breast cancer.

  12. Reducing the Human Burden of Breast Cancer: Advanced Radiation Therapy Yields Improved Treatment Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currey, Adam D; Bergom, Carmen; Kelly, Tracy R; Wilson, J Frank

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an important modality in the treatment of patients with breast cancer. While its efficacy in the treatment of breast cancer was known shortly after the discovery of x-rays, significant advances in radiation delivery over the past 20 years have resulted in improved patient outcomes. With the development of improved systemic therapy, optimizing local control has become increasingly important and has been shown to improve survival. Better understanding of the magnitude of treatment benefit, as well as patient and biological factors that confer an increased recurrence risk, have allowed radiation oncologists to better tailor treatment decisions to individual patients. Furthermore, significant technological advances have occurred that have reduced the acute and long-term toxicity of radiation treatment. These advances continue to reduce the human burden of breast cancer. It is important for radiation oncologists and nonradiation oncologists to understand these advances, so that patients are appropriately educated about the risks and benefits of this important treatment modality.

  13. Expression of hexokinase II and Glut-1 in untreated human breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Raya S.; Goodman, Tonya M.; Zasadny, Kenneth R.; Greenson, Joel K.; Wahl, Richard L. E-mail: rsbrown@umich.edu

    2002-05-01

    Expressions of HKII and Glut-1 were studied in untreated primary human breast cancers by immunohistochemistry. 79% of the breast cancers were HKII-positive and 61% were Glut-1-positive. Average positive malignant cell areas were 66{+-}41% for HKII and 29{+-}36% for Glut-1. HKII staining was cytoplasmic, suggesting mitochondrial localization with no variations in staining intensities. Glut-1 staining was heterogeneous, cytoplasmic and membranous and varied with histology and tumor stage. Cells expressing HKII did not always express Glut-1 and vice versa. Increased FDG-uptake appeared to be associated with increased Glut-1 expression (P=0.021), but not with HKII expression (p=0.6). FDG uptake in breast cancer tissue appears to be associated with the extent of immunodetectable expression of Glut-1, but not that of HKII, and FDG uptake may differ between individual tumors depending on tumor stage and histology.

  14. Antitumor efficacy of piperine in the treatment of human HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Minh Truong; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Choi, Jae Ho; Khanal, Tilak; Park, Bong Hwan; Tran, Thu Phuong; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2013-12-01

    Piperine is a bioactive component of black pepper, Piper nigrum Linn, commonly used for daily consumption and in traditional medicine. Here, the molecular mechanisms by which piperine exerts antitumor effects in HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells was investigated. The results showed that piperine strongly inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis through caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage. Furthermore, piperine inhibited HER2 gene expression at the transcriptional level. Blockade of ERK1/2 signaling by piperine significantly reduced SREBP-1 and FAS expression. Piperine strongly suppressed EGF-induced MMP-9 expression through inhibition of AP-1 and NF-κB activation by interfering with ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and Akt signaling pathways resulting in a reduction in migration. Finally, piperine pretreatment enhanced sensitization to paclitaxel killing in HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells. Our findings suggest that piperine may be a potential agent for the prevention and treatment of human breast cancer with HER2 overexpression.

  15. Human breast microvascular endothelial cells retain phenotypic traits in long-term finite life span culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigurdsson, Valgardur; Fridriksdottir, Agla J R; Kjartansson, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Attempts to study endothelial-epithelial interactions in the human breast have been hampered by lack of protocols for long-term cultivation of breast endothelial cells (BRENCs). The aim of this study was to establish long-term cultures of BRENCs and to compare their phenotypic traits...... with the tissue of origin. Microvasculature was localized in situ by immunohistochemistry in breast samples. From this tissue, collagen-rich stroma and adipose tissue were dissected mechanically and further disaggregated to release microvessel organoids. BRENCs were cultured from these organoids in endothelial...... uptake of low-density lipoprotein, and had E-selectin induced upon treatment with tumor necrosis factor-alpha. The first signs of senescence in passage 14 were accompanied by gain of trisomy 11. At passage 18 cells showed chromosomal aberrations and growth arrest as revealed by beta...

  16. Establishment of a normal-derived estrogen receptor-positive cell line comparable to the prevailing human breast cancer subtype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hopkinson, Branden Michael; Klitgaard, Marie Christine; Petersen, Ole William

    2017-01-01

    Understanding human cancer increasingly relies on insight gained from subtype specific comparisons between malignant and non-malignant cells. The most frequent subtype in breast cancer is the luminal. By far the most frequently used model for luminal breast cancer is the iconic estrogen receptor-...

  17. The PDZ protein TIP-1 facilitates cell migration and pulmonary metastasis of human invasive breast cancer cells in athymic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Miaojun [Key Laboratory of Animal Models and Human Disease Mechanisms of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Yunnan Province, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Yunnan (China); Graduate School, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Wang, Hailun [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Zhang, Hua-Tang [Key Laboratory of Animal Models and Human Disease Mechanisms of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Yunnan Province, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Yunnan (China); Han, Zhaozhong, E-mail: zhaozhong.han@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study has revealed novel oncogenic functions of TIP-1 in human invasive breast cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elevated TIP-1 expression levels in human breast cancers correlate to the disease prognosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the cell migration and pulmonary metastasis of human breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the expression and functionality of motility-related genes. -- Abstract: Tax-interacting protein 1 (TIP-1, also known as Tax1bp3) inhibited proliferation of colon cancer cells through antagonizing the transcriptional activity of beta-catenin. However, in this study, elevated TIP-1 expression levels were detected in human invasive breast cancers. Studies with two human invasive breast cancer cell lines indicated that RNAi-mediated TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the cell adhesion, proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro, and inhibited tumor growth in mammary fat pads and pulmonary metastasis in athymic mice. Biochemical studies showed that TIP-1 knockdown had moderate and differential effects on the beta-catenin-regulated gene expression, but remarkably down regulated the genes for cell adhesion and motility in breast cancer cells. The decreased expression of integrins and paxillin was accompanied with reduced cell adhesion and focal adhesion formation on fibronectin-coated surface. In conclusion, this study revealed a novel oncogenic function of TIP-1 suggesting that TIP-1 holds potential as a prognostic biomarker and a therapeutic target in the treatment of human invasive breast cancers.

  18. The sodium iodide symporter (NIS and potential regulators in normal, benign and malignant human breast tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Ryan

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The presence, relevance and regulation of the Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS in human mammary tissue remains poorly understood. This study aimed to quantify relative expression of NIS and putative regulators in human breast tissue, with relationships observed further investigated in vitro. METHODS: Human breast tissue specimens (malignant n = 75, normal n = 15, fibroadenoma n = 10 were analysed by RQ-PCR targeting NIS, receptors for retinoic acid (RARα, RARβ, oestrogen (ERα, thyroid hormones (THRα, THRβ, and also phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K. Breast cancer cells were treated with Retinoic acid (ATRA, Estradiol and Thyroxine individually and in combination followed by analysis of changes in NIS expression. RESULTS: The lowest levels of NIS were detected in normal tissue (Mean(SEM 0.70(0.12 Log(10 Relative Quantity (RQ with significantly higher levels observed in fibroadenoma (1.69(0.21 Log(10RQ, p<0.005 and malignant breast tissue (1.18(0.07 Log(10RQ, p<0.05. Significant positive correlations were observed between human NIS and ERα (r = 0.22, p<0.05 and RARα (r = 0.29, p<0.005, with the strongest relationship observed between NIS and RARβ (r = 0.38, p<0.0001. An inverse relationship between NIS and PI3K expression was also observed (r =  0.21, p<0.05. In vitro, ATRA, Estradiol and Thyroxine individually stimulated significant increases in NIS expression (range 6-16 fold, while ATRA and Thyroxine combined caused the greatest increase (range 16-26 fold. CONCLUSION: Although NIS expression is significantly higher in malignant compared to normal breast tissue, the highest level was detected in fibroadenoma. The data presented supports a role for retinoic acid and estradiol in mammary NIS regulation in vivo, and also highlights potential thyroidal regulation of mammary NIS mediated by thyroid hormones.

  19. Sulforaphane causes epigenetic repression of hTERT expression in human breast cancer cell lines.

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    Syed M Meeran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sulforaphane (SFN, an isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables, is a common dietary component that has histone deacetylase inhibition activity and exciting potential in cancer prevention. The mechanisms by which SFN imparts its chemopreventive properties are of considerable interest and little is known of its preventive potential for breast cancer. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that SFN significantly inhibits the viability and proliferation of breast cancer cells in vitro while it has negligible effects on normal breast cells. Inhibition of telomerase has received considerable attention because of its high expression in cancer cells and extremely low level of expression in normal cells. SFN treatment dose- and time-dependently inhibited human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT, the catalytic regulatory subunit of telomerase, in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs, especially DNMT1 and DNMT3a, were also decreased in SFN-treated breast cancer cells suggesting that SFN may repress hTERT by impacting epigenetic pathways. Down-regulation of DNMTs in response to SFN induced site-specific CpG demethylation occurring primarily in the first exon of the hTERT gene thereby facilitating CTCF binding associated with hTERT repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP analysis of the hTERT promoter revealed that SFN increased the level of active chromatin markers acetyl-H3, acetyl-H3K9 and acetyl-H4, whereas the trimethyl-H3K9 and trimethyl-H3K27 inactive chromatin markers were decreased in a dose-dependent manner. SFN-induced hyperacetylation facilitated the binding of many hTERT repressor proteins such as MAD1 and CTCF to the hTERT regulatory region. Depletion of CTCF using siRNA reduced the SFN-induced down-regulation of hTERT mRNA transcription in these breast cancer cells. In addition, down-regulation of hTERT expression facilitated the induction of cellular apoptosis in human breast

  20. BRG1 is a prognostic marker and potential therapeutic target in human breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Bai

    Full Text Available BRG1, a core component of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex, has been implicated in cancer development; however, the biological significance of BRG1 in breast cancer remains unknown. We explored the role of BRG1 in human breast cancer pathogenesis. Using tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry, we evaluated BRG1 staining in 437 breast cancer specimens and investigated its role in breast cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Our Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed that high BRG1 expression is inversely correlated with both overall (P = 0.000 and disease-specific (P = 0.000 5-year patient survival. Furthermore, we found that knockdown of BRG1 by RNA interference markedly inhibits cell proliferation and causes cessation of cell cycle. This reduced cell proliferation is due to G1 phase arrest as cyclin D1 and cyclin E are diminished whereas p27 is upregulated. Moreover, BRG1 depletion induces the expression of TIMP-2 but reduces MMP-2, thereby inhibiting the ability of cells to migrate and to invade. These results highlight the importance of BRG1 in breast cancer pathogenesis and BRG1 may serve as a prognostic marker as well as a potentially selective therapeutic target.

  1. Carbon nanotube electron field emitters for x-ray imaging of human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidcumb, Emily; Gao, Bo; Shan, Jing; Inscoe, Christy; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2014-06-20

    For imaging human breast cancer, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been shown to improve image quality and breast cancer detection in comparison to two-dimensional (2D) mammography. Current DBT systems have limited spatial resolution and lengthy scan times. Stationary DBT (s-DBT), utilizing an array of carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission x-ray sources, provides increased spatial resolution and potentially faster imaging than current DBT systems. This study presents the results of detailed evaluations of CNT cathodes for x-ray breast imaging tasks. The following were investigated: high current, long-term stability of CNT cathodes for DBT; feasibility of using CNT cathodes to perform a 2D radiograph function; and cathode performance through several years of imaging. Results show that a breast tomosynthesis system using CNT cathodes could run far beyond the experimentally tested lifetime of one to two years. CNT cathodes were found capable of producing higher currents than typical DBT would require, indicating that the s-DBT imaging time can be further reduced. The feasibility of using a single cathode of the s-DBT tube to perform 2D mammography in 4 s was demonstrated. Over the lifetime of the prototype s-DBT system, it was found that both cathode performance and transmission rate were stable and consistent.

  2. Carbon nanotube electron field emitters for x-ray imaging of human breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidcumb, Emily; Gao, Bo; Shan, Jing; Inscoe, Christy; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2014-06-01

    For imaging human breast cancer, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been shown to improve image quality and breast cancer detection in comparison to two-dimensional (2D) mammography. Current DBT systems have limited spatial resolution and lengthy scan times. Stationary DBT (s-DBT), utilizing an array of carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission x-ray sources, provides increased spatial resolution and potentially faster imaging than current DBT systems. This study presents the results of detailed evaluations of CNT cathodes for x-ray breast imaging tasks. The following were investigated: high current, long-term stability of CNT cathodes for DBT; feasibility of using CNT cathodes to perform a 2D radiograph function; and cathode performance through several years of imaging. Results show that a breast tomosynthesis system using CNT cathodes could run far beyond the experimentally tested lifetime of one to two years. CNT cathodes were found capable of producing higher currents than typical DBT would require, indicating that the s-DBT imaging time can be further reduced. The feasibility of using a single cathode of the s-DBT tube to perform 2D mammography in 4 s was demonstrated. Over the lifetime of the prototype s-DBT system, it was found that both cathode performance and transmission rate were stable and consistent.

  3. First Evidence that Ecklonia cava-Derived Dieckol Attenuates MCF-7 Human Breast Carcinoma Cell Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Kyung Kim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of Ecklonia cava (E. cava-derived dieckol on movement behavior and the expression of migration-related genes in MCF-7 human breast cancer cell. Phlorotannins (e.g., dieckol, 6,6′-biecko, and 2,7″-phloroglucinol-6,6′-bieckol were purified from E. cava by using centrifugal partition chromatography. Among the phlorotannins, we found that dieckol inhibited breast cancer cell the most and was selected for further study. Radius™-well was used to assess cell migration, and dieckol (1–100 µM was found to suppress breast cancer cell movement. Metastasis-related gene expressions were evaluated by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. In addition, dieckol inhibited the expression of migration-related genes such as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. On the other hand, it stimulated the expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2. These results suggest that dieckol exerts anti-breast cancer activity via the regulation of the expressions of metastasis-related genes, and this is the first report on the anti-breast cancer effect of dieckol.

  4. Pit-1 inhibits BRCA1 and sensitizes human breast tumors to cisplatin and vitamin D treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoane, Samuel; Arias, Efigenia; Sigueiro, Rita; Sendon-Lago, Juan; Martinez-Ordoñez, Anxo; Castelao, Esteban; Eiró, Noemí; Garcia-Caballero, Tomás; Macia, Manuel; Lopez-Lopez, Rafael; Maestro, Miguel; Vizoso, Francisco; Mouriño, Antonio; Perez-Fernandez, Roman

    2015-01-01

    The POU class 1 homeobox 1 (POU1F1, also known as Pit-1), pertaining to the Pit-Oct-Unc (POU) family of transcription factors, has been related to tumor growth and metastasis in breast. However, its role in response to breast cancer therapy is unknown. We found that Pit-1 down-regulated DNA-damage and repair genes, and specifically inhibited BRCA1 gene expression, sensitizing breast cancer cells to DNA-damage agents. Administration of 1α, 25-dihydroxy-3-epi-vitamin D3 (3-Epi, an endogenous low calcemic vitamin D metabolite) reduced Pit-1 expression, and synergized with cisplatin, thus, decreasing cell proliferation and apoptosis in vitro, and reducing tumor growth in vivo. In addition, fifteen primary cultures of human breast tumors showed significantly decreased proliferation when treated with 3-Epi+cisplatin, compared to cisplatin alone. This response positively correlated with Pit-1 levels. Our findings demonstrate that high levels of Pit-1 and reduced BRCA1 levels increase breast cancer cell susceptibility to 3-Epi+cisplatin therapy. PMID:25992773

  5. Tumor characterization and treatment monitoring of postsurgical human breast specimens using harmonic motion imaging (HMI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yang; Wang, Shutao; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Taback, Bret; Konofagou, Elisa

    2016-05-09

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a noninvasive technique used in the treatment of early-stage breast cancer and benign tumors. To facilitate its translation to the clinic, there is a need for a simple, cost-effective device that can reliably monitor HIFU treatment. We have developed harmonic motion imaging (HMI), which can be used seamlessly in conjunction with HIFU for tumor ablation monitoring, namely harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU). The overall objective of this study was to develop an all ultrasound-based system for real-time imaging and ablation monitoring in the human breast in vivo. HMI was performed in 36 specimens (19 normal, 15 invasive ductal carcinomas, and 2 fibroadenomas) immediately after surgical removal. The specimens were securely embedded in a tissue-mimicking agar gel matrix and submerged in degassed phosphate-buffered saline to mimic in vivo environment. The HMI setup consisted of a HIFU transducer confocally aligned with an imaging transducer to induce an oscillatory radiation force and estimate the resulting displacement. 3D HMI displacement maps were reconstructed to represent the relative tissue stiffness in 3D. The average peak-to-peak displacement was found to be significantly different (p = 0.003) between normal breast tissue and invasive ductal carcinoma. There were also significant differences before and after HMIFU ablation in both the normal (53.84 % decrease) and invasive ductal carcinoma (44.69 % decrease) specimens. HMI can be used to map and differentiate relative stiffness in postsurgical normal and pathological breast tissues. HMIFU can also successfully monitor thermal ablations in normal and pathological human breast specimens. This HMI technique may lead to a new clinical tool for breast tumor imaging and HIFU treatment monitoring.

  6. Commonly consumed and specialty dietary mushrooms reduce cellular proliferation in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Keith R; Brophy, Sara K

    2010-11-01

    Worldwide, over one million women will be newly diagnosed with breast cancer in the next year. Moreover, breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the USA. An accumulating body of evidence suggests that consumption of dietary mushrooms can protect against breast cancer. In this study, we tested and compared the ability of five commonly consumed or specialty mushrooms to modulate cell number balance in the cancer process using MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Hot water extracts (80°C for 2 h) of maitake (MT, Grifola frondosa), crimini (CRIM, Agaricus bisporus), portabella (PORT, Agaricus bisporus), oyster (OYS, Pleurotus ostreatus) and white button (WB, Agaricus bisporus) mushrooms or water alone (5% v/v) were incubated for 24 h with MCF-7 cells. Cellular proliferation determined by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation was significantly (P mushrooms, with MT and OYS being the most effective. MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) reduction, an often used mitochondrion-dependent marker of proliferation, was unchanged although decreased (P > 0.05) by 15% with OYS extract. Lactate dehydrogenase release, as a marker of necrosis, was significantly increased after incubation with MT but not with other test mushrooms. Furthermore, MT extract significantly increased apoptosis, or programmed cell death, as determined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl end labeling method, whereas other test mushrooms displayed trends of ∼15%. The total numbers of cells per flask, determined by hemacytometry, were not different from control cultures. Overall, all test mushrooms significantly suppressed cellular proliferation, with MT further significantly inducing apoptosis and cytotoxicity in human breast cancer cells. This suggests that both common and specialty mushrooms may be chemoprotective against breast cancer.

  7. Imatinib mesylate inhibits proliferation and exerts an antifibrotic effect in human breast stroma fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioni, Vassiliki; Karampinas, Theodoros; Voutsinas, Gerassimos; Roussidis, Andreas E; Papadopoulos, Savvas; Karamanos, Nikos K; Kletsas, Dimitris

    2008-05-01

    Tumor stroma plays an important role in cancer development. In a variety of tumors, such as breast carcinomas, a desmoplastic response, characterized by stromal fibroblast and collagen accumulation, is observed having synergistic effects on tumor progression. However, the effect of known anticancer drugs on stromal cells has not been thoroughly investigated. Imatinib mesylate is a selective inhibitor of several protein tyrosine kinases, including the receptor of platelet-derived growth factor, an important mediator of desmoplasia. Recently, we have shown that imatinib inhibits the growth and invasiveness of human epithelial breast cancer cells. Here, we studied the effect of imatinib on the proliferation and collagen accumulation in breast stromal fibroblasts. We have shown that it blocks the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase and Akt signaling pathways and up-regulates cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(WAF1), leading to the inhibition of fibroblast proliferation, by arresting them at the G(0)/G(1) phase of the cell cycle. Imatinib inhibits more potently the platelet-derived growth factor-mediated stimulation of breast fibroblast proliferation. By using specific inhibitors, we have found that this is due to the inhibition of the Akt pathway. In addition, imatinib inhibits fibroblast-mediated collagen accumulation. Conventional and quantitative PCR analysis, as well as gelatin zymography, indicates that this is due to the down-regulation of mRNA synthesis of collagen I and collagen III-the main collagen types in breast stroma-and not to the up-regulation or activation of collagenases matrix metalloproteinase 2 and matrix metalloproteinase 9. These data indicate that imatinib has an antifibrotic effect on human breast stromal fibroblasts that may inhibit desmoplastic reaction and thus tumor progression.

  8. Cell membrane softening in human breast and cervical cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Händel, Chris; Schmidt, B. U. Sebastian; Schiller, Jürgen; Dietrich, Undine; Möhn, Till; Kießling, Tobias R.; Pawlizak, Steve; Fritsch, Anatol W.; Horn, Lars-Christian; Briest, Susanne; Höckel, Michael; Zink, Mareike; Käs, Josef A.

    2015-08-01

    Biomechanical properties are key to many cellular functions such as cell division and cell motility and thus are crucial in the development and understanding of several diseases, for instance cancer. The mechanics of the cellular cytoskeleton have been extensively characterized in cells and artificial systems. The rigidity of the plasma membrane, with the exception of red blood cells, is unknown and membrane rigidity measurements only exist for vesicles composed of a few synthetic lipids. In this study, thermal fluctuations of giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) directly derived from the plasma membranes of primary breast and cervical cells, as well as breast cell lines, are analyzed. Cell blebs or GPMVs were studied via thermal membrane fluctuations and mass spectrometry. It will be shown that cancer cell membranes are significantly softer than their non-malignant counterparts. This can be attributed to a loss of fluid raft forming lipids in malignant cells. These results indicate that the reduction of membrane rigidity promotes aggressive blebbing motion in invasive cancer cells.

  9. Catalog of genetic progression of human cancers: breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmedt, Christine; Yates, Lucy; Kulka, Janina

    2016-03-01

    With the rapid development of next-generation sequencing, deeper insights are being gained into the molecular evolution that underlies the development and clinical progression of breast cancer. It is apparent that during evolution, breast cancers acquire thousands of mutations including single base pair substitutions, insertions, deletions, copy number aberrations, and structural rearrangements. As a consequence, at the whole genome level, no two cancers are identical and few cancers even share the same complement of "driver" mutations. Indeed, two samples from the same cancer may also exhibit extensive differences due to constant remodeling of the genome over time. In this review, we summarize recent studies that extend our understanding of the genomic basis of cancer progression. Key biological insights include the following: subclonal diversification begins early in cancer evolution, being detectable even in in situ lesions; geographical stratification of subclonal structure is frequent in primary tumors and can include therapeutically targetable alterations; multiple distant metastases typically arise from a common metastatic ancestor following a "metastatic cascade" model; systemic therapy can unmask preexisting resistant subclones or influence further treatment sensitivity and disease progression. We conclude the review by describing novel approaches such as the analysis of circulating DNA and patient-derived xenografts that promise to further our understanding of the genomic changes occurring during cancer evolution and guide treatment decision making.

  10. Geographical distribution and accumulation features of PBDEs in human breast milk from Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudaryanto, Agus; Kajiwara, Natsuko; Takahashi, Shin; Muawanah; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2008-01-01

    The present study reports concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and organochlorines (OCs) in human breast milk from Indonesia covering urban, suburban and rural areas. PBDEs were detected in all the samples of the present study with total concentrations ranging from 0.49 to 13 ng/g lipid wt. Geographical distribution showed that concentrations of PBDEs were relatively uniform (p>0.05) and the levels were in the same order as those in Japan and some European countries, but were one or two order lower than North America. When compared to OCs, the level of total PBDEs was lower. The congener pattern was in accordance with other studies on human matrices, in which BDE-47 was the most abundant congener. Variations of PBDE congeners in human breast milk were further discussed to elucidate the potential exposure source(s) and pathways.

  11. Targeting Breast Cancer Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of breast cancer-associated deaths. Despite the significant improvement in current therapies in extending patient life, 30–40% of patients may eventually suffer from distant relapse and succumb to the disease. Consequently, a deeper understanding of the metastasis biology is key to developing better treatment strategies and achieving long-lasting therapeutic efficacies against breast cancer. This review covers recent breakthroughs in the discovery of various me...

  12. A paradox of cadmium: a carcinogen that impairs the capability of human breast cancer cells to induce angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacini, Stefania; Punzi, Tiziana; Morucci, Gabriele; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Cadmium, a highly persistent heavy metal, has been categorized as a human carcinogen. Even though it is known that cadmium acts as estrogens in breast cancer cells, several studies failed to demonstrate whether cadmium is a causal factor for breast cancer. The lack of a strong association between cadmium and breast cancer could be found in the antiangiogenic properties of this heavy metal, which might counteract its carcinogenic properties in the progression of breast cancer. In this study, we exposed estrogen-responsive breast cancer cells to subtoxic levels of cadmium, and we evaluated their angiogenic potential using the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane assay. Exposure of breast cancer cells to subtoxic levels of cadmium significantly inhibited the angiogenic potential of the breast cancer cell line, suggesting the possibility that cadmium might negatively regulate the production of proangiogenic factors in breast cancer cells. Our results suggest that cadmium might exert a paradoxical effect in breast cancer: on the one hand, it could promote carcinogenesis, and, on the other hand, it could delay the onset of tumors by inhibiting breast cancer cell-induced angiogenesis.

  13. Cancer-associated fibroblasts in a human HEp-2 established laryngeal xenografted tumor are not derived from cancer cells through epithelial-mesenchymal transition, phenotypically activated but karyotypically normal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei; Wu, Chun-Ping; Pan, Jun-Yan; Zheng, Wen-Wei; Cao, Xiao-Juan; Fan, Guo-Kang

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play a crucial role in cancer progression and even initiation. However, the origins of CAFs in various cancer types remain controversial, and one of the important hypothesized origins is through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) from cancer cells. In this study, we investigated whether the HEp-2 laryngeal cancer cells are able to generate CAFs via EMT during tumor formation, which is now still unknown. The laryngeal xenografted tumor model was established by inoculating the HEp-2 laryngeal cancer cell line in nude mice. Primary cultured CAFs from the tumor nodules and matched normal fibroblasts (NFs) from the adjacent connective tissues were subcultured, purified, and verified by immunofluorescence. Migration, invasion, and proliferation potentials were compared between the CAFs and NFs. A co-culture of CAFs with HEp-2 cells and a co-injection of CAFs with HEp-2 cells in nude mice were performed to examine the cancer-promoting potential of CAFs to further verify their identity. Karyotypic analyses of the CAFs, NFs, and HEp-2 cells were conducted. A co-culture of NFs with HEp-2 cells was also performed to examine the expression of activated markers of CAFs. A pathological examination confirmed that the laryngeal xenografted tumor model was successfully established, containing abundant CAFs. Immunocytochemical staining verified the purities and identities of the CAFs and NFs. Although the CAFs manifested higher migration, invasion, proliferation, and cancer-promoting capacities compared with the NFs, an analysis of chromosomes revealed that both the CAFs and NFs showed typical normal mouse karyotypes. In addition, the NFs co-cultured with HEp-2 cells did not show induced expressions of activated markers of CAFs. Our findings reveal that the CAFs in the HEp-2 established laryngeal xenografted tumor are not of laryngeal cancer origin but of mouse origin, indicating that the HEp-2 laryngeal cancer cells cannot generate their

  14. Study on interleukin-18 gene transfer into human breast cancer cells to prevent tumorigenicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩明勇; 郑树; 于金明; 彭佳萍; 郭其森; 王家林

    2004-01-01

    To study the effect of interleukin-18 gene transfection on the tumorigenesis of breast cancer cell line Bacp37, human breast cancer cell line Bcap37 were transfected with Lipofectamine and selected by G418. The biological expression of rhIL-18 was tested by RT-PCR and ELISA method; nude mice were injected with Bcap37 cell with or without the hIL-18 gene. The hIL-18 cDNA was successfully integrated into Bcap37 cell; 126.3±4.5 pg hIL-18 secreted by one million transduced cells in 24 hours. Nude mice injected with IL-18 gene engineered Bcap37 cell had no tumor growth. These findings indicated that human breast cancer cells were successfully modified by the gene of IL-18 cytokine; the IL-18 gene engineered Bcap37 cells secreted hIL-18 and lost their tumorigenicity. The Bcap37 cells transduced with IL-18 gene may be used as breast cancer vaccine.

  15. RCP is a human breast cancer-promoting gene with Ras-activating function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinqiu; Liu, Xuejing; Datta, Arpita; Govindarajan, Kunde; Tam, Wai Leong; Han, Jianyong; George, Joshy; Wong, Christopher; Ramnarayanan, Kalpana; Phua, Tze Yoong; Leong, Wan Yee; Chan, Yang Sun; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Liu, Edison Tak-Bun; Karuturi, Krishna Murthy; Lim, Bing; Miller, Lance David

    2009-08-01

    Aggressive forms of cancer are often defined by recurrent chromosomal alterations, yet in most cases, the causal or contributing genetic components remain poorly understood. Here, we utilized microarray informatics to identify candidate oncogenes potentially contributing to aggressive breast cancer behavior. We identified the Rab-coupling protein RCP (also known as RAB11FIP1), which is located at a chromosomal region frequently amplified in breast cancer (8p11-12) as a potential candidate. Overexpression of RCP in MCF10A normal human mammary epithelial cells resulted in acquisition of tumorigenic properties such as loss of contact inhibition, growth-factor independence, and anchorage-independent growth. Conversely, knockdown of RCP in human breast cancer cell lines inhibited colony formation, invasion, and migration in vitro and markedly reduced tumor formation and metastasis in mouse xenograft models. Overexpression of RCP enhanced ERK phosphorylation and increased Ras activation in vitro. As these results indicate that RCP is a multifunctional gene frequently amplified in breast cancer that encodes a protein with Ras-activating function, we suggest it has potential importance as a therapeutic target. Furthermore, these studies provide new insight into the emerging role of the Rab family of small G proteins and their interacting partners in carcinogenesis.

  16. RCP is a human breast cancer–promoting gene with Ras-activating function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinqiu; Liu, Xuejing; Datta, Arpita; Govindarajan, Kunde; Tam, Wai Leong; Han, Jianyong; George, Joshy; Wong, Christopher; Ramnarayanan, Kalpana; Phua, Tze Yoong; Leong, Wan Yee; Chan, Yang Sun; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Liu, Edison Tak-Bun; Karuturi, Krishna Murthy; Lim, Bing; Miller, Lance David

    2009-01-01

    Aggressive forms of cancer are often defined by recurrent chromosomal alterations, yet in most cases, the causal or contributing genetic components remain poorly understood. Here, we utilized microarray informatics to identify candidate oncogenes potentially contributing to aggressive breast cancer behavior. We identified the Rab-coupling protein RCP (also known as RAB11FIP1), which is located at a chromosomal region frequently amplified in breast cancer (8p11–12) as a potential candidate. Overexpression of RCP in MCF10A normal human mammary epithelial cells resulted in acquisition of tumorigenic properties such as loss of contact inhibition, growth-factor independence, and anchorage-independent growth. Conversely, knockdown of RCP in human breast cancer cell lines inhibited colony formation, invasion, and migration in vitro and markedly reduced tumor formation and metastasis in mouse xenograft models. Overexpression of RCP enhanced ERK phosphorylation and increased Ras activation in vitro. As these results indicate that RCP is a multifunctional gene frequently amplified in breast cancer that encodes a protein with Ras-activating function, we suggest it has potential importance as a therapeutic target. Furthermore, these studies provide new insight into the emerging role of the Rab family of small G proteins and their interacting partners in carcinogenesis. PMID:19620787

  17. Anti-angiogenic activity in metastasis of human breast cancer cells irradiated by a proton beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyu-Shik; Shin, Jin-Sun; Nam, Kyung-Soo; Shon, Yun-Hee

    2012-07-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential process of metastasis in human breast cancer. We investigated the effects of proton beam irradiation on angiogenic enzyme activities and their expressions in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. The regulation of angiogenic regulating factors, of transforming growth factor- β (TGF- β) and of vesicular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in breast cancer cells irradiated with a proton beam was studied. Aromatase activity and mRNA expression, which is correlated with metastasis, were significantly decreased by irradiation with a proton beam in a dose-dependent manner. TGF- β and VEGF transcriptions were also diminished by proton beam irradiation. In contrast, transcription of tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs), also known as biological inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), was dose-dependently enhanced. Furthermore, an increase in the expression of TIMPs caused th MMP-9 activity to be diminished and the MMP-9 and the MMP-2 expressions to be decreased. These results suggest that inhibition of angiogenesis by proton beam irradiation in breast cancer cells is closely related to inhibitions of aromatase activity and transcription and to down-regulation of TGF- β and VEGF transcription.

  18. Anti-angiogenic activity in metastasis of human breast cancer cells irradiated by a proton beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyu-Shik; Shin, Jin-Sun; Nam, Kyung-Soo [Dongguk University, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of); Shon, Yun-Hee [Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    Angiogenesis is an essential process of metastasis in human breast cancer. We investigated the effects of proton beam irradiation on angiogenic enzyme activities and their expressions in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. The regulation of angiogenic regulating factors, of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and of vesicular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in breast cancer cells irradiated with a proton beam was studied. Aromatase activity and mRNA expression, which is correlated with metastasis, were significantly decreased by irradiation with a proton beam in a dose-dependent manner. TGF-β and VEGF transcriptions were also diminished by proton beam irradiation. In contrast, transcription of tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs), also known as biological inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), was dose-dependently enhanced. Furthermore, an increase in the expression of TIMPs caused the MMP-9 activity to be diminished and the MMP-9 and the MMP-2 expressions to be decreased. These results suggest that inhibition of angiogenesis by proton beam irradiation in breast cancer cells is closely related to inhibitions of aromatase activity and transcription and to down-regulation of TGF-β and VEGF transcription.

  19. When fat becomes an ally of the enemy: adipose tissue as collaborator in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapeire, Lore; Denys, Hannelore; Cocquyt, Véronique; De Wever, Olivier

    2015-07-01

    Since the discovery of leptin in 1994, our vision of adipose tissue as a static organ regulating mainly lipid storage and release has been completely overthrown, and adipose tissue is now seen as an active and integral organ in human physiology. In the past years, extensive research has tremendously given us more insights in the mechanisms and pathways involved not only in normal but also in 'sick' adipose tissue, for example, in obesity and lipodystrophy. With growing evidence of a link between obesity and several types of cancer, research focusing on the interaction between adipose tissue and cancer has begun to unravel the interesting but complex multi-lateral communication between the different players. With breast cancer as one of the first cancer types where a positive correlation between obesity and breast cancer incidence and prognosis in post-menopausal women was found, we have focused this review on the paracrine and endocrine role of adipose tissue in breast cancer initiation and progression. As important inter-species differences in adipose tissue occur, we mainly selected human adipose tissue- and breast cancer-based studies with a short reflection on therapeutic possibilities. This review is part of the special issue on "Adiposopathy in Cancer and (Cardio)Metabolic Diseases".

  20. Study on interleukin-18 gene transfer into human breast cancer cells to prevent tumorigenicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩明勇; 郑树; 于金明; 彭佳萍; 郭其森; 王家林

    2004-01-01

    To study the effect of interleukin-18 gene transfection on the tumorigenesis of breast cancer cell line Bacp37,human breast cancer cell line Bcap37 were transfected with Lipofectamine and selected by G418.The biological expression of rhIL-18 was tested by RT-PCR and ELISA method;nude mice were injected with Bcap37 cell with or without the hIL-18 gene.The hIL-18 cDNA was successfully integrated into Bcap37 cell; 126.3±4.5pg hIL-18 secreted by one million transduced cells in 24 hours. Nude mice injected with IL-18 gene engineered Bcap37 cell had no tumor growth.These findings indicated that human breast cancer cells were successfully modified by the gene of IL-18 cytokine;the IL-18 gene engineered Bcap37 cells secreted hIL-18 and lost their tumorigenicity.The Bcap37 cells transduced with IL-18 gene may be used as breast cancer vaccine.

  1. Three-dimensional cultures modeling premalignant progression of human breast epithelial cells: role of cysteine cathepsins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Stefanie R.; Sameni, Mansoureh; Blum, Galia; Bogyo, Matthew; Sloane, Bonnie F.; Moin, Kamiar

    2013-01-01

    The expression of the cysteine protease cathepsin B is increased in early stages of human breast cancer. To assess the potential role of cathepsin B in premalignant progression of breast epithelial cells, we employed a 3D reconstituted basement membrane overlay culture model of MCF10A human breast epithelial cells and isogenic variants that replicate the in vivo phenotypes of hyperplasia (MCF10AneoT) and atypical hyperplasia (MCF10AT1). MCF10A cells developed into polarized acinar structures with central lumens. In contrast, MCF10AneoT and MCF10AT1 cells form larger structures in which the lumens are filled with cells. CA074Me, a cell-permeable inhibitor selective for the cysteine cathepsins B and L, reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis of MCF10A, MCF10AneoT and MCF10AT1 cells in 3D culture. We detected active cysteine cathepsins in the isogenic MCF10 variants in 3D culture with GB111, a cell-permeable activity-based probe, and established differential inhibition of cathepsin B in our 3D cultures. We conclude that cathepsin B promotes proliferation and premalignant progression of breast epithelial cells. These findings are consistent with studies by others showing that deletion of cathepsin B in the transgenic MMTV-PyMT mice, a murine model that is predisposed to development of mammary cancer, reduces malignant progression. PMID:23667900

  2. The plasticity of human breast carcinoma cells is more than epithelial to mesenchymal conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Ole William; Nielsen, Helga Lind; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Villadsen, Ren& #233; ; Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J.

    2001-05-12

    The human breast comprises three lineages: the luminal epithelial lineage, the myoepithelial lineage, and the mesenchymal lineage. It has been widely accepted that human breast neoplasia pertains only to the luminal epithelial lineage. In recent years, however, evidence has accumulated that neoplastic breast epithelial cells may be substantially more plastic in their differentiation repertoire than previously anticipated. Thus, along with an increasing availability of markers for the myoepithelial lineage, at least a partial differentiation towards this lineage is being revealed frequently. It has also become clear that conversions towards the mesenchymal lineage actually occur, referred to as epithelial to mesenchymal transitions. Indeed, some of the so-called myofibroblasts surrounding the tumor may indeed have an epithelial origin rather than a mesenchymal origin. Because myoepithelial cells, epithelial to mesenchymal transition-derived cells, genuine stromal cells and myofibroblasts share common markers, we now need to define a more ambitious set of markers to distinguish these cell types in the microenvironment of the tumors. This is necessary because the different microenvironments may confer different clinical outcomes. The aim of this commentary is to describe some of the inherent complexities in defining cellular phenotypes in the microenvironment of breast cancer and to expand wherever possible on the implications for tumor suppression and progression.

  3. Clotrimazole Preferentially Inhibits Human Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation, Viability and Glycolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Cristiane M.; Marcondes, Mariah C.; Sola-Penna, Mauro; de Souza, Maisa L. S.; Zancan, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Background Clotrimazole is an azole derivative with promising anti-cancer effects. This drug interferes with the activity of glycolytic enzymes altering their cellular distribution and inhibiting their activities. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effects of clotrimazole on the growth pattern of breast cancer cells correlating with their metabolic profiles. Methodology/Principal Findings Three cell lines derived from human breast tissue (MCF10A, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) that present increasingly aggressive profiles were used. Clotrimazole induces a dose-dependent decrease in glucose uptake in all three cell lines, with Ki values of 114.3±11.7, 77.1±7.8 and 37.8±4.2 µM for MCF10A, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, respectively. Furthermore, the drug also decreases intracellular ATP content and inhibits the major glycolytic enzymes, hexokinase, phosphofructokinase-1 and pyruvate kinase, especially in the highly metastatic cell line, MDA-MB-231. In this last cell lineage, clotrimazole attenuates the robust migratory response, an effect that is progressively attenuated in MCF-7 and MCF10A, respectively. Moreover, clotrimazole reduces the viability of breast cancer cells, which is more pronounced on MDA-MB-231. Conclusions/Significance Clotrimazole presents deleterious effects on two human breast cancer cell lines metabolism, growth and migration, where the most aggressive cell line is more affected by the drug. Moreover, clotrimazole presents little or no effect on a non-tumor human breast cell line. These results suggest, at least for these three cell lines studied, that the more aggressive the cell is the more effective clotrimazole is. PMID:22347377

  4. Modulation of doxorubicin cytotoxicity by resveratrol in a human breast cancer cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Abdel-Moneim M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is the most common cancer in the Arab world and it ranked first among Saudi females. Doxorubicin (DOX, an anthracycline antibiotic is one of the most effective anticancer agents used to treat breast cancer. chronic cardiotoxicity is a major limiting factor of the use of doxorubicin. Therefore, our study was designed to assess the role of a natural product resveratrol (RSVL on sensitization of human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 to the action of DOX in an attempt to minimize doxorubicin effective dose and thereby its side effects. Methods Human breast cancer cell line MCF-7, was used in this study. Cytotoxic activity of DOX was determined using (sulforhodamine SRB method. Apoptotic cells were quantified after treatment by annexin V-FITC- propidium iodide (PI double staining using flow-cytometer. Cell cycle disturbance and doxorubicin uptake were determined after RSVL or DOX treatment. Results Treatment of MCF-7 cells with 15 μg/ml RSVL either simultaneously or 24 h before DOX increased the cytotoxicity of DOX, with IC50 were 0.056 and 0.035 μg/ml, respectively compared to DOX alone IC50 (0.417 μg/ml. Moreover, flow cytometric analysis of the MCF-7 cells treated simultaneously with DOX (0.5 μg/ml and RSVL showed enhanced arrest of the cells in G0 (80%. On the other hand, when RSVL is given 24 h before DOX although there was more increased in the cytotoxic effect of DOX against the growth of the cells, however, there was decreased in percentage arrest of cells in G0, less inhibition of DOX-induced apoptosis and reduced DOX cellular uptake into the cells. Conclusion RSVL treatment increased the cytotoxic activity of DOX against the growth of human breast cancer cells when given either simultaneously or 24 h before DOX.

  5. Clotrimazole preferentially inhibits human breast cancer cell proliferation, viability and glycolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane M Furtado

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clotrimazole is an azole derivative with promising anti-cancer effects. This drug interferes with the activity of glycolytic enzymes altering their cellular distribution and inhibiting their activities. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effects of clotrimazole on the growth pattern of breast cancer cells correlating with their metabolic profiles. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Three cell lines derived from human breast tissue (MCF10A, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 that present increasingly aggressive profiles were used. Clotrimazole induces a dose-dependent decrease in glucose uptake in all three cell lines, with K(i values of 114.3±11.7, 77.1±7.8 and 37.8±4.2 µM for MCF10A, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, respectively. Furthermore, the drug also decreases intracellular ATP content and inhibits the major glycolytic enzymes, hexokinase, phosphofructokinase-1 and pyruvate kinase, especially in the highly metastatic cell line, MDA-MB-231. In this last cell lineage, clotrimazole attenuates the robust migratory response, an effect that is progressively attenuated in MCF-7 and MCF10A, respectively. Moreover, clotrimazole reduces the viability of breast cancer cells, which is more pronounced on MDA-MB-231. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Clotrimazole presents deleterious effects on two human breast cancer cell lines metabolism, growth and migration, where the most aggressive cell line is more affected by the drug. Moreover, clotrimazole presents little or no effect on a non-tumor human breast cell line. These results suggest, at least for these three cell lines studied, that the more aggressive the cell is the more effective clotrimazole is.

  6. Individual characterisation of the metastatic capacity of human breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimann, R; Hellman, S

    2000-08-01

    The clinical implications of understanding the invasive and metastatic proclivities of an individual patient's tumour are substantial because the choice of systemic therapy needs to be guided by the likelihood of occult metastasis as well as by knowing when the metastases will become overt. Malignant potential is dynamic, progressing throughout the natural history of a tumour. Required of tumours is the development of critical phenotypic attributes: growth, angiogenesis, invasion and metastagenicity. Characterisation of the extent of tumour progression with regard to these major tumour phenotypes should allow the fashioning of individual therapy for each patient. To examine the clinical parameters and molecularly characterise the metastatic proclivity we have been studying a series of regionally treated breast cancer patients who received no systemic therapy and have long follow-up. Clinically we describe two parameters: metastagenicity - the metastatic proclivity of a tumour, and virulence--the rate at which these metastases appear. Both attributes increase with tumour size and nodal involvement. However, within each clinical group there is a cured population, even in those with extensive nodal involvement, underscoring the heterogeneity of breast cancers within each group and the need for further molecular characterisation. Using biomarkers that characterise the malignant phenotype we have determined that there is progression in the phenotypic changes. Angiogenesis and loss of nm23 are earlier events than the loss of E-cadherin, or abnormalities in TP53. The strongest biomarkers of poor prognosis are p53 and E-cadherin, but even when both are abnormal 42% of node-negative patients are cured indicating that other determinative steps need to occur before successful metastases are established. Identification of these critical later events will further increase the efficacy of determining the malignant capacities of individual tumours.

  7. [Immunohistochemical study of human breast tumors using monoclonal antibodies to intermediate filament proteins (nonproliferating epithelial structures in breast dysplasia)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gel'shteĭn, V I; Chipysheva, T A; Litvinova, L V; Ermilova, V D; Bannikov, G A

    1985-01-01

    An immunohistochemical analysis of nonproliferating epithelial structures was carried out in 10 samples of human breast dysplasia and in 4 samples of tissue surrounding mammary gland carcinoma. Monoclonal mouse antibodies against individual prekeratins of rat monolayer epithelial antibodies of clone C12 against rat prekeratin with the molecular mass 49 kilodalton and antibodies of clone E3 against rat prekeratin with the molecular mass 40 kilodalton-monoclonal antibodies against vimentin (clone 30), as well as polyclonal antibodies against smooth muscle myosin and against the basement membrane glycoprotein laminin were used. The lining epithelium of all glandular structures reacted only with C12 antibodies. Two variants of myoepithelial cells containing myosin were detected. Variant I contains myosin and vimentin and is localized in intralobular ducts. Variant 2 contains myosin and prekeratin, recognized by E3 antibodies and is found in extralobular ducts.

  8. Growth of human breast tissues from patient cells in 3D hydrogel scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol, Ethan S; Miller, Daniel H; Breggia, Anne; Spencer, Kevin C; Arendt, Lisa M; Gupta, Piyush B

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cultures have proven invaluable for expanding human tissues for basic research and clinical applications. In both contexts, 3D cultures are most useful when they (1) support the outgrowth of tissues from primary human cells that have not been immortalized through extensive culture or viral infection and (2) include defined, physiologically relevant components. Here we describe a 3D culture system with both of these properties that stimulates the outgrowth of morphologically complex and hormone-responsive mammary tissues from primary human breast epithelial cells. Primary human breast epithelial cells isolated from patient reduction mammoplasty tissues were seeded into 3D hydrogels. The hydrogel scaffolds were composed of extracellular proteins and carbohydrates present in human breast tissue and were cultured in serum-free medium containing only defined components. The physical properties of these hydrogels were determined using atomic force microscopy. Tissue growth was monitored over time using bright-field and fluorescence microscopy, and maturation was assessed using morphological metrics and by immunostaining for markers of stem cells and differentiated cell types. The hydrogel tissues were also studied by fabricating physical models from confocal images using a 3D printer. When seeded into these 3D hydrogels, primary human breast epithelial cells rapidly self-organized in the absence of stromal cells and within 2 weeks expanded to form mature mammary tissues. The mature tissues contained luminal, basal, and stem cells in the correct topological orientation and also exhibited the complex ductal and lobular morphologies observed in the human breast. The expanded tissues became hollow when treated with estrogen and progesterone, and with the further addition of prolactin produced lipid droplets, indicating that they were responding to hormones. Ductal branching was initiated by clusters of cells expressing putative mammary stem cell

  9. Energy intake from human milk covers the requirement of 6-month-old Senegalese exclusively breast-fed infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agne-Djigo, Anta; Kwadjode, Komlan M; Idohou-Dossou, Nicole; Diouf, Adama; Guiro, Amadou T; Wade, Salimata

    2013-11-01

    Exclusive breast-feeding until 6 months is advised by the WHO as the best practice to feed infants. Yet, some studies have suggested a gap between energy requirements and the energy provided by human milk for many infants at 6 months. In order to assess the adequacy of WHO recommendations in 6-month-old Senegalese lactating infants, a comprehensive study was designed to measure human milk intake by the dose-to-the mother 2H2O turnover method. Infants’ energy intakes were calculated using daily breast milk intake and the energy content of milk was estimated on the basis of creamatocrit. Of the fifty-nine mother–infant pairs enrolled, fifteen infants were exclusively breast-fed (Ex) while forty-four were partially breast-fed (Part). Infants’ breast milk intake was significantly higher in the Ex group (993 (SD 135) g/d, n 15) compared with the Part group (828 (SD 222) g/d, n 44, P¼0·009). Breast milk energy content as well as infants' growth was comparable in both groups. However, infants’ energy intake from human milk was significantly higher (364 (SD 50) kJ/kg per d (2586 (SD 448) kJ/d)) in the Ex group than in the Part group (289 (SD 66) kJ/kg per d (2150 (SD 552) kJ/d), P,0·01). Compared with WHO recommendations, the results demonstrate that energy intake from breast milk was low in partially breast-fed infants while exclusively breast-fed 6-month-old Senegalese infants received adequate energy from human milk alone, the most complete food for infants. Therefore, advocacy of exclusive breast-feeding until 6 months should be strengthened.

  10. Unravelling the mystery of stem/progenitor cells in human breast milk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiping Fan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mammary stem cells have been extensively studied as a system to delineate the pathogenesis and treatment of breast cancer. However, research on mammary stem cells requires tissue biopsies which limit the quantity of samples available. We have previously identified putative mammary stem cells in human breast milk, and here, we further characterised the cellular component of human breast milk. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified markers associated with haemopoietic, mesenchymal and neuro-epithelial lineages in the cellular component of human breast milk. We found 2.6 ± 0.8% (mean ± SEM and 0.7 ± 0.2% of the whole cell population (WCP were found to be CD133+ and CD34+ respectively, 27.8 ± 9.1% of the WCP to be positive for Stro-1 through flow-cytometry. Expressions of neuro-ectodermal stem cell markers such as nestin and cytokeratin 5 were found through reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, and in 4.17 ± 0.2% and 0.9 ± 0.2% of the WCP on flow-cytometry. We also established the presence of a side-population (SP (1.8 ± 0.4% of WCP as well as CD133+ cells (1.7 ± 0.5% of the WCP. Characterisation of the sorted SP and non-SP, CD133+ and CD133- cells carried out showed enrichment of CD326 (EPCAM in the SP cells (50.6 ± 8.6 vs 18.1 ± 6.0, P-value  = 0.02. However, culture in a wide range of in vitro conditions revealed the atypical behaviour of stem/progenitor cells in human breast milk; in that if they are present, they do not respond to established culture protocols of stem/progenitor cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The identification of primitive cell types within human breast milk may provide a non-invasive source of relevant mammary cells for a wide-range of applications; even the possibility of banking one's own stem cell for every breastfeeding woman.

  11. Targeting ceramide metabolic pathway induces apoptosis in human breast cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vethakanraj, Helen Shiphrah; Babu, Thabraz Ahmed; Sudarsanan, Ganesh Babu; Duraisamy, Prabhu Kumar; Ashok Kumar, Sekar, E-mail: sekarashok@gmail.com

    2015-08-28

    The sphingolipid ceramide is a pro apoptotic molecule of ceramide metabolic pathway and is hydrolyzed to proliferative metabolite, sphingosine 1 phosphate by the action of acid ceramidase. Being upregulated in the tumors of breast, acid ceramidase acts as a potential target for breast cancer therapy. We aimed at targeting this enzyme with a small molecule acid ceramidase inhibitor, Ceranib 2 in human breast cancer cell lines MCF 7 and MDA MB 231. Ceranib 2 effectively inhibited the growth of both the cell lines in dose and time dependant manner. Morphological apoptotic hallmarks such as chromatin condensation, fragmented chromatin were observed in AO/EtBr staining. Moreover, ladder pattern of fragmented DNA observed in DNA gel electrophoresis proved the apoptotic activity of Ceranib 2 in breast cancer cell lines. The apoptotic events were associated with significant increase in the expression of pro-apoptotic genes (Bad, Bax and Bid) and down regulation of anti-apoptotic gene (Bcl 2). Interestingly, increase in sub G1 population of cell cycle phase analysis and elevated Annexin V positive cells after Ceranib 2 treatment substantiated its apoptotic activity in MCF 7 and MDA MB 231 cell lines. Thus, we report Ceranib 2 as a potent therapeutic agent against both ER{sup +} and ER{sup −} breast cancer cell lines. - Highlights: • Acid Ceramidase inhibitor, Ceranib 2 induced apoptosis in Breast cancer cell lines (MCF 7 and MDA MB 231 cell lines). • Apoptosis is mediated by DNA fragmentation and cell cycle arrest. • Ceranib 2 upregulated the expression of pro-apoptotic genes and down regulated anti-apoptotic gene expression. • More potent compared to the standard drug Tamoxifen.

  12. Genome-wide analysis of alternative transcripts in human breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ji; Toomer, Kevin H.

    2016-01-01

    Transcript variants play a critical role in diversifying gene expression. Alternative splicing is a major mechanism for generating transcript variants. A number of genes have been implicated in breast cancer pathogenesis with their aberrant expression of alternative transcripts. In this study, we performed genome-wide analyses of transcript variant expression in breast cancer. With RNA-Seq data from 105 patients, we characterized the transcriptome of breast tumors, by pairwise comparison of gene expression in the breast tumor versus matched healthy tissue from each patient. We identified 2839 genes, ~10 % of protein-coding genes in the human genome, that had differential expression of transcript variants between tumors and healthy tissues. The validity of the computational analysis was confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR assessment of transcript variant expression from four top candidate genes. The alternative transcript profiling led to classification of breast cancer into two subgroups and yielded a novel molecular signature that could be prognostic of patients’ tumor burden and survival. We uncovered nine splicing factors (FOX2, MBNL1, QKI, PTBP1, ELAVL1, HNRNPC, KHDRBS1, SFRS2, and TIAR) that were involved in aberrant splicing in breast cancer. Network analyses for the coordinative patterns of transcript variant expression identified twelve “hub” genes that differentiated the cancerous and normal transcriptomes. Dysregulated expression of alternative transcripts may reveal novel biomarkers for tumor development. It may also suggest new therapeutic targets, such as the “hub” genes identified through the network analyses of transcript variant expression, or splicing factors implicated in the formation of the tumor transcriptome. PMID:25913416

  13. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN EXPRESSIONS OF P38 PROTEIN IN HUMAN BREAST CARCINOMA AND LYMPH NODES METASTASIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bai-lin; LI Feng; HAN Yan-chun; SONG Min; SONG Ji-ye

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To detect the change of p38 protein expression and investigate the relationship of p38 and lymph nodes metastasis in human breast carcinomas. Methods: Sixty breast cancer cases were checked by S-P immunohistochemistry technique and 30 breast cancer cases were examined by Western Blot. Results: Immunohistochemical results showed that p38protein was observed in breast cancer and normal cytoplasm. P-p38 was positive in nucleus in breast cancer. P38 protein expressed positively in 29 out of 38 patients who had lymph nodes metastasis (positive rate 76.3%) and in 9 out of 22 patients who had no lymph nodes metastasis (positive rate 40.9%). There was a significant difference between these two groups (P<0.01). The positive rate of p-p38 in patients who had lymph nodes metastasis was 68.4%, and the positive rate in patients who had no metastasis was 36.4%, and there was a significant difference between these two groups (P<0.05). The result of western blot showed that the protein contents of p38 and p-p38 in patients with metastasis was higher than those in patients without metastasis (P<0.05). P38 and p-p38 protein expressions had relation with clinical pathological grades in breast cancer, higher in grade Ⅲ than in grade Ⅰ, Ⅱ (P<0.05), while had no relation with patients' age and tumor size (P>0.05).Conclusion: p38 and p-p38 protein expressions had relationship with lymph nodes metastasis and the levels of p38 and p-p38protein expression in groups with lymph nodes metastasis were higher than in groups without lymph nodes metastasis. P38and p-p38 protein expressions had relationship with clinical grades and had no relationship with patients' age and tumor size.

  14. Acute lung injury after instillation of human breast milk or infant formula into rabbits' lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hare, B; Lerman, J; Endo, J; Cutz, E

    1996-06-01

    Recent interest in shortening the fasting interval after ingestion of milk products demonstrated large volumes of breast milk in the stomach 2 h after breastfeeding. Although aspiration is a rare event, if it were to occur with human breast milk, it is important to understand the extent of the lung injury that might occur. Therefore, the response to instillation of acidified breast milk and infant formula in the lungs of adult rabbits was studied. In 18 anesthetized adult rabbits, 1 of 3 fluids (in a volume of 0.8 ml.kg-1 and pH level of 1.8, acidified with hydrochloric acid); saline, breast milk, or infant formula (SMA, Wyeth, Windsor, Ontario), was instilled into the lungs via a tracheotomy. The lungs were ventilated for 4 h after instillation. Alveolar-to-arterial oxygen gradient and dynamic compliance were measured before and at hourly intervals after instillation. After 4 h, the rabbits were killed and the lungs were excised. Neutrophil infiltration was quantitated by a pathologist blinded to the instilled fluid. A histologic control group of four rabbits was ventilated under study conditions without any intratracheal fluid instillation. Alveolar-to-arterial oxygen gradient increased and dynamic compliance decreased significantly during the 4 h after instillation of both breast milk and infant formula compared with baseline measurements and with saline controls (P formula rabbits were significantly greater than those in the control group. Instillation of acidified breast milk or infant formula (in a volume of 0.8 ml.kg-1 and pH level of 1.8) into rabbits' lungs induces acute lung injury of similar intensity that lasts at least 4 h.

  15. Human breast milk contamination with phthalates and alterations of endogenous reproductive hormones in infants three months of age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Main, Katharina M; Mortensen, Gerda Krog; Kaleva, Marko M

    2006-01-01

    Phthalates adversely affect the male reproductive system in animals. We investigated whether phthalate monoester contamination of human breast milk had any influence on the postnatal surge of reproductive hormones in newborn boys as a sign of testicular dysgenesis.......Phthalates adversely affect the male reproductive system in animals. We investigated whether phthalate monoester contamination of human breast milk had any influence on the postnatal surge of reproductive hormones in newborn boys as a sign of testicular dysgenesis....

  16. A synthetic cryptochrome inhibitor induces anti-proliferative effects and increases chemosensitivity in human breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Sung Kook [Department of Brain & Cognitive Sciences, Daegu-Gyeongbuk Institute of Science & Technology, Daegu, 711-873 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biological Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Brain & Cognitive Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Sooyoung [Department of Biological Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul, 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee-Dae [Department of Biological Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ju Hyung [Department of Systems Biology, Yonsei University College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Jaebong [College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeongah; Kim, Doyeon [Department of Brain & Cognitive Sciences, Daegu-Gyeongbuk Institute of Science & Technology, Daegu, 711-873 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biological Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Brain & Cognitive Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Son, Gi Hoon [Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul, 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Young J. [Department of Systems Biology, Yonsei University College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Young-Ger [College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Cheol Soon [Gachon Clinical Trials Center, Gachon University, Incheon, 417-842 (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2015-11-13

    Disruption of circadian rhythm is a major cause of breast cancer in humans. Cryptochrome (CRY), a circadian transcription factor, is a risk factor for initiation of breast cancer, and it is differentially expressed between normal and breast cancer tissues. Here, we evaluated the anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activity of KS15, a recently discovered small-molecule inhibitor of CRY, in human breast cancer cells. First, we investigated whether KS15 treatment could promote E-box-mediated transcription by inhibiting the activity of CRY in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Protein and mRNA levels of regulators of cell cycle and apoptosis, as well as core clock genes, were differentially modulated in response to KS15. Next, we investigated whether KS15 could inhibit proliferation and increase sensitivity to anti-tumor drugs in MCF-7 cells. We found that KS15 decreased the speed of cell growth and increased the chemosensitivity of MCF-7 cells to doxorubicin and tamoxifen, but had no effect on MCF-10A cells. These findings suggested that pharmacological inhibition of CRY by KS15 exerts an anti-proliferative effect and increases sensitivity to anti-tumor drugs in a specific type of breast cancer. - Highlights: • Cryptochrome inhibitor (KS15) has anti-tumor activity to human breast cancer cells. • KS15 induces differential changes in cell cycle regulators and pro-apoptotic genes. • KS15 inhibits MCF-7 cell growth and enhances susceptibility to anti-tumor drugs.

  17. Effect of aluminium on migratory and invasive properties of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbre, Philippa D; Bakir, Ayse; Iskakova, Elzira

    2013-11-01

    Aluminium (Al) has been measured in human breast tissue, nipple aspirate fluid and breast cyst fluid, and recent studies have shown that at tissue concentrations, aluminium can induce DNA damage and suspension growth in human breast epithelial cells. This paper demonstrates for the first time that exposure to aluminium can also increase migratory and invasive properties of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Long-term (32 weeks) but not short-term (1 week) exposure of MCF-7 cells to 10(-4) M aluminium chloride or 10(-4) M aluminium chlorohydrate increased motility of the cells as measured by live cell imaging (cumulative length moved by individual cells), by a wound healing assay and by migration in real time through 8 μm pores of a membrane using xCELLigence technology. Long-term exposure (37 weeks) to 10(-4) M aluminium chloride or 10(-4) M aluminium chlorohydrate also increased the ability of MCF-7 cells to invade through a matrigel layer as measured in real time using the xCELLigence system. Although molecular mechanisms remain to be characterized, the ability of aluminium salts to increase migratory and invasive properties of MCF-7 cells suggests that the presence of aluminium in the human breast could influence metastatic processes. This is important because mortality from breast cancer arises mainly from tumour spread rather than from the presence of a primary tumour in the breast. © 2013.

  18. Polarized spectral features of human breast tissues through wavelet transform and principal component analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anita Gharekhan; Ashok N Oza; M B Sureshkumar; Asima Pradhan; Prasanta K Panigrahi

    2010-12-01

    Fluorescence characteristics of human breast tissues are investigated through wavelet transform and principal component analysis (PCA). Wavelet transform of polarized fluorescence spectra of human breast tissues is found to localize spectral features that can reliably differentiate different tissue types. The emission range in the visible wavelength regime of 500–700 nm is analysed, with the excitation wavelength at 488 nm using laser as an excitation source, where flavin and porphyrin are some of the active fluorophores. A number of global and local parameters from principal component analysis of both high- and low-pass coefficients extracted in the wavelet domain, capturing spectral variations and subtle changes in the diseased tissues are clearly identifiable.

  19. XLN306 induces apoptosis in human breast carcinoma MX-1 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Jin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available XLN306 is a novel synthetic quinazoline derivative with potentially useful anticancer activity. In previous research, we showed that XLN306 is highly cytotoxic to many tumor cell lines. This paper reports an investigation of this cytotoxicity in a number of human carcinoma cell lines. The results show that human breast carcinoma MX-1 cells are extremely sensitive to XLN306 and that the cytotoxicity is due to dose- and time-dependent apoptosis as confirmed by DAPI stain and DNA fragmentation analysis. Both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways are involved in the apoptosis process. The findings indicate that XLN306 has apoptotic induction activity and may be useful for the management of various cancers, especially breast carcinoma.

  20. Performance comparison of breast imaging modalities using a 4AFC human observer study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elangovan, Premkumar; Rashidnasab, Alaleh; Mackenzie, Alistair; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Bosmans, Hilde; Segars, William P.; Wells, Kevin

    2015-03-01

    This work compares the visibility of spheres and simulated masses in 2D-mammography and tomosynthesis systems using human observer studies. Performing comparison studies between breast imaging systems poses a number of practical challenges within a clinical environment. We therefore adopted a simulation approach which included synthetic breast blocks, a validated lesion simulation model and a set of validated image modelling tools as a viable alternative to clinical trials. A series of 4-alternative forced choice (4AFC) human observer experiments has been conducted for signal detection tasks using masses and spheres as targets. Five physicists participated in the study viewing images with a 5mm target at a range of contrast levels and 60 trials per experimental condition. The results showed that tomosynthesis has a lower threshold contrast than 2D-mammography for masses and spheres, and that detection studies using spheres may produce overly-optimistic threshold contrast values.

  1. Momordica cochinchinensis Aril Extract Induced Apoptosis in Human MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petchsak, Phuchong; Sripanidkulchai, Bungorn

    2015-01-01

    Momordica cochinchinensis Spreng (MC) has been used in traditional medicine due to its high carotenoid content. The objective of this study was to investigate mechanisms underlying apoptotic effects of MC on human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. A lycopene-enriched aril extract of MC (AE) showed cytotoxicity and antiestrogenicity to MCF-7 cells. On DAPI staining, AE induced cell shrinkage and chromatin condensation were evident. With flow cytometric analysis, AE increased the percentage of cells in an early apoptosis stage when compared with the control group. RT-PCR analysis showed AE to significantly increase the expression of the proapoptotic bax gene without effect on expression of the anti-apoptotic bcl-2 gene. Moreover, AE enhanced caspase 6, 8 and 9 activity. Taken together, we conclude that AE of MC fruit has anticancer effects on human MCF-7 breast cancer cells by induction of cell apoptosis via both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of signaling.

  2. Neogenin expression may be inversely correlated to the tumorigenicity of human breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Sung-Won

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neogenin is expressed in cap cells that have been suggested to be mammary stem or precursor cells. Neogenin is known to play an important role in mammary morphogenesis; however its relationship to tumorigenesis remains to be elucidated. Methods To compare the expression levels of neogenin in cells with different tumorigenicity, the expression levels in M13SV1, M13SV1R2 and M13SV1R2N1 cells, which are immortalized derivatives of type I human breast epithelial cells, were evaluated. Then we measured the expression level of neogenin in paired normal and cancer tissues from eight breast cancer patients. Tissue array analysis was performed for 54 human breast tissue samples with different histology, and the results were divided into four categories (none, weak, moderate, strong by a single well-trained blinded pathologist and statistically analyzed. Results The nontumorigenic M13SV1 cells and normal tissues showed stronger expression of neogenin than the M13SV1R2N1 cells and the paired cancer tissues. In the tissue array, all (8/8 of the normal breast tissues showed strong neogenin expression, while 93.5% (43/46 of breast cancer tissues had either no expression or only moderate levels of neogenin expression. There was a significant difference, in the expression level of neogenin, in comparisons between normal and infiltrating ductal carcinoma (p Conclusion Neogenin may play a role in mammary carcinogenesis as well as morphogenesis, and the expression may be inversely correlated with mammary carcinogenicity. The value of neogenin as a potential prognostic factor needs further evaluation.

  3. Organochlorine pesticides and their metabolites in human breast milk from Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dasheng; Wang, Dongli; Ni, Rong; Lin, Yuanjie; Feng, Chao; Xu, Qian; Jia, Xiaodong; Wang, Guoquan; Zhou, Zhijun

    2015-06-01

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) are persistent organic pollutants that could cause deleterious effects on human health. Breast milk represents a noninvasive specimen source to assess maternal and infant exposure to OCPs. This study recruited 142 pregnant mothers in 2011-2012 in Shanghai, China, and their breast milk samples were collected during lactation and analyzed for 27 OCP compounds. Detection rates were in a range of 65.5 to 100 %. In particular, metabolites of 2,2-bis(chlorophenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (DDT) such as 2-chloro-1,1-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethylene (DDMU), 2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethanol (DDOH), bis(4-chlorophenyl)ketone (DBP), and 4,4'-dichlorodiphenylmethane (DDM) were detected in most milk samples. DDTs, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) were dominant OCPs with mean levels of 316, 49.8, and 41.5 ng/g lipid content, respectively, whereas levels of methoxychlor, ∑Drins, ∑Heptachlor, ∑Chlordane, and ∑Endosulfan were fairly low (0.87-5.6 ng/g lipid content). Milk concentrations of OCPs were weakly correlated with maternal age, body weight, and body mass indexes (BMIs). ∑OCPs in this study were much lower than those in human breast milk samples collected in 2002 and 2007. Consumption of higher amounts of fish was associated with higher milk levels of OCPs. Specific OCP patterns in breast milk samples from migrant mothers in Shanghai reflected features of OCP production, use, and exposure in their home provinces. The probabilistic exposure assessment model reveals that Shanghai infants were exposed to low levels of OCPs through breast milk consumption. However, infants as the vulnerable group might be subject to the potential additive and/or synergistic health effects from complex OCP exposure.

  4. An Improved Syngeneic Orthotopic Murine Model of Human Breast Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Omar M.; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Ramachandran, Suburamaniam; Dumur, Catherine; Schaum, Julia; Yamada, Akimitsu; Terracina, Krista P.; Milstien, Sheldon; Spiegel, Sarah; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Breast cancer drug development costs nearly $610 million and 37 months in preclinical mouse model trials with minimal success rates. Despite these inefficiencies, there are still no consensus breast cancer preclinical models. Methods Murine mammary adenocarcinoma 4T1-luc2 cells were implanted subcutaneous (SQ) or orthotopically percutaneous injection in the area of the nipple (OP), or surgically into the chest 2nd mammary fat pad under direct vision (ODV) in Balb/c immunocompetent mice. Tumor progression was followed by in vivo bioluminescence and direct measurements, pathology and survival determined, and tumor gene expression analyzed by genome-wide microarrays. Results ODV produced less variable sized tumors and was a reliable method of implantation. ODV implantation into the chest 2nd mammary pad rather than into the abdominal 4th mammary pad, the most common implantation site, better mimicked human breast cancer progression pattern, which correlated with bioluminescent tumor burden and survival. Compared to SQ, ODV produced tumors that differentially expressed genes whose interaction networks are of importance in cancer research. qPCR validation of 10 specific target genes of interest in ongoing clinical trials demonstrated significant differences in expression. Conclusions ODV implantation into the chest 2nd mammary pad provides the most reliable model that mimics human breast cancer compared from subcutaneous implantation that produces tumors with different genome expression profiles of clinical significance. Increased understanding of the limitations of the different preclinical models in use will help guide new investigations and may improve the efficiency of breast cancer drug development. PMID:25200444

  5. Evaluation of Cytotoxicity of Sagebrush Plain Extract on Human Breast Cancer MCF7 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Gordanian

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim: Several studies have reported anti-cancer properties of sagebrush plain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of the methanol extract of sagebrush plain on human breast cancer MCF7 cells. Methods: In the present experimental study, the toxic effects of methanol extracts of flowers, leaves, stems and roots of sagebrush plain from of Khorassan and Esfahan province were tested on human breast cancer cells MCF-7 and normal cells HEK293 . Plant samples were extracted by methanol and their toxic effects on normal and breast cancer cells at concentrations of 5.62, 125, 250 and 500 µg/ml was determined by MTT. Both breast cancer cells MCF-7 and normal HEK293 cells were cultured in RPMI-1640 medium and DMEM containing 10% fetal calf serums were cultured. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. Results: The methanol extract of sagebrush showed toxicity on MCF7 cells. The extract of Khorasan showed higher toxicity than Esfahan province. IC50 of sagebrush plant for all parts of the plant were obtained more than 500 µg/ml, but the IC50 of sagebrush plant of Khorasan region in leaf and flower were 205 ± 1.3 and 213 ± 5.3µg respectively. The leaves and flowers in both cases had the highest cytotoxicity. Plant extracts in both regions did not show significant cytotoxicity on normal HEK293 cells. Conclusion: The extract of the sagebrush plain region of Khorasan region showed greater cytotoxicity than Esfahan. It seems that different environmental conditionshas considerable cytotoxicity. Keywords: Sagebrush Plain, MTT, Breast Cancer

  6. Methylation of PLCD1 and adenovirus-mediated PLCD1 overexpression elicits a gene therapy effect on human breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, Haixi [Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics Laboratory, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Department of Endocrine and breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Wang, Na; Zhao, Lijuan; Li, Shuman; Li, Qianqian; Chen, Ling; Luo, Xinrong; Qiu, Zhu [Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics Laboratory, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Li, Lili [Cancer Epigenetics Laboratory, Department of Clinical Oncology, Sir YK Pao Center for Cancer and Li Ka Shing Institute of Health Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong and CUHK Shenzhen Research Institute (Hong Kong); Ren, Guosheng [Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics Laboratory, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Department of Endocrine and breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Xu, Yongzhu [Chongqing Health Service Center, Chongqing 400020 (China); Zhou, Xiangyang [The Wistar Institute, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Xiang, Tingxiu, E-mail: xiangtx1@gmail.com [Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics Laboratory, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2015-03-15

    Our previous study showed that PLCD1 significantly decreases cell proliferation and affects cell cycle progression in breast cancer cells. In the present study, we aimed to investigate its functional and molecular mechanisms, and whether or not can become a new target for gene therapies. We found reduced PLCD1 protein expression in breast tumor tissues compared with paired surgical margin tissues. PLCD1 promoter CpG methylation was detected in 55 of 96 (57%) primary breast tumors, but not in surgical-margin tissues and normal breast tissues. Ectopic expression of PLCD1 inhibited breast tumor cell proliferation in vivo by inducing apoptosis and suppressed tumor cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins including RhoA and phospho-cofilin. Furthermore, we found that PLCD1 induced p53 accumulation, increased p27 and p21 protein levels, and cleaved PARP. Finally, we constructed an adenoviral vector expressing PLCD1 (AdH5-PLCD1), which exhibited strong cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells. Our findings provide insights into the development of PLCD1 gene therapies for breast cancer and perhaps, other human cancers. - Highlights: • PLCD1 is downregulated via hypermethylation in breast cancer. • PLCD1 suppressed cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins. • Adenovirus AdHu5-PLCD1 may be a novel therapeutic option for breast cancer.

  7. CCR5 Expression Influences the Progression of Human Breast Cancer in a p53-dependent Manner

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Chemokines are implicated in tumor pathogenesis, although it is unclear whether they affect human cancer progression positively or negatively. We found that activation of the chemokine receptor CCR5 regulates p53 transcriptional activity in breast cancer cells through pertussis toxin–, JAK2-, and p38 mitogen–activated protein kinase–dependent mechanisms. CCR5 blockade significantly enhanced proliferation of xenografts from tumor cells bearing wild-type p53, but did not affect proliferation...

  8. Experimental evaluation of boron neutron capture therapy of human breast carcinoma implanted on nude mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Satya Ranjan

    2000-06-01

    An in-pool small animal irradiation neutron tube (SAINT) facility was designed, constructed and installed at the University of Virginia Nuclear Research Reactor (UVAR). Thermal neutron flux profiles were measured by foil activation analysis (gold) and verified with DORT and MCNP computer code models. The gamma-ray absorbed dose in the neutron-gamma mixed field was determined from TLD measurements. The SAINT thermal neutron flux was used to investigate the well characterized human breast cancer cell line MCF-7B on both in-vitro samples and in- vivo animal subjects. Boronophenylalanine (BPA enriched in 95% 10B) was used as a neutron capturing agent. The in-vitro response of MCF-7B human breast carcinoma cells to BPA in a mixed field of neutron-gamma radiation or pure 60Co gamma radiation was investigated. The best result (lowest surviving fraction) was observed in cell cultures pre-incubated with BPA and given the neutron irradiation. The least effective treatment consisted of 60Co irradiation only. Immunologically deficient nude mice were inoculated subcutaneously with human breast cancer MCF-7B cells and estradiol pellets (to support tumor growth). The tumor volume in the mouse control group increased over time, as expected. The group of mice exposed only to neutron treatment exhibited initial tumor volume reduction lasting until 35 days following the treatment, followed by renewed tumor growth. Both groups given BPA plus neutron treatment showed continuous reduction in tumor volume over the 55-day observation period. The group given the higher BPA concentration showed the best tumor reduction response. The results on both in-vitro and in-vivo studies showed increased cell killing with BPA, substantiating the incorporation of BPA into the tumor or cell line. Therefore, BNCT may be a possible choice for the treatment of human breast carcinoma. However, prior to the initiation of any clinical studies, it is necessary to determine the therapeutic efficacy in a large

  9. 5-Alkynyl-2'-deoxyuridines: Chromatography-free synthesis and cytotoxicity evaluation against human breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Meneni, Srinivasarao; Ott, Ingo; Sergeant, Craig D.; Sniady, Adam; Gust, Ronald; Dembinski, Roman

    2007-01-01

    Starting with 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine, a series of 5-alkynyl-2'-deoxyuridines (with n-propyl, cyclopropyl, 1-hydroxycyclohexyl, p-tolyl, p-tert-butylphenyl, p-pentylphenyl, and trimethylsilyl alkyne substituents) have been synthesized via the palladium-catalyzed (Sonogashira) coupling reaction followed by a simplified isolation protocol (76–94% yield). The cytotoxic activity of modified nucleosides against MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells has been determined in vitro. 5-Ethynyl-2...

  10. Estrogenic activity of natural and synthetic estrogens in human breast cancer cells in culture.

    OpenAIRE

    Zava, D T; Blen, M; Duwe, G

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the estrogenic activity of various environmental pollutants (xenobiotics), in particular the xenoestrogen o,p-DDT, and compared their effects with those of endogenous estrogens, phytoestrogens, and mycoestrogens on estrogen receptor binding capacity, induction of estrogen end products, and activation of cell proliferation in estrogen-sensitive human breast cancer cells in monolayer culture. We also quantified the levels of phytoestrogens in extracts of some common foods, herbs...

  11. Midregion PTHrP and Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Luparello

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available PTHrP is a polyhormone undergoing proteolytic processing into smaller bioactive forms, comprising an N-terminal peptide, which is the mediator of the “classical” PTH-like effect, as well as midregion and C-terminal peptides. The midregion PTHrP domain (38-94-amide was found to restrain growth and invasion in vitro of some breast cancer cell lines, causing striking toxicity and accelerating death; the most responsive being MDA-MB231, whose tumorigenesis was also attenuated in vivo. In addition, midregion PTHrP appears to be imported in the nucleoplasm of cultured MDA-MB231 cells and in vitro, it can bind chromatin of metaphase spread preparations and also an isolated 20-mer oligonucleotide, thereby appearing endowed with a putative transcription factor–like DNA-binding ability. The object of this review is to discuss collectively and critically both precedent and more updated data obtained in the lab, the latter arising from assays on DNA status, and gene and protein expression patterns of treated cells, aiming to check whether the cytotoxicity of the peptide may result from a reprogramming of gene expression towards apoptotic death or, instead, it is to be ascribed to an unprogrammed perturbation of cell functions.

  12. Can rye intake decrease risk of human breast cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Adlercreutz

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rye contains more fibre and bioactive compounds than other cereals used for bread production. The fibre and compounds of the fibre complex could provide protection against breast cancer (BC. Objective: To review the evidence and theoretical background for a role of rye and some of its components in the prevention of BC. Design: A short review based to a great extent on the work by scientists in the Nordic countries. Results: Some of the possible mechanisms by which the fibre complex could reduce BC risk are presented. The fibre through its effect on fermentation increases esterification of bile acids reducing toxicity of the free bile acids and is involved in the production of butyrate with potential anticancer effects including BC. The fibre reduces the enterohepatic circulation of the oestrogens leading to lower plasma oestrogen concentrations. The fibre complex contains bioactive compounds such as lignans and alkylresorcinols that are antioxidative and potentially anticarcinogenic. In addition, vitamins, minerals, and phytic acid in rye may provide protection against BC. Conclusion: Rye products made from wholegrain rye flour are likely to contribute to reduced BC risk.

  13. Aptamer-Assisted Detection of the Altered Expression of Estrogen Receptor Alpha in Human Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Ahirwar

    Full Text Available An increase in the expression of estrogen receptors (ER and the expanded population of ER-positive cells are two common phenotypes of breast cancer. Detection of the aberrantly expressed ERα in breast cancer is carried out using ERα-antibodies and radiolabelled ligands to make decisions about cancer treatment and targeted therapy. Capitalizing on the beneficial advantages of aptamer over the conventional antibody or radiolabelled ligand, we have identified a DNA aptamer that selectively binds and facilitates the detection of ERα in human breast cancer tissue sections. The aptamer is identified using the high throughput sequencing assisted SELEX screening. Biophysical characterization confirms the binding and formation of a thermodynamically stable complex between the identified DNA aptamer (ERaptD4 and ERα (Ka = 1.55±0.298×108 M(-1; ΔH = 4.32×104±801.1 cal/mol; ΔS = -108 cal/mol/deg. Interestingly, the specificity measurements suggest that the ERaptD4 internalizes into ERα-positive breast cancer cells in a target-selective manner and localizes specifically in the nuclear region. To harness these characteristics of ERaptD4 for detection of ERα expression in breast cancer samples, we performed the aptamer-assisted histochemical analysis of ERα in tissue samples from breast cancer patients. The results were validated by performing the immunohistochemistry on same samples with an ERα-antibody. We found that the two methods agree strongly in assay output (kappa value = 0.930, p-value <0.05 for strong ERα positive and the ERα negative samples; kappa value = 0.823, p-value <0.05 for the weak/moderate ER+ve samples, n = 20. Further, the aptamer stain the ERα-positive cells in breast tissues without cross-reacting to ERα-deficient fibroblasts, adipocytes, or the inflammatory cells. Our results demonstrate a significant consistency in the aptamer-assisted detection of ERα in strong ERα positive, moderate ERα positive and ERα negative

  14. Combined effects of lapatinib and bortezomib in human epidermal receptor 2 (HER2)-overexpressing breast cancer cells and activity of bortezomib against lapatinib-resistant breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chuandong; Niu, Xiuqing; Luo, Jianmin; Shao, Zhimin; Shen, Kunwei

    2010-10-01

    Lapatinib and bortezomib are highly active against breast cancer cells. Breast cancer patients who initially respond to lapatinib may eventually manifest acquired resistance to this treatment. Thus, the identification of novel agents that may prevent or delay the development of acquired resistance to lapatinib is critical. In the current study, we show that the combination of lapatinib and bortezomib results in a synergistic growth inhibition in human epidermal receptor 2 (HER2)-overexpressing breast cancer cells and that the combination enhances apoptosis of SK-BR-3 cells. Importantly, we found that the combination of lapatinib plus bortezomib more effectively blocked activation of the HER2 pathway in SK-BR-3 cells, compared with monotherapy. In addition, we established a model of acquired resistance to lapatinib by chronically challenging SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells with increasing concentrations of lapatinib. Here, we showed that bortezomib notably induced apoptosis of lapatinib-resistant SK-BR-3 pools and further inhibited HER2 signaling in the resistant cells. Taken together, the current data indicate a synergistic interaction between lapatinib and bortezomib in HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells and provide the rationale for the clinical evaluation of these two noncross-resistant targeted therapies. The combination of lapatinib and bortezomib may be a potentially novel approach to prevent or delay the onset of acquired resistance to lapatinib in HER2-overxpressing/estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancers.

  15. Trousseau's syndrome: cancer-associated thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikushima, Soichiro; Ono, Ryu; Fukuda, Kensuke; Sakayori, Masashi; Awano, Nobuyasu; Kondo, Keisuke

    2016-03-01

    Trousseau's syndrome (cancer-associated thrombosis) is the second leading cause of death in cancer patients, after death from cancer itself. The risk of a venous thromboembolism is 4- to 7-fold higher in patients with cancer than in those without cancer. The causes of this impaired coagulation are associated with general patient-related risk factors, and other factors that are specific to the particular cancer or treatment. It is important to assess the risk of thrombotic events in cancer patients and administer effective prophylaxis and treatment. Effective prophylaxis and treatment of venous thromboembolism reduces morbidity and mortality, and improves patients' quality of life. Low molecular weight heparin is the first-line treatment for venous thromboembolism, as an effective and safe means for prophylaxis and treatment, according to guidelines released by international scientific societies. Oral anticoagulation therapy with warfarin is preferable to no therapy. However, warfarin has low efficacy and is associated with high rates of recurrence. If low molecular weight heparin is unavailable, some guidelines recommend the use of vitamin K antagonists that have a target international normalized ratio in the range of 2-3, as acceptable alternatives. Novel oral anticoagulants that directly inhibit factor Xa or thrombin are promising for the prophylaxis of high-risk cancer patients and in the long-term treatment of venous thromboembolism. However, to date, there is insufficient evidence to support the use of these new anticoagulants.

  16. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus vectors for the treatment of human breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ren-bin; Samuel D.Rabkin

    2005-01-01

    Background Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors can be used for cancer therapy as direct cytotoxic agents, inducers of anti-tumor immune responses, and as expressers of anti-cancer genes. In this study, the efficacy of HSV vectors, G47Δ and NV1023 were examined for the treatment of the human breast cancer.Methods Human breast cancer MDA-MB-435 cells were cultured or implanted subcutaneously in BALB/c nude mice. The cells or tumors were inoculated with G47Δ or NV1023, and cell killing or inhibition of tumor growth determined. Both viruses contained the LacZ gene and expression in infected cells was detected with X-gal histochemistry. Results G47Δ and NV1023 were highly cytotoxic to MDA-MB-435 cells in vitro at very low multiplicities of infection. X-gal staining of infected tumor cells in vitro and in vivo illustrated the replication and spread of both viruses. G47Δ and NV1023 inoculation inhibited tumor growth and prolonged mouse survival. Both vectors behaved similarly.Conclusions Oncolytic HSV vectors, G47Δ and NV1023, were extremely effective at killing human breast cancer cells in vitro and in tumor xenografts in vivo. This novel form of cancer therapy warrants further investigation and consideration of clinical application.

  17. MECHANISM OF TAXOL-INDUCED APOPTOSIS IN HUMAN BREAST CANCER CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Lirong; Zheng Shu; MC Willingham; Fan Weimin

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the mechanism by which taxol induces apoptosis in human breast cancer cells.Methods: Cell morphology, agarose gel electrophoresis,flow cytometry, video time-lapse monitor and Western blot were performed for investigating taxol-induced apoptosis in human breast cancer cells (BCap 37).Results: BCap 37 cells treated with taxol (100 nm) under