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Sample records for human blood collected

  1. A practical guide for the stabilization of acylghrelin in human blood collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatnik, Matthew; Soderstrom, Catherine I

    2011-03-01

    To better understand acylghrelin plasma stability, human synthetic acylghrelin was spiked into plasma and tracked by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. To investigate the best method for quantifying clinical plasma acylghrelin levels, pre- and postprandial human blood was collected from healthy volunteers (n=6) using various sample collections and treatments. Plasma ghrelin levels from human blood collections were analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA). Acylghrelin's half-life in plasma was approximately 45 min with the formation of des-acylghrelin approaching 50% before the end of the 60-min incubation. Loss of acylghrelin inversely correlated with an increase in des-acylghrelin (Psodium citrate/citric acid, K(2) EDTA, aprotinin/HCl and P800 collections. HCl addition to AEBSF-treated plasma did not provide enhanced acylghrelin stability and induced deacylation at and above the 100 mM final concentration. Pre- and postprandial ghrelin attenuation was investigated using aprotinin/HCl, AEBSF, protease inhibitor cocktail and no treatment for blood and plasma preparations. Fasting samples treated with AEBSF and protease inhibitor cocktail were approximately threefold higher than aprotinin/HCl and control treatments (Pghrelin attenuation was approximately twofold different (P<0.04) with significant counterintuitive trends in aprotinin/HCl and K(2) EDTA groups. Our data suggest that AEBSF addition to K(2) EDTA blood immediately after collection without plasma acidification, processing on ice and 14-day 70 °C storage is the best treatment for accurately quantifying acylghrelin in human plasma. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Peripheral blood collection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franken, Carmen; Remy, Sylvie; Lambrechts, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    A crucial challenge for gene expression analysis in human biomonitoring studies on whole blood samples is rapid sample handling and mRNA stabilization. This study was designed to evaluate the impact of short bench times (less than 30 min) on yield, quality and gene expression of mRNA in the prese......A crucial challenge for gene expression analysis in human biomonitoring studies on whole blood samples is rapid sample handling and mRNA stabilization. This study was designed to evaluate the impact of short bench times (less than 30 min) on yield, quality and gene expression of m......RNA in the presence of different stabilization buffers (TempusTM Blood RNA tube and RNAlater® Stabilization Reagent). Microarray analyzes showed significant changes over short periods of time in expression of a considerate part of the transcriptome (2356 genes) with a prominent role for NFкB-, cancer......- and glucocorticoid-mediated networks, and specifically interleukin-8 (IL-8). These findings suggest that even short bench times affect gene expression, requiring to carry out blood collection in a strictly standardized way. © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group....

  3. Bloody Fast Blood Collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brummelen, Samuel Pieter Josephus

    2017-01-01

    This thesis consists of four parts: The first part contains an introduction, the second presents approaches for the evaluation of waiting times at blood collection sites, the third uses these to present approaches that improve waiting times at blood collection sites. The final part shows the

  4. Human blood RNA stabilization in samples collected and transported for a large biobank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duale Nur

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa is a nation-wide population-based pregnancy cohort initiated in 1999, comprising more than 108.000 pregnancies recruited between 1999 and 2008. In this study we evaluated the feasibility of integrating RNA analyses into existing MoBa protocols. We compared two different blood RNA collection tube systems – the PAXgene™ Blood RNA system and the Tempus™ Blood RNA system - and assessed the effects of suboptimal blood volumes in collection tubes and of transportation of blood samples by standard mail. Endpoints to characterize the samples were RNA quality and yield, and the RNA transcript stability of selected genes. Findings High-quality RNA could be extracted from blood samples stabilized with both PAXgene and Tempus tubes. The RNA yields obtained from the blood samples collected in Tempus tubes were consistently higher than from PAXgene tubes. Higher RNA yields were obtained from cord blood (3 – 4 times compared to adult blood with both types of tubes. Transportation of samples by standard mail had moderate effects on RNA quality and RNA transcript stability; the overall RNA quality of the transported samples was high. Some unexplained changes in gene expression were noted, which seemed to correlate with suboptimal blood volumes collected in the tubes. Temperature variations during transportation may also be of some importance. Conclusions Our results strongly suggest that special collection tubes are necessary for RNA stabilization and they should be used for establishing new biobanks. We also show that the 50,000 samples collected in the MoBa biobank provide RNA of high quality and in sufficient amounts to allow gene expression analyses for studying the association of disease with altered patterns of gene expression.

  5. Stem cell collection filter system for human placental/umbilical cord blood processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasutake, M; Sumita, M; Terashima, S; Tokushima, Y; Nitadori, Y; Takahashi, T A

    2001-02-01

    The hydroxyethyl starch method and the Top & Bottom method have been used worldwide for the volume reduction of human placental/umbilical cord blood (PCB) units. To simplify the preparation of nucleated cell (NC) concentrates, we developed a new filter device--the stem cell collection filter system (SCF SYSTEM)--which can collect mononuclear cells (MNC) at a high recovery rate. The SCF SYSTEM consisted of a filter and two bags. Multilayered polyethylene terephthalate non-wovens, coated with a hydrophilic polymer, were used as filter media. PCB units were filtered by gravity (n = 12). Red blood cells, platelets and plasma were drained into the drain bag, and the NC trapped on the filter media was collected in the recovery bag by reverse washing. Recovered cell fractions were evaluated. The volume of cell concentrate recovered was 27.4 +/- 2.2 ml (mean +/- SD, n = 12). The whole time required for processing was less than 30 min, and handling was very simple. The viability of recovered NC was 97.8 +/- 3.2%. The recovery of lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes was 79.5 +/- 16.9%, 79.8 +/- 20.4% and 39.0 +/- 19.5%, respectively. The recovery rate of granulocytes was significantly lower than that of monocytes and lymphocytes (P < or = 0.0001). The recovery rates of CD3+ cells, CD19+ cells and CD56+ cells were almost the same as that of MNC. The recovery rates of CD34+ cells, total colony-forming cells and long-term culture-initiating cells were 81.7 +/- 27.0% (n = 11), 80.8 +/- 27.7% (n = 12) and 75.0 +/- 18.4% (n = 2), respectively. The new filter system was shown to be efficient for PCB processing, encompassing a very simple handling procedure with a good recovery of haematopoietic progenitor cells. Hence, the SCF SYSTEM is potentially useful for the volume reduction of PCB units for cord blood banking.

  6. Bridging the gap between sample collection and laboratory analysis: using dried blood spots to identify human exposure to chemical agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelin, Elizabeth I.; Blake, Thomas A.; Perez, Jonas W.; Crow, Brian S.; Shaner, Rebecca L.; Coleman, Rebecca M.; Johnson, Rudolph C.

    2016-05-01

    Public health response to large scale chemical emergencies presents logistical challenges for sample collection, transport, and analysis. Diagnostic methods used to identify and determine exposure to chemical warfare agents, toxins, and poisons traditionally involve blood collection by phlebotomists, cold transport of biomedical samples, and costly sample preparation techniques. Use of dried blood spots, which consist of dried blood on an FDA-approved substrate, can increase analyte stability, decrease infection hazard for those handling samples, greatly reduce the cost of shipping/storing samples by removing the need for refrigeration and cold chain transportation, and be self-prepared by potentially exposed individuals using a simple finger prick and blood spot compatible paper. Our laboratory has developed clinical assays to detect human exposures to nerve agents through the analysis of specific protein adducts and metabolites, for which a simple extraction from a dried blood spot is sufficient for removing matrix interferents and attaining sensitivities on par with traditional sampling methods. The use of dried blood spots can bridge the gap between the laboratory and the field allowing for large scale sample collection with minimal impact on hospital resources while maintaining sensitivity, specificity, traceability, and quality requirements for both clinical and forensic applications.

  7. 21 CFR 640.4 - Collection of the blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Collection of the blood. 640.4 Section 640.4 Food... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Whole Blood § 640.4 Collection of the blood. (a) Supervision. Blood shall be drawn from the donor by a qualified physician or under his supervision by...

  8. Modelling and simulation of blood collection systems: improvement of human resources allocation for better cost-effectiveness and reduction of candidate donor abandonment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, E; Xie, X; Augusto, V; Garraud, O

    2013-04-01

    This study addresses the modelling and simulation of blood collection for fixed blood collection sites in a medium-sized large French city, as well as mobile blood collection in urban and rural environments. Formal Petri net models were used to describe all relevant donor flows of the various blood collection systems; the Petri net models were converted onto discrete-event simulation models, allowing the evaluation of a large number of scenarios and configurations of blood collection systems. Quantitative models were proposed that encompassed all components of the blood collection systems, such as the donor arrival process, resource capacities and performance indicators. Appropriate experimental designs and cost-effectiveness analyses were used to determine the best configurations of human resources and donor appointment strategies. The donor service level depended on both adequate human resources capacity and appropriate appointment strategies. These decisions depend on the distribution during the day of walk-in donors. Models permit to improve management of blood collection; they have now partially entered the real situation, awaiting further implementation. © 2012 The Author(s). Vox Sanguinis © 2012 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  9. 21 CFR 640.13 - Collection of the blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Collection of the blood. 640.13 Section 640.13...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.13 Collection of the blood. (a) The source blood shall be collected as prescribed in § 640.4. (b) Source blood may also be...

  10. Modeling and simulation of blood collection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, Edgar; Xie, Xiaolan; Augusto, Vincent; Garraud, Olivier

    2012-03-01

    This paper addresses the modeling and simulation of blood collection systems in France for both fixed site and mobile blood collection with walk in whole blood donors and scheduled plasma and platelet donors. Petri net models are first proposed to precisely describe different blood collection processes, donor behaviors, their material/human resource requirements and relevant regulations. Petri net models are then enriched with quantitative modeling of donor arrivals, donor behaviors, activity times and resource capacity. Relevant performance indicators are defined. The resulting simulation models can be straightforwardly implemented with any simulation language. Numerical experiments are performed to show how the simulation models can be used to select, for different walk in donor arrival patterns, appropriate human resource planning and donor appointment strategies.

  11. Levels of persistent fluorinated, chlorinated and brominated compounds in human blood collected in Sweden in 1997-2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindstroem, G.; Kaerrman, A.; Bavel, B. van [MTM Research Centre, Oerebro Univ. (Sweden); Hardell, L. [Dept. of Oncology, Univ. Hospital, Oerebro (Sweden); Hedlund, B. [Environmental Monitoring Section, Swedish EPA, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-09-15

    Levels of persistent fluorinated, chlorinated and brominated compounds in blood collected from the Swedish population have been determined in connection with several exposure and monitoring studies at the MTM Research Centre. A data base with 631 individual congener specific measurements on halogenated POPs such as dioxins, PCBs, HCB, DDE, chlordanes, PBDEs and PFAs including information on residency, age, BMI, diet, occupation, number of children, smoking habits, immunological status etc. has been compiled from samples collected between 1994 and 2004. A brief overview focusing on levels of some persistent chlorinated, brominated and fluorinated, compounds in blood collected in a background population group (n=83) in 1997-2000 is given here.

  12. Influence of blood collection systems on the prothrombin time and international sensitivity index determined with human and rabbit thromboplastin reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Besselaar, Anton M H P; Hoekstra, Martha M C L; Witteveen, Evelina; Didden, Jan H; van der Meer, Felix J M

    2007-05-01

    Three brands of blood collection tubes were studied for their influence on the prothrombin time (PT) and international sensitivity index (ISI) for 5 commercial thromboplastin reagents. With all reagents, PTs were shorter in Vacutainer (Becton Dickinson Vacutainer Systems, Plymouth, England) samples than in S-Monovette (Sarstedt, Nümbrecht, Germany) or Venosafe (Terumo Europe, Leuven, Belgium) samples. ISI values were higher with Vacutainer samples than with S-Monovette or Venosafe samples. The ISI differences between the tubes were small for Thromborel-S (2.1%; Dade Behring, Marburg, Germany) and Hepato Quick (1.1%; Diagnostica Stago, Asnières, France; Roche Diagnostics Nederland, Almere, the Netherlands) but greater for Neoplastin Plus (5.5%; Diagnostica Stago; Roche Diagnostics Nederland), Simplastin HTF (8.3%; bioMérieux, Durham, NC), and Innovin (8.8%; Dade Behring). The PT and ISI differences between the tubes could be explained mostly by the effect of magnesium ion contamination in the sodium citrate solutions. When PT ratios were transformed into international normalized ratios (INRs) using crossover ISI (ie, samples collected with one type of tube and ISI determined with another collection system for the PT reagent), the differences in mean INRs could be approximately 10%. For ISI calibration of reference thromboplastins, blood collection tubes should be used with minimal divalent metal ion contamination of the citrate solution.

  13. Seroepidemiological study of human cysticercosis with blood samples collected on filter paper, in Lages, State of Santa Catarina, Brazil, 2004-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Márcia Imenes Ishida

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Human serofrequency of antibodies against Taenia solium antigens was determined and risk factors for cysticercosis transmission were identified. METHODS: Individuals (n=878 from periurban and rural locations of Lages, SC, were interviewed to gather demographic, sanitary and health information. Interviews and blood sample collections by finger prick on Whatman filter paper were performed from August 2004 to May 2005. Observation determined that 850 samples were suitable for analysis and were tested by ELISA using vesicular fluid of Taenia crassiceps heterologous antigen. To ensure the reliability of the results, 77 samples of the dried blood were matched with sera. The reactive samples were submitted to a serum confirmatory immunoblot (IB test using purified Taenia crassiceps glycoproteins. RESULTS: The ELISA results for the dried blood and serum samples were statistically consistent. ELISA was positive in 186 (21.9% out of 850 individuals. A group of 213 individuals were asked to collect vein blood for IB (186 with positive result in ELISA and 27 with inappropriate whole blood samples and 130 attended the request. The IB was positive in 29 (3.4% out of 850 individuals. A significant correlation (p = 0.0364 was determined among individuals who tested positive in the IB assay who practiced both pig rearing and kitchen gardening. CONCLUSIONS: ELISA with dried blood eluted from filter paper was suitable for cysticercosis population surveys. In Lages, human infection was associated with pig rearing and kitchen gardening. The prevalence index was compatible with other Latin American endemic areas.

  14. Capillary blood collecting system for glucose determination.

    OpenAIRE

    Wiles, P G; Watkins, P J

    1983-01-01

    A method of self collection of blood is described for use by diabetic patients unable, or unwilling, to determine their own blood glucose, and for when accurate results are required for research purposes. A commercially available 'flask' capillary blood collecting system can be used to collect 50 microliters blood for glucose determination on a Yellow Springs analyser. The results are accurate when compared to Auto Analyzer (r = 0.988) and are unaffected by storage at 4 degrees C for up to 28...

  15. Effect of magnesium contamination in evacuated blood collection tubes on the prothrombin time test and ISI calibration using recombinant human thromboplastin and different types of coagulometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Besselaar, A M H P; Rutten, W P F; Witteveen, E

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of two types of evacuated blood collection tube on the prothrombin time and international sensitivity index (ISI) of Recombiplastin, a recombinant human thromboplastin. Vacutainer tubes were compared with Venoject II tubes. Magnesium contamination was detected in the sodium citrate solutions contained in the Vacutainer tubes with concentrations ranging from 1.1 to 1.5 mmol/l. In contrast, magnesium ions could not be detected in the Venoject II tubes. The prothrombin ratio was decreased by contamination with magnesium ions and, hence, the ISI was increased. The magnitude of the effect of magnesium contamination on the ISI was influenced by the type of coagulometer and increased in the order: ACL Advance (3%), ACL-300 (4%), Electra-1000 (6%). The ISI bias is transmitted to the international normalized ratio (INR). In the case of the Electra-1000, the INR bias would be approximately 6% at INR 3.0 if the two types of blood collection tubes would be used without distinction. In a secondary study, the effect of magnesium contamination on the prothrombin time was assessed with the current World Health Organization international reference preparation for recombinant human thromboplastin (rTF/95). Magnesium chloride added to patients' blood (0.2 mmol/l) induced 2.3% reduction of the INR determined with rTF/95 and the manual technique. The magnitude of the influence of blood collection tubes contaminated with magnesium on ISI and INR determined with recombinant human thromboplastin depends on the coagulometer.

  16. 21 CFR 640.64 - Collection of blood for Source Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Collection of blood for Source Plasma. 640.64... (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.64 Collection of blood for Source Plasma. (a) Supervision. All blood for the collection of Source Plasma shall...

  17. [Geomatics in the service of blood collection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbout, P; Lebaudy, J P; Gagneux, F; Brosius, N; Pelletier, B; Danic, B

    2015-08-01

    To achieve blood supply, EFS organizes mobile blood collection sessions (80% of whole blood supply), close to target blood donors. Mobile sessions planning is usually developed in partnership with organizations of voluntary blood donors, based on the experience of previous sessions. However, population moving to urban areas and lifestyles changing force to focus on objective demographic analysis to determine a prospective vision of potentialities to ensure blood supply. For blood supply management, EFS recently implemented innovative methods of mapping, through Geographic Information System software (GIS) that allow a spatial representation of different indicators. Geomatics engineering gathers and processes spatially referenced information about blood collections and blood donors, combining data from EFS and data from IGN or INSEE. The authors present some examples of geomatics applied to blood supply and a feedback on the implementation of these tools in a French region. These innovative tools enhance expertise and increase the mastery of analysis for blood supply strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Aspergillus DNA contamination in blood collection tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Elizabeth; Stalhberger, Thomas; Whelan, Ruth; Sugrue, Michele; Wingard, John R; Alexander, Barbara D; Follett, Sarah A; Bowyer, Paul; Denning, David W

    2010-08-01

    Fungal polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based diagnostic methods are at risk for contamination. Sample collection containers were investigated for fungal DNA contamination using real-time PCR assays. Up to 18% of blood collection tubes were contaminated with fungal DNA, probably Aspergillus fumigatus. Lower proportions of contamination in other vessels were observed. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Aspergillus DNA contamination in blood collection tubes

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Elizabeth; Stahlberger, Thomas; Whelan, Ruth; Sugrue, Michele; Wingard, John R.; Alexander, Barbara D.; Follett, Sarah A.; Bowyer, Paul; Denning, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Fungal PCR-based diagnostic methods are at risk of contamination. Sample collection containers were investigated for fungal DNA contamination using real-time PCR assays. Up to 18% of blood collection tubes were contaminated with fungal DNA, probably A. fumigatus. Lower proportions of contamination in other vessels were observed.

  20. Umbilical Cord Blood: Counselling, Collection, and Banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armson, B Anthony; Allan, David S; Casper, Robert F

    2015-09-01

    To review current evidence regarding umbilical cord blood counselling, collection, and banking and to provide guidelines for Canadian health care professionals regarding patient education, informed consent, procedural aspects, and options for cord blood banking in Canada. Selective or routine collection and banking of umbilical cord blood for future stem cell transplantation for autologous (self) or allogeneic (related or unrelated) treatment of malignant and non-malignant disorders in children and adults. Cord blood can be collected using in utero or ex utero techniques. Umbilical cord blood counselling, collection, and banking, education of health care professionals, indications for cord blood collection, short- and long-term risk and benefits, maternal and perinatal morbidity, parental satisfaction, and health care costs. Published literature was retrieved through searches of Medline and PubMed beginning in September 2013 using appropriate controlled MeSH vocabulary (fetal blood, pregnancy, transplantation, ethics) and key words (umbilical cord blood, banking, collection, pregnancy, transplantation, ethics, public, private). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date limits, but results were limited to English or French language materials. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to September 2014. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, and national and international medical specialty societies. The quality of evidence in this document was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1). Umbilical cord blood is a readily available source of hematopoetic stem cells used with increasing frequency as an alternative to

  1. Ion suppression from blood collection devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselstrøm, Jørgen Bo; Sejr Gothelf, Aase

    . The S-monovette and Vacuette tubes resulted in up to 49% and 33% lower peak areas, respectively. The analytes subjected to major ion suppression, when using the three blood collection devices, were 9-OH-risperidone, risperidone, duloxetine, and perphenazine. None of the three BD Vacutainer serum tubes...

  2. AhR- and ER-mediated activities in human blood samples collected from PCB-contaminated and background region in Slovakia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pliskova, M. [Veterinary Researcch Institute, Brno (Czech Republic); Canton, R.F.; Duursen, M.B.M. van [Utrecht Univ. (NL). Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS)] (and others)

    2004-09-15

    Endocrine disruption mediated through activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and estrogen receptor (ER) by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and other persistent organic pollutants (POPs) has been studied extensively both in vivo and in vitro. Non-ortho- and mono-ortho-substituted polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are potent AhR agonists therefore, increased dioxin-like activity of complex blood samples might reflect an increased exposure to PCBs. The induction of expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 in different tissues, including lymphocytes, also depends on activation of AhR and it could be useful as a potential biomarker of exposure to dioxin-like compounds. Using various in vivo and in vitro models, the exposure to PCBs or hydroxy-PCBs has been reported to lead to either induction of ER-mediated activity or to an antiestrogenic effect associated with a suppression of estradiol-induced ER-dependent gene expression. Nevertheless, relative (anti)estrogenic potencies of a large set of prevalent environmental PCBs have not been yet compared in a single bioassay. A cross-talk between AhR and ER has been suggested to lead to a suppression of ER-mediated gene expression. Therefore, presence of dioxin-like compounds in blood could potentially suppress the ER-mediated activity. Additionally, AhR-dependent induction of CYP1A1 and especially CYP1B1, two enzymes involved in oxidative metabolism of estradiol and other estrogens, might enhance the metabolism of estradiol and it has been suggested to cause a potential depression of estrogen levels in the body. The aim of the present study was to determine dioxin-like, estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities in human blood samples collected in two Eastern Slovakia regions differently polluted with PCBs using established in vitro bioassays. We also studied mRNA expression of CYP1A1 and 1B1 in lymphocytes and the genotypes of CYP1B1 as possible biomarkers of exposure for PCBs and related compounds. The biological data obtained

  3. Ticagrelor Removal From Human Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George O. Angheloiu, MD

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The authors devised an efficient method for ticagrelor removal from blood using sorbent hemadsorption. Ticagrelor removal was measured in 2 sets of in vitro experiments. The first set was a first-pass experiment using bovine serum albumin (BSA solution pre-incubated with ticagrelor, whereas the second set, performed in a recirculating manner, used human blood mixed with ticagrelor. Removal of ticagrelor from BSA solution reached values >99%. The peak removal rate was 99% and 94% from whole blood and 99.99% and 90% from plasma during 10 h and 3 to 4 h of recirculating experiments, respectively. In conclusion, hemadsorption robustly removes ticagrelor from BSA solution and human blood samples.

  4. Blood product collection and supply: a matter of money?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kort, W; Wagenmans, E; van Dongen, A; Slotboom, Y; Hofstede, G; Veldhuizen, I

    2010-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that countries with a low or medium Human Development Index (HDI) transfuse far fewer blood products than countries with a high HDI. HDI comprises both economical and non-economical elements. We considered the hypothesis that non-economical, cultural differences may be additional factors in understanding blood donation and blood supply differences. We quantified the explained variance, r(2), in: the number of donors, the number of whole blood collections and the number of red blood cell units supplied to hospitals for 25 European countries. Candidate predictors were Hofstede's cultural dimensions, the demographic factor Old Age Dependency Ratio and the three components of HDI: Gross National Income, Life Expectancy and the Educational Development Index. The cultural dimension Power Distance was the best sole predictor of whole blood collection (r(2) = 56.8%) and the number of donors (r(2) = 25.1%). The Educational Development Index best predicted the number of red blood cell units (r(2) = 45.0%). Multivariable models including the cultural dimension Power Distance and the Educational Development Index gave the best results in predicting the number of whole blood collections and red blood cell units supplied and, to a lesser extent, the number of donors, with adjusted r(2) values of 63.6%, 51.9% and 28.6%, respectively. In contrast, Gross National Income made no significant predictive contribution to any of the multivariable models. Neither did the other cultural dimensions, Life Expectancy or Old Age Dependency Ratio. The effects of education level and cultural aspects should be taken into account as influencers on donation behaviour. The concept of power distance, in particular, presents a challenge to blood donor managers in cross-cultural and multi-cultural donor management contexts.

  5. Different blood collection methods from rats: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Kumar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available It is essential for collection of blood samples from laboratory animals employed in wide range of scientific research. There is a no. of techniques available for blood sample collection from Rats/mice. The stress produced in animals during the blood collection may compromise with the research data which may invalidate the results. It is necessary that the blood sample collection is done by trained individuals so as to minimize the stress and other physiological reactions in the animals. This article reviews some of the common approved blood collection techniques for rats/mice.

  6. Automatic collection of bovine blood samples | Hale | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A technique is described which allows automatic collection of jugular venous blood from tethered cows. In this system, blood is pumped continuously from an intravenous cannula which has a double lumen while an anticoagulant is pumped through the second opening. Diluted blood is collected in a fraction collector which ...

  7. Techniques for collecting blood from the domestic chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Lisa M; Alworth, Leanne C

    2013-10-01

    As the use of chickens in biomedical research is increasing, demand is growing for technical skills involving poultry, particularly techniques such as venipuncture. Phlebotomy (blood collection) is an important diagnostic tool for determining causes of morbidity and mortality and for collection of other research-relevant data. This column describes four standard methods of blood collection from the domestic chicken.

  8. Influence of Blood Collection Systems on Coagulation Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soner Yavaş

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Coagulation tests are influenced by pre-analytic conditions such as blood collection systems. Change of glass collection tubes with plastic ones will cause alteration of the test results. The aim of this study was to compare three plastic blood collection tubes with a standard glass blood collection tube and each plastic collection tube with the other two for possible additional tube-to- tube differences. METHODS: A total of 284 blood samples were obtained from 42 patients receiving warfarin during their routine controls, besides 29 healthy volunteers. Subgroup analyses were done according to health status. RESULTS: Our study demonstrated that different blood collection tubes have a statistically significant influence on coagulation tests. The magnitude of the effect depends on the tube used. However most of the tests performed on samples obtained from any tube correlated significantly with results obtained from other tube samples. CONCLUSION: Although blood collection tubes with different brands or properties will have distinct effects on coagulation tests, the influence of these blood collection tubes may be relatively small to interfere with decision-making on dose prescription, therefore lack clinical importance. Correlations between the results showed that, one of these plastic blood collection tubes tested in our study, can be used interchangably for a wide variety of coagulation assays.

  9. Interferences from blood collection tube components on clinical chemistry assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Raffick A R; Remaley, Alan T

    2014-01-01

    Improper design or use of blood collection devices can adversely affect the accuracy of laboratory test results. Vascular access devices, such as catheters and needles, exert shear forces during blood flow, which creates a predisposition to cell lysis. Components from blood collection tubes, such as stoppers, lubricants, surfactants, and separator gels, can leach into specimens and/or adsorb analytes from a specimen; special tube additives may also alter analyte stability. Because of these interactions with blood specimens, blood collection devices are a potential source of pre-analytical error in laboratory testing. Accurate laboratory testing requires an understanding of the complex interactions between collection devices and blood specimens. Manufacturers, vendors, and clinical laboratorians must consider the pre-analytical challenges in laboratory testing. Although other authors have described the effects of endogenous substances on clinical assay results, the effects/impact of blood collection tube additives and components have not been well systematically described or explained. This review aims to identify and describe blood collection tube additives and their components and the strategies used to minimize their effects on clinical chemistry assays.

  10. Bystander apoptosis in human cells mediated by irradiated blood plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinnikov, Volodymyr, E-mail: vlad.vinnikov@mail.ru [Grigoriev Institute for Medical Radiology of the National Academy of Medical Science of Ukraine (Ukraine); Lloyd, David; Finnon, Paul [Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards of the Health Protection Agency of the United Kingdom (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-01

    Following exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation, due to an accident or during radiotherapy, bystander signalling poses a potential hazard to unirradiated cells and tissues. This process can be mediated by factors circulating in blood plasma. Thus, we assessed the ability of plasma taken from in vitro irradiated human blood to produce a direct cytotoxic effect, by inducing apoptosis in primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM), which mainly comprised G{sub 0}-stage lymphocytes. Plasma was collected from healthy donors' blood irradiated in vitro to 0-40 Gy acute {gamma}-rays. Reporter PBM were separated from unirradiated blood with Histopaque and held in medium with the test plasma for 24 h at 37 Degree-Sign C. Additionally, plasma from in vitro irradiated and unirradiated blood was tested against PBM collected from blood given 4 Gy. Apoptosis in reporter PBM was measured by the Annexin V test using flow cytometry. Plasma collected from unirradiated and irradiated blood did not produce any apoptotic response above the control level in unirradiated reporter PBM. Surprisingly, plasma from irradiated blood caused a dose-dependent reduction of apoptosis in irradiated reporter PBM. The yields of radiation-induced cell death in irradiated reporter PBM (after subtracting the respective values in unirradiated reporter PBM) were 22.2 {+-} 1.8% in plasma-free cultures, 21.6 {+-} 1.1% in cultures treated with plasma from unirradiated blood, 20.2 {+-} 1.4% in cultures with plasma from blood given 2-4 Gy and 16.7 {+-} 3.2% in cultures with plasma from blood given 6-10 Gy. These results suggested that irradiated blood plasma did not cause a radiation-induced bystander cell-killing effect. Instead, a reduction of apoptosis in irradiated reporter cells cultured with irradiated blood plasma has implications concerning oncogenic risk from mutated cells surviving after high dose in vivo irradiation (e.g. radiotherapy) and requires further study.

  11. Collection and Transfusion of Blood in Jos University Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... that blood collection and transfusion in JUTH is on the increase with anti- HIV positivity still being high. There is therefore, an urgent need to further improve the safety of blood transfused through provision of appropriate screening methods, encouragement of autologous donations and ensuring good laboratory practice.

  12. Ochratoxin A in human blood in European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hald, B

    1991-01-01

    Ochratoxin A is a mycotoxin which contaminates cereals in particular and occurs all over the world. Humans are undoubtedly exposed to this toxin through foods of vegetable and animal origin and through airborne dust. The presence of ochratoxin A in human blood has been suggested as an indicator for indirect assessment of exposure to this nephrotoxic agent. In several countries, therefore, human blood has been collected with the purpose of obtaining more information on the intake of ochratoxin A. Analyses of serum samples in European countries revealed that blood from healthy humans was contaminated with ochratoxin A at concentrations of 0.1-14.4 micrograms/l. The frequency of contamination of human sera seems to indicate continuous, widespread exposure of humans to ochratoxin A.

  13. Good practices in collecting umbilical cord and placental blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Auer Lopes

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: to identify the factors related to the quality of umbilical cord and placental blood specimens, and define best practices for their collection in a government bank of umbilical cord and placental blood. Method: this was a descriptive study, quantitative approach, performed at a government umbilical cord and placental blood bank, in two steps: 1 verification of the obstetric, neonatal and operational factors, using a specific tool for gathering data as non-participant observers; 2 definition of best practices by grouping non-conformities observed before, during and after blood collection. The data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and the following statistical software: Statistica(r and R(r. Results: while there was a correlation with obstetrical and neonatal factors, there was a larger correlation with operational factors, resulting in the need to adjust the professional practices of the nursing staff and obstetrical team involved in collecting this type of blood. Based on these non-conformities we defined best practices for nurses before, during and after blood collection. Conclusion: the best practices defined in this study are an important management tool for the work of nurses in obtaining blood specimens of high cell quality.

  14. 21 CFR 864.9100 - Empty container for the collection and processing of blood and blood components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of blood and blood components. 864.9100 Section 864.9100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... collection and processing of blood and blood components. (a) Identification. An empty container for the collection and processing of blood and blood components is a device intended for medical purposes that is an...

  15. Evaluation of a novel dried blood spot collection device (HemaSpot™) to test blood samples collected from dogs for antibodies to Leishmania infantum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosypal, Alexa C; Pick, Leanne D; Hernandez, Jaime O Esquivel; Lindsay, David S

    2014-09-15

    Collection of blood samples from veterinary and wildlife patients is often challenging because the samples have to be collected on farm or in the wild under various environmental conditions. This poses many technical problems associated with venipuncture materials, their safe use and disposal, transportation and processing of collected samples. Dried blood spot (DBS) sample collection techniques offer a simple and practical alternative to traditional blood collection methods to obtain blood samples from animals for parasite antibody evaluation. The DBS collection devices are compact, simple to use, and are particularly useful for large number of samples. Additionally, DBS samples take up less space and they are easier to transport than traditional venipuncture-collected blood samples. Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a potentially fatal parasitic disease of dogs and humans and it is frequently diagnosed by antibody tests. Immunochromatographic tests (ICT) for antibodies to Leishmania infantum are commercially available for dogs and they produce qualitative results in minutes. Measurement of canine antibodies to L. infantum with the ICT using traditional venipuncture has been validated previously, but the use of DBS samples has not been evaluated using this method. The purpose of the present study was to determine the ability of DBS samples to detect antibodies to L. infantum in dogs using a commercial ICT assay. One hundred plasma samples from dogs experimentally infected with the LIVT-1 strain of L. infantum were collected by venipuncture and frozen. Individual samples were thawed, and then 80 μl plasma (2 drops) was aliquotted onto the 8-spoked disk pad on individual DBS sample collection devices (HemaSpot™, Spot-On Sciences, Austin, TX), dried, and stored in the dark at room temperature. After one month and six months, respectively, 2 spokes of the 8 spokes of the disk pad of each DBS sample were removed and eluted in 200 μl PBS. The eluate was used to test

  16. Effects of blood collection conditions on ovarian cancer serum markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason D Thorpe

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Evaluating diagnostic and early detection biomarkers requires comparing serum protein concentrations among biosamples ascertained from subjects with and without cancer. Efforts are generally made to standardize blood processing and storage conditions for cases and controls, but blood sample collection conditions cannot be completely controlled. For example, blood samples from cases are often obtained from persons aware of their diagnoses, and collected after fasting or in surgery, whereas blood samples from some controls may be obtained in different conditions, such as a clinic visit. By measuring the effects of differences in collection conditions on three different markers, we investigated the potential of these effects to bias validation studies.We analyzed serum concentrations of three previously studied putative ovarian cancer serum biomarkers-CA 125, Prolactin and MIF-in healthy women, women with ovarian cancer undergoing gynecologic surgery, women undergoing surgery for benign ovary pathology, and women undergoing surgery with pathologically normal ovaries. For women undergoing surgery, a blood sample was collected either in the clinic 1 to 39 days prior to surgery, or on the day of surgery after anesthesia was administered but prior to the surgical procedure, or both. We found that one marker, prolactin, was dramatically affected by collection conditions, while CA 125 and MIF were unaffected. Prolactin levels were not different between case and control groups after accounting for the conditions of sample collection, suggesting that sample ascertainment could explain some or all of the previously reported results about its potential as a biomarker for ovarian cancer.Biomarker validation studies should use standardized collection conditions, use multiple control groups, and/or collect samples from cases prior to influence of diagnosis whenever feasible to detect and correct for potential biases associated with sample collection.

  17. Distribution and survival of Borrelia miyamotoi in human blood components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorp, Aaron M; Tonnetti, Laura

    2016-03-01

    Borrelia miyamotoi, the agent of relapsing fever, is a tick-borne spirochete first isolated in Japan in 1994. Since then, the spirochete has been detected in ticks globally, generally in the same vectors as the Lyme disease agent. Human infection has been reported in Russia, Europe, Japan, and the United States, as influenza-like febrile illness. In addition, two cases of meningoencephalitis caused by B. miyamotoi have also been reported in immunocompromised patients. Here we evaluate the ability of the spirochete to survive in human blood components stored under standard blood bank conditions. Freshly collected human whole blood was spiked with in vitro cultured B. miyamotoi or B. miyamotoi-infected mouse plasma and separated into red blood cells (RBCs), plasma, and platelets. Components were either injected into immunocompromised (SCID) or wild-type immunocompetent mice or cultured in vitro, right after separation and after storage at the appropriate conditions. Infection was monitored by microscopic observation, blood smears, and polymerase chain reaction. In vivo, all the SCID mice challenged with the components before storage and the RBCs stored for up to 42 days developed the infection. Wild-type mice also developed the infection when injected with prestorage samples from all components, while a lower number of mice were infected by RBCs stored for 42 days. In vitro, spirochetes grew in all samples but frozen plasma. This study demonstrated that B. miyamotoi can survive standard storage conditions of most human blood components, suggesting the possibility of transmission by blood transfusion. © 2015 AABB.

  18. Bone blood flow and metabolism in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinonen, Ilkka; Kemppainen, Jukka; Kaskinoro, Kimmo

    2012-01-01

    Human bone blood flow and metabolism during physical exercise remains poorly characterised. In the present study we measured femoral bone blood flow and glucose uptake in young healthy subjects by positron emission tomography in three separate protocols. In six women, blood flow was measured...... in femoral bone at rest and during one leg intermittent isometric exercise with increasing exercise intensities. In nine men, blood flow in femur was determined at rest and during dynamic one leg exercise, and two other physiological perturbations: moderate systemic hypoxia (14 O(2) ) at rest and during...... exercise, and during intra-femoral infusion of high-dose adenosine. Bone glucose uptake was measured at rest and during dynamic one leg exercise in five men. The results indicate that isometric exercise increased femoral bone blood flow from rest (1.8 ± 0.6 ml/100g/min) to low intensity exercise (4.1 ± 1...

  19. Blood donor well-being: a primary responsibility of blood collection agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Robert F

    2011-01-01

    Current FDA regulations and AABB standards do not adequately protect the well-being of blood donors. Several practices have adverse consequences for donors, including: elevated incidence of donation related reactions and injuries, iron deficiency anemia in premenopausal women, and inadequate counseling of donors to obtain medical follow-up for health risks identified during pre-donation health screening. These practices can be improved without impacting negatively on the national blood supply. In addition to revising current blood collection operations, blood centers should explore the feasibility of establishing expanded donor health screening programs and determining their effectiveness in improving donor health, donor recruitment, and donor retention.

  20. [Determination methods for human blood acetaldehyde].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, T; Yamamoto, H; Tanegashima, A

    1998-06-01

    Although a number of reports on human blood acetaldehyde have been published, most of them during alcohol intoxication are still various in each researcher. The difficult problems are summarized as follows; 1) low boiling point of acetaldehyde, 2) low level in blood, 3) rapid disappearance in blood, and 4) artefactual formation during the procedures. The most crucial problem is the artefactual formation from ethanol or other sources during the procedures. Hemolysation, heating and/or other analytical procedures cause the artefacts. In this report, several methods for the determination and the evaluation of the acetaldehyde levels are reviewed.

  1. Human Blood Identification: A Forensic Science Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Francis X.; Kobilinsky, Lawrence

    1984-01-01

    Presents a series of experiments (involving immunological and serological techniques) in which a stained fabric is analyzed to determine if blood is present, and if so, whether it is of human origin. The experiments can be performed without expensive or sophisticated equipment and require only a minimal expenditure on consumable supplies. (JN)

  2. Predicting human blood viscosity in silico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedosov, Dmitry A. [Inst. of Complex Systems and Inst. for Advanced Simulation, Julich (Germany); Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Pan, Wenxiao [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Caswell, Bruce [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Gompper, Gerhard [Inst. of Complex Systems and Inst. for Advanced Simulation, Julich (Germany); Karniadakis, George E. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States)

    2011-07-05

    Cellular suspensions such as blood are a part of living organisms and their rheological and flow characteristics determine and affect majority of vital functions. The rheological and flow properties of cell suspensions are determined by collective dynamics of cells, their structure or arrangement, cell properties and interactions. We study these relations for blood in silico using a mesoscopic particle-based method and two different models (multi-scale/low-dimensional) of red blood cells. The models yield accurate quantitative predictions of the dependence of blood viscosity on shear rate and hematocrit. We explicitly model cell aggregation interactions and demonstrate the formation of reversible rouleaux structures resulting in a tremendous increase of blood viscosity at low shear rates and yield stress, in agreement with experiments. The non-Newtonian behavior of such cell suspensions (e.g., shear thinning, yield stress) is analyzed and related to the suspension’s microstructure, deformation and dynamics of single cells. We provide the flrst quantitative estimates of normal stress differences and magnitude of aggregation forces in blood. Finally, the flexibility of the cell models allows them to be employed for quantitative analysis of a much wider class of complex fluids including cell, capsule, and vesicle suspensions.

  3. Maternal blood contamination of collected cord blood can be identified using DNA methylation at three CpGs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Alexander M; Gatev, Evan; McEwen, Lisa M; MacIsaac, Julia L; Lin, David T S; Koen, Nastassja; Czamara, Darina; Räikkönen, Katri; Zar, Heather J; Koenen, Karestan; Stein, Dan J; Kobor, Michael S; Jones, Meaghan J

    2017-01-01

    Cord blood is a commonly used tissue in environmental, genetic, and epigenetic population studies due to its ready availability and potential to inform on a sensitive period of human development. However, the introduction of maternal blood during labor or cross-contamination during sample collection may complicate downstream analyses. After discovering maternal contamination of cord blood in a cohort study of 150 neonates using Illumina 450K DNA methylation (DNAm) data, we used a combination of linear regression and random forest machine learning to create a DNAm-based screening method. We identified a panel of DNAm sites that could discriminate between contaminated and non-contaminated samples, then designed pyrosequencing assays to pre-screen DNA prior to being assayed on an array. Maternal contamination of cord blood was initially identified by unusual X chromosome DNA methylation patterns in 17 males. We utilized our DNAm panel to detect contaminated male samples and a proportional amount of female samples in the same cohort. We validated our DNAm screening method on an additional 189 sample cohort using both pyrosequencing and DNAm arrays, as well as 9 publically available cord blood 450K data sets. The rate of contamination varied from 0 to 10% within these studies, likely related to collection specific methods. Maternal blood can contaminate cord blood during sample collection at appreciable levels across multiple studies. We have identified a panel of markers that can be used to identify this contamination, either post hoc after DNAm arrays have been completed, or in advance using a targeted technique like pyrosequencing.

  4. Solubility of haloether anesthetics in human and animal blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Joao H N; Brosnan, Robert J; Fukushima, Fabíola B; Hodges, Joanne; Liu, Hong

    2012-07-01

    Anesthetic blood solubility predicts pharmacokinetics for inhaled agents and is essential for determination of blood anesthetic concentrations from end-tidal gas concentrations using Henry's Law. Though used to model anesthetic effects in humans, there are limited interspecies solubility comparisons that include modern haloethers. This study aimed to measure hematocrit-adjusted blood:gas anesthetic partition coefficients (λ B:G) for desflurane, sevoflurane, isoflurane, and methoxyflurane in humans and animals. Whole blood was collected from 20 rats, 8 horses, and 4 each of cats, cattle, humans, dogs, goats, pigs, rabbits, and sheep. Plasma or cell volume was removed to adjust all samples to a packed cell volume of 40%. A single-agent calibration gas headspace was added to blood in a glass syringe and was mixed and equilibrated at 37°C for 2 h. Agent concentrations in the calibration gas and syringe headspace were measured using gas chromatography. Anesthetic solubility in saline, citrate-phosphate-dextrose-adenine, and olive oil were similarly measured. Except for goats, all animal species had at least one λ B:G measurement that differed significantly from humans. For each agent, λ B:G positively correlated with serum triglyceride concentrations, but this only explained 25% of interspecies variability. Desflurane was significantly less soluble in blood than sevoflurane in some species (e.g., humans) but not in others (e.g., rabbits). Anesthetic partition coefficients differ significantly between humans and most animals for haloether anesthetics. Because of their similar λ B:G values, goats may be a better animal model for inhaled anesthetic pharmacokinetics in people.

  5. Lea blood group antigen on human platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunstan, R.A.; Simpson, M.B.; Rosse, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    One- and two-stage radioligand assays were used to determine if human platelets possess the Lea antigen. Goat IgG anti-Lea antibody was purified by multiple adsorptions with Le(a-b-) human red blood cells, followed by affinity chromatography with synthetic Lea substance and labeling with /sup 125/I. Human IgG anti-Lea antibody was used either in a two stage radioassay with /sup 125/I-labeled mouse monoclonal IgG anti-human IgG as the second antibody or, alternatively, purified by Staph protein A chromatography, labeled with /sup 125/I, and used in a one-stage radioassay. Platelets from donors of appropriate red blood cell phenotypes were incubated with the antisera, centrifuged through phthalate esters, and assayed in a gamma scintillation counter. Dose response and saturation curve analysis demonstrate the presence of Lewis a antigen on platelets from Lea+ donors. Furthermore, platelets from an Le(a-b-) donor incubated in Le (a+b-) plasma adsorb Lea antigen in a similar manner to red blood cells. The clinical significance of these antigens in platelet transfusion remains undefined.

  6. A unique elastase in human blood platelets.

    OpenAIRE

    James, H L; Wachtfogel, Y T; James, P L; Zimmerman, M; Colman, R W; Cohen, A. B.

    1985-01-01

    Previous investigations suggested that elastolytic activity found in platelets could be due to contamination by neutrophil elastase. In the present study, the lysate of blood platelets free of detectable neutrophils was examined for elastase-like activity using tertiary-butyloxycarbonyl (tBOC)-ala-ala-pro-ala-aminomethyl coumarin (I), tBOC-ala-ala-pro-val-aminomethyl coumarin (II), and succinyl-tri-ala-rho-nitroanilide (SAPNA), and for elastolytic activity using 3H-labeled dog and human lung ...

  7. Applicability of non-invasively collected matrices for human biomonitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickmilder Marc

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With its inclusion under Action 3 in the Environment and Health Action Plan 2004–2010 of the European Commission, human biomonitoring is currently receiving an increasing amount of attention from the scientific community as a tool to better quantify human exposure to, and health effects of, environmental stressors. Despite the policy support, however, there are still several issues that restrict the routine application of human biomonitoring data in environmental health impact assessment. One of the main issues is the obvious need to routinely collect human samples for large-scale surveys. Particularly the collection of invasive samples from susceptible populations may suffer from ethical and practical limitations. Children, pregnant women, elderly, or chronically-ill people are among those that would benefit the most from non-invasive, repeated or routine sampling. Therefore, the use of non-invasively collected matrices for human biomonitoring should be promoted as an ethically appropriate, cost-efficient and toxicologically relevant alternative for many biomarkers that are currently determined in invasively collected matrices. This review illustrates that several non-invasively collected matrices are widely used that can be an valuable addition to, or alternative for, invasively collected matrices such as peripheral blood sampling. Moreover, a well-informed choice of matrix can provide an added value for human biomonitoring, as different non-invasively collected matrices can offer opportunities to study additional aspects of exposure to and effects from environmental contaminants, such as repeated sampling, historical overview of exposure, mother-child transfer of substances, or monitoring of substances with short biological half-lives.

  8. The Human Blood Metabolome-Transcriptome Interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Bartel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Biological systems consist of multiple organizational levels all densely interacting with each other to ensure function and flexibility of the system. Simultaneous analysis of cross-sectional multi-omics data from large population studies is a powerful tool to comprehensively characterize the underlying molecular mechanisms on a physiological scale. In this study, we systematically analyzed the relationship between fasting serum metabolomics and whole blood transcriptomics data from 712 individuals of the German KORA F4 cohort. Correlation-based analysis identified 1,109 significant associations between 522 transcripts and 114 metabolites summarized in an integrated network, the 'human blood metabolome-transcriptome interface' (BMTI. Bidirectional causality analysis using Mendelian randomization did not yield any statistically significant causal associations between transcripts and metabolites. A knowledge-based interpretation and integration with a genome-scale human metabolic reconstruction revealed systematic signatures of signaling, transport and metabolic processes, i.e. metabolic reactions mainly belonging to lipid, energy and amino acid metabolism. Moreover, the construction of a network based on functional categories illustrated the cross-talk between the biological layers at a pathway level. Using a transcription factor binding site enrichment analysis, this pathway cross-talk was further confirmed at a regulatory level. Finally, we demonstrated how the constructed networks can be used to gain novel insights into molecular mechanisms associated to intermediate clinical traits. Overall, our results demonstrate the utility of a multi-omics integrative approach to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying both normal physiology and disease.

  9. Implementation of good manufacturing practices (GMP) on human blood irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boghi, Claudio; Napolitano, Celia M.; Ferreira, Danilo C.; Rela, Paulo Roberto [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: cboghi@uol.com.br; cmnapoli@ipen.br; dancarde@ig.com.br; prela@ipen.br; Zarate, Herman S. [Comission Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Santiago (Chile)]. E-mail: hzarate@cchen.cl

    2007-07-01

    The irradiation of human blood is used to avoid the TA-GVHD (transfusion-associated graft-versus-host-disease), a rare but devastating adverse effect of leukocytes present in blood components for a immuno-competent transfusion recipients. Usually this irradiation practice is performed to a physical elimination of lymphocytes. The implementation of the GMP will assure that the properly dose in a range of 25 Gy to 50 Gy will be delivered to the blood in the bag collected in a blood tissue bank. The studies to establish the GMP were developed under the guidelines of the standard ISO 11137 - Sterilization of health care products - Requirements for validation and routine control - Radiation sterilization. In this work, two dosimetric systems were used for dose mapping during the studies of irradiator qualification, loading pattern, irradiation process validation and auditing. The CaSO{sub 4}: Dy dosimeter presented difficulties concerning to uncertainty on dose measurement, stability, trace ability and calibration system. The PMMA and gafchromic dosimetric systems have shown a better performance and were adopted on establishment of GMP procedures. The irradiation tests have been done using a Gammacell 220 Irradiator. The developed GMP can be adapted for different types of gamma irradiators, allowing to set up a quality assurance program for blood irradiation. (author)

  10. Good practices in collecting umbilical cord and placental blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Lauren Auer; Bernardino, Elizabeth; Crozeta, Karla; Guimarães, Paulo Ricardo Bittencourt

    2016-08-18

    to identify the factors related to the quality of umbilical cord and placental blood specimens, and define best practices for their collection in a government bank of umbilical cord and placental blood. this was a descriptive study, quantitative approach, performed at a government umbilical cord and placental blood bank, in two steps: 1) verification of the obstetric, neonatal and operational factors, using a specific tool for gathering data as non-participant observers; 2) definition of best practices by grouping non-conformities observed before, during and after blood collection. The data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and the following statistical software: Statistica(r) and R(r). while there was a correlation with obstetrical and neonatal factors, there was a larger correlation with operational factors, resulting in the need to adjust the professional practices of the nursing staff and obstetrical team involved in collecting this type of blood. Based on these non-conformities we defined best practices for nurses before, during and after blood collection. the best practices defined in this study are an important management tool for the work of nurses in obtaining blood specimens of high cell quality. identificar fatores relacionados à qualidade das amostras do sangue de cordão umbilical e placentário e definir boas práticas para sua coleta em um banco público de sangue de cordão umbilical e placentário. pesquisa descritiva, abordagem quantitativa, realizada em um banco público de sangue de cordão umbilical e placentário, desenvolvida em duas etapas: 1) verificação dos fatores obstétricos, neonatais e operacionais, obtidos por coleta em instrumento próprio e observação não participante; 2) definição das boas práticas, por meio do agrupamento de não-conformidades observadas antes, durante e após a coleta do sangue. Os dados foram analisados por meio da estatística descritiva, utilizando-se dos softwares Statistica(r) e R(r). houve

  11. Effects of collecting blood into plastic heparinised vacutainer tubes and storage conditions on blood gas analysis values in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, P G; Couëtil, L; Constable, P D

    2010-11-01

    Plastic heparinised vacutainer tubes are used for blood gas analysis in horses. This collection method may not be ideal because influx of atmospheric O(2) through the permeable plastic wall of the vacutainer tube and loss of CO(2) into the gas phase above the blood sample should increase blood PO(2) and decrease PCO(2), respectively. To determine the effects of collecting blood into plastic vacutainer tubes and storage conditions on blood gas analysis values. Blood was obtained from 6 healthy horses and tonometered at 37 °C with 12% O(2) and 5% CO(2). Three ml aliquots of tonometered blood were collected using a glass syringe or vacutainer tube and stored in iced water or at room temperature for 0, 5, 15, 30, 60 and 120 min. Blood samples from vacutainer tubes were collected aerobically (tube opened for 5 s) or anaerobically (tube remained closed). Blood gas analysis was performed in duplicate using a Radiometer ABL5. Data was analysed using repeated measures analysis of variance and P blood collected in vacutainer tubes had an immediate, significant, sustained and marked increase in PO(2) and an immediate, significant, transient but small decrease in PCO(2). Blood PO(2) and PCO(2) were higher when vacutainer tubes were stored in iced water instead of at room temperature. Measured blood pH and calculated values for plasma bicarbonate and total CO(2) concentration and base excess of extracellular fluid were similar when blood was collected in glass syringes or vacutainer tubes and values were not altered by storage temperature or time. Plastic heparinised vacutainer tubes should not be used to collect samples for measurement of blood PCO(2) and PO(2). Vacutainer tubes provide an accurate method for measuring plasma bicarbonate concentration, total CO(2) concentration and base excess. © 2010 EVJ Ltd.

  12. [Medical safety management in the blood collection center of clinical laboratory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Kisugi, Reiko; Koike, Masaru

    2011-03-01

    Safety management is essential for providing patients with medical services. Our hospital, opened at Kashiwa in 1987, has been building up systems and taking a number of steps to reduce the blood collection related problems, including venipuncture-related infection, nerve injury, and vasovagal reflex with syncope in accordance with guidelines for the standard method of venipuncture blood collection. We also have made efforts for improving medical services, including reductions in patient waiting time and prevention of patient misidentification, medical test malpractice, and patient privacy. However, ultimately, it is of obvious significance to educate and train communication skills for humanity and friendly kindness because most of medical accidents are basically attributed to communication errors between patients and medical staff.

  13. Sample collection guidelines for trace elements in blood and urine. IUPAC Commission of Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelis, R; Heinzow, B; Herber, R F; Christensen, J M; Poulsen, O M; Sabbioni, E; Templeton, D M; Thomassen, Y; Vahter, M; Vesterberg, O

    1996-06-01

    This paper presents an organized system for element-specific sample collection and handling of human blood (whole blood, serum or plasma, packed cells or erythrocytes) and urine also indicating a proper definition of the subject and sample. Harmonized procedures for collection, preparation, analysis and quality control are suggested. The aim is to assist scientists worldwide to produce comparable data which will be useful on a regional, national and international scale. The guidelines are directed to the elements aluminium, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, lithium, manganese, mercury, nickel, selenium and zinc. These include the most important elements measured for their occupational or clinical significance, and serve as examples of principles that will guide development of methods for other elements in the future.

  14. Optimal method for collection of umbilical cord blood: an Egyptian trial for a public cord blood bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassiouny, M R; El-Chennawi, F; Mansour, A K; Yahia, S; Darwish, A

    2015-06-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) contains stem cells and can be used as an alternative to bone marrow transplantation. Engraftment is dependent on the total nucleated cell (TNC) and CD34+ cell counts of the cord blood units. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of the method of collection of the UCB on the yield of the cord blood units. Informed consent was obtained from 100 eligible mothers for donation of cord blood. Both in utero and ex utero methods were used for collection. The cord blood volume was measured. The TNC and the CD34+ cell counts were enumerated. We have found that in utero collection gave significantly larger volumes of cord blood and higher TNC counts than ex utero collection. There was no significant difference between both methods regarding the CD34+ cell counts. This study revealed a significant correlation between the volume of the collected cord blood and both TNC and CD34+ cell counts. It is better to collect cord blood in utero before placental delivery to optimize the quality of the cord blood unit. © 2015 AABB.

  15. Human Elimination of Organochlorine Pesticides: Blood, Urine, and Sweat Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genuis, Stephen J; Lane, Kevin; Birkholz, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    Background . Many individuals have been exposed to organochlorinated pesticides (OCPs) through food, water, air, dermal exposure, and/or vertical transmission. Due to enterohepatic reabsorption and affinity to adipose tissue, OCPs are not efficiently eliminated from the human body and may accrue in tissues. Many epidemiological studies demonstrate significant exposure-disease relationships suggesting OCPs can alter metabolic function and potentially lead to illness. There is limited study of interventions to facilitate OCP elimination from the human body. This study explored the efficacy of induced perspiration as a means to eliminate OCPs. Methods . Blood, urine, and sweat (BUS) were collected from 20 individuals. Analysis of 23 OCPs was performed using dual-column gas chromatography with electron-capture detectors. Results . Various OCPs and metabolites, including DDT, DDE, methoxychlor, endrin, and endosulfan sulfate, were excreted into perspiration. Generally, sweat samples showed more frequent OCP detection than serum or urine analysis. Many OCPs were not readily detected in blood testing while still being excreted and identified in sweat. No direct correlation was found among OCP concentrations in the blood, urine, or sweat compartments. Conclusions . Sweat analysis may be useful in detecting some accrued OCPs not found in regular serum testing. Induced perspiration may be a viable clinical tool for eliminating some OCPs.

  16. Chlamydia trachomatis antibody detection in home-collected blood samples for use in epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenderboom, B M; van Ess, E F; van den Broek, I V F; van Loo, I H M; Hoebe, C J P A; Ouburg, S; Morré, S A

    2018-01-01

    Capillary blood collected in serum tubes was subjected to centrifugation delay while stored at room temperature. Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) IgG concentrations in aliquoted serum of these blood samples remained stable for seven days after collection. CT IgG concentrations can reliably be measured in mailed blood samples in epidemiological studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Self-sustained circadian rhythm in cultured human mononuclear cells isolated from peripheral blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebisawa, Takashi; Numazawa, Kahori; Shimada, Hiroko; Izutsu, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Kato, Nobumasa; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Mori, Akio; Honma, Ken-ichi; Honma, Sato; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2010-02-01

    Disturbed circadian rhythmicity is associated with human diseases such as sleep and mood disorders. However, study of human endogenous circadian rhythm is laborious and time-consuming, which hampers the elucidation of diseases. It has been reported that peripheral tissues exhibit circadian rhythmicity as the suprachiasmatic nucleus-the center of the biological clock. We tried to study human circadian rhythm using cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from a single collection of venous blood. Activated human PBMCs showed self-sustained circadian rhythm of clock gene expression, which indicates that they are useful for investigating human endogenous circadian rhythm.

  18. Why and how does collective red blood cells motion occur in the blood microcirculation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghigliotti, Giovanni; Selmi, Hassib; Asmi, Lassaad El; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2012-10-01

    The behaviour of red blood cells (RBCs), modelled as vesicles, in Poiseuille flow, mimicking the microvasculature, is studied with numerical simulations in two dimensions. RBCs moving in the centre of the Poiseuille flow (as in blood capillaries) are shown to attract each other and form clusters only due to hydrodynamic interactions, provided that their distance at a given time is below a certain critical value. This distance depends on physical parameters, such as the flow strength. Our simulations reveal that clusters are unstable above a threshold value in the number of forming RBCs, beyond which one or few cells escape the pack by a self-regulating mechanism that select the marginally stable size. This size selection depends on the flow strength as well as on the RBC swelling ratio. The results are interpreted via the analysis of the perturbation of the flow field induced by the vesicles and the interplay with bending and tension forces. This sheds a novel light on the process of collective motion of RBCs observed in vivo.

  19. Effect of age and blood collection site on the metabolic profile of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The serum metabolic profile of ostriches was studied in relation to the blood collection site (jugular vs. wing vein) and age (1 vs. 2 years) on 20 male birds. Blood was collected from the birds in the morning, after 12 h of fasting. Different collection site did not affect the examined parameters, but some statistically significant ...

  20. Evaluation of the effect of horse blood supplemented with human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    morsitans flies were assigned to each group. The first group was entirely maintained on defibrinated horse blood, while the second and third groups fed horse blood with one feed per week on human blood and vitamin supplement respectively. The result of the study showed no difference in mortality between the flies fed ...

  1. Prevalence of malaria and human blood factors among patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Malaria has been and is still a major protozoan disease affecting the human population. Erythrocyte polymorphisms (mainly in blood groups and genotypes) influence the susceptibility to severe malaria. Aim: This study is aimed at assessing the prevalence malaria in relation to human blood factor and to ...

  2. Evidence for endotoxin contamination in plastic Na+-heparin blood collection tube lots

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Newhall, Kathryn J; Diemer, Geoffrey S; Leshinsky, Natalia; Kerkof, Keith; Chute, Hilary T; Russell, Chris B; Rees, William; Welcher, Andrew A; Patterson, Scott D; Means, Gary D

    2010-01-01

    .... Because bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (endotoxin) contamination is known to cause spontaneous cytokine production by monocytes, contamination of blood collection tubes may interfere with biomarker assay results...

  3. Evidence for endotoxin contamination in plastic [Na.sup.+]-heparin blood collection tube lots

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rees, William; Patterson, Scott D; Chute, Hilary T; Welcher, Andrew A; Russell, Chris B; Means, Gary D; Kerkof, Keith; Diemer, Geoffrey S; Newhall, Kathryn J; Leshinsky, Natalia

    2010-01-01

    .... Because bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (endotoxin) contamination is known to cause spontaneous cytokine production by monocytes, contamination of blood collection tubes may interfere with biomarker assay results. METHODS...

  4. Ethical issues in the collection, storage, and research use of human biological materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meslin, Eric M; Quaid, Kimberly A

    2004-11-01

    Human biological materials (HBMs) are samples of blood, DNA, organs and tissues commonly obtained during routine surgical procedures or through direct donation by an individual. This article reviews four of the most pressing issues arising from the collection, storage, and use of HBMs in research: current regulations governing research with human subjects, misuse of genetic information, economic factors, and public knowledge.

  5. Finger stick blood collection for gene expression profiling and storage of tempus blood RNA tubes [version 2; referees: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darawan Rinchai

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available With this report we aim to make available a standard operating procedure (SOP developed for RNA stabilization of small blood volumes collected via a finger stick. The anticipation that this procedure may be improved through peer-review and/or readers public comments is another element motivating the publication of this SOP. Procuring blood samples from human subjects can, among other uses, enable assessment of the immune status of an individual subject via the profiling of RNA abundance using technologies such as real time PCR, NanoString, microarrays or RNA-sequencing. It is often desirable to minimize blood volumes and employ methods that are the least invasive and can be practically implemented outside of clinical settings. Finger stick blood samples are increasingly used for measurement of levels of pharmacological drugs and biological analytes. It is a simple and convenient procedure amenable for instance to field use or self-collection at home using a blood sample collection kit. Such methodologies should also enable the procurement of blood samples at high frequency for health or disease monitoring applications.

  6. Blood collection, components preparation and distribution in Iran, 2008-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidkhoda, Azadeh; Amini Kafi-Abad, Sedigheh; Pourfatollah, Ali Akbar; Maghsudlu, Mahtab

    2016-02-01

    The information about the dynamics of blood collection, components preparation and distribution in Iran was measured and compared during 2008-2012. The survey instruments were based on collecting data from all 220 blood collections and blood processing centers over the country, registering them in the validated data base and reporting them to headquarter of Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization. Total blood collection increased during this period, and in 2012 represented a 12.6 percent increase compared to that in 2008. On average, red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma and platelet concentrate were prepared from 95.5 ± 2.4, 81 ± 3.8 and 47 ± 8.8 percent of all whole blood collection. From 2008 to 2011, the distribution of whole blood and fresh frozen plasma revealed different patterns. For whole blood, declines were noted, while for fresh frozen plasma increases were reported. In addition the distribution of red blood cells and platelet concentrate did not change considerably. Also between 2008 and 2012, the mean percentage of outdated and discarded units was 3.6 ± 1 and 5.2 ± 4.6. This study as a first national survey provides comprehensive information about the blood supply, components preparation and distribution, and helps to define strategy for the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. 77 FR 10756 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Opinions and Perspectives About the Current Blood Donation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-23

    ... tested disease marker positive and were interviewed regarding potential risk factors suggest that some..., Division of Blood Diseases and Resources, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH. Dated: February... public comment on proposed data collection projects, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI...

  8. Measurements of vitamin B12 in human blood serum using resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiminis, G.; Schartner, E. P.; Brooks, J. L.; Hutchinson, M. R.

    2016-12-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin and its derivatives) deficiency has been identified as a potential modifiable risk factor for dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Chronic deficiency of vitamin B12 has been significantly associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline. An effective and efficient method for measuring vitamin B12 concentration in human blood would enable ongoing tracking and assessment of this potential modifiable risk factor. In this work we present an optical sensor based on resonance Raman spectroscopy for rapid measurements of vitamin B12 in human blood serum. The measurement takes less than a minute and requires minimum preparation (centrifuging) of the collected blood samples.

  9. Evaluation Of Blood Collected From Clinically Diagnosed Typhoid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Out of the 635 patients, 505 (79.5%) were positive for Widal agglutination test using 1:160 as the cut-off antibody titre as determined in the screened sera of the healthy volunteers. Blood culture revealed that 216 (42.8%) bacterial pathogens were isolated from the Widal positive patients yielded out of which 101 (46.8%) ...

  10. Photosensitized inactivation of infectious blood-borne human parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judy, Millard M.; Sogandares-Bernal, Franklin M.; Matthews, James Lester

    1995-05-01

    Blood-borne viruses and protozoan parasites that are infectious to humans pose risk world-wide of infection transmission through blood and blood product transfusion. Blood-borne infectious viruses include human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-I), which causes AIDS; hepatitis C virus, which can cause chronic hepatitis; and cytomegalovirus, which can be dangerous to immunocompromised patients, e.g., the newborn, transplant recipients, and AIDS patients. Infectious blood-borne protozoan parasites include Trypanosoma cruzi, which causes Chagas' disease, endemic throughout Central and South America; the Trypanosoma species causing African sleeping sickness endemic in Central Africa; and Plasmodium falciparum, which causes malignant and increasingly drug- resistant human malaria prevalent throughout the tropics. Some researchers have focused on using photosensitizers to inactivate HIV-I and other viruses in whole blood, packed red cells, and platelet concentrates without compromising blood product function. Our group previously has reported photosensitized in vitro inactivation of P. falciparum and the mouse malaria organism Plasmodium berghei in whole blood using hematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) and of T. cruzi using benzoporphyrin derivatives BPDMA and BPDDA, dihematoporphyrin ether (DHE), and hydroxyethylvinyldeuteroporphyrin (HEVD). These results suggest that continued investigation is warranted to evaluate the potential for photosensitized inactivation of blood-borne parasites in blood banking.

  11. Predicting human blood viscosity in silico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Pan, Wenxiao; Caswell, Bruce; Gompper, Gerhard; Karniadakis, George E.

    2011-01-01

    The viscosity of blood has long been used as an indicator in the understanding and treatment of disease, and the advent of modern viscometers allows its measurement with ever-improving clinical convenience. However, these advances have not been matched by theoretical developments that can yield a quantitative understanding of blood’s microrheology and its possible connection to relevant biomolecules (e.g., fibrinogen). Using coarse-grained molecular dynamics and two different red blood cell models, we accurately predict the dependence of blood viscosity on shear rate and hematocrit. We explicitly represent cell–cell interactions and identify the types and sizes of reversible rouleaux structures that yield a tremendous increase of blood viscosity at low shear rates. We also present the first quantitative estimates of the magnitude of adhesive forces between red cells. In addition, our simulations support the hypothesis, previously deduced from experiments, of yield stress as an indicator of cell aggregation. This non-Newtonian behavior is analyzed and related to the suspension’s microstructure, deformation, and dynamics of single red blood cells. The most complex cell dynamics occurs in the intermediate shear rate regime, where individual cells experience severe deformation and transient folded conformations. The generality of these cell models together with single-cell measurements points to the future prediction of blood-viscosity anomalies and the corresponding microstructures associated with various diseases (e.g., malaria, AIDS, and diabetes mellitus). The models can easily be adapted to tune the properties of a much wider class of complex fluids including capsule and vesicle suspensions. PMID:21730178

  12. Effects of post-sampling analysis time, type of blood samples and collection tubes on values of blood gas testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smajić, Jasmina; Kadić, Damira; Hasić, Sabaheta; Serdarević, Nafija

    2015-08-01

    To investigate effects of post-sampling analysis time, a type of blood samples and collection tubes on blood gas testing. This study included 100 patients at the Clinic for Pulmonary Diseases, Clinical Centre Sarajevo. The partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) and carbon dioxide (pCO2), and the oxygen saturation level of hemoglobin (sO2) were analyzed in the arterial blood samples (ABS) and capillary blood samples (CBS) by a potentiometric method using a blood gas analyzer ABL 555 (Radiometer, Copenhagen, Denmark). Paired measurements of ABS were performed within 15 minutes and after 60 minutes from sampling and compared. The results of CBS obtained within 15 minutes were compared with matching ABS results, as well as the results obtained from CBS within 15 minutes taken into glass and plastic tubes. pO2 and sO2 values were significantly lower after 60 minutes compared to those within 15 minutes in ABS (9.20±1.89 vs. 9.51±1.95 and 91.25±5.03 vs. 92.40±4.5; pblood values were not influenced significantly (p>0.05). The length of post-sampling analysis time, a type of blood samples and collection tubes have significant impact on blood oxygen parameters. Analysis within 15 minutes after blood sampling is considered as appropriate. Copyright© by the Medical Assotiation of Zenica-Doboj Canton.

  13. A new strategy for umbilical cord blood collection developed at the first Colombian public cord blood bank increases total nucleated cell content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanegas, Diana; Triviño, Lady; Galindo, Cristian; Franco, Leidy; Salguero, Gustavo; Camacho, Bernardo; Perdomo-Arciniegas, Ana-María

    2017-09-01

    The total nucleated cell dosage of umbilical cord blood (UCB) is an important factor in determining successful allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation after a minimum human leukocyte antigen donor-recipient match. The northern South American population is in need of a new-generation cord blood bank that cryopreserves only units with high total nucleated cell content, thereby increasing the likelihood of use. Colombia set up a public cord blood bank in 2014; and, as a result of its research for improving high total nucleated cell content, a new strategy for UCB collection was developed. Data from 2933 collected and 759 cryopreserved cord blood units between 2014 and 2015 were analyzed. The correlation of donor and collection variables with cellularity was evaluated. Moreover, blood volume, cell content, CD34+ count, clonogenic capacity, and microbial contamination were assessed comparing the new method, which combines in utero and ex utero techniques, with the conventional strategies. Multivariate analysis confirmed a correlation between neonatal birth weight and cell content. The new collection method increased total nucleated cell content in approximately 26% and did not alter pre-cryopreservation and post-thaw cell recovery, viability, or clonogenic ability. Furthermore, it showed a remarkably low microbial contamination rate (1.2%). The strategy for UCB collection developed at the first Colombian public cord blood bank increases total nucleated cell content and does not affect unit quality. The existence of this bank is a remarkable breakthrough for Latin-American patients in need of this kind of transplantation. © 2017 The Authors Transfusion published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AABB.

  14. Phenotype and functions of memory Tfh cells in human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Nathalie; Bentebibel, Salah-Eddine; Ueno, Hideki

    2014-09-01

    Our understanding of the origin and functions of human blood CXCR5(+) CD4(+) T cells found in human blood has changed dramatically in the past years. These cells are currently considered to represent a circulating memory compartment of T follicular helper (Tfh) lineage cells. Recent studies have shown that blood memory Tfh cells are composed of phenotypically and functionally distinct subsets. Here, we review the current understanding of human blood memory Tfh cells and the subsets within this compartment. We present a strategy to define these subsets based on cell surface profiles. Finally, we discuss how increased understanding of the biology of blood memory Tfh cells may contribute insight into the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and the mode of action of vaccines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Staphylococci with markers of antibiotic resistance collected from blood cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Focarelli

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Blood culture is still the gold standard for the detection of the causative agent of sepsis. Especially in intensive care patients and those with vascular catheters, the most common organisms isolated are coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS and Staphylococcus aureus, both characterized by multidrug resistance. Purposes of our work are the study of the incidence of markers of resistance in staphylococci and evaluation of potential changes over the years. Materials and methods: In the period January 2008-June 2011 5239 blood cultures were analyzed.They were mainly obtained from the departments of Intensive Care, Cardiology, Hematology, General Medicine, Emergency Medicine, Infectious Diseases, Oncology, Pulmonology and Pediatric Hematoncology. The vials containing the blood were incubated in the BACTEC 9120 automated tool of Becton Dickinson and susceptibility testing performed with the Phoenix instrument of the same company. Results:Within a total of 5239 blood cultures, 3967 (75.7% were negative and 1272 (24.3% positive. Fungi were isolated in 6.2% (79 of the positive ones, Gram-negative bacteria in 24.6% (313 and Gram-positive bacteria in 69.2% (880. Within the latter, 187 (21.2% were not staphylococcal isolates, 693 (78.8% were stafiloccocci mainly represented by S. epidermidis, S. aureus, S. hominis, S. haemolyticus and S. saprophyticus. Of the 693 staphylococcal isolates, 436 (62.9% were b lactamase producers, and between them 336 (77.1% were methicillin resistant, while only 3 of 436 (0.69% were S. aureus resistant to vancomycin as well.The incidence of markers of resistance was very high, especially in patients in intensive care and cardiac surgery, who are usually subjected to combined antibiotic therapy. In the three years studied there were no statistically significant differences in the resistance of staphylococci. Conclusions: The data show an alarming high number of multi-resistant staphylococci, which is often a

  16. The Rh complex exports ammonium from human red blood cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemker, Mirte B.; Cheroutre, Goedele; van Zwieten, Rob; Maaskant-van Wijk, Petra A.; Roos, Dirk; Loos, Johannes A.; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; von dem Borne, Albert E. G. Kr

    2003-01-01

    The Rh blood group system represents a major immunodominant protein complex on red blood cells (RBC). Recently, the Rh homologues RhAG and RhCG were shown to promote ammonium ion transport in yeast. In this study, we showed that also in RBC the human Rh complex functions as an exporter of ammonium

  17. Evaluation of the effect of horse blood supplemented with human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted to evaluate the effect of horse blood supplemented with human blood and vitamin on the performance of Glossina morsitans morsitans colony. Three feeding groups were established and a total of 144 female G. m. morsitans flies were assigned to each group. The first group was entirely ...

  18. Tracking blood vessels in human forearms using visual servoing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savarimuthu, Thiusius Rajeeth; Ellekilde, Lars-Peter; Hansen, Morten

    compensation. By using images taken with near-infrared light to locate the blood vessels in a human forearm and using the same images to detects movements of the arm, this paper shows that it is possible make a robot arm, potentially equipped with a needle for drawing the blood, compensate for the movements...

  19. Inhibition of uptake of adenosine into human blood platelets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lips, J.P.M.; Sixma, J.J.; Trieschnigg, A.C.

    1980-01-01

    Adenosine transport into human blood platelets is mediated by two independent systems with different affinities. Both systems transport only purine nucleosides and no pyrimidine nucleosides. In experiments with differently substituted purine nucleosides, purines and analogues, differences in carrier

  20. Analysis of allelic differential expression in human white blood cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pant, P V Krishna; Tao, Heng; Beilharz, Erica J; Ballinger, Dennis G; Cox, David R; Frazer, Kelly A

    2006-01-01

    .... To identify human genes with allelic expression differences, we genotype DNA and examine mRNA isolated from the white blood cells of 12 unrelated individuals using oligonucleotide arrays containing 8406 exonic SNPs...

  1. Raising the standard: changes to the Australian Code of Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) for human blood and blood components, human tissues and human cellular therapy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Craig; Velickovic, Zlatibor; Brown, Ross; Larsen, Stephen; Macpherson, Janet L; Gibson, John; Rasko, John E J

    2014-04-01

    In Australia, manufacture of blood, tissues and biologicals must comply with the federal laws and meet the requirements of the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) Manufacturing Principles as outlined in the current Code of Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP). The Therapeutic Goods Order (TGO) No. 88 was announced concurrently with the new cGMP, as a new standard for therapeutic goods. This order constitutes a minimum standard for human blood, tissues and cellular therapeutic goods aimed at minimising the risk of infectious disease transmission. The order sets out specific requirements relating to donor selection, donor testing and minimisation of infectious disease transmission from collection and manufacture of these products. The Therapeutic Goods Manufacturing Principles Determination No. 1 of 2013 references the human blood and blood components, human tissues and human cellular therapy products 2013 (2013 cGMP). The name change for the 2013 cGMP has allowed a broadening of the scope of products to include human cellular therapy products. It is difficult to directly compare versions of the code as deletion of some clauses has not changed the requirements to be met, as they are found elsewhere amongst the various guidelines provided. Many sections that were specific for blood and blood components are now less prescriptive and apply to a wider range of cellular therapies, but the general overall intent remains the same. Use of 'should' throughout the document instead of 'must' allows flexibility for alternative processes, but these systems will still require justification by relevant logical argument and validation data to be acceptable to TGA. The cGMP has seemingly evolved so that specific issues identified at audit over the last decade have now been formalised in the new version. There is a notable risk management approach applied to most areas that refer to process justification and decision making. These requirements commenced on 31 May 2013 and a 12 month

  2. Trichloroethene levels in human blood and exhaled breath from controlled inhalation exposure.

    OpenAIRE

    Pleil, J D; Fisher, J W; Lindstrom, A B

    1998-01-01

    The organic constituents of exhaled human breath are representative of bloodborne concentrations through gas exchange in the blood/breath interface in the lungs. The presence of specific compounds can be an indicator of recent exposure or represent a biological response of the subject. For volatile organic compounds, sampling and analysis of breath is preferred to direct measurement from blood samples because breath collection is noninvasive, potentially infectious waste is avoided, the sampl...

  3. Why humans do not make good vampires. Testing the ability of humans to detect true blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, Delphine; Van Speybroeck, Linda; Verplaetse, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Research indicating the effects of real blood or of its iconic representation on human behaviour has thus far concentrated on phobia and aggressiveness. Little is known about other responses or, more fundamentally, about the biological basis of all such responses. In this study it is examined whether or not humans are able to detect real blood. Human subjects (n = 89) were asked to distinguish different kinds of blood from red control fluids under varying visual and choice conditions. Relevant differences between subjects were tested for through written questionnaires, including standardized scales for disgust sensitivity (DS-R) and blood phobia (MBPI) and performance on two clinical olfactory tests. Analysis of variance shows that humans are excellent detectors of animal blood (in casu pig blood), whereas the ability of detecting human blood is much less developed. Surprisingly, differences in olfactory capacities and personal experience with blood have no effect on blood detection, while blood fear lowers and disgust sensitivity ameliorates this performance. This study allows further mapping of the exact role of disgust sensitivity in human behaviour, as well as a deliberate choice of materials in blood-related experiments. It is imperative for further research on the behavioural and psychological impact 'blood' resorts on humans.

  4. Human white blood cells contain cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimer photolyase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, B.M.; Bennett, P.V. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-10-10

    Although enzymatic photoreactivation of cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers in DNA is present in almost all organisms, its presence in placental mammals is controversial. We tested human white blood cells for photolyase by using three defined DNAs (suprecoiled pET-2, nonsupercoiled bacteriphage {lambda}, and a defined-sequence 287-bp oligonucleotide), two dimer-specific endonucleases (T4 endonuclease V and UV endonuclease from Micrococcus luteus), and three assay methods. We show that human white blood cells contain photolyase that can photorepair pyrimidine dimers in defined supercoiled and linear DNAs and in a 287-bp oligonucleotide and that human photolyase is active on genomic DNA in intact human cells. 44 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Freeze-Dried Human Red Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-15

    after reinfusion. Blood 1982; 56: 1141-1147. 11. Danon D, Marikovsky Y. Determination of density distribution of red cell population. J Lab Clin Med...back to the study site. The lyophilized red cells will be stored refrigerated until use. Fourteen days after phlebotomy, the subject will return to the...The subject will remain in confinement at the study site for 24 hours following the transfusion and return on the following four days (Study Days 2

  6. Skin Blood Perfusion and Oxygenation Colour Affect Perceived Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Ian D.; Coetzee, Vinet; Law Smith, Miriam; Perrett, David I.

    2009-01-01

    Skin blood perfusion and oxygenation depends upon cardiovascular, hormonal and circulatory health in humans and provides socio-sexual signals of underlying physiology, dominance and reproductive status in some primates. We allowed participants to manipulate colour calibrated facial photographs along empirically-measured oxygenated and deoxygenated blood colour axes both separately and simultaneously, to optimise healthy appearance. Participants increased skin blood colour, particularly oxygenated, above basal levels to optimise healthy appearance. We show, therefore, that skin blood perfusion and oxygenation influence perceived health in a way that may be important to mate choice. PMID:19337378

  7. Blood collection procedures in hematology: knowledge and practice among laboratory personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Sujata; Suri, Vaishali; Pant, Ishita; Rusia, Usha

    2006-07-01

    Blood collection is an important preanalytical component of haematological testing. This questionnaire based study was conducted on laboratory personnel to elicit their knowledge and practice regarding blood collection procedures for haematological testing. Questionnaire comprised of 37 multiple choice questions, of which 10 questions each were related to essential and desirable knowledge, 10 to practice and 7 to educational and job profile. Ninety four laboratory personnel participated in the study. Analysis was done on SPSS software. Percentages of unsatisfactory scores were 42.6%, 4.3%, 17% and 6% in the essential knowledge, desirable knowledge, practice and total scoring respectively. 91.5%, however, had a satisfactory total score. Importance needs to be given to blood collection procedures both, individually and collectively. The study highlights the deficient areas which need to addressed by all laboratorians. Such studies should also be conducted among nursing and resident staff- the other groups concerned with blood collection.

  8. Nocturnal variations in peripheral blood flow, systemic blood pressure, and heart rate in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindrup, J H; Kastrup, J; Christensen, H

    1991-01-01

    Subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow rate, together with systemic arterial blood pressure and heart rate under ambulatory conditions, was measured in the lower legs of 15 normal human subjects for 12-20 h. The 133Xe-washout technique, portable CdTe(Cl) detectors, and a portable data storage uni.......0001). The synchronism of the nocturnal subcutaneous hyperemia and the decrease in systemic mean arterial blood pressure point to a common, possibly central nervous or humoral, eliciting mechanism.......Subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow rate, together with systemic arterial blood pressure and heart rate under ambulatory conditions, was measured in the lower legs of 15 normal human subjects for 12-20 h. The 133Xe-washout technique, portable CdTe(Cl) detectors, and a portable data storage unit...

  9. Collection, processing and testing of bone, corneas, umbilical cord blood and haematopoietic stem cells by European Blood Alliance members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Närhi, M; Natri, O; Desbois, I; Kinggaard Holm, D; Galea, G; Aranko, K; Korhonen, M; Nordstrom, K

    2013-11-01

    A questionnaire study was carried out in collaboration with the European Blood Alliance (EBA) Tissues and Cells (T&C) working group. The aim was to assess the level of involvement and commonality of processes on the procurement, testing and storage of bone, corneas, umbilical cord blood (UCB) and haematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in order to identify different practices and to explore whether recommendations can be made for harmonization. An online questionnaire was used for data collection in 2011, and 43 replies were received covering 71 product answers from 13 countries. Estimated percentages of tissue and cell banking covered by EBA member blood banks as a proportion of all collections of each individual country varied markedly. There were also major differences in the amounts of products collected and discarded and in proportions tissues provided for grafting. However, discarding of certain collections also reflects the practice of increasing the likelihood of the very best units being used for transplantation. Harmonization of possible practices should focus on matching supply with demand and on identifying the most efficient operators. This could allow for the development of practices for minimizing unnecessary collections. © 2013 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  10. Theorical and practical bases for blood sample collection from the heel of newborns for neonatal screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Vela-Amieva

    2014-07-01

    collected in a special filter paper (Guthrie’s card. Despite its apparent simplicity, NBS laboratories commonly receive a large number of samples collected incorrectly and technically unsuitable for perfor4ming biochemical determinations. The aim of the present paper is to offer recommendations based on scientific evidence, for the properly blood collection on filter paper for NBS programs.

  11. Evaluation of pesticide residues in human blood samples from Punjab (India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasbir Singh Bedi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was undertaken to estimate the current status of residues of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs, organophosphates (OPs and synthetic pyrethroids (SPs pesticides in human blood. Materials and Methods: Human blood samples were analyzed by gas chromatography and confirmed by gas chromatographymass spectrometry in selective ion monitoring mode. Results: The gas chromatographic analysis of human blood samples collected from Punjab revealed the presence of p,p’-dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethylene (DDE, p,p’ dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethane (DDD, o,p’ DDE and β-endosulfan at mean levels of 15.26, 2.71, 5.62 and 4.02 ng/ml respectively. p,p’ DDE residue was observed in 18.0% blood samples, and it contributes 55% of the total pesticide burden in human blood. The difference of total dichlorordiphenyl trichloroethane (DDT between different age groups of humans was found to be statistically significant (p<0.05. The difference of DDT and endosulfan between dietary habits, gender and spraying of pesticides was found statistically non-significant, however endosulfan residues were observed only in pesticide sprayer’s population. Conclusion: Occurrence of p,p’ DDE, p,p’ DDD, o,p’ DDE in human blood indicated restricted use of DDT. However, presence of endosulfan residues in occupationally exposed population is a matter of public health concern.

  12. Performance of an Early Infant Diagnostic Test, AmpliSens DNA-HIV-FRT, Using Dried Blood Spots Collected from Children Born to Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Mothers in Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Joy; Tarasova, Tetyana; Shanmugam, Vedapuri; Azarskova, Marianna; Nguyen, Shon; Hurlston, Mackenzie; Sabatier, Jennifer; Zhang, Guoqing; Osmanov, Saladin; Ellenberger, Dennis; Yang, Chunfu; Vitek, Charles; Liulchuk, Maria; Nizova, Natalya

    2015-12-01

    An accurate accessible test for early infant diagnosis (EID) is crucial for identifying HIV-infected infants and linking them to treatment. To improve EID services in Ukraine, dried blood spot (DBS) samples obtained from 237 HIV-exposed children (≤18 months of age) in six regions in Ukraine in 2012 to 2013 were tested with the AmpliSens DNA-HIV-FRT assay, the Roche COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan (CAP/CTM) HIV-1 Qual test, and the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 Qualitative assay. In comparison with the paired whole-blood results generated from AmpliSens testing at the oblast HIV reference laboratories in Ukraine, the sensitivity was 0.99 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.95 to 1.00) for the AmpliSens and Roche CAP/CTM Qual assays and 0.96 (95% CI, 0.90 to 0.98) for the Abbott Qualitative assay. The specificity was 1.00 (95% CI, 0.97 to 1.00) for the AmpliSens and Abbott Qualitative assays and 0.99 (95% CI, 0.96 to 1.00) for the Roche CAP/CTM Qual assay. McNemar analysis indicated that the proportions of positive results for the tests were not significantly different (P > 0.05). Cohen's kappa (0.97 to 0.99) indicated almost perfect agreement among the three tests. These results indicated that the AmpliSens DBS and whole-blood tests performed equally well and were comparable to the two commercially available EID tests. More importantly, the performance characteristics of the AmpliSens DBS test meets the World Health Organization EID test requirements; implementing AmpliSens DBS testing might improve EID services in resource-limited settings. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Genotoxic damage in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genotoxic damage in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes of oral contraceptive users. F Naz, S Jyoti, N Akhtar, M Afzal, YH Siddique. Abstract. Synthetic progestins and estrogens have been reported to be toxic in various experimental models. Their prolonged use has been reported to induce cancer in humans.

  14. In vitro analysis of cell salvage blood collection with a laparoscopic suction device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarsheth, Nimesh P; Fenske, Suzanne Silverman; Shah, Apurva; Moshier, Erin; Stahl, Rosalyn; Shander, Aryeh

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether cell salvage blood collection with a laparoscopic suction device is inferior to use of a traditional Yankauer suction device. Prospective, in vitro study. Academic teaching hospital. Individual units of donated packed red blood cells were diluted with normal saline solution to a hematocrit level of 21%. The blood was divided into 2 equal parts and then suctioned with either a laparoscopic suction device or a Yankauer plastic suction catheter tip connected to double-lumen cell salvage tubing with a diluted heparin drip and a vacuum pressure of 100 mm Hg. Collected blood was processed with a cell salvage device. Red blood cell volume was calculated by multiplying the hematocrit level by the total volume of blood product at the time of testing. Mean hemolysis indexes were compared between the laparoscopic and Yankauer method of blood collection by use of a 2-sample t test. Assuming a clinically acceptable limit of loss to be 7%, percent loss in red blood cell volume was tested with a 95% one-sided confidence limit to assess noninferiority. The mean hemolysis index was 43.33 with laparoscopic suction method and 34.67 with the Yankauer suction method. The mean difference was 8.67 and was not considered significant (p = .074). The percent loss in red blood cell volume after collection and cell salvage processing was 33.2% with the laparoscopic suction method and 29.57% with the Yankauer method. The mean difference was 3.63% and was within the acceptable 7% loss limit for noninferiority (p = .0278). Laparoscopic blood collection is not inferior to the standard Yankauer method for cell salvage collection. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Remote blood collection in reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus L: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Wiklund

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available Automatic blood sampling equipment (ABSE was used successfully to collect blood samples from two reindeer. During blood sampling, two methods of restraint were applied which caused no short term changes in plasma concentrations of urea, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase or total protein. Plasma Cortisol concentrations were significantly elevated by the two restraint techniques. The value of ABSE in studies of stress in reindeer is discussed.

  16. Forensic Identification of Human Blood: comparison of two one-step presumptive tests for blood screening of crime scene samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Flávia Belchior Andrade

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Blood is the most common body fluid found at crime scenes. One-step presumptive tests have been designed as a rapid immunological test for the qualitative detection of human hemoglobin in stool samples (faecal occult blood their usefulness for forensic purposes has been demonstrated before. In this study we compare Hexagon OBTI kit and FOB One-step Bioeasy kit sensitivity in the analysis of diluted blood samples. With Hexagon OBTI, positive test results are achieved in whole blood dilutions up to 1:1.000. Sensitivity decreased with aged samples, if samples were not stored under low temperatures regardless of which presumptive test is used. Whole blood tests must take into consideration that “hook” effect may interfere. Comparing both tests, OBTI Hexagon Kit is more sensible to detect diluted blood, showing a wider detection window in all conditions. This is interesting when analyzing forensic samples as forensic analysts usually do not know about the history of the analyzed sample before its collection.

  17. Design and performance of a system for blood collection of rats under whole-body inhalation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Take, Makoto; Ohnishi, Makoto; Nagano, Kasuke; Yamamoto, Seigo; Fukushima, Shoji

    2009-04-01

    In order to obtain basic risk assessment data on human health exposure to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapor by inhalation, a whole-body inhalation exposure system which allows blood collection during the exposure period was designed. The system was tested using chloroform as a model VOC. Chloroform vapor, sampled from the supply-header, animal-chambers and exhaust-header, remained constant in this system with variations in its concentration being less than 2%; flow rate of the vapor through the system was also constant. Rats were exposed to chloroform vapor and blood collected from the tail during exposure to the chloroform vapor. The chloroform concentration in the blood increased during the initial 60 min of exposure, and afterwards its concentration remained at about 2 microg/ml from 60 to 360 min. In conclusion, our design allows blood to be collected from individual rats during exposure by inhalation to test VOCs and changes in the blood concentration of the VOC during exposure to be assessed.

  18. Mesenteric, coeliac and splanchnic blood flow in humans during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perko, M J; Nielsen, H B; Skak, C

    1998-01-01

    1. Exercise reduces splanchnic blood flow, but the mesenteric contribution to this response is uncertain. 2. In nineteen humans, superior mesenteric and coeliac artery flows were determined by duplex ultrasonography during fasting and postprandial submaximal cycling and compared with the splanchnic...... blood flow as assessed by the Indocyanine Green dye-elimination technique. 3. Cycling increased arterial pressure, heart rate and cardiac output, while it reduced total vascular resistance. These responses were not altered in the postprandial state. During fasting, cycling increased mesenteric, coeliac...... decreased by 51 and 31 % (0.49 +/- 0.07 and 0.96 +/- 0.28 l min-1). Splanchnic blood flow values assessed by duplex ultrasound and by dye-elimination techniques were correlated (r = 0.70; P exercise in humans, splanchnic resistance increases and blood flow is reduced following...

  19. Foundations of Collective Cultural Rights in International Human Rights Law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donders, Y.; Jakubowski, A.

    2016-01-01

    Although collective cultural rights are included in international human rights law, their place and their nature and significance are not well-explored or understood. This chapter aims to classify collective cultural rights in international human rights instruments and to explore how these rights

  20. Foundations of collective cultural rights in international human rights law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donders, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Although collective cultural rights are included in international human rights law, their precise place and their nature and significance are not well-explored or understood. This paper aims to show where collective cultural rights can be found in international human rights law and explore how these

  1. Blood flow and microdialysis in the human femoral head

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgehøj, Morten; Emmeluth, Claus; Overgaard, Søren

    2007-01-01

    ischemia and measure changes in blood flow. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 9 patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty for primary osteoarthrosis, two MD catheters were inserted into the femoral head through two drill holes after the blood flow had been visualized by LD. Then primary samples were collected...... with the femoral head in situ; thereafter, the head was removed and samples were collected over the following 4 hours ex vivo. The variables obtained by MD were concentrations of glucose, lactate, pyruvate, and glycerol in extracellular fluid. RESULTS: The results showed development of ischemia...

  2. Human blood-feeding rates among sympatric sibling species of Anopheles quadrimaculatus mosquitoes in northern Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, T; Cockburn, A F; Kaiser, P E; Barnard, D R

    1996-05-01

    We compared rates of feeding on human hosts for blood-engorged female Anopheles quadrimaculatus species A, B and C1 collected from daytime resting sites in Manatee Springs State Park, Levy County, Florida during 1992-1993. Quick-blot DNA probes were used to identify mosquito taxa and also the presence of human blood in the mosquito gut. In collections from a campground area, human blood-feeding rates differed significantly among mosquito species (10.7% [19 of 177], 0%, [0 of 62], and 1.2%, [4 of 327]), respectively for species A, B and C1). In collections from a woodland site (1 km from the campground), 1.5% (2 of 129) of the species B females had fed on humans, whereas none of 19 species A or 159 species C1 females had done so. Of the three species in this study area, species A appears the most likely to be a biting pest of humans and a vector of human malaria.

  3. Rheology of Human Blood, near and at Zero Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, E. W.; Gilliland, E. R.; Cokelet, G.; Shin, H.; Britten, A.; Wells, R. E.

    1963-01-01

    Static normal human blood possesses a distinctive yield stress. When the yield stress is exceeded, the same blood has a stress-shear rate function under creeping flow conditions closely following Casson's model, which implies reversible aggregation of red cells in rouleaux and flow dominated by movement of rouleaux. The yield stress is essentially independent of temperature and its cube root varies linearly with hematocrit value. The dynamic rheological properties in the creeping flow range are such that the relative viscosity of blood to water is almost independent of temperature. Questions raised by these data are discussed, including red cell aggregation promoted by elements in the plasma. PMID:13935042

  4. An assessment of various blood collection and transfer methods used for malaria rapid diagnostic tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baik Fred

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Four blood collection and transfer devices commonly used for malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs were assessed for their consistency, accuracy and ease of use in the hands of laboratory technicians and village health workers. Methods Laboratory technicians and village health workers collected blood from a finger prick using each device in random order, and deposited the blood either on filter paper or into a suitable casette-type RDT. Consistency and accuracy of volume delivered was determined by comparing the measurements of the resulting blood spots/heights with the measurements of laboratory-prepared pipetted standard volumes. The effect of varying blood volumes on RDT sensitivity and ease of use was also observed. Results There was high variability in blood volume collected by the devices, with the straw and the loop, the most preferred devices, usually transferring volumes greater than intended, while the glass capillary tube and the plastic pipette transferring less volume than intended or none at all. Varying the blood volume delivered to RDTs indicated that this variation is critical to RDT sensitivity only when the transferred volume is very low. Conclusion None of the blood transfer devices assessed performed consistently well. Adequate training on their use is clearly necessary, with more development efforts for improved designs to be used by remote health workers, in mind.

  5. Sympathetic reflex control of blood flow in human peripheral tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O

    1991-01-01

    sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes are blocked. Blood flow has been measure by the local 133Xe-technique. The results indicate the presence of spinal as well as supraspinal sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes to human peripheral tissues. Especially is emphasized the presence of a local sympathetic veno......Sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes are essential for the maintenance of arterial blood pressure in upright position. It has been generally believed that supraspinal sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes elicited by changes in baroreceptor activity play an important role. Recent studies on human...

  6. 1-D blood flow modelling in a running human body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Viktor; Halász, Gábor

    2017-07-01

    In this paper an attempt was made to simulate blood flow in a mobile human arterial network, specifically, in a running human subject. In order to simulate the effect of motion, a previously published immobile 1-D model was modified by including an inertial force term into the momentum equation. To calculate inertial force, gait analysis was performed at different levels of speed. Our results show that motion has a significant effect on the amplitudes of the blood pressure and flow rate but the average values are not effected significantly.

  7. Seroepidemiological study of human cysticercosis with blood samples collected on filter paper, in Lages, State of Santa Catarina, Brazil, 2004-2005 Estudo soroepidemiológico da cisticercose humana com amostras de sangue total coletado em papel filtro, em Lages, Estado de Santa Catarina, 2004-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Márcia Imenes Ishida

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Human serofrequency of antibodies against Taenia solium antigens was determined and risk factors for cysticercosis transmission were identified. METHODS: Individuals (n=878 from periurban and rural locations of Lages, SC, were interviewed to gather demographic, sanitary and health information. Interviews and blood sample collections by finger prick on Whatman filter paper were performed from August 2004 to May 2005. Observation determined that 850 samples were suitable for analysis and were tested by ELISA using vesicular fluid of Taenia crassiceps heterologous antigen. To ensure the reliability of the results, 77 samples of the dried blood were matched with sera. The reactive samples were submitted to a serum confirmatory immunoblot (IB test using purified Taenia crassiceps glycoproteins. RESULTS: The ELISA results for the dried blood and serum samples were statistically consistent. ELISA was positive in 186 (21.9% out of 850 individuals. A group of 213 individuals were asked to collect vein blood for IB (186 with positive result in ELISA and 27 with inappropriate whole blood samples and 130 attended the request. The IB was positive in 29 (3.4% out of 850 individuals. A significant correlation (p = 0.0364 was determined among individuals who tested positive in the IB assay who practiced both pig rearing and kitchen gardening. CONCLUSIONS: ELISA with dried blood eluted from filter paper was suitable for cysticercosis population surveys. In Lages, human infection was associated with pig rearing and kitchen gardening. The prevalence index was compatible with other Latin American endemic areas.INTRODUÇÃO: O primeiro levantamento sobre cisticercose humana e identificação dos fatores de risco associados à transmissão, foram realizados em Lages, SC. MÉTODOS: Oitocentos e setenta e sete voluntários de regiões periurbana e rural foram entrevistados e forneceram informações demográficas e condições sanitárias e de sa

  8. The blood DNA virome in 8,000 humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Moustafa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The characterization of the blood virome is important for the safety of blood-derived transfusion products, and for the identification of emerging pathogens. We explored non-human sequence data from whole-genome sequencing of blood from 8,240 individuals, none of whom were ascertained for any infectious disease. Viral sequences were extracted from the pool of sequence reads that did not map to the human reference genome. Analyses sifted through close to 1 Petabyte of sequence data and performed 0.5 trillion similarity searches. With a lower bound for identification of 2 viral genomes/100,000 cells, we mapped sequences to 94 different viruses, including sequences from 19 human DNA viruses, proviruses and RNA viruses (herpesviruses, anelloviruses, papillomaviruses, three polyomaviruses, adenovirus, HIV, HTLV, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, parvovirus B19, and influenza virus in 42% of the study participants. Of possible relevance to transfusion medicine, we identified Merkel cell polyomavirus in 49 individuals, papillomavirus in blood of 13 individuals, parvovirus B19 in 6 individuals, and the presence of herpesvirus 8 in 3 individuals. The presence of DNA sequences from two RNA viruses was unexpected: Hepatitis C virus is revealing of an integration event, while the influenza virus sequence resulted from immunization with a DNA vaccine. Age, sex and ancestry contributed significantly to the prevalence of infection. The remaining 75 viruses mostly reflect extensive contamination of commercial reagents and from the environment. These technical problems represent a major challenge for the identification of novel human pathogens. Increasing availability of human whole-genome sequences will contribute substantial amounts of data on the composition of the normal and pathogenic human blood virome. Distinguishing contaminants from real human viruses is challenging.

  9. The blood DNA virome in 8,000 humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Ahmed; Xie, Chao; Kirkness, Ewen; Biggs, William; Wong, Emily; Turpaz, Yaron; Bloom, Kenneth; Delwart, Eric; Nelson, Karen E; Venter, J Craig; Telenti, Amalio

    2017-03-01

    The characterization of the blood virome is important for the safety of blood-derived transfusion products, and for the identification of emerging pathogens. We explored non-human sequence data from whole-genome sequencing of blood from 8,240 individuals, none of whom were ascertained for any infectious disease. Viral sequences were extracted from the pool of sequence reads that did not map to the human reference genome. Analyses sifted through close to 1 Petabyte of sequence data and performed 0.5 trillion similarity searches. With a lower bound for identification of 2 viral genomes/100,000 cells, we mapped sequences to 94 different viruses, including sequences from 19 human DNA viruses, proviruses and RNA viruses (herpesviruses, anelloviruses, papillomaviruses, three polyomaviruses, adenovirus, HIV, HTLV, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, parvovirus B19, and influenza virus) in 42% of the study participants. Of possible relevance to transfusion medicine, we identified Merkel cell polyomavirus in 49 individuals, papillomavirus in blood of 13 individuals, parvovirus B19 in 6 individuals, and the presence of herpesvirus 8 in 3 individuals. The presence of DNA sequences from two RNA viruses was unexpected: Hepatitis C virus is revealing of an integration event, while the influenza virus sequence resulted from immunization with a DNA vaccine. Age, sex and ancestry contributed significantly to the prevalence of infection. The remaining 75 viruses mostly reflect extensive contamination of commercial reagents and from the environment. These technical problems represent a major challenge for the identification of novel human pathogens. Increasing availability of human whole-genome sequences will contribute substantial amounts of data on the composition of the normal and pathogenic human blood virome. Distinguishing contaminants from real human viruses is challenging.

  10. Effects of low power violet laser irradiation on red blood cells volume and erythrocyte sedimentation rate in human blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Musawi, Mustafa S.; Jafaar, M. S.; Ahmed, Naser M.; Al-Gailani, B. T.; Suhaimi, Fatanah M.

    2017-08-01

    This study is designed in vitro to examine the effects of low power violet laser irradiation on some human blood samples rheological factors such as mean red blood cell volume (MCV) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). Blood samples were collected into EDTA contained tubes and separated into two equal aliquots to be attended as irradiated and control. Samples were irradiated for 20, 30, 40 or 50 min with a laser of power 10 mW. The measurements were done directly after irradiation by applying westergen method and using a computerized hemtoanalyzer. The RBCs volume and ESR were decreased after irradiation for 40min by 0.44% and 6.7% respectively. It is possible to suggest that laser irradiation can reduction red blood cells volume because of the increased concentrations of free intracellular Ca+². The result shows that ESR reduction exposed to low power laser is mostly by reason of the effect of laser on composition of the plasma that finally affects in ESR of whole blood.

  11. Laboratory strategic defense initiatives against transmission of human immune deficiency virus in blood and blood products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, S G

    2003-12-01

    Serological methods based on enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blot tests for detecting the presence of antibodies against the human immune deficiency virus are the standard techniques for identifying infected blood donors. However, these tests could not detect infected seronegative donors who were in the window period at the time of donation. Such donors can be identified by more elaborate methods including antigen detecting ELISA and polymerase chain reaction, which can detect viral antigens and nucleic acids in infected donor blood even in window period. In addition, the process of donor selection whereby individuals who were at high risk for HIV infections were excluded from the donor panel had substantially reduced the risk of window period donation. Furthermore, in order to ensure greater safety, transfusion centers nowadays undertake additional measures in the form of virucidal techniques such as the use of heat, detergents and photochemical agents to treat blood and blood products. Despite all of these measures, a risk-free transfusion was not practically achievable. However, risk-free transfusion is now possible with the introduction of recombinant blood products, the use of which is severely limited by their cost. Nonetheless, a risk-free transfusion is still achievable at a relatively little cost by transfusing suitably eligible patients with their own blood through the autologous blood transfusion program. Antibody testing is virtually the only method currently available in Nigerian blood banks. There is the need to reactivate and expand the scope of our National Blood Transfusion Service in order to make our blood and products safer.

  12. The DNA methylome of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yingrui; Zhu, Jingde; Tian, Geng

    2010-01-01

    strand), we report a comprehensive (92.62%) methylome and analysis of the unique sequences in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from the same Asian individual whose genome was deciphered in the YH project. PBMC constitute an important source for clinical blood tests world-wide. We found...... that 68.4% of CpG sites and 80% displayed allele-specific expression (ASE). These data demonstrate that ASM is a recurrent phenomenon and is highly correlated with ASE in human PBMCs. Together with recently reported similar studies, our study provides a comprehensive resource for future epigenomic......DNA methylation plays an important role in biological processes in human health and disease. Recent technological advances allow unbiased whole-genome DNA methylation (methylome) analysis to be carried out on human cells. Using whole-genome bisulfite sequencing at 24.7-fold coverage (12.3-fold per...

  13. Evaluation of Saphenous Venipuncture and Modified Tail-clip Blood Collection in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abatan, Omorodola I; Welch, Kathleen B; Nemzek, Jean A

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of 2 methods of blood collection in unanesthetized mice. The saphenous venipuncture method was compared with a modified tail-clip technique that requires minimal restraint. Mice were evaluated through behavioral observation and plasma corticosterone levels. The results showed that the 2 methods produced similar corticosterone responses and that the tail-clip method produced fewer behavioral reactions. In addition, the effects of saphenous venipuncture method appeared to be dependent on the handler's technical expertise. When a series of 4 blood collections were performed over 1 wk, the 2 methods yielded similar corticosterone levels that did not increase over time. Some of the behavioral signs appeared to increase over the series of blood collections obtained by the saphenous venipuncture method. Serial complete blood counts showed that the tail vessels yielded higher total white blood cell, neutrophil, and lymphocyte counts than did the saphenous vein. Neither method appeared to cause stress-associated changes in the leukogram after serial blood collection. Overall, the effects of modified tail-clip method were similar to those of the saphenous venipuncture method in unanesthetized mice. PMID:18459706

  14. Overexpression of Renin in the collecting duct causes elevated blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramkumar, Nirupama; Ying, Jian; Stuart, Deborah; Kohan, Donald E

    2013-08-01

    Renin is synthesized in the collecting duct and is regulated differently than renin in the juxtaglomerular apparatus. However, the physiological relevance of collecting duct renin remains unknown, particularly with regard to its ability to regulate blood pressure. We used gene targeting to generate mice with overexpression of renin in the collecting duct. A conditional mutant mouse line was created with the mouse renin transcript distal to a "transcriptional stop sequence" such that gene expression only occurred when the stop sequence was excised. These mice were bred with mice transgenic for the aquaporin-2 promoter driving Cre recombinase in order to achieve collecting duct-specific overexpression of renin. RNA analysis confirmed kidney-specific recombination, and medullary renin mRNA levels were increased 5-fold in collecting duct renin mice. Blood pressure was recorded by telemetry and plasma and urine was collected in 24-hour metabolic cages on normal, high-, and low-Na+ diets. Although no significant differences in 24-hour urinary Na+ excretion between targeted and control mice were detected, renin overexpresser mice had elevated blood pressure compared with controls on a high-Na+ diet. Urinary renin excretion was 2-fold higher in targeted mice as compared with controls on normal and low-Na+ diets. Plasma renin concentration was significantly suppressed in targeted mice as compared with controls on normal and high-Na+ diets. Taken together, these results suggest that collecting duct-derived renin has the potential to modulate blood pressure independent of the systemic renin-angiotensin system.

  15. 21 CFR 640.1 - Whole Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Whole Blood. 640.1 Section 640.1 Food and Drugs... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Whole Blood § 640.1 Whole Blood. The proper name of this product shall be Whole Blood. Whole Blood is defined as blood collected from human donors for transfusion...

  16. The nanoparticle protein corona formed in human blood or human blood fractions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Lundqvist

    Full Text Available The protein corona formed around nanoparticles in protein-rich fluids plays an important role for nanoparticle biocompatibility, as found in several studies during the last decade. Biological fluids have complex compositions and the molecular components interact and function together in intricate networks. Therefore, the process to isolate blood or the preparation of blood derivatives may lead to differences in the composition of the identified protein corona around nanoparticles. Here, we show distinct differences in the protein corona formed in whole blood, whole blood with EDTA, plasma, or serum. Furthermore, the ratio between particle surface area to protein concentration influences the detected corona. We also show that the nanoparticle size per se influences the formed protein corona due to curvature effects. These results emphasize the need of investigating the formation and biological importance of the protein corona in the same environment as the nanoparticles are intended for or released into.

  17. The nanoparticle protein corona formed in human blood or human blood fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, Martin; Augustsson, Cecilia; Lilja, Malin; Lundkvist, Kristoffer; Dahlbäck, Björn; Linse, Sara; Cedervall, Tommy

    2017-01-01

    The protein corona formed around nanoparticles in protein-rich fluids plays an important role for nanoparticle biocompatibility, as found in several studies during the last decade. Biological fluids have complex compositions and the molecular components interact and function together in intricate networks. Therefore, the process to isolate blood or the preparation of blood derivatives may lead to differences in the composition of the identified protein corona around nanoparticles. Here, we show distinct differences in the protein corona formed in whole blood, whole blood with EDTA, plasma, or serum. Furthermore, the ratio between particle surface area to protein concentration influences the detected corona. We also show that the nanoparticle size per se influences the formed protein corona due to curvature effects. These results emphasize the need of investigating the formation and biological importance of the protein corona in the same environment as the nanoparticles are intended for or released into.

  18. Microdialysis in the femoral head of the minipig and in a blood cloth of human blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgehøj, Morten Foged; Emmeluth, Claus; Overgaard, Søren

    2011-01-01

    is happening in the dead space around the catheter in the drill canal, and is there an equilibrium period after the insertion of the catheter? Material and methods In an ex-vivo study using 5 syringes with 5 mL human blood, a microdialysis catheter was inserted and microdialysis was performed over 3 h...

  19. Does Every Cell Get Blood? Young Students' Discussions about Illustrations of Human Blood Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westman, Anna-Karin; Karlsson, Karl-Goran

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a study of how groups of young students discuss illustrations of human blood circulation. Transparency is not an innate quality of illustrations, visual information is always coded and interpretations are always related to culture and context. Results of this study are discussed with reference to Kress and van Leeuwens'…

  20. Deep coverage mouse red blood cell proteome: a first comparison with the human red blood cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasini, Erica M; Kirkegaard, Morten; Salerno, Doris

    2008-01-01

    Mice have close genetic/physiological relationships to humans, breed rapidly, and can be genetically modified, making them the most used mammal in biomedical research. Because the red blood cell (RBC) is the sole gas transporter in vertebrates, diseases of the RBC are frequently severe; much...

  1. The nanoparticle protein corona formed in human blood or human blood fractions

    OpenAIRE

    Lundqvist, Martin; Augustsson, Cecilia; Lilja, Malin; Lundkvist, Kristoffer; Dahlb?ck, Bj?rn; Linse, Sara; Cedervall, Tommy

    2017-01-01

    The protein corona formed around nanoparticles in protein-rich fluids plays an important role for nanoparticle biocompatibility, as found in several studies during the last decade. Biological fluids have complex compositions and the molecular components interact and function together in intricate networks. Therefore, the process to isolate blood or the preparation of blood derivatives may lead to differences in the composition of the identified protein corona around nanoparticles. Here, we sh...

  2. Mesenteric, coeliac and splanchnic blood flow in humans during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perko, M J; Nielsen, H B; Skak, C

    1998-01-01

    1. Exercise reduces splanchnic blood flow, but the mesenteric contribution to this response is uncertain. 2. In nineteen humans, superior mesenteric and coeliac artery flows were determined by duplex ultrasonography during fasting and postprandial submaximal cycling and compared with the splanchnic...... blood flow as assessed by the Indocyanine Green dye-elimination technique. 3. Cycling increased arterial pressure, heart rate and cardiac output, while it reduced total vascular resistance. These responses were not altered in the postprandial state. During fasting, cycling increased mesenteric, coeliac...... the coeliac circulation was not influenced. Postprandial cycling did not influence the mesenteric resistance significantly, but its blood flow decreased by 22 % (0.46 +/- 0.28 l min-1). Coeliac and splanchnic resistance increased by 150 and 63 %, respectively, and the corresponding regional blood flow...

  3. Direct determination of external radiation dose in human blood

    CERN Document Server

    Tanir, AG; Sahiner, E; Bolukdemir, MH; Koc, K; Meric, N; Keles, SK; Kucuk, O

    2014-01-01

    In this study it was shown that it is possible to determine radiation doses from external beam therapy both directly and retrospectively from a human blood sample. To the best of our knowledge no other studies exist on the direct measurement of doses received by a person from external beam therapy. Optically stimulated luminescence counts from a healthy blood sample exposed to an external radiation source were measured. Blood aliquots were given 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 50, 100 and 200Gy beta doses and their decay and dose-response curves were plotted. While the luminescence intensities were found to be relatively low for the doses smaller than 10Gy, they were measured considerably higher for doses greater than 10Gy. The dose received by the blood aliquots was determined by interpolating the luminescence counts of 10Gy to the dose-response curve. This study has important ramifications for healthcare, medicine and radiation protection

  4. Laser-photophoretic migration and fractionation of human blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monjushiro, Hideaki; Tanahashi, Yuko; Watarai, Hitoshi

    2013-05-13

    Laser photophoretic migration behavior of human blood cells in saline solution was investigated under the irradiation of Nd:YAG laser beam (532 nm) in the absence and the presence of the flow in a fused silica capillary. Red blood cells (RBC) were migrated faster than white blood cells (WBC) and blood pellets to the direction of propagation of laser light. The observed photophoretic velocity of RBC was about 11 times faster than those of others. This was understood from the larger photophoretic efficiency of RBC than that of WBC, which was simulated based on the Mie scattering theory. Furthermore, it was found that, during the photophoretic migration, RBCs spontaneously orientated parallel to the migration direction so as to reduce the drag force. Finally, it was demonstrated that RBC and WBC were separated in a micro-channel flow system by the laser photophoresis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Isoforms of purified methyltransferase from human blood platelets ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A membrane-bound protein with N-methyltransferase activity, associated with phospholipid metabolism, has been isolated from purified human blood platelet plasma membranes. The activity of this enzyme has been detected in crude platelet preparations. However, the nature and properties of this enzyme and its ...

  6. Genotoxic damage in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Falaq Naz

    2012-06-29

    Jun 29, 2012 ... In the present study the effects of oral contraceptives were studied among users using chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges and DNA damage as a parameter, in cultured human peripheral blood lym- phocytes. The study was performed on 25 women (users) and 25 age match controls.

  7. Expansion of human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Song; Chu, Pat; Hwang, William; Lodish, Harvey

    2010-10-08

    A recent Science paper reported a purine derivative that expands human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells in culture (Boitano et al., 2010) by antagonizing the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Major problems need to be overcome before ex vivo HSC expansion can be used clinically. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dynamical Analysis in the Mathematical Modelling of Human Blood Glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Saebyok; Kang, Byungmin

    2012-01-01

    We want to apply the geometrical method to a dynamical system of human blood glucose. Due to the educational importance of model building, we show a relatively general modelling process using observational facts. Next, two models of some concrete forms are analysed in the phase plane by means of linear stability, phase portrait and vector…

  9. Cations Content And Membrane Properties Of Human Sickle Blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of hydroxyurea, sodium thiocyanate and potassium tellurite on cations content and membrane properties of sickle erythrocyte was investigated in this study. Human sickle blood was incubated with the drugs in vitro at their optimum sickling inhibitory concentration. Mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean ...

  10. Effects of dietary triglycerides on rheological properties of human red blood cells (abstract).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicha, I; Suzuki, Y; Tateishi, N; Maeda, N

    2004-01-01

    Atherogenic diets rich in saturated fat and cholesterol influence the blood viscosity and red blood cell (RBC) aggregability, the parameters associated with increased risk of circulatory disorders. However, little is known about the effect of triglycerides, which are the major dietary lipid form in humans, on blood rheology. Therefore, we studied the effects of postprandial plasma triglyceride levels on human RBC indices, hematological parameters, RBCs aggregation velocity and whole blood viscosity. For this purpose, whole blood was collected 2 hours after high-fat or low-fat meal. Proteins, triglycerides and cholesterol levels of plasma were analysed, and RBCs rouleaux formation rate was measured in 70% autologous plasma using a low-shear rheoscope. There were no significant differences in hematological parameters, RBC indices, whole blood viscosity, plasma protein and cholesterol content between high-fat and low-fat blood samples. However, a significant increase in rouleaux formation rate was observed in samples with high postprandial triglyceride levels, when compared with low-triglyceride samples. Plasma triglyceride levels correlated significantly with rouleaux formation rate. In conclusion, these results suggest that diet-dependent alterations of plasma triglyceride levels as well as possible changes in the cell membrane lipid composition lead to RBC hyperaggregability. Copyright 2004 IOS Press

  11. Onchocerciasis transmission in Ghana: the human blood index of sibling species of the Simulium damnosum complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberton, Poppy H L; Cheke, Robert A; Walker, Martin; Winskill, Peter; Crainey, J Lee; Boakye, Daniel A; Osei-Atweneboana, Mike Y; Tirados, Iñaki; Wilson, Michael D; Tetteh-Kumah, Anthony; Otoo, Sampson; Post, Rory J; Basañez, María-Gloria

    2016-08-05

    Vector-biting behaviour is important for vector-borne disease (VBD) epidemiology. The proportion of blood meals taken on humans (the human blood index, HBI), is a component of the biting rate per vector on humans in VBD transmission models. Humans are the definitive host of Onchocerca volvulus, but the simuliid vectors feed on a range of animals and HBI is a key indicator of the potential for human onchocerciasis transmission. Ghana has a diversity of Simulium damnosum complex members, which are likely to vary in their HBIs, an important consideration for parameterization of onchocerciasis control and elimination models. Host-seeking and ovipositing S. damnosum (sensu lato) (s.l.) were collected from seven villages in four Ghanaian regions. Taxa were morphologically and molecularly identified. Blood meals from individually stored blackfly abdomens were used for DNA profiling, to identify previous host choice. Household, domestic animal, wild mammal and bird surveys were performed to estimate the density and diversity of potential blood hosts of blackflies. A total of 11,107 abdomens of simuliid females (which would have obtained blood meal(s) previously) were tested, with blood meals successfully amplified in 3,772 (34 %). A single-host species was identified in 2,857 (75.7 %) of the blood meals, of which 2,162 (75.7 %) were human. Simulium soubrense Beffa form, S. squamosum C and S. sanctipauli Pra form were the most anthropophagic (HBI = 0.92, 0.86 and 0.70, respectively); S. squamosum E, S. yahense and S. damnosum (sensu stricto) (s.s.)/S. sirbanum were the most zoophagic (HBI = 0.44, 0.53 and 0.63, respectively). The degree of anthropophagy decreased (but not statistically significantly) with increasing ratio of non-human/human blood hosts. Vector to human ratios ranged from 139 to 1,198 blackflies/person. DNA profiling can successfully identify blood meals from host-seeking and ovipositing blackflies. Host choice varies according to sibling

  12. Continued decline in blood collection and transfusion in the United States–2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingson, Katherine D.; Sapiano, Mathew R. P.; Haass, Kathryn A.; Savinkina, Alexandra A.; Baker, Misha L.; Chung, Koo-Whang; Henry, Richard A.; Berger, James J.; Kuehnert, Matthew J.; Basavaraju, Sridhar V.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND In 2011 and 2013, the National Blood Collection and Utilization Survey (NBCUS) revealed declines in blood collection and transfusion in the United States. The objective of this study was to describe blood services in 2015. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS The 2015 NBCUS was distributed to all US blood collection centers, all hospitals performing at least 1000 surgeries annually, and a 40% random sample of hospitals performing 100 to 999 surgeries annually. Weighting and imputation were used to generate national estimates for units of blood and components collected, deferred, distributed, transfused, and outdated. RESULTS Response rates for the 2015 NBCUS were 78.4% for blood collection centers and 73.9% for transfusing hospitals. In 2015, 12,591,000 units of red blood cells (RBCs) (95% confidence interval [CI], 11,985,000–13,197,000 units of RBCs) were collected, and 11,349,000 (95% CI, 10,592,000–11,747,000) were transfused, representing declines since 2013 of 11.6% and 13.9%, respectively. Total platelet units distributed (2,436,000; 95% CI, 2,230,000–2,642,000) and transfused (1,983,000; 95% CI, 1,816,000=2,151,000) declined by 0.5% and 13.1%, respectively, since 2013. Plasma distributions (3,714,000; 95% CI, 3,306,000–4,121,000) and transfusions (2,727,000; 95% CI, 2,594,000–2,859,000) in 2015 declined since 2013. The median price paid per unit in 2015—$211 for leukocyte-reduced RBCs, $524 for apheresis platelets, and $54 for fresh frozen plasma—was less for all components than in 2013. CONCLUSIONS The 2015 NBCUS findings suggest that continued declines in demand for blood products resulted in fewer units collected and distributed Maintaining a blood inventory sufficient to meet routine and emergent demands will require further monitoring and understanding of these trends. PMID:28591469

  13. Regulation of the skeletal muscle blood flow in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Stefan; Saltin, Bengt

    2014-01-01

    hyperaemia whereas the role of ATP remains uncertain due to lack of specific purinergic receptor blockers for human use. The purpose of this review is to address the interaction between vasodilator systems and to discuss the multiple proposed roles of ATP in human skeletal muscle blood flow regulation......In humans, skeletal muscle blood flow is regulated by an interaction between several locally formed vasodilators including nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins. In plasma, ATP is a potent vasodilator that stimulates the formation of NO and prostaglandins and very importantly can offset local...... sympathetic vasoconstriction. ATP is released into plasma from erythrocytes and endothelial cells and the plasma concentration increases in both the feeding artery and the vein draining the contracting skeletal muscle. Adenosine also stimulates the formation of NO and prostaglandins, but the plasma adenosine...

  14. Optoacoustic mapping of cerebral blood oxygenation in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Yuriy; Prough, Donald S.; Petrov, Irene Y.; Richardson, C. Joan; Fonseca, Rafael A.; Robertson, Claudia S.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2017-03-01

    Noninvasive, transcranial mapping, monitoring, and imaging are highly important for detection and management of cerebral abnormalities and neuroscience research. Mapping, imaging, and monitoring of cerebral blood oxygenation are necessary for diagnostics and management of patients with traumatic brain injury, stroke, and other neurological conditions. We proposed to use optoacoustic technology for noninvasive, transcranial monitoring and imaging. In this work, we developed optoacoustic systems for mapping of cerebral blood oxygenation in humans and tested them in adults and neonates. The systems provide noninvasive, transcranial optoacoustic measurements in the transmission (forward) and reflection (backward) modes in the near infrared spectral range. Novel, ultra-sensitive probes were built for detection of optoacoustic signals and measurement of blood oxygenation in neonates and adults. Cerebral oxygenation was measured at different lateral sites from the superior sagittal sinus (SSS), a large central cerebral vein, located immediately beneath the midline of the human skull. In neonates, cerebral oxygenation was measured through open anterior and posterior fontanelles. Optoacoustic signal detection at different locations allowed for mapping of cerebral blood oxygenation. Our future studies will be focused on 3D mapping of cerebral blood oxygenation.

  15. A duplex PCR for rapid and simultaneous detection of Brucella spp. in human blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirnejad, Reza; Mohamadi, Mozafar; Piranfar, Vahbeh; Mortazavi, Seied Mojtaba; Kachuei, Reza

    2013-06-01

    To design a duplex PCR for rapid and simultaneous detection of Brucella species. in human blood samples. Fifty-two peripheral bloods samples were collected from suspicious patients with brucellosis. Following DNA extraction, PCR assay were performed, using three primers that could simultaneously identify and differentiate three major species of pathogenic Brucella in humans and animals. Of the 52 peripheral bloods samples tested, 25 sample (48%) showed positive reactions in PCR. Twelve samples were positive for Brucella abortus 39 (B. abortus 39) (23%), 13 for Brucella melitensis 39 (B. melitensis 39) (25%) and 0 for Brucella ovis 39 (B. ovis 39) (0%). This work demonstrates that in case where specific primers were utilized, duplex PCR has proved to be a simple, fast, and relatively inexpensive method for simultaneous detection of important species of Brucella in clinical samples. Copyright © 2013 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Application of Data Collection Techniques by Human Performance Technology Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Minjing

    2011-01-01

    By content-analyzing 22 published cases from a variety of professional and academic books and journals, this study examines the status quo of human performance technology (HPT) practitioners' application of five major data collection techniques in their everyday work: questionnaire, interview, focus group, observation, and document collection. The…

  17. Studying Collective Human Decision Making and Creativity with Evolutionary Computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayama, Hiroki; Dionne, Shelley D

    2015-01-01

    We report a summary of our interdisciplinary research project "Evolutionary Perspective on Collective Decision Making" that was conducted through close collaboration between computational, organizational, and social scientists at Binghamton University. We redefined collective human decision making and creativity as evolution of ecologies of ideas, where populations of ideas evolve via continual applications of evolutionary operators such as reproduction, recombination, mutation, selection, and migration of ideas, each conducted by participating humans. Based on this evolutionary perspective, we generated hypotheses about collective human decision making, using agent-based computer simulations. The hypotheses were then tested through several experiments with real human subjects. Throughout this project, we utilized evolutionary computation (EC) in non-traditional ways-(1) as a theoretical framework for reinterpreting the dynamics of idea generation and selection, (2) as a computational simulation model of collective human decision-making processes, and (3) as a research tool for collecting high-resolution experimental data on actual collaborative design and decision making from human subjects. We believe our work demonstrates untapped potential of EC for interdisciplinary research involving human and social dynamics.

  18. Empirical modelling to predict the refractive index of human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahya, M; Saghir, M Z

    2016-02-21

    Optical techniques used for the measurement of the optical properties of blood are of great interest in clinical diagnostics. Blood analysis is a routine procedure used in medical diagnostics to confirm a patient's condition. Measuring the optical properties of blood is difficult due to the non-homogenous nature of the blood itself. In addition, there is a lot of variation in the refractive indices reported in the literature. These are the reasons that motivated the researchers to develop a mathematical model that can be used to predict the refractive index of human blood as a function of concentration, temperature and wavelength. The experimental measurements were conducted on mimicking phantom hemoglobin samples using the Abbemat Refractometer. The results analysis revealed a linear relationship between the refractive index and concentration as well as temperature, and a non-linear relationship between refractive index and wavelength. These results are in agreement with those found in the literature. In addition, a new formula was developed based on empirical modelling which suggests that temperature and wavelength coefficients be added to the Barer formula. The verification of this correlation confirmed its ability to determine refractive index and/or blood hematocrit values with appropriate clinical accuracy.

  19. 75 FR 34146 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request Resource for the Collection and Evaluation of Human Tissues...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-16

    ... the life styles and exposures and the biospecimens will serve as controls for the assay results..., for opportunity for public comment on proposed data collection projects, the National Cancer Institute..., and human cancer. Human subjects recruited from the general population are needed as controls...

  20. Chromosome Aberration in Human Blood Lymphocytes Exposed to Energetic Protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, M.; George, Kerry A.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2008-01-01

    During space flight, astronauts are exposed to a space radiation consisting of high-energy protons, high charge and energy (HZE) nuclei, as well as secondary particles that are generated when the primary particles penetrate the spacecraft shielding. Secondary particles have a higher LET value than primary protons and therefore expected to have a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). To investigate this theory, we exposed human peripheral blood lymphocytes to protons with energies of 250 MeV, 800MeV, 2 GeV, or 2.5 GeV. LET values for these protons ranged from 0.4 to 0.2 keV/micrometer. and doses ranged from 0.2 to 3 Gy. Over this energy the probability of nuclear reaction leading to secondary radiation, and the multiplicity of reaction produces such as neutrons and mesons increases substantially. The effect of aluminum and polyethylene shielding was also assessed using the 2 GeV and 2.5GeV proton beams. After exposure lymphocytes were stimulated to divide and chromosomes were collected from cells in the first G2 and metaphase cell cycle after exposure using a chemical induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. Dose response data for chromosome damage was analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting technique. Selected samples were also analyzed with multicolor FISH (mFISH) and multicolor banding FISH (mBAND) techniques. Data indicates that the dose response for simple-type exchanges is similar for proton and gamma exposure, whereas protons induce higher yields of complex exchanges that are LET dependent. RBE values will be presented for each proton energy, and the effects of shielding and possible cytogenetic signatures of proton exposure will be discussed.

  1. Alterations in cell surface area and deformability of individual human red blood cells in stored blood

    CERN Document Server

    Park, HyunJoo; Lee, SangYun; Kim, Kyoohyun; Sohn, Yong-Hak; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01

    The functionality and viability of stored human red blood cells (RBCs) is an important clinical issue in transfusion. To systematically investigate changes in stored whole blood, the hematological properties of individual RBCs were quantified in blood samples stored for various periods with and without a preservation solution called CPDA-1. With 3-D quantitative phase imaging techniques, the optical measurements of the 3-D refractive index (RI) distributions and membrane fluctuations were done at the individual cell level. From the optical measurements, the morphological (volume, surface area and sphericity), biochemical (hemoglobin content and concentration), and mechanical parameters (dynamic membrane fluctuation) were simultaneously quantified to investigate the functionalities and their progressive alterations in stored RBCs. Our results show that the stored RBCs without CPDA-1 had a dramatic morphological transformation from discocytes to spherocytes within 2 weeks which was accompanied with significant ...

  2. Successful Generation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines from Blood Samples Held at Room Temperature for up to 48 hr

    OpenAIRE

    Agu, Chukwuma A.; Soares, Filipa A.C.; Alderton, Alex; Patel, Minal; Ansari, Rizwan; Patel, Sharad; Forrest, Sally; Yang, Fengtang; Lineham, Jonathan; Vallier, Ludovic; Kirton, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The collection sites of human primary tissue samples and the receiving laboratories, where the human induced pluripotent stem cells (hIPSCs) are derived, are often not on the same site. Thus, the stability of samples prior to derivation constrains the distance between the collection site and the receiving laboratory. To investigate sample stability, we collected blood and held it at room temperature for 5, 24, or 48?hr before isolating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and re...

  3. Characterization of Microvesicles Released from Human Red Blood Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duc Bach Nguyen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Extracellular vesicles (EVs are spherical fragments of cell membrane released from various cell types under physiological as well as pathological conditions. Based on their size and origin, EVs are classified as exosome, microvesicles (MVs and apoptotic bodies. Recently, the release of MVs from human red blood cells (RBCs under different conditions has been reported. MVs are released by outward budding and fission of the plasma membrane. However, the outward budding process itself, the release of MVs and the physical properties of these MVs have not been well investigated. The aim of this study is to investigate the formation process, isolation and characterization of MVs released from RBCs under conditions of stimulating Ca2+ uptake and activation of protein kinase C. Methods: Experiments were performed based on single cell fluorescence imaging, fluorescence activated cell sorter/flow cytometer (FACS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, atomic force microscopy (AFM and dynamic light scattering (DLS. The released MVs were collected by differential centrifugation and characterized in both their size and zeta potential. Results: Treatment of RBCs with 4-bromo-A23187 (positive control, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA, or phorbol-12 myristate-13 acetate (PMA in the presence of 2 mM extracellular Ca2+ led to an alteration of cell volume and cell morphology. In stimulated RBCs, exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS and formation of MVs were observed by using annexin V-FITC. The shedding of MVs was also observed in the case of PMA treatment in the absence of Ca2+, especially under the transmitted bright field illumination. By using SEM, AFM and DLS the morphology and size of stimulated RBCs, MVs were characterized. The sizes of the two populations of MVs were 205.8 ± 51.4 nm and 125.6 ± 31.4 nm, respectively. Adhesion of stimulated RBCs and MVs was observed. The zeta potential of MVs was determined in the range from - 40 mV to - 10 m

  4. Retraction: The effect of anticoagulant choice on collection of cord blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    "The effect of anticoagulant choice on collection of cord blood" by M. Badowski, C. Shultz and D.T. Harris. Transfusion. First published online: June 12, 2014. The above article, published online on June 12, 2014 on Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been withdrawn for legal reasons by agreement between the authors, the journal Editor in Chief, Paul M. Ness, MD, the AABB, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The withdrawal has been agreed due to violation of a research agreement between the Cord Blood Registry, which commissioned the article, and the authors. Badowski M, Shultz C and Harris DT. The effect of anticoagulant choice on collection of cord blood. Transfusion. 2014. doi: 10.1111/trf.12744. First published online: 12 JUN 2014. © 2014 AABB.

  5. Short Communication Effect of age and blood collection site on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fulvia

    South African Society for Animal Science. 267. Short Communication. Effect of age and blood collection site on the metabolic profile of ostriches. G. Moniello l#. , F. Bovera. 2. , I.L. Solinas. 1. , G. Piccolo. 2. , W. Pinna. 1 and A. Nizza. 2. 1Dipartimento di Biologia Animale, Facoltà di Medicina Veterinaria, Università di Sassari, ...

  6. The Scent of Blood: A Driver of Human Behavior?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James K Moran

    Full Text Available The scent of blood is potentially one of the most fundamental and survival-relevant olfactory cues in humans. This experiment tests the first human parameters of perceptual threshold and emotional ratings in men and women of an artificially simulated smell of fresh blood in contact with the skin. We hypothesize that this scent of blood, with its association with injury, danger, death, and nutrition will be a critical cue activating fundamental motivational systems relating to either predatory approach behavior or prey-like withdrawal behavior, or both. The results show that perceptual thresholds are unimodally distributed for both sexes, with women being more sensitive. Furthermore, both women and men's emotional responses to simulated blood scent divide strongly into positive and negative valence ratings, with negative ratings in women having a strong arousal component. For women, this split is related to the phase of their menstrual cycle and oral contraception (OC. Future research will investigate whether this split in both genders is context-dependent or trait-like.

  7. Adjustment of Cell-Type Composition Minimizes Systematic Bias in Blood DNA Methylation Profiles Derived by DNA Collection Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiwa, Yuh; Hachiya, Tsuyoshi; Furukawa, Ryohei; Ohmomo, Hideki; Ono, Kanako; Kudo, Hisaaki; Hata, Jun; Hozawa, Atsushi; Iwasaki, Motoki; Matsuda, Koichi; Minegishi, Naoko; Satoh, Mamoru; Tanno, Kozo; Yamaji, Taiki; Wakai, Kenji; Hitomi, Jiro; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Kubo, Michiaki; Tanaka, Hideo; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Sobue, Kenji; Shimizu, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Differences in DNA collection protocols may be a potential confounder in epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS) using a large number of blood specimens from multiple biobanks and/or cohorts. Here we show that pre-analytical procedures involved in DNA collection can induce systematic bias in the DNA methylation profiles of blood cells that can be adjusted by cell-type composition variables. In Experiment 1, whole blood from 16 volunteers was collected to examine the effect of a 24 h storage period at 4°C on DNA methylation profiles as measured using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array. Our statistical analysis showed that the P-value distribution of more than 450,000 CpG sites was similar to the theoretical distribution (in quantile-quantile plot, λ = 1.03) when comparing two control replicates, which was remarkably deviated from the theoretical distribution (λ = 1.50) when comparing control and storage conditions. We then considered cell-type composition as a possible cause of the observed bias in DNA methylation profiles and found that the bias associated with the cold storage condition was largely decreased (λ adjusted = 1.14) by taking into account a cell-type composition variable. As such, we compared four respective sample collection protocols used in large-scale Japanese biobanks or cohorts as well as two control replicates. Systematic biases in DNA methylation profiles were observed between control and three of four protocols without adjustment of cell-type composition (λ = 1.12-1.45) and no remarkable biases were seen after adjusting for cell-type composition in all four protocols (λ adjusted = 1.00-1.17). These results revealed important implications for comparing DNA methylation profiles between blood specimens from different sources and may lead to discovery of disease-associated DNA methylation markers and the development of DNA methylation profile-based predictive risk models.

  8. Molecularly imprinted composite cryogels for hemoglobin depletion from human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baydemir, Gözde; Andaç, Müge; Perçin, Işιk; Derazshamshir, Ali; Denizli, Adil

    2014-09-01

    A molecularly imprinted composite cryogel (MICC) was prepared for depletion of hemoglobin from human blood prior to use in proteome applications. Poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) based MICC was prepared with high gel fraction yields up to 90%, and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer, scanning electron microscopy, swelling studies, flow dynamics and surface area measurements. MICC exhibited a high binding capacity and selectivity for hemoglobin in the presence of immunoglobulin G, albumin and myoglobin. MICC column was successfully applied in fast protein liquid chromatography system for selective depletion of hemoglobin for human blood. The depletion ratio was highly increased by embedding microspheres into the cryogel (93.2%). Finally, MICC can be reused many times with no apparent decrease in hemoglobin adsorption capacity. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Laser-photophoretic migration and fractionation of human blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monjushiro, Hideaki; Tanahashi, Yuko; Watarai, Hitoshi, E-mail: watarai@chem.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2013-05-13

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •RBCs were migrated faster than WBCs and blood pellets by laser photophoresis. •Photophoretic efficiency of RBC and WBC was simulated by the Mie scattering theory. •Spontaneous orientation of RBC parallel to the migration direction was elucidated. •Laser photophoretic separation of RBC and WBC was possible in a tip flow system. -- Abstract: Laser photophoretic migration behavior of human blood cells in saline solution was investigated under the irradiation of Nd:YAG laser beam (532 nm) in the absence and the presence of the flow in a fused silica capillary. Red blood cells (RBC) were migrated faster than white blood cells (WBC) and blood pellets to the direction of propagation of laser light. The observed photophoretic velocity of RBC was about 11 times faster than those of others. This was understood from the larger photophoretic efficiency of RBC than that of WBC, which was simulated based on the Mie scattering theory. Furthermore, it was found that, during the photophoretic migration, RBCs spontaneously orientated parallel to the migration direction so as to reduce the drag force. Finally, it was demonstrated that RBC and WBC were separated in a micro-channel flow system by the laser photophoresis.

  10. Human Blood Cell Sensing with Platinum Black Electroplated Impedance Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Siyang; Nandra, Mandheerej S.; Tai, Yu-Chong

    2007-01-01

    AC impedance sensing is an important method for biological cell analysis in flow cytometry. For micro impedance cell sensors, downsizing electrodes increases the double layer impedance of the metal-electrolyte interface, thus leaves no sensing zone in frequency domain and reduces the sensitivity significantly. We proposed using platinum black electroplated electrodes to solve the problem. In this paper, using this technique we demonstrated human blood cell sensing with high signal to noise ra...

  11. Metabolic control of muscle blood flow during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher

    2003-01-01

    to exert control of muscle vasodilation. Adenosine, nitric oxide (NO), prostacyclin (PGI2), and endothelial-derived hyperpolarization factor (EDHF) are possible mediators of muscle vasodilation during exercise. In humans, adenosine has been shown to contribute to functional hyperemia as blood flow...... that combined blockade of NOS and PGI2, and NOS and cytochrome P450, both attenuate exercise-induced hyperemia in humans. Combined vasodilator blockade studies offer the potential to uncover important interactions and compensatory vasodilator responses. The signaling pathways that link metabolic events evoked...

  12. Immediate stabilization of human blood for delayed quantification of endogenous thiols and disulfides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giustarini, Daniela; Galvagni, Federico; Orlandini, Maurizio; Fanti, Paolo; Rossi, Ranieri

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous thiols undergo rapid and reversible oxidation to disulfides when exposed to oxidants and are, therefore, suitable biomarkers of oxidative stress. However, accurate analysis of thiols in blood is frequently compromised by their artifactual oxidation during sample manipulation, which spuriously elevates the disulfide levels. Here, we describe a validated pre-analytical procedure that prevents both artifactual oxidation of thiols during sample manipulation and their oxidative decay for months in biosamples that are stored at −80°C. Addition of N-ethylmaleimide to blood samples from healthy donors was used to stabilize whole blood, red blood cells, platelets and plasma disulfides, whereas addition of citrate buffer followed by dilution of plasma with H2O was used to stabilize plasma thiols. The concentrations of thiols and disulfides were stable in all biosamples for at least 6 months when analyzed by UV/Vis HPLC at regular intervals. Only 3 ml of blood were needed to perform the analyses of thiols and disulfides in the different blood fractions. This pre-analytical procedure is reliable for use in both animal and human prospective studies. Its ease of implementation makes the method suitable for application to multicenter studies where blood samples are collected by different sites and personnel and are shipped to specific specialized laboratories. PMID:26896310

  13. Human cord blood cells can differentiate into retinal nerve cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike-Kiriyama, Naoko; Adachi, Yasushi; Minamino, Keizo; Iwasaki, Masayoshi; Nakano, Keiji; Koike, Yasushi; Yamada, Haruhiko; Mukaide, Hiromi; Shigematsu, Akio; Mizokami, Tomomi; Matsumura, Miyo; Ikehara, Susumu

    2007-01-01

    Retinal degeneration and dystrophy are the major causes of blindness in the developed world. It has been reported that human cord blood cells (HCBCs) can differentiate into neuron-like cells in vitro. We have recently demonstrated that bone marrow cells (BMCs) of both mice and rats can differentiate into retinal nerve cells (RNCs). In the present study, we show the differentiation capacity of HCBCs into RNCs in vivo. We transplanted lineage-negative HCBCs into the subretinal space of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. Two weeks after the transplantation, some of the transplanted cells expressed human nestin, human MAP2, human neuron specific enolase (NSE), beta-III tubulin and also rhodopsin. These results indicate that HCBCs can differentiate into RNCs and suggest that our new strategy could be used for the regeneration of retinal nerve cells in degenerative or dystrophic diseases.

  14. Human blood platelets lack nitric oxide synthase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhmer, Anke; Gambaryan, Stepan; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Reports on expression and functionality of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in human blood platelets and erythrocytes are contradictory. We used a specific gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method to detect NOS activity in human platelets. The method measures simultaneously [(15)N]nitrite and [(15)N]nitrate formed from oxidized (15)N-labeled nitric oxide ((15)NO) upon its NOS-catalyzed formation from the substrate l-[guanidino-(15)N2]-arginine. Using this GC-MS assay, we did not detect functional NOS in non-stimulated platelets and in intact platelets activated by various agonists (adenosine diphosphate, collagen, thrombin, or von Willebrand factor) or lysed platelets. l-[guanidino-nitro]-Arginine-inhibitable NOS activity was measured after addition of recombinant human endothelial NOS to lysed platelets. Previous and recent studies from our group challenge expression and functionality of NOS in human platelets and erythrocytes.

  15. Global changes in Staphylococcus aureus gene expression in human blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Malachowa

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of bloodstream infections worldwide. In the United States, many of these infections are caused by a strain known as USA300. Although progress has been made, our understanding of the S. aureus molecules that promote survival in human blood and ultimately facilitate metastases is incomplete. To that end, we analyzed the USA300 transcriptome during culture in human blood, human serum, and trypticase soy broth (TSB, a standard laboratory culture media. Notably, genes encoding several cytolytic toxins were up-regulated in human blood over time, and hlgA, hlgB, and hlgC (encoding gamma-hemolysin subunits HlgA, HlgB, and HlgC were among the most highly up-regulated genes at all time points. Compared to culture supernatants from a wild-type USA300 strain (LAC, those derived from an isogenic hlgABC-deletion strain (LACΔhlgABC had significantly reduced capacity to form pores in human neutrophils and ultimately cause neutrophil lysis. Moreover, LACΔhlgABC had modestly reduced ability to cause mortality in a mouse bacteremia model. On the other hand, wild-type and LACΔhlgABC strains caused virtually identical abscesses in a mouse skin infection model, and bacterial survival and neutrophil lysis after phagocytosis in vitro was similar between these strains. Comparison of the cytolytic capacity of culture supernatants from wild-type and isogenic deletion strains lacking hlgABC, lukS/F-PV (encoding PVL, and/or lukDE revealed functional redundancy among two-component leukotoxins in vitro. These findings, along with a requirement of specific growth conditions for leukotoxin expression, may explain the apparent limited contribution of any single two-component leukotoxin to USA300 immune evasion and virulence.

  16. Blood transcriptome based biomarkers for human circadian phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, Emma E; Möller-Levet, Carla S; Poh, Norman; Santhi, Nayantara; Archer, Simon N; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2017-02-20

    Diagnosis and treatment of circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders both require assessment of circadian phase of the brain's circadian pacemaker. The gold-standard univariate method is based on collection of a 24-hr time series of plasma melatonin, a suprachiasmatic nucleus-driven pineal hormone. We developed and validated a multivariate whole-blood mRNA-based predictor of melatonin phase which requires few samples. Transcriptome data were collected under normal, sleep-deprivation and abnormal sleep-timing conditions to assess robustness of the predictor. Partial least square regression (PLSR), applied to the transcriptome, identified a set of 100 biomarkers primarily related to glucocorticoid signaling and immune function. Validation showed that PLSR-based predictors outperform published blood-derived circadian phase predictors. When given one sample as input, the R2 of predicted vs observed phase was 0.74, whereas for two samples taken 12 hr apart, R2 was 0.90. This blood transcriptome-based model enables assessment of circadian phase from a few samples.

  17. Optimizing cord blood collections: Assessing the role of maternal and neonatal factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Joseph; Kushwaha, Neerja; Chatterjee, Tathagata; Mallhi, Rajiv Singh

    2015-01-01

    As processing and cryopreservation of cord blood is time consuming and costly, it is essential to select units with optimal CD34+ cells, total nucleated cell (TNC) number and colony forming units (CFUs). These are the most important factors affecting outcome of UCB transplantation and are influenced by various maternal and neonatal factors. To determine the maternal and neonatal factors affecting TNC and CD34+ cell counts in cord blood so as to aid in proper selection of cord blood units for cryopreservation. A total of 100 UCB units were collected from normal vaginal deliveries, processed and assessed for volume, TNC, CD34+ cell count and CFU-GM. These parameters were then analyzed to find out whether they correlated with maternal and neonatal characteristics such as mother's age, parity, gestational age, baby's birth weight, and sex. The volume of CB collected significantly correlated with the TNC, CD34+ cell, and CFU-GM yields (P blood collected. Since these factors are of prognostic significance, their analysis will aid in deciding which UCB unit should be processed and cryopreserved for UCB banking and subsequent transplantation.

  18. Forensic Identification of Human Blood: comparison of two one-step presumptive tests for blood screening of crime scene samples.

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Flávia Belchior Andrade; Maria Emília Cambria Guimaro Siqueira; Luciano Chaves Arantes; Larissa Silva Queiroz; Rayane Luiza Viegas Silva; Eduardo Dias Ramalho

    2014-01-01

    Blood is the most common body fluid found at crime scenes. One-step presumptive tests have been designed as a rapid immunological test for the qualitative detection of human hemoglobin in stool samples (faecal occult blood) their usefulness for forensic purposes has been demonstrated before. In this study we compare Hexagon OBTI kit and FOB One-step Bioeasy kit sensitivity in the analysis of diluted blood samples. With Hexagon OBTI, positive test results are achieved in whole blood dilutions ...

  19. The DNA methylome of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingrui Li

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation plays an important role in biological processes in human health and disease. Recent technological advances allow unbiased whole-genome DNA methylation (methylome analysis to be carried out on human cells. Using whole-genome bisulfite sequencing at 24.7-fold coverage (12.3-fold per strand, we report a comprehensive (92.62% methylome and analysis of the unique sequences in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from the same Asian individual whose genome was deciphered in the YH project. PBMC constitute an important source for clinical blood tests world-wide. We found that 68.4% of CpG sites and 80% displayed allele-specific expression (ASE. These data demonstrate that ASM is a recurrent phenomenon and is highly correlated with ASE in human PBMCs. Together with recently reported similar studies, our study provides a comprehensive resource for future epigenomic research and confirms new sequencing technology as a paradigm for large-scale epigenomics studies.

  20. Collection of aerosolized human cytokines using Teflon® filters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer H McKenzie

    Full Text Available Collection of exhaled breath samples for the analysis of inflammatory biomarkers is an important area of research aimed at improving our ability to diagnose, treat and understand the mechanisms of chronic pulmonary disease. Current collection methods based on condensation of water vapor from exhaled breath yield biomarker levels at or near the detection limits of immunoassays contributing to problems with reproducibility and validity of biomarker measurements. In this study, we compare the collection efficiency of two aerosol-to-liquid sampling devices to a filter-based collection method for recovery of dilute laboratory generated aerosols of human cytokines so as to identify potential alternatives to exhaled breath condensate collection.Two aerosol-to-liquid sampling devices, the SKC® Biosampler and Omni 3000™, as well as Teflon® filters were used to collect aerosols of human cytokines generated using a HEART nebulizer and single-pass aerosol chamber setup in order to compare the collection efficiencies of these sampling methods. Additionally, methods for the use of Teflon® filters to collect and measure cytokines recovered from aerosols were developed and evaluated through use of a high-sensitivity multiplex immunoassay. Our results show successful collection of cytokines from pg/m(3 aerosol concentrations using Teflon® filters and measurement of cytokine levels in the sub-picogram/mL concentration range using a multiplex immunoassay with sampling times less than 30 minutes. Significant degradation of cytokines was observed due to storage of cytokines in concentrated filter extract solutions as compared to storage of dry filters.Use of filter collection methods resulted in significantly higher efficiency of collection than the two aerosol-to-liquid samplers evaluated in our study. The results of this study provide the foundation for a potential new technique to evaluate biomarkers of inflammation in exhaled breath samples.

  1. Collection of aerosolized human cytokines using Teflon® filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Jennifer H; McDevitt, James J; Fabian, M Patricia; Hwang, Grace M; Milton, Donald K

    2012-01-01

    Collection of exhaled breath samples for the analysis of inflammatory biomarkers is an important area of research aimed at improving our ability to diagnose, treat and understand the mechanisms of chronic pulmonary disease. Current collection methods based on condensation of water vapor from exhaled breath yield biomarker levels at or near the detection limits of immunoassays contributing to problems with reproducibility and validity of biomarker measurements. In this study, we compare the collection efficiency of two aerosol-to-liquid sampling devices to a filter-based collection method for recovery of dilute laboratory generated aerosols of human cytokines so as to identify potential alternatives to exhaled breath condensate collection. Two aerosol-to-liquid sampling devices, the SKC® Biosampler and Omni 3000™, as well as Teflon® filters were used to collect aerosols of human cytokines generated using a HEART nebulizer and single-pass aerosol chamber setup in order to compare the collection efficiencies of these sampling methods. Additionally, methods for the use of Teflon® filters to collect and measure cytokines recovered from aerosols were developed and evaluated through use of a high-sensitivity multiplex immunoassay. Our results show successful collection of cytokines from pg/m(3) aerosol concentrations using Teflon® filters and measurement of cytokine levels in the sub-picogram/mL concentration range using a multiplex immunoassay with sampling times less than 30 minutes. Significant degradation of cytokines was observed due to storage of cytokines in concentrated filter extract solutions as compared to storage of dry filters. Use of filter collection methods resulted in significantly higher efficiency of collection than the two aerosol-to-liquid samplers evaluated in our study. The results of this study provide the foundation for a potential new technique to evaluate biomarkers of inflammation in exhaled breath samples.

  2. Gene expression analysis in human breast cancer associated blood vessels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan T Jones

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is essential for solid tumour growth, whilst the molecular profiles of tumour blood vessels have been reported to be different between cancer types. Although presently available anti-angiogenic strategies are providing some promise for the treatment of some cancers it is perhaps not surprisingly that, none of the anti-angiogenic agents available work on all tumours. Thus, the discovery of novel anti-angiogenic targets, relevant to individual cancer types, is required. Using Affymetrix microarray analysis of laser-captured, CD31-positive blood vessels we have identified 63 genes that are upregulated significantly (5-72 fold in angiogenic blood vessels associated with human invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC of the breast as compared with blood vessels in normal human breast. We tested the angiogenic capacity of a subset of these genes. Genes were selected based on either their known cellular functions, their enriched expression in endothelial cells and/or their sensitivity to anti-VEGF treatment; all features implicating their involvement in angiogenesis. For example, RRM2, a ribonucleotide reductase involved in DNA synthesis, was upregulated 32-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels; ATF1, a nuclear activating transcription factor involved in cellular growth and survival was upregulated 23-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels and HEX-B, a hexosaminidase involved in the breakdown of GM2 gangliosides, was upregulated 8-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels. Furthermore, in silico analysis confirmed that AFT1 and HEX-B also were enriched in endothelial cells when compared with non-endothelial cells. None of these genes have been reported previously to be involved in neovascularisation. However, our data establish that siRNA depletion of Rrm2, Atf1 or Hex-B had significant anti-angiogenic effects in VEGF-stimulated ex vivo mouse aortic ring assays. Overall, our results provide proof-of-principle that our approach can identify a cohort of

  3. Splanchnic blood flow and hepatic glucose production in exercising humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergeron, R; Kjaer, M; Simonsen, L

    2001-01-01

    The study examined the implication of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in regulation of splanchnic blood flow and glucose production in exercising humans. Subjects cycled for 40 min at 50% maximal O(2) consumption (VO(2 max)) followed by 30 min at 70% VO(2 max) either with [angiotensin-converti......The study examined the implication of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in regulation of splanchnic blood flow and glucose production in exercising humans. Subjects cycled for 40 min at 50% maximal O(2) consumption (VO(2 max)) followed by 30 min at 70% VO(2 max) either with [angiotensin......-converting enzyme (ACE) blockade] or without (control) administration of the ACE inhibitor enalapril (10 mg iv). Splanchnic blood flow was estimated by indocyanine green, and splanchnic substrate exchange was determined by the arteriohepatic venous difference. Exercise led to an approximately 20-fold increase (P ... blockade; 0.74 +/- 0.14 l/min, control), whereas splanchnic glucose production (at rest: 0.50 +/- 0.06, ACE blockade; 0.68 +/- 0.10 mmol/min, control) increased during moderate exercise (1.97 +/- 0.29, ACE blockade; 1.91 +/- 0.41 mmol/min, control). Refuting a major role of the RAS for these responses...

  4. Aluminum induces lipid peroxidation and aggregation of human blood platelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neiva T.J.C.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum (Al3+ intoxication is thought to play a major role in the development of Alzheimer's disease and in certain pathologic manifestations arising from long-term hemodialysis. Although the metal does not present redox capacity, it can stimulate tissue lipid peroxidation in animal models. Furthermore, in vitro studies have revealed that the fluoroaluminate complex induces diacylglycerol formation, 43-kDa protein phosphorylation and aggregation. Based on these observations, we postulated that Al3+-induced blood platelet aggregation was mediated by lipid peroxidation. Using chemiluminescence (CL of luminol as an index of total lipid peroxidation capacity, we established a correlation between lipid peroxidation capacity and platelet aggregation. Al3+ (20-100 µM stimulated CL production by human blood platelets as well as their aggregation. Incubation of the platelets with the antioxidants nor-dihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA (100 µM and n-propyl gallate (NPG (100 µM, inhibitors of the lipoxygenase pathway, completely prevented CL and platelet aggregation. Acetyl salicylic acid (ASA (100 µM, an inhibitor of the cyclooxygenase pathway, was a weaker inhibitor of both events. These findings suggest that Al3+ stimulates lipid peroxidation and the lipoxygenase pathway in human blood platelets thereby causing their aggregation

  5. Possible sources of ochratoxin A in human blood in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goliński, P; Grabarkiewicz-Szczesna, J; Chelkowski, J; Hult, K; Kostecki, M

    1991-01-01

    Samples of plant origin and human and porcine blood samples were screened over a long period for the presence of ochratoxin A. Of 1353 cereal samples, 11.7% contained the mycotoxin; of 1372 samples of feed, 1.5%; of 368 bread samples, 17.2%; of 215 flour samples, 22.3%; of 894 porcine serum samples, 37.4%; and of 1065 human serum samples, 7.2%. Seasonal variations in the natural occurrence of ochratoxin A were observed, with an increased percentage of positive samples in the spring. Individual daily intake of the mycotoxin, estimated on the basis of residues in human serum, was found to be 0.4 ng/g of food consumed.

  6. Lectin receptors distribution in the surface membrane of Trypanosoma cruzi blood forms collected from mice submitted to specific treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Fontes

    1991-09-01

    Full Text Available The author investigated the distribution of lectin receptors on Trypanosoma cruzi blood forms collected from mice inoculated with, respectively, the drug-resistant and drug-sensitive strains VL-10 and CL, and treated with the two standard active nitroheterocyclic compounds nifurtimox and benznidazole used for treatment of human Chagas' disease. Blood trypomastigotes purified in Fycoll-Hypaque were incubated with fluorescein-labelled lectins Con A, WGA, EE, WFA, TPA and PNA and then microscopically examined. Neither qualitative or quantitative differences in the fluorescence intensity could be detected between parasites from VL-10 and CL strains submitted or not to treatment. The results suggest that both strains do not differ in their surface membrane carbohydrate moieties. Moreover, the rapid clearance of blood forms the drug-sensitive strain in animals treated with singlo doses of both compounds is not likely to depend on membrane alterations expressed by changes in the carbohydrate components. furthermore, resistance or sensitivity to drugs is not apparently related to carbohydrate distribution on T. cruzi blood forms.

  7. Estimation of ochratoxin A in the human blood of Romanian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlăvog, Anca Vartolomei; Cuciureanu, Magdalena; Schiriac, Elena; Popa, Ionela; Diaconu, Camelia; Cuciureanu, Rodica

    2013-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a toxic secondary metabolite of fungi belonging to the Aspergillus and Penicillium genera, its presence in human blood being the primary indicator of exposure. In the present study we determined OTA in 38 blood samples collected from healthy Romanian subjects of both genders. The OTA was determined through the direct, competitive, solid-phase immunoenzymatic method; the minimum quantification limit for determining OTA in serum samples was 0.0289 ng/mL. The positive sample percentage was 100%. OTA concentrations varied between blood samples exhibit a very high degree of exposure to OTA, but in only approximately 10% of the subjects exceeded 0.5 ng/mL, considered the threshold for OTA-induced renal pathology.

  8. DNA Microarray Detection of 18 Important Human Blood Protozoan Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mu-Xin; Ai, Lin; Chen, Jun-Hu; Feng, Xin-Yu; Chen, Shao-Hong; Cai, Yu-Chun; Lu, Yan; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Chen, Jia-Xu; Hu, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Accurate detection of blood protozoa from clinical samples is important for diagnosis, treatment and control of related diseases. In this preliminary study, a novel DNA microarray system was assessed for the detection of Plasmodium, Leishmania, Trypanosoma, Toxoplasma gondii and Babesia in humans, animals, and vectors, in comparison with microscopy and PCR data. Developing a rapid, simple, and convenient detection method for protozoan detection is an urgent need. The microarray assay simultaneously identified 18 species of common blood protozoa based on the differences in respective target genes. A total of 20 specific primer pairs and 107 microarray probes were selected according to conserved regions which were designed to identify 18 species in 5 blood protozoan genera. The positive detection rate of the microarray assay was 91.78% (402/438). Sensitivity and specificity for blood protozoan detection ranged from 82.4% (95%CI: 65.9% ~ 98.8%) to 100.0% and 95.1% (95%CI: 93.2% ~ 97.0%) to 100.0%, respectively. Positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) ranged from 20.0% (95%CI: 2.5% ~ 37.5%) to 100.0% and 96.8% (95%CI: 95.0% ~ 98.6%) to 100.0%, respectively. Youden index varied from 0.82 to 0.98. The detection limit of the DNA microarrays ranged from 200 to 500 copies/reaction, similar to PCR findings. The concordance rate between microarray data and DNA sequencing results was 100%. Overall, the newly developed microarray platform provides a convenient, highly accurate, and reliable clinical assay for the determination of blood protozoan species.

  9. Increasing the economic efficacy of peripheral blood progenitor cell collections by monitoring peripheral blood CD34+ concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutensohn, Kai; Magens, Mirko M; Kuehnl, Peter; Zeller, Wolfgang

    2010-03-01

    After mobilization, the collection of peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPCs) can either be started a fixed number of days after having passed the white blood cell nadir (fixed-day scheme) or be based on monitoring of CD34+ cells. This study was conducted to compare both approaches and to assess possible financial consequences. For 29 patients daily enumeration of CD34+ cells was used to guide leukapheresis timing. In a retrospective analysis for the same group of patients, application of a fixed-day scheme was assumed. For scenarios of beginning apheresis 2, 3, 4, or 5 days after WBC nadir, the number of apheresis days and granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) application days that could be saved was calculated. A total of 44 apheresis procedures were performed resulting in a mean CD34+ cell content per apheresis product of 10.4 x 10(6) (range, 0.1 x 10(6)-49.5 x 10(6))/kg of body weight. The smallest number of deviation days compared to a fixed-day scheme was found for beginning an apheresis on Day 3. In comparison to this, CD34+ monitoring reduced the number of G-CSF days by 9 and the number of apheresis procedures by 11 overall, resulting in savings of euro;19,965 (US$28,788) in comparison to expenses of euro826 (US$1191) for CD34+ monitoring. Measurement of CD34+ cells has reached a precision enabling a prediction of the harvest success. In comparison to a fixed-day scheme, daily CD34+ monitoring reduces the donor's exposition to G-CSF, enables collection of a sufficient number of PBPCs in the least possible number of apheresis sessions, and improves the economic efficacy of the institution.

  10. Vasa vasorum of superficial collecting lymphatics of human thigh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aglianò, M; Sacchi, G; Weber, E; Pucci, A M; Comparini, L

    1997-09-01

    Collecting lymphatics were obtained from human thigh fat for light microscopy and tridimensional reconstruction at time of operation for varicose veins. No patient had lymphedema and routine sections showed no inflammation or notable pathologic alteration of the surrounding soft tissue. Abundant vasa vasorum was observed around the musculature of superficial collecting lymphatics of human thigh. Within intervalvular portions of the lymphatic collectors where the muscle coat was thicker and more compact, the vasa vasorum penetrated between smooth muscle cells and was in contact with the endothelium. In valvular portions of the collecting lymphatics where the muscle layer was thinner and more fragmented, there were fewer vasa vasorum. Tri-dimensional reconstructions of the collecting lymphatic wall showed two communicating plexi of vasa vasorum--one outside and the other inside the muscle layer. Arteries and veins of similar size did not have such an abundant vasa vasorum. The explanation for this difference may relate to the fact that a relatively low oxygen and nutrient content of lymph is insufficient to nourish the collecting lymphatic. Moreover, diffusion of nutrients from the external plexus is likely also impeded by the thickness and density of the muscle layer. The vasa vasorum deep in the muscular layer and in the subendothelial space probably sustain adequate nutrition and oxygenation to the collecting lymphatic.

  11. Cobalt uptake and binding in human red blood cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Lars Ole; Brown, Anthony M; Harbak, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    The basal uptake and cytoplasmic binding of cobalt was studied in human red cells using (57)Co as tracer. The basal uptake is linear with time, at a rate of about 10 µmol (l cells)(-1) h(-1) at 100 µM [Co(2+)](o), and is almost irreversible, as there is hardly any efflux into excess EDTA. Ionophore......, compared with timed or in-competition whole-blood and serum analysis, an average value for the exposure over the last couple of months....

  12. Distribution of Blood Groups(ABO between Symptomatic & Asymptomatic Human Leishmania Infantum Infection in Human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Molaie

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim: According to the hypothesis that leishmania parasites can be escaped from immune system covered by blood group antigens (ABO to prevent its recognition by the immune system. The aim of this study was to show the associated blood groups with symptomatic or asymptomatic visceral leishmaniasis due to Leishmania infantum in human. Methods: In this cross-sectional study the population was divided into two groups. The first group included 54 patients with kala-azar (antibody against Leishmania titers ≥1:3200 by TDA with clinical specificity and the second group consisted of 45 subjects infected with Leishmania infantum (Leishmania antibody titers of1: 800 and 1:1600 by DAT method and non-specific symptoms. The distribution of the 4 main blood groups ABO type, sex, age, presence or absence of symptoms, clinical signs, and response to Glucantim therapy and DAT results were evaluated. Data were analyzed by chi-square test. Results: Most of the patients in group 1 were blood group A (37% and the lowest number of blood group were B (12.8%. In the second group, most of the ABO blood group A (42.2% and lowest in the ABO blood group AB (8.9%.There was no significant association between blood groups and clinical symptoms (p>0.05. Conclusion: This study showed that there is no association between blood group and incidence of symptomatic and asymptomatic kala-azar. Key words: Leishmania Infantum, Kala-azar, Blood Group, Human

  13. Integrated Metabolomics Assessment of Human Dried Blood Spots and Urine Strips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drolet, Jeremy; Tolstikov, Vladimir; Williams, Brian A; Greenwood, Bennett P; Hill, Collin; Vishnudas, Vivek K; Sarangarajan, Rangaprasad; Narain, Niven R; Kiebish, Michael A

    2017-07-15

    (1) Background: Interest in the application of metabolomics toward clinical diagnostics development and population health monitoring has grown significantly in recent years. In spite of several advances in analytical and computational tools, obtaining a sufficient number of samples from patients remains an obstacle. The dried blood spot (DBS) and dried urine strip (DUS) methodologies are a minimally invasive sample collection method allowing for the relative simplicity of sample collection and minimal cost. (2) Methods: In the current report, we compared results of targeted metabolomics analyses of four types of human blood sample collection methods (with and without DBS) and two types of urine sample collection (DUS and urine) across several parameters including the metabolite coverage of each matrix and the sample stability for DBS/DUS using commercially available Whatman 903TM paper. The DBS/DUS metabolomics protocols were further applied to examine the temporal metabolite level fluctuations within hours and days of sample collection. (3) Results: Several hundred polar metabolites were monitored using DBS/DUS. Temporal analysis of the polar metabolites at various times of the day and across days identified several species that fluctuate as a function of day and time. In addition, a subset of metabolites were identified to be significantly altered across hours within a day and within successive days of the week. (4) Conclusion: A comprehensive DBS/DUS metabolomics protocol was developed for human blood and urine analyses. The described methodology demonstrates the potential for enabling patients to contribute to the expanding bioanalytical demands of precision medicine and population health studies.

  14. Human collective intelligence under dual exploration-exploitation dilemmas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Toyokawa

    Full Text Available The exploration-exploitation dilemma is a recurrent adaptive problem for humans as well as non-human animals. Given a fixed time/energy budget, every individual faces a fundamental trade-off between exploring for better resources and exploiting known resources to optimize overall performance under uncertainty. Colonies of eusocial insects are known to solve this dilemma successfully via evolved coordination mechanisms that function at the collective level. For humans and other non-eusocial species, however, this dilemma operates within individuals as well as between individuals, because group members may be motivated to take excessive advantage of others' exploratory findings through social learning. Thus, even though social learning can reduce collective exploration costs, the emergence of disproportionate "information scroungers" may severely undermine its potential benefits. We investigated experimentally whether social learning opportunities might improve the performance of human participants working on a "multi-armed bandit" problem in groups, where they could learn about each other's past choice behaviors. Results showed that, even though information scroungers emerged frequently in groups, social learning opportunities reduced total group exploration time while increasing harvesting from better options, and consequentially improved collective performance. Surprisingly, enriching social information by allowing participants to observe others' evaluations of chosen options (e.g., Amazon's 5-star rating system in addition to choice-frequency information had a detrimental impact on performance compared to the simpler situation with only the choice-frequency information. These results indicate that humans groups can handle the fundamental "dual exploration-exploitation dilemmas" successfully, and that social learning about simple choice-frequencies can help produce collective intelligence.

  15. Human collective intelligence under dual exploration-exploitation dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyokawa, Wataru; Kim, Hye-rin; Kameda, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    The exploration-exploitation dilemma is a recurrent adaptive problem for humans as well as non-human animals. Given a fixed time/energy budget, every individual faces a fundamental trade-off between exploring for better resources and exploiting known resources to optimize overall performance under uncertainty. Colonies of eusocial insects are known to solve this dilemma successfully via evolved coordination mechanisms that function at the collective level. For humans and other non-eusocial species, however, this dilemma operates within individuals as well as between individuals, because group members may be motivated to take excessive advantage of others' exploratory findings through social learning. Thus, even though social learning can reduce collective exploration costs, the emergence of disproportionate "information scroungers" may severely undermine its potential benefits. We investigated experimentally whether social learning opportunities might improve the performance of human participants working on a "multi-armed bandit" problem in groups, where they could learn about each other's past choice behaviors. Results showed that, even though information scroungers emerged frequently in groups, social learning opportunities reduced total group exploration time while increasing harvesting from better options, and consequentially improved collective performance. Surprisingly, enriching social information by allowing participants to observe others' evaluations of chosen options (e.g., Amazon's 5-star rating system) in addition to choice-frequency information had a detrimental impact on performance compared to the simpler situation with only the choice-frequency information. These results indicate that humans groups can handle the fundamental "dual exploration-exploitation dilemmas" successfully, and that social learning about simple choice-frequencies can help produce collective intelligence.

  16. Optimizing cord blood collections: Assessing the role of maternal and neonatal factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Philip

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: As processing and cryopreservation of cord blood is time consuming and costly, it is essential to select units with optimal CD34+ cells, total nucleated cell (TNC number and colony forming units (CFUs. These are the most important factors affecting outcome of UCB transplantation and are influenced by various maternal and neonatal factors. Aim and objectives: To determine the maternal and neonatal factors affecting TNC and CD34+ cell counts in cord blood so as to aid in proper selection of cord blood units for cryopreservation. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 UCB units were collected from normal vaginal deliveries, processed and assessed for volume, TNC, CD34+ cell count and CFU-GM. These parameters were then analyzed to find out whether they correlated with maternal and neonatal characteristics such as mother′s age, parity, gestational age, baby′s birth weight, and sex. Results: The volume of CB collected significantly correlated with the TNC, CD34+ cell, and CFU-GM yields (P < 0.02. A heavier placenta (P < 0.05, and a heavier baby (P < 0.002 were associated with a significantly greater volume of CB whereas the age, parity of mother and the sex of the baby had no significant effect. Conclusion: The only factors found to affect the TNC and CD34+ cell counts significantly were weight of the baby and placenta and the volume of cord blood collected. Since these factors are of prognostic significance, their analysis will aid in deciding which UCB unit should be processed and cryopreserved for UCB banking and subsequent transplantation.

  17. Human Umbilical Cord Blood for Transplantation Therapy in Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Sandra A; Franzese, Nick; Staples, Meaghan; Weinbren, Nathan L; Babilonia, Monica; Patel, Jason; Merchant, Neil; Simancas, Alejandra Jacotte; Slakter, Adam; Caputo, Mathew; Patel, Milan; Franyuti, Giorgio; Franzblau, Max H; Suarez, Lyanne; Gonzales-Portillo, Chiara; Diamandis, Theo; Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Tajiri, Naoki; Sanberg, Paul R; Kaneko, Yuji; Miller, Leslie W; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2013-07-01

    Cell-based therapy is a promising therapy for myocardial infarction. Endogenous repair of the heart muscle after myocardial infarction is a challenge because adult cardiomyocytes have a limited capacity to proliferate and replace damaged cells. Pre-clinical and clinical evidence has shown that cell based therapy may promote revascularization and replacement of damaged myocytes after myocardial infarction. Adult stem cells can be harvested from different sources including bone marrow, skeletal myoblast, and human umbilical cord blood cells. The use of these cells for the repair of myocardial infarction presents various advantages over other sources of stem cells. Among these are easy harvesting, unlimited differentiation capability, and robust angiogenic potential. In this review, we discuss the milestone findings and the most recent evidence demonstrating the therapeutic efficacy and safety of the transplantation of human umbilical cord blood cells as a stand-alone therapy or in combination with gene therapy, highlighting the importance of optimizing the timing, dose and delivery methods, and a better understanding of the mechanisms of action that will guide the clinical entry of this innovative treatment for ischemic disorders, specifically myocardial infarction.

  18. Concise review: programming human pluripotent stem cells into blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easterbrook, Jennifer; Fidanza, Antonella; Forrester, Lesley M

    2016-06-01

    Blood disorders are treated with cell therapies including haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation as well as platelet and red blood cell transfusions. However the source of cells is entirely dependent on donors, procedures are susceptible to transfusion-transmitted infections and serious complications can arise in recipients due to immunological incompatibility. These problems could be alleviated if it was possible to produce haematopoietic cells in vitro from an autologous and renewable cell source. The production of haematopoietic cells in the laboratory from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may provide a route to realize this goal but it has proven challenging to generate long-term reconstituting HSCs. To date, the optimization of differentiation protocols has mostly relied on the manipulation of extrinsic signals to mimic the in vivo environment. We review studies that have taken an alternative approach to modulate intrinsic signals by enforced expression of transcription factors. Single and combinations of multiple transcription factors have been used in a variety of contexts to enhance the production of haematopoietic cells from human pluripotent stem cells. This programming approach, together with the recent advances in the production and use of synthetic transcription factors, holds great promise for the production of fully functional HSCs in the future. © 2016 The Authors. British Journal of Haematology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Infrared spectra in monitoring biochemical parameters of human blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, S.; Jain, N.; Singh, R. A.

    2012-05-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is gaining recognition as a promising method. The infrared spectra of selected regions (2000-400cm-1) of blood tissue samples are reported. Present study related to the role of spectral peak fitting in the study of human blood and quantitative interpretations of infrared spectra based on chemometrics. The spectral variations are interpreted in terms of the biochemical and pathological processes involved. The mean RNA/DNA ratio of fitted intensities and analytical area as calculated from the transmittance peaks at 1121cm-1/1020cm-1 is found to be 0.911A.U and 2.00A.U. respectively. The ratio of 1659cm-1/1544cm-1 (amide-I/amide-II) bands is found to shed light on the change in the DNA content. The ratio of amide-I/amide-II is almost unity (≈1.054) for blood spectra. The deviation from unity is an indication of DNA absorption from the RBC cells. The total phosphate content has found to be 25.09A.U. The level for glycogen/phosphate ratio (areas under peaks 1030cm-1/1082cm-1) is found to be 0.286A.U. The ratio of unsaturated and saturated carbonyl compounds (C=O) in blood samples is in form of esters and the analytical areas under the spectral peaks at 1740cm-1 and 1731cm-1 for unsaturated esters and saturated esters respectively found to be 0.618A.U.

  20. Dynamic and temporal assessment of human dried blood spot MS/MSALL shotgun lipidomics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; McDaniel, Justice; Chen, Emily Y; Rockwell, Hannah E; Drolet, Jeremy; Vishnudas, Vivek K; Tolstikov, Vladimir; Sarangarajan, Rangaprasad; Narain, Niven R; Kiebish, Michael A

    2017-01-01

    Real-time and dynamic assessment of an individual's lipid homeostatic state in blood is complicated due to the need to collect samples in a clinical environment. In the context of precision medicine and population health, tools that facilitate sample collection and empower the individual to participate in the process are necessary to complement advanced bioanalytical analysis. The dried blood spot (DBS) methodology via finger prick or heel prick is a minimally invasive sample collection method that allows the relative ease and low cost of sample collection as well as transport. However, it has yet to be integrated into broad scale personalized lipidomic analysis. Therefore, in this study we report the development of a novel DBS high resolution MS/MSALL lipidomics workflow. In this report we compared lipidomic analysis of four types of blood sample collection methods (DBS, venous whole blood, serum, and plasma) across several parameters, which include lipidomics coverage of each matrix and the effects of temperature and time on the coverage and stability of different lipid classes and molecular species. The novel DBS-MS/MSALL lipidomics platform developed in this report was then applied to examine postprandial effects on the blood lipidome and further to explore the temporal fluctuation of the lipidome across hours and days. More than 1,200 lipid molecular species from a single DBS sample were identified and quantified. The lipidomics profile of the DBS samples is comparable to whole blood matrix. DBS-MS/MSALL lipidomic analysis in postprandial experiments revealed significant alterations in triacylglyceride species. Temporal analysis of the lipidome at various times in the day and across days identified several lipid species that fluctuate as a function of time, and a subset of lipid species were identified to be significantly altered across hours within a day and within successive days of the week. A novel DBS-MS/MSALL lipidomics method has been established for

  1. Connecting Humans and Water: The Case for Coordinated Data Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braden, J. B.; Brown, D. G.; Jolejole-Foreman, C.; Maidment, D. R.; Marquart-Pyatt, S. T.; Schneider, D. W.

    2012-12-01

    "Water problems" are fundamentally human problems -- aligning water quality and quantity with human aspirations. In the U.S., however, the few ongoing efforts to repeatedly observe humans in relation to water at large scale are disjointed both with each other and with observing systems for water quality and quantity. This presentation argues for the systematic, coordinated, and on-going collection of primary data on humans, spanning beliefs, perceptions, behaviors, and institutions, alongside the water environments in which they are embedded. Such an enterprise would advance not only water science and related policy and management decisions, but also generate basic insights into human cognition, decision making, and institutional development as they relate to the science of sustainability. In support of this argument, two types of original analyses are presented. First, two case studies using existing data sets illustrate methodological issues involved in integrating natural system data with social data at large scale: one concerns the influence of water quality conditions on personal efforts to conserve water and contribute financially to environmental protection; the other explores relationships between recreation behavior and water quality. Both case studies show how methodological differences between data programs seriously undercut the potential to draw inference about human responses to water quality while also illustrating the scientific potential that could be realized from linking human and scientific surveys of the water environment. Second, the results of a survey of water scientists concerning important scientific and policy questions around humans and water provide insight into data collection priorities for a coordinated program of observation.

  2. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate of human blood exposed to low-level laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Musawi, Mustafa S; Jaafar, M S; Al-Gailani, B; Ahmed, Naser M; Suhaimi, Fatanah M; Bakhsh, Muhammad

    2016-08-01

    This study is designed to investigate in vitro low-level laser (LLL) effects on rheological parameter, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), of human blood. The interaction mechanism between LLL radiation and blood is unclear. Therefore, research addresses the effects of LLL irradiation on human blood and this is essential to understanding how laser radiation interacts with biological cells and tissues. The blood samples were collected through venipuncture into EDTA-containing tubes as an anticoagulant. Each sample was divided into two equal aliquots to be used as a non-irradiated sample (control) and an irradiated sample. The aliquot was subjected to doses of 36, 54, 72 and 90 J/cm(2) with wavelengths of 405, 589 and 780 nm, with a radiation source at a fixed power density of 30 mW/cm(2). The ESR and red blood cell count and volume are measured after laser irradiation and compared with the non-irradiated samples. The maximum reduction in ESR is observed with radiation dose 72 J/cm(2) delivered with a 405-nm wavelength laser beam. Moreover, no hemolysis is observed under these irradiation conditions. In a separate protocol, ESR of separated RBCs re-suspended in irradiated plasma (7.6 ± 2.3 mm/h) is found to be significantly lower (by 51 %) than their counterpart re-suspended in non-irradiated plasma (15.0 ± 3.7 mm/h). These results indicate that ESR reduction is mainly due to the effects of LLL on the plasma composition that ultimately affect whole blood ESR.

  3. Modeling human-flood interactions: Collective action and community resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, D. J.; Sangwan, N.; Sung, K.

    2016-12-01

    Stylized models of socio-hydrology have mainly used social memory aspects such as community awareness or sensitivity to connect hydrologic change and social response. However, social memory alone does not satisfactorily capture the details of how human behavior is translated into collective action for water resources governance. Nor is it the only mechanism by which the two-way feedbacks of socio-hydrology can be operationalized. This study contributes towards bridging of this gap by developing a stylized model of a human-flood system that includes two additional drivers of change: (1) institutions for collective action, and (2) connections to an external economic system. Motivated by the case of community-managed flood protection systems (polders) in coastal Bangladesh, we use the model to understand critical general features that affect long-term resilience of human-flood systems. Our findings suggest that occasional adversity can enhance long-term resilience. Allowing some hydrological variability to enter into the polder can increase its adaptive capacity and resilience through the preservation of social memory and institutions for collective action. Further, there are potential tradeoffs associated with optimization of flood resilience through structural measures. By reducing sensitivity to flooding, the system may become more fragile under the double impact of flooding and economic change

  4. Lactation-Related MicroRNA Expression in Microvesicles of Human Umbilical Cord Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, De-Jing; Wang, Chen-Meiyi; Wang, Yi-Ting; Qiao, Hai; Fang, Liao-Qiong; Wang, Zhi-Biao

    2016-11-24

    BACKGROUND The complex process by which lactation is initiated upon neonate delivery remains incompletely understood. Microvesicles (MVs) can transmit microRNAs (miRNAs) into recipient cells to influence cell function, and recent studies have identified miRNAs essential for mammary gland development and lactation. This study aimed to investigate the expression of lactation-related miRNAs in MVs isolated from human umbilical cord blood immediately after delivery. MATERIAL AND METHODS Umbilical cord blood samples were collected from 70 healthy pregnant women, and MVs were isolated through differential centrifugation and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, Western blotting, and nanoparticle tracking analysis. Lactation-related miRNAs were screened using bioinformatics tools for miRNA target prediction, gene ontology, and signaling pathway analyses. miRNA PCR arrays were used for miRNA expression analysis, and the results were validated by real-time PCR. Upon exposure of HBL-100 human mammary epithelial cells to MVs, MV uptake was examined by fluorescence confocal microscopy and b-casein secretion was detected by ELISA. RESULTS Spherical MVs extracted from umbilical cord blood expressed CD63 and had an average diameter of 167.0±77.1 nm. We profiled 337 miRNAs in human umbilical cord blood MVs and found that 85 were related to lactation by bioinformatics analysis. The 25 most differentially expressed lactation-related miRNAs were validated by real-time PCR. MV uptake by HBL-100 cells was after 4 h in culture, and significantly increased secretion of β-casein was observed after 96 h from cells exposed to MVs (Plactation-related miRNAs and can induce β-casein production by HBL-100 cells in vitro. Thus, umbilical cord blood MVs may mediate secretion of β-casein through miRNAs, thereby playing an important role in fetal-maternal crosstalk.

  5. Kinetic analysis of ex vivo human blood infection by Leishmania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Moreno

    Full Text Available The leishmanioses, vector-borne diseases caused by the trypanosomatid protozoan Leishmania, are transmitted to susceptible mammals by infected phlebotomine sand flies that inoculate promastigotes into hemorrhagic pools created in host skin. We assumed that promastigotes are delivered to a blood pool, and analyzed early promastigote interactions (0-5 min with host components, which lead to parasite endocytosis by blood leukocytes, and to host infection. Promastigotes were incubated with NHS or with heparinized blood in near-physiological conditions, and we used cell radioimmunoassay and flow cytometry to measure the on-rate constants (k(+1 of promastigote interactions with natural opsonins and erythrocytes. We obtained quantitative data for parasitized cells to determine the time-course of promastigote binding and internalization by blood leukocytes. In these reactions, promastigotes bind natural opsonins, immune adhere to erythrocytes and activate complement cytolysis, which kills approximately 95% of promastigotes by 2 min post-infection. C3-promastigote binding is a key step in opsonization; nascent C3-promastigotes are the substrate for two simultaneous reactions, C3-promastigote immune adherence (IA to erythrocytes and complement-mediated promastigote killing. The k(+1 for IA was 75-fold greater than that for promastigote killing, showing that IA facilitates promastigote endocytosis and circumvents lysis. At 5 min post-infection, when reaction velocity is still linear and promastigote concentration is not limiting, 17.4% of granulocytes and 10.7% of monocytes had bound promastigotes, of which approximately 50% and approximately 25%, respectively, carried surface-bound (live or internalized (live and dead leishmanias. Of other leukocyte types, 8.5% of B cells bound but did not internalize promastigotes, and T cells, NK cells and CD209(+ dendritic cells did not bind parasites. These data show that, once in contact with blood, promastigote

  6. Is the test result correct? A questionnaire study of blood collection practices in primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderberg, Johan; Wallin, Olof; Grankvist, Kjell; Brulin, Christine

    2010-08-01

    Venous blood tests are important for clinical decision making. Most errors in blood testing are due to human errors before the blood samples reach the laboratory. The present study was designed to investigate venous blood sampling (VBS) practices in primary health care centres (PHCs) compared with clinical laboratory staff. A cross-sectional survey of 70 PHCs and two clinical laboratories is conducted. All staff responsible for VBS (317 respondents, response rate 94%) completed a questionnaire on VBS practices. Instructions for VBS were not followed in the surveyed PHCs. For example, only 54% reported that they always identified the patient by using name/Swedish identification number and only 5% reported that they always used photo-ID, the two preferred means for patient identification. Only 12% reported that they always released venous stasis as soon as possible. Fewer PHC staff than clinical laboratory staff reported correct VBS practices. For example, 54% of the PHC staff reported that they always identified the patient by name and Swedish identification number, as compared with 95% of the clinical laboratory staff (P VBS routines and re-education in VBS were not clearly associated with reported correct VBS practices. In the surveyed PHCs, there are clinically important risks for misidentification of patients and erroneous test results, with consequences for the diagnosis and treatment of patients. Quality interventions, aimed at improving VBS practices, are needed to ensure patient safety.

  7. Biobanking human endometrial tissue and blood specimens: standard operating procedure and importance to reproductive biology research and diagnostic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Elizabeth; Vo, Kim Chi; McIntire, Ramsey A; Aghajanova, Lusine; Zelenko, Zara; Irwin, Juan C; Giudice, Linda C

    2011-05-01

    To develop a standard operating procedure (SOP) for collection, transport, storage of human endometrial tissue and blood samples, subject and specimen annotation, and establishing sample priorities. The SOP synthesizes sound scientific procedures, the literature on ischemia research, sample collection and gene expression profiling, good laboratory practices, and the authors' experience of workflow and sample quality. The National Institutes of Health, University of California, San Francisco, Human Endometrial Tissue and DNA Bank. Women undergoing endometrial biopsy or hysterectomy for nonmalignant indications. Collecting, processing, storing, distributing endometrial tissue and blood samples under approved institutional review board protocols and written informed consent from participating subjects. Standard operating procedure. The SOP addresses rigorous and consistent subject annotation, specimen processing and characterization, strict regulatory compliance, and a reference for researchers to track collection and storage times that may influence their research. The comprehensive and systematic approach to the procurement of human blood and endometrial tissue in this SOP ensures the high quality, reliability, and scientific usefulness of biospecimens made available to investigators by the National Institutes of Health, University of California, San Francisco, Human Endometrial Tissue and DNA Bank. The detail and perspective in this SOP also provides a blueprint for implementation of similar collection programs at other institutions. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Factors associated with nursing students' adherence to venous blood collection practice guidelines - A cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Karin; Brulin, Christine; Grankvist, Kjell; Juthberg, Christina

    2017-03-01

    Venous blood specimen collection is a common procedure that nursing students perform during pre-registration courses, and training for such collections takes place on campus as well as at clinical placements. However, levels of adherence to practice guidelines are still suboptimal among both nursing students and healthcare staff. We aimed to explore nursing students' adherence to the Swedish national venous blood specimen collection practice guidelines regarding patient identification and test request management and how this adherence is related to clinical experience, capability beliefs, research use, and the perceived social climate in clinical contexts. A survey with a cross-sectional design was conducted among 305 nursing students at a medium-sized university in Sweden. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were used for data analysis. The survey showed that 82% of the students adhered to patient identification guideline practices and 80% to test request management practices. Factors associated with correct patient identification procedures were semester and frequency of research use. Factors associated with correct test request management were previous healthcare work experience, semester, and capability beliefs regarding academic abilities and evidence-based practice. We conclude that there is a need to develop educational tools to train students in research use and evidence-based practice in order to enhance guideline practice adherence and improve patient safety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterizing dynamic changes in the human blood transcriptional network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhu

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression data generated systematically in a given system over multiple time points provides a source of perturbation that can be leveraged to infer causal relationships among genes explaining network changes. Previously, we showed that food intake has a large impact on blood gene expression patterns and that these responses, either in terms of gene expression level or gene-gene connectivity, are strongly associated with metabolic diseases. In this study, we explored which genes drive the changes of gene expression patterns in response to time and food intake. We applied the Granger causality test and the dynamic Bayesian network to gene expression data generated from blood samples collected at multiple time points during the course of a day. The simulation result shows that combining many short time series together is as powerful to infer Granger causality as using a single long time series. Using the Granger causality test, we identified genes that were supported as the most likely causal candidates for the coordinated temporal changes in the network. These results show that PER1 is a key regulator of the blood transcriptional network, in which multiple biological processes are under circadian rhythm regulation. The fasted and fed dynamic Bayesian networks showed that over 72% of dynamic connections are self links. Finally, we show that different processes such as inflammation and lipid metabolism, which are disconnected in the static network, become dynamically linked in response to food intake, which would suggest that increasing nutritional load leads to coordinate regulation of these biological processes. In conclusion, our results suggest that food intake has a profound impact on the dynamic co-regulation of multiple biological processes, such as metabolism, immune response, apoptosis and circadian rhythm. The results could have broader implications for the design of studies of disease association and drug response in clinical

  10. Survey of Canadian human blood plasma for ochratoxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, P M; Kanhere, S R; Lau, B P; Lewis, D A; Hayward, S; Ryan, J J; Kuiper-Goodman, T

    1998-07-01

    Blood plasma samples collected from 144 healthy volunteers in 16 locations across Canada in 1994 were analysed for ochratoxin A (OTA). The method of analysis included cleanup by C18 solid phase extraction and immunoaffinity columns followed by liquid chromatography (LC) with fluorescence detection, which gave 86.5% (s.d. = 9.7) recovery (n = 31) of OTA (added at 2 ng/ml) with a detection limit of 0.15 ng/ml. The arithmetic mean concentration found in the plasma samples, corrected for volume of anticoagulant added, was 0.88 ng/ml with a standard deviation of 0.35 ng/ml and a range of 0.29-2.37 ng/ml. Confirmation of identity of OTA was by methyl ester formation for 65 samples and by LC-tandem mass spectrometry for 17 samples (some of which were included in pooled samples). Statistical analysis, by ANOVA of the log OTA plasma concentrations, showed a highly significant effect due to location in Canada (p = blood group of donors. The highest mean concentration was found in Winnipeg, significantly different (p = 0.05) by the Student-Newman-Keuls multiple range test from the lowest levels found in Toronto, Vancouver and Saint John.

  11. Functional Blood Progenitor Markers in Developing Human Liver Progenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orit Goldman

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the early fetal liver, hematopoietic progenitors expand and mature together with hepatoblasts, the liver progenitors of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. Previous analyses of human fetal livers indicated that both progenitors support each other's lineage maturation and curiously share some cell surface markers including CD34 and CD133. Using the human embryonic stem cell (hESC system, we demonstrate that virtually all hESC-derived hepatoblast-like cells (Hep cells transition through a progenitor stage expressing CD34 and CD133 as well as GATA2, an additional hematopoietic marker that has not previously been associated with human hepatoblast development. Dynamic expression patterns for CD34, CD133, and GATA2 in hepatoblasts were validated in human fetal livers collected from the first and second trimesters of gestation. Knockdown experiments demonstrate that each gene also functions to regulate hepatic fate mostly in a cell-autonomous fashion, revealing unprecedented roles of fetal hematopoietic progenitor markers in human liver progenitors.

  12. Comparison between intermittent and continuous spectra optia leukapheresis systems for autologous peripheral blood stem cell collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisenko, Katharina; Pavel, Petra; Bruckner, Thomas; Puthenparambil, Joe; Hundemer, Michael; Schmitt, Anita; Witzens-Harig, Mathias; Ho, Anthony D; Wuchter, Patrick

    2017-02-01

    Terumo BCT recently introduced a new system for mononuclear cell (MNC) collection that uses a Spectra Optia apheresis machine equipped with a redesigned disposable kit and software program (version 11.2). It allows for the continuous collection of MNCs, unlike the original Spectra Optia system (version 7.2), which included a chamber for two-step cell separation. The aim of this study was to compare the two apheresis systems in regard to specific performance parameters. A retrospective data analysis of 150 patients who had undergone peripheral blood stem cell collection between March of 2014 and May of 2015 at our institution was performed. For the matched comparison, patients were divided into two groups by diagnosis and by previous forms of therapy received: a homogeneous group of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) that had received first line therapy ("MM" group, n = 88) and a heterogeneous group that included all of the other patients ("other" group, n = 62). No significant differences in CD34+ collection yields between both collection regimens were found (pMM  = 0.19, pother  = 0.74) in either group. Moreover, similar performance ratios (collected/predicted CD34+ cell number in %) were observed (pMM  = 0.89, pother  = 0.1). No relevant variations in platelet or hemoglobin loss were found between the two systems. We conclude that the new continuous Spectra Optia MNC system is equally efficient in collecting CD34+ cells and can be used without sacrificing collection efficiency levels when treating a broad variety of autologous patients. J. Clin. Apheresis 32:27-34, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. A new voluntary blood collection method for the Andean bear (Tremarctos ornatus) and Asiatic black bear (Ursus thibetanus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otaki, Yusuke; Kido, Nobuhide; Omiya, Tomoko; Ono, Kaori; Ueda, Miya; Azumano, Akinori; Tanaka, Sohei

    2015-01-01

    Various training methods have been developed for animal husbandry and health care in zoos and one of these trainings is blood collection. One training method, recently widely used for blood collection in Ursidae, requires setting up a sleeve outside the cage and gives access to limited blood collection sites. A new voluntary blood collection method without a sleeve was applied to the Andean bear (Tremarctos ornatus) and Asiatic black bear (Ursus thibetanus) with access to various veins at the same time. The present study evaluated the effectiveness of this new method and suggests improvements. Two Andean and two Asiatic black bears in Yokohama and Nogeyama Zoological Gardens, respectively, were trained to hold a bamboo pipe outside their cages. We could, thereby, simultaneously access superficial dorsal veins, the dorsal venous network of the hand, the cephalic vein from the carpal joint, and an area approximately 10 cm proximal to the carpal joint. This allowed us to evaluate which vein was most suitable for blood collection. We found that the cephalic vein, approximately 10 cm proximal to the carpal joint, was the most suitable for blood collection. This new method requires little or no modification of zoo facilities and provides a useful alternative method for blood collection. It could be adapted for use in other clinical examinations such as ultrasound examination. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Amyloid β levels in human red blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehiro Kiko

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Amyloid β-peptide (Aβ is hypothesized to play a key role by oxidatively impairing the capacity of red blood cells (RBCs to deliver oxygen to the brain. These processes are implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Although plasma Aβ has been investigated thoroughly, the presence and distribution of Aβ in human RBCs are still unclear. In this study, we quantitated Aβ40 and Aβ42 in human RBCs with ELISA assays, and provided evidence that significant amounts of Aβ could be detected in RBCs and that the RBC Aβ levels increased with aging. The RBC Aβ levels increased with aging. On the other hand, providing an antioxidant supplement (astaxanthin, a polar carotenoid to humans was found to decrease RBC Aβ as well as oxidative stress marker levels. These results suggest that plasma Aβ40 and Aβ42 bind to RBCs (possibly with aging, implying a pathogenic role of RBC Aβ. Moreover, the data indicate that RBC Aβ40 and Aβ42 may constitute biomarkers of AD. As a preventive strategy, therapeutic application of astaxanthin as an Aβ-lowering agent in RBCs could be considered as a possible anti-dementia agent. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN42483402.

  15. Human Saliva Collection Devices for Proteomics: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohaib Khurshid

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There has been a rapid growth in the interest and adaptation of saliva as a diagnostic specimen over the last decade, and in the last few years in particular, there have been major developments involving the application of saliva as a clinically relevant specimen. Saliva provides a “window” into the oral and systemic health of an individual, and like other bodily fluids, saliva can be analyzed and studied to diagnose diseases. With the advent of new, more sensitive technologies to detect smaller concentrations of analytes in saliva relative to blood levels, there have been a number of critical developments in the field that we will describe. In particular, recent advances in standardized saliva collection devices that were not available three to four years ago, have made it easy for safe, simple, and non-invasive collection of samples to be carried out from patients. With the availability of these new technologies, we believe that in the next decade salivary proteomics will make it possible to predict and diagnose oral as well as systemic diseases, cancer, and infectious diseases, among others. The aim of this article is to review recent developments and advances in the area of saliva specimen collection devices and applications that will advance the field of proteomics.

  16. Evaluating the optimum rest period prior to blood collection for fractionated plasma free metanephrines analysis

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Griffin, T.P.

    2016-05-01

    The high diagnostic accuracy of plasma metanephrines (PMets) in the di-agnosis of Phaeochromocytoma\\/Paraganglioma (PPGL) is well established. Considerable controversy exists regarding optimum sampling conditions for PMets. The use of reference intervals that do not compromise diagnostic sensitivity is recommended. However, the optimum rest period prior to sampling has yet to be clearly established. The aim of this study was to evaluate PMets concentrations in paired blood samples collected following 30 and 40 min seated-rest prior to sampling, in patients in whom it was clinically rea-sonable to suspect that PPGL may be present.

  17. The passive biomechanics of human pelvic collecting lymphatic vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, Dimitrios; Edgar, Lowell T; Jafarnejad, Mohammad; Nixon, Katherine; Duarte, Delfim; Hawkins, Edwin D; Jamalian, Samira; Cunnea, Paula; Lo Celso, Cristina; Kobayashi, Shunichi; Fotopoulou, Christina; Moore, James E

    2017-01-01

    The lymphatic system has a major significance in the metastatic pathways in women's cancers. Lymphatic pumping depends on both extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms, and the mechanical behavior of lymphatic vessels regulates the function of the system. However, data on the mechanical properties and function of human lymphatics are lacking. Our aim is to characterize, for the first time, the passive biomechanical behavior of human collecting lymphatic vessels removed at pelvic lymph node dissection during primary debulking surgeries for epithelial ovarian cancer. Isolated vessels were cannulated and then pressurized at varying levels of applied axial stretch in a calcium-free Krebs buffer. Pressurized vessels were then imaged using multi-photon microscopy for collagen-elastin structural composition and fiber orientation. Both pressure-diameter and force-elongation responses were highly nonlinear, and axial stretching of the vessel served to decrease diameter at constant pressure. Pressure-diameter behavior for the human vessels is very similar to data from rat mesenteric vessels, though the human vessels were approximately 10× larger than those from rats. Multiphoton microscopy revealed the vessels to be composed of an inner layer of elastin with an outer layer of aligned collagen fibers. This is the first study that successfully described the passive biomechanical response and composition of human lymphatic vessels in patients with ovarian cancer. Future work should expand on this knowledge base with investigations of vessels from other anatomical locations, contractile behavior, and the implications on metastatic cell transport.

  18. 77 FR 14530 - National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; New Proposed Collection; Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-12

    ... collection projects, the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), the National... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; New Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Environmental Science Formative Research Methodology Studies...

  19. Mechanism of the dissolution of enflurane and isoflurane into human, dog and bovine blood

    OpenAIRE

    多田, 恵一

    1987-01-01

    This study was performed to elucidate the difference in the mechanism of the dissolution of enflurane and isoflurane into human, dog and bovine blood in terms of changes in the hematocrit using the highly accurate analytical method of direct gas chromatography. With enflurane, as the hematocrit increased, the blood-gas partition coefficient for human and bovine blood decreased linearly (P < 0.001), and that for dog blood increased linearly (P < 0.001). With isoflurane, as the hematocrit incre...

  20. 21 CFR 640.53 - Testing the blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testing the blood. 640.53 Section 640.53 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Cryoprecipitate § 640.53 Testing the blood. (a) Blood... sample of blood collected at the time of collecting the source blood, and such sample container shall be...

  1. Measurement of thyroid hormones in donkey (Equus asinus) blood and milk: validation of ELISA kits and evaluation of sample collection, handling and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todini, Luca; Malfatti, Alessandro; Salimei, Elisabetta; Fantuz, Francesco

    2010-11-01

    Donkey's milk is well tolerated by human infants with cow's milk allergy and is useful in the treatment of human immune-related diseases and in the prevention of atherosclerosis. Thyroid hormones (TH) stimulate lactation and active triiodothyronine (T3) in colostrum and milk could take paracrine action supporting lactogenesis in the mother, and play physiological roles for the suckling offspring (systemic or within the gastrointestinal tract). The aims were to measure TH concentrations in donkey blood and milk, validate ELISA methods, evaluate the effects of sample collection and post-collection handling and the stability of TH in milk and blood serum and plasma samples. In milk and blood samples obtained from lactating jennies total concentrations of TH were assayed using competitive-type ELISA kits. Good validation results were obtained for both TH concentrations in blood serum and plasma and T3 in milk samples extracted with cold (-20°C) ethanol alkalinized (pH 9·0) with NH4OH. In most of the milk extract samples, thyroxine (T4) concentrations resulted below the sensitivity threshold. Intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variations of TH concentrations in different blood and milk samples were below 10%. Parallelism tests gave displacement lines parallel to those of the calibrators for both TH in blood serum and plasma and for T3 in milk extracts. Mean recovery rates were between 95% and 123%, but the concentration values approaching the highest calibrators were overestimated. Therefore, serum and plasma samples for T3 assay must be previously diluted with buffer. Both TH concentrations in blood serum and plasma and T3 in milk did not change during storage for up to 6 months at -20°C. In conclusion, the ELISA methods tested in the present study are suitable for determination of both TH concentrations in donkey blood samples, and for T3 measurement in milk, after extraction with cold alkaline ethanol.

  2. Circulating Blood Monocyte Subclasses and Lipid-Laden Adipose Tissue Macrophages in Human Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecht, Tal; Haim, Yulia; Bashan, Nava; Shapiro, Hagit; Harman-Boehm, Ilana; Kirshtein, Boris; Clément, Karine; Shai, Iris; Rudich, Assaf

    2016-01-01

    Visceral adipose tissue foam cells are increased in human obesity, and were implicated in adipose dysfunction and increased cardio-metabolic risk. In the circulation, non-classical monocytes (NCM) are elevated in obesity and associate with atherosclerosis and type 2 diabetes. We hypothesized that circulating NCM correlate and/or are functionally linked to visceral adipose tissue foam cells in obesity, potentially providing an approach to estimate visceral adipose tissue status in the non-surgical obese patient. We preformed ex-vivo functional studies utilizing sorted monocyte subclasses from healthy donors. Moreover, we assessed circulating blood monocyte subclasses and visceral fat adipose tissue macrophage (ATM) lipid content by flow-cytometry in paired blood and omental-fat samples collected from patients (n = 65) undergoing elective abdominal surgery. Ex-vivo, NCM and NCM-derived macrophages exhibited lower lipid accumulation capacity compared to classical or intermediate monocytes/-derived macrophages. Moreover, of the three subclasses, NCM exhibited the lowest migration towards adipose tissue conditioned-media. In a cohort of n = 65, increased %NCM associated with higher BMI (r = 0.250,plipid content (r = 0.303,plipid content, particularly in men. Collectively, although circulating blood NCM are unlikely direct functional precursor cells for adipose tissue foam cells, their increased percentage in the circulation may clinically reflect higher lipid content in visceral ATMs.

  3. De Novo Generated Human Red Blood Cells in Humanized Mice Support Plasmodium falciparum Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anburaj Amaladoss

    Full Text Available Immunodeficient mouse-human chimeras provide a powerful approach to study host specific pathogens like Plasmodium (P. falciparum that causes human malaria. Existing mouse models of P. falciparum infection require repeated injections of human red blood cells (RBCs. In addition, clodronate lipsomes and anti-neutrophil antibodies are injected to suppress the clearance of human RBCs by the residual immune system of the immunodeficient mice. Engraftment of NOD-scid Il2rg-/- mice with human hematopoietic stem cells leads to reconstitution of human immune cells. Although human B cell reconstitution is robust and T cell reconstitution is reasonable in the recipient mice, human RBC reconstitution is generally poor or undetectable. The poor reconstitution is mainly the result of a deficiency of appropriate human cytokines that are necessary for the development and maintenance of these cell lineages. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding human erythropoietin and interleukin-3 into humanized mice by hydrodynamic tail-vein injection resulted in significantly enhanced reconstitution of erythrocytes. With this improved humanized mouse, here we show that P. falciparum infects de novo generated human RBCs, develops into schizonts and causes successive reinvasion. We also show that different parasite strains exhibit variation in their ability to infect these humanized mice. Parasites could be detected by nested PCR in the blood samples of humanized mice infected with P. falciparum K1 and HB3 strains for 3 cycles, whereas in other strains such as 3D7, DD2, 7G8, FCR3 and W2mef parasites could only be detected for 1 cycle. In vivo adaptation of K1 strain further improves the infection efficiency and parasites can be detected by microscopy for 3 cycles. The parasitemia ranges between 0.13 and 0.25% at the first cycle of infection, falls between 0.08 and 0.15% at the second cycle, and drops to barely detectable levels at the third cycle of infection. Compared to existing

  4. Concentrations of environmental contaminants in blood samples collected from Sharp-shinned hawks (Accipiter striatus) from the Eastern Flyway

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Table 1 provides the results of organochlorine and mercury analysis on plasma and whole blood samples (respectively) collected from 20 sharp-shinned hawks at HMS...

  5. Events at blood collection area due to nonconforming blood bags and plateletpheresis kits: need for timely corrective and preventive actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Anupam; Sachan, Deepti; Elhence, Priti; Pandey, Hem; Dubey, Anju

    2012-07-01

    Good blood banking practice requires that every effort should be made to detect any deviation or defect in blood bank products and to identify any potential risk to blood donor or recipient(s). We report the findings of an exercise that provide an insight into why feedback from the user side is crucial. Various events involving blood bags and plateletpheresis kits and the corresponding appropriate actions instituted for remedial measures were recorded. These scattered events were recorded for 6 months following the use of a new batch of improved blood bags with add-on features. Several events related to plateletpheresis kits from three different manufacturers were also recorded for 1 year. The affected blood bags were utilized with no untoward incident. The complaint was closed following satisfactory response from the blood bag manufacturing company that acted in a timely manner in addressing the root causes of the problems. However, corrective and preventive actions (CAPA) could not be implemented for plateletpheresis kits. The rate of undesirable events was higher with plateletpheresis kits as compared with whole blood bags (1.75% vs. 0.06%). As defects or deviations that trigger the need for CAPA can stem from numerous sources, it is important to clearly identify and document the problems and level of risk so that appropriate investigations can be instituted and remedial actions can be taken in a timely manner. This study demonstrates the usefulness of a quality initiative to collate and analyze blood product faults in conjunction with blood product manufacturers. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  6. Collection and storage of red blood cells with anticoagulant and additive solution with a physiologic pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burger, Patrick; Korsten, Herbert; Verhoeven, Arthur J.; de Korte, Dirk; van Bruggen, Robin

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A donation of whole blood is most commonly collected in acidic citrate-phosphate-dextrose (CPD) variants with pH 5.2 to 6.2 as anticoagulants. Previously, we have shown that the initial pH after red blood cell (RBC) preparation can have an effect on RBCs during storage. First, we

  7. Concordance of mutation detection in circulating tumor DNA in early clinical trials using different blood collection protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlborn, Lise B.; Madsen, Mette; Jonson, Lars

    2017-01-01

    in a clinical setting. Here we investigate the concordance between standard blood collection for molecular analysis using immediate separation of plasma, compared to the use of collection tubes allowing for delayed processing. Methods: In this study, we measured the fractional abundance of tumor specific...... patients with advanced solid cancers enrolled in early clinical trials. Results: Concordance in the fractional abundance of mutations in ctDNA isolated from blood collected in either K3EDTA or BCT tubes from patients with different solid cancers was observed. Conclusions: This study indicates that BCT...... tubes are preferable for collection of circulating DNA in a clinical setting due to the favorable storage and shipping conditions....

  8. Cleaning the IceMole: collection of englacial samples from Blood Falls, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikucki, J.; Digel, I.; Chua, M.; Davis, J.; Ghosh, D.; Lyons, W. B.; Welch, K. A.; Purcell, A.; Francke, G.; Feldmann, M.; Espe, C.; Heinen, D.; Dachwald, B.; Kowalski, J.; Tulaczyk, S. M.

    2016-12-01

    The Minimally Invasive Direct Glacial Access project (MIDGE) used a maneuverable thermoelectric melting probe called the IceMole to collect the first englacial samples of brine from Blood Falls, Antarctica. In order to maintain the scientific integrity of samples collected and minimize impact to this specially protected ecosystem, microbial and chemical contamination of the IceMole needed to be minimized. Guidelines have been established for research in Antarctic subglacial systems by the scientific and regulatory community and have been detailed by the "Code of Conduct for the Exploration and Research of Subglacial Aquatic Environments" put forth by the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) Action Group, and was submitted to the Antarctic Treaty System. This Code of Conduct (CoC) recognizes the ecological importance and pristine nature of subglacial habitats and recommends a path forward towards clean exploration. Similarly, the US and European space agencies (NASA and ESA) have detailed instrument preparation protocols for the exploration of icy worlds in our solar system for planetary protection. Given the synergistic aims of these two groups we have adopted protocols from both subglacial and space exploration approaches. Here we present our approach to cleaning the IceMole in the field and report on ability to reduce the bioload inherent on the melter. Specifically our protocol reduced the exterior bio-load by an order of magnitude, to levels common in most clean rooms, and 1-3 orders of magnitude below that of Taylor Glacier ice surrounding Blood Falls. Our results indicate that the collection of englacial samples for microbiological analysis is feasible with melting probes.

  9. Electrometric measurement of plasma, erythrocyte, and whole blood cholinesterase activities in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, F K; Alias, A S; Ahmed, O A H

    2007-03-01

    activity in the plasma, the estimated true cholinesterase activities in males and females were 0.08 and 0.07 DeltapH/20 min, respectively. The percentage of true cholinesterase in the plasma of males and females was 8.2. Using the modified electrometric method, various percentages of cholinesterase inhibitions in the plasma, erythrocytes, and whole blood were detected after in vitro addition of the organophosphate insecticides (chlorpyrifos and methidathion) and the carbamate insecticide (carbaryl) to the reaction mixtures. These findings are the first collective report of human plasma, erythrocyte, and whole blood cholinesterase activities as determined by the modified electrometric method, and they could serve as reference points for future studies that involve human exposure to anticholinesterase pesticides.

  10. Erythropoietic Potential of CD34+ Hematopoietic Stem Cells from Human Cord Blood and G-CSF-Mobilized Peripheral Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honglian Jin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Red blood cell (RBC supply for transfusion has been severely constrained by the limited availability of donor blood and the emergence of infection and contamination issues. Alternatively, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs from human organs have been increasingly considered as safe and effective blood source. Several methods have been studied to obtain mature RBCs from CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells via in vitro culture. Among them, human cord blood (CB and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized adult peripheral blood (mPB are common adult stem cells used for allogeneic transplantation. Our present study focuses on comparing CB- and mPB-derived stem cells in differentiation from CD34+ cells into mature RBCs. By using CD34+ cells from cord blood and G-CSF mobilized peripheral blood, we showed in vitro RBC generation of artificial red blood cells. Our results demonstrate that CB- and mPB-derived CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells have similar characteristics when cultured under the same conditions, but differ considerably with respect to expression levels of various genes and hemoglobin development. This study is the first to compare the characteristics of CB- and mPB-derived erythrocytes. The results support the idea that CB and mPB, despite some similarities, possess different erythropoietic potentials in in vitro culture systems.

  11. Collection, processing and testing of bone, corneas, umbilical cord blood and haematopoietic stem cells by European Blood Alliance members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Närhi, M; Natri, O; Desbois, I

    2013-01-01

    A questionnaire study was carried out in collaboration with the European Blood Alliance (EBA) Tissues and Cells (T&C) working group. The aim was to assess the level of involvement and commonality of processes on the procurement, testing and storage of bone, corneas, umbilical cord blood (UCB...

  12. Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... organs and show how well treatments are working. Problems with your blood may include bleeding disorders, excessive clotting and platelet disorders. If you lose too much blood, you may need a transfusion. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  13. Performance and safety of femoral central venous catheters in pediatric autologous peripheral blood stem cell collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooling, Laura; Hoffmann, Sandra; Webb, Dawn; Yamada, Chisa; Davenport, Robertson; Choi, Sung Won

    2017-12-01

    Autologous peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cell collection (A-HPCC) in children typically requires placement of a central venous catheter (CVC) for venous access. There is scant published data regarding the performance and safety of femoral CVCs in pediatric A-HPCC. Seven-year, retrospective study of A-HPCC in pediatric patients collected between 2009 and January 2017. Inclusion criteria were an age ≤ 21 years and A-HPCC using a femoral CVC for venous access. Femoral CVC performance was examined by CD34 collection rate, inlet rate, collection efficiency (MNC-FE, CD34-FE), bleeding, flow-related adverse events (AE), CVC removal, and product sterility testing. Statistical analysis and graphing were performed with commercial software. A total of 75/119 (63%) pediatric patients (median age 3 years) met study criteria. Only 16% of children required a CVC for ≥ 3 days. The CD34 collect rate and CD34-FE was stable over time whereas MNC-FE decreased after day 4 in 80% of patients. CD34-FE and MNC-FE showed inter- and intra-patient variability over time and appeared sensitive to plerixafor administration. Femoral CVC showed fewer flow-related AE compared to thoracic CVC, especially in pediatric patients (6.7% vs. 37%, P = 0.0005; OR = 0.12 (95%CI: 0.03-0.45). CVC removal was uneventful in 73/75 (97%) patients with hemostasis achieved after 20-30 min of pressure. In a 10-year period, there were no instances of product contamination associated with femoral CVC colonization. Femoral CVC are safe and effective for A-HPCC in young pediatric patients. Femoral CVC performance was maintained over several days with few flow-related alarms when compared to thoracic CVCs. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Salt, Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Changes in Human and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present review describes the effects of ingestion of high salt diet on blood pressure and attempts to elucidate some of the cardiovascular changes that give rise to elevated blood pressure. High dietary salt loading especially in experimental animals tend to result in elevated levels of arterial blood pressure. Studies in ...

  15. Reference values for total blood volume and cardiac output in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, L.R. [Indiana Univ., South Bend, IN (United States). Division of Liberal Arts and Sciences

    1994-09-01

    Much research has been devoted to measurement of total blood volume (TBV) and cardiac output (CO) in humans but not enough effort has been devoted to collection and reduction of results for the purpose of deriving typical or {open_quotes}reference{close_quotes} values. Identification of normal values for TBV and CO is needed not only for clinical evaluations but also for the development of biokinetic models for ultra-short-lived radionuclides used in nuclear medicine (Leggett and Williams 1989). The purpose of this report is to offer reference values for TBV and CO, along with estimates of the associated uncertainties that arise from intra- and inter-subject variation, errors in measurement techniques, and other sources. Reference values are derived for basal supine CO and TBV in reference adult humans, and differences associated with age, sex, body size, body position, exercise, and other circumstances are discussed.

  16. Epidemiological study of pathogens collected from blood for a period of a year (2008-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio A. Debbia

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. An epidemiological study, addressed to identify the pathogens isolated from blood, and their antibiotic susceptibility patterns, was conducted. Methods. 12 laboratories, homogeneously distributed in a Northern area of Italy, were required to collected all consecutive non-duplicated strains isolated from blood during February 2008 to February 2009 and sent them to the reference laboratory. Results. A total of 1092 microorganisms were collected, including 653 gram-positive, 385 gram-negative and 54 fungi. Escherichia coli 234, Staphylococcus epidermidis 205, S. aureus 142, S. hominis 87, Enterococcus faecalis 47, S. haemolyticus 33, Klebsiella pneumoniae 33, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 32, Candida albicans 28, Enterobacter cloacae 21 were the prevalent microrganisms found. Samples were collected mainly from medicine (255 strains, intensive care units (154, surgery (99, infectious diseases (93, paediatrics (62 and nephrology (62. Antibiotic resistance (in % in staphylococci was 65.7 (methicillin, 33.5 (gentamicin, 61.8 (azithromycin, 59.6 (erythromycin, 45.2 (ciprofloxacin 14.8 (chloramphenicol, 2.0 (teicoplanin, and 24.1 (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole no vancomycin-resistant strain was found. Enterococci showed resistance to vancomycin (10.8, ampicillin (34.4, gentamycin (42.9, ciprofloxacin (42.2 teicoplanin (7.6, erythromycin (54.7 and chloramphenicol (17.5. Enterobacteriaceae exhibited resistance to ciprofloxacin(27.0, ampicillin (74.1, ceftazidime (15.8, cefoxitin (14.7, cefepime (13.3, ceftriaxone (15.0, both imipenem and amikacin (0.95, piperacillin-tazobactam (5.1 and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (32.7. Non fermenting gram negative strains were found resistant to ciprofloxacin (27.3, ceftazidime (9.5, cefepime (14.6, ceftriaxone (81.6, both imipenem and amikacin (18.6, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (65.2, and piperacillin-tazobactam (7.5. Conclusions.These data show a prevalent incidence of gram-positive (59.7 % in comparison to

  17. Time-dependent histamine release from stored human blood products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Edvardsen, L; Vangsgaard, K

    1996-01-01

    storage. Whole blood (six units), plasma-reduced whole blood (six units), and plasma- and buffy coat-reduced (saline-adenine-glucose-mannitol) (SAGM) blood (six units) from unpaid healthy donors were stored in the blood bank for 35 days at 4 degrees C. Plasma histamine and total cell-bound histamine.......0 (range 176.0-910.0) nmol/l in whole blood and 475.0 (range 360.0-1560.0) nmol/l in plasma-reduced whole blood, while it was undetectable in SAGM blood. Spontaneous histamine release increased in a time-dependent manner from a median of 6.7 (range 2.2-17.4) nmol/l at the time of storage to 175.0 (range 33...

  18. Volume-dependent hemodynamic effects of blood collection in canine donors - evaluation of 13% and 15% of total blood volume depletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RUI R.F. FERREIRA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is no consensus regarding the blood volume that could be safely donated by dogs, ranging from 11 to 25% of its total blood volume (TBV. No previous studies evaluated sedated donors.Aim: To evaluate the hemodynamic effects of blood collection from sedated and non-sedated dogs and to understand if such effects were volume-dependent.Materials and Methods: Fifty three donations of 13% of TBV and 20 donations of 15% TBV were performed in dogs sedated with diazepam and ketamine. Additionally, a total of 30 collections of 13% TBV and 20 collections of 15% TBV were performed in non-sedated dogs. Non-invasive arterial blood pressures and pulse rates were registered before and 15 min after donation. Results: Post-donation pulse rates increased significantly in both sedated groups, with higher differences in the 15% TBV collections. Systolic arterial pressures decreased significantly in these groups, while diastolic pressures increased significantly in 13% TBV donations. Non-sedated groups revealed a slight, but significant, SBP decrease. No clinical signs related to donations were registered.Conclusion: These results suggest that the collection of 15% TBV in sedated donors induces hemodynamic variations that may compromise the harmlessness of the procedure, while it seems to be a safe procedure in non-sedated dogs.

  19. Deployed skills training for whole blood collection by a special operations expeditionary surgical team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Linda C; Smith, Iain M; Benavides, Jerome M; Bowley, Douglas M; Doughty, Heidi A; Lundy, Jonathan B

    2017-06-01

    Noncompressible hemorrhage is the leading cause of potentially preventable battlefield death. Combining casualty retrieval from the battlefield and damage control resuscitation (DCR) within the "golden hour" increases survival. However, transfusion requirements may exceed the current blood component stocks held by forward surgical teams. Warm fresh whole blood (WFWB) is an alternative. We report WFWB transfusion training developed by and delivered to a US Golden Hour Offset Surgical Treatment Team and the resulting improvement in confidence with WFWB transfusion. A bespoke instructional package was derived from existing operational clinical guidelines. All Golden Hour Offset Surgical Treatment Team personnel completed initial training, reinforced through ongoing casualty simulations. A record of blood types and donor eligibility was established to facilitate rapid identification of potential WFWB donors. Self-reported confidence in seven aspects of the WFWB transfusion process was assessed before and after training using a five-point Likert scale. Personnel were analyzed by groups consisting of those whose operational role includes WFWB transfusion ("transfusers"), clinical personnel without such responsibilities ("nontransfusers") and nonclinical personnel (other). Comparisons within and between groups were made using appropriate nonparametric tests. Data were collected from 39 (89%) of 44 training participants: 24 (62%) transfusers, 12 (31%) nontransfusing clinicians, and 3 (8%) other personnel. Transfusers and nontransfusers reported increased comfort with all practical elements of WFWB transfusion. The confidence of other personnel also increased, but (likely due to small numbers) was not statistically significant. WFWB transfusion is an integral part of modern deployed military remote DCR. Our in-theater training program rapidly and reproducibly enhanced the comfort in WFWB transfusion in providers from a range of backgrounds and skill-mixes. This model has

  20. Computational lipidology: predicting lipoprotein density profiles in human blood plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Hübner

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring cholesterol levels is strongly recommended to identify patients at risk for myocardial infarction. However, clinical markers beyond "bad" and "good" cholesterol are needed to precisely predict individual lipid disorders. Our work contributes to this aim by bringing together experiment and theory. We developed a novel computer-based model of the human plasma lipoprotein metabolism in order to simulate the blood lipid levels in high resolution. Instead of focusing on a few conventionally used predefined lipoprotein density classes (LDL, HDL, we consider the entire protein and lipid composition spectrum of individual lipoprotein complexes. Subsequently, their distribution over density (which equals the lipoprotein profile is calculated. As our main results, we (i successfully reproduced clinically measured lipoprotein profiles of healthy subjects; (ii assigned lipoproteins to narrow density classes, named high-resolution density sub-fractions (hrDS, revealing heterogeneous lipoprotein distributions within the major lipoprotein classes; and (iii present model-based predictions of changes in the lipoprotein distribution elicited by disorders in underlying molecular processes. In its present state, the model offers a platform for many future applications aimed at understanding the reasons for inter-individual variability, identifying new sub-fractions of potential clinical relevance and a patient-oriented diagnosis of the potential molecular causes for individual dyslipidemia.

  1. Cerebral blood flow during static exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogers, H B; Schroeder, T; Secher, N H

    1990-01-01

    resistance increased from 1.5 (1.0-2.2) to 2.4 (1.4-3.0) mmHg. 100 g.min.ml-1 (P less than 0.025) at 32% of MVC. There was no difference in CBF between the two hemispheres at rest or during exercise. In contrast to dynamic leg exercise, static leg exercise is not associated with an increase in global CBF......Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was determined in humans at rest and during four consecutive unilateral static contractions of the knee extensors. Each contraction was maintained for 3 min 15 s with the subjects in a semisupine position. The contractions corresponded to 8, 16, 24, and 32% of the maximal...... (102-146) mmHg, respectively (P less than 0.0005), during the contraction at 32% MVC. Arterial PCO2 and central venous pressure did not change. Corrected to the average resting PCO2, CBF during control was 55 (35-73) ml.100 g-1.min-1 and remained constant during contractions. Cerebral vascular...

  2. [Mobilization and collection of autologous peripheral blood stem cells by CIE or IEV protocol in children with malignant solid tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Wei-Ling; Huang, Dong-Sheng; Yang, Yi-Ping; Liu, Xiao-Chao; Wu, Yi-Ping

    2011-06-01

    Autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (APBSCT) is an important method for treatment of malignant solid tumors in children. The mobilization and collection of blood stem cells is crucial for APBSCT. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of mobilization and collection of blood stem cells by CIE or IEV chemotherapy protocol in APBSCT in children with neuroblastoma (NB) or rhabdomyosarcoma. The protocols of CIE (cisplatin, etoposide) and IEV (vincristine, dosfamide, etoposide) were used as mobilization chemotherapy in 8 cases of NB with stage IV and 3 cases of rhabdomysacoma with stage III, respectively. The results of the mobilization of blood stem cells were observed. Of the 11 cases, mononuclear cells (MNC) and CD34+ cells were successfully collected and the volume of MNC and CD34 averaged (5.55 ± 1.43)× 10(8)/kg and (4.88 ± 2.48) × 10(6)/kg, respectively. No severe complications were observed during the mobilization and collection. A rapid hemopoietic reconstitution was observed in 10 children after APBSCT. One with NB out of the 10 children died of left heart failure 32 days after APBSCT. Others (9 cases) showed a nearly normal result of routine peripheral blood test 60 days after APBSCT. CIE or IEV protocol is effective and safe for the mobilization and collection of peripheral blood stem cells in children with NB or rhabdomysacoma.

  3. Effects of low-level laser irradiation on human blood lymphocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Musawi, Mustafa S; Jaafar, M S; Al-Gailani, B; Ahmed, Naser M; Suhaimi, Fatanah M; Suardi, Nursakinah

    2017-02-01

    Low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) has various effects on cultured human lymphocytes in vitro, but little is known about such effects in whole blood. This study investigated whether LLLI affected lymphocyte count in human whole blood in vitro. A total number of 130 blood samples were collected from apparently healthy adult patients through venipuncture into tubes containing EDTA. Each sample was divided into two equal aliquots to be used as a non-irradiated control sample and an irradiated sample. The irradiated aliquot was subjected to laser wavelengths of 405, 589, and 780 nm with different fluences of 36, 54, 72, and 90 J/cm2, at a fixed irradiance of 30 mW/cm2. A paired student t test was used to compare between non-irradiated and irradiated samples. The lymphocyte counts were measured using a computerized hematology analyzer and showed a significant (P irradiated samples. This increase in lymphocyte count upon irradiation was confirmed by flow cytometry. At a wavelength of 589 nm and fluence of 72 J/cm2, irradiation of whole blood samples showed a significant increase in CD45 lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) (CD16, CD56) cells, but no significant changes in CD3 T lymphocytes, T-suppressor (CD3, CD8) cells, T-helper (CD3, CD4) cells, and CD19 B lymphocytes when compared with their non-irradiated counterparts. Our results clearly demonstrate that NK cell count is altered by irradiation, which ultimately affects the whole lymphocyte count significantly.

  4. Temporal changes in human skeletal muscle and blood lipid composition with fish oil supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlory, Chris; Galloway, Stuart D R; Hamilton, D Lee; McClintock, Craig; Breen, Leigh; Dick, James R; Bell, John G; Tipton, Kevin D

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine changes in the lipid profile of red blood cells and muscle tissue along with the expression of anabolic signalling proteins in human skeletal muscle. Following a 2-week control period, 10 healthy male participants consumed 5 g d(-1) of fish oil (FO) for 4 weeks. Muscle biopsies and venous blood samples were collected in the fasted state 2 weeks prior (W-2) and immediately before (W0) the initiation of FO supplementation for internal control. Muscle biopsies and venous blood samples were again obtained at week 1 (W1), 2 (W2) and 4 (W4) during FO supplementation for assessment of changes in lipid composition and expression of anabolic signalling proteins. There was no change in the composition of any lipid class between W-2 and W0 confirming control. Following FO supplementation n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA) muscle lipid composition was increased from W0 to W2 and continued to rise at W4. n-3 PUFA blood lipid composition was increased from W0 to W1 and remained elevated for the remaining time points. Total protein content of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) increased from W0 to W4 whereas total mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) was increased from W0 at W1 with no further significant increases at W2 and W4. These data show that FO supplementation results in discordant changes in the n-3 PUFA composition of skeletal muscle compared to blood that is associated with increases in total FAK content. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluating health risks posed by heavy metals to humans consuming blood cockles (Anadara granosa) from the Upper Gulf of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudsandee, Suntorn; Tantrakarnapa, Kraichat; Tharnpoophasiam, Prapin; Limpanont, Yanin; Mingkhwan, Ratchaneekorn; Worakhunpiset, Suwalee

    2017-06-01

    There is global concern about heavy metal contamination in the environment. Adverse health effects can be caused by heavy metals in contaminated food and water. Therefore, environmental monitoring studies and risk assessments should be conducted periodically. In this study, we measured levels of Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn in blood cockles (Anadara granosa) collected from three locations in the Upper Gulf of Thailand. Hazard quotients and hazard indices were calculated to evaluate the health risks posed by heavy metals in consumed blood cockles. Heavy metal concentrations in all of the blood cockle samples were lower than the relevant food standards. The hazard quotients and hazard indices were heavy metals in blood cockles over a human lifetime.

  6. Preference changes of adult outpatients for giving saliva, urine and blood for clinical testing after actual sample collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhima, Matilda; Salinas, Thomas J; Wermers, Robert A; Weaver, Amy L; Koka, Sreenivas

    2013-01-01

    Patients' preferences of the type of sample collections for clinical testing are currently unknown. The aims of this study were: (1) to assess patients' preferences of three types of samples for clinical testing (saliva, urine and blood) both before and after collection and (2) to assess whether prior experiences with collection of saliva impacted patients responses. Adult outpatients underwent collection of one sample each of saliva, urine and blood. Patients' perceptions of comfort, convenience and easiness were assessed in pre-collection and post-collection questionnaires. Post-collection, patients' endorsement of saliva as being the "most comfortable" and "most convenient" significantly declined (pre vs. post, 61.5% vs. 37.5% and 73.1% vs. 42.3%). However, saliva was still endorsed as the "most convenient" post-collection (compared to urine 33.7% and blood 24.0%). Although not statistically significant, the proportion of patients who changed their response in terms of what sample was "easiest to collect at home" was considerably higher in the group with vs. without prior experience giving saliva (54.6% vs. 32.6%, p=0.19 Fisher's exact test). Overall, saliva remained as the most highly preferred sample to donate despite a decline in patients' preferences of saliva donation after sample collection. The results of the study are promising for future widespread patient acceptance of saliva as a diagnostic fluid. Copyright © 2012 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Multi-nucleated giant cell formation from human cord blood monocytes in vitro, in comparison with adult peripheral blood monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Y; Yasui, K; Yashiro, M; Tsuge, M; Kotani, N; Morishima, T

    2009-10-01

    Multi-nucleated giant cells (MGCs; Langhans-type cell), formed from macrophage fusion, are recognized as a hallmark histological feature in chronic inflammation. However, their precise pathological role is still poorly understood, especially for microorganism pathogens in the neonatal immune system, which are capable of surviving intracellularly in phagocytes. To conduct a partial evaluation of the monocyte function of neonates, we investigated the ability of human cord blood monocytes to form MGCs in vitro by stimulating various cytokines and comparing them with adult peripheral blood monocytes. Monocytes from cord blood and adult peripheral blood were isolated and cultured for 14 days with cytokines known to induce MGC in vitro. The fusion index in experiments with a combination of interleukin (IL)-4 and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and a combination of IL-4 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) was significantly lower in cord blood than in adult blood monocytes (P = 0.0018 and P = 0.0141, respectively). The number of nuclei per MGC was significantly lower in cord blood than in adult blood monocytes in experiments with IL-4 alone, the combination of IL-4 and M-CSF, and the combination of IL-4 and GM-CSF (P < 0.0001). These results suggest the possibility that the susceptibility of newborns to mycobacterium infection is due partly to impaired MGC formation.

  8. Comparison of complete blood counts in samples obtained from healthy dogs and cats by use of standard and microsample blood collection tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittemore, Jacqueline C; Flatland, Bente

    2010-08-01

    To compare results of a CBC performed on blood samples obtained from healthy dogs and cats by use of standard and microsample collection tubes. Evaluation study. 29 healthy client-owned animals (14 dogs and 15 cats). A blood sample (3 mL) was collected from each animal; 2.5 mL was transferred into a vacuum tube that contained sodium EDTA, and 0.5 mL was transferred into a microsample tube that contained sodium EDTA. Variables evaluated were total numbers of RBCs and WBCs, hemoglobin concentration, Hct, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), mean platelet volume, and plasma total protein concentration as well as neutrophil, lymphocyte, monocyte, eosinophil, basophil, and platelet counts. Results for the 2 types of tube in each species were compared by use of Pearson correlation coefficients, Passing-Bablok regression analysis, and Bland-Altman analysis. The Pearson correlation coefficient was low for basophil count in cats and moderate, high, or very high for all other variables. Constant and proportional biases were identified for MCHC in dogs by use of Passing-Bablok regression analysis, although the mean difference between types of blood collection tubes was small. No evidence of constant or proportional bias for any other variable was revealed by regression analysis or Bland-Altman analysis. Samples obtained from healthy dogs and cats by use of microsample blood collection tubes provided clinically equivalent CBC results, compared with results for samples obtained by use of standard blood collection tubes, and minimized the total sample volume collected for diagnostic testing.

  9. Time-dependent histamine release from stored human blood products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Edvardsen, L; Vangsgaard, K

    1996-01-01

    Perioperative transfusion of whole blood has been shown to amplify trauma-induced immunosuppression, which could be attenuated by perioperative administration of histamine2 receptor antagonists. Supernatants from different blood products were, therefore, analysed for histamine content during...... storage. Whole blood (six units), plasma-reduced whole blood (six units), and plasma- and buffy coat-reduced (saline-adenine-glucose-mannitol) (SAGM) blood (six units) from unpaid healthy donors were stored in the blood bank for 35 days at 4 degrees C. Plasma histamine and total cell-bound histamine...... content at donation, and histamine concentration in samples drawn from the units on days 0, 2, 5, 9, 14, 21, 28 and 35 were analysed with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Median plasma histamine concentration was 4.8 (range 1.9-14.3) nmol/l (n = 18). Median total cell-bound histamine content was 417...

  10. Development of a PCR Assay to Detect Low Level Trypanosoma cruzi in Blood Specimens Collected with PAXgene Blood DNA Tubes for Clinical Trials Treating Chagas Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Bo; Chen, Lei; Kibukawa, Miho; Kang, John; Waskin, Hetty; Marton, Matthew

    2016-12-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the parasitic infection of Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). The STOP CHAGAS clinical trial was initiated in 2011 to evaluate posaconazole in treating Chagas disease, with treatment success defined as negative qualitative PCR results of detecting the parasites in blood specimens collected post-treatment. PAXgene Blood DNA tubes were utilized as a simple procedure to collect and process blood specimens. However, the PAXgene blood specimens challenged published T. cruzi PCR methods, resulting in poor sensitivity and reproducibility. To accurately evaluate the treatment efficacy of the clinical study, we developed and validated a robust PCR assay for detecting low level T. cruzi in PAXgene blood specimens. The assay combines a new DNA extraction method with a custom designed qPCR assay, resulting in limit of detection of 0.005 and 0.01 fg/μl for K98 and CL Brener, two representative strains of two of T. cruzi's discrete typing units. Reliable qPCR standard curves were established for both strains to measure parasite loads, with amplification efficiency ≥ 90% and the lower limit of linearity ≥ 0.05 fg/μl. The assay successfully analyzed the samples collected from the STOP CHAGAS study and may prove useful for future global clinical trials evaluating new therapies for asymptomatic chronic Chagas disease.

  11. Blood temperature and perfusion to exercising and non-exercising human limbs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    González-Alonso, José; Calbet, José A. L.; Boushel, Robert

    2015-01-01

    - and metabolism-sensitive mechanisms are important for the control of human limb perfusion, possibly by activating ATP release from the erythrocytes.  Temperature-sensitive mechanisms may contribute to blood-flow regulation, but the influence of temperature on perfusion to exercising and non-exercising human...... limbs is not established. Blood temperature (TB), blood flow and oxygen uptake (V̇O2) in the legs and arms were measured in 16 healthy humans during 90 min of leg and arm exercise and during exhaustive incremental leg or arm exercise. During prolonged exercise, leg blood flow (LBF) was fourfold higher...

  12. Metabolomics analysis of human sweat collected after moderate exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Povedano, M M; Calderón-Santiago, M; Luque de Castro, M D; Priego-Capote, F

    2018-01-15

    Sweat is a promising biofluid scarcely used in clinical analysis despite its non-invasive sampling. A more frequent clinical use of sweat requires to know its whole composition, especially concerning to non-polar compounds, and the development of analytical strategies for its characterization. The aim of the present study was to compare different sample preparation strategies to maximize the detection of metabolites in sweat from humans collected after practicing moderate exercise. Special emphasis was put on non-polar compounds as they have received scant attention in previous studies dealing with this biofluid. Sample preparation by liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) using extractants with different polarity index was compared to deproteination. Then, derivatization by methoxymation with subsequent silylation was compared to direct analysis of sweat extracts to check the influence of derivatization on the subsequent determination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). 135 compounds were tentatively identified by combining spectral and retention time information after analysis by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry in high resolution mode (GC-TOF/MS). Lipids, VOCs, benzenoids and other interesting metabolites such as alkaloids and ethanolamines were identified. Among the tested protocols, methyoxiamination plus silylation after LLE with dichloromethane was the best option to obtain a representative snapshot of sweat metabolome collected from different body parts after moderate exercise. Passive and active sweat pools from a cohort of volunteers (n = 6) were compared to detect compositional differences which can be explained by the sampling process and sweating induction. As most of the identified compounds are metabolites involved in key biochemical pathways, this study opens new opportunities to extend the applicability of human sweat as a source of metabolite biomarkers of pathologies or specific processes such as dehydration or nutritional unbalance

  13. Modulation of the Host Environment by Human Cytomegalovirus with Viral Interleukin 10 in Peripheral Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Vivian P; Mariano, Margarette C; Tu, Carolyn C; Allaire, Kathryn M; Avdic, Selmir; Slobedman, Barry; Spencer, Juliet V

    2017-03-15

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a herpesvirus with both lytic and latent life cycles. Human cytomegalovirus encodes 2 viral cytokines that are orthologs of human cellular interleukin 10 (cIL-10). Both cytomegalovirus interleukin 10 (cmvIL-10) and Latency-associated cytomegalovirus interleukin 10 (LAcmvIL-10) (collectively vIL-10) are expressed during lytic infection and cause immunosuppressive effects that impede virus clearance. LAcmvIL-10 is also expressed during latent infection of myeloid progenitor cells and monocytes and facilitates persistence. Here, we investigated whether vIL-10 could be detected during natural infection. Plasma from healthy blood donors was tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for anti-HCMV immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin M and for cIL-10 and vIL-10 levels using a novel vIL-10 assay that detects cmvIL-10 and LAcmvIL-10, with no cross-reactivity to cIL-10. vIL-10 was evident in HCMV+ donors (n = 19 of 26), at levels ranging 31-547 pg/mL. By comparison, cIL-10 was detected at lower levels ranging 3-69 pg/mL. There was a strong correlation between vIL-10 and cIL-10 levels (P = .01). Antibodies against vIL-10 were also detected and neutralized vIL-10 activity. vIL-10 was detected in peripheral blood of healthy blood donors. These findings suggest that vIL-10 may play a key role in sensing or modifying the host environment during latency and, therefore, may be a potential target for intervention strategies.

  14. 78 FR 32668 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Changes to an Approved Application: Biological Products: Human Blood...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry: Changes to an Approved... Manufacture; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and... Industry: Changes to an Approved Application: Biological Products: Human Blood and Blood Components...

  15. Light-scattering properties of undiluted human blood subjected to simple shear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Kolkman, R.G.M.; de Mul, F.F.M.

    1999-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed into the effect of simple shear on the light-scattering properties of undiluted human blood. Undiluted human blood was enclosed between two glass plates with an adjustable separation between 30 and 120 mm and with one plate moving parallel to the other.

  16. Collective-goal ascription increases cooperation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitkidis, Panagiotis; Sørensen, Jesper; Nielbo, Kristoffer L; Andersen, Marc; Lienard, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Cooperation is necessary in many types of human joint activity and relations. Evidence suggests that cooperation has direct and indirect benefits for the cooperators. Given how beneficial cooperation is overall, it seems relevant to investigate the various ways of enhancing individuals' willingness to invest in cooperative endeavors. We studied whether ascription of a transparent collective goal in a joint action promotes cooperation in a group. A total of 48 participants were assigned in teams of 4 individuals to either a "transparent goal-ascription" or an "opaque goal-ascription" condition. After the manipulation, the participants played an anonymous public goods game with another member of their team. We measured the willingness of participants to cooperate and their expectations about the other player's contribution. Between subjects analyses showed that transparent goal ascription impacts participants' likelihood to cooperate with each other in the future, thereby greatly increasing the benefits from social interactions. Further analysis showed that this could be explained with a change in expectations about the partner's behavior and by an emotional alignment of the participants. The study found that a transparent goal ascription is associated with an increase of cooperation. We propose several high-level mechanisms that could explain the observed effect: general affect modulation, trust, expectation and perception of collective efficacy.

  17. Collective-goal ascription increases cooperation in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Mitkidis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cooperation is necessary in many types of human joint activity and relations. Evidence suggests that cooperation has direct and indirect benefits for the cooperators. Given how beneficial cooperation is overall, it seems relevant to investigate the various ways of enhancing individuals' willingness to invest in cooperative endeavors. We studied whether ascription of a transparent collective goal in a joint action promotes cooperation in a group. METHODS: A total of 48 participants were assigned in teams of 4 individuals to either a "transparent goal-ascription" or an "opaque goal-ascription" condition. After the manipulation, the participants played an anonymous public goods game with another member of their team. We measured the willingness of participants to cooperate and their expectations about the other player's contribution. RESULTS: Between subjects analyses showed that transparent goal ascription impacts participants' likelihood to cooperate with each other in the future, thereby greatly increasing the benefits from social interactions. Further analysis showed that this could be explained with a change in expectations about the partner's behavior and by an emotional alignment of the participants. CONCLUSION: The study found that a transparent goal ascription is associated with an increase of cooperation. We propose several high-level mechanisms that could explain the observed effect: general affect modulation, trust, expectation and perception of collective efficacy.

  18. Endocannabinoids modulate human blood-brain barrier permeability in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hind, William H; Tufarelli, Cristina; Neophytou, Maria; Anderson, Susan I; England, Timothy J; O'Sullivan, Saoirse E

    2015-06-01

    Endocannabinoids alter permeability at various epithelial barriers, and cannabinoid receptors and endocannabinoid levels are elevated by stroke, with potential neuroprotective effects. We therefore explored the role of endocannabinoids in modulating blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in normal conditions and in an ischaemia/reperfusion model. Human brain microvascular endothelial cell and astrocyte co-cultures modelled the BBB. Ischaemia was modelled by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and permeability was measured by transepithelial electrical resistance. Endocannabinoids or endocannabinoid-like compounds were assessed for their ability to modulate baseline permeability or OGD-induced hyperpermeability. Target sites of action were investigated using receptor antagonists and subsequently identified with real-time PCR. Anandamide (10 μM) and oleoylethanolamide (OEA, 10 μM) decreased BBB permeability (i.e. increased resistance). This was mediated by cannabinoid CB2 receptors, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels, calcitonin gene-regulated peptide (CGRP) receptor (anandamide only) and PPARα (OEA only). Application of OEA, palmitoylethanolamide (both PPARα mediated) or virodhamine (all 10 μM) decreased the OGD-induced increase in permeability during reperfusion. 2-Arachidonoyl glycerol, noladin ether and oleamide did not affect BBB permeability in normal or OGD conditions. N-arachidonoyl-dopamine increased permeability through a cytotoxic mechanism. PPARα and γ, CB1 receptors, TRPV1 channels and CGRP receptors were expressed in both cell types, but mRNA for CB2 receptors was only present in astrocytes. The endocannabinoids may play an important modulatory role in normal BBB physiology, and also afford protection to the BBB during ischaemic stroke, through a number of target sites. © 2015 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The British Pharmacological Society.

  19. Peripheral blood CD34+ cell count as a predictor of adequacy of hematopoietic stem cell collection for autologous transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Combariza, Juan F.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In order to carry out an autologous transplantation, hematopoietic stem cells should be mobilized to peripheral blood and later collected by apheresis. The CD34+ cell count is a tool to establish the optimal time to begin the apheresis procedure. Objective: To evaluate the association between peripheral blood CD34+ cell count and the successful collection of hematopoietic stem cells. Materials and methods: A predictive test evaluation study was carried out to establish the usefulness of peripheral blood CD34+ cell count as a predictor of successful stem cell collection in patients that will receive an autologous transplantation. Results: 77 patients were included (median age: 49 years; range: 5-66. The predominant baseline diagnosis was lymphoma (53.2 %. The percentage of patients with successful harvest of hematopoietic stem cells was proportional to the number of CD34+cells in peripheral blood at the end of the mobilization procedure. We propose that more than 15 CD34+cells/μL must be present in order to achieve an adequate collection of hematopoietic stem cells. Conclusion: Peripheral blood CD34+ cell count is a useful tool to predict the successful collection of hematopoietic stem cells.

  20. In vitro effects of helium-neon laser irradiation on human blood: blood viscosity and deformability of erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Xian-Qiang; Chen, Ji-Yao; Liang, Zi-Jun; Zhou, Lu-Wei

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vitro effects of He-Ne laser irradiation on some rheological factors of human blood, such as blood viscosity, erythrocyte deformability, and sedimentation rate. The intravascular irradiation of low power laser has been applied in pre-clinical and clinical to treat various pathological processes. However, the mechanism is not fully understood so far. Especially the interaction and related mechanism between the laser and blood are unclear. In this work, by measuring the change of the main rheological factors after laser irradiation, the interaction and mechanism were explored. A30-mW He-Ne laser was used for irradiation with a 4-5-mm-diameter beam spot on blood samples, with a fluence rate of about 150 mW/cm.(2) The irradiation time was 60 min, so the total dose of irradiation was 540 J/cm.(2) The pathological samples of blood were obtained from patients (volunteers), and each sample was divided into two tubes for irradiation and control. The blood viscosity, erythrocyte deformability, and sedimentation rate were measured after laser irradiation and compared with un-irradiated control. The blood samples with poor erythrocyte deformability were prepared by adding Ca(2+) to the normal erythrocytes of a healthy person for investigating the laser effect on erythrocyte deformability further. Laser irradiation reduced the erythrocyte sedimentation rate of blood samples, which had a hyper-sedimentation rate originally. The blood viscosity of samples in hyper-values was lowered by laser irradiation in all shear rates measured (10-110 S(-1)), with a relative variation of approximately 10%. The deformability of erythrocytes from pathological samples and Ca(2+)-treated samples was improved after laser irradiation. The positive effects of laser irradiation on improving the rheological properties of blood were demonstrated in vitro.

  1. The relationship between vacuum and hemolysis during catheter blood collection: a retrospective analysis of six large cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrazek, Cornelia; Simundic, Ana-Maria; Wiedemann, Helmut; Krahmer, Florian; Felder, Thomas Klaus; Kipman, Ulrike; Hoppe, Uta; Haschke-Becher, Elisabeth; Cadamuro, Janne

    2017-07-26

    Blood collection through intravenous (IV) catheters is a common practice at emergency departments (EDs). This technique is associated with higher in vitro hemolysis rates and may even be amplified by the use of vacuum collection tubes. Our aim was to investigate the association of five different vacuum tubes with hemolysis rates in comparison to an aspiration system under real-life conditions and to propose an equation to estimate the amount of hemolysis, depending on the vacuum collection tube type. We retrospectively evaluated hemolysis data of plasma samples from our ED, where blood is drawn through IV catheters. Over the past 5 years, we compared 19,001 hemolysis index values amongst each other and against the respective vacuum pressure (Pv) of the collection tubes, which were used within the six observational periods. The highest hemolysis rates were associated with full-draw evacuated tubes. Significantly reduced hemolysis was observed for two kinds of partial-draw tubes. The hemolysis rate of one partial-draw blood collection tube was comparable to those of the aspiration system. Regression analysis of Pv and mean free hemoglobin (fHb) values yielded the formula fHb (g/L)=0.0082*Pv2-0.1143*Pv+ 0.5314 with an R2 of 0.99. If IV catheters are used for blood collection, hemolysis rates directly correlate with the vacuum within the tubes and can be estimated by the proposed formula. By the use of partial-draw vacuum blood collection tubes, hemolysis rates in IV catheter collections can be reduced to levels comparable with collections performed by aspiration systems.

  2. Trace samples of human blood in mosquitoes as a forensic investigation tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabêlo, K C N; Albuquerque, C M R; Tavares, V B; Santos, S M; Souza, C A; Oliveira, T C; Oliveira, N C L; Crovella, S

    2015-11-23

    Investigations of any type of crime invariably starts at the crime scene by collecting evidence. Thus, the purpose of this research was to collect and analyze an entomological trace from an environment that is similar to those of indoor crime scenes. Hematophagous mosquitoes were collected from two residential units; saliva of volunteers that were residents in the units was also collected for genetic analysis as reference samples. We examined the allele frequencies of 15 short tandem repeat loci (D8S1179, D21S11, D7S820, CSF1PO, D3S1358, TH01, D13S317, D16S539, D2S1338, D19S433, vWA, TPOX, D18S51, D5S818, and FGA) and amelogenin. A total of 26 female hematophagous mosquitoes were identified as Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus, and Culex quinquefasciatus; we were able to obtain 11 forensically valid genetic profiles, with a minimum of 0.028203 ng/μL of human DNA. Thus, the results of this study showed that it was possible to correlate human genetic information from mosquitoes with the volunteer reference samples, which validates the use of this information as forensic evidence. Furthermore, we observed mixed genetic profiles from one mosquito. Therefore, it is clearly important to collect these insects indoors where crimes were committed, because it may be possible to find intact genetic profiles of suspects in the blood found in the digestive tract of hematophagous mosquitoes for later comparison to identify an offender and/or exclude suspects.

  3. Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... anemia. Iron deficiency anemia is the most common type of anemia and can affect people who have a diet ... 2015 More on this topic for: Teens Blood Types Donating Blood Blood Transfusions Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Hemophilia When Cancer Keeps You ...

  4. 129Xe chemical shift in human blood and pulmonary blood oxygenation measurement in humans using hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR

    OpenAIRE

    Norquay, G.; Leung, G; Stewart, N J; Wolber, J.; Wild, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the dependency of the 129Xe?red blood cell (RBC) chemical shift on blood oxygenation, and to use this relation for noninvasive measurement of pulmonary blood oxygenation in vivo with hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR. Methods Hyperpolarized 129Xe was equilibrated with blood samples of varying oxygenation in vitro, and NMR was performed at 1.5 T and 3 T. Dynamic in vivo NMR during breath hold apnea was performed at 3 T on two healthy volunteers following inhalation of hyperpolarized...

  5. Blood-brain transfer of Pittsburgh compound B in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjedde, Albert; Aanerud, Joel; Braendgaard, Hans; Rodell, Anders B

    2013-01-01

    In the labeled form, the Pittsburgh compound B (2-(4'-{N-methyl-[(11)C]}methyl-aminophenyl)-6-hydroxy-benzothiazole, [(11)C]PiB), is used as a biomarker for positron emission tomography (PET) of brain β-amyloid deposition in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The permeability of [(11)C]PiB in the blood-brain barrier is held to be high but the permeability-surface area product and extraction fractions in patients or healthy volunteers are not known. We used PET to determine the clearance associated with the unidrectional blood-brain transfer of [(11)C]PiB and the corresponding cerebral blood flow rates in frontal lobe, whole cerebral cortex, and cerebellum of patients with Alzheimer's disease and healthy volunteers. Regional cerebral blood flow rates differed significantly between the two groups. Thus, regional and whole-brain permeability-surface area products were identical, in agreement with the observation that numerically, but insignificantly, unidirectional blood-brain clearances are lower and extraction fractions higher in the patients. The evidence of unchanged permeability-surface area products in the patients implies that blood flow changes can be deduced from the unidirectional blood-brain clearances of [(11)C]PiB in the patients.

  6. Human blood rheology in MEMS-based microneedles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, P.; Johnston, C. R.

    2005-02-01

    MEMS-based microneedles have the potential to revolutionize biomedical/biotechnology applications by providing precise transdermal drug delivery and localized blood sampling. In this paper, we propose a novel theory-based model that predicts drift velocity of blood-flow through the microchannels embedded in the microneedles. The profile of blood flow in the microneedles is determined by solving the conservation of momentum equation of the liquid phase, coupled with the force balance equations at the liquid-air interface. For the first time, this work enables accurate calculation/prediction of the velocity profile of the blood flow through a vertical in-plane microneedle, considering the effect of surface tension forces which are the most prominent forces. In order to withdraw blood samples from capillaries in the dermis layer, the length of our MEMS-based in-plane microneedle has been set at 600 μm with the micro-channel thickness chosen to be 35 μm, to avoid deformation of red blood cells. Blood flow through microneedles has been computed analytically using the proposed formulation. The results are then verified by a commercial finite element simulation tool "ANSYS".

  7. 75 FR 69680 - National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Revision to Proposed Collection...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-15

    ... Health National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Revision to Proposed Collection; Comment... on proposed data collection projects, the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development... Collection Title: The National Children's Study, Vanguard (pilot) Study. Type of Information Collection...

  8. What is the blood flow to resting human muscle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elia, M; Kurpad, A

    1993-05-01

    1. An investigation was carried out in five healthy lean adults to assess whether forearm and calf plethysmography largely reflect muscle blood flow as measured by 133Xe and whether there is substantial variability in the blood flow to muscles located at different sites in the body. 2. Blood flow to forearm and calf flexors and extensors, biceps, triceps and quadriceps was assessed using the 133Xe clearance technique. Blood flow to forearm skin and subcutaneous adipose tissue was also measured using the 133Xe clearance technique, whereas blood flow to the forearm and calf was measured using strain gauge plethysmography. 3. The mean blood flow to different muscles ranged from 1.4 +/- 0.6 (gastrocnemius) to 1.8 +/- 0.7 (forearm extensor) ml min-1 100 g-1 muscle (1.4 +/- 0.6 and 1.9 +/- 0.8 ml min-1 100 ml-1 muscle, respectively) but there were no significant differences between them. Forearm and calf blood flows (2.7 +/- 0.3 and 3.0 +/- 0.7 ml min-1 100 ml-1 limb tissue, respectively) were about 50% to more than 100% greater (P muscles within them (1.7 +/- 0.5 and 1.4 +/- 0.5 ml min-1 100 g-1 muscle, respectively, or 1.8 +/- 0.6 and 1.5 +/- 0.5 ml min-1 100 ml-1 muscle, respectively). In contrast, the blood flows to 100 g of forearm skin (9.1 +/- 2.6 ml min-1 100 g-1) and adipose tissue (3.8 +/- 1.1 ml min-1 100 g-1) were higher than the blood flow to 100 g of forearm (P < 0.01 and not significant, respectively).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Identification of Staphylococcus aureus Factors Required for Pathogenicity and Growth in Human Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, John; Boldock, Emma; Prince, Lynne R; Renshaw, Stephen A; Whyte, Moira K; Foster, Simon J

    2017-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a human commensal but also has devastating potential as an opportunistic pathogen. S. aureus bacteremia is often associated with an adverse outcome. To identify potential targets for novel control approaches, we have identified S. aureus components that are required for growth in human blood. An ordered transposon mutant library was screened, and 9 genes involved specifically in hemolysis or growth on human blood agar were identified by comparing the mutants to the parental strain. Three genes ( purA , purB , and pabA ) were subsequently found to be required for pathogenesis in the zebrafish embryo infection model. The pabA growth defect was specific to the red blood cell component of human blood, showing no difference from the parental strain in growth in human serum, human plasma, or sheep or horse blood. PabA is required in the tetrahydrofolate (THF) biosynthesis pathway. The pabA growth defect was found to be due to a combination of loss of THF-dependent dTMP production by the ThyA enzyme and increased demand for pyrimidines in human blood. Our work highlights pabA and the pyrimidine salvage pathway as potential targets for novel therapeutics and suggests a previously undefined role for a human blood factor in the activity of sulfonamide antibiotics. Copyright © 2017 Connolly et al.

  10. Evaluation of new automated hematopoietic progenitor cell analysis in the clinical management of peripheral blood stem cell collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peerschke, Ellinor I; Moung, Christine; Pessin, Melissa S; Maslak, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Successful peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) depends on the collection and infusion of adequate numbers of peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPCs). Several predictors of PBPC yield are used currently, including white blood cell (WBC) count and CD34 analysis. This study evaluated the utility of the new automated hematopoietic progenitor cell count available on Sysmex XN hematology analyzers (XN-HPCs) in PBSCT. The performance characteristics of XN-HPC, CD34+, and WBC analysis were compared using 107 matched peripheral blood and apheresis samples. Good correlation was observed between XN-HPC and CD34+ cell counts in peripheral blood (r = 0.88; slope, 0.81) and apheresis collections (r = 0.91; slope, 0.89). Moreover, peripheral blood XN-HPC and CD34 analysis showed comparable ability to predict successful PBPC harvests (≥2 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg). At a cutoff of 20 × 10(6) progenitor cells/L, peripheral blood XN- HPC and CD34 analysis both showed negative predictive values (NPVs) of 100% and positive predictive values (PPVs) of 55.4 and 63%, respectively. Using an optimized cutoff of 38 × 10(6) progenitor cells/L, derived from receiver operating characteristic analysis, the PPV for XN-HPC and CD34 analysis increased to 71.4 and 78.9%, respectively, with relatively unchanged NPVs (XN-HPC 97.7%, CD34+ 98.0%). In contrast, the correlation between peripheral blood WBC and CD34 analysis was poor (r = 0.48; slope, 669.85), and the peripheral blood WBC count (cutoff, 10 × 10(9) /L) was a poor predictor of PBPC harvest (NPV 60%, PPV 43.1%). XN-HPC compares favorably with CD34 analysis and may be a surrogate for CD34 analysis to predict optimal timing of PBPC collections. © 2015 AABB.

  11. The potential use of gingival crevicular blood for measuring glucose to screen for diabetes: an examination based on characteristics of the blood collection site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Shiela M; Wheeler, Alla J; Russell, Stefanie L; Brodsky, Anya; Davidson, Robert M; Gluzman, Rima; Li, Lin; Malo, Roberto Galao; Salis, Bram; Schoor, Robert; Tzvetkova, Krassimira

    2009-06-01

    This study examined conditions under which gingival crevicular blood (GCB) could be used to obtain a useful glucose reading to screen for undiagnosed diabetes during routine dental visits. GCB and capillary finger-stick blood (CFB) glucose readings obtained with a glucometer were compared for 46 patients recruited from an urban university dental clinic. Study participants were divided into two groups based on probing depth or bleeding on probing (BOP) at the site of collection of the GCB sample. Group 1 participants had blood collected from sites with adequate BOP to obtain a sample without touching the tooth or gingival margin, whereas group 2 participants had blood collected from sites with little or no bleeding. For each group, Pearson correlations were calculated for glucose readings obtained using GCB and CFB samples, and the limits of agreement between the two samples were examined. For group 1 participants, correlations between CFB and GCB glucose readings were high (0.89), and the limits of agreement were acceptable (-27.1 to 29.7). By contrast, for participants in group 2, correlations between the glucose readings were lower (0.78), and limits of agreement were much broader (-25.1 to 80.5). GCB samples were suitable to screen for diabetes in persons with sufficient BOP to obtain a sample without touching the tooth or gingival margin (i.e., in patients having the basic clinical signs of gingivitis or periodontal disease).

  12. Cost analysis of strategies to reduce blood culture contamination in the emergency department: sterile collection kits and phlebotomy teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Self, Wesley H; Talbot, Thomas R; Paul, Barbara R; Collins, Sean P; Ward, Michael J

    2014-08-01

    Blood culture collection practices that reduce contamination, such as sterile blood culture collection kits and phlebotomy teams, increase up-front costs for collecting cultures but may lead to net savings by eliminating downstream costs associated with contamination. The study objective was to compare overall hospital costs associated with 3 collection strategies: usual care, sterile kits, and phlebotomy teams. Cost analysis. This analysis was conducted from the perspective of a hospital leadership team selecting a blood culture collection strategy for an adult emergency department (ED) with 8,000 cultures drawn annually. Total hospital costs associated with 3 strategies were compared: (1) usual care, with nurses collecting cultures without a standardized protocol; (2) sterile kits, with nurses using a dedicated sterile collection kit; and (3) phlebotomy teams, with cultures collected by laboratory-based phlebotomists. In the base case, contamination rates associated with usual care, sterile kits, and phlebotomy teams were assumed to be 4.34%, 1.68%, and 1.10%, respectively. Total hospital costs included costs of collecting cultures and hospitalization costs according to culture results (negative, true positive, and contaminated). Compared with usual care, annual net savings using the sterile kit and phlebotomy team strategies were $483,219 and $288,980, respectively. Both strategies remained less costly than usual care across a broad range of sensitivity analyses. EDs with high blood culture contamination rates should strongly consider evidence-based strategies to reduce contamination. In addition to improving quality, implementing a sterile collection kit or phlebotomy team strategy is likely to result in net cost savings.

  13. [Comparison of human cord blood mesenchymal stem cell culture between using human umbilical cord plasma and using fetal bovine serum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yan; Lu, Zhiyong; Yuan, Yahong; Wang, Xiaoli; Li, Dongsheng; Zeng, Yi

    2013-12-01

    To investigate whether human umbilical cord plasma (HUP) can be used to culture human cord blood mesenchymal stem cells (HUCMSCs), we collected 20 surplus HUP. After being treated with salting out and diasysis, the HUP were used to culture HUCMSCs as 10% volume, and compared with fetal bovine serum (FBS). Morphological characteristics, growth curve and reproductive activity of HUCMSCs cells were observed. The concentration of bFGF and noggin secreted by HUCMSCs cultured with HUP and FBS medium were detected by ELISA. It was found that compared to FBS, the morphology, reproductive activity and characteristic of HUCMSCs cell cultured with HUP were not distinctively different from FBS. The concentration of bFGF in HUP group was significantly higher than that of FBS group, and the concentration of noggin was also different in the two groups. So we concluded that HUP could be used to culture HUCMSCs for a long-time, and the HUP mediumcoild could be more suitable for the culture of human embryonic stem cell (hESC).

  14. Blood Meal Identification of the Mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) Specimens Belong to Culex pipiens Complex that were Collected from Kayseri Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Seval; Yıldırım, Alparslan; Düzlü, Önder; Çiloğlu, Arif; Önder, Zuhal; İnci, Abdullah

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to determine the host preferences in blood meal of specimens belonging to Culex pipiens complex. A total of 1284 female mosquitos were morphologically examined, and genomic DNA isolations were individually performed on 376 (28.4%) specimens that were determined to be Cx. pipiens complex. PCR was performed with primers to specifically amplify the avian and mammalian mitochondrial cytochrome b (mt-cytb) gene region. Amplicons were cloned, and the obtained plasmids were sequenced to determine host species. Of 376 specimens, 148 (39.4%) were positive for the avian and/or mammalian blood meal. Among the positive specimens, 43, 98, and seven were determined to be positive for only mammalian, avian, and both avian and mammalian blood, respectively. Avian host preference in blood meal of the specimens belonging to Cx. pipiens was found to be significant. Of 15 avian blood positive isolates, nine, three, two, and one were designated as blood meal from avian species in Passeriformes, Accipitriformes, Columbiformes, and Strigiformes orders, respectively. While six, four, three, and two out of 15 mammalian blood-positive specimens were found to be positive for human, cattle, sheep, and dog blood, respectively. Molecular data regarding the host preferences of the Cx. pipiens species complex in blood meal were revealed for the first time in Turkey with this study.

  15. Production of recombinant cathepsin C from human blood fluke

    OpenAIRE

    Illichová, Hana

    2015-01-01

    Blood flukes of the genus Schistosoma cause schistosomiasis, a serious parasitic disease occurring in tropical and subtropical areas. Cathepsin C (EC 3.4.14.1) is a digestive enzyme of the blood flukes which participates in the degradation of hemoglobin through its dipeptidyl aminopeptidase activity. This enzyme is critical for metabolism of the parasite and represents a potential target for the development of antischistosomal drugs. Cathepsin C has not yet been studied in detail. This bachel...

  16. An Automated Method to Quantify Radiation Damage in Human Blood Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon K. Livingston, Mark S. Jenkins and Akio A. Awa

    2006-07-10

    Cytogenetic analysis of blood lymphocytes is a well established method to assess the absorbed dose in persons exposed to ionizing radiation. Because mature lymphocytes circulate throughout the body, the dose to these cells is believed to represent the average whole body exposure. Cytogenetic methods measure the incidence of structural aberrations in chromosomes as a means to quantify DNA damage which occurs when ionizing radiation interacts with human tissue. Methods to quantify DNA damage at the chromosomal level vary in complexity and tend to be laborious and time consuming. In a mass casualty scenario involving radiological/nuclear materials, the ability to rapidly triage individuals according to radiation dose is critically important. For high-throughput screening for dicentric chromosomes, many of the data collection steps can be optimized with motorized microscopes coupled to automated slide scanning platforms.

  17. Age-Related Somatic Structural Changes in the Nuclear Genome of Human Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Lars A.; Rasi, Chiara; Razzaghian, Hamid R.; Pakalapati, Geeta; Waite, Lindsay; Thilbeault, Krista Stanton; Ronowicz, Anna; Wineinger, Nathan E.; Tiwari, Hemant K.; Boomsma, Dorret; Westerman, Maxwell P.; Harris, Jennifer R.; Lyle, Robert; Essand, Magnus; Eriksson, Fredrik; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Iribarren, Carlos; Strachan, Eric; O'Hanlon, Terrance P.; Rider, Lisa G.; Miller, Frederick W.; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Lannfelt, Lars; Ingelsson, Martin; Piotrowski, Arkadiusz; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Absher, Devin; Dumanski, Jan P.

    2012-01-01

    Structural variations are among the most frequent interindividual genetic differences in the human genome. The frequency and distribution of de novo somatic structural variants in normal cells is, however, poorly explored. Using age-stratified cohorts of 318 monozygotic (MZ) twins and 296 single-born subjects, we describe age-related accumulation of copy-number variation in the nuclear genomes in vivo and frequency changes for both megabase- and kilobase-range variants. Megabase-range aberrations were found in 3.4% (9 of 264) of subjects ≥60 years old; these subjects included 78 MZ twin pairs and 108 single-born individuals. No such findings were observed in 81 MZ pairs or 180 single-born subjects who were ≤55 years old. Recurrent region- and gene-specific mutations, mostly deletions, were observed. Longitudinal analyses of 43 subjects whose data were collected 7–19 years apart suggest considerable variation in the rate of accumulation of clones carrying structural changes. Furthermore, the longitudinal analysis of individuals with structural aberrations suggests that there is a natural self-removal of aberrant cell clones from peripheral blood. In three healthy subjects, we detected somatic aberrations characteristic of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome. The recurrent rearrangements uncovered here are candidates for common age-related defects in human blood cells. We anticipate that extension of these results will allow determination of the genetic age of different somatic-cell lineages and estimation of possible individual differences between genetic and chronological age. Our work might also help to explain the cause of an age-related reduction in the number of cell clones in the blood; such a reduction is one of the hallmarks of immunosenescence. PMID:22305530

  18. Blood-Brain Transfer of Pittsburgh Compound B in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert eGjedde

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the labeled form, the Pittsburgh compound B (2-(4’-{N-methyl-[11C]}methyl-aminophenyl-6-hydroxybenzothiazole,[11C]PiB, is used as a biomarker for positron emission tomography (PET of brain □-amyloiddeposition in Alzheimer’s disease (AD. The permeability of [11C]PiB in the blood-brain barrier is held tobe high but the permeability-surface area product and extraction fractions in patients or healthy volunteersare not known. We used PET to determine the clearance associated with the unidrectional blood-braintransfer of [11C]PiB and the corresponding cerebral blood flow rates in frontal lobe, whole cerebral cortex,and cerebellum of patients with Alzheimer’s disease and healthy volunteers. Regional cerebral blood flowrates differed significantly between the two groups, but regional and whole-brain permeability-surface areaproducts were identical, in agreement with the observation that numerically, but insignificantly, unidirectionalblood-brain clearances are lower and extraction fractions higher in the patients. The evidence of unchangedpermeability-surface area products in the patients implies that blood flow changes can be deduced from theunidirectional blood-brain clearances of [11C]PiB in the patients.

  19. Comparison between human cord blood serum and platelet-rich plasma supplementation for Human Wharton's Jelly Stem Cells and dermal fibroblasts culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashemi SS

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We carried out a side-by-side comparison of the effects of Human cord blood serum (HcbS versus embryonic PRP on Human Wharton's Jelly Stem Cells(hWMSCand dermal fibroblasts proliferation. Human umbilical cord blood was collected to prepare activated serum (HCS and platelet-rich plasma (CPRP.Wharton's Jelly Stem Cells and dermal fibroblasts were cultured in complete medium with10% CPRP, 10%HCSor 10% fetal bovine serumand control (serum-free media.The efficiency of the protocols was evaluated in terms of the number of adherent cells and their expansion and Cell proliferation. We showed that proliferation of fibroblasts and mesenchymal stem cells in the presence of cord blood serum and platelet-rich plasma significantly more than the control group (p≤0/05. As an alternative to FBS, cord blood serum has been proved as an effective component in cell tissue culture applications and embraced a vast future in clinical applications of regenerative medicine. However, there is still a need to explore the potential of HCS and its safe applications in humanized cell therapy or tissue engineering.

  20. Non-ABO blood group systems phenotyping in non-human primates for blood banking laboratory and xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramis, G; Martínez-Alarcon, L; Quereda, J J; Mrowiec, A; Funes, C; Ríos, A; Ramírez, P; Muñoz, A; Majado, M J

    2013-04-01

    Some biomedical research procedures, such as organ xenotransplantation, usually require intensive hemotherapy. Knowledge of the whole phenotype of blood donor and graft could be useful in the field of xenotransplantation. Human and simian-type categories of blood groups have been established and they can be tested by standard methods used for human blood grouping. The aim of this work was to study the incidence of non-ABO blood group systems in different species of non-human primates, which are employed in biomedical research. The phenotype of Rh, Lewis, Kidd, Kell, MNSs, Lutheran, P and Duffy antigens was investigated in olive baboon (n = 48), chacma baboon (n = 9), Guinea baboon (n = 14), Rhesus macaque (n = 38) and squirrel monkey (n = 30) by using commercial microtyping cards. Kell, Lutheran, Kidd and Duffy antigens have been detected in all species, Rh in squirrel monkey, MNSs in rhesus macaque and squirrel monkey, and Lewis in baboon and rhesus macaque. There were differences in frequency and haemagglutination scores between species regardless of their gender and age. The main differences were found in squirrel monkey when compared with baboons and macaques. This typing system provides a tool to assess the presence of antigens in animals used for experimental procedures, such as xenotransplantation and xenotransfusion.

  1. Inter-Individual Differences in RNA Levels in Human Peripheral Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomczynski, Piotr; Wilfinger, William W.; Eghbalnia, Hamid R.; Kennedy, Amy; Rymaszewski, Michal; Mackey, Karol

    2016-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the range of RNA levels in human blood. This report provides assessment of peripheral blood RNA level and its inter-individual differences in a group of 35 healthy humans consisting of 25 females and 10 males ranging in age from 50 to 89 years. In this group, the average total RNA level was 14.59 μg/ml of blood, with no statistically significant difference between females and males. The individual RNA level ranged from 6.7 to 22.7 μg/ml of blood. In healthy subjects, the repeated sampling of an individual’s blood showed that RNA level, whether high or low, was stable. The inter-individual differences in RNA level in blood can be attributed to both, differences in cell number and the amount of RNA per cell. The 3.4-fold range of inter-individual differences in total RNA levels, documented herein, should be taken into account when evaluating the results of quantitative RT-PCR and/or RNA sequencing studies of human blood. Based on the presented results, a comprehensive assessment of gene expression in blood should involve determination of both the amount of mRNA per unit of total RNA (U / ng RNA) and the amount of mRNA per unit of blood (U / ml blood) to assure a thorough interpretation of physiological or pathological relevance of study results. PMID:26863434

  2. Using CF11 cellulose columns to inexpensively and effectively remove human DNA from Plasmodium falciparum-infected whole blood samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesan Meera

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome and transcriptome studies of Plasmodium nucleic acids obtained from parasitized whole blood are greatly improved by depletion of human DNA or enrichment of parasite DNA prior to next-generation sequencing and microarray hybridization. The most effective method currently used is a two-step procedure to deplete leukocytes: centrifugation using density gradient media followed by filtration through expensive, commercially available columns. This method is not easily implemented in field studies that collect hundreds of samples and simultaneously process samples for multiple laboratory analyses. Inexpensive syringes, hand-packed with CF11 cellulose powder, were recently shown to improve ex vivo cultivation of Plasmodium vivax obtained from parasitized whole blood. This study was undertaken to determine whether CF11 columns could be adapted to isolate Plasmodium falciparum DNA from parasitized whole blood and achieve current quantity and purity requirements for Illumina sequencing. Methods The CF11 procedure was compared with the current two-step standard of leukocyte depletion using parasitized red blood cells cultured in vitro and parasitized blood obtained ex vivo from Cambodian patients with malaria. Procedural variations in centrifugation and column size were tested, along with a range of blood volumes and parasite densities. Results CF11 filtration reliably produces 500 nanograms of DNA with less than 50% human DNA contamination, which is comparable to that obtained by the two-step method and falls within the current quality control requirements for Illumina sequencing. In addition, a centrifuge-free version of the CF11 filtration method to isolate P. falciparum DNA at remote and minimally equipped field sites in malaria-endemic areas was validated. Conclusions CF11 filtration is a cost-effective, scalable, one-step approach to remove human DNA from P. falciparum-infected whole blood samples.

  3. Knowledge and attitudes of pregnant women with regard to collection, testing and banking of cord blood stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Conrad V; Gordon, Kevin; Van den Hof, Michiel; Taweel, Shaureen; Baylis, Françoise

    2003-03-18

    Umbilical cord blood is used as a source of hematopoietic stem cells for bone marrow transplantation in the treatment of malignant and nonmalignant disease. We sought to examine pregnant women's knowledge and attitudes regarding cord blood banking, as their support is crucial to the success of cord blood transplant programs. A questionnaire examining sociodemographic factors and women's attitudes to cord blood banking was developed on the basis of findings from 2 focus groups and a pilot study. The questionnaire was distributed to 650 women attending antenatal clinics at a regional women's hospital between April and July 2001. A total of 443 women (68%) responded. More than half of the women (307/438 or 70% [95% confidence interval, CI, 66% to 74%]) reported poor or very poor knowledge about cord blood banking. Many of the respondents (299/441 or 68% [95% CI 63% to 72%]) thought that physicians should talk to pregnant women about the collection of cord blood, and they wanted to receive information about this topic from health care professionals (290/441 or 66% [95% CI 61% to 70%]) or prenatal classes (308/441 or 70% [95% CI 65% to 74%]). Most of the women (379/442 or 86% [95% CI 82% to 89%]) would elect to store cord blood in a public bank, many citing altruism as the reason for this choice. A much smaller proportion (63/442 or 14% [95% CI 11% to 18%]) would elect private banking, indicating that this would be a good investment or that they would feel guilty if the blood had not been stored. Additional acceptable uses for cord blood included research (mentioned by 294/436 women or 67% [95% CI 63% to 72%]) and gene therapy (mentioned by 169/437 women or 39% [95% CI 34% to 43%]). Most of the women in this study supported the donation of cord blood to public cord blood banks for potential transplantation and research.

  4. The modulating effect of royal jelly consumption against radiation-induced apoptosis in human peripheral blood leukocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Rafat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work was designed to assess the radioprotective effect of royal jelly (RJ against radiation-induced apoptosis in human peripheral blood leukocytes. In this study, peripheral blood samples were obtained on days 0, 4, 7, and 14 of the study from six healthy male volunteers taking a 1000 mg RJ capsule orally per day for 14 consecutive days. On each sampling day, all collected whole blood samples were divided into control and irradiated groups which were then exposed to the selected dose of 4 Gy X-ray. Percentage of apoptotic cells (Ap % was evaluated for all samples immediately after irradiation (Ap0 and also after a 24 h postirradiation incubation at 37°C in 5% CO2 (Ap24 by the use of neutral comet assay. Concerning Ap0, collected data demonstrated that the percentage of apoptotic cells in both control and irradiated groups did not significantly change during the study period. However, with respect to Ap24, the percentage of apoptotic cells in irradiated groups gradually reduced during the experiment, according to which a significant decrease was found after 14 days RJ consumption (P = 0.002. In conclusion, the present study revealed the protective role of 14 days RJ consumption against radiation-induced apoptosis in human peripheral blood leukocytes.

  5. Enrichment of NK cells from human blood with the RosetteSep kit from StemCell technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeton, Christine; Chandy, K George

    2007-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are large granular cytotoxic lymphocytes that belong to the innate immune system and play major roles in fighting against cancer and infections, but are also implicated in the early stages of pregnancy and transplant rejection. These cells are present in peripheral blood, from which they can be isolated. Cells can be isolated using either positive or negative selection. For positive selection we use antibodies directed to a surface marker present only on the cells of interest whereas for negative selection we use cocktails of antibodies targeted to surface markers present on all cells but the cells of interest. This latter technique presents the advantage of leaving the cells of interest free of antibodies, thereby reducing the risk of unwanted cell activation or differentiation. In this video-protocol we demonstrate how to separate NK cells from human blood by negative selection, using the RosetteSep kit from StemCell technologies. The procedure involves obtaining human peripheral blood (under an institutional review board-approved protocol to protect the human subjects) and mixing it with a cocktail of antibodies that will bind to markers absent on NK cells, but present on all other mononuclear cells present in peripheral blood (e.g., T lymphocytes, monocytes...). The antibodies present in the cocktail are conjugated to antibodies directed to glycophorin A on erythrocytes. All unwanted cells and red blood cells will therefore be trapped in complexes. The mix of blood and antibody cocktail is then diluted, overlayed on a Histopaque gradient, and centrifuged. NK cells (>80% pure) can be collected at the interface between the Histopaque and the diluted plasma. Similar cocktails are available for enrichment of other cell populations, such as human T lymphocytes.

  6. Reduced blood flow to contracting skeletal muscle in ageing humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin; Hellsten, Ylva

    2016-01-01

    consequences of ageing and physical inactivity can be challenging; yet, observations from cross-sectional and longitudinal studies on the effects of physical activity have provided some insight. Physical activity has the potential to offset the age-related decline in blood flow to contracting skeletal muscle...... the O2 demand of the active skeletal muscle of aged individuals during conditions where systemic blood flow is not limited by cardiac output seems to a large extent to be related to the level of physical activity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.......The ability to sustain a given absolute submaximal workload declines with advancing age likely due to a lower level of blood flow and O2 delivery to the exercising muscles. Given that physical inactivity mimics many of the physiological changes associated with ageing, separating the physiological...

  7. HCG-Activated Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMC) Promote Trophoblast Cell Invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaqin; Guo, Yue; Zhou, Danni; Xu, Mei; Ding, Jinli; Yang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Successful embryo implantation and placentation depend on appropriate trophoblast invasion into the maternal endometrial stroma. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is one of the earliest embryo-derived secreted signals in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) that abundantly expresses hCG receptors. The aims of this study were to estimate the effect of human embryo–secreted hCG on PBMC function and investigate the role and underlying mechanisms of activated PBMC in trophoblast invasion. Blood samples were collected from women undergoing benign gynecological surgery during the mid-secretory phase. PBMC were isolated and stimulated with or without hCG for 0 or 24 h. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) expressions in PBMC were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The JAR cell line served as a model for trophoblast cells and was divided into four groups: control, hCG only, PBMC only, and PBMC with hCG. JAR cell invasive and proliferative abilities were detected by trans-well and CCK8 assays and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1, and TIMP-2 expressions in JAR cells were detected by western blotting and real-time PCR analysis. We found that hCG can remarkably promote IL-1β and LIF promotion in PBMC after 24-h culture. PBMC activated by hCG significantly increased the number of invasive JAR cells in an invasion assay without affecting proliferation, and hCG-activated PBMC significantly increased MMP-2, MMP-9, and VEGF and decreased TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 expressions in JAR cells in a dose-dependent manner. This study demonstrated that hCG stimulates cytokine secretion in human PBMC and could stimulate trophoblast invasion. PMID:26087261

  8. Effects of midazolam on cerebral blood flow in human volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forster, A.; Juge, O.; Morel, D.

    1982-06-01

    The effects of intravenously administered midazolam on cerebral blood flow were evaluated in eight healthy volunteers using the /sup 133/Xe inhalation technique. Six minutes after an intravenous dose of 0.15 mg/kg midazolam, the cerebral blood flow decreased significantly (P less than 0.001) from a value of 40.6 +/- 3.3 to a value of 27.0 +/- 5.0 ml . 100 g-1 . min-1. Cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) increased from 2.8 +/- 0.2 to 3.9 to 0.6 mmHg/(ml . 100 g-1 . min-1)(P less than 0.001). Mean arterial blood pressure decreased significantly (P less than 0.05) from 117 +/- 8 to 109 +/- 9 mmHg and arterial carbon dioxide tension increased from 33.9 +/- 2.3 to 38.6 +/- 3.2 mmHg (P less than 0.05). Arterial oxygen tension remained stable throughout the study, 484 +/- 95 mmHg before the administration of midazolam and 453 +/- 76 mmHg after. All the subjects slept after the injection of the drug and had anterograde amnesia of 24.5 +/- 5 min. The decrease in mean arterial blood pressure was probably not important since it remained in the physiologic range for cerebral blood flow autoregulation. The increase in arterial carbon dioxide tension observed after the midazolam injection may have partially counteracted the effect of this new benzodiazepine on cerebral blood flow. Our data suggest that midazolam might be a safe agent to use for the induction of anethesia in neurosurgical patients with intracranial hypertension.

  9. Seroepidemiology of Human Brucellosis Among Blood Donors in Southern Ethiopia: Calling Attention to a Neglected Zoonotic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workalemahu, Bereket; Sewunet, Tsegaye; Astatkie, Ayalew

    2017-01-11

    Human brucellosis is neglected in southern Ethiopia. Although traditional food processing practices and animal husbandry which increase the risk of brucellosis are common, it has not been properly studied yet. This study was conducted to determine the seroepidemiology of brucellosis among apparently healthy individuals in southern Ethiopia. In the study, blood samples were collected to screen for serum agglutinins reactive to stained antigen of Brucella abortus Standard tube titration was performed for reactive serum to determine the titer of the agglutinin. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data on possible risk factors for brucellosis. The seroprevalence of human brucellosis in this study was found to be 10.6% (95% confidence interval = 7.0, 14.0). Possession of domestic ruminant animals, contact with ruminant animals, and husbandry practices at home were associated with seropositivity. The higher seroprevalence of human brucellosis in the study area needs attention and additional confirmatory investigation. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  10. BLOOD

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    benefit (altruism). '35 An individual who gives blood in replacement for that which has been given to his relation is referred to as family replacement donor. '2 But when a person donates blood for the purpose of transfusing a. defined patient, such a person is referred to as. AHMED S. G. AND HASSAN A. W. a directed donor.

  11. Anti-phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I determination using blood collection on filter paper in leprosy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TOMIMORI-YAMASHITA Jane

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors studied 70 leprosy patients and 20 normal individuals, comparing the traditional sera collection method and the finger prick blood with the conservation on filter paper for specific antibodies against the native phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I from Mycobacterium leprae. The finger prick blood dried on filter paper was eluated in phosphate buffer saline (PBS containing 0.5% gelatin. The classical method for native PGL-I was performed for these eluates, and compared with the antibody determination for sera. It was observed that there is a straight correlation comparing these two methods; although the titles found for the eluates were lower than those obtained for serology. This blood collection method could be useful for investigation of new leprosy cases in field, specially in contacts individuals.

  12. Update 1996: Blood collection and handling procedures for assessment of plasminogen activators and inhibitors (Leiden Fibrinolysis Workshop)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluft, C.; Meijer, P.

    1996-01-01

    Procedures of blood collection and handling can be different for the various variables in fibrinolysis. Some of them may require adaptation to the progress in assay methodology and in biochemical and physiological knowledge. During the Leiden Fibrinolysis Workshop 6 in 1996, the procedures described

  13. 129 Xe chemical shift in human blood and pulmonary blood oxygenation measurement in humans using hyperpolarized 129 Xe NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norquay, Graham; Leung, General; Stewart, Neil J; Wolber, Jan; Wild, Jim M

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the dependency of the 129 Xe-red blood cell (RBC) chemical shift on blood oxygenation, and to use this relation for noninvasive measurement of pulmonary blood oxygenation in vivo with hyperpolarized 129 Xe NMR. Hyperpolarized 129 Xe was equilibrated with blood samples of varying oxygenation in vitro, and NMR was performed at 1.5 T and 3 T. Dynamic in vivo NMR during breath hold apnea was performed at 3 T on two healthy volunteers following inhalation of hyperpolarized 129 Xe. The 129 Xe chemical shift in RBCs was found to increase nonlinearly with blood oxygenation at 1.5 T and 3 T. During breath hold apnea, the 129 Xe chemical shift in RBCs exhibited a periodic time modulation and showed a net decrease in chemical shift of ∼1 ppm over a 35 s breath hold, corresponding to a decrease of 7-10 % in RBC oxygenation. The 129 Xe-RBC signal amplitude showed a modulation with the same frequency as the 129 Xe-RBC chemical shift. The feasibility of using the 129 Xe-RBC chemical shift to measure pulmonary blood oxygenation in vivo has been demonstrated. Correlation between 129 Xe-RBC signal and 129 Xe-RBC chemical shift modulations in the lung warrants further investigation, with the aim to better quantify temporal blood oxygenation changes in the cardiopulmonary vascular circuit. Magn Reson Med 77:1399-1408, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  14. 129Xe chemical shift in human blood and pulmonary blood oxygenation measurement in humans using hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norquay, Graham; Leung, General; Stewart, Neil J.; Wolber, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the dependency of the 129Xe‐red blood cell (RBC) chemical shift on blood oxygenation, and to use this relation for noninvasive measurement of pulmonary blood oxygenation in vivo with hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR. Methods Hyperpolarized 129Xe was equilibrated with blood samples of varying oxygenation in vitro, and NMR was performed at 1.5 T and 3 T. Dynamic in vivo NMR during breath hold apnea was performed at 3 T on two healthy volunteers following inhalation of hyperpolarized 129Xe. Results The 129Xe chemical shift in RBCs was found to increase nonlinearly with blood oxygenation at 1.5 T and 3 T. During breath hold apnea, the 129Xe chemical shift in RBCs exhibited a periodic time modulation and showed a net decrease in chemical shift of ∼1 ppm over a 35 s breath hold, corresponding to a decrease of 7–10 % in RBC oxygenation. The 129Xe‐RBC signal amplitude showed a modulation with the same frequency as the 129Xe‐RBC chemical shift. Conclusion The feasibility of using the 129Xe‐RBC chemical shift to measure pulmonary blood oxygenation in vivo has been demonstrated. Correlation between 129Xe‐RBC signal and 129Xe‐RBC chemical shift modulations in the lung warrants further investigation, with the aim to better quantify temporal blood oxygenation changes in the cardiopulmonary vascular circuit. Magn Reson Med 77:1399–1408, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:27062652

  15. In vitro differentiation of human umbilical cord blood mesenchymal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    May H. Hasan

    2016-08-05

    Aug 5, 2016 ... Abstract Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were isolated by gradient density centrifugation from umbilical cord blood. Spindle-shaped adherent cells were permitted to grow to 70% confluence in primary culture media which was reached by day 12. Induction of differentiation started by cul- turing cells with ...

  16. The transcriptional landscape of age in human peripheral blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Marjolein J.; Joehanes, Roby; Pilling, Luke C.; Schurmann, Claudia; Conneely, Karen N.; Powell, Joseph; Reinmaa, Eva; Sutphin, George L.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Schramm, Katharina; Wilson, Yana A.; Kobes, Sayuko; Tukiainen, Taru; Ramos, Yolande F.; Goering, Harald H. H.; Fornage, Myriam; Liu, Yongmei; Gharib, Sina A.; Stranger, Barbara E.; De Jager, Philip L.; Aviv, Abraham; Levy, Daniel; Murabito, Joanne M.; Munson, Peter J.; Huan, Tianxiao; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; van Rooij, Jeroen; Stolk, Lisette; Broer, Linda; Verbiest, Michael M. P. J.; Jhamai, Mila; Arp, Pascal; Metspalu, Andres; Tserel, Liina; Milani, Lili; Samani, Nilesh J.; Peterson, Paert; Kasela, Silva; Codd, Veryan; Peters, Annette; Ward-Caviness, Cavin K.; Herder, Christian; Waldenberger, Melanie; Roden, Michael; Singmann, Paula; Zeilinger, Sonja; Illig, Thomas; Homuth, Georg; Grabe, Hans-Joergen; Voelzke, Henry; Steil, Leif; Kocher, Thomas; Murray, Anna; Melzer, David; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Bandinelli, Stefania; Moses, Eric K.; Kent, Jack W.; Curran, Joanne E.; Johnson, Matthew P.; Williams-Blangero, Sarah; Westra, Harm-Jan; Mcrae, Allan F.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Hovatta, Iiris; Perola, Markus; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Henders, Anjali K.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Smith, Alicia K.; Mehta, Divya; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Nylocks, K. Maria; Kennedy, Elizabeth M.; Klengel, Torsten; Ding, Jingzhong; Suchy-Dicey, Astrid M.; Enquobahrie, Daniel A.; Brody, Jennifer; Rotter, Jerome I.; Chen, Yii-Der I.; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Slagboom, P. Eline; Helmer, Quinta; den Hollander, Wouter; Bean, Shannon; Raj, Towfique; Bakhshi, Noman; Wang, Qiao Ping; Oyston, Lisa J.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Tracy, Russell P.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Turner, Stephen T.; Blangero, John; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Ressler, Kerry J.; Yang, Jian; Franke, Lude; Kettunen, Johannes; Visscher, Peter M.; Neely, G. Gregory; Korstanje, Ron; Hanson, Robert L.; Prokisch, Holger; Ferrucci, Luigi; Esko, Tonu; Teumer, Alexander; van Meurs, Joyce B. J.; Johnson, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Disease incidences increase with age, but the molecular characteristics of ageing that lead to increased disease susceptibility remain inadequately understood. Here we perform a whole-blood gene expression meta-analysis in 14,983 individuals of European ancestry (including replication) and identify

  17. The transcriptional landscape of age in human peripheral blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Peters (Marjolein); R. Joehanes (Roby); L.C. Pilling (Luke); C. Schurmann (Claudia); K.N. Conneely (Karen N.); J.E. Powell (Joseph); E. Reinmaa (Eva); G.L. Sutphin (George L.); A. Zhernakova (Alexandra); K. Schramm (Katharina); Y.A. Wilson (Yana A.); S. Kobes (Sayuko); T. Tukiainen (Taru); Y.F.M. Ramos (Yolande); H.H.H. Göring (Harald H.); M. Fornage (Myriam); Y. Liu (Yongmei); S.A. Gharib (Sina); B.E. Stranger (Barbara); P.L. de Jager (Philip); A. Aviv (Abraham); D. Levy (Daniel); J. Murabito (Joanne); P.J. Munson (Peter J.); T. Huan (Tianxiao); A. Hofman (Albert); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); J. van Rooij (Jeroen); L. Stolk (Lisette); L. Broer (Linda); M.M.P.J. Verbiest (Michael); M. Jhamai (Mila); P.P. Arp (Pascal); A. Metspalu (Andres); L. Tserel (Liina); L. Milani (Lili); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); P. Peterson (Pärt); S. Kasela (Silva); V. Codd (Veryan); A. Peters (Annette); C.K. Ward-Caviness (Cavin K.); C. Herder (Christian); M. Waldenberger (Melanie); M. Roden (Michael); P. Singmann (Paula); S. Zeilinger (Sonja); T. Illig (Thomas); G. Homuth (Georg); H.J. Grabe (Hans Jörgen); H. Völzke (Henry); L. Steil (Leif); T. Kocher (Thomas); A. Murray (Anna); D. Melzer (David); H. Yaghootkar (Hanieh); S. Bandinelli; E.K. Moses (Eric); J.W. Kent (Jack); J.E. Curran (Joanne); M.P. Johnson (Matthew); S. Williams-Blangero (Sarah); H.J. Westra (Harm-Jan); A.F. McRae (Allan F.); J.A. Smith (Jennifer A); S.L.R. Kardia (Sharon); I. Hovatta (Iiris); M. Perola (Markus); S. Ripatti (Samuli); V. Salomaa (Veikko); A.K. Henders (Anjali); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); A.K. Smith (Alicia K.); D. Mehta (Divya); E.B. Binder (Elisabeth B.); K.M. Nylocks (K. Maria); E.M. Kennedy (Elizabeth M.); T. Klengel (Torsten); J. Ding (Jingzhong); A. Suchy-Dicey (Astrid); D. Enquobahrie; J. Brody (Jennifer); J.I. Rotter (Jerome I.); Y.-D.I. Chen (Yii-Der I.); J.J. Houwing-Duistermaat (Jeanine); M. Kloppenburg (Margreet); P.E. Slagboom (Eline); Q. Helmer (Quinta); W. den Hollander (Wouter); S. Bean (Shannon); T. Raj (Towfique); N. Bakhshi (Noman); Q.P. Wang (Qiao Ping); L.J. Oyston (Lisa J.); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); R.P. Tracy (Russell); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); S.T. Turner (Stephen); J. Blangero (John); I. Meulenbelt (Ingrid); K.J. Ressler (Kerry); J. Yang (Jian); L. Franke (Lude); J. Kettunen (Johannes); P.M. Visscher (Peter); G.G. Neely (G. Gregory); R. Korstanje (Ron); R.L. Hanson (Robert L.); H. Prokisch (Holger); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); T. Esko (Tõnu); A. Teumer (Alexander); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); A.D. Johnson (Andrew D.); M.A. Nalls (Michael); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); M.R. Cookson (Mark); R.J. Gibbs (Raphael J.); J. Hardy (John); A. Ramasamy (Adaikalavan); A.B. Zonderman (Alan B.); A. Dillman (Allissa); B. Traynor (Bryan); C. Smith (Colin); D.L. Longo (Dan L.); D. Trabzuni (Danyah); J.C. Troncoso (Juan); M.P. van der Brug (Marcel); M.E. Weale (Michael); R. O'Brien (Richard); R. Johnson (Robert); R. Walker (Robert); R.H. Zielke (Ronald H.); S. Arepalli (Sampath); M. Ryten (Mina); A. Singleton

    2015-01-01

    textabstractDisease incidences increase with age, but the molecular characteristics of ageing that lead to increased disease susceptibility remain inadequately understood. Here we perform a whole-blood gene expression meta-analysis in 14,983 individuals of European ancestry (including replication)

  18. Hypothermia and acidosis synergistically impair coagulation in human whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirkmann, Daniel; Hanke, Alexander A; Görlinger, Klaus; Peters, Jürgen

    2008-06-01

    Hypothermia and acidosis were reported to influence coagulopathy in different clinical settings. We evaluated whole blood coagulation to determine the effects of hypothermia and/or acidosis on hemostasis. Whole blood samples (3.000 microL) from 10 healthy volunteers (2 female, 8 male) were acidified by adding 40 microL of hydrochloric acid of increasing molarity to achieve a blood pH (alpha-stat) between 7.0 and 7.37, and coagulation was analyzed by rotational thromboelastometry after an incubation period of 30 min using both intrinsically (InTEM) and extrinsically (ExTEM) activated assays. To assess temperature-dependent effects, all tests were performed at blood/thromboelastometer temperatures of 30, 33, 36, and 39 degrees C, respectively. An additional extrinsically activated test with addition of cytochalasin D was performed to examine clot formation without platelet contribution. Hypothermia at a normal pH produced an increased coagulation time [ExTEM: 65 s +/- 3.6 (36 degrees C) vs 85 +/- 4 (30 degrees C), P coagulation time, InTEM: 181 s +/- 10 (36 degrees C) vs 226 +/- 9, P coagulation changes that were worsened by acidosis whereas acidosis without hypothermia has no significant effect on coagulation, as studied by thromboelastometry. This effect was mediated by the inhibition of coagulation factors and platelet function. Thus, thromboelastometry performed at 37 degrees C overestimated integrity of coagulation during hypothermia in particular in combination with acidosis.

  19. Blood-brain transfer of Pittsburgh compound B in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjedde, Albert; Aanerud, Joel; Braendgaard, Hans

    2013-01-01

    In the labeled form, the Pittsburgh compound B (2-(4'-{N-methyl-[(11)C]}methyl-aminophenyl)-6-hydroxy-benzothiazole, [(11)C]PiB), is used as a biomarker for positron emission tomography (PET) of brain β-amyloid deposition in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The permeability of [(11)C]PiB in the blood...

  20. Effects of Septrin Administration on Blood Cells Parameters in Humans

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results showed that the packed cell volume (PCV), total white blood cell count (WBC), neutrophils and platelets were significantly decreased (p<0.05), especially after 7-10 days of septrin administration, compared to the control values. On the other hand, the reticulocytes, lymphocytes, eosinophils and prothrombin time ...

  1. Cerebral blood flow and oxidative metabolism during human endotoxemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kirsten; Strauss, Gitte Irene; Qvist, Jesper

    2002-01-01

    and catecholamines was investigated in eight healthy young volunteers. Cerebral blood flow was measured by the Kety-Schmidt technique at baseline (during normocapnia and voluntary hyperventilation for calculation of subject-specific cerebrovascular CO reactivity), and 90 minutes after an intravenous bolus...

  2. Effect on some haematological indices of human whole blood when ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fact that it does not chelate calcium as its mechanism of anticoagulation gives it an advantage over K3EDTA when used for biochemical tests. It should therefore, be explored as alternative laboratory anticoagulant in view of this advantage. Keywords: Euphorbia heterophylla, anticoagulants, storage of blood, red cell ...

  3. In vitro differentiation of human umbilical cord blood mesenchymal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were isolated by gradient density centrifugation from umbilical cord blood. Spindle-shaped adherent cells were permitted to grow to 70% confluence in primary culture media which was reached by day 12. Induction of differentiation started by culturing cells with differentiation medium ...

  4. Bone-Like Hydroxyapatite Formation in Human Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, Anatoly T.; Larionov, Peter M.; Ivanova, Alexandra S.; Zaikovskii, Vladimir I.; Chernyavskiy, Mikhail A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prove the mechanism of mineralization, when hydroxyapatite (HAP) is formed in blood plasma. These observations were substantiated by in vitro simulation of HAP crystallization in the plasma of healthy adults in a controllable quasi-physiological environment (T = 37°C, pH = 7.4) and at concentrations of dissolved Ca…

  5. Roughness influence on human blood drop spreading and splashing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Fiona; Buntsma, Naomi; Brutin, David

    2017-11-01

    The impact behaviour of complex fluid droplets is a topic that has been extensively studied but with much debate. The Bloodstain Pattern Analysis (BPA) community is encountering this scientific problem with daily practical cases since they use bloodstains as evidence in crime scene reconstruction. We aim to provide fundamental explanations in the study of blood drip stains by investigating the influence of surface roughness and wettability on the splashing limit of droplets of blood, a non-Newtonian colloidal fluid. Droplets of blood impacting perpendicularly different surfaces at different velocities were recorded. The recordings were analysed as well as the surfaces characteristics in order to find an empirical solution since we found that roughness plays a major role in the threshold of the splashing/non-splashing behaviour of blood compared to the wettability. Moreover it appears that roughness alters the deformation of the drip stains. These observations are key in characterising features of drip stains with the impacting conditions, which would answer some forensic issues.

  6. Bovine lactoferrin enhances proliferation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes and induces cytokine production in whole blood cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaczyńska, Ewa; Kocięba, Maja; Śliwińska, Ewelina; Zimecki, Michał

    2014-01-01

    Lactoferrin belongs to the immunoregulatory milk proteins involved in iron metabolism as well in providing innate immunity to newborns. The protein has been the subject of numerous clinical studies. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the effects of bovine lactoferrins (bLF), differing in source and iron content, on spontaneous proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and cytokine production by human whole blood cultures. The following bLF preparations were used: partially iron saturated or devoid of iron bLF from milk and bLF from colostrum. The study was conducted on 12 healthy volunteers (men, 20-24 years old). The effects of bLFs on the proliferation of PBMC in four-day cultures was studied at 50-0.6 µg/mL concentration range and the rate of proliferation was determined using the MTT colorimetric method. TNF α and IL-6 levels, induced by the bLFs in 24 h whole blood cultures, were measured by ELISA. The lactoferrins stimulated autologous proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in a dose-dependent manner, with a comparable efficacy. This stimulation occurred both in the constant presence of bLFs in the cultures and also upon preincubation of PBMC with bLFs with subsequent exhaustive wash of cells. Only bLF from colostrum induced production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in cultures of whole blood cells. This phenomenon took place predominantly at concentration of 50 µg/mL. The results showed potent stimulation of the proliferative response of PBMC by bovine lactoferrin, associated with the induction of proinflammatory cytokines only in the case of colostral bLF. This observation may be of importance when high doses of bLF are used in therapy and by designing diet supplementation with this protein.

  7. Human umbilical cord-derived MSC culture: the replacement of animal sera with human cord blood plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yan; Yang, Hua; Feng, Jing Bo; Qiu, Ying; Li, Dong Sheng; Zeng, Yi

    2013-12-01

    Human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) hold great potential for their therapeutic use in various clinical diseases. Many publications have reported on human blood-derived alternatives to animal serum for culturing mesenchymal stem cells, such as human serum, allogenic umbilical cord blood serum, and human platelet derivatives. However, it is not clear whether human umbilical cord blood plasma (UCBP), as the surplusage of umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cell extraction, could be used. In this study, in order to make the best of umbilical cord blood, the human UCBP was dialyzed to replace fetal bovine serum (FBS) in the culture medium. hUC-MSCs were cultured in the new medium. Cell growth rate, specific biomarkers, and differentiation properties were detected to characterize the cell proliferation and MSC-specific properties. The hUC-MSCs cultured in such derived medium were verified with proliferation rate, cluster differentiation markers, cell cycle, as well as differentiation capabilities. Such dialyzed human UCBP is fully comparable with, if not superior to, FBS in deriving and culturing hUC-MSCs.

  8. Human placental growth hormone in ectopic pregnancy: Detection in maternal blood, immunohistochemistry and potential clinical implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübener, Christoph; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Wu, Zida; Diebold, Joachim; Strasburger, Christian J; Mahner, Sven; Hasbargen, Uwe; Delius, Maria

    2017-12-01

    To investigate human placental growth hormone (hGH-V) in ectopic pregnancy (EP): detection in maternal blood, correlation with immunohistochemistry and possible role as a marker for the course of EP. Women presenting in the outpatient or emergency department of a tertiary care university hospital with a positive pregnancy test and strong suspicion of EP by ultrasound and/or symptoms were eligible for the study (n=70). Tissue specimens from the surgically treated patients (n=50) were examined by histopathology as well as by a hGH-V specific immohistochemistry set-up. A highly sensitive hGH-V specific immunoassay was used to analyse serum samples collected before treatment, day 1 post surgery samples and serial samples for medical treatment. In EP patients' sera hGH-V was shown to be measurable for the first time (n=18). HGH-V however could not be detected in all patients' sera. HCG levels were significantly higher in the hGH-V serum positive group (p 0.001). HGH-V was localized to the syncytiotrophoblast in all specimens of EP examined by immunohistochemistry (n=10) regardless of the detection in the patient's blood. Placental growth hormone (hGH-V) was shown to be present both in ectopic pregnancy patients' sera and tissue. It may serve as a biomarker for monitoring the course and treatment of EP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Context and social perceptions of blood donation in donors found positive for human immunodeficiency virus in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquesnoy, Alice; Danic, Bruno; Santos, Aurélie; Martinaud, Christophe; Woimant, Geneviève; Laperche, Syria; Tiberghien, Pierre; Jauffret-Roustide, Marie; Pillonel, Josiane

    2017-09-01

    In France, information collected during postdonation interviews showed that a majority of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected donors were not eligible to donate as per donor selection criteria. In the interest of blood safety, this study aimed to explore the mechanisms of noncompliance with blood donor selection criteria, notably the permanent deferral of men who have sex with men (MSM). Semistructured individual interviews were conducted with 32 blood donors found positive for HIV between mid-2011 and 2014. Topics such as the experience and motivations for donating blood, understanding of selection criteria, sexual risk management, and opinions on donor selection were discussed. Transcripts were analyzed inductively. More than 50% of study participants were noncompliant with donor selection criteria. Reasons for nondisclosure of risk factors in the predonation questionnaire or the predonation interview included stigma, test-seeking motivations, symbolic attachment to blood donation, and context of donation. Compliance to donor criteria was seen as secondary by donors who reaped personal benefits from the symbolism of their donation. Donors lacked self-reflexivity in their assessment of risky sexual behavior. The "window period" and the underlying epidemiologic arguments for donor selection criteria were poorly understood. Nearly all participants disapproved of the permanent ban on blood donations from MSM. This study demonstrated the need for more communication on the epidemiologic basis for donor selection criteria and on the window period to facilitate donor compliance. These findings have already advanced improvements to predonation documents, in a larger context of 2016 donor selection criteria revision. © 2017 AABB.

  10. Renal cortical and medullary blood flow responses to altered NO-availability in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkjaer, Mads; Vafaee, Manoucher; Møller, Michael Lehd

    2010-01-01

    The objective was to quantify regional renal blood flow in humans. In nine young volunteers on a controlled diet, the lower abdomen was CT-scanned and regional renal blood flow determined by positron emission tomography (PET) scanning using H(2)(15)O as tracer. Measurements were performed at base...

  11. The effective reduction of tourniquet application time after minor modification of the CLSI H03-A6 blood collection procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima-Oliveira, Gabriel; Lippi, Giuseppe; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Montagnana, Martina; Picheth, Geraldo; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2013-01-01

    The phlebotomists' procedures are a still source of laboratory variability. The aim of this study was to verify the efficacy of minor modification in procedure for collection of diagnostic blood specimens by venipuncture from CLSI H03-A6 document is able to reduce the tourniquet application time. Thirty phlebotomists were invited to participate. Each phlebotomist was trained individually to perform the new venipuncture procedure that shortens the time of tourniquet release and removal. The phlebotomy training program was delivered over 8h. After training, all phlebotomists were monitored for 20 working days, to guarantee the adoption of the correct new procedures for collection of diagnostic blood specimens. After this time frame the phlebotomists were evaluated to verify whether the new procedure for blood collection derived from CLSI H03-A6 document was effective to improve the quality process by decrease in tourniquet application time. We compared the tourniquet application time and qualitative difference of phlebotomy procedures between laboratories before and after phlebotomy training. The overall mean +/- SD tourniquet application time before and afterthis intervention were 118 +/- 1 s and 30 +/- 1 s respectively. Minor modifications in procedure for blood collection were able to reduce significantly the tourniquet application time (-88 s, P CLSI H03-A6 document were able to reduce the tourniquet application time. Now the proposed new procedure for collection of diagnostic blood specimens by venipuncture could be considered usefulness and should be put into practice by all quality laboratory managers and/or phlebotomy coordinators to avoid preanalytical errors regard venous stasis and guarantee patient safety.

  12. Effects of blood transportation on human peripheral mononuclear cell yield, phenotype and function: implications for immune cell biobanking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Posevitz-Fejfár

    Full Text Available Human biospecimen collection, processing and preservation are rapidly emerging subjects providing essential support to clinical as well as basic researchers. Unlike collection of other biospecimens (e.g. DNA and serum, biobanking of viable immune cells, such as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC and/or isolated immune cell subsets is still in its infancy. While certain aspects of processing and freezing conditions have been studied in the past years, little is known about the effect of blood transportation on immune cell survival, phenotype and specific functions. However, especially for multicentric and cooperative projects it is vital to precisely know those effects. In this study we investigated the effect of blood shipping and pre-processing delay on immune cell phenotype and function both on cellular and subcellular levels. Peripheral blood was collected from healthy volunteers (n = 9: at a distal location (shipped overnight and in the central laboratory (processed immediately. PBMC were processed in the central laboratory and analyzed post-cryopreservation. We analyzed yield, major immune subset distribution, proliferative capacity of T cells, cytokine pattern and T-cell receptor signal transduction. Results show that overnight transportation of blood samples does not globally compromise T- cell subsets as they largely retain their phenotype and proliferative capacity. However, NK and B cell frequencies, the production of certain PBMC-derived cytokines and IL-6 mediated cytokine signaling pathway are altered due to transportation. Various control experiments have been carried out to compare issues related to shipping versus pre-processing delay on site. Our results suggest the implementation of appropriate controls when using multicenter logistics for blood transportation aiming at subsequent isolation of viable immune cells, e.g. in multicenter clinical trials or studies analyzing immune cells/subsets. One important conclusion might

  13. 77 FR 35408 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request: Opinions and Perspectives About the Current Blood Donation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-13

    ... who have tested disease marker positive and were interviewed regarding potential risk factors suggest..., Director, Division of Blood Diseases and Resources, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH. Dated... provisions of Section 3507(a)(1)(D) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the National Heart, Lung, and...

  14. Cord Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Abroun

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available   Stem cells are naïve or master cells. This means they can transform into special 200 cell types as needed by body, and each of these cells has just one function. Stem cells are found in many parts of the human body, although some sources have richer concentrations than others. Some excellent sources of stem cells, such as bone marrow, peripheral blood, cord blood, other tissue stem cells and human embryos, which last one are controversial and their use can be illegal in some countries. Cord blood is a sample of blood taken from a newborn baby's umbilical cord. It is a rich source of stem cells, umbilical cord blood and tissue are collected from material that normally has no use following a child’s birth. Umbilical cord blood and tissue cells are rich sources of stem cells, which have been used in the treatment of over 80 diseases including leukemia, lymphoma and anemia as bone marrow stem cell potency.  The most common disease category has been leukemia. The next largest group is inherited diseases. Patients with lymphoma, myelodysplasia and severe aplastic anemia have also been successfully transplanted with cord blood. Cord blood is obtained by syringing out the placenta through the umbilical cord at the time of childbirth, after the cord has been detached from the newborn. Collecting stem cells from umbilical blood and tissue is ethical, pain-free, safe and simple. When they are needed to treat your child later in life, there will be no rejection or incompatibility issues, as the procedure will be using their own cells. In contrast, stem cells from donors do have these potential problems. By consider about cord blood potency, cord blood banks (familial or public were established. In IRAN, four cord blood banks has activity, Shariati BMT center cord blood bank, Royan familial cord blood banks, Royan public cord blood banks and Iranian Blood Transfusion Organ cord blood banks. Despite 50,000 sample which storage in these banks, but the

  15. Conserved synteny in rat and mouse for a blood pressure QTL on human chromosome 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimdahl, Heike; Kreitler, Thomas; Gösele, Claudia; Ganten, Detlev; Hübner, Norbert

    2002-06-01

    Evidence for blood pressure quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on rat chromosome 10 has been found in multiple independent studies. Analysis of the homologous region on human chromosome 17 revealed significant linkage to blood pressure. The critical segment on human chromosome 17 spans a large interval containing the genes Itga2b, Gfap, and Itgb3. Therefore, findings in the rat may help to refine the position of blood pressure-regulating loci, assuming a common molecular cause across species. However, it has recently been suggested that the gene order in human, rat, and mouse is not conserved in this region, leaving uncertainty about the overlap of the blood pressure- regulating region between human chromosome 17 and rat chromosome 10. We have performed a detailed comparative analysis among human, mouse, and rat, defining the segment in question, by obtaining gene structure information in silico and by radiation hybrid mapping. It is of interest that this region also contains Wnk4, a gene previously identified to cause pseudohypoaldosteronism type II and human hypertension. Our results definitively show that the conserved synteny extends among human chromosome 17, rat chromosome 10, and mouse chromosome 11, demonstrating an overlap between previously localized blood pressure QTLs in humans and rats.

  16. Stability of Radiation Induced Chromosome Damage in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; George, K.; Willingham, V.

    2006-01-01

    Chromosome damage in an individual's peripheral blood lymphocytes can be an indicator of radiation exposure and this data can be used to evaluate dose after accidental or occupational exposure. Evidence suggests that the yield of chromosome damage in lymphocytes is also a relevant biomarker of cancer risk in humans that reflects individual cancer susceptibility. It follows that biomonitoring studies can be used to uncover subjects who are particularly susceptible to radiation damage and therefore at higher risk of cancer. Translocations and other stable aberrations are commonly believed to persist in peripheral blood cells for many years after exposure, and it has been suggested that translocations can be used for assessing retrospective radiation doses or chronic exposures. However, recent investigations suggest that translocations might not always persist indefinitely. We measured chromosome aberrations in the blood lymphocytes of six astronauts before their respective missions of approximately 3 to 6 months onboard the international space station, and again at various intervals up to 5 years after flight. In samples collected a few days after return to earth, the yield of chromosome translocations had significantly increased compared with preflight values, and results indicate that biodosimetry estimates lie within the range expected from physical dosimetry. However, for five of the astronauts, follow up analysis revealed a temporal decline in translocations with half-lives ranging from 10 to 58 months. The yield of exchanges remained unchanged for the sixth astronaut during an observation period of 5 months post-flight. These results may indicate complications with the use of stable aberrations for retrospective dose reconstruction and could affect cancer risk predictions that are estimated from yields of chromosome damage obtained shortly after exposure.

  17. Blood screening for human immunodeficiency virus: a new algorithm to reduce the false-positive results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, R; Sun, Y; Wang, L; Zhang, K; Xie, J; Li, J

    2013-08-01

    The objectives to this study were to evaluate the performance of an anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) blood screening test and propose a new screening algorithm for blood banks routinely using nucleic acid amplification testing (NAT) to reduce false-positive results. Most anti-HIV enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) results are false-positive because of the low prevalence of HIV infection and high sensitivity of the ELISAs. A total of 281 588 voluntary donations were collected and sera reactive on one or both anti-HIV ELISAs were confirmed by Western blot (WB) testing. All samples with nonreactive results for the two ELISAs underwent NAT. A confirmed HIV-1-positive result was defined by a reactive result on NAT or WB testing. Correlations between signal-to-cutoff ratios and the confirmed HIV-1 infection rate were analysed for each enzyme immunoassay and two-enzyme immunoassay combination. The positive predictive values (PPVs) of the current and proposed algorithms were calculated. Seventy-nine donations (13·9%) were positive on WB analysis and one donation negative for anti-HIV antibody was reactive on NAT and confirmed to be a window period donation on additional follow-up testing. The PPV of the 567 donations reactive on one or two ELISAs was 13·9%. However, using the new screening algorithm, 457 donations underwent NAT immediately instead of WB testing. Only 110 donations were tested with WB and the PPV was 71·8%. Screening for HIV is sensitive, specific and time saving for donors with this algorithm, which is suitable for HIV screening in low prevalence settings. © 2013 The Authors. Transfusion Medicine © 2013 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  18. The impact of human immunodeficiency virus infection on obstetric hemorrhage and blood transfusion in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Evan M; Crookes, Robert L; Hull, Jennifer; Fawcus, Sue; Gangaram, Rajesh; Anthony, John; Ingram, Charlotte; Ngcobo, Solomuzi; Croxford, Julie; Creel, Darryl V; Murphy, Edward L

    2015-07-01

    Globally, as in South Africa, obstetric hemorrhage (OH) remains a leading cause of maternal mortality and morbidity. Although blood transfusion is critical to OH management, the incidence and predictors of transfusion as well as their relation to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are poorly described. A cross-sectional study was conducted of all peripartum patients at four major hospitals in South Africa (April to July 2012). Comprehensive clinical data were collected on patients who sustained OH and/or were transfused. Logistic regression was used to model risk factors for OH and transfusion. A total of 15,725 peripartum women were evaluated, of whom 3969 (25.2%) were HIV positive. Overall, 387 (2.5%) women sustained OH and 438 (2.8%) received transfusions, including 213 (1.4%) women with both OH and transfusion. There was no significant difference in OH incidence between HIV-positive (2.8%) and HIV-negative (2.3%) patients (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.72-1.25). In contrast, the incidence of blood transfusion was significantly higher in HIV-positive (3.7%) than in HIV-negative (2.4%) patients (adjusted OR, 1.52; 95% CI, 1.14-2.03). Other risk factors for transfusion included OH, low prenatal hemoglobin, the treating hospital, lack of prenatal care, and gestational age of not more than 34 weeks. In the South African obstetric setting, the incidence of peripartum blood transfusion is significantly higher than in the United States and other high-income countries while OH incidence is similar. While OH and prenatal anemia are major predictors of transfusion, HIV infection is a common and independent contributing factor. © 2015 AABB.

  19. Concordance of Mutation Detection in Circulating Tumor DNA in Early Clinical Trials Using Different Blood Collection Protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlborn, Lise B; Madsen, Mette; Jonson, Lars

    2017-01-01

    in patients with tumors inaccessible for biopsy, making ctDNA an important alternative source of tumor material. Immediate separation of plasma is widely used in standard isolation of cell-free DNA to ensure high quality plasma DNA. However, these procedures are labor intensive and logistically challenging...... in a clinical setting. Here we investigate the concordance between standard blood collection for molecular analysis using immediate separation of plasma, compared to the use of collection tubes allowing for delayed processing. METHODS: In this study, we measured the fractional abundance of tumor specific...... patients with advanced solid cancers enrolled in early clinical trials. RESULTS: Concordance in the fractional abundance of mutations in ctDNA isolated from blood collected in either K3EDTA or BCT tubes from patients with different solid cancers was observed. CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates that BCT...

  20. Novel Membrane System to Automatically Deglycerolize Thawed Frozen Human Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-04-01

    equivalent to the current Haemonetics 115 device. • Washing frozen/thawed RBCs with the WUP I and WUP II/B/ H devices yielded glycerol washouts of...RHeaton, A, Mesbah -Karimi N, Bross J. Vox Sang 12. Blood Bank Week 1995;12(23):3 36 List of Tables Table 1: Sequence of Events for TBPS Console Table...2..... *1. . ...i.... .,..6. . . ............ 6 ..... 4 E...,..6.... H ..o

  1. Identification of Phosphoglycerate Kinase 1 (PGK1 as a reference gene for quantitative gene expression measurements in human blood RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unger Elizabeth R

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blood is a convenient sample and increasingly used for quantitative gene expression measurements with a variety of diseases including chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS. Quantitative gene expression measurements require normalization of target genes to reference genes that are stable and independent from variables being tested in the experiment. Because there are no genes that are useful for all situations, reference gene selection is an essential step to any quantitative reverse transcription-PCR protocol. Many publications have described appropriate genes for a wide variety of tissues and experimental conditions, however, reference genes that may be suitable for the analysis of CFS, or human blood RNA derived from whole blood as well as isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, have not been described. Findings Literature review and analyses of our unpublished microarray data were used to narrow down the pool of candidate reference genes to six. We assayed whole blood RNA from Tempus tubes and cell preparation tube (CPT-collected PBMC RNA from 46 subjects, and used the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms to select the most stable reference genes. Phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1 was one of the optimal normalization genes for both whole blood and PBMC RNA, however, additional genes differed for the two sample types; Ribosomal protein large, P0 (RPLP0 for PBMC RNA and Peptidylprolyl isomerase B (PPIB for whole blood RNA. We also show that the use of a single reference gene is sufficient for normalization when the most stable candidates are used. Conclusions We have identified PGK1 as a stable reference gene for use with whole blood RNA and RNA derived from PBMC. When stable genes are selected it is possible to use a single gene for normalization rather than two or three. Optimal normalization will improve the ability of results from PBMC RNA to be compared with those from whole blood RNA and potentially allows comparison of

  2. Hunting, Swimming, and Worshiping: Human Cultural Practices Illuminate the Blood Meal Sources of Cave Dwelling Chagas Vectors (Triatoma dimidiata) in Guatemala and Belize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Lori; Monroy, M. Carlota; Rodas, Antonieta Guadalupe; Dorn, Patricia L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Triatoma dimidiata, currently the major Central American vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasite that causes Chagas disease, inhabits caves throughout the region. This research investigates the possibility that cave dwelling T. dimidiata might transmit the parasite to humans and links the blood meal sources of cave vectors to cultural practices that differ among locations. Methodology/Principal Findings We determined the blood meal sources of twenty-four T. dimidiata collected from two locations in Guatemala and one in Belize where human interactions with the caves differ. Blood meal sources were determined by cloning and sequencing PCR products amplified from DNA extracted from the vector abdomen using primers specific for the vertebrate 12S mitochondrial gene. The blood meal sources were inferred by ≥99% identity with published sequences. We found 70% of cave-collected T. dimidiata positive for human DNA. The vectors had fed on 10 additional vertebrates with a variety of relationships to humans, including companion animal (dog), food animals (pig, sheep/goat), wild animals (duck, two bat, two opossum species) and commensal animals (mouse, rat). Vectors from all locations fed on humans and commensal animals. The blood meal sources differ among locations, as well as the likelihood of feeding on dog and food animals. Vectors from one location were tested for T. cruzi infection, and 30% (3/10) tested positive, including two positive for human blood meals. Conclusions/Significance Cave dwelling Chagas disease vectors feed on humans and commensal animals as well as dog, food animals and wild animals. Blood meal sources were related to human uses of the caves. We caution that just as T. dimidiata in caves may pose an epidemiological risk, there may be other situations where risk is thought to be minimal, but is not. PMID:25211347

  3. Hunting, swimming, and worshiping: human cultural practices illuminate the blood meal sources of cave dwelling Chagas vectors (Triatoma dimidiata in Guatemala and Belize.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Stevens

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Triatoma dimidiata, currently the major Central American vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasite that causes Chagas disease, inhabits caves throughout the region. This research investigates the possibility that cave dwelling T. dimidiata might transmit the parasite to humans and links the blood meal sources of cave vectors to cultural practices that differ among locations.We determined the blood meal sources of twenty-four T. dimidiata collected from two locations in Guatemala and one in Belize where human interactions with the caves differ. Blood meal sources were determined by cloning and sequencing PCR products amplified from DNA extracted from the vector abdomen using primers specific for the vertebrate 12S mitochondrial gene. The blood meal sources were inferred by ≥ 99% identity with published sequences. We found 70% of cave-collected T. dimidiata positive for human DNA. The vectors had fed on 10 additional vertebrates with a variety of relationships to humans, including companion animal (dog, food animals (pig, sheep/goat, wild animals (duck, two bat, two opossum species and commensal animals (mouse, rat. Vectors from all locations fed on humans and commensal animals. The blood meal sources differ among locations, as well as the likelihood of feeding on dog and food animals. Vectors from one location were tested for T. cruzi infection, and 30% (3/10 tested positive, including two positive for human blood meals.Cave dwelling Chagas disease vectors feed on humans and commensal animals as well as dog, food animals and wild animals. Blood meal sources were related to human uses of the caves. We caution that just as T. dimidiata in caves may pose an epidemiological risk, there may be other situations where risk is thought to be minimal, but is not.

  4. Study of terahertz-radiation-induced DNA damage in human blood leukocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angeluts, A A; Esaulkov, M N; Kosareva, O G; Solyankin, P M; Shkurinov, A P [International Laser Center, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gapeyev, A B; Pashovkin, T N [Institute of Cell Biophysics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Matyunin, S N [Section of Applied Problems at the Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Nazarov, M M [Institute on Laser and Information Technologies, Russian Academy of Sciences, Shatura, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Cherkasova, O P [Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-03-28

    We have carried out the studies aimed at assessing the effect of terahertz radiation on DNA molecules in human blood leukocytes. Genotoxic testing of terahertz radiation was performed in three different oscillation regimes, the blood leukocytes from healthy donors being irradiated for 20 minutes with the mean intensity of 8 – 200 μW cm{sup -2} within the frequency range of 0.1 – 6.5 THz. Using the comet assay it is shown that in the selected regimes such radiation does not induce a direct DNA damage in viable human blood leukocytes. (biophotonics)

  5. Study of terahertz-radiation-induced DNA damage in human blood leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeluts, A. A.; Gapeyev, A. B.; Esaulkov, M. N.; Kosareva, O. G.; Matyunin, S. N.; Nazarov, M. M.; Pashovkin, T. N.; Solyankin, P. M.; Cherkasova, O. P.; Shkurinov, A. P.

    2014-03-01

    We have carried out the studies aimed at assessing the effect of terahertz radiation on DNA molecules in human blood leukocytes. Genotoxic testing of terahertz radiation was performed in three different oscillation regimes, the blood leukocytes from healthy donors being irradiated for 20 minutes with the mean intensity of 8 - 200 μW cm-2 within the frequency range of 0.1 - 6.5 THz. Using the comet assay it is shown that in the selected regimes such radiation does not induce a direct DNA damage in viable human blood leukocytes.

  6. New methods for field collection of human skin volatiles and perspectives for their application in the chemical ecology of human-pathogen-vector interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormont, Laurent; Bessière, Jean-Marie; McKey, Doyle; Cohuet, Anna

    2013-08-01

    Odours emitted by human skin are of great interest to biologists in many fields, with practical applications in forensics, health diagnostic tools and the ecology of blood-sucking insect vectors of human disease. Convenient methods are required for sampling human skin volatiles under field conditions. We experimentally compared four modern methods for sampling skin odours: solvent extraction, headspace solid-phase micro-extraction (SPME), and two new techniques not previously used for the study of mammal volatiles, contact SPME and dynamic headspace with a chromatoprobe design. These methods were tested and compared both on European subjects under laboratory conditions and on young African subjects under field conditions. All four methods permitted effective trapping of skin odours, including the major known human skin volatile compounds. In both laboratory and field experiments, contact SPME, in which the time of collection was restricted to 3 min, provided results very similar to those obtained with classical headspace SPME, a method that requires 45 min of collection. Chromatoprobe sampling also proved to be very sensitive, rapid and convenient for the collection of human-produced volatiles in natural settings. Both contact SPME and chromatoprobe design may considerably facilitate the study of human skin volatiles under field conditions, opening new possibilities for examining the olfactory cues mediating the host-seeking behaviour of mosquito vectors implicated in the transmission of major diseases.

  7. Relationship between blood oxygenation and lactate in human skeletal muscle revealed by near-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guodong; Luo, Qingming; Ge, Xinfa; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2002-04-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a focus of attention in the research field of biomedical photonics. The concentration of HbO2 in human skeletal muscle has been measured noninvasive NIRS using a portable tissue oximeter continuously when the subjects did incremental exercises on a power bicycle. Blood lactate is one of traditional physical research subjects which is applied most widely. We study blood volume in the tissue of sportsmen when they are subjected by the incremental physical load, simultaneously detecting some parameters such as the heart rate, maximal oxygen absorption and the concentration of blood lactate. As the intensity of exercises was heightened, the concentration of blood lactate and blood volume in tissue increased, while the concentration of HbO2 decreased. Thus the rudimental characteristics of energy consumption and supply during hypoxia and aerobic exercises are investigated. By discovering the relationship between blood lactate in human skeletal muscle and blood oxygenation, a novel approach for measuring blood lactate noninvasively and assessing the sports ability could be provided. Furthermore, it is possible to assess the fatigue state with tissue oximeter to monitor the human sports intensity noninvasively and dynamically.

  8. Pattern of distribution of blood group antigens on human epidermal cells during maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, Erik; Buschard, Karsten; Hakomori, Sen-Itiroh

    1984-01-01

    monoclonal antibodies were used to identify H antigen (type 2 chain) and N-acetyl-lactosamine. Human antisera were used to identify A and B antigens. In all groups N-acetyl-lactosamine and H antigen were found on the cell membranes of the spinous cell layer. N-acetyl-lactosamine was present mainly...... on the lower spinous cells whereas H antigen was seen predominantly on upper spinous cells or on the granular cells. Epithelia from blood group A or B persons demonstrated A or B antigens, respectively, but only if the tissue sections were trypsinized before staining. In such cases A or B antigens were found......The distribution in human epidermis of A, B, and H blood group antigens and of a precursor carbohydrate chain, N-acetyl-lactosamine, was examined using immunofluorescence staining techniques. The material included tissue from 10 blood group A, 4 blood group B, and 9 blood group O persons. Murine...

  9. Effect of heating on extracellular bioactive substances in stored human blood: in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, J H; Mynster, T; Reimert, C M; Pedersen, A N; Dybkjaer, E; Alsbjørn, B; Nielsen, H J

    1997-11-01

    We have previously shown extracellular accumulation of various leukocyte and platelet-derived bioactive substances in human blood during storage. Release of bioactive substances may be temperature-dependent, and we studied the effect of heating during in vitro transfusion on bioactive substance accumulation in stored human blood. Eight units of whole blood and eight units of prestorage leukofiltered whole blood were stored at 4 degrees C for 7 days. Subsequently, the blood from all 16 units was transfused via a blood-heating device, which increased the blood temperature to 37 degrees C at outlet. Samples for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or radioimmunoassay analyses of histamine, myeloperoxidase (MPO), eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) were drawn from the units at donation, after 7 days of storage just before transfusion, and during the in vitro transfusion. Extracellular concentrations of histamine, MPO, ECP, and PAI-1 were significantly (p Heating reduced histamine, MPO, and ECP concentrations significantly (p heating of leukofiltered whole blood. Heating reduces accumulation of extracellular leukocyte-derived bioactive substances in whole blood, whereas it increases platelet-derived substances. Prestorage leukofiltration, however, reduces the obligatory extracellular accumulation of leukocyte and platelet-derived bioactive substances, which in addition is unchanged by heating.

  10. Peripheral blood stem cell mobilization and collection from elderly patients and elderly healthy donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozdag, Sinem Civriz; Ilhan, Osman

    2015-08-01

    The impact of age on peripheral blood stem cell mobilization has been reported with contradictory results. We aimed to revise these data about stem cell mobilization in elderly patients and healthy donors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Estimation of Ochratoxin A in human blood of healthy Tunisian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karima, Hmaissia-Khlifa; Ridha, Ghali; Zied, Aouni; Chekib, Mazigh; Salem, Machgoul; Abderrazek, Hedhili

    2010-09-01

    Human exposure to Ochratoxin A (OTA) has been investigated in many Mediterranean countries, where OTA was found with a higher frequency in foodstuffs and blood samples. The aim of this study was to assess OTA concentrations in human blood serum in Tunisia and to evaluate the impact of several factors (age, origin, sex) on these prevalence reference values. One hundred and seven blood serum samples from healthy subjects were analyzed using a solid-phase extraction linked to a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. OTA values ranged from 0 to 3.43 ng/mL with a mean value of 0.49+/-0.67 ng/mL. OTA levels were higher in the Sahal group. Our results reflect OTA concentration previously detected for human blood in Tunisia. Origin, but not age and sex, may affect the OTA reference values. (c) 2009 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of staphylococcal phage with reduced transcription in human blood through transcriptome sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasha Marie Santiago-Rodriguez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Many pathogenic bacteria have bacteriophage and other mobile genetic elements whose activity during human infections has not been evaluated. We investigated the gene expression patterns in human subjects with invasive Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infections to determine the gene expression of bacteriophage and other mobile genetic elements. We developed an ex vivo technique that involved direct inoculation of blood from subjects with invasive bloodstream infections into culture media to reduce any potential laboratory adaptation.We compared ex vivo to in vitro profiles from 10 human subjects to determine MRSA gene expression in blood. Using RNA sequencing, we found that there were distinct and significant differences between ex vivo and in vitro MRSA gene expression profiles. Among the major differences between ex vivo and in vitro gene expression were virulence/disease/defense and mobile elements. While transposons were expressed at higher levels ex vivo, lysogenic bacteriophage had significantly higher in vitro expression. Five subjects had MRSA with bacteriophage that were inhibited by the presence of blood in the media, supporting that the lysogeny state was preferred in human blood. Some of the phage produced also had reduced infectivity, further supporting that phage were inhibited by blood. By comparing the gene expression cultured in media with and without the blood of patients, we gain insights into the specific adaptations made by MRSA and its bacteriophage to life in the human bloodstream.

  13. HANPP Collection: Human Appropriation of Net Primary Productivity (HANPP) by Country and Product

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Global Patterns in Human Appropriation of Net Primary Productivity (HANPP) portion of the HANPP Collection represents a digital map of human appropriation of net...

  14. HANPP Collection: Global Patterns in Human Appropriation of Net Primary Productivity (HANPP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Global Patterns in Human Appropriation of Net Primary Productivity (HANPP) portion of the HANPP Collection represents a digital map of human appropriation of net...

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of fluid levels in an aneurysmal bone cyst and in anticoagulated human blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, T.M.; Hamlin, D.J.; Fitzsimmons, J.R.

    1985-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a fluid level within an aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC). Since the ABC contained gross blood at operation, an anticoagulated human blood sample was studied by MRI also, and a fluid level was again clearly visible. MRI pulse sequences emphasizing T/sub 1/ contrast showed the fluid levels most clearly in both the ABC and the blood. Sequences emphasizing T/sub 2/ contrast showed homogeneous, bright signals in the ABC and in the blood, with no visible fluid level in the ABC and a nearly invisible one in the blood. In the blood sample, the calculated plasma T/sub 1/ value was 1585 ms, and that of the red cells was 794 ms.

  16. A large blood pressure-raising effect of nitric oxide synthase inhibition in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, M.; Chavoshan, B.; Victor, R. G.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    In experimental animals, systemic administration of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors causes large increases in blood pressure that are in part sympathetically mediated. The aim of this study was to determine the extent to which these conclusions can be extrapolated to humans. In healthy normotensive humans, we measured blood pressure in response to two NOS inhibitors, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) and NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), the latter of which recently became available for use in humans. The major new findings are 3-fold. First, L-NAME produced robust increases in blood pressure that were more than 2 times larger than those previously reported in humans with L-NMMA and approximated those seen in experimental animals. L-NAME (4 mg/kg) raised mean arterial pressure by 24+/-2 mm Hg (n=27, P<0.001), whereas in subjects who received both inhibitors, a 12-fold higher dose of L-NMMA (50 mg/kg) raised mean arterial pressure by 15+/-2 mm Hg (n=4, P<0.05 vs L-NAME). Second, the L-NAME-induced increases in blood pressure were caused specifically by NOS inhibition because they were reversed by L-arginine (200 mg/kg, n=12) but not D-arginine (200 mg/kg, n=6) and because NG-nitro-D-arginine methyl ester (4 mg/kg, n=5) had no effect on blood pressure. Third, in humans, there is an important sympathetic component to the blood pressure-raising effect of NOS inhibition. alpha-Adrenergic blockade with phentolamine (0.2 mg/kg, n=9) attenuated the L-NAME-induced increase in blood pressure by 40% (P<0.05). From these data, we conclude that pharmacological inhibition of NOS causes large increases in blood pressure that are in part sympathetically mediated in humans as well as experimental animals.

  17. The application of silicon sol-gel technology to forensic blood substitute development: Mimicking aspects of whole human blood rheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotesbury, Theresa; Illes, Mike; Wilson, Paul; Vreugdenhil, Andrew J

    2017-01-01

    Solution-gelation chemistry has promising applications in forensic synthetic blood substitute development. This research offers a silicon-based sol-gel approach to creating stable materials that share similar rheological properties to that of whole human blood samples. Room temperature, high water content, silicon sol-gels were created using the organosilane precursors 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane and tetraethylorthosilicate along with various concentrations of filler and pigment. Shear-thinning non-Newtonian properties were observed within most formulations of the presented materials. The effects of colloidal concentration, temperature, age and filler addition on the viscosity of the sol-gels were investigated. SEM-EDS analysis was used to identify the behavior of the fillers within the film and support their inclusion for basic bloodstain pattern simulation. A final proposed candidate sol-gel was assessed using a previously reported passive drip simulation test on a hard, dry surface and passed. This works represents encouraging development in providing safe material alternatives to using whole human blood for forensic training and research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Noninvasive MRI measurement of the absolute cerebral blood volume-cerebral blood flow relationship during visual stimulation in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciris, Pelin Aksit; Qiu, Maolin; Constable, R Todd

    2014-09-01

    The relationship between cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) underlies blood oxygenation level-dependent functional MRI signal. This study investigates the potential for improved characterization of the CBV-CBF relationship in humans, and examines sex effects as well as spatial variations in the CBV-CBF relationship. Healthy subjects were imaged noninvasively at rest and during visual stimulation, constituting the first MRI measurement of the absolute CBV-CBF relationship in humans with complete coverage of the functional areas of interest. CBV and CBF estimates were consistent with the literature, and their relationship varied both spatially and with sex. In a region of interest with stimulus-induced activation in CBV and CBF at a significance level of the P < 0.05, a power function fit resulted in CBV = 2.1 CBF(0.32) across all subjects, CBV = 0.8 CBF(0.51) in females and CBV = 4.4 CBF(0.15) in males. Exponents decreased in both sexes as ROIs were expanded to include less significantly activated regions. Consideration for potential sex-related differences, as well as regional variations under a range of physiological states, may reconcile some of the variation across literature and advance our understanding of the underlying cerebrovascular physiology. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Plasma degradome affected by variable storage of human blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaisar, Maria; Van Dullemen, Leon F. A.; Thezenas, Marie-Laetitia; Akhtar, M. Zeeshan; Huang, Honglei; Rendel, Sandrine; Charles, Philip D.; Fischer, Roman; Ploeg, Rutger J.; Kessler, Benedikt M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The successful application of-omics technologies in the discovery of novel biomarkers and targets of therapeutic interventions is facilitated by large collections of well curated clinical samples stored in bio banks. Mining the plasma proteome holds promise to improve our understanding

  20. 77 FR 10758 - National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Proposed Collection; Comment Request...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Child Health and Human Development... Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Building 6100... comment on proposed data collection projects, the National Institute of Child Health and ] Human...

  1. Transient receptor potential canonical type 3 channels and blood pressure in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilo, Florian; Baumunk, Daniel; Krause, Hans

    2009-01-01

    There is evidence that transient receptor potential canonical type 3 (TRPC3) cation channels are involved in the regulation of blood pressure, but this has not been studied using human renal tissue. We tested the hypothesis that the expression of TRPC3 in human renal tissue is associated with blo...

  2. Accelerated clearance of human red blood cells in a rat transfusion model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straat, M.; Klei, Trl; de Korte, D.; van Bruggen, R.; Juffermans, N. P.

    2015-01-01

    Animal models are valuable in transfusion research. Use of human red blood cells (RBCs) in animal models facilitates extrapolation of the impact of storage conditions to the human condition but may be hampered by the use of cross species. Investigation of clearance and posttransfusion recovery in a

  3. Human peripheral blood leukocyte engraftment into SCID mice: critical role of CD4(+) T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duchosal, M. A.; Mauray, S.; Rüegg, M.; Trouillet, P.; Vallet, V.; Aarden, L.; Tissot, J. D.; Schapira, M.

    2001-01-01

    We examined the influence of donor T lymphocytes on human peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) engraftment into severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice. Mice were injected with unfractionated or subset-depleted human PBL, and treated at various times with OKT3, a cytotoxic monoclonal antibody

  4. Prevalence of Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 among blood donors in Manaus, Amazonas State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Márcia Poinho EncarnaçÃo de; Gato, Cynara Melo; Maciel, Lucinei Alves; Lalwani, Pritesh; Costa, Cristóvão Alves; Lalwani, Jaila Dias Borges

    2017-12-21

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1/2) is endemic in Brazil, but few studies have investigated the seroprevalence of HTLV and its subtypes among blood donors in the capital city Manaus, Amazonas State, Brazil. To estimate the seroprevalence of HTLV-1/2 and to identify circulating subtypes among blood donors in Manaus. Blood donors (2001-2003) were screened for HTLV-1/2 antibodies by ELISA. Positive results were confirmed and subtyped by Western blot assays. Prevalence rates were calculated and compared with demographic data. Among the 87,402 individuals screened, 116 (0.13%) were seropositive for HTLV-1/2. A second sample (76/116) was collected and retested by HTLV-1/2 ELISA, of which only 41/76 were positive. Western blot confirmed HTLV infection in 24/41 retested blood donors [HTLV-1 (n=16), HTLV-2 (n=5) and HTLV-untypable (n=3)]. HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 are prevalent among blood donors in Manaus. However, additional studies are needed to comprehend the epidemiology of HTLV-1/2 in Amazonas not only to understand the pathophysiology of the disease providing adequate medical assistance, but also to reduce or block virus transmission.

  5. Prevalence of Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 among blood donors in Manaus, Amazonas State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Poinho EncarnaçÃo de Morais

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1/2 is endemic in Brazil, but few studies have investigated the seroprevalence of HTLV and its subtypes among blood donors in the capital city Manaus, Amazonas State, Brazil. Aim: To estimate the seroprevalence of HTLV-1/2 and to identify circulating subtypes among blood donors in Manaus. Materials and Methods: Blood donors (2001-2003 were screened for HTLV-1/2 antibodies by ELISA. Positive results were confirmed and subtyped by Western blot assays. Prevalence rates were calculated and compared with demographic data. Results: Among the 87,402 individuals screened, 116 (0.13% were seropositive for HTLV-1/2. A second sample (76/116 was collected and retested by HTLV-1/2 ELISA, of which only 41/76 were positive. Western blot confirmed HTLV infection in 24/41 retested blood donors [HTLV-1 (n=16, HTLV-2 (n=5 and HTLV-untypable (n=3]. Discussion: HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 are prevalent among blood donors in Manaus. However, additional studies are needed to comprehend the epidemiology of HTLV-1/2 in Amazonas not only to understand the pathophysiology of the disease providing adequate medical assistance, but also to reduce or block virus transmission.

  6. Combined analysis of whole human blood parameters by Raman spectroscopy and spectral-domain low-coherence interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnyba, M.; Wróbel, M. S.; Karpienko, K.; Milewska, D.; Jedrzejewska-Szczerska, M.

    2015-07-01

    In this article the simultaneous investigation of blood parameters by complementary optical methods, Raman spectroscopy and spectral-domain low-coherence interferometry, is presented. Thus, the mutual relationship between chemical and physical properties may be investigated, because low-coherence interferometry measures optical properties of the investigated object, while Raman spectroscopy gives information about its molecular composition. A series of in-vitro measurements were carried out to assess sufficient accuracy for monitoring of blood parameters. A vast number of blood samples with various hematological parameters, collected from different donors, were measured in order to achieve a statistical significance of results and validation of the methods. Preliminary results indicate the benefits in combination of presented complementary methods and form the basis for development of a multimodal system for rapid and accurate optical determination of selected parameters in whole human blood. Future development of optical systems and multivariate calibration models are planned to extend the number of detected blood parameters and provide a robust quantitative multi-component analysis.

  7. Human growth hormone alters carbohydrate storage in blood and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Growth hormone (GH) is a peptide hormone that plays vital roles in cell growth and metabolism. Aim: The study investigates the effect of GH on carbohydrate metabolism using Indian bird, Acridotheres tristis. Methods: Three different doses (0.4, 0.6, and 0.8mg/100g body weight) of human growth hormone ...

  8. NMR metabolomics of human blood and urine in disease research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Iola F; Diaz, Sílvia O; Gil, Ana M

    2014-05-01

    This paper reviews the main applications of NMR metabolomics of blood and urine in disease research, over the last 5 years. The broad range of disease types addressed attests the increasing interest within the academic and medical communities to explore the recognised potential of metabolomics to (1) provide insight into underlying disease pathogenesis and (2) unveil new metabolic markers for disease diagnosis and follow up. Importantly, most recent studies reveal an increasing awareness of possible limitations and pitfalls of the metabolomics approach, together with efforts for improved study design and statistical validation, which are crucial requisites for the sound development of NMR metabolomics and its progress into the clinical setting. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Factors affecting autologous peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell collections by large-volume leukapheresis: a single center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araci Massami Sakashita

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate factors affecting peripheral bloodhematopoietic stem cell yield in patients undergoing large-volumeleukapheresis for autologous peripheral blood stem cell collection.Methods: Data from 304 consecutive autologous peripheral bloodstem cell donors mobilized with hematopoietic growth factor (usually G-CSF, associated or not with chemotherapy, at Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein between February 1999 and June 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. The objective was to obtain at least 2 x 106CD34+ cells/kg of body weight. Pre-mobilization factors analyzedincluded patient’s age, gender and diagnosis. Post mobilizationparameters evaluated were pre-apheresis peripheral white bloodcell count, immature circulating cell count, mononuclear cell count,peripheral blood CD34+ cell count, platelet count, and hemoglobinlevel. The effect of pre and post-mobilization factors on hematopoietic stem cell collection yield was investigated using logistic regression analysis (univariate and multivariate approaches. Results: Premobilization factors correlating to poor CD34+ cell yield in univariate analysis were acute myeloid leukemia (p = 0.017 and other hematological diseases (p = 0.023. Significant post-mobilization factors included peripheral blood immature circulating cells (p = 0.001, granulocytes (p = 0.002, hemoglobin level (p = 0.016, and CD34+ cell concentration (p < 0.001 in the first harvesting day. However, according to multivariate analysis, peripheral blood CD34+ cell content (p < 0.001 was the only independent factor that significantly correlated to poor hematopoietic stem cell yield. Conclusion: In this study, peripheral blood CD34+ cell concentration was the only factor significantly correlated to yield in patients submitted to for autologous collection.

  10. Analysis of cytotoxic effects of chlorhexidine gluconate as antiseptic agent on human blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimi, Ahmad; Alami, Bahare; Pourahmad, Jalal

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the cytotoxicity of chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) on human blood lymphocytes as a useful ex vivo model for accelerated human toxicity studies. Using biochemical and flow cytometry assessments, we demonstrated that addition of CHG at 1 μM concentration to human blood lymphocytes induced cytotoxicity following 6 h. The CHG-induced cytotoxicity on human blood lymphocytes was associated with intracellular reactive oxygen species generation, mitochondrial membrane potential collapse, lysosomal membrane injury, lipid peroxidation, and depletion of glutathione. According to our results, CHG triggers oxidative stress and organelles damages in lymphocytes which are important cells in defense against foreign agents. Finally our findings suggest that using of antioxidants and mitochondrial/lysosomal protective agents could be of benefit for the people in the exposure with CHG. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. In vitro shear stress-induced platelet activation: sensitivity of human and bovine blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qijin; Hofferbert, Bryan V; Koo, Grace; Malinauskas, Richard A

    2013-10-01

    As platelet activation plays a critical role in physiological hemostasis and pathological thrombosis, it is important in the overall hemocompatibility evaluation of new medical devices and biomaterials to assess their effects on platelet function. However, there are currently no widely accepted in vitro test methods to perform this assessment. In an effort to develop effective platelet tests for potential use in medical device evaluation, this study compared the sensitivity of platelet responses to shear stress stimulation of human and bovine blood using multiple platelet activation markers. Fresh whole blood samples anticoagulated with heparin or anticoagulant citrate dextrose, solution A (ACDA) were exposed to shear stresses up to 40 Pa for 2 min using a cone-and-plate rheometer model. Platelet activation was characterized by platelet counts, platelet surface P-selectin expression, and serotonin release into blood plasma. The results indicated that exposure to shear stresses above 20 Pa caused significant changes in all three of the platelet markers for human blood and that the changes were usually greater with ACDA anticoagulation than with heparin. In contrast, for bovine blood, the markers did not change with shear stress stimulation except for plasma serotonin in heparin anticoagulated blood. The differences observed between human and bovine platelet responses suggest that the value of using bovine blood for in vitro platelet testing to evaluate devices may be limited. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  12. Lipid composition of the human eye: are red blood cells a good mirror of retinal and optic nerve fatty acids?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niyazi Acar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The assessment of blood lipids is very frequent in clinical research as it is assumed to reflect the lipid composition of peripheral tissues. Even well accepted such relationships have never been clearly established. This is particularly true in ophthalmology where the use of blood lipids has become very common following recent data linking lipid intake to ocular health and disease. In the present study, we wanted to determine in humans whether a lipidomic approach based on red blood cells could reveal associations between circulating and tissue lipid profiles. To check if the analytical sensitivity may be of importance in such analyses, we have used a double approach for lipidomics. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Red blood cells, retinas and optic nerves were collected from 9 human donors. The lipidomic analyses on tissues consisted in gas chromatography and liquid chromatography coupled to an electrospray ionization source-mass spectrometer (LC-ESI-MS. Gas chromatography did not reveal any relevant association between circulating and ocular fatty acids except for arachidonic acid whose circulating amounts were positively associated with its levels in the retina and in the optic nerve. In contrast, several significant associations emerged from LC-ESI-MS analyses. Particularly, lipid entities in red blood cells were positively or negatively associated with representative pools of retinal docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, retinal very-long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (VLC-PUFA or optic nerve plasmalogens. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: LC-ESI-MS is more appropriate than gas chromatography for lipidomics on red blood cells, and further extrapolation to ocular lipids. The several individual lipid species we have identified are good candidates to represent circulating biomarkers of ocular lipids. However, further investigation is needed before considering them as indexes of disease risk and before using them in clinical studies on

  13. Lipid composition of the human eye: are red blood cells a good mirror of retinal and optic nerve fatty acids?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Niyazi; Berdeaux, Olivier; Grégoire, Stéphane; Cabaret, Stéphanie; Martine, Lucy; Gain, Philippe; Thuret, Gilles; Creuzot-Garcher, Catherine P; Bron, Alain M; Bretillon, Lionel

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of blood lipids is very frequent in clinical research as it is assumed to reflect the lipid composition of peripheral tissues. Even well accepted such relationships have never been clearly established. This is particularly true in ophthalmology where the use of blood lipids has become very common following recent data linking lipid intake to ocular health and disease. In the present study, we wanted to determine in humans whether a lipidomic approach based on red blood cells could reveal associations between circulating and tissue lipid profiles. To check if the analytical sensitivity may be of importance in such analyses, we have used a double approach for lipidomics. Red blood cells, retinas and optic nerves were collected from 9 human donors. The lipidomic analyses on tissues consisted in gas chromatography and liquid chromatography coupled to an electrospray ionization source-mass spectrometer (LC-ESI-MS). Gas chromatography did not reveal any relevant association between circulating and ocular fatty acids except for arachidonic acid whose circulating amounts were positively associated with its levels in the retina and in the optic nerve. In contrast, several significant associations emerged from LC-ESI-MS analyses. Particularly, lipid entities in red blood cells were positively or negatively associated with representative pools of retinal docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), retinal very-long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (VLC-PUFA) or optic nerve plasmalogens. LC-ESI-MS is more appropriate than gas chromatography for lipidomics on red blood cells, and further extrapolation to ocular lipids. The several individual lipid species we have identified are good candidates to represent circulating biomarkers of ocular lipids. However, further investigation is needed before considering them as indexes of disease risk and before using them in clinical studies on optic nerve neuropathies or retinal diseases displaying photoreceptors degeneration.

  14. Computer Simulation Study of Collective Phenomena in Dense Suspensions of Red Blood Cells under Shear

    CERN Document Server

    Krüger, Timm

    2012-01-01

    The rheology of dense red blood cell suspensions is investigated via computer simulations based on the lattice Boltzmann, the immersed boundary, and the finite element methods. The red blood cells are treated as extended and deformable particles immersed in the ambient fluid. In the first part of the work, the numerical model and strategies for stress evaluation are discussed. In the second part, the behavior of the suspensions in simple shear flow is studied for different volume fractions, particle deformabilities, and shear rates. Shear thinning behavior is recovered. The existence of a shear-induced transition from a tumbling to a tank-treading motion is demonstrated. The transition can be parameterized by a single quantity, namely the effective capillary number. It is the ratio of the suspension stress and the characteristic particle membrane stress. At the transition point, a strong increase in the orientational order of the red blood cells and a significant decrease of the particle diffusivity are obser...

  15. Effect of cholesterol and triglycerides levels on the rheological behavior of human blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Leonardo; Calderas, Fausto; Sanchez-Olivares, Guadalupe; Medina-Torres, Luis; Sanchez-Solis, Antonio; Manero, Octavio

    2015-02-01

    Important public health problems worldwide such as obesity, diabetes, hyperlipidemia and coronary diseases are quite common. These problems arise from numerous factors, such as hyper-caloric diets, sedentary habits and other epigenetic factors. With respect to Mexico, the population reference values of total cholesterol in plasma are around 200 mg/dL. However, a large proportion has higher levels than this reference value. In this work, we analyze the rheological properties of human blood obtained from 20 donors, as a function of cholesterol and triglyceride levels, upon a protocol previously approved by the health authorities. Samples with high and low cholesterol and triglyceride levels were selected and analyzed by simple-continuous and linear-oscillatory shear flow. Rheometric properties were measured and related to the structure and composition of human blood. In addition, rheometric data were modeled by using several constitutive equations: Bautista-Manero-Puig (BMP) and the multimodal Maxwell equations to predict the flow behavior of human blood. Finally, a comparison was made among various models, namely, the BMP, Carreau and Quemada equations for simple shear rate flow. An important relationship was found between cholesterol, triglycerides and the structure of human blood. Results show that blood with high cholesterol levels (400 mg/dL) has flow properties fully different (higher viscosity and a more pseudo-plastic behavior) than blood with lower levels of cholesterol (tendency to Newtonian behavior or viscosity plateau at low shear rates).

  16. Systems biology of coagulation initiation: kinetics of thrombin generation in resting and activated human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Manash S; Denney, William S; Jing, Huiyan; Diamond, Scott L

    2010-09-30

    Blood function defines bleeding and clotting risks and dictates approaches for clinical intervention. Independent of adding exogenous tissue factor (TF), human blood treated in vitro with corn trypsin inhibitor (CTI, to block Factor XIIa) will generate thrombin after an initiation time (T(i)) of 1 to 2 hours (depending on donor), while activation of platelets with the GPVI-activator convulxin reduces T(i) to ∼20 minutes. Since current kinetic models fail to generate thrombin in the absence of added TF, we implemented a Platelet-Plasma ODE model accounting for: the Hockin-Mann protease reaction network, thrombin-dependent display of platelet phosphatidylserine, VIIa function on activated platelets, XIIa and XIa generation and function, competitive thrombin substrates (fluorogenic detector and fibrinogen), and thrombin consumption during fibrin polymerization. The kinetic model consisting of 76 ordinary differential equations (76 species, 57 reactions, 105 kinetic parameters) predicted the clotting of resting and convulxin-activated human blood as well as predicted T(i) of human blood under 50 different initial conditions that titrated increasing levels of TF, Xa, Va, XIa, IXa, and VIIa. Experiments with combined anti-XI and anti-XII antibodies prevented thrombin production, demonstrating that a leak of XIIa past saturating amounts of CTI (and not "blood-borne TF" alone) was responsible for in vitro initiation without added TF. Clotting was not blocked by antibodies used individually against TF, VII/VIIa, P-selectin, GPIb, protein disulfide isomerase, cathepsin G, nor blocked by the ribosome inhibitor puromycin, the Clk1 kinase inhibitor Tg003, or inhibited VIIa (VIIai). This is the first model to predict the observed behavior of CTI-treated human blood, either resting or stimulated with platelet activators. CTI-treated human blood will clot in vitro due to the combined activity of XIIa and XIa, a process enhanced by platelet activators and which proceeds in the

  17. Human Blood Feeding Activity of Female Hybrids between Culex pipiens pipiens and Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus(Diptera: Culicidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshii, Manabu; Mine, Mariko; Kurokawa, Kenji; Oda, Tsutomu; Kato, Katsutomo; Ogawa, Yasunori; Eshita, Yuuki; Uchida, Keikichi

    2007-01-01

    Human blood feeding activity was examined in females of hybrids between Culex pipiens pipiens and Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus during long photoperiod at 25℃. Blood feeding rates of hybrids were lower than in Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus and Culex pipiens pallens, and higher than in Culex pipiens pipiens, because no females fed on human blood in Culex pipiens pipiens.

  18. Artificial Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umit Yasar

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The problems and additional cost factor involved in collecting and storing human blood, as well as the pending worldwide shortages are the main driving forces in the development of blood substitutes. Studies on artificial blood basically aim to develop oxygen carrying compounds, produce stem cell-based erythrocyte cells in vitro and, implement the functions and movements of natural hemoglobin molecules found in erythrocyte cells through artificial erythrocyte cells. Consequently, major areas of research in artificial blood studies are haemoglobin-based oxygen carriers, perfluorochemicals, respirocytes and stem cells. Even though these artificial erythrocyte cells do not qualify as perfect red blood cell substitutes yet, they have many potential clinical and non clinical uses. Studies are being carried out on the elimination of side effects of blood substitutes and extensive clinical trials are being conducted to test their safety and efficacy. Artificial blood substitutes could only be used clinically for patient management following clinical trials and approvals, and will be the ultimate global solution to the problems associated with donor scarcity, blood collection and transfusion-mediated diseases. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2012; 21(2.000: 95-108

  19. Utilizing human blood plasma for proteomic biomarker discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Jon M.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Qian, Weijun; Liu, Tao; Shen, Yufeng; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2005-08-01

    Application of proteomic biomarker discovery efforts towards human plasma entails both incredible clinical potential as well as significant challenges to overcome the intrinsic characteristics of plasma. The dynamic range of proteins within plasma, coupled with the likely presence of potential biomarkers in the more difficult to detect lower abundance range has driven the development of various methodologies and strategies to maximize the possible detective dynamic range within this biofluid. Discussed is the array of the available approaches currently used by our laboratory and others to utilized human plasma as a viable medium for biomarker discovery efforts. Various separation, depletion, enrichment, and quantitative efforts have resulted in a measurable improvement in the detectability of the low abundance fraction of proteins but more advances are needed to bridge the gap between the current range of detection and what remains unobservable to fully maximize the potential of this sample.

  20. Estimation of cerebral blood flow during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, S F; Stadeager, Carsten Preben; Siemkowicz, E

    1990-01-01

    /kg/min). The cortical CBF was found between 14 and 211 ml 100 g-1.min-1 with mean 42 ml 100 g-1.min-1 and mean white matter CBF equal to 27 ml 100 g-1.min-1. It is suggested that the external cardiac massage in humans may be of poor efficacy in terms of brain revival. Cortical CBF after long-lasting cardiopulmonary...

  1. Raman and SERS recognition of β-carotene and haemoglobin fingerprints in human whole blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casella, Michele; Lucotti, Andrea; Tommasini, Matteo; Bedoni, Marzia; Forvi, Elena; Gramatica, Furio; Zerbi, Giuseppe

    2011-09-01

    The present work reports on Raman and Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) vibrational fingerprints of β-carotene and haemoglobin in fresh whole blood (i.e. right after blood test) with different laser excitations, i.e. visible (514 nm) and near-infrared (NIR, 785 nm). The use of colloidal silver nanoparticles significantly increases the Raman signal, thus providing a clear SERS spectrum of blood. The collected spectra have been examined and marker bands of β-carotene and of the haem prosthetic group of haemoglobin have been found. In particular, the fundamental features of β-carotene (514 nm excitation), blood proteins and haem molecules (785 nm excitation) were recognized and assigned. Moreover haemoglobin SERS signals can be identified and related with its oxygenation state (oxy-haemoglobin). The data reported show the prospects of Raman and SERS techniques to detect important bio-molecules in a whole blood sample with no pre-treatment.

  2. Whole thorax irradiation of non-human primates induces persistent nuclear damage and gene expression changes in peripheral blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanaz A Ghandhi

    Full Text Available We investigated the cytogenetic and gene expression responses of peripheral blood cells of non-human primates (NHP, Macaca mulatta that were whole-thorax irradiated with a single dose of 10 Gy. In this model, partial irradiation of NHPs in the thoracic region (Whole Thorax Lung Irradiation, WTLI allows the study of late radiation-induced lung injury, while avoiding acute radiation syndromes related to hematopoietic and gastrointestinal injury. A transient drop in circulating lymphocytes and platelets was seen by 9 days, followed by elevations in respiratory rate, circulating neutrophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes at 60-100 days, corresponding to computed tomography (CT and histologic evidence of pneumonitis, and elective euthanasia of four animals. To evaluate long-term DNA damage in NHP peripheral blood lymphocytes after 10 Gy WTLI, we used the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN assay to measure chromosomal aberrations as post-mitotic micronuclei in blood samples collected up to 8 months after irradiation. Regression analysis showed significant induction of micronuclei in NHP blood cells that persisted with a gradual decline over the 8-month study period, suggesting long-term DNA damage in blood lymphocytes after WTLI. We also report transcriptomic changes in blood up to 30 days after WTLI. We isolated total RNA from peripheral blood at 3 days before and then at 2, 5 and 30 days after irradiation. We identified 1187 transcripts that were significantly changed across the 30-day time course. From changes in gene expression, we identified biological processes related to immune responses, which persisted across the 30-day study. Response to oxygen-containing compounds and bacteria were implicated by gene-expression changes at the earliest day 2 and latest, day 30 time-points. Gene expression changes suggest a persistent altered state of the immune system, specifically response to infection, for at least a month after WTLI.

  3. 75 FR 9226 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Human Tissue...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    ... immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B, and hepatitis C through the use of human tissue for transplantation. The.... Based on information from the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research's (CBER's) database system... establishments (257 - 216 = 41, or 41/257 = 16%). FDA assumes that all current tissue establishments have...

  4. A novel automated discontinuous venous blood monitoring system for ex vivo glucose determination in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, R; Feichtner, F; Köhler, H; Bodenlenz, M; Plank, J; Wutte, A; Mader, J K; Ellmerer, M; Hellmich, R; Wedig, H; Hainisch, R; Pieber, T R; Schaupp, L

    2009-03-15

    Intensive insulin therapy reduces mortality and morbidity in critically ill patients but imposes great demands on medical staff who must take frequent blood samples for the determination of glucose levels. A solution to this resourcing problem would be provided by an automated blood monitoring system. The aim of the present clinical study was to evaluate such a system comprising an automatic blood sampling unit linked to a glucose biosensor. Our approach was to determine the correlation and system error of the sampling unit alone and of the combined system with respect to reference levels over 12h in humans. Two venous cannulae were inserted to connect the automatic and reference systems to the subjects. Blood samples were taken at 15 and 30 min intervals. The median Pearson coefficient of correlation between manually and automatically withdrawn blood samples was 0.982 for the sampling unit alone and 0.950 for the complete system. The biosensor had a linear range up to 20 mmoll(-1) and a 95% response time of blood sampling system reduced blood withdrawal failures through occluded catheters fourfold. In summary, automated blood sampling from a peripheral vein coupled with automatic glucose determination is a promising alternative to frequent manual blood sampling.

  5. Evaluation of fluid warmer safety using hemorheologic analysis with outdated human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Jung; Yoo, Sung Mook; Chung, Jae Ho; Kim, Tae Sik; Lee, Sung Ho; Son, Ho Sung

    2016-01-01

    A newly developed fluid warmer (ThermoSens®) has a direct blood warming plate, which can result in hemolysis or red blood cell injury during heating. Therefore, to evaluate the safety of heating blood products with a fluid warmer, we conducted laboratory tests to study hemolysis and erythrocyte rheology. We used outdated human blood taken from a Korean blood bank. Packed red blood cells mixed with 100 mL isotonic saline was passed through the fluid warmer. Blood flow was achieved by either gravity or 300 mmHg pressure. Blood samples were analyzed before and after heating for hemolysis marker and erythrocyte rheology parameters. The temperatures at the outlet were higher than 38°C at gravity and 300 mmHg pressure, respectively. There were no significant differences in hemolysis markers (hemoglobin, hematocrit, lactate dehydrogenase, and plasma free hemoglobin) or erythrocyte rheology (deformability, disaggregating shear stress, and aggregation index) between before and after heating (p >  0.05) except LDH at gravity (p = 0.0001). The ThermoSens® fluid warmer caused no erythrocyte injury or negative effects on rheology during heating. Regarding medical device development, hemorheologic analysis can be useful for safety evaluation of medical devices that directly contact blood for temperature modulation.

  6. Age-related changes in peripheral blood counts in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlknecht, Ulrich; Kaiser, Simone

    2010-11-01

    Anaemia has become a common concern in geriatric health. Since its prevalence varies quite significantly among different groups depending on factors such as ethnicity, lifestyle or fitness, the appropriateness of the current WHO definition of anaemia in the elderly may be questioned. We evaluated peripheral blood parameters from 1,724 individuals (908 women aged 18-101 years and 816 men aged 18-96 years), who were treated at the University of Heidelberg Medical Center with no known haematological history. Patients with a known malignant haematological or oncological disease or with chronic infection or inflammation were excluded. Patients with disorders affecting the kidneys, thyroid or stomach, as well as patients with a bleeding history, haemolysis or who had been previously diagnosed with anaemia were excluded from the study. Average haemoglobin levels for men beyond the age of 70 and for women beyond the age of 80 were found to fulfill the WHO criteria for the diagnosis of anaemia. While in our cohort ∼20% of men and women between 60-69 years of age were by definition anaemic, these numbers steadily increased to 63% in females and 76% in males beyond the age of 90. Based on the results of our study and in accordance with the literature on this topic, we suggest age-adjusted criteria for the diagnosis of anaemia in the elderly in conjunction with a geriatric assessment.

  7. Cerebral blood flow reduction in Alzheimer's disease: impact of capillary occlusions on mice and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Maxime; Merlo, Adlan; Peyrounette, Myriam; Doyeux, Vincent; Smith, Amy; Cruz-Hernandez, Jean; Bracko, Oliver; Haft-Javaherian, Mohammad; Nishimura, Nozomi; Schaffer, Chris B.; Davit, Yohan; Quintard, Michel; Lorthois, Sylvie

    2017-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease may be the most common form of dementia, yet a satisfactory diagnosis procedure has still to be found. Recent studies suggest that a significant decrease of cerebral blood flow, probably caused by white blood cells stalling small vessels, may be among the earliest biological markers. To assess this hypothesis we derive a blood flow model, validate it against in vitro controlled experiments and in vivo measurements made on mice. We then investigate the influence of capillary occlusions on regional perfusion (sum of all arteriole flowrates feeding the network) of large mice and humans anatomical networks. Consistent with experiments, we observe no threshold effect, so that even a small percentage of occlusions (2-4%) leads to significant blood flow decrease (5-12%). We show that both species share the same linear dependance, suggesting possible translation from mice to human. ERC BrainMicroFlow GA61510, CALMIP HPC (Grant 2017-1541).

  8. A high confidence, manually validated human blood plasma protein reference set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schenk, Susann; Schoenhals, Gary J; de Souza, Gustavo

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The immense diagnostic potential of human plasma has prompted great interest and effort in cataloging its contents, exemplified by the Human Proteome Organization (HUPO) Plasma Proteome Project (PPP) pilot project. Due to challenges in obtaining a reliable blood plasma protein list...... the full diagnostic potential of blood plasma, we feel that there is still a need for an ultra-high confidence reference list (at least 99% confidence) of blood plasma proteins. METHODS: To address the complexity and dynamic protein concentration range of the plasma proteome, we employed a linear ion...... consecutive stages of tandem mass spectrometry (MS3). The combination of MS3 with very high mass accuracy in the parent peptide allows peptide identification with orders of magnitude more confidence than that typically achieved. RESULTS: Herein we established a high confidence set of 697 blood plasma proteins...

  9. Study of Total Antioxidant Activity of Human Serum Blood in the Pathology of Alcoholism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniy V. Plotnikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The total antioxidant activity (TAA of human serum blood of patients suffering from alcoholism was tested by cathode voltammetry with a model process of oxygen electroreduction. A known spectrophotometrical method was used for comparison. As results the total antioxidant activity of serum blood of patients with alcoholism was estimated by voltammetry during therapy in hospital. It was shown the TAA of serum blood of patients in pathology before and after treatment is lower than that one of healthy people. However, during the process of 10 days of alcoholism treatment the TAA coefficient increases. The relationship between the coefficient of total antioxidant activity of human serum blood and the stage of treatment was detected.

  10. Blood flow in the peritendinous space of the human Achilles tendon during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langberg, Henning; Bülow, J; Kjaer, M

    1998-01-01

    This study evaluated blood flow in the peritendinous space of the human Achilles tendon during rest and 40-min dynamical contraction of m. triceps surae. In 10 healthy volunteers 133Xe was injected in to the peritendinous space just ventrally to the Achilles tendon 2 and 5 cm proximal...... to the calcaneal insertion of the tendon, respectively. Blood flow 5 cm proximal to the Achilles tendon insertion was found to increase 4-fold from rest to exercise whereas the exercise induced increase in blood flow was less pronounced, only 2.5-fold, when measured 2 cm proximal to the Achilles tendon insertion....... Lymph drainage from the area was found to be negligible both during rest and exercise. We conclude that dynamical calf muscle contractions result in increased peritendinous blood flow at the Achilles tendon in humans....

  11. High-yield extraction of Escherichia coli RNA from human whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennecke, Johannes; Kraut, Simone; Zwadlo, Klara; Gandi, Senthil Kumar; Pritchard, David; Templeton, Kate; Bachmann, Till

    2017-03-01

    Studies of bacterial transcriptomics during bloodstream infections are limited to-date because unbiased extraction of bacterial mRNA from whole blood in sufficient quantity and quality has proved challenging. Problems include the high excess of human cells, the presence of PCR inhibitors and the short intrinsic half-life of bacterial mRNA. This study aims to provide a framework for the choice of the most suitable sample preparation method. Escherichia coli cells were spiked into human whole blood and the bacterial gene expression was stabilized with RNAprotect either immediately or after lysis of the red blood cells with Triton X-100, saponin, ammonium chloride or the commercial MolYsis buffer CM. RNA yield, purity and integrity were assessed by absorbance measurements at 260 and 280 nm, real-time PCR and capillary electrophoresis. For low cell numbers, the best mRNA yields were obtained by adding the commercial RNAprotect reagent directly to the sample without prior lyses of the human blood cells. Using this protocol, significant amounts of human RNA were co-purified, however, this had a beneficial impact on the yields of bacterial mRNA. Among the tested lysis agents, Triton X-100 was the most effective and reduced the human RNA background by three to four orders of magnitude. For most applications, lysis of the human blood cells is not required. However, co-purified human RNA may interfere with some downstream processes such as RNA sequencing. In this case, blood cell lysis with Triton X-100 is desirable.

  12. Collection of human oocytes at laparoscopy and laparotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopata, A; Johnston, I W; Leeton, J F; Muchnicki, D; Talbot, J M; Wood, C

    1974-12-01

    In order to determine whether ovarian follicular aspiration at laparoscopy would provide enough oocytes for adequate in vitro studies, oocytes were collected during the periovulatory stage of the normal menstrual cycle from 45 women undergoing laparoscopy and from 25 women undergoing laparotomy. A larger average number of oocytes was recovered per patient at laparotomy due to better oocyte recoveries from ovarian wedges. However, the average number of oocytes rocovered per patient was the same at both procedures, providing that a suction vacuum of 200 mm Hg was used at laparoscopy, and under these conditions a greater percentage of follicles yielded oocytes at laparoscopy. Overall, 498 follicles were aspirated and 217 oocytes collected; the average recovery was 3 per patient. Moreover, the mean follicular diameter was 9.1 mm in infertile and 8.0 mm in fertile patients (p less than .05).

  13. How Fucose of Blood Group Glycotopes Programs Human Gut Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononova, S V

    2017-09-01

    Formation of appropriate gut microbiota is essential for human health. The first two years of life is the critical period for this process. Selection of mutualistic microorganisms of the intestinal microbiota is controlled by the FUT2 and FUT3 genes that encode fucosyltransferases, enzymes responsible for the synthesis of fucosylated glycan structures of mucins and milk oligosaccharides. In this review, the mechanisms of the selection and maintenance of intestinal microorganisms that involve fucosylated oligosaccharides of breast milk and mucins of the newborn's intestine are described. Possible reasons for the use of fucose, and not sialic acid, as the major biological signal for the selection are also discussed.

  14. Human Pluripotent Stem Cells to Engineer Blood Vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Xin Yi; Elliott, Morgan B; Macklin, Bria; Gerecht, Sharon

    2017-11-01

    Development of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is a remarkable scientific advancement that allows scientists to harness the power of regenerative medicine for potential treatment of disease using unaffected cells. PSCs provide a unique opportunity to study and combat cardiovascular diseases, which continue to claim the lives of thousands each day. Here, we discuss the differentiation of PSCs into vascular cells, investigation of the functional capabilities of the derived cells, and their utilization to engineer microvascular beds or vascular grafts for clinical application. Graphical Abstract Human iPSCs generated from patients are differentiated toward ECs and perivascular cells for use in disease modeling, microvascular bed development, or vascular graft fabrication.

  15. Growth Kinetics, Characterization, and Plasticity of Human Menstrual Blood Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Mehrabani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the readily available sources of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs is menstrual blood-derived stem cells (Men-SCs, which exhibit characteristics similar to other types of MSCs. This study was performed to determine the growth kinetics, plasticity, and characterization of Men-SCs in women. During spring 2014 in the southern Iranian city of Shiraz, menstrual blood (5 mL was obtained from 10 women on their third day of menstruation in 2 age groups of 30 to 40 and 40 to 50 years old. Ficoll was used to separate the mononuclear cell fraction. After the Men-SCs were cultured, they were subcultured up to passage 4. Growth behavior and population doubling time were evaluated by seeding 5×104 cells into 12- and 24-well culture plates, and the colonies were enumerated. The expression of CD44, CD90, and CD34 was evaluated. The osteogenic potential was assessed by alizarin red staining. The Men-SCs were shown to be plastic adherent and spindle-shaped. Regarding the growth curves in the 12- and 24-well culture plates, it was demonstrated that in the women aged between 30 and 40 years, population doubling time was 55.5 and 62 hours, respectively, while these values in the women aged between 40 and 50 years were 70.4 and 72.4 hours, correspondingly. Positive expression of CD44 and CD90 and negative expression of CD34 were noted. In the osteogenic differentiation medium, the cells differentiated toward osteoblasts. As human Men-SCs are easily collectable without any invasive procedure and are a safe and rapid source of MSCs, they can be a good candidate for stem cell banking and cell transplantation in women.

  16. Role of Human Health Care Providers and Medical Treatment Facilities in Military Working Dog Care and Accessibility Difficulties with Military Working Dog Blood Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles Iii, James T

    2016-01-01

    The use of military working dogs (MWDs) in support of military operations has increased dramatically over recent years, as they have proven to be our most reliable deterrent to improvised explosive devices. Healthcare delivery for MWDs in combat presents unique challenges and requires extensive collaboration between veterinarians and human health care providers (HCPs). A successful example is the incorporation of MWD emergency care for nonveterinary HCPs into the Joint Trauma System Clinical Practice Guidelines, which has proven to be a helpful product. Additional challenges that need further solutions include MWDs as patients in human medical treatment facilities (MTFs) and the procurement of appropriate canine blood components in an operational environment. It is often necessary for MWDs to be treated as patients in human MTFs, however, there is no Department of Defense guidance to support this activity. Access to MWD blood products is limited to collection of fresh whole blood in the operational setting. Similar to humans, specific blood component therapy, such as fresh frozen plasma, is often indicated for sick or injured MWDs. Currently there is no formal system in place to deliver any blood products for MWDs or to facilitate collection in theater.

  17. Multifactorial analysis of human blood cell responses to clinical total body irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuhas, J. M.; Stokes, T. R.; Lushbaugh, C. C.

    1972-01-01

    Multiple regression analysis techniques are used to study the effects of therapeutic radiation exposure, number of fractions, and time on such quantal responses as tumor control and skin injury. The potential of these methods for the analysis of human blood cell responses is demonstrated and estimates are given of the effects of total amount of exposure and time of protraction in determining the minimum white blood cell concentration observed after exposure of patients from four disease groups.

  18. Dielectric monitoring of rouleaux formation in human whole blood: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irimajiri, A; Ando, M; Matsuoka, R; Ichinowatari, T; Takeuchi, S

    1996-08-13

    In search of a method for detecting rouleaux formation in vitro, we studied the dielectric behavior of human blood under both agitated and stationary conditions. Among the parameters examined, relative permittivity ('dielectric constant') at 50-100 kHz was found to be a suitable measure of rouleaux growth, which has been difficult to quantify through conventional optical approaches. The electrical method presented here appears applicable to the kinetic analysis of rouleaux formation in undiluted whole blood.

  19. New polymorphic variants of human blood clotting factor IX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surin, V.L.; Luk`yanenko, A.V.; Tagiev, A.F.; Smirnova, O.V. [Hematological Research Center, Moscow (Russian Federation); Plutalov, O.V.; Berlin, Yu.A. [Shemyakin Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-04-01

    The polymorphism of Alu-repeats, which are located in the introns of the human factor IX gene (copies 1-3), was studied. To identify polymorphic variants, direct sequencing of PCR products that contained appropriate repeats was used. In each case, 20 unrelated X chromosomes were studied. A polymorphic Dra I site was found near the 3{prime}-end of Alu copy 3 within the region of the polyA tract. A PCR-based testing system with internal control of restriction hydrolysis was suggested. Testing 81 unrelated X chromosomes revealed that the frequency of the polymorphic Dra I site is 0.23. Taq I polymorphism, which was revealed in Alu copy 4 of factor IX gene in our previous work, was found to be closely linked to Dra I polymorphism. Studies in linkage between different types of polymorphisms of the factor IX gene revealed the presence of a rare polymorphism in intron a that was located within the same minisatellite region as the known polymorphic insertion 50 bp/Dde I. However, the size of the insertion in our case was 26 bp. Only one polymorphic variant was found among over 150 unrelated X chromosomes derived from humans from Moscow and its vicinity. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Human red blood cells alterations in primary aldosteronism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordin, Luciana; Donà, Gabriella; Sabbadin, Chiara; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Andrisani, Alessandra; Ambrosini, Guido; Brunati, Anna Maria; Clari, Giulio; Armanini, Decio

    2013-06-01

    Aldosterone (Aldo) effects include NADPH oxidase activation involved in Aldo-related oxidative stress. Red blood cells (RBCs) are particularly sensitive to oxidative assault, and both the formation of high molecular weight aggregates (HMWAs) and the diamide-induced Tyr phosphorylation (Tyr-P) level of membrane band 3 can be used to monitor their redox status. The Aldo-related alterations in erythrocytes were evaluated by comparing in vitro evidence. This was a multicenter comparative study. The study included 12 patients affected by primary aldosteronism (PA) and 6 healthy control subjects (HCs), whose RBCs were compared with those of patients with PA. For in vitro experiments, RBCs from HCs were incubated with increasing Aldo concentrations. The Tyr-P level, band 3 HMWA formation, and autologous IgG binding were evaluated. In patients with PA, both Tyr-P levels and band 3 HMWAs were higher than those in HCs. RBCs from HCs were treated with increasing Aldo concentrations in both platelet-poor plasma (PPP) and charcoal-stripped (CS)-PPP. Results showed that Aldo had dose- and time-dependent effects on band 3 Tyr-P and HMWA formation in CS-PPP more than in PPP. These effects were almost completely prevented by canrenone or cortisol. Aldo-related membrane alterations led to increased autologous IgG binding. Erythrocytes from patients with PA show oxidative-like stress evidenced by increased HMWA content and diamide-induced band 3 Tyr-P level. Aldo effects are mediated by the mineralocorticoid receptor, as suggested by the inhibitory effects of canrenone, an antagonist of Aldo. In CS-PPP, in which Aldo induces remarkable membrane alterations leading to IgG binding, Aldo may be responsible for premature RBC removal from circulation.

  1. Collective Motion of Humans in Mosh and Circle Pits at Heavy Metal Concerts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Jesse L.; Bierbaum, Matthew; Sethna, James P.; Cohen, Itai

    2013-05-01

    Human collective behavior can vary from calm to panicked depending on social context. Using videos publicly available online, we study the highly energized collective motion of attendees at heavy metal concerts. We find these extreme social gatherings generate similarly extreme behaviors: a disordered gaslike state called a mosh pit and an ordered vortexlike state called a circle pit. Both phenomena are reproduced in flocking simulations demonstrating that human collective behavior is consistent with the predictions of simplified models.

  2. 78 FR 26639 - Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request: Financial Sustainability of Human Tissue Biobanking...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-07

    ... enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (4) Ways to minimize the... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request: Financial... invited on one or more of the following points: (1) Whether the proposed collection of information is...

  3. Collective response of human populations to large-scale emergencies

    CERN Document Server

    Bagrow, James P; Barabási, Albert-László; 10.1371/journal.pone.0017680

    2011-01-01

    Despite recent advances in uncovering the quantitative features of stationary human activity patterns, many applications, from pandemic prediction to emergency response, require an understanding of how these patterns change when the population encounters unfamiliar conditions. To explore societal response to external perturbations we identified real-time changes in communication and mobility patterns in the vicinity of eight emergencies, such as bomb attacks and earthquakes, comparing these with eight non-emergencies, like concerts and sporting events. We find that communication spikes accompanying emergencies are both spatially and temporally localized, but information about emergencies spreads globally, resulting in communication avalanches that engage in a significant manner the social network of eyewitnesses. These results offer a quantitative view of behavioral changes in human activity under extreme conditions, with potential long-term impact on emergency detection and response.

  4. Collective Response of Human Populations to Large-Scale Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabási, Albert-László

    2011-01-01

    Despite recent advances in uncovering the quantitative features of stationary human activity patterns, many applications, from pandemic prediction to emergency response, require an understanding of how these patterns change when the population encounters unfamiliar conditions. To explore societal response to external perturbations we identified real-time changes in communication and mobility patterns in the vicinity of eight emergencies, such as bomb attacks and earthquakes, comparing these with eight non-emergencies, like concerts and sporting events. We find that communication spikes accompanying emergencies are both spatially and temporally localized, but information about emergencies spreads globally, resulting in communication avalanches that engage in a significant manner the social network of eyewitnesses. These results offer a quantitative view of behavioral changes in human activity under extreme conditions, with potential long-term impact on emergency detection and response. PMID:21479206

  5. Bayesian decision making in human collectives with binary choices

    CERN Document Server

    Eguíluz, Víctor M; Fernández-Gracia, J

    2015-01-01

    Here we focus on the description of the mechanisms behind the process of information aggregation and decision making, a basic step to understand emergent phenomena in society, such as trends, information spreading or the wisdom of crowds. In many situations, agents choose between discrete options. We analyze experimental data on binary opinion choices in humans. The data consists of two separate experiments in which humans answer questions with a binary response, where one is correct and the other is incorrect. The questions are answered without and with information on the answers of some previous participants. We find that a Bayesian approach captures the probability of choosing one of the answers. The influence of peers is uncorrelated with the difficulty of the question. The data is inconsistent with Weber's law, which states that the probability of choosing an option depends on the proportion of previous answers choosing that option and not on the total number of those answers. Last, the present Bayesian ...

  6. Collective response of human populations to large-scale emergencies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Bagrow

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in uncovering the quantitative features of stationary human activity patterns, many applications, from pandemic prediction to emergency response, require an understanding of how these patterns change when the population encounters unfamiliar conditions. To explore societal response to external perturbations we identified real-time changes in communication and mobility patterns in the vicinity of eight emergencies, such as bomb attacks and earthquakes, comparing these with eight non-emergencies, like concerts and sporting events. We find that communication spikes accompanying emergencies are both spatially and temporally localized, but information about emergencies spreads globally, resulting in communication avalanches that engage in a significant manner the social network of eyewitnesses. These results offer a quantitative view of behavioral changes in human activity under extreme conditions, with potential long-term impact on emergency detection and response.

  7. [Establishment of Humanized Mouse Model by Using Transplantation of Mobilized Peripheral Blood Stem Cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ya-Ru; Li, Yu-Hang; Chen, Shui-Ping; Zou, Bing-Han; Zhang, Qin; Xu, Man; Kong, Wei-Xia; Sheng, Hong-Xia; Hu, Guo-Liang; Liao, Li; Zhang, Bin; Hu, Liang-Ding

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the hematopoietic reconstitution in immunodeficiency NPG(TM) mice after transplantation of G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood CD34(+) hemopoietic stem cells. CD34(+) cells were isolated from peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS), and then were transplanted into NPG(TM) mice irradiated with sublethal dose of X ray by marrow cavity transplantation. The hemogram of mice after transplantation for 2, 4 weeks was observed; human cell populations (CD45(+), CD19(+)) in the peripheral blood of mice were dynamically analyzed by flow cytometry (FCM) at 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 weeks after transplantation. Until the planned harvest at the 12 week after transplantation, the CD45(+), CD19(+) level in bone marrow, liver, spleen from each mouse were detected by flow cytometry; the expression of human Alu gene in the bone marrow cell of mouse was detected by PCR. The purity of CD34(+) cells accounted for 96.3%; after irradiation, the nucleated cells and megalokaryocytes in the marrow cavity of NPG mice were reduced significantly or were lost, and reached the myeloablative effect. At week 4 after transplantation, components of blood cells in peripheral blood of transplanted mice were recovered to the level before irradiation; all the mice survived, human CD45(+), CD19(+) cells were found by FCM in the peripheral blood of all the surviving mice in transplantation group at week 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 after the transplantation; at the 12th week, the human Alu gene could be detected in the bone marrow of all the mice in transplantation group. The human-mouse chimeric model is successfully established in irradiation-induced NPG mouse by transplantation of CD34(+) HSC from G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood via marrow cavity.

  8. Quantitative analysis of human herpesvirus-6 and human cytomegalovirus in blood and saliva from patients with acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefzi, Faten; Ben Salem, Nabil Abid; Khelif, Abderrahim; Feki, Salma; Aouni, Mahjoub; Gautheret-Dejean, Agnès

    2015-03-01

    Human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) DNAs were quantified by real-time PCR assays in blood and saliva obtained from 50 patients with acute leukemia at the time of diagnosis (50 of each matrix), aplasia (65 of each matrix), remission (55 of each matrix), and relapse (20 of each matrix) to evaluate which biological matrix was more suitable to identify a viral reactivation, search for a possible link between HHV-6 and HCMV reactivations, and evaluate the relations between viral loads and count of different leukocyte types in blood. The median HHV-6 loads were 136; 219; 226, and 75 copies/million cells in blood at diagnosis, aplasia, remission and relapse, respectively. The HCMV loads were 193 and 317 copies/million cells in blood at diagnosis and remission. In the saliva samples, the HHV-6 loads were 22,165; 15,238; 30,214, and 17,454 copies/million cells at diagnosis, aplasia, remission, and relapse, respectively. The HCMV loads were 8,991; 1,461; 2,980, and 4,283 copies/million cells at diagnosis, aplasia, remission, and relapse, respectively. The HHV-6 load in the blood was correlated to the counts of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (R(2)  = 0.5; P blood in the detection of HHV-6 or HCMV reactivations. The HHV-6 and HCMV reactivations were linked only in saliva. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Report - Analysis of designer drugs in human blood using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueguo; Zhao, Dan

    2017-05-01

    A robust gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method was utilized in the qualitative and quantitative analysis of designer drugs in human blood. Designer drugs, including methcathinone, 3, 4-methylenedioxymethcathinone, 4'-methyl-α-pyrrolidinopropiophenone and methylenedioxy-pyrovalerone were simultaneously analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Liquid-liquid small volume extraction was employed in the pretreatment of human blood sample, and the experimental results showed that the method was validated with high extraction efficiency, low limits of detection and good linearity throughout the studied concentration ranges. Furthermore, the method not only exhibited good accuracy and precision in the determination of designer drugs in human blood, but also showed the potential of the approach in the determination of trace evidence in forensic science.

  10. Rapid engraftment by peripheral blood progenitor cells mobilized by recombinant human stem cell factor and recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, R G; Briddell, R A; Knitter, G H; Rowley, S D; Appelbaum, F R; McNiece, I K

    1995-01-01

    We have previously shown that administration of low-dose recombinant human stem cell factor (rhSCF) plus recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) to baboons mobilizes greater numbers of progenitor cells in the blood than does administration of rhG-CSF alone. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether marrow repopulating cells are present in the blood of nonhuman primates administered low-dose rhSCF plus rhG-CSF, and if present, whether these cells engraft lethally irradiated recipients as rapidly as blood cells mobilized by treatment with rhG-CSF alone. One group of baboons was administered low-dose rhSCF (25 micrograms/kg/d) plus rhG-CSF (100 micrograms/kg/d) while a second group received rhG-CSF alone (100 micrograms/kg/d). Each animal underwent a single 2-hour leukapheresis occurring the day when the number of progenitor cells per volume of blood was maximal. For baboons administered low-dose rhSCF plus rhG-CSF, the leukapheresis products contained 1.8-fold more mononuclear cells and 14.0-fold more progenitor cells compared to the leukapheresis products from animals treated with rhG-CSF alone. All animals successfully engrafted after transplantation of cryopreserved autologous blood cells. In animals transplanted with low-dose rhSCF plus rhG-CSF mobilized blood cells, we observed a time to a platelet count of > 20,000 was 8 days +/- 0, to a white blood cell count (WBC) of > 1,000 was 11 +/- 1 days, and to an absolute neutrophil count (ANC) of > 500 was 12 +/- 1 days. These results compared with 42 +/- 12, 16 +/- 1, and 24 +/- 4 days to achieve platelets > 20,000, WBC > 1,000, and ANC > 500, respectively, for baboons transplanted with rhG-CSF mobilized blood cells. Animals transplanted with low-dose rhSCF plus rhG-CSF mobilized blood cells had blood counts equivalent to pretransplant values within 3 weeks after transplant. The results suggest that the combination of low-dose rhSCF plus rhG-CSF mobilizes greater numbers of

  11. Simplified Methods of Collecting and Processing Whole Blood for Quantitation of Plasma Catecholamines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    processing whole blood for quantitaio p catecholamines 12. PEU, SONAL Ab-IOR(S) D’AlesandroMM, Reed H1L, Robertson R, Lewis SB 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME...transport of ihoe 1. Ben-Itinathan N. Potter 1C :A wsnic ti. blod (6 ud~ whousorlntyd lay fer duoenzat assay tot ulopaunine, niirepinc-phrinc bloo (6

  12. BloodChIP: a database of comparative genome-wide transcription factor binding profiles in human blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon, Diego; Beck, Dominik; Perera, Dilmi; Wong, Jason W H; Pimanda, John E

    2014-01-01

    The BloodChIP database (http://www.med.unsw.edu.au/CRCWeb.nsf/page/BloodChIP) supports exploration and visualization of combinatorial transcription factor (TF) binding at a particular locus in human CD34-positive and other normal and leukaemic cells or retrieval of target gene sets for user-defined combinations of TFs across one or more cell types. Increasing numbers of genome-wide TF binding profiles are being added to public repositories, and this trend is likely to continue. For the power of these data sets to be fully harnessed by experimental scientists, there is a need for these data to be placed in context and easily accessible for downstream applications. To this end, we have built a user-friendly database that has at its core the genome-wide binding profiles of seven key haematopoietic TFs in human stem/progenitor cells. These binding profiles are compared with binding profiles in normal differentiated and leukaemic cells. We have integrated these TF binding profiles with chromatin marks and expression data in normal and leukaemic cell fractions. All queries can be exported into external sites to construct TF-gene and protein-protein networks and to evaluate the association of genes with cellular processes and tissue expression.

  13. Effect of propolis on mitotic and cellular proliferation indices in human blood lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoro, A.; Almonacid, M.; Villaescusa, J. [Valencia Hospital Univ. la Fe, Servicio de Proteccion Radiologica (Spain); Barquinero, J. [Barcelona Univ. Autonom, Servicio de Dosimetria Biologica, Unidad de Antropologia, Dept. de Biologia Animal, Vegetal y Ecologia, barcelona (Spain); Barrios, L. [Barcelona Univ. Autonoma, Dept. de Biologia Celular y Fisiologia. Unidad de Biologia Celular (Spain); Verdu, G. [Valencia Univ. Politecnica, Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear (Spain); Perez, J. [Hospital la Fe, Seccion de Radiofisica, Servicio de Radioterapia, valencia (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    The study of the frequency of chromosomal aberrations per cell is the tool used in Biological dosimetry studies. Using dose-effect calibration curve obtained in our laboratory, we can evaluate the radioprotector effect of the EEP (ethanolic extract of propolis) in cultures in vitro. Propolis is the generic name for resinous substance collected by honeybees. The results showed a reduction in chromosomal aberrations's frequency of up to 50 %. The following study consisted of analyzing human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to 2 Gy {gamma} rays, in presence and absence of EEP, the change in the frequency of chromosome aberrations was analysed with biological dosimetry. The protection against the formation of dicentric and ring was dose-dependent, but there seemed to be a maximum protection, i.e. a further increase in the concentration of EEP does not show additional protection. This work studies the effect of the EEP of the cellular cycle using the mitotic and cellular proliferation index, as an alternative for the screening cytostatic activity. The results indicate that the lymphocytes which were cultures in presence of EEP exhibited a significant and dependent-concentration decrease in mitotic index and proliferation kinetics. The possible mechanisms involved in the radioprotective influence of EEP are discussed. (authors)

  14. Infradian awake and asleep systolic and diastolic blood pressure rhythms in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Lloret, Santiago; Toblli, Jorge E; Vigo, Daniel E; Cardinali, Daniel P; Milei, José

    2006-07-01

    Blood pressure shows 24-h rhythms with a significant seasonal fluctuation. To characterize 2-month to 12-month infradian rhythms in the mean awake and asleep systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in humans. A total of 1689 participants underwent 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring during different periods of the year. The mean daily temperature, humidity, barometric pressure and wind velocity values for the same time span and geographical location were obtained. Fourier analysis was used to fit 12-month, 6-month, 4-month, 3-month and 2-month rhythms to the mean awake and asleep SBP and DBP and to metereological variables. The awake mean SBP and DBP values showed significant 12-month and 3-month rhythms (respectively, R2 = 55%, P pressure means showed mainly 3-month rhythms (SBP, R2 = 19%, P barometric pressure showed 12-month and 6-month rhythms, and wind velocity showed 12-month and 3-month rhythms. Minimal temperature values and maximal humidity values coincided with elevated blood pressure values. Awake blood pressure means exhibited mainly circannual fluctuations while asleep blood pressure means showed principally 3-month rhythms. Infradian blood pressure variations correlated with some meteorological variables.

  15. Post - prandial rise of microvesicles in peripheral blood of healthy human donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mam Keriya

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microvesicles isolated from body fluids are membrane - enclosed fragments of cell interior which carry information on the status of the organism. It is yet unclear how metabolism affects the number and composition of microvesicles in isolates from the peripheral blood. Aim To study the post - prandial effect on microvesicles in isolates from the peripheral blood of 21 healthy donors, in relation to blood cholesterol and blood glucose concentrations. Results The average number of microvesicles in the isolates increased 5 hours post - prandially by 52%; the increase was statistically significant (p = 0.01 with the power P = 0.68, while the average total blood cholesterol concentration, average low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration (LDL-C and average high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration (HDL-C all remained within 2% of their fasting values. We found an 11% increase in triglycerides (p = 0.12 and a 6% decrease in blood glucose (p Conclusions In a population of healthy human subjects the number of microvesicles in isolates from peripheral blood increased in the post - prandial state. The increase in the number of microvesicles was affected by the fasting concentration of cholesterol and correlated with the decrease in blood glucose.

  16. Determination of Ochratoxin A in small volumes of human blood serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köller, G; Rolle-Kampczyk, U; Lehmann, I; Popp, P; Herbarth, O

    2004-05-25

    A new simple and rapid method for analysing Ochratoxin A (OTA) in small volumes of human blood serum using capillary zone electrophoresis coupled to laser-induced fluorescence is described. The clean-up procedure solely consists of a double extraction step. To improve the reproducibility of migration times and quantification, two internal standards were used. The limit of detection was 0.55 ng/ml, with a linear range of 1-100 ng/ml of OTA in spiked human blood serum. The method is used to rapidly screen suspected patients.

  17. Bayesian decision making in human collectives with binary choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguíluz, Víctor M; Masuda, Naoki; Fernández-Gracia, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Here we focus on the description of the mechanisms behind the process of information aggregation and decision making, a basic step to understand emergent phenomena in society, such as trends, information spreading or the wisdom of crowds. In many situations, agents choose between discrete options. We analyze experimental data on binary opinion choices in humans. The data consists of two separate experiments in which humans answer questions with a binary response, where one is correct and the other is incorrect. The questions are answered without and with information on the answers of some previous participants. We find that a Bayesian approach captures the probability of choosing one of the answers. The influence of peers is uncorrelated with the difficulty of the question. The data is inconsistent with Weber's law, which states that the probability of choosing an option depends on the proportion of previous answers choosing that option and not on the total number of those answers. Last, the present Bayesian model fits reasonably well to the data as compared to some other previously proposed functions although the latter sometime perform slightly better than the Bayesian model. The asset of the present model is the simplicity and mechanistic explanation of the behavior.

  18. Bayesian decision making in human collectives with binary choices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor M Eguíluz

    Full Text Available Here we focus on the description of the mechanisms behind the process of information aggregation and decision making, a basic step to understand emergent phenomena in society, such as trends, information spreading or the wisdom of crowds. In many situations, agents choose between discrete options. We analyze experimental data on binary opinion choices in humans. The data consists of two separate experiments in which humans answer questions with a binary response, where one is correct and the other is incorrect. The questions are answered without and with information on the answers of some previous participants. We find that a Bayesian approach captures the probability of choosing one of the answers. The influence of peers is uncorrelated with the difficulty of the question. The data is inconsistent with Weber's law, which states that the probability of choosing an option depends on the proportion of previous answers choosing that option and not on the total number of those answers. Last, the present Bayesian model fits reasonably well to the data as compared to some other previously proposed functions although the latter sometime perform slightly better than the Bayesian model. The asset of the present model is the simplicity and mechanistic explanation of the behavior.

  19. Measuring xenon in human plasma and blood by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevis, Mario; Piper, Thomas; Geyer, Hans; Thomas, Andreas; Schaefer, Maximilian S; Kienbaum, Peter; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2014-07-15

    Due to the favorable pharmacokinetic properties and minimal side effects of xenon, its use in modern anesthesia has been well accepted, and recent studies further demonstrated the intra- and postoperative neuro-, cardio-, and reno-protective action of the noble gas. Since the production of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and its downstream effector erythropoietin as well as noradrenalin reuptake inhibition have been found to play key roles in this context, the question arose as to whether the use of xenon is a matter for doping controls and preventive doping research. The aim of the present study was hence to evaluate whether the (ab)use of xenon can be detected from doping control samples with the instrumentation commonly available in sports drug testing laboratories. Plasma was saturated with xenon according to reported protocols, and the target analyte was measured by means of gas chromatography/time-of-flight and triple quadrupole mass spectrometry with headspace injection. Recording the accurate mass of three major xenon isotopes at m/z 128.9048, 130.9045 and 131.9042 allowed for the unequivocal identification of the analyte and the detection assay was characterized concerning limit of detection (LOD), intraday precision, and specificity as well as analyte recovery under different storage conditions. Xenon was detected in fortified plasma samples with detection limits of approximately 0.5 nmol/mL to 50 nmol/mL, depending on the type of mass spectrometer used. The method characteristics of intraday precision (coefficient of variation xenon at non-physiological concentrations in human plasma and blood. Eventually, authentic plasma and blood samples collected pre-, intra-, and post-operative (4, 8, and 24 h) were positively analyzed after storage for up to 30 h, and provided proof-of-concept for the developed assay. If relevant to doping controls, xenon can be determined from plasma and blood samples, i.e. common specimens of routine sports

  20. The effect of blood collection procedure on plasma renin activity (PRA) and concentrations of direct renin (DRC) and aldosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinicki, Piotr; Jeske, Wojciech; Gietka-Czernel, Małgorzata; Bednarek-Papierska, Lucyna; Kruszyńska, Aleksandra; Słowińska-Srzednicka, Jadwiga; Zgliczyński, Wojciech

    2015-06-01

    Performing measurements of plasma renin activity (PRA) or direct renin concentration (DRC) and aldosterone concentration, we should be well informed about requirements concerning blood sample processing. Forty-seven patients had blood collected in the supine and upright positions. Blood was withdrawn into two EDTA2K tubes and one with clot activator. One EDTA2K tube was cooled at +4 °C and centrifuged at +4 °C whereas the other was prepared at room temperature. PRA and DRC were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA) and radioimmunometry (IRMA), respectively, in both cooled and not cooled plasma samples, and aldosterone was measured by RIA in not cooled plasma and in serum. In all the groups, with low, medium, and high values of PRA and direct renin, the temperature of sample processing within 30 minutes had no marked influence on the final result (correlation coefficient for renin was 0.9994, and for PRA, 0.8297). The measured concentrations of aldosterone also showed high correlation (r = 0.9790) but were markedly higher in plasma. The measurements of DRC, and to a lesser extent PRA, were similar regardless of temperature condition during the 20-30 minutes necessary for blood sample processing. Aldosterone concentrations in plasma vs serum samples appeared to be markedly higher. © The Author(s) 2013.

  1. Is human blood a good surrogate for brain tissue in transcriptional studies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van den Berg Leonard H

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since human brain tissue is often unavailable for transcriptional profiling studies, blood expression data is frequently used as a substitute. The underlying hypothesis in such studies is that genes expressed in brain tissue leave a transcriptional footprint in blood. We tested this hypothesis by relating three human brain expression data sets (from cortex, cerebellum and caudate nucleus to two large human blood expression data sets (comprised of 1463 individuals. Results We found mean expression levels were weakly correlated between the brain and blood data (r range: [0.24,0.32]. Further, we tested whether co-expression relationships were preserved between the three brain regions and blood. Only a handful of brain co-expression modules showed strong evidence of preservation and these modules could be combined into a single large blood module. We also identified highly connected intramodular "hub" genes inside preserved modules. These preserved intramodular hub genes had the following properties: first, their expression levels tended to be significantly more heritable than those from non-preserved intramodular hub genes (p -90; second, they had highly significant positive correlations with the following cluster of differentiation genes: CD58, CD47, CD48, CD53 and CD164; third, a significant number of them were known to be involved in infection mechanisms, post-transcriptional and post-translational modification and other basic processes. Conclusions Overall, we find transcriptome organization is poorly preserved between brain and blood. However, the subset of preserved co-expression relationships characterized here may aid future efforts to identify blood biomarkers for neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases when brain tissue samples are unavailable.

  2. Human research and data collection via the internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Michael H

    2004-01-01

    Advantages and disadvantages of Web and lab research are reviewed. Via the World Wide Web, one can efficiently recruit large, heterogeneous samples quickly, recruit specialized samples (people with rare characteristics), and standardize procedures, making studies easy to replicate. Alternative programming techniques (procedures for data collection) are compared, including client-side as opposed to server-side programming. Web studies have methodological problems; for example, higher rates of drop out and of repeated participation. Web studies must be thoroughly analyzed and tested before launching on-line. Many studies compared data obtained in Web versus lab. These two methods usually reach the same conclusions; however, there are significant differences between college students tested in the lab and people recruited and tested via the Internet. Reasons that Web researchers are enthusiastic about the potential of the new methods are discussed.

  3. Modification method to reduce the impact of blood vessel on noncontact discrimination of human blood based on ;M+N; theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linna; Ding, Hongyan; Lin, Ling; Wang, Yimin; Guo, Xin

    2018-01-01

    Noncontact discriminating human blood is significantly crucial for import-export ports and inspection and quarantine departments. We had already demonstrated that visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy combining PLS-DA method can successfully realize noncontact human blood discrimination. However, the circulated blood vessels may be produced with different materials. The use of various kinds of blood tubes may have a negative effect on the discrimination, based on ;M+N; theory (Li et al., 2016). In this research, we explored the impact of different material of blood vessels, such as glass tube and plastic tube, on the prediction ability of the discrimination model. Furthermore, we searched for the modification method to reduce the influence from the blood tubes. Our work indicated that generalized diffuse reflectance method can greatly improve the discrimination accuracy. This research can greatly facilitate the application of noncontact discrimination method based on visible and near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

  4. Biomaterials trigger endothelial cell activation when co-incubated with human whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herklotz, Manuela; Hanke, Jasmin; Hänsel, Stefanie; Drichel, Juliane; Marx, Monique; Maitz, Manfred F; Werner, Carsten

    2016-10-01

    Endothelial cell activation resulting from biomaterial contact or biomaterial-induced blood activation may in turn also affect hemostasis and inflammatory processes in the blood. Current in vitro hemocompatibility assays typically ignore these modulating effects of the endothelium. This study describes a co-incubation system of human whole blood, biomaterial and endothelial cells (ECs) that was developed to overcome this limitation. First, human endothelial cells were characterized in terms of their expression of coagulation- and inflammation-relevant markers in response to various activators. Subsequently, their capacity to regulate hemostasis as well as complement and granulocyte activation was monitored in a hemocompatibility assay. After blood contact, quiescent ECs exhibited anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory properties. When they were co-incubated with surfaces exhibiting pro-coagulant or pro-inflammatory characteristics, the ECs down-regulated coagulation but not complement or leukocyte activation. Analysis of intracellular levels of the endothelial activation markers E-selectin and tissue factor showed that co-incubation with model surfaces and blood significantly increased the activation state of ECs. Finally, the coagulation- and inflammation-modulating properties of the ECs were tested after blood/biomaterial exposure. Pre-activation of ECs by biomaterials in the blood induced a pro-coagulant and pro-inflammatory state of the ECs, wherein the pro-coagulant response was higher for biomaterial/blood pre-activated ECs than for TNF-α-pre-activated cells. This work provides evidence that biomaterials, even without directly contacting the endothelium, affect the endothelial activation state with and have consequences for plasmatic and cellular reactions in the blood. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Blood pressure and the contractility of a human leg muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Billy L; Fitzpatrick, Richard C

    2013-01-01

    These studies investigate the relationships between perfusion pressure, force output and pressor responses for the contracting human tibialis anterior muscle. Eight healthy adults were studied. Changing the height of tibialis anterior relative to the heart was used to control local perfusion pressure. Electrically stimulated tetanic force output was highly sensitive to physiological variations in perfusion pressure showing a proportionate change in force output of 6.5% per 10 mmHg. This perfusion-dependent change in contractility begins within seconds and is reversible with a 53 s time constant, demonstrating a steady-state equilibrium between contractility and perfusion pressure. These stimulated contractions did not produce significant cardiovascular responses, indicating that the muscle pressor response does not play a major role in cardiovascular regulation at these workloads. Voluntary contractions at forces that would require constant motor drive if perfusion pressure had remained constant generated a central pressor response when perfusion pressure was lowered. This is consistent with a larger cortical drive being required to compensate for the lost contractility with lower perfusion pressure. The relationship between contractility and perfusion for this large postural muscle was not different from that of a small hand muscle (adductor pollicis) and it responded similarly to passive peripheral and active central changes in arterial pressure, but extended over a wider operating range of pressures. If we consider that, in a goal-oriented motor task, muscle contractility determines central motor output and the central pressor response, these results indicate that muscle would fatigue twice as fast without a pressor response. From its extent, timing and reversibility we propose a testable hypothesis that this change in contractility arises through contraction- and perfusion-dependent changes in interstitial K+ concentration. PMID:24018946

  6. Survey of Blood Collection Centers and Implementation of Guidance for Prevention of Transfusion-Transmitted Zika Virus Infection--Puerto Rico, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Amber M; Sapiano, Mathew R P; Basavaraju, Sridhar V; Kuehnert, Matthew J; Rivera-Garcia, Brenda

    2016-04-15

    Since November 2015, Puerto Rico has reported active mosquito-borne transmission of Zika virus. Because of the potential for Zika virus to be transmitted through transfusion of blood components, and because a high percentage of persons infected with Zika virus are asymptomatic, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommended that blood collections cease in areas of the United States affected by active vector-borne transmission of Zika virus until laboratory screening of blood donations or pathogen reduction technology (PRT) for treatment of blood components can be implemented. To inform efforts to maintain the safety and availability of the blood supply in Puerto Rico, CDC, in collaboration with the Puerto Rico Department of Health, conducted a rapid assessment of blood collection and use on the island. A total of 139,369 allogeneic red blood cell (RBC) units, 45,243 platelet units, and 56,466 plasma units were collected in or imported to Puerto Rico during 2015, and 135,966 allogeneic RBC units, 13,526 therapeutic platelet units, and 25,775 plasma units were transfused. Because of the potential for local Zika virus transmission in areas with a competent mosquito vector, other areas of the United States should develop plans to ensure local blood safety and adequacy. Blood collection organizations and public health agencies should collaborate to maintain the safety and availability of local blood supplies in accordance with FDA guidance.

  7. Estimating the total TEQ in human blood from naturally-occurring vs. anthropogenic dioxins. A dietary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, K. [Exponent, Natick, MA (United States); Harris, M. [Exponent, Houston, TX (United States); Edwards, M. [Exponent, Bellevue, WA (United States); Chu, A.; Clark, G. [XDS, Inc., Durham, NC (United States); Finley, B. [Exponent, Santa Rosa, CA (United States)

    2004-09-15

    Numerous naturally-occurring compounds in the human diet can bind to the aryl hydrocarbon, or dioxin receptor (AhR) and activate the AhR signaling pathway. These compounds include certain indole carbinols and their derivatives, heterocyclic aromatic amines, flavonoids, carotinoids, vitamin A derivatives (retinoids), and tryptophan metabolites. Several researchers have suggested that the daily dietary intake of these ''endodioxins'', in terms of a TCDD-equivalency (TEQ) is likely to be far greater than that associated with daily background intake of anthropogenic dioxins. The purpose of this study was to provide preliminary data for evaluating whether dietary endodioxins may in fact be significant contributors to the non-PCDD/F and PCB fraction of the blood TEQ. This was accomplished by measuring the total bioassay (CALUX {sup registered}) TEQ in the blood of several volunteers under various dietary regimens. Specifically, blood samples were collected from volunteers who maintained a baseline diet, which was relatively free of vegetables, followed by a diet enriched in endodioxin-containing vegetables. The background blood levels of PCDD/Fs and PCBs were measured for each volunteer at the beginning of the study in order to establish a baseline TEQ for each participant. To provide a measure of study sensitivity, CALUX {sup registered} analysis was also performed on blood samples from volunteers who took an off-the-shelf indole-3-carbinole (I3C) supplement. I3C is the main dietary ICZ precursor and could be expected to increase the levels of this endodioxin in blood.

  8. NIR Raman spectra of whole human blood: effects of laser-induced and in vitro hemoglobin denaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemler, P; Premasiri, W R; DelMonaco, A; Ziegler, L D

    2014-01-01

    Care must be exercised in the use of Raman spectroscopy for the identification of blood in forensic applications. The Raman spectra of dried whole human blood excited at 785 nm are shown to be exclusively due to oxyhemoglobin or related hemoglobin denaturation products. Raman spectra of whole blood are reported as a function of the incident 785-nm-laser power, and features attributable to heme aggregates are observed for fluences on the order of 10(4) W/cm(2) and signal collection times of 20 s. In particular, the formation of this local-heating-induced heme aggregate product is indicated by a redshifting of several heme porphyrin ring vibrational bands, the appearance of a large broad band at 1,248 cm(-1), the disappearance of the Fe-O2 stretching and bending bands, and the observation of a large overlapping fluorescence band. This denaturation product is also observed in the low-power-excitation Raman spectrum of older ambient-air-exposed bloodstains (2 weeks or more). The Raman spectrum of methemoglobin whole blood excited at 785 nm is reported, and increasing amounts of this natural denaturation product can also be identified in Raman spectra of dried whole blood particularly when the blood has been stored prior to drying. These results indicate that to use 785-nm-excitation Raman spectra as an identification method for forensic applications to maximum effect, incident laser powers need to be kept low to eliminate variable amounts of heme aggregate spectral components contributing to the signal and the natural aging process of hemoglobin denaturation needs to be accounted for. This also suggests that there is a potential opportunity for 785-nm-excitation Raman spectra to be a sensitive indicator of the age of dried bloodstains at crime scenes.

  9. Evaluation of the clinical utility of a rapid blood test for human leptospirosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eapen, C. K.; Sugathan, Sheela; Kuriakose, Mariamma; Abdoel, Theresia; Smits, Henk L.

    2002-01-01

    A rapid assay device for the detection of Leptospira-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies was applied on whole blood samples collected from a group of consecutive patients admitted with clinical suspicion of leptospirosis to a district hospital in Kerala, India. The hospital is located in an

  10. Occurrence of artificial sweeteners in human liver and paired blood and urine samples from adults in Tianjin, China and their implications for human exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Gan, Zhiwei; Gao, Chuanzi; Ma, Ling; Li, Yanxi; Li, Xiao; Sun, Hongwen

    2016-09-14

    In this study, acesulfame (ACE), saccharin (SAC) and cyclamate (CYC) were found in all paired urine and blood samples collected from healthy adults, with mean values of 4070, 918 and 628 ng mL(-1), respectively, in urine and 9.03, 20.4 and 0.72 ng mL(-1), respectively, in blood. SAC (mean: 84.4 ng g(-1)) and CYC (4.29 ng g(-1)) were detectable in all liver samples collected from liver cancer patients, while ACE was less frequently detected. Aspartame (ASP) was not found in any analyzed human sample, which can be explained by the fact that this chemical metabolized rapidly in the human body. Among all adults, significantly positive correlations between SAC and CYC levels were observed (p < 0.001), regardless of human matrices. Nevertheless, no significant correlations between concentrations of SAC (or CYC) and ACE were found in any of the human matrices. Our results suggest that human exposure to SAC and CYC is related, whereas ACE originates from a discrete source. Females (or young adults) were exposed to higher levels of SAC and CYC than males (or elderly). The mean renal clearance of SAC was 730 mL per day per kg in adults, which was significantly (p < 0.001) lower than those for CYC (10 800 mL per day per kg) and ACE (10 300 mL per day per kg). The average total daily intake of SAC and ACE was 9.27 and 33.8 μg per kg bw per day, respectively.

  11. The Proteomes of Human Parotid and Submandibular/Sublingual Gland Salivas Collected as the Ductal Secretions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Paul; Hagen, Fred K.; Hardt, Markus; Liao, Lujian; Yan, Weihong; Arellanno, Martha; Bassilian, Sara; Bedi, Gurrinder S.; Boontheung, Pinmannee; Cociorva, Daniel; Delahunty, Claire M.; Denny, Trish; Dunsmore, Jason; Faull, Kym F.; Gilligan, Joyce; Gonzalez-Begne, Mireya; Halgand, Frédéric; Hall, Steven C.; Han, Xuemei; Henson, Bradley; Hewel, Johannes; Hu, Shen; Jeffrey, Sherry; Jiang, Jiang; Loo, Joseph A.; Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R.; Malamud, Daniel; Melvin, James E.; Miroshnychenko, Olga; Navazesh, Mahvash; Niles, Richard; Park, Sung Kyu; Prakobphol, Akraporn; Ramachandran, Prasanna; Richert, Megan; Robinson, Sarah; Sondej, Melissa; Souda, Puneet; Sullivan, Mark A.; Takashima, Jona; Than, Shawn; Wang, Jianghua; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Witkowska, H. Ewa; Wolinsky, Lawrence; Xie, Yongming; Xu, Tao; Yu, Weixia; Ytterberg, Jimmy; Wong, David T.; Yates, John R.; Fisher, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    Saliva is a body fluid with important functions in oral and general health. A consortium of three research groups catalogued the proteins in human saliva collected as the ductal secretions: 1166 identifications—914 in parotid and 917 in submandibular/sublingual saliva—were made. The results showed that a high proportion of proteins that are found in plasma and/or tears are also present in saliva along with unique components. The proteins identified are involved in numerous molecular processes ranging from structural functions to enzymatic/catalytic activities. As expected, the majority mapped to the extracellular and secretory compartments. An immunoblot approach was used to validate the presence in saliva of a subset of the proteins identified by mass spectrometric approaches. These experiments focused on novel constituents and proteins for which the peptide evidence was relatively weak. Ultimately, information derived from the work reported here and related published studies can be used to translate blood-based clinical laboratory tests into a format that utilizes saliva. Additionally, a catalogue of the salivary proteome of healthy individuals allows future analyses of salivary samples from individuals with oral and systemic diseases, with the goal of identifying biomarkers with diagnostic and/or prognostic value for these conditions; another possibility is the discovery of therapeutic targets. PMID:18361515

  12. Comparison of a human portable blood glucose meter, veterinary portable blood glucose meter, and automated chemistry analyzer for measurement of blood glucose concentrations in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Beth M; Fry, Michael M; Flatland, Bente; Kirk, Claudia A

    2009-12-01

    To compare blood glucose concentrations measured with 2 portable blood glucose meters (PBGMs) validated for use in dogs (PBGM-D) and humans (PBGM-H) and an automated chemistry analyzer. Validation study. 92 samples of fresh whole blood and plasma from 83 dogs with various diseases. Each PBGM was used to measure whole blood glucose concentration, and the automated analyzer was used to measure plasma glucose concentration. Passing-Bablok linear regression and Bland-Altman plots were used to determine correlations and bias between the PBGMs and the automated analyzer. Calculated acceptability limits based on combined inherent instrument imprecision were used with Bland-Altman plots to determine agreement. Clinical relevance was assessed via error grid analysis. Although correlation between results of both PBGMs and the standard analyzer was > 0.90, disagreement was greater than could be explained by instrument imprecision alone. Mean difference between PBGM-H and chemistry-analyzer values was -15.8 mg/dL. Mean difference between PBGM-D and chemistry-analyzer values was 2.4 mg/dL. Linear regression analysis revealed proportional bias of PBGM-H (greater disagreement at higher glucose concentrations); no proportional bias was detected for PBGM-D. No constant bias was detected for either PBGM. Error grid analysis revealed all measurements from both PBGMs were within zones without an anticipated effect on clinical outcome. Neither PBGM had exact agreement with the automated analyzer; however, the disagreement detected did not have serious clinical consequences. Our findings stressed the importance of using the same device for monitoring trends in dogs and using instrument-specific reference ranges.

  13. Partial blood meal, carbohydrate availability, and blood-feeding postponement effects on human host avidity and DEET repellency in Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Host avidity and DEET repellency were measured in partially blood fed Aedes albopictus (Skuse) provided 10% sucrose in water, water, or neither when access to a human host was postponed for 1 to 72 h after a partial blood meal. Carbohydrate availability and post-feeding time influenced host avidity...

  14. Thiol-Reactive Star Polymers Display Enhanced Association with Distinct Human Blood Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Joshua J; Li, Yang; De Rose, Robert; Johnston, Angus P R; Czuba, Ewa I; Khor, Song Yang; Quinn, John F; Whittaker, Michael R; Davis, Thomas P; Kent, Stephen J

    2017-04-12

    Directing nanoparticles to specific cell types using nonantibody-based methods is of increasing interest. Thiol-reactive nanoparticles can enhance the efficiency of cargo delivery into specific cells through interactions with cell-surface proteins. However, studies to date using this technique have been largely limited to immortalized cell lines or rodents, and the utility of this technology on primary human cells is unknown. Herein, we used RAFT polymerization to prepare pyridyl disulfide (PDS)-functionalized star polymers with a methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol) brush corona and a fluorescently labeled cross-linked core using an arm-first method. PDS star polymers were examined for their interaction with primary human blood components: six separate white blood cell subsets, as well as red blood cells and platelets. Compared with control star polymers, thiol-reactive nanoparticles displayed enhanced association with white blood cells at 37 °C, particularly the phagocytic monocyte, granulocyte, and dendritic cell subsets. Platelets associated with more PDS than control nanoparticles at both 37 °C and on ice, but they were not activated in the duration examined. Association with red blood cells was minor but still enhanced with PDS nanoparticles. Thiol-reactive nanoparticles represent a useful strategy to target primary human immune cell subsets for improved nanoparticle delivery.

  15. Bone marrow blood vessel ossification and "microvascular dead space" in rat and human long bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisby, Rhonda D

    2014-07-01

    Severe calcification of the bone microvascular network was observed in rats, whereby the bone marrow blood vessels appeared ossified. This study sought to characterize the magnitude of ossification in relation to patent blood vessels and adipocyte content in femoral diaphyses. Additionally, this study confirmed the presence of ossified vessels in patients with arteriosclerotic vascular disease and peripheral vascular disease and cellulitis. Young (4-6 month; n=8) and old (22-24 month; n=8) male Fischer-344 rats were perfused with barium sulfate to visualize patent bone marrow blood vessels. Femoral shafts were processed for bone histomorphometry to quantify ossified (Goldner's Trichrome) and calcified (Alizarin Red) vessels. Adipocyte content was also determined. Additional femora (n=5/age group) were scanned via μCT to quantify microvascular ossification. Bone marrow blood vessels from the rats and the human patients were also isolated and examined via microscopy. Ossified vessels (rats and humans) had osteocyte lacunae on the vessel surfaces and "normal" vessels were transitioning into bone. The volume of ossified vessels was 4800% higher (possification of bone marrow blood vessels in rats and humans. Ossification presumably results in "microvascular dead space" in regard to loss of patency and vasomotor function as opposed to necrosis. Progression of bone microvascular ossification may provide the common link associated with age-related changes in bone and bone marrow. The clinical implications may be evident in the difficulties treating bone disease in the elderly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Norovirus drug candidates that inhibit viral capsid attachment to human histo-blood group antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Eunüs S.; Rajapaksha, Harinda; Carr, Jillian M.; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2016-01-01

    Human noroviruses are the leading causative agents of epidemic and sporadic viral gastroenteritis and childhood diarrhoea worldwide. Human histo-blood group antigens (HBGA) serve as receptors for norovirus capsid protein attachment and play a critical role in infection. This makes HBGA-norovirus binding a promising target for drug development. Recently solved crystal structures of norovirus bound to HBGA have provided a structural basis for identification of potential anti-norovirus drugs and...

  17. Generation of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Anchor Protein-Deficient Blood Cells From Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Xuan; Braunstein, Evan M.; Ye, Zhaohui; Liu, Cyndi F; Chen, Guibin; Zou, Jizhong; Cheng, Linzhao; Brodsky, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Using PIG-A gene targeting and an inducible PIG-A expression system, this study established a conditional PIG-A knockout model in human induced pluripotent stem cells that allowed for the production of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein (GPI-AP)-deficient blood cells. This conditional PIG-A knockout model should be a valuable tool for studying the importance of GPI-APs in hematopoiesis and human development.

  18. Collective human mobility pattern from taxi trips in urban area

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Chengbin

    2012-04-18

    We analyze the passengers\\' traffic pattern for 1.58 million taxi trips of Shanghai, China. By employing the non-negative matrix factorization and optimization methods, we find that, people travel on workdays mainly for three purposes: commuting between home and workplace, traveling from workplace to workplace, and others such as leisure activities. Therefore, traffic flow in one area or between any pair of locations can be approximated by a linear combination of three basis flows, corresponding to the three purposes respectively. We name the coefficients in the linear combination as traffic powers, each of which indicates the strength of each basis flow. The traffic powers on different days are typically different even for the same location, due to the uncertainty of the human motion. Therefore, we provide a probability distribution function for the relative deviation of the traffic power. This distribution function is in terms of a series of functions for normalized binomial distributions. It can be well explained by statistical theories and is verified by empirical data. These findings are applicable in predicting the road traffic, tracing the traffic pattern and diagnosing the traffic related abnormal events. These results can also be used to infer land uses of urban area quite parsimoniously. 2012 Peng et al.

  19. Collective human mobility pattern from taxi trips in urban area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengbin Peng

    Full Text Available We analyze the passengers' traffic pattern for 1.58 million taxi trips of Shanghai, China. By employing the non-negative matrix factorization and optimization methods, we find that, people travel on workdays mainly for three purposes: commuting between home and workplace, traveling from workplace to workplace, and others such as leisure activities. Therefore, traffic flow in one area or between any pair of locations can be approximated by a linear combination of three basis flows, corresponding to the three purposes respectively. We name the coefficients in the linear combination as traffic powers, each of which indicates the strength of each basis flow. The traffic powers on different days are typically different even for the same location, due to the uncertainty of the human motion. Therefore, we provide a probability distribution function for the relative deviation of the traffic power. This distribution function is in terms of a series of functions for normalized binomial distributions. It can be well explained by statistical theories and is verified by empirical data. These findings are applicable in predicting the road traffic, tracing the traffic pattern and diagnosing the traffic related abnormal events. These results can also be used to infer land uses of urban area quite parsimoniously.

  20. Collection and processing of whole blood for transformation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and extraction of DNA: the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosinger, Silke; Nutland, Sarah; Mickelson, Eric; Varney, Michael D; Boehm, Bernard O; Olsem, Gary J; Hansen, John A; Nicholson, Ian; Hilner, Joan E; Perdue, Letitia H; Pierce, June J; Akolkar, Beena; Nierras, Concepcion; Steffes, Michael W

    2010-01-01

    and To yield large amounts of DNA for many genotype analyses and to provide a renewable source of DNA, the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC) harvested DNA and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from individuals with type 1 diabetes and their family members in several regions of the world. DNA repositories were established in Asia-Pacific, Europe, North America, and the United Kingdom. To address region-specific needs, different methods and sample processing techniques were used among the laboratories to extract and to quantify DNA and to establish Epstein-Barr virus transformed cell lines. More than 98% of the samples of PBMCs were successfully transformed. Approximately 20-25 microg of DNA were extracted per mL of whole blood. Extraction of DNA from the cell pack ranged from 92 to 165 microg per cell pack. In addition, the extracted DNA from whole blood or transformed cells was successfully utilized in each regional human leukocyte antigen genotyping laboratory and by several additional laboratories performing consortium-wide genotyping projects. Although the isolation of PBMCs was consistent among sites, the measurement of DNA was difficult to harmonize. DNA repositories can be established in different regions of the world and produce similar amounts of high-quality DNA for a variety of high-throughput genotyping techniques. Furthermore, even with the distances and time necessary for transportation, highly efficient transformation of PBMCs is possible. For future studies/trials involving several laboratories in different locations, the T1DGC experience includes examples of protocols that may be applicable. In summary, T1DGC has developed protocols that would be of interest to any scientific organization attempting to overcome the logistical problems associated with studies/trials spanning multiple research facilities, located in different regions of the world.

  1. Identification of phosphorylethanolamine in 31P-NMR spectra of human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, A; Hørder, M; Jacobsen, J P

    1986-10-10

    The 31P-NMR spectrum of intact human peripheral blood lymphocytes contains a large unidentified peak in the phosphomonoester region. The pH dependency of the 31P-NMR chemical shift of this peak in perchloric acid extracts of peripheral blood lymphocytes was recorded. It was compared to the pH dependency of the chemical shift of phosphorylethanolamine, phosphorylcholine, and ribose 5-phosphate in model solutions. An excellent agreement was found between the behavior of phosphorylethanolamine and the unidentified peak. To further substantiate this assignment phosphorylethanolamine was added to extracts and the pH titrations were repeated. The added phosphorylethanolamine gave exactly the same chemical shift as the unidentified peak and no difference was observed with pH titrations. The concentration of phosphorylethanolamine in human peripheral blood lymphocytes was estimated by 31P NMR to be 2.4 mumol/10(9) cells (range 0.9-4.3/10(9) cells, n = 4).

  2. Determination of Chlorpyrifos in Human Blood by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhua Dai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method was developed for the qualitative and quantitative analyses of chlorpyrifos in human blood samples. The chlorpyrifos and parathion (internal standard in human blood were extracted with a mixed solvent of hexane and acetonitrile. Chlorpyrifos was well separated from the internal standard. The linear range of chlorpyrifos was 0.01–2 μg/ml in blood. The limit of detection and limit of quantification were estimated at 0.002 and 0.01 μg/ml, respectively. The inter- and intra-day precisions, accuracy, and recovery were assessed to verify this method. The results showed that the developed method is rapid, sensitive, and reliable. It is suitable for the determination of chlorpyrifos in forensic toxicological analysis and clinical diagnosis.

  3. Fish-oil supplementation induces antiinflammatory gene expression profiles in human blood mononuclear cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwens, M.; Rest, van de O.; Dellschaft, N.; Grootte Bromhaar, M.M.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Geleijnse, J.M.; Müller, M.R.; Afman, L.A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Polyunsaturated fatty acids can have beneficial effects on human immune cells, such as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). However, the mechanisms of action of polyunsaturated fatty acids on immune cells are still largely unknown. Objective: The objective was to examine the

  4. Interleukin 12 in part regulates gamma interferon release in human whole blood stimulated with Leptospira interrogans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Fost, Maaike; Hartskeerl, Rudy A.; Groenendijk, Martijn R.; van der Poll, Tom

    2003-01-01

    Heat-killed pathogenic Leptospira interrogans serovar rachmati induced the production of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and the IFN-gamma-inducing cytokines interleukin-12p40 (IL-12p40) and tumor necrosis factor alpha in human whole blood in vitro. The production of IFN-gamma was largely dependent on

  5. Proteins involved in the Vroman effect during exposure of human blood plasma to glass and polyethylene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turbill, P.; Beugeling, T.; Beugeling, T.; Poot, Andreas A.

    1996-01-01

    The amounts of fibrinogen adsorbed to glass from various human blood plasmas have been measured as a function of time. The plasmas were 11 single donor plasmas, pooled plasma, a single donor high molecular weight kininogen (HMWK)-deficient plasma and HMWK-deficient plasma, which had been

  6. Nocturnal variations in subcutaneous blood flow rate in lower leg of normal human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindrup, J H; Kastrup, J; Jørgensen, B

    1991-01-01

    Subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow rate was measured in the lower leg of 22 normal human subjects over 12- to 20-h ambulatory conditions. The 133Xe washout technique, portable CdTe(Cl) detectors, and a portable data storage unit were used. The tracer depot was applied on the medial aspect...

  7. A New Machine Classification Method Applied to Human Peripheral Blood Leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rorvig, Mark E.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Discusses pattern classification of images by computer and describes the Two Domain Method in which expert knowledge is acquired using multidimensional scaling of judgments of dissimilarities and linear mapping. An application of the Two Domain Method that tested its power to discriminate two patterns of human blood leukocyte distribution is…

  8. Toward Reliable Lipoprotein Particle Predictions from NMR Spectra of Human Blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monsonis Centelles, Sandra; Hoefsloot, Huub C.J.; Khakimov, Bekzod; Ebrahimi, Parvaneh; Lind, Mads V.; Kristensen, Mette; Roo, De Niels; Jacobs, Doris M.; Duynhoven, Van John; Cannet, Claire; Fang, Fang; Humpfer, Eberhard; Schäfer, Hartmut; Spraul, Manfred; Engelsen, Søren B.; Smilde, Age K.

    2017-01-01

    Lipoprotein profiling of human blood by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a rapid and promising approach to monitor health and disease states in medicine and nutrition. However, lack of standardization of measurement protocols has prevented the use of NMR-based lipoprotein

  9. Thrombocidins, microbicidal proteins from human blood platelets, are C-terminal deletion products of CXC chemokines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijgsveld, J.; Zaat, S. A.; Meeldijk, J.; van Veelen, P. A.; Fang, G.; Poolman, B.; Brandt, E.; Ehlert, J. E.; Kuijpers, A. J.; Engbers, G. H.; Feijen, J.; Dankert, J.

    2000-01-01

    Antibacterial proteins are components of the innate immune system found in many organisms and produced by a variety of cell types. Human blood platelets contain a number of antibacterial proteins in their alpha-granules that are released upon thrombin activation. The present study was designed to

  10. Low Temperature Irradiation Applied to Neutron Activation Analysis of Mercury In Human Whole Blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brune, D.

    1966-02-15

    The distribution of mercury in human whole blood has been studied by means of neutron activation analysis. During the irradiation procedure the samples were kept at low temperature by freezing them in a cooling device in order to prevent interferences caused by volatilization and contamination. The mercury activity was separated by means of distillation and ion exchange techniques.

  11. Immunomodulatory capacity of fungal proteins on the cytokine production of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurink, P.V.; Lull Noguera, C.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Wichers, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    Immunomodulation by fungal compounds can be determined by the capacity of the compounds to influence the cytokine production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC). These activities include mitogenicity, stimulation and activation of immune effector cells. Eight mushroom strains

  12. A quantitative flow cytometric assay for determining binding characteristics of chimeric, humanized and human antibodies in whole blood: proof of principle with rituximab and ofatumumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelberts, Patrick J; Badoil, Carole; Beurskens, Frank J; Boulay-Moine, Danièle; Grivel, Karine; Parren, Paul W H I; Moulard, Maxime

    2013-02-28

    Clinical successes of antibody-based drugs has led to extensive (pre-) clinical development of human(ized) monoclonal antibodies in a great number of diseases. The high specificity of targeted therapy with antibodies makes it ideally suited for personalized medicine approaches in which treatments needs are tailored to individual patients. One aspect of patient stratification pertains to the accurate determination of target occupancy and target expression to determine individual pharmacodynamic properties as well as the therapeutic window. The availability of reliable tools to measure target occupancy and expression on diseased and normal cells is therefore essential. Here, we evaluate a novel human antibody detection assay (Human-IgG Calibrator assay), which allows the flow cytometric quantification of therapeutic antibodies bound to the surface of cells circulating in whole blood. This assay not only permits the determination of the number of specific antibody bound per cell (sABC), but, when combined with quantification of exogenously added mouse antibody, also provides information on binding kinetics and antigen modulation. Our data indicate that the calibrator assay has all properties required for a pharmacodynamic tool to quantify target occupancy of chimeric, humanized and human therapeutic antibodies during therapy, as well as to collect valuable information on both antibody and antigen kinetics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Human whole-blood culture system for ex vivo characterization of designer-cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schukur, Lina; Geering, Barbara; Fussenegger, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Encapsulated designer cells implanted into mice are currently used to validate the efficacy of therapeutic gene networks for the diagnosis and treatment of various human diseases in preclinical research. Because many human conditions cannot be adequately replicated by animal models, complementary and alternative procedures to test future treatment strategies are required. Here we describe a novel approach utilizing an ex vivo human whole-blood culture system to validate synthetic biology-inspired designer cell-based treatment strategies. The viability and functionality of transgenic mammalian designer cells co-cultured with primary human immune cells were characterized. We demonstrated that transgenic mammalian designer cells required adequate insulation from the human blood microenvironment to maintain viability and functionality. The biomaterial alginate-(poly-l-lysine)-alginate used to encapsulate the transgenic designer cells did neither affect the viability of primary granulocytes and lymphocytes nor the functionality of lymphocytes. Additionally, alginate-encapsulated transgenic designer cells remained responsive to the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) from the whole-blood culture upon exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). TNF diffused into the alginate capsules, bound to the specific TNF receptors on the transgenic designer cells' surface and triggered the expression of the reporter gene SEAP (human placental secreted alkaline phosphatase) that was rewired to the TNF-specific signaling cascade. Human whole-blood culture systems can therefore be considered as valuable complementary assays to animal models for the validation of synthetic circuits in genetically modified mammalian cells and may speed up preclinical research in a world of personalized medicine. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. HANPP Collection: Human Appropriation of Net Primary Productivity (HANPP) by Country and Product

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Human Appropriation of Net Primary Productivity (HANPP) by Country and Product portion of the HANPP Collection contains tabular data on carbon-equivalents of...

  15. HANPP Collection: Human Appropriation of Net Primary Productivity as a Percentage of Net Primary Productivity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Human Appropriation of Net Primary Productivity (HANPP) as a Percentage of Net Primary Product (NPP) portion of the HANPP Collection represents a map identifying...

  16. 78 FR 8192 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request; Education and Human Resources Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request; Education and Human Resources Project... study will assess the implementation of resources, models, and technologies to determine how and why...

  17. Use of COTS Infrared Camera Arrays for Enhanced Human in the Loop Data Collection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Demonstrate use of Microsoft Kinect infrared cameras in the application of passive data collection during human-in- the-loop (HITL) tests. Low-cost COTS cameras are...

  18. Peripheral blood stem cell collection for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Practical implications after 200 consequent transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goren Sahin, Deniz; Arat, Mutlu

    2017-12-01

    Proper stem cell mobilization is one of the most important steps in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The aim of this paper is to share our 6 years' experience and provide practical clinical approaches particularly for stem cell mobilization and collection within the series of more than 200 successive allogeneic HSCT at our transplant center. Two hundred and seven consecutive patients who underwent allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation were included in this study. Age, sex, weight, complete blood counts, CD34+ cell counts, total collected amount of CD34+ cells, CD34+ cells per 10l processed, mobilization failure and adverse events were reviewed. Median age was 40.2±12.9 (21-68) years and 46.4±13.4 (17-67) years for donors and patients, respectively. The number of donors who had undergone adequate CD34+ cell harvesting and completed the procedure on the fourth day was 67 (32.8% of all patients). Only 12 patients required cell apheresis both on day 5 and 6. Apheresis was completed on day 4 and/or day 5 in 94.2% of all our donors. There was no significant association between CD34+ stem cell volume and age, gender and weight values of donors. Mobilization failure was not seen in our series. G-CSF is highly effective in 1/3 of the donors on the 4th day in order to collect enough number of stem cells. We propose that peripheral stem cell collection might start on day 4th of G-CSF treatment for avoiding G-CSF related side effects and complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification and validation of suitable endogenous reference genes for gene expression studies in human peripheral blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Renee J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression studies require appropriate normalization methods. One such method uses stably expressed reference genes. Since suitable reference genes appear to be unique for each tissue, we have identified an optimal set of the most stably expressed genes in human blood that can be used for normalization. Methods Whole-genome Affymetrix Human 2.0 Plus arrays were examined from 526 samples of males and females ages 2 to 78, including control subjects and patients with Tourette syndrome, stroke, migraine, muscular dystrophy, and autism. The top 100 most stably expressed genes with a broad range of expression levels were identified. To validate the best candidate genes, we performed quantitative RT-PCR on a subset of 10 genes (TRAP1, DECR1, FPGS, FARP1, MAPRE2, PEX16, GINS2, CRY2, CSNK1G2 and A4GALT, 4 commonly employed reference genes (GAPDH, ACTB, B2M and HMBS and PPIB, previously reported to be stably expressed in blood. Expression stability and ranking analysis were performed using GeNorm and NormFinder algorithms. Results Reference genes were ranked based on their expression stability and the minimum number of genes needed for nomalization as calculated using GeNorm showed that the fewest, most stably expressed genes needed for acurate normalization in RNA expression studies of human whole blood is a combination of TRAP1, FPGS, DECR1 and PPIB. We confirmed the ranking of the best candidate control genes by using an alternative algorithm (NormFinder. Conclusion The reference genes identified in this study are stably expressed in whole blood of humans of both genders with multiple disease conditions and ages 2 to 78. Importantly, they also have different functions within cells and thus should be expressed independently of each other. These genes should be useful as normalization genes for microarray and RT-PCR whole blood studies of human physiology, metabolism and disease.

  20. Damage of chromosoms under irradiation of human blood lymphocytes and development of bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemetun, O V

    2016-12-01

    the research the distribution of radiation induced damages among chromosomes and their bands in irra diated in vitro human blood lymphocytes and in unirradiated bystander cells.Material and methods of research: cultivation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes by semi micromethod D.A. Hungerford, modeling of radiation induced bystander effect in mixed cultures consisting of irradiated in vitro and non irradiated blood lymphocytes from persons of different gender, GTG staining of metaphase chromosomes and their cytogenetic analysis. Break points in chromosomes under the formation of aberrations were identified in exposed in vitro human peripheral blood lymphocytes in doses 0.25 Gy (95 breaks in 1248 cells) and 1.0 Gy (227 breaks in 726 cells) and in non irradiated bystander cells under their joint cultivation with irradiated in vitro human lymphocytes (51 breaks in 1137 cells at irradiation of adjacent populations of lymphocytes in dose 0.25 Gy and 75 breaks in 1321 cells at irradiation of adjacent population of lymphocytes in a dose 1.0 Gy). The distribution of injuries among the chromo somes and their bands was investigated. in radiation exposed in vitro human peripheral blood lymphocytes as well as in bystander cells the fre quency of damaged bands and number of breaks which localized in them exceeded the control value (p bystander effect, chromosomes were damaged according to their relative length. Location of bands with increasing number of breaks coincided with the «hot spots» of chromosome damage following irradiation and fragile sites. More sensitive to damage were G negative euchromatin chromosome bands, in which were localized 82 88 % breaks. Damageability of telomeric regions in the irradiated cells had no significant difference from the control, while in bystander cells was lower than control value (p < 0.05). O. V. Shemetun.

  1. Receptor expression and responsiveness of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to a human cytomegalovirus encoded CC chemokine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qi; Xu, Jun; Gao, Huihui; Tao, Ran; Li, Wei; Shang, Shiqiang; Gu, Weizhong

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus is a ubiquitous pathogen that infects the majority of the world's population. After long period of time co-evolving with human being, this pathogen has developed several strategies to evade host immune surveillance. One of the major trick is encoding homologous to those of the host organism or stealing host cellular genes that have significant functions in immune system. To date, we have found several viral immune analogous which include G protein coupled receptor, class I major histocompatibility complex and chemokine. Chemokine is a small group of molecules which is defined by the presence of four cysteines in highly conserved region. The four kinds of chemokines (C, CC, CXC, and CX3C) are classified based on the arrangement of 1 or 2 N-terminal cysteine residues. UL128 protein is one of the analogous that encoded by human cytomegalovirus that has similar amino acid sequences to the human CC chemokine. It has been proved to be one of the essential particles that involved in human cytomegalovirus entry into epithelial/endothelial cells as well as macrophages. It is also the target of potent neutralizing antibodies in human cytomegalovirus-seropositive individuals. We had demonstrated the chemotactic trait of UL128 protein in our previous study. Recombinant UL128 in vitro has the ability to attract monocytes to the infection region and enhances peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation by activating the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. However, the way that this viral encoded chemokine interacting with peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the detailed mechanism that involving the virus entry into host cells keeps unknown. Here we performed in vitro investigation into the effects of UL128 protein on peripheral blood mononuclear cell's activation and receptor binding, which may help us further understand the immunomodulatory function of UL128 protein as well as human cytomegalovirus diffusion mechanism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda

  2. An automated discontinuous venous blood sampling system for ex vivo glucose determination in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Roland; Feichtner, Franz; Köhler, Hans; Bodenlenz, Manfred; Plank, Johannes; Wutte, Andrea; Mader, Julia K; Ellmerer, Martin; Hainisch, Reinhard; Pieber, Thomas R; Schaupp, Lukas

    2009-01-01

    Intensive insulin therapy reduces mortality and morbidity in critically ill patients but places great demands on medical staff who must take frequent blood samples for the determination of glucose levels. A cost-effective solution to this resourcing problem could be provided by an effective and reliable automated blood sampling (ABS) system suitable for ex vivo glucose determination. The primary study aim was to compare the performance of a prototype ABS system with a manual reference system over a 30 h sampling period under controlled conditions in humans. Two venous cannulae were inserted to connect the ABS system and the reference system. Blood samples were taken with both systems at 15, 30, and 60 min intervals and analyzed using a Beckman glucose analyzer. During the study, blood glucose levels were altered through four meal ingestions. The median Pearson coefficient of correlation between manually and automatically withdrawn blood samples was 0.976 (0.953-0.996). The system error was -3.327 ± 5.546% (-6.03-0.49). Through Clark error grid analysis, 420 data pairs were analyzed, showing that 98.6% of the data were in zone A and 1.4% were in zone B. Insulin titration error grid analysis revealed an acceptable treatment in 100% of cases. A 17.5-fold reduction in the occurrence of blood-withdrawal failures through occluded catheters was moreover achieved by the added implementation in the ABS system of a "keep vein open" saline infusion. Our study showed that the ABS system described provides a user-friendly, reliable automated means for reproducible and accurate blood sampling from a peripheral vein for blood glucose determination and thus represents a promising alternative to frequent manual blood sampling. © Diabetes Technology Society

  3. Lack of enhancing effect of human anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) antibody on HIV-1 infection of human blood monocytes and peritoneal macrophages.

    OpenAIRE

    Shadduck, P P; Weinberg, J B; Haney, A. F.; Bartlett, J. A.; Langlois, A J; Bolognesi, D P; Matthews, T J

    1991-01-01

    The influence of human anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) antibody on HIV-1 infection of freshly isolated normal human peritoneal macrophages and blood monocytes was examined. Each of 14 HIV antibody-positive human serum samples was found to block the infection of four virus isolates (human T-cell lymphotropic virus type IIIBa-L [HTLV-IIIBa-L], HTLV-IIIB, D.U. 6587-7, and D.U. 7887-8) at serum dilutions ranging from 10(-1) to 10(-2). Three of these isolates (HTLV-IIIBa-L, D.U. 6...

  4. Two small lymphocyte subpopulations in human peripheral blood. I. Purification and surface marker profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hokland, M; Hokland, P; Heron, I

    1978-01-01

    By means of simple rosette sedimentation methods two subsets from human peripheral blood lymphocytes have been isolated: (1) (E, Fc)- and (2) (E, Ig)-. The first subset was obtained by centrifuging suspensions of macrophage-depleted PBL in which E and EA rosettes had been allowed to form simultan...... of small subsets of human lymphocytes are effective and easy to perform and might be used to purify cells for functional studies. Udgivelsesdato: 1978-null......By means of simple rosette sedimentation methods two subsets from human peripheral blood lymphocytes have been isolated: (1) (E, Fc)- and (2) (E, Ig)-. The first subset was obtained by centrifuging suspensions of macrophage-depleted PBL in which E and EA rosettes had been allowed to form...

  5. Primary cilia are present on human blood and bone marrow cells and mediate Hedgehog signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mohan; Chaudhry, Parvesh; Merchant, Akil A

    2016-12-01

    Primary cilia are nonmotile, microtubule-based organelles that are present on the cellular membrane of all eukaryotic cells. Functional cilia are required for the response to developmental signaling pathways such as Hedgehog (Hh) and Wnt/β-catenin. Although the Hh pathway has been shown to be active in leukemia and other blood cancers, there have been no reports describing the presence of primary cilia in human blood or leukemia cells. In the present study, we show that nearly all human blood and bone marrow cells have primary cilia (97-99%). In contrast, primary cilia on AML cell lines (KG1, KG1a, and K562) were less frequent (10-36% of cells) and were often shorter and dysmorphic, with less well-defined basal bodies. Finally, we show that treatment of blood cells with the Hh pathway ligand Sonic Hedgehog (SHh) causes translocation of Smoothened (SMO) to the primary cilia and activation of Hh target genes, demonstrating that primary cilia in blood cells are functional and participate in Hh signaling. Loss of primary cilia on leukemia cells may have important implications for aberrant pathway activation and response to SMO inhibitors currently in clinical development. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Normal variations in the isotopic composition of metabolically relevant transition metals in human blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Heghe, L.; Cloquet, C.; Vanhaecke, F.

    2012-04-01

    Cu, Fe and Zn are transition metals with great catalytic, structural and regulating importance in the human body. Hence, an aberrant metabolism of these elements can have serious implications on the health of a person. It is assumed that, due to differences in isotope fractionation, the isotopic composition of these elements in whole blood of patients can be different from that in blood of healthy subjects. Therefore, isotopic analysis of the element affected by the disease can be a promising approach for early diagnosis. A method for isotopic analysis of Cu, Fe and Zn in human whole blood was developed. The simultaneous chromatographic isolation of these elements and the conditions for isotope ratio measurement via multi-collector ICP - mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) were optimized. So far, only whole blood of supposedly healthy volunteers (reference population) was analyzed. Results for Fe confirmed the known differences in isotopic composition between male and female blood. It is also shown that other parameters can have influence as well, e.g., the isotopic composition of Zn seems to be governed by the diet.

  7. A comprehensive, cell specific microRNA catalogue of human peripheral blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juzenas, Simonas; Venkatesh, Geetha; Hübenthal, Matthias; Hoeppner, Marc P; Du, Zhipei Gracie; Paulsen, Maren; Rosenstiel, Philip; Senger, Philipp; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin; Keller, Andreas; Kupcinskas, Limas; Franke, Andre; Hemmrich-Stanisak, Georg

    2017-09-19

    With this study, we provide a comprehensive reference dataset of detailed miRNA expression profiles from seven types of human peripheral blood cells (NK cells, B lymphocytes, cytotoxic T lymphocytes, T helper cells, monocytes, neutrophils and erythrocytes), serum, exosomes and whole blood. The peripheral blood cells from buffy coats were typed and sorted using FACS/MACS. The overall dataset was generated from 450 small RNA libraries using high-throughput sequencing. By employing a comprehensive bioinformatics and statistical analysis, we show that 3' trimming modifications as well as composition of 3' added non-templated nucleotides are distributed in a lineage-specific manner-the closer the hematopoietic progenitors are, the higher their similarities in sequence variation of the 3' end. Furthermore, we define the blood cell-specific miRNA and isomiR expression patterns and identify novel cell type specific miRNA candidates. The study provides the most comprehensive contribution to date towards a complete miRNA catalogue of human peripheral blood, which can be used as a reference for future studies. The dataset has been deposited in GEO and also can be explored interactively following this link: http://134.245.63.235/ikmb-tools/bloodmiRs. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Blood volume fraction imaging of the human lung using intravoxel incoherent motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carinci, Flavio; Meyer, Cord; Phys, Dipl; Breuer, Felix A; Triphan, Simon; Choli, Morwan; Phys, Dipl; Jakob, Peter M

    2015-05-01

    To present a technique for non-contrast-enhanced in vivo imaging of the blood volume fraction of the human lung. The technique is based on the intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) approach. However, a substantial novelty is introduced here: the need for external diffusion sensitizing gradients is eliminated by exploiting the internal magnetic field gradients typical of the lung tissue, due to magnetic susceptibility differences at air/tissue interfaces. A single shot turbo spin-echo sequence with stimulated-echo preparation and electrocardiograph synchronization was used for acquisition. Two images were acquired in a single breath-hold of 10 seconds duration: one reference image and one blood-suppressed image. The blood volume fraction was quantified using a two-compartment signal decay model, as given by the IVIM theory. Experiments were performed at 1.5T in eight healthy volunteers. Values of the blood volume fraction obtained within the lung parenchyma (36 ± 16%) are in good agreement with previous reports, obtained using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (33%), and show relatively good reproducibility. The presented technique offers a robust way to quantify the blood volume fraction of the human lung parenchyma without using contrast agents. Image acquisition can be accomplished in a single breath-hold and could be suitable for clinical applications on patients with lung diseases. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2015;41:1454-1464. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Balancing Human and Inter-Agent Influences for Shared Control of Bio-Inspired Collectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    UT USA ldsrogan@gmail.com, mike @cs.byu.edu Abstract—Human interaction with bio-inspired collectives provides an interesting setting for studying shared...successfully shape the col- lective. Stable switches between collective states resulted when between-partition and within-partition connectivities were bal

  10. Social collective intelligence: combining the powers of humans and machines to build a smarter society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miorandi, Daniele; Maltese, Vincenzo; Rovatsos, Michael; Nijholt, Antinus; Stewart, James

    2014-01-01

    The book focuses on Social Collective Intelligence, a term used to denote a class of socio-technical systems that combine, in a coordinated way, the strengths of humans, machines and collectives in terms of competences, knowledge and problem solving capabilities with the communication, computing and

  11. 75 FR 11940 - Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer; Information Collection; Ancestry and Ethnicity Data...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... NATIONAL INTELLIGENCE Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer; Information Collection; Ancestry and...: Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI). ACTION: Information Collection Activities... instrument is to assess the IC's progress in recruitment and retention and not for equal employment...

  12. Flow cytometric assay for analysis of cytotoxic effects of potential drugs on human peripheral blood leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieschke, Kathleen; Mittag, Anja; Golab, Karolina; Bocsi, Jozsef; Pierzchalski, Arkadiusz; Kamysz, Wojciech; Tarnok, Attila

    2014-03-01

    Toxicity test of new chemicals belongs to the first steps in the drug screening, using different cultured cell lines. However, primary human cells represent the human organism better than cultured tumor derived cell lines. We developed a very gentle toxicity assay for isolation and incubation of human peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and tested it using different bioactive oligopeptides (OP). Effects of different PBL isolation methods (red blood cell lysis; Histopaque isolation among others), different incubation tubes (e.g. FACS tubes), anticoagulants and blood sources on PBL viability were tested using propidium iodide-exclusion as viability measure (incubation time: 60 min, 36°C) and flow cytometry. Toxicity concentration and time-depended effects (10-60 min, 36 °C, 0-100 μg /ml of OP) on human PBL were analyzed. Erythrocyte lysis by hypotonic shock (dH2O) was the fastest PBL isolation method with highest viability (>85%) compared to NH4Cl-Lysis (49%). Density gradient centrifugation led to neutrophil granulocyte cell loss. Heparin anticoagulation resulted in higher viability than EDTA. Conical 1.5 mL and 2 mL micro-reaction tubes (both polypropylene (PP)) had the highest viability (99% and 97%) compared to other tubes, i.e. three types of 5.0 mL round-bottom tubes PP (opaque-60%), PP (blue-62%), Polystyrene (PS-64%). Viability of PBL did not differ between venous and capillary blood. A gentle reproducible preparation and analytical toxicity-assay for human PBL was developed and evaluated. Using our assay toxicity, time-course, dose-dependence and aggregate formation by OP could be clearly differentiated and quantified. This novel assay enables for rapid and cost effective multiparametric toxicological screening and pharmacological testing on primary human PBL and can be adapted to high-throughput-screening.°z

  13. Basement Membrane-Rich Organoids with Functional Human Blood Vessels Are Permissive Niches for Human Breast Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Periáñez, Rodrigo; Molina-Privado, Irene; Rojo, Federico; Guijarro-Muñoz, Irene; Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Zazo, Sandra; Compte, Marta; Álvarez-Cienfuegos, Ana; Cuesta, Ángel M.; Sánchez-Martín, David; Álvarez-Méndez, Ana M.; Sanz, Laura; Álvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Metastasic breast cancer is the leading cause of death by malignancy in women worldwide. Tumor metastasis is a multistep process encompassing local invasion of cancer cells at primary tumor site, intravasation into the blood vessel, survival in systemic circulation, and extravasation across the endothelium to metastasize at a secondary site. However, only a small percentage of circulating cancer cells initiate metastatic colonies. This fact, together with the inaccessibility and structural complexity of target tissues has hampered the study of the later steps in cancer metastasis. In addition, most data are derived from in vivo models where critical steps such as intravasation/extravasation of human cancer cells are mediated by murine endothelial cells. Here, we developed a new mouse model to study the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying late steps of the metastatic cascade. We have shown that a network of functional human blood vessels can be formed by co-implantation of human endothelial cells and mesenchymal cells, embedded within a reconstituted basement membrane-like matrix and inoculated subcutaneously into immunodeficient mice. The ability of circulating cancer cells to colonize these human vascularized organoids was next assessed in an orthotopic model of human breast cancer by bioluminescent imaging, molecular techniques and immunohistological analysis. We demonstrate that disseminated human breast cancer cells efficiently colonize organoids containing a functional microvessel network composed of human endothelial cells, connected to the mouse circulatory system. Human breast cancer cells could be clearly detected at different stages of the metastatic process: initial arrest in the human microvasculature, extravasation, and growth into avascular micrometastases. This new mouse model may help us to map the extravasation process with unprecedented detail, opening the way for the identification of relevant targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID

  14. Basement membrane-rich organoids with functional human blood vessels are permissive niches for human breast cancer metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Fernández-Periáñez

    Full Text Available Metastatic breast cancer is the leading cause of death by malignancy in women worldwide. Tumor metastasis is a multistep process encompassing local invasion of cancer cells at primary tumor site, intravasation into the blood vessel, survival in systemic circulation, and extravasation across the endothelium to metastasize at a secondary site. However, only a small percentage of circulating cancer cells initiate metastatic colonies. This fact, together with the inaccessibility and structural complexity of target tissues has hampered the study of the later steps in cancer metastasis. In addition, most data are derived from in vivo models where critical steps such as intravasation/extravasation of human cancer cells are mediated by murine endothelial cells. Here, we developed a new mouse model to study the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying late steps of the metastatic cascade. We have shown that a network of functional human blood vessels can be formed by co-implantation of human endothelial cells and mesenchymal cells, embedded within a reconstituted basement membrane-like matrix and inoculated subcutaneously into immunodeficient mice. The ability of circulating cancer cells to colonize these human vascularized organoids was next assessed in an orthotopic model of human breast cancer by bioluminescent imaging, molecular techniques and immunohistological analysis. We demonstrate that disseminated human breast cancer cells efficiently colonize organoids containing a functional microvessel network composed of human endothelial cells, connected to the mouse circulatory system. Human breast cancer cells could be clearly detected at different stages of the metastatic process: initial arrest in the human microvasculature, extravasation, and growth into avascular micrometastases. This new mouse model may help us to map the extravasation process with unprecedented detail, opening the way for the identification of relevant targets for therapeutic

  15. Susceptibility and response of human blood monocyte subsets to primary dengue virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok Loon Wong

    Full Text Available Human blood monocytes play a central role in dengue infections and form the majority of virus infected cells in the blood. Human blood monocytes are heterogeneous and divided into CD16(- and CD16(+ subsets. Monocyte subsets play distinct roles during disease, but it is not currently known if monocyte subsets differentially contribute to dengue protection and pathogenesis. Here, we compared the susceptibility and response of the human CD16(- and CD16(+ blood monocyte subsets to primary dengue virus in vitro. We found that both monocyte subsets were equally susceptible to dengue virus (DENV2 NGC, and capable of supporting the initial production of new infective virus particles. Both monocyte subsets produced anti-viral factors, including IFN-α, CXCL10 and TRAIL. However, CD16(+ monocytes were the major producers of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in response to dengue virus, including IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, CCL2, 3 and 4. The susceptibility of both monocyte subsets to infection was increased after IL-4 treatment, but this increase was more profound for the CD16(+ monocyte subset, particularly at early time points after virus exposure. These findings reveal the differential role that monocyte subsets might play during dengue disease.

  16. In vitro study of thimerosal reactions in human whole blood and plasma surrogate samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trümpler, Stefan; Meermann, Björn; Nowak, Sascha; Buscher, Wolfgang; Karst, Uwe; Sperling, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Because of its bactericidal and fungicidal properties, thimerosal is used as a preservative in drugs and vaccines and is thus deliberately injected into the human body. In aqueous environment, it decomposes into thiosalicylic acid and the ethylmercury cation. This organomercury fragment is a potent neurotoxin and is suspected to have similar toxicity and bioavailability like the methylmercury cation. In this work, human whole blood and physiological simulation solutions were incubated with thimerosal to investigate its behaviour and binding partners in the blood stream. Inductively coupled plasma with optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) was used for total mercury determination in different blood fractions, while liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to electrospray ionisation time-of-flight (ESI-TOF) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) provided information on the individual mercury species in plasma surrogate samples. Analogous behaviour of methylmercury and ethylmercury species in human blood was shown and an ethylmercury-glutathione adduct was identified. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Elevated Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Gene Expression in Blood Cells Associated with Chronic Arsenic Exposure in Inner Mongolia, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Jinyao; Xia, Yajuan; Ning, Zhixiong; Wade, Timothy J.; Mumford, Judy L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Arsenic exposure is associated with human cancer. Telomerase-containing human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) can extend telomeres of chromosomes, delay senescence, and promote cell proliferation leading to tumorigenesis. Objective The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of As on hTERT mRNA expression in humans and in vitro. Method A total of 324 Inner Mongolia residents who have been exposed to As via drinking water participated in this study. Water and toenail samples were collected and analyzed for As. Blood samples were quantified for hTERT mRNA expression using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The hTERT mRNA levels were linked to water and nail As concentrations and skin hyperkeratosis. Human epidermal keratinocytes were treated with arsenite to assess effects on cell viability and hTERT expression in vitro. Results hTERT mRNA expression levels were significantly associated with As concentrations of water (p insults by As and may also indicate that As may function as a tumor promoter in carcinogenesis in humans. PMID:19337508

  18. Determination of natural in vivo noble-gas concentrations in human blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yama Tomonaga

    Full Text Available Although the naturally occurring atmospheric noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe possess great potential as tracers for studying gas exchange in living beings, no direct analytical technique exists for simultaneously determining the absolute concentrations of these noble gases in body fluids in vivo. In this study, using human blood as an example, the absolute concentrations of all stable atmospheric noble gases were measured simultaneously by combining and adapting two analytical methods recently developed for geochemical research purposes. The partition coefficients determined between blood and air, and between blood plasma and red blood cells, agree with values from the literature. While the noble-gas concentrations in the plasma agree rather well with the expected solubility equilibrium concentrations for air-saturated water, the red blood cells are characterized by a distinct supersaturation pattern, in which the gas excess increases in proportion to the atomic mass of the noble-gas species, indicating adsorption on to the red blood cells. This study shows that the absolute concentrations of noble gases in body fluids can be easily measured using geochemical techniques that rely only on standard materials and equipment, and for which the underlying concepts are already well established in the field of noble-gas geochemistry.

  19. Dried blood spots, valid screening for viral hepatitis and human immunodeficiency virus in real-life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mössner, Belinda K; Staugaard, Benjamin; Jensen, Janne

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To detect chronic hepatitis B (CHB), chronic hepatitis C (CHC) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections in dried blood spot (DBS) and compare these samples to venous blood sampling in real-life. METHODS: We included prospective patients with known viral infections from drug treatment......, but correctly classified 95% of the anti-HCV-positive patients with chronic and past infections. Anti-HBc and anti-HBS showed low sensitivity in DBS (68% and 42%). CONCLUSION: DBS sampling, combined with an automated analysis system, is a feasible screening method to diagnose chronic viral hepatitis and HIV...

  20. Shilajit: evalution of its effects on blood chemistry of normal human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Praveen; Jha, Jagrati; Shrinivas, V; Dwivedi, L K; Suresh, P; Sinha, M

    2003-10-01

    The effect of Shilajit on blood chemistry was studied in normal human volunteers. Administration of two gms of Shilajit for 45 days did not produced any significant change in physical parameters i.e. blood pressure, pulse rate and body weight and similarly no charge was observed in hematological parameters. A signification reduction in Serum Triglycerides, Serum cholesterol with simultaneous improvement in HDL Cholesterol was seen, besides Shilajit also improved antioxidant status of volunteers. Results of study suggest hypolipidemic and strong antioxidant activity of Shilajit.

  1. A New Chemical Approach to Human ABO Histo-Blood Group Type 2 Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Hara

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A new chemical approach to synthesizing human ABO histo-blood type 2 antigenic determinants was developed. N-Phthaloyl-protected lactosaminyl thioglycoside derived from lactulose via the Heyns rearrangement was employed to obtain a type 2 core disaccharide. Use of this scheme lowered the overall number of reaction steps. Stereoselective construction of the α-galactosaminide/galactoside found in A- and B-antigens, respectively, was achieved by using a unique di-tert-butylsilylene-directed α-glycosylation method. The proposed synthetic scheme provides an alternative to existing procedures for preparing ABO blood group antigens.

  2. Volume-dependent K+ transport in rabbit red blood cells comparison with oxygenated human SS cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Rohil, N.; Jennings, M.L.

    1989-07-01

    In this study the volume-dependent or N-ethylmaleimide (NEM)-stimulated, ouabain-insensitive K+ influx and efflux were measured with the tracer 86Rb+ in rabbit red blood cells. The purpose of the work was to examine the rabbit as a potential model for cell volume regulation in human SS red blood cells and also to investigate the relationship between the NEM-reactive sulfhydryl group(s) and the signal by which cell swelling activates the transport. Ouabain-resistant K+ efflux and influx increase nearly threefold in cells swollen hypotonically by 15%. Pretreatment with 2 mM NEM stimulates efflux 5-fold and influx 10-fold (each measured in an isotonic medium). The ouabain-resistant K+ efflux was dependent on the major anion in the medium. The anion dependence of K+ efflux in swollen or NEM-stimulated cells was as follows: Br- greater than Cl- much greater than NO3- = acetate. The magnitudes of both the swelling- and the NEM-stimulated fluxes are much higher in young cells (density separated but excluding reticulocytes) than in older cells. Swelling- or NEM-stimulated K+ efflux in rabbit red blood cells was inhibited 50% by 1 mM furosemide, and the inhibitory potency of furosemide was enhanced by extracellular K+, as is known to be true for human AA and low-K+ sheep red blood cells. The swelling-stimulated flux in both rabbit and human SS cells has a pH optimum at approximately 7.4. We conclude that rabbit red blood cells are a good model for swelling-stimulated K+ transport in human SS cells.

  3. 'Doing good by proxy': human-animal kinship and the 'donation' of canine blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashall, Vanessa; Hobson-West, Pru

    2017-07-01

    This article demonstrates the relevance of animals to medical sociology by arguing that pet owners' accounts of veterinary decision-making can highlight key sociological themes which are important to both human and animal health. Based on semi-structured interviews, the article argues that interspecies 'kinship' allows for the extension of sociological claims regarding altruism, self-interest and mutuality from human blood donation to companion animal blood 'donation'. Furthermore, this study extends sociological understanding of the human-animal bond by showing how the dog's status as kin meant they were expected to donate blood, and that the act of donation itself represents an important opportunity for family 'display'. However, owners who do not or cannot donate blood themselves describe pet blood donation as an opportunity to lessen associated feelings of guilt or obligation through 'doing good by proxy'. These findings raise critical sociological and ethical questions concerning the risks and benefits of donation, and for how we understand third-party decision making. Finally, the article argues for the close entanglement of human and animal health, and concludes that sociologists of health and medicine should explore the radical possibility that decision-making in healthcare more generally might be influenced by experiences at the veterinary clinic, and vice versa. (A Virtual Abstract of this paper can be viewed at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_979cmCmR9rLrKuD7z0ycA). © 2017 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Foundation for SHIL.

  4. Inducing Acute Traumatic Coagulopathy In Vitro: The Effects of Activated Protein C on Healthy Human Whole Blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M Howard

    Full Text Available Acute traumatic coagulopathy has been associated with shock and tissue injury, and may be mediated via activation of the protein C pathway. Patients with acute traumatic coagulopathy have prolonged PT and PTT, and decreased activity of factors V and VIII; they are also hypocoagulable by thromboelastometry (ROTEM and other viscoelastic assays. To test the etiology of this phenomenon, we hypothesized that such coagulopathy could be induced in vitro in healthy human blood with the addition of activated protein C (aPC.Whole blood was collected from 20 healthy human subjects, and was "spiked" with increasing concentrations of purified human aPC (control, 75, 300, 2000 ng/mL. PT/PTT, factor activity assays, and ROTEM were performed on each sample. Mixed effect regression modeling was performed to assess the association of aPC concentration with PT/PTT, factor activity, and ROTEM parameters.In all subjects, increasing concentrations of aPC produced ROTEM tracings consistent with traumatic coagulopathy. ROTEM EXTEM parameters differed significantly by aPC concentration, with stepwise prolongation of clotting time (CT and clot formation time (CFT, decreased alpha angle (α, impaired early clot formation (a10 and a20, and reduced maximum clot firmness (MCF. PT and PTT were significantly prolonged at higher aPC concentrations, with corresponding significant decreases in factor V and VIII activity.A phenotype of acute traumatic coagulopathy can be induced in healthy blood by the in vitro addition of aPC alone, as evidenced by viscoelastic measures and confirmed by conventional coagulation assays and factor activity. This may lend further mechanistic insight to the etiology of coagulation abnormalities in trauma, supporting the central role of the protein C pathway. Our findings also represent a model for future investigations in the diagnosis and treatment of acute traumatic coagulopathy.

  5. New approach to isolate mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) from human umbilical cord blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Issam; Magd, Salah A; Eremin, Oleg; El-Sheemy, Mohamed

    2012-07-01

    HUCB (human umbilical cord blood) has been frequently used in clinical allogeneic HSC (haemopoietic stem cell) transplant. However, HUCB is poorly recognized as a rich source of MSC (mesenchymal stem cell). The aim of this study has been to establish a new method for isolating large number of MSC from HUCB to recognize it as a good source of MSC. HUCB samples were collected from women following their elective caesarean section. The new method (Clot Spot method) was carried out by explanting HUCB samples in mesencult complete medium and maintained in 37°C, in a 5% CO2 and air incubator. MSC presence was established by quantitative and qualitative immunophenotyping of cells and using FITC attached to MSC phenotypic markers (CD29, CD73, CD44 and CD105). Haematopoietic antibodies (CD34 and CD45) were used as negative control. MSC differentiation was examined in neurogenic and adipogenic media. Immunocytochemistry was carried out for the embryonic markers: SOX2 (sex determining region Y-box 2), OLIG-4 (oligodendrocyte-4) and FABP-4 (fatty acid binding protein-4). The new method was compared with the conventional Rosset Sep method. MSC cultures using the Clot Spot method showed 3-fold increase in proliferation rate compared with conventional method. Also, the cells showed high expression of MSC markers CD29, CD73, CD44 and CD105, but lacked the expression of specific HSC markers (CD34 and CD45). The isolated MSC showed some differentiation by expressing the neurogenic (SOX2 and Olig4) and adipogenic (FABP-4) markers respectively. In conclusion, HUCB is a good source of MSC using this new technique.

  6. Elastolytic activity of human blood monocytes characterized by a new monoclonal antibody against human leucocyte elastase. Relationship to rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, H S; Christensen, L D

    1990-01-01

    The leucocyte elastase of human blood monocytes was investigated by applying a new monoclonal antibody which did not block the enzyme activity against elastin. In a fixed population of mononuclear cells (MNC) and using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), the human leucocyte elastase (HLE......) antibody identified a subgroup of CD14+ cells which contained all the elastase activity and which could be blocked by a specific chloromethylketone elastase inhibitor. By anti-CD14 labelling the HLE positive cells were identified as monocytes and amounted to 88% of this cell type (median: range 72...

  7. EFFECT OF PLANT LECTINS ON HUMAN BLOOD GROUP ANTIGENS WITH SPECIAL FOCUS ON PLANT FOODS AND JUICES

    OpenAIRE

    B. Venkata Raman; B. Sravani; P. Phani Rekha; K.V.N. Lalitha; B. Narasimha Rao

    2012-01-01

    Different plant lectins have been studied for lectin binding activity on ABO blood group system individually to study their suitability for consumption. 45% of plants were found to show blood group agglutination activity against A, B, AB and O groups. These results showed more suitability for consumption of investigated plants and their products to entire human population. Data also alarming human to be more careful about the plant lectins reacting with blood groups as the similar reactions ...

  8. Effectiveness of PCR and Immunofluorescence Techniques for Detecting Human Cytomegalovirus in Blood and Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roży, A; Duk, K; Szumna, B; Skrońska, P; Gawryluk, D; Chorostowska-Wynimko, J

    Current diagnostic methods allow a rapid and reliable detection of active human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) infection by identifying the presence of pp65 CMV antigen or CMV DNA in peripheral blood and affected organs. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of CMV detection in blood and organ-specific biological material, such as bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), by comparing two standard diagnostic methods, immunofluorescence (IF) and the real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We evaluated 25 patients with concomitant respiratory disease who were referred to our hospital for diagnosis due to suspected acute CMV infection. The presence of hCMV was concomitantly evaluated by IF and PCR in 16 peripheral blood samples. In two patients, we observed positive results for both IF and PCR, and in two other patients the results were discordant. Of 11 patients, CMV DNA was detected in six BALF samples, and in one blood plasma sample. Real-time PCR detected CMV DNA in 54.6 % of BALF samples and 12.0 % of blood samples, while indirect IF testing confirmed antigenemia in 12.5 % of blood samples. The results from our study suggest that the IF method is as effective as PCR for detecting an ongoing CMV infection in blood samples. However, real-time PCR was much more effective at detecting CMV DNA in BALF compared to blood samples. Our results suggest that the biological material being tested during CMV diagnosis should be derived directly from the virally infected organ(s).

  9. PCDD/F and dioxin-like PCB in human blood and milk from German mothers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittsiepe, J.; Schrey, P.; Lemm, F.; Wilhelm, M. [Ruhr-Univ. Bochum, Abt. fuer Hygiene, Sozial- und Umweltmedizin (Germany); Fuerst, P. [Chemisches Landes- und Staatliches Veterinaeruntersuchungsamt, Muenster (Germany); Kraft, M. [Ministerium fuer Umwelt und Naturschutz, Landwirtschaft und Verbraucherschutz des Landes Nordrhein-Westfalen, Duesseldorf (Germany); Eberwein, G. [Landesumweltamt Nordrhein-Westfalen, Essen (Germany); Winneke, G. [Medizinisches Inst. fuer Umwelthygiene an der Heinrich-Heine Univ. Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2004-09-15

    Human biomonitoring of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofuranes (PCDD/F) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) is done by analyzing both blood and milk samples. With reference to calculation of Toxicity Equivalents (TEq) as published by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1998 determination of 17 PCDD/F congeners together with 4 non- and 8 mono-ortho PCB congeners is the preferred method. In contrast to data on PCDD/F only little is known on background levels of dioxin-like PCB in human blood or milk samples. In the present study we report on PCDD/F and PCB levels in human blood samples of pregnant women living in an industrialized area of Germany and of human milk samples from the same women taken in the first weeks after birth. The investigations demonstrate the current background levels found in Germany, make a contribution for the assessment of preand postnatal exposure of infants and show correlations between the two matrices.

  10. Study of OH● Radicals in Human Serum Blood of Healthy Individuals and Those with Pathological Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Linert

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The human body is constantly under attack from free radicals that occur as part of normal cell metabolism, and by exposure to environmental factors such as UV light, cigarette smoke, environmental pollutants and gamma radiation. The resulting “Reactive Oxygen Species” (ROS circulate freely in the body with access to all organs and tissues, which can have serious repercussions throughout the body. The body possesses a number of mechanisms both to control the production of ROS and to cope with free radicals in order to limit or repair damage to tissues. Overproduction of ROS or insufficient defense mechanisms leads to a dangerous disbalance in the organism. Thereby several pathomechanisms implicated in over 100 human diseases, e.g., cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes mellitus, physiological disease, aging, etc., can be induced. Thus, a detailed investigation on the quantity of oxygen radicals, such as hydroxyl radicals (OH● in human serum blood, and its possible correlation with antioxidant therapy effects, is highly topical. The subject of this study was the influence of schizophrenia on the amount of OH● in human serum blood. The radicals were detected by fluorimetry, using terephthalic acid as a chemical trap. For all experiments the serum blood of healthy people was used as a control group.

  11. Autologous peripheral blood stem cell harvest: Collection efficiency and factors affecting it

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aseem K Tiwari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Harvest of hematopoietic progenitor cells via leukapheresis is being used increasingly for transplants in India. Adequate yield of cells per kilogram body weight of recipient is required for successful engraftment. Collection efficiency (CE is an objective quality parameter used to assess the quality of leukapheresis program. In this study, we calculated the CE of the ComTec cell separator (Fresenius Kabi, Germany using two different formulae (CE1 and CE2 and analyzed various patient and procedural factors, which may affect it. Materials and Methods: One hundred and one consecutive procedures in 77 autologous donors carried out over 3 years period were retrospectively reviewed. Various characteristics like gender, age, weight, disease status, hematocrit, preprocedure total leukocyte count, preprocedure CD34 positive (CD34+ cells count, preprocedure absolute CD34+ cell count and processed apheresis volume effect on CE were compared. CE for each procedure was calculated using two different formulae, and results were compared using statistical correlation and regression analysis. Results: The mean CE1 and CE2 was 41.2 and 49.1, respectively. CE2 appeared to be more accurate indicator of overall CE as it considered the impact of continued mobilization of stem cells during apheresis procedure, itself. Of all the factors affecting CE, preprocedure absolute CD34+ was the only independent factor affecting CE. Conclusion: The only factor affecting CE was preprocedure absolute CD34+ cells. Though the mean CE2 was higher than CE1, it was not statistically significant.

  12. [Dosage of cadmium and lead in human blood by anodic stripping voltammetry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attar, Tarik; Harek, Yahia; Dennouni-Medjati, Nouria; Lahcen, Larabi

    2012-10-01

    The objective is the determination of the conditions operating optimal to determine the concentration of the cadmium and the lead dissolved in the human blood. An electroanalytical method has been developed for the determination of lead and cadmium in whole blood by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV) on a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE). The best conditions were found to be electrolyte support perchloric acid 0.02 M, the accumulation potential is -900 mV, and the accumulation time is 320 s. The obtained limits of detection are equal to 0.46 and 0.08 ng/mL respectively for the lead and the cadmium. The developed method was validated by the analysis of reference materials certified by total blood.

  13. Method for breast cancer diagnosis by phase spectrophotometry of human blood plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintser, Ozar P.; Oliinychenko, B. P.

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of breast cancer diagnostics by means of phase structure measurements of laser radiation transformed by human blood plasma samples. The theoretical fundamentals of polarization filtration method for direct phase shifts measurements of microscopic images are provided. The optical model of polycrystalline networks of blood plasma proteins is suggested. The results of investigating the interrelation between the values of statistical (statistical moments of the 1st-4th order), correlation (correlation area, asymmetry coefficient and autocorrelation function excess) and fractal (dispersion of logarithmic dependencies of power spectra) parameters are presented. They characterize the coordinate distributions of phase shifts between the orthogonal components of the amplitude in the points of laser images of blood plasma smears and pathological changes in the mammary gland tissue. The diagnostic criteria of breast cancer nascency are determined.

  14. Isolation of endothelial colony-forming cells from blood samples collected from the jugular and cephalic veins of healthy adult horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Ashley N; Seeto, Wen J; Winter, Randolph L; Zhong, Qiao; Lipke, Elizabeth A; Wooldridge, Anne A

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate optimal isolation of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) from peripheral blood of horses. SAMPLE Jugular and cephalic venous blood samples from 17 adult horses. PROCEDURES Each blood sample was divided; isolation was performed with whole blood adherence (WBA) and density gradient centrifugation (DGC). Isolated cells were characterized by uptake of 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate-labeled acetylated low-density lipoprotein (DiI-Ac-LDL), vascular tubule formation, and expression of endothelial (CD34, CD105, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, and von Willebrand factor) and hematopoietic (CD14) cell markers by use of indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and flow cytometry. RESULTS Colonies with cobblestone morphology were isolated from 15 of 17 horses. Blood collected from the cephalic vein yielded colonies significantly more often (14/17 horses) than did blood collected from the jugular vein (8/17 horses). Of 14 cephalic blood samples with colonies, 13 were obtained with DGC and 8 with WBA. Of 8 jugular blood samples with colonies, 8 were obtained with DGC and 4 with WBA. Colony frequency (colonies per milliliter of blood) was significantly higher for cephalic blood samples and samples isolated with DGC. Cells formed vascular tubules, had uptake of DiI-Ac-LDL, and expressed endothelial markers by use of IFA and flow cytometry, which confirmed their identity as ECFCs. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Maximum yield of ECFCs was obtained for blood samples collected from both the jugular and cephalic veins and use of DGC to isolate cells. Consistent yield of ECFCs from peripheral blood of horses will enable studies to evaluate diagnostic and therapeutic uses.

  15. Improving the Diet for the Rearing of Glossina brevipalpis Newstead and Glossina austeni Newstead: Blood Source and Collection - Processing - Feeding Procedures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantel J De Beer

    Full Text Available One of the challenges to maintain tsetse fly (Diptera: Glossinidae colonies is the sustainable supply of high quality blood meals. The effect of using anticoagulants during collection of the blood, the addition of phagostimulants to the blood meals as well as using mixtures of bovine and porcine blood in different proportions for feeding on colony productivity was assessed. Defibrinated bovine blood was found to be suitable to maintain both the Glossina brevipalpis Newstead and Glossina austeni Newstead colonies. Blood collected with the anticoagulants sodium citrate, citric sodium combination, citrate phosphate dextrose adenine and citric acid did not affect colony performance of both species. Defibrinated bovine and porcine blood in a 1:1 ratio or the feeding of either bovine or porcine blood on alternating days improved pupae production of G. austeni and can be used to enhance colony growth. Bovine blood is appropriate to maintain G. brevipalpis colonies, however, feeding either bovine or porcine blood on alternating days did improve productivity. Adding the phagostimulants inosine tri-phosphate, cytosine mono-phosphate and guanosine mono-phosphate to the blood at a concentration of 10-4 M improved pupae production of the G. brevipalpis colony. The addition of adenosine tri-phosphate and inosine tri-phosphate improved the performance of the G. austeni colony. Decisions on the most suitable rearing diet and feeding protocols will not only depend on the biological requirements of the species but also on the continuous supply of a suitable blood source that can be collected and processed in a cost-effective way.

  16. Raman and SERS recognition of β-carotene and haemoglobin fingerprints in human whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casella, Michele; Lucotti, Andrea; Tommasini, Matteo; Bedoni, Marzia; Forvi, Elena; Gramatica, Furio; Zerbi, Giuseppe

    2011-09-01

    The present work reports on Raman and Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) vibrational fingerprints of β-carotene and haemoglobin in fresh whole blood (i.e. right after blood test) with different laser excitations, i.e. visible (514 nm) and near-infrared (NIR, 785 nm). The use of colloidal silver nanoparticles significantly increases the Raman signal, thus providing a clear SERS spectrum of blood. The collected spectra have been examined and marker bands of β-carotene and of the haem prosthetic group of haemoglobin have been found. In particular, the fundamental features of β-carotene (514 nm excitation), blood proteins and haem molecules (785 nm excitation) were recognized and assigned. Moreover haemoglobin SERS signals can be identified and related with its oxygenation state (oxy-haemoglobin). The data reported show the prospects of Raman and SERS techniques to detect important bio-molecules in a whole blood sample with no pre-treatment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Human neutrophil kinetics: modeling of stable isotope labeling data supports short blood neutrophil half-lives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoz-Beneytez, Julio; Elemans, Marjet; Zhang, Yan; Ahmed, Raya; Salam, Arafa; Block, Michael; Niederalt, Christoph; Asquith, Becca; Macallan, Derek

    2016-06-30

    Human neutrophils have traditionally been thought to have a short half-life in blood; estimates vary from 4 to 18 hours. This dogma was recently challenged by stable isotope labeling studies with heavy water, which yielded estimates in excess of 3 days. To investigate this disparity, we generated new stable isotope labeling data in healthy adult subjects using both heavy water (n = 4) and deuterium-labeled glucose (n = 9), a compound with more rapid labeling kinetics. To interpret results, we developed a novel mechanistic model and applied it to previously published (n = 5) and newly generated data. We initially constrained the ratio of the blood neutrophil pool to the marrow precursor pool (ratio = 0.26; from published values). Analysis of heavy water data sets yielded turnover rates consistent with a short blood half-life, but parameters, particularly marrow transit time, were poorly defined. Analysis of glucose-labeling data yielded more precise estimates of half-life (0.79 ± 0.25 days; 19 hours) and marrow transit time (5.80 ± 0.42 days). Substitution of this marrow transit time in the heavy water analysis gave a better-defined blood half-life of 0.77 ± 0.14 days (18.5 hours), close to glucose-derived values. Allowing the ratio of blood neutrophils to mitotic neutrophil precursors (R) to vary yielded a best-fit value of 0.19. Reanalysis of the previously published model and data also revealed the origin of their long estimates for neutrophil half-life: an implicit assumption that R is very large, which is physiologically untenable. We conclude that stable isotope labeling in healthy humans is consistent with a blood neutrophil half-life of less than 1 day. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  18. The impact of ambient air pollution on the human blood metabolome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaanderen, J J; Janssen, N A; Hoek, G; Keski-Rahkonen, P; Barupal, D K; Cassee, F R; Gosens, I; Strak, M; Steenhof, M; Lan, Q; Brunekreef, B; Scalbert, A; Vermeulen, R C H

    2017-07-01

    Biological perturbations caused by air pollution might be reflected in the compounds present in blood originating from air pollutants and endogenous metabolites influenced by air pollution (defined here as part of the blood metabolome). We aimed to assess the perturbation of the blood metabolome in response to short term exposure to air pollution. We exposed 31 healthy volunteers to ambient air pollution for 5h. We measured exposure to particulate matter, particle number concentrations, absorbance, elemental/organic carbon, trace metals, secondary inorganic components, endotoxin content, gaseous pollutants, and particulate matter oxidative potential. We collected blood from the participants 2h before and 2 and 18h after exposure. We employed untargeted metabolite profiling to monitor 3873 metabolic features in 493 blood samples from these volunteers. We assessed lung function using spirometry and six acute phase proteins in peripheral blood. We assessed the association of the metabolic features with the measured air pollutants and with health markers that we previously observed to be associated with air pollution in this study. We observed 89 robust associations between air pollutants and metabolic features two hours after exposure and 118 robust associations 18h after exposure. Some of the metabolic features that were associated with air pollutants were also associated with acute health effects, especially changes in forced expiratory volume in 1s. We successfully identified tyrosine, guanosine, and hypoxanthine among the associated features. Bioinformatics approach Mummichog predicted enriched pathway activity in eight pathways, among which tyrosine metabolism. This study demonstrates for the first time the application of untargeted metabolite profiling to assess the impact of air pollution on the blood metabolome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Rapid flow cytometric measurement of cytokine-induced phosphorylation pathways [CIPP] in human peripheral blood leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, David T; Lotze, Michael T

    2006-11-01

    Current strategies designed to assess cells in the peripheral blood are limited to evaluation of phenotype or delayed measurement [>6 h] of function, usually quantifying cytokine production, cytolytic activity, or response to antigens. We reasoned that measurable abnormalities in signaling pathways could reflect pathological environs that cells experience in the setting of inflammatory states/cancer and could be represented in the peripheral blood. Two major pathways regulating the immune response are the JAK/STAT and MAPK/ERK pathways. These pathways are initiated by ligand-receptor binding and are rapidly propagated by subsequent protein phosphorylation cascades. We evaluated the brief application of cytokines in vitro to interrogate the early phosphorylation events of these signaling pathways in normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Individual cytokine doses and time intervals of treatment were assessed to identify conditions useful in a clinical laboratory and as an initial goal to induce maximal phosphorylation. Surprisingly, all of the STAT proteins assessed and ERK1/2 are maximally phosphorylated within 15 min in human PBMC simply following addition of cytokines without preactivation of the cells. At 2 h, cells typically return to their basal phosphorylation states. For most of the cytokines tested, increased phosphorylation directly correlated with increased concentrations of the individual cytokines. These strategies will enable robust development of simple blood analyses to identify normal levels as well as impairments in STAT and MAPK/ERK signaling pathways associated with various human disease states including acute and chronic inflammatory conditions throughout clinical immunology.

  20. Influence of the renin-angiotensin system on human forearm blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stadeager, C; Hesse, B; Henriksen, O

    1990-01-01

    Although angiotensin II is a potent vasoconstrictor agent in all tissues, including the human forearm, equivocal effects on forearm blood flow (FBF) have been found after angiotensin blockade. In 13 healthy Na(+)-depleted subjects FBF was measured by the 133Xe washout technique; subcutaneous...... and muscle blood flows were determined separately. FBF was measured during supine rest, after the arm was lowered, and during lower body negative pressure (LBNP). The measurements were repeated during intra-arterial saralasin infusion in six subjects and after intravenous administration of enalapril in seven....... It is concluded that, in the human forearm, angiotensin II is not necessary for sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes but may, through a central effect, have some influence on arteriolar tone at rest....

  1. A brief history of the discovery of the circulation of blood in the human body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Mohammad-Hossein; Nayernouri, Touraj; Azizi, Farzaneh

    2008-05-01

    The present article describes briefly the development of the theories regarding the circulation of blood in humans, from the time of Galen (second century C.E.) to the work of William Harvey (17th century C.E.).We shall summarize the views of Galen together with those of two prominent Iranian physicians of the Middle Ages (Razi and Ahwazi known in the West as Rhazes and Haly Abbas respectively) as well as that of Ibn-Nafis from Damascus (the discoverer of the pulmonary circulation) and the Spanish physician and cleric Michael Servetus and finally the definitive work of William Harvey, the English physician who described the mechanism of both the systemic and pulmonary circulation of blood in the human body.

  2. alpha isoforms of soluble and membrane-linked folate-binding protein in human blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoier-Madsen, M.; Holm, J.; Hansen, S.I.

    2008-01-01

    supported the hypothesis that serum FBP (29 kDa) mainly originates from neutrophils. The presence of FBP/FR alpha isoforms were established for the first time in human blood using antibodies specifically directed against human milk FBP alpha. The alpha isoforms identified on erythrocyte membranes......, and in granulocytes and serum, only constituted an almost undetectable fraction of the functional FBP The FBP alpha in neutrophil granulocytes was identified as a cytoplasmic component by indirect immunofluorescence. Gel filtration of serum revealed a peak of FBP alpha (>120 kDa), which could represent receptor...... fragments from decomposed erythrocytes and granulocytes. The soluble FBPs may exert bacteriostatic effects and protect folates in plasma from biological degradation, whereas FRs on the surface of blood cells could be involved in intracellular folate uptake or serve as signal proteins. The latter receptors...

  3. Real-time monitoring of human blood clotting using a lateral excited film bulk acoustic resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Da; Wang, Jingjng; Wang, Peng; Guo, Qiuquan; Zhang, Zhen; Ma, Jilong

    2017-04-01

    Frequent assay of hemostatic status is an essential issue for the millions of patients using anticoagulant drugs. In this paper, we presented a micro-fabricated film bulk acoustic sensor for the real-time monitoring of blood clotting and the measurement of hemostatic parameters. The device was made of an Au/ZnO/Si3N4 film stack and excited by a lateral electric field. It operated under a shear mode resonance with the frequency of 1.42 GHz and had a quality factor of 342 in human blood. During the clotting process of blood, the resonant frequency decreased along with the change of blood viscosity and showed an apparent step-ladder curve, revealing the sequential clotting stages. An important hemostatic parameter, prothrombin time, was quantitatively determined from the frequency response for different dilutions of the blood samples. The effect of a typical anticoagulant drug (heparin) on the prothrombin time was exemplarily shown. The proposed sensor displayed a good consistency and clinical comparability with the standard coagulometric methods. Thanks to the availability of direct digital signals, excellent potentials of miniaturization and integration, the proposed sensor has promising application for point-of-care coagulation technologies.

  4. Knowledge, attitude, and beliefs of young, college student blood donors about Human immunodeficiency virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Dubey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Young people, who tend to be healthy, idealistic, and motivated, are an excellent pool of potential voluntary unpaid blood donors. Recruiting and retaining young blood donors improves the long term safety and sufficiency of a country′s blood supply. Knowledge, attitude, and beliefs about Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV should play an important role in prevention of disease transmission. Materials and Methods: This study was a questionnaire based survey, conducted to explore the levels of knowledge, attitude, and beliefs about HIV in young college student blood donors. Results: The results showed that the proportion of participants with comprehensive knowledge of HIV prevention and transmission was lesser than expected. Increase in education level and male gender was found to be significantly associated with high HIV-related knowledge. The responses on the different aspects of HIV-related attitude were also varied and there is still stigma associated with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS even in the educated groups. Discussion: There was a spectrum of myths and misperceptions emphasizing the need of education that recognizes the social context of attitude towards HIV. Results from this study may contribute to the development of appropriate educational and training material for this group of donors which in turn, may assist in achieving the elusive goal of safe blood supply in future.

  5. Study on thin wideband applicator for detecting blood characteristics in human body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamba, Kazuki; Kuki, Takao; Nikawa, Yoshio

    2016-11-01

    Preventive care as well as early detection method and monitoring technique for diseases are highly attracted attention to increase quality of life. Noninvasive measurement method for blood characteristics in body is expected by patients with kidney dysfunction. Complex permittivity of blood is changed a few present at 6GHz. This change is caused by the change of water and albumin contents in blood. In this study, to detect blood characteristics in human body, experiments with phantom model has been performed using thin wideband applicator for examining microwave transmission up to 6GHz. The thin wideband applicator has advantages for detecting living body information in detail. The thin wideband applicator is designed based on Antipodal Vivaldi Antenna and is not required any balun and is very easy handling. Using developed Antipodal Vivaldi Antenna, transmission coefficient can be obtained as a function of thickness of phantom model with high sensitivity. Using this method, highly sensitive sensor for obtaining characteristics of blood in body can be developed.

  6. Determination of antimony in human blood with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzi, Ali; Nriagu, Jerome O; Inhorn, Marcia C; Linder, Aaron M

    2005-12-01

    A method is presented for the determination of antimony in whole human blood samples with an ICP-MS instrument using a quadrupole mass analyzer. A nitric acid/hydrogen peroxide open digestion procedure was employed for the blood sample treatment and preparation for analysis. The precision and accuracy of the method were evaluated by analyzing several Seronorm trace elements whole blood reference materials. The precision of the method at various antimony levels was better than 4% RSD and the recovery was greater than 92% at all levels. The detection limit, calculated as three times the standard deviation of the blank (3sigma, n= 12), was 0.03 microg L(-1). The method was successfully applied for the determination of antimony in blood samples from school children in rural areas of Kwazulu/Natal, South Africa and adults from Dearborn, Michigan. Blood antimony levels ranged from <0.03 to 3.82 microg L(-1) in children and 1.40 to 4.35 microg L(-1) for adults.

  7. Optimal Fluxes, Reaction Replaceability, and Response to Enzymopathies in the Human Red Blood Cell

    OpenAIRE

    De Martino, A.; Granata, D.; Marinari, E; Martelli, C.; Van Kerrebroeck, V.

    2010-01-01

    Characterizing the capabilities, key dependencies, and response to perturbations of genome-scale metabolic networks is a basic problem with important applications. A key question concerns the identification of the potentially most harmful reaction knockouts. The integration of combinatorial methods with sampling techniques to explore the space of viable flux states may provide crucial insights on this issue. We assess the replaceability of every metabolic conversion in the human red blood cel...

  8. Human neutrophil kinetics: modeling of stable isotope labeling data supports short blood neutrophil half-lives

    OpenAIRE

    Lahoz-Beneytez, J; Elemans, M; Zhang, Y.; R. Ahmed; Salam, A.; Block, M.; Niederalt, C; Asquith, B; Macallan, D

    2016-01-01

    Human neutrophils have traditionally been thought to have a short half-life in blood; estimates vary from 4-18 hours. This dogma was recently challenged by stable isotope labeling studies with heavy water which yielded estimates in excess of 3 days. To investigate this disparity we generated new stable isotope labeling data in healthy adult subjects using both heavy water (n=4) and deuterium-labeled glucose (n=9), a compound with more rapid labeling kinetics. To interpret results we developed...

  9. Does aerobic exercises induce mtDNA mutation in human blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of eight weeks aerobic training on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation in human blood leucocytes. Twenty untrained healthy students (training group: n =10, age = 20.7±1.5 yrs, weight = 67.7±10 kg, BF% = 17.5±7.35 & control group: n =10, age = 21±1.3 yrs, weight ...

  10. Susceptibility contrast imaging of CO2-induced changes in the blood volume of the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostrup, Egill; Larsson, H B; Toft, P B

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate changes in the regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) in human subjects during rest and hypercapnia by MR imaging, and to compare the results from contrast-enhanced and noncontrast-enhanced susceptibility-weighted imaging. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five healthy volunteers (aged...... in cerebral hemodynamics than noncontrast-enhanced imaging. The results of the deconvolution analysis suggested that perfusion calculation by conventional tracer kinetic methods may be impracticable because of nonlinear effects in contrast-enhanced MR imaging....

  11. Fibroblast growth factor 23 weakens chemotaxis of human blood neutrophils in microfluidic devices

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ke; Peretz-Soroka, Hagit; Wu, Jiandong; Zhu, Ling; Cui, Xueling; Zhang, Michael; Rigatto, Claudio; Liu, Yong; Lin, Francis

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil trafficking in tissues critically regulates the body?s immune response. Neutrophil migration can either play a protective role in host defense or cause health problems. Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a known biomarker for chronic kidney disease (CKD) and was recently shown to impair neutrophil arrest on endothelium and transendothelial migration. In the present study, we further examined the effect of FGF23 on human blood neutrophil chemotaxis using two new microfluidic dev...

  12. Antibody-Mediated Neutralization of Pertussis Toxin-Induced Mitogenicity of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Scott H Millen; Bernstein, David I.; Connelly, Beverly; Ward, Joel I.; Chang, Swei-Ju; Weiss, Alison A.

    2004-01-01

    Antibody-mediated neutralization of pertussis toxin-induced proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was assessed using alamarBlue and compared with results from the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell assay using sera from vaccinated adults and convalescent children. Neutralization values for the CHO assay were similar for vaccinated and convalescent subjects; however. the convalescent group had higher titers in the PBMC assay. Results for pertussis toxin neutralization ...

  13. Effect of blood collection by the push-pull technique from an indwelling catheter versus direct venipuncture on venous blood gas values before and after administration of alfaxalone or propofol in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Ciara A; Gianotti, Giacomo; Graffeo, Carly E; Drobatz, Kenneth J; Silverstein, Deborah C

    2017-11-15

    OBJECTIVE To compare the effect of blood collection by a push-pull technique from an indwelling IV catheter versus direct venipuncture on venous blood gas values before and after administration of alfaxalone or propofol to dogs. DESIGN Prospective randomized clinical study. ANIMALS 30 healthy client-owned dogs that weighed ≥ 10 kg (22 lb) and were anesthetized for elective surgical procedures. PROCEDURES All dogs were premedicated with methadone (0.5 mg/kg [0.2 mg/lb], IM), and 20 to 30 minutes later, anesthesia was induced with either alfaxalone (1 to 3 mg/kg [0.5 to 1.4 mg/lb], IV to effect; n = 15) or propofol (2 to 6 mg/kg [0.9 to 2.7 mg/lb], IV to effect; 15). Immediately prior to premedication and after anesthesia induction, paired blood samples were collected from the cephalic veins; 1 by direct venipuncture and 1 by use of a push-pull technique from a 20-gauge catheter. All blood samples underwent venous blood gas analysis immediately after collection. Results were compared between sample collection techniques before and after anesthesia induction and between anesthesia induction protocols. RESULTS All results were within established reference ranges. For many variables, statistically significant but clinically irrelevant differences were detected between samples collected by direct venipuncture and those collected by the push-pull technique but not between the 2 anesthesia induction protocols. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated the push-pull technique was an acceptable method for collection of blood samples from dogs for venous blood gas analysis that could be used instead of direct venipuncture for patients with patent IV catheters.

  14. Further insight into the roles of the glycans attached to human blood protein C inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Wei; Parry, Simon; Ubhayasekera, Wimal

    2010-01-01

    Protein C inhibitor (PCI) is a 57-kDa glycoprotein that exists in many tissues and secretions in human. As a member of the serpin superfamily of proteins it displays unusually broad protease specificity. PCI is implicated in the regulation of a wide range of processes, including blood coagulation...... or absence of 6 amino acids at the amino-terminus. In this study we have verified that such heterogeneity exists in PCI purified from single individuals, and that individuals of two different ethnicities possess a similar PCI pattern, verifying that the micro-heterogeneity is conserved among humans...

  15. The physiology of blood loss and shock: New insights from a human laboratory model of hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Alicia M; Howard, Jeffrey T; Convertino, Victor A

    2017-04-01

    The ability to quickly diagnose hemorrhagic shock is critical for favorable patient outcomes. Therefore, it is important to understand the time course and involvement of the various physiological mechanisms that are active during volume loss and that have the ability to stave off hemodynamic collapse. This review provides new insights about the physiology that underlies blood loss and shock in humans through the development of a simulated model of hemorrhage using lower body negative pressure. In this review, we present controlled experimental results through utilization of the lower body negative pressure human hemorrhage model that provide novel insights on the integration of physiological mechanisms critical to the compensation for volume loss. We provide data obtained from more than 250 human experiments to classify human subjects into two distinct groups: those who have a high tolerance and can compensate well for reduced central blood volume (e.g. hemorrhage) and those with low tolerance with poor capacity to compensate.We include the conceptual introduction of arterial pressure and cerebral blood flow oscillations, reflex-mediated autonomic and neuroendocrine responses, and respiration that function to protect adequate tissue oxygenation through adjustments in cardiac output and peripheral vascular resistance. Finally, unique time course data are presented that describe mechanistic events associated with the rapid onset of hemodynamic failure (i.e. decompensatory shock). Impact Statement Hemorrhage is the leading cause of death in both civilian and military trauma. The work submitted in this review is important because it advances the understanding of mechanisms that contribute to the total integrated physiological compensations for inadequate tissue oxygenation (i.e. shock) that arise from hemorrhage. Unlike an animal model, we introduce the utilization of lower body negative pressure as a noninvasive model that allows for the study of progressive

  16. Determination of reference intervals and comparison of venous blood gas parameters using standard and non-standard collection methods in 24 cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Karin; Kutter, Annette Pn; Schefer, Rahel Jud; Marly-Voquer, Charlotte; Sigrist, Nadja

    2017-08-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine in-house reference intervals (RIs) for venous blood analysis with the RAPIDPoint 500 blood gas analyser using blood gas syringes (BGSs) and to determine whether immediate analysis of venous blood collected into lithium heparin (LH) tubes can replace anaerobic blood sampling into BGSs. Methods Venous blood was collected from 24 healthy cats and directly transferred into a BGS and an LH tube. The BGS was immediately analysed on the RAPIDPoint 500 followed by the LH tube. The BGSs and LH tubes were compared using paired t-test or Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test, Bland-Altman and Passing-Bablok analysis. To assess clinical relevance, bias or percentage bias between BGSs and LH tubes was compared with the allowable total error (TEa) recommended for the respective parameter. Results Based on the values obtained from the BGSs, RIs were calculated for the evaluated parameters, including blood gases, electrolytes, glucose and lactate. Values derived from LH tubes showed no significant difference for standard bicarbonate, whole blood base excess, haematocrit, total haemoglobin, sodium, potassium, chloride, glucose and lactate, while pH, partial pressure of carbon dioxide and oxygen, actual bicarbonate, extracellular base excess, ionised calcium and anion gap were significantly different to the samples collected in BGSs ( P blood base excess, haematocrit, total haemoglobin, sodium, potassium, chloride, glucose and lactate can be made based on blood collected in LH tubes and analysed within 5 mins. For pH, partial pressure of carbon dioxide and oxygen, extracellular base excess, anion gap and ionised calcium the clinically relevant alterations have to be considered if analysed in LH tubes.

  17. A stable and reproducible human blood-brain barrier model derived from hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeo Cecchelli

    Full Text Available The human blood brain barrier (BBB is a selective barrier formed by human brain endothelial cells (hBECs, which is important to ensure adequate neuronal function and protect the central nervous system (CNS from disease. The development of human in vitro BBB models is thus of utmost importance for drug discovery programs related to CNS diseases. Here, we describe a method to generate a human BBB model using cord blood-derived hematopoietic stem cells. The cells were initially differentiated into ECs followed by the induction of BBB properties by co-culture with pericytes. The brain-like endothelial cells (BLECs express tight junctions and transporters typically observed in brain endothelium and maintain expression of most in vivo BBB properties for at least 20 days. The model is very reproducible since it can be generated from stem cells isolated from different donors and in different laboratories, and could be used to predict CNS distribution of compounds in human. Finally, we provide evidence that Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway mediates in part the BBB inductive properties of pericytes.

  18. Levels of PCBs, DDT, DDE and DDD in Italian human blood samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocca, C. La; Abate, V.; Alivernini, S.; Iacovella, N.; Mantovani, A.; Turrio-Baldassarri, L. [Ist. Superiore di Sanita, Roma (Italy); Silvestroni, L.; Spera, G. [Dept. of Medical Pathophysiology, Univ. (Italy)

    2004-09-15

    The environmental contamination from polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is effecting the exposure of the general population in a direct way through air inhalation, ingestion of particulate matter and dermal absorption and, most of all, in an indirect way through diet. Diet represents, in fact, the main way of human exposure to PCBs. PCBs have potential teratogenic, carcinogenic, hormonal and immunological effects. An association between endometriosis and high levels of PCB in plasma has also been reported3. Moreover, some congeners (PCB 105, PCB 118, PCB 153) have effects on thyroid hormones in animal models, although the PCB dose used in these experiments was an order of magnitude higher than the estimated human exposure. Humans are, however, exposed to a complex mixtures of PCB congeners. In this study identification and quantification of 60 PCB congeners and 3 chlorinated pesticides in human whole blood samples are presented. The subjects examined in this pilot study were a small group of patients with possible endocrine-related problems and unknown specific exposure. The aim of this study was to increase the present understanding about the distribution of the PCBs in human whole blood. The levels of DDT and metabolites were measured as well, since these compounds are consistently reported to contribute to the whole body burden of persistent chlorinated compounds, together with PCBs.

  19. Cytotoxicity Investigation on Cultured Human Blood Cells Treated with Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rosaria Scarfì

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs are one of the new materials ofemerging technologies. They are becoming increasingly studied for the possibleapplications in electronics, optics and biology. In particular, very promising fields ofapplication are the development of optical biosensors and the intracellular drug delivery.Nevertheless, there is a paucity of information on their toxicological properties and onpotential human health risk. In the present study the SWCNTs were investigated for thepossible induction of toxicity in human blood cells. Cell growth, viability, apoptosis andmetabolic activity were evaluated in proliferating human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Inun-stimulated human leukocytes primary DNA damage was also evaluated. SWCNTsconcentrations ranging from 1 to 50 μg/ml were tested, and treatment duration varied from6 to 72 h, in accordance with the biological target investigated. A statistically significantdecrease in cell growth was found in cells treated with the highest concentrations (25 and50 μg/ml. Such decrease was not associated to cell death or apoptosis, but it wasdemonstrated to be related to a decrease in metabolic activity, as assessed by resazurinassay. Moreover, treatments of 6 h with SWCNTs concentrations of 1, 5 and 10 μg/mlfailed to induce primary DNA damage on the entire human leukocytes population.

  20. [Evaluation of home collection performed by a human milk bank in a university hospital in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Glória; de Lima-Cavalcanti, Lígia; de Morais-Oliveira, Angela Maria; Costa-Pinto, Rogério de Melo; Steffen-Abdallah, Vânia Olivetti

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of procedures during household milking and transport of human milk associated with their quality control. 48 donors registered in the Human Milk Bank of the Clinics Hospital of the Federal University at Uberlândia. Observations were made during home visits. A checklist was elaborated according to the technical standards for human milk banks, been associated with physical-chemical, and microbiological controls. The chi-square test, logistic regression and Spearman test (pmilk bank staff and procedures were satisfactorily performed. It could be demonstrated that milking and home collection are safe and effective ways for obtaining donated human milk.

  1. Developing Humanities Collections in the Digital Age: Exploring Humanities Faculty Engagement with Electronic and Print Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachaluba, Sarah Buck; Brady, Jessica Evans; Critten, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    This article is based on quantitative and qualitative research examining humanities scholars' understandings of the advantages and disadvantages of print versus electronic information resources. It explores how humanities' faculty members at Florida State University (FSU) use print and electronic resources, as well as how they perceive these…

  2. Hepatitis B and C Viruses Infections and Their Association with Human Immunodeficiency Virus: A Cross-Sectional Study among Blood Donors in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yami, Alemeshet; Alemseged, Fissehaye; Hassen, Alima

    2011-03-01

    Since the introduction of Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy and the dramatic improvement in the prognosis of individuals with Human Immunodeficiency Virus, liver disease due to chronic viral hepatitis has become as important cause of morbidity and mortality in co-infected individuals. The objective of the study was to determine the Sero-prevalence of Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus and the association of the virus with Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatitis C Virus infection. As Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis B Virus infections are highly prevalent and they are among the major public health concern in developing countries including Ethiopia investigating this problem is of paramount benefit. Although studies on co-infection of Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus have clearly identified adverse effects of co-infection, the prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus infection and the association with Human Immunodeficiency Virus in developing countries including Ethiopia has not been know for sure. A cross sectional study was conducted from January 1 to 31, 2010, in Jimma University specialized hospital Blood Bank. The inclusion criteria of the study was adult who donated blood to Jimma University specialized hospital blood bank any time from establishment of the unit until January 2010 and whose record was retrieved. Accordingly 9,204 adults were included of which 6,063 were selected by lottery method. Data on socio-demographic variables (age and sex), laboratory test result for Hepatitis B surface Antigen, anti-Hepatitis C Virus antibody, anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 antibody, and Rapid Plasma Reagin tests were collected using structured questionnaire. After the data were collected, they were entered into a computer and analyzed using SPSS -16 for windows. P-Value of Virus, Hepatitis C Virus, Human Immunodeficiency Virus and syphilis infection were 2.1%, 0.2%, 2.1% and 0.7%, respectively. Sex and age had

  3. Possibilities of collecting evidences about crime act of sexual exploitation in human beings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijalković Saša

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Collecting evidences about organized crime act of sexual exploitation in human begins often is very difficult because of high level of organization, secrecy ant precaution taken during committing prostitution, pornography, sex tourism and human trafficking. On the other side, high illegal profit enable criminals to engage "expensive" and experienced lawyers, whose often make values and reliability of collected evidences questionable, appealing to irregularities during police collecting procedure. Among traditional criminalities methods and proofing activities, in the study, modern tendencies in special investigative measures and techniques are considered. After that, there is pointing at specificity, meaning and value of material tracks and objects, which are essential for proofing crime act or perpetrator’s guiltiness. On the end, there is pointing at importance of victims’ cooperation in collecting evidences about their sexual exploitation.

  4. Site-specific O-Glycosylation Analysis of Human Blood Plasma Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Marcus; Marx, Kristina; Reichl, Udo; Wuhrer, Manfred; Rapp, Erdmann

    2016-02-01

    Site-specific glycosylation analysis is key to investigate structure-function relationships of glycoproteins, e.g. in the context of antigenicity and disease progression. The analysis, though, is quite challenging and time consuming, in particular for O-glycosylated proteins. In consequence, despite their clinical and biopharmaceutical importance, many human blood plasma glycoproteins have not been characterized comprehensively with respect to their O-glycosylation. Here, we report on the site-specific O-glycosylation analysis of human blood plasma glycoproteins. To this end pooled human blood plasma of healthy donors was proteolytically digested using a broad-specific enzyme (Proteinase K), followed by a precipitation step, as well as a glycopeptide enrichment and fractionation step via hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography, the latter being optimized for intact O-glycopeptides carrying short mucin-type core-1 and -2 O-glycans, which represent the vast majority of O-glycans on human blood plasma proteins. Enriched O-glycopeptide fractions were subjected to mass spectrometric analysis using reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled online to an ion trap mass spectrometer operated in positive-ion mode. Peptide identity and glycan composition were derived from low-energy collision-induced dissociation fragment spectra acquired in multistage mode. To pinpoint the O-glycosylation sites glycopeptides were fragmented using electron transfer dissociation. Spectra were annotated by database searches as well as manually. Overall, 31 O-glycosylation sites and regions belonging to 22 proteins were identified, the majority being acute-phase proteins. Strikingly, also 11 novel O-glycosylation sites and regions were identified. In total 23 O-glycosylation sites could be pinpointed. Interestingly, the use of Proteinase K proved to be particularly beneficial in this context. The identified O-glycan compositions most probably correspond to mono- and disialylated core-1

  5. Blood donor deferral policies across Europe and characteristics of men who have sex with men screened for human immunodeficiency virus in blood establishments: data from the European Men-who-have-sex-with-men Internet Survey (EMIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schink, Susanne B; Offergeld, Ruth; Schmidt, Axel J; Marcus, Ulrich

    2017-03-23

    The predominant mode of transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in Europe is male-to-male transmission. Men who have sex with men (MSM) are deferred from donating blood in many countries, but nevertheless do donate blood. Based on data from 34 countries, we estimated the proportion of MSM screened for HIV in the context of a blood donation and identified individual factors associated with this HIV screening in order to propose possible public health interventions. In 2010, the first European MSM Internet Survey (EMIS) collected self-reported data on HIV testing from >180,000 MSM in 38 European countries. Using logistic regression, demographic and behavioural factors associated with screening for HIV in blood establishments were identified. Stratified by European sub-region, we analysed the proportion of MSM screening in blood establishments by time elapsed since last negative HIV test. Donor eligibility criteria for MSM vary across Europe with most countries using permanent deferral. The Western region had the lowest (2%) proportion of MSM screened in blood establishments and the Northeastern region had the highest (14%). Being <25 years old, not disclosing sexual attraction to men, never having had anal intercourse with a man, having a female partner, living in a rural area, and certain European sub-regions or countries of residence increased the likelihood of being screened in blood establishments. In spite of deferral policies, MSM are screened for HIV in the context of blood donations. Gay-friendly testing services are rare in rural areas, and young men might be reluctant to disclose their sexual orientation. Recent developments, such as home sampling, might offer new testing possibilities for those not reached by established services yet wishing to know their HIV status. Donor selection procedures should be improved. Both interventions might help to further reduce the risk of transfusion-transmitted infections.

  6. Effect of collection, transport, processing and storage of blood specimens on the activity of lysosomal enzymes in plasma and leukocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Burin

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate the effect of different conditions of collection, transport and storage on the quality of blood samples from normal individuals in terms of the activity of the enzymes ß-glucuronidase, total hexosaminidase, hexosaminidase A, arylsulfatase A and ß-galactosidase. The enzyme activities were not affected by the different materials used for collection (plastic syringes or vacuum glass tubes. In the evaluation of different heparin concentrations (10% heparin, 5% heparin, and heparinized syringe in the syringes, it was observed that higher doses resulted in an increase of at least 1-fold in the activities of ß-galactosidase, total hexosaminidase and hexosaminidase A in leukocytes, and ß-glucuronidase in plasma. When the effects of time and means of transportation were studied, samples that had been kept at room temperature showed higher deterioration with time (72 and 96 h before processing, and in this case it was impossible to isolate leukocytes from most samples. Comparison of heparin and acid citrate-dextrose (ACD as anticoagulants revealed that ß-glucuronidase and hexosaminidase activities in plasma reached levels near the lower normal limits when ACD was used. In conclusion, we observed that heparin should be used as the preferable anticoagulant when measuring these lysosomal enzyme activities, and we recommend that, when transport time is more than 24 h, samples should be shipped by air in a styrofoam box containing wet ice.

  7. Blood culture collection technique and pneumococcal surveillance in Malawi during the four year period 2003–2006: an observational study

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    Zijlstra Eduard E

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blood culture surveillance will be used for assessing the public health effectiveness of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines in Africa. Between 2003 and 2006 we assessed blood culture outcome and performance in adult patients in the central public hospital in Blantyre, Malawi, before and after the introduction of a dedicated nurse led blood culture team. Methods A prospective observational study. Results Following the introduction of a specialised blood culture team in 2005, the proportion of contaminated cultures decreased (19.6% in 2003 to 5.0% in 2006, blood volume cultured increased and pneumococcal recovery increased significantly from 2.8% of all blood cultures to 6.1%. With each extra 1 ml of blood cultured the odds of recovering a pneumococcus increased by 18%. Conclusion Standardisation and assessment of blood culture performance (blood volume and contamination rate should be incorporated into pneumococcal disease surveillance activities where routine blood culture practice is constrained by limited resources.

  8. A virtual infection model quantifies innate effector mechanisms and Candida albicans immune escape in human blood.

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    Kerstin Hünniger

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans bloodstream infection is increasingly frequent and can result in disseminated candidiasis associated with high mortality rates. To analyze the innate immune response against C. albicans, fungal cells were added to human whole-blood samples. After inoculation, C. albicans started to filament and predominantly associate with neutrophils, whereas only a minority of fungal cells became attached to monocytes. While many parameters of host-pathogen interaction were accessible to direct experimental quantification in the whole-blood infection assay, others were not. To overcome these limitations, we generated a virtual infection model that allowed detailed and quantitative predictions on the dynamics of host-pathogen interaction. Experimental time-resolved data were simulated using a state-based modeling approach combined with the Monte Carlo method of simulated annealing to obtain quantitative predictions on a priori unknown transition rates and to identify the main axis of antifungal immunity. Results clearly demonstrated a predominant role of neutrophils, mediated by phagocytosis and intracellular killing as well as the release of antifungal effector molecules upon activation, resulting in extracellular fungicidal activity. Both mechanisms together account for almost [Formula: see text] of C. albicans killing, clearly proving that beside being present in larger numbers than other leukocytes, neutrophils functionally dominate the immune response against C. albicans in human blood. A fraction of C. albicans cells escaped phagocytosis and remained extracellular and viable for up to four hours. This immune escape was independent of filamentation and fungal activity and not linked to exhaustion or inactivation of innate immune cells. The occurrence of C. albicans cells being resistant against phagocytosis may account for the high proportion of dissemination in C. albicans bloodstream infection. Taken together, iterative experiment

  9. Expanding the limits of human blood metabolite quantitation using NMR spectroscopy.

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    Nagana Gowda, G A; Gowda, Yashas N; Raftery, Daniel

    2015-01-06

    A current challenge in metabolomics is the reliable quantitation of many metabolites. Limited resolution and sensitivity combined with the challenges associated with unknown metabolite identification have restricted both the number and the quantitative accuracy of blood metabolites. Focused on alleviating this bottleneck in NMR-based metabolomics, investigations of pooled human serum combining an array of 1D/2D NMR experiments at 800 MHz, database searches, and spiking with authentic compounds enabled the identification of 67 blood metabolites. Many of these (∼1/3) are new compared with those reported previously as a part of the Human Serum Metabolome Database. In addition, considering both the high reproducibility and quantitative nature of NMR as well as the sensitivity of NMR chemical shifts to altered sample conditions, experimental protocols and comprehensive peak annotations are provided here as a guide for identification and quantitation of the new pool of blood metabolites for routine applications. Further, investigations focused on the evaluation of quantitation using organic solvents revealed a surprisingly poor performance for protein precipitation using acetonitrile. One-third of the detected metabolites were attenuated by 10-67% compared with methanol precipitation at the same solvent-to-serum ratio of 2:1 (v/v). Nearly 2/3 of the metabolites were further attenuated by up to 65% upon increasing the acetonitrile-to-serum ratio to 4:1 (v/v). These results, combined with the newly established identity for many unknown metabolites in the NMR spectrum, offer new avenues for human serum/plasma-based metabolomics. Further, the ability to quantitatively evaluate nearly 70 blood metabolites that represent numerous classes, including amino acids, organic acids, carbohydrates, and heterocyclic compounds, using a simple and highly reproducible analytical method such as NMR may potentially guide the evaluation of samples for analysis using mass spectrometry.

  10. A Virtual Infection Model Quantifies Innate Effector Mechanisms and Candida albicans Immune Escape in Human Blood

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    Bieber, Kristin; Martin, Ronny; Figge, Marc Thilo; Kurzai, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans bloodstream infection is increasingly frequent and can result in disseminated candidiasis associated with high mortality rates. To analyze the innate immune response against C. albicans, fungal cells were added to human whole-blood samples. After inoculation, C. albicans started to filament and predominantly associate with neutrophils, whereas only a minority of fungal cells became attached to monocytes. While many parameters of host-pathogen interaction were accessible to direct experimental quantification in the whole-blood infection assay, others were not. To overcome these limitations, we generated a virtual infection model that allowed detailed and quantitative predictions on the dynamics of host-pathogen interaction. Experimental time-resolved data were simulated using a state-based modeling approach combined with the Monte Carlo method of simulated annealing to obtain quantitative predictions on a priori unknown transition rates and to identify the main axis of antifungal immunity. Results clearly demonstrated a predominant role of neutrophils, mediated by phagocytosis and intracellular killing as well as the release of antifungal effector molecules upon activation, resulting in extracellular fungicidal activity. Both mechanisms together account for almost of C. albicans killing, clearly proving that beside being present in larger numbers than other leukocytes, neutrophils functionally dominate the immune response against C. albicans in human blood. A fraction of C. albicans cells escaped phagocytosis and remained extracellular and viable for up to four hours. This immune escape was independent of filamentation and fungal activity and not linked to exhaustion or inactivation of innate immune cells. The occurrence of C. albicans cells being resistant against phagocytosis may account for the high proportion of dissemination in C. albicans bloodstream infection. Taken together, iterative experiment–model–experiment cycles allowed

  11. Human and great ape red blood cells differ in plasmalogen levels and composition

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    Ely John J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmalogens are ether phospholipids required for normal mammalian developmental, physiological, and cognitive functions. They have been proposed to act as membrane antioxidants and reservoirs of polyunsaturated fatty acids as well as influence intracellular signaling and membrane dynamics. Plasmalogens are particularly enriched in cells and tissues of the human nervous, immune, and cardiovascular systems. Humans with severely reduced plasmalogen levels have reduced life spans, abnormal neurological development, skeletal dysplasia, impaired respiration, and cataracts. Plasmalogen deficiency is also found in the brain tissue of individuals with Alzheimer disease. Results In a human and great ape cohort, we measured the red blood cell (RBC levels of the most abundant types of plasmalogens. Total RBC plasmalogen levels were lower in humans than bonobos, chimpanzees, and gorillas, but higher than orangutans. There were especially pronounced cross-species differences in the levels of plasmalogens with a C16:0 moiety at the sn-1 position. Humans on Western or vegan diets had comparable total RBC plasmalogen levels, but the latter group showed moderately higher levels of plasmalogens with a C18:1 moiety at the sn-1 position. We did not find robust sex-specific differences in human or chimpanzee RBC plasmalogen levels or composition. Furthermore, human and great ape skin fibroblasts showed only modest differences in peroxisomal plasmalogen biosynthetic activity. Human and chimpanzee microarray data indicated that genes involved in plasmalogen biosynthesis show cross-species differential expression in multiple tissues. Conclusion We propose that the observed differences in human and great ape RBC plasmalogens are primarily caused by their rates of biosynthesis and/or turnover. Gene expression data raise the possibility that other human and great ape cells and tissues differ in plasmalogen levels. Based on the phenotypes of humans and

  12. Enhancement of Toxic Substances Clearance from Blood Equvalent Solution and Human Whole Blood through High Flux Dialyzer by 1 MHz Ultrasound

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    Shiran, M.B.; Barzegar Marvasti, M.; Shakeri-Zadeh, A.; Shahidi, M.; Tabkhi, N.; Farkhondeh, F.; Kalantar, E.; Asadinejad, A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hemodialysis is a process of removing waste and excess fluid from blood when kidneys cannot function efficiently. It often involves diverting blood to the filter of the dialysis machin to be cleared of toxic substances. Fouling of pores in dialysis membrane caused by adhesion of plasma protein and other toxins will reduce the efficacy of the filtre. Objective: In This study, the influence of pulsed ultrasound waves on diffusion and the prevention of fouling in the filter membrane were investigated. Material and Methods: Pulsed ultrasound waves with frequency of 1 MHz at an intensity of 1 W/cm2 was applied to the high flux (PES 130) filter. Blood and blood equivalent solutions were passed through the filter in separate experimental setups. The amount of Creatinine, Urea and Inulin cleared from both blood equvalent solution and human whole blood passed through High Flux (PES 130) filter were measured in the presence and absence of ultrasound irradiation. Samples were taken from the outlet of the dialyzer every five minutes and the clearance of each constituent was calculated. Results: Statistical analysis of the blood equvalent solution and whole blood indicated the clearance of Urea and Inulin in the presence of ultrasound increased (p<0.05), while no significant effects were observed for Creatinine. Conclusion: It may be concluded that ultrasound, as a mechanical force, can increase the rate of clearance of some toxins (such as middle and large molecules) in the hemodialysis process. PMID:28580332

  13. Enhancement of Toxic Substances Clearance from Blood Equvalent Solution and Human Whole Blood through High Flux Dialyzer by 1 MHz Ultrasound

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    Shiran M. B.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hemodialysis is a process of removing waste and excess fluid from blood when kidneys cannot function efficiently. It often involves diverting blood to the filter of the dialysis machin to be cleared of toxic substances. Fouling of pores in dialysis membrane caused by adhesion of plasma protein and other toxins will reduce the efficacy of the filtre. Objective: In This study, the influence of pulsed ultrasound waves on diffusion and the prevention of fouling in the filter membrane were investigated. Material and Methods: Pulsed ultrasound waves with frequency of 1 MHz at an intensity of 1 W/cm2 was applied to the high flux (PES 130 filter. Blood and blood equivalent solutions were passed through the filter in separate experimental setups. The amount of Creatinine, Urea and Inulin cleared from both blood equvalent solution and human whole blood passed through High Flux (PES 130 filter were measured in the presence and absence of ultrasound irradiation. Samples were taken from the outlet of the dialyzer every five minutes and the clearance of each constituent was calculated. Results: Statistical analysis of the blood equvalent solution and whole blood indicated the clearance of Urea and Inulin in the presence of ultrasound increased (p<0.05, while no significant effects were observed for Creatinine. Conclusion: It may be concluded that ultrasound, as a mechanical force, can increase the rate of clearance of some toxins (such as middle and large molecules in the hemodialysis process.

  14. Blood group astrology - why the AB0 blood groups do not determine the human character nor the appropriate nutrition

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    Martina Gajšek Grbec

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available AB0 blood groups are inherited markers on blood cells. Since their discovery, there were numerous attempts to be attributed a wide variety of biological functions they don’t possess. The purpose of this article is primarily to inform the professional, as well as lay public that the theory of healthy nutrition based on AB0 blood groups represents nothing more than a pseudoscience used for mass exploitation and commercial purposes. ABO blood groups were attributed such characteristics by naturopathic doctor Peter D'Adamo, who on the basis of false methods and erroneous assumptions wrote a bestseller "Eat Right For Your Type". It claims that the blood groupsAB0 represent a "key to the functioning of our immune system" and that the blood group based diet represents a “key to the health of every man”. As in the case of nutrition based on the ABO blood groups, the scientific knowledge in the field of immunohematology is misused to mislead the lay public, we are obliged to explain the real meaning and the role of blood groups in health and disease, the misuse of blood groups in relation to healthy nutrition.

  15. Incidence of human herpes virus-6 and human cytomegalovirus infections in donated bone marrow and umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells

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    Behzad-Behbahani A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the incidence of human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6 and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infections that are potentially transmitted to haematopoietic stem cells (HSC transplant recipients via bone marrow (BM or umbilical cord blood (UCB. Bone marrow progenitor cells were collected from 30 allogenic BM donors. UCB HSC were collected from 34 subjects. The extracted DNA was then processed using nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR technique. HCMV and HHV-6 serological status were determined by enzyme immunoassay (EIA. Nested PCR identified HCMV in 22 (73% of 30 samples of BM progenitor cells but in only eight (23.5% of 34 samples of UBC HSC ( P = 0.001. HHV-6 DNA was detected in 11 (36.6% of 30 BM progenitor cells and in only one (2.9% of 34 UBC cells ( P = 0.002. Both HHV-6 and HCMV infections were determined in nine (26.5% of 34 bone marrow samples. The results indicate that, the risk of HCMV and HHV-6 via BM progenitor cells is higher than transmission by UCB cells ( P= 0.04.

  16. Human hantavirus infection elicits pronounced redistribution of mononuclear phagocytes in peripheral blood and airways.

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    Saskia Scholz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hantaviruses infect humans via inhalation of virus-contaminated rodent excreta. Infection can cause severe disease with up to 40% mortality depending on the viral strain. The virus primarily targets the vascular endothelium without direct cytopathic effects. Instead, exaggerated immune responses may inadvertently contribute to disease development. Mononuclear phagocytes (MNPs, including monocytes and dendritic cells (DCs, orchestrate the adaptive immune responses. Since hantaviruses are transmitted via inhalation, studying immunological events in the airways is of importance to understand the processes leading to immunopathogenesis. Here, we studied 17 patients infected with Puumala virus that causes a mild form of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS. Bronchial biopsies as well as longitudinal blood draws were obtained from the patients. During the acute stage of disease, a significant influx of MNPs expressing HLA-DR, CD11c or CD123 was detected in the patients' bronchial tissue. In parallel, absolute numbers of MNPs were dramati