WorldWideScience

Sample records for human blink reflex

  1. Associative stimulation of the supraorbital nerve fails to induce timing-specific plasticity in the human blink reflex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeuner, Kirsten E; Knutzen, Arne; Al-Ali, Asmaa;

    2010-01-01

    Associative high-frequency electrical stimulation (HFS) of the supraorbital nerve in five healthy individuals induced long-term potentiation (LTP)-like or depression (LTD)-like changes in the human blink reflex circuit according to the rules of spike timing-dependent plasticity (Mao and Evinger...... the orbicularis oculi muscles, HFS(LTP) induced excessive LTP-like associative plasticity relative to healthy controls, which was normalized after botulinum toxin (BTX) injections (Quartarone et al, 2006)....

  2. Zolmitriptan reverses blink reflex changes induced during the migraine attack in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tommaso, M; Guido, M; Libro, G; Sciruicchio, V; Puca, F

    2000-07-28

    The question about the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)(1B-1D) receptors agonists, if the clinical efficacy in migraine attacks is linked with the action at the central level or at the peripheral one, is still unresolved. We evaluated the effects of zolmitriptan and sumatriptan on blink reflex in thirty migraine without aura patients during the attacks in order to assess the central action on the trigeminal system. Both drugs were effective in reducing headache severity compared to placebo. In the migraine attack an increased area of the R3 component on the pain side was observed; it was suppressed by zolmitriptan, which confirmed its action on the central trigeminal circuits, though the clinical relevance of this effect could be questioned.

  3. Multi-level approach to anaesthetic effects produced by sevoflurane or propofol in humans : 1. BIS and blink reflex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourisse, J.; Lerou, J.; Struys, M.; Zwarts, M.; Booij, L.

    2007-01-01

    Background. The relative roles of forebrain and brainstem in producing adequate anaesthesia are unclear. Methods. We simultaneously analysed the effects of sevoflurane (Group S; n = 18) or propofol (Group P; n = 29) on the bispectral index (BIS) and the first component of the blink reflex (RI). The

  4. Multi-level approach to anaesthetic effects produced by sevoflurane or propofol in humans: 1. BIS and blink reflex.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourisse, J.M.J.; Lerou, J.G.C.; Struys, M.; Zwarts, M.J.; Booij, L.H.D.J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The relative roles of forebrain and brainstem in producing adequate anaesthesia are unclear. METHODS: We simultaneously analysed the effects of sevoflurane (Group S; n = 18) or propofol (Group P; n = 29) on the bispectral index (BIS) and the first component of the blink reflex (R1). The

  5. [Value of blink reflex studies in neurosurgical problems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamjoom, Z; Nahser, H C; Nau, H E

    1983-09-01

    Blinking reflex studies were done in neurosurgical patients with processes in the posterior fossa and idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia. Alterations were found in space occupying, ischemic, and traumatic lesions of the trigemino-facial system. The analysis of the components of the blinking reflex can give hints to the site of the lesion and also to the prognosis of the underlying process.

  6. Startle and blink reflex in high functioning autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erturk, Ozdem; Korkmaz, Baris; Alev, Gulce; Demirbilek, Veysi; Kiziltan, Meral

    2016-06-01

    An important clinical feature of autism is the presence of atypical responses to sensory stimuli. In this study, we investigated if high functioning autistic patients had abnormalities in the blink reflex and the startle reaction to auditory or somatosensory stimuli. Fourteen patients aged between 7 and 16 years were included in the study. We found a longer latency of the blink reflex, an increased duration and amplitude of the auditory startle reaction and a lower presence rate of the somatosensorial startle reaction in autistic patients. To better define the sensorial characteristics of the disease could improve the therapeutic management of children with autism spectrum disorder.

  7. Stimulation of the corneal blinking reflex by ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobias, C.; Luce, J.; Yanni, N.; Brustad, T.; Lyman, J.; Kimura, S.

    1961-05-04

    Accelerated alpha particles from the Berkeley heavy-ion linear accelerator were used in a series of experiments designed to elucidate the conditions by which radiation can stimulate or modify nerve action in mammals. Single millisecond pulses in excess of 40,000 radsor pulse trains of less than 1 sec duration elicited the corneal blinking reflex when delivered to the cornea of unanesthetized rabbits. The lowest threshold dose was observed when the Bragg ionization peak was placed at 140 {mu} depth.

  8. Effects of visual cortex activation on the nociceptive blink reflex in healthy subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona L Sava

    Full Text Available Bright light can cause excessive visual discomfort, referred to as photophobia. The precise mechanisms linking luminance to the trigeminal nociceptive system supposed to mediate this discomfort are not known. To address this issue in healthy human subjects we modulated differentially visual cortex activity by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS or flash light stimulation, and studied the effect on supraorbital pain thresholds and the nociceptive-specific blink reflex (nBR. Low frequency rTMS that inhibits the underlying cortex, significantly decreased pain thresholds, increased the 1st nBR block ipsi- and contralaterally and potentiated habituation contralaterally. After high frequency or sham rTMS over the visual cortex, and rMS over the right greater occipital nerve we found no significant change. By contrast, excitatory flash light stimulation increased pain thresholds, decreased the 1st nBR block of ipsi- and contralaterally and increased habituation contralaterally. Our data demonstrate in healthy subjects a functional relation between the visual cortex and the trigeminal nociceptive system, as assessed by the nociceptive blink reflex. The results argue in favour of a top-down inhibitory pathway from the visual areas to trigemino-cervical nociceptors. We postulate that in normal conditions this visuo-trigeminal inhibitory pathway may avoid disturbance of vision by too frequent blinking and that hypoactivity of the visual cortex for pathological reasons may promote headache and photophobia.

  9. Pharmacology of reflex blinks in the rat: a novel model for headache research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M G; Andreou, A P; McMahon, S B; Spanswick, D

    2016-12-01

    Migraineurs are highly sensitive to the nitric oxide donor glyceryl trinitrate which triggers attacks in many sufferers. In animal studies, glyceryl trinitrate increases neuronal activity in the trigeminovascular pathway and elevates neurotransmitter levels in the brainstem. Many migraineurs also display alterations in blink reflexes, known to involve brainstem circuits. We investigated the effect of GTN on evoked blinks in the anaesthetised rat to determine whether such reflexes may prove useful as the basis for a novel animal model to evaluate potential anti-migraine therapeutic agents. In anaesthetised rats the electromyogram associated with the reflex blink evoked by corneal airpuff was recorded. Rats were infused with glyceryl trinitrate, sumatriptan plus glyceryl trinitrate or vehicle control. Changes in the magnitude of the reflex blink-associated electromyogram following these treatments were measured. Glyceryl trinitrate potentiated the evoked reflex blink-associated EMG response from 2 h after infusion. That effect was abolished by simultaneous infusion of sumatriptan with glyceryl trinitrate. These results show that simple skin surface measurements of evoked electromyographic activity in the rat can reliably detect the evoked blink reflex that can be potentiated by nitric oxide donors. This novel model may be an effective tool for evaluating putative anti-migraine therapeutic agents.

  10. Reflex excitability regulates prepulse inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schicatano, E J; Peshori, K R; Gopalaswamy, R; Sahay, E; Evinger, C

    2000-06-01

    Presentation of a weak stimulus, a prepulse, before a reflex-evoking stimulus decreases the amplitude of the reflex response relative to reflex amplitude evoked without a preceding prepulse. For example, presenting a brief tone before a trigeminal blink-eliciting stimulus significantly reduces reflex blink amplitude. A common explanation of such data are that sensory processing of the prepulse modifies reflex circuit behavior. The current study investigates the converse hypothesis that the intrinsic characteristics of the reflex circuit rather than prepulse processing determine prepulse modification of trigeminal and acoustic reflex blinks. Unilateral lesions of substantia nigra pars compacta neurons created rats with hyperexcitable trigeminal reflex blinks but normally excitable acoustic reflex blinks. In control rats, presentation of a prepulse reduced the amplitude of both trigeminal and acoustic reflex blinks. In 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, however, the same acoustic prepulse facilitated trigeminal reflex blinks but inhibited acoustic reflex blinks. The magnitude of prepulse modification correlated with reflex excitability. Humans exhibited the same pattern of prepulse modification. An acoustic prepulse facilitated the trigeminal reflex blinks of subjects with hyperexcitable trigeminal reflex blinks caused by Parkinson's disease. The same prepulse inhibited trigeminal reflex blinks of age-matched control subjects. Prepulse modification also correlated with trigeminal reflex blink excitability. These data show that reflex modification by a prepulse reflects the intrinsic characteristics of the reflex circuit rather than an external adjustment of the reflex circuit by the prepulse.

  11. Modulation of trigeminal reflex excitability in migraine: effects of attention and habituation on the blink reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tommaso, Marina; Murasecco, Donatella; Libro, Giuseppe; Guido, Marco; Sciruicchio, Vittorio; Specchio, Luigi Maria; Gallai, Virgilio; Puca, Francomichele

    2002-06-01

    The modulation of trigeminal reflex excitability in migraine patients was evaluated during the asymptomatic phase by studying the effects of attention, habituation and preconditioning stimulus on the R2 and R3 components of the blink reflex (BR). Fifty patients suffering from migraine without aura, 20 affected by migraine with aura and 35 sex- and age-matched controls were selected. In subgroups of migraine with-aura and without-aura patients, and normal controls, the blink reflex was elicited during different cognitive situations: (a) spontaneous mental activity; (b) stimulus anticipation; (c) recognition of target numbers. In the remaining subjects, R2 and R3 habituation was evaluated by repetitive stimulation at 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 s intervals. The R2 and R3 recovery curves were also computed. A reduced R3 threshold with a normal pain threshold was found in migraine with-aura and without-aura patients; the R3 component was not significantly correlated with the pain thresholds in patients and controls. The R2 and R3 components were less influenced by the warning of the stimulus in migraine without-aura and migraine with-aura patients, in comparison with the control group. A slight increase of both R2 and R3 recovery after preconditioning stimulus was also observed in migraine patients, probably caused by a phenomenon of trigeminal hyperexcitability persisting after the last attack. The abnormal BR modulation by alerting expresses in migraine a dysfunction of adaptation capacity to environmental conditions, probably predisposing to migraine.

  12. Aging of the trigeminal blink system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peshori, K R; Schicatano, E J; Gopalaswamy, R; Sahay, E; Evinger, C

    2001-02-01

    This study characterizes trigeminal blinks in normal human subjects between 20 and 80 years of age, 60-year-old Parkinson's disease patients, and young and old guinea pigs. In normal humans over 60 years of age, lid-closing duration, and the excitability and latency of the trigeminal reflex blink increase significantly relative to younger subjects. Aged guinea pigs appear to display similar increases in reflex blink duration and latency. Reflex blink amplitude, however, does not change consistently with age. For subjects less than 70 years of age, a unilateral trigeminal stimulus evokes a 37% larger blink in the eyelid ipsilateral to the stimulus than in the contralateral eyelid, but 70-year-olds exhibit blinks of equal amplitude. In all cases, blink duration is identical for the two eyelids. If normal, age-related loss of dopamine neurons explains these trigeminal blink modifications, then Parkinson's disease should exaggerate age-related changes in these blink parameters. Preliminary data show that Parkinson's disease increases blink duration and excitability relative to age-matched control subjects. Thus, it seems likely that normal, age-related loss of dopamine neurons accounts for increases in trigeminal blink excitability and duration. A previously uncharacterized type of trigeminally evoked blink appears after age 40 in humans and in aged guinea pigs. In subjects less than 40 years old, a single trigeminal stimulus elicits a single reflex blink. In subjects over age 40, however, a single stimulus frequently evokes a reflex blink and additional blinks that occur at a fixed interval relative to the preceding blink. These "blink oscillations" may arise from oscillatory processes within trigeminal reflex blink circuits. The presence of exaggerated blink oscillations in subjects with dry eye and benign essential blepharospasm suggests that an alteration of blink oscillation mechanisms plays a critical role in these disorders.

  13. Results of Investigations on the Blink Reflex as a Protective Means against Laser and LED Radiation: A Description Based on Fundamental Psychophysical Laws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans-Dieter Reidenbach [Cologne University of Applied Sciences Research Laboratory on Medical Technology/HLT Betzdorfer Str. 2, 50679 Koeln (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    2,650 volunteers have been investigated in blink-reflex studies with various test equipment, where a laser beam or a single element L.E.D. or an array have been used to irradiate the human eye in order to initiate a physiological reaction. In addition 1,196 volunteers took part in aversion response studies. 491 persons out of 2,650, i.e., 18.53 %, showed a blink reflex or lid closure, upon exposure to irradiation from a laser or an L.E.D.. Only 6.19 %, i. e., 74 out of 1,196 volunteers, showed other aversion responses, like gross eye or head movements. The different parameters which are mainly responsible for the respective results concerning the blink reflex will be dealt with and explained, as they have been achieved up to now. In addition some experimentally verified dependencies on fundamental psychophysical laws will be described. Besides the statement that the blink reflex should not be used as a sufficient physiological protective means it can be generally stated that in order to ensure their safety, in spite of the missing blink-reflex and other aversion responses, users of low-power lasers should be instructed to perform active protective reactions, e.g., to close the eyes voluntarily and simultaneously move the head away from the beam in the case of an unintentional exposure or intrabeam viewing. (author)

  14. Is the Nociceptive Blink Reflex Associated with Psychological Factors in Healthy Participants?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, Yuri; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi;

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the possible association between the nociceptive blink reflex (nBR) and various pain-related psychological measures: the Anxiety Sensitivity Index-3 (ASI-3), the Fear of Pain Questionnaire III (FPQ-III), the Pain Vigilance and Awareness Questionnaire (PVAQ), the Somatosensory...

  15. Psychophysiological consideration of the blink reflex as a function of wavelength; Psychophysiologische Betrachtung des Lidschlussreflexes als Funktion der Wellenlaenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reidenbach, H.D. [Fachhochschule Koeln (Germany). Forschungsbereich Medizintechnik: Hochfrequenz- und Lasertechnik

    2004-07-01

    It has been shown in investigations of the blink reflex that the incidence depends on the wavelength of the applied laser radiation. The experimentally acquired correlation shows a remarkably weaker association to the V({lambda})-curve compared to the spectral visibility function. The present results might be described by a dependence which is known from the fundamental Weber-Fechner-law in psychophysics and might be given as a blink reflex function according to the Stevens power function. (orig.)

  16. Effects of monotherapy and polytherapy on the blink reflex in epileptic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancman, M E; Cristiano, E; Golimstok, A; Granillo, R J

    1993-01-01

    We performed the blink reflex (BR) in 20 normal volunteers, 13 epileptic patients receiving antiepileptic drug (AED) monotherapy, and 13 epileptic patients receiving AED polytherapy. Comparison of R1, ipsilateral and contralateral R2 and VIIth nerve latencies in the three groups showed no statistically significant differences R1 and VIIth nerve latencies among the three groups. There were statistically significant differences between the polytherapy group and the monotherapy and control groups in comparisons of ipsilateral and contralateral R2. There were no significant differences between the monotherapy group and the control group for ipsilateral and contralateral R2. We hypothesized that AED polytherapy might interfere with synaptic transmission in the polysynaptic pathway of the blink reflex, prolonging the latency of R2. These results provide further evidence of the pathophysiologic effects associated with polytherapy in epileptic patients.

  17. The blink reflex and the corneal reflex are followed by cortical activity resembling the nociceptive potentials induced by trigeminal laser stimulation in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tommaso, M; Libro, G; Guido, M; Sciruicchio, V; Puca, F

    2001-09-07

    Laser stimulation of the supraorbital regions evokes brain potentials (LEPs) related to trigeminal nociception. The aim of this study was to record the R2 component of the blink reflex and the corneal reflex in 20 normal subjects, comparing the scalp activity following these reflexes with the nociceptive potentials evoked by CO2 laser stimulation of supraorbital regions. Cortical and muscular reflexes evoked by stimulation of the first trigeminal branch were recorded simultaneously. The R2 component of the blink reflex and the corneal reflex were followed by two cortical peaks, which resembled morphologically N-P waves of LEPs. The two peaks demonstrated a difference in latency of approximately 40 ms, which is consistent with activation time of nociception. This finding suggests that these reflexes are induced by activation of small pain-related fibers.

  18. Values of blink reflex and electroneurography in diagnosis of facial paralysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:The electrophysiological test was mainly achieved by the reaction of nerve fiber to electrical stimulus,usually expressed by the amplitude and latency.Blink reflex and electroneurography (ENOG) are widely applied in facial paralysis,the amplitude would step down,and the latency would prolong when the facial nerve was injured.OBJECTIVE:To compare the value of blink reflex and ENOG in the diagnosis of facial paralysis (Bell's palsy).DESIGN:A controlled trial.SETTINGS:Affiliated Hospital,Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine;West China Hospital of Sichuan University;Mianyang Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine;Sichuan People's Hospital.PARTICIPANTS:The patients who had finished the tests of blink reflex (n=207) and ENOG (n=205) were selected from the Affiliated Hospital,Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine;West China Hospital of Sichuan University;Mianyang Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine;Sichuan People's Hospital from September 2001 to July 2003.After treatment for 4 weeks,the patients finished tests of blink reflex (n =207) and ENOG (n =205) were randomly divided into primary treatment group (n=68,69),acupuncture group (n =71,66) and comprehensive treatment group (n =68,70),respectively.Approval was obtained from the ethic committee of hospital.METHODS:Patients in the primary treatment group and acupuncture group were treated with western medicine,acupuncture and moxibustion alone respectively,and those in the comprehensive treatment group were treated with acupuncture and moxibustion based on western medicine.The whole period of treatment was 4 weeks.The tests of blink reflex and ENOG were carried out using Japanese light and electricity MEB-2200 electromyogram/induced potential instrument for once before and after treatment respectively.The normal value of the latency period of wave R1 was within 13 ms,and the difference was 1 - 1.2 ms between the left and right sides.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:The latency of wave Rl

  19. Blink reflex in subjects with different hypnotizability: New findings for an old debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarcangelo, Enrica L; Briscese, Lucia; Capitani, Simone; Orsini, Paolo; Varanini, Maurizio; Rossi, Bruno; Carboncini, Maria C

    2016-09-01

    Hypnotizability is associated with attentional characteristics whose neurophysiological bases are still under debate. Aim of the study was the assessment of possible hypnotizability-related differences in blink reflex (BR) which has a nociceptive component, is sensitive to attentional-emotional traits and states and is modulated by the brain dopamine content. In 10 high (highs) and 10 low hypnotizable participants (lows) BR was induced by electrical nociceptive stimulation of the right supraorbital nerve in the absence (noW) and in the presence of a visual cue preceding the electrical stimulation by 0.1ms (W01) and by 1ms (W1). The studied variables were: the amplitude of BR components (R1, R2, R3), the amplitude of the quick change (TO) of heart rate ("turbulence") induced by stimulation and its recovery slope (TS), the role of the Behavioral Inhibition/Activation System (BIS/BAS) in the variability BR and cardiac turbulence. Repeated measures ANOVA did not show any significant difference between highs and lows in blink reflex. TO indicated stimulation related HR increase in highs and decrease in lows, TS was larger in highs. BIS and BAS accounted for the warning effects on the BR amplitude and modulated the hypnotizability and warning effects on TO and TS. Findings do not support dopamine based hypnotizability-related attentional abilities. In contrast, they indicate that hypnotizability modulates the short-lasting cardiac response to electrical nociceptive stimulation.

  20. Usefulness of blink reflex in hypothyroid patients with or without polyneuropathy: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Sachin; Udan, Vikas; Jain, Jyoti; Shende, Vinod; Singh, Ramji

    2014-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction is an important consequence of thyroid deficiency. Cranial nerves are frequently affected in hypothyroid process. On routine nerve conduction studies, symptomatic peripheral and cranial neuropathy can be detected, however, diagnosing subclinical cranial neuropathy pose the major problem. Blink reflex (BR), has been shown to be an effective method for revealing subclinical involvement of cranial nerves in generalized neuropathies. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of BR as a method for early diagnosis of subclinical cranial neuropathy in hypothyroid patients with or without overt peripheral polyneuropathy. A case control study was conducted on 150 subjects aged 18 years and above (100 controls, 50 cases). A routine nerve conduction study and BR evaluation was done in all the subjects. We found abnormal BR response in 50% of hypothyroid patients studied. In hypothyroid patient without polyneuropathy R1 latency was significantly prolonged (P < 0.05 Vs control). Ipsilateral and contralateral R2 latencies were significantly prolonged in hypothyroid cases with or without polyneuropathy on bilateral stimulation. Magnitude of prolongation was greater in with polyneuropathy group. In conclusion, study suggests that BR is a useful non-invasive method for the detection of clinically silent cranial nerve compromise in hypothyroid patients.

  1. The three responses of the blink reflex in adult and juvenile migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tommaso, M; Guido, M; Libro, G; Sciruicchio, V; Puca, F

    2000-06-01

    Recent theories about migraine pathogenesis have emphasized the role of the trigeminal system in the pathogenesis of migraine attacks (Moskowitz, 1997). The blink reflex (BR) could be a suitable method to evaluate the trigeminal system in migraine, as it is generally elicited by stimulation of the trigeminal ophthalmic division (Kimura et al., 1967), involved in migraine attacks. Sixty one adult and 15 juvenile migraine without aura subjects were selected, in order to evaluate the BR features, including the subjective perceptive and pain thresholds and the R1, R2 and R3 components intensity thresholds and amplitudes. The electrophysiological procedure was carried out during the pain free phase. The findings were compared with those of 28 healthy controls, 18 adults and 10 children. In both adult and juvenile migraine sufferers an early appearance of the R3 response at almost the R2 threshold was observed in comparison with age-matched controls. Unfortunately, the anatomic and physiologic organization of the R3 component is uncertain: its early onset could suggest a dysfunction of the inhibitory control system on the trigeminal networks, which may predispose to migraine attacks.

  2. 瞬目反射在急性面神经炎中的应用价值%The value of blink reflex in facial paralysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    战丽; 梁冰; 周阳

    2011-01-01

    [目的]探讨瞬目反射对面神经炎早期诊断和病变范围评估的价值.[方法]对60例面神经炎患者在发病1~7 d内进行瞬目反射检查并与神经电图检查作对照.[结果]瞬目反射异常率为100%(60/60),神经电图异常率为46.6%(28/60),差异有统计学意义.瞬目反射提示单纯面神经损害68.3%(41/60),面神经、脑干和三叉神经联合损害19例.[结论]瞬目反射是面神经炎早期诊断的敏感指标,对评估病变范围有助.%[Objective] To explore the value of blink reflex examination on the early diagnosis and extent of facial paralysis.[ Mothods] 60 cases of facial paralysis patients accepted blink reflexes examination and compared with nerve eleetronystagmography examination within 1 to 7 days. [ Results] The blink reflex abnormality rate was 100% (60/60), abnormal nerve diagram was 46.6% (28/60), the ditterenee was statistically significant. Blink reflex in facial nerve damage alone suggested a pure facial nerve damage 68.3%(41/60). Facial nerve, brainstem, and extensive damage to the trigeminal nerve were examined in 19 cases. [Conclusion] The facial blink reflex is a sensitive marker of early diagnosis on facial paralysis and is helpful for the assessment of the extent of the disease.

  3. Heterosynaptic long-term depression of craniofacial nociception: divergent effects on pain perception and blink reflex in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yekta, Sareh Said; Lamp, Susanne; Ellrich, Jens

    2006-04-01

    Noxious low-frequency stimulation (LFS) of presynaptic nerve fibers induces long-term depression (LTD) of synaptic transmission. In vitro studies suggest a sole homosynaptic effect. Consequently, the present study addressed the hypothesis that LTD of craniofacial nociception in man is mediated by a homosynaptic mechanism. Nociceptive supraorbital afferents were excited by electric pulses via a concentric electrode in ten healthy volunteers. The electrically evoked bilateral blink reflex (BR) was recorded from both orbicularis oculi muscles by surface electrodes. The BR was evoked in blocks of ten electric stimuli each (0.1 Hz) with an interblock interval of 8 min. Conditioning noxious LFS (1 Hz, 20 min) was applied via concentric electrode either to the same site as BR test stimuli (ipsilateral) or to the corresponding contralateral forehead area (contralateral). LFS and test stimulus intensities corresponded to about threefold the pain threshold. After three baseline stimulus blocks, either conditioning ipsilateral or contralateral LFS were applied or stimulation was interrupted for 20 min as a control task. Afterwards, test stimulation blocks were continued for 40 min. Each volunteer participated in all three sessions on different days. Noxious LFS induced LTD of the BR independently from the side of conditioning stimulation. Pain perception decreased after ipsilateral LFS but not after contralateral LFS. The bilateral effect of noxious LFS on the BR provides evidence for heterosynaptic LTD based on bilateral projections of supraorbital nerve afferents onto spinal trigeminal nuclei. The divergent effect on pain perception may be due to a preferential contralateral projection of nociceptive afferents onto reflex interneurons but not onto trigeminothalamic projection neurons.

  4. The vestibulosympathetic reflex in humans: neural interactions between cardiovascular reflexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Chester A.; Monahan, Kevin D.

    2002-01-01

    1. Over the past 5 years, there has been emerging evidence that the vestibular system regulates sympathetic nerve activity in humans. We have studied this issue in humans by using head-down rotation (HDR) in the prone position. 2. These studies have clearly demonstrated increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and calf vascular resistance during HDR. These responses are mediated by engagement of the otolith organs and not the semicircular canals. 3. However, differential activation of sympathetic nerve activity has been observed during HDR. Unlike MSNA, skin sympathetic nerve activity does not increase with HDR. 4. Examination of the vestibulosympathetic reflex with other cardiovascular reflexes (i.e. barorereflexes and skeletal muscle reflexes) has shown an additive interaction for MSNA. 5. The additive interaction between the baroreflexes and vestibulosympathetic reflex suggests that the vestibular system may assist in defending against orthostatic challenges in humans by elevating MSNA beyond that of the baroreflexes. 6. In addition, the further increase in MSNA via otolith stimulation during isometric handgrip, when arterial pressure is elevated markedly, indicates that the vestibulosympathetic reflex is a powerful activator of MSNA and may contribute to blood pressure and flow regulation during dynamic exercise. 7. Future studies will help evaluate the importance of the vestibulosympathetic reflex in clinical conditions associated with orthostatic hypotension.

  5. Inhibition of the blink reflex R2 component after supraorbital and index finger stimulations is reduced in cluster headache: an indication for both segmental and suprasegmental dysfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozza, A; Schoenen, J; Delwaide, P J

    1997-05-01

    Peripheral as well as central mechanisms are thought to play a role in cluster headache pathogenesis. We have studied recovery curves of the R2 component of the blink reflex after conditioning by supraorbital or index finger stimuli in 10 episodic cluster headache (CH) patients during a cluster period and in 10 healthy controls. There was no significant change of R2 threshold, latency or area in CH patients. After paired supraorbital stimuli, R2 recovered more rapidly in patients on the symptomatic side. After index stimulations, R2 recovery was more rapid on both symptomatic and non-symptomatic sides in patients compared to controls. Naloxone (0.4 mg) i.v. in two subjects partially reversed the R2 suppression induced by index finger stimuli. The unilateral decrease of R2 inhibition after a segmental supraorbital stimulus most likely reflects sensitisation in the spinal trigeminal nucleus. Whether the latter is due to irritation of the ophthalmic nerve within the cavernous sinus region, which is thought to be pivotal in CH pathogenesis, remains to be proven. In addition, we propose that the bilateral deficit of R2 inhibition after an extrasegmental exteroceptive stimulus might reflect hypoactivity of reticular nuclei, possibly because of reduced central opioid activity.

  6. [Cutaneo-muscular reflexes of the human hand. II. Neurophysiologic aspects of reflex organization and coordination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinck, H M; Berkefeld, J; Conrad, B

    1987-09-01

    The organization and coordination of cutaneo-muscular reflexes of human finger and arm muscles to electrical stimulation of the digital nerves were investigated in 14 healthy volunteers. Thumb and finger muscles, although antagonists, showed homonymous reflex effects whereas the wrist and elbow muscles exhibited an reciprocally alternating reflex pattern in pairs of antagonists (Fig. 1). The mechanographical correlate of the homonymous reflex activity in distal muscles was a short release (Fig. 6). The receptive field for evoking such reflex effects covered both the palmar and dorsal surfaces of the fingers (Fig. 2). However, with stimulation of the thumb, the muscles of the fingers and of the wrist showed reflex reversal (Figs 3, 5). If the stimulus was moved from the second to the fifth fingers, a successive attenuation of the transcortical reflex component was seen (Fig. 4). It is concluded that the reflexes investigated are complex flexor reflexes comprising both a distal release and a proximal flexion synergy. According to opposition of the thumb in grasping, the receptive field terminates between thumb and index finger. These reflexes are supposed to have no assisting function during corticalized manipulatory movements--in contrast to the long-loop reflexes evoked by epicritic sensibility. The transcortical servo is blocked if the eliciting stimulus is contaminated by nociceptive signals; its receptive field is confined to those fingers used in the precision grip.

  7. The attentional blink reveals serial working memory encoding: evidence from virtual and human event-related potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craston, Patrick; Wyble, Brad; Chennu, Srivas; Bowman, Howard

    2009-03-01

    Observers often miss a second target (T2) if it follows an identified first target item (T1) within half a second in rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP), a finding termed the attentional blink. If two targets are presented in immediate succession, however, accuracy is excellent (Lag 1 sparing). The resource sharing hypothesis proposes a dynamic distribution of resources over a time span of up to 600 msec during the attentional blink. In contrast, the ST(2) model argues that working memory encoding is serial during the attentional blink and that, due to joint consolidation, Lag 1 is the only case where resources are shared. Experiment 1 investigates the P3 ERP component evoked by targets in RSVP. The results suggest that, in this context, P3 amplitude is an indication of bottom-up strength rather than a measure of cognitive resource allocation. Experiment 2, employing a two-target paradigm, suggests that T1 consolidation is not affected by the presentation of T2 during the attentional blink. However, if targets are presented in immediate succession (Lag 1 sparing), they are jointly encoded into working memory. We use the ST(2) model's neural network implementation, which replicates a range of behavioral results related to the attentional blink, to generate "virtual ERPs" by summing across activation traces. We compare virtual to human ERPs and show how the results suggest a serial nature of working memory encoding as implied by the ST(2) model.

  8. The Electrooculogram and a New Blink Detection Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-30

    blinks involve both reflexive (startle) blinks, which occur to protect the eye in reaction to an external impetus, and spontaneous (endogenous) blinks...burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching...0964. Report contains color. 14. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) Accurate and efficient real- time cognitive workload assessment has many important

  9. Noisy cooperative intermittent processes: From blinking quantum dots to human consciousness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allegrini, Paolo; Paradisi, Paolo; Menicucci, Danilo; Bedini, Remo; Gemignani, Angelo [Istituto di Fisiologia Clinica (IFC-CNR), Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Fronzoni, Leone, E-mail: allegrini@ifc.cnr.it [Dipartimento di Fisica ' E. Fermi' -Universita di Pisa and INFM CRS-SOFT, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2011-07-08

    We study the superposition of a non-Poisson renewal process with the presence of a superimposed Poisson noise. The non-Poisson renewals mark the passage between meta-stable states in system with self-organization. We propose methods to measure the amount of information due to the two independent processes independently, and we see that a superficial study based on the survival probabilities yield stretched-exponential relaxations. Our method is in fact able to unravel the inverse-power law relaxation of the isolated non-Poisson processes, even when noise is present. We provide examples of this behavior in system of diverse nature, from blinking nano-crystals to weak turbulence. Finally we focus our discussion on events extracted from human electroencephalograms, and we discuss their connection with emerging properties of integrated neural dynamics, i.e. consciousness.

  10. Noisy cooperative intermittent processes: From blinking quantum dots to human consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegrini, Paolo; Paradisi, Paolo; Menicucci, Danilo; Bedini, Remo; Gemignani, Angelo; Fronzoni, Leone

    2011-07-01

    We study the superposition of a non-Poisson renewal process with the presence of a superimposed Poisson noise. The non-Poisson renewals mark the passage between meta-stable states in system with self-organization. We propose methods to measure the amount of information due to the two independent processes independently, and we see that a superficial study based on the survival probabilities yield stretched-exponential relaxations. Our method is in fact able to unravel the inverse-power law relaxation of the isolated non-Poisson processes, even when noise is present. We provide examples of this behavior in system of diverse nature, from blinking nano-crystals to weak turbulence. Finally we focus our discussion on events extracted from human electroencephalograms, and we discuss their connection with emerging properties of integrated neural dynamics, i.e. consciousness.

  11. Reflex control of human jaw muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türker, Kemal S

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss what is known about the reflex control of the human masticatory system and to propose a method for standardized investigation. Literature regarding the current knowledge of activation of jaw muscles, receptors involved in the feedback control, and reflex pathways is discussed. The reflexes are discussed under the headings of the stimulation conditions. This was deliberately done to remind the reader that under each stimulation condition, several receptor systems are activated, and that it is not yet possible to stimulate only one afferent system in isolation in human mastication experiments. To achieve a method for uniform investigation, we need to set a method for stimulation of the afferent pathway under study with minimal simultaneous activation of other receptor systems. This stimulation should also be done in an efficient and reproducible way. To substantiate our conviction to standardize the stimulus type and parameters, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of mechanical and electrical stimuli. For mechanical stimulus to be delivered in a reproducible way, the following precautions are suggested: The stimulus delivery system (often a probe attached to a vibrator) should be brought into secure contact with the area of stimulation. To minimize the slack between the probe, the area to be stimulated should be taken up by the application of pre-load, and the delivered force should be recorded in series. Electrical stimulus has advantages in that it can be delivered in a reproducible way, though its physiological relevance can be questioned. It is also necessary to standardize the method for recording and analyzing the responses of the motoneurons to the stimulation. For that, a new technique is introduced, and its advantages over the currently used methods are discussed. The new method can illustrate the synaptic potential that is induced in the motoneurons without the errors that are unavoidable in the current

  12. Sympathetic reflex control of blood flow in human peripheral tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O

    1991-01-01

    Sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes are essential for the maintenance of arterial blood pressure in upright position. It has been generally believed that supraspinal sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes elicited by changes in baroreceptor activity play an important role. Recent studies on human...... sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes are blocked. Blood flow has been measure by the local 133Xe-technique. The results indicate the presence of spinal as well as supraspinal sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes to human peripheral tissues. Especially is emphasized the presence of a local sympathetic veno...

  13. Sympathetic reflex control of blood flow in human peripheral tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O

    1991-01-01

    Sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes are essential for the maintenance of arterial blood pressure in upright position. It has been generally believed that supraspinal sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes elicited by changes in baroreceptor activity play an important role. Recent studies on human ...... to collision of normodromically and antidromically conducted impulses in efferent sympathetic vasoconstrictor fibers. The evidence obtained suggests that sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes to postural changes are complex and highly differentiated....

  14. Functional neurological evaluation of the brainstem. Part I: the blink reflex Evaluación neurofuncional del tallo cerebral. Parte I: Reflejo del parpadeo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Bedoya

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available

    The blink reflex is the neural response elicited in the orbicular oculi muscle after single or paired supraorbital nerve stimulation, by either electrical, mechanical, acoustic, thermal, chemical or magnetic stimulation. It is made up of three responses called R1, R2 and R3. R1 is an early response that follows A beta fibers, and does not habituate. R2 is a middle-latency response that follows A beta and A delta fibers, tends to habituate and is modulated by sensorimotor suprasegmental structures.

    R3 is a long-latency response, generated by stimulation of a multisynaptic chain of neurons that involve type C fibers belonging to a complex pontothalamic-amigdalo-cerebellar pathway. It is also possible to record three silent periods if the blink reflex is obtained while the subject makes a voluntary facial muscle effort.

    The functional study of this reflex allows to define with certainty whether the lesion is in afferent or efferent pathways or if it involves an abnormal sensorimotor integration due to disorders of the central, autonomic or peripheral nervous systems. A correct execution of these studies, and their appropriate interpretation, based on the underlying mechanisms of neural plasticity, will guide toward better neurorehabilitation protocols.

    [Human physiology: images and practices of the reflex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wübben, Yvonne

    2010-01-01

    The essay examines the function of visualizations and practices in the formation of the reflex concept from Thomas Willis to Marshall Hall. It focuses on the specific form of reflex knowledge that images and practices can contain. In addition, the essay argues that it is through visual representations and experimental practices that technical knowledge is transferred to the field of human reflex physiology. When using technical metaphors in human physiology authors often seem to feel obliged to draw distinctions between humans, machines and animals. On closer scrutiny, these distinctions sometimes fail to establish firm borders between the human and the technical.

  15. Axon reflexes in human cold exposed fingers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Ducharme, M.B.

    2000-01-01

    Exposure of fingers to severe cold induces cold induced vasodilation (CIVD). The mechanism of CIVD is still debated. The original theory states that an axon reflex causes CIVD. To test this hypothesis, axon reflexes were evoked by electrical stimulation of the middle fingers of hands immersed in

  16. Axon reflexes in human cold exposed fingers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Ducharme, M.B.

    2000-01-01

    Exposure of fingers to severe cold induces cold induced vasodilation (CIVD). The mechanism of CIVD is still debated. The original theory states that an axon reflex causes CIVD. To test this hypothesis, axon reflexes were evoked by electrical stimulation of the middle fingers of hands immersed in wat

  17. Analgesic-antiinflammatory drugs inhibit orbicularis oculi reflexes in humans via a central mode of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferracuti, S; Leardi, M G; Cruccu, G; Fabbri, A; Itil, T M

    1994-01-01

    1. A cross-over single blind study examined the possible central effects of non-opioid analgesic drugs on the trigeminal reflexes. 2. The corneal reflex and blink reflex (R1, R2) were recorded electromyographically and response areas measured in healthy volunteers before and after intramuscular injection of piroxicam (40 mg); and after intravenous injection of lysine acetylsalicylate (500 mg). After the last drug recording the subjects received intravenous naloxone (2 mg) followed 5 minutes later by further reflex testing. Saline was used as a placebo in control experiments. 3. Both analgesics reduced the corneal reflex: piroxicam induced a 27% and lysine acetylsalicylate a 21% a reduction that naloxone did not reverse. Neither drug reduced the early or the late component of the blink reflex. 4. The marked inhibitory changes that the two non-narcotic analgesics produced on the corneal reflex--a nociceptive response--indicate a centrally-mediated action. 5. Naloxone's failure to reverse the induced analgesia argues against opiate receptor mediation.

  18. Human intersegmental reflexes from intercostal afferents to scalene muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBain, Rachel A; Taylor, Janet L; Gorman, Robert B; Gandevia, Simon C; Butler, Jane E

    2016-10-01

    What is the central question of this study? The aim was to determine whether specific reflex connections operate between intercostal afferents and the scalene muscles in humans, and whether these connections operate after a clinically complete cervical spinal cord injury. What is the main finding and its importance? This is the first description of a short-latency inhibitory reflex connection between intercostal afferents from intercostal spaces to the scalene muscles in able-bodied participants. We suggest that this reflex is mediated by large-diameter afferents. This intercostal-to-scalene inhibitory reflex is absent after cervical spinal cord injury and may provide a way to monitor the progress of the injury. Short-latency intersegmental reflexes have been described for various respiratory muscles in animals. In humans, however, only short-latency reflex responses to phrenic nerve stimulation have been described. Here, we examined the reflex connections between intercostal afferents and scalene muscles in humans. Surface EMG recordings were made from scalene muscles bilaterally, in seven able-bodied participants and seven participants with motor- and sensory-complete cervical spinal cord injury (median 32 years postinjury, range 5 months to 44 years). We recorded the reflex responses produced by stimulation of the eighth or tenth left intercostal nerve. A short-latency (∼38 ms) inhibitory reflex was evident in able-bodied participants, in ipsilateral and contralateral scalene muscles. This bilateral intersegmental inhibitory reflex occurred in 46% of recordings at low stimulus intensities (at three times motor threshold). It was more frequent (in 75-85% of recordings) at higher stimulus intensities (six and nine times motor threshold), but onset latency (38 ± 9 ms, mean ± SD) and the size of inhibition (23 ± 10%) did not change with stimulus intensity. The reflex was absent in all participants with spinal cord injury. As the intercostal

  19. Frequency-Dependent Habituation Deficit of the Nociceptive Blink Reflex in Aura With Migraine Headache. Can Migraine Aura Modulate Trigeminal Excitability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotta, Armando; Anastasio, Maria Grazia; De Icco, Roberto; Coppola, Gianluca; Ambrosini, Anna; Serrao, Mariano; Sandrini, Giorgio; Pierelli, Francesco

    2017-06-01

    To study the influence of the migraine aura on the trigeminal nociception, we investigated the habituation of the nociceptive blink reflex (nBR) R2 responses in aura with migraine headache (AwMH) and comparatively in migraine without aura (MWoA) and healthy subjects (HS). A clear deficit of habituation in trigeminal nociceptive responses has been documented in MWoA; however, similar data in MWA are lacking. Seventeen AwMH, 29 MWoA, and 30 HS were enrolled and a nonrandomized clinical neurophysiological study examining nBR habituation by clinical diagnosis was devised. We delivered a series of 26 electrical stimuli, at different stimulation frequencies (SF) (0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.5, and 1 Hz), subsequently subdivided in five blocks of five responses for each SF. The mean area values of the second to the fifth block expressed as the percentage of the mean area value of the first block were taken as an index of habituation for each SF. A significant lower mean percentage decrease of the R2 area across all blocks was found at 1, 0.5, 0.3, and 0.2 Hz SF in MWoA and at 0.3 and 0.2 Hz SF in AwMH, when compared to HS. In the most representative fifth block of responses, we found in MWoA vs HS at 1 Hz, 57.0 ± 27.8 vs 30.6 ± 12.0; at 0.5 Hz, 54.8 ± 26.1 vs 32.51 ± 17.7; at 0.3 Hz, 44.7 ± 21.6 vs 27.6 ± 13.2; at 0.2 Hz, 61.3 ± 29.5 vs 32.6 ± 18.0, and in AwMH vs HS at 0.3 Hz, 52.7 ± 24.7 vs 27.6 ± 13.2; at 0.2 Hz, 69.3 ± 38.6 vs 32.6 ± 18.0 as mean ± SD of the R2 area percentage of the first block, respectively. Interestingly, AwMH subjects did not show differences in mean percentage decrease of the R2 area at 1 and 0.5 Hz SF when compared to HS. No differences between groups were found at 0.1 and 0.05 Hz SF. We demonstrated in AwMH a deficit of habituation of the nBR R2 responses after repeated stimulations, although less pronounced than that observed in MWoA of comparable clinical severity. We hypothesize

  1. Human investigations into the exercise pressor reflex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Niels H; Amann, Markus

    2012-01-01

    During exercise, neural input from skeletal muscles reflexly maintains or elevates blood pressure (BP) despite a maybe fivefold increase in vascular conductance. This exercise pressor reflex is illustrated by similar heart rate (HR) and BP responses to electrically induced and voluntary exercise....... The importance of the exercise pressor reflex for tight cardiovascular regulation during dynamic exercise is supported by studies using pharmacological blockade of lower limb muscle afferent nerves. These experiments show attenuation of the increase in BP and cardiac output when exercise is performed...... of an increase in BP during exercise with paralysed legs manifests, although electrical stimulation of muscles enhances lactate release and reduces muscle glycogen. Thus, the exercise pressor reflex enhances sympathetic activity and maintains perfusion pressure by restraining abdominal blood flow, while brain...

  2. Ocular surface area and human eye blink frequency during VDU work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Pernille Kofoed; Søgaard, Karen; Skotte, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how the ocular surface area (OSA) and the eye blink frequency (BF) are affected by a high versus a low-monitor position during visual display unit (VDU) work with varying cognitive demands. In a balanced randomized (2 x 2) design ten healthy subjects....... The low BF during the active task was succeded by a burst with high BF after cessation of the active task, indicating a compensatory blinking process. This stresses that interchange of work tasks with different cognitive load is as important as the monitor position in the prevention of visual...

  3. Lower esophageal sphincter relaxation reflex kinetics: effects of peristaltic reflexes and maturation in human premature neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Eneysis M; Parks, Vanessa N; Peng, Juan; Fernandez, Soledad A; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Shaker, Reza; Jadcherla, Sudarshan R

    2010-12-01

    We defined the sensory-motor characteristics of the lower esophageal sphincter relaxation (LESR) (stimulus threshold volume, response onset, and relaxation period, relaxation magnitude, nadir) during maturation in human neonates. We hypothesized that LESR kinetics differs during maturation and with peristaltic reflex type. Basal and adaptive esophageal motility testing was performed (N = 20 premature neonates) at 34.7 and 39.1 wk (time 1 and time 2). Effects of midesophageal provocation with graded stimuli (N = 1,267 stimuli, air and liquids) on LESR kinetics during esophagodeglutition response (EDR) and secondary peristalsis (SP) were analyzed by mixed models. Frequency of LESR with basal primary peristalsis were different during maturation (P = 0.03). During adaptive responses with maturation, 1) the frequencies of peristaltic reflexes and LESR were similar; 2) liquid stimuli resulted in a shorter LESR response latency and LESR nadir and greater LESR magnitude (all P reflexes at both times (vs. none, P reflex, and postnatal maturation. Maturation modulates an increased recruitment of inhibitory pathways that favor LESR.

  4. Stretch reflex instability compared in three different human muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbaba, R; Taylor, A; Manu, C A; Buonajuti, M

    2005-06-01

    The possibility of causing instability in the stretch reflex has been examined in three different human muscles: biceps, first dorsal interosseous (FDI) of the hand and digastric. Tremor recorded as fluctuation of isometric force was compared with that occurring during contraction against a spring load. The spring compliance was selected to make the natural frequency of the part in each case appropriate for oscillations in the short latency stretch reflex. A computer model of the whole system was used to predict the frequency at which oscillations should be expected and to estimate the reflex gain required in each case to cause sustained oscillations. Estimates were computed of the autospectra of the force records and of the rectified surface EMG signals and of the coherence functions. Normal subjects showed no evidence of a distinct spectral peak during isometric recording from any of the three muscles. However, in anisometric conditions regular oscillations in force occurred in biceps, but not in FDI or digastric. The oscillations in biceps at 8-9 Hz were accompanied by similar oscillations in the EMG which were highly coherent with the force signal. The results are consistent with the presence of a strong segmental stretch reflex effect in biceps and weak or absent reflex in FDI. Digastric is known to contain no muscle spindles and therefore to lack a stretch reflex. In two subjects who volunteered that they had more tremor than normal, but had no known neurological abnormality, there was a distinct peak in the force spectrum at 8-9 Hz in biceps and FDI in isometric conditions with coherent EMG activity. The peak increased in size in anisometric conditions in biceps but not in FDI. This component appears to be of central rather than of reflex origin. No equivalent component was found in digastric records. The results are discussed in relation to the possible role of the short latency stretch reflex in the genesis of physiological tremor in different muscles.

  5. Reflex receptive fields for human withdrawal reflexes elicited by non-painful and painful electrical stimulation of the foot sole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, O K; Sonnenborg, F A; Arendt-Nielsen, L

    2001-04-01

    Human withdrawal reflex receptive fields (RRFs) were assessed for 4 different electrical stimulus intensities, ranging from below the pain threshold (PTh) to up to two times the PTh intensity (0.8x, 1.2x, 1.6x, and 2.0xPTh). Thirteen subjects participated, and the reflexes were recorded in a sitting position. The stimuli were delivered in random order to 12 positions distributed over the foot sole. Tibialis anterior (TA), gastrocnemius medialis (GM), vastus lateralis (VL), and biceps femoris (BF) reflexes were recorded. Further, knee and ankle joint angle changes were recorded. The strongest reflexes were seen in the TA compared with the other 3 muscles. Dorsi-flexion dominated distal to the talocrural joint corresponding to the TA receptive field area. An expansion of the RRF for the TA and GM was seen when increasing the stimulus intensity from 0.8xPTh to 1.2xPTh and from 1.2xPTh to 1.6xPTh, indicating a gradually increasing reflex threshold towards the border, where TA contraction is inappropriate in a withdrawal reaction. For the BF and VL, the borders of the RRF areas were not detected. By integrating the reflex size within the RRF (i.e. the reflex volume), gradually increasing reflexes for increasing stimulus intensity were seen in all 4 muscles tested, most clearly in the TA and GM. The subjective pain intensity correlated to the reflex volume for the TA, GM, and BF. In conclusion, the highest reflex sensitivity was seen in the centre of the RRF, while the stimulus intensity needed for eliciting a reflex increased towards the receptive field border. Within the RRF, stronger reflexes were evoked for increasing stimulus intensity. The limit in the size of the receptive field size for the TA and GM supports a modular withdrawal reflex organisation.

  6. Diagnostic significance of blink reflex in cranial Guillain-Barré Syndrome%瞬目反射对颅神经型格林巴利综合征的诊断价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康维礼; 洪军

    2001-01-01

    目的 探讨瞬目反射(blink reflex,BR)对颅神经型格林巴利综合征(Guillain-Barré Syndrome,GBS)的诊断价值。方法 将7例颅神经型GBS进行BR检测并与正常对照组进行比较。结果 与对照组相比,GBS组BR包括R1、R2i、R2c、M波潜伏期和波幅及R1颅内段传导时间(R1CT)的差异均具有显著性意义(P<0.001)。结论 BR结合颜面肌电图对颅神经型GBS有重要诊断价值,为临床鉴别诊断提供客观依据。%Objective To study diagnostic significance of blink reflex(BR) in cranial Guillain-Barré Syndrome (cGBS). Methods A comparative study was carried out on BR in 7 cGBS cases and 39 normal subjects.Results As compared with controls,the cGBS group showed significant differences on latency and amplitude of R1,R2i, R2c component of BR,M wave and R1 conduction time (R1CT) inside the cranial part(P<0.001). Conclusion The result suggested that BR and facial electromyogram were of great significance in the diagnosis of cGBS and might provide an objective index for clinical differential diagnosis.

  7. Plasticity of the human otolith-ocular reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, C. 3rd; Smith, T. R.; Furman, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    The eye movement response to earth vertical axis rotation in the dark, a semicircular canal stimulus, can be altered by prior exposure to combined visual-vestibular stimuli. Such plasticity of the vestibulo-ocular reflex has not been described for earth horizontal axis rotation, a dynamic otolith stimulus. Twenty normal human subjects underwent one of two types of adaptation paradigms designed either to attenuate or enhance the gain of the semicircular canal-ocular reflex prior to undergoing otolith-ocular reflex testing with horizontal axis rotation. The adaptation paradigm paired a 0.2 Hz sinusoidal rotation about a vertical axis with a 0.2 Hz optokinetic stripe pattern that was deliberately mismatched in peak velocity. Pre- and post-adaptation horizontal axis rotations were at 60 degrees/s in the dark and produced a modulation in the slow component velocity of nystagmus having a frequency of 0.17 Hz due to putative stimulation of the otolith organs. Results showed that the magnitude of this modulation component response was altered in a manner similar to the alteration in semicircular canal-ocular responses. These results suggest that physiologic alteration of the vestibulo-ocular reflex using deliberately mismatched visual and semicircular canal stimuli induces changes in both canal-ocular and otolith-ocular responses. We postulate, therefore, that central nervous system pathways responsible for controlling the gains of canal-ocular and otolith-ocular reflexes are shared.

  8. Resource sharing in the attentional blink

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shapiro, K; Schmitz, F; Martens, S; Hommel, B; Schnitzler, A

    2006-01-01

    Humans have difficulty processing more than one event at a time, as is evidenced by the attentional blink ('blink') phenomenon: the second of two targets in a visual stream of events cannot be reported accurately if it appears between 100 and 500 ms after the first. By using whole-head magnetoenceph

  9. The Significance of blink reflex and facial electroneurogram in Evaluating the Prognosis with Bell's paralysis%瞬目反射与面神经电图在Bell's麻痹预后判断中的价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张红; 秦美华; 毛继芳; 韩敬翠

    2010-01-01

    Objective To study the Significance of blink reflex (BR) and facial electroneurogam (ENG) in Evaluating the Prognosis with Bell's paralysis. Methods 256 patients with Bell'ss paralysis have been examined by using BR and ENG. Results The positive rate of BR was 100%, while that of ENG was 63.8% (P<0.01). Conclusion Both BR and ENG can reflx the degrees, location and prognosis of facial nerves damage. BR is more sensitive in early diagnosis of Bell's paralysis than ENG, while their combination is more valuable than when only one is used.%目的 探讨瞬目反射(BR))与面神经电图(ENG)在Bell's麻痹预后判断中的价值.方法 对256例Bell's麻痹患者行BR和ENG检查,并对32例BR缺如、5例病初M波未引出者3个月后随访.结果 BR阳性率为100%,ENG阳性率63.8%(P<0.01).结论 BR与ENG均能反映面神经损害的严重程度、部位及预后,BR在早期诊断中更敏感,两者结合临床价值更大.

  10. Diagnostic value of Blink reflex and facial nerve's electroneurogram (ENG) in patients with Bell's paralysis%瞬目反射和面神经电图在Bell's麻痹中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柯将琼; 李勇; 王小同

    2007-01-01

    目的 探讨Bell's麻痹患者行瞬目反射(blink reflex,BR)、面神经电图(electroneurogram,ENG)检测的意义.方法 36例Bell′s麻痹患者在发病1周内行BR和ENG测定.结果 患侧R1、R2及R2′缺如者23例,其余13例患侧较健侧R1、R2及R2′波潜伏期延长,异常率100%;患侧面神经运动传导潜伏期延长、波幅降低,与健侧比较差异有显著性(P<0.05),早期异常率为63.9%.结论 BR测定是诊断Bell's麻痹的敏感指标,同时结合ENG可全面、客观地评价面神经损害的程度和预后.

  11. Blink Animation Software to Improve Blinking and Dry Eye Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosch, Daniela S; Foppa, Curdin; Tóth, Mike; Joos, Roland E

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate if the animation "blink blink" increases blink rate and improves dry eye symptoms during prolonged computer use. Study part A: Blink rate was recorded at baseline and during computer work of normal subjects without symptoms of dry eye. Half of the subjects used "blink blink," instructed to blink on animation appearance; the other half used a placebo version for 1 week during computer use. Thereafter, blink rate was recorded again with the use of "blink blink." Study part B: Blink rate was recorded during computer work with dry eye symptoms (modified Ocular Surface Disease Index > 15.0). Subjects used the test and placebo version of "blink blink" each for 1 week (1 week washout; crossover) and were instructed to blink twice on presentation of the animation. Blink rate and dry eye symptoms were assessed after each phase and compared with baseline. Study part A: Ten subjects participated (mean [± SD] age, 38.3 [± 16.0] years; 5 women). A greater increase in blink rate was observed in the test group (5.62 blinks/min for the test group and 0.96 blinks/min for the control group). Study part B: Twenty-four subjects participated (mean [± SD] age, 39.3 [± 19.1] years; 11 women). Dry eye symptoms improved during both phases (with test and placebo) to a statistically significant degree (each, p animation allowed a decrease in number of presentations and improved acceptance of "blink blink."

  12. Medial olivocochlear efferent reflex inhibition of human cochlear nerve responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenhan, J T; Wilson, U S; Hancock, K E; Guinan, J J

    2016-03-01

    Inhibition of cochlear amplifier gain by the medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferent system has several putative roles: aiding listening in noise, protection against damage from acoustic overexposure, and slowing age-induced hearing loss. The human MOC reflex has been studied almost exclusively by measuring changes in otoacoustic emissions. However, to help understand how the MOC system influences what we hear, it is important to have measurements of the MOC effect on the total output of the organ of Corti, i.e., on cochlear nerve responses that couple sounds to the brain. In this work we measured the inhibition produced by the MOC reflex on the amplitude of cochlear nerve compound action potentials (CAPs) in response to moderate level (52-60 dB peSPL) clicks from five, young, normal hearing, awake, alert, human adults. MOC activity was elicited by 65 dB SPL, contralateral broadband noise (CAS). Using tympanic membrane electrodes, approximately 10 h of data collection were needed from each subject to yield reliable measurements of the MOC reflex inhibition on CAP amplitudes from one click level. The CAS produced a 16% reduction of CAP amplitude, equivalent to a 1.98 dB effective attenuation (averaged over five subjects). Based on previous reports of efferent effects as functions of level and frequency, it is possible that much larger effective attenuations would be observed at lower sound levels or with clicks of higher frequency content. For a preliminary comparison, we also measured MOC reflex inhibition of DPOAEs evoked from the same ears with f2's near 4 kHz. The resulting effective attenuations on DPOAEs were, on average, less than half the effective attenuations on CAPs.

  13. Application of blink reflex and facial electroneurogram in patients with Bell paralysis%瞬目反射与面神经电图在Bell麻痹中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔穗晶

    2004-01-01

    目的:探讨Bell麻痹患者行瞬目反射(blink reflex,BR)、面神经电图(electroneurogam,ENoG)对面神经损害程度及部位的评估价值.方法:20例Bell麻痹患者在发病后1~14 d分别行BR,ENoG检查.结果:患侧R1,R2及R2'波缺如者5例,余15例患侧较健侧R1,R2及R2'波潜伏期延长,异常率100%.患侧面神经运动潜伏期延长,波幅低,与健侧比较差异有显著性意义(P<0.01)根据R1/M潜伏期比值测定结果提示,10例为近端(茎乳孔内段)损害,5例为远端(茎乳孔外段)损害,5例为较大范围受累.结论:BR检测是诊断Bell麻痹的早期敏感指标,而采用BR,ENoG综合检测Bell麻痹的患者,可全面、客观地评价面神经损害的程度及部位,对临床治疗和预后评估有一定的帮助.

  14. Postnatal temporal, spatial and modality tuning of nociceptive cutaneous flexion reflexes in human infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Laura; Fabrizi, Lorenzo; Patten, Deborah; Worley, Alan; Meek, Judith; Boyd, Stewart; Slater, Rebeccah; Fitzgerald, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous flexion reflexes are amongst the first behavioural responses to develop and are essential for the protection and survival of the newborn organism. Despite this, there has been no detailed, quantitative study of their maturation in human neonates. Here we use surface electromyographic (EMG) recording of biceps femoris activity in preterm (reflex (>4 seconds) to a single noxious skin lance which decreases significantly with gestational age. This reflex is not restricted to the stimulated limb: heel lance evokes equal ipsilateral and contralateral reflexes in preterm and term infants. We further show that infant flexion withdrawal reflexes are not always nociceptive specific: in 29% of preterm infants, tactile stimulation evokes EMG activity that is indistinguishable from noxious stimulation. In 40% of term infants, tactile responses are also present but significantly smaller than nociceptive reflexes. Infant flexion reflexes are also evoked by application of calibrated punctate von Frey hairs (vFh), 0.8-17.2 g, to the heel. Von Frey hair thresholds increase significantly with gestational age and the magnitude of vFh evoked reflexes are significantly greater in preterm than term infants. Furthermore flexion reflexes in both groups are sensitized by repeated vFh stimulation. Thus human infant flexion reflexes differ in temporal, modality and spatial characteristics from those in adults. Reflex magnitude and tactile sensitivity decreases and nociceptive specificity and spatial organisation increases with gestational age. Strong, relatively non-specific, reflex sensitivity in early life may be important for driving postnatal activity dependent maturation of targeted spinal cord sensory circuits.

  15. Loading and reflexes : the influence of body weight and active movements on reflex responses in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaanse, Catharina Maria

    2003-01-01

    This thesis describes six studies on the influence of active movements and body loading on reflex responses. To measure those influences healthy subjects were asked to walk with different loadings (e.g. a backpack) or with different active movements (e.g. arm swing) while different reflex responses

  16. Soleus H-reflex gain in humans walking and running under simulated reduced gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, D. P.; Aagaard, P.; Simonsen, E. B.; Farley, C. T.; Dyhre-Poulsen, P.

    2001-01-01

    The Hoffmann (H-) reflex is an electrical analogue of the monosynaptic stretch reflex, elicited by bypassing the muscle spindle and directly stimulating the afferent nerve. Studying H-reflex modulation provides insight into how the nervous system centrally modulates stretch reflex responses.A common measure of H-reflex gain is the slope of the relationship between H-reflex amplitude and EMG amplitude. To examine soleus H-reflex gain across a range of EMG levels during human locomotion, we used simulated reduced gravity to reduce muscle activity. We hypothesised that H-reflex gain would be independent of gravity level.We recorded EMG from eight subjects walking (1.25 m s-1) and running (3.0 m s-1) at four gravity levels (1.0, 0.75, 0.5 and 0.25 G (Earth gravity)). We normalised the stimulus M-wave and resulting H-reflex to the maximal M-wave amplitude (Mmax) elicited throughout the stride to correct for movement of stimulus and recording electrodes relative to nerve and muscle fibres. Peak soleus EMG amplitude decreased by 30% for walking and for running over the fourfold change in gravity. As hypothesised, slopes of linear regressions fitted to H-reflex versus EMG data were independent of gravity for walking and running (ANOVA, P > 0.8). The slopes were also independent of gait (P > 0.6), contrary to previous studies. Walking had a greater y-intercept (19.9% Mmax) than running (-2.5% Mmax; P EMG, walking H-reflex amplitudes were higher than running H-reflex amplitudes by a constant amount. We conclude that the nervous system adjusts H-reflex threshold but not H-reflex gain between walking and running. These findings provide insight into potential neural mechanisms responsible for spinal modulation of the stretch reflex during human locomotion.

  17. Somatosensory-evoked blink response: investigation of the physiological mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, H; Nohara, C; Hotta, M; Shimo, Y; Amemiya, K

    1998-02-01

    The somatosensory-evoked blink response (SBR) is a newly identified blink reflex elicited by electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves. The present study was performed to investigate the physiological mechanism underlying the SBR elicited by median nerve stimulation in normal subjects. The peripheral afferents responsible for the SBR included low-threshold cutaneous fibres. In the SBR-positive subjects, the late (R2) component of the blink reflex elicited by supraorbital nerve stimulation and the SBR facilitated each other when both responses were induced at the same time, but they each caused long-lasting inhibition in the other when one stimulus was given as a conditioning stimulus. The extent of inhibition was correlated with the size of the preceding SBR. In the SBR-negative subjects, simultaneous inhibition of R2 was observed when median nerve stimulation was applied as a conditioning stimulus. Brainstem excitability, as evaluated by blink-reflex recovery studies, did not differ between SBR-positive and SBR-negative subjects. Therefore, based on anatomical and physiological findings, it appears that the reflex pathways of the SBR and R2 converge within the brainstem and compete with each other, presumably by presynaptic inhibition at the premotor level, before entering the common blink-reflex pathway. The influence of median nerve stimulation upon tonic contraction of the orbicularis oculi muscle was studied to detect the latent SBR. There was not only a facilitatory period corresponding to the SBR but also an active inhibitory period (exteroceptive suppression), suggesting that the mechanism generating the SBR is not only influenced by blink-reflex volleys but also by active exteroceptive suppression. Thus, the SBR may appear as a result of integration of facilitatory and inhibitory mechanisms within the brainstem.

  18. 瞬目反射与肛门括约肌肌电图对帕金森病患者病情分期判定的意义%Significance of blink reflex and anal sphincter electromyography in judging the stage of patients with Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪丽; 李珂; 闫晓海

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the significance of blink reflex and external anal sphincter electromyography ( EAS-EMG) in the diagnosis and judging the stage of patients with Parkinson's disease( PD) . Methods A total of 108 patients with PD were selected as PD group,including41 patients in the early stage and 67 patients in the late or advanced stage. Fifty healthy physical examination people were selected as healthy control group. Blink reflex and EAS-EMG were examined in the two groups,and the result was analyzed through SPSS 12. 0 software. Results Blink reflex R2,R2' wave latency in PD group extend significantly compared with those in healthy control group( P < 0. 01 ,P<0.05). Blink reflex R2,R2' wave latency in early stage group extend significantly compared with those in late or advanced stage group(P <0. 05). Spontaneous potential were observed in 3 cases of late or advanced stage group in relax state. The differences of average time percentage and multiphase wave percentage of motor unit action potentials (MUP) between PD group and healthy control group were statistically significant ( P < 0. 01). The differences of average time percentage and multiphase wave percentage of MUP late or advanced stage group and early stage group were statistically significant ( P <0. 05) . Conclusion Blink reflex and EAS-EMG could be the objective observation indicators of diagnosis and disease stage determination in PD.%目的 探讨瞬目反射与肛门括约肌肌电图(EAS-EMG)检查对帕金森病(PD)诊断及病情分期判定的意义.方法 选择PD患者108例(PD组),其中早期患者41例,中、晚期患者67例;健康对照组为同期50例健康体检者.分别对2组行瞬目反射与EAS-EMG检查.应用SPSS 12.0软件对其结果进行统计学分析.结果 PD组瞬目反射R2、R2'波潜伏期均较健康对照组明显延长(P<0.01,P<0.05);中、晚期PD组瞬目反射R2、R2'波潜伏期较早期PD组延长(P<0.05).放松状态下,EAS-EMG检查

  19. Blink rate, incomplete blinks and computer vision syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portello, Joan K; Rosenfield, Mark; Chu, Christina A

    2013-05-01

    Computer vision syndrome (CVS), a highly prevalent condition, is frequently associated with dry eye disorders. Furthermore, a reduced blink rate has been observed during computer use. The present study examined whether post task ocular and visual symptoms are associated with either a decreased blink rate or a higher prevalence of incomplete blinks. An additional trial tested whether increasing the blink rate would reduce CVS symptoms. Subjects (N = 21) were required to perform a continuous 15-minute reading task on a desktop computer at a viewing distance of 50 cm. Subjects were videotaped during the task to determine their blink rate and amplitude. Immediately after the task, subjects completed a questionnaire regarding ocular symptoms experienced during the trial. In a second session, the blink rate was increased by means of an audible tone that sounded every 4 seconds, with subjects being instructed to blink on hearing the tone. The mean blink rate during the task without the audible tone was 11.6 blinks per minute (SD, 7.84). The percentage of blinks deemed incomplete for each subject ranged from 0.9 to 56.5%, with a mean of 16.1% (SD, 15.7). A significant positive correlation was observed between the total symptom score and the percentage of incomplete blinks during the task (p = 0.002). Furthermore, a significant negative correlation was noted between the blink score and symptoms (p = 0.035). Increasing the mean blink rate to 23.5 blinks per minute by means of the audible tone did not produce a significant change in the symptom score. Whereas CVS symptoms are associated with a reduced blink rate, the completeness of the blink may be equally significant. Because instructing a patient to increase his or her blink rate may be ineffective or impractical, actions to achieve complete corneal coverage during blinking may be more helpful in alleviating symptoms during computer operation.

  20. Effect of a retention interval between pre-exposure and conditioning on latent inhibition in humans using a blink conditioning procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Casa Rivas, Luis Gonzalo; Traverso Arcos, Luis Miguel; Márquez Zamora, Raúl

    2010-11-01

    Latent inhibition, retarded learning after pre-exposure to the to-be-conditioned stimulus, was examined using a blink conditioned procedure in humans. Experiment 1 showed that the procedure is suited to inducing the latent inhibition effect. In Experiment 2, the introduction of a 3-minute interval between pre-exposure and conditioning phases attenuated latent inhibition. These results contribute to identify the mechanisms involved in pre-exposure and subsequent conditioning of a stimulus, which is particularly important if we bear in mind that latent inhibition has been used repeatedly as an instrument to analyze the course of attentional processes in normal and pathological populations.

  1. Pre-pulse inhibition of the acoustic startle eye-blink in the Göttingen minipig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, Sidse Marie; Lind, Nanna Marie; Hansen, Axel Kornerup;

    2004-01-01

    by a weak white noise pre-pulse (PP), the interval between the PP and the startle noise stimulus (SNS) determining the degree of inhibition. Aiming at developing a new animal model of schizophrenia, we have investigated the acoustic startle eye-blink and PPI in 10 Göttingen minipigs. The stimuli......Pre-pulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle response is a measure of sensorimotor gating which has been frequently shown to be deficient in schizophrenic patients. In humans it is typically measured as the attenuation of the startle eye-blink reflex EMG when a startle eliciting noise is preceded...... and the block design of the stimulation were similar to paradigms used in human research. Initially the startle habituation across trials and blocks, secondarily the PPI at PP to SNS intervals of 30, 60, 120, 220, 520, 1020 and 2020 ms was investigated. One pig out of ten did not have a startle response...

  2. H-reflex modulation in the human medial and lateral gastrocnemii during standing and walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makihara, Yukiko; Segal, Richard L.; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.; Thompson, Aiko K.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The soleus H-reflex is dynamically modulated during walking. However, modulation of the gastrocnemii H-reflexes has not been studied systematically. Methods The medial and lateral gastrocnemii (MG and LG) and soleus H-reflexes were measured during standing and walking in humans. Results Maximum H-reflex amplitude was significantly smaller in MG (mean 1.1 mV) or LG (1.1 mV) than in soleus (3.3 mV). Despite these size differences, the reflex amplitudes of the three muscles were positively correlated. The MG and LG H-reflexes were phase- and task-dependently modulated in ways similar to the soleus H-reflex. Discussion Although there are anatomical and physiological differences between the soleus and gastrocnemii muscles, the reflexes of the three muscles are similarly modulated during walking and between standing and walking. The findings support the hypothesis that these reflexes are synergistically modulated during walking to facilitate ongoing movement. PMID:22190317

  3. A Method for Functional Quantification of the Reflex Effect of Human Peripheral Nerve Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Zehr, E. P.; Komiyama, Tomoyushi; Stein, R B

    2000-01-01

    E.P. Zehr, KOMIYAMA, T. and R.B. Stein. A Method for Functional Quantification of the Reflex Effect of Human Peripheral Nerve Stimulation. Adv. Exerc. Sports Physiol., Vol.6, No.1 pp25-32, 2000. We have developed simple method that accounts for the overrall function of reflex effects occurring in the surface electrimyogran (EMG) after human nerve stimulation. This method involves the subtraction of pre-stimulus EMG levels from EMG modulation curves obtained after human peripheral nerve stimul...

  4. Postnatal temporal, spatial and modality tuning of nociceptive cutaneous flexion reflexes in human infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cornelissen

    Full Text Available Cutaneous flexion reflexes are amongst the first behavioural responses to develop and are essential for the protection and survival of the newborn organism. Despite this, there has been no detailed, quantitative study of their maturation in human neonates. Here we use surface electromyographic (EMG recording of biceps femoris activity in preterm (4 seconds to a single noxious skin lance which decreases significantly with gestational age. This reflex is not restricted to the stimulated limb: heel lance evokes equal ipsilateral and contralateral reflexes in preterm and term infants. We further show that infant flexion withdrawal reflexes are not always nociceptive specific: in 29% of preterm infants, tactile stimulation evokes EMG activity that is indistinguishable from noxious stimulation. In 40% of term infants, tactile responses are also present but significantly smaller than nociceptive reflexes. Infant flexion reflexes are also evoked by application of calibrated punctate von Frey hairs (vFh, 0.8-17.2 g, to the heel. Von Frey hair thresholds increase significantly with gestational age and the magnitude of vFh evoked reflexes are significantly greater in preterm than term infants. Furthermore flexion reflexes in both groups are sensitized by repeated vFh stimulation. Thus human infant flexion reflexes differ in temporal, modality and spatial characteristics from those in adults. Reflex magnitude and tactile sensitivity decreases and nociceptive specificity and spatial organisation increases with gestational age. Strong, relatively non-specific, reflex sensitivity in early life may be important for driving postnatal activity dependent maturation of targeted spinal cord sensory circuits.

  5. Reflex control of robotic gait using human walking data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A Macleod

    Full Text Available Control of human walking is not thoroughly understood, which has implications in developing suitable strategies for the retraining of a functional gait following neurological injuries such as spinal cord injury (SCI. Bipedal robots allow us to investigate simple elements of the complex nervous system to quantify their contribution to motor control. RunBot is a bipedal robot which operates through reflexes without using central pattern generators or trajectory planning algorithms. Ground contact information from the feet is used to activate motors in the legs, generating a gait cycle visually similar to that of humans. Rather than developing a more complicated biologically realistic neural system to control the robot's stepping, we have instead further simplified our model by measuring the correlation between heel contact and leg muscle activity (EMG in human subjects during walking and from this data created filter functions transferring the sensory data into motor actions. Adaptive filtering was used to identify the unknown transfer functions which translate the contact information into muscle activation signals. Our results show a causal relationship between ground contact information from the heel and EMG, which allows us to create a minimal, linear, analogue control system for controlling walking. The derived transfer functions were applied to RunBot II as a proof of concept. The gait cycle produced was stable and controlled, which is a positive indication that the transfer functions have potential for use in the control of assistive devices for the retraining of an efficient and effective gait with potential applications in SCI rehabilitation.

  6. An electronic device to record consensual reflex in human pupil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, H M; Costa, R M; Camilo, E N R; Gang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Examination of the pupil offers an objective evaluation of visual function as well as the vegetative pathways to the eye. This work proposes the development of an effective method and a portable device to test the consensual pupillary reflex. The first results demonstrate the success of a new device construction and methodology to record the consensual reflex with different stimulus, in a situation of complete blockage of light.

  7. An experimental psychophysiological approach to human bradycardiac reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furedy, J J

    1985-01-01

    Bradycardic reflexes in man are both of scientific and clinical interest. Using the methods of experimental psychophysiology, control over relevant independent variables permits the study of fine-grained temporal physiologic response topographies, and of psychological factors that may modify the reflex. In addition, information can also be sought through interdisciplinary collaborations with experimental physiologists in order to shed light on the mechanism of the reflexes. These general features of the approach are illustrated by presenting data on two bradycardic reflex preparations: the laboratory dive analog, and the 90-degree negative tilt. The dive-analog studies have shown that a) the dive-reflex proper is a late-occurring bradycardia accompanied by a late-occurring vasoconstriction; and b) for the elicitation of this reflex, both breath-holding and face immersion are necessary. In addition, the physiologic manipulation of temperature affects the reflex in an inverse way over the range of 10 degrees to 40 degrees C, while the sense of control (a psychological variable) attenuates the reflex. The negative-tilt preparation produces a bradycardic response that is ideal as a Pavlovian unconditional response. Some Pavlovian conditioning arrangements, especially an "imaginational" form, do produce significant conditional bradycardic responding, and this has both potential clinical (e.g., biofeedback-related) and theoretical (e.g., S-R vs. S-S accounts of Pavlovian conditioning) applications. The paper ends with a comment on the cognitive paradigm shift in psychology. Although this shift is of importance, it is suggested that it is also important to "remember the response."

  8. Influence of lower body negative pressure release on soleus H reflex, respiratory sensations and reflexes in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Ashima; Raj, Hans; Gupta, Uday A; Srivastava, Niraj

    2010-09-30

    Using a physiological model of acutely increasing venous return into the lungs, i.e. by applying and then releasing lower body negative pressure (LBNP) to mimic the natural stimulus of juxtapulmonary capillary (J) or pulmonary C fibre receptors, produced an immediate and significant reduction in the amplitude of the Hoffman (H) reflex by 81±4% (P=0.001) in a majority of subjects 70% (n=5). Accompanying this was a notable change in the respiratory pattern with tidal volume (V(T)) increasing in all subjects from (mean) 0.462±.038 to 0.777±.061l/min (P=0.001) and the respiratory rate (F(R)) in 40% from 14±1 to 24±0.8 breaths/min. A feeling of pressure in throat, upper chest was reported by all and a shortness of breath-by 70% of the subjects. These were similar in nature to the respiratory sensations felt with threshold doses of intravenous lobeline, a well-established chemical stimulant of J receptors. All effects lasted for 15-20s and within a minute the parameters resumed their earlier control values. In animals, respiratory augmentation and locomotion inhibition are well-established reflexes of J receptors - this simultaneous though transitory reduction in H reflex amplitude reflecting change in the excitability of the motoneurone pool and appearance of respiratory effects, is the first demonstration in human subjects of the two reflexes appearing in response to a sudden increase in pulmonary blood flow that mimics the natural stimulus of these receptors. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. THE OBSERVATION OF BLINK REFLEX IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC INFLAMMATORY DEMYELINATING POLYNEUROPATHY AND ITS CLINICAL APPLIED VALUE%慢性炎症性脱髓鞘性多发性神经病患者瞬目反射的观察及临床应用探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张承洁; 赵丽梅

    2005-01-01

    目的:探讨瞬目反射(blink reflex,BR)在慢性炎症性脱髓鞘性多发性神经病(CIDP)中的表现及临床应用.方法:将11例CIDP进行BR检测并与正常对照进行比较.结果:与对照组相比CIDP组BR包括R1,R2,R2'潜伏期差异均具有显著性意义(P<0.001),R1波幅有显著差异(P<0.001).结论:BR检查对CIDP患者有重要诊断价值,为临床鉴别诊断提供客观依据.

  10. Did Lavoisier Blink?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, William B.

    2004-01-01

    A question and answer session on whether Lavoisier made an agreement with the French mathematician, Comte Joseph-Louis Lagrange shortly before being beheaded that he would blink his eyes if he retained consciousness after being beheaded and that he was executed because of his revolutionary scientific views is described. The circumstances…

  11. Unilateral adaptation of the human angular vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliaccio, Americo A; Schubert, Michael C

    2013-02-01

    A recent study showed that the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) can be better adaptively increased using an incremental retinal image velocity error signal compared with a conventional constant large velocity-gain demand (×2). This finding has important implications for vestibular rehabilitation that seeks to improve the VOR response after injury. However, a large portion of vestibular patients have unilateral vestibular hypofunction, and training that raises their VOR response during rotations to both the ipsilesional and contralesional side is not usually ideal. We sought to determine if the vestibular response to one side could selectively be increased without affecting the contralateral response. We tested nine subjects with normal vestibular function. Using the scleral search coil and head impulse techniques, we measured the active and passive VOR gain (eye velocity / head velocity) before and after unilateral incremental VOR adaptation training, consisting of self-generated (active) head impulses, which lasted ≈ 15 min. The head impulses consisted of rapid, horizontal head rotations with peak-amplitude 15°, peak-velocity 150°/s and peak-acceleration 3,000°/s(2). The VOR gain towards the adapting side increased after training from 0.92 ± 0.18 to 1.11 ± 0.22 (+22.7 ± 20.2 %) during active head impulses and from 0.91 ± 0.15 to 1.01 ± 0.17 (+11.3 ± 7.5 %) during passive head impulses. During active impulses, the VOR gain towards the non-adapting side also increased by ≈ 8 %, though this increase was ≈ 70 % less than to the adapting side. A similar increase did not occur during passive impulses. This study shows that unilateral vestibular adaptation is possible in humans with a normal VOR; unilateral incremental VOR adaptation may have a role in vestibular rehabilitation. The increase in passive VOR gain after active head impulse adaptation suggests that the training effect is robust.

  12. Esophageal sensation in premature human neonates: temporal relationships and implications of aerodigestive reflexes and electrocortical arousals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadcherla, Sudarshan R; Parks, Vanessa N; Peng, Juan; Dzodzomenyo, Samuel; Fernandez, Soledad; Shaker, Reza; Splaingard, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Electrocortical arousal (ECA) as an effect of visceral provocation or of its temporal relationships with aerodigestive reflexes in premature neonates is not known. We tested the hypothesis that esophageal provocation results in both esophageal reflex responses and ECAs during sleep and that ECAs are dependent on the frequency characteristics of esophageal neuromotor responses. We defined the spatiotemporal relationship of ECAs in relation to 1) spontaneous pharyngoesophageal swallow sequences and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) events and 2) sensory-motor characteristics of esophageal reflexes. Sixteen healthy premature neonates born at 27.9 ± 3.4 wk were tested at 36.8 ± 1.9 wk postmenstrual age. Ninety-five midesophageal and 31 sham stimuli were given in sleep during concurrent manometry and videopolysomnography. With stimulus onset as reference point, we scored the response latency, frequency occurrence and duration of arousals, peristaltic reflex, and upper esophageal sphincter contractile reflex (UESCR). Changes in polysomnography-respiratory patterns and esophageal sensory-motor parameters were scored by blinded observers. Significantly (for each characteristic listed, P reflexes or clearance, sleep state modification, and prolonged respiratory arousal. Midesophageal stimuli (54%) provoked arousals and were associated with increased frequency, prolonged latency, prolonged response duration of peristaltic reflexes and UESCR, and increased frequency of sleep state changes and respiratory arousals. In human neonates, ECAs are provoked upon esophageal stimulation; the sensory-motor characteristics of esophageal reflexes are distinct when accompanied by arousals. Aerodigestive homeostasis is defended by multiple tiers of aerodigestive safety mechanisms, and when esophageal reflexes are delayed, cortical hypervigilance (ECAs) occurs.

  13. Locomotor training alters the behavior of flexor reflexes during walking in human spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew C; Mummidisetty, Chaithanya K; Rymer, William Zev; Knikou, Maria

    2014-11-01

    In humans, a chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) impairs the excitability of pathways mediating early flexor reflexes and increases the excitability of late, long-lasting flexor reflexes. We hypothesized that in individuals with SCI, locomotor training will alter the behavior of these spinally mediated reflexes. Nine individuals who had either chronic clinically motor complete or incomplete SCI received an average of 44 locomotor training sessions. Flexor reflexes, elicited via sural nerve stimulation of the right or left leg, were recorded from the ipsilateral tibialis anterior (TA) muscle before and after body weight support (BWS)-assisted treadmill training. The modulation pattern of the ipsilateral TA responses following innocuous stimulation of the right foot was also recorded in 10 healthy subjects while they stepped at 25% BWS to investigate whether body unloading during walking affects the behavior of these responses. Healthy subjects did not receive treadmill training. We observed a phase-dependent modulation of early TA flexor reflexes in healthy subjects with reduced body weight during walking. The early TA flexor reflexes were increased at heel contact, progressively decreased during the stance phase, and then increased throughout the swing phase. In individuals with SCI, locomotor training induced the reappearance of early TA flexor reflexes and changed the amplitude of late TA flexor reflexes during walking. Both early and late TA flexor reflexes were modulated in a phase-dependent pattern after training. These new findings support the adaptive capability of the injured nervous system to return to a prelesion excitability and integration state. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Carotid baroreceptor reflexes in humans during orthostatic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, V L; Hainsworth, R

    2001-09-01

    Orthostatic stress, including standing, head-up tilting and lower body suction, results in increases in peripheral vascular resistance but little or no change in mean arterial pressure. This study was undertaken to determine whether the sensitivity of the carotid baroreceptor reflex was enhanced during conditions of decreased venous return. We studied eight healthy subjects and determined responses of pulse interval (ECG) and forearm vascular resistance (mean finger blood pressure divided by Doppler estimate of brachial artery blood velocity) to graded increases and decreases in carotid transmural pressure, effected by a neck suction/pressure device. Responses were determined with and without the application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) at -40 mmHg. Stimulus-response curves were determined as the responses to graded neck pressure changes and the differential of this provided estimates of reflex sensitivity. Changes in carotid transmural pressure caused graded changes in R-R interval and vascular resistance. The cardiac responses were unaffected by LBNP. Vascular resistance responses, however, were significantly enhanced during LBNP and the peak gain of the reflex was increased from 1.2 +/- 0.3 (mean +/- S.E.M.) to 2.2 +/- 0.3 units (P < 0.05). The increased baroreflex gain may contribute to maintenance of blood pressure during orthostatic stress and limit the pressure decreases during prolonged periods of such stress.

  15. Decoupling of stretch reflex and background muscle activity during anticipatory postural adjustments in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedula, Siddharth; Kearney, Robert E; Wagner, Ross; Stapley, Paul J

    2010-08-01

    We studied the evolution of stretch reflexes in relation to background electromyographic (EMG) activity in the soleus muscle preceding the onset of voluntary arm raise movements. Our objective was to investigate if changes in reflex EMG and muscle activity occur simultaneously and are similarly scaled in amplitude. Ten human subjects stood with each foot on pedals able to exert short dorsiflexor pulses during stance. Subjects were asked to product consistent voluntary arm raise movements to a target upon a visual cue. In (1/4) of trials, no pulse perturbations were given, but in the remaining (3/4)'s of all trials pulses were given randomly during a 600-ms period, from 400 ms before until 200 ms after the onset of the movements. Perturbation trials were sorted into 20-ms bins post hoc, and the amplitude of the reflex EMG component was calculated and compared to the EMG activity obtained when no pulses were given. Results showed that despite exhibiting similar profiles over time, the background EMG consistently inhibited before the reflex EMG did. However, times of reactivation (rebound) were variable across subjects, with background EMG activating before reflex for some subjects and vice versa for others. The minimum values of inhibition, time of inhibition and time of rebound for background and reflex EMG measures did not show significant linear correlations when all subjects' data were considered. These results suggest that reflex and background EMG components of anticipatory postural adjustments evolve differently in time and amplitude. This has implications for the independent control of reflexes and voluntary muscle activity.

  16. Effects of contraction intensity on muscle fascicle and stretch reflex behavior in the human triceps surae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Neil J; Peltonen, Jussi; Ishikawa, Masaki; Komi, Paavo V; Avela, Janne; Sinkjaer, Thomas; Voigt, Michael

    2008-07-01

    The aims of this study were to examine changes in the distribution of a stretch to the muscle fascicles with changes in contraction intensity in the human triceps surae and to relate fascicle stretch responses to short-latency stretch reflex behavior. Thirteen healthy subjects were seated in an ankle ergometer, and dorsiflexion stretches (8 degrees ; 250 degrees /s) were applied to the triceps surae at different moment levels (0-100% of maximal voluntary contraction). Surface EMG was recorded in the medial gastrocnemius, soleus, and tibialis anterior muscles, and ultrasound was used to measure medial gastrocnemius and soleus fascicle lengths. At low forces, reflex amplitudes increased despite a lack of change or even a decrease in fascicle stretch velocities. At high forces, lower fascicle stretch velocities coincided with smaller stretch reflexes. The results revealed a decline in fascicle stretch velocity of over 50% between passive conditions and maximal force levels in the major muscles of the triceps surae. This is likely to be an important factor related to the decline in stretch reflex amplitudes at high forces. Because short-latency stretch reflexes contribute to force production and stiffness regulation of human muscle fibers, a reduction in afferent feedback from muscle spindles could decrease the efficacy of human movements involving the triceps surae, particularly where high force production is required.

  17. Relationship between Human Pupillary Light Reflex and Circadian System Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonmati-Carrion, Maria Angeles; Hild, Konstanze; Isherwood, Cheryl; Sweeney, Stephen J.; Revell, Victoria L.; Skene, Debra J.; Rol, Maria Angeles; Madrid, Juan Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs), whose photopigment melanopsin has a peak of sensitivity in the short wavelength range of the spectrum, constitute a common light input pathway to the olivary pretectal nucleus (OPN), the pupillary light reflex (PLR) regulatory centre, and to the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), the major pacemaker of the circadian system. Thus, evaluating PLR under short wavelength light (λmax ≤ 500 nm) and creating an integrated PLR parameter, as a possible tool to indirectly assess the status of the circadian system, becomes of interest. Nine monochromatic, photon-matched light stimuli (300 s), in 10 nm increments from λmax 420 to 500 nm were administered to 15 healthy young participants (8 females), analyzing: i) the PLR; ii) wrist temperature (WT) and motor activity rhythms (WA), iii) light exposure (L) pattern and iv) diurnal preference (Horne-Östberg), sleep quality (Pittsburgh) and daytime sleepiness (Epworth). Linear correlations between the different PLR parameters and circadian status index obtained from WT, WA and L recordings and scores from questionnaires were calculated. In summary, we found markers of robust circadian rhythms, namely high stability, reduced fragmentation, high amplitude, phase advance and low internal desynchronization, were correlated with a reduced PLR to 460–490 nm wavelengths. Integrated circadian (CSI) and PLR (cp-PLR) parameters are proposed, that also showed an inverse correlation. These results demonstrate, for the first time, the existence of a close relationship between the circadian system robustness and the pupillary reflex response, two non-visual functions primarily under melanopsin-ipRGC input. PMID:27636197

  18. Test-retest reliability of the soleus H-reflex excitability measured during human walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik B; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate with what accuracy the soleus H-reflex modulation and excitability could be measured during human walking on two occasions separated by days. The maximal M-wave (Mmax) was measured at rest in the standing position. During treadmill walking every stimulu...

  19. Business Analytics in (a) Blink

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Barber; P. Bendel; M. Czech; O. Draese; F. Ho; N. Hrle; S. Idreos (Stratos); M Kim; O Koeth; J. Lee (Jae-Gil); T. Tim Li (Tianchao); G. Lohman; K. Morfonios; R. Mueller (René); K Murthy; I. Pandis; L. Qiao; V. Raman (Vijayshankar); R. Sidle; K Stolze; S. Szabo

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe Blink project’s ambitious goal is to answer all Business Intelligence (BI) queries in mere seconds, regardless of the database size, with an extremely low total cost of ownership. Blink is a new DBMS aimed primarily at read-mostly BI query processing that exploits scale-out of

  20. Business Analytics in (a) Blink

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barber, R.; Bendel, P.; Czech, M.; Draese, O.; Ho, F.; Hrle, N.; Idreos, S.; Kim, M; Koeth, O; Lee, J.; Tim Li, T.; Lohman, G.; Morfonios, K.; Mueller, R.; Murthy, K; Pandis, I.; Qiao, L.; Raman, V.; Sidle, R.; Stolze, K; Szabo, S.

    2012-01-01

    The Blink project’s ambitious goal is to answer all Business Intelligence (BI) queries in mere seconds, regardless of the database size, with an extremely low total cost of ownership. Blink is a new DBMS aimed primarily at read-mostly BI query processing that exploits scale-out of commodity multi-co

  1. Age-related changes in human vestibulo-ocular and optokinetic reflexes: Pseudorandom rotation tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterka, R. J.; Black, F. O.; Schoenhoff, M. B.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamic response properties of horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) and optokinetic reflex (OKR) were characterized in 216 human subjects ranging in age from 7 to 81 years. The object of this cross-sectional study was to determine the effects of aging on VOR and OKR reflex dynamics, and to identify the distributions of parameters which describe VOR and OKR responses to pseudorandom stimuli in a putatively normal population. In general, VOR and OKR response parameters changed in a manner consistent with declining function with increasing age. For the VOR this was reflected in declining response amplitudes, although the magnitude of the decline was small relative to the variability of the data. For the OKR the lag time of the response, probably associated with the time required for visual information processing, increased linearly with age at a rate of about 1 ms per year.

  2. Eye blink frequency during different computer tasks quantified by electrooculography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skotte, J H; Nøjgaard, J K; Jørgensen, L V;

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate electrooculography (EOG) as an automatic method to measure the human eye blink frequency (BF) during passive and interactive computer tasks performed at two screen heights. Ten healthy subjects (5 males and 5 females) participated in the study in a 23...... degrees C temperature and 30-35% relative humidity controlled simulated office environment. Each test subject completed a 2 x 10 min active task of computer work and a 3 x 10 min passive task of watching a film on a video display unit (VDU). Both tasks included two viewing angles: standard (the monitors...... counted manually from the video recordings and compared to the EOG measurements. The method showed a high validity to detect blinks during computer work: 95.4% of the blinks were retrieved by the EOG method and very few artefacts from eye movements were erroneously classified as eye blinks (2.4%). By use...

  3. The human vestibulo-ocular reflex during linear locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, S. T.; Hirasaki, E.; Raphan, T.; Cohen, B.

    2001-01-01

    During locomotion, there is a translation and compensatory rotation of the head in both the vertical and horizontal planes. During moderate to fast walking (100 m/min), vertical head translation occurs at the frequency of stepping (2 Hz) and generates peak linear acceleration of 0.37 g. Lateral head translation occurs at the stride frequency (1 Hz) and generates peak linear acceleration of 0.1 g. Peak head pitch and yaw angular velocities are approximately 17 degrees/s. The frequency and magnitude of these head movements are within the operational range of both the linear and angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (IVOR and aVOR). Vertical eye movements undergo a phase reversal from near to far targets. When viewing a far (>1 m) target, vertical eye velocity is typical of an aVOR response; that is, it is compensatory for head pitch. At close viewing distances (head pitch and is compensatory for vertical head translation, suggesting that the IVOR predominantly generates the eye movement response. Horizontal head movements during locomotion occur at the stride frequency of 1 Hz, where the IVOR gain is low. Horizontal eye movements are compensatory for head yaw at all viewing distances and are likely generated by the aVOR.

  4. The human vestibulo-ocular reflex during linear locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, S. T.; Hirasaki, E.; Raphan, T.; Cohen, B.

    2001-01-01

    During locomotion, there is a translation and compensatory rotation of the head in both the vertical and horizontal planes. During moderate to fast walking (100 m/min), vertical head translation occurs at the frequency of stepping (2 Hz) and generates peak linear acceleration of 0.37 g. Lateral head translation occurs at the stride frequency (1 Hz) and generates peak linear acceleration of 0.1 g. Peak head pitch and yaw angular velocities are approximately 17 degrees/s. The frequency and magnitude of these head movements are within the operational range of both the linear and angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (IVOR and aVOR). Vertical eye movements undergo a phase reversal from near to far targets. When viewing a far (>1 m) target, vertical eye velocity is typical of an aVOR response; that is, it is compensatory for head pitch. At close viewing distances (<1 m), vertical eye velocity is in phase with head pitch and is compensatory for vertical head translation, suggesting that the IVOR predominantly generates the eye movement response. Horizontal head movements during locomotion occur at the stride frequency of 1 Hz, where the IVOR gain is low. Horizontal eye movements are compensatory for head yaw at all viewing distances and are likely generated by the aVOR.

  5. Proprioceptive reaction times and long-latency reflexes in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, C D; Tolhurst, S A; Bawa, P

    2012-08-01

    The stretch of upper limb muscles results in two electromyographic (EMG) peaks, M1 and M2. The amplitude of M2 peak can generally be modified by giving prior instruction to the subject on how to react to the applied perturbation. The unresolved question is whether the amplitude modulation results from change in the gain of the reflex pathway contributing to M2, or by superposition of reaction time (RT) activity. The following study attempted to resolve this question by examining the overlap between proprioceptive RT and M2 activities. Subject's right wrist flexors were stretched, and he/she was instructed either (1) not to intervene (passive task) or (2) to react as fast as possible by simultaneously flexing both wrists (active or compensate task). Under passive and active conditions, M1 and M2 were observed from EMG of right wrist flexors, and during the active condition, RT activities were additionally observed from both sides. The onset and offset of M2 (M1(onset), M2(offset)) were measured from the passive averages, while the RT was measured from the averaged EMG response of the left wrist flexors. For between-subject correlations, the data were divided into two sets: (1) subjects with RT shorter than M2(offset) (fast group) and (2) subjects with RT more than 10 ms longer than their M2(offset) (slow group). Modulation during M2 period was large for the fast group, and it was almost zero for the slow group. These results indicate that the superimposition of RT activity mainly contributes to the instruction-dependent modulation of M2 peak.

  6. Operant conditioning of the soleus H-reflex does not induce long-term changes in the gastrocnemius H-reflexes and does not disturb normal locomotion in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makihara, Yukiko; Segal, Richard L; Wolpaw, Jonathan R; Thompson, Aiko K

    2014-09-15

    In normal animals, operant conditioning of the spinal stretch reflex or the H-reflex has lesser effects on synergist muscle reflexes. In rats and people with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI), soleus H-reflex operant conditioning can improve locomotion. We studied in normal humans the impact of soleus H-reflex down-conditioning on medial (MG) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) H-reflexes and on locomotion. Subjects completed 6 baseline and 30 conditioning sessions. During conditioning trials, the subject was encouraged to decrease soleus H-reflex size with the aid of visual feedback. Every sixth session, MG and LG H-reflexes were measured. Locomotion was assessed before and after conditioning. In successfully conditioned subjects, the soleus H-reflex decreased 27.2%. This was the sum of within-session (task dependent) adaptation (13.2%) and across-session (long term) change (14%). The MG H-reflex decreased 14.5%, due mainly to task-dependent adaptation (13.4%). The LG H-reflex showed no task-dependent adaptation or long-term change. No consistent changes were detected across subjects in locomotor H-reflexes, EMG activity, joint angles, or step symmetry. Thus, in normal humans, soleus H-reflex down-conditioning does not induce long-term changes in MG/LG H-reflexes and does not change locomotion. In these subjects, task-dependent adaptation of the soleus H-reflex is greater than it is in people with SCI, whereas long-term change is less. This difference from results in people with SCI is consistent with the fact that long-term change is beneficial in people with SCI, since it improves locomotion. In contrast, in normal subjects, long-term change is not beneficial and may necessitate compensatory plasticity to preserve satisfactory locomotion. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  7. The relationship between eye-winking tics, frequent eye-blinking and blepharospasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elston, J S; Granje, F C; Lees, A J

    1989-04-01

    A family is reported in which three generations were affected with eye-winking tics and/or blepharospasm. The proband developed eye-winking tics in childhood and then developed excessive blinking progressing to blepharospasm by the age of 21 years. His mother presented with Meige's syndrome and spasmodic torticollis at the age of 59 years; his uncle had blinked excessively from his early forties. His eldest son developed an eye-winking tic with facial grimacing at the age of 8 years, and in another son, a self-limiting period of eye-blinking occurred at the age of 4 years. The recovery cycle of the blink reflex was abnormal in all three generations. Three other children with eye-winking tics have a parent or close relative with frequent eye-blinking or blepharospasm. Five patients with adult-onset blepharospasm or Meige's syndrome are also described who had excessive eye-blinking dating back to childhood. It is suggested that eye-winking tics, frequent blinking and blepharospasm may share common pathophysiological mechanisms; the clinical expression may be age-related.

  8. Self-Reflexivity within Human Strangeness in Nocturnes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李厥云

    2014-01-01

    Like his earlier novels, this collection of short stories continues the similar thematization which has been recurring from Ishiguro's beginning of creations. Through reading Nocturnes, readers are reminded the similar familiarity of his first-person narrators or protagonists who ironically reveal but also purposely conceal the inconsistency of their nostalgia and the present realities, which becomes an allegory of the pursuing self-identities human beings intend to elude in the foregrounding predicament of human conditions.

  9. Behavior of human horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex in response to high-acceleration stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, E. F.; Huebner, W. P.; Seidman, S. H.; Leigh, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    The horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during transient, high-acceleration (1900-7100 deg/sec-squared) head rotations was studied in four human subjects. Such stimuli perturbed the angle of gaze and caused illusory movement of a viewed target (oscillopsia). The disturbance of gaze could be attributed to the latency of the VOR (which ranged from 6-15 ms) and inadequate compensatory eye rotations (median VOR gain ranged from 0.61-0.83).

  10. Periodic modulation of repetitively elicited monosynaptic reflexes of the human lumbosacral spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstoetter, Ursula S; Danner, Simon M; Freundl, Brigitta; Binder, Heinrich; Mayr, Winfried; Rattay, Frank; Minassian, Karen

    2015-07-01

    In individuals with motor-complete spinal cord injury, epidural stimulation of the lumbosacral spinal cord at 2 Hz evokes unmodulated reflexes in the lower limbs, while stimulation at 22-60 Hz can generate rhythmic burstlike activity. Here we elaborated on an output pattern emerging at transitional stimulation frequencies with consecutively elicited reflexes alternating between large and small. We analyzed responses concomitantly elicited in thigh and leg muscle groups bilaterally by epidural stimulation in eight motor-complete spinal cord-injured individuals. Periodic amplitude modulation of at least 20 successive responses occurred in 31.4% of all available data sets with stimulation frequency set at 5-26 Hz, with highest prevalence at 16 Hz. It could be evoked in a single muscle group only but was more strongly expressed and consistent when occurring in pairs of antagonists or in the same muscle group bilaterally. Latencies and waveforms of the modulated reflexes corresponded to those of the unmodulated, monosynaptic responses to 2-Hz stimulation. We suggest that the cyclical changes of reflex excitability resulted from the interaction of facilitatory and inhibitory mechanisms emerging after specific delays and with distinct durations, including postactivation depression, recurrent inhibition and facilitation, as well as reafferent feedback activation. The emergence of large responses within the patterns at a rate of 5.5/s or 8/s may further suggest the entrainment of spinal mechanisms as involved in clonus. The study demonstrates that the human lumbosacral spinal cord can organize a simple form of rhythmicity through the repetitive activation of spinal reflex circuits. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Effects of the hallucinogen psilocybin on habituation and prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouzoulis-Mayfrank, E; Heekeren, K; Thelen, B; Lindenblatt, H; Kovar, K A; Sass, H; Geyer, M A

    1998-11-01

    Schizophrenic patients exhibit deficits in indices of sensorimotor gating, such as habituation and prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle reflex. Hallucinogenic drug-induced states are putative models for the early and acute stages of schizophrenic and schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. Hallucinogenic drugs have been shown to disrupt PPI and/or retard habituation of the startle reflex in animal models of schizophrenia, consistent with the view of hallucinogen-induced states as 'model psychoses'. We evaluated the effects of the hallucinogen psilocybin on PPI and habituation of the startle reflex in a double-blind, placebo-controlled human study with 12 healthy subjects. In contrast to animal studies, in our small human sample, psilocybin increased PPI, while having no clear effect on habituation (n = 6). These findings must be considered preliminary because several factors, including dose regimens and experimental parameters, may influence the results of studies on startle plasticity. Further investigations both with psychotic patients in different stages of the disease and with human and animal models of schizophrenia are needed in order to explore the effects of hallucinogens on sensorimotor gating and the relationship between information processing in hallucinogenic drug-induced states and the naturally occurring psychoses.

  12. Modulation of human exteroceptive jaw reflexes during simulated mastication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lobbezoo, F.; Sowman, P.F.; Türker, K.S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate changes in synaptic input from lower lip afferents to human jaw muscle motoneurons during simulated mastication. Methods: The lower lip of 14 subjects was stimulated electrically under static and dynamic conditions. In the static condition, subjects bit at mid-open position

  13. The human vestibulo-ocular reflex : effects of adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J.J.M. Boumans (Leon)

    1982-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis systematically investigates the influence of adaptation on the human VOR-response. Various types of angular acceleration around the vertical axis are used to determine the time constants of the VOR-system. Care is taken as far as possible to avoid fatigue, habituation and the

  14. Modeling Mixed Groups of Humans and Robots with Reflexive Game Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, Sergey

    The Reflexive Game Theory is based on decision-making principles similar to the ones used by humans. This theory considers groups of subjects and allows to predict which action from the set each subject in the group will choose. It is possible to influence subject's decision in a way that he will make a particular choice. The purpose of this study is to illustrate how robots can refrain humans from risky actions. To determine the risky actions, the Asimov's Three Laws of robotics are employed. By fusing the RGT's power to convince humans on the mental level with Asimov's Laws' safety, we illustrate how robots in the mixed groups of humans and robots can influence on human subjects in order to refrain humans from risky actions. We suggest that this fusion has a potential to device human-like motor behaving and looking robots with the human-like decision-making algorithms.

  15. Reflex responses to combined hip and knee motion in human chronic spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Wu, PhD

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The relative contributions of hip and knee proprioceptors to the origination of extensor spasms were examined in 11 subjects with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI. Ramp and hold extension and combined hip and knee oscillation movements were imposed to the right leg while the ankle was held in a static position by a custom-designed robot. Isometric joint torques of the hip, knee, and ankle and surface electromyograms (EMGs from seven leg muscles were recorded following controlled hip and knee extension. A stereotypical torque response consisting of hip flexion, knee extension, and ankle plantar flexion was observed following hip and knee perturbations. Further, the hip or knee joint posture modulated the spastic reflexes triggered by the extension movement of the other joint, with larger responses observed with the hip and knee extended. In addition, combined hip and knee oscillation movements were imposed to one leg with four different phasing conditions. The phasing between the hip and knee modulated the reflex activity triggered by hip and knee oscillations. The EMG patterns of the spastic reflexes were generally consistent with muscle timing during locomotion in human SCI. This knowledge may help identify rehabilitation strategies that produce functional movements in human SCI.

  16. Plantar flexor stretch reflex responses to whole body loading/unloading during human walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grey, Michael James; van Doornik, Johannes; Sinkjær, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    was to investigate the contribution of load receptor feedback to the compensatory stretch reflex response. We examined the contribution of load receptor feedback to the magnitude of the short and medium latency components of the ankle plantar flexor stretch reflex responses following an unexpected dorsiflexion...... perturbation during human walking. Three body load conditions were investigated: normal body load, a 30% increase in body load, and a 30% decrease in body load. Healthy subjects walked on a treadmill at approximately 3.6 km/h with the left ankle attached to a portable stretching device. Dorsiflexion...... perturbations (8 degrees; 350-425 degrees/s) were generated during the late stance phase of gate (approximately 400 ms following heel contact). Electromyographic activity was recorded from the soleus, tibialis anterior, medial gastrocnemius, rectus femoris, and biceps femoris muscles using bipolar surface...

  17. Pain sensation and nociceptive reflex excitability in surgical patients and human volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, J B; Erichsen, C J; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, A

    1992-01-01

    Pain threshold, nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR) threshold and responses to suprathreshold stimulation were investigated in 15 female patients (mean age 32 yr (range 22-48 yr)) before and 68 (range 48-96) h after gynaecological laparotomy. Control measurements were performed in 17 healthy human...... volunteers (five males, age 30 yr (range 24-41 yr)). In the surgical patients, pain threshold decreased and pain to suprathreshold stimulation increased significantly (P = 0.006 and P = 0.04, respectively) from before to after surgery. A corresponding trend was demonstrated in neurophysiological measurements......, although the decrease in NFR threshold and increase in NFR amplitude to suprathreshold stimulation were not significant (P = 0.08 and P = 0.24, respectively). The correlations between the relative change in pain and reflex thresholds, and time from surgery, were statistically significant (pain threshold...

  18. THE EFFECTS OF LEFT VS. RIGHT EAR STIMULATION ON HUMAN STARTLE REFLEX MODULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kaviani

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported previously that modulatory effects of pleasant and unpleasant slides on the human acoustic reflex are observed only if startle probes are presented to the left ear or with binaural presentation. The present study examined the effects of the left and the right ear stimulation on modulated startle reflex (as indexed by eyeblink component, measured at the right eye employing short (2-min film-clips to elicit emotions. Sixteen right-handed subjects served as volunteers. The experiment included two consecutive sessions, on a single occasion. The acoustic stimuli were presented monaurally to one of the ears in each session, counterbalanced across order. The laterality phenomenon in startle modulation previously observed with affect-toned slides was not confirmed in this experiment. The probable discrepancy will be discussed methodologically.

  19. The reflex effects of nonnoxious sural nerve stimulation on human triceps surae motor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukulka, C G

    1994-05-01

    1. The effects of low-intensity electrical stimulation of the ipsilateral sural nerve on the reflex response of human triceps surae motor neurons were examined in 169 motor units recorded in 11 adult volunteers: 69 units from soleus (SOL), 48 units from lateral gastrocnemius (LG), and 52 units from medial gastrocnemius (MG). The reflex effects were assessed by the peristimulus time histogram (PSTH) technique, categorized according to onset latencies, and the magnitudes of effects were calculated as percent changes in baseline firing rates. 2. Sural stimulation evoked complex changes in motor-unit firing at onset latencies between 28 and 140 ms. The two most common responses seen in all muscles were a short-latency depression (D1) in firing (mean onset latency = 40 ms) in 42% of all units studied and a secondary enhancement (E2) in firing (mean onset latency = 72 ms) in 43% of all units. In LG, the D1 effect represented a mean decrease in firing of 52% which was statistically different from the changes in MG (42% decrease) and SOL (38% decrease). The magnitudes of E2 effects were similar across muscles with an average of 47% increase in firing. 3. No differences were found in the frequencies of occurrence for the enhancements in firing among the muscles studied. The main difference in reflex responses was the occurrence of an intermediate latency depression (D2) in 27% of the LG units with a mean onset latency of 72 ms. 4. Based on estimates of conduction times for activation of low-threshold cutaneous afferents, the short-latency D1 response likely represents an oligosynaptic spinal reflex with transmission times similar to the Ia reciprocal inhibitory pathway. These findings raise the question as to the possibility of low-threshold cutaneous afferents sharing common interneurons with low-threshold muscle afferent reflexes that have identical onset latencies. The complex reflex effects associated with low-level stimulation of a cutaneous nerve indicate a rich

  20. 贝尔麻痹患者早期瞬目反射、面神经电图的改变及其与面神经功能损害的关系%Relationship among Characteristic of Blink Reflex, Facial Nerve Electroneurography and Functional Lesion at the Early Stage of Bell's Palsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余青云; 洪铭范; 程静

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨贝尔麻痹患者早期瞬目反射、面神经电图的改变及其与面神经功能损害相关性。方法对25例贝尔麻痹早期患者进行瞬目反射与面神经电图检测,比较其阳性率,并分别根据其检测结果分为轻-中度损害、重度损害;同时按House-Blackmann(H-B)面神经功能评价分级标准进行面瘫程度评估,Ⅰ级为正常,Ⅱ~Ⅲ级为轻-中度、Ⅳ~Ⅵ级为重度。结果H-B面瘫分级评估,轻-中度面瘫占44%,重度面瘫占56%。瞬目反射检测阳性率达100%,其中轻-中度损害占28%,重度损害占72%;瞬目反射检测与H-B面瘫分级评估一致(P>0.05)。面神经电图检测阳性率52%,其中轻-中度损害占44%,重度损害占8%,与H-B面瘫分级评估不一致(P0.05). The positive rate of electroneurography was 52%, with the proportion of mild-moderate damage was 44%and severe damage was 8%, which was inconsistent with H-B scale evaluation (P<0.05). Conclusion Blink reflex is preferable to electroneurography in evaluating facial paralysis degree at the early stage of Bell's palsy.

  1. Increased whole-body auditory startle reflex and autonomic reactivity in children with anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Mirte J; Tijssen, Marina A J; van der Meer, Johan N; Koelman, Johannes H T M; Boer, Frits

    Background: Young patients with anxiety disorders are thought to have a hypersensitive fear system, including alterations of the early sensorimotor processing of threatening information. However, there is equivocal support in auditory blink response studies for an enlarged auditory startle reflex

  2. Design of virtual keyboard using blink control method for the severely disabled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shih-Wei; Lin, Chern-Sheng; Lin, Shir-Kuan; Lee, Chi-Hung

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, a human-machine interface with the concept of "blink control" is proposed. The human-machine interface is applied to an assistive device, namely "blink scanning keyboard", which is designed specifically for the severely physical disabled and people suffering from motor neuron diseases or severe cerebral palsy. The pseudo electromyography (EMG) signal of blinking eyes could be acquired by wearing a Bluetooth headset with one sensor on the forehead and the other three on the left ear of the user. Through a conscious blink, a clear and immediate variation will be formed in the pseudo EMG signal from the users' forehead. The occurrence of this variation in pseudo EMG signal could be detected and filtered by the algorithms proposed in this paper, acting like a trigger to activate the functions integrated in the scanning keyboard. The severely physical and visual disabled then can operate the proposed design by simply blinking their eyes, thus communicating with outside world.

  3. Characteristics of the vibratory reflex in humans with reduced suprasegmental influence due to spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, A M; Dimitrijevic, M R; Bacia, T; McKay, W B

    1993-01-01

    The tonic stretch reflex elicited by vibration of a muscle or tendon provides a means of studying segmental reflex activity in humans with impaired volitional motor activity due to spinal cord injury (SCI). Vibration applied to the achilles or patellar tendon in a group of 51 SCI subjects elicited motor unit activity different from that found in 12 healthy subjects. Four distinct features of motor unit responses to vibration of a single tendon (achilles or patellar) could be seen in the SCI subjects: (i) a rapid onset, tonic response, frequently beginning with a single burst analogous to a tendon jerk, in 72% of vibrated sites; (ii) repetitive, phasic bursts of activity or vibratory-induced clonus in 23% of the tonic responses; (iii) spread of activity to muscles distant from the vibration in 44% of the tonic responses; and vibratory-induced withdrawal reflexes (VWR) which occurred after vibration of 37% of the sites. Overall, 81% of stimulated sites responded to vibration in SCI subjects. In contrast, only 54% of vibrated sites responded in control subjects, always with a gradual onset tonic response, never accompanied by a VWR. The VWR in SCI subjects was typically of much larger amplitude than the tonic responses and involved a mean of 5 muscles (41% bilaterally). Features of these responses provide an insight into underlying neurocontrol mechanisms which may provide guidance in the selection of appropriate intervention or management strategies.

  4. Modulation of an inhibitory reflex in single motor units in human masseter by tonic painful stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, P; McMillan, A S; Graven-Nielsen, T; Wang, K; Arendt-Nielsen, L

    1999-12-01

    Perioral electrical stimuli cause inhibitory reflex responses in single motor-units (SMU) and surface electromyographic (EMG) recordings from voluntary contracted human jaw-closing muscles. Tonic experimental masseter pain has recently been shown to reduce the inhibitory reflex response in surface EMG recordings but the effect on SMU activity has not been described. In this study, motor-unit action potentials were recorded with wire electrodes inserted into the left masseter in eleven subjects. The subjects kept the SMU firing rate around 10 Hz by feedback. Ninety-nine electrical stimuli were applied sequentially to the left mental nerve with increasing stimulus delays in steps of 1 ms after the preceding motor unit action potential. The inhibitory reflex in SMU was recorded before, during and after infusion of hypertonic saline (5%) into the ipsilateral masseter muscle. Spike train data were used to calculate (1) the mean pre- and post-stimulus inter-spike-intervals (ISI) in all of the 99 trials, (2) cumulative changes in firing probability, and (3) estimation of the compound inhibitory post-synaptic potential (IPSP) in the masseter motoneuron. Tonic masseter pain did not change pre-stimulus SMU firing characteristics but the mean ISI for the first post-stimulus discharge (158.2+/-9.2 ms) was significantly decreased compared to the pre-pain (175.8+/-11.3 ms, Pmasseter pain compared to pre-pain and post-pain conditions. In conclusion, this study indicates that tonic masseter pain has a net excitatory effect on the inhibitory jaw-reflexes, which could be mediated by presynaptic mechanisms on the involved motoneurons.

  5. Is the long-latency stretch reflex in human masseter transcortical?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Sophie L; Miles, Timothy S; Thompson, Philip D; Nordstrom, Michael A

    2003-06-01

    A long-latency stretch reflex (LLSR) has been described in the human masseter muscle, but its pathway remains uncertain. To investigate this, the excitability of corticomotoneuronal (CM) cells projecting to masseter motoneurons during the LLSR was assessed with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). A facilitated response to TMS would be evidence of a LLSR pathway that traverses the motor cortex. Surface electromyogram electrodes were placed over the left or right masseter, and subjects ( n=10) bit on bars with their incisor teeth at 10% of maximal electromyographic activity (EMG). Servo-controlled displacements were imposed on the lower jaw to evoke a short- and long-latency stretch reflex in masseter. TMS intensity was just suprathreshold for a response in contralateral masseter. Trials consisted of: (1) stretch alone, (2) TMS alone, and (3) TMS with a preceding conditioning stretch at varied conditioning-testing (C-T) intervals chosen to combine TMS with the short-latency stretch reflex (3 ms, 5 ms) and the LLSR (23-41 ms). Masseter EMG was rectified and averaged. With TMS alone, mean (+/- SE) MEP area above baseline was 56+/-9%. The area of masseter MEPs above baseline in the C-T trials was calculated from each EMG average following subtraction of the response to stretch alone. Conditioning muscle stretch had no significant effect on masseter MEPs evoked by TMS with any C-T interval (ANOVA; P=0.90). In addition, subjects were unable to modify the SLSR or LLSR by voluntary command. It is concluded that the long-latency stretch reflex in the masseter does not involve the motor cortex and is not influenced by "motor set".

  6. Binocular Coordination of the Human Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex during Off-axis Pitch Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, S. J.; Reschke, M. F.; Kaufman, G. D.; Black, F. O.; Paloski, W. H.

    2006-01-01

    Head movements in the sagittal pitch plane typically involve off-axis rotation requiring both vertical and horizontal vergence ocular reflexes to compensate for angular and translational motion relative to visual targets of interest. The purpose of this study was to compare passive pitch VOR responses during rotation about an Earth-vertical axis (canal only cues) with off-axis rotation (canal and otolith cues). Methods. Eleven human subjects were oscillated sinusoidally at 0.13, 0.3 and 0.56 Hz while lying left-side down with the interaural axis either aligned with the axis of rotation or offset by 50 cm. In a second set of measurements, twelve subjects were also tested during sinusoidally varying centrifugation over the same frequency range. The modulation of vertical and horizontal vergence ocular responses was measured with a binocular videography system. Results. Off-axis pitch rotation enhanced the vertical VOR at lower frequencies and enhanced the vergence VOR at higher frequencies. During sinusoidally varying centrifugation, the opposite trend was observed for vergence, with both vertical and vergence vestibulo-ocular reflexes being suppressed at the highest frequency. Discussion. These differential effects of off-axis rotation over the 0.13 to 0.56 Hz range are consistent with the hypothesis that otolith-ocular reflexes are segregated in part on the basis of stimulus frequency. At the lower frequencies, tilt otolith-ocular responses compensate for declining canal input. At higher frequencies, translational otolith-ocular reflexes compensate for declining visual contributions to the kinematic demands required for fixating near targets.

  7. Neural mechanisms influencing interlimb coordination during locomotion in humans: presynaptic modulation of forearm H-reflexes during leg cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Mezzarane, Rinaldo A; Klarner, Taryn; Barss, Trevor S; Hundza, Sandra R; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi; Zehr, E Paul

    2013-01-01

    Presynaptic inhibition of transmission between Ia afferent terminals and alpha motoneurons (Ia PSI) is a major control mechanism associated with soleus H-reflex modulation during human locomotion. Rhythmic arm cycling suppresses soleus H-reflex amplitude by increasing segmental Ia PSI. There is a reciprocal organization in the human nervous system such that arm cycling modulates H-reflexes in leg muscles and leg cycling modulates H-reflexes in forearm muscles. However, comparatively little is known about mechanisms subserving the effects from leg to arm. Using a conditioning-test (C-T) stimulation paradigm, the purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that changes in Ia PSI underlie the modulation of H-reflexes in forearm flexor muscles during leg cycling. Subjects performed leg cycling and static activation while H-reflexes were evoked in forearm flexor muscles. H-reflexes were conditioned with either electrical stimuli to the radial nerve (to increase Ia PSI; C-T interval  = 20 ms) or to the superficial radial (SR) nerve (to reduce Ia PSI; C-T interval  = 37-47 ms). While stationary, H-reflex amplitudes were significantly suppressed by radial nerve conditioning and facilitated by SR nerve conditioning. Leg cycling suppressed H-reflex amplitudes and the amount of this suppression was increased with radial nerve conditioning. SR conditioning stimulation removed the suppression of H-reflex amplitude resulting from leg cycling. Interestingly, these effects and interactions on H-reflex amplitudes were observed with subthreshold conditioning stimulus intensities (radial n., ∼0.6×MT; SR n., ∼ perceptual threshold) that did not have clear post synaptic effects. That is, did not evoke reflexes in the surface EMG of forearm flexor muscles. We conclude that the interaction between leg cycling and somatosensory conditioning of forearm H-reflex amplitudes is mediated by modulation of Ia PSI pathways. Overall our results support a conservation of neural

  8. Neural mechanisms influencing interlimb coordination during locomotion in humans: presynaptic modulation of forearm H-reflexes during leg cycling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Nakajima

    Full Text Available Presynaptic inhibition of transmission between Ia afferent terminals and alpha motoneurons (Ia PSI is a major control mechanism associated with soleus H-reflex modulation during human locomotion. Rhythmic arm cycling suppresses soleus H-reflex amplitude by increasing segmental Ia PSI. There is a reciprocal organization in the human nervous system such that arm cycling modulates H-reflexes in leg muscles and leg cycling modulates H-reflexes in forearm muscles. However, comparatively little is known about mechanisms subserving the effects from leg to arm. Using a conditioning-test (C-T stimulation paradigm, the purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that changes in Ia PSI underlie the modulation of H-reflexes in forearm flexor muscles during leg cycling. Subjects performed leg cycling and static activation while H-reflexes were evoked in forearm flexor muscles. H-reflexes were conditioned with either electrical stimuli to the radial nerve (to increase Ia PSI; C-T interval  = 20 ms or to the superficial radial (SR nerve (to reduce Ia PSI; C-T interval  = 37-47 ms. While stationary, H-reflex amplitudes were significantly suppressed by radial nerve conditioning and facilitated by SR nerve conditioning. Leg cycling suppressed H-reflex amplitudes and the amount of this suppression was increased with radial nerve conditioning. SR conditioning stimulation removed the suppression of H-reflex amplitude resulting from leg cycling. Interestingly, these effects and interactions on H-reflex amplitudes were observed with subthreshold conditioning stimulus intensities (radial n., ∼0.6×MT; SR n., ∼ perceptual threshold that did not have clear post synaptic effects. That is, did not evoke reflexes in the surface EMG of forearm flexor muscles. We conclude that the interaction between leg cycling and somatosensory conditioning of forearm H-reflex amplitudes is mediated by modulation of Ia PSI pathways. Overall our results support a

  9. Using Eye Blinking for EOG-Based Robot Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duguleana, Mihai; Mogan, Gheorghe

    This paper proposes a new approach to real-time robot controlling by integrating an Electrooculography (EOG) measuring device within human-robot interaction (HRI). Our study focuses on controlling robots using EOG for fulfilling elementary robot activities such as basic motor movements and environment interaction. A new EOG-based HRI paradigm has been developed on the specific defined problem of eye blinking. The resulted model is tested using biometric capturing equipment. We propose a simple algorithm for real-time identification and processing of signals produced by eyes during blinking phases. We present the experimental setup and the results of the experiment. We conclude by listing further research issues.

  10. Oral sapropterin acutely augments reflex vasodilation in aged human skin through nitric oxide-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanhewicz, Anna E; Alexander, Lacy M; Kenney, W Larry

    2013-10-01

    Functional constitutive nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and its cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) are required for full reflex cutaneous vasodilation and are attenuated in primary aging. Acute, locally administered BH4 increases reflex vasodilation through NO-dependent mechanisms in aged skin. We hypothesized that oral sapropterin (Kuvan, shelf-stable pharmaceutical formulation of BH4) would augment reflex vasodilation in aged human skin during hyperthermia. Nine healthy human subjects (76 ± 1 yr) ingested sapropterin (10 mg/kg) or placebo in a randomized double-blind crossover design. Venous blood samples were collected prior to, and 3 h following, ingestion of sapropterin for measurement of plasma BH4. Three intradermal microdialysis fibers were placed in the forearm skin for local delivery of 1) lactated Ringer's solution, 2) 10 mM BH4, and 3) 20 mM N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) to inhibit NOS. Red cell flux was measured at each site by laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) as reflex vasodilation was induced using a water-perfused suit. At 1°C rise in oral temperature, mean body temperature was clamped and 20 mM l-NAME was perfused at each site. Cutaneous vascular conductance was calculated (CVC = LDF/MAP) and expressed as a percentage of maximum (%CVCmax 28 mM sodium nitroprusside and local heat 43°C). Plasma concentrations of BH4 were significantly elevated 3 h after ingestion of sapropterin (0 h: 19.1 ± 2 pmol/ml vs. 3 h: 43.8 ± 3 pmol/ml; P vasodilation at control site (placebo: 14 ± 1 %CVCmax vs. sapropterin: 25 ± 4 %CVCmax; P = 0.004). Local BH4 administration increased NO-dependent vasodilation compared with control in placebo trials only (control: 14 ± 1 %CVCmax vs. BH4-treated: 24 ± 3 %CVCmax; P = 0.02). These data suggest oral sapropterin increases bioavailable BH4 in aged skin microvasculature sufficiently to increase NO synthesis through NOS and that sapropterin may be a viable intervention to increase skin blood flow during hyperthermia

  11. Emotionally Colorful Reflexive Games

    CERN Document Server

    Tarasenko, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    This study addresses the matter of reflexive control of the emotional states by means of Reflexive Game Theory (RGT). It is shown how to build a bridge between RGT and emotions. For this purpose the Pleasure-Arousal-Dominance (PAD) model is adopted. The major advantages of RGT are its ability to predict human behavior and unfold the entire spectra of reflexion in the human mind. On the other hand, PAD provides ultimate approach to model emotions. It is illustrated that emotions are reflexive processes and, consequently, RGT fused with PAD model is natural solution to model emotional interactions between people. The fusion of RGT and PAD, called Emotional Reflexive Games (ERG), inherits the key features of both components. Using ERG, we show how reflexive control can be successfully applied to model human emotional states. Up to date, EGR is a unique methodology capable of modeling human reflexive processes and emotional aspects simultaneously.

  12. The human vertical translational vestibulo-ocular reflex. Normal and abnormal responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ke; Walker, Mark F; Joshi, Anand; Reschke, Millard; Strupp, Michael; Leigh, R John

    2009-05-01

    Geometric considerations indicate that the human translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (tVOR) should have substantially different properties than the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (aVOR). Specifically, tVOR cannot simultaneously stabilize images of distant and near objects on the retina. Most studies make the tacit assumption that tVOR acts to stabilize foveal images even though, in humans, tVOR is reported to compensate for less than 60% of foveal image motion. We have determined that the compensation gain (eye rotational velocity/required eye rotational velocity to maintain foveal target fixation) of tVOR is held steady at approximately 0.6 during viewing of either near or distant targets during vertical (bob) translations in ambient illumination. We postulate that tVOR evolved not to stabilize the image of the target on the fovea, but rather to minimize retinal image motion between objects lying in different depth planes, in order to optimize motion parallax information. Such behavior is optimized when binocular visual cues of both near and distant targets are available in ambient light. Patients with progressive supranuclear palsy or cerebellar ataxia show impaired ability to increase tVOR responses appropriately when they view near targets. In cerebellar patients, impaired ability to adjust tVOR responses to viewing conditions occurs despite intact ability to converge at near. Loss of the ability to adjust tVOR according to viewing conditions appears to represent a distinct disorder of vestibular function.

  13. Characteristics of the spino-bulbo-spinal reflex with evoked EMGs in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, T; Miyazawa, T; Fujiwara, T

    1984-08-01

    Training in sports medicine and rehabilitation medicine requires the establishment of conditioned reflexes. Reinforcement of a conditioned reflex is more effective when it is part of a set of two or three reflexes. The late spinal reflexes appearing after conditioning were resolved into a stretch reflex and a spino-bulbo-spinal (SBS) reflex. H and M waves on the tibialis anterior muscle induced by tibial nerve stimulation were determined from the escape potential of the triceps sural muscle contraction. The tibial nerve and peroneal nerve were stimulated bilaterally, and H and M waves from the triceps sural muscle and tibialis anterior muscle were recorded bilaterally. The complete separation method of the late response and the time course of the stretch reflex and SBS reflex that composed the late response are described in this paper.

  14. The inhibitory effect of a chewing task on a human jaw reflex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maillou, P.; Cadden, S.W.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2010-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate whether an inhibitory jaw reflex could be modulated by experimentally controlled conditions that mimicked symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. Reflecting on previous work, we anticipated that these conditions might suppress the reflex. Electromyographic r

  15. Hip proprioceptors preferentially modulate reflexes of the leg in human spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Onushko, Tanya; Hyngstrom, Allison; Brian D Schmit

    2013-01-01

    Stretch-sensitive afferent feedback from hip muscles has been shown to trigger long-lasting, multijoint reflex responses in people with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). These reflexes could have important implications for control of leg movements during functional activities, such as walking. Because the control of leg movement relies on reflex regulation at all joints of the limb, we sought to determine whether stretch of hip muscles modulates reflex activity at the knee and ankle and, conv...

  16. The (B)link Between Creativity and Dopamine: Spontaneous Eye Blink Rates Predict and Dissociate Divergent and Convergent Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chermahini, Soghra Akbari; Hommel, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Human creativity has been claimed to rely on the neurotransmitter dopamine, but evidence is still sparse. We studied whether individual performance (N=117) in divergent thinking (alternative uses task) and convergent thinking (remote association task) can be predicted by the individual spontaneous eye blink rate (EBR), a clinical marker of…

  17. Reflex pathways connect receptors in the human lower leg to the erector spinae muscles of the lower back.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clair, J M; Okuma, Y; Misiaszek, J E; Collins, D F

    2009-06-01

    Reflex pathways connect all four limbs in humans. Presently, we tested the hypothesis that reflexes also link sensory receptors in the lower leg with muscles of the lower back (erector spinae; ES). Taps were applied to the right Achilles' tendon and electromyographic activity was recorded from the right soleus and bilaterally from ES. Reflexes were compared between sitting and standing and between standing with the eyes open versus closed. Reflexes were evoked bilaterally in ES and consisted of an early latency excitation, a medium latency inhibition, and a longer latency excitation. During sitting but not standing, the early excitation was larger in the ES muscle ipsilateral to the stimulation (iES) than in the contralateral ES (cES). During standing but not sitting, the longer latency excitation in cES was larger than in iES. This response in cES was also larger during standing compared to sitting. Responses were not significantly different between the eyes open and eyes closed conditions. Taps applied to the lateral calcaneus (heel taps) evoked responses in ES that were not significantly different in amplitude or latency than those evoked by tendon taps, despite a 75-94% reduction in the amplitude of the soleus stretch reflex evoked by the heel taps. Electrical stimulation of the sural nerve, a purely cutaneous nerve at the ankle, evoked ES reflexes that were not significantly different in amplitude but had significantly longer latencies than those evoked by the tendon and heel taps. These results support the hypothesis that reflex pathways connect receptors in the lower leg with muscles of the lower back and show that that the amplitude of these reflexes is modulated by task. Responses evoked by stimulation of the sural nerve establish that reflex pathways connect the ES muscles with cutaneous receptors of the foot. In contrast, the large volley in muscle spindle afferents induced by the tendon taps compared to the heel taps did not alter the ES responses

  18. Human Walking Pattern Recognition Based on KPCA and SVM with Ground Reflex Pressure Signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoqin Peng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Algorithms based on the ground reflex pressure (GRF signal obtained from a pair of sensing shoes for human walking pattern recognition were investigated. The dimensionality reduction algorithms based on principal component analysis (PCA and kernel principal component analysis (KPCA for walking pattern data compression were studied in order to obtain higher recognition speed. Classifiers based on support vector machine (SVM, SVM-PCA, and SVM-KPCA were designed, and the classification performances of these three kinds of algorithms were compared using data collected from a person who was wearing the sensing shoes. Experimental results showed that the algorithm fusing SVM and KPCA had better recognition performance than the other two methods. Experimental outcomes also confirmed that the sensing shoes developed in this paper can be employed for automatically recognizing human walking pattern in unlimited environments which demonstrated the potential application in the control of exoskeleton robots.

  19. Triceps surae short latency stretch reflexes contribute to ankle stiffness regulation during human running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Neil J; Carty, Christopher P; Barrett, Rod S

    2011-01-01

    During human running, short latency stretch reflexes (SLRs) are elicited in the triceps surae muscles, but the function of these responses is still a matter of controversy. As the SLR is primarily mediated by Ia afferent nerve fibres, various methods have been used to examine SLR function by selectively blocking the Ia pathway in seated, standing and walking paradigms, but stretch reflex function has not been examined in detail during running. The purpose of this study was to examine triceps surae SLR function at different running speeds using Achilles tendon vibration to modify SLR size. Ten healthy participants ran on an instrumented treadmill at speeds between 7 and 15 km/h under 2 Achilles tendon vibration conditions: no vibration and 90 Hz vibration. Surface EMG from the triceps surae and tibialis anterior muscles, and 3D lower limb kinematics and ground reaction forces were simultaneously collected. In response to vibration, the SLR was depressed in the triceps surae muscles at all speeds. This coincided with short-lasting yielding at the ankle joint at speeds between 7 and 12 km/h, suggesting that the SLR contributes to muscle stiffness regulation by minimising ankle yielding during the early contact phase of running. Furthermore, at the fastest speed of 15 km/h, the SLR was still depressed by vibration in all muscles but yielding was no longer evident. This finding suggests that the SLR has greater functional importance at slow to intermediate running speeds than at faster speeds.

  20. Triceps surae short latency stretch reflexes contribute to ankle stiffness regulation during human running.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil J Cronin

    Full Text Available During human running, short latency stretch reflexes (SLRs are elicited in the triceps surae muscles, but the function of these responses is still a matter of controversy. As the SLR is primarily mediated by Ia afferent nerve fibres, various methods have been used to examine SLR function by selectively blocking the Ia pathway in seated, standing and walking paradigms, but stretch reflex function has not been examined in detail during running. The purpose of this study was to examine triceps surae SLR function at different running speeds using Achilles tendon vibration to modify SLR size. Ten healthy participants ran on an instrumented treadmill at speeds between 7 and 15 km/h under 2 Achilles tendon vibration conditions: no vibration and 90 Hz vibration. Surface EMG from the triceps surae and tibialis anterior muscles, and 3D lower limb kinematics and ground reaction forces were simultaneously collected. In response to vibration, the SLR was depressed in the triceps surae muscles at all speeds. This coincided with short-lasting yielding at the ankle joint at speeds between 7 and 12 km/h, suggesting that the SLR contributes to muscle stiffness regulation by minimising ankle yielding during the early contact phase of running. Furthermore, at the fastest speed of 15 km/h, the SLR was still depressed by vibration in all muscles but yielding was no longer evident. This finding suggests that the SLR has greater functional importance at slow to intermediate running speeds than at faster speeds.

  1. Is attentional blink a byproduct of neocortical attractors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David N Silverstein

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a computational model for attentional blink or blink of the mind, a phenomenon where a human subject misses perception of a later expected visual pattern as two expected visual patterns are presented less than 500 ms apart. A neocortical patch modeled as an attractor network is stimulated with a sequence of 14 patterns 100 ms apart, two of which are expected targets. Patterns that become active attractors are considered recognized. A neocortical patch is represented as a square matrix of hypercolumns, each containing a set of minicolumns with synaptic connections within and across both minicolumns and hypercolumns. Each minicolumn consists of locally connected layer 2/3 pyramidal cells with interacting basket cells and layer 4 pyramidal cells for input stimulation. All neurons are implemented using the Hodgkin-Huxley multi-compartmental cell formalism and include calcium dynamics, and they interact via saturating and depressing AMPA / NMDA and GABAA synapses. Stored patterns are encoded with global connectivity of minicolumns across hypercolumns and active patterns compete as the result of lateral inhibition in the network. Stored patterns were stimulated over time intervals to create attractor interference measurable with synthetic spike traces. This setup corresponds with item presentations in human visual attentional blink studies. Stored target patterns were depolarized while distractor patterns where hyperpolarized to represent expectation of items in working memory. Additionally, studies on the inhibitory effect of benzodiazopines on attentional blink in human subjects were compared with neocortical simulations where the GABAA receptor conductance and decay time were increased. Simulations showed increases in the attentional blink duration, agreeing with observations in human studies.

  2. Anticipatory modulation of neck muscle reflex responses induced by mechanical perturbations of the human forehead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramochi, Rieko; Kimura, Toshitaka; Nakazawa, Kimitaka; Akai, Masami; Torii, Suguru; Suzuki, Shuji

    2004-08-12

    The aim of this study was to test whether anticipation of upcoming head blow stimuli, which elicit reflex responses in the neck muscle, makes the reflex responses greater or not. In nine healthy subjects the reflex responses were elicited in the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle in the eyes-open (EO) and eyes-closed (EC) conditions, which corresponded to the predictable and unpredictable conditions, respectively. The subjects were instructed not to resist the perturbations after the impact. The results demonstrated that the reflex response of the SCM muscle was significantly smaller in the predictable EO condition than in the unpredictable EC condition (P component, which most probably mediated the stretch reflex pathway. In contrast, no significant difference was observed in the early component, which was presumed to be the vestibular-collic reflex. The reduced stretch reflex response was suggested to be functionally relevant to the task requirement, i.e., to let the neck extension movement occur, and not to resist after the impact of the head blow. It was concluded that the anticipation has an effect on reducing the stretch reflex responses in the neck muscle, but does not have any effect on the presumed vestibular-collic reflex under the present experimental paradigm. It is suggested that the gain of the stretch reflex pathway is modulated by anticipatory information of upcoming mechanical event.

  3. The human startle reflex and alcohol cue reactivity: effects of early versus late abstinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saladin, Michael E; Drobes, David J; Coffey, Scott F; Libet, Julian M

    2002-06-01

    This study investigated the human eyeblink startle reflex as a measure of alcohol cue reactivity. Alcohol-dependent participants early (n = 36) and late (n = 34) in abstinence received presentations of alcohol and water cues. Consistent with previous research, greater salivation and higher ratings of urge to drink occurred in response to the alcohol cues. Differential salivary and urge responding to alcohol versus water cues did not vary as a function of abstinence duration. Of special interest was the finding that startle response magnitudes were relatively elevated to alcohol cues, but only in individuals early in abstinence. Affective ratings of alcohol cues suggested that alcohol cues were perceived as aversive. Methodological and theoretical implications of the findings are discussed.

  4. Group Ia afferents contribute to short-latency interlimb reflexes in the human biceps femoris muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevenson, Andrew James Thomas; Kamavuako, Ernest Nlandu; Geertsen, Svend Sparre

    2017-01-01

    and velocity of the iKnee rotations. Methods 11 seated participants (mean age: 25 ± 5 years) performed a voluntary isometric knee extension with the ipsilateral leg and contralateral knee flexion to 10% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). A mechanical actuator (MTS-Systems Corporation) imposed i...... amplitudes (4 vs. 8°) at the same 150°/s velocity (p’s > 0.08). Conclusion Because fast conducting group Ia muscle spindle afferents are sensitive to changes in muscle stretch velocity, while group II spindle afferents are sensitive to changes in amplitude (Grey et al., JPhysiol., 2001; Matthews, Trends...... Neurosci., 1991), group Ia velocity sensitive muscle spindle afferents likely contribute to the short-latency crossed spinal reflexes in the cBF muscle following iKnee joint rotations. This supports the findings for the short-latency crossed responses in the human soleus muscle (Stubbs & Mrachacz...

  5. Reflex influence of carotid baroreceptor inactivation on respiratory resistance in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klawe JJ

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Our previous study demonstrated that selective carotid baroreceptors activation decreases airway resistance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of carotid baroreceptor inactivation on the reflex change of respiratory resistance. Twenty healthy men aged between 20 and 25 were included in the study. Selective inactivation of carotid baroreceptors was induced by generating a positive pressure of 40 mmHg for 5 s in two capsules placed bilaterally on the neck over the bifurcation of the carotid arteries. The oscillatory method (Siregnost FD5, Siemens was used to measure continuously respiratory resistance. Inactivation of carotid baroreceptors produced a short increase in respiratory resistance by 0.39 ± 0.01(SE mbar/l/s, i.e., 21.7% above the resting level. We conclude that in humans, carotid baroreceptors might have a background contribution to bronchodilator tone. This observation seems to be important for clinical situations of impairment of baroreflex function.

  6. Dynamic properties of the human vestibulo-ocular reflex during head rotations in roll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidman, S. H.; Leigh, R. J.; Tomsak, R. L.; Grant, M. P.; Dell'Osso, L. F.

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the dynamic properties of the human vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during roll head rotations in three human subjects using the magnetic search coil technique. In the first of two experiments, we quantify the behavior of the ocular motor plant in the torsional plane. The subject's eye was mechanically displaced into intorsion, extorsion or abduction, and the dynamic course of return of the eye to its resting position was measured. The mean predominant time constants of return were 210 msec from intorsion, 83 msec from extorsion, and 217 msec from abduction, although there was considerable variability of results from different trials and subjects. In the second experiment, we quantify the efficacy of velocity-to-position integration of the vestibular signal. Position-step stimuli were used to test the torsional or horizontal VOR, being applied with subjects heads erect or supine. After a torsional position-step, the eye drifted back to its resting position, but after a horizontal position-step the eye held its new horizontal position. To interpret these responses we used a simple model of the VOR with parameters of the ocular motor plant set to values determined during Exp 1. The time constant of the velocity-to-position neural integrator was smaller (typically 2 sec) in the torsional plane than in the horizontal plane (> 20 sec). No disconjugacy of torsional eye movements was observed. Thus, the dynamic properties of the VOR in roll differ significantly from those of the VOR in yaw, reflecting different visual demands placed on this reflex in these two planes.

  7. Group II muscle afferents probably contribute to the medium latency soleus stretch reflex during walking in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grey, Michael James; Ladouceur, Michel; Andersen, Jacob B.

    2001-01-01

    1. The objective of this study was to determine which afferents contribute to the medium latency response of the soleus stretch reflex resulting from an unexpected perturbation during human walking. 2. Fourteen healthy subjects walked on a treadmill at approximately 3.5 km h(-1) with the left ankle...... component (P = 0.004), whereas the medium latency component was unchanged (P = 0.437). 6. Two hours after the ingestion of tizanidine, an alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor agonist known to selectively depress the transmission in the group II afferent pathway, the medium latency reflex was strongly depressed (P...... = 0.007), whereas the short latency component was unchanged (P = 0.653). 7. An ankle block with lidocaine hydrochloride was performed to suppress the cutaneous afferents of the foot and ankle. Neither the short (P = 0.453) nor medium (P = 0.310) latency reflexes were changed. 8. Our results support...

  8. Functionality of the contralateral biceps femoris reflex response during human walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevenson, Andrew James Thomas; Geertsen, Svend Sparre; Sinkjaer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In this study we examined the functionality of the contralateral biceps femoris (cBF) reflex response following ipsilateral knee extension joint rotations during the late stance phase of the gait cycle [1]. Stevenson et al. [1] proposed that the cBF reflex acts to slow the forward progression...... the treadmill velocity was altered concurrently or 50 ms after knee perturbation onset. These results, together with the finding that the cBF reflex response is under some cortical control [1], strongly suggest a functional role for the cBF reflex during walking that is adaptable to the environmental situation....

  9. Somatosensory-evoked blink reflex in peripheral facial palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah S El-Tawab

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion SBR occurs in patients with PFP and PFS and in healthy individuals. It has no relation with the clinical and electrophysiological changes occurring in PFP and PFS. Increased brainstem interneurons excitability is not essential to generate SBR. The hypothetical sensory-motor gating mechanism could be responsible for SBR generation.

  10. Single motor unit activity in human extraocular muscles during the vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Konrad P; Rosengren, Sally M; Michels, Rike; Sturm, Veit; Straumann, Dominik; Landau, Klara

    2012-07-01

    Motor unit activity in human eye muscles during the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is not well understood, since the associated head and eye movements normally preclude single unit recordings. Therefore we recorded single motor unit activity following bursts of skull vibration and sound, two vestibular otolith stimuli that elicit only small head and eye movements. Inferior oblique (IO) and inferior rectus (IR) muscle activity was measured in healthy humans with concentric needle electrodes. Vibration elicited highly synchronous, short-latency bursts of motor unit activity in the IO (latency: 10.5 ms) and IR (14.5 ms) muscles. The activation patterns of the two muscles were similar, but reciprocal, with delayed activation of the IR muscle. Sound produced short-latency excitation of the IO muscle (13.3 ms) in the eye contralateral to the stimulus. Simultaneous needle and surface recordings identified the IO as the muscle of origin of the vestibular evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP) thus validating the physiological basis of this recently developed clinical test of otolith function. Single extraocular motor unit recordings provide a window into neural activity in humans that can normally only be examined using animal models and help identify the pathways of the translational VOR from otoliths to individual eye muscles.

  11. Cutaneous reflexes evoked during human walking are reduced when self-induced.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baken, B.C.M.; Nieuwenhuijzen, P.H.J.A.; Bastiaanse, C.M.; Dietz, V.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2006-01-01

    Reflex responses are often less pronounced when they are self-induced, but this question has barely been investigated quantitatively. The issue is particularly relevant for locomotion since it has been shown that reflexes elicited during normal gait are important for the regulation of locomotion. Th

  12. Functionality of the contralateral biceps femoris reflex response during human walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevenson, Andrew James Thomas; Geertsen, Svend S.; Sinkjær, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In this study we examined the functionality of the contralateral biceps femoris (cBF) reflex response following ipsilateral knee extension joint rotations during the late stance phase of the gait cycle [1]. Stevenson et al. [1] proposed that the cBF reflex acts to slow the forward progression...

  13. Blinking and the Brain: Pathways and Pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E. Smit (Albertine Eline)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractA blink is a rapid bilateral eyelid closure and co-occurring eye movement. The eyes rotate down towards the tip of the nose and back up again. Seemingly, this generally unnoticed often repeated action is not very spectacular. However, if not for the occasional blink we would all be blind

  14. Correlation of augmented startle reflex with brainstem electrophysiological responses in Tay-Sachs disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Sadao; Saito, Yoshiaki; Ishiyama, Akihiko; Sugai, Kenji; Iso, Takashi; Inagaki, Masumi; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    To clarify the evolution of an augmented startle reflex in Tay-Sachs disease and compare the temporal relationship between this reflex and brainstem evoked potentials. Clinical and electrophysiological data from 3 patients with Tay-Sachs disease were retrospectively collected. The augmented startle reflex appeared between the age of 3 and 17 months and disappeared between the age of 4 and 6 years. Analysis of brainstem auditory evoked potentials revealed that poor segregation of peak I, but not peak III, coincided with the disappearance of the augmented startle reflex. A blink reflex with markedly high amplitude was observed in a patient with an augmented startle reflex. The correlation between the augmented startle reflex and the preservation of peak I but not peak III supports the theory that the superior olivary nucleus is dispensable for this reflex. The blink reflex with high amplitudes may represent augmented excitability of reticular formation at the pontine tegmentum in Tay-Sachs disease, where the pattern generators for the augmented startle and blink reflexes may functionally overlap. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Artificial balance: restoration of the vestibulo-ocular reflex in humans with a prototype vestibular neuroprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Fornos, Angelica; Guinand, Nils; van de Berg, Raymond; Stokroos, Robert; Micera, Silvestro; Kingma, Herman; Pelizzone, Marco; Guyot, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The vestibular system plays a crucial role in the multisensory control of balance. When vestibular function is lost, essential tasks such as postural control, gaze stabilization, and spatial orientation are limited and the quality of life of patients is significantly impaired. Currently, there is no effective treatment for bilateral vestibular deficits. Research efforts both in animals and humans during the last decade set a solid background to the concept of using electrical stimulation to restore vestibular function. Still, the potential clinical benefit of a vestibular neuroprosthesis has to be demonstrated to pave the way for a translation into clinical trials. An important parameter for the assessment of vestibular function is the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), the primary mechanism responsible for maintaining the perception of a stable visual environment while moving. Here we show that the VOR can be artificially restored in humans using motion-controlled, amplitude modulated electrical stimulation of the ampullary branches of the vestibular nerve. Three patients received a vestibular neuroprosthesis prototype, consisting of a modified cochlear implant providing vestibular electrodes. Significantly higher VOR responses were observed when the prototype was turned ON. Furthermore, VOR responses increased significantly as the intensity of the stimulation increased, reaching on average 79% of those measured in healthy volunteers in the same experimental conditions. These results constitute a fundamental milestone and allow us to envision for the first time clinically useful rehabilitation of patients with bilateral vestibular loss.

  16. Artificial balance: restoration of the vestibulo-ocular reflex in humans with a prototype vestibular neuroprosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica ePerez Fornos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The vestibular system plays a crucial role in the multisensory control of balance. When vestibular function is lost, essential tasks such as postural control, gaze stabilization, and spatial orientation are limited and the quality of life of patients is significantly impaired. Currently there is no effective treatment for bilateral vestibular deficits. Research efforts both in animals and humans during the last decade set a solid background to the concept of using electrical stimulation to restore vestibular function. Still, the potential clinical benefit of a vestibular neuroprosthesis has to be demonstrated to pave the way for a translation into clinical trials. An important parameter for the assessment of vestibular function is the Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (VOR, the primary mechanism responsible for maintaining the perception of a stable visual environment while moving. Here we show that the VOR can be artificially restored in humans using motion-controlled, amplitude modulated electrical stimulation of the ampullary branches of the vestibular nerve. Three patients received a vestibular neuroprosthesis prototype, consisting of a modified cochlear implant providing vestibular electrodes. Significantly higher VOR responses were observed when the prototype was turned ON. Furthermore, VOR responses increased significantly as the intensity of the stimulation increased, reaching on average 79% of those measured in healthy volunteers in the same experimental conditions. These results constitute a fundamental milestone and allow us to envision for the first time clinically useful rehabilitation of patients with bilateral vestibular loss.

  17. Hip proprioceptors preferentially modulate reflexes of the leg in human spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onushko, Tanya; Hyngstrom, Allison; Schmit, Brian D

    2013-07-01

    Stretch-sensitive afferent feedback from hip muscles has been shown to trigger long-lasting, multijoint reflex responses in people with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). These reflexes could have important implications for control of leg movements during functional activities, such as walking. Because the control of leg movement relies on reflex regulation at all joints of the limb, we sought to determine whether stretch of hip muscles modulates reflex activity at the knee and ankle and, conversely, whether knee and ankle stretch afferents affect hip-triggered reflexes. A custom-built servomotor apparatus was used to stretch the hip muscles in nine chronic SCI subjects by oscillating the legs about the hip joint bilaterally from 10° of extension to 40° flexion. To test whether stretch-related feedback from the knee or ankle would be affected by hip movement, patellar tendon percussions and Achilles tendon vibration were delivered when the hip was either extending or flexing. Surface electromyograms (EMGs) and joint torques were recorded from both legs. Patellar tendon percussions and Achilles tendon vibration both elicited reflex responses local to the knee or ankle, respectively, and did not influence reflex responses observed at the hip. Rather, the movement direction of the hip modulated the reflex responses local to the joint. The patellar tendon reflex amplitude was larger when the perturbation was delivered during hip extension compared with hip flexion. The response to Achilles vibration was modulated by hip movement, with an increased tonic component during hip flexion compared with extension. These results demonstrate that hip-mediated sensory signals modulate activity in distal muscles of the leg and appear to play a unique role in modulation of spastic muscle activity throughout the leg in SCI.

  18. Identification of time-varying dynamics of the human triceps surae stretch reflex. I. Rapid isometric contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, R F; Kearney, R E; MacNeil, J B

    1993-01-01

    We have examined the time variations of stretch reflex dynamics throughout rapid voluntary changes in the isometric contraction level of the human triceps surae muscles. This was achieved by superimposing a small stochastic displacement upon many such changing contractions and then identifying the time-varying relationship between the perturbation and the evoked electromyograms (EMGs). An "ensemble" time-varying system identification technique was used to estimate these input-output dynamics as a set of impulse response functions, one for each time before, during, and after the change in contraction level, with a temporal resolution equal to the data acquisition rate. Three main findings resulted. First, stretch reflex gain (relating joint velocity to EMG) was significantly modulated during changes in voluntary contraction level, increasing as the subject contracted the muscles and decreasing as the subject relaxed. Second, stretch reflex dynamics did not change with contraction level, even when its gain varied substantially. Third, the time course of the gain changes closely followed the level of the EMG, even though the subjects used rather different activation and deactivation patterns. These results suggest that, for the behavior studied (i.e., rapid changes in isometric contraction level), stretch reflex gain and motoneuron pool activation level were controlled by a common descending command rather than being independently specified.

  19. Modulation of high-frequency vestibuloocular reflex during visual tracking in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, V. E.; Leigh, R. J.; Thomas, C. W.; Averbuch-Heller, L.; Zivotofsky, A. Z.; Discenna, A. O.; Dell'Osso, L. F.

    1995-01-01

    1. Humans may visually track a moving object either when they are stationary or in motion. To investigate visual-vestibular interaction during both conditions, we compared horizontal smooth pursuit (SP) and active combined eye-head tracking (CEHT) of a target moving sinusoidally at 0.4 Hz in four normal subjects while the subjects were either stationary or vibrated in yaw at 2.8 Hz. We also measured the visually enhanced vestibuloocular reflex (VVOR) during vibration in yaw at 2.8 Hz over a peak head velocity range of 5-40 degrees/s. 2. We found that the gain of the VVOR at 2.8 Hz increased in all four subjects as peak head velocity increased (P tracking gains were similar, and the mean slip speed of the target's image on the retina was held below 5.5 degrees/s whether subjects were stationary or being vibrated at 2.8 Hz. During both horizontal SP and CEHT of target motion at 0.4 Hz, while subjects were vibrated in yaw, VVOR gain for the 2.8-Hz head rotations was similar to or higher than that achieved during fixation of a stationary target. This is in contrast to the decrease of VVOR gain that is reported while stationary subjects perform CEHT.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  20. Modulation of high-frequency vestibuloocular reflex during visual tracking in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, V E; Leigh, R J; Thomas, C W; Averbuch-Heller, L; Zivotofsky, A Z; Discenna, A O; Dell'Osso, L F

    1995-08-01

    1. Humans may visually track a moving object either when they are stationary or in motion. To investigate visual-vestibular interaction during both conditions, we compared horizontal smooth pursuit (SP) and active combined eye-head tracking (CEHT) of a target moving sinusoidally at 0.4 Hz in four normal subjects while the subjects were either stationary or vibrated in yaw at 2.8 Hz. We also measured the visually enhanced vestibuloocular reflex (VVOR) during vibration in yaw at 2.8 Hz over a peak head velocity range of 5-40 degrees/s. 2. We found that the gain of the VVOR at 2.8 Hz increased in all four subjects as peak head velocity increased (P control condition when subjects were rotated in darkness. 3. During both horizontal SP and CEHT, tracking gains were similar, and the mean slip speed of the target's image on the retina was held below 5.5 degrees/s whether subjects were stationary or being vibrated at 2.8 Hz. During both horizontal SP and CEHT of target motion at 0.4 Hz, while subjects were vibrated in yaw, VVOR gain for the 2.8-Hz head rotations was similar to or higher than that achieved during fixation of a stationary target. This is in contrast to the decrease of VVOR gain that is reported while stationary subjects perform CEHT.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Dual adaptation and adaptive generalization of the human vestibulo-ocular reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, R. B.; Bridgeman, B.; Williams, J. A.; Semmler, R.

    1998-01-01

    In two experiments, we examined the possibility that the human vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is subject to dual adaptation (the ability to adapt to a sensory rearrangement more rapidly and/or more completely after repeated experience with it) and adaptive generalization (the ability to adapt more readily to a novel sensory rearrangement as a result of prior dual adaptation training). In Experiment 1, the subjects actively turned the head during alternating exposure to a visual-vestibular rearrangement (target/head gain = 0.5) and the normal situation (target/head gain = 0.0). These conditions produced both adaptation and dual adaptation of the VOR but no evidence of adaptive generalization when tested with a target/head gain of 1.0. Experiment 2, in which exposure to the 0.5 gain entailed externally controlled (i.e., passive) whole body rotation, resulted in VOR adaptation but no dual adaptation. As in Experiment 1, no evidence of adaptive generalization was found.

  2. The human translational vestibulo-ocular reflex in response to complex motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Mark; Liao, Ke

    2011-09-01

    We studied the translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (tVOR) in four healthy human subjects during complex, unpredictable sum-of-sines head motion (combination of 0.73, 1.33, 1.93, and 2.93 Hz), while subjects viewed a target 15 cm away. Ideal eye velocity was calculated from recorded head motion; actual eye velocity was measured with scleral coils. The gain and phase for each frequency component was determined by least-squares optimization. Gain averaged approximately 40% and did not change with frequency; phase lag increased with frequency to a maximum of 66°. Fitting actual to ideal eye velocity predicted a tVOR latency of 48 m/s for vertical and 38 m/s for horizontal translation. These findings provide further evidence that the normal tVOR is considerably undercompensatory, even at low frequencies if the stimulus is not predictable. The similarity of this behavior to that of pursuit suggests that these two eye movements may share some aspects of neural processing.

  3. The human vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) evaluated with a reactive torque helmet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Tabak (Sylvia)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe vestibulo-ocular reflex (YOR) generates eye rotations that compensate for head movements. Head movements include rotations and translations (linear displacements). Linear acceleration during translational movement, as well as the gravitational acceleration, signalling head orientatio

  4. Visual contribution to the high-frequency human angular vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chim, Daniel; Lasker, David M; Migliaccio, Americo A

    2013-09-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) acts to maintain images stable on the retina by rotating the eyes in exactly the opposite direction, but with equal magnitude, to head velocity. When viewing a near target, this reflex has an increased response to compensate for the translation of the eyes relative to the target that acts to reduce retinal image slip. Previous studies have shown that retinal velocity error provides an important visual feedback signal to increase the low-frequency (<1 Hz) VOR response during near viewing. We sought to determine whether initial eye position and retinal image position error could provide enough information to substantially increase the high-frequency VOR gain (eye velocity/head velocity) during near viewing. Ten human subjects were tested using the scleral search coil technique during horizontal head impulses under different lighting conditions (constant dark, strobe light at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 10, 15 Hz, constant light) while viewing near (9.5 ± 1.3 cm) and far (104 cm) targets. Our results showed that the VOR gain increased during near viewing compared to far viewing, even during constant dark. For the near target, there was an increase in VOR gain with increasing strobe frequency from 1.17 ± 0.17 in constant dark to 1.36 ± 0.27 in constant light, a 21 ± 9 % increase. For the far target, strobe frequency had no effect. Presentation order of strobe frequency (i.e. 0.5-15 vs. 15-0.5 Hz) did not affect the gain, but it did affect the vergence angle (angle between the two eye's lines of sight). The VOR gain and vergence angles were constant during each trial. Our findings show that a retinal position error signal helps increase the vergence angle and could be invoking vestibular adaptation mechanisms to increase the high-frequency VOR response during near viewing. This is in contrast to the low-frequency VOR that depends more on retinal velocity error and predictive adaptation mechanisms.

  5. Short-term memory across eye blinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, David E

    2014-01-01

    The effect of eye blinks on short-term memory was examined in two experiments. On each trial, participants viewed an initial display of coloured, oriented lines, then after a retention interval they viewed a test display that was either identical or different by one feature. Participants kept their eyes open throughout the retention interval on some blocks of trials, whereas on others they made a single eye blink. Accuracy was measured as a function of the number of items in the display to determine the capacity of short-term memory on blink and no-blink trials. In separate blocks of trials participants were instructed to remember colour only, orientation only, or both colour and orientation. Eye blinks reduced short-term memory capacity by approximately 0.6-0.8 items for both feature and conjunction stimuli. A third, control, experiment showed that a button press during the retention interval had no effect on short-term memory capacity, indicating that the effect of an eye blink was not due to general motoric dual-task interference. Eye blinks might instead reduce short-term memory capacity by interfering with attention-based rehearsal processes.

  6. Velocity storage in the human vertical rotational vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolini, G; Ramat, S

    2011-03-01

    Human horizontal rotational vestibulo-ocular reflex (rVOR) has been extensively investigated: the horizontal semicircular canals sense yaw rotations with high-pass filter dynamics and a time constant (TC) around 5 s, yet the rVOR response shows a longer TC due to a central processing stage, known as velocity storage mechanism (VSM). It is generally assumed that the vertical rVOR behaves similarly to the horizontal one; however, VSM processing of the human vertical rVOR is still to be proven. We investigated the vertical rVOR in eight healthy human subjects using three experimental paradigms: (1) per- and post-rotatory around an earth-vertical axis (ear down rotations, EDR), (2) post-rotatory around an earth-horizontal axis with different stopping positions (static otolith stimulation), (3) per-rotatory around an earth-horizontal axis (dynamic otolith stimulation). We found that the TC of vertical rVOR responses ranged 3-10 s, depending both on gravity and on the direction of rotation. The shortest TC were found in response to post-rotatory earth-horizontal stimulation averaging 3.6 s, while they were prolonged in EDR stimulation, i.e. when the head angular velocity vector is aligned with gravity, with a mean value of about 6.0 s. Overall, the longest TC were observed in per-rotatory earth-horizontal stimulation, averaging 7.8 s. The finding of longer TC in EDR than in post-rotatory earth-horizontal stimulation indicates a role for the VSM in the vertical rVOR, although its contribution appears to be weaker than on the horizontal rVOR and may be directionally asymmetric. The results from per-rotatory earth-horizontal stimulation, instead, imply a role for the otoliths in controlling the duration of the vertical rVOR response. We found no reorientation of the response toward earth horizontal, indicating a difference between human and monkey rVOR.

  7. Reconstruction of eye movements during blinks

    CERN Document Server

    Baptista, M S; Kliegl, R; Engbert, R; Kurths, J

    2008-01-01

    In eye movement research in reading, the amount of data plays a crucial role for the validation of results. A methodological problem for the analysis of the eye movement in reading are blinks, when readers close their eyes. Blinking rate increases with increasing reading time, resulting in high data losses, especially for older adults or reading impaired subjects. We present a method, based on the symbolic sequence dynamics of the eye movements, that reconstructs the horizontal position of the eyes while the reader blinks. The method makes use of an observed fact that the movements of the eyes before closing or after opening contain information about the eyes movements during blinks. Test results indicate that our reconstruction method is superior to methods that use simpler interpolation approaches. In addition, analyses of the reconstructed data show no significant deviation from the usual behavior observed in readers.

  8. Load-related modulation of cutaneous reflexes in the tibialis anterior muscle during passive walking in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Kamibayashi, Kiyotaka; Takahashi, Makoto; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi; Akai, Masami; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2008-03-01

    Although cutaneous reflexes are known to be strongly modulated in a phase-dependent manner during walking in both human and cat, it is not clear whether the movement-related or the load-sensitive afferent feedback plays a more important role in regulating this modulation. To address this issue in humans, we investigated modulation of the cutaneous reflex in the tibialis anterior muscles (TA) of 17 subjects during passive walking with a load (0%, 33%, 66% unloading of body weight) and without a load (100% unloading). These walking tasks were performed passively with a robotic gait trainer system. Cutaneous reflexes in TA, elicited by electrical stimulation to the distal tibial (Tib) and superficial peroneal (SP) nerves, were recorded during 10 different phases of the walking cycle, and the middle latency responses (MLR, 70-120 ms) were analysed. During loaded walking, the magnitudes of the MLR induced by Tib nerve stimulation were strongly increased during the late stance-to-early swing phase irrespective of the amount of load (phase modulation), a phenomenon that also occurred without background electromyogram in the TA. Predominant suppression of the MLR following SP nerve stimulation at the early stance phase changed to facilitation at the late stance. By contrast, the MLR following either Tib or SP nerve stimulation was not at all modulated by the stepping phase during both unloaded walking (100% unloading) and standing. These results suggest that phasic changes in the load-related afferent information in concert with rhythmic lower limb movement play a key role in modulating cutaneous reflexes during walking.

  9. What can other animals tell us about human social cognition?An evolutionary perspective on reflective and reflexive processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin E Hecht

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Human neuroscience has seen a recent boom in studies on reflective, controlled, explicit social cognitive functions like imitation, perspective‐taking, and empathy. The relationship of these higher‐level functions to lower‐level, reflexive, automatic, implicit functions is an area of current research. As the field continues to address this relationship, we suggest that an evolutionary, comparative approach will be useful, even essential. There is a large body of research on reflexive, automatic, implicit processes in animals. A growing perspective sees social cognitive processes as phylogenically continuous, making findings in other species relevant for understanding our own. One of these phylogenically continuous processes appears to be self‐other matching or simulation. Mice are more sensitive to pain after watching other mice experience pain; geese experience heart rate increases when seeing their mate in conflict; and infant macaques, chimpanzees, and humans automatically mimic adult facial expressions. In this article, we review findings in different species that illustrate how such reflexive processes are related to (higher order reflexive processes, such as cognitive empathy, theory of mind, and learning by imitation. We do so in the context of self‐other matching in three different domains – in the motor domain (somatomotor movements, in the perceptual domain (eye movements and cognition about visual perception, and in the autonomic/emotional domain. We also review research on the developmental origin of these processes and their neural bases across species. We highlight gaps in existing knowledge and point out some questions for future research. We conclude that our understanding of the psychological and neural mechanisms of self‐other mapping and other functions in our own species can be informed by considering the layered complexity these functions in other species.

  10. The effect of retinal image error update rate on human vestibulo-ocular reflex gain adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadaee, Shannon B; Migliaccio, Americo A

    2016-04-01

    The primary function of the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is to stabilise images on the retina during head movements. Retinal image movement is the likely feedback signal that drives VOR modification/adaptation for different viewing contexts. However, it is not clear whether a retinal image position or velocity error is used primarily as the feedback signal. Recent studies examining this signal are limited because they used near viewing to modify the VOR. However, it is not known whether near viewing drives VOR adaptation or is a pre-programmed contextual cue that modifies the VOR. Our study is based on analysis of the VOR evoked by horizontal head impulses during an established adaptation task. Fourteen human subjects underwent incremental unilateral VOR adaptation training and were tested using the scleral search coil technique over three separate sessions. The update rate of the laser target position (source of the retinal image error signal) used to drive VOR adaptation was different for each session [50 (once every 20 ms), 20 and 15/35 Hz]. Our results show unilateral VOR adaptation occurred at 50 and 20 Hz for both the active (23.0 ± 9.6 and 11.9 ± 9.1% increase on adapting side, respectively) and passive VOR (13.5 ± 14.9, 10.4 ± 12.2%). At 15 Hz, unilateral adaptation no longer occurred in the subject group for both the active and passive VOR, whereas individually, 4/9 subjects tested at 15 Hz had significant adaptation. Our findings suggest that 1-2 retinal image position error signals every 100 ms (i.e. target position update rate 15-20 Hz) are sufficient to drive VOR adaptation.

  11. Brainstem reflexes in patients with familial dysautonomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Joel V; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2015-03-01

    Several distinctive clinical features of patients with familial dysautonomia (FD) including dysarthria and dysphagia suggest a developmental defect in brainstem reflexes. Our aim was to characterize the neurophysiological profile of brainstem reflexes in these patients. We studied the function of sensory and motor trigeminal tracts in 28 patients with FD. All were homozygous for the common mutation in the IKAP gene. Each underwent a battery of electrophysiological tests including; blink reflexes, jaw jerk reflex, masseter silent periods and direct stimulation of the facial nerve. Responses were compared with 25 age-matched healthy controls. All patients had significantly prolonged latencies and decreased amplitudes of all examined brainstem reflexes. Similar abnormalities were seen in the early and late components. In contrast, direct stimulation of the facial nerve revealed relative preservation of motor responses. The brainstem reflex abnormalities in FD are best explained by impairment of the afferent and central pathways. A reduction in the number and/or excitability of trigeminal sensory axons is likely the main problem. These findings add further evidence to the concept that congenital mutations of the elongator-1 protein (or IKAP) affect the development of afferent neurons including those carrying information for the brainstem reflex pathways. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ocular Reflex Phase During Off-Vertical Axis Rotation In Humans Is Modified By Head-On-Trunk Position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Scott; Clement, Gilles; Denise, Pierre; Reschke, Millard

    2005-01-01

    Constant velocity Off-Vertical Axis Rotation (OVAR) imposes a continuously varying orientation of the head and body relative to gravity. The ensuing ocular reflexes include modulation of both horizontal and torsional eye velocity as a function of the varying linear acceleration along the lateral plane. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the modulation of these ocular reflexes would be modified by different head-on-trunk positions. Ten human subjects were rotated in darkness about their longitudinal axis 20 deg off-vertical at constant rates of 45 and 180 deg/s, corresponding to 0.125 and 0.5 Hz. Binocular responses were obtained with video-oculography with the head and trunk aligned, and then with the head turned relative to the trunk 40 deg to the right or left of center. Sinusoidal curve fits were used to derive amplitude, phase and bias velocity of the eye movements across multiple cycles for each head-on-trunk position. Consistent with previous studies, the modulation of torsional eye movements was greater at 0.125 Hz while the modulation of horizontal eye movements was greater at 0.5 Hz. Neither amplitude nor bias velocities were significantly altered by head-on-trunk position. The phases of both torsional and horizontal ocular reflexes, on the other hand, shifted towards alignment with the head. These results are consistent with the modulation of torsional and horizontal ocular reflexes during OVAR being primarily mediated by the otoliths in response to the sinusoidally varying linear acceleration along the interaural head axis.

  13. Using Stimulation of the Diving Reflex in Humans to Teach Integrative Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choate, Julia K.; Denton, Kate M.; Evans, Roger G.; Hodgson, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    During underwater submersion, the body responds by conserving O[subscript 2] and prioritizing blood flow to the brain and heart. These physiological adjustments, which involve the nervous, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems, are known as the diving response and provide an ideal example of integrative physiology. The diving reflex can be…

  14. Re-examination of the role of the human acoustic stapedius reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Dennis P.; Stuart, Andrew; Carpenter, Michael

    2002-05-01

    The ``rollover'' seen in the word recognition performance scores of patients with Bell's palsy (facial nerve paralysis) has historically been taken as an indicator of the role of the stapedius reflex in the protection from upward spread of masking. Bell's palsy, however, may be a polyneuropathy, so it is not clear that the poor word recognition performance at high levels is necessarily attributable specifically to impaired facial nerve function. The present article reports two new experiments that probe whether an isolated impairment of the stapedius reflex can produce rollover in word recognition performance-intensity functions. In experiment 1, performance-intensity functions for monosyllabic speech materials were obtained from ten normal listeners under two listening conditions: normal and low-frequency augmented to offset the effects of the stapedius reflex on the transmission of low-frequency vibrations to the cochlea. There was no effect of the spectral augmentation on word recognition for stimulus levels up to 107 dB SPL. In experiment 2, six patients who had undergone stapedectomy were tested for rollover using performance-intensity functions. None of the patients showed rollover in their performance-intensity functions, even at stimulus levels in excess of 100 dB HL. These data suggest that if the stapedius reflex has a role in protection from upward spread of masking, then this role is inconsequential for word recognition in quiet.

  15. Peaks and Troughs of Three-Dimensional Vestibulo-ocular Reflex in Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Goumans (Janine); M. Houben (Mark); J. Dits (Joyce); J. van der Steen (Hans)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe three-dimensional vestibulo-ocular reflex (3D VOR) ideally generates compensatory ocular rotations not only with a magnitude equal and opposite to the head rotation but also about an axis that is collinear with the head rotation axis. Vestibulo-ocular responses only partially fulfill

  16. Peaks and troughs of three-dimensional vestibulo-ocular reflex in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goumans, J.; Houben, M.M.J.; Dits, J.; Steen, J. van der

    2010-01-01

    The three-dimensional vestibulo-ocular reflex (3D VOR) ideally generates compensatory ocular rotations not only with a magnitude equal and opposite to the head rotation but also about an axis that is collinear with the head rotation axis. Vestibulo-ocular responses only partially fulfill this ideal

  17. Peaks and troughs of three-dimensional vestibulo-ocular reflex in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Goumans (Janine); M. Houben (Mark); J. Dits (Joyce); J. van der Steen (Johannes)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe three-dimensional vestibulo-ocular reflex (3D VOR) ideally generates compensatory ocular rotations not only with a magnitude equal and opposite to the head rotation but also about an axis that is collinear with the head rotation axis. Vestibulo-ocular responses only partially fulfill

  18. Post-activation depression of soleus stretch reflexes in healthy and spastic humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grey, Michael James; Klinge, Klaus; Crone, Clarissa

    2007-01-01

    Reduced depression of transmitter release from Ia afferents following previous activation (post-activation depression) has been suggested to be involved in the pathophysiology of spasticity. However, the effect of this mechanism on the myotatic reflex and its possible contribution to increased re...

  19. Distractor Inhibition Predicts Individual Differences in the Attentional Blink

    OpenAIRE

    Dux, Paul E.; René Marois

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The attentional blink (AB) refers to humans' impaired ability to detect the second of two targets (T2) in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) stream of distractors if it appears within 200-600 ms of the first target (T1). Here we examined whether humans' ability to inhibit distractors in the RSVP stream is a key determinant of individual differences in T1 performance and AB magnitude. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We presented subjects with RSVP streams (93.3 ms/item) of l...

  20. Spontaneous eye blinks during creative task correlate with divergent processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Yoshiyuki; Tominaga, Atsuko; Kajimura, Shogo; Nomura, Michio

    2016-07-01

    Creativity consists of divergent and convergent thinking, with both related to individual eye blinks at rest. To assess underlying mechanisms between eye blinks and traditional creativity tasks, we investigated the relationship between creativity performance and eye blinks at rest and during tasks. Participants performed an alternative uses and remote association task while eye blinks were recorded. Results showed that the relationship between eye blinks at rest and creativity performance was compatible with those of previous research. Interestingly, we found that the generation of ideas increased as a function of eye blink number during the alternative uses task. On the other hand, during the remote association task, accuracy was independent of eye blink number during the task, but response time increased with it. Moreover, eye blink changes in participants who responded quickly during the remote association task were different depending on their resting state eye blinks; that is, participants with many eye blinks during rest showed little increasing eye blinks and achieved solutions quickly. Positive correlations between eye blinks during creative tasks and yielding ideas on the alternative uses task and response time on the remote association task suggest that eye blinks during creativity tasks relate to divergent thinking processes such as conceptual reorganization.

  1. A linear canal-otolith interaction model to describe the human vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, B T; Demer, J L

    1999-08-01

    A control systems model of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) originally derived for yaw rotation about an eccentric axis (Crane et al. 1997) was applied to data collected during ambulation and dynamic posturography. The model incorporates a linear summation of an otolith response due to head translation scaled by target distance, adding to a semi-circular canal response that depends only on angular head rotation. The results of the model were compared with human experimental data by supplying head angular velocity as determined by magnetic search coil recording as the input for the canal branch of the model and supplying linear acceleration as determined by flux gate magnetometer measurements of otolith position. The model was fit to data by determining otolith weighting that enabled the model to best fit the data. We fit to the model experimental data from normal subjects who were: standing quietly, walking, running, or making active sinusoidal head movements. We also fit data obtained during dynamic posturography tasks of: standing on a platform sliding in a horizontal plane at 0.2 Hz, standing directly on a platform tilting at 0.1 Hz, and standing on the tilting platform buffered by a 5-cm thick foam rubber cushion. Each task was done with the subject attending a target approximately 500, 100, or 50 cm distant, both in light and darkness. The model accurately predicted the observed VOR response during each test. Greater otolith weighting was required for near targets for nearly all activities, consistent with weights for the otolith component found in previous studies employing imposed rotations. The only exceptions were for vertical axis motion during standing, sliding, and tilting when the platform was buffered with foam rubber. In the horizontal axis, the model always fit near target data better with a higher otolith component. Otolith weights were similar with the target visible and in darkness. The model predicts eye movement during both passive whole

  2. Blinking supervision in a working environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcego, Bernardo; Argilés, Marc; Cabrerizo, Marc; Cardona, Genís; Pérez, Ramon; Pérez-Cabré, Elisabet; Gispets, Joan

    2016-02-01

    The health of the ocular surface requires blinks of the eye to be frequent in order to provide moisture and to renew the tear film. However, blinking frequency has been shown to decrease in certain conditions such as when subjects are conducting tasks with high cognitive and visual demands. These conditions are becoming more common as people work or spend their leisure time in front of video display terminals. Supervision of blinking frequency in such environments is possible, thanks to the availability of computer-integrated cameras. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to develop an algorithm for the detection of eye blinks and to test it, in a number of videos captured, while subjects are conducting a variety of tasks in front of the computer. The sensitivity of the algorithm for blink detection was found to be of 87.54% (range 30% to 100%), with a mean false-positive rate of 0.19% (range 0% to 1.7%), depending on the illumination conditions during which the image was captured and other computer-user spatial configurations. The current automatic process is based on a partly modified pre-existing eye detection and image processing algorithms and consists of four stages that are aimed at eye detection, eye tracking, iris detection and segmentation, and iris height/width ratio assessment.

  3. Using stimulation of the diving reflex in humans to teach integrative physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choate, Julia K; Denton, Kate M; Evans, Roger G; Hodgson, Yvonne

    2014-12-01

    During underwater submersion, the body responds by conserving O2 and prioritizing blood flow to the brain and heart. These physiological adjustments, which involve the nervous, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems, are known as the diving response and provide an ideal example of integrative physiology. The diving reflex can be stimulated in the practical laboratory setting using breath holding and facial immersion in water. Our undergraduate physiology students complete a laboratory class in which they investigate the effects of stimulating the diving reflex on cardiovascular variables, which are recorded and calculated with a Finapres finger cuff. These variables include heart rate, cardiac output, stroke volume, total peripheral resistance, and arterial pressures (mean, diastolic, and systolic). Components of the diving reflex are stimulated by 1) facial immersion in cold water (15°C), 2) breathing with a snorkel in cold water (15°C), 3) facial immersion in warm water (30°C), and 4) breath holding in air. Statistical analysis of the data generated for each of these four maneuvers allows the students to consider the factors that contribute to the diving response, such as the temperature of the water and the location of the sensory receptors that initiate the response. In addition to providing specific details about the equipment, protocols, and learning outcomes, this report describes how we assess this practical exercise and summarizes some common student misunderstandings of the essential physiological concepts underlying the diving response.

  4. Jaw-opening reflex and corticobulbar motor excitability changes during quiet sleep in non-human primates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Dongyuan; Lavigne, Gilles J.; Lee, Jye-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Study Objective: To test the hypothesis that the reflex and corticobulbar motor excitability of jaw muscles is reduced during sleep. Design: Polysomnographic recordings in the electrophysiological study. Setting: University sleep research laboratories. Participants and Interventions: The reflex a...

  5. A neurodynamic model of the attentional blink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragopanagos, Nickolaos; Kockelkoren, Stephanus; Taylor, John G

    2005-08-01

    A brain-based neural model of attention is used to simulate results for the 'attentional blink', observed when a subject is exposed to a rapid stream of stimuli and required to monitor for two successive targets in the stream. The 'blink' occurs when the time between the first and second targets is 200-500 ms, when there is reduced accuracy for report of the second target. The model gives a qualitative explanation of the phenomenon, especially of how attention is bolstered, during the processing to report of a given stimulus, in order to defend reportable information from attack by distracters.

  6. High-speed camera characterization of voluntary eye blinking kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Kyung-Ah; Shipley, Rebecca J; Edirisinghe, Mohan; Ezra, Daniel G; Rose, Geoff; Best, Serena M; Cameron, Ruth E

    2013-08-01

    Blinking is vital to maintain the integrity of the ocular surface and its characteristics such as blink duration and speed can vary significantly, depending on the health of the eyes. The blink is so rapid that special techniques are required to characterize it. In this study, a high-speed camera was used to record and characterize voluntary blinking. The blinking motion of 25 healthy volunteers was recorded at 600 frames per second. Master curves for the palpebral aperture and blinking speed were constructed using palpebral aperture versus time data taken from the high-speed camera recordings, which show that one blink can be divided into four phases; closing, closed, early opening and late opening. Analysis of data from the high-speed camera images was used to calculate the palpebral aperture, peak blinking speed, average blinking speed and duration of voluntary blinking and compare it with data generated by other methods previously used to evaluate voluntary blinking. The advantages of the high-speed camera method over the others are discussed, thereby supporting the high potential usefulness of the method in clinical research.

  7. Withdrawal reflexes examined during human gait by ground reaction forces: site and gait phase dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emborg, Jonas; Spaich, Erika G; Andersen, Ole K

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the modulation of the nociceptive withdrawal reflex during gait measured using Force Sensitive Resistors (FSR). Electrical stimulation was delivered to four locations on the sole of the foot at three different time points between heel-off and toe-off. Peak force changes were measured by FSRs attached to the big toe, distal to the first and fourth metatarsophalangeal joints, and the medial process of the calcaneus on both feet. Force changes were assessed in five gait sub-phases. The painful stimulation led to increased ipsilateral unloading (10 +/- 1 N) and contralateral loading (12 +/- 1 N), which were dependent on stimulation site and phase. In contrast, the hallux of the ipsilateral foot plantar flexed, thus facilitating the push-off. The highest degree of plantar flexion (23 +/- 10 N; range, 8-44 N) was seen in the second double support phase following the stimulation. Site and phase modulation of the reflex were detected in the force signals from all selected anatomical landmarks. In the kinematic responses, both site and phase modulation were observed. For stimulations near toe-off, withdrawal was primarily accomplished by ankle dorsiflexion, while the strategy for stimulations at heel-off was flexion of the knee and hip joints.

  8. The effects of exercise and training on human cardiovascular reflex control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, S E; Bell, C

    2000-07-01

    During physical activity, there is a graded withdrawal of vagal cardiac tone and a graded increase in sympathetic cardiac and vasomotor tone, initiated through both central command from the somatic motor cortex and muscle chemoreceptive and mechanoreceptive inputs. In parallel, there is an upward resetting of the operating point of the arterial baroreflex, with preserved reflex sensitivity. In contrast to the traditional interpretation that blood flow through exercising muscle is independent of vasomotor neural influences because of the dominance of local dilator metabolites, recent evidence suggests that both constrictor and dilator sympathetic neural influences may be involved in determining absolute levels of perfusion. Post-exercise, there is a period of relative hypotension that is associated with decreased peripheral resistance. Some, but not all, evidence indicates a causal role for reduced sympathetic drive. Chronic exercise training appears to reduce resting sympathetic activity, with parallel changes in the gain of a variety of cardiovascular autonomic reflexes initiated from cardiovascular sites. These changes may be attributable at least partly to masking of arterial baroreflexes by the impact of elevated blood volume on low-pressure baroreceptors. The reductions in sympathetic drive that follow training are more pronounced in patients with essential hypertension than in normotensive individuals and are likely to underlie the anti-hypertensive effect of exercise.

  9. Detection of Blinking Part from Animated Videos / Pictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Pal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this thesis is to execute a technique and the region detection of blinking part in gif images, to find out the new method which is capable for it. It is a very difficult task in image mining examines area for extract a blinking part into variations of any size or type of natural blinking image. The intend of this research is to explain this problem by introduce a new technique called Morphology based technique for Extraction and Detection of blinking Region from gif Images which is more capable for area extraction and edge detection of blinking part into any type of gif image edge based and connected component Here we are using the edge based area extraction process which help in detecting and extraction of blinking part and also in fined out the recall rate and precision rate of blinking part of any animated image.

  10. Maturation of upstream and downstream esophageal reflexes in human premature neonates: the role of sleep and awake states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadcherla, Sudarshan R; Chan, Chin Yee; Fernandez, Soledad; Splaingard, Mark

    2013-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the sensory-motor characteristics of aerodigestive reflexes are dependent on stimulus type and volumes, sleep or awake states, and maturation. Thirteen neonates were studied at 33.6 ± 0.5 wk (time 1) and 37.3 ± 0.5 wk (time 2) postmenstrual age using multimodal provocative esophageal manometry concurrent with video polysomnography. Effects of graded volumes (399 infusions at time 1, 430 infusions at time 2) of midesophageal stimulation with air, water, and apple juice on the sensory thresholds and recruitment frequency of upper esophageal sphincter (UES), esophageal body, and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) reflexes were investigated during sleep and awake states. Sensory thresholds for aerodigestive reflexes between maturational stages were similar. Increased frequency recruitment of UES contractile reflex, LES relaxation reflex, and peristaltic reflexes were noted at time 2 (all, P reflexes.

  11. Control over experience? Magnitude of the attentional blink depends on meditative state

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Vugt, Marieke K.; Slagter, Heleen A.

    2014-01-01

    The information processing capacity of the human mind is limited, as is evidenced by the so-called 'attentional-blink' deficit. This deficit is believed to result from competition between stimuli for limited attentional resources. We examined to what extent advanced meditators can manipulate their a

  12. A Fast, Robust, Automatic Blink Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Sayahzadeh

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction “Blink” is defined as closing and opening of the eyes in a small duration of time. In this study, we aimed to introduce a fast, robust, vision-based approach for blink detection. Materials and Methods This approach consists of two steps. In the first step, the subject’s face is localized every second and with the first blink, the system detects the eye’s location and creates an open-eye template image. In the second step, the eye is tracked, using sum of squared differences (SSD. This system can classify the state of the eyes as open, closed, or lost, using the SSD-based classifier. If the eyes are closed as in usual blinking, the blink will be detected. To classify eyes as closed or open, two adaptive thresholds were proposed; therefore, factors such as the subject’s distance from the camera or environment illumination did not affect the system performance. In addition, in order to improve system performance, a new feature, called "peak-to-neighbors ratio", was proposed. Results The accuracy of this system was 96.03%, based on the evaluation on Zhejiang University (ZJU dataset, and 98.59% in our own dataset. Conclusion The present system was faster than other systems, which use normalized correlation coefficient (NCC for eye tracking, since time complexity of SSD is lower than that of NCC. The achieved processing rate for ZJU dataset was 35 fps.

  13. Blink the power of thinking without thinking

    CERN Document Server

    Gladwell, Malcolm

    2005-01-01

    In his landmark bestseller The Tipping Point, Malcolm Gladwell redefined how we understand the world around us. Now, in Blink, he revolutionizes the way we understand the world within. Blink is a book about how we think without thinking, about choices that seem to be made in an instant-in the blink of an eye-that actually aren't as simple as they seem. Why are some people brilliant decision makers, while others are consistently inept? Why do some people follow their instincts and win, while others end up stumbling into error? How do our brains really work-in the office, in the classroom, in the kitchen, and in the bedroom? And why are the best decisions often those that are impossible to explain to others?In Blink we meet the psychologist who has learned to predict whether a marriage will last, based on a few minutes of observing a couple; the tennis coach who knows when a player will double-fault before the racket even makes contact with the ball; the antiquities experts who recognize a fake at a glance. Her...

  14. Biology Today: Of Wishbones, Beavers & Blinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Maura, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Provided is a discussion of items covering a variety of fascinating biological topics which include: the elasticity of the furcula of starlings in flight, beavers increasing the greenhouse effect, effective invaders, traveling birds, the cuckoo deception, competitive sperm, hearing springs, heat and sight, blinking as punctuation, mutations, and…

  15. Postauricular reflexes elicited by soft acoustic clicks and loud noise probes: Reliability, prepulse facilitation, and sensitivity to picture contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, Rachel V; Benning, Stephen D

    2016-12-01

    The startle blink reflex is facilitated during early picture viewing, then inhibited by attention during pleasant and aversive pictures compared to neutral pictures, and finally potentiated during aversive pictures specifically. However, it is unclear whether the postauricular reflex, which is elicited by the same loud acoustic probe as the startle blink reflex but enhanced by appetitive instead of defensive emotion, has the same pattern and time course of emotional modulation. We examined this issue in a sample of 90 undergraduates using serially presented soft acoustic clicks that elicited postauricular (but not startle blink) reflexes in addition to standard startle probes. Postauricular reflexes elicited by both clicks and probes correlated during food and nurturant contents, during which they were potentiated compared to neutral pictures, suggesting clicks effectively elicit emotionally modulated postauricular reflexes. The postauricular reflex was initially facilitated during the first 500 ms of picture processing but was larger during pleasant than neutral pictures throughout picture processing, with larger effect sizes during the latter half of picture processing. Across reflexes and eliciting stimuli, measures of emotional modulation had higher coefficient alphas than magnitudes during specific picture contents within each valence, indicating that only emotional modulation measures assess higher-order appetitive or defensive processing. © 2016 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  16. The nature of suprasegmental influences on the late reflex activity in human forearm muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chequer, R S; Goodin, D S; Aminoff, M J

    1991-12-06

    The earliest component of the late EMG response (M2) to sudden stretch of an isometrically contracting muscle is influenced by suprasegmental mechanism, but whether these are tonic, phasic, or both, is uncertain. We have therefore investigated the nature of these mechanisms by varying the predictability of the direction of perturbation of forearm muscles held isometrically against a constant flexor or extensor force of 2.3 N. We found that the M2 response did not change appreciably regardless of whether the direction of perturbation was known in advance or which hand was used by the subject. These findings suggest that any tonic supraspinal influence of the M2 response is of little significance compared to the importance of phasic mechanisms and provide support for the existence of a cerebral arc subserving this reflex component.

  17. Identification of Spinal Reflexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vlugt, E.

    2004-01-01

    Visco-elasticity of joints is important for the maintenance of the human body posture and can in two manners be regulated. By means of cocontraction of antagonistic muscle groups and by neural reflexive feedback of muscle length and muscle strength, measured both by means of sensors in the muscles.

  18. Sensory nerves and nitric oxide contribute to reflex cutaneous vasodilation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Brett J

    2013-04-15

    We tested the hypothesis that inhibition of cutaneous sensory nerves would attenuate reflex cutaneous vasodilation in response to an increase in core temperature. Nine subjects were equipped with four microdialysis fibers on the forearm. Two sites were treated with topical anesthetic EMLA cream for 120 min. Sensory nerve inhibition was verified by lack of sensation to a pinprick. Microdialysis fibers were randomly assigned as 1) lactated Ringer (control); 2) 10 mM nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) to inhibit nitric oxide synthase; 3) EMLA + lactated Ringer; and 4) EMLA + L-NAME. Laser-Doppler flowmetry was used as an index of skin blood flow, and blood pressure was measured via brachial auscultation. Subjects wore a water-perfused suit, and oral temperature was monitored as an index of core temperature. The suit was perfused with 50°C water to initiate whole body heat stress to raise oral temperature 0.8°C above baseline. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated and normalized to maximal vasodilation (%CVC(max)). There was no difference in CVC between control and EMLA sites (67 ± 5 vs. 69 ± 6% CVC(max)), but the onset of vasodilation was delayed at EMLA compared with control sites. The L-NAME site was significantly attenuated compared with control and EMLA sites (45 ± 5% CVC(max); P vasodilation during the early, but not latter, stages of heat stress, and full expression of reflex cutaneous vasodilation requires functional sensory nerves and NOS.

  19. Local tetrahydrobiopterin administration augments reflex cutaneous vasodilation through nitric oxide-dependent mechanisms in aged human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanhewicz, Anna E; Bruning, Rebecca S; Smith, Caroline J; Kenney, W Larry; Holowatz, Lacy A

    2012-03-01

    Functional constitutive nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is required for full expression of reflex cutaneous vasodilation that is attenuated in aged skin. Both the essential cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) and adequate substrate concentrations are necessary for the functional synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) through NOS, both of which are reduced in aged vasculature through increased oxidant stress and upregulated arginase, respectively. We hypothesized that acute local BH(4) administration or arginase inhibition would similarly augment reflex vasodilation in aged skin during passive whole body heat stress. Four intradermal microdialysis fibers were placed in the forearm skin of 11 young (22 ± 1 yr) and 11 older (73 ± 2 yr) men and women for local infusion of 1) lactated Ringer, 2) 10 mM BH(4), 3) 5 mM (S)-(2-boronoethyl)-l-cysteine + 5 mM N(ω)-hydroxy-nor-l-arginine to inhibit arginase, and 4) 20 mM N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) to inhibit NOS. Red cell flux was measured at each site by laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) as reflex vasodilation was induced. After a 1.0°C rise in oral temperature (T(or)), mean body temperature was clamped and 20 mM l-NAME was perfused at each site. Cutaneous vascular conductance was calculated (CVC = LDF/mean arterial pressure) and expressed as a percentage of maximum (%CVC(max); 28 mM sodium nitroprusside and local heat, 43°C). Vasodilation was attenuated at the control site of the older subjects compared with young beginning at a 0.3°C rise in T(or). BH(4) and arginase inhibition both increased vasodilation in older (BH(4): 55 ± 5%; arginase-inhibited: 47 ± 5% vs. control: 37 ± 3%, both P 0.05) at a 1°C rise in T(or). With a 1°C rise in T(or), local BH(4) increased NO-dependent vasodilation in the older (BH(4): 31.8 ± 2.4%CVC(max) vs. control: 11.7 ± 2.0%CVC(max), P vasodilation in aged human skin and that BH(4) NOS coupling mechanisms may be a potential therapeutic target for increasing skin blood flow during

  20. Comparison of the physiological properties of human periodontal-masseteric reflex evoked by incisor and canine stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko eOhmori

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present study was designed to clarify whether the bilateral cooperation in the human periodontal-masseteric reflex (PMR differs between central incisors and canines. Methods: Surface array electrodes were placed on the bilateral masseter muscles to simultaneously record the firing activities of single motor units from both sides in 7 healthy adults. During light clenching, mechanical stimulation was applied to the right maxillary central incisor and canine to evoke the PMR. Unitary activity was plotted with respect to the background activity and firing frequency. The slope of the regression line (sRL and the correlation coefficient (CC between the central incisor and canine and the lateral differences between these values were compared. Results: There were significant differences in the sRL and CC, as well as lateral differences, between the central incisor- and canine-driven PMR. Discussion: These results suggest that the PMR differs depending on both the tooth position and laterality.

  1. Effects of melatonin on prepulse inhibition, habituation and sensitization of the human startle reflex in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehtinen, Emilia K; Ucar, Ebru; Glenthøj, Birte Y

    2014-01-01

    Prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex (PPI) is an operational measure of sensorimotor gating, which is demonstrated to be impaired in patients with schizophrenia. In addition, a disruption of the circadian rhythm together with blunted melatonin secretion is regularly found in patients...... with schizophrenia and it is theorized that these may contribute to their attentional deficits. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of acute melatonin on healthy human sensorimotor gating. Twenty-one healthy male volunteers were administered melatonin or placebo after which their levels of PPI were...... assessed. Melatonin significantly reduced startle magnitude and ratings of alertness, but did not influence PPI, nor sensitization and habituation. However, when taking baseline scores in consideration, melatonin significantly increased PPI in low scoring individuals while significantly decreasing...

  2. Triceps surae stretch reflex modulation after a mechanically evoked ankle dorsiflexion during the swing phase of human running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scohier, Mikael; De Jaeger, Dominique; Schepens, Benedicte

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to mechanically evoke a triceps surae stretch reflex during the swing phase of running, to study its within-the-step phase dependency. Seven participants ran on a treadmill at 2.8 m·s-1 wearing an exoskeleton capable of evoking a sudden ankle dorsiflexion. We measured the electromyographic activity of the soleus, medial and lateral gastrocnemii just after the perturbation to evaluate the triceps surae stretch reflex. Similar perturbations were also delivered at rest. Our results showed that the stretch reflex was suppressed during the swing phase of running, except in late swing where a late reflex response was observed. At rest, all triceps surae muscles showed an early reflex response to stretch. Our findings suggest that the triceps surae short/medium-latency stretch reflex cannot be evoked during swing phase and thus cannot contribute to the control of the locomotor pattern after aperturbation during this phase.

  3. M.I.T./Canadian vestibular experiments on the Spacelab-1 mission: 3. Effects of prolonged weightlessness on a human otolith-spinal reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, D. G.; Money, K. E.; Tomi, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    Reflex responses that depend on human otolith organ sensitivity were measured before, during and after a 10 day space flight. Otolith-spinal reflexes were elicited by means of sudden, unexpected falls. In weightlessness, "falls" were achieved using elastic cords running from a torso harness to the floor. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded from gastrocnemius-soleus. The EMG response occurring in the first 100-120 ms of a fall, considered to be predominantly otolith-spinal in origin, decreased in amplitude immediately upon entering weightlessness, and continued to decline throughout the flight, especially during the first two mission days. The response returned to normal before the first post-flight testing session. The results suggest that information coming from the otolith organs is gradually ignored by the nervous system during prolonged space flight, although the possibility that otolith-spinal reflexes are decreased independent of other otolith output pathways cannot be ruled out.

  4. M.I.T./Canadian vestibular experiments on the Spacelab-1 mission. III - Effects of prolonged weightlessness on a human otolith-spinal reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, D. G. D.; Money, K. E.; Tomi, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    Reflex responses that depend on human otolith organ sensitivity were measured before, during and after a 10 day space flight. Otolith-spinal reflexes were elicited by means of sudden, unexpected falls. In weightlessness, 'falls' were achieved using elastic cords running from a torso harness to the floor. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded from gastrocnemius-soleus. The EMG response occurring in the first 100-120 ms of a fall, considered to be predominantly otolith-spinal in origin, decreased in amplitude immediately upon entering weightlessness, and continued to decline throughout the flight, especially during the first two mission days. The response returned to normal before the first post-flight testing session. The results suggest that information coming from the otolith organs is gradually ignored by the nervous system during prolonged space flight, although the possibility that otolith-spinal reflexes are decreased independent of other otolith output pathways cannot by ruled out.

  5. Efficient Eye Blink Detection Method for disabled-helping domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assit. Prof. Aree A. Mohammed

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a real time method based on some video and image processing algorithms for eye blink detection. The motivation of this research is the need of disabling who cannot control the calls with human mobile interaction directly without the need of hands. A Haar Cascade Classifier is applied for face and eye detection for getting eye and facial axis information. In addition, the same classifier is used based on Haar- like features to find out the relationship between the eyes and the facial axis for positioning the eyes. An efficient eye tracking method is proposed which uses the position of detected face. Finally, an eye blinking detection based on eyelids state (close or open is used for controlling android mobile phones. The method is used with and without smoothing filter to show the improvement of detection accuracy. The application is used in real time for studying the effect of light and distance between the eyes and the mobile device in order to evaluate the accuracy detection and overall accuracy of the system. Test results show that our proposed method provides a 98% overall accuracy and 100% detection accuracy for a distance of 35 cm and an artificial light.

  6. System identification of the human vestibulo-ocular reflex during head-free tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangorra, James L; Jones, Lynette A; Hunter, Ian W

    2004-01-01

    A method was developed to identify the linear, system level dynamics of the horizontal, angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) as it stabilized vision during head-free tracking of a visual target. Small amplitude, broad spectrum, stochastic torque perturbations were applied to the head while the subject tracked an unpredictable, moving target with active head and eye motions. Stochastic system identification techniques were used to design the torque and target inputs and to conduct the analysis such that the linear dynamics of the VOR, independently of the visual system's influence on eye motions, were determined. The linear analysis was limited to evaluating VOR dynamics from approximately 0.5 to 4.5 Hz. Nonlinearities in the head-neck system affected the low frequency response of the head to the torque perturbations, and the eye velocity sequence was affected by nonlinearities and degraded by noise at high frequencies. The VOR's gain was near 1.0 between about 0.5 and 2.5 Hz, and then decreased steadily to 0.85 as the frequency increased towards 4.0 Hz. The VOR phase angle was also frequency dependent and corresponded to VOR eye motions lagging the head's disturbance motion by less than 10 ms at frequencies greater than 1.0 Hz.

  7. Effects of simulated obstructive sleep apnoea on the human carotid baroreceptor-vascular resistance reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, V L; Bowker, C M; Pearson, S B; Elliott, M W; Hainsworth, R

    2004-06-15

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), which is characterized by periodic inspiratory obstruction, is associated with hypertension and possibly with changes in the baroreceptor reflex. In this investigation we induced changes in inspiratory resistance and in inspiratory oxygen and carbon dioxide content, which simulate some of the changes in OSA, to determine whether this caused changes in the gain or setting of the carotid baroreflex. In eight healthy subjects (aged 21-62 years) we changed the stimulus to carotid baroreceptors, using neck chambers and graded pressures of -40 to +60 mmHg, and assessed vascular resistance responses in the brachial artery from changes in blood pressure (Finapres) divided by brachial artery blood flow velocity (Doppler ultrasound). Stimulus-response curves were defined during (a) sham (no additional stimulus), (b) addition of an inspiratory resistance (inspiratory pressure -10 mmHg), (c) breathing asphyxic gas (12% O(2), 5% CO(2)), and (d) combined resistance and asphyxia. Sigmoid or polynomial functions were applied to the curves and maximum differentials (equivalent to peak gain) and the corresponding carotid pressures (equivalent to 'set point') were determined. The sham test had no effect on either gain or 'set point'. Inspiratory resistance alone had no effect on blood pressure and did not displace the curve. However, it reduced gain from -3.0 +/- 0.6 to -2.1 +/- 0.4 units (P sleep apnoea.

  8. The vestibular implant: Frequency-dependency of the electrically evoked Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond eVan De Berg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (VOR shows frequency-dependent behavior. This study investigated whether the characteristics of the electrically evoked VOR (eVOR elicited by a vestibular implant, showed the same frequency-dependency.Twelve vestibular electrodes implanted in 7 patients with bilateral vestibular hypofunction were tested. Stimuli consisted of amplitude-modulated electrical stimulation with a sinusoidal profile at frequencies of 0.5Hz, 1Hz, and 2Hz. The main characteristics of the eVOR were evaluated and compared to the natural VOR characteristics measured in a group of age-matched healthy volunteers who were subjected to horizontal whole body rotations with equivalent sinusoidal velocity profiles at the same frequencies.A strong and significant effect of frequency was observed in the total peak eye velocity of the eVOR. This effect was similar to that observed in the natural VOR. Other characteristics of the (eVOR (angle, habituation-index, and asymmetry showed no significant frequency-dependent effect. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that, at least at the specific (limited frequency range tested, responses elicited by a vestibular implant closely mimic the frequency-dependency of the normal vestibular system.

  9. The vestibular implant: frequency-dependency of the electrically evoked vestibulo-ocular reflex in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Berg, Raymond; Guinand, Nils; Nguyen, T A Khoa; Ranieri, Maurizio; Cavuscens, Samuel; Guyot, Jean-Philippe; Stokroos, Robert; Kingma, Herman; Perez-Fornos, Angelica

    2014-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) shows frequency-dependent behavior. This study investigated whether the characteristics of the electrically evoked VOR (eVOR) elicited by a vestibular implant, showed the same frequency-dependency. Twelve vestibular electrodes implanted in seven patients with bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH) were tested. Stimuli consisted of amplitude-modulated electrical stimulation with a sinusoidal profile at frequencies of 0.5, 1, and 2 Hz. The main characteristics of the eVOR were evaluated and compared to the "natural" VOR characteristics measured in a group of age-matched healthy volunteers who were subjected to horizontal whole body rotations with equivalent sinusoidal velocity profiles at the same frequencies. A strong and significant effect of frequency was observed in the total peak eye velocity of the eVOR. This effect was similar to that observed in the "natural" VOR. Other characteristics of the (e)VOR (angle, habituation-index, and asymmetry) showed no significant frequency-dependent effect. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that, at least at the specific (limited) frequency range tested, responses elicited by a vestibular implant closely mimic the frequency-dependency of the "normal" vestibular system.

  10. Motivational priming and processing interrupt: startle reflex modulation during shallow and deep processing of emotional words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Cornelia; Kissler, Johanna

    2010-05-01

    Valence-driven modulation of the startle reflex, that is larger eyeblinks during viewing of unpleasant pictures and inhibited blinks while viewing pleasant pictures, is well documented. The current study investigated, whether this motivational priming pattern also occurs during processing of unpleasant and pleasant words, and to what extent it is influenced by shallow vs. deep encoding of verbal stimuli. Emotional and neutral adjectives were presented for 5s, and the acoustically elicited startle eyeblink response was measured while subjects memorized the words by means of shallow or deep processing strategies. Results showed blink potentiation to unpleasant and blink inhibition to pleasant adjectives in subjects using shallow encoding strategies. In subjects using deep-encoding strategies, blinks were larger for pleasant than unpleasant or neutral adjectives. In line with this, free recall of pleasant words was also better in subjects who engaged in deep processing. The results suggest that motivational priming holds as long as processing is perceptual. However, during deep processing the startle reflex appears to represent a measure of "processing interrupt", facilitating blinks to those stimuli that are more deeply encoded.

  11. Preservation of veno-arteriolar reflex in the skin following 20 days of head down bed rest in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabrielsen, A; Suzuki, Y; Norsk, P

    1999-01-01

    an orthostatic stress after spaceflight could be another important mechanism for orthostatic intolerance. Previous investigations have revealed that a local veno-arteriolar reflex is present in cutaneous, subcutaneous and muscle tissue. The reflex response is elicited in response to an increase in transmural...

  12. Light Loop Echoes and Blinking Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Boyle, Latham

    2011-01-01

    Radiation emitted near a black hole reaches the observer by multiple paths; and when this radiation varies in time, the time-delays between the various paths generate a "blinking" effect in the observed light curve L(t) or its auto-correlation function xi(T)= . For the particularly important "face-on" configuration (in which the hole is viewed roughly along its spin axis, while the emission comes roughly from its equatorial plane -- e.g. from the inner edge of its accretion disk, or from the violent flash of a nearby/infalling star) we calculate the blinking in detail by computing the time delay Delta t_{j}(r,a) and magnification mu_{j}(r,a) of the jth path (j=1,2,3,...), relative to the primary path (j=0), as a function of the emission radius r and black hole spin 0blinking signal, making it more detectable and more independent of certain astrophysical and observational details. The effect can b...

  13. Shoulder reflexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Louise; Krogsgaard, Michael; Voigt, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Dynamic shoulder stability is dependent on muscular coordination and sensory inputs. In the shoulder, mechanoreceptors are found in the coracoacromial ligament, the rotator cuff tendons, the musculotendinous junctions of the rotator cuff and in the capsule. The number of receptors in the capsule...... is small compared to the number in the other shoulder structures. Proprioceptive information from numerous receptors in muscles and tendons is mediated via fast conducting nervefibers and probably contribute more to kinaestethic sensation than information from capsule and ligaments. Therefore it seems...... likely that the joint receptors have a more distinct role for the kinaestethic sense than muscle receptors. In cats a direct reflex from the afferents innervating the shoulder to the muscles around the shoulder has been presented. The reflex had an extremely short latency (2.7-3.1 ms). In man, a very...

  14. Correlation between Inter-Blink Interval and Episodic Encoding during Movie Watching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Seok Shin

    Full Text Available Human eye blinking is cognitively suppressed to minimize loss of visual information for important real-world events. Despite the relationship between eye blinking and cognitive state, the effect of eye blinks on cognition in real-world environments has received limited research attention. In this study, we focused on the temporal pattern of inter-eye blink interval (IEBI during movie watching and investigated its relationship with episodic memory. As a control condition, 24 healthy subjects watched a nature documentary that lacked a specific story line while electroencephalography was performed. Immediately after viewing the movie, the subjects were asked to report its most memorable scene. Four weeks later, subjects were asked to score 32 randomly selected scenes from the movie, based on how much they were able to remember and describe. The results showed that the average IEBI was significantly longer during the movie than in the control condition. In addition, the significant increase in IEBI when watching a movie coincided with the most memorable scenes of the movie. The results suggested that the interesting episodic narrative of the movie attracted the subjects' visual attention relative to the documentary clip that did not have a story line. In the episodic memory test executed four weeks later, memory performance was significantly positively correlated with IEBI (p<0.001. In summary, IEBI may be a reliable bio-marker of the degree of concentration on naturalistic content that requires visual attention, such as a movie.

  15. Temporal characteristics of melanopsin inputs to the human pupil light reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Daniel S; Feigl, Beatrix; Cao, Dingcai; Zele, Andrew J

    2015-02-01

    Rods, cones and melanopsin containing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) operate in concert to regulate pupil diameter. The temporal properties of intrinsic ipRGC signalling are distinct to those of rods and cones, including longer latencies and sustained signalling after light offset. We examined whether the melanopsin mediated post-illumination pupil response (PIPR) and pupil constriction were dependent upon the inter-stimulus interval (ISI) between successive light pulses and the temporal frequency of sinusoidal light stimuli. Melanopsin excitation was altered by variation of stimulus wavelength (464 nm and 638 nm lights) and irradiance (11.4 and 15.2 log photons cm(-2) s(-1)). We found that 6s PIPR amplitude was independent of ISI and temporal frequency for all melanopsin excitation levels, indicating complete summation. In contrast to the PIPR, the maximum pupil constriction increased with increasing ISI with high and low melanopsin excitation, but time to minimum diameter was slower with high melanopsin excitation only. This melanopsin response to briefly presented pulses (16 and 100 ms) slows the temporal response of the maximum pupil constriction. We also demonstrate that high melanopsin excitation attenuates the phasic peak-trough pupil amplitude compared to conditions with low melanopsin excitation, indicating an interaction between inner and outer retinal inputs to the pupil light reflex. We infer that outer retina summation is important for rapidly controlling pupil diameter in response to short timescale fluctuations in illumination and may occur at two potential sites, one that is presynaptic to extrinsic photoreceptor input to ipRGCs, or another within the pupil control pathway if ipRGCs have differential temporal tuning to extrinsic and intrinsic signalling.

  16. Peaks and troughs of three-dimensional vestibulo-ocular reflex in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goumans, Janine; Houben, Mark M J; Dits, Joyce; van der Steen, Johannes

    2010-09-01

    The three-dimensional vestibulo-ocular reflex (3D VOR) ideally generates compensatory ocular rotations not only with a magnitude equal and opposite to the head rotation but also about an axis that is collinear with the head rotation axis. Vestibulo-ocular responses only partially fulfill this ideal behavior. Because animal studies have shown that vestibular stimulation about particular axes may lead to suboptimal compensatory responses, we investigated in healthy subjects the peaks and troughs in 3D VOR stabilization in terms of gain and alignment of the 3D vestibulo-ocular response. Six healthy upright sitting subjects underwent whole body small amplitude sinusoidal and constant acceleration transients delivered by a six-degree-of-freedom motion platform. Subjects were oscillated about the vertical axis and about axes in the horizontal plane varying between roll and pitch at increments of 22.5 degrees in azimuth. Transients were delivered in yaw, roll, and pitch and in the vertical canal planes. Eye movements were recorded in with 3D search coils. Eye coil signals were converted to rotation vectors, from which we calculated gain and misalignment. During horizontal axis stimulation, systematic deviations were found. In the light, misalignment of the 3D VOR had a maximum misalignment at about 45 degrees . These deviations in misalignment can be explained by vector summation of the eye rotation components with a low gain for torsion and high gain for vertical. In the dark and in response to transients, gain of all components had lower values. Misalignment in darkness and for transients had different peaks and troughs than in the light: its minimum was during pitch axis stimulation and its maximum during roll axis stimulation. We show that the relatively large misalignment for roll in darkness is due to a horizontal eye movement component that is only present in darkness. In combination with the relatively low torsion gain, this horizontal component has a relative

  17. Three-Dimensional Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex in Humans: a Matter of Balance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Goumans (Janine)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe objective of this thesis was to quantify three-dimensional ocular stability in response to head movements in healthy human subjects and in patients with various types of peripheral vestibular disorders. Despite a large increase in our knowledge from animal and human studies about the

  18. How the brain blinks : Towards a neurocognitive model of the attentional blink

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hommel, Bernhard; Kessler, Klaus; Schmitz, Frank; Gross, Joachim; Akyürek, Elkan; Shapiro, Kimron; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2006-01-01

    When people monitor a visual stream of rapidly presented stimuli for two targets (T1 and T2), they often miss T2 if it falls into a time window of about half a second after T1 onset-the attentional blink (AB). We provide an overview of recent neuroscientific studies devoted to analyze the neural pro

  19. Influence of stimulus interval on the habituation of vestibulo-ocular reflex and sensation of rotation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Gilles; Tilikete, Caroline; Courjon, Jean-Hubert

    2013-08-01

    Previous studies in cats revealed that vestibular habituation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) only occurs when velocity steps are delivered during the secondary phase nystagmus, suggesting that the presence of anti-compensatory slow phases may trigger the habituation process. We verified this property in humans by comparing vestibular habituation of VOR and sensation of rotation when steps were delivered either immediately after the perception of self-rotation had stopped, which is shortly before the nystagmus reverses direction; or when steps were delivered 60s later, i.e. during the secondary phase. Vestibular habituation of the VOR occurred in both instances. However, the decrease in VOR peak slow phase velocity and time constant was larger when steps were delivered after nystagmus reversal compared to before nystagmus reversal. The duration of the perception of self-rotation habituated equally for both conditions. These results confirm that VOR habituation fully develops only when velocity steps are delivered after the primary phase nystagmus. This finding may be helpful for minimizing the impact of repetitive vestibular stimuli in protocols using crossover design for drug studies, testing recovery in vestibular patients, or training people for different gravitoinertial environments.

  20. Infrared-based blink-detecting glasses for facial pacing: toward a bionic blink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigerio, Alice; Hadlock, Tessa A; Murray, Elizabeth H; Heaton, James T

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Facial paralysis remains one of the most challenging conditions to effectively manage, often causing life-altering deficits in both function and appearance. Facial rehabilitation via pacing and robotic technology has great yet unmet potential. A critical first step toward reanimating symmetrical facial movement in cases of unilateral paralysis is the detection of healthy movement to use as a trigger for stimulated movement. OBJECTIVE To test a blink detection system that can be attached to standard eyeglasses and used as part of a closed-loop facial pacing system. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Standard safety glasses were equipped with an infrared (IR) emitter-detector unit, oriented horizontally across the palpebral fissure, creating a monitored IR beam that became interrupted when the eyelids closed, and were tested in 24 healthy volunteers from a tertiary care facial nerve center community. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Video-quantified blinking was compared with both IR sensor signal magnitude and rate of change in healthy participants with their gaze in repose, while they shifted their gaze from central to far-peripheral positions, and during the production of particular facial expressions. RESULTS Blink detection based on signal magnitude achieved 100% sensitivity in forward gaze but generated false detections on downward gaze. Calculations of peak rate of signal change (first derivative) typically distinguished blinks from gaze-related eyelid movements. During forward gaze, 87% of detected blink events were true positives, 11% were false positives, and 2% were false negatives. Of the 11% false positives, 6% were associated with partial eyelid closures. During gaze changes, false blink detection occurred 6% of the time during lateral eye movements, 10% of the time during upward movements, 47% of the time during downward movements, and 6% of the time for movements from an upward or downward gaze back to the primary gaze. Facial expressions

  1. The Attentional Blink Provides Episodic Distinctiveness : Sparing at a Cost

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wyble, Brad; Bowman, Howard; Nieuwenstein, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The attentional blink (J. E. Raymond. K. L. Shapiro, & K. M. Arnett. 1992) refers to an apparent gap in perception observed when a second target follows a first within several hundred milliseconds. Theoretical and computational work have provided explanations for early sets of blink data, but more r

  2. Reflex Human Papillomavirus Test Results as an Option for the Management of Korean Women With Atypical Squamous Cells Cannot Exclude High-Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesion

    OpenAIRE

    Ryu, Ki-Jin; Lee, Sanghoon; Min, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Jae Won; Hong, Jin Hwa; SONG, JAE YUN; Lee, Jae Kwan; Lee, Nak Woo

    2015-01-01

    Current guidelines recommend universal colposcopy for the management of women with atypical squamous cells, cannot exclude high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (ASC-H) on cytology, but the present study suggested that human papillomavirus (HPV) cotesting in patients with ASC-H cytology can provide more detailed and useful information regarding the risk of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia lesions and the need for further treatment. Reflex HPV testing should be an option for ...

  3. Two-photon interference from two blinking quantum emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jöns, Klaus D.; Stensson, Katarina; Reindl, Marcus; Swillo, Marcin; Huo, Yongheng; Zwiller, Val; Rastelli, Armando; Trotta, Rinaldo; Björk, Gunnar

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the effect of blinking on the two-photon interference measurement from two independent quantum emitters. We find that blinking significantly alters the statistics in the Hong-Ou-Mandel second-order intensity correlation function g(2 )(τ ) and the outcome of two-photon interference measurements performed with independent quantum emitters. We theoretically demonstrate that the presence of blinking can be experimentally recognized by a deviation from the gD(2 )(0 ) =0.5 value when distinguishable photons from two emitters impinge on a beam splitter. Our findings explain the significant differences between linear losses and blinking for correlation measurements between independent sources and are experimentally verified using a parametric down-conversion photon-pair source. We show that blinking imposes a mandatory cross-check measurement to correctly estimate the degree of indistinguishability of photons emitted by independent quantum emitters.

  4. Neurophysiology and Neuroanatomy of Reflexive and Voluntary Saccades in Non-Human Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Kevin; Everling, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    A multitude of cognitive functions can easily be tested by a number of relatively simple saccadic eye movement tasks. This approach has been employed extensively with patient populations to investigate the functional deficits associated with psychiatric disorders. Neurophysiological studies in non-human primates performing the same tasks have…

  5. Contribution of the otholiths to the human torsional vestibulo-ocular reflex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, E.L.; Bos, J.E.; Graaf, J.E. de

    1999-01-01

    The dynamic contribution of the otoliths to the human ocular torsion response was examined during passive sinusoidal body roll about an earth-horizontal axis (varying otolith input) and about an earth-vertical axis (unvarying otolith input). At a fixed amplitude of 25°, the stimulus frequency was va

  6. Neurophysiology and Neuroanatomy of Reflexive and Volitional Saccades: Evidence from Studies of Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Jennifer E.; Dyckman, Kara A.; Austin, Benjamin P.; Clementz, Brett A.

    2008-01-01

    This review provides a summary of the contributions made by human functional neuroimaging studies to the understanding of neural correlates of saccadic control. The generation of simple visually guided saccades (redirections of gaze to a visual stimulus or pro-saccades) and more complex volitional saccades require similar basic neural circuitry…

  7. An investigation of reflex elicited by percutaneous stimulation of the medial and lateral ligaments of the human knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheil Mokhtari

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Disease and injury of joints are major causes of pain and disability in the population. The principal purpose of this study was to extend our knowledge of reflexes associated with joint. Methods: Seventeen subjects were seated on a testing bench and hip angle was 90 degrees. The maximal voluntary contractions of the quadriceps were measured at 180o of knee extension. This was then used to set the magnitude of subsequent sub-maximal contractions at 5, 10 and 20% of MVC. An identical stimulation sequence was delivered during sustained contractions. Electrodes were placed over the lateral and medial knee ligaments separately and the ligaments were stimulated by 3 pulses of 1 msec duration at 100 HZ. The stimulation intensity was the ranged of 0-45 mamps. The muscles selected were Rectus Femoris, Vastus Medialis and Vastus Lateralis. Results: No reflexes were elicited in very low current, effects have started in 20 ma. The pattern of the muscle response was relevant to the stimulation intensity. By increasing the stimulation intensity the EMG waves became bigger. In addition, the magnitudes of the responses were increased. Reflexes elicited following MCL and LCL stimulation artifact. Inhibition and excitation reflexes elicited and there was no significant difference between responses after MCL and LCL stimulation. The mean latency of early inhibition after LCL stimulation was 66+7 (ms and After MCL stimulation was 68+12 (ms. The difference was not significant (P=0.26. Conclusion: It may be concluded that that reflexes may be elicited following enough electrical stimulation of the MCL and LCL and the muscles develop a sustained contraction. There was also no evidence to suggest that the reflexes are changed by movement from a seated to a standing posture. Stimulation of MCL and LCL seems to elicit reflexes widely in the limb and to affect muscles acting above and below the knee.

  8. WEAKLY ALGEBRAIC REFLEXIVITY AND STRONGLY ALGEBRAIC REFLEXIVITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TaoChangli; LuShijie; ChenPeixin

    2002-01-01

    Algebraic reflexivity introduced by Hadwin is related to linear interpolation. In this paper, the concepts of weakly algebraic reflexivity and strongly algebraic reflexivity which are also related to linear interpolation are introduced. Some properties of them are obtained and some relations between them revealed.

  9. Reflexes in Psychiatry

    OpenAIRE

    Sanders, Richard D.; Gillig, Paulette Marie

    2011-01-01

    Psychiatric patients often do not cooperate fully with the neurologic examination. Reflexes virtually bypass patient effort and are difficult to consciously determine. This article reviews muscle stretch (deep tendon) reflexes, and pathological reflexes including the extensor plantar (Babinski) and primitive release reflexes. Topics include findings in common psychiatric and neurologic conditions and methods for eliciting these signs.

  10. Reflexive cacti: a survey

    OpenAIRE

    Bojana Mihailović; Marija Rašajski; Zoran Stanić

    2016-01-01

    A graph is called reflexive if its second largest eigenvalue does not exceed 2. We survey the results on reflexive cacti obtained in the last two decades. We also discuss various patterns of appearing of Smith graphs as subgraphs of reflexive cacti. In the Appendix, we survey the recent results concerning reflexive bipartite regular graphs.

  11. The nasocardiac reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxandall, M L; Thorn, J L

    1988-06-01

    The oculocardiac reflex is well described and recognised in anaesthesia. The nasocardiac reflex is less well-known. We describe a clinical manifestation of this reflex and describe the relevant anatomy. This reflex may be obtunded during general anaesthesia. during general anaesthesia.

  12. Reflexives in Veracruz Huastec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constable, Peter G.

    A study examines various Huastec clause types that are reflexive in some sense, including ordinary reflexives, which involve co-reference. Two mutually exclusive morphosyntactic devices are used in Huastec: reflexive pronouns and verbal morphology. In this way, Huastec is like various European languages. Clauses involving reflexive pronouns and…

  13. Increased spinal reflex excitability is associated with enhanced central activation during voluntary lengthening contractions in human spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyosub E.; Corcos, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    This study of chronic incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) subjects investigated patterns of central motor drive (i.e., central activation) of the plantar flexors using interpolated twitches, and modulation of soleus H-reflexes during lengthening, isometric, and shortening muscle actions. In a recent study of the knee extensors, SCI subjects demonstrated greater central activation ratio (CAR) values during lengthening (i.e., eccentric) maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs), compared with during isometric or shortening (i.e., concentric) MVCs. In contrast, healthy controls demonstrated lower lengthening CAR values compared with their isometric and shortening CARs. For the present investigation, we hypothesized SCI subjects would again produce their highest CAR values during lengthening MVCs, and that these increases in central activation were partially attributable to greater efficacy of Ia-α motoneuron transmission during muscle lengthening following SCI. Results show SCI subjects produced higher CAR values during lengthening vs. isometric or shortening MVCs (all P reflex testing revealed normalized H-reflexes (maximal SOL H-reflex-to-maximal M-wave ratios) were greater for SCI than controls during passive (P = 0.023) and active (i.e., 75% MVC; P = 0.017) lengthening, suggesting facilitation of Ia transmission post-SCI. Additionally, measures of spinal reflex excitability (passive lengthening maximal SOL H-reflex-to-maximal M-wave ratio) in SCI were positively correlated with soleus electromyographic activity and CAR values during lengthening MVCs (both P < 0.05). The present study presents evidence that patterns of dynamic muscle activation are altered following SCI, and that greater central activation during lengthening contractions is partly due to enhanced efficacy of Ia-α motoneuron transmission. PMID:25972590

  14. Reflex response and control of the human soleus and gastrocnemius muscles during walking and running at increasing velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik B; Alkjær, Tine; Raffalt, Peter C

    2012-01-01

    than the soleus H-reflex. In both muscles the H-reflex increased significantly from walking to running but also with increasing running speed. The peak of EMG activity increased in both muscles with increasing speed. The V-wave of both muscles was absent or rather low during walking, but it increased...... significantly from walking to running with increasing running speed in the soleus but not in the medial gastrocnemius. In both muscles the V-wave was highest just prior to heel strike. It is suggested that this was due to a high firing frequency of the motoneurones in this phase of the movement. It is concluded...

  15. Reflex influences on muscle spindle activity in relaxed human leg muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandevia, S C; Miller, S; Aniss, A M; Burke, D

    1986-07-01

    The study was designed to determine whether low-threshold cutaneous and muscle afferents from the foot reflexly activate gamma-motoneurons innervating relaxed muscles of the leg. In 15 experiments multiunit recordings were made from 21 nerve fascicles innervating triceps surae or tibialis anterior. In a further nine experiments the activity of 19 identified single muscle spindle afferents was recorded, 13 from triceps surae, 5 from tibialis anterior, and 1 from extensor digitorum longus. Trains of electrical stimuli (5 stimuli, 300 Hz) were delivered to the sural nerve at the ankle (intensity, twice sensory threshold) and the posterior tibial nerve at the ankle (intensity, 1.1 times motor threshold for the small muscles of the foot). In addition, a tap on the appropriate tendon at varying times after the stimuli was used to assess the dynamic responsiveness of the afferents under study. The conditioning electrical stimuli did not change the discharge of single spindle afferents. Recordings of rectified and averaged multiunit activity also revealed no change in the overall level of background neural activity following the electrical stimuli. The afferent responses to tendon taps did not differ significantly whether or not they were preceded by stimulation of the sural or posterior tibial nerves. These results suggest that low-threshold afferents from the foot do not produce significant activation of fusimotor neurons in relaxed leg muscles, at least as judged by their ability to alter the discharge of muscle spindle afferents. As there may be no effective background activity in fusimotor neurons innervating relaxed human muscles, it is possible that these inputs from the foot could influence the fusimotor system during voluntary contractions when the fusimotor neurons have been brought to firing threshold. In one subject trains of stimuli were delivered to the posterior tibial nerve at painful levels (30 times motor threshold). They produced an acceleration of the

  16. [Clinical relevance of cardiopulmonary reflexes in anesthesiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerri-Guttenberg, R A; Siaba-Serrate, F; Cacheiro, F J

    2013-10-01

    The baroreflex, chemoreflex, pulmonary reflexes, Bezold-Jarisch and Bainbridge reflexes and their interaction with local mechanisms, are a demonstration of the richness of cardiovascular responses that occur in human beings. As well as these, the anesthesiologist must contend with other variables that interact by attenuating or accentuating cardiopulmonary reflexes such as, anesthetic drugs, surgical manipulation, and patient positioning. In the present article we review these reflexes and their clinical relevance in anesthesiology. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  17. The trigemino-cervical reflex in normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanov, I; Bogdanova, D; Ishpekova, B

    2001-01-01

    There are only few reports on the trigemino-cervical reflex in humans and there is debate over the best method of reflex examination. The aim of this study was, comparing different methods, to provide a reproducible method for evaluating the trigemino-cervical reflex. The trigemino-cervical reflex was studied in 32 healthy volunteers. The stimulation was applied to the supraorbital, infraorbital or mental nerve. Recordings were performed bilaterally from the sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles at rest. The reflex was also examined during maximal voluntary contraction of the sternocleidomastoid muscle after supraorbital nerve stimulation. It presented as a two-component reflex if recorded from a tonically active muscle and as a one-component reflex if recorded from a relaxed muscle. The most reproducible reflex responses were obtained from the resting sternocleidomastoid muscle after stimulation of the supraorbital nerve. In conclusion, the trigemino-cervical reflex may be most easily obtained from the relaxed sternocleidomastoid muscle after supraorbital nerve stimulation.

  18. Unilateral Eye Blinking Arising From the Ictal Ipsilateral Occipital Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falsaperla, Raffaele; Perciavalle, Valentina; Pavone, Piero; Praticò, Andrea Domenico; Elia, Maurizio; Ruggieri, Martino; Caraballo, Roberto; Striano, Pasquale

    2016-07-01

    We report on an 18-month-old boy with unilateral left eye blinking as a single ictal manifestation without facial twitching. The clinical onset of this phenomenon was first recorded (as an occasional event) at age 3 months, and it was overlooked. By age 6 months, the child's blinking increased to almost daily occurrence in clusters: during blinking the infant showed intact awareness and occasional jerks in the upper limbs and right leg. A video-electroencephalography (video-EEG) documented clinical correlation with a focal pattern arising from the left occipital region, and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed severe brain damage, consisting in poroencephalic hollows and increased spaces in the convexities involving a large area of the left cerebral hemisphere. The boy was prescribed sodium valproate (30 mg/kg/d), resulting in drastic reduction of his clinical seizures. Follow-up to his current age documented good general status, with persistent partial right hemilateral seizures. The blinking progressively disappeared, and is no longer recorded. The pathogenic hypotheses of the unilateral ictal blinking include involvement of the ipsilateral cerebral hemisphere and/or the cerebellar pathways. Review of previous reports of unilateral eye blinking, arising from the ictal ipsilateral brain, revealed that different damaged regions may give rise to blinking ictal phenomena, likely via the trigeminal fibres innervating the subdural intracranial structures and the pial vessels in the ipsilateral affected brain. The eye blinking in the present child represents a further example of an ictal phenomenon, which is predictive of the damaged brain region.

  19. Capsaicin effects on blinking Efectos de la capsaicina en el parpadeo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidias E. Leon-Sarmiento

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Blinking is a normal human phenomenom involving trigeminal and facial patways. To gain understanding on the neurobiology of blinking, five normal subjects were investigated before and after application of transdermal capsaicin at the forehead for two weeks. No effects of topical capsaicin were detected in eye blink rates. However, when capsaicin was applied to a female subject with blepharospasm, she showed a dramatic restoration of her vision subsequent to blinking modification. Deactivation of abnormal A-to-C fibers cross talks at the trigeminal-facial pathways seems to be the most likely mechanism of such improvement.El parpadeo es un fenómeno normal en los humanos que involucra las vías trigéminas faciales. Con el fin de conocer un poco más la neurobiología de este fenómeno estudiamos cinco individuos normales antes y después de aplicar capsaicina trasdérmica en la frente de cada uno de ellos, por dos semanas. La frecuencia de parpadeo no se alteró con la aplicación de capsaicina tópica. Sin embargo, cuando la misma sustancia se aplicó a una paciente con blefaroespasmo hubo dramática restauración de su visión, la cual fue secundaria a la modificación de la actividad muscular palpebral. La desactivación del cruce patológico de información que pasa de las fibras A a las fibras C, pertenecientes a las vías trigémino-faciales, parece ser el mecanismo de acción relacionado con la aplicación de capsaicina, el que estaría directamente relacionado con la recuperación clínica observada en la paciente con blefaroespasmo.

  20. Oculomotor Reflexes as a Test of Visual Dysfunctions in Cognitively Impaired Observers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The elec- tronic components (MiniLab) include hardware-implemented algorithms for segmenting the pupil image from the eye image and calculating the...automatic eye-event regis- tration algorithm was developed. The kit is used to present visual stimuli, collect eye-position and pupil -size data and...events in real time. Altogether, 4 types of filters 9 were developed: blinks, saccades, optokinetic reflex (nystagmus), and pupil - lary response

  1. Soleus stretch reflex during cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grey, Michael James; Pierce, C. W.; Milner, T. E.

    2001-01-01

    The modulation and strength of the human soleus short latency stretch reflex was investigated by mechanically perturbing the ankle during an unconstrained pedaling task. Eight subjects pedaled at 60 rpm against a preload of 10 Nm. A torque pulse was applied to the crank at various positions durin...

  2. Embodied Self-Reflexivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagis, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Drawing on G. H. Mead and Merleau-Ponty, this paper aims to extend our understanding of self-reflexivity beyond the notion of a discursive, abstract, and symbolic process. It offers a framework for embodied self-reflexivity, which anchors the self in the reflexive capacity of bodily sensations. The data consist of two years of ethnographic…

  3. A moving overlay shrinks the attentional blink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Fook K

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a study examining the effects of overlaying a veil of spots on the letters in a central rapid serial visual presentation stream. Observers identified two target letters (T1 and T2, respectively) embedded in a stream of distractor letters printed in a different color. In Experiment 1, the attentional blink (AB) diminished when a different overlay veiled each letter, such that the spots appeared to move as the letters changed. Experiment 2 concerned whether the performance enhancement occurred because the overlay hampered processing of the lag 1 distractor, thus weakening the distractor's interference with T1. Experiment 3 focused on how changing the overlay at or around T1 affected the AB. The attention disengagement hypothesis was proposed to explain the common theme in the results-that performance was only enhanced when different overlays were applied to the T1 and lag 1 frames. The claim is that the AB reflects a failure of prompt attentional disengagement from T1, which, in turn, delays reengagement when T2 appears shortly thereafter. When T1's disappearance is accompanied by an overlay change, the perceptual system gets an additional cue signaling that the visual scene has changed, thereby inducing attentional disengagement. Apart from facilitating prompt reengagement at the next target, earlier disengagement also improves target recovery by excluding features of the trailing item, likely to be a distractor, from working memory.

  4. Modulation of the startle reflex by pleasant and unpleasant music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Mathieu; Mailhot, Jean-Philippe; Gosselin, Nathalie; Paquette, Sébastien; Peretz, Isabelle

    2009-01-01

    The issue of emotional feelings to music is the object of a classic debate in music psychology. Emotivists argue that emotions are really felt in response to music, whereas cognitivists believe that music is only representative of emotions. Psychophysiological recordings of emotional feelings to music might help to resolve the debate, but past studies have failed to show clear and consistent differences between musical excerpts of different emotional valence. Here, we compared the effects of pleasant and unpleasant musical excerpts on the startle eye blink reflex and associated body markers (such as the corrugator and zygomatic activity, skin conductance level and heart rate). The startle eye blink amplitude was larger and its latency was shorter during unpleasant compared with pleasant music, suggesting that the defensive emotional system was indeed modulated by music. Corrugator activity was also enhanced during unpleasant music, whereas skin conductance level was higher for pleasant excerpts. The startle reflex was the response that contributed the most in distinguishing pleasant and unpleasant music. Taken together, these results provide strong evidence that emotions were felt in response to music, supporting the emotivist stance.

  5. Delayed working memory consolidation during the attentional blink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Edward K; Luck, Steven J

    2002-12-01

    After the detection of a target (T1) in a rapid stream of visual stimuli, there is a period of 400-600 msec during which a subsequent target (T2) is missed. This impairment in performance has been labeled the attentional blink. Recent theories propose that the attentional blink reflects a bottleneck in working memory consolidation such that T2 cannot be consolidated until after T1 is consolidated, and T2 is therefore masked by subsequent stimuli if it is presented while T1 is being consolidated. In support of this explanation, Giesbrecht & Di Lollo (1998) found that when T2 is the final item in the stimulus stream, no attentional blink is observed, because there are no subsequent stimuli that might mask T2. To provide a direct test of this explanation of the attentional blink, in the present study we used the P3 component of the event-related potential waveform to track the processing of T2. When T2 was followed by a masking item, we found that the P3 wave was completely suppressed during the attentional blink period, indicating that T2 was not consolidated in working memory. When T2 was the last item in the stimulus stream, however, we found that the P3 wave was delayed but not suppressed, indicating that T2 consolidation was not eliminated but simply delayed. These results are consistent with a fundamental limit on the consolidation of information in working memory.

  6. Probing and controlling fluorescence blinking of single semiconductor nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsien-Chen Ko

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this review we present an overview of the experimental and theoretical development on fluorescence intermittency (blinking and the roles of electron transfer in semiconductor crystalline nanoparticles. Blinking is a very interesting phenomenon commonly observed in single molecule/particle experiments. Under continuous laser illumination, the fluorescence time trace of these single nanoparticles exhibit random light and dark periods. Since its first observation in the mid-1990s, this intriguing phenomenon has attracted wide attention among researchers from many disciplines. We will first present the historical background of the discovery and the observation of unusual inverse power-law dependence for the waiting time distributions of light and dark periods. Then, we will describe our theoretical modeling efforts to elucidate the causes for the power-law behavior, to probe the roles of electron transfer in blinking, and eventually to control blinking and to achieve complete suppression of the blinking, which is an annoying feature in many applications of quantum dots as light sources and fluorescence labels for biomedical imaging.

  7. Automatic and Direct Identification of Blink Components from Scalp EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guojun Dai

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Eye blink is an important and inevitable artifact during scalp electroencephalogram (EEG recording. The main problem in EEG signal processing is how to identify eye blink components automatically with independent component analysis (ICA. Taking into account the fact that the eye blink as an external source has a higher sum of correlation with frontal EEG channels than all other sources due to both its location and significant amplitude, in this paper, we proposed a method based on correlation index and the feature of power distribution to automatically detect eye blink components. Furthermore, we prove mathematically that the correlation between independent components and scalp EEG channels can be translating directly from the mixing matrix of ICA. This helps to simplify calculations and understand the implications of the correlation. The proposed method doesn’t need to select a template or thresholds in advance, and it works without simultaneously recording an electrooculography (EOG reference. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can automatically recognize eye blink components with a high accuracy on entire datasets from 15 subjects.

  8. Automatic and direct identification of blink components from scalp EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Wanzeng; Zhou, Zhanpeng; Hu, Sanqing; Zhang, Jianhai; Babiloni, Fabio; Dai, Guojun

    2013-08-16

    Eye blink is an important and inevitable artifact during scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) recording. The main problem in EEG signal processing is how to identify eye blink components automatically with independent component analysis (ICA). Taking into account the fact that the eye blink as an external source has a higher sum of correlation with frontal EEG channels than all other sources due to both its location and significant amplitude, in this paper, we proposed a method based on correlation index and the feature of power distribution to automatically detect eye blink components. Furthermore, we prove mathematically that the correlation between independent components and scalp EEG channels can be translating directly from the mixing matrix of ICA. This helps to simplify calculations and understand the implications of the correlation. The proposed method doesn't need to select a template or thresholds in advance, and it works without simultaneously recording an electrooculography (EOG) reference. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can automatically recognize eye blink components with a high accuracy on entire datasets from 15 subjects.

  9. Detection of eye blink artifacts from single prefrontal channel electroencephalogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Won-Du; Cha, Ho-Seung; Kim, Kiwoong; Im, Chang-Hwan

    2016-02-01

    Eye blinks are one of the most influential artifact sources in electroencephalogram (EEG) recorded from frontal channels, and thereby detecting and rejecting eye blink artifacts is regarded as an essential procedure for improving the quality of EEG data. In this paper, a novel method to detect eye blink artifacts from a single-channel frontal EEG signal was proposed by combining digital filters with a rule-based decision system, and its performance was validated using an EEG dataset recorded from 24 healthy participants. The proposed method has two main advantages over the conventional methods. First, it uses single-channel EEG data without the need for electrooculogram references. Therefore, this method could be particularly useful in brain-computer interface applications using headband-type wearable EEG devices with a few frontal EEG channels. Second, this method could estimate the ranges of eye blink artifacts accurately. Our experimental results demonstrated that the artifact range estimated using our method was more accurate than that from the conventional methods, and thus, the overall accuracy of detecting epochs contaminated by eye blink artifacts was markedly increased as compared to conventional methods. The MATLAB package of our library source codes and sample data, named Eyeblink Master, is open for free download.

  10. The Dynamics of the Stapedial Acoustic Reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Sherrin Mary

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. This thesis aims to separate the neural and muscular components of the stapedial acoustic reflex, both anatomically and physiologically. It aims to present an hypothesis to account for the differences between ipsilateral and contralateral reflex characteristics which have so far been unexplained, and achieve a greater understanding of the mechanisms underlying the reflex dynamics. A technique enabling faithful reproduction of the time course of the reflex is used throughout the experimental work. The technique measures tympanic membrane displacement as a result of reflex stapedius muscle contraction. The recorded response can be directly related to the mechanics of the middle ear and stapedius muscle contraction. Some development of the technique is undertaken by the author. A model of the reflex neural arc and stapedius muscle dynamics is evolved that is based upon a second order system. The model is unique in that it includes a latency in the ipsilateral negative feedback loop. Oscillations commonly observed on reflex responses are seen to be produced because of the inclusion of a latency in the feedback loop. The model demonstrates and explains the complex relationships between neural and muscle dynamic parameters observed in the experimental work. This more comprehensive understanding of the interaction between the stapedius dynamics and the neural arc of the reflex would not usually have been possible using human subjects, coupled with a non-invasive measurement technique. Evidence from the experimental work revealed the ipsilateral reflex to have, on average, a 5 dB lower threshold than the contralateral reflex. The oscillatory charcteristics, and the steady state response, of the contralateral reflex are also seen to be significantly different from those of the ipsilateral reflex. An hypothesis to account for the experimental observations is proposed. It is propounded that chemical neurotransmitters

  11. [Non-reflex activity of the CNS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozek, G

    1995-06-01

    Recent studies of biological rhythms have modified Sherrington's concept of nervous system as exclusively reflexive to include the fact that some neural activity is also endogenously rhythmic. Reflexes are undoubtedly the most important components of animal's and human behavior. But are reflexes the basic units of all complex movements and acts? Rhythmical movements such as respiration, walking and running and other forms of locomotion, as well as rhythmical alimentary processes such as respiration, walking and running and other forms of locomotion, as well as rhythmical alimentary processes such as licking, mastication, and the peristaltic propulsion of nutrients and waste are examples of acts controlled by intrinsic oscillators, so called central pattern generators. Information from the periphery is, however, essential for controlling the extent and rate of movements. Between reflex and non-reflex activity it is possible to place complex species-specific responses called by ethologists fixed-action patterns. Recent investigators have shown that many complex sequences of behavior like speech or piano playing are determined by an internal plan, rather than being generated by a "chain" of reflexes. Non-reflexive activity appears earlier in ontogeny, and is probably phylogenetically older than reflexes.

  12. Triple helix conformation-specific blinking of Cy3 in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Kiyohiko; Maruyama, Atsushi

    2015-03-21

    We report that Cy3 undergoes triple helix conformation-specific blinking in DNA. Blinking patterns were affected by the stabilization of the Hoogsteen base-pair, suggesting that not only the presence but also the fluctuating behaviour of the triple helix can be monitored by the changes in the Cy3 blinking patterns.

  13. The attentional blink as an indicator of sexual interest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Mac Conaill

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Using implicit measures in psychological assessment is new in research. The Attentional Blink is a widely supported phenomenon in the cognitive literature. It has been reported that emotionally salient stimuli, particularly those of a sexual nature, can produce it, leading to lower recall of a neutral target presented after the stimulus item. This study looked at the Attentional Blink as a measure of sexual interest. It also looked at the use of computer-generated (CG images as an alternative to real images. Findings showed that nude images produced the largest Attentional Blink, real images are most effective, and CG images produced some effect. These finding are promising for the development of CG images of children for use in paedophile assessment.

  14. Reflexives and reflexive constructions in Afrikaans

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kate H

    coreferential relationship between the pronoun and some other expression in the sentence. Keywords: reflexives ...... object argument, functions as the complement of a noun. Consider the ...... A minimalist approach to the syntax of. Dutch.

  15. Accident Prevention by Eye Blinking Sensor and Alcohol Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa K B, Chaitra M

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This system provides a unique method to curb drunken and drowsy people. This system has an alcohol sensor and eye blinking sensor embedded in the vehicles. Whenever the driver start vehicle, the sensors senses the eye blink and measures the content of alcohol in his breathe and automatically sends the signal to buzzer, gsm and lcd. In this system the outputs of sensors are given to the microcontroller for comparison. If the value reaches to fixed limit then automatically gsm will send the sms, buzzer will produces sound and lcd will display the message.

  16. Distractor inhibition predicts individual differences in the attentional blink.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul E Dux

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The attentional blink (AB refers to humans' impaired ability to detect the second of two targets (T2 in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP stream of distractors if it appears within 200-600 ms of the first target (T1. Here we examined whether humans' ability to inhibit distractors in the RSVP stream is a key determinant of individual differences in T1 performance and AB magnitude. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We presented subjects with RSVP streams (93.3 ms/item of letters containing white distractors, a red T1 and a green T2. Subjects' ability to suppress distractors was assessed by determining the extent to which their second target performance was primed by a preceding distractor that shared the same identity as T2. Individual subjects' magnitude of T2 priming from this distractor was found to be negatively correlated with their T1 accuracy and positively related to their AB magnitude. In particular, subjects with attenuated ABs showed negative priming (i.e., worse T2 performance when the priming distractor appeared in the RSVP stream compared to when it was absent, whereas those with large ABs displayed positive priming (i.e., better T2 performance when the priming distractor appeared in the RSVP stream compared to when it was absent. Thus, a subject's ability to suppress distractors, as assessed by T2 priming magnitude, predicted both their T1 performance and AB magnitude. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results confirm that distractor suppression plays a key role in RSVP target selection and support the hypothesis that the AB results, at least in part, from a failure of distractor inhibition.

  17. A case with a rare type of trigemino-oculomotor synkinesis: clinical and blink reflex study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, H; Yildiz, O K; Eliaçik, S; Bolayir, E; Topaktaş, S

    2010-12-01

    Several abnormal synkinetic eye movements during jaw movements may often be seen after trauma or congenitally in the Marcus Gunn jaw winking phenomenon. The most frequent type consists of unilateral ptosis and retraction of the ptotic lid upon moving the jaw. The authors describe a case with isolated simultaneous adduction of the left eye upon jaw movement. This paper presents a rare case of Marcus Gunn jaw winking with trigemino-oculomotor synkinesis.

  18. The Fontana paradoxical reflex?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavorini, Federico; Fontana, Giovanni; Chellini, Elisa; Magni, Chiara; Pistolesi, Massimo; Widdicombe, John

    2011-09-01

    This commentary describes the "deflation cough" caused by deep lung deflations. Deflation cough is a paradoxical reflex similar to that described by Henry Head in 1889 for lung inflations that probably is mediated by the same sensors and afferent fibers in the lungs and activated by gastroesophageal reflux. We discuss how this reflex must be self-limiting, the general role of paradoxical reflexes in the body, and the possible clinical significance of deflation cough.

  19. Intranasal oxytocin attenuates the human acoustic startle response independent of emotional modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenbogen, Mark A; Linnen, Anne-Marie; Cardoso, Christopher; Joober, Ridha

    2014-11-01

    Oxytocin promotes social affiliation in humans. However, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon require further elucidation. The present study investigated the influence of intranasal oxytocin on basic emotional processing in men and women, using an emotion-modulated startle response paradigm. Eighty-four participants self-administered 24 IU of intranasal oxytocin or saline and completed an assessment of the acoustic startle reflex, using electromyography (EMG), with varying emotional foregrounds. Oxytocin had no impact on the affective modulation of the startle eye blink response, but significantly diminished the acoustic startle reflex irrespective of the emotional foreground. The results suggest that oxytocin facilitates prosocial behavior, in part, by attenuating basic physiological arousal. The dampening effect of oxytocin on EMG startle could possibly be used as an inexpensive marker of oxytocin's effect on limbic brain circuits.

  20. Musical minds: attentional blink reveals modality-specific restrictions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Martens

    Full Text Available Formal musical training is known to have positive effects on attentional and executive functioning, processing speed, and working memory. Consequently, one may expect to find differences in the dynamics of temporal attention between musicians and non-musicians. Here we address the question whether that is indeed the case, and whether any beneficial effects of musical training on temporal attention are modality specific or generalize across sensory modalities.When two targets are presented in close temporal succession, most people fail to report the second target, a phenomenon known as the attentional blink (AB. We measured and compared AB magnitude for musicians and non-musicians using auditory or visually presented letters and digits. Relative to non-musicians, the auditory AB was both attenuated and delayed in musicians, whereas the visual AB was larger. Non-musicians with a large auditory AB tended to show a large visual AB. However, neither a positive nor negative correlation was found in musicians, suggesting that at least in musicians, attentional restrictions within each modality are completely separate.AB magnitude within one modality can generalize to another modality, but this turns out not to be the case for every individual. Formal musical training seems to have a domain-general, but modality-specific beneficial effect on selective attention. The results fit with the idea that a major source of attentional restriction as reflected in the AB lies in modality-specific, independent sensory systems rather than a central amodal system. The findings demonstrate that individual differences in AB magnitude can provide important information about the modular structure of human cognition.

  1. Musical minds: attentional blink reveals modality-specific restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Sander; Wierda, Stefan M; Dun, Mathijs; de Vries, Michal; Smid, Henderikus G O M

    2015-01-01

    Formal musical training is known to have positive effects on attentional and executive functioning, processing speed, and working memory. Consequently, one may expect to find differences in the dynamics of temporal attention between musicians and non-musicians. Here we address the question whether that is indeed the case, and whether any beneficial effects of musical training on temporal attention are modality specific or generalize across sensory modalities. When two targets are presented in close temporal succession, most people fail to report the second target, a phenomenon known as the attentional blink (AB). We measured and compared AB magnitude for musicians and non-musicians using auditory or visually presented letters and digits. Relative to non-musicians, the auditory AB was both attenuated and delayed in musicians, whereas the visual AB was larger. Non-musicians with a large auditory AB tended to show a large visual AB. However, neither a positive nor negative correlation was found in musicians, suggesting that at least in musicians, attentional restrictions within each modality are completely separate. AB magnitude within one modality can generalize to another modality, but this turns out not to be the case for every individual. Formal musical training seems to have a domain-general, but modality-specific beneficial effect on selective attention. The results fit with the idea that a major source of attentional restriction as reflected in the AB lies in modality-specific, independent sensory systems rather than a central amodal system. The findings demonstrate that individual differences in AB magnitude can provide important information about the modular structure of human cognition.

  2. Content-specific working memory modulation of the attentional blink

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akyürek, Elkan G.; Abedian-Amiri, Ali; Ostermeier, Sonja M.

    2011-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of working memory content on temporal attention in a rapid serial visual presentation attentional blink paradigm. It was shown that categorical similarity between working memory content and the target stimuli pertaining to the attentional t

  3. Timing attention : Cuing target onset interval attenuates the attentional blink

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, S; Johnson, A

    2005-01-01

    Three experiments tested whether the attentional blink (AB; a deficit in reporting the second of two targets when it occurs 200-500 msec after the first) can be attenuated by providing information about the target onset asynchrony (TOA) of the second target relative to the first. Blocking the TOA di

  4. Modulation of eyeblink and postauricular reflexes during the anticipation and viewing of food images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Karen R; Valle-Inclán, Fernando; Hackley, Steven A

    2015-04-01

    One of the goals of neuroscience research on the reward system is to fractionate its functions into meaningful subcomponents. To this end, the present study examined emotional modulation of the eyeblink and postauricular components of startle in 60 young adults during anticipation and viewing of food images. Appetitive and disgusting photos served as rewards and punishments in a guessing game. Reflexes evoked during anticipation were not influenced by valence, consistent with the prevailing view that startle modulation indexes hedonic impact (liking) rather than incentive salience (wanting). During the slide-viewing period, postauricular reflexes were larger for correct than incorrect feedback, whereas the reverse was true for blink reflexes. Probes were delivered in brief trains, but only the first response exhibited this pattern. The specificity of affective startle modification makes it a valuable tool for studying the reward system. Copyright © 2014 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  5. Cruciate ligament reflexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard, Michael R; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul; Fischer-Rasmussen, Torsten

    2002-01-01

    The idea of muscular reflexes elicited from sensory nerves of the cruciate ligaments is more than 100 years old, but the existence of such reflexes has not been proven until the recent two decades. First in animal experiments, a muscular excitation could be elicited in the hamstrings when the ant...

  6. Reflexivity in qualitative research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evans, Adam Brian; Nistrup, Anne; Henderson, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    There has been something of a “reflexive shift” in sociological research. Sociological researchers are increasingly encouraged to be “present” within their work, and to recognize their own role in structuring the entire research process. One way to achieve this is through engagement in reflexive...... practice, that is, to reflect on our own values, beliefs, and biographies. It can be difficult to know exactly how a researcher should engage in these practices, however. Here, we discuss our reflexive practice in two case studies, both which utilized the same figurational theoretical framework...... Kingdom. Reflexive practice in both studies was affected by researcher biographies and by study design. In Study 1, both researchers were reasonably detached from the study context, the theoretical framework was in place from the very beginning, and reflexive practice was embedded in the study design...

  7. Soleus H-Reflex Operant Conditioning Changes The H-Reflex Recruitment Curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Aiko K.; Chen, Xiang Yang; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Operant conditioning can gradually change the human soleus H-reflex. The protocol conditions the reflex near M-wave threshold. This study examined its impact on the reflexes at other stimulus strengths. Methods H-reflex recruitment curves were obtained before and after a 24-session exposure to an up-conditioning (HRup) or down-conditioning (HRdown) protocol and were compared. Results In both HRup and HRdown subjects, conditioning affected the entire H-reflex recruitment curve. In 5 of 6 HRup and 3 of 6 HRdown subjects, conditioning elevated (HRup) or depressed (HRdown), respectively, the entire curve. In the other HRup subject or the other 3 HRdown subjects, the curve was shifted to the left or to the right, respectively. Discussion H-reflex conditioning does not simply change the H-reflex to a stimulus of particular strength; it also changes the H-reflexes to stimuli of different strengths. Thus, it is likely to affect many actions in which this pathway participates. PMID:23281107

  8. Somatosympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes in human spinal cord injury: responses to innocuous and noxious sensory stimulation below lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaughan G Macefield

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the sudden increases in blood pressure associated with autonomic dysreflexia in people with spinal cord injury (SCI is due to a spinally-mediated reflex activation of sympathetic vasoconstrictor neurones supplying skeletal muscle and the gut. Apart from visceral inputs, such as those originating from a distended bladder, there is a prevailing opinion that autonomic dysreflexia can be triggered by noxious stimulation below the lesion. However, do noxious inputs really cause an increase in blood pressure in SCI? Using microelectrodes inserted into a peripheral nerve to record sympathetic nerve activity we had previously shown that selective stimulation of small-diameter afferents in muscle or skin, induced by bolus injection of hypertonic saline into the tibialis anterior muscle or the overlying skin, evokes a sustained increase in muscle sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure and a transient increase in skin sympathetic nerve activity and decrease in skin blood flow. We postulated that these sympathetic responses would be exaggerated in SCI, with a purely noxious stimulus causing long-lasting increases in blood pressure and long-lasting decreases in skin blood flow. Surprisingly, though, we found that intramuscular or subcutaneous injection of hypertonic saline into the leg caused negligible changes in these parameters. Conversely, weak electrical stimulation over the abdominal wall, which in able-bodied subjects is not painful and activates large-diameter cutaneous afferents, caused a marked increase in blood pressure in SCI but not in able-bodied subjects. This suggests that it is activation of large-diameter somatic afferents, not small-diameter afferents, that triggers increases in sympathetic outflow in SCI. Whether the responses to activation of large-diameter afferents reflect plastic changes in the spinal cord in SCI is unknown.

  9. The effects of gender and birth control pill use on spontaneous blink rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yolton, D P; Yolton, R L; López, R; Bogner, B; Stevens, R; Rao, D

    1994-11-01

    Two major reference works suggest that men and women blink spontaneously at different rates, but they disagree with regard to which gender blinks faster. Spontaneous blink rates of 59 males and 86 females, 44 of whom were taking birth control (BC) pills, were measured for 5 consecutive minutes. Schirmer test results and tear break-up times (TBUTs) were also obtained. Females taking BC pills blinked at a mean rate of 19.6 times per minute, females not taking birth control pills blinked 14.9 times per minute, and males blinked 14.5 times per minute. There were very large differences between blink rates for individuals in each of the groups. No strong associations were found between spontaneous blink rates and a history of contact lens use, tear break-up time, Schirmer test results, temperature or humidity in the examination room, subject age, or menstrual cycle phase. The 32 percent increase in mean blink rate for females taking BC pills suggests that the pills affect at least one of the mechanisms that control spontaneous blinking, but it is unclear how they accomplish this.

  10. Modeling and Identification of a Realistic Spiking Neural Network and Musculoskeletal Model of the Human Arm, and an Application to the Stretch Reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivasa, Manish; Ayusawa, Ko; Nakamura, Yoshihiko

    2016-05-01

    This study develops a multi-level neuromuscular model consisting of topological pools of spiking motor, sensory and interneurons controlling a bi-muscular model of the human arm. The spiking output of motor neuron pools were used to drive muscle actions and skeletal movement via neuromuscular junctions. Feedback information from muscle spindles were relayed via monosynaptic excitatory and disynaptic inhibitory connections, to simulate spinal afferent pathways. Subject-specific model parameters were identified from human experiments by using inverse dynamics computations and optimization methods. The identified neuromuscular model was used to simulate the biceps stretch reflex and the results were compared to an independent dataset. The proposed model was able to track the recorded data and produce dynamically consistent neural spiking patterns, muscle forces and movement kinematics under varying conditions of external forces and co-contraction levels. This additional layer of detail in neuromuscular models has important relevance to the research communities of rehabilitation and clinical movement analysis by providing a mathematical approach to studying neuromuscular pathology.

  11. Etnography and Reflexivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Cardano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay deals with a relevant and controversial topic – objectivity in ethnographic research. More specifically, I would like to examine how reflexive procedures, more precisely “reflexive account”, can increase the robustness of results gained through an ethnographic research. The essay is organized in five parts. I will start by giving a preliminary definition of the two key concepts which are at the center of the analysis – objectivity and reflexivity. I will then give a brief description of the epistemological framework in which the proposed conceptions of objectivity and reflexivity are located. Thirdly, I move on to consider the epistemic status of ethnographic research, and will emphasize that ethnographies are not just “theory-laden”, as many writers have stated, but also “praxis” or “procedure laden”. In other words, I will stress that it is not only theories which are inevitably embedded in research, influencing how observations can be made; much the same can also be said of the concrete research practices which contribute to determine the experience of the ethnographer and its representation in a text. Fourthly, I will discuss why it is useful to employ reflexive practices, and then immediately afterwards will illustrate the ways in which reflexive descriptions can contribute to greater objectivity of ethnographic accounts. In conclusion, I will discuss a number of objections which have been raised against this use of reflexivity.

  12. Effects of leg muscle tendon vibration on group Ia and group II reflex responses to stance perturbation in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, Marco; Nardone, Antonio; Schieppati, Marco

    2003-01-01

    Stretching the soleus (Sol) muscle during sudden toe-up rotations of the supporting platform in a standing subject evokes a short-latency response (SLR) and a medium-latency response (MLR). The aim of the present investigation was to further explore the afferent and spinal pathways mediating the SLR and MLR in lower limb muscles by means of tendon vibration. In seven subjects, toe-up or toe-down rotations were performed under: (1) control, (2) continuous bilateral vibration at 90 Hz of Achilles' tendon or tibialis anterior (TA) tendon, and (3) post-vibration conditions. Sol and TA background EMG activity and reflex responses were bilaterally recorded and analysed. Toe-up rotations induced SLRs and MLRs in Sol at average latencies of 40 and 66 ms, respectively. During vibration, the latency of both responses increased by about 2 ms. The area of the SLR significantly decreased during vibration, regardless of the underlying background activity, and almost returned to control value post-vibration. The area of Sol MLR was less influenced by vibration than SLR, the reduction being negligible with relatively high background activity. However, contrary to SLR, MLR was even more reduced post-vibration. Toe-down rotations induced no SLR in the TA, while a MLR was evoked at about 81 ms. The area of TA MLR decreased slightly during vibration but much more post-vibration. SLRs and MLRs were differently affected by changing the vibration frequency to 30 Hz: vibration had a negligible effect on the SLR, but still produced a significant effect on the MLR. The independence from the background EMG of the inhibitory effect of vibration upon the SLR suggests that vibration removes a constant amount of the Ia afferent input. This can be accounted for by either presynaptic inhibition of group Ia fibres or a ‘busy-line' phenomenon. The differential effect of vibration on SLRs and MLRs is compatible with the notions that spindle primaries have a higher sensitivity to vibration than

  13. Effects of leg muscle tendon vibration on group Ia and group II reflex responses to stance perturbation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, Marco; Nardone, Antonio; Schieppati, Marco

    2003-07-15

    Stretching the soleus (Sol) muscle during sudden toe-up rotations of the supporting platform in a standing subject evokes a short-latency response (SLR) and a medium-latency response (MLR). The aim of the present investigation was to further explore the afferent and spinal pathways mediating the SLR and MLR in lower limb muscles by means of tendon vibration. In seven subjects, toe-up or toe-down rotations were performed under: (1) control, (2) continuous bilateral vibration at 90 Hz of Achilles' tendon or tibialis anterior (TA) tendon, and (3) post-vibration conditions. Sol and TA background EMG activity and reflex responses were bilaterally recorded and analysed. Toe-up rotations induced SLRs and MLRs in Sol at average latencies of 40 and 66 ms, respectively. During vibration, the latency of both responses increased by about 2 ms. The area of the SLR significantly decreased during vibration, regardless of the underlying background activity, and almost returned to control value post-vibration. The area of Sol MLR was less influenced by vibration than SLR, the reduction being negligible with relatively high background activity. However, contrary to SLR, MLR was even more reduced post-vibration. Toe-down rotations induced no SLR in the TA, while a MLR was evoked at about 81 ms. The area of TA MLR decreased slightly during vibration but much more post-vibration. SLRs and MLRs were differently affected by changing the vibration frequency to 30 Hz: vibration had a negligible effect on the SLR, but still produced a significant effect on the MLR. The independence from the background EMG of the inhibitory effect of vibration upon the SLR suggests that vibration removes a constant amount of the Ia afferent input. This can be accounted for by either presynaptic inhibition of group Ia fibres or a 'busy-line' phenomenon. The differential effect of vibration on SLRs and MLRs is compatible with the notions that spindle primaries have a higher sensitivity to vibration than

  14. On Reflexive Data Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, S.

    2000-08-20

    An information system is reflexive if it stores a description of its current structure in the body of stored information and is acting on the base of this information. A data model is reflexive, if its language is meta-closed and can be used to build such a system. The need for reflexive data models in new areas of information technology applications is argued. An attempt to express basic notions related to information systems is made in the case when the system supports and uses meta-closed representation of the data.

  15. Reflex Human Papillomavirus Test Results as an Option for the Management of Korean Women With Atypical Squamous Cells Cannot Exclude High-Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Ki-Jin; Lee, Sanghoon; Min, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Jae Won; Hong, Jin Hwa; Song, Jae Yun; Lee, Jae Kwan; Lee, Nak Woo

    2015-06-01

    Current guidelines recommend initial colposcopy with biopsy regardless of human papillomavirus (HPV) test results in women with atypical squamous cells, cannot exclude high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (ASC-H). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the value of HPV testing in women with ASC-H based on colposcopic pathology results. A multicenter cross-sectional study was carried out at three academic hospitals and involved 40,847 Korean women who underwent cervical cancer screening with cytology and HPV tests with or without subsequent colposcopic biopsies between January 2007 and December 2013. ASC-H was diagnosed in 276 women (0.7%). Only 6 of 68 (8.8%) women with ASC-H who were HPV negative had cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade ≥2 (CIN ≥2) lesions, whereas 47.4% of the women with ASC-H who were HPV positive had CIN ≥2 lesions. No cases of invasive cervical cancer were diagnosed among women with ASC-H who were HPV negative. Logistic regression analysis was performed using the group with normal Papanicolaou test results and HPV-negative status as the reference group. Women with ASC-H who were HPV positive had a significantly increased risk of CIN ≥2 lesions, whereas no significant increase was observed in patients with ASC-H and HPV-negative status. If the result of the HPV test was negative, the risk of CIN ≥2 lesions in Korean women with ASC-H cytology was low. Reflex HPV testing should be an option for the management of women with cytology showing ASC-H to decrease unnecessary colposcopic biopsies, which are expensive and invasive. Current American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology guidelines recommend universal colposcopy for the management of women with atypical squamous cells, cannot exclude high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (ASC-H) on cytology, regardless of human papillomavirus (HPV) test results. The present study suggested that HPV cotesting in patients with ASC-H cytology can provide more detailed and

  16. Prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex and its attentional modulation in the human S-ketamine and N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) models of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heekeren, K; Neukirch, A; Daumann, J; Stoll, M; Obradovic, M; Kovar, K-A; Geyer, M A; Gouzoulis-Mayfrank, E

    2007-05-01

    Patients with schizophrenia exhibit diminished prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle reflex and deficits in the attentional modulation of PPI. Pharmacological challenges with hallucinogens are used as models for psychosis in both humans and animals. Remarkably, in contrast to the findings in schizophrenic patients and in animal hallucinogen models of psychosis, previous studies with healthy volunteers demonstrated increased levels of PPI after administration of low to moderate doses of either the antiglutamatergic hallucinogen ketamine or the serotonergic hallucinogen psilocybin. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of moderate and high doses of the serotonergic hallucinogen N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) and the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist S-ketamine on PPI and its attentional modulation in humans. Fifteen healthy volunteers were included in a double-blind cross-over study with two doses of DMT and S-ketamine. Effects on PPI and its attentional modulation were investigated. Nine subjects completed both experimental days with the two doses of both drugs. S-ketamine increased PPI in both dosages, whereas DMT had no significant effects on PPI. S-ketamine decreased and DMT tended to decrease startle magnitude. There were no significant effects of either drug on the attentional modulation of PPI. In human experimental hallucinogen psychoses, and even with high, clearly psychotogenic doses of DMT or S-ketamine, healthy subjects failed to exhibit the predicted attenuation of PPI. In contrast, PPI was augmented and the startle magnitude was decreased after S-ketamine. These data point to important differences between human hallucinogen models and both animal hallucinogen models of psychosis and naturally occurring schizophrenia.

  17. Clarifying the Role of Defensive Reactivity Deficits in Psychopathy and Antisocial Personality Using Startle Reflex Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Uma; Hall, Jason R.; Patrick, Christopher J.; Bernat, Edward M.

    2010-01-01

    Prior research has demonstrated deficits in defensive reactivity (indexed by potentiation of the startle blink reflex) in psychopathic individuals. However, the basis of this association remains unclear, as diagnostic criteria for psychopathy encompass two distinct phenotypic components that may reflect differing neurobiological mechanisms – an affective-interpersonal component, and an antisocial deviance component. Likewise, the role of defensive response deficits in antisocial personality disorder (APD), a related but distinct syndrome, remains to be clarified. The current study examined affective priming deficits in relation to factors of psychopathy and symptoms of APD using startle reflex methods in 108 adult male prisoners. Deficits in blink reflex potentiation during aversive picture viewing were found in relation to the affective-interpersonal (Factor 1) component of psychopathy, and to a lesser extent in relation to the antisocial deviance (Factor 2) component of psychopathy and symptoms of APD—but only as a function of their overlap with affective-interpersonal features of psychopathy. These findings provide clear evidence that deficits in defensive reactivity are linked specifically to the affective-interpersonal features of psychopathy, and not the antisocial deviance features represented most strongly in APD. PMID:20973594

  18. Clarifying the role of defensive reactivity deficits in psychopathy and antisocial personality using startle reflex methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Uma; Hall, Jason R; Patrick, Christopher J; Bernat, Edward M

    2011-02-01

    Prior research has demonstrated deficits in defensive reactivity (indexed by potentiation of the startle blink reflex) in psychopathic individuals. However, the basis of this association remains unclear, as diagnostic criteria for psychopathy encompass two distinct phenotypic components that may reflect differing neurobiological mechanisms-an affective-interpersonal component and an antisocial deviance component. Likewise, the role of defensive response deficits in antisocial personality disorder (APD), a related but distinct syndrome, remains to be clarified. In the current study, the authors examined affective priming deficits in relation to factors of psychopathy and symptoms of APD using startle reflex methods in 108 adult male prisoners. Deficits in blink reflex potentiation during aversive picture viewing were found in relation to the affective-interpersonal (Factor 1) component of psychopathy, and to a lesser extent in relation to the antisocial deviance (Factor 2) component of psychopathy and symptoms of APD-but only as a function of their overlap with affective-interpersonal features of psychopathy. These findings provide clear evidence that deficits in defensive reactivity are linked specifically to the affective-interpersonal features of psychopathy and not to the antisocial deviance features represented most strongly in APD.

  19. Two-laser optical tweezers with a blinking beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamperska, Weronika; Masajada, Jan; Drobczyński, Sławomir; Gusin, Paweł

    2017-07-01

    We report on a two-laser holographic optical tweezers setup and present its two major advantages over single-laser one. First, the trap stiffness of a weak trapping beam can be measured with a considerable accuracy. Second, a novel method of examining local viscosity of fluid is proposed. Both measurements are performed based on forcing the oscillations of a microscopic polystyrene bead placed between two optical traps. The two beams are generated by separate laser sources and therefore their trapping power can vary. Moreover, a stronger trap 'blinks', modulated by an electronic shutter. The blinking frequency can be precisely adjusted to the experimental conditions, which results in high accuracy of the measurements.

  20. A blinking periorbital prosthesis using surface electromyographic signals of the orbicularis oculi muscle

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent advances in human–machine interface technology have enabled the development of multifunctional, primarily orthopedic myoelectric prostheses. We developed a noninvasive blinking periorbital prosthesis that can synchronize with blinking of the intact eyelid by using surface electromyographic signals of the orbicularis oculi muscle. Methods Myoelectric potentials of the orbicularis oculi muscle while blinking were measured with surface electrodes on the eyelid in four healthy a...

  1. Origin and control of blinking in quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efros, Alexander L; Nesbitt, David J

    2016-08-03

    Semiconductor nanocrystals offer an enormous diversity of potential device applications, based on their size-tunable photoluminescence, high optical stability and 'bottom-up' chemical approaches to self-assembly. However, the promise of such applications can be seriously limited by photoluminescence intermittency in nanocrystal emission, that is, 'blinking', arising from the escape of either one or both of the photoexcited carriers to the nanocrystal surface. In the first scenario, the remaining nanocrystal charge quenches photoluminescence via non-radiative Auger recombination, whereas for the other, the exciton is thought to be intercepted before thermalization and does not contribute to the photoluminescence. This Review summarizes the current understanding of the mechanisms responsible for nanocrystal blinking kinetics as well as core-shell engineering efforts to control such phenomena. In particular, 'softening' of the core-shell confinement potential strongly suppresses non-radiative Auger processes in charged nanocrystals, with successful non-blinking implementations demonstrated in CdSe-CdS core-thick-shell nanocrystals and their modifications.

  2. Simultaneous Eye Tracking and Blink Detection with Interactive Particle Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan M. Trivedi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a system that simultaneously tracks eyes and detects eye blinks. Two interactive particle filters are used for this purpose, one for the closed eyes and the other one for the open eyes. Each particle filter is used to track the eye locations as well as the scales of the eye subjects. The set of particles that gives higher confidence is defined as the primary set and the other one is defined as the secondary set. The eye location is estimated by the primary particle filter, and whether the eye status is open or closed is also decided by the label of the primary particle filter. When a new frame comes, the secondary particle filter is reinitialized according to the estimates from the primary particle filter. We use autoregression models for describing the state transition and a classification-based model for measuring the observation. Tensor subspace analysis is used for feature extraction which is followed by a logistic regression model to give the posterior estimation. The performance is carefully evaluated from two aspects: the blink detection rate and the tracking accuracy. The blink detection rate is evaluated using videos from varying scenarios, and the tracking accuracy is given by comparing with the benchmark data obtained using the Vicon motion capturing system. The setup for obtaining benchmark data for tracking accuracy evaluation is presented and experimental results are shown. Extensive experimental evaluations validate the capability of the algorithm.

  3. Investigation of extended blinks and interblink intervals in subjects with and without dry eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez JD

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available John D Rodriguez,1 George W Ousler III,1 Patrick R Johnston,1 Keith Lane,1 Mark B Abelson1,21Ora, Inc, Andover, MA, 2Schepens Eye Research Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to investigate the occurrence and duration of extended blinks ≥ 70 msec and their associated interblink intervals in normal subjects and in subjects with mild to moderate dry eye.Methods: This single-center, prospective, double-blind study included 11 subjects with dry eye and eight subjects with normal eyes. Extended blinks were defined as lid closure in at least two successive video frames (≥ 70 msec. Digital video imaging of each subject's eyes was recorded while the subject viewed a 10-minute documentary. The subjects did not know that blink was the outcome being measured. Following capture, the videos were manually analyzed in a masked fashion for the occurrence of extended blinks. The length of the interblink interval (ie, time between blinks before and after these extended blinks (the interblink interval ratio was calculated, as well as differences in lid contact times.Results: The dry eye group had a median extended blink duration which was 2.53 times longer than that of the normal group. For subjects with dry eye, interblink intervals post-extended blink were significantly longer than interblink intervals pre-extended blink (P < 0.001. Interblink intervals did not lengthen significantly in normal subjects. In both groups, the duration of the extended blink was significantly (P = 0.001 and positively correlated with interblink interval ratio (post-extended to pre-extended blink interblink interval, such that for each doubling of extended blink duration, the interblink interval ratio increased by 10%. Blinks longer than one second in duration occurred almost exclusively in subjects with dry eye.Conclusion: This study reports three central findings: blink duration tended to be longer in subjects with dry

  4. Bourdieu and Science Studies: Toward a Reflexive Sociology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Two of Bourdieu's fundamental contributions to science studies--the reflexive analysis of the social and human sciences and the concept of an intellectual field--are used to frame a reflexive study of the history and social studies of science and technology as an intellectual field in the United States. The universe of large, Ph.D.-granting…

  5. (Re)constructing Reflexivity: A Relational Constructionist Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosking, D.M.; Pluut, B.

    2010-01-01

    This article distinguishes three discourses of reflexivity in relation to human inquiry. One of these arises from a post-modern, relational constructionist perspective which radically re-conceptualizes reflexivity: (a) as a local and co-constructed process oriented towards the question (b) how are w

  6. (Re)constructing Reflexivity: A Relational Constructionist Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosking, D.M.; Pluut, B.

    2010-01-01

    This article distinguishes three discourses of reflexivity in relation to human inquiry. One of these arises from a post-modern, relational constructionist perspective which radically re-conceptualizes reflexivity: (a) as a local and co-constructed process oriented towards the question (b) how are

  7. New molecular knowledge towards the trigemino-cardiac reflex as a cerebral oxygen-conserving reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandu, N; Spiriev, T; Lemaitre, F; Filis, A; Schaller, B

    2010-05-04

    The trigemino-cardiac reflex (TCR) represents the most powerful of the autonomous reflexes and is a subphenomenon in the group of the so-called "oxygen-conserving reflexes". Within seconds after the initiation of such a reflex, there is a powerful and differentiated activation of the sympathetic system with subsequent elevation in regional cerebral blood flow (CBF), with no changes in the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) or in the cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc). Such an increase in regional CBF without a change of CMRO2 or CMRglc provides the brain with oxygen rapidly and efficiently. Features of the reflex have been discovered during skull base surgery, mediating reflex protection projects via currently undefined pathways from the rostral ventrolateral medulla oblongata to the upper brainstem and/or thalamus, which finally engage a small population of neurons in the cortex. This cortical center appears to be dedicated to transduce a neuronal signal reflexively into cerebral vasodilatation and synchronization of electrocortical activity; a fact that seems to be unique among autonomous reflexes. Sympathetic excitation is mediated by cortical-spinal projection to spinal preganglionic sympathetic neurons, whereas bradycardia is mediated via projections to cardiovagal motor medullary neurons. The integrated reflex response serves to redistribute blood from viscera to the brain in response to a challenge to cerebral metabolism, but seems also to initiate a preconditioning mechanism. Previous studies showed a great variability in the human TCR response, in special to external stimuli and individual factors. The TCR gives, therefore, not only new insights into novel therapeutic options for a range of disorders characterized by neuronal death, but also into the cortical and molecular organization of the brain.

  8. Effects of ayahuasca on sensory and sensorimotor gating in humans as measured by P50 suppression and prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex, respectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riba, Jordi; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Barbanoj, Manel J

    2002-12-01

    Ayahuasca, a South American psychotropic plant tea, combines the psychedelic agent and 5-HT(2A/2C) agonist N, N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) with beta-carboline alkaloids showing monoamine oxidase-inhibiting properties. Current human research with psychedelics and entactogens has explored the possibility that drugs displaying agonist activity at the 5-HT(2A/2C) sites temporally disrupt inhibitory neural mechanisms thought to intervene in the normal filtering of information. Suppression of the P50 auditory evoked potential (AEP) and prepulse inhibition of startle (PPI) are considered operational measures of sensory (P50 suppression) and sensorimotor (PPI) gating. Contrary to findings in lower animals, unexpected increases in sensorimotor gating have been found in humans following the administration of the serotonergic psychedelic psilocybin and the serotonin releaser 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). In addition, to our knowledge P50 suppression has not been assessed previously in humans following the administration of a 5-HT(2A/2C) agonist. To assess the effects of the acute administration of ayahuasca on P50 suppression and PPI in humans, in order to evaluate the drug's modulatory actions on these measures of sensory and sensorimotor gating. Eighteen healthy volunteers with prior experience of psychedelic drug use participated in a clinical trial in which placebo or ayahuasca doses (0.6 mg and 0.85 mg DMT/kg body weight) were administered according to a double-blind, cross-over balanced design. P50 and startle reflex (pulse-alone and 60 ms, 120 ms, 240 ms and 2000 ms prepulse-to-pulse intervals) recordings were undertaken at 1.5 h and 2 h after drug intake, respectively. Ayahuasca produced diverging effects on each of the two gating measures evaluated. Whereas significant dose-dependent reductions of P50 suppression were observed after ayahuasca, no significant effects were found on the startle response, its habituation rate, or on PPI at any of the prepulse

  9. A task dependent change in the medium latency component of the soleus stretch reflex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grey, Michael James; Larsen, Birgit; Sinkjær, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    In comparison to the H-reflex, the task dependency of the human stretch reflex during locomotive and postural tasks has not received a great deal of attention in the literature. The few studies on reflex task dependency that have been performed to date have concentrated on either the group Ia...

  10. Acquisition of conditioned facial reflexes in the cat: cortical control of different facial movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, C D

    1982-04-01

    The motor cortex plays a role in determining which of three different facial movements is acquired in Pavlovian conditioning experiments. Three separate facial reflexes can be distinguished by recording electromyographic activity from the orbicularis oculi (eye blink) and levator orii (nose twitch) muscles. One in a pure eye blink; a second is a nose twitch; the third is a compound eye blink and nose twitch. Which of these movements is elicited by a click (conditioned stimulus) following associative conditioning is reflected by the pattern of unit activity elicited by the click at the motor cortex. Activity is enhanced, after conditioning, in those units that project polysynaptically to the specific muscles performing the learned movement. This enhancement of activity is, in turn, relatable to an enhanced electrical excitability of the involved neurons. Analogous changes in the excitability of neurons of the motor cortex to applied currents can be produced by local application of cholinergic agents. Iontophoresis of acetylcholine, aceclidine (a cholinomimetic drug), or intracellularly applied cyclic GMP produces changes in single neuron membrane resistance that increase neuronal excitability. The units of the motor cortex that respond preferentially to these agents and to the click conditioned stimuli with short latencies have been identified as pyramidal cells of layer V. The axons of these neurons form the pyramidal tract, a pathway characterized as serving voluntary movement. It appears that this system supports rapid transmission and processing of auditory-motor information used to perform learned movements adaptively, selectively, and discriminatively.

  11. Blink Rate in Boys with Fragile X Syndrome: Preliminary Evidence for Altered Dopamine Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J. E.; Symons, F. J.; Johnson, A.-M.; Hatton, D. D.; Boccia, M. L.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Dopamine, a neurotransmitter involved in motor and cognitive functioning, can be non-invasively measured via observation of spontaneous blink rates. Blink rates have been studied in a number of clinical conditions including schizophrenia, autism, Parkinsons, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder with results implicating either…

  12. Linking Single-Molecule Blinking to Chromophore Structure and Redox Potentials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, Ingo H.; Capone, Stella; Smit, Jochem H.; Baumann, Fabian; Cordes, Thorben; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Intensity fluctuations between an ON-state and an OFF-state, also called blinking, are common to all luminescent objects when studied at the level of individuals. We studied blinking of three dyes from a homologous series (Cy3, Cy5, Cy7). The underlying radical anion states were induced by removing

  13. Linking Single-Molecule Blinking to Chromophore Structure and Redox Potentials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, Ingo H.; Capone, Stella; Smit, Jochem H.; Baumann, Fabian; Cordes, Thorben; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Intensity fluctuations between an ON-state and an OFF-state, also called blinking, are common to all luminescent objects when studied at the level of individuals. We studied blinking of three dyes from a homologous series (Cy3, Cy5, Cy7). The underlying radical anion states were induced by removing

  14. Quantitative study of spontaneous eye blinks and eye tics in Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.M. Tulen (Joke); M. Azzolini; J.A. de Vries; W.H. Groeneveld; J. Passchier (Jan); B.J.M. van de Wetering (Ben)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractSpontaneous eye blink rate and frequency of eye tics were studied in nine Tourette patients during periods of rest, conversation, and video watching. In comparison with controls, the Tourette patients showed a significantly higher blink rate during rest and

  15. Biological Motion Cues Trigger Reflexive Attentional Orienting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jinfu; Weng, Xuchu; He, Sheng; Jiang, Yi

    2010-01-01

    The human visual system is extremely sensitive to biological signals around us. In the current study, we demonstrate that biological motion walking direction can induce robust reflexive attentional orienting. Following a brief presentation of a central point-light walker walking towards either the left or right direction, observers' performance…

  16. Corneomandibular reflex: Anatomical basis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Pistacchi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Corneomandibular reflex is a pathological phenomenon evident in cases of severe brainstem damage. It is considered to be a pathological exteroceptive reflex, associated with precentro bulbar tract lesions. The sign is useful in distinguishing central neurological injuries to metabolic disorders in acutely comatose patients, localizing lesions to the upper brainstem area, determining the depth of coma and its evolution, providing evidence of uncal or transtentorial herniation in acute cerebral hemisphere lesions, and it is a marker of supraspinal level impairment in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple sclerosis. This sign was evident in a patient with severe brain damage. We discuss the literature findings and its relevance in prognosis establishment.

  17. Dynamics of the human linear vestibulo-ocular reflex at medium frequency and modification by short-term training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelhamer, M.; Roberts, D. C.; Zee, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    We study here the effect of a short-term training paradigm on the gain and phase of the human translational VOR (the linear VOR: LVOR). Subjects were exposed to lateral sinusoidal translations on a sled, at 0.5 Hz, 0.3 g peak acceleration. With subjects tracking a remembered target at 1.2 m, the LVOR (slow-phase) under these conditions typically has a phase lead or lag, and a gain that falls short of compensatory. To induce short-term adaptation (training), we presented an earth-fixed visual scene at 1.2 m during sinusoidal translation (x 1 viewing) for 20 minutes, so as to drive the LVOR toward compensatory phase and gain. We examined both the slow-phase and the saccadic responses to these stimuli. Testing after training showed changes in slow-component gain and phase which were mostly but not always in the compensatory direction. These changes were more consistent in naive subjects than in subjects who had previous LVOR experience. Changes in gain were seen with step as well as sinusoidal test stimuli; gain changes were not correlated with vergence changes. There was a strong correlation between gain changes and phase changes across subjects. Fast phases (catch-up saccades) formed a large component of the LVOR under our testing conditions (approximately 30% of the changes in gain but not in phase due to training.

  18. Dopamine activation in Neuroticism as measured by spontaneous eye blink rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbato, Giuseppe; Della Monica, Ciro; Costanzo, Antonio; De Padova, Vittoria

    2012-01-18

    Personality dimensions have been associated with different psychobiological systems. However, no agreement exists in literature on a specific role of a single neurotransmitter for each of the dimensions investigated. We studied the relationship of Neuroticism, Extraversion and Psychoticism as assessed by Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI) with spontaneous eye blink rate (BR), a non-invasive measure of central dopamine activity. A total of sixty-three healthy subjects (40 females, 23 males, mean age 24.2±3.9) were studied. Spontaneous blink rate and time of blink suppression were assessed by EOG measurement. Levels of Extraversion and Neuroticism were inversely correlated. In contrast with previous findings, a significant correlation between blink rate measures and Neuroticism was found. No significant correlation between blink measures and either Extraversion, or Psychoticism were found. The results appear consistent with a lower threshold for activation in neuroticism as suggested by Eysenck's original model.

  19. Non-blinking semiconductor colloidal quantum dots for biology, optoelectronics and quantum optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinicelli, Piernicola; Mahler, Benoit; Buil, Stéphanie; Quélin, Xavier; Dubertret, Benoit; Hermier, Jean-Pierre

    2009-04-14

    Twinkle, twinkle: The blinking of semiconductor colloidal nanocrystals is the main inconvenience of these bright nanoemitters. There are various approaches for obtaining non-blinking nanocrystals, one of which is to grow a thick coat of CdS on the CdSe core (see picture). Applications of this method in the fields of optoelectronic devices, biologic labelling and quantum information processing are discussed.The blinking of semiconductor colloidal nanocrystals is the main inconvenience of these bright nanoemitters. For some years, research on this phenomenon has demonstrated the possibility to progress beyond this problem by suppressing this fluorescence intermittency in various ways. After a brief overview on the microscopic mechanism of blinking, we review the various approaches used to obtain non-blinking nanocrystals and discuss the commitment of this crucial improvement to applications in the fields of optoelectronic devices, biologic labelling and quantum information processing.

  20. Camera vibration measurement using blinking light-emitting diode array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Kazuki; Matsuda, Yuichi

    2017-01-23

    We present a new method for measuring camera vibrations such as camera shake and shutter shock. This method successfully detects the vibration trajectory and transient waveforms from the camera image itself. We employ a time-varying pattern as the camera test chart over the conventional static pattern. This pattern is implemented using a specially developed blinking light-emitting-diode array. We describe the theoretical framework and pattern analysis of the camera image for measuring camera vibrations. Our verification experiments show that our method has a detection accuracy and sensitivity of 0.1 pixels, and is robust against image distortion. Measurement results of camera vibrations in commercial cameras are also demonstrated.

  1. New Molecular Knowledge Towards the Trigemino-Cardiac Reflex as a Cerebral Oxygen-Conserving Reflex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sandu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The trigemino-cardiac reflex (TCR represents the most powerful of the autonomous reflexes and is a subphenomenon in the group of the so-called “oxygen-conserving reflexes”. Within seconds after the initiation of such a reflex, there is a powerful and differentiated activation of the sympathetic system with subsequent elevation in regional cerebral blood flow (CBF, with no changes in the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2 or in the cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc. Such an increase in regional CBF without a change of CMRO2 or CMRglc provides the brain with oxygen rapidly and efficiently. Features of the reflex have been discovered during skull base surgery, mediating reflex protection projects via currently undefined pathways from the rostral ventrolateral medulla oblongata to the upper brainstem and/or thalamus, which finally engage a small population of neurons in the cortex. This cortical center appears to be dedicated to transduce a neuronal signal reflexively into cerebral vasodilatation and synchronization of electrocortical activity; a fact that seems to be unique among autonomous reflexes. Sympathetic excitation is mediated by cortical-spinal projection to spinal preganglionic sympathetic neurons, whereas bradycardia is mediated via projections to cardiovagal motor medullary neurons. The integrated reflex response serves to redistribute blood from viscera to the brain in response to a challenge to cerebral metabolism, but seems also to initiate a preconditioning mechanism. Previous studies showed a great variability in the human TCR response, in special to external stimuli and individual factors. The TCR gives, therefore, not only new insights into novel therapeutic options for a range of disorders characterized by neuronal death, but also into the cortical and molecular organization of the brain.

  2. The Babinski reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gijn, J

    1995-11-01

    The plantar response is a reflex that involves not only the toes, but all muscles that shorten the leg. In the newborn the synergy is brisk, involving all flexor muscles of the leg; these include the toe 'extensors', which also shorten the leg on contraction and therefore are flexors in a physiological sense. As the nervous system matures and the pyramidal tract gains more control over spinal motoneurones the flexion synergy becomes less brisk, and the toe 'extensors' are no longer part of it. The toes then often go down instead of up, as a result of a segmental reflex involving the small foot muscles and the overlying skin, comparable to the abdominal reflexes. With lesions of the pyramidal system, structural or functional, this segmental, downward response of the toes disappears, the flexion synergy may become disinhibited and the extensor hallucis longus muscle is again recruited into the flexion reflex of the leg: the sign of Babinski. A true Babinski sign denotes dysfunction of the pyramidal tract, and should be clearly distinguished from upgoing toes that do not belong to the flexion synergy of the leg. Correct interpretation of the plantar response depends only to a minor degree on the method or site of stimulation of the foot. It is therefore most important to assess the response in the entire leg.

  3. Reflexivity and social justice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maksimovic, Tijana; Jakobsen, Helle Nordentoft

    2017-01-01

    Career practitioners’ reflexive understanding of their professional role as change agents in career guidance and counselling practices has a major impact on how social justice can be achieved. This entitles an awareness of the way in which guidance and counselling practices are embedded in the co...

  4. Spinal reflexes in brain death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Yesim; Çiftçi, Yeliz; Incesu, Tülay Kurt; Seçil, Yaprak; Akhan, Galip

    2014-12-01

    Spontaneous and reflex movements have been described in brain death and these unusual movements might cause uncertainties in diagnosis. In this study we evaluated the presence of spinal reflexes in patients who fulfilled the criteria for brain death. Thirty-two (22 %) of 144 patients presented unexpected motor movements spontaneously or during examinations. These patients exhibited the following signs: undulating toe, increased deep tendon reflexes, plantar responses, Lazarus sign, flexion-withdrawal reflex, facial myokymia, neck-arm flexion, finger jerks and fasciculations. In comparison, there were no significant differences in age, sex, etiology of brain death and hemodynamic laboratory findings in patients with and without reflex motor movement. Spinal reflexes should be well recognized by physicians and it should be born in mind that brain death can be determined in the presence of spinal reflexes.

  5. Ultimate concerns in late modernity: Archer, Bourdieu and reflexivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, David; Woodman, Dan

    2015-12-01

    Through a critique of Margaret Archer's theory of reflexivity, this paper explores the theoretical contribution of a Bourdieusian sociology of the subject for understanding social change. Archer's theory of reflexivity holds that conscious 'internal conversations' are the motor of society, central both to human subjectivity and to the 'reflexive imperative' of late modernity. This is established through critiques of Bourdieu, who is held to erase creativity and meaningful personal investments from subjectivity, and late modernity is depicted as a time when a 'situational logic of opportunity' renders embodied dispositions and the reproduction of symbolic advantages obsolete. Maintaining Archer's focus on 'ultimate concerns' in a context of social change, this paper argues that her theory of reflexivity is established through a narrow misreading and rejection of Bourdieu's work, which ultimately creates problems for her own approach. Archer's rejection of any pre-reflexive dimensions to subjectivity and social action leaves her unable to sociologically explain the genesis of 'ultimate concerns', and creates an empirically dubious narrative of the consequences of social change. Through a focus on Archer's concept of 'fractured reflexivity', the paper explores the theoretical necessity of habitus and illusio for understanding the social changes that Archer is grappling with. In late modernity, reflexivity is valorized just as the conditions for its successful operation are increasingly foreclosed, creating 'fractured reflexivity' emblematic of the complex contemporary interaction between habitus, illusio, and accelerating social change. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2015.

  6. Mentalis muscle related reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Ayşegül; Uyanık, Özlem; Ertürk, Özdem; Sohtaoğlu, Melis; Kızıltan, Meral Erdemir

    2016-05-01

    The mentalis muscle (MM) arises from the incisive fossa of the mandible, raises and protrudes the lower lip. Here, we aim to characterize responses obtained from MM by supraorbital and median electrical as well as auditory stimuli in a group of 16 healthy volunteers who did not have clinical palmomental reflex. Reflex activities were recorded from the MM and orbicularis oculi (O.oc) after supraorbital and median electrical as well as auditory stimuli. Response rates over MM were consistent after each stimulus, however, mean latencies of MM response were longer than O.oc responses by all stimulation modalities. Shapes and amplitudes of responses from O.oc and MM were similar. Based on our findings, we may say that MM motoneurons have connections with trigeminal, vestibulocochlear and lemniscal pathways similar to other facial muscles and electrophysiological recording of MM responses after electrical and auditory stimulation is possible in healthy subjects.

  7. Reflex epilepsy: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Nikkhah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Interesting phenomena of reflex epileptic syndromes are characterized by epileptic seizures each one induced by specific stimulus with a variety of types. Simple triggers, which lead to seizures within seconds, are of sensory type (most commonly visual, most rarely tactile or proprioceptive stimuli. Complex triggers, which are mostly of cognitive type such as praxis, reading, talking, and music, usually induce the epileptic event within minutes. It should differ from what most epileptic patients report as provocative precipitants for seizures (such as emotional stress, fatigue, fever, sleep deprivation, alcohol, and menstrual cycle. The identification of a specific trigger is not only important for patients or their parents to avoid seizures, but also it might help neurologists to choose the most effective antiepileptic drug for each case. In addition, research in this area may possibly reveal some underlying pathophysiology of epileptic phenomena in the brain.In this review, we briefly introduce reported reflex epileptic seizures, their clinical features and management.

  8. Blinking in quantum dots: The origin of the grey state and power law statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Mao; Searson, Peter C.

    2011-09-01

    Quantum dot (QD) blinking is characterized by switching between an “on” state and an “off” state, and a power-law distribution of on and off times with exponents from 1.0 to 2.0. The origin of blinking behavior in QDs, however, has remained a mystery. Here we describe an energy-band model for QDs that captures the full range of blinking behavior reported in the literature and provides new insight into features such as the gray state, the power-law distribution of on and off times, and the power-law exponents.

  9. Reflexive regulation of CSR to promote sustainablility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhmann, Karin

    climate change and environmental sustainability, and social, economic and other human rights lend human rights as part of CSR a potential for meeting some environmental and climate concerns and handling adverse side-effects. The article analyses two EU initiatives: The EU Multi-Stakeholder (MSF) on CSR...... in promoting companies’ responsibility with regard to aspects of sustainable development, such as climate impact. Keywords: Sustainable development, sustainable companies, reflexive regulation, climate change, CSR, EU law, public-private regulation, companies' self-regulation...... and the EU CSR Alliance. Focusing on human rights based in international law, it analyses the patterns of negotiation in the MSF and the background for the launch of the CSR Alliance. It shows that analysing public-private regulation of CSR from the perspective of reflexive law theory assists us...

  10. Eye Blink Imitation Based on Mel Script%基于Mel Script的人眼随机眨动行为仿真研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    惠晓钟

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the method for imitating human eye random blink behavior with Maya Mel Script. The basic rules of human eye blink, eye rigging and wrapping technique in Maya, and the method of imitating eye blink with Mel script without keyframing are analyzed. The advantages and disadvantages of Blendshape and joint rigging in facial animation are discussed. The result shows that the imitation is working, and it saves the animator's time.%为说明如何用Maya Mel Script脚本语言对人眼随机眨动行为进行仿真;文章分析了人眼眨动的行为规律,说明了在Maya中对眼睛的骨骼绑定和封装技术,以及利用独立于动画时间线和关键帧编辑模式的Mel Script动画技术模拟人眼的随机眨动行为.并讨论了Blendshape技术和骨骼绑定结合Mel Script动画技术在动画效果上的优劣.结果证明基于Mel Script的人眼随机眨动行为仿真是可行的,可以节省动画制作时间.

  11. Neurophysiological methods for the assessment of spasticity: the Hoffmann reflex, the tendon reflex, and the stretch reflex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voerman, Gerlienke; Gregoric, M.; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    PURPOSE: To review the literature concerning neurophysiological methods to assess spasticity with respect to mechanisms and methodology, and to describe the three most commonly used methods: the Hoffmann reflex (H-reflex), the Tendon reflex (T-reflex), and the Stretch Reflex (SR). METHOD: A

  12. Adductor T reflex abnormalities in patients with decreased patellar reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tataroglu, Cengiz; Deneri, Ersin; Ozkul, Ayca; Sair, Ahmet; Yaycioglu, Soner

    2009-08-01

    The adductor reflex (AR) is a tendon reflex that has various features that differ from other tendon reflexes. This reflex was tested in different disorders presenting with diminished patellar reflexes such as diabetic lumbosacral radiculoplexus neuropathy (DLRPN), L2-L4 radiculopathy, and distal symmetric diabetic neuropathy (diabetic PNP). The AR and crossed-AR (elicited by tapping the contralateral patellar tendon) were recorded using concentric needle electrodes. Additionally, the patellar T reflex (vm-TR) and vastus medialis H reflex (vm-HR) were recorded using surface electrodes. AR was recorded in only one out of eight patients with DLRPN, but it was recorded in 21 out of 22 patients with L2-L4 radiculopathy (95.5%). Of these reflexes, only AR showed prolonged latency in the L2-L4 radiculopathy group. The latencies of AR, vm-TR, and vm-HR were prolonged in patients with diabetic PNP. We conclude that AR can be useful in the differential diagnosis of some lower motor neuron disorders that present with patellar reflex disturbance. Muscle Nerve 40: 264-270, 2009.

  13. Non-blinking quantum dot with a plasmonic nanoshell resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Botao; Giovanelli, Emerson; Habert, Benjamin; Spinicelli, Piernicola; Nasilowski, Michel; Xu, Xiangzhen; Lequeux, Nicolas; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Marquier, Francois; Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Dubertret, Benoit

    2015-02-01

    Colloidal semiconductor quantum dots are fluorescent nanocrystals exhibiting exceptional optical properties, but their emission intensity strongly depends on their charging state and local environment. This leads to blinking at the single-particle level or even complete fluorescence quenching, and limits the applications of quantum dots as fluorescent particles. Here, we show that a single quantum dot encapsulated in a silica shell coated with a continuous gold nanoshell provides a system with a stable and Poissonian emission at room temperature that is preserved regardless of drastic changes in the local environment. This novel hybrid quantum dot/silica/gold structure behaves as a plasmonic resonator with a strong Purcell factor, in very good agreement with simulations. The gold nanoshell also acts as a shield that protects the quantum dot fluorescence and enhances its resistance to high-power photoexcitation or high-energy electron beams. This plasmonic fluorescent resonator opens the way to a new family of plasmonic nanoemitters with robust optical properties.

  14. Filter Feeding, Chaotic Filtration, and a Blinking Stokeslet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, J. R.; Otto, S. R.; Blake, D. A.

    The filtering mechanisms in bivalve molluscs, such as the mussel Mytilus edulis, and in sessile organisms, such as Vorticella or Stentor, involve complex fluid mechanical phenomena. In the former example, three different sets of cilia serving different functions are involved in the process whereas in the sessile organisms the flexibility and contractile nature of the stalk may play an important role in increasing the filtering efficiency of the organisms. In both cases, beating microscopic cilia are the ``engines'' driving the fluid motion, so the fluid mechanics will be dominated entirely by viscous forces. A fluid mechanical model is developed for the filtering mechanism in mussels that enables estimates to be made of the pressure drop through the gill filaments due to (i) latero-frontal filtering cilia, (ii) the lateral (pumping) cilia, and (iii) through the non-ciliated zone of the ventral end of the filament. The velocity profile across the filaments indicates that a backflow can occur in the centre of the channel leading to the formation of two ``standing'' eddies which may drive particles towards the mucus-laden short cilia, the third set of cilia. Filter feeding in the sessile organisms is modelled by a point force above a rigid boundary. The point force periodically changes its point of application according to a given protocol (a blinking stokeslet). The resulting fluid field is illustrated via Poincaré sections and particle dispersion-showing the potential for a much improved filtering efficiency. Returning to filter feeding in bivalve molluscs, this concept is extended to a pair of blinking stokeslets above a rigid boundary to give insight into possible mechanisms for movement of food particles onto the short mucus-bearing cilia. The appendix contains a Latin and English version of an ``Ode of Achievement'' in celebration of Sir James Lighthill's contributions to mathematics and fluid mechanics.

  15. The swallowing reflex and its significance as an airway defensive reflex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi eNishino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Swallowing function, in humans, is very complex. Swallowing plays, not only an important role in food digestion, but also a major role in preventing the entrance of food and/or other materials into the lower respiratory tract. To achieve this, precise coordination is necessary between breathing and swallowing since the pharynx serves as a common pathway for both respiration and digestion. The swallowing reflex consists of afferent pathways, central integration, and efferent pathways. Any defect or disorder along reflex arc can cause a potential delay or impairment in swallow function. The swallowing reflex can be modulated not only by pathological factors but also by physiological factors. Among these, timing of swallows in relation to the phase of respiration may be the most important factor that determines the occurrence of pulmonary aspiration, since phases of inspiration and the expiration-inspiration transition are the most vulnerable for pulmonary aspiration.

  16. A New EEG Acquisition Protocol for Biometric Identification Using Eye Blinking Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abo-Zahhad

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new acquisition protocol is adopted for identifying individuals from electroencephalogram signals based on eye blinking waveforms. For this purpose, a database of 10 subjects is collected using Neurosky Mindwave headset. Then, the eye blinking signal is extracted from brain wave recordings and used for the identification task. The feature extraction stage includes fitting the extracted eye blinks to auto-regressive model. Two algorithms are implemented for auto-regressive modeling namely; Levinson-Durbin and Burg algorithms. Then, discriminant analysis is adopted for classification scheme. Linear and quadratic discriminant functions are tested and compared in this paper. Using Burg algorithm with linear discriminant analysis, the proposed system can identify subjects with best accuracy of 99.8%. The obtained results in this paper confirm that eye blinking waveform carries discriminant information and is therefore appropriate as a basis for person identification methods.

  17. Interindividual differences in H reflex modulation during normal walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Erik B; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul; Alkjaer, Tine; Aagaard, Per; Magnusson, S Peter

    2002-01-01

    Based on previous studies, at least two different types of soleus Hoffmann (H) reflex modulation were likely to be found during normal human walking. Accordingly, the aim of the present study was to identify different patterns of modulation of the soleus H reflex and to examine whether or not subjects with different H reflex modulation would exhibit different walking mechanics and different EMG activity. Fifteen subjects walked across two force platforms at 4.5 km/h (+/-10%) while the movements were recorded on video. The soleus H reflex and EMG activity were recorded separately during treadmill walking at 4.5 km/h. Using a two-dimensional analysis joint angles, angular velocities, accelerations, linear velocities and accelerations were calculated, and net joint moments about the ankle, knee and hip joint were computed by inverse dynamics from the video and force plate data. Six subjects (group S) showed a suppressed H reflex during the swing phase, and 9 subjects (group LS) showed increasing reflex excitability during the swing phase. The plantar flexor dominated moment about the ankle joint was greater for group LS. In contrast, the extensor dominated moment about the knee joint was greater for the S group. The hip joint moment was similar for the groups. The EMG activity in the vastus lateralis and anterior tibial muscles was greater prior to heel strike for the S group. These data indicate that human walking exhibits at least two different motor patterns as evaluated by gating of afferent input to the spinal cord, by EMG activity and by walking mechanics. Increasing H reflex excitability during the swing phase appears to protect the subject against unexpected perturbations around heel strike by a facilitated stretch reflex in the triceps surae muscle. Alternatively, in subjects with a suppressed H reflex in the swing phase the knee joint extensors seem to form the primary protection around heel strike.

  18. Positive priming and intentional binding: eye-blink rate predicts reward information effects on the sense of agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarts, Henk; Bijleveld, Erik; Custers, Ruud; Dogge, Myrthel; Deelder, Merel; Schutter, Dennis; Haren, Neeltje E M van

    2012-01-01

    Human society is strongly rooted in people's experiences of agency; that is, the pervasive feeling that one engages in voluntary behavior and causes one's own actions and resulting outcomes. Rewards and positive affect play an important role in the control of voluntary action. However, the role of positive reward signals in the sense of agency is poorly understood. This study examined effects of reward-related information on the sense of agency by employing the intentional binding paradigm. This paradigm measures the extent to which actions and their effects subjectively shift together across time, reflecting a crucial component of people's sense of agency. Results showed that intentional binding is stronger when participants are primed with reward-related information via brief exposure to positive pictures. Interestingly, this positive priming effect was moderated by baseline eye-blink rates (an indirect marker of striatal dopaminergic functioning); reward-related information increased intentional binding mainly for participants displaying higher baseline eye-blink rates. These findings suggest a possible role for striatal dopamine activity in the process by which reward-related information shapes the way people see themselves as agents.

  19. Eyelid contour detection and tracking for startle research related eye-blink measurements from high-speed video records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Florian; Deuter, Christian Eric; Gemmar, Peter; Schachinger, Hartmut

    2013-10-01

    Using the positions of the eyelids is an effective and contact-free way for the measurement of startle induced eye-blinks, which plays an important role in human psychophysiological research. To the best of our knowledge, no methods for an efficient detection and tracking of the exact eyelid contours in image sequences captured at high-speed exist that are conveniently usable by psychophysiological researchers. In this publication a semi-automatic model-based eyelid contour detection and tracking algorithm for the analysis of high-speed video recordings from an eye tracker is presented. As a large number of images have been acquired prior to method development it was important that our technique is able to deal with images that are recorded without any special parametrisation of the eye tracker. The method entails pupil detection, specular reflection removal and makes use of dynamic model adaption. In a proof-of-concept study we could achieve a correct detection rate of 90.6%. With this approach, we provide a feasible method to accurately assess eye-blinks from high-speed video recordings.

  20. Too Busy for Reflexivity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratner, Helene

    highlighted non-symmetric relationships between observer and observed and accused the academic text of enacting a realist genre, concealing the relativism entailed in textual production (Clifford and Marcus 1986, Woolgar 1988, Ashmore 1989). On the other hand, the reflexivity program produced fears...... of a “corrosive relativism in which everything is but a more or less clever expression of opinion” (Geertz 1988:2, 3) and it has suffered the little flattering accusations of piling "layer upon layer of self-consciousness to no avail" (Latour 1988:170) with little “interest [for] … theoretically ambitious...

  1. Effect of X-ray irradiation on the blinking of single silicon nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pevere, Federico; Bruhn, Benjamin; Sangghaleh, Fatemeh; Hormozan, Yashar; Sychugov, Ilya; Linnros, Jan [Material and Nano Physics Department, ICT School, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Kista (Sweden)

    2015-12-15

    Photoluminescence (PL) intermittency (blinking) observed for single silicon nanocrystals (Si-NCs) embedded in oxide is usually attributed to trapping/de-trapping of carriers in the vicinity of the NC. Following this model, we propose that blinking could be modified by introducing new trap sites, for example, via X-rays. In this work, we present a study of the effect of X-ray irradiation (up to 65 kGy in SiO{sub 2}) on the blinking of single Si-NCs embedded in oxide nanowalls. We show that the luminescence characteristics, such as spectrum and life-time, are unaffected by X-rays. However, substantial changes in ON-state PL intensity, switching frequency, and duty cycle emerge from the blinking traces, while the ON- and OFF- time distributions remain of mono-exponential character. Although we do not observe a clear monotonic dependence of the blinking parameters on the absorbed dose, our study suggests that, in the future, Si-NCs could be blinking-engineered via X-ray irradiation. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. [Laryngeal and larynx-associated reflexes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptok, M; Kühn, D; Miller, S; Jungheim, M; Schroeter, S

    2016-06-01

    The laryngeal adductor reflex and the pharyngoglottal closure reflex protect the trachea and lower respiratory tract against the entrance of foreign material. The laryngeal expiration reflex and the cough reflex serve to propel foreign material, which has penetrated in the cranial direction. The inspiration reflex, the sniff reflex, and the swallowing reflex are further larynx-associated reflexes. In patients with dysphagia the laryngeal adductor reflex can be clinically tested with air pulses. The water swallow test serves to show the integrity of the cough reflex. The sniff reflex is useful to test the abduction function of the vocal folds. Future studies should address laryngeal reflexes more specifically, both for a better understanding of these life-supporting mechanisms and to improve diagnostic procedures in patients with impaired laryngeal function.

  3. Blink patterns and lid-contact times in dry-eye and normal subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ousler GW 3rd

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available George W Ousler 3rd,1 Mark B Abelson,1,2 Patrick R Johnston,1 John Rodriguez,1 Keith Lane,1 Lisa M Smith11Ora, Andover, MA, USA; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAPurpose: To classify blinks in dry eye and normal subjects into six subtypes, and to define the blink rate and duration within each type of blink, as well as the total lid-contact time/minute.Materials and methods: This was a single-centered, prospective, double-blind study of eleven dry-eye and ten normal subjects. Predefined subjects watched a video while blinks were recorded for 10 minutes. Partial blinks were classified by percentage closure of maximal palpebral fissure opening: 25%, 50%, 75%. Complete blinks were characterized as full (>0 seconds, extended (>0.1 seconds, or superextended (>0.5 seconds. The mean duration of each type of blink was determined and standardized per minute as total lid-contact time.Results: Total blinks observed were 4,990 (1,414 normal, 3,756 dry eye: 1,809 (50.59% partial and 1,767 (49.41% complete blinks among dry-eye subjects versus 741 (52.90% partial and 673 (47.60% complete blinks among normal subjects. Only superextended blinks of ≥0.5-second duration were significantly more frequent in dry-eye subjects than normals (2.3% versus 0.2%, respectively; P=0.023. Total contact time was seven times higher in dry-eye subjects than normals (0.565 versus 0.080 seconds, respectively; P<0.001. Isolating only extended blinks (>0.1 second, the average contact time (seconds was four times longer in dry-eye versus normal subjects (2.459 in dry eye, 0.575 in normals; P=0.003. Isolating only superextended blinks (>0.5 seconds, average contact time was also significantly different (7.134 in dry eye, 1.589 in normals; P<0.001. The contact rate for all full closures was 6.4 times longer in dry-eye (0.045 versus 0.007, P<0.001 than normal subjects.Conclusion: Dry-eye subjects spent 4.5% of a

  4. Patterning of somatosympathetic reflexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerman, I. A.; Yates, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    In a previous study, we reported that vestibular nerve stimulation in the cat elicits a specific pattern of sympathetic nerve activation, such that responses are particularly large in the renal nerve. This patterning of vestibulosympathetic reflexes was the same in anesthetized and decerebrate preparations. In the present study, we report that inputs from skin and muscle also elicit a specific patterning of sympathetic outflow, which is distinct from that produced by vestibular stimulation. Renal, superior mesenteric, and lumbar colonic nerves respond most strongly to forelimb and hindlimb nerve stimulation (approximately 60% of maximal nerve activation), whereas external carotid and hypogastric nerves were least sensitive to these inputs (approximately 20% of maximal nerve activation). In contrast to vestibulosympathetic reflexes, the expression of responses to skin and muscle afferent activation differs in decerebrate and anesthetized animals. In baroreceptor-intact animals, somatosympathetic responses were strongly attenuated (to 150 mmHg. These findings demonstrate that different types of somatic inputs elicit specific patterns of sympathetic nerve activation, presumably generated through distinct neural circuits.

  5. Affective modulation of the startle reflex and the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory of personality: The role of sensitivity to reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluja, Anton; Blanch, Angel; Blanco, Eduardo; Balada, Ferran

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated differences in the amplitude of startle reflex and Sensitivity to Reward (SR) and Sensitivity to Punishment (SP) personality variables of the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST). We hypothesized that subjects with higher scores in SR would obtain a higher startle reflex when exposed to pleasant pictures than lower scores, while higher scores in SP would obtain a higher startle reflex when exposed to unpleasant pictures than subjects with lower scores in this dimension. The sample consisted of 112 healthy female undergraduate psychology students. Personality was assessed using the short version of the Sensitivity to Punishment and Sensitivity Reward Questionnaire (SPSRQ). Laboratory anxiety was controlled by the State Anxiety Inventory. The startle blink reflex was recorded electromyographically (EMG) from the right orbicularis oculi muscle as a response to the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) pleasant, neutral and unpleasant pictures. Subjects higher in SR obtained a significant higher startle reflex response in pleasant pictures than lower scorers (48.48 vs 46.28, p<0.012). Subjects with higher scores in SP showed a light tendency of higher startle responses in unpleasant pictures in a non-parametric local regression graphical analysis (LOESS). The findings shed light on the relationships among the impulsive-disinhibited personality, including sensitivity to reward and emotions evoked through pictures of emotional content.

  6. Detection Rate of High-Grade Cervical Neoplasia and Cost-Effectiveness of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Genotyping with Reflex Liquid-based Cytology in Cervical Cancer Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Sun Kuie; Lin, Lynette Eo; Goh, Ronald Ch

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 or worse (≥CIN3) and cost-effectiveness of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotyping with reflex liquid-based cytology (LBC) for cervical cancer screening in Singapore. Women who were ≥25 years old and undertook co-testing with LBC and HPV-genotyping (Cobas-4800, Roche, USA) for HPV-16, HPV-18 and 12 high-risk HPV types in a single institution were studied retrospectively. A single cervical smear in ThinPrep® PreservCyt® solution (Hologic, USA) was separated for tests in independent cytology and molecular pathology laboratories. The results were reviewed by a designated gynaecologist according to institutional clinical management protocols. Those who tested positive for HPV-16 and/or HPV-18 (regardless of cytology results), cytology showing low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) or high-grade SIL (HSIL), or atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) with positive 12 high-risk HPV types were referred for colposcopy. Colposcopy was performed by experienced colposcopists. Cervical biopsy, either directed punch biopsies or excisional biopsy, was determined by a colposcopist. The diagnosis of ≥CIN3 was reviewed by a gynaecologic pathologist. Cost-effectiveness of HPV-based screening in terms of disease and financial burden was analysed using epidemiological, clinical and financial input data from Singapore. Of 1866 women studied, 167 (8.9%) had abnormal cytology (≥ASCUS) and 171 (9.2%) tested positive for high-risk HPV. Twenty-three CIN were detected. Three of the 10 ≥CIN3 cases had negative cytology but positive HPV-16. Compared to cytology, HPV genotyping detected more ≥CIN3 (OR: 1.43). HPV+16/18 genotyping with reflex LBC was superior in terms of cost-effectiveness to LBC with reflex HPV, both for disease detection rate and cost per case of ≥CIN2 detected. Compared to cytology, HPV+16/18 genotyping with reflex LBC detected more ≥CIN3

  7. Proprioceptive reflexes and neurological disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, A.C.

    2004-01-01

    Proprioceptive reflexes play an important role during the control of movement and posture. Disturbed modulation of proprioceptive reflexes is often suggested as the cause for the motoric features present in neurological disorders. In this thesis methods are developed and evaluated to quantify propri

  8. AMPUTATION AND REFLEX SYMPATHETIC DYSTROPHY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GEERTZEN, JHB; EISMA, WH

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy is a chronic pain syndrome characterized by chronic burning pain, restricted range of motion, oedema and vasolability. Patients are difficult to treat and the prognosis is very often poor. This report emphasizes that an amputation in case of a reflex sympathetic

  9. Reflexive Aero Structures for Enhanced Survivability Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) proposes to develop an advanced reflexive structure system to increase the survivability of aerostructures. This reflexive...

  10. Bullying: reflexões sobre a violência no contexto escolar = Education as a way of racism elimination: a issue of human rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira, Josi Rosa de

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho apresenta reflexões acadêmicas sobre a violência, trazendo nas primeiras seções um panorama parcial, definições e considerações sobre a temática, enfocando nas seções que se seguem, a violência nos espaços escolares, suas contextualizações e possíveis soluções coletivas. O Bullying é apresentado como um problema social que invadiu a escola, ocasionando vários problemas de ordem estrutural, política e pedagógica. Reflexões são feitas com o objetivo de se conhecer o problema, as suas implicações no processo de desenvolvimento da criança e do adolescente; caracterizando o bullying, o mobbing, o cyberbullying e o comportamento dos bullies. Apresenta algumas considerações em relação às estratégias que possam contribuir na prevenção e na intervenção do bullying na escola, que passa pela capacitação dos professores, orientação dos alunos, políticas de prevenção e educação para a paz

  11. Acoustic reflex and general anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Z

    1983-01-01

    Infant and small children are not always able to cooperate in impedance measurements. For this reason it was decided, -in special cases, -to perform acoustic reflex examination under general anaesthesia. The first report on stapedius reflex and general anaesthesia was published by Mink et al. in 1981. Under the effect of Tiobutabarbital, Propanidid and Diazepam there is no reflex response. Acoustic reflex can be elicited with Ketamin-hydrochlorid and Alphaxalone-alphadolone acetate narcosis. The reflex threshold remains unchanged and the amplitude of muscle contraction is somewhat increased. The method was used: 1. to assess the type and degree of hearing loss in children with cleft palate and/or lip prior to surgery. 2. to exclude neuromuscular disorders with indication of pharyngoplasties. 3. to quantify hearing level in children--mostly multiply handicapped--with retarded speech development. The results of Behavioral Observation and Impedance Audiometry are discussed and evaluated.

  12. [Reflex seizures, cinema and television].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares-Romero, Jesús

    2015-12-16

    In movies and television series are few references to seizures or reflex epilepsy even though in real life are an important subgroup of total epileptic syndromes. It has performed a search on the topic, identified 25 films in which they appear reflex seizures. Most seizures observed are tonic-clonic and visual stimuli are the most numerous, corresponding all with flashing lights. The emotions are the main stimuli in higher level processes. In most cases it is not possible to know if a character suffers a reflex epilepsy or suffer reflex seizures in the context of another epileptic syndrome. The main conclusion is that, in the movies, the reflex seizures are merely a visual reinforcing and anecdotal element without significant influence on the plot.

  13. An experimental study of artificial murine bladder reflex arc established by abdominal reflex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jin-wu; ZHAO Yu-wu; HOU Chun-lin; NI Wei-feng; RUI Bi-yu; GUO Shang-chun; ZHENG Xian-you; DAI Ke-rong

    2011-01-01

    Background The neurogenic bladder dysfunction caused by spinal cord injury is difficult to treat clinically. The aim of this research was to establish an artificial bladder reflex arc in rats through abdominal reflex pathway above the level of spinal cord injury, reinnervate the neurogenic bladder and restore bladder micturition.Methods The outcome was achieved by intradural microanastomosis of the right T13 ventral root to S2 ventral root with autogenous nerve grafting, leaving the right T13 dorsal root intact. Long-term function of the reflex arc was assessed from nerve electrophysiological data and intravesical pressure tests during 8 months postoperation. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) tracing was performed to observe the effectiveness of the artificial reflex.Results Single stimulus (3 mA, 0.3 ms pulses, 20 Hz, 5-second duration) on the right T13 dorsal root resulted in evoked action potentials, raised intravesical pressures and bladder smooth muscle, compound action potential recorded from the right vesical plexus before and after the spinal cord transaction injury between L5 and S4 segmental in 12 Sprague-Dawley rats. There were HRP labelled cells in T13 ventral horn on the experimental side and in the intermediolateral nucleus on both sides of the L6-S4 segments after HRP injection. There was no HRP labelled cell in T13 ventral horn on the control side.Conclusion Using the surviving somatic reflex above the level of spinal cord injury to reconstruct the bladder autonomous reflex arc by intradural microanastomosis of ventral root with a segment of autologous nerve grafting is practical in rats and may have clinical applications for humans.

  14. Interindividual differences in H reflex modulation during normal walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik B; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul; Alkjaer, T

    2002-01-01

    Based on previous studies, at least two different types of soleus Hoffmann (H) reflex modulation were likely to be found during normal human walking. Accordingly, the aim of the present study was to identify different patterns of modulation of the soleus H reflex and to examine whether...... or not subjects with different H reflex modulation would exhibit different walking mechanics and different EMG activity. Fifteen subjects walked across two force platforms at 4.5 km/h (+/-10%) while the movements were recorded on video. The soleus H reflex and EMG activity were recorded separately during...... treadmill walking at 4.5 km/h. Using a two-dimensional analysis joint angles, angular velocities, accelerations, linear velocities and accelerations were calculated, and net joint moments about the ankle, knee and hip joint were computed by inverse dynamics from the video and force plate data. Six subjects...

  15. Facial expression influences face identity recognition during the attentional blink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Dominik R; Schmidt-Daffy, Martin; Dolan, Raymond J

    2014-12-01

    Emotional stimuli (e.g., negative facial expressions) enjoy prioritized memory access when task relevant, consistent with their ability to capture attention. Whether emotional expression also impacts on memory access when task-irrelevant is important for arbitrating between feature-based and object-based attentional capture. Here, the authors address this question in 3 experiments using an attentional blink task with face photographs as first and second target (T1, T2). They demonstrate reduced neutral T2 identity recognition after angry or happy T1 expression, compared to neutral T1, and this supports attentional capture by a task-irrelevant feature. Crucially, after neutral T1, T2 identity recognition was enhanced and not suppressed when T2 was angry-suggesting that attentional capture by this task-irrelevant feature may be object-based and not feature-based. As an unexpected finding, both angry and happy facial expressions suppress memory access for competing objects, but only angry facial expression enjoyed privileged memory access. This could imply that these 2 processes are relatively independent from one another.

  16. Blinking effect and the use of quantum dots in single molecule spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rombach-Riegraf, Verena; Oswald, Peter; Bienert, Roland; Petersen, Jan [Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg, Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Albertstrasse 23a, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Domingo, M.P. [Instituto de Carboquimica (CSIC), Miguel Luesma 4, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Pardo, Julian [Grupo Apoptosis, Inmunidad y Cancer, Departamento Bioquimica y Biologia Molecular y Celular, Fac. Ciencias, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Fundacion Aragon I-D (ARAID), Gobierno de Aragon, Zaragoza (Spain); Immune Effector Cells Group, Aragon Health Research Institute (IIS Aragon), Biomedical Research Centre of Aragon (CIBA) Fundacion Aragon I-D - ARAID, Gobierno de Aragon, Zaragoza (Spain); Graeber, P. [Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg, Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Albertstrasse 23a, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Galvez, E.M., E-mail: eva@icb.csic.es [Instituto de Carboquimica (CSIC), Miguel Luesma 4, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Immune Effector Cells Group, Aragon Health Research Institute (IIS Aragon), Biomedical Research Centre of Aragon (CIBA) Fundacion Aragon I-D - ARAID, Gobierno de Aragon, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is possible to eliminate the blinking effect of a water-soluble QD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provide a direct method to study protein function and dynamics at the single level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer QD, potent tool for single molecule studies of biochemical and biological processes. -- Abstract: Luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots, QD) have unique photo-physical properties: high photostability, brightness and narrow size-tunable fluorescence spectra. Due to their unique properties, QD-based single molecule studies have become increasingly more popular during the last years. However QDs show a strong blinking effect (random and intermittent light emission), which may limit their use in single molecule fluorescence studies. QD blinking has been widely studied and some hypotheses have been done to explain this effect. Here we summarise what is known about the blinking effect in QDs, how this phenomenon may affect single molecule studies and, on the other hand, how the 'on'/'off' states can be exploited in diverse experimental settings. In addition, we present results showing that site-directed binding of QD to cysteine residues of proteins reduces the blinking effect. This option opens a new possibility of using QDs to study protein-protein interactions and dynamics by single molecule fluorescence without modifying the chemical composition of the solution or the QD surface.

  17. Blink Number Forecasting Based on Improved Bayesian Fusion Algorithm for Fatigue Driving Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An improved Bayesian fusion algorithm (BFA is proposed for forecasting the blink number in a continuous video. It assumes that, at one prediction interval, the blink number is correlated with the blink numbers of only a few previous intervals. With this assumption, the weights of the component predictors in the improved BFA are calculated according to their prediction performance only from a few intervals rather than from all intervals. Therefore, compared with the conventional BFA, the improved BFA is more sensitive to the disturbed condition of the component predictors for adjusting their weights more rapidly. To determine the most relevant intervals, the grey relation entropy-based analysis (GREBA method is proposed, which can be used analyze the relevancy between the historical data flows of blink number and the data flow at the current interval. Three single predictors, that is, the autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA, radial basis function neural network (RBFNN, and Kalman filter (KF, are designed and incorporated linearly into the BFA. Experimental results demonstrate that the improved BFA obviously outperforms the conventional BFA in both accuracy and stability; also fatigue driving can be accurately warned against in advance based on the blink number forecasted by the improved BFA.

  18. Additive effects of threat-of-shock and picture valence on startle reflex modulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Bublatzky

    Full Text Available The present study examined the effects of sustained anticipatory anxiety on the affective modulation of the eyeblink startle reflex. Towards this end, pleasant, neutral and unpleasant pictures were presented as a continuous stream during alternating threat-of-shock and safety periods, which were cued by colored picture frames. Orbicularis-EMG to auditory startle probes and electrodermal activity were recorded. Previous findings regarding affective picture valence and threat-of-shock modulation were replicated. Of main interest, anticipating aversive events and viewing affective pictures additively modulated defensive activation. Specifically, despite overall potentiated startle blink magnitude in threat-of-shock conditions, the startle reflex remained sensitive to hedonic picture valence. Finally, skin conductance level revealed sustained sympathetic activation throughout the entire experiment during threat- compared to safety-periods. Overall, defensive activation by physical threat appears to operate independently from reflex modulation by picture media. The present data confirms the importance of simultaneously manipulating phasic-fear and sustained-anxiety in studying both normal and abnormal anxiety.

  19. Estrogen attenuates the exercise pressor reflex in female cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Petra M; Kaufman, M P

    2003-10-01

    In humans, the pressor and muscle sympathetic nerve responses to static exercise are less in women than in men. The difference has been attributed to the effect of estrogen on the exercise pressor reflex. Estrogen receptors are abundant in areas of the dorsal horn receiving input from group III and IV muscle afferents, which comprise the sensory limb of the exercise pressor reflex arc. These findings prompted us to investigate the effect of estrogen on the spinal pathway of the exercise pressor reflex arc. Previously, we found that the threshold concentration of 17beta-estradiol needed to attenuate the exercise pressor reflex in male decerebrate cats was 10 microg/ml (Schmitt PM and Kaufman MP. J Appl Physiol 94: 1431-1436, 2003). The threshold concentration for female cats, however, is not known. Consequently, we applied 17beta-estradiol to a well covering the L6-S1 spinal cord in decerebrate female cats. The exercise pressor reflex was evoked by electrical stimulation of the L7 or S1 ventral root, a maneuver that caused the hindlimb muscles to contract statically. We found that the pressor response to contraction averaged 38 +/- 7 mmHg before the application of 17beta-estradiol (0.01 microg/ml) to the spinal cord, whereas it averaged only 23 +/- 4 mmHg 30 min after application (P effect on the exercise pressor reflex (n = 5). We conclude that the concentration of 17beta-estradiol required to attenuate the exercise pressor reflex is 1,000 times more dilute in female cats than that needed to attenuate this reflex in male cats.

  20. Mechanical Characteristics of Reflex Durign Upright Posture in Paralyzed Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongchul; Youm, Youngil; Lee, Bumsuk; Kim, Youngho; Choi, Hyeonki

    The characteristics of flexor reflexes have been investigated in the previous studies with human subjects who were seated or supine position. However, researchers did not describe how the spinal circuits are used in different hip angles for paralyzed subjects, such as the standing position with walker or cane. In upright posture the compatibility between a flexor reflex of leg and body balance is a special problem for lower limb injured subjects. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of hip angle change on the flexor reflex evoked in standing paralyzed subjects supported by walker. In this study, six spinal cord injured and four stroke subjects were recruited through the inpatient physical therapy clinics of Korea national rehabilitation hospital. A single axis electronic goniometer was mounted on the lateral side of the hip joint of the impaired limb to record movements in the sagittal plane at this joint. The electronic goniometer was connected to a data acquisition system, through amplifiers to a computer. Since subject' posture influenced characteristics of the flexion reflex response, the subjects were supported in an upright posture by the help of parallelogram walder. Two series of tests were performed on each leg. The first series of the tests investigated the influence of hip angle during stationary standing posture on flexion reflex response. The hip angle was adjusted by the foot plate. The second examined the effect of the voluntary action of subject on swing motion during the gait. The electrically induced flexion reflex simultaneously produced the flexion of the hip, knee and dorsiflexion of the ankle enabling the swing phase of walking. Form the experimental results we observed that the reflex response of hip joint was largerwith the hip in the extended position than in the flexed position during standing posture. Under voluntary movement on flexion reflex during gaint, the peak hip angle induced by stimulation was

  1. Oculocardiac reflex during strabismus surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehryar Taghavi Gilani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The activation of oculucardiac reflex (OCR is common during the strabismus surgeries. OCR is known as a trigemino-vagal reflex, which leads to the various side effects including bradycardia, tachycardia, arrhythmia, or in some cases cardiac arrest. This reflex could be activated during intraorbital injections, hematomas, and mechanical stimulation of eyeball and extraocular muscles surgeries. The incidence of OCR varies in a wide range, from 14% to 90%, that depends on anesthetic strategy and drug used for the surgery. The efficacy of various anticholinergic and anesthetic agents on declining the OCR reflex has been evaluated in different studies, especially in children. Although the detection of OCR goes back to 1908, its exact effect is not well recognized during strabismus surgery. In this review, we aimed to summarize the studies investigated the efficacy and potential of various anesthetic medications on inhibiting the OCR in children undergoing strabismus surgery.

  2. Management of Reflex Anoxic Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at the Roald Dahl EEG Unit, Alder Hey Children’s NHS Foundation, Liverpool, UK, review the definition, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and management of reflex anoxic seizures (RAS in children.

  3. 77 FR 30349 - Alderox, Inc., Applied Solar, Inc., Artes Medical, Inc., AskMeNow, Inc., Blink Logic Inc., and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Alderox, Inc., Applied Solar, Inc., Artes Medical, Inc., AskMeNow, Inc., Blink Logic Inc., and... information concerning the securities of Blink Logic Inc. because it has not filed any periodic reports since...

  4. Low Dimensional Temporal Organization of Spontaneous Eye Blinks in Adults with Developmental Disabilities and Stereotyped Movement Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mei-Hua; Bodfish, James W.; Lewis, Mark H.; Newell, Karl M.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the mean rate and time-dependent sequential organization of spontaneous eye blinks in adults with intellectual and developmental disability (IDD) and individuals from this group who were additionally categorized with stereotypic movement disorder (IDD + SMD). The mean blink rate was lower in the IDD + SMD group than the IDD…

  5. SYSTEM REFLEXIVE STRATEGIC MARKETING MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dligach

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the System Reflexive paradigm of strategic marketing management, being based on the alignment of strategic economic interests of stakeholders, specifically, enterprise owners and hired managers, and consumers. The essence of marketing concept of management comes under review, along with the strategic management approaches to business, buildup and alignment of economic interests of business stakeholders. A roadmap for resolving the problems of modern marketing is proposed through the adoption of System Reflexive marketing theory.

  6. SYSTEM REFLEXIVE STRATEGIC MARKETING MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrii A. DLIGACH

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the System Reflexive paradigm of strategic marketing management, being based on the alignment of strategic economic interests of stakeholders, specifically, enterprise owners and hired managers, and consumers. The essence of marketing concept of management comes under review, along with the strategic management approaches to business, buildup and alignment of economic interests of business stakeholders. A roadmap for resolving the problems of modern marketing is proposed through the adoption of System Reflexive marketing theory.

  7. Quantifying the vestibulo-ocular reflex with video-oculography: nature and frequency of artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantokoudis, Georgios; Saber Tehrani, Ali S; Kattah, Jorge C; Eibenberger, Karin; Guede, Cynthia I; Zee, David S; Newman-Toker, David E

    2015-01-01

    Video-oculography devices are now used to quantify the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) at the bedside using the head impulse test (HIT). Little is known about the impact of disruptive phenomena (e.g. corrective saccades, nystagmus, fixation losses, eye-blink artifacts) on quantitative VOR assessment in acute vertigo. This study systematically characterized the frequency, nature, and impact of artifacts on HIT VOR measures. From a prospective study of 26 patients with acute vestibular syndrome (16 vestibular neuritis, 10 stroke), we classified findings using a structured coding manual. Of 1,358 individual HIT traces, 72% had abnormal disruptive saccades, 44% had at least one artifact, and 42% were uninterpretable. Physicians using quantitative recording devices to measure head impulse VOR responses for clinical diagnosis should be aware of the potential impact of disruptive eye movements and measurement artifacts.

  8. Priming the semantic neighbourhood during the attentional blink.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina M Harris

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: When two targets are presented in close temporal proximity amongst a rapid serial visual stream of distractors, a period of disrupted attention and attenuated awareness lasting 200-500 ms follows identification of the first target (T1. This phenomenon is known as the "attentional blink" (AB and is generally attributed to a failure to consolidate information in visual short-term memory due to depleted or disrupted attentional resources. Previous research has shown that items presented during the AB that fail to reach conscious awareness are still processed to relatively high levels, including the level of meaning. For example, missed word stimuli have been shown to prime later targets that are closely associated words. Although these findings have been interpreted as evidence for semantic processing during the AB, closely associated words (e.g., day-night may also rely on specific, well-worn, lexical associative links which enhance attention to the relevant target. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a measure of semantic distance to create prime-target pairs that are conceptually close, but have low word associations (e.g., wagon and van and investigated priming from a distractor stimulus presented during the AB to a subsequent target (T2. The stimuli were words (concrete nouns in Experiment 1 and the corresponding pictures of objects in Experiment 2. In both experiments, report of T2 was facilitated when this item was preceded by a semantically-related distractor. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study is the first to show conclusively that conceptual information is extracted from distractor stimuli presented during a period of attenuated awareness and that this information spreads to neighbouring concepts within a semantic network.

  9. Revisiting the spread of sparing in the attentional blink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2015-07-01

    The attentional blink (AB) refers to a deficit in reporting the second of two targets (T2) in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) stream when this target is presented less than 500 ms after the onset of the first target (T1). It is under debate whether the AB originates from a limitation of cognitive resources or from an attentional suppression process triggered by a distractor or by target discontinuity. In this study, we placed a distractor (D(inter)) or an extra target (T(inter)) between T1 and T2 while at the same time manipulating the time interval between D(inter) (or T(inter)) and T2 (0, 200, or 500 ms). The level of attentional enhancement induced by the detection of T1 was also manipulated by adding external noise to T1. The results showed that, as compared to the dual-target condition, T2 performance was better in the consecutive-target condition, when T2 was close in time to T(inter) (i.e., the spread of sparing), but was worse with a longer interval between T2 and the preceding item. Adding external noise to T1 improved T2 performance when T2 was close in time to the preceding item, irrespective of whether this item was D(inter) or T(inter). These findings present difficulties for the existing models of the AB, although the overall pattern observed is generally more consistent with the episodic simultaneous-type, serial-token (eSTST) model than with conventional resource accounts or distractor-based attentional selection accounts of the AB.

  10. Suppressed blinking behavior of CdSe/CdS QDs by polymer coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aidi; Bian, Yannan; Wang, Jinjie; Chen, Kuiyong; Dong, Chaoqing; Ren, Jicun

    2016-02-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are very important fluorescent nanocrystals with excellent optical properties. However, QDs, at the single-particle level, show severe fluorescence intermittency (or blinking) on a wide time scale from milliseconds to minutes, which limits certain optical and biological applications. Generally, blinking behavior of QDs strongly depends on their surface state and surrounding environment. Therefore, current blinking suppression approaches are mostly focused on the introduction of an inorganic shell and organic small molecule compounds. In this study, we described a ``bottom up'' approach for the synthesis of CdSe/CdS/polymer core/shell/shell QDs via the in situ one-pot polymerization approach in order to control the blinking behavior of QDs. Three monomers (dithiothreitol (DTT), phenylenediamine (PDA), and hexamethylenediamine (HDA)) were respectively used to polymerize with hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene (HCCP), and then the polyphosphazene polymers were obtained with cyclotriphosphazene as the basic macromolecular backbone. By regulating the molar ratios of the activated comonomers, we can control the blinking behavior of CdSe/CdS/polymer QDs. Under the optimal conditions, the percentage of ``non-blinking'' CdSe/CdS/polymer QDs (the ``on time'' fraction > 99% of the overall observation time) was up to 78%. The suppression mechanism was attributed to the efficient passivation of QD surface traps by the sulfhydryl or phenyl groups in the polyphosphazene polymers.Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are very important fluorescent nanocrystals with excellent optical properties. However, QDs, at the single-particle level, show severe fluorescence intermittency (or blinking) on a wide time scale from milliseconds to minutes, which limits certain optical and biological applications. Generally, blinking behavior of QDs strongly depends on their surface state and surrounding environment. Therefore, current blinking suppression approaches are

  11. New Methods of Detecting Voluntary Blinking Used to Communicate with Disabled People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOZOMITU, R.-G.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper two new methods of detecting a voluntary blinking and neglecting involuntary blinks are comparatively presented. This technique is used to communicate with disabled people by using the EOG acquisition system. The proposed methods are based on Hilbert transform and envelope detection of the low frequency differential EOG signals. To safely detect voluntary blinking pulses, these methods use an adaptive threshold depending on the level of the low frequency EOG signal. The prototype of the proposed system has been designed, constructed and tested for different subjects from medical care centers, hospitals and treatment units. The experiments that we made with patients have confirmed the performing operation of the proposed EOG acquisition system.

  12. Preferential access to emotion under attentional blink: evidence for threshold phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szczepanowski Remigiusz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study provides evidence that the activation strength produced by emotional stimuli must pass a threshold level in order to be consciously perceived, contrary to the assumption of continuous quality of representation. An analysis of receiver operating characteristics (ROC for attentional blink performance was used to distinguish between two (continuous vs. threshold models of emotion perception by inspecting two different ROC’s shapes. Across all conditions, the results showed that performance in the attentional blink task was better described by the two-limbs ROC predicted by the Krantz threshold model than by the curvilinear ROC implied by the signal-detection theory.

  13. Observation and control of blinking nitrogen-vacancy centres in discrete nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradac, C; Gaebel, T; Naidoo, N; Sellars, M J; Twamley, J; Brown, L J; Barnard, A S; Plakhotnik, T; Zvyagin, A V; Rabeau, J R

    2010-05-01

    Nitrogen-vacancy colour centres in diamond can undergo strong, spin-sensitive optical transitions under ambient conditions, which makes them attractive for applications in quantum optics, nanoscale magnetometry and biolabelling. Although nitrogen-vacancy centres have been observed in aggregated detonation nanodiamonds and milled nanodiamonds, they have not been observed in very small isolated nanodiamonds. Here, we report the first direct observation of nitrogen-vacancy centres in discrete 5-nm nanodiamonds at room temperature, including evidence for intermittency in the luminescence (blinking) from the nanodiamonds. We also show that it is possible to control this blinking by modifying the surface of the nanodiamonds.

  14. Muscle, reflex and central components in the control of the ankle joint in healthy and spastic man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkjaer, T

    1997-01-01

    In understanding the control of the ankle joint during different motor tasks, we have to investigate at least three components, namely the influence of i) the passive and intrinsic properties of the intact and active muscle system around the joint (termed the non-reflex component), ii) the mechanical importance of the stretch reflex in the stretched and unloaded muscles, and iii) the supraspinal control of the stretch reflex. This thesis is dealing with the importance of the three components in healthy and spastic persons during sitting, standing, and walking. The results are based on stretch reflex and H-reflex measurements from the ankle extensor muscles. During stretch reflex experiments the foot was mounted to a platform (portable during walking) from which the ankle joint torque and the position were measured. To elicit a stretch reflex, the ankle joint was rotated by a strong motor connected to the platform. The mechanical importance of the stretch reflex was investigated by measuring the changes in joint torque. Electrically, the stretch reflex was recorded as the compound muscle action potential through bipolar surface EMG electrodes placed over the soleus muscle. During H-reflex experiments, the tibial nerve was stimulated at the popliteal fossa and the H-reflex recorded over the soleus muscle as during stretch reflex experiments. To investigate how the contractile properties of a muscle in humans depend on the history of activation, we investigated the intrinsic stiffness of the ankle extensors in healthy subjects. At matched background contraction in sitting subjects, a prolonged contraction increased the intrinsic muscle stiffness by 49%. Muscle yielding has been considered especially important for understanding the reflex compensation. We found a general lack of muscle yield and a mechanically important non-reflex stiffness of the ankle extensors showing that non-reflex stiffness is a prominent factor in normal movements of the ankle joint. In both

  15. Bilateral Reflex Fluctuations during Rhythmic Movement of Remote Limb Pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzarane, Rinaldo A.; Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Zehr, E. Paul

    2017-01-01

    The modulation of spinal cord excitability during rhythmic limb movement reflects the neuronal coordination underlying actions of the arms and legs. Integration of network activity in the spinal cord can be assessed by reflex variability between the limbs, an approach so far very little studied. The present work addresses this question by eliciting Hoffmann (H-) reflexes in both limbs to assess if common drive onto bilateral pools of motoneurons influence spinal cord excitability simultaneously or with a delay between sides. A cross-covariance (CCV) sequence between reflexes in both arms or legs was evaluated under conditions providing common drive bilaterally through voluntary muscle contraction and/or rhythmic movement of the remote limbs. For H-reflexes in the flexor carpi radialis (FCR) muscle, either contraction of the FCR or leg cycling induced significant reduction in the amplitude of the peak at the zero lag in the CCV sequence, indicating independent variations in spinal excitability between both sides. In contrast, for H-reflexes in the soleus (SO) muscle, arm cycling revealed no reduction in the amplitude of the peak in the CCV sequence at the zero lag. This suggests a more independent control of the arms compared with the legs. These results provide new insights into the organization of human limb control in rhythmic activity and the behavior of bilateral reflex fluctuations under different motor tasks. From a functional standpoint, changes in the co-variability might reflect dynamic adjustments in reflex excitability that are subsumed under more global control features during locomotion. PMID:28725191

  16. Phase-dependent reflex modulation in tibialis anterior during passive viewing of walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, Frank; Wagner, Heiko; de Lussanet, Marc H E

    2013-03-01

    It is well established that reflexes are highly adaptive, as they depend both on our intention and on the active state of the muscles. Reflex gains change dynamically during actions such as walking and running, with the gain of cutaneous reflexes being increased at the end of the stance phase but decreased at the end of the swing phase in the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle. Reflex gains can even change during the mere observation of an action. The mechanisms and functions of such modulations are unclear. It has been suggested that the changed reflex gains prevent the actual performance of actions that we see. However, the modulation of reflexes in response to seeing an action has never been reproduced for the active execution of such actions. In the present study, medium-latency cutaneous reflexes from the TA muscle, of which the activity and reflexes during walking are well known, were measured in human subjects. The results show that the gain changes of the medium-latency responses of the TA are the same as during active walking. We conclude that reflexes do not represent an inhibitory mechanism that prevents motor output during action observation. Instead, our findings provide evidence that even the peripheral spinal motor system is actively involved in the motor resonance processes, without evoking any measurable motor responses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Persistent beneficial impact of H-reflex conditioning in spinal cord-injured rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Chen, Lu; Wang, Yu; Wolpaw, Jonathan R; Chen, Xiang Yang

    2014-11-15

    Operant conditioning of a spinal cord reflex can improve locomotion in rats and humans with incomplete spinal cord injury. This study examined the persistence of its beneficial effects. In rats in which a right lateral column contusion injury had produced asymmetric locomotion, up-conditioning of the right soleus H-reflex eliminated the asymmetry while down-conditioning had no effect. After the 50-day conditioning period ended, the H-reflex was monitored for 100 [±9 (SD)] (range 79-108) more days and locomotion was then reevaluated. After conditioning ended in up-conditioned rats, the H-reflex continued to increase, and locomotion continued to improve. In down-conditioned rats, the H-reflex decrease gradually disappeared after conditioning ended, and locomotion at the end of data collection remained as impaired as it had been before and immediately after down-conditioning. The persistence (and further progression) of H-reflex increase but not H-reflex decrease in these spinal cord-injured rats is consistent with the fact that up-conditioning improved their locomotion while down-conditioning did not. That is, even after up-conditioning ended, the up-conditioned H-reflex pathway remained adaptive because it improved locomotion. The persistence and further enhancement of the locomotor improvement indicates that spinal reflex conditioning protocols might supplement current therapies and enhance neurorehabilitation. They may be especially useful when significant spinal cord regeneration becomes possible and precise methods for retraining the regenerated spinal cord are needed.

  18. Emotional modulation of attention: fear increases but disgust reduces the attentional blink.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Vermeulen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is well known that facial expressions represent important social cues. In humans expressing facial emotion, fear may be configured to maximize sensory exposure (e.g., increases visual input whereas disgust can reduce sensory exposure (e.g., decreases visual input. To investigate whether such effects also extend to the attentional system, we used the "attentional blink" (AB paradigm. Many studies have documented that the second target (T2 of a pair is typically missed when presented within a time window of about 200-500 ms from the first to-be-detected target (T1; i.e., the AB effect. It has recently been proposed that the AB effect depends on the efficiency of a gating system which facilitates the entrance of relevant input into working memory, while inhibiting irrelevant input. Following the inhibitory response on post T1 distractors, prolonged inhibition of the subsequent T2 is observed. In the present study, we hypothesized that processing facial expressions of emotion would influence this attentional gating. Fearful faces would increase but disgust faces would decrease inhibition of the second target. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We showed that processing fearful versus disgust faces has different effects on these attentional processes. We found that processing fear faces impaired the detection of T2 to a greater extent than did the processing disgust faces. This finding implies emotion-specific modulation of attention. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on the recent literature on attention, our finding suggests that processing fear-related stimuli exerts greater inhibitory responses on distractors relative to processing disgust-related stimuli. This finding is of particular interest for researchers examining the influence of emotional processing on attention and memory in both clinical and normal populations. For example, future research could extend upon the current study to examine whether inhibitory processes invoked by

  19. Blinking effect and the use of quantum dots in single molecule spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rombach-Riegraf, Verena; Oswald, Peter; Bienert, Roland; Petersen, Jan; Domingo, M P; Pardo, Julian; Gräber, P; Galvez, E M

    2013-01-01

    Luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots, QD) have unique photo-physical properties: high photostability, brightness and narrow size-tunable fluorescence spectra. Due to their unique properties, QD-based single molecule studies have become increasingly more popular during the last years. However QDs show a strong blinking effect (random and intermittent light emission), which may limit their use in single molecule fluorescence studies. QD blinking has been widely studied and some hypotheses have been done to explain this effect. Here we summarise what is known about the blinking effect in QDs, how this phenomenon may affect single molecule studies and, on the other hand, how the "on"/"off" states can be exploited in diverse experimental settings. In addition, we present results showing that site-directed binding of QD to cysteine residues of proteins reduces the blinking effect. This option opens a new possibility of using QDs to study protein-protein interactions and dynamics by single molecule fluorescence without modifying the chemical composition of the solution or the QD surface.

  20. Individual Differences in the Attentional Blink : The Temporal Profile of Blinkers and Non-Blinkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, Charlotte; Wierda, Stefan M.; van Viegen, Eva; Martens, Sander

    2013-01-01

    Background: When two targets are presented in close temporal succession, the majority of people frequently fail to report the second target. This phenomenon, known as the 'attentional blink' (AB), has been a major topic in attention research for the past twenty years because it is informative about

  1. Spontaneous eye blink rate predicts learning from negative, but not positive, outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slagter, H.A.; Georgopoulou, K.; Frank, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    A large body of research shows that striatal dopamine critically affects the extent to which we learn from the positive and negative outcomes of our decisions. In this study, we examined the relationship between reinforcement learning and spontaneous eye blink rate (sEBR), a cheap, non-invasive, and

  2. The temporal locus of the interaction between working memory consolidation and the attentional blink

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akyürek, E.G.; Leszczyński, Marcin; Schubö, Anna

    2010-01-01

    An increase in concurrent working memory load has been shown to amplify the attentional blink. The present study investigated the temporal locus of this phenomenon, by using a dual rapid serial visual presentation paradigm that enabled the measurement of lateralized event-related potentials. The P3

  3. Testing models of the attentional blink : Does masking increase processing duration in RSVP?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wyble, Brad; Sense, Florian; Nieuwenstein, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Theories of the attentional blink (AB) – an impairment in perceiving the second of two targets shown within less than 500 ms of each other – generally assume that this effect reflects the time required to consolidate the first target in memory. In this view, the fact that the AB is strongly increase

  4. Under which conditions does T1 difficulty affect T2 performance in the attentional blink?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Simon; Petersen, Anders; Andersen, Tobias Søren

    When two visual targets (T1 & T2) are presented in rapid succession, performance of T2 suffers up to 900 ms. One theory of this attentional blink (Raymond, Shapiro, & Arnell, 1992) propose that T1 and T2 compete for limited processing resources (Chun & Potter, 1995), and predict that prolonging...

  5. Priming T2 in a Visual and Auditory Attentional Blink Task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burg, E. van der; Olivers, C.N.L.; Bronkhorst, A.W.; Theeuwes, J.

    2008-01-01

    Participants performed an attentional blink (AB) task including digits as targets and letters as distractors within the visual and auditory domains. Prior to the rapid serial visual presentation, a visual or auditory prime was presented in the form of a digit that was identical to the second target

  6. Computer and Modernization%Concurrency Control Algorithms with Balanced Blink-tree Database Index

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    包斌; 李亚岗

    2016-01-01

    针对B链树作为多版本数据库索引的并发控制机制,提出一种新的B链树结构修改并发控制算法。该算法将B链树结构修改操作划分为几个更小的原子修改操作,这些修改操作可以并发运行并且不会死锁。实验表明,新算法提高了并发度与事务的吞吐量,并保持B链树结构的一致性和平衡性。%Concerning the concurrency control mechanism for multiversion database index based on Blink-tree, a new Blink-tree concurrency control modification algorithm was proposed. The algorithm divides Blink-tree structure modification into several smal-ler atomic modifications which run concurrently and deadlock-free. The experimental results show that the new algorithm improves concurrency and transaction throughput, and retains consistency and balance of Blink-tree structure.

  7. Time to see the bigger picture : Individual differences in the attentional blink

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, Charlotte; Martens, Sander

    2016-01-01

    If two to-be-identified targets are presented in close temporal succession, identification for the second target is typically impaired. This attentional blink (AB) phenomenon has long been considered as a robust, universal cognitive limitation. However, more recent studies have demonstrated that AB

  8. Under which conditions does T1 difficulty affect T2 performance in the attentional blink?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Simon; Petersen, Anders; Andersen, Tobias Søren

    ) found that increasing the contrast of T1 decreased the attentional blink but Chua (2005) found the opposite effect. In the current study, we varied the perceptual difficulty of T1 in the two-target paradigm (Duncan, Ward, & Shapiro, 1994) both by changing the contrast and by changing the exposure...

  9. Resting EEG in Alpha and Beta Bands Predicts Individual Differences in Attentional Blink Magnitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Mary H.; Arnell, Karen M.; Cote, Kimberly A.

    2012-01-01

    Accuracy for a second target (T2) is reduced when it is presented within 500 ms of a first target (T1) in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP)--an attentional blink (AB). There are reliable individual differences in the magnitude of the AB. Recent evidence has shown that the attentional approach that an individual typically adopts during a…

  10. Distractor inhibition predicts individual differences in recovery from the attentional blink

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slagter, H.A.; Georgopoulou, K.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The attentional blink (AB) refers to an impairment in detecting the second of two target stimuli presented in close succession in a rapid stream of distractors. Recent studies indicate that the AB results, in part, from distractor suppression mechanisms, that may be mediated by striatal

  11. Negative attentional set in the attentional blink : control is not lost

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Dexuan; Zhou, Xiaolin; Martens, Sander

    2011-01-01

    The attentional blink (AB) refers to the finding that performance on the second of two targets (T1 and T2) in a rapidly presented stimulus stream is impaired when the targets are presented within 200-500 ms. This study investigates whether a negative attentional set, a form of top-down control, has

  12. Word Frequency and the Attentional Blink : The Effects of Target Difficulty on Retrieval and Consolidation Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierda, Stefan M.; Taatgen, Niels A.; van Rijn, Hedderik; Martens, Sander

    2013-01-01

    Background: When a second target (T2) is presented in close succession of a first target (T1) within a stream of non-targets, people often fail to detect T2-a deficit known as the attentional blink (AB). Two types of theories can be distinguished that have tried to account for this phenomenon. Where

  13. Individual Differences in the Attentional Blink : The Temporal Profile of Blinkers and Non-Blinkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, Charlotte; Wierda, Stefan M.; van Viegen, Eva; Martens, Sander

    2013-01-01

    Background: When two targets are presented in close temporal succession, the majority of people frequently fail to report the second target. This phenomenon, known as the 'attentional blink' (AB), has been a major topic in attention research for the past twenty years because it is informative about

  14. Photoluminescence blinking and carrier dynamics in giant nanocrystals with different electron confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampat, Sid; Guo, Yijun; Vela, Javier; Malko, Anton

    2012-02-01

    Quantum dots have shown great promise as high quantum yield photon sources for applications in bioimaging, LEDs, lasers, etc. However, their photoluminescence (PL) intermittency (blinking) often complicates practical implementations. Recently, a new breed of giant nanocrystal quantum dots (gNQDs) with a large number of shell monolayers (ML) has been developed that show strongly suppressed blinkingootnotetextY. Chen et al., JACS 130, 5026 (2008) and existence of multiexcitons.ootnotetextY.S. Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 187401 (2011)^,ootnotetextA. V. Malko et al., Nano Lett., accepted (2011) So far, their PL emission has been limited to around 630nm. In this work, we broadened this approach and extended gNQD emission to shorter wavelength in the visible spectrum. We investigated photostable CdSe/CdS gNQDs with small (480nm emission) core and compared them to large (625nm emission) core non-blinking gNQDs with similar shell thickness (14-17 ML). The small core dots show increased blinking behavior and shorter PL decay times in comparison to large core dots. The observed difference in blinking behavior is suggestive of different carrier confinement regimes leading to enhanced electron trapping at the dot's surface as well as modifications to non-radiative Auger recombination rates.

  15. Short-term memory and the attentional blink : Capacity versus content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akyürek, Elkan G; Hommel, Bernhard

    When people monitor the rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) of stimuli for two targets (T1 and T2), they often miss T2 if it falls into a time window of about half a second after T1 onset, a phenomenon known as the attentional blink (AB). We found that overall performance in an RSVP task was

  16. Working memory capacity, intelligence, and the magnitude of the attentional blink revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, Sander; Johnson, Addie

    The attentional blink (AB) is a well-established phenomenon in the study of attention. This deficit in reporting the second of two targets presented in rapid serial visual presentation when it occurs 200-500 ms after the first is considered to reflect a fundamental limitation in attentional

  17. Attentional and Perceptual Factors Affecting the Attentional Blink for Faces and Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Ayelet N.; Bentin, Shlomo

    2008-01-01

    When 2 different visual targets presented among different distracters in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) are separated by 400 ms or less, detection and identification of the 2nd targets are reduced relative to longer time intervals. This phenomenon, termed the "attentional blink" (AB), is attributed to the temporary engagement…

  18. Working memory capacity, intelligence, and the magnitude of the attentional blink revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, Sander; Johnson, Addie

    2009-01-01

    The attentional blink (AB) is a well-established phenomenon in the study of attention. This deficit in reporting the second of two targets presented in rapid serial visual presentation when it occurs 200-500 ms after the first is considered to reflect a fundamental limitation in attentional processi

  19. Combining Blink, Pupil, and Response Time Measures in a Concealed Knowledge Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis eSeymour

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The response time (RT based Concealed Knowledge Test (CKT has been shown to accurately detect participants’ knowledge of mock-crime related information. Tests based on ocular measures such as pupil size and blink rate have sometimes resulted in poor classification, or lacked detailed classification analyses. The present study examines the fitness of multiple pupil and blink related responses in the CKT paradigm. To maximize classification efficiency, participants’ concealed knowledge was assessed using both individual test measures and combinations of test measures. Results show that individual pupil-size, pupil-slope, and pre-response blink-rate measures produce efficient classifications. Combining pupil and blink measures yielded more accuracy classifications than individual ocular measures. Although RT-based tests proved efficient, combining RT with ocular measures had little incremental benefit. It is argued that covertly assessing ocular measures during RT-based tests may guard against effective countermeasure use in applied settings. A compound classification procedure was used to categorize individual participants and yielded high hit rates and low false-alarm rates without the need for adjustments between test paradigms or subject populations. We conclude that with appropriate test paradigms and classification analyses, ocular measures may prove as effective as other indices, though additional research is needed.

  20. Delayed exciton emission and its relation to blinking in CdSe quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rabouw, F.T.; Kamp, M.; van Dijk-Moes, R.J.A.; Gamelin, D.R.; Koenderink, A.F.; Meijerink, A.; Vanmaekelbergh, D.

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency and stability of emission from semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs) is negatively affected by "blinking" on the single-nanocrystal level, that is, random alternation of bright and dark periods. The time scales of these fluctuations can be as long as many seconds, orders of mag

  1. Distractor Devaluation Effect in the Attentional Blink: Direct Evidence for Distractor Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Ken; Yagi, Yoshihiko; Takeda, Yuji; Kawahara, Jun I.

    2011-01-01

    When two targets (T1 and T2) are embedded in rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP), T2 is often missed (attentional blink, AB) if T2 follows T1 by less than 500 ms. Some have proposed that inhibition of a distractor following T1 contributes to the AB, but no direct evidence supports this proposal. This study examined distractor inhibition by…

  2. Resolving Single-Molecule Assembled Patterns with Superresolution Blink-Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cordes, Thorben; Strackharn, Mathias; Stahl, Stefan W.; Summerer, Wolfram; Steinhauer, Christian; Forthmann, Carsten; Puchner, Elias M.; Vogelsang, Jan; Gaub, Hermann E.; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we experimentally combine a recently developed AFM-based molecule-by-molecule assembly (single-molecule cut-and-paste, SMCP) with subdiffraction resolution fluorescence imaging. Using “Blink-Microscopy”, which exploits the fluctuating emission of single molecules for the reconstruction

  3. Reflexive regulation of CSR to promote sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhmann, Karin

    2011-01-01

    climate change and environmental sustainability, and social, economic and other human rights lend human rights as part of CSR a potential for meeting some environmental and climate concerns and handling adverse side-effects. The article analyses two EU initiatives: The EU Multi-Stakeholder (MSF) on CSR......This article discusses Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) from the perspective of governmental regulation as a measure to promote public policy interests through public-private regulation intended to influence firms’ self-regulation. Presenting a ‘government case’ for CSR, the connection between...... and the EU CSR Alliance. Focusing on human rights based in international law, it analyses the patterns of negotiation in the MSF and the background for the launch of the CSR Alliance. It shows that analysing public-private regulation of CSR from the perspective of reflexive law theory assists us...

  4. Conditioning-specific reflex modification of the rabbit's nictitating membrane response and heart rate: behavioral rules, neural substrates, and potential applications to posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burhans, Lauren B; Smith-Bell, Carrie; Schreurs, Bernard G

    2008-12-01

    Interest in classical conditioning is usually focused on anticipatory responses to a stimulus associated with a significant event, and it is assumed that responses to the event itself are reflexive, involuntary, and relatively invariant. However, there is compelling evidence that both the rabbit nictitating membrane response (NMR) and heart rate response (HR), well-known reflexive reactions to aversive events, can change quite dramatically as a function of learning when measured in the absence of the conditioned stimulus. In the case of NMR conditioning, a simple blink is transformed into a larger and more complex response. For HR conditioning, reflexive heart rate acceleration can actually change to heart rate deceleration. In both cases, the reflex comes to resemble the conditioned response and follows some of the same behavioral laws. This change in response to the aversive event itself or weaker forms of that event is called conditioning-specific reflex modification (CRM). CRM may force us to reevaluate the behavioral and neural consequences of classical conditioning and may have important consequences for the treatment of conditions such as posttraumatic stress disorder.

  5. Design of Perturbation Signals for the Estimation of Proprioceptive Reflexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, A.C.; De Vlugt, E.; Van der Helm, F.C.T.

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the functional contribution of reflexes to human motor control during posture maintenance. Continuous random force disturbances were applied at the hand while the subjects were instructed to minimize the deviation resulting from the force disturbances. The results were a

  6. Outside home. Notes on reflexivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Clemente

    2017-01-01

    The paper proffers the idea in which a “reflexive process” on subjectivity can involve and/or hopefully involve the entire experience of the researcher, going beyond the borders of a single research. In the process, unexpected elements of subjectivity can come into play; in other cases the meaning attributed to them can change in time or can have a role different from what had been expected. Some elements, objects of epistemological analyses, as imposed by a reflexive approach, can become objects of attention also on the phenomenological level.

  7. The history of examination of reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Christopher J

    2014-12-01

    In the late 1800s, Wilhelm Erb, Joseph Babinski, William Gowers, and others helped develop the neurologic examination as we know it today. Erb was one of the first to emphasize a detailed and systematic neurologic exam and was co-discoverer of the muscle stretch reflex, Gowers began studying the knee jerk shortly after it was described, and Babinski focused on finding reliable signs that could differentiate organic from hysterical paralysis. These physicians and others emphasized the bedside examination of reflexes, which have been an important part of the neurologic examination ever since. This review will focus on the history of the examination of the following muscle stretch and superficial/cutaneous reflexes: knee jerk, jaw jerk, deep abdominal reflexes, superficial abdominal reflexes, plantar reflex/Babinski sign, and palmomental reflex. The history of reflex grading will also be discussed.

  8. Educating the Reflexive Practitioner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc J. Neveu

    2012-09-01

    wearing any clothes.Notwithstanding such issues, I do believe the studio holds the potentialto be an empowering learning experience. The intention of this article is to question the mode of instruction in an architectural studio. I’ve structured the paper in three parts. First, I will briefly describe the findingsof the study made by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancementof Teaching known as the Boyer Report.2 To develop and support the findings of the Boyer Report, I introduce the work of the educator Donald Schön. Though I see much merit in the Boyer Report, and Schön’sproposals, I argue that a more nuanced approach is required. I will recommend, therefore, in the second section of this paper that a meansof architectural education as based on the Socratic method may be amore productive approach. My reading of the Socratic method is basedprimarily on early Socratic dialogues and I will specifically use Charmidesto illustrate the issues that I believe are relevant to studio pedagogy.3 From my analysis of Charmides I will, in the third section of the essay,describe how the Socratic method is beneficial to studio pedagogy threeways: reflexive, non-propositional, and finally how Socrates’ approachmay indeed be practical. This last section will be illustrated with a studentproject. It is my conjecture that the Socratic method offers insight intocurrent discussions of educational theory, namely student-centered,project-based learning.

  9. The reflexive case study method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rittenhofer, Iris

    2015-01-01

    This paper extends the international business research on small to medium-sized enterprises (SME) at the nexus of globalization. Based on a conceptual synthesis across disciplines and theoretical perspectives, it offers management research a reflexive method for case study research of postnational...

  10. Reflexive regulation of CSR to promote sustainablility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhmann, Karin

    climate change and environmental sustainability, and social, economic and other human rights lend human rights as part of CSR a potential for meeting some environmental and climate concerns and handling adverse side-effects. The article analyses two EU initiatives: The EU Multi-Stakeholder (MSF) on CSR...... in promoting companies’ responsibility with regard to aspects of sustainable development, such as climate impact. Keywords: Sustainable development, sustainable companies, reflexive regulation, climate change, CSR, EU law, public-private regulation, companies' self-regulation......This article discusses Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) from the perspective of governmental regulation as a measure to promote public policy interests through public-private regulation intended to influence firms’ self-regulation. Presenting a ‘government case’ for CSR, the connection between...

  11. Interlimb Reflexes Induced by Electrical Stimulation of Cutaneous Nerves after Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Jane E; Godfrey, Sharlene; Thomas, Christine K

    2016-01-01

    Whether interlimb reflexes emerge only after a severe insult to the human spinal cord is controversial. Here the aim was to examine interlimb reflexes at rest in participants with chronic (>1 year) spinal cord injury (SCI, n = 17) and able-bodied control participants (n = 5). Cutaneous reflexes were evoked by delivering up to 30 trains of stimuli to either the superficial peroneal nerve on the dorsum of the foot or the radial nerve at the wrist (5 pulses, 300 Hz, approximately every 30 s). Participants were instructed to relax the test muscles prior to the delivery of the stimuli. Electromyographic activity was recorded bilaterally in proximal and distal arm and leg muscles. Superficial peroneal nerve stimulation evoked interlimb reflexes in ipsilateral and contralateral arm and contralateral leg muscles of SCI and control participants. Radial nerve stimulation evoked interlimb reflexes in the ipsilateral leg and contralateral arm muscles of control and SCI participants but only contralateral leg muscles of control participants. Interlimb reflexes evoked by superficial peroneal nerve stimulation were longer in latency and duration, and larger in magnitude in SCI participants. Interlimb reflex properties were similar for both SCI and control groups for radial nerve stimulation. Ascending interlimb reflexes tended to occur with a higher incidence in participants with SCI, while descending interlimb reflexes occurred with a higher incidence in able-bodied participants. However, the overall incidence of interlimb reflexes in SCI and neurologically intact participants was similar which suggests that the neural circuitry underlying these reflexes does not necessarily develop after central nervous system injury.

  12. An Intelligent Computerized Stretch Reflex Measurement System For Clinical And Investigative Neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, P. M.; Chutkow, J. G.; Riggs, M. T.; Cristiano, V. D.

    1987-05-01

    We describe the design of a reliable, user-friendly preprototype system for quantifying the tendon stretch reflexes in humans and large mammals. A hand-held, instrumented reflex gun, the impactor of which contains a single force sensor, interfaces with a computer. The resulting test system can deliver sequences of reproducible stimuli at graded intensities and adjustable durations to a muscle's tendon ("tendon taps"), measure the impacting force of each tap, and record the subsequent reflex muscle contraction from the same tendon -- all automatically. The parameters of the reflex muscle contraction include latency; mechanical threshold; and peak time, peak magnitude, and settling time. The results of clinical tests presented in this paper illustrate the system's potential usefulness in detecting neurologic dysfunction affecting the tendon stretch reflexes, in documenting the course of neurologic illnesses and their response to therapy, and in clinical and laboratory neurologic research.

  13. Cough reflex sensitization from esophagus and nose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennel, Michal; Brozmanova, Mariana; Kollarik, Marian

    2015-12-01

    The diseases of the esophagus and nose are among the major factors contributing to chronic cough although their role in different patient populations is debated. Studies in animal models and in humans show that afferent C-fiber activators applied on esophageal or nasal mucosa do not initiate cough, but enhance cough induced by inhaled irritants. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that activation of esophageal and nasal C-fibers contribute to cough reflex hypersensitivity observed in chronic cough patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and chronic rhinitis, respectively. The afferent nerves mediating cough sensitization from the esophagus are probably the neural crest-derived vagal jugular C-fibers. In addition to their responsiveness to high concentration of acid typical for gastroesophageal reflux (pH cough sensitization are less understood. Increased cough reflex sensitivity was also reported in many patients with GERD or rhinitis who do not complain of cough indicating that additional endogenous or exogenous factors may be required to develop chronic coughing in these diseases.

  14. Somatoautonomic reflexes in acupuncture therapy: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Sae; Kagitani, Fusako; Sato-Suzuki, Ikuko

    2017-03-01

    Oriental therapies such as acupuncture, moxibustion, or Anma, have been used to treat visceral disorders since ancient times. In each of these therapies, stimulation of the skin or underlying muscles leads to excitation of afferent nerves. The sensory information is carried to the central nervous system, where it is transferred to autonomic efferents, thus affecting visceral functions. This neuronal pathway, known as the "somatoautonomic reflex", has been systematically studied by Sato and his colleagues for over a half century. Nearly all their studies were conducted in anesthetized animals, whereas human patients are conscious. Responses in patients or the events following therapeutic somatic stimulation may differ from those observed in anesthetized animals. In fact, it is increasingly apparent that the responses in patients and animals are not always coincident, and the differences have been difficult for clinicians to reconcile. We review the mechanism of the "somatoautonomic reflex" as described in anesthetized animals and then discuss how it can be applied clinically. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Metabolic syndrome and the hepatorenal reflex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Wider

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Insufficient hepatic O 2 in animal and human studies has been shown to elicit a hepatorenal reflex in response to increased hepatic adenosine, resulting in stimulation of renal as well as muscle sympathetic nerve activity and activating the renin angiotensin system. Low hepatic ATP, hyperuricemia, and hepatic lipid accumulation reported in metabolic syndrome (MetS patients may reflect insufficient hepatic O 2 delivery, potentially accounting for the sympathetic overdrive associated with MetS. This theoretical concept is supported by experimental results in animals fed a high fructose diet to induce MetS. Hepatic fructose metabolism rapidly consumes ATP resulting in increased adenosine production and hyperuricemia as well as elevated renin release and sympathetic activity. This review makes the case for the hepatorenal reflex causing sympathetic overdrive and metabolic syndrome in response to exaggerated splanchnic oxygen consumption from excessive eating. This is strongly reinforced by the fact that MetS is cured in a matter of days in a significant percentage of patients by diet, bariatric surgery, or endoluminal sleeve, all of which would decrease splanchnic oxygen demand by limiting nutrient contact with the mucosa and reducing the nutrient load due to the loss of appetite or dietary restriction.

  16. Is the cutaneous silent period an opiate-sensitive nociceptive reflex?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inghilleri, Maurizio; Conte, Antonella; Frasca, Vittorio; Berardelli, Alfredo; Manfredi, Mario; Cruccu, Giorgio

    2002-05-01

    In humans, high-intensity electrical stimuli delivered to the fingers induce an inhibitory effect on C7-T1 motoneurons. This inhibitory reflex, called the cutaneous silent period (CSP) is considered a defense response specific for the human upper limbs. It is not clear whether the CSP-like other defense responses such as the corneal reflex and the R III reflex-is an opiate-sensitive nociceptive reflex. Because opiates suppress some, but not all, nociceptive reflexes, we studied the effect of the narcotic-analgesic drug fentanyl on the CSP and the R III reflex. The CSP was recorded from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle in seven normal subjects during voluntary contraction, before and 10 and 20 min after fentanyl injection. To assess possible fentanyl-induced changes, we also tested the effect of finger stimulation on motor evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited in the FDI muscle by transcranial magnetic stimulation before and after fentanyl injection. Fentanyl-induced changes were also studied on the R III reflex recorded from the biceps femoris muscle. Fentanyl, as expected, suppressed the R III reflex but failed to change the inhibitory effect of finger stimulation on FDI motoneurons. Finger stimulation reduced the size of MEPs in the FDI, and fentanyl injection left this inhibitory effect unchanged. The differential fentanyl-induced modulation of the CSP and R III reflex provides evidence that the CSP circuit is devoid of mu-opiate receptors and is therefore an opiate-insensitive nociceptive reflex, which may be useful in the assessment of central-acting, non-opioid drugs.

  17. Low dimensional temporal organization of spontaneous eye blinks in adults with developmental disabilities and stereotyped movement disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mei-Hua; Bodfish, James W; Lewis, Mark H; Newell, Karl M

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the mean rate and time-dependent sequential organization of spontaneous eye blinks in adults with intellectual and developmental disability (IDD) and individuals from this group who were additionally categorized with stereotypic movement disorder (IDD+SMD). The mean blink rate was lower in the IDD+SMD group than the IDD group and both of these groups had a lower blink rate than a contrast group of healthy adults. In the IDD group the n to n+1 sequential organization over time of the eye-blink durations showed a stronger compensatory organization than the contrast group suggesting decreased complexity/dimensionality of eye-blink behavior. Very low blink rate (and thus insufficient time series data) precluded analysis of time-dependent sequential properties in the IDD+SMD group. These findings support the hypothesis that both IDD and SMD are associated with a reduction in the dimension and adaptability of movement behavior and that this may serve as a risk factor for the expression of abnormal movements.

  18. Spontaneous Blinking Kinetics on Paralytic Lagophthalmos After Lid Load with Gold Weight or Autogenous Temporalis Fascia Sling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wambier, Sarah P F; Garcia, Denny M; Cruz, Antonio A V; Messias, Andre

    2016-04-01

    To assess the upper eyelid kinematics during spontaneous blinking in unilateral paralytic lagophthalmos before and after upper eyelid load with gold weight (GW) or autogenous temporalis fascia (TF) sling. Comparative case series. Patients with long-standing unresolved unilateral facial palsy who underwent surgical treatment with GW (n = 8) or upper lid cerclage with TF (n = 10). The contralateral eyelid served as the control for each patient (control group). Preoperative and postoperative measurements of spontaneous blink kinematics with magnetic search coil and clinical assessment of lid margin position, lagophthalmos and ocular surface exposure, and determine amplitude, maximum velocity and main sequence of spontaneous blinks; relative amplitude of blinks to the pupil center; ocular surface exposure scores; magnitude of lagophthalmos and mid-pupil lid distances. The mean (±SE) down-phase amplitude ratio between paralyzed and contralateral eyelids (blink gain) was 10.0% preoperatively for both groups and significantly increased to 29 ± 6% for the GW group (p lagophthalmos decreased postoperatively especially in the GW group. The beneficial effect of lid load surgeries result from a combination of a small increase on the spontaneous blink amplitude and a static effect due to the reduction of the distance between the lid margin and pupil center.

  19. Reflexivity in Narratives on Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Helle Nordentoft; Olesen, Lektor Birgitte Ravn

    Previous research has shown how reflexivity is a precondition for knowledge co-production through productive dialogue in organisational contexts because it entails a re-ordering, re-arranging and re-designing of what one knows and therefore creates new angles of vision. In this paper, we draw...... on Bakhtinian dialogic communication theory and discursive psychology to investigate the written practice narratives of 23 students on a Masters Degree Programme in Educational Studies, focusing on how the process of writing narratives accentuates reflexivity. Our findings indicate that the narratives invite...... a dialogic conception of practice as they entail a conceptual reframing of key elements in practice. In addition, the narratives expose a situational and relational, rather than normative, focus which allows for reflections on emotional and bodily experiences. In conclusion, we argue that practice narratives...

  20. Integrating Reflexivity in Livelihoods Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prowse, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Much poverty and development research is not explicit about its methodology or philosophical foundations. Based on the extended case method of Burawoy and the epistemological standpoint of critical realism, this paper discusses a methodological approach for reflexive inductive livelihoods researc...... that overcomes the unproductive social science dualism of positivism and social constructivism. The approach is linked to a conceptual framework and a menu of research methods that can be sequenced and iterated in light of research questions.......Much poverty and development research is not explicit about its methodology or philosophical foundations. Based on the extended case method of Burawoy and the epistemological standpoint of critical realism, this paper discusses a methodological approach for reflexive inductive livelihoods research...

  1. Synthesis of Non-blinking Semiconductor Quantum Dots Emitting in the Near-Infrared

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis, Allison M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mangum, Benjamin D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Piryatinski, Andrei [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Young-Shin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Htoon, Han [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-21

    Our previous work demonstrates that Quasi-Type II CdSe/CdS core-shell quantum dots with thick shells (3-5 nm) exhibit unique photophysical characteristics, including improved chemical robustness over typical thin-shelled core/shell systems and the elimination of blinking through suppression of nonradiative Auger recombination. Here we describe a new thick-shelled heterostructure, InP/CdS, which exhibits a Type II bandgap alignment producing near-infrared (NIR) emission. Samples with a range of shell thicknesses were synthesized, enabling shell-thickness-dependent study of the absorbance and emission spectra, fluorescence lifetimes, and quantum yields. InP/CdS/ZnS core/shell/shell structures were also synthesized to reduce cadmium exposure for applications in the biological environment. Single particle spectroscopy indicates reduced blinking and improved photostability with increasing shell thickness, resulting in thick-shelled dots that are appropriate for single-particle tracking measurements with NIR emission.

  2. The influence of stimulus sex and emotional expression on the attentional blink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Hilary E; Vanous, Jesse B

    2015-08-01

    Past studies have demonstrated that angry faces used as the first target (T1) in an attentional blink paradigm interfere with processing of a second, neutral target (T2). However, despite research that suggests that the sex and emotional expression of a face are confounded, no study has investigated whether the sex of a stimulus might interact with emotional expression to influence the attentional blink. In the current study, both the sex and emotional expression of a T1 stimulus were manipulated to assess participants' ability to report the presences of a subsequent neutral target. Although the findings revealed limited evidence to support an interaction between sex and emotion, both the sex and emotional expression of the T1 stimulus were found to independently affect reporting of T2. These findings suggest that both emotional expression and stimulus sex are important in the temporal allocation of attentional resources to faces. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Impaired eye-blink conditioning in waggler, a mutant mouse with cerebellar BDNF deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, S; Chen, L; Qiao, X; Knusel, B; Thompson, R F

    1998-01-01

    In addition to their trophic functions, neurotrophins are also implicated in synaptic modulation and learning and memory. Although gene knockout techniques have been used widely in studying the roles of neurotrophins at molecular and cellular levels, behavioral studies using neurotrophin knockouts are limited by the early-onset lethality and various sensory deficits associated with the gene knockout mice. In the present study, we found that in a spontaneous mutant mouse, waggler, the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was selectively absent in the cerebellar granule cells. The cytoarchitecture of the waggler cerebellum appeared to be normal at the light microscope level. The mutant mice exhibited no sensory deficits to auditory stimuli or heat-induced pain. However, they were massively impaired in classic eye-blink conditioning. These results suggest that BDNF may have a role in normal cerebellar neuronal function, which, in turn, is essential for classic eye-blink conditioning.

  4. Active Bio-sensor System, Compatible with Arm Muscle Movement or Blinking Signals in BCI Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Mehrkanoon

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses a bionic active sensor system for the BCI application. Proposed system involves analog and digital parts. Two types of accurate sensors are used to pickup the blinking and muscle movement signals. A precision micro-power instrumentation amplifier with the adjustable gain, a sixth order low pass active filter with cutoff frequency 0.1 Hz, and a sixth order band pas filter with the bandwidth of 2-6 Hz are constructed to provide the clean blinking and arm muscle movement signals. TMS320C25 DSP processor is used for independent and unique command signals which are prepared for BCI application by a power amplifier and driver.

  5. In the twinkling of an eye: synchronization of EEG and eye tracking based on blink signatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Per; Petersen, Michael Kai; Larsen, Jakob Eg

    2014-01-01

    be integrated into next generation user interfaces. In experimental lab settings EEG neuroimaging and eye tracking data are traditionally combined using external triggers to synchronize the signals. However, with biometric sensors increasingly being applied in everyday usage scenarios, there will be a need...... for solutions providing a continuous alignment of signals. In the present paper we propose using spontaneous eye blinks, as a means to achieve near real-time synchronization of EEG and eye tracking. Analyzing key parameters that define eye blink signatures across the two domains, we outline a probability...... function based algorithm to correlate the signals. Comparing the accuracy of the method against a state of the art EYE-EEG plug-in for offline analysis of EEG and eye tracking data, we propose our approach could be applied for robust synchronization of biometric sensor data collected in a mobile context....

  6. Reflexive fatherhood in everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerling, Allan

    2015-01-01

    This article looks at fathering practices in Denmark, using the findings from a research project on everyday family life in Denmark. It takes a social psychological perspective and employs discursive psychology and theories about reflexive modernisation. It shows how fathers orient towards intimacy...... this analysis and discussion, the article offers a way to understand the complexities of fathering in everyday life from the perspective of fathers....

  7. Integrating Reflexivity in Livelihoods Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prowse, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Much poverty and development research is not explicit about its methodology or philosophical foundations. Based on the extended case method of Burawoy and the epistemological standpoint of critical realism, this paper discusses a methodological approach for reflexive inductive livelihoods researc...... that overcomes the unproductive social science dualism of positivism and social constructivism. The approach is linked to a conceptual framework and a menu of research methods that can be sequenced and iterated in light of research questions....

  8. Cortical source of blink-related delta oscillations and their correlation with levels of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfiglio, Luca; Olcese, Umberto; Rossi, Bruno; Frisoli, Antonio; Arrighi, Pieranna; Greco, Giovanni; Carozzo, Simone; Andre, Paolo; Bergamasco, Massimo; Carboncini, Maria Chiara

    2013-09-01

    Recently, blink-related delta oscillations (delta BROs) have been observed in healthy subjects during spontaneous blinking at rest. Delta BROs have been linked with continuous gathering of information from the surrounding environment, which is classically attributed to the precuneus. Furthermore, fMRI studies have shown that precuneal activity is reduced or missing when consciousness is low or absent. We therefore hypothesized that the source of delta BROs in healthy subjects could be located in the precuneus and that delta BROs could be absent or reduced in patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). To test these hypotheses, electroencephalographic (EEG) activity at rest was recorded in 12 healthy controls and nine patients with DOC (four vegetative states, and five minimally conscious states). Three-second-lasting EEG epochs centred on each blink instance were analyzed in both time- (BROs) and frequency domains (event-related spectral perturbation or ERSP and intertrial coherence or ITC). Cortical sources of the maximum blink-related delta power, corresponding to the positive peak of the delta BROs, were estimated by standardized Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography. In control subjects, as expected, the source of delta BROs was located in the precuneus, whereas in DOC patients, delta BROs were not recognizable and no precuneal localization was possible. Furthermore, we observed a direct relationship between spectral indexes and levels of cognitive functioning in all subjects participating in the study. This reinforces the hypothesis that delta BROs reflect neural processes linked with awareness of the self and of the environment. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley company.

  9. Time to see the bigger picture: Individual differences in the attentional blink

    OpenAIRE

    Willems, Charlotte; Martens, Sander

    2015-01-01

    If two to-be-identified targets are presented in close temporal succession, identification for the second target is typically impaired. This attentional blink (AB) phenomenon has long been considered as a robust, universal cognitive limitation. However, more recent studies have demonstrated that AB task performance greatly differs between individuals, with some individuals even showing no AB in certain paradigms. Several studies have focused on these individual differences in an attempt to re...

  10. The Emotional Blink: Adult Age Differences in Visual Attention to Emotional Information

    OpenAIRE

    Langley, Linda K.; Rokke, Paul D.; Stark, Atiana C.; Saville, Alyson L.; Allen, Jaryn L.; Bagne, Angela G.

    2008-01-01

    To assess age differences in attention-emotion interactions, younger adults (ages 18–33 yrs) and older adults (ages 60–80 yrs) identified target words in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) task. The second of two target words was neutral or emotional in content (positive in Experiment 1, negative in Experiment 2). In general, the ability to identify targets from a word stream declined with age. Age differences specific to the attentional blink were greatly reduced when baseline detecti...

  11. Painful faces-induced attentional blink modulated by top-down and bottom-up mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Pain-related stimuli can capture attention in an automatic (bottom-up) or intentional (top-down) fashion. Previous studies have examined attentional capture by pain-related information using spatial attention paradigms that involve mainly a bottom-up mechanism. In the current study, we investigated the pain information–induced attentional blink (AB) using a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) task, and compared the effects of task-irrelevant and task-relevant pain distractors. Relationshi...

  12. Painful faces-induced attentional blink modulated by top–down and bottom–up mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Pain-related stimuli can capture attention in an automatic (bottom–up) or intentional (top–down) fashion. Previous studies have examined attentional capture by pain-related information using spatial attention paradigms that involve mainly a bottom–up mechanism. In the current study, we investigated the pain information-induced attentional blink (AB) using a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) task, and compared the effects of task-irrelevant and task-relevant pain distractors. Relationshi...

  13. Strain-induced effects in colloidal quantum dots: lifetime measurements and blinking statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veilleux, V; Lachance-Quirion, D; Landry, D B; Allen, C Ni [Centre d' optique, photonique et laser (COPL), 2375 rue de la Terrasse, Universite Laval, QC, G1V 0A6 (Canada); Dore, K [Centre de Recherche Universite Laval Robert-Giffard (CRULRG), 2601, de la Canardiere, QC, G1J 2G3 (Canada); Charette, P G, E-mail: claudine.allen@phy.ulaval.ca [Centre d' optique, photonique et laser (COPL), Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, J1K 2R1 (Canada)

    2010-04-02

    A series of samples of CdSe/ Cd{sub x}Zn{sub 1-x}S core/shell quantum dots have been synthesized in order to measure the influence of lattice-mismatch-induced strain on the photoluminescence (PL) and blinking behaviour. The PL spectra show a significant variation of the fluorescence wavelength even though the colloidal quantum dots (cQDs) are similar in size. The PL excitation spectra show a gradual splitting of the first exciton level as the proportion of Zn is increased in the shell and as the shell grows. On the other hand, blinking studies clearly demonstrate a significant dependence on the amount of Zn present in the shell. Distributions of on and off times go from the usual power-law distributions to power-law distributions with exponential cut-offs. These cut-offs become increasingly pronounced as the proportion of Zn increases. We interpret these results in the framework of diffusion-controlled electron transfer. Exciton relaxation lifetime measurements strongly suggest that lattice mismatch is responsible for a greater number of defects in core/shell cQDs. Therefore, strain and lattice mismatch are shown to be parameters of significant importance for the electronic structure of nanocrystals, influencing the photoluminescence, exciton relaxation lifetime and blinking behaviour.

  14. Does Repeated Ticking Maintain Tic Behavior? An Experimental Study of Eye Blinking in Healthy Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. V. Beetsma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tics in Tourette Syndrome (TS are often preceded by 'premonitory urges': annoying feelings or bodily sensations. We hypothesized that, by reducing annoyance of premonitory urges, tic behaviour may be reinforced. In a 2X2 experimental design in healthy participants, we studied the effects of premonitory urges (operationalized as air puffs on the eye and tic behaviour (deliberate eye blinking after a puff or a sound on changes in subjective evaluation of air puffs, and EMG responses on the m. orbicularis oculi. The experimental group with air puffs+ blinking experienced a decrease in subjective annoyance of the air puff, but habituation of the EMG response was blocked and length of EMG response increased. In the control groups (air puffs without instruction to blink, no air puffs, these effects were absent. When extrapolating to the situation in TS patients, these findings suggest that performance of tics is reinforced by reducing the subjective annoyance of premonitory urges, while simultaneously preventing habituation or even inducing sensitisation of the physiological motor response.

  15. Emotional modulation of the attentional blink and the relation to interpersonal reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp eKanske

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The extent of the attentional blink effect on detection rates in rapid serial visual presentations is modulated by the emotionality of the stimuli. Emotionally salient stimuli are detected more often, even if presented in the attentional blink period, and elicit an enlarged P3 response, which has been interpreted as enhanced consolidation. This effect correlates with individual differences in trait affectivity such as anxiety or dysphoria. Here, we ask if it is also related to the capacity to detect emotions in others, i.e. to interpersonal social traits. We therefore presented emotional and neutral images depicting social scenes as targets in an attentional blink design and measured detection rates and event-related potentials. In addition, we recorded self-reports of empathy as measured by the Interpersonal Reactivity Index. The results show enhanced performance for emotional stimuli and increased P3 amplitudes, which correlated with individual differences in empathy. The data suggest that self-reported empathy goes along with enhanced processing of emotion in social stimuli, even under stimulus conditions that are suboptimal for conscious target detection.

  16. Relieving the attentional blink in the amblyopic brain with video games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Roger W; Ngo, Charlie V; Levi, Dennis M

    2015-01-01

    Video game play induces a generalized recovery of a range of spatial visual functions in the amblyopic brain. Here we ask whether video game play also alters temporal processing in the amblyopic brain. When visual targets are presented in rapid succession, correct identification of the first target (T1) can interfere with identification of the second (T2). This is known as the "attentional blink". We measured the attentional blink in each eye of adults with amblyopia before and after 40 hours of active video game play, using a rapid serial visual presentation technique. After videogame play, we observed a ~40% reduction in the attentional blink (identifying T2 200 ms after T1) seen through the amblyopic eye and this improvement in performance transferred substantially to the untrained fellow sound eye. Our experiments show that the enhanced performance cannot be simply explained by eye patching alone, or to improved visual acuity, but is specific to videogame experience. Thus, videogame training might have important therapeutic applications for amblyopia and other visual brain disorders.

  17. Human otolith-ocular reflexes during off-vertical axis rotation: effect of frequency on tilt-translation ambiguity and motion sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Scott J.; Paloski, W. H. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how the modulation of tilt and translation otolith-ocular responses during constant velocity off-vertical axis rotation varies as a function of stimulus frequency. Eighteen human subjects were rotated in darkness about their longitudinal axis 30 degrees off-vertical at stimulus frequencies between 0.05 and 0.8 Hz. The modulation of torsion decreased while the modulation of horizontal slow phase velocity (SPV) increased with increasing frequency. It is inferred that the ambiguity of otolith afferent information is greatest in the frequency region where tilt (torsion) and translational (horizontal SPV) otolith-ocular responses crossover. It is postulated that the previously demonstrated peak in motion sickness susceptibility during linear accelerations around 0.3 Hz is the result of frequency segregation of ambiguous otolith information being inadequate to distinguish between tilt and translation.

  18. Cuidado humanizado em terapia intensiva: um estudo reflexivo Cuidado humanizado en terapia intensiva: un estudio reflexivo Humanized care in intensive therapy: a reflexive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joselany Áfio Caetano

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se neste estudo conhecer o significado da assistência humanizada prestada a pacientes em tratamento intensivo sob a ótica de dezessete profissionais de saúde que trabalhavam na Unidade de Terapia Intensiva de um hospital filantrópico situado na região metropolitana da cidade de Sobral - CE, Brasil. Para a coleta de dados, utilizou-se um instrumento contendo a seguinte pergunta: Qual o significado da humanização da assistência para você? Dos dados emergiram três categorias de análise: conforto emocional; conforto físico e compromisso profissional, cuja análise revela a melhoria da assistência não configurada nos avanços da tecnologia, mas, em valores pessoais, na compreensão do verdadeiro significado do cuidado, o direcionamento da assistência ao conforto físico e emocional associado ao cuidado que visa amenizar a dor; cuidar com compromisso aplicando a prática humanística. Conclui-se que o processo de cuidar humanístico leva os profissionais a refletir acerca das suas posturas pessoais e acadêmicas, fortalecendo sempre o trabalho em equipe.Se objetivó en este estudio conocer el significado de la asistencia ofrecida a los pacientes en tratamiento intensivo sobre la óptica de los diecisiete profesionales de salud que trabajó en la Unidad de la Terapia Intensiva de un hospital filantrópico situado en la región próxima de la ciudad de Sobral - Ceará, Brasil. Para la colecta de datos se utilizó una herramienta conteniendo la siguiente pregunta: ¿Cuál es el significado de la humanización de asistencia para usted? Los datos recogidos, emergieron en tres categorías de análisis: conforto emocional; conforto físico y compromiso profesional, el análisis señaló la mejoría de la asistencia no configurada en los avances de la tecnología, todavía en valores personales y la comprensión del verdadero significado de la atención y en el direccionamiento de la asistencia al conforto físico y emocional asociado

  19. Amplification of background EMG activity affects the interpretation of H-reflex gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahayori, Behdad; Kitano, Koichi; Hong, Siang L; Koceja, David M

    2010-12-01

    In many H-reflex studies, the modulation of the H-reflex is usually compared relative to the normal EMG activity within the muscle. Such comparisons enable the investigators to infer whether the change in the amplitude of the H-reflex was independent of normally occurring muscle activity. This interpretation of the H-reflex is regarded as H-reflex gain, a popular dependent variable in human H-reflex studies. However, in many studies to date, the muscle activity level has been determined from the same EMG signal from which the H-reflex is recorded. This leads to an important methodological consideration: measuring the ongoing normal EMG activity from the same signal might result in an inaccurate measurement, since this EMG signal will need to be minimally amplified to capture the synchronous volley of the H-reflex amplitude. In this study we examined this possibility and found that comparing the EMG activity level from the seated position to standing position yields different results (on average 8.03% in the measurement of the increase of muscle activity). This difference was both dependent on the task and also on the EMG instrumentation used. To solve this problem we suggest the bifurcation of the EMG signal from the recording electrodes with differential amplification of the signal. With this method, both the naturally occurring muscle activity and the H-reflex signal are collected from the same area of the muscle and a more accurate measurement of the H-reflex gain will be yielded.

  20. O cidadão com transtorno psíquico: reflexões sobre os direitos humanos e os direitos do paciente Citizen with psychological distraction: reflections about human rights and the patient's rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cássia Chamma

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Considerando, as transformações sócio-político-econômicas que vem ocorrendo, a construção da história da Enfermagem Psiquiátrica, bem como as modificações no ensino de enfermagem pela nova Lei de Diretrizes e Bases e, ainda, a preocupação existente por parte de algumas facções no que se refere ao cumprimento e ao respeito aos Direitos Humanos e Direitos do Paciente, este estudo propõe reflexões sobre as condutas éticas de profissionais de enfermagem em relação ao paciente internado em hospital psiquiátrico, ressaltando o respeito pela dignidade humana. A discussão se dá à luz da Cartilha dos Direitos do Paciente, proposta pela Secretaria de Estado da Saúde do Governo do Estado de São Paulo e da Declaração Universal dos Direitos Humanos. Dá destaque à responsabilidade da área do ensino no tocante ao processo de mobilização para a transformação de preconceitos sobre a loucura, buscando a prática efetiva regida pelos princípios de igualdade, democracia, liberdade e exercício da cidadania.Considering the social, political and economical changes such as occured during the construction of the Psychiatric Nursing History, as well as the ongoing modifications in teaching nursing due the new Law for Directories and Bases, and taking also into account the existing preoccupation of some sections as far as the compliance with the Human Rights and Patient Rights are concerned, the present study proposes some reflections about the ethical conducts by nursing professionals in relation to patients interned in Psychiatric Hospitals, giving emphasis to the aspects related to the human dignity. The discussion is based in the Directory of the Rights of Patients proposed by the Secretary of Health of the Government of the State of Seto Paulo, as well as the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The study gives furthermore emphasis to the responsability in the area of teaching as far as the mobilization process for transforming

  1. Reflex control of the spine and posture: a review of the literature from a chiropractic perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morningstar, Mark W; Pettibon, Burl R; Schlappi, Heidi; Schlappi, Mark; Ireland, Trevor V

    2005-01-01

    Objective This review details the anatomy and interactions of the postural and somatosensory reflexes. We attempt to identify the important role the nervous system plays in maintaining reflex control of the spine and posture. We also review, illustrate, and discuss how the human vertebral column develops, functions, and adapts to Earth's gravity in an upright position. We identify functional characteristics of the postural reflexes by reporting previous observations of subjects during periods of microgravity or weightlessness. Background Historically, chiropractic has centered around the concept that the nervous system controls and regulates all other bodily systems; and that disruption to normal nervous system function can contribute to a wide variety of common ailments. Surprisingly, the chiropractic literature has paid relatively little attention to the importance of neurological regulation of static upright human posture. With so much information available on how posture may affect health and function, we felt it important to review the neuroanatomical structures and pathways responsible for maintaining the spine and posture. Maintenance of static upright posture is regulated by the nervous system through the various postural reflexes. Hence, from a chiropractic standpoint, it is clinically beneficial to understand how the individual postural reflexes work, as it may explain some of the clinical presentations seen in chiropractic practice. Method We performed a manual search for available relevant textbooks, and a computer search of the MEDLINE, MANTIS, and Index to Chiropractic Literature databases from 1970 to present, using the following key words and phrases: "posture," "ocular," "vestibular," "cervical facet joint," "afferent," "vestibulocollic," "cervicocollic," "postural reflexes," "spaceflight," "microgravity," "weightlessness," "gravity," "posture," and "postural." Studies were selected if they specifically tested any or all of the postural reflexes

  2. Reflex control of the spine and posture: a review of the literature from a chiropractic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlappi Mark

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective This review details the anatomy and interactions of the postural and somatosensory reflexes. We attempt to identify the important role the nervous system plays in maintaining reflex control of the spine and posture. We also review, illustrate, and discuss how the human vertebral column develops, functions, and adapts to Earth's gravity in an upright position. We identify functional characteristics of the postural reflexes by reporting previous observations of subjects during periods of microgravity or weightlessness. Background Historically, chiropractic has centered around the concept that the nervous system controls and regulates all other bodily systems; and that disruption to normal nervous system function can contribute to a wide variety of common ailments. Surprisingly, the chiropractic literature has paid relatively little attention to the importance of neurological regulation of static upright human posture. With so much information available on how posture may affect health and function, we felt it important to review the neuroanatomical structures and pathways responsible for maintaining the spine and posture. Maintenance of static upright posture is regulated by the nervous system through the various postural reflexes. Hence, from a chiropractic standpoint, it is clinically beneficial to understand how the individual postural reflexes work, as it may explain some of the clinical presentations seen in chiropractic practice. Method We performed a manual search for available relevant textbooks, and a computer search of the MEDLINE, MANTIS, and Index to Chiropractic Literature databases from 1970 to present, using the following key words and phrases: "posture," "ocular," "vestibular," "cervical facet joint," "afferent," "vestibulocollic," "cervicocollic," "postural reflexes," "spaceflight," "microgravity," "weightlessness," "gravity," "posture," and "postural." Studies were selected if they specifically tested any or

  3. Point-Counterpoint: Cervical Cancer Screening Should Be Done by Primary Human Papillomavirus Testing with Genotyping and Reflex Cytology for Women over the Age of 25 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoler, Mark H; Austin, R Marshall; Zhao, Chengquan

    2015-09-01

    Screening for cervical cancer with cytology testing has been very effective in reducing cervical cancer in the United States. For decades, the approach was an annual Pap test. In 2000, the Hybrid Capture 2 human papillomavirus (HPV) test was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for screening women who have atypical squamous cells of underdetermined significance (ASCUS) detected by Pap test to determine the need for colposcopy. In 2003, the FDA approved expanding the use of the test to include screening performed in conjunction with a Pap test for women over the age of 30 years, referred to as "cotesting." Cotesting allows women to extend the testing interval to 3 years if both tests have negative results. In April of 2014, the FDA approved the use of an HPV test (the cobas HPV test) for primary cervical cancer screening for women over the age of 25 years, without the need for a concomitant Pap test. The approval recommended either colposcopy or a Pap test for patients with specific high-risk HPV types detected by the HPV test. This was based on the results of the ATHENA trial, which included more than 40,000 women. Reaction to this decision has been mixed. Supporters point to the fact that the primary-screening algorithm found more disease (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 3 or worse [CIN3+]) and also found it earlier than did cytology or cotesting. Moreover, the positive predictive value and positive-likelihood ratio of the primary-screening algorithm were higher than those of cytology. Opponents of the decision prefer cotesting, as this approach detects more disease than the HPV test alone. In addition, the performance of this new algorithm has not been assessed in routine clinical use. Professional organizations will need to develop guidelines that incorporate this testing algorithm. In this Point-Counterpoint, Dr. Stoler explains why he favors the primary-screening algorithm, while Drs. Austin and Zhao explain why they prefer the cotesting

  4. Neural reflexes in inflammation and immunity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andersson, Ulf; Tracey, Kevin J

    2012-01-01

    .... Development of advanced neurophysiological and immunological techniques recently enabled the study of reflex neural circuits that maintain immunological homeostasis, and are essential for health in mammals...

  5. Reflexive Aero Structures for Enhanced Survivability Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) will develop an advanced reflexive structure technology system to increase the survivability of future systems constructed of...

  6. Reflexivity in Narratives on Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Helle Nordentoft; Olesen, Lektor Birgitte Ravn

    on Bakhtinian dialogic communication theory and discursive psychology to investigate the written practice narratives of 23 students on a Masters Degree Programme in Educational Studies, focusing on how the process of writing narratives accentuates reflexivity. Our findings indicate that the narratives invite...... a dialogic conception of practice as they entail a conceptual reframing of key elements in practice. In addition, the narratives expose a situational and relational, rather than normative, focus which allows for reflections on emotional and bodily experiences. In conclusion, we argue that practice narratives...

  7. Two ways to support reflexivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine; Knudsen, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    Management (MEM). MEM provides the participating managers with a new language that can give them a critical distance to the overload of expectations they meet at work and MEM teaches the participants to translate this new language into practice. The pedagogy used for this is labelled ‘experimental management......’. This requires participants to conduct experiments in their own organization, to reflect on and analyse their experiences with concepts from the curriculum. While the new language and the experimental teaching format are difficult, the participants learn a reflexive practice that can enable them to life up...

  8. Structural cure for reflex syncope?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulke, Neil; Eysenck, William; Badiani, Sveeta; Furniss, Stephen

    2016-01-20

    The ROX Coupler is a device that allows creation of a central arteriovenous anastomosis at the iliac level. The device has been shown to improve exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and is CE marked for the treatment of resistant and uncontrolled hypertension. Reflex syncope is a challenging clinical condition with limited proven therapeutic options. We describe the resolution of symptoms and tilt table response of a patient who underwent insertion of a ROX Coupler to treat hypertension, and also incidentally had pre-existing vasodepressor syncope.

  9. Non-blinking (Zn)CuInS/ZnS Quantum Dots Prepared by In Situ Interfacial Alloying Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aidi; Dong, Chaoqing; Li, Liang; Yin, Jinjin; Liu, Heng; Huang, Xiangyi; Ren, Jicun

    2015-10-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are very important optical nanomaterials with a wide range of potential applications. However, blinking behavior of single QD is an intrinsic drawback for some biological and photoelectric applications based on single-particle emission. Herein we present a rational strategy for fabrication of non-blinking (Zn)CuInS/ZnS QDs in organic phase through in situ interfacial alloying approach. This new strategy includes three steps: synthesis of CuInS QDs, eliminating the interior traps of QDs by forming graded (Zn)CuInS alloyed QDs, modifying the surface traps of QDs by introducing ZnS shells onto (Zn)CuInS QDs using alkylthiols as sulfur source and surface ligands. The suppressed blinking mechanism was mainly attributed to modifying QDs traps from interior to exterior via a step-by-step modification. Non-blinking QDs show high quantum yield, symmetric emission spectra and excellent crystallinity, and will enable applications from biology to optoelectronics that were previously hindered by blinking behavior of traditional QDs.

  10. The Moro reaction: More than a reflex, a ritualized behavior of nonverbal communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Pierre V; Matton, Florence; Lecuyer, Renaud; Lahaye, Willy

    2017-02-01

    To propose a phylogenetic significance to the Moro reflex which remains unexplained since its publication in 1918 because both hands are free at the end of the gesture. Among the 75 videos of healthy term newborns we have filmed in a research project on antenatal education to parenthood, we describe a sequence that clearly showed the successive movements of the Moro reflex and we report the occurrence of this reflex in the videos that were recorded from Time 0 of birth defined as the moment that lies between the birth of the thorax and the pelvis of the infant. The selected sequence showed the following succession of the newborn's actions: quick extension-adduction of both arms, the orientation of the body, head and eyes towards a human person, and full extension-abduction of both arms with spreading of the fingers, crying and a distressed face. There were 13 Moro reflexes between 2 and 14s from Time 0 of birth. We found a significant association between the occurrence of the Moro reflex and the placement of the newborn at birth in supine position on the mother's abdomen (p=0.002). The quick extension-adduction of both arms which started the sequence may be considered as a startle reflex controlled by the neural fear system and the arm extension-adduction which followed as a Moro reflex. The characteristics of all Moro reflexes were those of ritualization: amplitude, duration, stereotype of the gestures. This evolutionary process turns a physiological behavior, grasping in this case, to a non-verbal communicative behavior whose meaning is a request to be picked up in the arms. The gestures associated with the Moro reflex: crying and orientation of the body, head, and eyes towards a human person, are gestures of intention to communicate which support our hypothesis. The neural mechanism of the Moro reaction probably involves both the fear and the separation-distress systems. This paper proposes for the first time a phylogenetic significance to the Moro reflex: a

  11. Reflexive choice in Dutch and German

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Petra; Hoeks, John C. J.; Spenader, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Standard Dutch and German have two reflexive forms: a weak form ('zich' in Dutch and 'sich' in German) and a strong form ('zichzelf' in Dutch and 'sich selbst' in German). The choice between the two reflexive forms in Dutch has been explained by the selectional restrictions of the verb, distinguishi

  12. Reflexivity in Teams: A Measure and Correlates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Schippers (Michaéla); D.N. den Hartog (Deanne); P.L. Koopman (Paul)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractReflexivity -the extent to which teams reflect upon and modify their functioning- has been identified as a possible key factor in the effectiveness of work teams. The aim of the present study was to develop a questionnaire to measure (aspects of) reflexivity, with a focus on team reflect

  13. Reliability of the NINDS Myotatic Reflex Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvan, I; Mangone, C A; Werden, W; Bueri, J A; Estol, C J; Garcea, D O; Rey, R C; Sica, R E; Hallett, M; Bartko, J J

    1996-10-01

    The assessment of deep tendon reflexes is useful for localization and diagnosis of neurologic disorders, but only a few studies have evaluated their reliability. We assessed the reliability of four neurologists, instructed in two different countries, in using the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Myotatic Reflex Scale. To evaluate the role of training in using the scale, the neurologists randomly and blindly evaluated a total of 80 patients, 40 before and 40 after a training session. Inter- and intraobserver reliability were measured with kappa statistics. Our results showed substantial to near-perfect intraobserver reliability, and moderate-to-substantial interobserver reliability of the NINDS Myotatic Reflex Scale. The reproducibility was better for reflexes in the lower than in the upper extremities. Neither educational background nor the training session influenced the reliability of our results. The NINDS Myotatic Reflex Scale has sufficient reliability to be adopted as a universal scale.

  14. Eye blink artifact rejection in single-channel electroencephalographic signals by complete ensemble empirical mode decomposition and independent component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanoga, Suguru; Mitsukura, Yasue

    2015-01-01

    To study an eye blink artifact rejection scheme from single-channel electroencephalographic (EEG) signals has been now a major challenge in the field of EEG signal processing. High removal performance is still needed to more strictly investigate pattern of EEG features. This paper proposes a new eye blink artifact rejection scheme from single-channel EEG signals by combining complete ensemble empirical mode decomposition (CEEMD) and independent component analysis (ICA). We compare the separation performance of our proposed scheme with existing schemes (wavelet-ICA, EMD-ICA, and EEMD-ICA) though real-life data by using signal-to-noise ratio. As a result, CEEMD-ICA showed high performance (11.86 dB) than all other schemes (10.78, 10.59, and 11.30 dB) in the ability of eye blink artifact removal.

  15. Temporal correlation of blinking events in CdSe/ZnS and Si/SiO{sub 2} nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruhn, Benjamin, E-mail: b.bruhn@uva.nl [Materials and Nanophysics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 164 40 Kista (Sweden); Van der Waals-Zeeman Institute, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); Qejvanaj, Fatjon [Materials and Nanophysics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 164 40 Kista (Sweden); Gregorkiewicz, Tom [Van der Waals-Zeeman Institute, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); Linnros, Jan [Materials and Nanophysics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 164 40 Kista (Sweden)

    2014-11-15

    Well passivated single Si/SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles obey mono-exponential blinking statistics, whereas CdSe/ZnS quantum dots follow an apparent (truncated) power-law. Log-normal distributions are found to describe the interval length histograms at least as well as power-laws, while at the same time being more physically feasible and significantly easing the determination of the exponential cutoff in the ON-time distribution. The correlation of an ON- (OFF-)interval with its temporally displaced ON (OFF) neighbors, as well as that of intermixed intervals (ON with OFF and OFF with ON neighbors) has been studied. As expected from purely random processes, the correlation coefficients for events in silicon nanocrystals equal zero, whereas positive correlations between the pure and negative correlations between the mixed states in CdSe quantum dots hint at a switching process between two distinct blinking regimes that are slower than the blinking itself.

  16. The anti-fatigue driving system design based on the eye blink detect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuyu; Song, Xin; Zhang, Li; Yu, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Traffic accident is one of the severe social problems in the world, but the appraisal and prevention of the fatigue driving is still a difficult problem that can not be solved. This paper is to study the results of fatigue driving and the existing antifatigue driving products, collecting brain wave with the TGAM (ThinkGear AM) Brain Wave Sensor Chip. We analyze the collected waveform based on eye blink detect algorithm to work out current situation of the driver. According to the analysis results, Sound Module and controllable speed car will make a series of feedback. Finally, an effective Anti- Fatigue Driving System is designed based on all above.

  17. Lack of trigemino-cervical reflexes in progressive supranuclear palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolo, Michelangelo; Serrao, Mariano; Perrotta, Armando; Tassorelli, Cristina; Sandrini, Giorgio; Pierelli, Francesco

    2008-07-30

    Trigemino-cervical reflexes (TCRs) are multisynaptic neck muscle withdrawal responses that are clearly identifiable in humans. Mediated by neural circuits at brainstem level, these reflex responses have been found to be significantly impaired in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), and it has been hypothesized that a degeneration of brainstem neural structures could play a role in these abnormalities. Because extensive neuronal degeneration at brainstem level has been demonstrated in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), in this pilot study we evaluated the TCR responses in 12 subjects with PSP, and in 16 healthy controls. The TCRs were absent in 11 out of the 12 PSP patients while clear responses were evoked in all the healthy subjects. These findings indicate that PSP patients are unable to react to the painful stimuli to the face, suggesting a generalized impairment of the brainstem circuits mediating TCRs.

  18. Pharmacology of human experimental anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graeff, F G; Parente, A; Del-Ben, C M; Guimarães, F S

    2003-04-01

    This review covers the effect of drugs affecting anxiety using four psychological procedures for inducing experimental anxiety applied to healthy volunteers and patients with anxiety disorders. The first is aversive conditioning of the skin conductance responses to tones. The second is simulated public speaking, which consists of speaking in front of a video camera, with anxiety being measured with psychometric scales. The third is the Stroop Color-Word test, in which words naming colors are painted in the same or in a different shade, the incongruence generating a cognitive conflict. The last test is a human version of a thoroughly studied animal model of anxiety, fear-potentiated startle, in which the eye-blink reflex to a loud noise is recorded. The evidence reviewed led to the conclusion that the aversive conditioning and potentiated startle tests are based on classical conditioning of anticipatory anxiety. Their sensitivity to benzodiazepine anxiolytics suggests that these models generate an emotional state related to generalized anxiety disorder. On the other hand, the increase in anxiety determined by simulated public speaking is resistant to benzodiazepines and sensitive to drugs affecting serotonergic neurotransmission. This pharmacological profile, together with epidemiological evidence indicating its widespread prevalence, suggests that the emotional state generated by public speaking represents a species-specific response that may be related to social phobia and panic disorder. Because of scant pharmacological data, the status of the Stroop Color-Word test remains uncertain. In spite of ethical and economic constraints, human experimental anxiety constitutes a valuable tool for the study of the pathophysiology of anxiety disorders.

  19. Pharmacology of human experimental anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.G. Graeff

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available This review covers the effect of drugs affecting anxiety using four psychological procedures for inducing experimental anxiety applied to healthy volunteers and patients with anxiety disorders. The first is aversive conditioning of the skin conductance responses to tones. The second is simulated public speaking, which consists of speaking in front of a video camera, with anxiety being measured with psychometric scales. The third is the Stroop Color-Word test, in which words naming colors are painted in the same or in a different shade, the incongruence generating a cognitive conflict. The last test is a human version of a thoroughly studied animal model of anxiety, fear-potentiated startle, in which the eye-blink reflex to a loud noise is recorded. The evidence reviewed led to the conclusion that the aversive conditioning and potentiated startle tests are based on classical conditioning of anticipatory anxiety. Their sensitivity to benzodiazepine anxiolytics suggests that these models generate an emotional state related to generalized anxiety disorder. On the other hand, the increase in anxiety determined by simulated public speaking is resistant to benzodiazepines and sensitive to drugs affecting serotonergic neurotransmission. This pharmacological profile, together with epidemiological evidence indicating its widespread prevalence, suggests that the emotional state generated by public speaking represents a species-specific response that may be related to social phobia and panic disorder. Because of scant pharmacological data, the status of the Stroop Color-Word test remains uncertain. In spite of ethical and economic constraints, human experimental anxiety constitutes a valuable tool for the study of the pathophysiology of anxiety disorders.

  20. [Urinary urgency and reflex incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madersbacher, H

    1991-07-01

    Urge and reflex incontinence are caused by detrusor dysfunction:urgency may be due to hyperactivity or hypersensitivity of the bladder. Neurogenic hyperactivity of the detrusor is called detrusor hyperreflexia: the neurogenic uninhibited bladder is caused by incomplete, and the so-called reflex bladder by complete, suprasacral lesions. The pathophysiology of symptomatic and idiopathic detrusor hyperactivity and the therapeutic armentarium are described. Bladder drill together with biofeedback and pharmacotherapy with spasmolytic drugs - several potent spasmolytic drugs with different modes of action are available - are the basis of treatment for hyperactivity and hypersensitivity of the detrusor. An alternative is electrostimulation: stimulation of the afferents of the pudendal nerve, via the pelvic floor (anal, vaginal), percutaneously (dorsal nerve of the penis, clitoric nerve) or by the implantation of electrodes results in inhibition of the detrusor. Most (80-90%) patients can be treated successfully by conservative means. Operative measurements comprise bladder denervation and bladder augmentation. The results of bladder denervation by transtrigonal phenolization of the pelvic plexus are highly controversial. In patients with uncontrollable hyperactivity of the detrusor, augmentation of the bladder (e.g. clam ileocystoplasty) is the method of choice, while for those with uncontrollable hypersensitivity of the detrusor, cystectomy followed by bladder substitution should be performed as a last resort. Treatment for urinary incontinence due to detrusor hyperreflexia must be selected bearing in mind that bladder emptying is inadequate, in most cases because of dyssynergia between detrusor and external sphincter. Therapy is basically aimed at transforming hyperreflexia of the detrusor into hyporeflexia, primarily by potent spasmolytic drugs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Cutaneous reflex modulation and self-induced reflex attenuation in cerebellar patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogkamer, Wouter; Van Calenbergh, Frank; Swinnen, Stephan P; Duysens, Jacques

    2015-02-01

    Modulation of cutaneous reflexes is important in the neural control of walking, yet knowledge about underlying neural pathways is still incomplete. Recent studies have suggested that the cerebellum is involved. Here we evaluated the possible roles of the cerebellum in cutaneous reflex modulation and in attenuation of self-induced reflexes. First we checked whether leg muscle activity during walking was similar in patients with focal cerebellar lesions and in healthy control subjects. We then recorded cutaneous reflex activity in leg muscles during walking. Additionally, we compared reflexes after standard (computer triggered) stimuli with reflexes after self-induced stimuli for both groups. Biceps femoris and gastrocnemius medialis muscle activity was increased in the patient group compared with the control subjects, suggesting a coactivation strategy to reduce instability of gait. Cutaneous reflex modulation was similar between healthy control subjects and cerebellar patients, but the latter appeared less able to attenuate reflexes to self-induced stimuli. This suggests that the cerebellum is not primarily involved in cutaneous reflex modulation but that it could act in attenuation of self-induced reflex responses. The latter role in locomotion would be consistent with the common view that the cerebellum predicts sensory consequences of movement. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Reflexivity and technology in adult learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Selwyn

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available It is argued by influential commentators such as Ulrich Beck and Scott Lash that we now live in a ‘reflexively modern' age. People are seen to now be free of the structures of modern society and driven instead by individualised opportunities to reflexively engage with their fast-changing social worlds and identities. Taking the notion of reflexive modernisation as its starting point, this paper explores the roles that information technologies (ITs may play in supporting adults' reflexive judgements about, and reflexive engagements with, education and learning. Through an analysis of interview data with 100 adults in the UK the paper finds that whilst a minority of interviewees were using ITs to support and inform reflexive engagementwith learning, the majority of individuals relayed little sign of technology-supported reflexivity when it came to their (nonengagement with education. For most people ITs were found, at best, to reinforce pre-established tendencies to ‘drift' through the formal education system. The paper concludes by considering the implications of these findings for ongoing efforts in developed countries to establish technology-supported ‘learning societies'.

  3. Semiotic scaffolding of the social self in reflexivity and friendship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emmeche, Claus

    2015-01-01

    scaffolding is a multi-level phenomenon. Focusing upon levels of semiosis specific to humans, the formation of the personal self and the role of friendship and similar interpersonal relations in this process is explored through Aristotle’s classical idea of the friend as ‘another self’, and sociologist...... Margaret Archer’s empirical and theoretical work on the interplay between individual subjectivity, social structure and interpersonal relations in a dynamics of human agency. It is shown that although processes of reflexivity and friendship can indeed be seen as instances of semiotic scaffolding...

  4. Semiotic scaffolding of the social self in reflexivity and friendship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emmeche, Claus

    2015-01-01

    The individual and social formation of a human self, from its emergence in early childhood through adolescence to adult life, has been described within philosophy, psychology and sociology as a product of developmental and social processes mediating a linguistic and social world. Semiotic...... Margaret Archer’s empirical and theoretical work on the interplay between individual subjectivity, social structure and interpersonal relations in a dynamics of human agency. It is shown that although processes of reflexivity and friendship can indeed be seen as instances of semiotic scaffolding...

  5. Impact of air temperature, relative humidity, air movement and pollution on eye blinking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Lyubenova, Velina S.; Skwarczynski, Mariusz;

    2011-01-01

    The effect of indoor air temperature, relative humidity, velocity and pollution on occupants’ eye blink frequency (BF) was examined. In total sixty subjects participated in eight 4 hour experiments without and with facially applied air movement under individual control of the subjects. Air movement...... of either polluted room air supplied isothermally or clean and cool air was used. Eye blinking video record for the last 15 min of each exposure were analysed. The increase of the room air temperature and relative humidity from 23 °C and 40% to 26 °C and 70% or to 28 °C and 70% decreased the BF....... At temperature of 26 °C and relative humidity of 70% facially applied flow of polluted room air didn’t have significant impact on BF in comparison without air movement. The increase of BF due to decrease of temperature and humidity and increase of velocity may be compensated due to the increase in air cleanness....

  6. Measurement of the hydrodynamic radius of quantum dots by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy excluding blinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Thomaz, A A; Almeida, D B; Pelegati, V B; Carvalho, H F; Cesar, C L

    2015-03-19

    One of the most important properties of quantum dots (QDs) is their size. Their size will determine optical properties and in a colloidal medium their range of interaction. The most common techniques used to measure QD size are transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction. However, these techniques demand the sample to be dried and under a vacuum. This way any hydrodynamic information is excluded and the preparation process may alter even the size of the QDs. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is an optical technique with single molecule sensitivity capable of extracting the hydrodynamic radius (HR) of the QDs. The main drawback of FCS is the blinking phenomenon that alters the correlation function implicating in a QD apparent size smaller than it really is. In this work, we developed a method to exclude blinking of the FCS and measured the HR of colloidal QDs. We compared our results with TEM images, and the HR obtained by FCS is higher than the radius measured by TEM. We attribute this difference to the cap layer of the QD that cannot be seen in the TEM images.

  7. Reaching back: the relative strength of the retroactive emotional attentional blink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ní Choisdealbha, Áine; Piech, Richard M.; Fuller, John K.; Zald, David H.

    2017-01-01

    Visual stimuli with emotional content appearing in close temporal proximity either before or after a target stimulus can hinder conscious perceptual processing of the target via an emotional attentional blink (EAB). This occurs for targets that appear after the emotional stimulus (forward EAB) and for those appearing before the emotional stimulus (retroactive EAB). Additionally, the traditional attentional blink (AB) occurs because detection of any target hinders detection of a subsequent target. The present study investigated the relations between these different attentional processes. Rapid sequences of landscape images were presented to thirty-one male participants with occasional landscape targets (rotated images). For the forward EAB, emotional or neutral distractor images of people were presented before the target; for the retroactive EAB, such images were also targets and presented after the landscape target. In the latter case, this design allowed investigation of the AB as well. Erotic and gory images caused more EABs than neutral images, but there were no differential effects on the AB. This pattern is striking because while using different target categories (rotated landscapes, people) appears to have eliminated the AB, the retroactive EAB still occurred, offering additional evidence for the power of emotional stimuli over conscious attention. PMID:28255172

  8. The Multiple Faces of Reflexive Research Designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl H. Müller

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Reflexive research can be grouped into five clusters with circular relations between two elements x ↔ x, namely circular relations between observers, between scientific building blocks like concepts, theories or models, between systemic levels, between rules and rule systems or as circular relations or x ↔ y between these four components. By far the most important cluster is the second cluster which becomes reflexive through a re-entry operation RE into a scientific element x and which establishes its circular formation as x(x. Many of the research problems in these five clusters in reflexivity research are still unexplored and pose grand challenges for future research.

  9. Ranges of bimodule projections and reflexivity

    CERN Document Server

    Eleftherakis, G K

    2011-01-01

    We develop a general framework for reflexivity in dual Banach spaces, motivated by the question of when the weak* closed linear span of two reflexive masa-bimodules is automatically reflexive. We establish an affirmative answer to this question in a number of cases by examining two new classes of masa-bimodules, defined in terms of ranges of masa-bimodule projections. We give a number of corollaries of our results concerning operator and spectral synthesis, and show that the classes of masa-bimodules we study are operator synthetic if and only if they are strong operator Ditkin.

  10. △'-Reflexive Modules and Cogen(P)-Linear Compactness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Xin

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce the notion of △'-reflexive modules. We investigate the reflexive modules with respect to a partial cotilting (bi)module and obtain a connection between △'-reflexive modules and Cogen(P)-linearly compact modules. The main results generalize the results on reflexive modules with respect to a cotilting bimodule.

  11. Abraham Guz memorial: Still unresolved hypotheses: Lung reflexes and perceptions of breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Mark I M

    2015-10-01

    This article constitutes a review of the studies performed by the group of the late A. Guz and other authors on the subjects of lung reflexes and perceptions of respiration. The experimental data suggest that the lung inflation and deflation reflexes are present in man, mediated by large myelinated afferent nerve fibres in the vagus nerves, but that the inflation reflex is weaker than in animals, possibly due to central neuronal inhibition. The authors of animal results on the deflation reflex differ as to the afferent fibres involved in the vagi, but it is argued, on the basis of the data, that the preferred hypothesis is that increased activity of the large myelinated mediates the inflation reflex, and decreased activity in these same fibres mediates the deflation reflex. Smaller myelinated fibres are thought to mediate cough and increased breathing in response to airway irritation, while small non-myelinated C fibres mediate hyperpnoea in response to parenchymal congestion and various disease states. The unpleasant sensation at the break point of breath-holding is not chemically mediated but may depend on a complex response involving vagal afferent, phrenic efferent and phrenic afferent pathways. Other experiments in humans on perception of various unpleasant respiratory sensations are discussed with unclear conclusions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Long-latency reflexes account for limb biomechanics through several supraspinal pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Louis Kurtzer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate control of body posture is enforced by a multitude of corrective actions operating over a range of time scales. The earliest correction is the short-latency reflex which occurs between 20-45 ms following a sudden displacement of the limb and is generated entirely by spinal circuits. In contrast, voluntary reactions are generated by a highly distributed network but at a significantly longer delay after stimulus onset (greater than 100 ms. Between these two epochs is the long-latency reflex (around 50-100 ms which but acts more rapidly than of voluntary reactions but shares some supraspinal pathways and functional capabilities. In particular, the long-latency reflex accounts for the arm’s biomechanical properties rather than only responding to local muscle stretch like the short-latency reflex. This paper will review how the long-latency reflex accounts for the arm’s biomechanical properties and the supraspinal pathways supporting this ability. Relevant experimental paradigms include clinical studies, non-invasive brain stimulation, neural recordings in monkeys, and human behavioral studies. The sum of this effort indicates that primary motor cortex and reticular formation contribute to the the long-latency reflex either by generating or scaling its structured response appropriate for the arm’s biomechanics whereas the cerebellum scales the magnitude of the feedback response. Additional putative pathways are discussed as well as potential research lines.

  13. Considering distortion product otoacoustic emission fine structure in measurements of the medial olivocochlear reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdala, Carolina; Mishra, Srikanta K; Williams, Tracy L

    2009-03-01

    In humans, when the medial olivocochlear (MOC) pathway is activated by noise in the opposite ear, changes in distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) level, i.e., the MOC reflex, can be recorded in the test ear. Recent evidence suggests that DPOAE frequency influences the direction (suppression/enhancement) of the reflex. In this study, DPOAEs were recorded at fine frequency intervals from 500 to 2500 Hz, with and without contralateral acoustic stimulation (CAS) in a group of 15 adults. The MOC reflex was calculated only at DPOAE frequencies corresponding to peaks in the fine structure. Additionally, inverse fast-Fourier transform was conducted to evaluate MOC effects on individual DPOAE components. Results show the following: (1) When considering peaks only, the mean MOC reflex was -2.05 dB and 97% of observations reflected suppression, (2) CAS reduced distortion characteristic frequency component levels more than overlap component levels, and (3) CAS produced an upward shift in fine structure peak frequency. Results indicate that when the MOC reflex is recorded at DPOAE frequencies corresponding to fine structure maxima (i.e., when DPOAE components are constructive and in phase), suppression is reliably observed and level enhancement, which probably reflects component mixing in the ear canal rather than strength of the MOC reflex, is eliminated.

  14. Under which conditions does T1 difficulty affect T2 performance in the attentional blink?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Simon; Petersen, Anders; Andersen, Tobias

    When two visual targets (T1 & T2) are presented in rapid succession, performance of T2 suffers up to 900 ms. One theory of this attentional blink (Raymond, Shapiro, & Arnell, 1992) propose that T1 and T2 compete for limited processing resources (Chun & Potter, 1995), and predict that prolonging...

  15. On the Labile Memory Buffer in the Attentional Blink: Masking the T2 Representation by Onset Transients Mediates the AB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannati, Ali; Spalek, Thomas M.; Di Lollo, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Report of a second target (T2) is impaired when presented within 500 ms of the first (T1). This attentional blink (AB) is known to cause a delay in T2 processing during which T2 must be stored in a labile memory buffer. We explored the buffer's characteristics using different types of masks after T2. These characteristics were inferred by…

  16. Closing one's eyes to reality: evidence for a dopaminergic basis of psychoticism from spontaneous eye blink rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.S. Colzato; H.A. Slagter; W.P.M. van den Wildenberg; B. Hommel

    2009-01-01

    We tested the idea that Psychoticism, a major personality dimension, is rooted in individual differences in dopamine functioning. To this end, we related the spontaneous eye blink rate (EBR), a marker of striatal dopaminergic activity, to scores in the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire Revised Short

  17. On the Labile Memory Buffer in the Attentional Blink: Masking the T2 Representation by Onset Transients Mediates the AB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannati, Ali; Spalek, Thomas M.; Di Lollo, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Report of a second target (T2) is impaired when presented within 500 ms of the first (T1). This attentional blink (AB) is known to cause a delay in T2 processing during which T2 must be stored in a labile memory buffer. We explored the buffer's characteristics using different types of masks after T2. These characteristics were inferred by…

  18. Lag-1 sparing in the attentional blink : Benefits and costs of integrating two events into a single episode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hommel, Bernhard; Akyürek, Elkan G

    2005-01-01

    When people monitor a visual stream of rapidly presented stimuli for two targets (T1 and T2), they often miss T2 if it falls into a time window of about half a second after T1 onset--the attentional blink. However, if T2 immediately follows T1, performance is often reported being as good as that at

  19. Entrepreneurship Teaching Conducted as Strategic Reflexive Conversation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansson, Michael

    The paper intends exploring and ascertaining whether the concept of strategic reflexive conversation can profitably be applied to entrepreneurship. As a start, a process of conceptualisation is undertaken, which is instrumental in placing the notion of strategic reflexive conversation...... into a knowledge management perspective. Strategic reflexive conversation is presented in an enhanced and updated version, which is contrasted to entrepreneurship through reflection. The findings indicate and it can be concluded that, with some important reservations, strategic reflexive conversation can...... and empirical studies. No doubt the reported study can be enhanced and refined in a theoretical sense and be empirically supported. The paper addresses a potentially significant theme and aims to stimulate discussion, which can provide input and ideas for enhancing practice-oriented entrepreneurship...

  20. Portraying Reflexivity in Health Services Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, John; Green, Bill

    2016-09-01

    A model is proposed for supporting reflexivity in qualitative health research, informed by arguments from Bourdieu and Finlay. Bourdieu refers to mastering the subjective relation to the object at three levels-the overall social space, the field of specialists, and the scholastic universe. The model overlays Bourdieu's levels of objectivation with Finlay's three stages of research (pre-research, data collection, and data analysis). The intersections of these two ways of considering reflexivity, displayed as cells of a matrix, pose questions and offer prompts to productively challenge health researchers' reflexivity. Portraiture is used to show how these challenges and prompts can facilitate such reflexivity, as illustrated in a research project. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. On the Second Language Acquisition of Spanish Reflexive Passives and Reflexive Impersonals by French- and English-Speaking Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Annie

    2006-01-01

    This study, a partial replication of Bruhn de Garavito (1999a; 1999b), investigates the second language (L2) acquisition of Spanish reflexive passives and reflexive impersonals by French- and English-speaking adults at an advanced level of proficiency. The L2 acquisition of Spanish reflexive passives and reflexive impersonals by native French and…

  2. Reflexive convention: civil partnership, marriage and family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaphy, Brian

    2017-09-14

    Drawing on an analysis of qualitative interview data from a study of formalized same-sex relationships (civil partnerships) this paper examines the enduring significance of marriage and family as social institutions. In doing so, it intervenes in current debates in the sociology of family and personal life about how such institutions are undermined by reflexivity or bolstered by convention. Against the backdrop of dominating sociological frames for understanding the links between the changing nature of marriage and family and same-sex relationship recognition, the paper analyses the diverse and overlapping ways (including the simple, relational, strategic, ambivalent and critical ways) in which same-sex partners reflexively constructed and engaged with marriage and family conventions. My analysis suggests that instead of viewing reflexivity and convention as mutually undermining, as some sociologists of family and personal life do, it is insightful to explore how diverse forms of reflexivity and convention interact in everyday life to reconfigure the social institutions of marriage and family, but do not undermine them as such. I argue the case for recognizing the ways in which 'reflexive convention', or reflexive investment in convention, contributes to the continuing significance of marriage and family as social institutions. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2017.

  3. The passive of reflexive verbs in Icelandic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hlíf Árnadóttir

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The Reflexive Passive in Icelandic is reminiscent of the so-called New Passive (or New Impersonal in that the oblique case of a passivized object NP is preserved. As is shown by recent surveys, however, speakers who accept the Reflexive Passive do not necessarily accept the New Passive, whereas conversely, speakers who accept the New Passive do also accept the Reflexive Passive. Based on these results we suggest that there is a hierarchy in the acceptance of passive sentences in Icelandic, termed the Passive Acceptability Hierarchy. The validity of this hierarchy is confirmed by our diachronic corpus study of open access digital library texts from Icelandic journals and newspapers dating from the 19th and 20th centuries (tímarit.is. Finally, we sketch an analysis of the Reflexive Passive, proposing that the different acceptability rates of the Reflexive and New Passives lie in the argument status of the object. Simplex reflexive pronouns are semantically dependent on the verbs which select them, and should therefore be analyzed as syntactic arguments only, and not as semantic arguments of these verbs.

  4. Torso flexion modulates stiffness and reflex response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, K P; Rogers, E

    2007-08-01

    Neuromuscular factors that contribute to spinal stability include trunk stiffness from passive and active tissues as well as active feedback from reflex response in the paraspinal muscles. Trunk flexion postures are a recognized risk factor for occupational low-back pain and may influence these stabilizing control factors. Sixteen healthy adult subjects participated in an experiment to record trunk stiffness and paraspinal muscle reflex gain during voluntary isometric trunk extension exertions. The protocol was designed to achieve trunk flexion without concomitant influences of external gravitational moment, i.e., decouple the effects of trunk flexion posture from trunk moment. Systems identification analyses identified reflex gain by quantifying the relation between applied force disturbances and time-dependent EMG response in the lumbar paraspinal muscles. Trunk stiffness was characterized from a second order model describing the dynamic relation between the force disturbances versus the kinematic response of the torso. Trunk stiffness increased significantly with flexion angle and exertion level. This was attributed to passive tissue contributions to stiffness. Reflex gain declined significantly with trunk flexion angle but increased with exertion level. These trends were attributed to correlated changes in baseline EMG recruitment in the lumbar paraspinal muscles. Female subjects demonstrated greater reflex gain than males and the decline in reflex gain with flexion angle was greater in females than in males. Results reveal that torso flexion influences neuromuscular factors that control spinal stability and suggest that posture may contribute to the risk of instability injury.

  5. Revisiting global body politics in Nepal: A reflexive analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harcourt, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Using the example of a human rights training in Nepal, the author looks at global body politics in a reflexive piece on her engagement in development practices that translate western feminist ideas on gender inequality and empowerment via UN human rights policies into non-western contexts. It firsts look at postcolonial and critical literature on feminist engagement in gender and development processes including a discussion on the concept of global body politics before examining briefly the framing of gender-based violence in Nepal. The core of the paper is a reflexive analysis and interrogation of the training in Nepal in order to bring out the tensions and contradictions around western developmental, feminist and human rights discourses. The discussion looks at how difficult it is for feminist, human rights and developmental discourses and practices to unmoor themselves from the notion of the 'expert' and those who do the rights/work/righting rights training and those who are perennially seen as requiring training. The conclusion reflects on possibilities of other epistemic practices found in intercultural dialogues.

  6. Reflexivity and the "Acting Subject": Conceptualizing the Unit of Analysis in Qualitative Health Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, James A

    2016-07-06

    The ways in which social scientists conceptualize the "reflexive" human subject have important consequences for how we go about our research. Whether and how we understand human subjects to be the authors of our own actions helps to structure what we say about health, health care, and the many other topics addressed in qualitative health research. In this article, I critically discuss assumptions of human reflexivity that are built into qualitative social science of health and medicine. I describe three alternative ways of understanding reflexive thought and human action derived from the theoretical works of Pierre Bourdieu, Bruno Latour, and George Lakoff and Mark Johnson, respectively. I then apply these three different ways of thinking about reflexivity and the acting subject to the analysis of an excerpt of participant observation data from a health services research study of transitions from hospital to home, illuminating the different kinds of analyses that arise from each perspective. I conclude with a call for social scientists to commit to the search for better ways of understanding the human subject, resisting the temptation to "settle" on theoretical statements that close down the path to more sophisticated conceptualizations of human thought and action.

  7. The temporal locus of the interaction between working memory consolidation and the attentional blink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyürek, Elkan G; Leszczyński, Marcin; Schubö, Anna

    2010-11-01

    An increase in concurrent working memory load has been shown to amplify the attentional blink. The present study investigated the temporal locus of this phenomenon, by using a dual rapid serial visual presentation paradigm that enabled the measurement of lateralized event-related potentials. The P3 component was shown to be affected by both working memory load and the lag between the target stimuli, consistent with current models of temporal attention and a functional explanation of the P3 in terms of memory consolidation. P3 amplitude was reduced for short target lags and high memory loads. The P2 component was affected by lag only, and not memory load. Importantly, the N2pc component was modulated also by both lag and memory load. The results showed that early attentional processing (as marked by the N2pc) was suppressed by increased involvement of working memory, a phenomenon not well predicted by many current theories of temporal attention.

  8. The emotional blink: adult age differences in visual attention to emotional information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Linda K; Rokke, Paul D; Stark, Atiana C; Saville, Alyson L; Allen, Jaryn L; Bagne, Angela G

    2008-12-01

    To assess age differences in attention-emotion interactions, the authors asked young adults (ages 18-33 years) and older adults (ages 60-80 years) to identify target words in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) task. The second of two target words was neutral or emotional in content (positive in Experiment 1, negative in Experiment 2). In general, the ability to identify targets from a word stream declined with age. Age differences specific to the attentional blink were greatly reduced when baseline detection accuracy was equated between groups. With regard to emotion effects, older adults showed enhanced identification of both positive and negative words relative to neutral words, whereas young adults showed enhanced identification of positive words and reduced identification of negative words. Together these findings suggest that the nature of attention-emotion interactions changes with age, but there was little support for a motivational shift consistent with emotional regulation goals at an early stage of cognitive processing.

  9. Camera Mouse Including “Ctrl-Alt-Del” Key Operation Using Gaze, Blink, and Mouth Shape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Arai

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents camera mouse system with additional feature: "CTRL - ALT - DEL" key. The previous gaze-based camera mouse systems are only considering how to obtain gaze and making selection. We proposed gaze-based camera mouse with "CTRL - ALT - DEL" key. Infrared camera is put on top of display while user looking ahead. User gaze is estimated based on eye gaze and head pose. Blinking and mouth detections are used to create "CTR - ALT - DEL" key. Pupil knowledge is used to improve robustness of eye gaze estimation against different users. Also, Gabor filter is used to extract face features. Skin color information and face features are used to estimate head pose. The experiments of each method have done and the results show that all methods work perfectly. By implemented this system, troubleshooting of camera mouse can be done by user itself and makes camera mouse be more sophisticated.

  10. The Attentional Blink Paradigm in Individuals with High and Low Levels of Depression and Anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Kathleen Skinner

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The attentional biases of individuals with high and low levels of depression and anxiety were tested using the Attentional Blink paradigm. A rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP task was used to detect biases in identification of emotionally valenced target images. The independent variables were depression, anxiety, lag of target stimulus, and emotional valence of target images. The dependent variables were accuracy, reaction times, and pupil dilation. As predicted, attentional biases were found for symptoms of both depression and anxiety, independently and co-morbidly, for dependent variables. The data suggest that there are both differences and similarities in the effects of symptoms of anxiety and depression on attentional biases around emotional stimuli.

  11. Decreased spontaneous eye blink rates in chronic cannabis users: evidence for striatal cannabinoid-dopamine interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael A Kowal

    Full Text Available Chronic cannabis use has been shown to block long-term depression of GABA-glutamate synapses in the striatum, which is likely to reduce the extent to which endogenous cannabinoids modulate GABA- and glutamate-related neuronal activity. The current study aimed at investigating the effect of this process on striatal dopamine levels by studying the spontaneous eye blink rate (EBR, a clinical marker of dopamine level in the striatum. 25 adult regular cannabis users and 25 non-user controls matched for age, gender, race, and IQ were compared. Results show a significant reduction in EBR in chronic users as compared to non-users, suggesting an indirect detrimental effect of chronic cannabis use on striatal dopaminergic functioning. Additionally, EBR correlated negatively with years of cannabis exposure, monthly peak cannabis consumption, and lifetime cannabis consumption, pointing to a relationship between the degree of impairment of striatal dopaminergic transmission and cannabis consumption history.

  12. The Danish CSR Reporting Requirement as Reflexive Law

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhmann, Karin

    2013-01-01

    beyond the reach of national law. The article argues that the Danish model for CSR-reporting exemplifies application of reflexive law as a regulatory strategy applied to push company self-regulation in a direction defined by public law standards and policy objectives, in casu particularly human rights...... history and reporting guidelines indicate a definite objective of drawing on the CSR paradigm to complement national substantive law, engaging company practice in the implementation of national public policy goals and in the extraterritorial implementation of public policy goals related to conditions......, labour rights, environment, climate change mitigation and anti-corruption....

  13. Distraction by emotion in early adolescence: affective facilitation and interference during the attentional blink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine eHeim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the extent to which early adolescents (aged 10 to 13 years differ from adults in their sensitivity to attention capture by affective stimuli during rapid processing. A rapid serial visual presentation paradigm (RSVP was implemented as a dual task, requiring the report of two green target stimuli embedded in a stream of distractors. Known as the attentional blink (AB, task performance is typically impaired when the first and second targets (T1 and T2, respectively are separated by at least one distractor and about 200 ms of time. Here we used written verbs of pleasant, neutral, and unpleasant content as T1 items, while affectively neutral exemplars served as T2 and distractor events. The temporal distance between T1 and T2 was manipulated to contain either one distractor (intertarget interval 232 ms or five distractors (intertarget interval 696 ms. Students reported pleasant T1 words more accurately, compared to neutral and unpleasant words, indicating facilitation of appetitive content on performance during RSVP. Emotional relevance of T1 was at the expense of T2 accuracy: At an intertarget interval of 232 ms (i.e., during the AB period, identification of (neutral T2 words was impaired when preceded by pleasant and unpleasant T1s. No interference across targets was observed, however, beyond the blink period, in which T1 and T2 were separated by 696 ms. Thus, emotionally relevant events capture and hold attentional resources, at the cost of attentive processing in subsequent episodes. Contrary to our findings in adults, these capture effects were most obvious when the available capacity was limited, i.e., during the critical interval of the AB. The findings are discussed in light of the use of alternative cognitive strategies as development proceeds beyond early adolescence into adulthood.

  14. Distractor inhibition predicts individual differences in recovery from the attentional blink.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heleen A Slagter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The attentional blink (AB refers to an impairment in detecting the second of two target stimuli presented in close succession in a rapid stream of distractors. Recent studies indicate that the AB results, in part, from distractor suppression mechanisms, that may be mediated by striatal dopamine. Yet, it is currently unclear how distractor suppression ability may contribute to the AB. Here, we examined whether distractor suppression ability is predictive of an individual's AB depth and/or recovery. In addition, we investigated the relationship between individual spontaneous eye blink rate (sEBR, a marker of striatal dopaminergic functioning, and AB performance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Subjects were presented with rapid streams of letters containing white distractors, a red T1 and a green T2. T2 was presented either at Lag2, Lag4 or Lag10, and preceded by a distractor that shared the same identity as T2 (T2 primed or not (T2 not primed. Replicating previous work [1], we found that slow AB recovery (poor T2 performance in Lag4 vs. Lag10 was associated with a failure to inhibit distractors, as indexed by greater positive priming. However, no relationship was observed between a subject's ability to suppress distractors and AB depth (Lag10 vs. Lag2. Moreover, no relationship between sEBR and AB performance was observed. RESULTS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that a failure to inhibit distracting information impairs AB recovery, possibly by interfering with target encoding in working memory - but does not affect AB magnitude. The absence of a relationship between individual sEBR and AB performance may be explained by task specifics.

  15. Distractor detection and suppression have a beneficial effect on attentional blink.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Attentional blink (AB is a phenomenon that describes the difficulty individuals have in reporting the second of two masked targets if the second target (T2 arrives 200-500 ms after the first target (T1. Recent studies explain the AB from cognitive resources limitation to distractors interference. For example, the temporary loss of control (TLC hypothesis suggests that the AB is conduced by distractors disrupting the input filter for target processing. The inhibition models suggest that the T1+1 distractor triggers a suppression mechanism which could be beneficial for T1 processing but would suppress T2 at short T1-T2 lags. These models consider that the AB is caused by the appearance of distractors. However, in the present study, two methods were taken to help individuals to detect the distractors more effectively. An attenuated AB deficit was found when the distractors could be excluded or suppressed in time. We consider that under an appropriate condition the distractors detection and suppression have a beneficial effect on attentional blink. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Two methods were employed to help individuals to detect the distractors more effectively: enlarging the low-level-physical characteristic difference between targets and distractors (Experiment 1 and restricting the sets of distractors (Experiment 2. Attenuated AB deficits were found as using the above manipulations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study found when the distractors are detected or identified quickly, they could be effectively suppressed, in order to reduce the interference from the targets and result in a smaller AB deficit. We suggest that the suppression mechanism for distractors have a beneficial effect on AB.

  16. Using ESO Reflex with Web Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järveläinen, P.; Savolainen, V.; Oittinen, T.; Maisala, S.; Ullgrén, M. Hook, R.

    2008-08-01

    ESO Reflex is a prototype graphical workflow system, based on Taverna, and primarily intended to be a flexible way of running ESO data reduction recipes along with other legacy applications and user-written tools. ESO Reflex can also readily use the Taverna Web Services features that are based on the Apache Axis SOAP implementation. Taverna is a general purpose Web Service client, and requires no programming to use such services. However, Taverna also has some restrictions: for example, no numerical types such integers. In addition the preferred binding style is document/literal wrapped, but most astronomical services publish the Axis default WSDL using RPC/encoded style. Despite these minor limitations we have created simple but very promising test VO workflow using the Sesame name resolver service at CDS Strasbourg, the Hubble SIAP server at the Multi-Mission Archive at Space Telescope (MAST) and the WESIX image cataloging and catalogue cross-referencing service at the University of Pittsburgh. ESO Reflex can also pass files and URIs via the PLASTIC protocol to visualisation tools and has its own viewer for VOTables. We picked these three Web Services to try to set up a realistic and useful ESO Reflex workflow. They also demonstrate ESO Reflex abilities to use many kind of Web Services because each of them requires a different interface. We describe each of these services in turn and comment on how it was used

  17. Effects of postural threat on spinal stretch reflexes: evidence for increased muscle spindle sensitivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horslen, Brian C; Murnaghan, Chantelle D; Inglis, J Timothy; Chua, Romeo; Carpenter, Mark G

    2013-08-01

    Standing balance is often threatened in everyday life. These threats typically involve scenarios in which either the likelihood or the consequence of falling is higher than normal. When cats are placed in these scenarios they respond by increasing the sensitivity of muscle spindles imbedded in the leg muscles, presumably to increase balance-relevant afferent information available to the nervous system. At present, it is unknown whether humans also respond to such postural threats by altering muscle spindle sensitivity. Here we present two studies that probed the effects of postural threat on spinal stretch reflexes. In study 1 we manipulated the threat associated with an increased consequence of a fall by having subjects stand at the edge of an elevated surface (3.2 m). In study 2 we manipulated the threat by increasing the likelihood of a fall by occasionally tilting the support surface on which subjects stood. In both scenarios we used Hoffmann (H) and tendon stretch (T) reflexes to probe the spinal stretch reflex circuit of the soleus muscle. We observed increased T-reflex amplitudes and unchanged H-reflex amplitudes in both threat scenarios. These results suggest that the synaptic state of the spinal stretch reflex is unaffected by postural threat and that therefore the muscle spindles activated in the T-reflexes must be more sensitive in the threatening conditions. We propose that this increase in sensitivity may function to satisfy the conflicting needs to restrict movement with threat, while maintaining a certain amount of sensory information related to postural control.

  18. The stretch reflex and the contributions of C David Marsden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyan B Bhattacharyya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The stretch reflex or myotatic reflex refers to the contraction of a muscle in response to its passive stretching by increasing its contractility as long as the stretch is within physiological limits. For ages, it was thought that the stretch reflex was of short latency and it was synonymous with the tendon reflex, subserving the same spinal reflex arc. However, disparities in the status of the two reflexes in certain clinical situations led Marsden and his collaborators to carry out a series of experiments that helped to establish that the two reflexes had different pathways. That the two reflexes are dissociated has been proved by the fact that the stretch reflex and the tendon reflex, elicited by stimulation of the same muscle, have different latencies, that of the stretch reflex being considerably longer. They hypothesized that the stretch reflex had a transcortical course before it reached the spinal motor neurons for final firing. Additionally, the phenomenon of stimulus-sensitive cortical myoclonus lent further evidence to the presence of the transcortical loop where the EEG correlate preceded the EMG discharge. This concept has been worked out by later neurologists in great detail , and the general consensus is that indeed, the stretch reflex is endowed with a conspicuous transcortical component.

  19. The effect of elbow position on biceps tendon reflex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keles Isik

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Testing of tendon (T reflex is the basic method used in the diagnostic procedure of clinical neurology. Measurement of T reflexes precisely can be a valuable adjunct to clinical examination. Quantification of T reflexes may provide more accurate results. Aims: To analyze the effect of elbow position on biceps T reflex. Settings and Design: A self-controlled clinical trial of biceps T reflex testing at the Electrophysiology Unit of the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Methods and Materials: Biceps T reflex was obtained utilizing a hand-held electronic reflex hammer in 50 extremities of 25 healthy volunteers and the effect of elbow position (at 90°, 120° and 150° on reflex response was evaluated. Statistical Analysis: Repeated-measures analysis of variance by the General Linear Model and Pearson correlation test procedures. Results: Onset latency was significantly shorter at 120° of elbow position. The maximum amplitude value of biceps T reflex was obtained at 90° of elbow position. Onset latency of the reflex correlated significantly with the height and arm length but not with age. Conclusions: The electrophysiological measurement of T reflexes is an easy and useful method in the quantification of reflexes, supplying more objective data. However, when performing T reflex studies, the position of the extremity should be taken into consideration to achieve more reliable results.

  20. Reflexive Planning as Design and Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lissandrello, Enza; Grin, John

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, planning theorists have advanced various interpretations of the notion of reflexivity, inspired by American pragmatism, complexity theory, hermeneutics, discursive and collaborative planning. Scholars agree that “reflexivity” has a strong temporal dimension: it not only aims...... to solve present planning problems, but to imagine and understand alternative trajectories for future action. This article explores the practical utility of reflexivity for planners, through a case study that focuses on a project to promote sustainable development in the Port of Amsterdam. Reflexivity...... in planning emerges as a new tool for generating critical knowledge and dialogue that can synthesise the perspectives of multiple actors in a common understanding, existing structural constraints and a collective imagination of alternative future possibilities. Such research highlights the potential...

  1. Reflexive Planning as Design and Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lissandrello, Enza; Grin, John

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, planning theorists have advanced various interpretations of the notion of reflexivity, inspired by American pragmatism, complexity theory, hermeneutics, discursive and collaborative planning. Scholars agree that “reflexivity” has a strong temporal dimension: it not only aims...... to solve present planning problems, but to imagine and understand alternative trajectories for future action. This article explores the practical utility of reflexivity for planners, through a case study that focuses on a project to promote sustainable development in the Port of Amsterdam. Reflexivity...... in planning emerges as a new tool for generating critical knowledge and dialogue that can synthesise the perspectives of multiple actors in a common understanding, existing structural constraints and a collective imagination of alternative future possibilities. Such research highlights the potential...

  2. Reflexive structures an introduction to computability theory

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchis, Luis E

    1988-01-01

    Reflexive Structures: An Introduction to Computability Theory is concerned with the foundations of the theory of recursive functions. The approach taken presents the fundamental structures in a fairly general setting, but avoiding the introduction of abstract axiomatic domains. Natural numbers and numerical functions are considered exclusively, which results in a concrete theory conceptually organized around Church's thesis. The book develops the important structures in recursive function theory: closure properties, reflexivity, enumeration, and hyperenumeration. Of particular interest is the treatment of recursion, which is considered from two different points of view: via the minimal fixed point theory of continuous transformations, and via the well known stack algorithm. Reflexive Structures is intended as an introduction to the general theory of computability. It can be used as a text or reference in senior undergraduate and first year graduate level classes in computer science or mathematics.

  3. Orthodoxy and reflexivity in international comparative analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Jens; Valkenburg, Ben

    2002-01-01

    project, in which we have tried to deal with these consequences. Fourth, and hopefully as a result of the first three aims, we want to argue that a reflexive approach of international, comparative research is not only desirable, but attainable as well. In order to do so, we begin with a short discussion...... upon the consequences on the level of empirical research. We want to avoid that, so our second and third subject will be the practical implications of reflexivity for empirical research as well as for social policy. Our discussion on these subjects is based on the practical experiences in the INPART...... on the main issues in the so-called ?reflexive approach? and consider the main consequences of this approach for both social science and social policy. Against this background we will discuss the implications for comparative research and the experiences of the INPART project end up with a few central issues...

  4. Context compensation in the vestibulo-ocular reflex during active head rotations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medendorp, W.P.; Gisbergen, J.A.M. van; Pelt, S. van; Gielen, C.C.A.M.

    2000-01-01

    The vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) needs to modulate its gain depending on target distance to prevent retinal slip during head movements. We investigated gain modulation (context compensation) for binocular gaze stabilization in human subjects during voluntary yaw and pitch head rotations. Movements o

  5. Phase-dependent modulation of short latency cutaneous reflexes during walking in man.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baken, B.C.M.; Dietz, V.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2005-01-01

    In reduced animal preparation (cat fictive locomotion) most of our knowledge on the phase-dependent modulation of cutaneous reflexes concerns early- (P1 responses) rather than medium-latency (P2) responses. In contrast, in humans, virtually only P2 responses have been studied because P1 responses ar

  6. Modeling movement disorders¿CRPS-related dystonia explained by abnormal proprioceptive reflexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugge, W.; Munts, A.G.; Schouten, Alfred Christiaan; van der Helm, F.C.T.

    2012-01-01

    Humans control their movements using adaptive proprioceptive feedback from muscle afferents. The interaction between proprioceptive reflexes and biomechanical properties of the limb is essential in understanding the etiology of movement disorders. A non-linear neuromuscular model of the wrist incorp

  7. An Existentialist in Iqaluit: Existentialism and Reflexivity Informing Pedagogy in the Canadian North

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Anthony R.

    2011-01-01

    Reflecting on the personal experience of teaching human resource management in the Canadian Arctic, the author explores the utility of an existentialist approach to pedagogy. The author outlines select aspects of existentialism that are pertinent to the teaching and discusses the implications of using reflexive existential thought as guidance in a…

  8. Influence of stimulus intensity on the soleus H-reflex amplitude and modulation during locomotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik B; Alkjær, Tine; Raffalt, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    Diverging results have been reported regarding the modulation and amplitude of the soleus H-reflex measured during human walking and running. A possible explanation to this could be the use of too high stimulus strength in some studies while not in others. During activities like walking and runni...

  9. Stuttering or reflex seizure? A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Véronique; Burbaud, Pierre; Taillard, Jacques; Gaida, Tsouria; Joseph, Pierre Alain; Duché, Bernard; Bioulac, Bernard

    2004-09-01

    Stuttering is characterized by involuntary syllabic repetitions and interruption in the smooth flow of speech. The exact cause of primary stuttering remains a matter of debate but a frontal dysfunction has been evoked. On the other hand, acquired stuttering is uncommon. We report a case of reflex epilepsy in which seizures were triggered by reading aloud or stressful conversation. Each paroxysmal event in left frontal region was associated clinically with a language disorder mimicking stuttering. Our observation suggests that reflex frontal focal epilepsy could be a putative etiology for acquired stuttering.

  10. [The vegetative component of a conditioned reflex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordzhonikadze, Ts A; Pkhakadze, L D

    1975-01-01

    Defensive and alimentary conditioned reflexes were studied on normal cats and cats with neural isolation of the neocortex. The cardiac component of the conditioned reflexes is elaborated in decorticated animals at a similar rate and is as steady as in normal cats. Motor conditioned reactions in decorticated cats are difficult to elaborate. Both in normal and decorticated cats unconditioned pain stimulation evokes tachycardia, while a conditioned signal, paired with this unconditioned stimulus, produces bradicardia. Ban assumption has been made that the primary conditioned reaction consists in the appearance of a certain emotional state which changes the cardiac rhythm in a typical way.

  11. Charitable giving and reflexive individuals: How personal reflexivity mediates between structure and agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghera, Balihar

    2017-03-01

    This article examines how individuals are reflexive beings who interpret the world in relation to things that matter to them, and how charitable acts are evaluated and embedded in their lives with different degrees of meaning and importance. Rather than framing the discussion of charitable practices in terms of an altruism/egoism binary or imputing motivations and values to social structures, the article explains how reflexivity is an important and neglected dimension of social practices, and how it interacts with sympathy, sentiments and discourses to shape giving. The study also shows that there are different modes of reflexivity, which have varied effects on charity and volunteering.

  12. Temporal constraints on visual perception: A psychophysical investigation of the relation between attention capture and the attentional blink

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Simon

    While the richness of our visual perceptions is nearly boundless, the rate with which we can perceive information is limited. For instance when we are required to perceive two consecutive target objects following briefly after each other, the accuracy with which we can report the second target...... be triggered by attention capture to the first object (Folk, Leber & Egeth, 2008) and that if making the first target easier to perceive increase its saliency this may increase the attentional blink (Chua, 2005). This thesis examines the attention capture hypothesis with focus on empirical investigations...... and a theoretical review. Specifically this work presents studies in which first target contrast is varied in two different attentional blink paradigms, while potential influences from bottleneck effects are controlled. Publication 1 describes findings using the two-target paradigm (Duncan, Ward & Shapiro, 1994...

  13. The second modern condition? Compressed modernity as internalized reflexive cosmopolitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyung-Sup, Chang

    2010-09-01

    Compressed modernity is a civilizational condition in which economic, political, social and/or cultural changes occur in an extremely condensed manner in respect to both time and space, and in which the dynamic coexistence of mutually disparate historical and social elements leads to the construction and reconstruction of a highly complex and fluid social system. During what Beck considers the second modern stage of humanity, every society reflexively internalizes cosmopolitanized risks. Societies (or their civilizational conditions) are thereby being internalized into each other, making compressed modernity a universal feature of contemporary societies. This paper theoretically discusses compressed modernity as nationally ramified from reflexive cosmopolitization, and, then, comparatively illustrates varying instances of compressed modernity in advanced capitalist societies, un(der)developed capitalist societies, and system transition societies. In lieu of a conclusion, I point out the declining status of national societies as the dominant unit of (compressed) modernity and the interactive acceleration of compressed modernity among different levels of human life ranging from individuals to the global community. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2010.

  14. How many theta roles in a reflexive verb?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dimitriadis, Alexis; Everaert, Martin

    2014-01-01

    While purely syntactic approaches to reflexivization have characterized reflexive verbs in terms of detransitivization, we show that there is a discrepancy between syntactic and semantic arity. Reflexive verbs are syntactically intransitive, but semantically they are two-place predicates: both

  15. Withdrawal reflexes in the upper limb adapt to arm posture and stimulus location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Carrie L; Riley, Zachary A; Krepkovich, Eileen T; Murray, Wendy M; Perreault, Eric J

    2014-05-01

    Withdrawal reflexes in the leg adapt in a context-appropriate manner to remove the limb from noxious stimuli, but the extent to which withdrawal reflexes adapt in the arm remains unknown. We examined the adaptability of withdrawal reflexes in response to nociceptive stimuli applied in different arm postures and to different digits. Reflexes were elicited at rest, and kinetic and electromyographic responses were recorded under isometric conditions, thereby allowing motorneuron pool excitability to be controlled. Endpoint force changed from a posterior-lateral direction in a flexed posture to predominantly a posterior direction in a more extended posture [change in force angle (mean ± standard deviation) 35.6 ± 5.0°], and the force direction changed similarly with digit I stimulation compared with digit V (change = 22.9 ± 2.9°). The withdrawal reflex in the human upper limb adapts in a functionally relevant manner when elicited at rest. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Effect of tobacco and electronic cigarette use on cough reflex sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicpinigaitis, Peter V

    2017-02-06

    Multiple previous studies have shown that otherwise healthy tobacco cigarette smokers have suppressed cough reflex sensitivity compared with nonsmokers and furthermore, that smoking cessation, even after years of tobacco use, leads to prompt enhancement of cough reflex sensitivity. Thus, cough reflex sensitivity is demonstrated to be a dynamic phenomenon, responding to the presence or absence of influences such as tobacco smoke. These studies, however, were unable to identify whether it was the influence of nicotine, or one or more of the numerous components of tobacco cigarette smoke, that were responsible for this effect. More recently, it has been shown that a single exposure to electronic cigarette (e-cig) vapor causes inhibition of cough reflex sensitivity in healthy lifetime nonsmokers. An identical study employing a non-nicotine containing e-cig confirmed an absence of effect on cough reflex sensitivity, thus implicating nicotine as the causative agent of these findings. Recent animal studies demonstrate cough suppression after injection of nicotine into the brains of cats, thus supporting a centrally-mediated antitussive effect of nicotine to explain the results of the aforementioned studies of tobacco smoke and e-cig vapor exposure in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A signal analysis technique of vestibulo-ocular reflex stimulated with impulsive head movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhola, Martti; Aalto, Heikki; Hirvonen, Timo

    2006-07-01

    Eye movements have been investigated in several areas of medicine and also elsewhere, such as in psychology or even in the development of human-computer interfaces. In the last few years we have designed a technique to stimulate, measure and analyze vestibulo-ocular reflex eye movements. In the otoneurological literature these are seen as a novel and promising means of revealing certain disorders and diseases associated with vertigo. Vestibulo-ocular reflex is stimulated by impulsive head movements. We developed the present pattern recognition technique to detect the stimulus (impulsive head movements) and the vestibulo-ocular reflex (response eye movements) generated from signals and to compute the latency and the gain values between them. Using our technique to calculate these attributes, we obtained clearly different results for a group of 22 dizzy patients than for a group of 30 healthy subjects.

  18. The effect on human eye blink frequency of exposure to limonene oxidation products and methacrolein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøjgaard, Jacob Klenø; Christensen, Karl Bang; Wolkoff, Peder

    2005-01-01

    to LOPs and methacrolein compared to the baseline of clean air, and the findings coincided with weak eye irritation symptoms. Lowest observed effect levels were 286 ppb methacrolein and a 10-min-old LOPs mixture of initially 92 ppb limonene and 101 ppb ozone (O3), which increased the BF comparably by 18......% (p=0.001) and 17% (p=0.003), respectively. The increase in BF was smaller, although not significantly different, during exposure to LOPs at 50% RH to 20% RH in mixtures prepared from ca. 350 ppb limonene and 300 ppb O3. LOPs may cause trigeminal stimulation and possibly eye irritation at O3...

  19. Team Reflexivity and Innovation: The Moderating Role of Team Context

    OpenAIRE

    Dawson, J.; Schippers, M; M. West

    2012-01-01

    Team reflexivity, the extent to which teams collectively reflect upon and adapt their working methods and functioning, has been shown to be an important predictor of team outcomes, notably innovation. As described in the current article, the authors developed and tested a team-level contingency model of team reflexivity, work demands, and innovation. They argue that highly reflexive teams will be more innovative than teams low in reflexivity when facing a demanding work environment. A field s...

  20. Neural Control of Voluntary Eye Closure: A Case Study and an fMRI Investigation of Blinking and Winking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martijn G. van Koningsbruggen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The current paper describes a rare case of a patient who suffered from unilateral apraxia of eye closure as a result of a bilateral stroke. Interestingly, the patient’s ability to voluntarily close both eyelids (i.e. blinking was not affected, indicating that different neural mechanisms control each type of eye closure. The stroke caused damage to a large part of the right frontal cortex, including the motor cortex, pre-motor cortex and the frontal eye field (FEF. The lesion in the left hemisphere was restricted to the FEF. In order to further study the neural mechanisms of eye closure, we conducted an fMRI study in a group of neurological healthy subjects. We found that all areas of the oculomotor cortex were activated by both left and right winking, including the FEF, supplementary eye field (SEF, and posterior parietal cortex (PPC. Blinking activated FEF and SEF, but not PPC. Both FEF and PPC were significantly more active during winking than blinking. Together, these results provide evidence for a critical role of the FEF in voluntary unilateral eye closure.

  1. Nearly Blinking-Free, High-Purity Single-Photon Emission by Colloidal InP/ZnSe Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Vigneshwaran; Tessier, Mickaël D; Dupont, Dorian; Geiregat, Pieter; Hens, Zeger; Brainis, Edouard

    2017-10-11

    Colloidal core/shell InP/ZnSe quantum dots (QDs), recently produced using an improved synthesis method, have a great potential in life-science applications as well as in integrated quantum photonics and quantum information processing as single-photon emitters. Single-particle spectroscopy of 10 nm QDs with 3.2 nm cores reveals strong photon antibunching attributed to fast (70 ps) Auger recombination of multiple excitons. The QDs exhibit very good photostability under strong optical excitation. We demonstrate that the antibunching is preserved when the QDs are excited above the saturation intensity of the fundamental-exciton transition. This result paves the way toward their usage as high-purity on-demand single-photon emitters at room temperature. Unconventionally, despite the strong Auger blockade mechanism, InP/ZnSe QDs also display very little luminescence intermittency ("blinking"), with a simple on/off blinking pattern. The analysis of single-particle luminescence statistics places these InP/ZnSe QDs in the class of nearly blinking-free QDs, with emission stability comparable to state-of-the-art thick-shell and alloyed-interface CdSe/CdS, but with improved single-photon purity.

  2. Removal of eye blink artifacts in wireless EEG sensor networks using reduced-bandwidth canonical correlation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Ben; Bertrand, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Objective. Chronic, 24/7 EEG monitoring requires the use of highly miniaturized EEG modules, which only measure a few EEG channels over a small area. For improved spatial coverage, a wireless EEG sensor network (WESN) can be deployed, consisting of multiple EEG modules, which interact through short-distance wireless communication. In this paper, we aim to remove eye blink artifacts in each EEG channel of a WESN by optimally exploiting the correlation between EEG signals from different modules, under stringent communication bandwidth constraints. Approach. We apply a distributed canonical correlation analysis (CCA-)based algorithm, in which each module only transmits an optimal linear combination of its local EEG channels to the other modules. The method is validated on both synthetic and real EEG data sets, with emulated wireless transmissions. Main results. While strongly reducing the amount of data that is shared between nodes, we demonstrate that the algorithm achieves the same eye blink artifact removal performance as the equivalent centralized CCA algorithm, which is at least as good as other state-of-the-art multi-channel algorithms that require a transmission of all channels. Significance. Due to their potential for extreme miniaturization, WESNs are viewed as an enabling technology for chronic EEG monitoring. However, multi-channel analysis is hampered in WESNs due to the high energy cost for wireless communication. This paper shows that multi-channel eye blink artifact removal is possible with a significantly reduced wireless communication between EEG modules.

  3. Pavlov's conceptualization of unconditional reflexes, or instincts, within the framework of the theory of higher nervous activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windholz, G

    1987-01-01

    According to I. P. Pavlov's theory of higher nervous activity, the establishment and dissolution of conditional reflexes enhances the higher organism's adaptation to the external environment. Pavlov asserted that, ontogenetically, conditional reflexes are based upon innate, unconditional reflexes (UR) or instincts. Pavlov did not distinguish between URs and instincts, but he preferred the former term. Phylogenetically the URs emerged out of well-established conditional reflexes during the development of higher organisms. An outgrowth of the experimental conditioning procedure, developed during the second decade of this century, was the observation and delineation of new URs. While studying human nervous and psychiatric disorders in the 1930s, Pavlov elucidated other URs. Pavlov identified 13 major URs, but he failed to formulate an exhaustive classification scheme of URs.

  4. Control of reflexive saccades following hemispherectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter-Lorenz, Patricia A; Herter, Troy M; Guitton, Daniel

    2011-06-01

    Individuals who have undergone hemispherectomy for treatment of intractable epilepsy offer a rare and valuable opportunity to examine the ability of a single cortical hemisphere to control oculomotor performance. We used peripheral auditory events to trigger saccades, thereby circumventing dense postsurgical hemianopia. In an antisaccade task, patients generated numerous unintended short-latency saccades toward contralesional auditory events, indicating pronounced limitations in the ability of a single hemicortex to exert normal inhibitory control over ipsilateral (i.e., contralesional) reflexive saccade generation. Despite reflexive errors, patients retained an ability to generate correct antisaccades in both directions. The prosaccade task revealed numerous contralesional express saccades, a robust contralesional gap effect, but the absence of both effects for ipsilesional saccades. These results indicate limits to the saccadic control capabilities following hemispherectomy: A single hemicortex can mediate antisaccades in both directions, but plasticity does not extend fully to the bilateral inhibition of reflexive saccades. We posit that these effects are due to altered control dynamics that reduce the responsivity of the superior colliculus on the intact side and facilitate the release of an auditory-evoked ocular grasp reflex into the blind hemifield that the intact hemicortex has difficulty suppressing.

  5. Dilemmas and Deliberations in Reflexive Ethnographic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Janean Valerie

    2014-01-01

    This paper traces insights into the challenges and dilemmas experienced whilst researching students' interpretations and understandings of the Behaviour Management in Schools policy in Western Australia. Journal records, supported by student transcripts, are woven together in a reflexive ethnographic journey--from the beginning phase of…

  6. The Reflexive Modernization of Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pick, David

    2004-01-01

    The profound changes occurring in Australian higher education are viewed here in the context of the social, cultural, political and economic effects of globalization. Particular attention is paid to providing a theoretical foundation for understanding these effects using the reflexive modernization perspective. Highlighted are some of the…

  7. A reflexive perspective in problem solving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chio, José Angel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to favour the methodological process of reflexive analysis in problem solving in the general teaching methods that concentrates in strengthening the dimensional analysis, to gain a greater preparation of the students for the solution of mathematical problems.

  8. Taking Control of Reflexive Social Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristic, Jelena; Kingstone, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Attention is shifted reflexively to where other people are looking. It has been argued by a number of investigators that this social attention effect reflects the obligatory bottom-up activation of domain-specific modules within the inferior temporal (IT) cortex that are specialized for processing face and gaze information. However, it is also the…

  9. The reflexive self and culture: a critique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Matthew

    2003-06-01

    This article attempts to engage with a tendency in the theorization of social change and self-identity, evident in the work of a number of contemporary social theorists, to place an extended process of reflexivity at the heart of modern identity. As symptomatic of 'neo-modern' accounts of selfhood, critical readings of Giddens, Beck, Castells and some aspects of social theory more generally, and their account of modern reflexivity's relationship to culture, are assessed. In light of these criticisms, ways in which culture might still play an important part in the shaping of identity are considered. The relationship between language, culture and reflexivity, drawing from philosophy, sociology and G. H. Mead's own brand of social psychology, are all utilized in establishing a critique of the role Giddens and others designate for culture in the constitution of the contemporary self. By potentially repositioning self-identity in its connection to culture, the overall bearing of reflexivity upon the processes of self-identity is thus questioned. It is argued that a culturally-situated, yet fluid and multifarious account of self-identity is a necessary analytical and normative alternative.

  10. A Testbed for Autonomous Reflexive Grasping

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-03-01

    written in C. The tactile sensor is neural network causes the reflex layer of the a 10 x 10 Tekscan sensor with an active area subsumption architecture to...Doctoral Thesis, March 1990. [9] J. G. Webster, Tactile Sensors for Robotics and Medicine, John Wiley & Sons, 1988 [10] Tekscan Inc., " Tekscan Corporate

  11. A Reflexive Model for Teaching Instructional Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shambaugh, Neal; Magliaro, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Documents a five-year study of two instructors who collaborated on formally studying their teaching of a master's level instructional design course. Outlines their views on learning, teaching, and instructional design (ID), describes the ID course, and explains the reflexive instructional model used, in which the teachers examined their teaching…

  12. Evolutionary transition from biological to social systems via generation of reflexive models of externality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igamberdiev, Abir U

    2017-06-24

    Evolutionary transition from biological to social systems corresponds to the emergence of the structure of subject that incorporates the internal image of external world. This structure, established on the basis of referral of the subject (self) to its symbolic image, acquires a potential to rationally describe the external world through the semiotic structure of human language. It has been modelled in reflexive psychology using the algebra of simple relations (Lefebvre, V.A., J. Soc. Biol. Struct. 10, 129-175, 1987). The model introduces a substantial opposition of the two basic complementary types of reflexion defined as Western (W) and Eastern (E). These types generate opposite models of behavior and opposite organizations of societies. Development of human societies involves the interactions of W and E types not only between the societies but also within one society underlying its homeostasis and dynamics. Invention of new ideas and implementation of new technologies shift the probability pattern of reflexive choices, appearing as internal assessments of the individual agents within a society, and direct changes in the preference of reflexive types. The dynamics of societies and of interactions between societies is based on the interference of opposite reflexive structures and on the establishment of different patterns during such interference. At different times of the history of human civilization these changing patterns resulted in the formation and splitting of large empires, the development and spreading of new technologies, the consecutive periods of wellness and decline. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Simultaneous occurrence of two independent vagal reflexes: a possible cause of vagal sudden death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alboni, Paolo; Alboni, Marco; Gianfranchi, Lorella

    2011-04-01

    A vagal origin of sudden death has been hypothesised in humans, but it has not yet been clearly demonstrated. Two vagal reflexes have been widely investigated: the diving reflex and the fear-induced central reaction, which are responsible for diving bradycardia and alarm bradycardia, respectively. The latter occurs in humans mainly in the context of emotional presyncope/syncope. A simultaneous occurrence of these two vagal reflexes has been observed in animals that are threatened while diving, and heart rates (HR) as low as two to six beats/min have been reported. In experiments carried out in rats, a high percentage of animals that were stressed before immersion in water died suddenly due to progressive slowing of HR; autopsy revealed no signs of drowning. No animals died if they had not been previously stressed. These data show that vagal sudden death can occur when the vagal cardiac fibres are synergically stimulated by two independent reflexes. In humans, it has been reported that in 10-15% of people who die after falling into water, autopsy reveals little or no water in the lungs. These sudden deaths could be due to vagal overactivity. The development of an adequate laboratory model may improve knowledge of the pathophysiology of this type of vagal sudden death and of its prevention.

  14. Ser humano idoso estomizado e ambientes de cuidado: reflexão sob a ótica da complexidade Ser humano anciano con estomia y entornos de cuidado: reflexión en la perspectiva de la complejidad Elderly human being with ostomy and environments of care: reflection on the perspective of complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edaiane Joana Lima Barros

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de discussão acerca da relação ser humano idoso estomizado e seus ambientes de cuidado sob o olhar da Complexidade de Edgar Morin. Um eixo sustenta a reflexão: ambientes de cuidado para o ser humano idoso com estomia. Nesse sentido, apresentam-se três tipos de ambiente que circundam o contexto de estomização do ser humano idoso: ambiente domiciliar, ambiente grupal e ambiente hospitalar. A reflexão traz como contribuição social um novo olhar acerca do redimensionamento do cuidado ao ser humano idoso estomizado em seu ambiente. Considera-se que o ambiente que abriga esse ser humano comporta uma diversidade de sentimentos, emoções, experiências, vincula múltiplos significados da relação do ambiente e o processo de cuidado a partir da Complexidade.Esta es una discusión sobre la relación entre los seres humanos ancianos con estomia y sus ambientes de cuidado, desde la perspectiva de la complejidad de Edgar Morin. Un eje sostiene la reflexión: los entornos de atención de los seres humanos ancianos con estomia. En este sentido, se presentan tres tipos de entorno que rodean el contexto de estomización de los seres humanos ancianos: ambiente familiar, ambiente de grupo y el entorno hospitalario. La reflexión tras, como una contribución social, una nueva mirada sobre el cuidado a los seres humanos ancianos estomizados en su entorno. Se considera que el entorno que hospeda este ser humano contiene una diversidad de sentimientos, emociones, experiencias, se une múltiples significados de la relación entre el ambiente y el proceso de atención de la Complejidad.This is discussion about the relationship between elderly human beings with ostomy and their environments care, under the perspective of Complexity Edgar Morin. An axis holds the reflection: environments of care for elderly humans with ostomy. In this sense, we present three types of environment that surround the context of elderly humans with ostomy: home environment

  15. Reflex changes in muscle spindle discharge during a voluntary contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniss, A M; Gandevia, S C; Burke, D

    1988-03-01

    anterior and in triceps surae was significant (P less than 0.05, chi 2 test). 4. For both triceps surae and pretibial flexor muscles the electrical stimuli to sural or posterior tibial nerves had clear effects on the alpha-motoneuron pool, whether assessed using surface EMG or the discharge of single-motor units. Based on EMG recordings using intramuscular wire electrodes, the reflex effects differed for the gastrocnemii and soleus. 5. In this study, reflex changes in the discharge of human spindle endings were more difficult to demonstrate than comparable changes in the discharge of alpha-motoneurons.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  16. The Interrater Reliability of Subjective Assessments of the Babinski Reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafkin, Chloe; Green, Andrew; Kerr, Samantha; Veliotes, Demetri; Olivier, Benita; McKinon, Warrick

    2016-01-01

    The Babinski reflex is a clinical diagnostic tool; however, the interrater reliability of this tool is currently greatly contested. A comparison between rater groups with objective measurements of the Babinski reflex was therefore conducted. Fifteen recorded Babinski reflexes were assessed by 12 neurologists and 12 medical students as being either pathological or nonpathological. Kinematic and electromyographic variables were collected and used to assess which aspects of the Babinski reflex predict classification. Substantial interrater agreement within the neurologist and student groups (κ = .72 and .67, respectively) was shown; however, there were some differing aspects between what neurologists and students used to assess the reflex as determined by objective kinematic measurements.

  17. Emotional modulation of the attentional blink: is there an effect of stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabe, Lars; Wolf, Oliver T

    2010-04-01

    Individuals are often unable to identify the second target (T2) of two when it is presented within 500 ms after the first target (T1). This "attentional blink" (AB) is attenuated by an emotionally arousing T2. Stress is known to affect cognitive performance, in particular for emotional material. In the present study, we asked whether (a) an emotional T2 reduces the AB when preceded by an emotional T1 and (b) the emotional modulation of the AB is affected by stress. Participants were presented neutral and aversive words as T1 and T2 in rapid serial visual presentation after they were exposed to stress (socially evaluated cold pressor test) or a control condition in a crossover manner. Our results indicate that an aversive T1 extends the AB. Aversive T2 attenuated the AB in the presence of a neutral, but not an aversive, T1. Stress-enhanced T2 detection and high cortisol responses to stress reduced the AB. However, neither stress nor cortisol interacted with the emotionality of the target words. In summary, these findings point to a strong impact of emotional factors on early perceptual experiences.

  18. The influence of training on the attentional blink and psychological refractory period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, K G; Tombu, M N; Dux, P E

    2014-05-01

    A growing body of research suggests that dual-task interference in sensory consolidation (e.g., the attentional blink, AB) and response selection (e.g., the psychological refractory period, PRP) stems from a common central bottleneck of information processing. With regard to response selection, it is well known that training reduces dual-task interference. We tested whether training that is known to be effective for response selection can also reduce dual-task interference in sensory consolidation. Over two experiments, performance on a PRP paradigm (Exp. 1) and on AB paradigms (differing in their stimuli and task demands, Exps. 1 and 2) was examined after participants had completed a relevant training regimen (T1 practice for both paradigms), an irrelevant training regimen (comparable sensorimotor training, not related to T1 for both tasks), a visual-search training regimen (Exp. 2 only), or after participants had been allocated to a no-training control group. Training that had shown to be effective for reducing dual-task interference in response selection was also found to be effective for reducing interference in sensory consolidation. In addition, we found some evidence that training benefits transferred to the sensory consolidation of untrained stimuli. Collectively, these findings show that training benefits can transfer across cognitive operations that draw on the central bottleneck in information processing. These findings have implications for theories of the AB and for the design of cognitive-training regimens that aim to produce transferable training benefits.

  19. The interplay of attention and consciousness in visual search, attentional blink and working memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffone, Antonino; Srinivasan, Narayanan; van Leeuwen, Cees

    2014-05-05

    Despite the acknowledged relationship between consciousness and attention, theories of the two have mostly been developed separately. Moreover, these theories have independently attempted to explain phenomena in which both are likely to interact, such as the attentional blink (AB) and working memory (WM) consolidation. Here, we make an effort to bridge the gap between, on the one hand, a theory of consciousness based on the notion of global workspace (GW) and, on the other, a synthesis of theories of visual attention. We offer a theory of attention and consciousness (TAC) that provides a unified neurocognitive account of several phenomena associated with visual search, AB and WM consolidation. TAC assumes multiple processing stages between early visual representation and conscious access, and extends the dynamics of the global neuronal workspace model to a visual attentional workspace (VAW). The VAW is controlled by executive routers, higher-order representations of executive operations in the GW, without the need for explicit saliency or priority maps. TAC leads to newly proposed mechanisms for illusory conjunctions, AB, inattentional blindness and WM capacity, and suggests neural correlates of phenomenal consciousness. Finally, the theory reconciles the all-or-none and graded perspectives on conscious representation.

  20. The Effects of Emotional Target and Mood State of Participants on Attentional Blink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai-Shan Chan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have found that attentional blink (AB, a failure to report targets temporally close to each other, can be attenuated separately by (1 emotionally significant test stimuli (T2 and (2 the emotional state of the observer. In the present study, we asked whether and how the (1 and (2 interact. Participants were induced with either positive or negative music and asked to complete an AB task which consisted of low-arousal positive, neutral and negative words as T2. We found low arousal negative words significantly reduced AB more than did other words, while no main nor interaction effect for mood was observed. However, on repeating the experiment and replacing low arousal words with high-arousal ones we not only were able to replicate the finding of an advantage of negative words over others, but detected an effect for the mood of the observer: participants who were induced to become happier using music performed better in detecting T2 across lags and word categories than did participants who became sadder. Our findings suggest an interaction of arousal level of emotional target with the induced mood of participants although the underlying mechanisms responsible for this effect need further investigation.