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Sample records for human biodistribution dosimetry

  1. Human biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of novel PET probes targeting the deoxyribonucleoside salvage pathway

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    Schwarzenberg, Johannes [David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Ahmanson Biological Imaging Division, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Pediatrics, Vienna (Austria); Radu, Caius G.; Tran, Andrew Q.; Phelps, Michael E.; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar [David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Benz, Matthias; Fueger, Barbara; Czernin, Johannes; Schiepers, Christiaan [David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Ahmanson Biological Imaging Division, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Witte, Owen N. [David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2011-04-15

    Deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) is a rate-limiting enzyme in deoxyribonucleoside salvage, a metabolic pathway involved in the production and maintenance of a balanced pool of deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) for DNA synthesis. dCK phosphorylates and therefore activates nucleoside analogs such as cytarabine, gemcitabine, decitabine, cladribine, and clofarabine that are used routinely in cancer therapy. Imaging probes that target dCK might allow stratifying patients into likely responders and nonresponders with dCK-dependent prodrugs. Here we present the biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of three fluorinated dCK substrates, {sup 18}F-FAC, L-{sup 18}F-FAC, and L-{sup 18}F-FMAC, developed for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of dCK activity in vivo. PET studies were performed in nine healthy human volunteers, three for each probe. After a transmission scan, the radiopharmaceutical was injected intravenously and three sequential emission scans acquired from the base of the skull to mid-thigh. Regions of interest encompassing visible organs were drawn on the first PET scan and copied to the subsequent scans. Activity in target organs was determined and absorbed dose estimated with OLINDA/EXM. The standardized uptake value was calculated for various organs at different times. Renal excretion was common to all three probes. Bone marrow had higher uptake for L-{sup 18}F-FAC and L-{sup 18}F-FMAC than {sup 18}F-FAC. Prominent liver uptake was seen in L-{sup 18}F-FMAC and L-{sup 18}F-FAC, whereas splenic activity was highest for {sup 18}F-FAC. Muscle uptake was also highest for {sup 18}F-FAC. The critical organ was the bladder wall for all three probes. The effective dose was 0.00524, 0.00755, and 0.00910 mSv/MBq for {sup 18}F-FAC, L-{sup 18}F-FAC, and L-{sup 18}F-FMAC, respectively. The biodistribution of {sup 18}F-FAC, L-{sup 18}F-FAC, and L-{sup 18}F-FMAC in humans reveals similarities and differences. Differences may be explained by different probe

  2. Whole body [{sup 11}C]-dihydrotetrabenazine imaging of baboons: biodistribution and human radiation dosimetry estimates

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    Murthy, Rajan [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Psychiatry, New York, NY (United States); New York State Psychiatric Institute, Department of Neuroscience, Division of Brain Imaging, New York, NY (United States); Harris, Paul; Leibel, Rudolph [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Simpson, Norman; Parsey, Ramin [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Psychiatry, New York, NY (United States); Van Heertum, Ronald [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); New York State Psychiatric Institute, Department of Neuroscience, Division of Brain Imaging, New York, NY (United States); Mann, J.J. [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Psychiatry, New York, NY (United States); Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); New York State Psychiatric Institute, Department of Neuroscience, Division of Brain Imaging, New York, NY (United States)

    2008-04-15

    Vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 abundance quantified using the radiotracer [{sup 11}C]-dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ) has been used to study diagnosis and pathogenesis of dementia and psychiatric disorders in humans. In addition, it may be a surrogate marker for insulin-producing pancreatic beta cell mass, useful for longitudinal measurements using positron emission tomography to track progression of autoimmune diabetes. To support the feasibility of long-term repeated administrations, we estimate the biodistribution and dosimetry of [{sup 11}C]-DTBZ in humans. Five baboon studies were acquired using a Siemens ECAT camera. After transmission scanning, 165-210 MBq of [{sup 11}C]-DTBZ were injected, and dynamic whole body emission scans were conducted. Time-activity data were used to obtain residence times and estimate absorbed radiation dose according to the MIRD model. Most of the injected tracer localized to the liver and the lungs, followed by the intestines, brain, and kidneys. The highest estimated absorbed radiation dose was in the stomach wall. The largest radiation dose from [{sup 11}C]-DTBZ is to the stomach wall. This dose estimate, as well as the radiation dose to other radiosensitive organs, must be considered in evaluating the risks of multiple administrations. (orig.)

  3. Radiation dosimetry and biodistribution of the beta-amyloid plaque imaging tracer {sup 11}C-BTA-1 in humans

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    Thees, S. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Neumaier, B.; Glatting, G.; Deisenhofer, S.; Reske, S.N.; Mottaghy, F.M. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Arnim, C.A.F. von [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Neurologie

    2007-07-01

    Aim: [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]2-(4'-(methylaminophenyl)-benzothiazole({sup 11}C-BTA-1)) is a thioflavin-T derivative that has been one of the promising PET tracers for imaging of amyloid plaque distribution in the Alzheimer patients brain in vivo. The biodistribution and dosimetry of this tracer in humans is presented and compared to the results of a previous dosimetry and biodistribution study of another thioflavin-T derivative [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]2-hydroxy-(4'-(methylaminophenyl)-benzothiazole ({sup 11}C-OH-BTA-1)) in baboons. Methods: Five subjects underwent 2D dynamic PET imaging. Source organs were segmented using a semiautomatic algorithm based on clustering. Residence times for each source organ were determined by analytical integration of an exponential fit of the time activity curves. Finally organ doses were estimated using the software OLINDA/EXM. Results: The administration of 286 {+-} 93 MBq {sup 11}C-BTA-1 was well tolerated by all subjects. Effective radiation dose was 4.3 {mu}Sv/MBq, range 3.6-5.0 {mu}Sv/MBq. In four ofthe five subjects the liver, in one of the subjects the gallbladder was the critical organ. Conclusion: The radiation burden of a single dose of 300 MBq {sup 11}C-BTA-1 is within the accepted limits for research purpose. In contrast to the previous non-human primate study revealing the gallbladder as the critical organ for {sup 11}C-6-OH-BTA-1, we found the liver as the critical organ in humans using {sup 11}C-BTA-1. Possible explanations may be (1) a reduced bile concentration of {sup 11}C-BTA-1 due to the absent OH-group or (2) a different hepatic metabolism of thioflavin derivatives in human and baboon. (orig.)

  4. Pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and dosimetry of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor humanized monoclonal antibody R3 in rats

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    Escobar, Normando Iznaga; Morales, Alejo Morales; Duconge, Jorge; Torres, Idania Caballero; Fernandez, Eduardo; Gomez, Jose A

    1998-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and dosimetry of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-hEGF-r) humanized monoclonal antibody (MAb) R3 was investigated following intravenous injection in normal Wistar rats. Serum disappearance curves were best fit by a two-compartment model having a mean distribution half-life (t{sub (1(2{alpha}}{sub ))}) of 0.250 h and a mean elimination (t{sub (1(2{beta}}{sub ))}) of 13.89 h. Among the various organs, a little accumulation of the radiolabeled antibody was found only in kidneys. Biodistribution and dosimetry studies in humans were performed by extrapolation of the animal data to humans. Absorbed dose to normal organs and the remainder of the whole body were estimated using the medical internal radiation dose formula, and dose contributions from radioactivity in transit through the gastrointestinal tract were estimated using a compartment model. Extrapolated values of radiation absorbed dose to normal organs in rads per millicurie administered were whole body, 0.0085; lower large intestine wall, 0.0898; small intestine, 0.0530; upper large intestine wall, 0.0731; and kidneys, 0.0455. The effective dose equivalent predicted was 0.0162 rem/mCi and the effective dose was found to be 0.015 rem/mCi. On the basis of the pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and internal radiation dosimetry information obtained in this study, a diagnostic phase I clinical trial with {sup 99m}Tc-labeled humanized MAb R3 conjugate in patients should be supported.

  5. Human biodistribution and dosimetry of {sup 18}F-JNJ42259152, a radioligand for phosphodiesterase 10A imaging

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    Laere, Koen van [University Hospital Leuven and KU Leuven, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); University Hospital Leuven - Gasthuisberg, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); Ahmad, Rawaha U.; Hudyana, Hendra; Koole, Michel [University Hospital Leuven and KU Leuven, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); Celen, Sofie; Bormans, Guy [KU Leuven, Laboratory for Radiopharmacy, Leuven (Belgium); Dubois, Kristof; Schmidt, Mark E. [Division of Janssen Pharmaceuticals NV, Janssen Research and Development, Beerse (Belgium)

    2013-02-15

    Phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) is a cAMP/cGMP-hydrolysing enzyme with a central role in striatal signalling and implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders such as Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia and addiction. We have developed a novel PDE10A PET ligand, {sup 18}F-JNJ42259152, and describe here its human dynamic biodistribution, safety and dosimetry. Six male subjects (age range 23-67 years) underwent ten dynamic whole-body PET/CT scans over 6 h after bolus injection of 175.5 {+-} 9.4 MBq {sup 18}F-JNJ42259152. Source organs were delineated on PET/CT and individual organ doses and effective dose were determined using the OLINDA software. F-JNJ42259152 was readily taken up by the brain and showed exclusive retention in the brain, especially in the striatum with good washout starting after 20 min. The tracer was cleared through both the hepatobiliary and the urinary routes. No defluorination was observed. Organ absorbed doses were largest for the gallbladder (239 {mu}Sv/MBq) and upper large intestine (138 {mu}Sv/MBq). The mean effective dose was 24.9 {+-} 4.1 {mu}Sv/MBq. No adverse events were encountered. In humans, {sup 18}F-JNJ42259152 has an appropriate distribution, brain kinetics and safety. The estimated effective dose was within WHO class IIb with low interindividual variability. Therefore, the tracer is suitable for further kinetic evaluation in humans. (orig.)

  6. Preliminary Dosimetry Study of 67Ga-AATS for Human Based on Biodistribution Data in Rats

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    Hassan Yousefnia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Gallium-67 (67Ga has been used as a radionuclide for imaging a variety of solid tumors since 1969. Since then use of various gallium-based radiotracers has been reported. Recently, 67Ga-labeled acetylacetate bis(thiosemicarbazones (67Ga-AATS complex with significant tumor accumulation and fast blood clearance has been employed. Materials and Methods In this study, the absorbed dose of 67Ga-AATS in each human organ was evaluated and compared with 67Ga-citrate as the most commonly used form of 67Ga in nuclear medicine. 67Ga was produced via 68Zn(p,2n67Ga reaction at 30 MeV cyclotron. Moreover, 67Ga-AATS was produced by adding 50 µl of AATS to absolute ethanol (1 mg/ml in a gallium-containing vial at 80-90 °C. The absorbed dose of each human organ was calculated, using RADAR method, based on biodistribution data in Wistar rats. Results According to the results, 67Ga-AATS was produced with radionuclidic and radiochemical purity higher than 99% and 93%, respectively. The highest absorbed dose was reported in the bone surface (0.401 mGy/MBq, whereas the whole-body absorbed dose was 0.092 mGy/MBq. Conclusion The absorbed dose of each human organ was comparable with the absorbed dose received by each organ after 67Ga-citrate injection. Considering this interesting finding and the significant tumor uptake, it seems that 67Ga-AATS can be used as an appropriate SPECT tracer.

  7. Human pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and dosimetry of the kit of monoclonal antibody IOR EGF/R3 labelled with {sup 99m} Tc

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    Torres, L.A.; Ramos, M.; Perera, A.; Hernandez, A.; Iznaga, M.E. N. [Solano, Ivette Alvarez, Jose L. Rodriguez. Centro de InvestigacionesClinicas. 34 no.4501 e/45 y 47 Kohly, Playa, C. Habana (Cuba)

    1998-12-31

    The aim of this work was to assess the human pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and dosimetry of the {sup 99m} Tc-labeled MAb ior egf/r3. Five patients were included in the biodistribution and dosimetric studies and three in the pharmacokinetic analysis. Multiple blood and urine samples we recollected and sequential anterior and posterior whole-body scintigraphies u pto 24 hr post-injection were performed to all patients . The internal radiation dosimetry was estimated from gamma camera imaging data using the methods developed by the Medical Internal radiation dosimetry (MIRD)committee. Raw data were computed from operations between gamma graphic images and regions of interest (ROI) using the Bio-Dose software and time-activity curves were calculated in order to determine the residence times of the source organs. The Pharmacokinetics and Biodistribution results showed that this compound have a bio exponential plasmatic and blood clearance with a rapid biodistribution phase of 9.1 {+-} 8.4 min and 12.2{+-}4.4 min, respectively, and a slower elimination phase of 6.6 {+-} 1.6 hr and 10.8 {+-} 6.8 hr. respectively. The urinary and hepatobiliary excretion showed 4.7 {+-} 0.4 % and 9.9 {+-} 1.8 % of the total administered dose,eliminated by these ways. Liver was the target organ of this product and had an uptake peak at 1 hr post-injection (61.2%) and a great retention of the MAb(T 1/2 eff = 5.3 hr, T 1/2 Biol. = 45.0 hr). The dosimetric results showed that liver, gallbladder and spleen received the higher absorbed. The effective dose and the effective equivalent dose were 1,2E-01 mSv/MBq and 9,2E-02 mSv/MBq respectively. These results allow to see the i or egf/r3 kit in a safe and controlled way. (Author)

  8. In Vivo Imaging of Human 11C-Metformin in Peripheral Organs: Dosimetry, Biodistribution and Kinetic Analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gormsen, Lars Christian; Sundelin, Elias Immanuel; Jensen, Jonas Brorson

    2016-01-01

    Metformin is the most widely prescribed oral antiglycemic drug, with few adverse effects. However, surprisingly little is known about its human biodistribution and target tissue metabolism. In animal experiments, we have shown that metformin can be labeled by (11)C and that (11)C-metformin PET can...

  9. 123I-2-iodo-tyrosine, a new tumour imaging agent: human biodistribution, dosimetry and initial clinical evaluation in glioma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyaerts, Marleen; Lahoutte, Tony; Neyns, Bart; Caveliers, Vicky; Vanhove, Chris; Everaert, Hendrik; Kersemans, Ken; Franken, Philippe R; Mertens, John; Bossuyt, Axel

    2007-07-01

    123I-2-iodo-tyrosine (123I-2IT) has been identified as a promising new amino acid tracer in animals. Uptake is mediated by LAT1 transport, which is increased in tumour cells. In this study we present the human biodistribution and first clinical results in glioma patients. For the biodistribution study, six male volunteers received 60-95 MBq 123I-2IT. Whole-body scans and blood and urine samples were obtained up to 24 h after injection; dosimetry was calculated using OLINDA 1.0 software. Initial clinical evaluation of 123I-2IT SPECT was performed in 35 patients with suspected or known glioma, either as primary diagnosis or for detection of recurrence. Tumour-to-background (T/B) ratios were calculated for semi-quantitative analysis. The results were correlated with clinical and MRI follow-up data or histology. 123I-2IT showed both renal and intestinal clearance. Bladder (0.12 mGy/MBq) and small intestine (0.03 mGy/MBq) received the highest absorbed doses. The effective dose equivalent and effective dose were estimated at 0.020 and 0.016 mSv/MBq, respectively. In patients, 123I-2IT SPECT did not differentiate between neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions after an indeterminate MRI. In follow-up of known glioma, 13/15 patients with disease recurrence had increased T/B values (range 1.39-3.91). Out of seven recurrence-negative patients, two showed an important increase in T/B, in one case due to radionecrosis (T/B 1.59) and in the other probably due to residual but stable disease (T/B 2.07). 123I-2IT has a favourable biodistribution for a tumour imaging agent. It shows increased uptake in central nervous system glioma and is potentially useful in the follow-up of glioma patients.

  10. Biodistribution and human dosimetry of enantiomer-1 of the synthetic leucine analog anti-1-amino-2-fluorocyclopentyl-1-carboxylic acid

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    Nye, Jonathon A., E-mail: jnye@emory.edu; Jarkas, Nashwa; Schuster, David M.; Savir-Baruch, Bital; Voll, Ronald J.; Camp, Vernon M.; Goodman, Mark M.

    2011-10-15

    Introduction: The enantiomerically enriched (ee=90%, enantiomer 1) synthetic amino acid (R,S)-anti-1-amino-2-fluorocyclopentyl-1-carboxylic acid (anti-2-[{sup 18}F]FACPC-1) accumulates in malignant cells by elevated transport through the sodium-independent system-L (leucine preferring) amino acid transporter. The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vivo uptake and single-dose toxicity of anti-2-[{sup 18}F]FACPC-1 in animals as well as the individual organ and whole-body dose in humans. Methods: A DU145 xenograft rodent model was used to measure anti-2-[{sup 18}F]FACPC-1 uptake at 15, 30 and 60 min post-injection. Animals were sacrificed and organs harvested to measure the percent injected activity per organ and to calculate residence time. Anti-2-[{sup 18}F]FACPC-1 toxicity was assessed using a single microdose (37-74 MBq/kg) in nonhuman primates. Their vital signs were monitored for 2 h post-injection for drug-related effects. Human biodistribution studies were collected by sequential whole-body PET/CT scans on six healthy volunteers (three male and three female) for 120 min following a single 247{+-}61 MBq bolus injection of anti-2-[{sup 18}F]FACPC-1. Estimates of radiation dose from anti-2-[{sup 18}F]FACPC-1 to the human body were calculated using recommendations of the MIRD committee and MIRDOSE 3.0 software. Results: High anti-2-[{sup 18}F]FACPC-1 residence time was observed in the pancreas of the rodent model compared to the human data. No abnormal treatment-related observations were made in the nonhuman primate toxicity studies. Human venous blood showed no metabolites of anti-2-[{sup 18}F]FACPC-1 in the first 60 min post-injection. All volunteers showed initially high uptake in the kidneys followed by a rapid washout phase. The estimated effective dose equivalent was 0.0196 mSv/MBq. Conclusion: Anti-2-[{sup 18}F]FACPC-1 showed low background uptake in the brain, thoracic and abdominal cavities of humans, suggesting a possible use for detecting

  11. {sup 123}I-2-iodo-tyrosine, a new tumour imaging agent: human biodistribution, dosimetry and initial clinical evaluation in glioma patients

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    Keyaerts, Marleen; Lahoutte, Tony; Caveliers, Vicky; Vanhove, Chris; Franken, Philippe R.; Bossuyt, Axel [Academic Hospital, Vrije Universiteit Brussel AZ-VUB, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Brussels (Belgium); ICMIC Brussels, Vrije Universiteit Brussel VUB, In Vivo Cellular and Molecular Imaging Center, Brussels (Belgium); Neyns, Bart [Academic Hospital, Vrije Universiteit Brussel AZ-VUB, Department of Medical Oncology, Oncologisch Centrum, Brussels (Belgium); Everaert, Hendrik; Kersemans, Ken; Mertens, John [Academic Hospital, Vrije Universiteit Brussel AZ-VUB, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Brussels (Belgium)

    2007-07-15

    {sup 123}I-2-iodo-tyrosine ({sup 123}I-2IT) has been identified as a promising new amino acid tracer in animals. Uptake is mediated by LAT1 transport, which is increased in tumour cells. In this study we present the human biodistribution and first clinical results in glioma patients. For the biodistribution study, six male volunteers received 60-95 MBq {sup 123}I-2IT. Whole-body scans and blood and urine samples were obtained up to 24 h after injection; dosimetry was calculated using OLINDA 1.0 software. Initial clinical evaluation of {sup 123}I-2IT SPECT was performed in 35 patients with suspected or known glioma, either as primary diagnosis or for detection of recurrence. Tumour-to-background (T/B) ratios were calculated for semi-quantitative analysis. The results were correlated with clinical and MRI follow-up data or histology. {sup 123}I-2IT showed both renal and intestinal clearance. Bladder (0.12 mGy/MBq) and small intestine (0.03 mGy/MBq) received the highest absorbed doses. The effective dose equivalent and effective dose were estimated at 0.020 and 0.016 mSv/MBq, respectively. In patients, {sup 123}I-2IT SPECT did not differentiate between neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions after an indeterminate MRI. In follow-up of known glioma, 13/15 patients with disease recurrence had increased T/B values (range 1.39-3.91). Out of seven recurrence-negative patients, two showed an important increase in T/B, in one case due to radionecrosis (T/B 1.59) and in the other probably due to residual but stable disease (T/B 2.07). {sup 123}I-2IT has a favourable biodistribution for a tumour imaging agent. It shows increased uptake in central nervous system glioma and is potentially useful in the follow-up of glioma patients. (orig.)

  12. Human biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of {sup 11}C-(R)-PK11195, the prototypic PET ligand to image inflammation

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    Hirvonen, Jussi; Roivainen, Anne; Virta, Jere; Helin, Semi; Naagren, Kjell; Rinne, Juha O. [University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku PET Centre, P.O. Box 52, Turku (Finland)

    2010-03-15

    The positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer {sup 11}C-(R)-PK11195 allows the in vivo imaging in humans of the translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO), previously called peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), a marker of inflammation. Despite its widespread use, the radiation burden associated with {sup 11}C-(R)-PK11195 in humans is not known. To examine this, we performed dynamic whole-body imaging with PET and {sup 11}C-(R)-PK11195 in healthy humans. Five healthy male volunteers were scanned with PET and {sup 11}C-(R)-PK11195, using a dynamic whole-body imaging protocol. An organ-specific method was used to measure accumulated radioactivity in source organs, and residence times were calculated as areas under the curve of time-activity curves expressed as percentage of injected radioactivity. Residence times were used as input for OLINDA/EXM 1.0 software to model the equivalent organ doses and the effective dose for the 70-kg man. After intravenous injection of {sup 11}C-(R)-PK11195, radioactivity accumulated in organs rich in TSPO as well as routes of excretion: the hepatobiliary system and the urine. The mean effective dose was 4.8 {mu}Sv/MBq according to International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 60 and 5.1 {mu}Sv/MBq according to ICRP Publication 103, and the highest equivalent organ doses were observed in the kidneys (14.0 {mu}Sv/MBq), spleen (12.5 {mu}Sv/MBq) and small intestine (12.2 {mu}Sv/MBq). Imaging of TSPO with PET using {sup 11}C-(R)-PK11195 is associated with modest radiation exposure, similar in magnitude to most other {sup 11}C-labelled PET tracers, suggesting feasibility of {sup 11}C-(R)-PK11195 imaging in clinical human studies involving multiple scans in the same subjects per year. (orig.)

  13. Biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of the integrin marker 18F-RGD-K5 determined from whole-body PET/CT in monkeys and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doss, Mohan; Kolb, Hartmuth C; Zhang, James J; Bélanger, Marie-José; Stubbs, James B; Stabin, Michael G; Hostetler, Eric D; Alpaugh, R Katherine; von Mehren, Margaret; Walsh, Joseph C; Haka, Michael; Mocharla, Vani P; Yu, Jian Q

    2012-05-01

    2-((2S,5R,8S,11S)-5-benzyl-8-(4-((2S,3R,4R,5R,6S)-6-((2-(4-(3-(18)F-fluoropropyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)acetamido)methyl)-3,4,5-trihydroxytetrahydro-2H-pyran-2-carboxamido)butyl)-11-(3-guanidinopropyl)-3,6,9,12,15-pentaoxo-1,4,7,10,13-pentaazacyclopentadecan-2-yl)acetic acid ((18)F-RGD-K5) has been developed as an α(v)β(3) integrin marker for PET. The purpose of this study was to determine the biodistribution and estimate the radiation dose from (18)F-RGD-K5 using whole-body PET/CT scans in monkeys and humans. Successive whole-body PET/CT scans were obtained after intravenous injection of (18)F-RGD-K5 in 3 rhesus monkeys (167 ± 19 MBq) and 4 healthy humans (583 ± 78 MBq). In humans, blood samples were collected between the PET/CT scans, and stability of (18)F-RGD-K5 was assessed. Urine was also collected between the scans, to determine the total activity excreted in urine. The PET scans were analyzed to determine the radiotracer uptake in different organs. OLINDA/EXM software was used to calculate human radiation doses based on human and monkey biodistributions. (18)F-RGD-K5 was metabolically stable in human blood up to 90 min after injection, and it cleared rapidly from the blood pool, with a 12-min half-time. For both monkeys and humans, increased (18)F-RGD-K5 uptake was observed in the kidneys, bladder, liver, and gallbladder, with mean standardized uptake values at 1 h after injection for humans being approximately 20, 50, 4, and 10, respectively. For human biodistribution data, the calculated effective dose was 31 ± 1 μSv/MBq, and the urinary bladder wall had the highest absorbed dose at 376 ± 19 μGy/MBq using the 4.8-h bladder-voiding model. With the 1-h voiding model, these doses reduced to 15 ± 1 μSv/MBq for the effective dose and 103 ± 4 μGy/MBq for the absorbed dose in the urinary bladder wall. For a typical injected activity of 555 MBq, the effective dose would be 17.2 ± 0.6 mSv for the 4.8-h model, reducing to 8.3 ± 0.4 mSv for the 1-h

  14. Biodistribution and dosimetry in humans of two inverse agonists to image cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors using positron emission tomography

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    Terry, Garth E. [National Institute of Mental Health, Molecular Imaging Branch, Bethesda, MD (United States); Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Stockholm (Sweden); Hirvonen, Jussi; Liow, Jeih-San; Seneca, Nicholas; Morse, Cheryl L.; Pike, Victor W.; Innis, Robert B. [National Institute of Mental Health, Molecular Imaging Branch, Bethesda, MD (United States); Tauscher, Johannes T.; Schaus, John M.; Phebus, Lee; Felder, Christian C. [Lilly Research Laboratories, Lilly Corporate Center, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Halldin, Christer [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-08-15

    Cannabinoid subtype 1 (CB{sub 1}) receptors are found in nearly every organ in the body, may be involved in several neuropsychiatric and metabolic disorders, and are therefore an active target for pharmacotherapy and biomarker development. We recently reported brain imaging of CB{sub 1} receptors with two PET radioligands: {sup 11}C-MePPEP and {sup 18}F-FMPEP-d{sub 2}. Here we describe the biodistribution and dosimetry estimates for these two radioligands. Seven healthy subjects (four men and three women) underwent whole-body PET scans for 120 min after injection with {sup 11}C-MePPEP. Another seven healthy subjects (two men and five women) underwent whole-body PET scans for 300 min after injection with {sup 18}F-FMPEP-d{sub 2}. Residence times were acquired from regions of interest drawn on tomographic images of visually identifiable organs for both radioligands and from radioactivity excreted in urine for {sup 18}F-FMPEP-d{sub 2}. The effective doses of {sup 11}C-MePPEP and {sup 18}F-FMPEP-d{sub 2} are 4.6 and 19.7 {mu}Sv/MBq, respectively. Both radioligands demonstrated high uptake of radioactivity in liver, lung, and brain shortly after injection and accumulated radioactivity in bone marrow towards the end of the scan. After injection of {sup 11}C-MePPEP, radioactivity apparently underwent hepatobiliary excretion only, while radioactivity from {sup 18}F-FMPEP-d{sub 2} showed both hepatobiliary and urinary excretion. {sup 11}C-MePPEP and {sup 18}F-FMPEP-d{sub 2} yield an effective dose similar to other PET radioligands labeled with either {sup 11}C or {sup 18}F. The high uptake in brain confirms the utility of these two radioligands to image CB{sub 1} receptors in brain, and both may also be useful to image CB{sub 1} receptors in the periphery. (orig.)

  15. Preliminary dosimetry of (166)Ho-propylene di-amino tetra (methy1enephosphonicacid) for human based on biodistribution data in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolghadri, Samaneh; Yousefnia, Hassan; Jalilian, Amir R; Shiri-Yekta, Zahra; Maragheh, Mohammad Ghannadi-

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, radionuclides with high β- particle energies such as (166)Ho are recommended for bone marrow ablation in patients with multiple myeloma. The addition of skeletal targeted radiotherapy to the patients can improve the response rate in phase I and II trials, with promising long-term survival data. In this work, the absorbed dose to each organ of human for (166)Ho-propylene di-amino tetra methy1enephosphonicacid (PDTMP) was evaluated based on biodistribution studies in rats and was compared with (166)Ho-tetraazacyclododecane tetramethylene-phosphonate (DOTMP) as the only clinically used Ho-166 bone marrow ablative agent. In this work, the accumulated activity in animals was extrapolated to the accumulated activity in humans by mass extrapolation method. The absorbed dose to each organ of human for (166)Ho-PDTMP was evaluated by medical internal radiation dose method. In this study, 166 Ho-PDTMP complex was prepared successfully using an in-house synthesized PDTMP ligand and (166)HoCl 3. Radiochemical purity of (166)Ho-PDTMP was checked by instant thin layer chromatography (>99%). The biodistribution of (166)Ho-PDTMP in wild-type rats was checked in animal tissues up to 48 h. All values were expressed as mean ± standard deviation, and the data were compared using Student's t-test. Statistical significance was defined as P < 0.05. The highest absorbed dose for this complex is observed in red marrow with 0.691 mSv/MBq. (166)Ho-PDTMP demonstrated a higher red marrow: Non target organ uptake ratio compared to (166)Ho-DOTMP. The results showed that 166 Ho-PDTMP has considerable characteristics compared to (166)Ho-DOTMP and therefore can be a good candidate for bone marrow ablation.

  16. Biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of the A{sub 1} adenosine receptor ligand {sup 18}F-CPFPX determined from human whole-body PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzog, Hans; Elmenhorst, David; Winz, Oliver [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institute of Neuroscience and Biophysics - Medicine, Juelich (Germany); Bauer, Andreas [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institute of Neuroscience and Biophysics - Medicine, Juelich (Germany); University Hospital Duesseldorf, Department of Neurology, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2008-08-15

    {sup 18}F-8-cyclopentyl-3-(3-fluoropropyl)-1-propylxanthine ({sup 18}F-CPFPX) is a potent radioligand to study human cerebral A{sub 1} adenosine receptors and their neuromodulatory and neuroprotective functions with positron emission tomography (PET). The purpose of this study was to determine the biodistribution and the radiation dose of {sup 18}F-CPFPX by whole-body scans in humans. Six normal volunteers were examined with 12 whole-body PET scans from 1.5 min to 4.5 h after injection. Volumes of interest were defined over all visually identifiable organs, i.e. liver, gallbladder, kidneys, small intestines, heart, and brain to obtain the organs' volumes and time-activity curves (TACs). TACs were fitted with exponential functions, extrapolated, multiplied with the physical decay and normalized to injected activities so that the residence times could be computed as area under the curve. Radiation doses were calculated using the OLINDA/EXM software for internal dose assessment in nuclear medicine. The liver uptake shows peak values (decay-corrected) of up to 35% of the injected radioactivity. About 30% is eliminated by bladder voiding. The highest radiation dose is received by the gallbladder (136.2 {+-} 66.1 {mu}Sv/MBq), followed by the liver (84.4 {+-} 10.6 {mu}Sv/MBq) and the urinary bladder (78.3 {+-} 7.1 {mu}Sv/MBq). The effective dose was 17.6 {+-} 0.5 {mu}Sv/MBq. With 300 MBq of injected {sup 18}F-CPFPX a subject receives an effective dose (ICRP 60) of 5.3 mSv. Thus the effective dose of an {sup 18}F-CPFPX study is comparable to that of other {sup 18}F-labelled neuroreceptor ligands. (orig.)

  17. Biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of the 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) radioligand [{sup 18}F]FEDAA1106: a human whole-body PET study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takano, Akihiro; Gulyas, Balazs; Varrone, Andrea; Karlsson, Per; Sjoholm, Nils; Halldin, Christer [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Stockholm (Sweden); Larsson, Stig; Jonsson, Cathrine; Odh, Richard [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Sparks, Richard [CDE Dosimetry Services, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Tawil, Nabil Al [Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Trial Alliance, Stockholm (Sweden); Hoffmann, Anja; Zimmermann, Torsten; Thiele, Andrea [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    [{sup 18}F]FEDAA1106 is a recently developed positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand for in vivo quantification of the 18 kDa translocator protein [TSPO or, as earlier called, the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR)]. TSPO imaging is expected to be useful for the clinical evaluation of neuroinflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to provide dosimetry estimates for [{sup 18}F]FEDAA1106 based on human whole-body PET measurements. PET scans were performed for a total of 6.6 h after the injection of 183.8 {+-} 9.1 MBq of [{sup 18}F]FEDAA1106 in six healthy subjects. Regions of interest were drawn on coronal images. Estimates of the absorbed doses of radiation were calculated using the OLINDA software. Peak uptake was largest in lungs, followed by liver, small intestine, kidney, spleen and other organs. Peak values of the percent injected dose (%ID) at a time after radioligand injection were calculated for the lungs (27.1%ID at 0.2 h), liver (21.1%ID at 0.6 h), small intestine (10.4%ID at 6.3 h), kidney (4.9%ID at 1.8 h) and spleen (4.6%ID at 0.6 h). The largest absorbed dose was found in the spleen (0.12 mSv/MBq), followed by kidneys (0.094 mSv/MBq). The calculated mean effective dose was 0.036 mSv/MBq. Based on the distribution and dose estimates, the estimated radiation burden of [{sup 18}F]FEDAA1106 is moderately higher than that of [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). In clinical studies, the administered activity of this radioligand ought to be adjusted in line with regional regulations. This result would be helpful for further clinical TSPO imaging studies. (orig.)

  18. Biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of [{sup 11}C]DASB in baboons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belanger, Marie-Jose [Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons New York, NY 10032 (United States); Division of Brain Imaging, Department of Neuroscience, New York State Pyschiatric Institute, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Simpson, Norman R. [Department of Radiology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and Division of Brain Imaging, Department of Neuroscience, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Wang, Theodore [Department of Radiology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and Division of Brain Imaging, Department of Neuroscience, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Division of Brain Imaging, Department of Neuroscience, New York State Pyschiatric Institute, New York, NY 10032 (United States)] [and others

    2004-11-01

    Objective: The serotonin transporter has been implicated in a variety of conditions including mood disorders and suicidal behavior. In vivo human brain studies with positron emission tomography and the serotonin transporter antagonist [{sup 11}C]DASB ([{sup 11}C]-3-amino-4-(2-dimethylaminomethyl-phenylsulfanyl)-benzonitrile) are ongoing in several laboratories with the maximum administered activity based on dosimetry collected in rodents. We report on the biodistribution and dosimetry of [{sup 11}C]DASB in the baboon as this species may be a more reliable surrogate for human dosimetry. Methods: Four baboon studies (two studies in each of two baboons) were acquired in an ECAT ACCEL camera after the bolus injection of 183{+-}5 MBq/2.3{+-}1.0 nmol of [{sup 11}C]DASB. For each study, six whole-body emission scans were collected in 3D mode over 6/7 bed positions for 2 h. Regions of interest were drawn on brain, lungs, liver, gallbladder, spleen, kidneys, small intestine and bladder. Since no fluid was removed from the animal, total body radioactivity was calculated using the injected dose calibrated to the ACCEL image units. Results: Uptake was greatest in lungs, followed by the urinary bladder, gallbladder, brain and other organs. The ligand was eliminated via the hepato-billiary and renal systems. The largest absorbed dose was found in the lungs (3.6x10{sup -2} mSv/MBq). The absorbed radiation doses in lungs and gallbladder were four and nine times larger than that previously estimated from rat studies. Conclusion: Based on our baboon biodistribution and dose estimates, the lungs are the critical organs for administration of [{sup 11}C]DASB. In the United States, the absorbed dose to the lungs would limit [{sup 11}C]DASB administered with the approval of a Radioactive Drug Research Committee to 1400 MBq (37 mCi) in the adult male and 1100 MBq (30 mCi) in the adult female.

  19. Biodistribution and dosimetry of {sup 123}I-mZIENT: a novel ligand for imaging serotonin transporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicol, Alice [NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Southern General Hospital, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Krishnadas, Rajeev [University of Glasgow, Sackler Institute of Psychobiological Research, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Champion, Sue [University of Glasgow, Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Tamagnan, Gilles [Institute for Neurodegenerative Disorders, New Haven, CT (United States); Stehouwer, Jeffrey S.; Goodman, Mark M. [Emory University, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Atlanta, GA (United States); Hadley, Donald M. [NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, Department of Neuro-Radiology, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Pimlott, Sally L. [NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, West of Scotland Radionuclide Dispensary, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2012-05-15

    {sup 123}I-labelled mZIENT (2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(3'-((Z)-2-iodoethenyl)phenyl)nortropane) has been developed as a radioligand for the serotonin transporter. The aim of this preliminary study was to assess its whole-body biodistribution in humans and estimate dosimetry. Three healthy controls and three patients receiving selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) therapy for depression were included (two men, four women, age range 41-56 years). Whole-body imaging, brain SPECT imaging and blood and urine sampling were performed. Whole-body images were analysed using regions of interest (ROIs), time-activity curves were derived using compartmental analysis and dosimetry estimated using OLINDA software. Brain ROI analysis was performed to obtain specific-to-nonspecific binding ratios in the midbrain, thalamus and striatum. Initial high uptake in the lungs decreased in later images. Lower uptake was seen in the brain, liver and intestines. Excretion was primarily through the urinary system. The effective dose was estimated to be of the order of 0.03 mSv/MBq. The organ receiving the highest absorbed dose was the lower large intestine wall. Uptake in the brain was consistent with the known SERT distribution with higher specific-to-nonspecific binding in the midbrain, thalamus and striatum in healthy controls compared with patients receiving SSRI therapy. {sup 123}I-mZIENT may be a promising radioligand for imaging the serotonin transporters in humans with acceptable dosimetry. (orig.)

  20. Whole-body biodistribution, dosimetry and metabolite correction of [11C]palmitate: A PET tracer for imaging of fatty acid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Nana Louise; Jakobsen, Steen; Schacht, Anna Christina

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Despite the decades long use of [11C]palmitate positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography in basic metabolism studies, only personal communications regarding dosimetry and biodistribution data have been published. METHODS: Dosimetry and biodistribution studies were...... performed in 2 pigs and 2 healthy volunteers by whole-body [11C]palmitate PET scans. Metabolite studies were performed in 40 participants (healthy and with type 2 diabetes) under basal and hyperinsulinemic conditions. Metabolites were estimated using 2 approaches and subsequently compared: Indirect [11C]CO2...... release and parent [11C]palmitate measured by a solid-phase extraction (SPE) method. Finally, myocardial fatty acid uptake was calculated in a patient cohort using input functions derived from individual metabolite correction compared with population-based metabolite correction. RESULTS: In humans, mean...

  1. Biodistribution, dosimetry, metabolism and monkey PET studies of [18F]GBR 13119. Imaging the dopamine uptake system in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourn, M R; Carey, J E; Koeppe, R A; Haka, M S; Hutchins, G D; Sherman, P S; Kuhl, D E

    1989-01-01

    The in vivo characteristics of a new radiotracer, [18F]GBR 13119, have been examined. Full body biodistribution in rats has been determined and the expected human dosimetry calculated. Pharmacological specificity of in vivo regional brain distribution in rats was examined. Blockage of specific binding was accomplished by dopamine reuptake inhibitors but no effect was observed for pretreatment with serotonin or norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors. Preliminary examination of rat blood shows the presence of radiolabeled metabolites, which can be rapidly identified using bonded-phase (Sep-Pak) chromatography. Finally, the striatum of living primates has been imaged using PET and i.v. administration of [18F]GBR 13119. These results represent the intermediate steps in the development of [18F]GBR 13119 as a radiotracer for the study of the dopamine uptake system in man.

  2. Organ biodistribution of Germanium-68 in rat in the presence and absence of [68Ga]Ga-DOTA-TOC for the extrapolation to the human organ and whole-body radiation dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikyan, Irina; Antoni, Gunnar; Sörensen, Jens; Estrada, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and in particular gallium-68 (68Ga) applications are growing exponentially worldwide contributing to the expansion of nuclear medicine and personalized management of patients. The significance of 68Ga utility is reflected in the implementation of European Pharmacopoeia monographs. However, there is one crucial point in the monographs that might limit the use of the generators and consequently expansion of 68Ga applications and that is the limit of 0.001% of Germanium-68 (68Ge(IV)) radioactivity content in a radiopharmaceutical. We have investigated the organ distribution of 68Ge(IV) in rat and estimated human dosimetry parameters in order to provide experimental evidence for the determination and justification of the 68Ge(IV) limit. Male and female rats were injected in the tail vein with formulated [68Ge]GeCl4 in the absence or presence of [68Ga]Ga-DOTA-TOC. The tissue radioactivity distribution data was extrapolated for the estimation of human organ equivalent doses and total effective dose using Organ Level Internal Dose Assessment Code software (OLINDA/EXM). 68Ge(IV) was evenly distributed among the rat organs and fast renal excretion prevailed. Human organ equivalent dose and total effective dose estimates indicated that the kidneys were the dose-limiting organs (185±54 μSv/MBq for female and 171±38 μSv/MBq for male) and the total effective dose was 15.5±0.1 and 10.7±1.2 μSv/MBq, respectively for female and male. The results of this dosimetry study conclude that the 68Ge(IV) limit currently recommended by monographs could be increased considerably (>100 times) without exposing the patient to harm given the small absorbed doses to normal organs and fast excretion. PMID:23526484

  3. The clinical safety, biodistribution and internal radiation dosimetry of [{sup 18}F]fluciclovine in healthy adult volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McParland, Brian J. [Imaging Technology Group, GE Healthcare Medical Diagnostics, Amersham, Buckinghamshire (United Kingdom); Wall, Anders; Soerensen, Jens [Uppsala University, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Johansson, Silvia [Uppsala University, Section of Oncology, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    We report on the biodistribution and internal radiation dosimetry in humans of [{sup 18}F]fluciclovine, a synthetic L-leucine analogue being investigated as a potential diagnostic biomarker for neoplasia. Whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) scans of 6 healthy volunteers were acquired at up to 16 time points up to about 5 h after a bolus administration of [{sup 18}F]fluciclovine (153.8 {+-} 2.2 MBq). Venous blood samples were taken up to about 4 h post-injection from which {sup 18}F activity concentrations in whole blood and plasma were measured. Urine was collected as voided up to 4 h post-injection, from which the excreted {sup 18}F activity was measured. Absolute values of the {sup 18}F activity contained in up to 11 source regions (brain, salivary glands, lung, heart, pancreas, spleen, liver, red bone marrow, kidneys, uterus and urinary bladder contents) were determined directly from quantitative analysis of the images. For each source region, the {sup 18}F activity decay-corrected and normalised to that injected, as a function of time, was fit by an analytical function which was subsequently integrated to yield the cumulated activity normalised to the injected activity. These normalised cumulated activities were then used as input to the Organ Level INternal Dose Assessment/EXponential Modelling (OLINDA/EXM) package to calculate the internal radiation dosimetry of each subject following the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) schema. An effective dose was then estimated for each subject. [{sup 18}F]Fluciclovine was clinically well tolerated in this study. Very little {sup 18}F was excreted with only a mean value of 3.3 % present in the urine at about 4 h post-injection; no activity within the intestinal contents was noted. The highest mean initial uptakes were measured in the liver (13.8 %), red bone marrow (11.1 %) and lung (7.1 %). The highest mean radiation absorbed doses per unit administered activity were received by the pancreas (102.2 {mu

  4. {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC: biodistribution and dosimetry in patients affected by neuroendocrine tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettinato, C.; Sarnelli, A.; Di Donna, M.; Civollani, S.; Marengo, M.; Bergamini, C. [A.O. S. Orsola-Malpighi, Health Physics, Bologna (Italy); Nanni, C.; Montini, G.; Di Pierro, D. [A.O. S. Orsola-Malpighi, Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Ferrari, M. [European Institute of Oncology, Health Physics, Milano (Italy)

    2008-01-15

    The aim of this work was the evaluation of biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC in patients affected by neuroendocrine tumors. We enrolled nine patients (six male and three female) affected by different types of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Each patient underwent four whole body positron emission tomography (PET) scans, respectively, at 5, 20, 60, and 120 min after the intravenous injection of about 185 MBq of {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC. Blood and urine samples were taken at different time points post injection: respectively, at about 5, 18, 40, 60, and 120 min for blood and every 40-50 min from injection time up to 4 h for urine. The organs involved in the dosimetric evaluations were liver, heart, spleen, kidneys, lungs, pituitary gland, and urinary bladder. Dosimetric evaluations were done using the OLINDA/EXM 1.0 software. A physiological uptake of {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC was seen in all patients in the pituitary gland, the spleen, the liver, and the urinary tract (kidneys and urinary bladder). Organs with the highest absorbed doses were kidneys (9.0 E-02{+-}3.2 E-02 mSv/Mq). The mean effective dose equivalent (EDE) was 2.5 E-02{+-}4.6 E-03 mSv/MBq. The excretion of the compound was principally via urine, giving dose to the kidney and the urinary bladder wall. As SSTR2 is the most frequently expressed somatostatin receptor and {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC has high affinity to it, this compound might play an important role in PET oncology in the future. The dosimetric evaluation carried out by our team demonstrated that {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC delivers a dose to organs comparable to, and even lower than, analogous diagnostic compounds. (orig.)

  5. Biodistribution and Radiation Dosimetry of the Integrin Marker 64Cu-BaBaSar-RGD2 Determined from Whole-Body PET/CT in a Non-human Primate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuanglong Liu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:64Cu-BaBaSar-RGD2 is a positron emission radiotracer taken up by integrin αvβ3, which is overexpressed in many malignancies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biodistribution of 64Cu-BaBaSar-RGD2 in a non-human primate with positron emission tomography (PET and to estimate the absorbed doses in major organs for human.Materials and Methods: Whole-body PET imaging was done on a Siemens Biograph scanner with a male macaque monkey. After an i.v. injection of 13.1–19.7 MBq/kg of 64Cu-BaBaSar-RGD2, whole body scan was collected for a total duration of 180 min. Attenuation and scatter corrections were applied to reconstructions of the whole-body emission scan. After image reconstruction, three-dimensional volumes of interest (VOI were hand-drawn on the PET transaxial or coronal slices of the frame where the organ was most conspicuous. Time-activity curves (TACs for each VOI were obtained, and residence times of each organ were calculated by integration of the time-activity curves. Human absorbed doses were estimated using the standard human model in OLINDA/EXM software.Results: Injection of 64Cu-BaBaSar-RGD2 was well-tolerated in the macaque monkey, with no serious tracer-related adverse events observed. 64Cu-BaBaSar-RGD2 was cleared rapidly from the blood pool, with a 12.1-min biological half-life. Increased 64Cu-BaBaSar-RGD2 uptake was observed in the kidneys, and bladder, with mean percentage injected dose (ID% values at 1 h after injection ~35.50 ± 6.47 and 36.89 ± 5.48, respectively. The calculated effective dose was 15.30 ± 2.21 μSv/MBq, and the kidneys had the highest absorbed dose at 108.43 ± 16.41 μGy/MBq using the non-voiding model. For an injected activity of 925 MBq 64Cu for human, the effective dose would be 14.2 ± 2.1 mSv.Discussion: Due to the limited availability of the primates, we evaluated 64Cu-BaBaSar-RGD2 in the same monkey using three imaging sessions. Measured absorbed doses and effective doses of

  6. Synthesis, in vivo biodistribution and dosimetry of [{sup 11}C]N-Methylpiperidyl benzilate ([{sup 11}C]NMPB), a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulholland, G. Keith; Kilbourn, Michael R.; Sherman, Phillip; Carey, James E.; Frey, Kirk A.; Koeppe, Robert A.; Kuhl, David E

    1995-01-01

    4-N-Methylpiperidyl benzilate (NMPB), a high affinity antagonist for the muscarinic cholinergic receptor, has been synthesized in carbon-11-labeled form through the N-[{sup 11}C]methylation of 4-piperidylbenzilate. The product was isolated by HPLC, and obtained in yields (> 100 mCi) and specific activities (500-3000 Ci/mmol) sufficient for in vivo evaluation in small animals. Time-dependent regional brain distributions in rats and mice showed high radiotracer uptake and retention in striatum and cortex, and low in cerebellum, consistent with muscarinic cholinergic receptor distributions. Radiotracer retention in tissues could be significantly reduced by pretreatment of animals with a large dose of a competing antagonist, quiniclidinyl benzilate. Whole body biodistribution in rats was used to calculate the expected human internal radiation dosimetry for this new radiopharmaceutical. These animal experiments formed the basis for subsequent introduction of [{sup 11}C]NMPB into human use with positron emission tomography.

  7. F-18 labelled PSMA-1007: biodistribution, radiation dosimetry and histopathological validation of tumor lesions in prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesel, Frederik L; Hadaschik, B; Cardinale, J; Radtke, J; Vinsensia, M; Lehnert, W; Kesch, C; Tolstov, Y; Singer, S; Grabe, N; Duensing, S; Schäfer, M; Neels, O C; Mier, W; Haberkorn, U; Kopka, K; Kratochwil, C

    2017-04-01

    The prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) targeted positron-emitting-tomography (PET) tracer (68)Ga-PSMA-11 shows great promise in the detection of prostate cancer. However, (68)Ga has several shortcomings as a radiolabel including short half-life and non-ideal energies, and this has motivated consideration of (18)F-labelled analogs. (18)F-PSMA-1007 was selected among several (18)F-PSMA-ligand candidate compounds because it demonstrated high labelling yields, outstanding tumor uptake and fast, non-urinary background clearance. Here, we describe the properties of (18)F-PSMA-1007 in human volunteers and patients. Radiation dosimetry of (18)F-PSMA-1007 was determined in three healthy volunteers who underwent whole-body PET-scans and concomitant blood and urine sampling. Following this, ten patients with high-risk prostate cancer underwent (18)F-PSMA-1007 PET/CT (1 h and 3 h p.i.) and normal organ biodistribution and tumor uptakes were examined. Eight patients underwent prostatectomy with extended pelvic lymphadenectomy. Uptake in intra-prostatic lesions and lymph node metastases were correlated with final histopathology, including PSMA immunostaining. With an effective dose of approximately 4.4-5.5 mSv per 200-250 MBq examination, (18)F-PSMA-1007 behaves similar to other PSMA-PET agents as well as to other (18)F-labelled PET-tracers. In comparison to other PSMA-targeting PET-tracers, (18)F-PSMA-1007 has reduced urinary clearance enabling excellent assessment of the prostate. Similar to (18)F-DCFPyL and with slightly slower clearance kinetics than PSMA-11, favorable tumor-to-background ratios are observed 2-3 h after injection. In eight patients, diagnostic findings were successfully validated by histopathology. (18)F-PSMA-1007 PET/CT detected 18 of 19 lymph node metastases in the pelvis, including nodes as small as 1 mm in diameter. (18)F-PSMA-1007 performs at least comparably to (68)Ga-PSMA-11, but its longer half-life combined with its superior energy

  8. F-18 labelled PSMA-1007: biodistribution, radiation dosimetry and histopathological validation of tumor lesions in prostate cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giesel, Frederik L.; Vinsensia, M.; Mier, W.; Haberkorn, U.; Kratochwil, C. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Hadaschik, B.; Radtke, J.; Kesch, C. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Urology, Heidelberg (Germany); Cardinale, J.; Schaefer, M.; Neels, O.C.; Kopka, K. [German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Heidelberg (Germany); Lehnert, W. [ABX-CRO, Dresden (Germany); Tolstov, Y.; Singer, S. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Section of Molecular Urooncology, Department of Urology, Medical Faculty Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Grabe, N. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Institute of Pathology, Heidelberg (Germany); University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Medical Oncology, National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg (Germany); University of Heidelberg, Hamamatsu Tissue Imaging and Analysis Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Duensing, S. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Urology, Heidelberg (Germany); University Hospital Heidelberg, Section of Molecular Urooncology, Department of Urology, Medical Faculty Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    The prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) targeted positron-emitting-tomography (PET) tracer {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 shows great promise in the detection of prostate cancer. However, {sup 68}Ga has several shortcomings as a radiolabel including short half-life and non-ideal energies, and this has motivated consideration of {sup 18}F-labelled analogs. {sup 18}F-PSMA-1007 was selected among several {sup 18}F-PSMA-ligand candidate compounds because it demonstrated high labelling yields, outstanding tumor uptake and fast, non-urinary background clearance. Here, we describe the properties of {sup 18}F-PSMA-1007 in human volunteers and patients. Radiation dosimetry of {sup 18}F-PSMA-1007 was determined in three healthy volunteers who underwent whole-body PET-scans and concomitant blood and urine sampling. Following this, ten patients with high-risk prostate cancer underwent {sup 18}F-PSMA-1007 PET/CT (1 h and 3 h p.i.) and normal organ biodistribution and tumor uptakes were examined. Eight patients underwent prostatectomy with extended pelvic lymphadenectomy. Uptake in intra-prostatic lesions and lymph node metastases were correlated with final histopathology, including PSMA immunostaining. With an effective dose of approximately 4.4-5.5 mSv per 200-250 MBq examination, {sup 18}F-PSMA-1007 behaves similar to other PSMA-PET agents as well as to other {sup 18}F-labelled PET-tracers. In comparison to other PSMA-targeting PET-tracers, {sup 18}F-PSMA-1007 has reduced urinary clearance enabling excellent assessment of the prostate. Similar to {sup 18}F-DCFPyL and with slightly slower clearance kinetics than PSMA-11, favorable tumor-to-background ratios are observed 2-3 h after injection. In eight patients, diagnostic findings were successfully validated by histopathology. {sup 18}F-PSMA-1007 PET/CT detected 18 of 19 lymph node metastases in the pelvis, including nodes as small as 1 mm in diameter. {sup 18}F-PSMA-1007 performs at least comparably to {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11, but its

  9. Biodistribution, radiation dosimetry and scouting of {sup 90}Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan therapy in patients with relapsed B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma using {sup 89}Zr-ibritumomab tiuxetan and PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizvi, Saiyada N.F.; Lingen, Arthur van; Hoekstra, Otto S. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Research, PO Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Visser, Otto J.; Zijlstra, Josee M.; Huijgens, Peter C. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Haematology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vosjan, Maria J.W.D.; Dongen, Guus A.M.S. van [VU University Medical Center, Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lubberink, Mark [VU University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Research, PO Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Uppsala University, and Medical Physics, Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2012-03-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) with {sup 89}Zr-ibritumomab tiuxetan can be used to monitor biodistribution of {sup 90}Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan as shown in mice. The aim of this study was to assess biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of {sup 90}Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan in humans on the basis of {sup 89}Zr-ibritumomab tiuxetan imaging, to evaluate whether co-injection of a therapeutic amount of {sup 90}Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan influences biodistribution of {sup 89}Zr-ibritumomab tiuxetan and whether pre-therapy scout scans with {sup 89}Zr-ibritumomab tiuxetan can be used to predict biodistribution of {sup 90}Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan and the dose-limiting organ during therapy. Seven patients with relapsed B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma scheduled for autologous stem cell transplantation underwent PET scans at 1, 72 and 144 h after injection of {proportional_to}70 MBq {sup 89}Zr-ibritumomab tiuxetan and again 2 weeks later after co-injection of 15 MBq/kg or 30 MBq/kg {sup 90}Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan. Volumes of interest were drawn over liver, kidneys, lungs, spleen and tumours. Ibritumomab tiuxetan organ absorbed doses were calculated using OLINDA. Red marrow dosimetry was based on blood samples. Absorbed doses to tumours were calculated using exponential fits to the measured data. The highest {sup 90}Y absorbed dose was observed in liver (3.2 {+-} 1.8 mGy/MBq) and spleen (2.9 {+-} 0.7 mGy/MBq) followed by kidneys and lungs. The red marrow dose was 0.52 {+-} 0.04 mGy/MBq, and the effective dose was 0.87 {+-} 0.14 mSv/MBq. Tumour absorbed doses ranged from 8.6 to 28.6 mGy/MBq. Correlation between predicted pre-therapy and therapy organ absorbed doses as based on {sup 89}Zr-ibritumomab tiuxetan images was high (Pearson correlation coefficient r = 0.97). No significant difference between pre-therapy and therapy tumour absorbed doses was found, but correlation was lower (r = 0.75). Biodistribution of {sup 89}Zr-ibritumomab tiuxetan is not influenced by simultaneous

  10. Biodistribution and Radiation Dosimetry of the Anti-HER2 Affibody Molecule 68Ga-ABY-025 in Breast Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandström, Mattias; Lindskog, Karolina; Velikyan, Irina; Wennborg, Anders; Feldwisch, Joachim; Sandberg, Dan; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Orlova, Anna; Sörensen, Jens; Carlsson, Jörgen; Lindman, Henrik; Lubberink, Mark

    2016-06-01

    (68)Ga-ABY-025 is a radiolabeled Affibody molecule for in vivo diagnosis of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer tumors with PET. The aim of the present work was to measure the biodistribution and estimate the radiation dosimetry of (68)Ga-ABY-025 for 2 different peptide mass doses in a single group of patients using dynamic and serial whole-body PET/CT. Eight patients with metastatic breast cancer were included. Each patient underwent an abdominal 45-min dynamic and 3 whole-body PET/CT scans at 1, 2, and 4 h after injection of a low peptide dose (LD) and a high peptide dose (HD), with approximately the same amount of radioactivity, in separate investigations 1 wk apart. As input to the absorbed dose calculations, volumes of interest were drawn on all clearly identifiable source organs: liver, kidneys, spleen, descending aorta, and upper large intestine. Absorbed doses were calculated using OLINDA/EXM, version 1.1. Of the major organs, the highest radionuclide uptake at 1, 2, and 4 h after injection was observed in the kidneys and liver. The highest absorbed organ doses were seen in the kidneys, followed by the liver for both LD and HD (68)Ga-ABY-025. Absorbed doses to liver and kidneys were slightly but significantly higher for LD. Total effective dose was 0.030 ± 0.003 mSv/MBq for LD and 0.028 ± 0.002 mSv/MBq for HD. The effective dose for a typical 200-MBq administration of (68)Ga-ABY-025 is 6.0 mSv for LD and 5.6 mSv for HD. Therefore, from a radiation dosimetry point of view, HD is preferred for PET/CT evaluation of HER2-expressing breast cancer tumors. These effective doses are somewhat higher than earlier published values for other (68)Ga-labeled tracers, such as 0.021 ± 0.003 mSv/MBq for (68)Ga-DOTATATE and (68)Ga-DOTATOC, mainly because of higher uptake in liver and kidney. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  11. Radiation dosimetry and biodistribution of {sup 99m}Tc-ethylene dicysteine-deoxyglucose in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schechter, Naomi R. [University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Division of Radiation Oncology, Houston, TX (United States); University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiation Oncology, UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA (United States); Erwin, William D.; Yang, David J.; Kim, E.E.; Munden, Reginald F.; Macapinlac, Homer A.; Podoloff, Donald A. [University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Division of Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States); Forster, Kenneth; Taing, Lina C.; Cox, James D. [University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Division of Radiation Oncology, Houston, TX (United States)

    2009-10-15

    To assess the radiation dosimetry and biodistribution of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled ethylene dicysteine deoxyglucose ({sup 99m}Tc-EC-DG) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Serial whole-body scans were acquired 0, 2, 4, 6 and 24 h after injection of {sup 99m}Tc-EC-DG (925 MBq) in seven NSCLC patients. Radiation dosimetry, blood clearance and SPECT imaging of the primary tumor were assessed. The critical organ was the bladder wall, with average radiation absorbed dose over all seven patients of 2.47 x 10{sup -2} mGy/MBq. The average effective dose equivalent and effective dose were 6.20 x 10{sup -3} mSv/MBq (6.89 mSv/1,110 MBq) and 5.90 x 10{sup -3} mSv/MBq (6.54 mSv/1,110 MBq), respectively. The primary tumor was visualized with SPECT in six patients. On final pathology, one patient had a granuloma, which did not enhance with {sup 99m}Tc-EC-DG. {sup 99m}Tc-EC-DG has acceptable dosimetric and biodistribution properties as a diagnostic tumor-imaging agent. Future studies are planned to evaluate its diagnostic potential. (orig.)

  12. Biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of 18F-CP-18, a potential apoptosis imaging agent, as determined from PET/CT scans in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doss, Mohan; Kolb, Hartmuth C; Walsh, Joseph C; Mocharla, Vani; Fan, Hong; Chaudhary, Ashok; Zhu, Zhihong; Alpaugh, R Katherine; Lango, Miriam N; Yu, Jian Q

    2013-12-01

    (18)F-CP-18, or (18S,21S,24S,27S,30S)-27-(2-carboxyethyl)-21-(carboxymethyl)-30-((2S,3R,4R,5R,6S)-6-((2-(4-(3-F18-fluoropropyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)acetamido)methyl)-3,4,5-trihydroxytetrahydro-2H-pyran-2-carboxamido)-24-isopropyl-18-methyl-17,20,23,26,29-pentaoxo-4,7,10,13-tetraoxa-16,19,22,25,28-pentaazadotriacontane-1,32-dioic acid, is being evaluated as a tissue apoptosis marker for PET imaging. The purpose of this study was to determine the biodistribution and estimate the normal-organ radiation-absorbed doses and effective dose from (18)F-CP-18. Successive whole-body PET/CT scans were obtained at approximately 7, 45, 90, 130, and 170 min after intravenous injection of (18)F-CP-18 in 7 healthy human volunteers. Blood samples and urine were collected between the PET/CT scans, and the biostability of (18)F-CP-18 was assessed using high-performance liquid chromatography. The PET scans were analyzed to determine the radiotracer uptake in different organs. OLINDA/EXM software was used to calculate human radiation doses based on the biodistribution of the tracer. (18)F-CP-18 was 54% intact in human blood at 135 min after injection. The tracer cleared rapidly from the blood pool with a half-life of approximately 30 min. Relatively high (18)F-CP-18 uptake was observed in the kidneys and bladder, with diffuse uptake in the liver and heart. The mean standardized uptake values (SUVs) in the bladder, kidneys, heart, and liver at around 50 min after injection were approximately 65, 6, 1.5, and 1.5, respectively. The calculated effective dose was 38 ± 4 μSv/MBq, with the urinary bladder wall having the highest absorbed dose at 536 ± 61 μGy/MBq using a 4.8-h bladder-voiding interval for the male phantom. For a 1-h voiding interval, these doses were reduced to 15 ± 2 μSv/MBq and 142 ± 15 μGy/MBq, respectively. For a typical injected activity of 555 MBq, the effective dose would be 21.1 ± 2.2 mSv for the 4.8-h interval, reduced to 8.3 ± 1.1 mSv for the 1-h interval

  13. The biodistribution and dosimetry of {sup 117m}Sn DTPA with special emphasis on active marrow absorbed doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stubbs, J. [Radiation Dosimetry Systems of Oak Ridge Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Atkins, H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1999-01-01

    {sup 117m}Sn(4+) DTPA is a new radiopharmaceutical for the palliation of pain associated with metastatic bone cancer. Recently, the Phase 2 clinical trials involving 47 patients were completed. These patients received administered activities in the range 6.7--10.6 MBq/kg of body mass. Frequent collections of urine were acquired over the first several hours postadministration and daily cumulative collections were obtained for the next 4--10 days. Anterior/posterior gamma camera images were obtained frequently over the initial 10 days. Radiation dose estimates were calculated for 8 of these patients. Each patient`s biodistribution data were mathematically simulated using a multicompartmental model. The model consisted of the following compartments: central, bone, kidney, other tissues, and cumulative urine. The measured cumulative urine data were used as references for the cumulative urine excretion compartment. The total-body compartment (sum of the bone surfaces, central, kidney, and other tissues compartments) was reference to all activity not excreted in the urine.

  14. Biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of {sup 82}Rb at rest and during peak pharmacological stress in patients referred for myocardial perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, Chad R.R.N.; DeKemp, Robert A. [Carleton University, Ottawa, ON (Canada); University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Hill, Jeremy [Consultant to Jubilant DraxImage, Kirkland, QC (Canada); Ziadi, M.C.; Beanlands, Rob S.B. [University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2015-03-28

    {sup 82}Rb is an ultra-short-lived positron emitter used for myocardial blood flow quantification with PET imaging. The aim of this study was to quantify the biodistribution and radiation dosimetry in patients with coronary disease and in healthy normal volunteers. A total of 30 subjects, 26 patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) and four healthy volunteers were injected with {sup 82}Rb chloride at 10 MBq/kg followed by a 10-min dynamic PET scan. Chest scans at rest were acquired in all subjects, as well as one additional biodistribution scan of the head, neck, abdomen, pelvis or thighs. Chest scans under stress were acquired in 25 of the CAD patients. {sup 82}Rb time-integrated activity coefficients were determined in 22 source organs using volume of interest analysis, including corrections for partial-volume losses. The mean time-integrated activity coefficients were used to calculate the whole-body effective dose using tissue weighting factors from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publications 60 and 103. A total of 283 organ time-integrated activity coefficients were calculated, with a minimum of four values per source organ. The rest and stress mean effective dose was 0.8 mSv/GBq, according to the most recent ICRP definition. Using 10 MBq/kg for 3D PET imaging, the effective dose to a gender-averaged reference person (60 kg female and 73 kg male) is 1.1 mSv for a complete rest and stress perfusion study. For 2D PET using a typical injected activity of 1.1 to 2.2 GBq each for rest and stress, the effective dose for a complete study is 1.8 to 3.5 mSv. The current effective dose estimate in CAD patients is four times lower than the values reported previously by the ICRP, and about 35 % lower than previous in vivo studies in young healthy subjects. (orig.)

  15. [{sup 68}Ga]NODAGA-RGD - Metabolic stability, biodistribution, and dosimetry data from patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and liver cirrhosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haubner, Roland; Rangger, Christine; Decristoforo, Clemens; Virgolini, Irene J. [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Finkenstedt, Armin; Zoller, Heinz [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Internal Medicine II, Innsbruck (Austria); Stegmayr, Armin [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); FH Gesundheit/University of Applied Sciences Tyrol, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2016-10-15

    This study was designed to determine safety, tolerability, and radiation burden of a [{sup 68}Ga]NODAGA-RGD-PET for imaging integrin α{sub v}β{sub 3} expression in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and liver cirrhosis. Moreover, metabolic stability and biokinetic data were compiled. After injection of 154-184 MBq [{sup 68}Ga]NODAGA-RGD three consecutive PET/CT scans were acquired starting 8.3 ± 2.1, 36.9 ± 2.8, and 75.1 ± 3.4 min after tracer injection. For metabolite analysis, blood and urine samples were analyzed by HPLC. For dosimetry studies, residence time VOIs were placed in the corresponding organs. The OLINDA/EXM program was used to estimate the absorbed radiation dose. The radiopharmaceutical was well tolerated and no drug-related adverse effects were observed. No metabolites could be detected in blood (30 and 60 min p.i.) and urine (60 min p.i.). [{sup 68}Ga]NODAGA-RGD showed rapid and predominantly renal elimination. Background radioactivity in blood, intestine, lung, and muscle tissue was low (%ID/l 60 min p.i. was 0.56 ± 0.43, 0.54 ± 0.39, 0.22 ± 0.05, and 0.16 ± 0.8, respectively). The calculated effective dose was 21.5 ± 5.4 μSv/MBq, and the highest absorbed radiation dose was found for the urinary bladder wall (0.26 ± 0.09 mSv/MBq). No increased uptake of the tracer was found in HCC compared with the background liver tissue. [{sup 68}Ga]NODAGA-RGD uptake in the HCCs lesions was not sufficient to use this tracer for imaging these tumors. [{sup 68}Ga]NODAGA-RGD was well tolerated and metabolically stable. Due to rapid renal excretion, background radioactivity was low in most of the body, resulting in low radiation burden and indicating the potential of [{sup 68}Ga]NODAGA-RGD PET for non-invasive determination of integrin α{sub v}β{sub 3} expression. (orig.)

  16. Scaling animal to human biodistribution of the radiopharmaceutical [68Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, Pamela Ochoa, E-mail: lapochoap@unal.edu.co; Veloza, Stella [Grupo de Física Nuclear, Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota, D.C. (Colombia)

    2016-07-07

    The radiotracer called {sup 68}Ga-labelled Glu-urea-Lys(Ahx)-HBED-CC ([68Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC) is a novel radiophar-maceutical for the detection of prostate cancer lesions by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Setting up a cost-effective manual synthesis of this radiotracer and making its clinical translation in Colombia will require two important elements: the evaluation of the procedure to yield a consistent product, meeting standards of radio-chemical purity and low toxicity and then, the evaluation of the radiation dosimetry. In this paper a protocol to extrapolate the biokinetic model made in normal mice to humans by using the computer software for internal dose assessment OLINDA/EXM® is presented as an accurate and standardized method for the calculation of radiation dosimetry estimates.

  17. ImmunoPET and biodistribution with human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 targeting antibody Zr-89-RG7116

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terwisscha Van Scheltinga, Anton G. T.; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N.; Abiraj, Keelara; Schroder, Carolien P.; Pot, Linda; Bossenmaier, Birgit; Thomas, Marlene; Holzlwimmer, Gabriele; Friess, Thomas; Kosterink, Jos G. W.; de Vries, Liesbeth

    2014-01-01

    The humanized monoclonal antibody with high affinity for the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) 3, RG7116, is a glycoengineered, IgG1 class antibody. By labeling RG7116 with zirconium-89 (Zr-89) we aimed to visualize in vivo HER 3 expression and study the biodistribution of this antibody

  18. Nuclear imaging analysis of human low-density lipoprotein biodistribution in rabbits and monkeys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, R.V.; Fleming, R.M.; Ryan, J.W.; Williams, K.A.; Stark, V.J.; Lathrop, K.A.; Harper, P.V. (Department of Pathology, University of Chicago, Illinois (USA))

    1991-06-01

    We have evaluated the biodistribution of human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) radiolabeled with 99mTc or with {sup 123}I-tyramine cellobiose in rabbits and in rhesus monkeys. Biodistribution was assessed after intravenous injection of radiolabeled LDL by quantitative analysis of scintigrams, counting of excreta, and counting of tissues at necropsy. Both rabbits and monkeys showed lower renal uptake ({sup 123}I:99mTc {approximately} 1:3, as regional percent injected activity corrected for physical decay) and excretion (1:2 to 1:4), but higher hepatic (1.5:1 to 2:1) and cardiac (1.7:1 to 4:1) uptake of {sup 123}I than of 99mTc. Adrenals were visualized in normolipemic animals with {sup 123}I-tyramine cellobiose-LDL but not with 99mTc-LDL. Hyperlipemic animals showed increased cardiac (up to six-fold) and decreased hepatic activity (by 50%-60%) of both radionuclides. We conclude that {sup 123}I-tyramine cellobiose-LDL is better suited than 99mTc-LDL for dynamic studies of LDL metabolism in vivo.

  19. Biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of the carbonic anhydrase IX imaging agent [(18) F]VM4-037 determined from PET/CT scans in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doss, Mohan; Kolb, Hartmuth C; Walsh, Joseph C; Mocharla, Vani P; Zhu, Zhihong; Haka, Michael; Alpaugh, R Katherine; Chen, David Y T; Yu, Jian Q

    2014-10-01

    [(18) F]VM4-037 has been developed as a positron emission tomography (PET) imaging marker to detect carbonic anhydrase IX (CA-IX) overexpression and is being investigated for use as a surrogate marker for tissue hypoxia. The purpose of this study was to determine the biodistribution and estimate the radiation dose from [(18) F]VM4-037 using whole-body PET/CT scans in healthy human volunteers. Successive whole-body PET/CT scans were performed after intravenous injection of [(18) F]VM4-037 in four healthy humans. The radiotracer uptakes in different organs were determined from the analysis of the PET scans. Human radiation doses were estimated using OLINDA/EXM software. High uptake of [(18) F]VM4-037 was observed in the liver and kidneys, with little clearance of activity during the study period, with mean standardized uptake values of ~35 in liver and ~22 in kidneys at ~1 h after injection. The estimated effective dose was 28 ± 1 μSv/MBq and the absorbed doses for the kidneys and liver were 273 ± 31 and 240 ± 68 μGy/MBq, respectively, for the adult male phantom. Hence, the effective dose would be 10 ± 0.5 mSv for the anticipated injected activity of 370 MBq, and the kidney and liver doses would be 101 ± 11 and 89 ± 25 mGy, respectively. [(18) F]VM4-037 displayed very high uptake in the liver and kidneys with little clearance of activity during the study period, resulting in these organs receiving the highest radiation doses among all bodily organs. Though the effective dose and the organ doses are within the limits considered as safe, the enhanced uptake of [(18) F]VM4-037 in the kidneys and liver will make the compound unsuitable for imaging overexpression of CA-IX in those two organs. However, the tracer may be suitable for imaging overexpression of CA-IX in lesions in other regions of the body such as in the lungs or head and neck region.

  20. A comparison of {sup 111}In-DOTATOC and {sup 111}In-DOTATATE: biodistribution and dosimetry in the same patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forrer, F.; Waldherr, C.; Mueller-Brand, J. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Petersgraben 4, 4031, Basel (Switzerland); Uusijaervi, H.; Bernhardt, P. [Department of Radiation Physics, Goeteborg University, Gothenburg (Sweden); Cremonesi, M. [Divisione di Medicina Nucleare, Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Milan (Italy); Maecke, H.R. [Division of Radiological Chemistry, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland)

    2004-09-01

    [Yttrium-90-DOTA-Tyr{sup 3}]-octreotide (DOTATOC) and [{sup 177}Lu-DOTA-Tyr{sup 3}-Thr{sup 8}]-octreotide (DOTATATE) are used for peptide receptor-mediated radionuclide therapy (PRMRT) in neuroendocrine tumours. No human data comparing these two compounds are available so far. We used {sup 111}In as a surrogate for {sup 90}Y and {sup 177}Lu and examined whether one of the {sup 111}In-labelled peptides had a more favourable biodistribution in patients with neuroendocrine tumours. Special emphasis was given to kidney uptake and tumour-to-kidney ratio since kidney toxicity is usually the dose-limiting factor. Five patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumours were injected with 222 MBq {sup 111}In-DOTATOC and {sup 111}In-DOTATATE within 2 weeks. Up to 48 h after injection, whole-body scans were performed and blood and urine samples were collected. The mean absorbed dose was calculated for tumours, kidney, liver, spleen and bone marrow. In all cases {sup 111}In-DOTATATE showed a higher uptake (%IA) in kidney and liver. The amount of {sup 111}In-DOTATOC excreted into the urine was significantly higher than for {sup 111}In-DOTATATE. The mean absorbed dose to the red marrow was nearly identical. {sup 111}In-DOTATOC showed a higher tumour-to-kidney absorbed dose ratio in seven of nine evaluated tumours. The variability of the tumour-to-kidney ratio was high and the significance level in favour of {sup 111}In-DOTATOC was P=0.065. In five patients the pharmacokinetics of {sup 111}In-DOTATOC and {sup 111}In-DOTATATE was found to be comparable. The two peptides appear to be nearly equivalent for PRMRT in neuroendocrine tumours, with minor advantages for {sup 111}In/{sup 90}Y-DOTATOC; on this basis, we shall continue to use {sup 90}Y-DOTATOC for PRMRT in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumours. (orig.)

  1. Biodistribution in rats and estimates of doses to humans from (64)CuCl2, a potential theranostic tracer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manrique-Arias, Juan C; Carrasco-Hernández, Jhonatan; Reyes, Pedro G; Ávila-Rodríguez, Miguel A

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain data on the biodistribution of (64)CuCl2 in rats and to obtain estimates of the radiation doses to humans by extrapolating the animal data. MicroPET imaging and biodistribution studies were carried out with Wistar rats, and the doses were estimated with OLINDA/EXM. The lower large intestine wall was found to be the critical organ with an absorbed dose of 139±34 and 125±32µGy/MBq for females and males, respectively. The corresponding effective doses were estimated as 47±4 and 39±4µSv/MBq. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Route of delivery influences biodistribution of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells following experimental bone marrow transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang FJ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs have shown promise as treatment for graft-versus-host disease (GvHD following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (alloBMT. Mechanisms mediating in vivo effects of MSCs remain largely unknown, including their biodistribution following infusion. To this end, human bone-marrow derived MSCs (hMSCs were injected via carotid artery (IA or tail vein (TV into allogeneic and syngeneic BMT recipient mice. Following xenogeneic transplantation, MSC biodistribution was measured by bioluminescence imaging (BLI using hMSCs transduced with a reporter gene system containing luciferase and by scintigraphic imaging using hMSCs labeled with [99mTc]-HMPAO. Although hMSCs initially accumulated in the lungs in both transplant groups, more cells migrated to organs in alloBMT recipient as measured by in vivo BLI and scintigraphy and confirmed by ex vivo BLI imaging, immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR. IA injection resulted in persistent whole–body hMSC distribution in alloBMT recipients, while hMSCs were rapidly cleared in the syngeneic animals within one week. In contrast, TV-injected hMSCs were mainly seen in the lungs with fewer cells traveling to other organs. Summarily, these results demonstrate the potential use of IA injection to alter hMSC biodistribution in order to more effectively deliver hMSCs to targeted tissues and microenvironments.

  3. Preclinical pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of human papillomavirus DNA vaccine delivered in human endogenous retrovirus envelope-coated baculovirus vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hee-Jeong; Lee, Soondong; Im, Saewon; Kim, Mi-Gyeong; Lee, Jaewoo; Lee, Hee-Jung; Lee, Keyong Ho; Kim, Sujeong; Kim, Young Bong; Oh, Yu-Kyoung

    2012-02-01

    Test pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of a human papillomavirus(HPV)16L1 DNA vaccine delivered in human endogenous retrovirus envelope protein (HERV)-expressing baculovirus (AcHERV) and those of naked plasmid vaccine. HPV16L1 gene was administrated as a naked plasmid or in AcHERV to mice via intravenous and intramuscular routes. HPV16L1 gene was extracted and assayed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, which was determined to have a detection limit of 50 copies/µg genomic DNA.. Mean residence times of HPV16L1 in AcHERV were 4.8- and 272.2-fold higher than naked HPV16L1 DNA vaccines after intramuscular and intravenous administration, respectively. Naked HPV16L1 DNA levels 1 month after injection were >3 orders of magnitude lower in each tissue tested than AcHERV-delivered HPV16L1, which was retained in most tissues without specific tissue tropism. AcHERV-delivered HPV16L1 administered intramuscularly persisted at the injection sites. However, the levels of copy numbers in muscle were low (1,800/μg genomic DNA) after 1 month, and undetectable after 6 months. HPV16L1 delivered via AcHERV resides longer in the body than HPV16L1 in naked form. The lack of tissue tropism ensures the safety of AcHERV vectors for further development.

  4. Lu-177-PSMA-617 Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Inhibitor Therapy in Patients with Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Stability, Bio-distribution and Dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabasakal, Levent; Toklu, Türkay; Yeyin, Nami; Demirci, Emre; Abuqbeitah, Mohammad; Ocak, Meltem; Aygün, Aslan; Karayel, Emre; Pehlivanoğlu, Hüseyin; Alan Selçuk, Nalan

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to estimate the radiation-absorbed doses and to study the in vivo and in vitro stability as well as pharmacokinetic characteristics of lutetium-177 (Lu-177) prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-617. Methods: For this purpose, 7 patients who underwent Lu-177-PSMA therapy were included into the study. The injected Lu-177-PSMA-617 activity ranged from 3.6 to 7.4 GBq with a mean of 5.2±1.8 GBq. The stability of radiotracer in saline was calculated up to 48 h. The stability was also calculated in blood and urine samples. Post-therapeutic dosimetry was performed based on whole body and single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) scans on dual-headed SPECT/CT system. Results: The radiochemical yield of Lu-177-PSMA-617 was >99%. It remained stable in saline up to 48 h. Analyses of the blood and urine samples showed a single radioactivity peak even at 24 hours after injection. Half-life of the distribution and elimination phases were calculated to be 0.16±0.09 and 10.8±2.5 hours, respectively. The mean excretion rate was 56.5±8.8% ranging from 41.5% to 65.4% at 24 h. Highest radiation estimated doses were calculated for parotid glands and kidneys (1.90±1.19 and 0.82±0.25 Gy/GBq respectively). Radiation dose given to the bone marrow was significantly lower than those of kidney and parotid glands (p<0.05) (0.030±0.008 Gy/GBq). Conclusion: Lu-177-PSMA-617 is a highly stable compound both in vitro and in vivo. Lu-177-PSMA-617 therapy seems to be a safe method for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer patients. The fractionation regime that enables the longest duration of tumor control and/or survival will have to be developed in further studies. PMID:28613198

  5. Biodistribution and radiation dosimetry in healthy volunteers of a novel tumour-specific probe for PET/CT imaging: BAY 85-8050.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolarz, Kamilla; Krause, Bernd Joachim; Graner, Frank Philipp; Wagner, Franziska Martina; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Sell, Tina; Bacher-Stier, Claudia; Fels, Lüder; Dinkelborg, Ludger; Schwaiger, Markus

    2013-12-01

    Novel tracers for the diagnosis of malignant disease with PET and PET/CT are being developed as the most commonly used (18)F deoxyglucose (FDG) tracer shows certain limitations. Employing radioactively labelled glutamate derivatives for specific imaging of the truncated citrate cycle potentially allows more specific tumour imaging. Radiation dosimetry of the novel tracer BAY 85-8050, a glutamate derivative, was calculated and the effective dose (ED) was compared with that of FDG. Five healthy volunteers were included in the study. Attenuation-corrected whole-body PET/CT scans were performed from 0 to 90 min, at 120 and at 240 min after injection of 305.0 ± 17.6 MBq of BAY 85-8050. Organs with moderate to high uptake at any of the imaging time points were used as source organs. Total activity in each organ at each time point was measured. Time-activity curves (TAC) were determined for the whole body and all source organs. The resulting TACs were fitted to exponential equations and accumulated activities were determined. OLINDA/EXM software was used to calculate individual organ doses and the whole-body ED from the acquired data. Uptake of the tracer was highest in the kidneys due to renal excretion of the tracer, followed by the pancreas, heart wall and osteogenic cells. The mean organ doses were: kidneys 38.4 ± 11.2 μSv/MBq, pancreas 23.2 ± 3.8 μSv/MBq, heart wall 17.4 ± 4.1 μSv/MBq, and osteogenic cells 13.6 ± 3.5 μSv/MBq. The calculated ED was 8.9 ± 1.5 μSv/MBq. Based on the distribution and dose estimates, the calculated radiation dose of BAY 85-8050 is 2.67 ± 0.45 mSv at a patient dose of 300 MBq, which compares favourably with the radiation dose of FDG (5.7 mSv).

  6. Biodistribution and radiation dosimetry in healthy volunteers of a novel tumour-specific probe for PET/CT imaging: BAY 85-8050

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolarz, Kamilla; Graner, Frank Philipp; Wagner, Franziska Martina; Wester, Hans-Juergen; Sell, Tina; Schwaiger, Markus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Krause, Bernd Joachim [University Hospital Rostock, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany); Bacher-Stier, Claudia; Fels, Lueder [Bayer HealthCare, Berlin (Germany); Dinkelborg, Ludger [Piramal Imaging GmbH, Berlin (Germany)

    2013-12-15

    Novel tracers for the diagnosis of malignant disease with PET and PET/CT are being developed as the most commonly used {sup 18}F deoxyglucose (FDG) tracer shows certain limitations. Employing radioactively labelled glutamate derivatives for specific imaging of the truncated citrate cycle potentially allows more specific tumour imaging. Radiation dosimetry of the novel tracer BAY 85-8050, a glutamate derivative, was calculated and the effective dose (ED) was compared with that of FDG. Five healthy volunteers were included in the study. Attenuation-corrected whole-body PET/CT scans were performed from 0 to 90 min, at 120 and at 240 min after injection of 305.0 {+-} 17.6 MBq of BAY 85-8050. Organs with moderate to high uptake at any of the imaging time points were used as source organs. Total activity in each organ at each time point was measured. Time-activity curves (TAC) were determined for the whole body and all source organs. The resulting TACs were fitted to exponential equations and accumulated activities were determined. OLINDA/EXM software was used to calculate individual organ doses and the whole-body ED from the acquired data. Uptake of the tracer was highest in the kidneys due to renal excretion of the tracer, followed by the pancreas, heart wall and osteogenic cells. The mean organ doses were: kidneys 38.4 {+-} 11.2 {mu}Sv/MBq, pancreas 23.2 {+-} 3.8 {mu}Sv/MBq, heart wall 17.4 {+-} 4.1 {mu}Sv/MBq, and osteogenic cells 13.6 {+-} 3.5 {mu}Sv/MBq. The calculated ED was 8.9 {+-} 1.5 {mu}Sv/MBq. Based on the distribution and dose estimates, the calculated radiation dose of BAY 85-8050 is 2.67 {+-} 0.45 mSv at a patient dose of 300 MBq, which compares favourably with the radiation dose of FDG (5.7 mSv). (orig.)

  7. Biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA HBED CC - a PSMA specific probe for PET imaging of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfob, Christian H.; Ziegler, Sibylle; Graner, Frank Philipp; Koehner, Markus; Schachoff, Sylvia; Blechert, Birgit; Scheidhauer, Klemens; Schwaiger, Markus; Eiber, Matthias [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Wester, Hans-Juergen [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Chair of Pharmaceutical Radiochemistry, Department Chemie, Garching (Germany); Maurer, Tobias [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Urology, Munich (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) agents targeting the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) are currently under broad clinical and scientific investigation. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA HBED-CC constitutes the first {sup 68}Ga-labelled PSMA-inhibitor and has evolved as a promising agent for imaging PSMA expression in vivo. The aim of this study was to evaluate the whole-body distribution and radiation dosimetry of this new probe. Five patients with a history or high suspicion of prostate cancer were injected intravenously with a mean of 139.8 ± 13.7 MBq of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA HBED-CC (range 120-158 MBq). Four static skull to mid-thigh scans using a whole-body fully integrated PET/MR-system were performed 10 min, 60 min, 130 min, and 175 min after the tracer injection. Time-dependent changes of the injected activity per organ were determined. Mean organ-absorbed doses and effective doses (ED) were calculated using OLINDA/EXM. Injection of a standard activity of 150 MBq {sup 68}Ga-PSMA HBED-CC resulted in a median effective dose of 2.37 mSv (Range 1.08E-02 - 2.46E-02 mSv/MBq). The urinary bladder wall (median absorbed dose 1.64E-01 mGv/MBq; range 8.76E-02 - 2.91E-01 mGv/MBq) was the critical organ, followed by the kidneys (median absorbed dose 1.21E-01 mGv/MBq; range 7.16E-02 - 1.75E-01), spleen (median absorbed dose 4.13E-02 mGv/MBq; range 1.57E-02 - 7.32E-02 mGv/MBq) and liver (median absorbed dose 2.07E-02 mGv/MBq; range 1.80E-02 - 2.57E-02 mGv/MBq). No drug-related pharmacological effects occurred. The use of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA HBED-CC results in a relatively low radiation exposure, delivering organ doses that are comparable to those of other {sup 68}Ga-labelled PSMA-inhibitors used for PET-imaging. Total effective dose is lower than for other PET-agents used for prostate cancer imaging (e.g. {sup 11}C- and {sup 18}F-Choline). (orig.)

  8. Platelet binding and biodistribution of [{sup 99m}Tc]rBitistatin in animal species and humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, Linda C. [Department of Radiology, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States)], E-mail: lknight@temple.edu; Romano, Jan E. [Department of Radiology, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States); Bright, Lewis T.; Agelan, Alexis [University Laboratory Animal Resources, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States); Kantor, Steven; Maurer, Alan H. [Department of Radiology, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States)

    2007-10-15

    Introduction: {sup 99m}Tc recombinant bitistatin (rBitistatin) is a radioligand for {alpha}{sub IIb}{beta}{sub 3} (glycoproteins IIb/IIIa) receptor on platelets and is being developed as a diagnostic radiopharmaceutical for in vivo imaging of acute thrombi and emboli. Prior to the first administration of [{sup 99m}Tc]rBitistatin to human subjects, its biodistribution and effects on platelets were evaluated in animals. This paper reports findings in animal studies in comparison with initial findings in normal human subjects. Methods: [{sup 99m}Tc]rBitistatin was administered to mice, guinea pigs and dogs to assess time-dependent organ distribution, urinary excretion and blood disappearance rates. Blood samples were analyzed to determine radioligand binding to circulating platelets and the extent of plasma protein binding. The effect of [{sup 99m}Tc]rBitistatin on circulating platelet count was determined. These factors were also determined in normal human subjects who received [{sup 99m}Tc]rBitistatin as part of a Phase I clinical trial. Results: The main organs that accumulated [{sup 99m}Tc]rBitistatin were kidneys, liver and spleen in all animal species and humans. The main organs seen on human images were the kidneys and spleen. Liver uptake was fainter, and soft-tissue background was low. [{sup 99m}Tc]rBitistatin bound to circulating platelets in blood, with a higher percentage of binding to platelets in guinea pigs and dogs compared to that in humans. Plasma protein binding was low and of little consequence in view of platelet binding. The main route of excretion was through the urine. [{sup 99m}Tc]rBitistatin did not affect platelet counts in humans or dogs. Conclusions: [{sup 99m}Tc]rBitistatin, when administered at low doses for imaging, has no adverse effects on platelets and has the qualitative biodistribution predicted by animal studies. [{sup 99m}Tc]rBitistatin was found to bind to circulating platelets in humans, suggesting that it will be able to bind

  9. Biodistribution and Radiation Dosimetry of 11C-Nicotine from Whole-Body PET Imaging in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Pradeep K; Lokitz, Stephen J; Nazih, Rachid; Garg, Sudha

    2017-03-01

    This study assessed the in vivo distribution of 11C-nicotine and the absorbed radiation dose from whole-body 11C-nicotine PET imaging of 11 healthy (5 male and 6 female) subjects. Methods: After an initial CT attenuation scan, 11C-nicotine was administered via intravenous injection. A dynamic PET scan was acquired for 90 s with the brain in the field of view, followed by a series of 13 whole-body PET scans acquired over a 90-min period. Regions of interest were drawn over organs visible in the reconstructed PET images. Time-activity curves were generated, and the residence times were calculated. The absorbed radiation dose for the whole body was calculated by entering the residence time in OLINDA/EXM 1.0 software to model the equivalent organ dose and the effective dose for a 70-kg man. Results: The mean residence times for 11C-nicotine in the liver, red marrow, brain, and lungs were 0.048 ± 0.010, 0.031 ± 0.005, 0.021 ± 0.004, and 0.020 ± 0.005 h, respectively. The mean effective dose for 11C-nicotine was 5.44 ± 0.67 μSv/MBq. The organs receiving the highest absorbed dose from the 11C-nicotine injection were the urinary bladder wall (14.68 ± 8.70 μSv/MBq), kidneys (9.56 ± 2.46 μSv/MBq), liver (8.94 ± 1.67 μSv/MBq), and spleen (9.49 ± 3.89 μSv/MBq). The renal and hepatobiliary systems were the major clearance and excretion routes for radioactivity. Conclusion: The estimated radiation dose from 11C-nicotine administration is relatively modest and would allow for multiple PET examinations on the same subject. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  10. Dosimetry; La dosimetrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Couteulx, I.; Apretna, D.; Beaugerie, M.F. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France)] [and others

    2003-07-01

    Eight articles treat the dosimetry. Two articles evaluate the radiation doses in specific cases, dosimetry of patients in radiodiagnosis, three articles are devoted to detectors (neutrons and x and gamma radiations) and a computer code to build up the dosimetry of an accident due to an external exposure. (N.C.)

  11. A comparative study of preliminary dosimetry for human based on distribution data in rats with 111In, 90Y, 153Sm, and 177Lu labeled rituximab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radfar Edalat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Radio immunotherapy is one of the most important and effective therapies for B-cell non Hoddgkin’s lymphoma treatment. Today, anti CD-20 antibodies labeled with beta emitter radionuclides are used in radio immunotherapy. Various radionuclides for labeling anti CD-20 antibodies have been studied and developed for the treatment and diagnosis of malignancies. This paper describes the preparation, bio-distribution and absorbed dose rate of 111In, 90Y, 177Lu, and 153Sm labeled anti CD-20 antibodies (rituximab in human organs, after injection to rats. The macro cyclic bifunctional chelating agent, N-succinimidyl-1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane-1, 4, 7, 10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA-NHS for conjugation to antibody, was used to prepare DOTA-rituximab. The conjugates were purified by molecular filtration, the average number of DOTA conjugated per mAb was calculated and total concentration was determined by spectrophotometric method. Radio-labeling was performed at 40 °C for 24 hours. After the quality control studies, the final radioactive solution was injected intravenously into rats through their tail vein. The tissue uptakes of each injection were measured. Then we calculated S values for 177Lu and 153Sm by using specific absorbed fractions and data used in the manner of radio-labeled analysis and dosimetry for humans. The absorbed dose rate of each organ was calculated in the specific time by medical internal radiation dose method with linear approximation in the activity measurements.

  12. Ex Vivo and In Vivo Imaging and Biodistribution of Aptamers Targeting the Human Matrix MetalloProtease-9 in Melanomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Kryza

    Full Text Available The human Matrix MetalloProtease-9 (hMMP-9 is overexpressed in tumors where it promotes the release of cancer cells thus contributing to tumor metastasis. We raised aptamers against hMMP-9, which constitutes a validated marker of malignant tumors, in order to design probes for imaging tumors in human beings. A chemically modified RNA aptamer (F3B, fully resistant to nucleases was previously described. This compound was subsequently used for the preparation of F3B-Cy5, F3B-S-acetylmercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG and F3B-DOTA. The binding properties of these derivatives were determined by surface plasmon resonance and electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Optical fluorescence imaging confirmed the binding to hMMP-9 in A375 melanoma bearing mice. Quantitative biodistribution studies were performed at 30 min, 1h and 2 h post injection of 99mTc-MAG-aptamer and 111In-DOTA-F3B. 99mTc radiolabeled aptamer specifically detected hMMP-9 in A375 melanoma tumors but accumulation in digestive tract was very high. Following i.v. injection of 111In-DOTA-F3B, high level of radioactivity was observed in kidneys and bladder but digestive tract uptake was very limited. Tumor uptake was significantly (student t test, p<0.05 higher for 111In-DOTA-F3B with 2.0%ID/g than for the 111In-DOTA-control oligonucleotide (0.7%ID/g with tumor to muscle ratio of 4.0. Such difference in tumor accumulation has been confirmed by ex vivo scintigraphic images performed at 1h post injection and by autoradiography, which revealed the overexpression of hMMP-9 in sections of human melanomas. These results demonstrate that F3B aptamer is of interest for detecting hMMP-9 in melanoma tumor.

  13. Radiolabeling of bleomycin-glucuronide with (131)I and biodistribution studies using xenograft model of human colon tumor in Balb/C mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiroğlu, Hasan; Avcibaşi, Ugur; Ünak, Perihan; Müftüler, Fazilet Zümrüt Biber; İçhedef, Ç A; Gümüşer, Fikriye Gül; Sakarya, Serhan

    2012-08-01

    Bleomycin-glucuronide (BLMG) is the glucuronide conjugate of BLM. In the present study, BLMG was primarily enzymatically synthesized by using a microsome preparate separated from rat liver, labeled with (131)I by iodogen method with the aim of generating a radionuclide-labeled prodrug, and investigated its bioaffinities with tumor-bearing Balb/C mice. Quality control procedures were carried out using thin-layer radiochromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography. Tumor growing was carried out by following Caco-2 cell inoculation into mice. Radiolabeling yield was found to be about 65%. Results indicated that (131)I-labeled BLMG ((131)I-BLMG) was highly stable for 24 hours in human serum. Biodistribution studies were carried out with male Albino Wistar rats and colorectal adenocarcinoma tumor-bearing female Balb/C mice. The biodistribution results in rats showed high uptake in the prostate, the large intestine, and the spinal cord. In addition to this, scintigraphic results agreed with those of biodistributional studies. Xenography studies with tumor-bearing mice demonstrated that tumor uptakes of (131)I-BLM and (131)I-BLMG were high in the first 30 minutes postinjection. Tumor-bearing animal studies demonstrated that (131)I-BLMG was specially retained in colorectal adenocarcinoma with high tumor uptake. Therefore, (131)I-BLMG can be proven to be a promising imaging and therapeutic agent, especially for colon cancer in nuclear medical applications.

  14. Biodistribution and Efficacy of Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Following Intranodal Administration in Experimental Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Lopez-Santalla

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have a large potential in cell therapy for treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, thanks to their immunomodulatory properties. The encouraging results in animal models have initiated the translation of MSC therapy to clinical trials. In cell therapy protocols with MSCs, administered intravenously, several studies have shown that a small proportion of infused MSCs can traffic to the draining lymph nodes (LNs. This is accompanied with an increase of different types of regulatory immune cells in the LNs, suggesting the importance of migration of MSCs to the LNs in order to contribute to immunomodulatory response. Intranodal (IN, also referred as intralymphatic, injection of cells, like dendritic cells, is being proposed in the clinic for the treatment of cancer and allergy, showing that this route of administration is clinically safe and efficient. In this study, we investigated, for the first time, the biodistribution and the efficacy of Luciferase+ adipose-derived MSCs (Luci-eASCs, infused through the inguinal LNs (iLNs, in normal mice and in inflamed mice with colitis. Most of the Luci-eASCs remain in the iLNs and in the adipose tissue surrounding the inguinal LNs. A small proportion of Luci-eASCs can migrate to other locations within the lymphatic system and to other tissues and organs, having a preferential migration toward the intestine in colitic mice. Our results show that the infused Luci-eASCs protected 58% of the mice against induced colitis. Importantly, a correlation between the response to eASC treatment and a higher accumulation of eASCs in popliteal, parathymic, parathyroid, and mesenteric LNs were found. Altogether, these results suggest that IN administration of eASCs is feasible and may represent an effective strategy for cell therapy protocols with human adipose-derived MSCs in the clinic for the treatment of immune-mediated disorders.

  15. Biodistribution and translational pharmacokinetic modeling of a human recombinant alkaline phosphatase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Esther; Stevens, Jasper; Arend, Jacques; Guan, Zheng; Raaben, Willem; Laverman, Peter; Elsas, Andrea van; Masereeuw, R.; Pickkers, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials showed renal protective effects of bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase (AP) in patients with sepsis-associated Acute Kidney Injury (AKI). Subsequently, a human recombinant chimeric AP (recAP) was developed as a pharmaceutically acceptable alternative. Here, we investigated the

  16. Evaluation of the Biodistribution of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Transplanted into Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunil; Lee, Sukjoon; Jung, Han-Sung; Kim, Sun-Young; Shin, Su-Jung; Kang, Mo K; Kim, Euiseong

    2018-01-19

    Several studies have attempted to use human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) for pulp-dentin complex regeneration in vitro. However, the safety of such applications should be first evaluated in vivo before their use in clinical trials. The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vivo fate of intrapulpally transplanted hDPSCs. hDPSCs were isolated and cultured from impacted third molars. In vivo experiments were performed using 7-week-old male BALB/c nude mice. Under deep anesthesia, 1 × 10 5 hDPSCs were transplanted in mice via the tail vein for intravenous injection or into the pulp chamber for intrapulpal transplantation. A total of 56 mice, 28 per group, were used. Mice were sacrificed at different time points, and the numbers of hDPSCs in the organs were analyzed quantitatively. In addition, qualitative analysis was performed to detect intrapulpally transplanted hDPSCs. Intravenously injected hDPSCs were mostly distributed to the lungs and rarely detected in other organs at all observed time points. The hDPSCs transplanted into the pulp chamber rarely migrated to other organs over time. These data indicate a differential distribution of transplanted hDPSCs between the intravenous and intrapulpal route and show the safety of pulpal transplantation of hDPSCs. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Interaction of extremophilic archaeal viruses with human and mouse complement system and viral biodistribution in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Linping; Uldahl, Kristine Buch; Chen, Fangfang; Benasutti, Halli; Logvinski, Deborah; Vu, Vivian; Banda, Nirmal K; Peng, Xu; Simberg, Dmitri; Moghimi, Seyed Moein

    2017-10-01

    Archaeal viruses offer exceptional biophysical properties for modification and exploration of their potential in bionanotechnology, bioengineering and nanotherapeutic developments. However, the interaction of archaeal viruses with elements of the innate immune system has not been explored, which is a necessary prerequisite if their potential for biomedical applications to be realized. Here we show complement activation through lectin (via direct binding of MBL/MASPs) and alternative pathways by two extremophilic archaeal viruses (Sulfolobus monocaudavirus 1 and Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus 2) in human serum. We further show some differences in initiation of complement activation pathways between these viruses. Since, Sulfolobus monocaudavirus 1 was capable of directly triggering the alternative pathway, we also demonstrate that the complement regulator factor H has no affinity for the viral surface, but factor H deposition is purely C3-dependent. This suggests that unlike some virulent pathogens Sulfolobus monocaudavirus 1 does not acquire factor H for protection. Complement activation with Sulfolobus monocaudavirus 1 also proceeds in murine sera through MBL-A/C as well as factor D-dependent manner, but C3 deficiency has no overall effect on viral clearance by organs of the reticuloendothelial system on intravenous injection. However, splenic deposition was significantly higher in C3 knockout animals compared with the corresponding wild type mice. We discuss the potential application of these viruses in biomedicine in relation to their complement activating properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Scientific days on electromagnetic fields: from dosimetry to human health - Conference proceedings; Journees scientifiques - Champs electromagnetiques: de la dosimetrie a la sante humaine - Recueil des resumes et presentations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiart, J.; Ghanmi, A.; Picon, O.; Conil, E.; Varsier, N.; Hadjem, A.; Sudret, B.; Magne, I.; Souques, M.; Gaudaire, F.; De Seze, R.; Jawad, O.; Lautru, D.; Dricot, J.M.; Horlin, F.; De Doncker, P.; Drissaoui, A.; Musy, F.; Nicolas, L.; Perrussel, R.; Scorretti, R.; Voyer, D.; Jala, M.; Moulines, E.; Levy-Leduc, C.; Mahfouz, Z.; Gati, A.; Fouad Hanna, V.; Leveque, P.; Arnaud-Cormos, D.; Zhadobov, M.; Jarrige, P.; Gaborit, G.; Kohler, S.; Ticaud, N.; Duvillaret, L.; Guelilia, Z.; Loison, R.; Gillard, R.; Laisne, A.; Favet, D.; Benadhira, R.; Mir, L.; Nadi, M.; Kourtiche, D.; Gazeau, F.; Wilhelm, C.; Delemotte, L.; Breton, M.; Tarek, M.; Marc-Vergnes, J.P.; Yardin, C.; Perrin, A.; Le Drean, Y.; Sauleau, R.; Lambrozo, J.; Selmaoui, B.; Ghosn, R.; Thuroczy, G.; Villegier, A.S.; Loos, N.; Brenet-Dufour, V.; Liabeuf, S.; Bach, V.; Moretti, D.; Lewis, N.; Garenne, A.; Poulletier De Gannes, F.; Haro, E.; Lagroye, I.; Bornat, Y.; Boutaib, Y.; Saighi, S.; Renaud, S.; Veyre, B.; Schuz, J.; Deltour, I.; Van Deventer, E.; Vecchia, P.; Merckel, O.; Bellaouel, A.; Demaret, P.; Donati, P.; Jovanovic, D.; Chauvin, S.; Desreumaux, J.P.; Fouquet, L.; Picard, D.; Massardier-Pilonchery, A.; Hours, M.; Bergeret, A.; Person, C.; Toutain, Y.; Butet, R.; Berrahma, K.; Balderelli, I.; Stelmaszyk, V.; Cretallaz, C.; Lamproglou, I.; Amourette, C.; Diserbo, M.; Fauquette, W.; Martigne, P.; Collin, A.; Lagroye, I.; Ait Aissa, S.; Hurtier, A.; Taxile, M.; Le Montagner, L.; Athane, A.; Duleu, S.; Percherancier, Y.; Geffard, M.; Ruffie, G.; Billaudel, B.; Veyret, B.; Pelletier, A.; Delanaud, S.; Libert, J.P.; Schunck, T.; Bieth, F.; Soubere Mahamoud, Y.; Le Quement, C.; Ferrand, G.; Le Guevel, R.; Carton, P.H.; Luong, M.; Tanvir, S.; Selmaoui, B.; Silva Pires-Antonietti, V.; Sonnet, P.; Pulvin, S.; Kuster, O.; Tetelin, C.

    2012-04-15

    - Electromagnetic interferences and cardiac implants; 24 - RF effects on central nervous system: sleep, cognition, Electro-encephalography, vascularisation; 25 - Specific effects of an exposure to mobile phone RF waves on the autonomous nervous control of the cutaneous vasomotor tone; 26 - The ERNAM project: exposure of neuronal networks to the GSM-1800 signal; 27 - Mobile phones, power lines and cancer: the epidemiological evidence leading to classification as possible carcinogens; 28 - EMF Risk Assessment and Management: A WHO Perspective; 29 - Evolution of ICNIRP guidelines; 30 - Assessment of RF-linked risks at the Anses: from dialogue management recommendations; 31 - Characterization of mobile phone-absorbing medium interactions for non-invasive dosimetry; 32 - Status of electromagnetic radiation exposures and evaluation of prevention means; 33 - General public exposure to RF in France; 34 - Power emitted by a mobile phone in voice communication: from 2G to 3G VoIP; 35 - Digital dosimetry in HF/VHF range; 36 - Professional exposure of mobile phone maintenance technicians; 37 - Robot-less multi-sensors dosimetry for real time SAR measurement; 38 - High performance SAR meter for the characterization of 3G mobile phones exposure; 39 - RF dosemeters and user's body diffraction; 40 - RF waves and health: summary of 2007-2011 scientific publications; 41 - Behaviour of adult male wistar rats during high power pulsed electromagnetic waves (3 GHz); 42 - Wi-Fi effects: results of IMS Lab studies; 43 - Effects on the energy fluxes of young rats homeostasis during a chronic exposure to RF fields; 44 - Biological effects of very-high power and ultra-large range radiations: ISL's research programme; 45 - Study of cell-scale biological effects of pulsed RF fields used in high-resolution NMR-imaging; 46 - Effects of cell phone radiofrequency exposure on the human cytochrome P450 reductase; 47 - CEA's 'electromagnetic safety' working group; 48 - In situ evaluation of

  19. A Revised Model for Dosimetry in the Human Small Intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Poston; Nasir U. Bhuiyan; R. Alex Redd; Neil Parham; Jennifer Watson

    2005-02-28

    A new model for an adult human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) has been developed for use in internal dose estimations to the wall of the GIT and to the other organs and tissues of the body from radionuclides deposited in the lumenal contents of the five sections of the GIT. These sections were the esophasgus, stomach, small intestine, upper large intestine, and the lower large intestine. The wall of each section was separated from its lumenal contents.

  20. Measurement of Libby Amphibole (LA) Elongated Particle Dissolution Rates and Alteration of Size/Shape Distributions in Support of Human Dosimetry Model Development and Relative Potency Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    To maximize the value of toxicological data in development of human health risk assessment models of inhaled elongated mineral particles, improvements in human dosimetry modeling are needed. In order to extend the dosimetry model of deposited fibers (Asgharian et aI., Johnson 201...

  1. Preclinical Potency and Biodistribution Studies of an AAV 5 Vector Expressing Human Interferon-β (ART-I02 for Local Treatment of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline J Aalbers

    Full Text Available Proof of concept for local gene therapy for the treatment of arthritis with immunomodulatory cytokine interferon beta (IFN-β has shown promising results in animal models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. For the treatment of RA patients, we engineered a recombinant adeno-associated serotype 5 vector (rAAV5 encoding human (hIFN-β under control of a nuclear factor κB promoter (ART-I02.The potency of ART-I02 in vitro as well as biodistribution in vivo in arthritic animals was evaluated to characterize the vector prior to clinical application. ART-I02 expression and bioactivity after transduction was evaluated in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS from different species. Biodistribution of the vector after local injection was assessed in a rat adjuvant arthritis model through qPCR analysis of vector DNA. In vivo imaging was used to investigate transgene expression and kinetics in a mouse collagen induced arthritis model.Transduction of RA FLS in vitro with ART-I02 resulted in high expression levels of bioactive hIFN-β. Transduction of FLS from rhesus monkeys, rodents and rabbits with ART-I02 showed high transgene expression, and hIFN-β proved bioactive in FLS from rhesus monkeys. Transgene expression and bioactivity in RA FLS were unaltered in the presence of methotrexate. In vivo, vector biodistribution analysis in rats after intra-articular injection of ART-I02 demonstrated that the majority of vector DNA remained in the joint (>93%. In vivo imaging in mice confirmed local expression of rAAV5 in the knee joint region and demonstrated rapid detectable and sustained expression up until 7 weeks.These data show that hIFN-β produced by RA FLS transduced with ART-I02 is bioactive and that intra-articular delivery of rAAV5 drives expression of a therapeutic transgene in the joint, with only limited biodistribution of vector DNA to other tissues, supporting progress towards a phase 1 clinical trial for the local treatment of arthritis in patients with RA.

  2. {sup 131}I-CRTX internal dosimetry: animal model and human extrapolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Henrique Martins de; Ferreira, Andrea Vidal; Soares, Marcella Araugio; Silveira, Marina Bicalho; Santos, Raquel Gouvea dos [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN-CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: hma@cdtn.br

    2009-07-01

    Snake venoms molecules have been shown to play a role not only in the survival and proliferation of tumor cells but also in the processes of tumor cell adhesion, migration and angiogenesis. {sup 125}I-Crtx, a radiolabeled version of a peptide derived from Crotalus durissus terrificus snake venom, specifically binds to tumor and triggers apoptotic signalling. At the present work, {sup 125}I-Crtx biokinetic data (evaluated in mice bearing Erlich tumor) were treated by MIRD formalism to perform Internal Dosimetry studies. Doses in several organs of mice were determinate, as well as in implanted tumor, for {sup 131}I-Crtx. Doses results obtained for animal model were extrapolated to humans assuming a similar concentration ratio among various tissues between mouse and human. In the extrapolation, it was used human organ masses from Cristy/Eckerman phantom. Both penetrating and non-penetrating radiation from {sup 131}I in the tissue were considered in dose calculations. (author)

  3. {sup 131}I-SPGP internal dosimetry: animal model and human extrapolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Henrique Martins de; Ferreira, Andrea Vidal; Soprani, Juliana; Santos, Raquel Gouvea dos [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN-CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: hma@cdtn.br; Figueiredo, Suely Gomes de [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, (UFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Fisiologicas. Lab. de Quimica de Proteinas

    2009-07-01

    Scorpaena plumieri is commonly called moreia-ati or manganga and is the most venomous and one of the most abundant fish species of the Brazilian coast. Soprani 2006, demonstrated that SPGP - an isolated protein from S. plumieri fish- possess high antitumoral activity against malignant tumours and can be a source of template molecules for the development (design) of antitumoral drugs. In the present work, Soprani's {sup 125}ISPGP biokinetic data were treated by MIRD formalism to perform Internal Dosimetry studies. Absorbed doses due to the {sup 131}I-SPGP uptake were determinate in several organs of mice, as well as in the implanted tumor. Doses obtained for animal model were extrapolated to humans assuming a similar ratio for various mouse and human tissues. For the extrapolation, it was used human organ masses from Cristy/Eckerman phantom. Both penetrating and non-penetrating radiation from {sup 131}I were considered. (author)

  4. The effect of circulating antigen on the biodistribution of the engineered human antibody hCTM01 in a nude mice model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, Q. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University Hospital, Queen`s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Perkins, A.C. [Department of Medical Physics, University Hospital, Queen`s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Frier, M. [Department of Medical Physics, University Hospital, Queen`s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Watson, S. [Department of Cancer Studies, University Hospital, Queen`s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Lalani, E.N. [Department of Cellular Pathology, Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Symonds, E.M. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University Hospital, Queen`s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    1997-02-01

    Clinical studies are currently underway to assess the biodistribution and therapeutic potential of the genetically engineered human antibody hCTM01 directed against polymorphic epithelial mucin (PEM) in patients with ovarian carcinoma. The present study was undertaken to assess the effect of circulating PEM antigen on the biodistribution of the anti-PEM antibody in mice bearing MUC-1 transfected adenocarcinoma cell lines. Tumour xenografts were established from three cell lines: 413-BCR, which expressed antigen on the cell surface and also shed antigen into the circulation, E3P23, which expressed the antigen but did not shed into the circulation, and a negative control (410.4 MUCI). Groups of five mice were injected with 1.0 mg/kg antibody, imaged after 72 h and then sacrificed, followed by assay of tissue uptake. The results showed a clear difference in the tumour and liver uptake, with the non-secreting cell line showing almost twice the tumour uptake and approximately 20% of the liver uptake of the secreting cell line. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Dosimetry of nasal uptake of soluble and reactive gases: A first study of inter-human variability (Journal Article)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anatomically accurate human child and adult nasal tract models will be used in concert with computationally simulated air flow information to investigate the influence of age-related differences in anatomy on inhalation dosimetry in the upper and lower airways. The findings of t...

  6. Biodistribution of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) humanized monoclonal antibody h-R3 in a xenograft model of human lung adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales-Morales, Alejo; Duconge, Jorge; Caballero-Torres, Idania; Nunez-Gandolff, Gilda; Fernandez, Eduardo; Iznaga-Escobar, Normando E-mail: normando@ict.cim.sld.cu

    1999-04-01

    The anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) humanized monoclonal antibody (MAb) h-R3 is an (IgG{sub 1}), which binds to an extracellular domain of EGF-R. It was used to evaluate the biodistribution on nude mice xenografted with H-125 human lung adenocarcinoma cell line. Results were compared with its murine version of the MAb ior-egf/r3. Twenty-one athymic female 4NMRI nu/nu mice were injected intraperitoneally with 10 {mu}g/100 {mu}Ci of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled MAbs. Immunoreactivity of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled MAbs were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) on H-125 cell line and the immunoreactive fractions was determined by the Lindmo method. Among all organs, significant accumulation was found in serum (27.05 {+-} 2.08 %ID/g) and tumor (3.903 {+-} 0.89 %ID/g) at 4 h after injection. These values decreased to 5.03 {+-} 0.50 %ID/g and 2.19 {+-} 0.56 %ID/g for serum and tumor, respectively. The immunoreactive fraction was found to be 0.70, with a correlation coefficient r=0.9984. With the good biodistribution and tumor uptake of the {sup 99m}Tc-labeled humanized antibody h-R3, a phase I diagnostic clinical trial of tumor with epithelial origin should be pursued.

  7. Estimated human absorbed dose of a new (153)Sm bone seeking agent based on biodistribution data in mice: Comparison with (153)Sm-EDTMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefnia, Hassan; Zolghadri, Samaneh

    2015-11-01

    The main goal in radiotherapy is to deliver the absorbed dose within the target organs in highest possible amount, while the absorbed dose of the other organs, especially the critical organs, should be kept as low as possible. In this work, the absorbed dose to human organs for a new (153)Sm bone-seeking agent was investigated. (153)Sm-(4-{[(bis(phosphonomethyl))carbamoyl]methyl}-7,10-bis(carboxymethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododec-1-yl) acetic acid ((153)Sm-BPAMD) complex was successfully prepared. The biodistribution of the complex was investigated in male Syrian mice up to 48 h post injection. The human absorbed dose of the complex was estimated based on the biodistribution data of the mice by radiation absorbed dose assessment resource (RADAR) method. The target to non-target absorbed dose ratios for (153)Sm-BPAMD were compared with these ratios for (153)Sm-EDTMP. The highest absorbed dose for (153)Sm-BPAMD was observed in bone surface with 5.828 mGy/MBq. The dose ratios of the bone surface to the red marrow and to the total body for (153)Sm-BPAMD were 5.3 and 20.0, respectively, while these ratios for (153)Sm-EDTMP were 4.4 and 18.3, respectively. This means, for a given dose to the bone surface as the target organ, the red marrow (as the main critical organ) and the total body would receive lesser absorbed dose in the case of (153)Sm-BPAMD. Generally, the human absorbed dose estimation of (153)Sm-BPAMD indicated that all other tissues approximately received insignificant absorbed dose in comparison with bone surface and therefore can be regarded as a new potential agent for bone pain palliation therapy. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Radiation dosimetry of the α4β2 nicotinic receptor ligand (+-[18F]flubatine, comparing preclinical PET/MRI and PET/CT to first-in-human PET/CT results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Kranz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both enantiomers of [18F]flubatine are new radioligands for neuroimaging of α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with positron emission tomography (PET exhibiting promising pharmacokinetics which makes them attractive for different clinical questions. In a previous preclinical study, the main advantage of (+-[18F]flubatine compared to (−-[18F]flubatine was its higher binding affinity suggesting that (+-[18F]flubatine might be able to detect also slight reductions of α4β2 nAChRs and could be more sensitive than (−-[18F]flubatine in early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. To support the clinical translation, we investigated a fully image-based internal dosimetry approach for (+-[18F]flubatine, comparing mouse data collected on a preclinical PET/MRI system to piglet and first-in-human data acquired on a clinical PET/CT system. Time-activity curves (TACs were obtained from the three species, the animal data extrapolated to human scale, exponentially fitted and the organ doses (OD, and effective dose (ED calculated with OLINDA. Results The excreting organs (urinary bladder, kidneys, and liver receive the highest organ doses in all species. Hence, a renal/hepatobiliary excretion pathway can be assumed. In addition, the ED conversion factors of 12.1 μSv/MBq (mice, 14.3 μSv/MBq (piglets, and 23.0 μSv/MBq (humans were calculated which are well within the order of magnitude as known from other 18F-labeled radiotracers. Conclusions Although both enantiomers of [18F]flubatine exhibit different binding kinetics in the brain due to the respective affinities, the effective dose revealed no enantiomer-specific differences among the investigated species. The preclinical dosimetry and biodistribution of (+-[18F]flubatine was shown and the feasibility of a dose assessment based on image data acquired on a small animal PET/MR and a clinical PET/CT was demonstrated. Additionally, the first-in-human study confirmed the tolerability

  9. Effect of the peptide Tat(49-57) on the bio-distribution and similar radiopharmaceuticals dosimetry of the bombesin; Efecto del peptido TAT(49-57) sobre la biodistribucion y dosimetria de radiofarmacos analogos de la bombesina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos C, C. L.

    2011-07-01

    The gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRP-r) is over-expressed in prostate and breast cancer. {sup 99m}Tc-Bombesin ({sup 99m}Tc-Bn) has been reported as a radiopharmaceutical with specific cell GRP-r binding. The HIV Tat(49-57)-derived peptide has been used to deliver a large variety of molecules to cell nuclei. New hybrid radiopharmaceuticals of type {sup 99m}Tc-N{sub 2}S{sub 2}-Tat(49-57)-Lys{sup 3}-Bn ({sup 99m}Tc-Tat-Bn) and {sup 188}Re-N{sub 2}S{sub 2}-Tat(49-57)-Lys{sup 3}-Bn ({sup 188}Re-Tat-Bn), would increase cell uptake and internalized in cancer cell nuclei could act as an effective system of targeted radiotherapy using Auger and internal conversion (I C) electron emissions near DNA. The aim of this research was to prepare and assess in vitro and in vivo uptake kinetics in cancer cells of {sup 99m}Tc/{sup 188}Re-Tat-Bn and the in vitro nucleus and cytoplasm internalization kinetics in GRP receptor-positive cancer cells as well as to evaluate the subcellular-level radiation absorbed dose associated with the observed effect on cancer cell DNA proliferation. Structures of N{sub 2}S{sub 2}-Tat-Bn and Tc/Re(O)N{sub 2}S{sub 2}-Tat-Bn were calculated by an Mm procedure. {sup 99m}Tc-Tat-Bn and {sup 188}Re-Tat-Bn were synthesized and stability studies carried out by HPLC and I TLC-Sg analyses in serum and cysteine solutions. In vitro internalization was tested using human prostate cancer Pc 3 cells and breast carcinoma cell lines MDA-Mb 231 and MCF 7. Nuclei from cells were isolated using a nuclear extraction kit. Total disintegrations in each subcellular compartment were calculated by integration of experimental time activity kinetic curves. Nucleus internalization was corroborated by con focal microscopy images using immunofluorescent labelled Tat-Bn. Biodistribution was determined in Pc 3 tumor-bearing nude mice. The Penelope code was used to simulate and calculate the absorbed dose by contribution of {beta}, Auger and I C electrons in the cytoplasm and

  10. Radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Hine, Gerald J; Hine, Gerald J

    1956-01-01

    Radiation Dosimetry focuses on the advancements, processes, technologies, techniques, and principles involved in radiation dosimetry, including counters and calibration and standardization techniques. The selection first offers information on radiation units and the theory of ionization dosimetry and interaction of radiation with matter. Topics include quantities derivable from roentgens, determination of dose in roentgens, ionization dosimetry of high-energy photons and corpuscular radiations, and heavy charged particles. The text then examines the biological and medical effects of radiation,

  11. Application of a canine 238Pu dosimetry model to human bioassay data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickman, Jr., A. W. [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1991-08-01

    Associated with the use of 2238Pu in thermoelectric power sources for space probes and power supplies for cardiac devices is the potential for human exposure to 238Pu, primarily by inhalation. In the event of human internal exposure, a means is needed for assessing the level of intake and calculating radiation doses. Several bioassay/dosimetry models have been developed for 239Pu. However, results from studies with laboratory animals have indicated that the biokinetics, and therefore the descriptive models, of 238Pu are significantly different from those for 239Pu. A canine model accounting for these differences has been applied in this work to urinary excretion data from seven humans occupationally exposed to low levels of an insoluble 238Pu compound. The modified model provides a good description of the urinary excretion kinetics observed in the exposed humans. The modified model was also used to provide estimates of the initial intakes of 238Pu for the seven individuals; these estimates ranged from 4.5 nCi (170 Bq) to 87 nCi (3200 Bq). Autopsy data on the amount and distribution of 238Pu retained in the organs may be used in the future to validate or refute both these estimates and the assumptions used to formulate the human model. Modification of the human model to simulate an injection exposure to 239Pu gave patterns of retention in the organs and urinary excretion comparable to those seen previously in humans; further modification of the model using fecal data (unavailable for the subjects of this study) is indicated.

  12. Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Cern Staff and Users can now consult their dose records for an individual or an organizational unit with HRT. Please see more information on our web page: http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry Dosimetry Service is open every morning from 8.30 - 12.00. Closed in the afternoons. We would like to remind you that dosimeters cannot be sent to customers by internal mail. Short-term dosimeters (VCT's) must always be returned to the Service after the use and must not be left on the racks in the experimental areas or in the secretariats. Dosimetry Service Tel. 7 2155 Dosimetry.service@cern.ch http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  13. Bone dosimetry using synthetic images to represent trabecular bones of five regions of the human body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima Filho, Jose de M. [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Vieira, Jose W. [Escola Politecnica de Pernambuco (POLI). Universidade de Pernambuco (UPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Lima, Vanildo J. de M., E-mail: vjr@ufpe.br [Departamento de Anatomia. Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Lima, Lindeval F., E-mail: lindeval@dmat.ufrr.br [Departamento de Matematica (DMAT). Universidade Federal de Roraima (UFRR), Boa Vista, RR (Brazil); Lima, Fernando R.A., E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN/NE-CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Vasconcelos, Wagner E. de [Departamento de Energia Nuclear (DEN). Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    One of the greatest challenges in numerical dosimetry of ionizing radiation is to estimate the absorbed dose by bone tissue in the human body. The bone tissues of greater radiosensitivity are the red bone marrow (RBM), that consist of the hematopoietic cells, located within the trabecular bones, and the bone surface cells (BSC), called osteogenic cells. The report 70 of the ICRP lists five spongiosa regions with their respective volume percent of trabecular bone: ribs (also contemplating the clavicles and sternum), spine, long bones, pelvis and skull (also contemplating mandible). The Grupo de Pesquisa em Dosimetria Numerica (GDN/CNPq) has been built exposure computational models (ECMs) based on voxel phantoms and EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. To estimate the energy deposited in the RBM and in the BSC of a phantom, the GDN/CNPq has used a method based on micro-CT images of the five trabecular regions mentioned above. These images were provided by other research institutes and were obtained from scan of bone samples of adult. Here is the greatest difficulty in reproducing this method: besides the need for bone images of real people with micrometer resolution, the distribution of bone marrow in the human body, according to ICRP 70, varies with age. This article presents some proposals of the GDN/CNPQ for replacing in the ECMs the micro-CT images by images synthesized by the computer, based on Monte Carlo sampling. (author)

  14. Monte Carlo simulations for external neutron dosimetry based on the visible Chinese human phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guozhi; Liu, Qian; Luo, Qingming

    2007-12-01

    A group of Monte Carlo simulations has been performed for external neutron dosimetry calculation based on a whole-body anatomical model, the visible Chinese human (VCH) phantom, which was newly developed from high-resolution cryosectional color photographic images of a healthy Chinese adult male cadaver. Physical characteristics of the VCH computational phantom that consists of 230 × 120 × 892 voxels corresponding to an element volume of 2 × 2 × 2 mm3 are evaluated through comparison against a variety of other anthropomorphic models. Organ-absorbed doses and the effective doses for monoenergic neutron beams ranging from 10-9 MeV to 10 GeV under six idealized irradiation geometries (AP, PA, LLAT, RLAT, ROT and ISO) were calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX2.5. Absorbed dose results for selected organs and the effective doses are presented in the form of tables. Dose results are also compared with currently available neutron data form ICRP Publication 74 and those of VIP-Man. Anatomical variations between different models, as well as their influence on dose distributions, are explored. Detailed information derived from the VCH phantom is able to lend quantitative references to the widespread application of human computational models in radiology.

  15. The UF family of hybrid phantoms of the developing human fetus for computational radiation dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maynard, Matthew R; Geyer, John W; Bolch, Wesley [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Aris, John P [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Shifrin, Roger Y, E-mail: wbolch@ufl.edu [Department of Radiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2011-08-07

    Historically, the development of computational phantoms for radiation dosimetry has primarily been directed at capturing and representing adult and pediatric anatomy, with less emphasis devoted to models of the human fetus. As concern grows over possible radiation-induced cancers from medical and non-medical exposures of the pregnant female, the need to better quantify fetal radiation doses, particularly at the organ-level, also increases. Studies such as the European Union's SOLO (Epidemiological Studies of Exposed Southern Urals Populations) hope to improve our understanding of cancer risks following chronic in utero radiation exposure. For projects such as SOLO, currently available fetal anatomic models do not provide sufficient anatomical detail for organ-level dose assessment. To address this need, two fetal hybrid computational phantoms were constructed using high-quality magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography image sets obtained for two well-preserved fetal specimens aged 11.5 and 21 weeks post-conception. Individual soft tissue organs, bone sites and outer body contours were segmented from these images using 3D-DOCTOR(TM) and then imported to the 3D modeling software package Rhinoceros(TM) for further modeling and conversion of soft tissue organs, certain bone sites and outer body contours to deformable non-uniform rational B-spline surfaces. The two specimen-specific phantoms, along with a modified version of the 38 week UF hybrid newborn phantom, comprised a set of base phantoms from which a series of hybrid computational phantoms was derived for fetal ages 8, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 38 weeks post-conception. The methodology used to construct the series of phantoms accounted for the following age-dependent parameters: (1) variations in skeletal size and proportion, (2) bone-dependent variations in relative levels of bone growth, (3) variations in individual organ masses and total fetal masses and (4) statistical percentile variations

  16. Biodistribution and photodynamic effects of polyvinylpyrrolidone-hypericin using multicellular spheroids composed of normal human urothelial and T24 transitional cell carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandepitte, Joachim; Roelants, Mieke; Cleynenbreugel, Ben Van; Hettinger, Klaudia; Lerut, Evelyne; van Poppel, Hendrik; de Witte, Peter A. M.

    2011-01-01

    Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-hypericin is a potent photosensitizer that is used in the urological clinic to photodiagnose with high-sensitivity nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). We examined the differential accumulation and therapeutic effects of PVP-hypericin using spheroids composed of a human urothelial cell carcinoma cell line (T24) and normal human urothelial (NHU) cells. The in vitro biodistribution was assessed using fluorescence image analysis of 5-μm cryostat sections of spheroids that were incubated with PVP-hypericin. The results show that PVP-hypericin accumulated to a much higher extent in T24 spheroids as compared to NHU spheroids, thereby reproducing the clinical situation. Subsequently, spheroids were exposed to different PDT regimes with a light dose ranging from 0.3 to 18J/cm2. When using low fluence rates, only minor differences in cell survival were seen between normal and malignant spheroids. High light fluence rates induced a substantial difference in cell survival between the two spheroid types, killing ~80% of the cells present in the T24 spheroids. It was concluded that further in vivo experiments are required to fully evaluate the potential of PVP-hypericin as a phototherapeutic for NMIBC, focusing on the combination of the compound with methods that enhance the oxygenation of the urothelium.

  17. Human eye analytical and mesh-geometry models for ophthalmic dosimetry using MCNP6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelocci, Lucas V.; Fonseca, Gabriel P.; Yoriyaz, Helio, E-mail: hyoriyaz@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Eye tumors can be treated with brachytherapy using Co-60 plaques, I-125 seeds, among others materials. The human eye has regions particularly vulnerable to ionizing radiation (e.g. crystalline) and dosimetry for this region must be taken carefully. A mathematical model was proposed in the past [1] for the eye anatomy to be used in Monte Carlo simulations to account for dose distribution in ophthalmic brachytherapy. The model includes the description for internal structures of the eye that were not treated in previous works. The aim of this present work was to develop a new eye model based on the Mesh geometries of the MCNP6 code. The methodology utilized the ABAQUS/CAE (Simulia 3DS) software to build the Mesh geometry. For this work, an ophthalmic applicator containing up to 24 model Amersham 6711 I-125 seeds (Oncoseed) was used, positioned in contact with a generic tumor defined analytically inside the eye. The absorbed dose in eye structures like cornea, sclera, choroid, retina, vitreous body, lens, optical nerve and optical nerve wall were calculated using both models: analytical and MESH. (author)

  18. Evaluation of tissue-equivalent materials to be used as human brain tissue substitute in dosimetry for diagnostic radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, C.C., E-mail: cassio.c.ferreira@gmail.co [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Postal Code 353, Sergipe-SE 49100-000 (Brazil); Ximenes Filho, R.E.M., E-mail: raimundoximenes@hotmail.co [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Postal Code 353, Sergipe-SE 49100-000 (Brazil); Vieira, J.W., E-mail: jwvieira@br.inter.ne [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Pernambuco (CEFET-PE), Av. Professor Luiz Freire, 500 Curado, CEP 50740-540, Recife (Brazil); Escola Politecnica de Pernambuco, Universidade de Pernambuco (EPP/UPE), Rua Benfica, 455, Madalena, CEP 50720-001, Recife (Brazil); Tomal, A., E-mail: alessandratomal@pg.ffclrp.usp.b [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto-SP 14040-90 (Brazil); Poletti, M.E., E-mail: poletti@ffclrp.usp.b [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto-SP 14040-90 (Brazil); Garcia, C.A.B., E-mail: cgarcia@ufs.b [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Postal Code 353, Sergipe-SE 49100-000 (Brazil); Maia, A.F., E-mail: afmaia@ufs.b [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Postal Code 353, Sergipe-SE 49100-000 (Brazil)

    2010-08-15

    Tissue-equivalent materials to be used as substitutes for human brain tissue in dosimetry for diagnostic radiology have been investigated in terms of calculated total mass attenuation coefficient ({mu}/{rho}), calculated mass energy-absorption coefficient ({mu}{sub en}/{rho}) and absorbed dose. Measured linear attenuation coefficients ({mu}) have been used for benchmarking the calculated total mass attenuation coefficient ({mu}/{rho}). The materials examined were bolus, nylon (registered) , orange articulation wax, red articulation wax, PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate), bees wax, paraffin I, paraffin II, pitch and water. The results show that water is the best substitute for brain among the materials investigated. The average percentage differences between the calculated {mu}/{rho} and {mu}{sub en}/{rho} coefficients for water and those for brain were 1.0% and 2.5%, respectively. Absorbed doses determined by Monte Carlo methods confirm water as being the best brain substitute to be used in dosimetry for diagnostic radiology, showing maximum difference of 0.01%. Additionally this study showed that PMMA, a material often used for the manufacturing of head phantoms for computed tomography, cannot be considered to be a suitable substitute for human brain tissue in dosimetry.

  19. Biodistribution and Clearance of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Quantitative Three-Dimensional Cryo-Imaging After Intravenous Infusion in a Rat Lung Injury Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmuck, Eric G; Koch, Jill M; Centanni, John M; Hacker, Timothy A; Braun, Rudolf K; Eldridge, Marlowe; Hei, Derek J; Hematti, Peiman; Raval, Amish N

    2016-12-01

    : Cell tracking is a critical component of the safety and efficacy evaluation of therapeutic cell products. To date, cell-tracking modalities have been hampered by poor resolution, low sensitivity, and inability to track cells beyond the shortterm. Three-dimensional (3D) cryo-imaging coregisters fluorescent and bright-field microcopy images and allows for single-cell quantification within a 3D organ volume. We hypothesized that 3D cryo-imaging could be used to measure cell biodistribution and clearance after intravenous infusion in a rat lung injury model compared with normal rats. A bleomycin lung injury model was established in Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 12). Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) labeled with QTracker655 were infused via jugular vein. After 2, 4, or 8 days, a second dose of hMSCs labeled with QTracker605 was infused, and animals were euthanized after 60, 120, or 240 minutes. Lungs, liver, spleen, heart, kidney, testis, and intestine were cryopreserved, followed by 3D cryo-imaging of each organ. At 60 minutes, 82% ± 9.7% of cells were detected; detection decreased to 60% ± 17% and 66% ± 22% at 120 and 240 minutes, respectively. At day 2, 0.06% of cells were detected, and this level remained constant at days 4 and 8 postinfusion. At 60, 120, and 240 minutes, 99.7% of detected cells were found in the liver, lungs, and spleen, with cells primarily retained in the liver. This is the first study using 3D cryo-imaging to track hMSCs in a rat lung injury model. hMSCs were retained primarily in the liver, with fewer detected in lungs and spleen. Effective bench-to-bedside clinical translation of cellular therapies requires careful understanding of cell fate through tracking. Tracking cells is important to measure cell retention so that delivery methods and cell dose can be optimized and so that biodistribution and clearance can be defined to better understand potential off-target toxicity and redosing strategies. This article demonstrates, for the first

  20. Enzyme replacement in a human model of mucopolysaccharidosis IVA in vitro and its biodistribution in the cartilage of wild type mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melita Dvorak-Ewell

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA; Morquio A syndrome is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS, an enzyme that degrades keratan sulfate (KS. Currently no therapy for MPS IVA is available. We produced recombinant human (rhGALNS as a potential enzyme replacement therapy for MPS IVA. Chinese hamster ovary cells stably overexpressing GALNS and sulfatase modifying factor-1 were used to produce active ( approximately 2 U/mg and pure (>or=97% rhGALNS. The recombinant enzyme was phosphorylated and was dose-dependently taken up by mannose-6-phosphate receptor (K(uptake = 2.5 nM, thereby restoring enzyme activity in MPS IVA fibroblasts. In the absence of an animal model with a skeletal phenotype, we established chondrocytes isolated from two MPS IVA patients as a disease model in vitro. MPS IVA chondrocyte GALNS activity was not detectable and the cells exhibited KS storage up to 11-fold higher than unaffected chondrocytes. MPS IVA chondrocytes internalized rhGALNS into lysosomes, resulting in normalization of enzyme activity and decrease in KS storage. rhGALNS treatment also modulated gene expression, increasing expression of chondrogenic genes Collagen II, Collagen X, Aggrecan and Sox9 and decreasing abnormal expression of Collagen I. Intravenous administration of rhGALNS resulted in biodistribution throughout all layers of the heart valve and the entire thickness of the growth plate in wild-type mice. We show that enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human GALNS results in clearance of keratan sulfate accumulation, and that such treatment ameliorates aberrant gene expression in human chondrocytes in vitro. Penetration of the therapeutic enzyme throughout poorly vascularized, but clinically relevant tissues, including growth plate cartilage and heart valve, as well as macrophages and hepatocytes in wild-type mouse, further supports development of rhGALNS as enzyme replacement therapy for

  1. Computational dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebert, B.R.L.; Thomas, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents a definition of the term ``Computational Dosimetry`` that is interpreted as the sub-discipline of computational physics which is devoted to radiation metrology. It is shown that computational dosimetry is more than a mere collection of computational methods. Computational simulations directed at basic understanding and modelling are important tools provided by computational dosimetry, while another very important application is the support that it can give to the design, optimization and analysis of experiments. However, the primary task of computational dosimetry is to reduce the variance in the determination of absorbed dose (and its related quantities), for example in the disciplines of radiological protection and radiation therapy. In this paper emphasis is given to the discussion of potential pitfalls in the applications of computational dosimetry and recommendations are given for their avoidance. The need for comparison of calculated and experimental data whenever possible is strongly stressed.

  2. The Theranostic PSMA Ligand PSMA-617 in the Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer by PET/CT: Biodistribution in Humans, Radiation Dosimetry, and First Evaluation of Tumor Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Hetzheim, Henrik; Kratochwil, Clemens; Benesova, Martina; Eder, Matthias; Neels, Oliver C; Eisenhut, Michael; Kübler, Wolfgang; Holland-Letz, Tim; Giesel, Frederik L; Mier, Walter; Kopka, Klaus; Haberkorn, Uwe

    2015-11-01

    PET imaging with the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-targeted radioligand (68)Ga-PSMA-11 is regarded as a significant step forward in the diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa). More recently, a PSMA ligand was developed that can be labeled with (68)Ga, (111)In, (177)Lu, and (90)Y. This ligand, named PSMA-617, therefore enables both diagnosis and therapy of PCa. The aims of this evaluation were to clinically investigate the distribution of (68)Ga-PSMA-617 in normal tissues and in PCa lesions as well as to evaluate the radiation exposure by the radioligand in PET imaging. Nineteen patients, most of them with recurrent PCa, were referred for (68)Ga-PSMA-617 PET/CT. The quantitative assessment of tracer uptake of several organs and of 53 representative tumor lesions was performed in 15 patients at 1 and 3 h after injection. In 4 additional patients, the same procedure was conducted at 5 min, 1 h, 2 h, 3 h, 4 h, and 5 h after injection. On the basis of the data for these 4 patients (mean injected dose, 231 MBq), the radiation exposure of a (68)Ga-PSMA-617 PET/CT was identified. Intense tracer uptake was observed in the kidneys and salivary glands. In 14 of 19 patients (73.7%), at least 1 lesion suspected of being a tumor was detected at 3 h after injection. Of 53 representative tumor lesions selected at 3 h after injection, 47 lesions were visible at 1 h after injection. The mean tumor-to-background ratio for maximum standardized uptake value was 20.4 ± 17.3 (range, 2.3-84.0) at 1 h after injection and 38.2 ± 38.6 (range, 3.6-154.3) at 3 h after injection. The average radiation exposure (effective dose) was approximately 0.021 mSv/MBq. Within healthy organs, the kidneys and salivary glands showed the highest (68)Ga-PSMA-617 uptake. The radiation exposure was relatively low. (68)Ga-PSMA-617 shows PCa lesions with high contrast. Images obtained between 2 and 3 h after injection seem to be the best option with regard to radiotracer uptake and tumor contrast. Later images can help to clarify unclear lesions. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  3. Dosimetry methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W.L.; Miller, A.; Kovacs, A.

    2003-01-01

    Chemical and physical radiation dosimetry methods, used for the measurement of absorbed dose mainly during the practical use of ionizing radiation, are discussed with respect to their characteristics and fields of application....

  4. Dosimetry; Dosimetria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Adauto de Souza; Almeida, Eduardo de; Elias, Elimoel Abrao; Cunha e Silva, Richard Maximiliano da

    1998-07-01

    This document contains a comprehensive work on dosimetry, covering the following subjects: radiological quantities and unities; the biological effects os ionizing radiations; dose calculations; permissive maximum dose; safety requirements; precautions; and the radioisotopes laboratory.

  5. High frequency electromagnetic dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez-Hernández, David A

    2009-01-01

    Along with the growth of RF and microwave technology applications, there is a mounting concern about the possible adverse effects over human health from electromagnetic radiation. Addressing this issue and putting it into perspective, this groundbreaking resource provides critical details on the latest advances in high frequency electromagnetic dosimetry.

  6. Preparation and biodistribution of 188Re-labeled folate conjugated human serum albumin magnetic cisplatin nanoparticles (188Re-folate-CDDP/HSA MNPs) in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qiu-Sha; Chen, Dao-Zhen; Xue, Wen-Qun; Xiang, Jing-Ying; Gong, Yong-Chi; Zhang, Li; Guo, Cai-Qin

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop intraperitoneal hyperthermic therapy based on magnetic fluid hyperthermia, nanoparticle-wrapped cisplatin chemotherapy, and magnetic particles of albumin. In addition, to combine the multiple-killing effects of hyperthermal targeting therapy, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, the albumin-nanoparticle surfaces were linked with radionuclide (188)Re-labeled folic acid ligand ((188)Re-folate-CDDP/HSA). Human serum albumin was labeled with (188)Re using the pre-tin method. Reaction time and optimal conditions of labeling were investigated. The particles were intravenously injected into mice, which were sacrificed at different time points. Radioactivity per gram of tissue of percent injected dose (% ID/g) was measured in vital organs. The biodistribution of (188)Re-folate-CDDP/HAS magnetic nanoparticles was assessed. Optimal conditions for (188)Re-labeled folate-conjugated albumin combined with cisplatin magnetic nanoparticles were: 0.1 mL of sodium gluconate solution (0.3 mol/L), 0.1 mL of concentrated hydrochloric acid with dissolved stannous chloride (10 mg/mL), 0.04 mL of acetic acid buffer solution (pH 5, 0.2 mol/L), 30 mg of folate-conjugated albumin combined with cisplatin magnetic nanoparticles, and (188)ReO(4) eluent (0.1 mL). The rate of (188)Re-folate-CDDP-HSA magnetic nanoparticle formation exceeded 90%, and radiochemical purity exceeded 95%. The overall labeling rate was 83% in calf serum at 37°C. The major uptake tissues were the liver, kidney, intestine, and tumor after the (188)Re-folate-CDDP/HSA magnetic nanoparticles were injected into nude mice. Uptake of (188)Re-folate-CDDP/HSA magnetic nanoparticles increased gradually after injection, peaked at 8 hours with a value of 8.83 ± 1.71, and slowly decreased over 24 hours in vivo. These results indicate that (188)Re-folate-CDDP/HSA magnetic nanoparticles can be used in radionuclide-targeted cancer therapy. Surface-modified albumin nanoparticles with folic acid

  7. Brain SPECT imaging and whole-body biodistribution with [{sup 123}I]ADAM - a serotonin transporter radiotracer in healthy human subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, K.-J. [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences, Chang-Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Molecular Imaging Center, Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Liu, C.-Y. [Neuroscience Research Center, Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Department of Psychiatry, Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Wey, S.-P. [Molecular Imaging Center, Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang-Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Hsiao, I.-T. [Molecular Imaging Center, Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang-Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Wu, Jay [Health Physics Divisions, Atomic Energy Council, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Tao-Yuan 325, Taiwan (China); Fu, Y.-K. [Atomic Energy Council, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Tao-Yuan 325, Taiwan (China); Yen, T.-C. [Molecular Imaging Center, Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China) and Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: yen1110@adm.cgmh.org.tw

    2006-02-15

    Introduction: [{sup 123}I]-2-((2-((dimethylamino)methyl)phenyl)thio)-5-iodophenylamine ([{sup 123}I]ADAM), a novel radiotracer, has promising application in the imaging of the serotonin transporter (SERT) in the human brain. In this study, the optimal scanning time for acquiring brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images was determined by performing dynamic SPECT studies at intervals from 0 to 6 h postinjection of [{sup 123}I]ADAM. Additionally, radiation-absorbed doses were determined for three healthy human subjects using attenuation-corrected images. Methods: Twelve subjects were randomized into one of three study groups as follows: whole-body distribution imaging (n=3), dynamic SPECT imaging (n=3) and brain SPECT imaging (n=6). The radiation-absorbed dose was calculated using MIRDOSE 3.0 software with attenuation-corrected data. The specific binding (SB) ratio of the brain stem was measured from dynamic SPECT images to determine the optimal scanning time. Results: Dynamic SPECT images showed that the SB of the brain stem gradually increased to a maximum 4 h postinjection. Single photon emission computed tomography images at 4 h postinjection showed a high uptake of the radiotracer (SB) in the hypothalamus (1.40{+-}0.12), brain stem (1.44{+-}0.16), pons (1.13{+-}0.14) and medial temporal lobe (0.59{+-}0.10). The mean adult male value of effective dose was 3.37x10{sup -2} mSv/MBq with a 4.8-h urine-voiding interval. Initial high uptake in SERT-rich sites was demonstrated in the lung and brain. A prominent washout of the radiotracer from the lung further increased brain radioactivity that reached a peak value of 5.03% of injected dose 40 min postinjection. Conclusions: [{sup 123}I]ADAM is a promising radiotracer for SPECT imaging of SERT in humans with acceptable dosimetry and high uptake in SERT-rich regions. Brain SPECT images taken within 4 h following injection show optimal levels of radiotracer uptake in known SERT sites. However, dynamic

  8. Biodistribution dosimetric study of radiopharmaceutical {sup 99mT}c Ixolaris in mice for melanoma diagnosis by molecular image and translational model for human beings; Estudo dosimetrico da biodistribuicao do radiofarmaco Ixolaris-{sup 99m}Tc em camundongos para diagnostico de melanoma atraves de imagem molecular e modelo translacional para humanos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soriano, Sarah Canuto Silva

    2015-07-01

    The labeling of Ixolaris with {sup 99m}Tc was developed by Barboza et.al. (2013) aiming its use primarily in glioblastoma and after in melanoma diagnosis, a less common but very aggressive cancer and with high mortality rate. Preliminary tests on animals have proven its effectiveness of labeling but a dosimetric study to human clinical trials should be performed. This study aimed to: (1) determine the biokinetic model for the radiotracer {sup 99m}Tc-Ixolaris in mice by imaging dosimetry method; and (2) estimate the absorbed and effective dose resulting from the use of a new radiopharmaceutical for melanoma and metastases diagnosis in human beings, since a dosimetric study of new radiopharmaceuticals in animals is necessary to test them subsequently in humans and apply for registration in ANVISA. According to SPECT images, was found a latency period of 15 to 21 days for the development of lung metastasis in mice. Three C57BL6 mice, one control animal, and two animals with induced cell line B16-F10 murine melanoma were tested. The {sup 99m}Tc-Ixolaris radiopharmaceutical was administered intravenously in a caudal vein, and SPECT images were acquired 0.5 h, 1.5 h, 2.5 h, 3.5 h and 24 h post-administration for analysis and biodistribution quantification. The biokinetic model was determined and thus, obtained cumulative activity in order to estimate the absorbed dose in each organ. The mass and metabolic differences between mice and humans were considered and used to extrapolate the data acquired at different scales. Based on dose factors provided by the software MIRDOSE and Olinda (S factor), absorbed doses in irradiated target organs were calculated for the source organs, and finally the effective dose was estimated. The results indicate that for diagnostic exams conducted in human melanoma patients by administering approximately 25.7 MBq the estimated effective dose was 4.3 mSv. Comparing with effective doses obtained in other diagnostic techniques with {sup 99m

  9. Uptake and dosimetry of Auger emitting diagnostic radionuclides (in particular indium-111) in human male germ cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nettleton, J.S. [Health and Safety Executive, Quay House, Manchester (United Kingdom); Lawson, R.S.; Prescott, M.C. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester (United Kingdom); Hoyes, K.P.; Morris, I.D. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2000-05-01

    This paper concerns the uptake and dosimetry of Auger electron emitting radionuclides which are used during routine diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures, in human testes and spermatozoa (sperm). A computer model was developed to calculate the doses to sperm heads from cellular localisation of the Auger electron emitting radionuclides {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In, {sup 123}I and {sup 201}Tl. An assumption of ellipsoidal geometry was made to approximate the sperm head. S Factors were determined for differing sub-cellular localisations of radionuclide. The S-Factors determined were then combined with in-vitro data for quantification of radionuclide uptake for {sup 99m}Tc pertechnetate, {sup 111}In chloride and {sup 201}Tl chloride, to estimate in-vivo doses to sperm heads following intravenous administration of radionuclide in typical diagnostic quantities. The uptake and resulting cellular radiation dose of {sup 111}In (from the chloride) was significantly larger than the other radionuclides in the chemical forms investigated. Further investigations were carried out to determine localisation of {sup 111}In on sperm. The results of these experiments indicate that the radiation dose to mature sperm following administration of {sup 111}In pharmaceuticals for diagnostic purposes might be large enough to result in DNA damage which is not expressed until after fertilisation of an oocyte. Consideration should therefore be given to providing some contraceptive advice following diagnostic administrations of this radionuclide. In order to consider the possible effects of these radionuclides on other spermatogenic cells, further studies were undertaken to obtain in-vivo data for quantification of {sup 111}In chloride and {sup 201}Tl chloride uptake into the human testis following intravenous administration. Conventional dosimetry was then used to estimate testicular radiation dose using our values of percentage uptake. The results obtained indicate that the values of testicular

  10. Liposome Biodistribution via Europium Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignet, Nathalie; Scherman, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The drug delivery field needs tools to follow vector biodistribution. Radioactive tracers and conventional fluorophores are widely used. We propose here to use europium complexes. Use of pulsed light source time-resolved fluorimetry takes into account the fluorescence decay time of the lanthanide chelates to gain sensitivity in biological media. The method was developed to follow liposome biodistribution. Octadecyl-DTPA.Eu compound has been prepared and incorporated into liposomes without alteration of its fluorescence signal. The method has been validated by comparison with fluorophore-labeled liposomes. The way to proceed to use this method for liposomes or other vectors is detailed.

  11. (Biological dosimetry)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preston, R.J.

    1990-12-17

    The traveler attended the 1st International Conference on Biological Dosimetry in Madrid, Spain. This conference was organized to provide information to a general audience of biologists, physicists, radiotherapists, industrial hygiene personnel and individuals from related fields on the current ability of cytogenetic analysis to provide estimates of radiation dose in cases of occupational or environmental exposure. There is a growing interest in Spain in biological dosimetry because of the increased use of radiation sources for medical and occupational uses, and with this the anticipated and actual increase in numbers of overexposure. The traveler delivered the introductory lecture on Biological Dosimetry: Mechanistic Concepts'' that was intended to provide a framework by which the more applied lectures could be interpreted in a mechanistic way. A second component of the trip was to provide advice with regard to several recent cases of overexposure that had been or were being assessed by the Radiopathology and Radiotherapy Department of the Hospital General Gregorio Maranon'' in Madrid. The traveler had provided information on several of these, and had analyzed cells from some exposed or purportedly exposed individuals. The members of the biological dosimetry group were referred to individuals at REACTS at Oak Ridge Associated Universities for advice on follow-up treatment.

  12. NASA astronaut dosimetry: Implementation of scalable human phantoms and benchmark comparisons of deterministic versus Monte Carlo radiation transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Amir Alexander

    Astronauts are exposed to a unique radiation environment in space. United States terrestrial radiation worker limits, derived from guidelines produced by scientific panels, do not apply to astronauts. Limits for astronauts have changed throughout the Space Age, eventually reaching the current National Aeronautics and Space Administration limit of 3% risk of exposure induced death, with an administrative stipulation that the risk be assured to the upper 95% confidence limit. Much effort has been spent on reducing the uncertainty associated with evaluating astronaut risk for radiogenic cancer mortality, while tools that affect the accuracy of the calculations have largely remained unchanged. In the present study, the impacts of using more realistic computational phantoms with size variability to represent astronauts with simplified deterministic radiation transport were evaluated. Next, the impacts of microgravity-induced body changes on space radiation dosimetry using the same transport method were investigated. Finally, dosimetry and risk calculations resulting from Monte Carlo radiation transport were compared with results obtained using simplified deterministic radiation transport. The results of the present study indicated that the use of phantoms that more accurately represent human anatomy can substantially improve space radiation dose estimates, most notably for exposures from solar particle events under light shielding conditions. Microgravity-induced changes were less important, but results showed that flexible phantoms could assist in optimizing astronaut body position for reducing exposures during solar particle events. Finally, little overall differences in risk calculations using simplified deterministic radiation transport and 3D Monte Carlo radiation transport were found; however, for the galactic cosmic ray ion spectra, compensating errors were observed for the constituent ions, thus exhibiting the need to perform evaluations on a particle

  13. Internal dosimetry of a chylomicron-like emulsion doubly-labeled with 3H-TG and {sup 14}C-CE in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcato, Larissa A.; Carvalho, Diego V.S.; Santos, Robinson A.; Hamada, Margarida M.; Mesquita, Carlos H. de [Energy and Nuclear Research Institute (IPEN/CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Vinagre, Carmen [University of Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). The Heart Institute of the Medical School Hospital; Maranhao, Raul C. [University of Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences

    2010-07-01

    Full text: This paper describes a research about the calculation of the effective equivalent doses to which participants are exposed when submitted to studies that use artificial lipid emulsions doubly-labeled with radioactive tracers {sup 14}C and {sup 3}H. Several studies have used these emulsions in order to improve the knowledge of the biodistribution parameters of plasma lipoproteins. In the particular case of studies with chylomicron-like emulsion doubly- labeled with radioactive cholesteryl esters ({sup 14}C-CE) and triacylglycerols ({sup 3}H-TG) the dosimetric calculations was estimated indirectly. Initially, the LIA limits suggested by ICRP no 26 for {sup 3}H and {sup 14}C were used, however the LIA parameter is dependent on the chemical form of the labeled product and these parameters have not been scheduled yet for artificial lipoproteins. In particular for the {sup 14}C-CE, the internal dose in humans was estimated from the allometric theory using data from the biodistribution in rats with approximately 0.4 kg. The purpose of this paper is to improve the estimation of the effective equivalent dose in humans in order to contribute to future studies that will utilize artificial lipoproteins. For this study, chylomicron-like emulsion containing radioactive lipids were injected intravenously in bolus into the volunteers and aliquots of blood were collected at predetermined intervals of time. The activity of each aliquot was measured in liquid scintillator using a spectrometer. The plasmatic radioactive decay curves were determined and subsequently the kinetic parameters and effective equivalent doses were calculated using the ANACOMP software. It was proposed a kinetic model consisting of eight compartments for the biodistribution of plasma lipoproteins in humans. (author)

  14. Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    Dosimetry Service

    2005-01-01

    Please remember to read your dosimeter every month at least once and preferably during the first week. A regular read-out is indispensable in order to ensure a periodic monitoring of the personal dose. You should read your dosimeter even if you have not visited the controlled areas. If you still have the old dosimeter (film badge), please send it immediately for evaluation to us (Bdg 24 E-011). After January 2005 there will be no developing process for the old film system. Information for Contractors: Please remember also to bring the form ‘Confirm Reception of a CERN Dosimeter' signed with ‘Feuille d'enregistrement du CERN'. Without these forms the dosimeter cannot be assigned. Thank you for your cooperation. Dosimetry Service Tel 767 2155 http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  15. Neutron beam measurement dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaro, C.R. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-11-01

    This report describes animal dosimetry studies and phantom measurements. During 1994, 12 dogs were irradiated at BMRR as part of a 4 fraction dose tolerance study. The animals were first infused with BSH and irradiated daily for 4 consecutive days. BNL irradiated 2 beagles as part of their dose tolerance study using BPA fructose. In addition, a dog at WSU was irradiated at BMRR after an infusion of BPA fructose. During 1994, the INEL BNCT dosimetry team measured neutron flux and gamma dose profiles in two phantoms exposed to the epithermal neutron beam at the BMRR. These measurements were performed as a preparatory step to the commencement of human clinical trials in progress at the BMRR.

  16. Exposure Setup and Dosimetry for a Study on Effects of Mobile Communication Signals on Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rohland

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe the design of an exposure setup used to study possible non-thermal effects due to the exposure of human hematopoietic stem cells to GSM, UMTS and LTE mobile communication signals. The experiments are performed under fully blinded conditions in a TEM waveguide located inside an incubator to achieve defined environmental conditions as required for the living cells. Chamber slides containing the cells in culture medium are placed on the septum of the waveguide. The environmental and exposure parameters such as signal power, temperatures, relative humidity and CO2 content of the surrounding atmosphere are monitored permanently during the exposure experiment. The power of the exposure signals required to achieve specific absorption rates of 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 W kg−1 are determined by numerical calculation of the field distribution inside the cell culture medium at 900 MHz (GSM, 1950 MHz (UMTS and 2535 MHz (LTE. The dosimetry is verified both with scattering parameter measurements on the waveguide with and without containers filled with cell culture medium and with temperature measurements with non-metallic probes in separate heating experiments.

  17. Exposure Setup and Dosimetry for a Study on Effects of Mobile Communication Signals on Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohland, Martina; Baaske, Kai; Gläser, Katharina; Hintzsche, Henning; Stopper, Helga; Kleine-Ostmann, Thomas; Schrader, Thorsten

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we describe the design of an exposure setup used to study possible non-thermal effects due to the exposure of human hematopoietic stem cells to GSM, UMTS and LTE mobile communication signals. The experiments are performed under fully blinded conditions in a TEM waveguide located inside an incubator to achieve defined environmental conditions as required for the living cells. Chamber slides containing the cells in culture medium are placed on the septum of the waveguide. The environmental and exposure parameters such as signal power, temperatures, relative humidity and CO2 content of the surrounding atmosphere are monitored permanently during the exposure experiment. The power of the exposure signals required to achieve specific absorption rates of 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 W kg-1 are determined by numerical calculation of the field distribution inside the cell culture medium at 900 MHz (GSM), 1950 MHz (UMTS) and 2535 MHz (LTE). The dosimetry is verified both with scattering parameter measurements on the waveguide with and without containers filled with cell culture medium and with temperature measurements with non-metallic probes in separate heating experiments.

  18. Topics in radiation dosimetry radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    1972-01-01

    Radiation Dosimetry, Supplement 1: Topics in Radiation Dosimetry covers instruments and techniques in dealing with special dosimetry problems. The book discusses thermoluminescence dosimetry in archeological dating; dosimetric applications of track etching; vacuum chambers of radiation measurement. The text also describes wall-less detectors in microdosimetry; dosimetry of low-energy X-rays; and the theory and general applicability of the gamma-ray theory of track effects to various systems. Dose equivalent determinations in neutron fields by means of moderator techniques; as well as developm

  19. Noninvasive optical imaging of nanomedicine biodistribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunjachan, S.; Gremse, F.; Theek, B.; Koczera, P.; Pola, R.; Pechar, M.; Etrych, T.; Ulbrich, K.; Storm, Gerrit; Kiessling, F.; Lammers, Twan Gerardus Gertudis Maria

    2013-01-01

    Nanomedicines are sub-micrometer-sized carrier materials designed to improve the biodistribution of i.v. administered (chemo-) therapeutic agents. In recent years, ever more efforts in the nanomedicine field have employed optical imaging (OI) techniques to monitor biodistribution and target site

  20. Modeling of inertial deposition in scaled models of rat and human nasal airways: Towards in vitro regional dosimetry in small animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Jinxiang; Kim, JongWon; Si, Xiuhua A.; Corley, Richard A.; Zhou, Yue

    2016-09-01

    Rodents are routinely used in inhalation toxicology tests as human surrogates. However, in vitro dosimetry tests in rodent casts are still scarce due to small rodent airways and in vitro tests to quantify sub-regional dosimetry are still impractical. We hypothesized that for inertial particles whose deposition is dominated by airflow convection (Reynolds number) and particle inertia (Stokes number), the deposition should be similar among airway replicas of different scales if their Reynolds and Stokes numbers are kept the same. In this study, we aimed to (1) numerically test the hypothesis in three airway geometries: a USP induction port, a human nose model, and a Sprague-Dawley rat nose model, and (2) find the range of applicability of this hypothesis. Five variants of the USP and human nose models and three variants of the rat nose model were tested. Inhalation rates and particle sizes were scaled to match the Reynolds number and Stokes numbers. A low-Reynolds-number k–ω model was used to resolve the airflow and a Lagrangian tracking algorithm was used to simulate the particle transport and deposition. Statistical analysis of predicted doses was conducted using ANOVA. For normal inhalation rates and particle dia- meters ranging from 0.5 to 24 mm, the deposition differences between the life-size and scaled models are insignificant for all airway geometries considered (i.e., human nose, USP, and rat nose). Furthermore, the deposition patterns and exit particle profiles also look similar among scaled models. However, deposition rates and patterns start to deviate if inhalation rates are too low, or particle sizes are too large. For the rat nose, the threshold velocity was found to be 0.71 m/s and the threshold Froude number to be 50. Results of this study provide a theoretical foundation for sub-regional in vitro dosimetry tests in small animals and for interpretation of data from inter-species or intra-species with varying body sizes.

  1. Studies on the biodistribution of dextrin nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, C; Gama, F M [IBB-Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Centre for Biological Engineering, Minho University, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Ferreira, M F M; Martins, J A [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade do Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Santos, A C; Prata, M I M [IBILI, Faculty of Medicine of the University of Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Geraldes, C F G C, E-mail: fmgama@deb.uminho.pt [Departamento de Ciencias da Vida, Faculdade de Ciencia e Tecnologia e Centro de Neurociencias e Biologia Celular, Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal)

    2010-07-23

    The characterization of biodistribution is a central requirement in the development of biomedical applications based on the use of nanoparticles, in particular for controlled drug delivery. The blood circulation time, organ biodistribution and rate of excretion must be well characterized in the process of product development. In this work, the biodistribution of recently developed self-assembled dextrin nanoparticles is addressed. Functionalization of the dextrin nanoparticles with a DOTA-monoamide-type metal chelator, via click chemistry, is described. The metal chelator functionalized nanoparticles were labelled with a {gamma}-emitting {sup 153}Sm{sup 3+} radioisotope and the blood clearance rate and organ biodistribution of the nanoparticles were obtained. The effect of PEG surface coating on the blood clearance rate and organ biodistribution of the nanoparticles was also studied.

  2. Physiologically based modelling of nanoparticle biodistribution and biokinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Carlander, Ulrika

    2016-01-01

    To predict the toxicity of nanoparticles (1-100 nm), it is crucial to understand their biokinetics i.e. how they are taken up, distributed, dissolved and removed from the body. Such information can be gained from biodistribution studies in animals. However, to make predictions for other types of nanoparticles, exposure conditions and species, including humans, extrapolations from such studies are required. Use of models, such as physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models, makes extra...

  3. Dosimetry for radiation processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne

    1986-01-01

    During the past few years significant advances have taken place in the different areas of dosimetry for radiation processing, mainly stimulated by the increased interest in radiation for food preservation, plastic processing and sterilization of medical products. Reference services both...... and sterilization dosimetry, optichromic dosimeters in the shape of small tubes for food processing, and ESR spectroscopy of alanine for reference dosimetry. In this paper the special features of radiation processing dosimetry are discussed, several commonly used dosimeters are reviewed, and factors leading...

  4. Light dosimetry in vivo in interstitial photodynamic therapy of human tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynes, Anne M.; Diebold, Simon; Lignon, Dominique; Granjon, Yves; Guillemin, Francois H.

    1991-11-01

    Photodynamic therapy, developed since 1961 with Lipson''s studies, is now limited in its clinical applications by the lack of knowledge about light comportment and the action of hematoporphyrin in tissues. Using human tumor models in mice, the intratumoral light flux was measured during an interstitial illumination (cylindrical diffusor 5 mm of length) by an argon dye laser emitting continuously at 630 nm (Spectra-Physics 375 B). The flux measured was captured by a plane-cut fiber (400 micrometers ) linked with an optical power meter (Newport 815). The light decrease in tissue had an exponential shape, and k, the global attenuation coefficient, was easily calculated as well as the depth penetration (1/k). Control measurements were performed in beef muscle, and the k value was very consistent with published data. In small tumors (3), the results presented a good reproducibility for the same histology (ksarcoma equals 0.48 +/- 0.08 mm-1, kcholangiocarcinoma equals 0.67 +/- 0.01 mm-1). The intraperitoneal injection of hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD at 10 mg/kg) did not seem to significantly influence the light evolution in tissues compared with control measurements without HpD. The simplicity and the reproducibility of this technique raises hopes of a coming clinical application and a possible comparison between different studies with measurable references.

  5. Internal dosimetry for [4-{sup 14}C]-cholesterol in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcato, Larissa A.; Mesquita, Carlos H. de, E-mail: chmesqui@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cesar, Thais B., E-mail: tcesar@fcfar.unesp.b [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (FCF/UNESP), Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Farmaceuticas. Dept. de Alimentos e Nutricao; Vinagre, Carmen G.C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (InCor/HCFMUSP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Instituto do Coracao

    2011-07-01

    This study proposes a biokinetic model for use in the assessment of the internal dose received by human subjects administered orally with [4-{sup 14}C]-cholesterol. The proposed model includes three systemic pools representing the short-term (T1/2 = 1 d), intermediate-term (T1/2 = 16 d) and long-term (T1/2 = 78 d) physiological exchanges and two excretion pathways: urine and feces. This model used the ANACOMP software to estimate radiometric doses with MIRD techniques (Medical Internal Radiation Dose). To validate the model, the profile curve of excretion prediction by the model in the range of seven days was compared with those curves described in literature. No statistical difference was detected (P = 0.416). The estimated effective dose coefficient calculated for the reference man described on ICRP publication 23 was 3.39x10{sup -10} SvBq{sup -1}. The organs that received the highest equivalent dose were the lower large intestine (2.459x10{sup -9} GyBq{sup -1}), upper large intestine (9.023x10{sup -10} GyBq{sup -1}) and small intestine (3.717x10{sup -10} GyBq{sup -1}). (author)

  6. Tumour dosimetry and response in patients with metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer using recombinant human thyrotropin before radioiodine therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keizer, Bart de; Hoekstra, Anne; Rijk, Peter P. van; Klerk, John M.H. de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Room E02.222, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX, Utrecht (Netherlands); Brans, Boudewijn; Dierckx, Rudi A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Zelissen, Pierre M.J.; Koppeschaar, Hans P.F.; Lips, Cees J.M. [Department of Endocrinology, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2003-03-01

    The development of recombinant human thyrotropin (rhTSH) has given clinicians new options for diagnostic follow-up and treatment of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). This paper evaluates the tumour dosimetry and response following -iodine-131 treatment of metastatic thyroid cancer patients after rhTSH stimulation instead of classical hormone withdrawal-induced hypothyroidism. Nineteen consecutive {sup 131}I treatments in 16 patients were performed after rhTSH stimulation. All patients had undergone a near-total thyroidectomy followed by an ablative dosage of {sup 131}I. They all suffered from metastatic or recurrent disease showing tumoral {sup 131}I uptake on previous post-treatment scintigraphy. Dosimetric calculations were performed using {sup 131}I tumour uptake measurements from post-treatment {sup 131}I scintigrams and tumour volume estimations from radiological images. Response was assessed by comparing pre-treatment serum thyroglobulin (Tg) level with the Tg level 3 months post treatment. In 18 out of 19 treatments, uptake of {sup 131}I in metastatic or recurrent lesions was seen. The median tumour radiation dose was 26.3 Gy (range 1.3-368 Gy), and the median effective half-life was 2.7 days (range 0.5-6.5 days). Eleven of 19 treatments (10/16 patients) were evaluable for response after 3 months. {sup 131}I therapy with rhTSH resulted in a biochemical partial response in 3/11 or 27% of treatments (two patients), biochemical stable disease in 2/11 or 18% of treatments and biochemical progressive disease in 6/11 or 55% of treatments. Our study showed that although tumour doses in DTC patients treated with {sup 131}I after rhTSH were highly variable, 45% of treatments led to disease stabilisation or partial remission when using rhTSH in conjunction with {sup 131}I therapy, without serious side-effects and with minimal impact on quality of life. RhTSH is therefore adequately satisfactory as an adjuvant tool in therapeutic settings and is

  7. Nanobarcoding for improved nanoparticle detection in nanomedical biodistribution studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eustaquio, Trisha

    Determination of the fate of nanoparticles (NPs) in a biological system, or NP biodistribution, is critical in evaluating a NP formulation for nanomedicine. Unlike small-molecule drugs, NPs impose unique challenges in the design of appropriate biodistribution studies due to their small size and subsequent detection signal. Current methods to determine NP biodistribution are greatly inadequate due to their limited detection thresholds. There is an overwhelming need for a sensitive and efficient imaging-based method that can (1) detect and measure small numbers of NPs of various types, ideally single NPs, (2) associate preferential NP uptake with histological cell type by preserving spatial information in samples, and (3) allow for relatively quick and accurate NP detection in in vitro (and possibly ex vivo) samples for comprehensive NP biodistribution studies. Herein, a novel method for improved NP detection is proposed, coined "nanobarcoding." Nanobarcoding utilizes a non-endogenous oligonucleotide, or "nanobarcode" (NB), conjugated to the NP surface to amplify the detection signal from a single NP via in situ polymerase chain reaction (ISPCR), and this signal amplification will facilitate rapid and precise detection of single NPs inside cells over large areas of sample such that more sophisticated studies can be performed on the NP-positive subpopulation. Moreover, nanobarcoding has the potential to be applied to the detection of more than one NP type to study the effects of physicochemical properties, targeting mechanisms, and route of entry on NP biodistribution. The nanobarcoding method was validated in vitro using NB-functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs (NB-SPIONs) as the model NP type for improved NP detection inside HeLa human cervical cancer cells, a cell line commonly used for ISPCR-mediated detection of human papilloma virus (HPV). Nanotoxicity effects of NB-SPIONs were also evaluated at the single-cell level using LEAP (Laser-Enabled Analysis

  8. Binding Affinity, Specificity and Comparative Biodistribution of the Parental Murine Monoclonal Antibody MX35 (Anti-NaPi2b) and Its Humanized Version Rebmab200

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegren, Sture; Andrade, Luciana N S; Bäck, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this preclinical study was to evaluate the characteristics of the monoclonal antibody Rebmab200, which is a humanized version of the ovarian-specific murine antibody MX35. This investigation contributes to the foundation for future clinical α-radioimmunotherapy of minimal residual ovar...

  9. ESR dosimetry: achievements and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baffa, O., E-mail: baffa@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Departamento de Fisica, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Electron Spin Resonance (ESR), also known as Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and more recently as Electron Magnetic Resonance (Emr), is a spectroscopy technique able to detect unpaired electrons such as those created by the interaction ionizing radiation with matter. When the unpaired electrons created by ionizing radiation are stable over some reasonable time, ESR can be used to measure the radiation dose deposited in the material under study. In principle, any insulating material that satisfies this requisite can be used as a dosimeter. ESR has been used in retrospective dosimetry in case of radiological accidents using natural constituents of human body such as teeth, bones and nails as well as fortuitous materials as sugar, sweeteners and plastics. When using teeth the typical detected dose is 0.5 Gy for, for X-Band spectrometers (9 GHz) and even lower doses if higher frequency spectrometers are used. Clinical dosimetry is another area of potential use of this dosimetric modality. In this application the amino acid alanine has been proposed and being used. Alanine dosimeters are very easy to prepare and require no complicated treatments for use. Alanine/ESR dosimetry satisfies many of the required properties for clinical applications such as water equivalent composition, independence of response for the energy range used in therapy and high precision. Other organic materials such as ammonium tartrate are being investigated to increase the sensitivity of ESR for clinical applications. Finally, industrial applications can also benefit from this dosimetry. The challenges to expand applications, the number of users and research groups of ESR dosimetry will be discussed. (Author)

  10. thermoluminescent dosimetry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2005-10-20

    Oct 20, 2005 ... local geology. In addition to the inevitable natural background radiation sources, man can be exposed to various man-made radiations sources, or natural sources that are enhanced by human activities such as mining. Because of the deleterious health effects of radiation exposure (Hanson and. Komorov ...

  11. Biodistribution and kinetics of {sup 131}I-labelled anti-CD20 MAB IDEC-C2B8 (rituximab) in relapsed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheidhauer, Klemens; Wolf, Ingo; Baumgartl, Hans-Joachim; Reidel, Guenther; Schwaiger, Markus [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Muenchen (Germany); Schilling, Christoph von; Schmidt, Burkhard; Peschel, Christian [III. Medizinische Klinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2002-10-01

    The native chimeric human-mouse anti-CD20 antibody IDEC-C2B8 (rituximab) is therapeutically applied in relapsed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the distribution and pharmacokinetics of iodine-131 labelled rituximab in humans for radioimmunotherapy of relapsed CD20-positive NHL. Thirty-five patients with relapsed NHL were administered 20-40 mg rituximab labelled with 250 MBq {sup 131}I. Biodistribution was determined by the gamma camera whole-body scans, whole-body probe measurements and the analysis of serial blood and urine samples. Dosimetry was performed using the MIRDOSE 3 program. Antibody administration was well tolerated. The whole-body activity showed a mono-exponential decrease with a wide range of effective half-lives, the mean value (88 h) being significantly longer than the half-life of its murine counterpart, tositumomab. This led to appropriately higher dose factors for the whole body and organs. Activity was excreted mainly through the kidneys. Normal organs showed decreasing ratios of organ to whole-body activity over time, whereas the tumour tissue presented different kinetics, with increasing ratios of tumour to whole-body activity as evidence for specific antibody binding. It is concluded that {sup 131}I-labelled rituximab is suitable for pretherapeutic dosimetry. Due to the wide range of whole-body and organ dose factors, individual dosimetry is necessary for radioimmunotherapy with {sup 131}I-labelled rituximab. The therapeutic activities of {sup 131}I-labelled rituximab required to deliver similar doses should be lower than those of its murine counterpart. (orig.)

  12. Long-Term Quantitative Biodistribution and Side Effects of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSCs Engraftment in NOD/SCID Mice following Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine François

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is little information on the fate of infused mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and long-term side effects after irradiation exposure. We addressed these questions using human MSCs (hMSCs intravenously infused to nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID mice submitted to total body irradiation (TBI or local irradiation (abdominal or leg irradiation. The animals were sacrificed 3 to 120 days after irradiation and the quantitative and spatial distribution of hMSCs were studied by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Following their infusion into nonirradiated animals, hMSCs homed to various tissues. Engraftment depended on the dose of irradiation and the area exposed. Total body irradiation induced an increased hMSC engraftment level compared to nonirradiated mice, while local irradiations increased hMSC engraftment locally in the area of irradiation. Long-term engraftment of systemically administered hMSCs in NOD/SCID mice increased significantly in response to tissue injuries produced by local or total body irradiation until 2 weeks then slowly decreased depending on organs and the configuration of irradiation. In all cases, no tissue abnormality or abnormal hMSCs proliferation was observed at 120 days after irradiation. This work supports the safe and efficient use of MSCs by injection as an alternative approach in the short- and long-term treatment of severe complications after radiotherapy for patients refractory to conventional treatments.

  13. Human Dosimetry and Preliminary Tumor Distribution of (superscript)18F-Fluoropaclitaxel in Healthy Volunteers and Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer Patients Using PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurdziel, K.A.; Logan, J.; Kurdziel, K.A.; Kalen, J.D.; Hirsch, J.I.; Wilson, J.D.; Bear, H.D.; Logan, J.; McCumisky, J.; Moorman-Sykes, K.; Adler, S.; Choyke, P.L.

    2011-08-17

    demonstrates the feasibility of using {sup 18}F-fluoropaclitaxel PET/CT tumor imaging and provides radiation dosimetry measurements in humans. Although further study is needed, it is hoped that the measured intratumoral {sup 18}F-fluoropaclitaxel distribution can serve as a surrogate for paclitaxel, and potentially other chemotherapeutic agent retention, in solid tumors.

  14. Development of internal dosimetry protocols using the code MCNPx and voxelized phantoms of Reference of ICRP 110; Desenvolvimento de protocolos de dosimetria interna empregando o codigo MCNPx e fantomas voxelizados de referencia da ICRP 110

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, B.M.; Fonseca, T.C.F., E-mail: bmm@cdtn.br [Centro de esenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Trindade, B.M.; Campos, T.P.R. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this work was to perform internal dosimetry calculations for {sup 18}F-FDG employing the MCNPx code and ICRP 110 voxelized reference phantoms (RCP{sub A}F and RCP{sub A}M). The methodologies developed and validated here represent protocols of internal dosimetry holding a better anthropomorphic and anthropometric representation of the human model in which heterogeneous distributions of the emissions can be adopted, useful in the study of new radiopharmaceuticals and internal contamination cases. The reference phantoms were implemented to run on MCNPx. Biodistribution data of {sup 18}F-FDG radiopharmaceutical provided in ICRP 128 were used in the simulations. The organs average absorbed doses and the effective doses were calculated for each model. The values obtained were compared with two reference works available in the literature for validation purposes. The means of the difference of our values and Zankl et al., 2012 reference values were -0.3% for RCP{sub A}M and -0.4% for RCP{sub A}F. Considering Hadid et al., 2013 reference values, the means of the deviation were -2.9% and -2.2% for RCP{sub A}M and RCP{sub A}F respectively. No statistically significant differences were observed (p <0.01) between the reference values and the values calculated by the internal dosimetry protocols developed by our group. Considering the {sup 18}F-FDG validation study performed in this work, the internal dosimetry protocols developed by our group have produced suitable dosimetry data. (author)

  15. Radiochromic film dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Xu Zhi Yong

    2002-01-01

    Radiochromic film dosimetry was developed to measure ionization irradiation dose for industry and medicine. At this time, there are no comprehensive guideline on the medical application, calibration method and densitometer system for medicine. The review gives update on Radiochromic film dosimetry used for medicine, including principles, film model and material, characteristics, calibration method, scanning densitometer system and medical application

  16. EPR Dosimetry - Present and Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regulla, D.F. [GSF - National Research Centre for Environment and Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    In the past, IAEA has played a central role in stipulating research and development in EPR high-dose standardisation as well as in coordinating and organising international dose intercomparison programs, within the Member States of the United Nations from the mid-seventies till today. The future tasks of EPR dosimetry seem to tend towards different subjects such as bio markers, biological radiation effects, post-accident dose reconstruction in the environment, and retrospective human dosimetry. The latter may be considered a promising tool for epidemiology on the way to re-define radiation risk of man for chronicle radiation exposures, based on e.g. South Ural civil population and radiation workers. There are on-going international activities in the field of standardising high-level dosimetry by the American Standards on Testing and Materials (Astm), and by the International Organisation of Standards (ISO). The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) is considering the establishment of relevant recommendations concerning industrial radiation processing, but also human dose reconstruction. (Author)

  17. Biodistribution and elimination kinetics of systemic Stx2 by the Stx2A and Stx2B subunit-specific human monoclonal antibodies in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheoran Abhineet

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS leading to acute kidney failure, is a condition linked to the production of primarily Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2 by some E. coli serotypes. We have previously shown that Stx2 A subunit-specific human monoclonal antibody (HuMAb 5C12, and B subunit-specific HuMAb 5H8 inhibit cultured cell death, and protect mice and piglets from fatal Stx2-intoxication. We have also shown that 5H8 blocks binding of Stx2 to its cell-surface receptor globotriaosyl ceramide (Gb3, whereas Stx2 when complexed with 5C12 binds Gb3 with higher affinity than Stx2. The mechanism by which 5C12 neutralizes Stx2 in vitro involves trapping of Stx2 in the recycling endosomes and releasing it into the extracellular environment. Because of the clinical implications associated with the formation of Stx2/antibody complexes and the potential for trapping and clearance through a severely damaged kidney associated with HUS, we investigated the likely site(s of Stx2/antibody localization and clearance in intoxicated mice treated with antibody or placebo. Results Mice were injected with radiolabeled Stx2 (125I-Stx2 4 hours after administration of 5C12, 5H8, or phosphate buffered saline (PBS and the sites of localization of labeled Stx2, were investigated 3, 24 and 48 hours later. The liver recorded statistically much higher concentrations of labeled Stx2 for groups receiving 5C12 and 5H8 antibodies after 3, 24 and 48 hours, as compared with the PBS group. In contrast, highest levels of labeled Stx2 were detected in the kidneys of the PBS group at all 3 sampling times. Mice receiving either of the two HuMAbs were fully protected against the lethal effect of Stx2, as compared with the fatal outcome of the control group. Conclusions The results suggest that HuMAbs 5C12 and 5H8 promoted hepatic accumulation and presumably clearance of toxin/antibody complexes, significantly diverting Stx2 localization in the kidneys, the target of Stx2 and the

  18. In-vivo fluorescence dosimetry of aminolevulinate-based protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) accumulation in human nonmelanoma skin cancers and precancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Christine B.; Lohser, Sara; Chang, Sung; Bailin, Philip A.; Maytin, Edward V.

    2009-06-01

    PDT is clinically useful for precancers (actinic keratoses; AK) of the skin, but the optimal duration for 5-ALA application is still controversial. For basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), cure rates remain inferior to surgical excision. Lack of knowledge about regional levels of PpIX levels within target tissues clearly contribute to these suboptimal results. To investigate PpIX levels achievable in human skin neoplasias in-vivo, a clinical study to monitor PpIX accumulation in vivo was performed. PpIX-fluorescence in patients undergoing ALA-PDT for facial AK was monitored via real-time in-vivo fluorescence dosimetry, with measurements q20 min following application of 5-ALA (Levulan Kerastick). PpIX accumulation followed linear kinetics in nearly all cases. The slopes varied widely, and did not correlate with clinical outcome in all patients. Some patients with a low accumulation of PpIX fluorescence had a good response to therapy, whereas others with high PpIX accumulation required repeat treatment (although not necessarily of the same lesion). PpIX accumulation rates did correlate to a certain degree with the overall amount of erythema. We conclude that unknown factors besides PpIX levels must be critical for the response to treatment. To assess the relationship between PpIX levels in various skin cancers, patients undergoing routine Mohs surgery for BCC or SCC were measured by in-vivo dosimetry at 2 h after 5-ALA application. Overall, a progressive increase in PpIX signal during malignant progression was observed, in the following rank order: Normal skin < AK < SCC ~ BCC.

  19. Biodistribution of Carbon Nanotubes in Animal Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Møller, Peter Horn; Clausen, Per Axel

    2017-01-01

    The many interesting physical and chemical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNT) make it one of the most commercially attractive materials in the era of nanotechnology. Here, we review the recent publications on in vivo biodistribution of pristine and functionalized forms of single-walled and multi...

  20. Safety, dosimetry and tumor detection ability of 68Ga-NOTA-AE105 - a novel radioligand for uPAR PET imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Dorthe; Persson, Morten; Brandt-Larsen, Malene

    2017-01-01

    safety and biodistribution in normal tissues and uptake in tumor lesions. METHODS: Ten patients (6 PC, 2 BC and 2 UBC) received a single intravenous dose of (68)Ga-NOTA-AE105 (154 + 59 MBq; range 48-208 MBq). The biodistribution and radiation dosimetry were assessed by serial PET/CT scans (10 minutes, 1...... and 2 hours p.i.). Safety assessment included measurements of vital signs with regular intervals during the imaging sessions and laboratory blood screening tests performed before and after injection. In a subgroup of patients, the in vivo stability of (68)Ga-NOTA-AE105 was determined in collected blood...... therapeutic and diagnostic strategies. In the study, uPAR Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging using a (68)Ga-labelled version of the uPAR targeting peptide (AE105) was investigated in a group of patients with BC, PC and UBC. The aim of this first-in-humans, Phase I, clinical trial was to investigate...

  1. [(89)Zr]Trastuzumab: Evaluation of Radiation Dosimetry, Safety, and Optimal Imaging Parameters in Women with HER2-Positive Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laforest, Richard; Lapi, Suzanne E; Oyama, Reiko; Bose, Ron; Tabchy, Adel; Marquez-Nostra, Bernadette V; Burkemper, Jennifer; Wright, Brian D; Frye, Jennifer; Frye, Sarah; Siegel, Barry A; Dehdashti, Farrokh

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of the present study is to evaluate safety, human radiation dosimetry, and optimal imaging time of [(89)Zr]trastuzumab in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. Twelve women with HER2-positive breast cancer underwent [(89)Zr]trastuzumab positron emission tomography (PET)/X-ray computed tomography (CT) twice within 7 days post-injection. Biodistribution data from whole-torso PET/CT images and organ time-activity curves were created using data from all patients. Human dosimetry was calculated using OLINDA with the adult female model. High-quality images and the greatest tumor-to-nontumor contrast were achieved with images performed 5 ± 1 day post-injection. Increased [(89)Zr]trastuzumab uptake was seen in at least one known lesion in ten patients. The liver was the dose-limiting organ (retention of ∼12 % of the injected dose and average dose of 1.54 mSv/MBq). The effective dose was 0.47 mSv/MBq. No adverse effects of [(89)Zr]trastuzumab were encountered. [(89)Zr]trastuzumab was safe and optimally imaged at least 4 days post-injection. The liver was the dose-limiting organ.

  2. Clearance kinetics and external dosimetry of 131I-labeled murine and humanized monoclonal antibody A33 in patients with colon cancer: radiation safety implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauer, Lawrence T; Boylan, Daniel C; Williamson, Matthew J; St Germain, Jean; Larson, Steven M

    2009-05-01

    The monoclonal antibody (mAb) A33 detects a membrane antigen that is expressed on greater than 95% of metastatic human colorectal cancers. Previous studies have shown excellent tumor-targeting of (131)I-labeled murine and humanized forms of the mAb. A retrospective analysis of whole-body clearance in the murine form was performed for comparison to the humanized form. Serial whole-body dose rate measurements were obtained for 55 treatments on 30 patients participating in phase I/II dose escalation studies of therapeutic (131)I-murine A33 mAb. Whole-body retention fractions over time were derived. Each treatment was fit with exponential curves to determine the effective half-lives and corresponding clearance fractions. There was a large variability in the calculated mono-exponential clearance effective half-life time, with a mean value of 36.5 h +/- 8.5 h. A bi-exponential fit of all combined data shows that 60% of the administered dose rapidly clears with a biological half-time of 23.9 h and 40% clears with a slower biological half-time of 101.2 h. The whole-body clearance proved to be more rapid in the murine form when compared with recent studies on the humanized form of radiolabeled A33 mAb. The variability in whole-body clearance reinforces the need for patient-specific tracer dosimetry for clinical care and radiation safety precautions. In addition, the slower clearance of the humanized form of the A33 mAb requires longer term radiation safety precautions than the earlier murine form. As other monoclonal antibodies progress from murine to humanized forms, radiopharmacokinetics should be evaluated for clinical and radiation safety implications.

  3. Land and Water Use Characteristics and Human Health Input Parameters for use in Environmental Dosimetry and Risk Assessments at the Savannah River Site 2017 Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannik, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Stagich, B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-05-25

    Operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in releases of relatively small amounts of radioactive materials to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. For regulatory compliance purposes, potential offsite radiological doses are estimated annually using computer models that follow U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulatory guides. Within the regulatory guides, default values are provided for many of the dose model parameters, but the use of site-specific values is encouraged. Detailed surveys of land-use and water-use parameters were conducted in 1991, 2008, 2010, and 2016 and are being concurred with or updated in this report. These parameters include local characteristics of meat, milk, and vegetable production; river recreational activities; and meat, milk, and vegetable consumption rates, as well as other human usage parameters required in the SRS dosimetry models. In addition, the preferred elemental bioaccumulation factors and transfer factors (to be used in human health exposure calculations at SRS) are documented. The intent of this report is to establish a standardized source for these parameters that is up to date with existing data, and that is maintained via review of future-issued national references (to evaluate the need for changes as new information is released). These reviews will continue to be added to this document by revision.

  4. Land and Water Use Characteristics and Human Health Input Parameters for use in Environmental Dosimetry and Risk Assessments at the Savannah River Site. 2016 Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannik, G. Tim [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hartman, Larry [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Stagich, Brooke [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-26

    Operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in releases of small amounts of radioactive materials to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. For regulatory compliance purposes, potential offsite radiological doses are estimated annually using computer models that follow U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulatory guides. Within the regulatory guides, default values are provided for many of the dose model parameters, but the use of applicant site-specific values is encouraged. Detailed surveys of land-use and water-use parameters were conducted in 1991 and 2010. They are being updated in this report. These parameters include local characteristics of meat, milk and vegetable production; river recreational activities; and meat, milk and vegetable consumption rates, as well as other human usage parameters required in the SRS dosimetry models. In addition, the preferred elemental bioaccumulation factors and transfer factors (to be used in human health exposure calculations at SRS) are documented. The intent of this report is to establish a standardized source for these parameters that is up to date with existing data, and that is maintained via review of future-issued national references (to evaluate the need for changes as new information is released). These reviews will continue to be added to this document by revision.

  5. Development and application of a dosimetry model (ExDoM2) for calculating internal dose of specific particle-bound metals in the human body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalvatzaki, Eleftheria; Lazaridis, Mihalis

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to develop a dosimetry model (ExDoM2) for calculating internal dose of specific particle-bound metals (As, Pb, Cd, Cr and Mn) in the human body. The ExDoM2 is a revised version of a respiratory tract model (ExDoM) incorporating a new particle clearance mechanism in the respiratory tract model and a Physiologically-Based PharmacoKinetic (PBPK) model. The revised respiratory tract model was used to calculate the deposition, clearance and retention of particles in the human respiratory tract and the mass transferred to the oesophagus (gastrointestinal tract) and blood. The PBPK module was used to analyze the distribution of metals (As, Pb, Cd, Cr and Mn) from the blood circulation system to other organs or tissues like liver, kidneys, heart, brain, muscle and bone. The model was applied to calculate the internal human dose for an adult Caucasian male exposed to particulate mass matter (PM), PMPb, PMCd, PMMn and PMCr in an urban area (Athens, Greece). The analysis showed that at the end of the exposure (one day exposure scenario) to PMPb, the major accumulation occurs in the bone, blood and muscle, whereas as regards PMCd the major accumulation occurs in the other tissues, like kidney and liver. In addition, for PMMn, the major accumulation occurs in the other tissues and lungs, whereas as regards PMCr the major accumulation occurs in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and lungs. Therefore, ExDoM2 is an important feature in studying deposition of particles in the human body.

  6. Kinetic and allometric models for dosimetry using radiopharmaceuticals labeled with lanthanides; Proposicao de modelos cineticos e alometricos para a dosimetria de radiofarmacos marcados com lantanideos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Marina Ferreira

    2012-07-01

    This work proposes two models based in compartmental analyses: Animal model and Human model, using images from gamma camera measurements to determinate the kinetic constants of the {sup 177}Lu-DOTATATE to three animal species (rat Wistar, Armenian hamster and Syrian hamster) and to the human in biodistribution studies split in two phases: Phase 1 governed by uptake from the blood and Phase 2 governed by the real excretion. The kinetic constants obtained from the animals' data ere used to build allometric scaling to predict radiopharmaceutical biodistribution in the human employing relations by mass, metabolism, by life span and by physiological parameters. These extrapolation results were compared with the PRRT (Peptide receptor radiotherapy) patients kinetic data calculated using the Human model. The kinetic constants obtained from humans were used in dose assessment to PRRT patients considering MIRD 26 organs and tissues. Dosimetry results were in agreement with available results from literature. For the Phase 1 allometric scaling from kinetic data from the blood to the organs straight responsible for the {sup 177}Lu-DOTATATE metabolism and excretion - liver, kidneys and urinary bladder -show good correlation in the scaling by mass, metabolism and physiological and parameters. For the Phase 2, only the kinetic data from blood to the liver and to the kidneys show good correlation. Based in the anaesthetics inhibitory action over the renal excretion, there is not empirical basis to allow measurement times over 40 minutes in in vivo studies with small animals. Consequently, the Phase 1 results seem enough to make allometric scaling to assessment dose in PRRT. (author)

  7. Single dose toxicity and biodistribution studies of [{sup 18}F] fluorocholine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Danielle C.; Santos, Priscilla F., E-mail: dcc@cdtn.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gereais (INCT-MM/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Medicina Molecular; Silveira, Marina B.; Ferreira, Soraya Z.; Malamut, Carlos; Silva, Juliana B. da, E-mail: radiofarmacoscdtn@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Unidade de Pesquisa e Producao de Radiofarmacos; Souza, Cristina M.; Campos, Liliane C.; Ferreira, Enio; Araujo, Marina R.; Cassali, Geovanni D., E-mail: cassalig@icb.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (LPC/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Patologia Comparada

    2013-07-01

    [{sup 18}F]Fluorocholine ({sup 18}FCH) is a valuable tool for non-invasive diagnosis using positron emission tomography (PET). This radiotracer has been proven to be highly effective in detecting recurrences and staging prostate cancer, diagnoses brain, breast, and esophageal tumors and also hepatocellular carcinoma. The higher uptake of fluorocholine by malignant tumors results from increased choline kinase activity due to accelerated cell multiplication and membrane formation. According to the Brazilian Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA), radiopharmaceuticals have to be registered before commercialization. The aim of this work was to evaluate single dose toxicity and biodistribution of {sup 18}FCH in mice, since preclinical safety studies are required for register. Experimental procedures were approved by the Ethics Committee on Animal Use (CEUA-IPEN/SP). Single dose toxicity and biodistribution studies were conducted in Swiss mice. No signs of toxicity were observed during clinical trial. No changes in the parameters which were examined, such as: body weight, food consumption, clinical pathology parameters or lesions microscopic were noted. Biodistribution results indicated high physiological tracer uptake in kidney, liver and heart 30 min after injection. Lower activities were recorded in other organs/tissues: pancreas, intestine, spleen, bone, bladder, muscle, brain and blood. Initial preclinical investigations showed no toxic effects of {sup 18}FCH at investigated doses and a biodistribution profile very similar to other reports in literature. This information is essential to support future human trials. (author)

  8. Nuclear medicine radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    McParland, Brian J

    2010-01-01

    Complexities of the requirements for accurate radiation dosimetry evaluation in both diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine (including PET) have grown over the past decade. This is due primarily to four factors: growing consideration of accurate patient-specific treatment planning for radionuclide therapy as a means of improving the therapeutic benefit, development of more realistic anthropomorphic phantoms and their use in estimating radiation transport and dosimetry in patients, design and use of advanced Monte Carlo algorithms in calculating the above-mentioned radiation transport and

  9. Pharmacokinetic modeling: Prediction and evaluation of route dependent dosimetry of bisphenol A in monkeys with extrapolation to humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Jeffrey W., E-mail: jeffrey.fisher@fda.hhs.gov; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Vanlandingham, Michelle; Doerge, Daniel R.

    2011-11-15

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for bisphenol A (BPA) in adult rhesus monkeys using intravenous (iv) and oral bolus doses of 100 {mu}g d6-BPA/kg (). This calibrated PBPK adult monkey model for BPA was then evaluated against published monkey kinetic studies with BPA. Using two versions of the adult monkey model based on monkey BPA kinetic data from and , the aglycone BPA pharmacokinetics were simulated for human oral ingestion of 5 mg d16-BPA per person (Voelkel et al., 2002). Voelkel et al. were unable to detect the aglycone BPA in plasma, but were able to detect BPA metabolites. These human model predictions of the aglycone BPA in plasma were then compared to previously published PBPK model predictions obtained by simulating the Voelkel et al. kinetic study. Our BPA human model, using two parameter sets reflecting two adult monkey studies, both predicted lower aglycone levels in human serum than the previous human BPA PBPK model predictions. BPA was metabolized at all ages of monkey (PND 5 to adult) by the gut wall and liver. However, the hepatic metabolism of BPA and systemic clearance of its phase II metabolites appear to be slower in younger monkeys than adults. The use of the current non-human primate BPA model parameters provides more confidence in predicting the aglycone BPA in serum levels in humans after oral ingestion of BPA. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A bisphenol A (BPA) PBPK model for the infant and adult monkey was constructed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hepatic metabolic rate of BPA increased with age of the monkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The systemic clearance rate of metabolites increased with age of the monkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gut wall metabolism of orally administered BPA was substantial across all ages of monkeys. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aglycone BPA plasma concentrations were predicted in humans orally given oral doses of deuterated BPA.

  10. Status of radiation processing dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, A.

    1993-01-01

    Several milestones have marked the field of radiation processing dosimetry since IMRP 7. Among them are the IAEA symposium on High Dose Dosimetry for Radiation Processing and the international Workshops on Dosimetry for Radiation Processing organized by the ASTM. Several standards have been...... or are being published by the ASTM in this field, both on dosimetry procedures and on the proper use of specific dosimeter systems. Several individuals are involved in this international cooperation which contribute significantly to the broader understanding of the role of dosimetry in radiation processing....... The importance of dosimetry is emphasized in the standards on radiation sterilization which are currently drafted by the European standards organization CEN and by the international standards organization ISO. In both standards, dosimetry plays key roles in characterization of the facility, in qualification...

  11. Biodistribution and PET Imaging of pharmacokinetics of manganese in mice using Manganese-52.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, A Lake; Aweda, Tolulope A; Lewis, Benjamin C; Gross, Rebecca B; Lapi, Suzanne E

    2017-01-01

    Manganese is essential to life, and humans typically absorb sufficient quantities of this element from a normal healthy diet; however, chronic, elevated ingestion or inhalation of manganese can be neurotoxic, potentially leading to manganism. Although imaging of large amounts of accumulated Mn(II) is possible by MRI, quantitative measurement of the biodistribution of manganese, particularly at the trace level, can be challenging. In this study, we produced the positron-emitting radionuclide 52Mn (t1/2 = 5.6 d) by proton bombardment (EpManganese is known to cross the blood-brain barrier, as confirmed in our studies following IV injection (0.86%ID/g, 1 d p.i.) and following inhalation of aerosol, (0.31%ID/g, 1 d p.i.). Uptake in salivary gland and pancreas were observed at 1 d p.i. (0.5 and 0.8%ID/g), but to a much greater degree from IV injection (6.8 and 10%ID/g). In a separate study, mice received IV injection of an imaging dose of [52Mn]MnCl2, followed by in vivo imaging by positron emission tomography (PET) and ex vivo biodistribution. The results from this study supported many of the results from the biodistribution-only studies. In this work, we have confirmed results in the literature and contributed new results for the biodistribution of inhaled radiomanganese for several organs. Our results could serve as supporting information for environmental and occupational regulations, for designing PET studies utilizing 52Mn, and/or for predicting the biodistribution of manganese-based MR contrast agents.

  12. INDIVIDUAL DOSIMETRY SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Deadline...Deadline...Deadline...Deadline...Deadline...Deadline...   Individual dosimetry service We inform all staffs and users under regular dosimetric control that the dosimeters for the monitoring period JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2002 are available from their usual dispatchers. Please have your films changed before the 15th of January. The color of the dosimeter valid in JANUARY/FEBRUARY is WHITE.

  13. Dosimetry in diagnostic radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghzifene, Ahmed; Dance, David R; McLean, Donald; Kramer, Hans-Michael

    2010-10-01

    Dosimetry is an area of increasing importance in diagnostic radiology. There is a realisation amongst health professionals that the radiation dose received by patients from modern X-ray examinations and procedures can be at a level of significance for the induction of cancer across a population, and in some unfortunate instances, in the acute damage to particular body organs such as skin and eyes. The formulation and measurement procedures for diagnostic radiology dosimetry have recently been standardised through an international code of practice which describes the methodologies necessary to address the diverging imaging modalities used in diagnostic radiology. Common to all dosimetry methodologies is the measurement of the air kerma from the X-ray device under defined conditions. To ensure the accuracy of the dosimetric determination, such measurements need to be made with appropriate instrumentation that has a calibration that is traceable to a standards laboratory. Dosimetric methods are used in radiology departments for a variety of purposes including the determination of patient dose levels to allow examinations to be optimized and to assist in decisions on the justification of examination choices. Patient dosimetry is important for special cases such as for X-ray examinations of children and pregnant patients. It is also a key component of the quality control of X-ray equipment and procedures. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  14. Ion-kill dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Fromm, M.; Chambaudet, A.

    2001-01-01

    Unanticipated late effects in neutron and heavy ion therapy, not attributable to overdose, imply a qualitative difference between low and high LET therapy. We identify that difference as 'ion kill', associated with the spectrum of z/beta in the radiation field, whose measurement we label 'ion-kill dosimetry'.

  15. LAND AND WATER USE CHARACTERISTICS AND HUMAN HEALTH INPUT PARAMETERS FOR USE IN ENVIRONMENTAL DOSIMETRY AND RISK ASSESSMENTS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannik, T.; Karapatakis, D.; Lee, P.; Farfan, E.

    2010-08-06

    Operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in releases of small amounts of radioactive materials to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. For regulatory compliance purposes, potential offsite radiological doses are estimated annually using computer models that follow U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guides. Within the regulatory guides, default values are provided for many of the dose model parameters but the use of site-specific values by the applicant is encouraged. A detailed survey of land and water use parameters was conducted in 1991 and is being updated here. These parameters include local characteristics of meat, milk and vegetable production; river recreational activities; and meat, milk and vegetable consumption rates as well as other human usage parameters required in the SRS dosimetry models. In addition, the preferred elemental bioaccumulation factors and transfer factors to be used in human health exposure calculations at SRS are documented. Based on comparisons to the 2009 SRS environmental compliance doses, the following effects are expected in future SRS compliance dose calculations: (1) Aquatic all-pathway maximally exposed individual doses may go up about 10 percent due to changes in the aquatic bioaccumulation factors; (2) Aquatic all-pathway collective doses may go up about 5 percent due to changes in the aquatic bioaccumulation factors that offset the reduction in average individual water consumption rates; (3) Irrigation pathway doses to the maximally exposed individual may go up about 40 percent due to increases in the element-specific transfer factors; (4) Irrigation pathway collective doses may go down about 50 percent due to changes in food productivity and production within the 50-mile radius of SRS; (5) Air pathway doses to the maximally exposed individual may go down about 10 percent due to the changes in food productivity in the SRS area and to the changes in element-specific transfer factors; and (6

  16. Biokinetics and dosimetry of {sup 99m} Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-[Lys{sup 3}]-bombesin in humans: imaging of GRP receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos C, C.L.; Ferro F, G. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Murphy, C.A de [INCMNSZ, 14000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Cardena, E.; Pichardo R, P. [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Oncologia Centro Medico Siglo XXI, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    Full text: Bombesin (BN) receptor subtype 2 (GRP-r) is over-expressed on various human tumors including breast, prostate, small cell lung and pancreatic cancer. Recently we reported the {sup 99-}mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-[Lys{sup 3}]-Bombesin ({sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-BN) complex as a new radiopharmaceutical with high stability in human serum, specific cell GRP-receptor binding and rapid internalization. The aim of this study was to evaluate the {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-BN biokinetics and dosimetry in 5-healthy and 3-breast cancer women. Whole-body images were acquired at 20, 90, 180 min and 24 h after {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-BN administration. Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn around source' organs on each time frame. The same set of ROIs was used for all 8 scans and the cpm of each ROI was converted to activity using the conjugate view counting method. The image sequence was used to extrapolate {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-BN time activity curves in each organ, to calculate the total number of disintegrations (N) that occurred in the source regions. N data were the input for the OLINDA/EXM code to calculate internal radiation dose estimates. Images showed a rapid radiopharmaceutical blood clearance with predominantly renal excretion and minimal hepatobiliary elimination. {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-BN exhibited high in vivo affinity for GRP-r over-expression successfully visualized in breast cancer lesions and well differentiated from GRP-r expression in lungs and airways with normal GRP-r density (ratio 3:1). The equivalent doses for a study using 370 MBq were 7.38{+-}1.68, 0.59{+-}0.08, 2.07{+-}0.60, 0.58{+-}0.1, 0.75{+-}0.09 and 0.43{+-}0.07 mSv for kidneys, liver, lungs, ovaries, pancreas and red marrow respectively. The effective dose was 1.64{+-}0.25 mSv which is comparable with the doses known for most of the {sup 99m}Tc radiopharmaceutical studies in nuclear medicine. (Author)

  17. Use of I-131- CRTX for targeting malignant adenocarcinoma in mice: biodistribution and radiation dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Raquel Gouvea dos; Soares, Marcella Araugio; Andrade, Henrique Martins de, E-mail: santosr@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Santos, Marcos Antonio da Cunha [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Estatistica

    2008-07-01

    Snake venoms molecules have been shown to play a role not only in the survival and proliferation of tumour cells but also in the processes of tumour cell adhesion, migration and angiogenesis. We have shown that {sup 125}I-Crtx, a radiolabeled version of a protein derived from Crotalus durissus terrificus snake venom (Cdt), specifically binds to tumor and triggers apoptotic death. This study reports the biokinetic profile of {sup 99m}Tc-Cdt and {sup 125/131}I-Crtx in Swiss mice bearing Ehrlich solid tumor and MIRD formulation was applied to calculate the absorbed radiation doses for various organs and tumor site. Biokinetic evaluations were performed up to 24 h after intravenous (i.v) or intratumor (i.tu.) injection of {sup 99m}Tc-Cdt or {sup 125/131}I-Crtx. Time-activity curves were generated for the main organs by fitting the organ specific mass mean counts. The radiation dose from {sup 131}I-Crtx was calculated based on non penetrating radiation in the mouse model. Biokinetics data from {sup 99m}Tc-Cdt after i.v. injection in mice tumor model showed rapid blood clearance (T{sub 1/2}= 36.1 ± 2.4 min.), slow tumor clearance (T{sub 1/2}: 108.3 ± 19.5 min.) and indicated the kidneys as the main excretion pathway. Interaction studies in vitro demonstrated that {sup 125}I-Crtx recognize specific sites on Erlich tumor cell membrane. Upon intravenous and intratumor administration of {sup 131}I-Crtx in mice bearing Erlich tumor, it was observed high uptake in tumor site in vivo (Ã =72kBq x h/g) resulting in a high absorbed dose radiation to tumor site. Distributions of {sup 125/131}I-Crtx i.v. were only significant in tumor, stomach, liver and kidneys, reflecting non-specific uptake of Crtx in normal excretion tissues in vivo. Intratumoral administration reduced significantly the radiation dose to the kidneys (42-fold lower) and increased the uptake by the tumor site (128- fold higher). {sup 131}I control was run in a parallel experiment and showed no significant tumor uptake. In conclusion, {sup 131}I-Crtx had a high concentration in tumor and low concentration in normal organs in mice bearing Erlich tumor. Tumor-to-normal tissue radiation dose ratio, for intratumor injected {sup 131}I-Crtx, were more than 60-fold higher depending on the organ. Our results indicate that Cdt components may provide interesting templates for development of a tool for targeted radiotherapy against adenocarcinoma. (author)

  18. The dosimetry of ionizing radiation

    CERN Document Server

    1990-01-01

    A continuation of the treatise The Dosimetry of Ionizing Radiation, Volume III builds upon the foundations of Volumes I and II and the tradition of the preceeding treatise Radiation Dosimetry. Volume III contains three comprehensive chapters on the applications of radiation dosimetry in particular research and medical settings, a chapter on unique and useful detectors, and two chapters on Monte Carlo techniques and their applications.

  19. The dosimetry of ionizing radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Bjaerngard, Bengt E; Kase, Kenneth R

    1987-01-01

    The Dosimetry of Ionizing Radiation, Volume II, attempts to fill the need for updated reference material on the field of radiation dosimetry. This book presents some broad topics in dosimetry and a variety of radiation dosimetry instrumentation and its application. The book opens with a chapter that extends and applies the concepts of microdosimetry to biological systems. This is followed by separate chapters on the state- of-the-art equipment and techniques used to determine neutron spectra; studies to determine recombination effects in ionization chambers exposed to high-intensity pulsed ra

  20. INDIVIDUAL DOSIMETRY SERVICE

    CERN Document Server

    1999-01-01

    Personnel in the distribution groups Aleph, Delphi, L3, Opal who also work for other experiments than at LEP, should contact the Individual Dosimetry ServiceWe inform all staff and users under regular dosimetric control that the dosimeters for the monitoring period JANUARY/FEBRUARY will be available from their usual dispatchers on Monday the third of January 2000.Please have your films changed:before the 12 January.The colour of the dosimeter valid in JANUARY/FEBRUARY is WHITE.

  1. In vivo studies: comparing the administration via and the impact on the biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Suyene Rocha; Sarcinelle, Michelle Alvares; de Souza Albernaz, Marta; da Silva, Franciana Maria Rosa; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; Almeida do Nascimento, Patricia; Carvalho, Cosme Leonardo Gomes; Santos-Oliveira, Ralph

    2014-10-01

    The use of in vivo assay to determine the biodistribution and subsequent inter-comparison with human parameters has been used since the dawn of science. The use of this type of test admits the metabolic equity among animals for inter-comparison. Thus, the use of Wistar rats in particular is quite frequent. Regarding routes of administration, there are three ways to test priority: jugular vein, intraocular (eye plexus) and caudal; there is a consensus that these three pathways behave in the same way, or at least very similar. Biodistribution studies of drugs, especially radiopharmaceuticals, have been using randomly any of these pathways believed to be effective in their likeness without worrying about your real analytic equity. In this study, we performed in vivo assay in 8 Wistar rats using 99mTc -labeled Herceptin to review the route of administration on the biodistribution result. Thus, four mice were injected via the intraocular (eye plexus), and four were injected via tail (caudal plexus). The results were quite disparate and call the attention of the scientific community to reassess the protocols for animal experiments, in order to have uniformity and fairness between the data and may represent a test for human inter-comparison of more reliable and trustworthy way. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Dosimetry in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asha, M L; Chatterjee, Ingita; Patil, Preeti; Naveen, S

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to review various dosimeters used in dentistry and the cumulative results of various studies done with various dosimeters. Several relevant PubMed indexed articles from 1999 to 2013 were electronically searched by typing "dosimeters", "dosimeters in dentistry", "properties of dosimeters", "thermoluminescent and optically stimulated dosimeters", "recent advancements in dosimetry in dentistry." The searches were limited to articles in English to prepare a concise review on dental dosimetry. Titles and abstracts were screened, and articles that fulfilled the criteria of use of dosimeters in dental applications were selected for a full-text reading. Article was divided into four groups: (1) Biological effects of radiation, (2) properties of dosimeters, (3) types of dosimeters and (4) results of various studies using different dosimeters. The present review on dosimetry based on various studies done with dosimeters revealed that, with the advent of radiographic technique the effective dose delivered is low. Therefore, selection of radiological technique plays an important role in dental dose delivery.

  3. Dosimetry: an ARDENT topic

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2012-01-01

    The first annual ARDENT workshop took place in Vienna from 20 to 23 November. The workshop gathered together the Early-Stage Researchers (ESR) and their supervisors, plus other people involved from all the participating institutions.   “The meeting, which was organised with the local support of the Austrian Institute of Technology, was a nice opportunity for the ESRs to get together, meet each other, and present their research plans and some preliminary results of their work,” says Marco Silari, a member of CERN Radiation Protection Group and the scientist in charge of the programme. Two full days were devoted to a training course on radiation dosimetry, delivered by renowned experts. The workshop closed with a half-day visit to the MedAustron facility in Wiener Neustadt. ARDENT (Advanced Radiation Dosimetry European Network Training) is a Marie Curie ITN project funded under EU FP7 with €4 million. The project focuses on radiation dosimetry exploiting se...

  4. Biodistribution and PET Imaging of pharmacokinetics of manganese in mice using Manganese-52.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Lake Wooten

    Full Text Available Manganese is essential to life, and humans typically absorb sufficient quantities of this element from a normal healthy diet; however, chronic, elevated ingestion or inhalation of manganese can be neurotoxic, potentially leading to manganism. Although imaging of large amounts of accumulated Mn(II is possible by MRI, quantitative measurement of the biodistribution of manganese, particularly at the trace level, can be challenging. In this study, we produced the positron-emitting radionuclide 52Mn (t1/2 = 5.6 d by proton bombardment (Ep<15 MeV of chromium metal, followed by solid-phase isolation by cation-exchange chromatography. An aqueous solution of [52Mn]MnCl2 was nebulized into a closed chamber with openings through which mice inhaled the aerosol, and a separate cohort of mice received intravenous (IV injections of [52Mn]MnCl2. Ex vivo biodistribution was performed at 1 h and 1 d post-injection/inhalation (p.i.. In both trials, we observed uptake in lungs and thyroid at 1 d p.i. Manganese is known to cross the blood-brain barrier, as confirmed in our studies following IV injection (0.86%ID/g, 1 d p.i. and following inhalation of aerosol, (0.31%ID/g, 1 d p.i.. Uptake in salivary gland and pancreas were observed at 1 d p.i. (0.5 and 0.8%ID/g, but to a much greater degree from IV injection (6.8 and 10%ID/g. In a separate study, mice received IV injection of an imaging dose of [52Mn]MnCl2, followed by in vivo imaging by positron emission tomography (PET and ex vivo biodistribution. The results from this study supported many of the results from the biodistribution-only studies. In this work, we have confirmed results in the literature and contributed new results for the biodistribution of inhaled radiomanganese for several organs. Our results could serve as supporting information for environmental and occupational regulations, for designing PET studies utilizing 52Mn, and/or for predicting the biodistribution of manganese-based MR contrast agents.

  5. First-in-human uPAR PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Morten; Skovgaard, Dorthe; Brandt-Larsen, Malene

    2015-01-01

    A first-in-human clinical trial with Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) in patients with breast, prostate and bladder cancer, is described. uPAR is expressed in many types of human cancers and the expression is predictive...... of invasion, metastasis and indicates poor prognosis. uPAR PET imaging therefore holds promise to be a new and innovative method for improved cancer diagnosis, staging and individual risk stratification. The uPAR specific peptide AE105 was conjugated to the macrocyclic chelator DOTA and labeled with (64)Cu...... for targeted molecular imaging with PET. The safety, pharmacokinetic, biodistribution profile and radiation dosimetry after a single intravenous dose of (64)Cu-DOTA-AE105 were assessed by serial PET and computed tomography (CT) in 4 prostate, 3 breast and 3 bladder cancer patients. Safety assessment...

  6. Radioembolization dosimetry : the road ahead

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Maarten L J; Elschot, Mattijs; Sze, Daniel Y; Kao, Yung H; Nijsen, JFW; Iagaru, Andre H; de Jong, Hugo W A M; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Lam, Marnix G E H

    Methods for calculating the activity to be administered during yttrium-90 radioembolization (RE) are largely based on empirical toxicity and efficacy analyses, rather than dosimetry. At the same time, it is recognized that treatment planning based on proper dosimetry is of vital importance for the

  7. Analysis behaviour of free radicals produced by ionizing radiations in human blood by EPR for biological dosimetry in patients; Analisis del comportamiento de los radicales libre en la radiolisis de la sangre por EPR para dosimetria biologia en pacientes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza, O. O.; Almanza, A.; Plazas, M. M. C.

    2006-07-01

    In this work is analyzed the biological dosimetry of the free radicals produced by ionizing radiations in human blood obtained by EPR and the biological behaviour of samples In-Vitro, with Rh: O+, in tubes with EDTA (Acid Etilen Diamino Tetracetic) the samples was extracted of the main investigator, these samples were radiated with gammas of ''60Co of a Theratron 780 between plates of PMMA to a depth of Z{sub m}ax of 0.5 cm and between doses 1 to 25 Gy. In these results the behaviors of signal the free radicals presented a increasing a their intensity depending on applied dose, of equal way are results of the biologic dosimetry displayed in sanguineous populations like. White Globules, Red. Platelets etc, to being compared with Resonance Paramagnetic Electronic (EPR). The results show changes in sanguineous populations in high doses (D>10 Gy) in the case of lymphocytes, granulocitos, macusanita, plaquetas, hemoglobina, haematocrit with change similarly in medium and low doses (D>10Gy) in linfocites, platelets, granulocytes, monocytes and the haematocrit. A sanguineous sample without radiating analyzes by EPR giving the presence of signals with values of g=2.13 2,41 in blood. For the first certain value of g authors have associated it to free radicals like: globin (Fe(IV)=0) or Cu''+ incorporated to the ceruloplasmin molecule. (Author)

  8. Relocation of Dosimetry Service

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    The Dosimetry Service is moving from Building 24 to Building 55 and will therefore be closed on Friday, March 30. From Monday, April 2 onwards you will find us in building 55/1-001. Please note that during that day we might still have some problems with the internet connections and cannot fully guarantee normal service procedures. The service's opening hours and telephone number will not change as a result of the move 8.30 - 12.00, afternoons closed Tel. 72155

  9. Electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry using synthetic hydroxyapatite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kwon; Kim, Hwi Young; Ye, Sung Joon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hirata, Hiroshi [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Park, Jong Min [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    The victims exposed doses under 3.5-4.0 Gy have chance to survive if treated urgently. To determine the priority of treatment among a large number of victims, the triage – distinguishing patients who need an urgent treatment from who may not be urgent – is necessary based on radiation biodosimetry. A current gold standard for radiation biodosimetry is the chromosomal assay using human lymphocytes. But this method requires too much time and skilled labors to cover the mass victims in radiation emergencies. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has been known for its capability of quantifying radicals in matters. EPR dosimetry is based on the measurement of stable radiation-induced radicals in tooth enamel. Hydroxyapatite (HAP) (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) contained in tooth enamel is a major probe for radiation dose reconstruction. This HAP dosimetry study was performed using a novel EPR spectrometer in Hokkaido University, Japan. The EPR dose-response curve was made using HAP samples. The blind test using 250 cGy samples showed the feasibility of EPR dosimetry for the triage purpose.

  10. Information from the Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Please note the following opening hours of the Service: From 31st July onwards: Every morning from 8:30 to 12:00 The Service is closed in the afternoons. We should like to remind you that dosimeters cannot be sent to customers by internal mail. Short-term dosimeters (VCTs) must always be returned to the Service after use and must not be left on the racks in the experimental areas or in the secretariats. Dosimetry Service Tel 72155 Bldg. 24 E 011 Dosimetry.service@cern.ch http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  11. Physiologically based kinetic model of effector cell biodistribution in mammals: implications for adoptive immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, H; Melder, R J; Baxter, L T; Jain, R K

    1996-08-15

    The goal of the present investigation was to develop a physiologically based kinetic model to describe the biodistribution of immunologically active effector cells in normal and neoplastic tissues of mammals based on the current understanding of lymphocyte trafficking pathways and signals. The model was used to extrapolate biodistribution among different animal species and to identify differences among different effector populations and between intra-arterial and systemic injections. Most importantly, the model was used to discern critical parameters for improving the delivery of effector cells. In the model, the mammalian body was divided into 12 organ compartments, interconnected in anatomic fashion. Each compartment was characterized by blood flow rate, organ volume and lymphatic flow rate, and other physiological and immunological parameters. The resulting set of 45 differential equations was solved numerically. The model was used to simulate the following biodistribution data: (a) nonactivated T lymphocytes in rats; (b) interleukin 2-activated tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in humans; (c) nonactivated natural killer (NK) cells in rats; and (d) interleukin 2-activated adherent NK cells in mice. Comparisons between simulations and data demonstrated the feasibility of the model and the scaling scheme. The similarities as well as differences in biodistribution of different lymphocyte populations were revealed as results of their trafficking properties. The importance of lymphocyte infiltration from surrounding normal tissues into tumor tissue was found to depend on lymphocyte migration rate, tumor size, and host organ. The study confirmed that treatment with effector cells has not been as impressive as originally promised, due, in part, to the biodistribution problems. The model simulations demonstrated that low effector concentrations in the systemic circulation greatly limited their delivery to tumor. This was due to high retention in normal tissues, especially

  12. Dosimetry by 90Y internal pair production PET imaging after liver radioembolization: How well can we quantify the absorbed dose to lesions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arienzo, M.

    2017-03-01

    Radioembolization is a catheter-based liver-directed therapy indicated mainly in a palliative setting for primary and secondary hepatic malignancies. It involves the administration of 90Y -loaded microspheres in the arterial vasculature of the liver by use of percutaneous transarterial techniques. Previous studies showed that the decay of 90Y has a minor branch to the 0+ first excited state of 90Zr at 1.76MeV, that is followed by a β+ / β- emission. In recent years, a number of authors have used the small positronic emission of 90Y , (3.186± 0.047)\\cdot 10^{-5} , to obtain high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) images of 90Y biodistribution after liver radioembolization. At present, it is generally accepted that the possibility of detecting β+ emissions from 90Y by PET scanners may pave the way for an accurate patient-specific dosimetry. The present paper has a twofold purpose. Firstly, a brief overview of imaging modalities currently used to assess microsphere biodistribution after liver radioembolization is presented. Secondly, the paper focuses on 90Y -PET dosimetry. A benchmark between a number of dosimetric approaches for accurate dosimetry after liver radioembolization with 90Y -PET dosimetry is presented.

  13. Internal dosimetry technical basis manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-20

    The internal dosimetry program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) consists of radiation protection programs and activities used to detect and evaluate intakes of radioactive material by radiation workers. Examples of such programs are: air monitoring; surface contamination monitoring; personal contamination surveys; radiobioassay; and dose assessment. The objectives of the internal dosimetry program are to demonstrate that the workplace is under control and that workers are not being exposed to radioactive material, and to detect and assess inadvertent intakes in the workplace. The Savannah River Site Internal Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual (TBM) is intended to provide a technical and philosophical discussion of the radiobioassay and dose assessment aspects of the internal dosimetry program. Detailed information on air, surface, and personal contamination surveillance programs is not given in this manual except for how these programs interface with routine and special bioassay programs.

  14. Medical dosimetry in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turák, O.; Osvay, M.; Ballay, L.

    2012-09-01

    Radiation exposure of medical staff during cardiological and radiological procedures was investigated. The exposure of medical staff is directly connected to patient exposure. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of doses on uncovered part of body of medical staff using LiF thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters in seven locations. Individual Kodak film dosimeters (as authorized dosimetry system) were used for the assessment of medical staff's effective dose. Results achieved on dose distribution measurements confirm that wearing only one film badge under the lead apron does not provide enough information on the personal dose. The value of estimated annual doses on eye lens and extremities (fingers) were in good correlation with international publications.

  15. Strahlungsmessung und Dosimetrie

    CERN Document Server

    Krieger, Hanno

    2013-01-01

    „Strahlungsquellen und Dosimetrie“ ist Teil einer Lehrbuchreihe zur Strahlungsphysik und zum Strahlenschutz. Der erste Teil befasst sich mit den physikalischen Grundlagen der Strahlungsdetektoren und der Strahlungsmessung. Im zweiten Teil werden die Konzepte und Verfahren der klinischen Dosimetrie dargestellt. Der dritte Abschnitt erläutert ausführlich die Dosisverteilungen der klinisch angewendeten Strahlungsarten. Im vierten Teil werden weitere Messaufgaben der Strahlungsphysik einschließlich der Messsysteme für die Bildgebung mit Röntgenstrahlung dargestellt. Neben den grundlegenden Ausführungen enthält dieser Band im laufenden Text zahlreiche Tabellen und Grafiken zur technischen und medizinischen Radiologie, die bei der praktischen Arbeit sehr hilfreich sein können und 199 Übungsaufgaben mit Lösungen zur Vertiefung der Inhalte. Für die zweite Auflage wurden die Darstellungen der Elektronen- und der Protonendosimetrie sowie der bildgebenden Verfahren mit Computertomografen deutlich erweit...

  16. Dosimetry of high energy radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Sahare, P D

    2018-01-01

    High energy radiation is hazardous to living beings and a threat to mankind. The correct estimation of the high energy radiation is a must and a single technique may not be very successful. The process of estimating the dose (the absorbed energy that could cause damages) is called dosimetry. This book covers the basic technical knowledge in the field of radiation dosimetry. It also makes readers aware of the dangers and hazards of high energy radiation.

  17. Phase I biodistribution and pharmacokinetic study of Lewis Y-targeting immunoconjugate CMD-193 in patients with advanced epithelial cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbertson, Rebecca A; Tebbutt, Niall C; Lee, Fook-Thean; MacFarlane, David J; Chappell, Bridget; Micallef, Noel; Lee, Sze-Ting; Saunder, Timothy; Hopkins, Wendie; Smyth, Fiona E; Wyld, David K; Bellen, John; Sonnichsen, Daryl S; Brechbiel, Martin W; Murone, Carmel; Scott, Andrew M

    2009-11-01

    This phase I study explored the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of the immunoconjugate CMD-193 [a humanized anti-Lewis Y (Le(y)) antibody conjugated with calicheamicin in patients with advanced cancers expressing the Le(y) antigen. The primary objectives were to determine biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of CMD-193. Secondary objectives included response rates and change in tumor metabolism. Patients with progressive, measurable, and Le(y) positive malignancies were eligible for enrollment in one of two dose cohorts, 1.0 and 2.6 mg/m(2). The first cycle was trace labeled with (111)In for biodistribution assessment using gamma camera imaging. Subsequent cycles were administered every 3 weeks up to a maximum of six cycles, depending on toxicity and response. Pharmacokinetic analysis was based on radioassay and ELISA. Nine patients were enrolled in the study. Biodistribution images showed initial blood pool activity, followed by markedly increased hepatic uptake by day 2, and fast blood clearance in all patients. There was low uptake in tumor in all patients. The overall T(1/2)beta of (111)In-CMD-193 was 102.88 +/- 35.67 hours, with no statistically significant difference between the two dose levels. One patient had a partial metabolic response on (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography ((18)F-FDG PET) after four cycles, but no radiological responses were observed. Myelosuppression and effects on liver function were the most significant adverse effects. CMD-193 shows rapid blood clearance and increased hepatic uptake compared with prior studies of the parental antibody hu3S193. These results highlight the importance of biodistribution and pharmacodynamic assessment in early phase studies of new biologics to assist in clinical development.

  18. RCT: Module 2.04, Dosimetry, Course 8769

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillmer, Kurt T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-11

    This course will introduce the types of instruments used to measure external and internal radiation to people. Dosimetry is the quantitative assessment of radiation received by the human body. Several types of dosimeters are used worldwide. This information is valuable to all radiological control personnel because dosimeters are the only direct method to measure and document personnel radiation exposure and ensure regulatory compliance with applicable limits. This course will cover dosimetry terms, Department of Energy (DOE) limits, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) administrative guidelines, thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), LANL dosimetry, and bioassay assessment methods. This course will prepare the student with the skills necessary for radiological control technician (RCT) qualification by passing quizzes, tests, and the RCT Comprehensive Phase 1, Unit 2 Examination (TEST 27566) and providing in-thefield skills.

  19. Retrospective accident dosimetry using trapped charges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. I.; Kim, J. L.; Chang, I.; Kim, B. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Dicentric chromosome aberrations technique scoring of aberrations in metaphases prepared from human lymphocytes is most commonly used. This is considered as a reliable technique because the sample is extracted from the individual human body itself. There are other techniques in biological dosimetry such as Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) using translocations, premature chromosome condensation (PCC) and micronucleus assay. However the minimum detectable doses (MDD) are relatively high and sample preparation time is also relatively longer. Therefore, there is limitation in use of these techniques for the purpose of triage in a short time in case of emergency situation relating large number of persons. Electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique is based on the signal from unpaired electrons such as free radicals in irradiated materials especially tooth enamel, however it has also limitation for the purpose of triage because of difficulty of sample taking and its high MDD. Recently as physical methods, thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique have been attracted due to its lower MDD and simplicity of sample preparation. Density of the trapped charges is generally proportional to the radiation dose absorbed and the intensity of emitting light is also proportional to the density of trapped charges, thus it can be applied to measure radiation dose retrospectively. In this presentation, TL and OSL techniques are going to introduced and discussed as physical methods for retrospective accident dosimetry using trapped charges especially in electronic component materials. As a tool for dose reconstruction for emergency situation, thermoluminescece and optically stimulated luminescence techniques which are based on trapped charges during exposure of material are introduced. These techniques have several advantages such as high sensitivity, fast evaluation and ease to sample collection over common biological dosimetry and EPR

  20. Thermoluminescence Dosimetry Applied to Radiation Protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Poul; Bøtter-Jensen, Lars; Majborn, Benny

    1982-01-01

    This is a general review of the present state of the development and application of thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) for radiation protection purposes. A description is given of commonly used thermoluminescent dosimeters and their main dosimetric properties, e.g. energy response, dose range......, fading, and LET dependence. The applications of thermoluminescence dosimetry in routine personnel monitoring, accident dosimetry, u.v. radiation dosimetry, and environmental monitoring are discussed with particular emphasis on current problems in routine personnel monitoring. Finally, the present state...

  1. Magnetically Targeted Viral Envelopes: A PET Investigation of Initial Biodistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flexman, Jennifer A.; Cross, Donna J.; Lewellen, Barbara L.; Miyoshi, Sosuke; Kim, Yongmin

    2009-01-01

    Gene and drug therapy for organ-specific diseases in part depends on the efficient delivery to a particular region of the body. We examined the biodistribution of a viral envelope commonly used as a nanoscale gene delivery vehicle using positron emission tomography (PET) and investigated the magnetic alteration of its biodistribution. Iron oxide nanoparticles and 18 F-fluoride were encapsulated by hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelopes (HVJ-Es). HVJ-Es were then injected intravenously in the rat and imaged dynamically using high-resolution PET. Control subjects received injections of encapsulated materials alone. For magnetic targeting, permanent magnets were fixed on the head during the scan. Based on the quantitative analysis of PET images, HVJ-Es accumulated in the liver and spleen and activity remained higher than control subjects for 2 h. Histological sections of the liver confirmed imaging findings. Pixel-wise activity patterns on coregistered PET images of the head showed a significantly different pattern for the subjects receiving magnetic targeting as compared to all control groups. Imaging demonstrated the initial biodistribution of a viral envelope within the rodent by providing quantitative behavior over time and in specific anatomical regions. Magnetic force altered the biodistribution of the viral envelope to a target structure, and could enable region-specific delivery of therapeutic vehicles noninvasively. PMID:18779103

  2. Dextrin-Based Nanomagnetogel : In Vivo Biodistribution and Stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goncalves, C.; Silva, J. P.; Farinha Antunes, Ines; Ferreira, M. F. M.; Martins, J. A.; Geraldes, C. F. G. C.; Lalatonne, Y.; Motte, L.; de Vries, Erik; Gama, F. M.

    The biodistribution profile of a new dextrin nanomagnetogel, which consists of gamma-Fe2O3 superparamagnetic nanoparticles loaded within a polymeric matrix of modified dextrin, was studied in mice. The nanomagnetogel bear a monomodal size distribution profile (average diameter 110 nm) close to

  3. Studies in Ultrasonic Dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitouni, Abderrachid

    The widespread use of ultrasonic devices in both industry and medicine confirms the great importance of ultrasound as a source of nonionizing radiation. The biological effects of this type of radiation are not completely known up to today, and the need for proper dosimetry is evident. Previous work in the field has been limited to the determination of ultrasonic energy deposition by attenuation measurements of traveling sound waves in homogenized specimens. Alternatively, observed effects were correlated to the output of the source. The objective of this work was to correlate the absorption properties of sound absorbing media to their elastic properties and deduce a correlation between the sonic absorption coefficient and the corresponding Young's modulus. Energy deposition measurements were performed in isotropic rubber samples and in anisotropic meat specimens by the use of the thermocouple probe method which measures the absorbed energy directly. Elasticity measurements were performed for the different types of materials used. The Young's modulus for each type was deduced from defletion measurements on rectangular strips when subjected to successive forces of varying magnitude. The final experimental results showed the existence of a linear relationship between the absorption coefficient of a given elastic material and the inverse square root of its Young's modulus.

  4. Biodistribution of Liver-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells After Peripheral Injection in a Hemophilia A Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokal, Etienne M; Lombard, Catherine Anne; Roelants, Véronique; Najimi, Mustapha; Varma, Sharat; Sargiacomo, Camillo; Ravau, Joachim; Mazza, Giuseppe; Jamar, François; Versavau, Julia; Jacobs, Vanessa; Jacquemin, Marc; Eeckhoudt, Stéphane; Lambert, Catherine; Stéphenne, Xavier; Smets, Françoise; Hermans, Cédric

    2017-08-01

    With the exception of liver transplantation, there is no cure for hemophilia, which is currently managed by preemptive replacement therapy. Liver-derived stem cells are in clinical development for inborn and acquired liver diseases and could represent a curative treatment for hemophilia A. The liver is a major factor VIII (FVIII) synthesis site, and mesenchymal stem cells have been shown to control joint bleeding in animal models of hemophilia. Adult-derived human liver stem cells (ADHLSCs) have mesenchymal characteristics and have been shown able to engraft in and repopulate both animal and human livers. Thus, the objectives were to evaluate the potency of ADHLSCs to control bleeding in a hemophilia A patient and assess the biodistribution of the cells after intravenous injection. A patient suffering from hemophilia A was injected with repeated doses of ADHLSCs via a peripheral vein (35 million In-oxine-labeled cells, followed by 125 million cells the next day, and 3 infusions of 250 million cells every 2 weeks thereafter; total infusion period, 50 days). After cell therapy, we found a temporary (15 weeks) decrease in the patient's FVIII requirements and severe bleeding complications, despite a lack of increase in circulating FVIII. The cells were safely administered to the patient via a peripheral vein. Biodistribution analysis revealed an initial temporary entrapment of the cells in the lungs, followed by homing to the liver and to a joint afflicted with hemarthrosis. These results suggest the potential use of ADHLSCs in the treatment of hemophilia A.

  5. For information: Individual dosimetry service

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The service has noticed that there are dosimeter holders who have changed their activities and thus have no longer need of dosimeter as a permanent basis in their work (persons who go rarely to the controlled areas). The reduction of persons in the regular distribution list of dosimeters will lighten the work of the service (distribution, evaluation and consolidation of doses) as well as the work of the distributors, needless to say the economical input this would have for CERN. For the persons who only need a dosimeter temporarily we would like to remind that there is a quick and simple procedure to have one immediately from the Individual Dosimetry Service. Please contact the service (dosimetry.service@cern.ch) if you do not need a dosimeter regularly. Thank you for your cooperation. http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  6. Information from the Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Please note the following opening hours of the Service: In June: Every morning from 8:30 to 12:00 In July: Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 8:30 to 11:30 Closed all day on Tuesdays and Thursdays From 31st July onwards: Every morning from 8:30 to 12:00 The Service is closed in the afternoons. We should like to remind you that dosimeters cannot be sent to customers by internal mail. Short-term dosimeters (VCTs) must always be returned to the Service after use and must not be left on the racks in the experimental areas or in the secretariats. Dosimetry Service Tel 72155 Bldg. 24 E 011 Dosimetry.service@cern.ch http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  7. Information from the Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    CERN Staff and Users can now consult their dose records for an individual or an organizational unit with HRT. Please see more information on our web page http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry. The Dosimetry Service is open every morning from 8.30 - 12.00, and closed in the afternoons. We would like to remind you that dosimeters cannot be sent to customers by internal mail. Short-term dosimeters (VCT's) must always be returned to the Service after use and must not be left on the racks in the experimental areas or in the secretariats.

  8. Information from the Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    CERN Staff and Users can now consult their dose records for an individual or an organizational unit with HRT. Please see more information on our web page: http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry. The Dosimetry Service is open every morning from 8.30 to 12.00 and is closed in the afternoons. We would like to remind you that dosimeters cannot be sent to customers by internal mail. Short-term dosimeters (VCT's) must always be returned to the Service after use and must not be left on the racks in the experimental areas or in the secretariats.

  9. A fast and effective determination of the biodistribution and subcellular localization of fluorescent immunoliposomes in freshly excised animal organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansi, Felista L; Rüger, Ronny; Kollmeier, Ansgar M; Böhm, Claudia; Kontermann, Roland E; Teichgraeber, Ulf K; Fahr, Alfred; Hilger, Ingrid

    2017-01-18

    Preclinical research implementing fluorescence-based approaches is inevitable for drug discovery and technology. For example, a variety of contrast agents developed for biomedical imaging are usually evaluated in cell systems and animal models based on their conjugation to fluorescent dyes. Biodistribution studies of excised organs are often performed by macroscopic imaging, whereas the subcellular localization though vital, is often neglected or further validated by histological procedures. Available systems used to define the subcellular biodistribution of contrast agents such as intravital microscopes or ex vivo histological analysis are expensive and not affordable by the majority of researchers, or encompass tedious and time consuming steps that may modify the contrast agents and falsify the results. Thus, affordable and more reliable approaches to study the biodistribution of contrast agents are required. We developed fluorescent immunoliposomes specific for human fibroblast activation protein and murine endoglin, and used macroscopic fluorescence imaging and confocal microscopy to determine their biodistribution and subcellular localization in freshly excised mice organs at different time points post intravenous injection. Near infrared fluorescence macroscopic imaging revealed key differences in the biodistribution of the respective immunoliposomes at different time points post injection, which correlated to the first-pass effect as well as the binding of the probes to molecular targets within the mice organs. Thus, a higher accumulation and longer retention of the murine endoglin immunoliposomes was seen in the lungs, liver and kidneys than the FAP specific immunoliposomes. Confocal microscopy showed that tissue autofluorescence enables detection of organ morphology and cellular components within freshly excised, non-processed organs, and that fluorescent probes with absorption and emission maxima beyond the tissue autofluorescence range can be easily

  10. Testicular biodistribution of 450 nm fluorescent latex particles after intramuscular injection in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Jean-Philippe; Boudard, Delphine; Cadusseau, Josette; Palle, Sabine; Forest, Valérie; Pourchez, Jérémie; Cottier, Michèle

    2013-01-01

    The significant expansion in the use of nanoparticles and submicron particles during the last 20 years has led to increasing concern about their potential toxicity to humans and particularly their impact on male fertility. Currently, an insufficient number of studies have focused on the testicular biodistribution of particles. The aim of our study was to assess the distribution of 450 nm fluorescent particles in mouse testes after intramuscular injection. To this end, testes were removed from 5 groups of 3 mice each at 1 h (H1), 4 days (D4), 21 days (D21), 45 days (D45) and 90 days (D90) after the injection of 7.28 × 109 particles in the tibialis anterior muscles of each mouse. We examined histological sections from these samples by epifluorescence microscopy and confocal microscopy and identified testicular biodistribution of a small number of particles in groups H1, D4, D21, D45 and D90. Using CD11b immunostaining, we showed that particles were not carried into the testis by macrophages. The intratesticular repartition of particles mainly followed testicular vascularization. Finally, we found some particles in seminiferous tubules but could not determine if the blood–testis barrier was crossed. PMID:23329290

  11. In aqua vivo EPID dosimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wendling, Markus; McDermott, Leah N.; Mans, Anton; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Ígor; Pecharromán-Gallego, Raul; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Stroom, Joep; van Herk, Marcel; Mijnheer, Ben J.

    2012-01-01

    At the Netherlands Cancer Institute--Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital in vivo dosimetry using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has been implemented for almost all high-energy photon treatments of cancer with curative intent. Lung cancer treatments were initially excluded, because the

  12. Dosimetry for Electron Beam Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne

    1983-01-01

    This report describes two aspects of electron bean dosimetry, on one hand developaent of thin fil« dosimeters and measurements of their properties, and on the other hand developaent of calorimeters for calibration of routine dosimeters, e.g. thin films. Two types of radiochromic thin film...

  13. Portal dosimetry in wedged beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spreeuw, H.; Rozendaal, R.; Camargo, P.; Mans, A.; Wendling, M.; Olaciregui-Ruiz, I.; Sonke, J.J.; Herk, M. van; Mijnheer, B.

    2015-01-01

    Portal dosimetry using electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) is often applied to verify high-energy photon beam treatments. Due to the change in photon energy spectrum, the resulting dose values are, however, not very accurate in the case of wedged beams if the pixel-to-dose conversion for the

  14. Radiation dosimetry by potassium feldspar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Radiation dosimetry by potassium feldspar. ARUN PANDYA*, S G VAIJAPURKAR and P K BHATNAGAR. Defence Laboratory, Jodhpur 342 011, India. MS received 12 July 1999; revised 15 February 2000. Abstract. The thermoluminescence (TL) properties of raw and annealed feldspar have been studied for their.

  15. Radiation dosimetry by potassium feldspar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The thermoluminescence (TL) properties of raw and annealed feldspar have been studied for their use in gamma dosimetry. The raw gamma exposed feldspar shows glow peaks at 120°C and 319°C. Gamma dose beyond 500 cGy can be measured without any significant fading even after 40 days of termination of ...

  16. Ac magnetic susceptibility study of in vivo nanoparticle biodistribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, L; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, S; Serna, C J; Morales, M P [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, ICMM-CSIC, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco 28049, Madrid (Spain); MejIas, R; Barber, D F [Centro Nacional de BiotecnologIa, CNB-CSIC, Darwin 3, Cantoblanco 28049, Madrid (Spain); Lazaro, F J, E-mail: lucia@icmm.csic.es [Departamento de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Materiales y Fluidos, Universidad de Zaragoza, Maria de Luna 3, 50018, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2011-06-29

    We analysed magnetic nanoparticle biodistribution, before and after cytokine conjugation, in a mouse model by ac susceptibility measurements of the corresponding resected tissues. Mice received repeated intravenous injections of nanoparticle suspension for two weeks and they were euthanized 1 h after the last injection. In general, only 10% of the total injected nanoparticles after multiple exposures were found in tissues. The rest of the particles may probably be metabolized or excreted by the organism. Our findings indicate that the adsorption of interferon to DMSA-coated magnetic nanoparticles changes their biodistribution, reducing the presence of nanoparticles in lungs and therefore their possible toxicity. The specific targeting of the particles to tumour tissues by the use of an external magnetic field has also been studied. Magnetic nanoparticles were observed by transmission electron microscopy in the targeted tissue and quantified by ac magnetic susceptibility.

  17. Altered biodistribution of Ga-67 by intramuscular gold salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moult, R.G.; Bekerman, C. (Chicago Osteopathic Medical Center, IL (USA))

    1989-11-01

    The authors observed a deviation from the normal scintigraphic pattern of Ga-67 citrate biodistribution. An 8-year-old black girl with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, who had been treated with intramuscular injections of gold salts, had a Ga-67 study as part of her workup. The study demonstrated no hepatic uptake, but showed elevated skeletal and renal activity. This characteristic biodistribution of Ga-67 may be due to inhibition of lysosomal enzymes by gold and/or to accumulation of gold in lysosomes. To study these possibilities, the authors reviewed the mechanisms of Ga-67 localization and gold metabolism. Alteration of the Ga-67 citrate scintigraphic pattern due to earlier treatment with gold salts has not been reported previously.

  18. In vivo study of doxorubicin-loaded cell-penetrating peptide-modified pH-sensitive liposomes: biocompatibility, bio-distribution, and pharmacodynamics in BALB/c nude mice bearing human breast tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Y

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Yuan Ding,1,* Wei Cui,2,* Dan Sun,1 Gui-Ling Wang,1 Yu Hei,1 Shuai Meng,1 Jian-Hua Chen,3 Ying Xie,1 Zhi-Qiang Wang4 1Beijing Key Laboratory of Molecular Pharmaceutics and New Drug Delivery Systems, Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University, 2School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 3School of Medicine, Jianghan University, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Kent State University Geauga, Burton, OH, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: In vivo evaluation of drug delivery vectors is essential for clinical translation. In BALB/c nude mice bearing human breast cancer tumors, we investigated the biocompatibility, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of doxorubicin (DOX-loaded novel cell-penetrating peptide (CPP-modified pH-sensitive liposomes (CPPL (referred to as CPPL(DOX with an optimal CPP density of 4%. In CPPL, a polyethylene glycol (PEG derivative formed by conjugating PEG with stearate via acid-degradable hydrazone bond (PEG2000-Hz-stearate was inserted into the surface of liposomes, and CPP was directly attached to liposome surfaces via coupling with stearate to simultaneously achieve long circulation time in blood and improve the selectivity and efficacy of CPP for tumor targeting. Compared to PEGylated liposomes, CPPL enhanced DOX accumulation in tumors up to 1.9-fold (p<0.01 and resulted in more cell apoptosis as a result of DNA disruption as well as a relatively lower tumor growth ratio (T/C%. Histological examination did not show any signs of necrosis or inflammation in normal tissues, but large cell dissolving areas were found in tumors following the treatment of animals with CPPL(DOX. Our findings provide important and detailed information regarding the distribution of CPPL(DOX in vivo and reveal their abilities of tumor penetration and potential for the treatment of

  19. Three dosimetry models of lipoma arborescens treated by {sup 90}Y synovectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O’Doherty, Jim, E-mail: jim.odoherty@kcl.ac.uk [Department of Medical Physics-Nuclear Medicine, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford GU2 7XX, United Kingdom and Division of Imaging Sciences, PET Imaging Centre at St. Thomas’ Hospital, King' s College London, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Clauss, Ralf [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford GU2 7XX (United Kingdom); Scuffham, James [Department of Medical Physics-Nuclear Medicine, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford GU2 7XX (United Kingdom); Khan, Aman [Department of Rheumatology, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford GU2 7XX (United Kingdom); Petitguillaume, Alice; Desbrée, Aurélie [Service de Dosimétrie Interne, Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, 92260 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Lipoma arborescens (LA) is a benign intra-articular lipomatous proliferation of the synovial membrane. This extremely rare condition has previously been treated by intra-articular{sup 90}Y radiosynoviorthesis but dosimetry literature on this form of radionuclide therapy is nonexistent. The authors detail methodology for successful treatment of LA and provide for the first time estimates of radiation dosimetry. The authors also analyze the biodistribution of the radiopharmaceutical over the course of the patient's treatment through sequential imaging. Methods: A patient with bilateral LA underwent intracavity injection of{sup 90}Y citrate colloid to the right and left knee joint spaces (181 and 198 MBq, respectively). SPECT/CT datasets were acquired over 9 days to quantify the biodistribution and kinetics of the radiopharmaceutical. Radiation dosimetry was performed using the MIRD schema (through OLINDA software), a custom voxel-based method, and a direct Monte Carlo calculation (OEDIPE). Results: Follow-up MRI showed marked reduction in LA size in both knees. Mean absorbed doses to the LA were 21.2 ± 0.8 and 42.9 ± 2.3 Gy using OLINDA, 8.1 ± 0.3 and 16.7 ± 0.5 Gy using voxel based methodology, and 8.2 ± 0.3 and 15.7 ± 0.5 Gy for OEDIPE in the right and left LA, respectively. Distribution of the radiopharmaceutical within the joint space alters over the imaging period, with less than 1% of the remaining activity having moved posteriorly in the knee cavity. No uptake was detected outside of the joint space after assessment with whole-body scintigraphy. Conclusions: An activity of approximately 185 MBq successfully relieved clinical symptoms of LA. There was good correlation between direct Monte Carlo and voxel based techniques, but OLINDA was shown to overestimate the absorbed dose to the tumor. Accurate dosimetry may help select an activity more tailored to the specific size and location of the LA.

  20. ALGEBRA: ALgorithm for the heterogeneous dosimetry based on GEANT4 for BRAchytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsharpour, H; Landry, G; D'Amours, M; Enger, S; Reniers, B; Poon, E; Carrier, J-F; Verhaegen, F; Beaulieu, L

    2012-06-07

    Task group 43 (TG43)-based dosimetry algorithms are efficient for brachytherapy dose calculation in water. However, human tissues have chemical compositions and densities different than water. Moreover, the mutual shielding effect of seeds on each other (interseed attenuation) is neglected in the TG43-based dosimetry platforms. The scientific community has expressed the need for an accurate dosimetry platform in brachytherapy. The purpose of this paper is to present ALGEBRA, a Monte Carlo platform for dosimetry in brachytherapy which is sufficiently fast and accurate for clinical and research purposes. ALGEBRA is based on the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code and is capable of handling the DICOM RT standard to recreate a virtual model of the treated site. Here, the performance of ALGEBRA is presented for the special case of LDR brachytherapy in permanent prostate and breast seed implants. However, the algorithm is also capable of handling other treatments such as HDR brachytherapy.

  1. Fifth personnel dosimetry intercomparison study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sims, C.S.

    1980-02-01

    The fifth Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study (PDIS) was conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Dosimetry Applications Research (DOSAR) facility on March 20-22, 1979. This study is the latest PDIS in the continuing series started at the DOSAR facility in 1974. The PDIS is a three day study, typically in March, where personnel dosimeters are mailed to the DOSAR facility, exposed to a range of low-level neutron radiation doses (1 to 15 mSv or equivalently, 100 to 1500 mrem) and neutron-to-gamma ratios (1:1-10:1) using the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) as the radiation source, and returned to the participants for evaluation. This report is a summary and analysis of the results reported by the various participants. The participants are able to intercompare their results with those of others who made dose measurements under identical experimental conditions.

  2. Gel dosimetry for conformal radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambarini, G. [Department of Physics of the University and INFN, Milan (Italy)]. e-mail: grazia.gambarini@mi.infn.it

    2005-07-01

    With the continuum development of conformal radio therapies, aimed at delivering high dose to tumor tissue and low dose to the healthy tissue around, the necessities has appeared of suitable improvement of dosimetry techniques giving the possibility of obtaining dose images to be compared with diagnostic images. Also if wide software has been developed for calculating dose distributions in the fields of various radiotherapy units, experimental verifications are necessary, in particular in the case of complex geometries in conformal radiotherapy. Gel dosimetry is a promising method for imaging the absorbed dose in tissue-equivalent phantoms, with the possibility of 3D reconstruction of the spatial dose distribution, with milli metric resolution. Optical imaging of gel dosimeters, based on visible light absorbance analysis, has shown to be a reliable technique for achieving dose distributions. (Author)

  3. NOTE FROM THE DOSIMETRY SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    During March, the Dosimetry Service will be opened from 8h30 to 12h in the morning and closed every afternoon.   We have established that many people, who are provided regularly with a personal dosimeter (film badge), have changed their activity and do not need it anymore, because they do not, or only exceptionally, enter controlled areas. If you are one of these persons, please contact the Personal Dosimeter Service (tel: 72155). There is a simplified procedure for obtaining a dosimeter if you have an immediate need for short-term visits in controlled areas. A reduction of the number of persons on the regular distribution list of dosimeters would decrease our and the distributors workload. It would also contribute to significant savings in the dosimetry, and thus CERN, budget. We thank you in advance for your understanding and for your collaboration.

  4. MISTI Shielding and Dosimetry Experiment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Reliable on-orbit dosimetry is necessary for understanding effects of space radiation environments on spacecraft microelectronics performance and comparison of...

  5. Clearance Kinetics and External Dosimetry of Iodine-131-labeled Murine and Humanized Monoclonal Antibody A33 in Patients with Colon Cancer: Radiation Safety Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Dauer, Lawrence T.; Boylan, Daniel C; Williamson, Matthew J.; Germain, Jean St.; Steven M. Larson

    2009-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody (mAb) A33 detects a membrane antigen that is expressed on greater than 95% of metastatic human colorectal cancers. Previous studies have shown excellent tumor-targeting of iodine-131 labeled murine and humanized forms of the mAb. A retrospective analysis of whole body clearance in the murine form was performed for comparison to the humanized form. Serial whole-body dose rate measurements were obtained for 55 treatments on 30 patients participating in phase I/II dose es...

  6. I-124 Imaging and Dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russ Kuker

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Although radioactive iodine imaging and therapy are one of the earliest applications of theranostics, there still remain a number of unresolved clinical questions as to the optimization of diagnostic techniques and dosimetry protocols. I-124 as a positron emission tomography (PET radiotracer has the potential to improve the current clinical practice in the diagnosis and treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer. The higher sensitivity and spatial resolution of PET/computed tomography (CT compared to standard gamma scintigraphy can aid in the detection of recurrent or metastatic disease and provide more accurate measurements of metabolic tumor volumes. However the complex decay schema of I-124 poses challenges to quantitative PET imaging. More prospective studies are needed to define optimal dosimetry protocols and to improve patient-specific treatment planning strategies, taking into account not only the absorbed dose to tumors but also methods to avoid toxicity to normal organs. A historical perspective of I-124 imaging and dosimetry as well as future concepts are discussed.

  7. Dosimetry studies in Zaborie village

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takada, J. E-mail: jtakada@ipc.hiroshima-u.ac.jp; Hoshi, M.; Endo, S.; Stepanenko, V.F.; Kondrashov, A.E.; Petin, D.; Skvortsov, V.; Ivannikov, A.; Tikounov, D.; Gavrilin, Y.; Snykov, V.P

    2000-05-15

    Dosimetry studies in Zaborie, a territory in Russia highly contaminated by the Chernobyl accident, were carried out in July, 1997. Studies on dosimetry for people are important not only for epidemiology but also for recovery of local social activity. The local contamination of the soil was measured to be 1.5-6.3 MBq/m{sup 2} of Cs-137 with 0.7-4 {mu}Sv/h of dose rate. A case study for a villager presently 40 years old indicates estimations of 72 and 269 mSv as the expected internal and external doses during 50 years starting in 1997 based on data of a whole-body measurement of Cs-137 and environmental dose rates. Mean values of accumulated external and internal doses for the period from the year 1986 till 1996 are also estimated to be 130 mSv and 16 mSv for Zaborie. The estimation of the 1986-1996 accumulated dose on the basis of large scale ESR teeth enamel dosimetry provides for this village, the value of 180 mSv. For a short term visitor from Japan to this area, external and internal dose are estimated to be 0.13 mSv/9d (during visit in 1997) and 0.024 mSv/50y (during 50 years starting from 1997), respectively.

  8. Small fields: nonequilibrium radiation dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Indra J; Ding, George X; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2008-01-01

    Advances in radiation treatment with beamlet-based intensity modulation, image-guided radiation therapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery (including specialized equipments like CyberKnife, Gamma Knife, tomotherapy, and high-resolution multileaf collimating systems) have resulted in the use of reduced treatment fields to a subcentimeter scale. Compared to the traditional radiotherapy with fields > or =4 x 4 cm2, this can result in significant uncertainty in the accuracy of clinical dosimetry. The dosimetry of small fields is challenging due to nonequilibrium conditions created as a consequence of the secondary electron track lengths and the source size projected through the collimating system that are comparable to the treatment field size. It is further complicated by the prolonged electron tracks in the presence of low-density inhomogeneities. Also, radiation detectors introduced into such fields usually perturb the level of disequilibrium. Hence, the dosimetric accuracy previously achieved for standard radiotherapy applications is at risk for both absolute and relative dose determination. This article summarizes the present knowledge and gives an insight into the future procedures to handle the nonequilibrium radiation dosimetry problems. It is anticipated that new miniature detectors with controlled perturbations and corrections will be available to meet the demand for accurate measurements. It is also expected that the Monte Carlo techniques will increasingly be used in assessing the accuracy, verification, and calculation of dose, and will aid perturbation calculations of detectors used in small and highly conformal radiation beams. rican Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  9. Preparation and biodistribution of {sup 59}Fe-radiolabelled iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pospisilova, Martina, E-mail: martinapospisilova@gmail.com; Zapotocky, Vojtech; Nesporova, Kristina [Contipro a.s (Czech Republic); Laznicek, Milan; Laznickova, Alice [Charles University, Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Králové (Czech Republic); Zidek, Ondrej; Cepa, Martin; Vagnerova, Hana; Velebny, Vladimir [Contipro a.s (Czech Republic)

    2017-02-15

    We report on the {sup 59}Fe radiolabelling of iron oxide nanoparticle cores through post-synthetic isotope exchange ({sup 59}Fe-IONP{sub ex}) and precursor labelling ({sup 59}Fe-IONP{sub pre}). Scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering measurements showed no impact of radiolabelling on nanoparticle size or morphology. While incorporation efficiencies of these methods are comparable—83 and 90% for precursor labelling and post-synthetic isotope exchange, respectively—{sup 59}Fe-IONP{sub pre} exhibited much higher radiochemical stability in citrated human plasma. Quantitative ex vivo biodistribution study of {sup 59}Fe-IONP{sub pre} coated with triethylene glycol was performed in Wistar rats. Following the intravenous administration, high {sup 59}Fe concentration was observed in the lung and the organs of the reticuloendothelial system such as the liver, the spleen and the femur.

  10. Pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and antitumour effects of Sclerotium rolfsii lectin in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anupama, S; Laha, Preeti; Sharma, Mamta; Pathak, Kamal; Bane, Sanjay; Ingle, Arvind D; Gota, Vikram; Kalraiya, Rajiv D; Yu, Lu-Gang; Rhodes, Jonathan M; Swamy, Bale M; Inamdar, Shashikala R

    2017-05-01

    Sclerotium rolfsii lectin (SRL) is a lectin isolated from the fungus Sclerotium rolfsii and has exquisite binding specificity towards the oncofetal Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen (TF-Ag; Galβ1-3GalNAcα-O-Ser/Thr) and its derivatives. Previous studies have shown that SRL inhibits the proliferation of human colon, breast and ovarian cancer cells in vitro and suppresses tumour growth in mice when introduced intratumourally. The present study assessed the effect of SRL on tumour growth when introduced intraperitoneally in BALB/c nude mice and investigated the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of SRL in Swiss albino mice. When 9 doses of SRL (30 mg/kg body weight/mice) was administered to BALB/c nude mice bearing human colon cancer HT-29 xenografts, a substantial reduction in tumour size was observed. A 35.8% reduction in tumour size was noted in the treated animals after 17 days. SRL treatment also inhibited angiogenesis, and the tumours from the treated animals were observed to carry fewer blood vessels and express less angiogenesis marker protein CD31, than that from the control animals. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution analysis revealed that SRL was detected in the serum after 1 h and its level peaked after 24 h. SRL was not detected in any of the organs apart from the kidney where a trace amount was detected after 24 h of SRL injection. No significant changes were observed in any of the biochemical parameters tested including SGOT, SGPT, LDH, CREAT and BUN in the SRL-treated mice compared to these levels in the controls. This suggests that SRL has good potential to be developed as a therapeutic agent for cancer treatment and warrant further investigations in vivo and subsequent clinical trials.

  11. Biodistribution of samarium-153-EDTMP in rats treated with docetaxel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villarim Neto, Arthur; Acucena, Maria Kadja Meneses Torres; Pereira, Kercia Regina Santos Gomes; Rego, Amalia Cinthia Meneses [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Postgraduate Program in Health Sciences; Azevedo, Italo Medeiros; Medeiros, Aldo Cunha [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Dept. of Surgery; Bernardo-Filho, Mario [State University of Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Biophysics and Biometry

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: Many patients with metastatic bone disease have to use radiopharmaceuticals associated with chemotherapy to relieve bone pain. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of docetaxel on the biodistribution of samarium-153-EDTMP in bones and other organs of rats. Methods: Wistar male rats were randomly allocated into 2 groups of 6 rats each. The DS (docetaxel/samarium) group received docetaxel (15 mg/kg) intraperitoneally in two cycles 11 days apart. The S (samarium/control) group rats were not treated with docetaxel. Nine days after chemotherapy, all the rats were injected with 0.1 ml of samarium-153-EDTMP via orbital plexus (25 {mu} Ci. After 2 hours, the animals were killed and samples of the brain, thyroid, lung, heart, stomach, colon, liver, kidney and both femurs were removed. The percentage radioactivity of each sample (% ATI / g) was determined in an automatic gamma-counter (Wizard-1470, Perkin-Elmer, Finland). Results: On the ninth day after the administration of the second chemotherapy cycle, the rats had a significant weight loss (314.50 +- 22.09 g) compared (p<0.5) to pre-treatment weight (353.66 {+-} 22.8). The % ATI/g in the samples of rats treated with samarium-153-EDTMP had a significant reduction in the right femur, left femur, kidney, liver and lungs of animals treated with docetaxel, compared to the control rats. Conclusion: The combination of docetaxel and samarium-153-EDTMP was associated with a lower response rate in the biodistribution of the radiopharmaceutical to targeted tissues. Further investigation into the impact of docetaxel on biodistribution of samarium-153-EDTMP would complement the findings of this study. (author)

  12. Synthesis, bioanalysis and biodistribution of photosensitizer conjugates for photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Denis, Tyler G; Hamblin, Michael R

    2013-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) was discovered in 1900 by Raab, and has since emerged as a promising tool for treating diseases characterized by unwanted cells or hyperproliferating tissue (e.g., cancer or infectious disease). PDT consists of the light excitation of a photosensitizer (PS) in the presence of O(2) to yield highly reactive oxygen species. In recent years, PDT has been improved by the synthesis of targeted bioconjugates between monoclonal antibodies and PS, and by investigating PS biodistribution and PD. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of major developments in PS-immunoconjugate-based PDT and the bioanalysis of these agents, with a specific emphasis on anticancer and antimicrobial PDT.

  13. Synthesis, bioanalysis and biodistribution of photosensitizer conjugates for photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Tyler GSt; Hamblin, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) was discovered in 1900 by Raab, and has since emerged as a promising tool for treating diseases characterized by unwanted cells or hyperproliferating tissue (e.g., cancer or infectious disease). PDT consists of the light excitation of a photosensitizer (PS) in the presence of O2 to yield highly reactive oxygen species. In recent years, PDT has been improved by the synthesis of targeted bioconjugates between monoclonal antibodies and PS, and by investigating PS biodistribution and PD. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of major developments in PS-immunoconjugate-based PDT and the bioanalysis of these agents, with a specific emphasis on anticancer and antimicrobial PDT. PMID:23641699

  14. In vitro evaluation, biodistribution in rats of radiolabeled raloxifene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayrak, Elif [Ege University, Institute of Nuclear Science, Department of Nuclear Applications, Bornova, 35100 Izmir (Turkey); Lambrecht, Fatma Yurt [Ege University, Institute of Nuclear Science, Department of Nuclear Applications, Bornova, 35100 Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: Fatma.yurt.lambrecht@ege.edu.tr; Durkan, Kubra [Ege University, Institute of Nuclear Science, Department of Nuclear Applications, Bornova, 35100 Izmir (Turkey); Yilmaz, Osman [Department of Animal Research Center, Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir (Turkey)

    2010-01-15

    Raloxifene is a selective estrogen receptor modulator that produces both estrogen agonistic effects on bone and lipid metabolism and estrogen-antagonistic effects on uterine endometrium and breast tissue. In the present study, raloxifene was labeled with I-131 by iodogen method and investigated for its radiopharmaceutical potential. Radiolabeling yield is 91{+-}0.7%, as determined by radio thin layer chromatography (RTLC). Results of in vitro study indicated {sup 131}I-raloxifene has high stability (4 h) in serum. Biodistribution study was carried out with Albino wistar female rats. The result has shown that the radioiodinated raloxifene has higher uptake in uterus than breast and ovarian.

  15. Production, quality control, biodistribution assessment and preliminary dose evaluation of (177)Lu-PDTMP as a possible bone palliative agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefnia, Hassan; Jalilian, Amir R; Zolghadri, Samaneh; Ghannadi-Maragheh, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    In this study, production, quality control, and biodistribution studies of a newly developed therapeutic compound have been presented and are followed by dosimetric evaluation for use in humans based on biodistribution data in wild-type rats. The Lu-1,2-propylene di-amino tetramethylenephosphonic acid (Lu-PDTMP) complex was prepared successfully using synthesized PDTMP ligand and LuCl3. LuCl3 was obtained by thermal neutron irradiation (4×10 n/cm/s) of enriched Lu2O3 samples. The radiochemical purity of Lu-PDTMP was checked by instant thin-layer chromatography. Stability studies of the complex in the final preparation and in the presence of human serum were performed for up to 72 h. The biodistribution of Lu-PDTMP and LuCl3 in wild-type rats was checked in animal tissues for up to 7 days. The absorbed dose of each human organ was calculated by means of the medical internal radiation dose method. Lu was produced with a specific activity of 100-110 GBq/mg. Lu-PDTMP was prepared with high radiochemical purity of greater than 99% and specific activity of 278 GBq/mmol. The complex demonstrated significant stability at room temperature. The agent demonstrated major accumulation in the bone tissue and a high target/nontarget uptake ratio. Dosimetric results showed that all tissues receive an insignificant absorbed dose in comparison with bone tissue. The results showed that Lu-PDTMP has considerably better properties compared with clinically used bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals and therefore can be a good candidate for bone pain palliative therapy in skeletal metastases; however, further biological studies in other mammals are still needed.

  16. Production, quality control, and determination of human absorbed dose of no carrier added (177) Lu-risedronate for bone pain palliation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salek, Nafise; Mehrabi, Mohsen; Shirvani Arani, Simindokht; Bahrami Samani, Ali; Erfani, Mostafa; Vosoghi, Sara; Ghannadi Maragheh, Mohammad; Shamsaei, Mojtaba

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the radiocomplexation of risedronic acid, a potent bisphosphonate with a no carrier added (NCA) (177) Lu, was investigated and followed by quality control studies, biodistribution evaluation, and dosimetry study for human based on biodistribution data in Wistar rats. The moderate energy β(-) emitter, (177) Lu (T½  = 6.7 days, Eβmax  = 497 keV), has been considered as a potential agent for development of bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals. Because the specific activity of the radiolabeled carrier molecules should be high, the NCA radionuclides have an effective role in nuclear medicine. Many researchers illustrated an NCA (177) Lu production; among these separation techniques, extraction chromatography has been considered more capable than other methods. The NCA (177) Lu was produced with specific activity of 48 Ci/mg and radionuclidic purity of 99.99% by the irradiation of enriched (176) Yb target in thermal neutron flux of 4 × 10(13)  n·cm(-)(2) ·s(-)(1) for 14 days. The NCA (177) Lu was mixed to a desired amount of sodium risedronate (15 mg/mL, 200 μL) and incubated with stirring at 95°C for 30 minutes. The radiochemical purity of (177) Lu-risedronate was determined by radio thin-layer chromatography, and high radiochemical purities (>97%) were obtained under optimized reaction conditions. The complex was injected to Wistar rats, and complex biodistribution was performed 4 hours to 7 days postinjections showing high bone uptake (9.8% ± 0.24% ID/g at 48 hours postinjection). Also, modeling the radiation dose delivery by RADAR software for the absorbed dose evaluation of each human organ showed a major accumulation of the radiocomplex in bone tissue. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Macroscopic and microscopic biodistribution of intravenously administered iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Adwiteeya; Petryk, Alicia A.; Strawbridge, Rendall R.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2015-03-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) are being developed for use as a cancer treatment. They have demonstrated efficacy when used either as a monotherapy or in conjunction with conventional chemotherapy and radiation. The success of IONP as a therapeutic tool depends on the delivery of a safe and controlled cytotoxic thermal dose to tumor tissue following activation with an alternating magnetic field (AMF). Prior to clinical approval, knowledge of IONP toxicity, biodistribution and physiological clearance is essential. This preliminary time-course study determines the acute toxicity and biodistribution of 110 nm dextran-coated IONP (iron) in mice, 7 days post systemic, at doses of 0.4, 0.6, and 1.0 mg Fe/ g mouse bodyweight. Acute toxicity, manifested as changes in the behavior of mice, was only observed temporarily at 1.0 mg Fe/ g mouse bodyweight, the highest dose administered. Regardless of dose, mass spectrometry and histological analysis demonstrated over 3 mg Fe/g tissue in organs within the reticuloendotheilial system (i.e. liver, spleen, and lymph nodes). Other organs (brain, heart, lungs, and kidney) had less than 0.5 mg Fe/g tissue with iron predominantly confined to the organ vasculature.

  18. In Vivo Renal Clearance, Biodistribution, Toxicity of Gold nanoclusters

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Shen, Xiu; Liu, Pei-Xun; Fan, Fei-Yue; Fan, Sai-Jun; 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2012.03.020

    2012-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have shown great prospective in cancer diagnosis and therapy, but they can not be metabolized and prefer to accumulate in liver and spleen due to their large size. The gold nanoclusters with small size can penetrate kidney tissue and have promise to decrease in vivo toxicity by renal clearance. In this work, we explore the in vivo renal clearance, biodistribution, and toxicity responses of the BSA- and GSH-protected gold nanoclusters for 24 hours and 28 days. The BSA-protected gold nanoclusters have low-efficient renal clearance and only 1% of gold can be cleared, but the GSH-protected gold nanoclusters have high-efficient renal clearance and 36 % of gold can be cleared after 24 hours. The biodistribution further reveals that 94% of gold can be metabolized for the GSH-protected nanoclusters, but only less than 5% of gold can be metabolized for the BSA-protected nanoclusters after 28 days. Both of the GSH- and BSA-protected gold nanoclusters cause acute infection, inflammation, and kidney fu...

  19. SU-E-I-14: Comparison of Iodine-Labeled and Indium-Labeled Antibody Biodistributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, L [Retired from City of Hope Medical Center, Arcadia, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: It is often assumed that animal biodistributions of novel proteins are not dependent upon the radiolabel used in their determination. In units of percent injected dose per gram of tissue (%ID/g), organ uptake results (u) may be obtained using either iodine or metal as radioactive labels. Iodination is preferred as it is a one-step process whereas metal labeling requires two chemical procedures and therefore more protein material. It is important to test whether the radioactive tag leads to variation in the uptake value. Methods: Uptakes of 3antibodies to Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) were evaluated in a nude mouse model bearing 150 to 300 mg LS174T human colon cancer xenografts. Antibodies included diabody (56 kDa), minibody (80kDa) and intact M5A (150 kDa) anti-CEA cognates. Both radioiodine and indium-111 labels were used with uptakes evaluated at 7 time(t) points out to 96 h. Ratios (R) of u(iodine-label)/u(indium-label) were determined for liver, spleen, kidneys, lung and tumor. Results: Hepatic loss was rapid for diabody and minibody; by 24 h their R values were only 2%; i.e., uptake of iodine was 2% of that of indium for these 2 antibodies. By contrast, R for the intact cognate was 50% at that time point. Splenic results were similar. Tumor uptake ratios did not depend upon the antibody type and were 50% at 24 h. Conclusions: Relatively rapid loss of iodine relative to indium in liver and spleen was observed in lower mass antibodies. Tumor ratios were larger and independent of antibody type. Aside from tumor, the R ratio of uptakes depended on the antibody type. R values decreased monotonically with time in all tissues and for all cognates. Using this ratio, one can possibly correct iodine-based u (t) results so that they resemble radiometal-derived biodistributions.

  20. The use of Monte Carlo codes in internal dosimetry; Utilisation des codes de Monte Carlo en dosimetrie interne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricard, M.; Coulot, J. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Service de Physique, 94 - Villejuif (France)

    2003-07-01

    Internal dosimetry concerns the radiation sources inside human body. It contributes to determine the energy depositions in a living organism following the accidental or medical irradiation. In the case of an accidental irradiation, the aim is to evaluate the risk estimation; in the case of a medical use the dosimetry data are used in a radiation protection purpose. In any case, it is necessary to have references methods in order to know the dose absorbed bound to the radioactive product incorporation. Three levels have to be considered: the organ level in radiation protection, the cellular and tissue levels for application in radiotherapy. The analytical methods become rapidly difficult to use so the Monte Carlo methods give now a correct statistical precision. The advantages of this way of doing are developed in this article. (N.C.)

  1. ESR dosimetry using eggshells and tooth enamel for accidental dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oka, Toshihide; Yamanaka, Chihiro; Ikeya, Motoji [Department of Earth and Space Science, Faculty of Science, Osaka Univ., Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan)

    1997-07-01

    The CO{sub 2}{sup -} signal of eggshells showed a good dose linearity and was appropriate in the wide dose range from 1 to 10 kGy, while ESR signal of CO{sub 2}{sup -} in sea and fresh water shells were saturated at a dose od below 10 kGy. The minimum detectable dose and G-value of CO{sub 2}{sup -} in eggshells were estimated 0.3 Gy and 0.28, respectively. The lifetime of CO{sub 2}{sup -} in eggshells could not be determined exactly because of overlapping organic signals, however it is still sufficiently long for practical use as ESR dosimeter materials. Various bird`s or reptile`s eggshells would be available as natural retrospective ESR dosimeter materials after nuclear accidents. Eggshells will be useful for the food irradiation dosimetry in the dose range of about a few kGy. Tooth enamel is one of the most useful dosimeter materials in public at a accident because of its high sensitivity. ESR dosimetry will replace TLD in near future if the cost of an ESR reader is further reduced . (author)

  2. The Future of Medical Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Robert D., E-mail: robert_adams@med.unc.edu

    2015-07-01

    The world of health care delivery is becoming increasingly complex. The purpose of this manuscript is to analyze current metrics and analytically predict future practices and principles of medical dosimetry. The results indicate five potential areas precipitating change factors: a) evolutionary and revolutionary thinking processes, b) social factors, c) economic factors, d) political factors, and e) technological factors. Outcomes indicate that significant changes will occur in the job structure and content of being a practicing medical dosimetrist. Discussion indicates potential variables that can occur within each process and change factor and how the predicted outcomes can deviate from normative values. Finally, based on predicted outcomes, future opportunities for medical dosimetrists are given.

  3. Relocation of the Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The Dosimetry Service is moving from Building 24 to Building 55 and will therefore be closed on Friday, 30 March. From Monday, 2 April onwards you will find us in Building 55/1-001. Please note that we cannot exclude problems with Internet connections on that day and are therefore unable to guarantee normal service. The Service's opening hours and telephone number will not change as a result of the move: Open from 8.30 - 12.00. Closed in the afternoons. Tel. 7 2155

  4. TestDose: A nuclear medicine software based on Monte Carlo modeling for generating gamma camera acquisitions and dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Marie-Paule, E-mail: marie-paule.garcia@univ-brest.fr; Villoing, Daphnée [UMR 1037 INSERM/UPS, CRCT, 133 Route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse (France); McKay, Erin [St George Hospital, Gray Street, Kogarah, New South Wales 2217 (Australia); Ferrer, Ludovic [ICO René Gauducheau, Boulevard Jacques Monod, St Herblain 44805 (France); Cremonesi, Marta; Botta, Francesca; Ferrari, Mahila [European Institute of Oncology, Via Ripamonti 435, Milano 20141 (Italy); Bardiès, Manuel [UMR 1037 INSERM/UPS, CRCT, 133 Route de Narbonne, Toulouse 31062 (France)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: The TestDose platform was developed to generate scintigraphic imaging protocols and associated dosimetry by Monte Carlo modeling. TestDose is part of a broader project (www.dositest.com) whose aim is to identify the biases induced by different clinical dosimetry protocols. Methods: The TestDose software allows handling the whole pipeline from virtual patient generation to resulting planar and SPECT images and dosimetry calculations. The originality of their approach relies on the implementation of functional segmentation for the anthropomorphic model representing a virtual patient. Two anthropomorphic models are currently available: 4D XCAT and ICRP 110. A pharmacokinetic model describes the biodistribution of a given radiopharmaceutical in each defined compartment at various time-points. The Monte Carlo simulation toolkit GATE offers the possibility to accurately simulate scintigraphic images and absorbed doses in volumes of interest. The TestDose platform relies on GATE to reproduce precisely any imaging protocol and to provide reference dosimetry. For image generation, TestDose stores user’s imaging requirements and generates automatically command files used as input for GATE. Each compartment is simulated only once and the resulting output is weighted using pharmacokinetic data. Resulting compartment projections are aggregated to obtain the final image. For dosimetry computation, emission data are stored in the platform database and relevant GATE input files are generated for the virtual patient model and associated pharmacokinetics. Results: Two samples of software runs are given to demonstrate the potential of TestDose. A clinical imaging protocol for the Octreoscan™ therapeutical treatment was implemented using the 4D XCAT model. Whole-body “step and shoot” acquisitions at different times postinjection and one SPECT acquisition were generated within reasonable computation times. Based on the same Octreoscan™ kinetics, a dosimetry

  5. Benchmark dose risk assessment for formaldehyde using airflow modeling and a single-compartment, DNA-protein cross-link dosimetry model to estimate human equivalent doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Paul M; Lilly, Patrick D; Conolly, Rory B; Janszen, Derek B; Kimbell, Julie S

    2003-06-01

    Formaldehyde induced squamous-cell carcinomas in the nasal passages of F344 rats in two inhalation bioassays at exposure levels of 6 ppm and above. Increases in rates of cell proliferation were measured by T. M. Monticello and colleagues at exposure levels of 0.7 ppm and above in the same tissues from which tumors arose. A risk assessment for formaldehyde was conducted at the CIIT Centers for Health Research, in collaboration with investigators from Toxicological Excellence in Risk Assessment (TERA) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) in 1999. Two methods for dose-response assessment were used: a full biologically based modeling approach and a statistically oriented analysis by benchmark dose (BMD) method. This article presents the later approach, the purpose of which is to combine BMD and pharmacokinetic modeling to estimate human cancer risks from formaldehyde exposure. BMD analysis was used to identify points of departure (exposure levels) for low-dose extrapolation in rats for both tumor and the cell proliferation endpoints. The benchmark concentrations for induced cell proliferation were lower than for tumors. These concentrations were extrapolated to humans using two mechanistic models. One model used computational fluid dynamics (CFD) alone to determine rates of delivery of inhaled formaldehyde to the nasal lining. The second model combined the CFD method with a pharmacokinetic model to predict tissue dose with formaldehyde-induced DNA-protein cross-links (DPX) as a dose metric. Both extrapolation methods gave similar results, and the predicted cancer risk in humans at low exposure levels was found to be similar to that from a risk assessment conducted by the U.S. EPA in 1991. Use of the mechanistically based extrapolation models lends greater certainty to these risk estimates than previous approaches and also identifies the uncertainty in the measured dose-response relationship for cell proliferation at low exposure levels, the dose

  6. Advances in radiation therapy dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paliwal Bhudatt

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, there has been an explosion of new radiation therapy planning and delivery tools. We went through a rapid transition from conventional three-dimensional (3D conformal radiation therapy to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT treatments, and additional new techniques for motion-adaptive radiation therapy are being introduced. These advances push the frontiers in our effort to provide better patient care; and with the addition of IMRT, temporal dimensions are major challenges for the radiotherapy patient dosimetry and delivery verification. Advanced techniques are less tolerant to poor implementation than are standard techniques. Mis-administrations are more difficult to detect and can possibly lead to poor outcomes for some patients. Instead of presenting a manual on quality assurance for radiation therapy, this manuscript provides an overview of dosimetry verification tools and a focused discussion on breath holding, respiratory gating and the applications of four-dimensional computed tomography in motion management. Some of the major challenges in the above areas are discussed.

  7. A small-scale anatomical dosimetry model of the liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenvall, Anna; Larsson, Erik; Strand, Sven-Erik; Jönsson, Bo-Anders

    2014-07-01

    Radionuclide therapy is a growing and promising approach for treating and prolonging the lives of patients with cancer. For therapies where high activities are administered, the liver can become a dose-limiting organ; often with a complex, non-uniform activity distribution and resulting non-uniform absorbed-dose distribution. This paper therefore presents a small-scale dosimetry model for various source-target combinations within the human liver microarchitecture. Using Monte Carlo simulations, Medical Internal Radiation Dose formalism-compatible specific absorbed fractions were calculated for monoenergetic electrons; photons; alpha particles; and 125I, 90Y, 211At, 99mTc, 111In, 177Lu, 131I and 18F. S values and the ratio of local absorbed dose to the whole-organ average absorbed dose was calculated, enabling a transformation of dosimetry calculations from macro- to microstructure level. For heterogeneous activity distributions, for example uptake in Kupffer cells of radionuclides emitting low-energy electrons (125I) or high-LET alpha particles (211At) the target absorbed dose for the part of the space of Disse, closest to the source, was more than eight- and five-fold the average absorbed dose to the liver, respectively. With the increasing interest in radionuclide therapy of the liver, the presented model is an applicable tool for small-scale liver dosimetry in order to study detailed dose-effect relationships in the liver.

  8. Human brain imaging and radiation dosimetry of 11C-N-desmethyl-loperamide, a PET radiotracer to measure the function of P-glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneca, Nicholas; Zoghbi, Sami S; Liow, Jeih-San; Kreisl, William; Herscovitch, Peter; Jenko, Kimberly; Gladding, Robert L; Taku, Andrew; Pike, Victor W; Innis, Robert B

    2009-05-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a membrane-bound efflux pump that limits the distribution of drugs to several organs of the body. At the blood-brain barrier, P-gp blocks the entry of both loperamide and its metabolite, N-desmethyl-loperamide (N-dLop), and thereby prevents central opiate effects. Animal studies have shown that (11)C-dLop, compared with (11)C-loperamide, is an especially promising radiotracer because it generates negligible radiometabolites that enter the brain. The purposes of this study were to determine whether (11)C-dLop is a substrate for P-gp at the blood-brain barrier in humans and to measure the distribution of radioactivity in the entire body to estimate radiation exposure. Brain PET scans were acquired in 4 healthy subjects for 90 min and included concurrent measurements of the plasma concentration of unchanged radiotracer. Time-activity data from the whole brain were quantified using a 1-tissue-compartment model to estimate the rate of entry (K(1)) of radiotracer into the brain. Whole-body PET scans were acquired in 8 healthy subjects for 120 min. For brain imaging, after the injection of (11)C-dLop the concentration of radioactivity in the brain was low (standardized uptake value, approximately 15%) and stable after approximately 20 min. In contrast, uptake of radioactivity in the pituitary was about 50-fold higher than that in the brain. The plasma concentration of (11)C-dLop declined rapidly, but the percentage composition of plasma was unusually stable, with the parent radiotracer constituting 85% of total radioactivity after approximately 5 min. The rate of brain entry was low (K(1) = 0.009 +/- 0.002 mL.cm(-3).min(-1); n = 4). For whole-body imaging, as a measure of radiation exposure to the entire body the effective dose of (11)C-dLop was 7.8 +/- 0.6 muSv/MBq (n = 8). The low brain uptake of radioactivity is consistent with (11)C-dLop being a substrate for P-gp in humans and confirms that this radiotracer generates negligible quantities of

  9. Internal dosimetry for [4-{sup 14}C]-cholesterol in humans; Dosimetria interna para o [4-{sup 14}C]-colesterol em humanos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcato, Larissa Andreto

    2012-07-01

    The main objective of this work is to provide a biokinetic model in order to estimate the radiometric dose due to intake of [4-{sup 14}C]-cholesterol. The model was validated comparing the values of fecal excretion and absorption described in literature with that predicted by the model. The proposed model achieved good concordance between the results (p = 0.416 for excretion and p = 0.423 for absorption). The coefficients of effective dose (SvBq{sup -1}), equivalent dose (SvBq{sup -1}) and absorbed dose (GyBq{sup -1}) in human organs and tissues were calculated using the MIRD methodology and the compartmental analysis software ANACOMP. The coefficients were estimated for four phantoms: adult with a body mass of 73.3 kg, 15 years old adolescent (56.9 kg), 10 years old child (33.2 kg) and five years old child (19.8 kg). The organ that received the highest absorbed dose for all phantoms was the lower large intestine (LLI). The allometry theory was used to interpolate the coefficient of absorbed dose in the lower large intestine (DLLI) for unknown body mass (m): DLLI (GyBq{sup -1})=161.26 m (kg){sup -1.025}. For the same administered activity, the effective dose coefficient (E) decreases as the body mass increases. On other words, for the same intake activity, individuals with low body mass are exposed to higher doses. The allometry theory was used to interpolate the coefficient effective dose (E) for unknown body mass (m): E(SvB{sup -1})= 171.1 m(kg){sup -1,021}. (author)

  10. Preclinical good laboratory practice-compliant safety study to evaluate biodistribution and tumorigenicity of a cartilage advanced therapy medicinal product (ATMP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zscharnack, Matthias; Krause, Christoph; Aust, Gabriela; Thümmler, Christian; Peinemann, Frank; Keller, Thomas; Smink, Jeske J; Holland, Heidrun; Somerson, Jeremy S; Knauer, Jens; Schulz, Ronny M; Lehmann, Jörg

    2015-05-20

    The clinical development of advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs), a new class of drugs, requires initial safety studies that deviate from standard non-clinical safety protocols. The study provides a strategy to address the safety aspects of biodistribution and tumorigenicity of ATMPs under good laboratory practice (GLP) conditions avoiding cell product manipulation. Moreover, the strategy was applied on a human ATMP for cartilage repair. The testing strategy addresses biodistribution and tumorigenicity using a multi-step analysis without any cell manipulation to exclude changes of test item characteristics. As a safeguard measurement for meeting regulatory expectations, the project design and goals were discussed continuously with the regulatory authority using a staggered scientific advice concept. Subsequently, the strategy was applied to co.don chondrosphere® (huChon spheroid), a tissue-engineered matrix-free ATMP of human normal chondrocytes. In both the biodistribution and tumorigenicity studies, huChon spheroids were implanted subcutaneously into 40 immunodeficient mice. Biodistribution was studied 1 month after implantation. A skin disc containing the huChon spheroid, two surrounding skin rings and selected organs were analyzed by validated, gender-specific, highly-sensitive triplex qPCR and by immunohistochemistry (IHC). No human DNA was detected in distant skin rings and analyzed organs. IHC revealed no direct or indirect indications of cell migration. Tumorigenicity was assessed 6 months after huChon spheroid implantation by palpation, macroscopic inspection, histology and IHC. No mice from the huChon spheroid group developed a tumor at the implantation site. In two mice, benign tumors were detected that were negative for HLA-ABC, suggesting that they were of spontaneous murine origin. In summary, the presented strategy using a multi-step analysis was confirmed to be suitable for safety studies of ATMPs.

  11. Non invasive scintigraphic method for biodistribution study of radiopharmaceuticals; Metodo cintilografico nao invasivo para estudo de biodistribuicao de radiofarmacos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Erika V.; Silva, Natanael G.; Freire, Antonio C.; Monteiro, Elisiane de G.; Benedetti, Stella; Muramoto, Emiko; Fukumori, Neuza T.O.; Matsuda, Margareth M.N., E-mail: erikavieira@usp.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Diretoria de Radiofarmacia; Vasconcellos, Marina B.A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro do Reator de Pesquisa

    2011-07-01

    Biodistribution studies can be done by invasive or noninvasive methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the percentage of retained dose (RD) in the organs of interest in noninvasive and invasive study of biodistribution of {sup 99m}Tc-DMSA (dimercaptosuccinic acid), {sup 99m}Tc-MAA (macro aggregated human serum albumin) and {sup 99m}Tc-MDP (methylene diphosphonate) and to compare with the invasive method described in the United States Pharmacopoeia (USP). Lyophilized reagents (DMSA, MAA and MDP) and sodium pertechnetate was obtained from IPEN-CNEN/SP. The radioactive concentration was 123 MBq mL{sup -1} ({sup 99m}Tc-DMSA and {sup 99m}Tc-MAA) and 617 MBq mL{sup -1} ({sup 99m}Tc-MDP). {sup 99m}Tc-DMSA and {sup 99m}Tc-MDP were injected via the tail vein and {sup 99m}Tc-MAA in the penile vein of rats. The scintigraphic images were obtained in a Nucline TH/22 Mediso gamma camera. The animals were sacrificed after the acquisition of images. The organs were removed and the activity of each organ of interest was measured in an ionization chamber. The renal uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-DMSA by noninvasive method was (47,02 +- 2,87)% up to (49,37 +- 3,41)%. By the invasive method it was observed RD (49.27 +- 1.88)%. The %RD of {sup 99m}Tc-MAA in the lungs by non-invasive method varied from (94,22 +- 0,17)% to (94,67 +- 0,25)%. Bone scintigraphy with {sup 99m}Tc-MDP showed significant uptake in the skeleton. The method proposed for noninvasive scintigraphic study biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals was feasible, with results comparable to those obtained by invasive method described in USP. (author)

  12. Non invasive scintigraphic method for biodistribution study of radiopharmaceuticals; Metodo cintilografico nao invasivo para estudo de biodistribuicao de radiofarmacos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Erika V.; Silva, Natanael G.; Freire, Antonio C.; Monteiro, Elisiane de G.; Benedetti, Stella; Muramoto, Emiko; Fukumori, Neuza T.O.; Matsuda, Margareth M.N., E-mail: erikavieira@usp.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Diretoria de Radiofarmacia; Vasconcellos, Marina B.A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro do Reator de Pesquisa

    2010-07-01

    Biodistribution studies can be done by invasive or noninvasive methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the percentage of retained dose (RD) in the organs of interest in noninvasive and invasive study of biodistribution of {sup 99m}Tc-DMSA (dimercaptosuccinic acid), {sup 99m}Tc-MAA (macro aggregated human serum albumin) and {sup 99m}Tc-MDP (methylene diphosphonate) and to compare with the invasive method described in the United States Pharmacopoeia (USP). Lyophilized reagents (DMSA, MAA and MDP) and sodium pertechnetate was obtained from IPEN-CNEN/SP. The radioactive concentration was 123 MBq mL{sup -1} ({sup 99m}Tc-DMSA and {sup 99m}Tc-MAA) and 617 MBq mL{sup -1} ({sup 99m}Tc-MDP). {sup 99m}Tc-DMSA and {sup 99m}Tc-MDP were injected via the tail vein and {sup 99m}Tc-MAA in the penile vein of rats. The scintigraphic images were obtained in a Nucline TH/22 Mediso gamma camera. The animals were sacrificed after the acquisition of images. The organs were removed and the activity of each organ of interest was measured in an ionization chamber. The renal uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-DMSA by noninvasive method was (47,02 {+-} b 2,87)% up to (49,37 {+-} b 3,41)%. By the invasive method it was observed RD (49.27 {+-} b 1.88)%. The %RD of {sup 99}mTc-MAA in the lungs by non-invasive method varied from (94,22 {+-} b 0,17)% to (94,67 {+-} b 0,25)%. Bone scintigraphy with {sup 99}mTc-MDP showed significant uptake in the skeleton. The method proposed for noninvasive scintigraphic study biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals was feasible, with results comparable to those obtained by invasive method described in USP. (author)

  13. Introduction to radiological physics and radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Attix, Frank Herbert

    2004-01-01

    A straightforward presentation of the broad concepts underlying radiological physics and radiation dosimetry for the graduate-level student. Covers photon and neutron attenuation, radiation and charged particle equilibrium, interactions of photons and charged particles with matter, radiotherapy dosimetry, as well as photographic, calorimetric, chemical, and thermoluminescence dosimetry. Includes many new derivations, such as Kramers X-ray spectrum, as well as topics that have not been thoroughly analyzed in other texts, such as broad-beam attenuation and geometrics, and the reciprocity theorem

  14. Novel methodology for labelling mesoporous silica nanoparticles using the {sup 18}F isotope and their in vivo biodistribution by positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas, Santiago; Gispert, Juan Domingo; Menchón, Cristina [PRBB, Institut d’Alta Tecnologia PRBB Fundació Privada (IAT) (Spain); Baldoví, Herme G.; Buaki-Sogo, Mireia [Polytechnic University of Valencia, University Institute of Chemical Technology (Spain); Rocha, Milagros [Foundation for the Promotion of Healthcare and Biomedical Research in the Valencian Community (FISABIO) (Spain); Abad, Sergio [PRBB, Institut d’Alta Tecnologia PRBB Fundació Privada (IAT) (Spain); Victor, Victor Manuel [Foundation for the Promotion of Healthcare and Biomedical Research in the Valencian Community (FISABIO) (Spain); García, Hermenegildo, E-mail: hgarcia@qim.upv.es [Polytechnic University of Valencia, University Institute of Chemical Technology (Spain); Herance, José Raúl, E-mail: jrherance@yahoo.es [PRBB, Institut d’Alta Tecnologia PRBB Fundació Privada (IAT) (Spain)

    2015-03-15

    Nanoparticles have been proposed for several biomedical applications due to their potential as drug carriers, diagnostic and therapeutic agents. However, only a few of them have been approved for their use in humans. In order to gauge the potential applicability of a specific type of nanoparticle, in vivo biodistribution studies to characterize their pharmacokinetic properties are essential. In this regard, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (30–130 nm) have been functionalized with amino groups in order to react with N-succinimidyl 4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzoate and thus anchor the {sup 18}F positron emission isotope by using a novel and easy labelling strategy. In vivo biodistribution was characterized in mice after intravenous administration of radiolabelled nanoparticles by positron emission tomography. Our results indicated that radiolabelled mesoporous silica nanoparticles were excreted into bile and urine and accumulated mainly in the organs of the reticuloendothelial system and lungs.

  15. Cross sections required for FMIT dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gold, R.; McElroy, W.N.; Lippincott, E.P.; Mann, F.M.; Oberg, D.L.; Roberts, J.H.; Ruddy, F.H.

    1980-05-02

    The Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility, currently under construction, is designed to produce a high flux of high energy neutrons for irradiation effects experiments on fusion reactor materials. Characterization of the flux-fluence-spectrum in this rapidly varying neutron field requires adaptation and extension of currently available dosimetry techniques. This characterization will be carried out by a combination of active, passive, and calculational dosimetry. The goal is to provide the experimenter with accurate neutron flux-fluence-spectra at all positions in the test cell. Plans have been completed for a number of experimental dosimetry stations and provision for these facilities has been incorporated into the FMIT design. Overall needs of the FMIT irradiation damage program delineate goal accuracies for dosimetry that, in turn, create new requirements for high energy neutron cross section data. Recommendations based on these needs have been derived for required cross section data and accuracies.

  16. In vivo dosimetry in brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanderup, Kari; Beddar, Sam; Andersen, Claus E; Kertzscher, Gustavo; Cygler, Joanna E

    2013-07-01

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) has been used in brachytherapy (BT) for decades with a number of different detectors and measurement technologies. However, IVD in BT has been subject to certain difficulties and complexities, in particular due to challenges of the high-gradient BT dose distribution and the large range of dose and dose rate. Due to these challenges, the sensitivity and specificity toward error detection has been limited, and IVD has mainly been restricted to detection of gross errors. Given these factors, routine use of IVD is currently limited in many departments. Although the impact of potential errors may be detrimental since treatments are typically administered in large fractions and with high-gradient-dose-distributions, BT is usually delivered without independent verification of the treatment delivery. This Vision 20/20 paper encourages improvements within BT safety by developments of IVD into an effective method of independent treatment verification.

  17. In vivo dosimetry in brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanderup, Kari [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus 8000 (Denmark); Department of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus 8000 (Denmark); Beddar, Sam [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Andersen, Claus E.; Kertzscher, Gustavo [Center of Nuclear Technologies, Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde 4000 (Denmark); Cygler, Joanna E. [Department of Physics, Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8L6 (Canada)

    2013-07-15

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) has been used in brachytherapy (BT) for decades with a number of different detectors and measurement technologies. However, IVD in BT has been subject to certain difficulties and complexities, in particular due to challenges of the high-gradient BT dose distribution and the large range of dose and dose rate. Due to these challenges, the sensitivity and specificity toward error detection has been limited, and IVD has mainly been restricted to detection of gross errors. Given these factors, routine use of IVD is currently limited in many departments. Although the impact of potential errors may be detrimental since treatments are typically administered in large fractions and with high-gradient-dose-distributions, BT is usually delivered without independent verification of the treatment delivery. This Vision 20/20 paper encourages improvements within BT safety by developments of IVD into an effective method of independent treatment verification.

  18. Development of radiation biological dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Chul Koo; Kim, Tae Hwan; Lee, Yun Sil; Son, Young Sook; Kim, Soo Kwan; Jang, Won Suk; Le, Sun Joo; Jee, Young Heun; Jung, Woo Jung

    1999-04-01

    Up until now, only a few methods have been developed for radiation biological dosimetry such as conventional chromosome aberration and micronucleus in peripheral blood cell. However, because these methods not only can be estimated by the expert, but also have a little limitation due to need high technique and many times in the case of radiation accident, it is very difficult to evaluate the absorbed dose of victims. Therefore, we should develop effective, easy, simple and rapid biodosimetry and its guideline (triage) to be able to be treated the victims as fast as possible. We established the premature chromosome condensation assay and apoptotic fragment assay which was the significant relationship between dose and cell damages to evaluate the irradiation dose as correct and rapid as possible using lymphocytes and crypt cells, and compared with conventional chromosome aberration assay and micronuclei assay.

  19. A probabilistic gastrointestinal tract dosimetry model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Chulhaeng

    In internal dosimetry, the tissues of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract represent one of the most radiosensitive organs of the body with the hematopoietic bone marrow. Endoscopic ultrasound is a unique tool to acquire in-vivo data on GI tract wall thicknesses of sufficient resolution needed in radiation dosimetry studies. Through their different echo texture and intensity, five layers of differing echo patterns for superficial mucosa, deep mucosa, submucosa, muscularis propria and serosa exist within the walls of organs composing the alimentary tract. Thicknesses for stomach mucosa ranged from 620 +/- 150 mum to 1320 +/- 80 mum (total stomach wall thicknesses from 2.56 +/- 0.12 to 4.12 +/- 0.11 mm). Measurements made for the rectal images revealed rectal mucosal thicknesses from 150 +/- 90 mum to 670 +/- 110 mum (total rectal wall thicknesses from 2.01 +/- 0.06 to 3.35 +/- 0.46 mm). The mucosa thus accounted for 28 +/- 3% and 16 +/- 6% of the total thickness of the stomach and rectal wall, respectively. Radiation transport simulations were then performed using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNP) 4C transport code to calculate S values (Gy/Bq-s) for penetrating and nonpenetrating radiations such as photons, beta particles, conversion electrons and auger electrons of selected nuclides, I123, I131, Tc 99m and Y90 under two source conditions: content and mucosa sources, respectively. The results of this study demonstrate generally good agreement with published data for the stomach mucosa wall. The rectal mucosa data are consistently higher than published data compared with the large intestine due to different radiosensitive cell thicknesses (350 mum vs. a range spanning from 149 mum to 729 mum) and different geometry when a rectal content source is considered. Generally, the ICRP models have been designed to predict the amount of radiation dose in the human body from a "typical" or "reference" individual in a given population. The study has been performed to

  20. Biodistribution and Bioimaging Studies of Hybrid Paclitaxel Nanocrystals: Lessons Learned of the EPR Effect and Image-Guided Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Christin P.; Weiss, Heidi L.; Leggas, Markos; Evers, B. Mark; Gemeinhart, Richard A.; Li, Tonglei

    2013-01-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) nanocrystals (200 nm) were produced by crystallization from solution. Antitumor efficacy and toxicity were examined through a survival study in a human HT-29 colon cancer xenograft murine model. The antitumor activity of the nanocrystal treatments was comparable with that by the conventional solubilization formulation (Taxol®), but yielded less toxicity as indicated by the result of survival study. Tritium-labeled PTX nanocrystals were further produced with a near infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye physically integrated in the crystal lattice. Biodistribution and tumor accumulation of the tritium-labeled PTX nanocrystals were determined immediately after intravenous administration and up to 48 hours by scintillation counting. Whole-body optical imaging of animals was concurrently carried out; fluorescent intensities were also measured from excised tumors and major organs of euthanized animals. It was found that drug accumulation in the tumor was less than 1% of 20 mg/kg intravenous dose. Qualitatively correlation was identified between the biodistribution determined by using tritium-labeled particles and that using optical imaging, but quantitative divergence existed. The divergent results suggest possible ways to improve the design of hybrid nanocrystals for cancer therapy and diagnosis. The study also raises questions of the general role of the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect in tumor targeting and the effectiveness of bioimaging, specifically for hybrid nanocrystals, in tracking drug distribution and pharmacokinetics. PMID:23920039

  1. Use of electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry with tooth enamel for retrospective dose assessment. Report of a co-ordinated research project

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry is a physical method for the assessment of absorbed dose from ionising radiation. It is based on the measurement of stable radiation induced radicals in human calcified tissues (primarily in tooth enamel). EPR dosimetry with teeth is now firmly established in retrospective dosimetry. It is a powerful method for providing information on exposure to ionising radiation many years after the event, since the 'signal' is 'stored' in the tooth or the bone. This technique is of particular relevance to relatively low dose exposures or when the results of conventional dosimetry are not available (e.g. in accidental circumstances). The use of EPR dosimetry, as an essential tool for retrospective assessment of radiation exposure is an important part of radioepidemiological studies and also provides data to select appropriate countermeasures based on retrospective evaluation of individual doses. Despite well established regulations and protocols for maintaining radiation pro...

  2. MO-B-BRB-04: 3D Dosimetry in End-To-End Dosimetry QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibbott, G. [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Full three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry using volumetric chemical dosimeters probed by 3D imaging systems has long been a promising technique for the radiation therapy clinic, since it provides a unique methodology for dose measurements in the volume irradiated using complex conformal delivery techniques such as IMRT and VMAT. To date true 3D dosimetry is still not widely practiced in the community; it has been confined to centres of specialized expertise especially for quality assurance or commissioning roles where other dosimetry techniques are difficult to implement. The potential for improved clinical applicability has been advanced considerably in the last decade by the development of improved 3D dosimeters (e.g., radiochromic plastics, radiochromic gel dosimeters and normoxic polymer gel systems) and by improved readout protocols using optical computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. In this session, established users of some current 3D chemical dosimeters will briefly review the current status of 3D dosimetry, describe several dosimeters and their appropriate imaging for dose readout, present workflow procedures required for good dosimetry, and analyze some limitations for applications in select settings. We will review the application of 3D dosimetry to various clinical situations describing how 3D approaches can complement other dose delivery validation approaches already available in the clinic. The applications presented will be selected to inform attendees of the unique features provided by full 3D techniques. Learning Objectives: L. John Schreiner: Background and Motivation Understand recent developments enabling clinically practical 3D dosimetry, Appreciate 3D dosimetry workflow and dosimetry procedures, and Observe select examples from the clinic. Sofie Ceberg: Application to dynamic radiotherapy Observe full dosimetry under dynamic radiotherapy during respiratory motion, and Understand how the measurement of high resolution dose data in an

  3. Uncertainty in 3D gel dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Deene, Yves; Jirasek, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) gel dosimetry has a unique role to play in safeguarding conformal radiotherapy treatments as the technique can cover the full treatment chain and provides the radiation oncologist with the integrated dose distribution in 3D. It can also be applied to benchmark new treatment strategies such as image guided and tracking radiotherapy techniques. A major obstacle that has hindered the wider dissemination of gel dosimetry in radiotherapy centres is a lack of confidence in the reliability of the measured dose distribution. Uncertainties in 3D dosimeters are attributed to both dosimeter properties and scanning performance. In polymer gel dosimetry with MRI readout, discrepancies in dose response of large polymer gel dosimeters versus small calibration phantoms have been reported which can lead to significant inaccuracies in the dose maps. The sources of error in polymer gel dosimetry with MRI readout are well understood and it has been demonstrated that with a carefully designed scanning protocol, the overall uncertainty in absolute dose that can currently be obtained falls within 5% on an individual voxel basis, for a minimum voxel size of 5 mm3. However, several research groups have chosen to use polymer gel dosimetry in a relative manner by normalizing the dose distribution towards an internal reference dose within the gel dosimeter phantom. 3D dosimetry with optical scanning has also been mostly applied in a relative way, although in principle absolute calibration is possible. As the optical absorption in 3D dosimeters is less dependent on temperature it can be expected that the achievable accuracy is higher with optical CT. The precision in optical scanning of 3D dosimeters depends to a large extend on the performance of the detector. 3D dosimetry with X-ray CT readout is a low contrast imaging modality for polymer gel dosimetry. Sources of error in x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry (XCT) are currently under investigation and include inherent

  4. Efficacy and biodistribution analysis of intracerebroventricular administration of an optimized scAAV9-SMN1 vector in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbruster, Nicole; Lattanzi, Annalisa; Jeavons, Matthieu; Van Wittenberghe, Laetitia; Gjata, Bernard; Marais, Thibaut; Martin, Samia; Vignaud, Alban; Voit, Thomas; Mavilio, Fulvio; Barkats, Martine; Buj-Bello, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disease of variable severity caused by mutations in the SMN1 gene. Deficiency of the ubiquitous SMN function results in spinal cord α-motor neuron degeneration and proximal muscle weakness. Gene replacement therapy with recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors showed therapeutic efficacy in several animal models of SMA. Here, we report a study aimed at analyzing the efficacy and biodistribution of a serotype-9, self-complementary AAV vector expressing a codon-optimized human SMN1 coding sequence (coSMN1) under the control of the constitutive phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) promoter in neonatal SMNΔ7 mice, a severe animal model of the disease. We administered the scAAV9-coSMN1 vector in the intracerebroventricular (ICV) space in a dose-escalating mode, and analyzed survival, vector biodistribution and SMN protein expression in the spinal cord and peripheral tissues. All treated mice showed a significant, dose-dependent rescue of lifespan and growth with a median survival of 346 days. Additional administration of vector by an intravenous route (ICV+IV) did not improve survival, and vector biodistribution analysis 90 days postinjection indicated that diffusion from the cerebrospinal fluid to the periphery was sufficient to rescue the SMA phenotype. These results support the preclinical development of SMN1 gene therapy by CSF vector delivery.

  5. In aqua vivo EPID dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendling, Markus; McDermott, Leah N.; Mans, Anton; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; Pecharroman-Gallego, Raul; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Stroom, Joep; Herk, Marcel J.; Mijnheer, Ben van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: At the Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital in vivo dosimetry using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has been implemented for almost all high-energy photon treatments of cancer with curative intent. Lung cancer treatments were initially excluded, because the original back-projection dose-reconstruction algorithm uses water-based scatter-correction kernels and therefore does not account for tissue inhomogeneities accurately. The aim of this study was to test a new method, in aqua vivo EPID dosimetry, for fast dose verification of lung cancer irradiations during actual patient treatment. Methods: The key feature of our method is the dose reconstruction in the patient from EPID images, obtained during the actual treatment, whereby the images have been converted to a situation as if the patient consisted entirely of water; hence, the method is termed in aqua vivo. This is done by multiplying the measured in vivo EPID image with the ratio of two digitally reconstructed transmission images for the unit-density and inhomogeneous tissue situation. For dose verification, a comparison is made with the calculated dose distribution with the inhomogeneity correction switched off. IMRT treatment verification is performed for each beam in 2D using a 2D {gamma} evaluation, while for the verification of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatments in 3D a 3D {gamma} evaluation is applied using the same parameters (3%, 3 mm). The method was tested using two inhomogeneous phantoms simulating a tumor in lung and measuring its sensitivity for patient positioning errors. Subsequently five IMRT and five VMAT clinical lung cancer treatments were investigated, using both the conventional back-projection algorithm and the in aqua vivo method. The verification results of the in aqua vivo method were statistically analyzed for 751 lung cancer patients treated with IMRT and 50 lung cancer patients treated with VMAT. Results: The improvements by

  6. RADON PROGENY AS AN EXPERIMENTAL TOOL FOR DOSIMETRY OF NANOAEROSOLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruzer, Lev; Ruzer, Lev S.; Apte, Michael G.

    2008-02-25

    The study of aerosol exposure and dosimetry measurements and related quantitation of health effects are important to the understanding of the consequences of air pollution, and are discussed widely in the scientific literature. During the last 10 years the need to correlate aerosol exposure and biological effects has become especially important due to rapid development of a new, revolutionary industry ?-- nanotechnology. Nanoproduct commerce is predicted to top $1 trillion by 2015. Quantitative assessment of aerosol particle behavior in air and in lung deposition, and dosimetry in different parts of the lung, particularly for nanoaerosols, remains poor despite several decades of study. Direct measurements on humans are still needed in order to validate the hollow cast, animal studies, and lung deposition modeling. We discuss here the use of nanoscale radon decay products as an experimental tool in the study of local deposition and lung dosimetry for nanoaerosols. The issue of the safe use of radon progeny in such measurements is discussed based on a comparison of measured exposure in 3 settings: general population, miners, and in a human experiment conducted at the Paul Scherer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland. One of the properties of radon progeny is that they consist partly of 1 nm radioactive particles called unattached activity; having extremely small size and high diffusion coefficients, these particles can be potentially useful as radioactive tracers in the study of nanometer-sized aerosols. We present a theoretical and experimental study of the correlation between the unattached activity and aerosol particle surface area, together with a description of its calibration and method for measurement of the unattached fraction.

  7. Technical Basis Document for PFP Area Monitoring Dosimetry Program

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper, J R

    2000-01-01

    This document describes the phantom dosimetry used for the PFP Area Monitoring program and establishes the basis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant's (PFP) area monitoring dosimetry program in accordance with the following requirements: Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), part 835, ''Occupational Radiation Protection'' Part 835.403; Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM-1), Part 514; HNF-PRO-382, Area Dosimetry Program; and PNL-MA-842, Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual.

  8. Dosimetry intercomparisons in European medical device sterilization plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, A.; Sharpe, P.H.G.

    2000-01-01

    Dosimetry intercomparisons have been carried out involving two-thirds of all European radiation sterilization facilities. Dosimeters for the intercomparisons were supplied by two accredited calibration laboratories. The results show good agreement, and indicate overall dosimetry accuracy of the o......Dosimetry intercomparisons have been carried out involving two-thirds of all European radiation sterilization facilities. Dosimeters for the intercomparisons were supplied by two accredited calibration laboratories. The results show good agreement, and indicate overall dosimetry accuracy...

  9. In vivo biodistribution of iron oxide nanoparticles: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Jennifer A.; Petryk, Alicia A.; Giustini, Andrew J.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2011-03-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles present a promising alternative to conventional energy deposition-based tissue therapies. The success of such nanoparticles as a therapeutic for diseases like cancer, however, depends heavily on the particles' ability to localize to tumor tissue as well as provide minimal toxicity to surrounding tissues and key organs such as those involved in the reticuloendothelial system (RES). We present here the results of a long term clearance study where mice injected intravenously with 2 mg Fe of 100 nm dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles were sacrificed at 14 and 580 days post injection. Histological analysis showed accumulation of the nanoparticles in some RES organs by the 14 day time point and clearance of the nanoparticles by the 580 day time point with no obvious toxicity to organs. An additional study reported herein employs 20 nm and 110 nm starch-coated iron oxide nanoparticles at 80 mg Fe/kg mouse in a size/biodistribution study with endpoints at 4, 24 and 72 hours. Preliminary results show nanoparticle accumulation in the liver and spleen with some elevated iron accumulation in tumoral tissues with differences between the 20 nm and the 110 nm nanoparticle depositions.

  10. Toxicity and biodistribution of orally administered casein nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Ana Gloria; Irache, Juan Manuel; Peñuelas, Iván; González Navarro, Carlos Javier; López de Cerain, Adela

    2017-08-01

    In the last years, casein nanoparticles have been proposed as carriers for the oral delivery of biologically active compounds. However, till now, no information about their possible specific hazards in vivo was available. The aim of this work was to assess the safety of casein nanoparticles when administered orally to animals through a 90 days dose-repeated toxicity study (OECD guideline 408), that was performed in Wistar rats under GLP conditions. After 90 days, no evidences of significant alterations in animals treated daily with 50, 150 or 500 mg/kg bw of nanoparticles were found. This safety agrees well with the fact that nanoparticles were not absorbed and remained within the gut as observed by radiolabelling in the biodistribution study. After 28 days, there was a generalized hyperchloremia in males and females treated with the highest dose of 500 mg/kg bw, that was coupled with hypernatremia in the females. These effects were related to the presence of mannitol which was used as excipient in the formulation of casein nanoparticles. According to these results, the No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) could be established in 150 mg/kg bw/day and the Lowest Observed Effect Level (LOEL) could be established in 500 mg/kg bw/day. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. (68)Ga-Labeling of RGD peptides and biodistribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Elisabeth; Velikyan, Irina; Estrada, Sergio; Hall, Håkan; Muhammad, Taj; Ding, Chenmin; Nair, Manoj; Långström, Bengt

    2012-01-01

    Several peptides comprising Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) domain and macrocyclic chelator were labeled with (68)Ga for the imaging of angiogenesis. The analogues varied in peptide constitution, linker and chelator type. The labeling efficiency did not vary with the peptide constitution and linker type, but depended on the chelator type. Four of the compounds containing 2,2',2'',2'''-(1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetrayl)tetraacetic acid (DOTA) chelator were labeled at 90 ± 5°C using conventional or microwave heating reaching 90% of (68)Ga incorporation after 5 and 2 min respectively, when the concentration of the precursor was 2.5 μM. The compound having 2,2',2''-(1,4,7-triazonane-1,4,7-triyl)triacetic acid (NOTA) as the chelator could be labeled at room temperature within 5 min using 2.5 μM peptide precursor. Two of the compounds contained a poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) linker to the chelator. The biodistribution of the analogues was studied in male rats.

  12. Biodistribution and Delivery Efficiency of Unmodified Tumor-Derived Exosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Tyson; Kullberg, Max; Malik, Noeen; Smith-Jones, Peter; Graner, Michael W.; Anchordoquy, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    The use of exosomes as a drug delivery vehicle has gained considerable interest. To establish if exosomes could be utilized effectively for drug delivery, a better understanding of their in vivo fate must be established. Through comparisons to liposomal formulations, which have been studied extensively for the last thirty years, we were able to make some comprehensive conclusions about the fate of unmodified tumor-derived exosomes in vivo. We observed a comparable rapid clearance and minimal tumor accumulation of intravenously-injected exosomes, PC:Chol liposomes, and liposomes formulated with the lipid extract of exosomes, suggesting the unique protein and lipid composition of exosomes does not appreciably impact exosomes’ rate of clearance and biodistribution. This rapid clearance along with minimal tumor accumulation of unmodified exosomes limits their use as an anti-cancer drug delivery vehicle; however, when delivered intratumorally, exosomes remained associated with tumor tissue to a significantly greater extent than PC:Chol liposomes. Furthermore, experiments utilizing mice with impaired adaptive or innate immune systems, revealed the significance of the innate immune system along with the complement protein C5 on exosomes’ rate of clearance. PMID:25523519

  13. Biodistribution of 99m technetium- labeled creatinine in healthy rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Yilmaz

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of creatinine, one of the toxic guanidine compounds, in various tissues has not been studied in detail by using radiolabeled creatinine. Our objective was to investigate the biodistribution of creatinine labeled with 99m technetium (99mTc by the stannous (II chloride method in healthy male Wistar rats. Quality controls were carried out by radio thin layer chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography, and paper electrophoresis. The labeling yield was 85 ± 2% under optimum conditions (pH 7 and 100 µg stannous chloride. Rats (N = 12 were injected intravenously with 99mTc-creatinine and their blood and visceral organs were evaluated for 99mTc-creatinine uptake as percent of the injected dose per gram wet weight of each tissue (%ID/g. The lowest amount of uptake was detected in the brain and testis. When the rate of uptake was evaluated, only the kidney showed increasing rates of uptake of 99mTc-creatinine throughout the study. Kidneys showed the highest amount of uptake throughout the study (P < 0.001 compared to all other organs, followed by liver, spleen and lung tissue.

  14. Improving bioavailability and biodistribution of anti-HIV chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacalone, Giovanna; Hillaireau, Hervé; Fattal, Elias

    2015-07-30

    In the context of the treatment of HIV/AIDS, many improvements have been achieved since the introduction of the combination therapy (HAART). Nevertheless, no cure for this disease has been so far possible, because of some particular features of the therapies. Among them, two important ones have been selected and will be the subject of this review. The first main concern in the treatments is the poor drug bioavailability, resulting in repeated administrations and therefore a demanding compliance (drug regimens consist of multiple drugs daily intake, and non-adherence to therapy is among the important reasons for treatment failure). A second important challenge is the need to target the drugs into the so-called reservoirs and sanctuaries, i.e. cells or body compartments where drugs cannot penetrate or are distributed in sub-active concentrations. The lack of antiviral action in these regions allows the virus to lie latent and start to replicate at any moment after therapy suspension. Recent drug delivery strategies addressing these two limitations will be presented in this review. In the first part, strategies to improve the bioavailability are proposed in order to overcome the absorption or the target cell barrier, or to extend the efficacy time of drugs. In the second section, the biodistribution issues are considered in order to target the drugs into the reservoirs and the sanctuaries, in particular the mononuclear phagocyte system and the brain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of amphotericin B on /sup 67/Ga biodistribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noujaim, A.A.; Turner, C.J.; Scott, J.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of Amphotericin B (AMB) on radiogallium biodistribution in mice was studied at various time intervals. Two doses of AMB (1 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg) were administered intraperitoneally into mice bearing EMT-6 mammary sarcomas. The tumor and tissue uptakes of /sup 67/Ga were calculated when the radioactivity was administered either as /sup 67/Ga-citrate or /sup 67/Ga-transferrin (Ga-Tf). The role of transferrin was also investigated by using doubly-labeled /sup 67/Ga-/sup 125/I-Tf. The results indicate that both the doses of AMB and the chemical form of the radiogallium administered affect the pattern of distribution in some distinct fashion. It was also found that although the administration of AMB results in an increase in tumor-associated transferrin, this does not necessarily result in a concomitant increase in radiogallium uptake. In general, the effects of AMB on various tissues uptake of /sup 67/Ga appear to be related to both acute and subacute toxicity.

  16. Biodistribution and tumor uptake of C{sub 60}(OH){sub x} in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji Zhiqiang; Sun Hongfang, E-mail: shf@pku.edu.cn; Wang Haifang; Xie Qunying; Liu Yuangfang [Peking University, Department of Chemical Biology, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering (China); Wang Zheng [Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Cancer Institute (China)

    2006-02-15

    Radiolabeling of fullerol, {sup 125}I-C{sub 60}(OH){sub x}, was performed by the traditional chloramine-T method. The C-I covalent bond in I-C{sub 60}(OH){sub x} was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) that was sufficiently stable for in vivo study. Laser light scattering spectroscopy clearly showed that C{sub 60}(OH){sub x} aggregated to large nanoparticle clumps with a wide range of distribution. The clumps formed were also visualized by transmission electron microscope (TEM). We examined the biodistribution and tumor uptake of C{sub 60}(OH){sub x} in five mouse bearing tumor models, including mouse H22 hepatocarcinoma, human lung giantcellcarcinoma PD, human colon cancer HCT-8, human gastric cancer MGC803, and human OS732 osteosarcoma. The accumulation ratios of {sup 125}I-C{sub 60}(OH){sub x} in mouse H22 hepatocarcinoma to that in normal muscle tissue (T/N) and blood (T/B) at 1, 6, 24 and 72 h, reveal that {sup 125}I-C{sub 60}(OH){sub x} gradually accumulates in H22 tumor, and retains for a quite long period (e.g., T/N 3.41, T/B 3.94 at 24 h). For the other four tumor models, the T/N ratio at 24 h ranges within 1.21-6.26, while the T/B ratio ranges between 1.23 and 4.73. The accumulation of C{sub 60}(OH){sub x} in tumor is mostly due to the enhanced permeability and retention effect (EPR) and the phagocytosis of mononuclear phagocytes. Hence, C{sub 60}(OH){sub x} might serve as a photosensitizer in the photodynamic therapy of some kinds of tumor.

  17. Biodistribution and tumor uptake of C60(OH) x in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhi Qiang; Sun, Hongfang; Wang, Haifang; Xie, Qunying; Liu, Yuangfang; Wang, Zheng

    2006-02-01

    Radiolabeling of fullerol, 125I-C60(OH) x , was performed by the traditional chloramine-T method. The C-I covalent bond in I-C60(OH) x was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) that was sufficiently stable for in vivo study. Laser light scattering spectroscopy clearly showed that C60(OH) x aggregated to large nanoparticle clumps with a wide range of distribution. The clumps formed were also visualized by transmission electron microscope (TEM). We examined the biodistribution and tumor uptake of C60(OH) x in five mouse bearing tumor models, including mouse H22 hepatocarcinoma, human lung giantcellcarcinoma PD, human colon cancer HCT-8, human gastric cancer MGC803, and human OS732 osteosarcoma. The accumulation ratios of 125I-C60(OH) x in mouse H22 hepatocarcinoma to that in normal muscle tissue (T/N) and blood (T/B) at 1, 6, 24 and 72 h, reveal that 125I-C60(OH) x gradually accumulates in H22 tumor, and retains for a quite long period (e.g., T/N 3.41, T/B 3.94 at 24 h). For the other four tumor models, the T/N ratio at 24 h ranges within 1.21-6.26, while the T/B ratio ranges between 1.23 and 4.73. The accumulation of C60(OH) x in tumor is mostly due to the enhanced permeability and retention effect (EPR) and the phagocytosis of mononuclear phagocytes. Hence, C60(OH) x might serve as a photosensitizer in the photodynamic therapy of some kinds of tumor.

  18. Development of a New Positron Emission Tomography Tracer for Targeting Tumor Angiogenesis: Synthesis, Small Animal Imaging, and Radiation Dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Lalush

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis plays a key role in cancer progression and correlates with disease aggressiveness and poor clinical outcomes. Affinity ligands discovered by screening phage display random peptide libraries can be engineered to molecularly target tumor blood vessels for noninvasive imaging and early detection of tumor aggressiveness. In this study, we tested the ability of a phage-display-selected peptide sequence recognizing specifically bone marrow- derived pro-angiogenic tumor-homing cells, the QFP-peptide, radiolabeled with 64Cu radioisotope to selectively image tumor vasculature in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET. To prepare the targeted PET tracer we modified QFP-phage with the DOTA chelator and radiolabeled the purified QFP-phage-DOTA intermediate with 64Cu to obtain QFP-targeted radioconjugate with high radiopharmaceutical yield and specific activity. We evaluated the new PET tracer in vivo in a subcutaneous (s.c. Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC mouse model and conducted tissue distribution, small animal PET/CT imaging study, autoradiography, histology, fluorescence imaging, and dosimetry assessments. The results from this study show that, in the context of the s.c. LLC immunocompetent mouse model, the QFP-tracer can target tumor blood vessels selectively. However, further optimization of the biodistribution and dosimetry profile of the tracer is necessary to ensure efficient radiopharmaceutical applications enabled by the biological specificity of the QFP-peptide.

  19. Fast neutron spectrometry and dosimetry; Spectrometrie et dosimetrie des neutrons rapides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaize, S.; Ailloud, J.; Mariani, J.; Millot, J.P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    We have studied fast neutron spectrometry and dosimetry through the recoil protons they produce in hydrogenated samples. In spectrometric, we used nuclear emulsions, in dosimetric, we used polyethylene coated with zinc sulphide and placed before a photomultiplier. (author)Fren. [French] Nous avons etudie la spectrometrie et la dosimetrie des neutrons rapides en utilisant les protons de recul qu'ils produisent dans une matiere hydrogenee. En spectrometrie, nous avons employe des emulsions nucleaires, en dosimetrie, du polyethylene recouvert de sulfure de zinc place devant un photomultiplicateur. (auteur)

  20. Survey of international personnel radiation dosimetry programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaja, R.E.

    1985-04-01

    In September of 1983, a mail survey was conducted to determine the status of external personnel gamma and neutron radiation dosimetry programs at international agencies. A total of 130 agencies participated in this study including military, regulatory, university, hospital, laboratory, and utility facilities. Information concerning basic dosimeter types, calibration sources, calibration phantoms, corrections to dosimeter responses, evaluating agencies, dose equivalent reporting conventions, ranges of typical or expected dose equivalents, and degree of satisfaction with existing systems was obtained for the gamma and neutron personnel monitoring programs at responding agencies. Results of this survey indicate that to provide the best possible occupational radiation monitoring programs and to improve dosimetry accuracy in performance studies, facility dosimetrists, regulatory and standards agencies, and research laboratories must act within their areas of responsibility to become familiar with their radiation monitoring systems, establish common reporting guidelines and performance standards, and provide opportunities for dosimetry testing and evaluation. 14 references, 10 tables.

  1. Instrumentation for the individual dosimetry of workers

    CERN Document Server

    Thévenin, J C

    2003-01-01

    The control of the radiation dose exposure of workers and personnel exposed to ionizing radiations (nuclear industry, nuclear medicine, army, university laboratories etc..) is ensured by individual dosemeters. This dosimetry is mandatory for all workers susceptible to be exposed to more than 30% of the regulatory dose limit. dosemeters are worn on the chest and in some particular cases, on the finger (dosemeter rings) or on the wrist. Passive dosemeters allow to measure the dose a posteriori, while electronic dosemeters allow a direct reading and recording of the dose. This article presents successively: 1 - the general principles of individual dosimetry: situations of exposure, radiation detection, operational data, standardization, calibration and quality assurance, measurement uncertainties; 2 - goals and regulatory framework of individual dosimetry: regulation and recommendations, optimization, respect of dose limits, accidental situations; 3 - passive dosemeters: film, thermoluminescent, radio-photolumin...

  2. Bayesian Methods for Radiation Detection and Dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Groer, Peter G

    2002-01-01

    We performed work in three areas: radiation detection, external and internal radiation dosimetry. In radiation detection we developed Bayesian techniques to estimate the net activity of high and low activity radioactive samples. These techniques have the advantage that the remaining uncertainty about the net activity is described by probability densities. Graphs of the densities show the uncertainty in pictorial form. Figure 1 below demonstrates this point. We applied stochastic processes for a method to obtain Bayesian estimates of 222Rn-daughter products from observed counting rates. In external radiation dosimetry we studied and developed Bayesian methods to estimate radiation doses to an individual with radiation induced chromosome aberrations. We analyzed chromosome aberrations after exposure to gammas and neutrons and developed a method for dose-estimation after criticality accidents. The research in internal radiation dosimetry focused on parameter estimation for compartmental models from observed comp...

  3. Reactor Dosimetry State of the Art 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorbraak, Wim; Debarberis, Luigi; D'Hondt, Pierre; Wagemans, Jan

    2009-08-01

    Oral session 1: Retrospective dosimetry. Retrospective dosimetry of VVER 440 reactor pressure vessel at the 3rd unit of Dukovany NPP / M. Marek ... [et al.]. Retrospective dosimetry study at the RPV of NPP Greifswald unit 1 / J. Konheiser ... [et al.]. Test of prototype detector for retrospective neutron dosimetry of reactor internals and vessel / K. Hayashi ... [et al.]. Neutron doses to the concrete vessel and tendons of a magnox reactor using retrospective dosimetry / D. A. Allen ... [et al.]. A retrospective dosimetry feasibility study for Atucha I / J. Wagemans ... [et al.]. Retrospective reactor dosimetry with zirconium alloy samples in a PWR / L. R. Greenwood and J. P. Foster -- Oral session 2: Experimental techniques. Characterizing the Time-dependent components of reactor n/y environments / P. J. Griffin, S. M. Luker and A. J. Suo-Anttila. Measurements of the recoil-ion response of silicon carbide detectors to fast neutrons / F. H. Ruddy, J. G. Seidel and F. Franceschini. Measurement of the neutron spectrum of the HB-4 cold source at the high flux isotope reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory / J. L. Robertson and E. B. Iverson. Feasibility of cavity ring-down laser spectroscopy for dose rate monitoring on nuclear reactor / H. Tomita ... [et al.]. Measuring transistor damage factors in a non-stable defect environment / D. B. King ... [et al.]. Neutron-detection based monitoring of void effects in boiling water reactors / J. Loberg ... [et al.] -- Poster session 1: Power reactor surveillance, retrospective dosimetry, benchmarks and inter-comparisons, adjustment methods, experimental techniques, transport calculations. Improved diagnostics for analysis of a reactor pulse radiation environment / S. M. Luker ... [et al.]. Simulation of the response of silicon carbide fast neutron detectors / F. Franceschini, F. H. Ruddy and B. Petrović. NSV A-3: a computer code for least-squares adjustment of neutron spectra and measured dosimeter responses / J. G

  4. Technical basis for internal dosimetry at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sula, M.J.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.

    1991-07-01

    The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, provides routine bioassay monitoring for employees who are potentially exposed to radionuclides in the workplace. This report presents the technical basis for routine bioassay monitoring and the assessment of internal dose at Hanford. The radionuclides of concern include tritium, corrosion products ({sup 58}Co, {sup 60}Co, {sup 54}Mn, and {sup 59}Fe), strontium, cesium, iodine, europium, uranium, plutonium, and americium,. Sections on each of these radionuclides discuss the sources and characteristics; dosimetry; bioassay measurements and monitoring; dose measurement, assessment, and mitigation and bioassay follow-up treatment. 78 refs., 35 figs., 115 tabs.

  5. Technical basis for internal dosimetry at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sula, M.J.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.

    1989-04-01

    The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, provides routine bioassay monitoring for employees who are potentially exposed to radionuclides in the workplace. This report presents the technical basis for routine bioassay monitoring and the assessment of internal dose at Hanford. The radionuclides of concern include tritium, corrosion products (/sup 58/Co, /sup 60/Co, /sup 54/Mn, and /sup 59/Fe), strontium, cesium, iodine, europium, uranium, plutonium, and americium. Sections on each of these radionuclides discuss the sources and characteristics; dosimetry; bioassay measurements and monitoring; dose measurement, assessment, and mitigation; and bioassay follow-up treatment. 64 refs., 42 figs., 118 tabs.

  6. Dosimetry of Low-Energy Beta Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Jette

    Useful techniques and procedures for derermination of absorbed doses from exposure in a low-energy beta radiation were studied and evaluated. The four techniques included were beta spectrometry, extrapolation chamber dosimetry, Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, and exoelectron dosimetry. As a typical...... low-energy beta radiation field a moderated spectrum from a carbon-14 source was used. The measured responce of a Si(Li) detector to photons (bremsstrahlung) showed fine agreemant with the MC calculated photon response, whereas the difference between measured and MC calculated response to electrons...

  7. SNL RML recommended dosimetry cross section compendium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, P.J.; Kelly, J.G.; Luera, T.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); VanDenburg, J. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-11-01

    A compendium of dosimetry cross sections is presented for use in the characterization of fission reactor spectrum and fluence. The contents of this cross section library are based upon the ENDF/B-VI and IRDF-90 cross section libraries and are recommended as a replacement for the DOSCROS84 multigroup library that is widely used by the dosimetry community. Documentation is provided on the rationale for the choice of the cross sections selected for inclusion in this library and on the uncertainty and variation in cross sections presented by state-of-the-art evaluations.

  8. Dosimetry requirements derived from the sterilization standards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, A.

    1998-01-01

    The main standards for radiation sterilization, ISO 11137 and EN 552, rest the documentation for the properly executed sterilization process on dosimetry. Both standards describe general requirements to the dosimetry system: The dose measurements must be traceable to national standards......, the uncertainty of the dose measurement and the environmental influences must be known. This paper discusses how to obtain and maintain traceability and how to document measurement uncertainty. The implications of these requirements in the process control of radiation sterilization are further discussed. Known...

  9. Thermoluminescent dosimetry in computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara C, A.; Rivera M, T. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Av. Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Osorio V, M. [ISSSTE, Centro Medico Nacional 20 de Noviembre, Felix Cuevas 540, Col. del Valle, 03100 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Hernandez O, O., E-mail: armando_lara_cam@yahoo.com.mx [Hospital General de Mexico, Dr. Balmis 148, Col. Doctores, 06726 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-10-15

    In this work we studied the dosimetry performed on CT scan in two different equipment, SOMATOM and Phillips, with 16 and 64 slice respectively. We used 51 pellets of lithium fluoride doped with magnesium and titanium (LiF: Mg, Ti) also knows as TLD-100 due to its physical properties and its easy of use, in this study, first analysis a batch of 56 pellets, but only 53 pellets were optimal for this study, cesium-137 was used as source irradiation, then proceeded to calibrate the batch with X-rays source, measuring the corresponding dose in a Farmers ionization chamber, then, we obtained a calibration curve, and we used as reference to calculation of the applied dose, finally designing ergonomic mesh, were it was deposited a TLD 100, placed in a regions of interest were made to each scan type. Once characterized our material proceeded to testing in 30 patients, which were irradiated with X-ray tube, whose operation was performed at 80, 120 kV with a current of 100, 300 and 400 m A according to scanning protocol. Overall we measured dose of 5 mGy to 53 mGy, these measurements reflect significant dose to can induced cancer, due previous reports published, that doses greater than 20 mGy there is a risk of developing cancer in the long term, but in practice when it assigned a medical diagnosis, there are no dose limits due to benefits patients, however, IAEA publish recommendations that allow us to carry out optimum handling of ionizing radiation, among these is the quality control of the tomography equipment that helps greatly reduce patient dose. (Author)

  10. Characterization of {sup 111}In{sup 3+} complexes of DTPA amide derivatives: biodistribution and clearance studied by gamma imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prata, M.I.M.; Santos, A.C.; Bligh, S.W.A.; Chowdhury, A.H.M.S.; Geraldes, C.F.G.C. E-mail: geraldes@lyra.ci.uc.pt; Lima, J.J.P. de

    2000-06-01

    A large series of structurally related diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid amide derivatives with different structures and lipophilic properties were synthesized and radiolabeled with {sup 111}In{sup 3+}. Two of the more hydrophobic compounds studied ([{sup 111}In]L{sup 9} and [{sup 111}In]L{sup 10}) showed high affinity for human serum albumin (HSA). The biodistribution and clearance properties shown by all complexes upon injection in Wistar rats were followed by gamma imaging. The blood retention time of the chelates correlates better with their binding to HSA than with their hydrophilic/lipophilic ratio. Hydrophilic and negatively charged complexes undergo renal retention, while the majority of the lipophilic complexes are retained in the blood for a longer period of time and are cleared through the liver.

  11. THE MAYAK WORKER DOSIMETRY SYSTEM (MWDS-2013): INTERNAL DOSIMETRY RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vostrotin, V.; Birchall, Alan; Zhdanov, Alexey; Puncher, Mathew L.; Efimov, Alexander; Napier, Bruce A.; Sokolova, Alexandra; Miller, Scott C.; Suslova, K. G.

    2017-10-31

    The distribution of calculated internal doses was determined for 8043 Mayak Production Associate (Mayak PA) workers according to the epidemiological cohorts and groups of raw data used as well as the type of industrial compounds of inhaled aerosols. Statistical characteristics of point estimates of accumulated doses to 17 different tissues and organs and the uncertainty ranges were calculated. Under the MWDS-2013 dosimetry system, the mean accumulated lung dose was 185585 mGy, with a median value of 31 mGy and a maximum of 8980 mGy maximum. The ranges of relative standard uncertainty were: from 40 to 2200% for accumulated lung dose, from 25-90% to 2600-3000% for accumulated dose to different regions of respiratory tract, from 13-18% to 2300-2500% for systemic organs and tissues. The Mayak PA workers accumulated internal plutonium lung dose is shown to be close to lognormal. The accumulated internal plutonium dose to systemic organs was close to a log-triangle. The dependency of uncertainty of accumulated absorbed lung and liver doses on the dose estimates itself is also shown. The accumulated absorbed doses to lung, alveolar-interstitial region, liver, bone surface cells and red bone marrow, calculated both with MWDS-2013 and MWDS-2008 have been compared. In general, the accumulated lung doses increased by a factor of 1.8 in median value, while the accumulated doses to systemic organs decreased by factor of 1.3-1.4 in median value. For the cases with identical initial data, accumulated lung doses increased by a factor of 2.1 in median value, while accumulated doses to systemic organs decreased by 8-13% in median value. For the cases with both identical initial data and all of plutonium activity in urine measurements above the decision threshold, accumulated lung doses increased by a factor of 2.8 in median value, while accumulated doses to systemic organs increased by 6-12% in median value.

  12. Production, quality control, biodistribution assessment and preliminary dose evaluation of {sup 166}Ho-alendronate as a bone marrow ablative agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhari, Ashraf [Tehran University of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Radiopharmacy; Jalilian, Amir Reza; Yousefnia, Hassan; Zolghadri, Samaneh; Samani, Ali Bahrami; Akbari, Mahmoud Reza; Deha, Fariba Johari [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shafiee-Ardestani, Mahdi; Khalaj, Ali [Tehran University of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Medicinal Chemistry

    2015-07-01

    In this study, production, quality control and biodistribution studies of {sup 166}Ho-alendronate have been presented and followed by dosimetric evaluation for human based on biodistribution data in wild-type rats. {sup 166}Ho chloride was obtained by thermal neutron irradiation of natural {sup 165}Ho(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} samples. {sup 166}Ho-alendronate complex was prepared by adding the desired amount of alkaline alendronate solution (0.2 mL, 150 mg/mL) to 3-5 mCi of the {sup 166}HoCl{sub 3} solution. Radiochemical purity of the complex was monitored by instant thin layer chromatography (ITLC). {sup 166}Ho-alendronate complex was prepared in high radiochemical purity (> 99%, ITLC) and specific activity of 4.4 GBq/mmol. Stability studies of the complex in the final preparation and in the presence of human serum were performed up to 48 h. The major accumulation of the radio-complex was in the bone tissues followed by absorbed dose evaluation of each human organ by RADAR software used for modelling the radiation dose delivered. The final preparation was administered to wild-type rats and biodistribution of the complex was performed 2-48 h post injection showing major accumulation of the complex in the bone tissue. The highest absorbed dose for {sup 166}Ho-alendronate is observed in bone surface and red marrow with 2.670 and 1.880 mSv/MBq; respectively. These findings suggest that {sup 166}Ho-alendronate has considerable characteristics compared to {sup 166}Ho-DOTMP and can be a possible candidate for bone marrow ablation in patients with multiple myeloma.

  13. [sup 222]Rn dosimetry in the dog lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harley, N.H.; Meyers, O.A.; Robbins, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    The alpha dose to cells in bronchial airways in the beagle dog during historical exposures to [sup 222]Rn decay products is calculated using updated information on airway morphometry, call nucleus depth, mucus thickness, physical dosimetry and atmospheric characteristics. The alpha dose per unit exposure to basal call nuclei in the upper airways ranges from 2 to 7 mGy WLM[sup [minus]1] (excluding the trachea) depending upon the exposure protocol used. The dose to alveolar tissue is 3 mGy WLM[sup [minus]1]. In the human lung, the dose factor for the bronchial airways is 9 mGy WLM[sub [minus]1] and for the pulmonary parenchyma 0.5 mGy WLM[sup [minus]1] The human tumors appear primarily in the first few branching airway generations while the only tumors observed in the animals were in the bronchioloalveolar region suggesting a difference in cell sensitivity to alpha radiation.

  14. {sup 222}Rn dosimetry in the dog lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harley, N.H.; Meyers, O.A.; Robbins, E.S.

    1991-12-31

    The alpha dose to cells in bronchial airways in the beagle dog during historical exposures to {sup 222}Rn decay products is calculated using updated information on airway morphometry, call nucleus depth, mucus thickness, physical dosimetry and atmospheric characteristics. The alpha dose per unit exposure to basal call nuclei in the upper airways ranges from 2 to 7 mGy WLM{sup {minus}1} (excluding the trachea) depending upon the exposure protocol used. The dose to alveolar tissue is 3 mGy WLM{sup {minus}1}. In the human lung, the dose factor for the bronchial airways is 9 mGy WLM{sub {minus}1} and for the pulmonary parenchyma 0.5 mGy WLM{sup {minus}1} The human tumors appear primarily in the first few branching airway generations while the only tumors observed in the animals were in the bronchioloalveolar region suggesting a difference in cell sensitivity to alpha radiation.

  15. Progress In The Development Of A Tomographic SPECT System For Online Dosimetry In BNCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minsky, D. M.; Valda, A.; Kreiner, A. J.; Burlon, A. A.; Green, S.; Wojnecki, C.; Ghani, Z.

    2010-08-01

    In boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) the delivered dose to the patient depends both on the neutron beam characteristics and on the 10B body distribution which, in turn, is governed by the tumor specificity of the 10B drug-carrier. BNCT dosimetry is a complex matter due to the several interactions that neutrons can undergo with the different nuclei present in tissue. However the boron capture reaction 10B(n,α)7Li accounts for about 80 % of the total dose in a tumor with 40 ppm in 10B concentration. Present dosimetric methods are indirect, based on drug biodistribution statistical data and subjected to inter and intra-patient variability. In order to overcome the consequences of the concomitant high dosimetric uncertainties, we propose a SPECT (Single Photon Emission Tomography) approach based on the detection of the prompt gamma-ray (478 keV) emitted in 94 % of the cases from 7Li. For this purpose we designed, built and tested a prototype based on LaBr3(Ce) scintillators. Measurements on a head and tumor phantom were performed in the accelerator-based BNCT facility of the University of Birmingham (UK). They result in the first tomographic image of the 10B capture distribution obtained in a BNCT facility.

  16. Development in neutron dosimetry: automatic traces reading system and albedo OSL dosimetry; Developpement en dosimetrie neutron: systeme automatique de lecture de traces et dosimetrie albedo OSL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Million, M.; Perks, C.A.; Faugoin, S.; Archambault, V. [LCIE Landauer, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France)

    2009-07-01

    To answer to a regulatory evolution and technical constraints, the Landauer group introduced on the make an automatic reading system of neutron traces and an albedo dosemeter based on the O.S.L. in light dosemeters (O.S.L. for optically stimulated luminescence). In this article are described the last developments in matter of neutron dosimetry. (N.C.)

  17. Advances in reference and transfer dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desrosiers, M.F. [Ionizing Radiation Division, Physics Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

    1999-07-01

    All prerequisites are now in place to create a fundamentally and radically different type of calibration service for the radiation processing industry. Advancements in dosimetry and information technology can be combined to provide industry with on-line calibrations, on demand at a low cost. The remote calibration service will serve as a basis for other areas of metrology. (Author)

  18. Thermoluminescence dosimetry of rare earth doped calcium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    CaAl2O4) doped with different rare earth ions have been studied and their suitability for radiation dosimetry applications is discussed. It is observed that monocalcium aluminate doped with cerium is a good dosimeter having linear response up to ...

  19. EPR-dosimetry of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Mariia; Vakhnin, Dmitrii; Tyshchenko, Igor

    2017-09-01

    This article discusses the problems that arise during the radiation sterilization of medical products. It is propose the solution based on alanine EPR-dosimetry. The parameters of spectrometer and methods of absorbed dose calculation are given. In addition, the problems that arise during heavy particles irradiation are investigated.

  20. Thermoluminescence dosimetry of rare earth doped calcium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The thermoluminescence (TL) properties of calcium aluminate (CaAl2O4) doped with different rare earth ions have been studied and their suitability for radiation dosimetry applications is discussed. It is observed that monocalcium aluminate doped with cerium is a good dosimeter having linear response up to about 4 kGy of ...

  1. Film dosimetry in conformal radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danciu, C.; Proimos, B.S. [Patras Univ. (Greece). Dept. of Medical Physics

    1995-12-01

    Dosimetry, through a film sandwiched in a transverse cross-section of a solid phantom, is a method of choice in Conformal Radiotherapy because: (a) the blackness (density) of the film at each point offers a measure of the total dose received at that point, and (b) the film is easily calibrated by exposing a film strip in the same cross-section, through a stationary field. The film must therefore have the following properties: (a) it must be slow, in order not to be overexposed, even at a therapeutic dose of 200 cGy, and (b) the response of the film (density versus dose curve) must be independent of the photon energy spectrum. A few slow films were compared. It was found that the Kodak X-Omat V for therapy verification was the best choice. To investigate whether the film response was independent of the photon energy, response curves for six depths, starting from the depth of maximum dose to the depth of 25 cm, in solid phantom were derived. The vertical beam was perpendicular to the anterior surface of the phantom, which was at the distance of 100 cm from the source and the field was 15x15 cm at that distance. This procedure was repeated for photon beams emitted by a Cobalt-60 unit, two 6 MV and 15 MV Linear Accelerators, as well as a 45 MV Betatron. For each of those four different beams the film response was the same for all six depths. The results, as shown in the diagrams, are very satisfactory. The response curve under a geometry similar to that actually applied, when the film is irradiated in a transverse cross-section of the phantom, was derived. The horizontal beam was almost parallel (angle of 85) to the plane of the film. The same was repeated with the central ray parallel to the film (angle 90) and at a distance of 1.5 cm from the horizontal film. The field size was again 15x15 at the lateral entrance surface of the beam. The response curves remained the same, as when the beam was perpendicular to the films.

  2. Image-based dosimetry for selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) using yttrium-90 microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selwyn, Reed G.

    90Y-loaded microspheres are currently used as a palliative treatment for patients with primary and metastatic solid liver tumors. These microspheres contain radioactive 90Y, which decays via beta-minus transition to 90Zr. While the normal liver receives about 75% of its blood supply from the portal vein, hepatic tumors receive their blood supply almost exclusively from the hepatic artery. Taking advantage of this unique blood flow, radioactive microspheres are injected into the hepatic artery resulting in a preferential distribution to tumor sites within the liver. Studies show that the single best prognostic indicator for patient response is the tumor-to-normal tissue (T:N) activity uptake ratio. However, 90Y emits very few photons its broad bremsstrahlung spectrum leads to diffuse, low resolution images, which are insufficient for accurate T:N quantification. Thus, the first objective was to develop a PET-labeled microsphere as a surrogate for the therapeutic microsphere to provide accurate biodistribution information. Furthermore, patient outcome is also suspected to be linked to the mean tumor dose and tumor dose volume histogram. Therefore, a second objective was to develop and validate a method to calculate the dose distribution within the tumor and normal liver tissue. Computer software that generates three-dimensional (3D) dose distributions was validated by comparing results to experimental measurements. The novel development of a 3D gel dosimeter will be discussed as well as a new protocol for 2D film dosimetry. Both dosimetry methods were validated but only film provided the desired accuracy. The overall accuracy of the dose distribution depends on the uncertainty of the 90Y assay, which can extend to 15% at 1sigma. Therefore, the third objective was to develop an accurate non-destructive assay of 90Y. To this end, a new 90Y positron branching ratio was measured and a clinically relevant transfer standard was developed. In summation, this thesis will

  3. In vivo biodistribution of amino-functionalized ceria nanoparticles in rats using positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Santiago; Gispert, Juan Domingo; Abad, Sergio; Buaki-Sogo, Mireia; Victor, Victor M; Garcia, Hermenegildo; Herance, Jose Raúl

    2012-12-03

    A variety of nanoparticles have been proposed for several biomedical applications. To gauge the therapeutic potential of these nanoparticles, in vivo biodistribution is essential and mandatory. In the present study, ceria nanoparticles (5 nm average particle size) were labeled with (18)F to study their in vivo biodistribution in rats by positron emission tomography (PET). The (18)F isotope was anchored by reaction of N-succinimidyl 4-[(18)F]fluorobenzoate ((18)F-SFB) with a modified nanoparticle surface obtained by silylation with 3-aminopropylsilyl. Radiolabeled ceria nanoparticles accumulated mainly in lungs, spleen, and liver. Metabolic products of the radiolabeled nanoparticulate material were excreted into the urinary tract.

  4. Biodistribution of technetium-99m pertechnetate after total colectomy in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meneses Rego, Amalia Cinthia; Alcantara Oliveira Ramalho, Rachel; Tabosa Egito, Eryvaldo Socrates; Araujo-Filho, Irami; Medeiros Azevedo, Italo [Postgraduate Program in Health Sciences, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Ave. Miguel Alcides Araujo 1889, Natal-RN 59078-270 (Brazil); Palestro, Christopher J. [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System, Manhasset and New Hyde Park, NY (United States); Medeiros, Aldo Cunha, E-mail: aldom@uol.com.b [Postgraduate Program in Health Sciences, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Ave. Miguel Alcides Araujo 1889, Natal-RN 59078-270 (Brazil)

    2010-12-15

    This study evaluated the effects of total colectomy on the biodistribution of technetium-99m pertechnetate ({sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) on the 28th postoperative day in rats. Samples of several organs were harvested for counting the percent of injected radioactivity/g of tissue (%ATI/g). The %ATI/g in colectomy rats was higher in the stomach and ileum than in sham and controls (p<0.05). Increase in mucosa and muscularis size of ileum was observed. Colectomy was associated with lower biodistribution in bladder and thyroid, T3, and T4, than in controls.

  5. Validation of biological dosimetry versus physical dosimetry in conditioned patients using total body irradiation: cytogenetic and FISH study; Validation de la dosimetrie biologique chez des patients conditionnes par irradiation corporelle totale: etude cytogenetique conventionnelle et hybridation in situ (FISH)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dossou, J.; M' kacher, R.; Violot, D.; Legal, J.D.; Lartigau, E.; Eschwege, F.; Parmentier, C. [Institut Gustave Roussy, UPRES EA27-10 Radiosensibilite et Radiocarcinogenese Humaine, 94 - Villejuif (France); Girinsky, T.; Eschwege, F. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 94 - Villejuif (France); Bridier, A. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Service de Physique, 94 - Villejuif (France)

    2000-12-01

    Purpose. - Validation of biological dosimetry versus physical dosimetry in malignant hemopathy patients conditioned by total body irradiation (TBI) before bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Patients and methods. -The scoring of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes irradiated in vivo was used to perform the biological dosimetry. The data were compared to those obtained with healthy volunteers' total blood exposed to in vitro irradiation with linear accelerator doses (0.2, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 Gy) for dose-response curves. In experimental animal models, can in vivo and in vitro responses be considered as being the same? All the published human data are based on retrospective dose evaluation with very large uncertainties on the dose precisely delivered to the subject. TBI before BMT was taken as a model where the dose calculation results from the physical method, with homogeneous beam and dose delivered precisely along the entire organism. In vivo response allows us to validate biological dosimetry in 15 adult patients (female + male), before (D = 0 Gy) and after the first fraction of 1.8 Gy, delivered by a linear accelerator (18 MV, dose-rate of 15.8 cGy/min{sup -1}). Two methods, conventional cyto-genetics (CCG) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH painting) of chromosome 4 were respectively used to analyze the unstable chromosome aberrations and stable chromosome aberrations. Results. -Healthy volunteer lymphocytes, before irradiation, yielded 0.1 % dicentrics and 0.3% translocations of chromosome 4, with 2.5% for the whole genome. Patients before irradiation had 2% dicentrics and 11.48% chromosome 4 translocations for the whole genome. In the 15 patients, for a physical dose of 1.8 Gy, the evaluated biological dose was 1.93 Gy (95% CI: 1.85-2.05 Gy) with conventional cyto-genetics and 2.06 Gy (95% CI: 1.75-2.15 Gy) with FISH. Conclusion. - These results, in which the biologically estimated dose is in complete agreement with the dose

  6. In-vivo biodistribution and safety of 99mTc-LLP2A-HYNIC in canine non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison L Zwingenberger

    Full Text Available Theranostic agents are critical for improving the diagnosis and treatment of non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL. The peptidomimetic LLP2A is a novel peptide receptor radiotherapy candidate for treating NHL that expresses the activated α4β1 integrin. Tumor-bearing dogs are an excellent model of human NHL with similar clinical characteristics, behavior, and compressed clinical course. Canine in vivo imaging studies will provide valuable biodistribution and affinity information that reflects a diverse clinical population of lymphoma. This may also help to determine potential dose-limiting radiotoxicity to organs in human clinical trials. To validate this construct in a naturally occurring model of NHL, we performed in-vivo molecular targeted imaging and biodistribution in 3 normal dogs and 5 NHL bearing dogs. (99mTc-LLP2A-HYNIC-PEG and (99mTc-LLP2A-HYNIC were successfully synthesized and had very good labeling efficiency and radiochemical purity. (99mTc-LLP2A-HYNIC and (99mTc-LLP2A-HYNIC-PEG had biodistribution in keeping with their molecular size, with (99mTc-LLP2A-HYNIC-PEG remaining longer in the circulation, having higher tissue uptake, and having more activity in the liver compared to (99mTc-LLP2A-HYNIC. (99mTc-LLP2A-HYNIC was mainly eliminated through the kidneys with some residual activity. Radioactivity was reduced to near-background levels at 6 hours after injection. In NHL dogs, tumor showed moderately increased activity over background, with tumor activity in B-cell lymphoma dogs decreasing after chemotherapy. This compound is promising in the development of targeted drug-delivery radiopharmaceuticals and may contribute to translational work in people affected by non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

  7. {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-RGD peptide: biodistribution and binding into atherosclerotic plaques in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haukkala, Johanna; Laitinen, Iina; Luoto, Pauliina; Knuuti, Juhani [University of Turku, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Iveson, Peter; Wilson, Ian [Medical Diagnostics, GE Healthcare Biosciences, London (United Kingdom); Karlsen, Hege; Cuthbertson, Alan [GE Healthcare MDx Research, Oslo (Norway); Laine, Jukka [Turku University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Turku (Finland); Leppaenen, Pia; Ylae-Herttula, Seppo [University of Kuopio, A.I. Virtanen Institute, Kuopio (Finland); Roivainen, Anne [University of Turku, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); University of Turku, Turku Centre for Disease Modelling, Turku (Finland)

    2009-12-15

    Increased expression of {alpha}v{beta}3/{alpha}v{beta}5 integrin is involved in angiogenesis and the inflammatory process in atherosclerotic plaques. The novel {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-RGD peptide binds with high affinity to {alpha}v{beta}3/{alpha}v{beta}5 integrin. The aim of this study was to investigate the uptake of the {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-RGD peptide in atherosclerotic plaques. Uptake of intravenously administered {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-RGD peptide was studied ex vivo in excised tissue samples and aortic sections of LDLR{sup -/-}ApoB{sup 100/100} atherosclerotic mice. The uptake of the tracer in aortic cryosections was examined by using digital autoradiography. Subsequently, the autoradiographs were combined with histological and immunohistological analysis of the sections. DOTA-RGD peptide was successfully labelled with the generator-produced {sup 68}Ga. The tracer had reasonably good specific radioactivity (8.7 {+-} 1.1 GBq/{mu}mol) and was quite stable in vivo. According to ex vivo biodistribution results, {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-RGD was cleared rapidly from the blood circulation and excreted through the kidneys to the urine with high radioactivity in the intestine, lungs, spleen and liver. Autoradiography results showed significantly higher uptake of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-RGD peptide in the atherosclerotic plaques compared to healthy vessel wall (mean ratio {+-} SD 1.4 {+-} 0.1, p = 0.0004). We observed that {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-RGD is accumulated into the plaques of atherosclerotic mice. However, this data only shows the feasibility of the approach, while the clinical significance still remains to be proven. Further studies are warranted to assess the uptake of this tracer into human atherosclerotic plaques. (orig.)

  8. A study on the synthesis, labeling and its biodistribution of estradiol derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Wook; Yang, Seung Dae; Suh, Yong Sup [College of Medicine, Dongguk Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    2000-10-01

    Due to the heterogeneous receptor distribution and changes of receptor status over time, the biochemical measurement of estrogen receptor status of biopsy specimens is not sufficient to diagnose breast cancer. As a result, I-123 labeled estradiols have been applied for the diagnosis. The purpose of this study was to develop a suitable radioligand for imaging estrogen receptor-positive human breast tumors. Among the various estradiol derivatives, 17{alpha}-[{sup 123}I]iodovinyl estradiol ([{sup 123}]IVE) has been prepared from 17{alpha}-ethynyl estradiol. Labeling of E-17{alpha}-[{sup 123}I]iodovinyl estradiol ([{sup 123}]IVE] was carried out using peracetic acid with [{sup 123}I]Nal and Z-[{sup 123}I]IVE labelling was archived using chloamine T/HCL solution with [{sup 123}I]Nal. Labeling yield was determined by silica thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and radiochemical purity was measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The biodistribution of E-[{sup 123}I]IVE was measured in immature female rats at 60 min, 120 min and 300 min after injection. The labeling yield of two isomers was 92% and 94% (E-[{sup 123}I]IVE and Z-[{sup 123}I]IVE, respectively). The radiochemical purity was more than 98% after purification. The highest uptake was observed at 120 min in uterus (3.11% ID/g for E-[{sup 123}I]IVE. These results suggest the possibility of using E-[{sup 123}I]IVE as an imaging agent for the evaluation of the presence of estrogen receptor in patients with breast cancer.

  9. Biodistribution of sodium borocaptate (BSH) for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in an oral cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garabalino, Marcela A; Heber, Elisa M; Monti Hughes, Andrea; González, Sara J; Molinari, Ana J; Pozzi, Emiliano C C; Nievas, Susana; Itoiz, Maria E; Aromando, Romina F; Nigg, David W; Bauer, William; Trivillin, Verónica A; Schwint, Amanda E

    2013-08-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on selective accumulation of ¹⁰B carriers in tumor followed by neutron irradiation. We previously proved the therapeutic success of BNCT mediated by the boron compounds boronophenylalanine and sodium decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model. Based on the clinical relevance of the boron carrier sodium borocaptate (BSH) and the knowledge that the most effective way to optimize BNCT is to improve tumor boron targeting, the specific aim of this study was to perform biodistribution studies of BSH in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model and evaluate the feasibility of BNCT mediated by BSH at nuclear reactor RA-3. The general aim of these studies is to contribute to the knowledge of BNCT radiobiology and optimize BNCT for head and neck cancer. Sodium borocaptate (50 mg ¹⁰B/kg) was administered to tumor-bearing hamsters. Groups of 3-5 animals were killed humanely at nine time-points, 3-12 h post-administration. Samples of blood, tumor, precancerous pouch tissue, normal pouch tissue and other clinically relevant normal tissues were processed for boron measurement by optic emission spectroscopy. Tumor boron concentration peaked to therapeutically useful boron concentration values of 24-35 ppm. The boron concentration ratio tumor/normal pouch tissue ranged from 1.1 to 1.8. Pharmacokinetic curves showed that the optimum interval between BSH administration and neutron irradiation was 7-11 h. It is concluded that BNCT mediated by BSH at nuclear reactor RA-3 would be feasible.

  10. Thermoluminescence in medical dosimetry; Termoluminiscencia en dosimetria medica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, T., E-mail: trivera@ipn.mx [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Av. Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2011-10-15

    The dosimetry by thermoluminescence (Tl) is applied in the entire world for the dosimetry of ionizing radiations specially to personal and medical dosimetry. This dosimetry method has been very interesting for measures in vivo because the Tl dosimeters have the advantage of being very sensitive in a very small volume and they are also equivalent to tissue and they do not need additional accessories (for example, cable, electrometer, etc.) The main characteristics of the diverse Tl materials to be used in the radiation measures and practical applications are: the Tl curve, the share homogeneity, the signal stability after the irradiation, precision and exactitude, the response in function with the dose and the energy influence. In this work a brief summary of the advances of the radiations dosimetry is presented by means of the thermally stimulated luminescence and its application to the dosimetry in radiotherapy. (Author)

  11. Exploring uptake and biodistribution of polystyrene (nano)particles in zebrafish embryos at different developmental stages.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Pomeren, M; Brun, N R; Peijnenburg, W J G M; Vijver, M G

    In ecotoxicology, it is continuously questioned whether (nano)particle exposure results in particle uptake and subsequent biodistribution or if particles adsorb to the epithelial layer only. To contribute to answering this question, we investigated different uptake routes in zebrafish embryos and

  12. Effects of protein binding on the biodistribution of PEGylated PLGA nanoparticles post oral administration

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Semete, B

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available of surface coating with various concentrations of polymeric surfactants (PEG and Pluronics F127) on the in vitro protein binding as well as the tissue biodistribution, post oral administration, of PLGA nanoparticles. The in vitro protein binding varied...

  13. Samarium oxide as a radiotracer to evaluate the in vivo biodistribution of PLGA nanoparticles

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mandiwana, V

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available .63 %ID/g) and liver (3.07 %ID/g), confirming that nanoparticles are rapidly removed from the blood by the RES, leading to rapid uptake in the liver and spleen. From the biodistribution data obtained, it is clear that polymeric nanoscale delivery systems...

  14. Validation of the micronucleus-centromere assay for biological dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojcik A.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The micronucleus assay is frequently used for purposes of biological dosimetry. Due to high interindividual variability in the spontaneous frequency of micronuclei, its sensitivity in the low dose region is poor. It has been suggested that this problem can be mitigated by selectively analyzing the frequency of those micronuclei which contain only acentric fragments. Using a pan-centromeric FISH probe we have studied the dose dependence of micronuclei with centromeres in peripheral lymphocytes of human donors. In contrast to previous publications, our approach is based on determining the relative frequency of micronuclei with and without centromeric signals. Our results confirm previous observations that in the low dose range of ionizing radiation, the micronucleus-centromere assay is more sensitive than the conventional micronucleus test.

  15. Thermoluminescent dosimetry in total body irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cortés, J; Rivera-Montalvo, T; Villaseñor Navarro, L F; Flores-López, O; Roman, J; Hernandez-Oviedo, J O

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this paper was to develop a thermoluminescent dosimetry method for the absorbed dose determination of 6 MeV high-energy electron beams by thermoluminescent dosimetry. Total body irradiation (TBI) was performed using four dual fields angled at 252° and 285° in high-dose rate (HDR) mode. TBI measurements were investigated to estimate the absorbed dose in different anatomical parts of the patient. Experimental results were obtained using thermoluminescent detectors and solid water phantoms. The TL response of the dosimeters, as a function of the high-energy electron beam (HEEB) absorbed dose, was linear, from 0.1 to 500 cGy. The entrance skin dose (ESD) and isodose distribution on the surface of the treatment were investigated graphically. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Trigeminal neuralgia treatment dosimetry of the Cyberknife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Anthony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Lo, Anthony T., E-mail: tonyho22003@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Dieterich, Sonja; Soltys, Scott G.; Gibbs, Iris C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Chang, Steve G.; Adler, John R. [Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2012-04-01

    There are 2 Cyberknife units at Stanford University. The robot of 1 Cyberknife is positioned on the patient's right, whereas the second is on the patient's left. The present study examines whether there is any difference in dosimetry when we are treating patients with trigeminal neuralgia when the target is on the right side or the left side of the patient. In addition, we also study whether Monte Carlo dose calculation has any effect on the dosimetry. We concluded that the clinical and dosimetric outcomes of CyberKnife treatment for trigeminal neuralgia are independent of the robot position. Monte Carlo calculation algorithm may be useful in deriving the dose necessary for trigeminal neuralgia treatments.

  17. Technical basis document for internal dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Hickman, D P

    1991-01-01

    This document provides the technical basis for the Chem-Nuclear Geotech (Geotech) internal dosimetry program. Geotech policy describes the intentions of the company in complying with radiation protection standards and the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) program. It uses this policy and applicable protection standards to derive acceptable methods and levels of bioassay to assure compliance. The models and computational methods used are described in detail within this document. FR-om these models, dose- conversion factors and derived limits are computed. These computations are then verified using existing documentation and verification information or by demonstration of the calculations used to obtain the dose-conversion factors and derived limits. Recommendations for methods of optimizing the internal dosimetry program to provide effective monitoring and dose assessment for workers are provided in the last section of this document. This document is intended to be used in establishing an accredited dosi...

  18. Absolute and relative dosimetry for ELIMED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania, Italy and Institute of Physics Czech Academy of Science, ELI-Beamlines project, Na Slovance 2, Prague (Czech Republic); Cuttone, G.; Candiano, G.; Musumarra, A.; Pisciotta, P.; Romano, F. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania (Italy); Carpinelli, M. [INFN Sezione di Cagliari, c/o Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Cagliari, Cagliari (Italy); Leonora, E.; Randazzo, N. [INFN-Sezione di Catania, Via Santa Sofia 64, Catania (Italy); Presti, D. Lo [INFN-Sezione di Catania, Via Santa Sofia 64, Catania, Italy and Università di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Via S. Sofia 64, Catania (Italy); Raffaele, L. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania, Italy and INFN-Sezione di Catania, Via Santa Sofia 64, Catania (Italy); Tramontana, A. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania, Italy and Università di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Via S. Sofia 64, Catania (Italy); Cirio, R.; Sacchi, R.; Monaco, V. [INFN, Sezione di Torino, Via P.Giuria, 1 10125 Torino, Italy and Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via P.Giuria, 1 10125 Torino (Italy); Marchetto, F.; Giordanengo, S. [INFN, Sezione di Torino, Via P.Giuria, 1 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2013-07-26

    The definition of detectors, methods and procedures for the absolute and relative dosimetry of laser-driven proton beams is a crucial step toward the clinical use of this new kind of beams. Hence, one of the ELIMED task, will be the definition of procedures aiming to obtain an absolute dose measure at the end of the transport beamline with an accuracy as close as possible to the one required for clinical applications (i.e. of the order of 5% or less). Relative dosimetry procedures must be established, as well: they are necessary in order to determine and verify the beam dose distributions and to monitor the beam fluence and the energetic spectra during irradiations. Radiochromic films, CR39, Faraday Cup, Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) and transmission ionization chamber will be considered, designed and studied in order to perform a fully dosimetric characterization of the ELIMED proton beam.

  19. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2005-02-25

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNL’s Hanford External Dosimetry Program which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. Rev. 0 marks the first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database.

  20. Radio-analysis. Applications: biological dosimetry; Radioanalyse. Applications: dosage biologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourrel, F. [CEA Saclay, INSTN, Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Courriere, Ph. [UFR de Pharmacie, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2003-06-01

    Radioisotopes have revolutionized the medical biology. Radio-immunology remains the reference measurement of the infinitely small in biology. Constant efforts have been performed to improve the simpleness, detectability and fastness of the method thanks to an increasing automation. This paper presents: 1 - the advantages of compounds labelling and the isotopic dilution; 2 - the antigen-antibody system: properties, determination of the affinity constant using the Scatchard method; 3 - radio-immunologic dosimetry: competitive dosimetry (radioimmunoassay), calibration curve and mathematical data processing, application to the free thyroxine dosimetry, immunoradiometric dosimetry (immunoradiometric assay), evaluation of the analytical efficiency of a radioimmunoassay; 4 - detection of the radioactive signal (solid and liquid scintillation). (J.S.)

  1. Biodistribution and metabolism of I-123 labelled fatty acid(I): [I-123]15-(p-iodophenyl)pentadecanoic acid (IPPA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Y. S. [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Y. S.; Lee, D. S.; Jeong, J. M.; Jeong, Z. K.; Lee, M. C.; Koh, C. S. [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-01-01

    I-123 labelled fatty acids are suitable for investigation of regional myocardial metabolism, so they are on the clinical trial. However, the precise properties of these materials are not characterized yet. We have synthesized phenylpentadecanoic acid and labeled this compound with I-123. The purpose of this study was to examine the stability, biodistribution, metabolism and SPECT imaging of [I-123]15-(p-iodophenyl) pentadecanoic acid (I-123-IPPA) that we made. The stability test of I-123-IPPA in serum of rat, mouse and human showed no free I-123 after 1 hour. In biodistribution study in mice for various time intervals after injection (5, 10, 15, 30, 60 minutes), uptake in myocardium was 14.5%ID/g(5 min), and 1.9%ID/heart (5 min), while uptake in muscles was 2.6%ID/g(5 min). Myocardium to blood ratio and myocardium to lung ratio increased for 5 min after injection and then decreased rapidly. Chromatographic data of rat blood and urine showed that little PPA was found in blood and urine at 15-20 min after injection. The myocardial I-123-IPPA SPECT images of a dog with myocardial infarction showed defects similar to those of Tc-99m-MIBI and F-18-FDG. These data suggest that I-123-IPPA is quite stable in vitro and shows favorable biodistribution in mice. SPECT imaging with I-123-IPPA demonstrated infarct zone as photon defect in dog model of myocardial infarction. I-123-IPPA may be used for the evaluation of fatty acid metabolism in clinical trials in Korea.

  2. Effects of Long-Term Exposure to Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles on Development, Zinc Metabolism and Biodistribution of Minerals (Zn, Fe, Cu, Mn) in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Lu, Jianjun; Zhou, Le; Li, Jun; Xu, Jiaman; Li, Weijian; Zhang, Lili; Zhong, Xiang; Wang, Tian

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (nano-ZnOs) are widely used and possess great potentials in agriculture and biomedicine. It is inevitable for human exposure to these nanoparticles. However, no study had been conducted to investigate the long term effects of nano-ZnOs. This study aimed at investigating effects of nano-ZnOs on development, zinc metabolism and biodistribution of minerals (Zn, Fe, Cu, and Mn) in mice from week 3 to 35. After the characteristics of nano-ZnOs were determined, they were added into the basal diet at 0, 50, 500 and 5000 mg/kg. Results indicated that added 50 and 500 mg/kg nano-ZnOs showed minimal toxicity. However, 5000 mg/kg nano-ZnOs significantly decreased body weight (from week 4 to 16) and increased the relative weights of the pancreas, brain and lung. Added 5000 mg/kg nano-ZnOs significantly increased the serum glutamic-pyruvic transaminase activity and zinc content, and significantly enhanced mRNA expression of zinc metabolism-related genes, including metallothionein 1(32.66 folds), metallothionein 2 (31.42 folds), ZIP8 (2.21folds), ZIP14 (2.45 folds), ZnT1 (4.76 folds), ZnT2 (6.19 folds) and ZnT4 (1.82 folds). The biodistribution determination showed that there was a significant accumulation of zinc in the liver, pancreas, kidney, and bones (tibia and fibula) after receiving 5000 mg/kg nano-ZnO diet, while no significant effects on Cu, Fe, and Mn levels, except for liver Fe content and pancreas Mn level. Our results demonstrated that long term exposure to 50 and 500 mg/kg nano-ZnO diets showed minimal toxicity. However, high dose of nano-ZnOs (5000 mg/kg) caused toxicity on development, and altered the zinc metabolism and biodistribution in mice.

  3. Whole-body biodistribution and the influence of body activity on brain kinetic analysis of the 11C-PiB PET scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu, Go; Nishio, Tomoyuki; Adachi, Kazuhiko; Ikari, Yasuhiko; Senda, Michio

    2017-12-01

    Dynamic 11C-PiB PET imaging with kinetic analysis has been performed for accurate quantification of amyloid binding in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we measured the whole-body biodistribution of 11C-PiB in nine subjects. We then evaluated the effect of body activity on quantitative accuracy of brain 11C-PiB three-dimensional (3D) dynamic PET. Based on clinical biodistribution data, we conducted phantom experiments to estimate the effect of body activity on quantification of the brain 3D dynamic 11C-PiB PET data and the error introduced by body activity using six different PET camera models. One of the PET cameras was used to acquire 11C-PiB brain 3D dynamic PET data on a patient with AD. We calculated the distribution volume ratio (DVR) in two kinetic methods using both the original human time-activity-curve (TAC) data and the TAC corrected for the error caused by body activity. In the early phase, both healthy subjects and patients with AD showed a biodistribution of 11C-PiB that reflected regional blood flow. In the simulated early phase of the phantom experiments, activity outside the field of view led to a maximum 6.0% overestimation of brain activity in the vertex region. Conversely, the effect of body activity on the DVR estimate was small (≤1.2%), probably because the tested kinetic methods did not rely heavily on early phase data. These results indicate that the effect of body activity on brain 11C-PiB PET quantification is generally small and that it depends on the method of kinetic analysis, the region of interest, and the PET camera model used.

  4. {sup 99m}Tc-NC100668, a new tracer for imaging venous thromboemboli: pre-clinical biodistribution and incorporation into plasma clots in vivo and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, David [Grove Centre, Research and Development, GE Healthcare Bio-Sciences, Little Chalfont (United Kingdom); Uppsala University Hospital, Institution of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Section of Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden); Lewis, Joanne; Battle, Mark; Lear, Rochelle; Farrar, Gill; Barnett, D.J.; Godden, Vanessa; Oliveira, Alexandra; Coombes, Catherine [Grove Centre, Research and Development, GE Healthcare Bio-Sciences, Little Chalfont (United Kingdom); Ahlstroem, Haakan [Uppsala University Hospital, Institution of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Section of Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2006-11-15

    {sup 99m}Tc-NC100668 is a new radiotracer being developed to aid the diagnosis of thromboembolism. The structure of NC100668 is similar to a region of human {alpha}{sub 2}-antiplasmin, which is a substrate for factor XIIIa (FXIIIa). The purpose of this study was to confirm the uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-NC100668 into forming plasma clot and to establish the biodistribution of {sup 99m}Tc-NC100668 in Wistar rats. The in vitro plasma clot uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-NC100668 and other compounds with known affinities to FXIIIa was measured using a plasma clot assay. The biodistribution and blood clot uptake of radioactivity of {sup 99m}Tc-NC100668 in normal Wistar rats and those bearing experimentally induced deep vein thrombi were investigated. The in vitro uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-NC100668 was greater than that for [{sup 14}C]dansyl cadaverine, a known substrate of FXIIIa in the plasma clot assay. The biodistribution of {sup 99m}Tc-NC100668 in male and female Wistar rats up to 24 h p.i. showed that radioactivity was rapidly excreted, predominantly into the urine, with very little background tissue retention. In vivo the uptake and retention of {sup 99m}Tc-NC100668 into the blood clot was greater than could be accounted for by non-specific accumulation of the radiotracer within the blood clot. {sup 99m}Tc-NC100668 was retained by plasma clots in vitro and blood clots in vivo. No significant tissue retention which could interfere with the ability to image thrombi in vivo was observed. This evidence suggests that {sup 99m}Tc-NC100668 might be useful in the detection of thromboembolism. (orig.)

  5. A dose-reconstruction study of the 1997 Sarov criticality accident using animated dosimetry techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Justin A; Ding, Aiping; Haley, Thomas; Caracappa, Peter F; Xu, X George

    2014-05-01

    Most computational human phantoms are static, representing a standing individual. There are, however, cases when these phantoms fail to represent accurately the detailed effects on dose that result from considering varying human posture and even whole sequences of motion. In this study, the feasibility of a dynamic and deformable phantom is demonstrated with the development of the Computational Human for Animated Dosimetry (CHAD) phantom. Based on modifications to the limb structure of the previously developed RPI Adult Male, CHAD's posture is adjustable using an optical motion capture system that records real-life human movement. To demonstrate its ability to produce dose results that reflect the changes brought about by posture-deformation, CHAD is employed to perform a dose-reconstruction analysis of the 1997 Sarov criticality accident, and a simulated total body dose of 13.3 Gy is observed, with the total body dose rate dropping from 1.4 Gy s to 0.25 Gy s over the first 4 s of retreat time. Additionally, dose measurements are calculated for individual organs and body regions, including a 36.8-Gy dose to the breast tissue, a 3.8-Gy dose to the bladder, and a 31.1-Gy dose to the thyroid, as well as the changes in dose rates for the individual organs over the course of the accident sequence. Comparison of results obtained using CHAD in an animated dosimetry simulation with reported information on dose and the medical outcome of the case shows that the consideration of posture and movement in dosimetry simulation allows for more detailed and precise analysis of dosimetry information, consideration of the evolution of the dose profile over time in the course of a given scenario, and a better understanding of the physiological impacts of radiation exposure for a given set of circumstances.

  6. Thermocurrent dosimetry with high purity aluminum oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fullerton, G.D.; Cameron, J.R.; Moran, P.R.

    1976-01-01

    The application of thermocurrent (TC) to ionizing radiation dosimetry was studied. It was shown that TC in alumina (Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/) has properties that are suited to personnel dosimetry and environmental monitoring. TC dosimeters were made from thin disks of alumina. Aluminum electrodes were evaporated on each side: on one face a high voltage electrode and on the opposite face a measuring electrode encircled by a guard ring. Exposure to ionizing radiation resulted in stored electrons and holes in metastable trapping sites. The signal was read-out by heating the dosimeter with a voltage source and picnometer connected in series between the opposite electrodes. The thermally remobilized charge caused a transient TC. The thermogram, TC versus time or temperature, is similar to a TL glow curve. Either the peak current or the integrated current is a measure of absorbed dose. Six grades of alumina were studied from a total of four commercial suppliers. All six materials displayed radiation induced TC signals. Sapphire of uv-grade quality from the Adolf Meller Co. (AM) had the best dosimetry properties of those investigated. Sources of interference were studied. Thermal fading, residual signal and radiation damage do not limit TC dosimetry. Ultraviolet light can induce a TC response but it is readily excluded with uv-opaque cladding. Improper surface preparation prior to electrode evaporation was shown to cause interference. A spurious TC signal resulted from polarization of surface contaminants. Spurious TC was reduced by improved cleaning prior to electrode application. Polished surfaces resulted in blocking electrodes and caused a sensitivity shift due to radiation induced thermally activated polarization. This was not observed with rough cut surfaces.

  7. Intratumoral delivery of CD154 homolog (Ad-ISF35) induces tumor regression: analysis of vector biodistribution, persistence and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo-Cardenas, J; Urquiza, M; Kipps, T J; Castro, J E

    2012-05-01

    Ad-ISF35 is an adenovirus (Ad) vector that encodes a mouse-human chimeric CD154. Ad-ISF35 induces activation of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells converting them into CLL cells capable of promoting immune recognition and anti-leukemia T-cell activation. Clinical trials in humans treated with Ad-ISF35-transduced leukemia cells or intranodal injection of Ad-ISF35 have shown objective clinical responses. To better understand the biology of Ad-ISF35 and to contribute to its clinical development, we preformed studies to evaluate biodistribution, persistence and toxicity of repeat dose intratumoral administration of Ad-ISF35 in a mouse model. Ad-ISF35 intratumoral administration induced tumor regression in more than 80% of mice bearing A20 tumors. There were no abnormalities in the serum chemistry. Mice receiving Ad-ISF35 presented severe extramedullary hematopoiesis and follicular hyperplasia in the spleen and extramedullary hematopoiesis with lymphoid hyperplasia in lymph nodes. After Ad-ISF35 injection, the vector was found primarily in the injected tumors with a biodistribution pattern that showed a rapid clearance with no evidence of Ad-ISF35 accumulation or persistence in the injected tumor or peripheral organs. Furthermore, pre-existing antibodies against Ad-5 did not abrogate Ad-ISF35 anti-tumor activity. In conclusion, intratumoral administration of Ad-ISF35 induced tumor regression in A20 tumor bearing mice without toxicities and with no evidence of vector accumulation or persistence.

  8. In vivo dosimetry in external beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mijnheer, Ben [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Beddar, Sam [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Izewska, Joanna [Division of Human Health, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna 1400 (Austria); Reft, Chester [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) is in use in external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to detect major errors, to assess clinically relevant differences between planned and delivered dose, to record dose received by individual patients, and to fulfill legal requirements. After discussing briefly the main characteristics of the most commonly applied IVD systems, the clinical experience of IVD during EBRT will be summarized. Advancement of the traditional aspects of in vivo dosimetry as well as the development of currently available and newly emerging noninterventional technologies are required for large-scale implementation of IVD in EBRT. These new technologies include the development of electronic portal imaging devices for 2D and 3D patient dosimetry during advanced treatment techniques, such as IMRT and VMAT, and the use of IVD in proton and ion radiotherapy by measuring the decay of radiation-induced radionuclides. In the final analysis, we will show in this Vision 20/20 paper that in addition to regulatory compliance and reimbursement issues, the rationale for in vivo measurements is to provide an accurate and independent verification of the overall treatment procedure. It will enable the identification of potential errors in dose calculation, data transfer, dose delivery, patient setup, and changes in patient anatomy. It is the authors' opinion that all treatments with curative intent should be verified through in vivo dose measurements in combination with pretreatment checks.

  9. Bayesian Methods for Radiation Detection and Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter G. Groer

    2002-09-29

    We performed work in three areas: radiation detection, external and internal radiation dosimetry. In radiation detection we developed Bayesian techniques to estimate the net activity of high and low activity radioactive samples. These techniques have the advantage that the remaining uncertainty about the net activity is described by probability densities. Graphs of the densities show the uncertainty in pictorial form. Figure 1 below demonstrates this point. We applied stochastic processes for a method to obtain Bayesian estimates of 222Rn-daughter products from observed counting rates. In external radiation dosimetry we studied and developed Bayesian methods to estimate radiation doses to an individual with radiation induced chromosome aberrations. We analyzed chromosome aberrations after exposure to gammas and neutrons and developed a method for dose-estimation after criticality accidents. The research in internal radiation dosimetry focused on parameter estimation for compartmental models from observed compartmental activities. From the estimated probability densities of the model parameters we were able to derive the densities for compartmental activities for a two compartment catenary model at different times. We also calculated the average activities and their standard deviation for a simple two compartment model.

  10. Hanford Internal Dosimetry Project manual. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.; MacLellan, J.A.; Long, M.P.

    1994-07-01

    This document describes the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Project, as it is administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy and its Hanford contractors. Project services include administrating the bioassay monitoring program, evaluating and documenting assessment of potential intakes and internal dose, ensuring that analytical laboratories conform to requirements, selecting and applying appropriate models and procedures for evaluating radionuclide deposition and the resulting dose, and technically guiding and supporting Hanford contractors in matters regarding internal dosimetry. Specific chapters deal with the following subjects: practices of the project, including interpretation of applicable DOE Orders, regulations, and guidance into criteria for assessment, documentation, and reporting of doses; assessment of internal dose, including summary explanations of when and how assessments are performed; recording and reporting practices for internal dose; selection of workers for bioassay monitoring and establishment of type and frequency of bioassay measurements; capability and scheduling of bioassay monitoring services; recommended dosimetry response to potential internal exposure incidents; quality control and quality assurance provisions of the program.

  11. Reconstructive dosimetry for cutaneous radiation syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, C.M.A.; Lima, A.R.; Degenhardt, Ä.L.; Da Silva, F.C.A., E-mail: dasilva@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Valverde, N.J. [Fundacao Eletronuclear de Assistencia Medica, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    According to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a relatively significant number of radiological accidents have occurred in recent years mainly because of the practices referred to as potentially high-risk activities, such as radiotherapy, large irradiators and industrial radiography, especially in gammagraphy assays. In some instances, severe injuries have occurred in exposed persons due to high radiation doses. In industrial radiography, 80 cases involving a total of 120 radiation workers, 110 members of the public including 12 deaths have been recorded up to 2014. Radiological accidents in industrial practices in Brazil have mainly resulted in development of cutaneous radiation syndrome (CRS) in hands and fingers. Brazilian data include 5 serious cases related to industrial gammagraphy, affecting 7 radiation workers and 19 members of the public; however, none of them were fatal. Some methods of reconstructive dosimetry have been used to estimate the radiation dose to assist in prescribing medical treatment. The type and development of cutaneous manifestations in the exposed areas of a person is the first achievable gross dose estimation. This review article presents the state-of-the-art reconstructive dosimetry methods enabling estimation of local radiation doses and provides guidelines for medical handling of the exposed individuals. The review also presents the Chilean and Brazilian radiological accident cases to highlight the importance of reconstructive dosimetry. (author)

  12. Diagnostic radiology dosimetry: status and trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera M, T., E-mail: trivera@ipn.mx [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Av. Legaria 694, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Medical radiation is by far the largest man-made source of public exposure to ionizing radiation. Since 1970 the expression of protection standards shifted from a dose- to a risk-based approach, with dose limits established to yield risks to radiation workers comparable with those for workers in other safe industries. Another hand, worldwide interest in patient dose measurement was stimulated by the publication of Patient Dose Reduction in Diagnostic Radiology by the UK National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB). In response to heightened awareness of the importance of patient dose contributed by radiology procedures, there has been a general trend to effect control of patient doses by applying the principles of optimization coupled with an increase in regulatory enforcement. In this sense, thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) has been actively proposed in the last 3 decades thanks to their successful applications in diagnostic radiology. At the same time, it is emerged as the best radiation dosimetry method. The present work presents advantages of thermoluminescent dosimetry for X-ray beams measurements and its optimization. (Author)

  13. Imaging cancer using PET--the effect of the bifunctional chelator on the biodistribution of a (64)Cu-labeled antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearling, Jason L J; Voss, Stephan D; Dunning, Patricia; Snay, Erin; Fahey, Frederic; Smith, Suzanne V; Huston, James S; Meares, Claude F; Treves, S Ted; Packard, Alan B

    2011-01-01

    Use of copper radioisotopes in antibody radiolabeling is challenged by reported loss of the radionuclide from the bifunctional chelator used to label the protein. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between the thermodynamic stability of the (64)Cu-complexes of five commonly used bifunctional chelators (BFCs) and the biodistribution of an antibody labeled with (64)Cu using these chelators in tumor-bearing mice. The chelators [S-2-(aminobenzyl)1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid (p-NH(2)-Bn-NOTA): 6-[p-(bromoacetamido)benzyl]-1, 4, 8, 11-tetraazacyclotetradecane-N, N', N'', N'''-tetraacetic acid (BAT-6): S-2-(4-aminobenzyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododocane tetraacetic acid (p-NH(2)-Bn-DOTA): 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododocane-N, N', N", N"'-tetraacetic acid (DOTA): and 1-N-(4-aminobenzyl)-3,6,10,13,16,19-hexaazabicyclo[6.6.6]eicosane-1,8-diamine (SarAr)] were conjugated to the anti-GD2 antibody ch14.18, and the modified antibody was labeled with (64)Cu and injected into mice bearing subcutaneous human melanoma tumors (M21) (n = 3-5 for each study). Biodistribution data were obtained from positron emission tomography images acquired at 1, 24 and 48 hours post-injection, and at 48 hours post-injection a full ex vivo biodistribution study was carried out. The biodistribution, including tumor targeting, was similar for all the radioimmunoconjugates. At 48 h post-injection, the only statistically significant differences in radionuclide uptake (p < 0.05) were between blood, liver, spleen and kidney. For example, liver uptake of [(64)Cu]ch14.18-p-NH(2)-Bn-NOTA was 4.74 ± 0.77 per cent of the injected dose per gram of tissue (%ID/g), and for [(64)Cu]ch14.18-SarAr was 8.06 ± 0.77 %ID/g. Differences in tumor targeting correlated with variations in tumor size rather than which BFC was used. The results of this study indicate that differences in the thermodynamic stability of these chelator-Cu(II) complexes were not associated with significant

  14. Low-frequency electrical dosimetry: research agenda of the IEEE International Committee on Electromagnetic Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, J Patrick; Hirata, Akimasa

    2016-06-21

    This article treats unsettled issues in the use of numerical models of electrical dosimetry as applied to international limits on human exposure to low-frequency (typically  IEEE-ICES (International Committee on Electromagnetic Safety) Technical Committee 95. The paper discusses 25 issues needing attention, fitting into three general categories: induction models; electrostimulation models; and human exposure limits. Of these, 9 were voted as 'high priority' by members of Subcommittee 6. The list is presented as a research agenda for refinements in numerical modeling with applications to human exposure limits. It is likely that such issues are also important in medical and electrical product safety design applications.

  15. Dosimetry of internal emitting: principles and perspectives of the MIRD technology; Dosimetria de emisores internos: principios y perspectivas de la metodologia MIRD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferro F, G. [Gerencia de Aplicaciones Nucleares en la Salud, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Salazar, Estado de Mexico C.P. 52045 (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    The development of the radiopharmaceutical technology have multiplied the number of radioisotopes with applications in therapeutical nuclear medicine so known as Directed radiotherapy. Assuming the radiation is capable to produce noxious effects in the biological systems, it is important to evaluate appropriately the risks and benefits of the administration of radioactive agents in the patient. The outstanding parameter in this evaluation is the absorbed dose, which is product of the radiation emitted by a radionuclide that is localized or distributed to the interior of the human body in study and whose its estimation helps to predict the efficacy of the treatment. The scheme generalized of MIRD, it was formulated from thirty years ago for evaluating the interior dosimetry at level of organs.The finality of this work is to show the basic principles of the MIRD methodology and its perspectives using innovator tools as the dosimetry for dynamic masses, in particular the personnel dosimetry for the organs of each patient, the dosimetry for the small structures inside the organs (sub organic dosimetry), the distributions of doses in three dimensions (S voxel), the dosimetry at cellular level and the quantitative acquisition of pharmaceutical data. (Author)

  16. Present status and expected progress in radiation processing dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovács, A.; Miller, A.

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes the present status of radiation processing dosimetry including the methods used most widely in gamma- and electron processing as well as the new methods under development or introduction. The recent trends with respect to calibrationof routine dosimetry systems as well...

  17. Use of the GATE Monte Carlo package for dosimetry applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visvikis, D. [INSERM U650, LaTIM, University Hospital Medical School, F 29609 Brest (France)]. E-mail: Visvikis.Dimitris@univ-brest.fr; Bardies, M. [INSERM U601, CHU Nantes, F 44093 Nantes (France); Chiavassa, S. [INSERM U601, CHU Nantes, F 44093 Nantes (France); Danford, C. [Department of Medical Physics, MSKCC, New York (United States); Kirov, A. [Department of Medical Physics, MSKCC, New York (United States); Lamare, F. [INSERM U650, LaTIM, University Hospital Medical School, F 29609 Brest (France); Maigne, L. [Departement de Curietherapie-Radiotherapie, Centre Jean Perrin, F 63000 Clemont-Ferrand (France); Staelens, S. [UGent-ELIS, St-Pietersnieuwstraat, 41, B 9000 Gent (Belgium); Taschereau, R. [CRUMP Institute for Molecular Imaging, UCLA, Los Angeles (United States)

    2006-12-20

    One of the roles for Monte Carlo (MC) simulation studies is in the area of dosimetry. A number of different codes dedicated to dosimetry applications are available and widely used today, such as MCNP, EGSnrc and PTRAN. However, such codes do not easily facilitate the description of complicated 3D sources or emission tomography systems and associated data flow, which may be useful in different dosimetry application domains. Such problems can be overcome by the use of specific MC codes such as GATE (GEANT4 Application to Tomographic Emission), which is based on Geant4 libraries, providing a scripting interface with a number of advantages for the simulation of SPECT and PET systems. Despite this potential, its major disadvantage is in terms of efficiency involving long execution times for applications such as dosimetry. The strong points and disadvantages of GATE in comparison to other dosimetry specific codes are discussed and illustrated in terms of accuracy, efficiency and flexibility. A number of features, such as the use of voxelised and moving sources, as well as developments such as advanced visualization tools and the development of dose estimation maps allowing GATE to be used for dosimetry applications are presented. In addition, different examples from dosimetry applications with GATE are given. Finally, future directions with respect to the use of GATE for dosimetry applications are outlined.

  18. Automation of radiation dosimetry using PTW dosemeter and LabVIEW{sup TM}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, C., E-mail: Pscientific1@aec.org.sy [Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, PO Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Al-Frouh, K.; Anjak, O. [Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, PO Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic)

    2011-10-21

    Automation of UNIDOS 'Dosemeter' using personal computer (PC) is discussed in this paper. In order to save time and eliminate human operation errors during the radiation dosimetry, suitable software, using LabVIEW{sup TM} graphical programming language, was written to automate and facilitate the processes of measurements, analysis and data storage. The software calculates the calibration factor of the ionization chamber in terms of air kerma or absorbed dose to water according to IAEA dosimetry protocols. It also has the ability to print a calibration certificate. The obtained results using this software are found to be more reliable and flexible than those obtained by manual methods previously employed. Using LabVIEW{sup TM} as a development tool is extremely convenient to make things easier when software modifications and improvements are needed.

  19. Targeted microbubbles for imaging tumor angiogenesis: assessment of whole-body biodistribution with dynamic micro-PET in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willmann, Jürgen K; Cheng, Zhen; Davis, Corrine

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate in vivo whole-body biodistribution of microbubbles (MBs) targeted to tumor angiogenesis-related vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 2 (VEGFR2) by using dynamic micro-positron emission tomography (PET) in living mice....

  20. Transient impedance changes in venous endothelial monolayers as a biological radiation dosimetry response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Fossum Young

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In March of 2011, a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and subsequent 14 m-high tsunami caused major damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan.  While cancer incidence in the radiation-exposed population is a logical concern, the complex effects of radiation on the heart and cardiovascular system are also of interest.  Immediate and early vascular radiation effects could be exploited as a dosimetry modality.  To test whether non-coronary vasculature exhibited transient perturbation in barrier function, video microscopy studies and Electric Cell Substrate Impedance Sensing technology were used to probe very subtle changes in primary human vascular endothelium.  Human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC monolayers exhibit a transient, statistically significant decrease (P = 0.017 in monolayer resistance 3 h after irradiation with 5.0 Gy of g rays.  Radiation induced perturbations in HUVEC monolayer permeability are similar in magnitude and kinetics to those observed in coronary arterial endothelium.  Therefore, at least two types of vasculature respond to radiation on ECIS arrays with an early transient disruption in permeability.  The finding supports the use of early passage HUVECs for use in bioelectric dosimetry studies of vasculature and suggests that permeability of vessels could potentially serve as a biological dosimetry tool.

  1. A nephron-based model of the kidneys for macro-to-micro α-particle dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Robert F.; Song, Hong; Huso, David L.; Sundel, Margaret H.; Sgouros, George

    2012-07-01

    Targeted α-particle therapy is a promising treatment modality for cancer. Due to the short path-length of α-particles, the potential efficacy and toxicity of these agents is best evaluated by microscale dosimetry calculations instead of whole-organ, absorbed fraction-based dosimetry. Yet time-integrated activity (TIA), the necessary input for dosimetry, can still only be quantified reliably at the organ or macroscopic level. We describe a nephron- and cellular-based kidney dosimetry model for α-particle radiopharmaceutical therapy, more suited to the short range and high linear energy transfer of α-particle emitters, which takes as input kidney or cortex TIA and through a macro to micro model-based methodology assigns TIA to micro-level kidney substructures. We apply a geometrical model to provide nephron-level S-values for a range of isotopes allowing for pre-clinical and clinical applications according to the medical internal radiation dosimetry (MIRD) schema. We assume that the relationship between whole-organ TIA and TIA apportioned to microscale substructures as measured in an appropriate pre-clinical mammalian model also applies to the human. In both, the pre-clinical and the human model, microscale substructures are described as a collection of simple geometrical shapes akin to those used in the Cristy-Eckerman phantoms for normal organs. Anatomical parameters are taken from the literature for a human model, while murine parameters are measured ex vivo. The murine histological slides also provide the data for volume of occupancy of the different compartments of the nephron in the kidney: glomerulus versus proximal tubule versus distal tubule. Monte Carlo simulations are run with activity placed in the different nephron compartments for several α-particle emitters currently under investigation in radiopharmaceutical therapy. The S-values were calculated for the α-emitters and their descendants between the different nephron compartments for both the

  2. Biological dosimetry of irradiation accidents; La dosimetrie biologique des accidents d`irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand, V.; Chambrette, V.; Le Roy, A.; Paillole, N.; Sorokine, I.; Voisin, P.

    1994-12-31

    The biological dosimetry in radiation protection allows to evaluate the received dose by a potentially irradiated person from biological markers such chromosomal abnormalities. The technologies of Hybridization In Situ by Fluorescence (F.I.S.H) allow the detection of steady chromosomal aberrations of translocation type.

  3. MO-B-BRB-00: Three Dimensional Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    Full three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry using volumetric chemical dosimeters probed by 3D imaging systems has long been a promising technique for the radiation therapy clinic, since it provides a unique methodology for dose measurements in the volume irradiated using complex conformal delivery techniques such as IMRT and VMAT. To date true 3D dosimetry is still not widely practiced in the community; it has been confined to centres of specialized expertise especially for quality assurance or commissioning roles where other dosimetry techniques are difficult to implement. The potential for improved clinical applicability has been advanced considerably in the last decade by the development of improved 3D dosimeters (e.g., radiochromic plastics, radiochromic gel dosimeters and normoxic polymer gel systems) and by improved readout protocols using optical computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. In this session, established users of some current 3D chemical dosimeters will briefly review the current status of 3D dosimetry, describe several dosimeters and their appropriate imaging for dose readout, present workflow procedures required for good dosimetry, and analyze some limitations for applications in select settings. We will review the application of 3D dosimetry to various clinical situations describing how 3D approaches can complement other dose delivery validation approaches already available in the clinic. The applications presented will be selected to inform attendees of the unique features provided by full 3D techniques. Learning Objectives: L. John Schreiner: Background and Motivation Understand recent developments enabling clinically practical 3D dosimetry, Appreciate 3D dosimetry workflow and dosimetry procedures, and Observe select examples from the clinic. Sofie Ceberg: Application to dynamic radiotherapy Observe full dosimetry under dynamic radiotherapy during respiratory motion, and Understand how the measurement of high resolution dose data in an

  4. Imaging, biodistribution and in vitro study of smart99mTc-PAMAM G4 dendrimer as novel nano-complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narmani, Asghar; Yavari, Kamal; Mohammadnejad, Javad

    2017-11-01

    Overexpression of folic acid receptor in various human tumors cells makes it as good candidate for targeting delivery of chemotherapeutic and radiopharmaceutical agents. In this research, FA used for functionalization of PEG modified PAMAM G4 dendrimer as a smart delivery of 5-FU and 99m Tc for the breast carcinoma in order to chemotherapeutic and imaging goals. One aim of this research was assess the FA-mediated cell viability assay of PEG-PAMAM G4-FA-5FU- 99m Tc and in vitro uptake of PEG-PAMAM G4-FA- 99m Tc as the novel nano-complex determined on C2Cl2 (normal cell) and MCF-7 (breast cancer cell) cell lines. Other main goals were studied. Morover, an investigation in to in vivo imaging and biodistribution was carried out via a novel radio tracer by which tumor accumulation and site were obviously detected. The targeted tumor images taken by tail intravenous injection demonstrated that nano-complex can be smartly used in imaging study of the clinical practices. Also, the biodistribution of this nano-complex was investigated and the organ predestination of 99m Tc labeled nano-complex (%ID/g) was ascertained. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Experimental Studies of Boronophenylalanine ((10)BPA) Biodistribution for the Individual Application of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for Malignant Melanoma Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpano, Marina; Perona, Marina; Rodriguez, Carla; Nievas, Susana; Olivera, Maria; Santa Cruz, Gustavo A; Brandizzi, Daniel; Cabrini, Romulo; Pisarev, Mario; Juvenal, Guillermo Juan; Dagrosa, Maria Alejandra

    2015-10-01

    Patients with the same histopathologic diagnosis of cutaneous melanoma treated with identical protocols of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) have shown different clinical outcomes. The objective of the present studies was to evaluate the biodistribution of boronophenilalanina ((10)BPA) for the potential application of BNCT for the treatment of melanoma on an individual basis. The boronophenilalanine (BPA) uptake was evaluated in 3 human melanoma cell lines: MEL-J, A375, and M8. NIH nude mice were implanted with 4 10(6) MEL-J cells, and biodistribution studies of BPA (350 mg/kg intraperitoneally) were performed. Static infrared imaging using a specially modified infrared camera adapted to measure the body infrared radiance of small animals was used. Proliferation marker, Ki-67, and endothelial marker, CD31, were analyzed in tumor samples. The in vitro studies demonstrated different patterns of BPA uptake for each analyzed cell line (PBNCT treatment for each individual patient and lesion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Sandia National Laboratories Internal Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual (Rev 4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goke, Sarah Hayes [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Elliott, Nathan Ryan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories’ Internal Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual is intended to provide extended technical discussion and justification of the internal dosimetry program at SNL. It serves to record the approach to evaluating internal doses from radiobioassay data, and where appropriate, from workplace monitoring data per the Department of Energy Internal Dosimetry Program Guide DOE G 441.1C. The discussion contained herein is directed primarily to current and future SNL internal dosimetrists. In an effort to conserve space in the TBM and avoid duplication, it contains numerous references providing an entry point into the internal dosimetry literature relevant to this program. The TBM is not intended to act as a policy or procedure statement, but will supplement the information normally found in procedures or policy documents. The internal dosimetry program outlined in this manual is intended to meet the requirements of Federal Rule 10CFR835 for monitoring the workplace and for assessing internal radiation doses to workers.

  7. MCNPX dosimetry and radiation-induced cancer risk estimation from {sup 18}F-FDG pediatric PET at Brazilian population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Bruno M.; Fonseca, Telma C.F. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Campos, Tarcisio P.R., E-mail: bmm@cdtn.br, E-mail: tcff@cdtn.br, E-mail: tprcampos@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (PCTN/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências e Técnicas Nucleares

    2017-07-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using {sup 18}F-FDG has increased significantly in pediatric patients. PET with {sup 18}F-FDG has often been applied in oncology. Cancer induction is one of the main stochastic risk from exposure to ionizing radiation of {sup 18}F-FDG. Radiation-induced cancer risk estimation due to medical exposures is an important tool for risk/benefit assessing. The objective was to perform dosimetry and estimate the risk of cancer induction due to pediatric use of {sup 18}F-FDG. MCNPX Computational dosimetry was performed to estimate organ absorbed doses resulting from {sup 18}F-FDG pediatric use. Two voxelized phantoms, kindly provided by the GSF - Helmholtz Zentrum, were used: 'Child' - 7 years child and 'Baby' 8-week-old infant. ICRP-128 publication provided the radiopharmaceutical biodistribution of F-18. Tables containing organ absorbed dose and effective dose per unit of injected activity for the two phantoms were obtained. The injected activities were estimated according to data provided in the literature. Images of the absorbed dose distribution were generated from both models. The BEIR VII methodology was used to calculate the risk of cancer induction. The risk of cancer induction (per imaging procedure) for the seven-year-old child was (0.09% ♂ and 0.15% ♀) and for the eight-week old baby was (0.11% ♂ and 0.21% ♀). The {sup 18}F-FDG absorbed dose distribution in the children and infants showed some divergences in comparison to adult data. Probably, the biokinetic data used to children and infants is the main reason for this disconnection. (author)

  8. Reference dosimetry and small-field dosimetry in external beam radiotherapy: Results from a Danish intercomparison study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beierholm, Anders Ravnsborg; Behrens, Claus F.; Sibolt, Patrik

    performed using the treatment planning systems. Measured output factors agreed within 3 % with commissioning beam data and within 2 % with dose calculations for small MLC-defined fields. The study demonstrated (i) consistency of reference dosimetry and small-field dosimetry on a national le-vel, and (ii...

  9. Tumor dosimetry for I-131 trastuzumab therapy in a Her2+ NCI N87 xenograft mouse model using the Siemens SYMBIA E gamma camera with a pinhole collimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Sub; Kim, Jin Su; Deuk Cho, Kyung; Kang, Joo Hyun; Moo Lim, Sang

    2015-07-01

    We performed imaging and therapy using I-131 trastuzumab and a pinhole collimator attached to a conventional gamma camera for human use in a mouse model. The conventional clinical gamma camera with a 2-mm radius-sized pinhole collimator was used for monitoring the animal model after administration of I-131 trastuzumab The highest and lowest radiation-received organs were osteogenic cells (0.349 mSv/MBq) and skin (0.137 mSv/MBq), respectively. The mean coefficients of variation (%CV) of the effective dose equivalent and effective dose were 0.091 and 0.093 mSv/MBq respectively. We showed the feasibility of the pinholeattached conventional gamma camera for human use for the assessment of dosimetry. Mouse dosimetry and prediction of human dosimetry could be used to provide data for the safety and efficacy of newly developed therapeutic schemes.

  10. High-accuracy biodistribution analysis of adeno-associated virus variants by double barcode sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsic, Damien; Méndez-Gómez, Héctor R; Zolotukhin, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    Biodistribution analysis is a key step in the evaluation of adeno-associated virus (AAV) capsid variants, whether natural isolates or produced by rational design or directed evolution. Indeed, when screening candidate vectors, accurate knowledge about which tissues are infected and how efficiently is essential. We describe the design, validation, and application of a new vector, pTR-UF50-BC, encoding a bioluminescent protein, a fluorescent protein and a DNA barcode, which can be used to visualize localization of transduction at the organism, organ, tissue, or cellular levels. In addition, by linking capsid variants to different barcoded versions of the vector and amplifying the barcode region from various tissue samples using barcoded primers, biodistribution of viral genomes can be analyzed with high accuracy and efficiency.

  11. High-accuracy biodistribution analysis of adeno-associated virus variants by double barcode sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Marsic

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodistribution analysis is a key step in the evaluation of adeno-associated virus (AAV capsid variants, whether natural isolates or produced by rational design or directed evolution. Indeed, when screening candidate vectors, accurate knowledge about which tissues are infected and how efficiently is essential. We describe the design, validation, and application of a new vector, pTR-UF50-BC, encoding a bioluminescent protein, a fluorescent protein and a DNA barcode, which can be used to visualize localization of transduction at the organism, organ, tissue, or cellular levels. In addition, by linking capsid variants to different barcoded versions of the vector and amplifying the barcode region from various tissue samples using barcoded primers, biodistribution of viral genomes can be analyzed with high accuracy and efficiency.

  12. Pharmacokinetics and Biodistribution of the Illegal Food Colorant Rhodamine B in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yung-Yi; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2017-02-08

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) demonstrated rhodamine B as a potential carcinogen in 1978. Nevertheless, rhodamine B has been illegally used as a colorant in food in many countries. Few pharmacokinetic and toxicological investigations have been performed since the first pharmacokinetic study on rhodamine B in 1961. The aims of this study were to develop a simple and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography method with fluorescence detection for the quantitative detection of rhodamine B in the plasma and organs of rats and to estimate its pharmacokinetics and biodistribution. The results demonstrated that the oral bioavailabilities of rhodamine B were 28.3 and 9.8% for the low-dose and high-dose exposures, respectively. Furthermore, rhodamine B was highly accumulated in the liver and, to a lesser extent, the kidney, but was undetectable in the brain. These results provide useful information for improving the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of rhodamine B, supporting additional food safety evaluations.

  13. Biocompatibility and biodistribution of functionalized carbon nano-onions (f-CNOs) in a vertebrate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    D' Amora, Marta; Rodio, Marina; Bartelmess, Juergen; Sancataldo, Giuseppe; Brescia, Rosaria; Cella Zanacchi, Francesca; Diaspro, Alberto; Giordani, Silvia

    2016-09-01

    Functionalized carbon nano-onions (f-CNOs) are of great interest as platforms for imaging, diagnostic and therapeutic applications due to their high cellular uptake and low cytotoxicity. To date, the toxicological effects of f-CNOs on vertebrates have not been reported. In this study, the possible biological impact of f-CNOs on zebrafish during development is investigated, evaluating different toxicity end-points such as the survival rate, hatching rate, and heart beat rate. Furthermore, a bio-distribution study of boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) functionalized CNOs in zebrafish larvae is performed by utilizing inverted selective plane illumination microscopy (iSPIM), due to its intrinsic capability of allowing for fast 3D imaging. Our in vivo findings indicate that f-CNOs exhibit no toxicity, good biocompatibility (in the concentration range of 5-100 μg mL-1) and a homogenous biodistribution in zebrafish larvae.

  14. Preclinical Evaluation of Raman Nanoparticle Biodistribution for their Potential Use in Clinical Endoscopy Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zavaleta, Cristina L; Hartman, Keith B; Miao, Zheng

    2011-01-01

    intestine (5 h = 10.37% ID g(-1) ; 24 h = 0.42% ID g(-1) ) with minimal uptake in other organs. Raman imaging of excised tissues correlate well with biodistribution data. These results suggest that the topical application of SERS nanoparticles in the mouse colon appears to minimize their systemic...... with endoscopy. The use of an accessory Raman endoscope in conjunction with topically administered tumor-targeting Raman nanoparticles during a routine colonoscopy could offer a new way to sensitively detect dysplastic lesions while circumventing Raman's limited depth of penetration and avoiding systemic...... toxicity. In this study, the natural biodistribution of gold surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles is evaluated by radiolabeling them with (64) Cu and imaging their localization over time using micropositron emission tomography (PET). Mice are injected either intravenously (IV...

  15. Biodistribution of the radiopharmaceutical sodium pertechnetate after biliopancreatic bypass with a duodenal switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo-Filho, Irami; Rego, Amalia Cinthia Meneses; Brandao-Neto, Jose; Villarim-Neto, Arthur; Egito, Eryvaldo Socrates Tabosa; Azevedo, Italo Medeiros; Medeiros, Aldo Cunha [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencias da Saude]. E-mail: aldo@ufrnet.br

    2007-09-15

    Study with the purpose to examine the effects of duodenal switch (DS), regularly performed in morbidly obese patients, on biodistribution of sodium pertechnetate in several organs of rats. There was no early or late mortality in either rats groups. The values of percent radioactivity per gram of tissue (%ATI/g), showed no significant difference in liver, stomach, small bowel, duodenum, kidney, heart, bladder, bone and brain, when compared the DS rats with sham and controls rats. A postoperative significant increase (p<0.05) in mean %ATI/g levels was observed in spleen, pancreas and muscle in group DS rats, as compared to group S and C rats. In the lung there was an increase and in thyroid a decrease in mean %ATI/g of DS rats, when compared to sham rats (p<0.05). In conclusion, the biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch in rats modified the biodistribution of sodium pertechnetate in thyroid, lung, pancreas, spleen and muscle. (author)

  16. Eurados trial performance test for photon dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stadtmann, H.; Bordy, J.M.; Ambrosi, P.

    2001-01-01

    Within the framework of the EURADOS Action entitled Harmonisation and Dosimetric Quality Assurance in Individual Monitoring for External Radiation, trial performance tests for whole-body and extremity personal dosemeters were carried out. Photon, beta and neutron dosemeters were considered...... 312 single results, 26 fell outside the limits of the trumpet curve and 32 were outside the range 1/1.5 to 1.5. Most outliers resulted from high energy R-F irradiations without electronic equilibrium. These fields are not routinely encountered by many of the participating dosimetry services...

  17. Characterization of brazilian wollastonite for radiation dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, D.N. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Sao Cristovao/SE (Brazil); Melo, A.P.; Gazano, V.S.O.; Caldas, L.V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Sao Paulo (Brazil)]. e-mail: dnsouza@fisca.ufs.br

    2006-07-01

    In these work preliminary results of the characterization analyses of Brazilian Wollastonite for radiation dosimetry are presented. Wollastonite is a silicate of calcium, Ca(SiO{sub 3}), and it was acquired in the form of rude mineral with Andradite inclusions. The sample was cleaned and prepared for obtained selected grains of Wollastonite. The analyses of chemical and mineralogical compositions were obtained using the neutron activation and X-ray powder diffraction techniques. The thermoluminescent (TL) glow curve of the material shows a prominent peak at about 200 C. TL emission spectra, and photoinduced emission spectra were also obtained. (Author)

  18. Micro dosimetry model. An extended version

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vroegindewey, C.

    1994-07-01

    In an earlier study a relative simple mathematical model has been constructed to simulate the energy transfer on a cellular scale and thus gain insight in the fundamental processes of BNCT. Based on this work, a more realistic micro dosimetry model is developed. The new facets of the model are: the treatment of proton recoil, the calculation of the distribution of energy depositions, and the determination of the number of particles crossing the target nucleus subdivided in place of origin. Besides these extensions, new stopping power tables for the emitted particles are generated and biased Monte Carlo techniques are used to reduce computer time. (orig.).

  19. Neutron spectrometry and dosimetry with ANNs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H. R.; Hernandez D, V. M. [Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Cipres 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Gallego, E.; Lorente, A. [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)], e-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com

    2009-10-15

    Artificial neural networks technology has been applied to unfold the neutron spectra and to calculate the effective dose, the ambient equivalent dose, and the personal dose equivalent for {sup 252}Cf and {sup 241}AmBe neutron sources. A Bonner sphere spectrometry with a {sup 6}LiI(Eu) scintillator was utilized to measure the count rates of the spheres that were utilized as input in two artificial neural networks, one for spectrometry and another for dosimetry. Spectra and the ambient dose equivalent were also obtained with BUNKIUT code and the UTA4 response matrix. With both procedures spectra and ambient dose equivalent agrees in less than 10%. (author)

  20. Samarium oxide as a radiotracer to evaluate the in vivo biodistribution of PLGA nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandiwana, Vusani, E-mail: VMandiwana@csir.co.za; Kalombo, Lonji, E-mail: LKalombo@csir.co.za [Centre of Polymers and Composites, CSIR (South Africa); Venter, Kobus, E-mail: Kobus.Venter@mrc.ac.za [South African Medical Research Council (South Africa); Sathekge, Mike, E-mail: Mike.Sathekge@up.ac.za [University of Pretoria and Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine (South Africa); Grobler, Anne, E-mail: Anne.Grobler@nwu.ac.za; Zeevaart, Jan Rijn, E-mail: zeevaart@necsa.co.za [North-West University, DST/NWU Preclinical Drug Development Platform (South Africa)

    2015-09-15

    Developing nanoparticulate delivery systems that will allow easy movement and localization of a drug to the target tissue and provide more controlled release of the drug in vivo is a challenge in nanomedicine. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biodistribution of poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles containing samarium-153 oxide ([{sup 153}Sm]Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in vivo to prove that orally administered nanoparticles alter the biodistribution of a drug. These were then activated in a nuclear reactor to produce radioactive {sup 153}Sm-loaded-PLGA nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were characterized for size, zeta potential, and morphology. The nanoparticles were orally and intravenously (IV) administered to rats in order to trace their uptake through imaging and biodistribution studies. The {sup 153}Sm-loaded-PLGA nanoparticles had an average size of 281 ± 6.3 nm and a PDI average of 0.22. The zeta potential ranged between 5 and 20 mV. The [{sup 153}Sm]Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} loaded PLGA nanoparticles, orally administered were distributed to most organs at low levels, indicating that there was absorption of nanoparticles. While the IV injected [{sup 153}Sm]Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}-loaded PLGA nanoparticles exhibited the highest localization of nanoparticles in the spleen (8.63 %ID/g) and liver (3.07 %ID/g), confirming that nanoparticles are rapidly removed from the blood by the RES, leading to rapid uptake in the liver and spleen. From the biodistribution data obtained, it is clear that polymeric nanoscale delivery systems would be suitable for improving permeability and thus the bioavailability of therapeutic compounds.

  1. Clinical feasibility of {sup 90}Y digital PET/CT for imaging microsphere biodistribution following radioembolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Chadwick L.; Binzel, Katherine; Zhang, Jun; Knopp, Michael V. [The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Wright Center of Innovation in Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Columbus, OH (United States); Wuthrick, Evan J. [The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2017-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical feasibility of next generation solid-state digital photon counting PET/CT (dPET/CT) technology and imaging findings in patients following {sup 90}Y microsphere radioembolization in comparison with standard of care (SOC) bremsstrahlung SPECT/CT (bSPECT/CT). Five patients underwent SOC {sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung imaging immediately following routine radioembolization with 3.5 ± 1.7 GBq of {sup 90}Y-labeled glass microspheres. All patients also underwent dPET/CT imaging at 29 ± 11 h following radioembolization. Matched pairs comparison was used to compare image quality, image contrast and {sup 90}Y biodistribution between dPET/CT and bSPECT/CT images. Volumetric assessments of {sup 90}Y activity using different isocontour thresholds on dPET/CT and bSPECT/CT images were also compared. Digital PET/CT consistently provided better visual image quality and {sup 90}Y-to-background image contrast while depicting {sup 90}Y biodistribution than bSPECT/CT. Isocontour volumetric assessment using a 1% threshold precisely outlined {sup 90}Y activity and the treatment volume on dPET/CT images, whereas a more restrictive 20% threshold on bSPECT/CT images was needed to obtain comparable treatment volumes. The use of a less restrictive 10% threshold isocontour on bSPECT/CT images grossly overestimated the treatment volume when compared with the 1% threshold on dPET/CT images. Digital PET/CT is clinically feasible for the assessment of {sup 90}Y microsphere biodistribution following radioembolization, and provides better visual image quality and image contrast than routine bSPECT/CT with comparable acquisition times. With further optimization and clinical validation, dPET technology may allow faster and more accurate imaging-based assessment of {sup 90}Y microsphere biodistribution. (orig.)

  2. Samarium oxide as a radiotracer to evaluate the in vivo biodistribution of PLGA nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandiwana, Vusani; Kalombo, Lonji; Venter, Kobus; Sathekge, Mike; Grobler, Anne; Zeevaart, Jan Rijn

    2015-09-01

    Developing nanoparticulate delivery systems that will allow easy movement and localization of a drug to the target tissue and provide more controlled release of the drug in vivo is a challenge in nanomedicine. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biodistribution of poly( d, l-lactide- co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles containing samarium-153 oxide ([153Sm]Sm2O3) in vivo to prove that orally administered nanoparticles alter the biodistribution of a drug. These were then activated in a nuclear reactor to produce radioactive 153Sm-loaded-PLGA nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were characterized for size, zeta potential, and morphology. The nanoparticles were orally and intravenously (IV) administered to rats in order to trace their uptake through imaging and biodistribution studies. The 153Sm-loaded-PLGA nanoparticles had an average size of 281 ± 6.3 nm and a PDI average of 0.22. The zeta potential ranged between 5 and 20 mV. The [153Sm]Sm2O3 loaded PLGA nanoparticles, orally administered were distributed to most organs at low levels, indicating that there was absorption of nanoparticles. While the IV injected [153Sm]Sm2O3-loaded PLGA nanoparticles exhibited the highest localization of nanoparticles in the spleen (8.63 %ID/g) and liver (3.07 %ID/g), confirming that nanoparticles are rapidly removed from the blood by the RES, leading to rapid uptake in the liver and spleen. From the biodistribution data obtained, it is clear that polymeric nanoscale delivery systems would be suitable for improving permeability and thus the bioavailability of therapeutic compounds.

  3. High-accuracy biodistribution analysis of adeno-associated virus variants by double barcode sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Marsic, Damien; Méndez-Gómez, Héctor R; Zolotukhin, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    Biodistribution analysis is a key step in the evaluation of adeno-associated virus (AAV) capsid variants, whether natural isolates or produced by rational design or directed evolution. Indeed, when screening candidate vectors, accurate knowledge about which tissues are infected and how efficiently is essential. We describe the design, validation, and application of a new vector, pTR-UF50-BC, encoding a bioluminescent protein, a fluorescent protein and a DNA barcode, which can be used to visua...

  4. New surface radiolabeling schemes of super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) for biodistribution studies†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallathamby, Prakash D.; Mortensen, Ninell P.; Palko, Heather A.; Malfatti, Mike; Smith, Catherine; Sonnett, James; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Gu, Baohua; Roeder, Ryan K.; Wang, Wei; Retterer, Scott T.

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterial based drug delivery systems allow for the independent tuning of the surface chemical and physical properties that affect their biodistribution in vivo and the therapeutic payloads that they are intended to deliver. Additionally, the added therapeutic and diagnostic value of their inherent material properties often provides extra functionality. Iron based nanomaterials with their magnetic properties and easily tailorable surface chemistry are of particular interest as model systems. In this study the core radius of the iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) was 14.08 ± 3.92 nm while the hydrodynamic radius of the NPs, as determined by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), was between 90–110 nm. In this study, different approaches were explored to create radiolabeled NPs that are stable in solution. The NPs were functionalized with polycarboxylate or polyamine surface functional groups. Polycarboxylate functionalized NPs had a zeta potential of –35 mV and polyamine functionalized NPs had a zeta potential of +40 mV. The polycarboxylate functionalized NPs were chosen for in vivo biodistribution studies and hence were radiolabeled with 14C, with a final activity of 0.097 nCi mg–1 of NPs. In chronic studies, the biodistribution profile is tracked using low-level radiolabeled proxies of the nanoparticles of interest. Conventionally, these radiolabeled proxies are chemically similar but not chemically identical to the non-radiolabeled NPs of interest. This study is novel as different approaches were explored to create radiolabeled NPs that are stable, possess a hydrodynamic radius of synthesis of a large class of nanomaterials with multiple core and surface functionalities. This work combined with the biodistribution data suggests that the radiolabeling schemes carried out in this study have broad implications for use in pharmacokinetic studies for a variety of nanomaterials. PMID:25790032

  5. Biodistribution and Lymphatic Tracking of the Main Neurotoxin of Micrurus fulvius Venom by Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Vergara

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The venom of the Eastern coral snake Micrurus fulvius can cause respiratory paralysis in the bitten patient, which is attributable to β-neurotoxins (β-NTx. The aim of this work was to study the biodistribution and lymphatic tracking by molecular imaging of the main β-NTx of M. fulvius venom. β-NTx was bioconjugated with the chelator diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (DTPA and radiolabeled with the radionuclide Gallium-67. Radiolabeling efficiency was 60%–78%; radiochemical purity ≥92%; and stability at 48 h ≥ 85%. The median lethal dose (LD50 and PLA2 activity of bioconjugated β-NTx decreased 3 and 2.5 times, respectively, in comparison with native β-NTx. The immune recognition by polyclonal antibodies decreased 10 times. Biodistribution of β-NTx-DTPA-67Ga in rats showed increased uptake in popliteal, lumbar nodes and kidneys that was not observed with 67Ga-free. Accumulation in organs at 24 h was less than 1%, except for kidneys, where the average was 3.7%. The inoculation site works as a depot, since 10% of the initial dose of β-NTx-DTPA-67Ga remains there for up to 48 h. This work clearly demonstrates the lymphatic system participation in the biodistribution of β-NTx-DTPA-67Ga. Our approach could be applied to analyze the role of the lymphatic system in snakebite for a better understanding of envenoming.

  6. Biodistribution of the radiopharmaceutical technetium-99m-sodium phytate in rats after splenectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Kercia Regina Santos Gomes; Acucena, Maria Kadja Meneses Torres; Villarim Neto, Arthur; Rego, Amalia Cinthia Meneses [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias da Saude; Bernardo-Filho, Mario [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes. Dept. de Biofisica e Biometria; Azevedo, Italo Medeiros; Araujo Filho, Irami; Medeiros, Aldo Cunha [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Dept. de Cirurgia]. E-mail: aldo@ufrnet.br

    2008-12-15

    Drugs and surgery can interfere with the biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals and data about the effect of splenectomy on the metabolism of phytate-Tc-99m are scarce. This study aimed at evaluating the interference of splenectomy on phytate-Tc-99m biodistribution and liver function in rats. The SP group rats (n=6) underwent splenectomy. In group C (control) the animals were not operated on. After 15 days, all rats were injected with 0.1 mL of Tc-99m-phytate via orbital plexus (0.66 MBq). After 30 minutes, liver samples were harvested, weighed and the percentage of radioactivity per gram (%ATI/g) was determined by a Wizard Perkin-Elme gamma counter. The ATI%/g in splenectomized rats (0.99{+-}0.02) was significantly higher than in controls (0.4{+-}0.02), (p=0.034). ALT, AST and HDL were significantly lower in SP rats (p= 0.001) and leucocytosis was observed in SP rats. In conclusion, splenectomy in rats changed the hepatic biodistribution of Tc-99m-phytate and liver enzymatic activity. (author)

  7. Preparation, biodistribution, and scintigraphic evaluation of (99m)Tc-clindamycin: an infection imaging agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hina, Saira; Rajoka, Muhammad Ibrahim; Roohi, Samina; Haque, Asma; Qasim, Muhammad

    2014-10-01

    Bacterial infection is found to be the cause of death throughout the world. Nuclear medicine imaging with the help of radiopharmaceuticals has great potential for treating infections. In the present work, clindamycin, a lincosamide antibiotic, was labeled with technetium-99 m (~380 MBq). Clindamycin has been proven to be efficient for treating serious infections caused by bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus. Quality control, characterization, biodistribution, and scintigraphy of radiolabeled clindamycin were done, and labeling efficiency was determined by ascending paper chromatography. More than 95 % labeling efficiency with technetium-99 m ((99m)Tc) was achieved at pH 6-7 while using 2.5-3 μg SnCl2 · H2O as a reducing agent and 100 μg of ligand at room temperature. The characterization of the compound was performed by using electrophoresis, HPLC and shake flask assay. Electrophoresis indicates the neutral behavior of (99m)Tc-clindamycin. HPLC analysis confirms the single specie of the labeled compound, while shake flask assay confirms high lipophilicity. The biodistribution studies of (99m)Tc-clindamycin were performed Sprague Dawley rats bearing bacterial infection. Scintigraphy and biodistribution studies showed a high uptake of (99m)Tc-clindamycin in the liver, heart, lung, and stomach as well as at S. aureus-infected sites in rabbits.

  8. Extracellular vesicle in vivo biodistribution is determined by cell source, route of administration and targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar P. B. Wiklander

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs have emerged as important mediators of intercellular communication in a diverse range of biological processes. For future therapeutic applications and for EV biology research in general, understanding the in vivo fate of EVs is of utmost importance. Here we studied biodistribution of EVs in mice after systemic delivery. EVs were isolated from 3 different mouse cell sources, including dendritic cells (DCs derived from bone marrow, and labelled with a near-infrared lipophilic dye. Xenotransplantation of EVs was further carried out for cross-species comparison. The reliability of the labelling technique was confirmed by sucrose gradient fractionation, organ perfusion and further supported by immunohistochemical staining using CD63-EGFP probed vesicles. While vesicles accumulated mainly in liver, spleen, gastrointestinal tract and lungs, differences related to EV cell origin were detected. EVs accumulated in the tumour tissue of tumour-bearing mice and, after introduction of the rabies virus glycoprotein-targeting moiety, they were found more readily in acetylcholine-receptor-rich organs. In addition, the route of administration and the dose of injected EVs influenced the biodistribution pattern. This is the first extensive biodistribution investigation of EVs comparing the impact of several different variables, the results of which have implications for the design and feasibility of therapeutic studies using EVs.

  9. Towards Therapeutic Delivery of Extracellular Vesicles: Strategies for In Vivo Tracking and Biodistribution Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rocco, Giuliana; Baldari, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs), such as microvesicles and exosomes, are membranous structures containing bioactive material released by several cells types, including mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs). Increasing lines of evidences point to EVs as paracrine mediators of the beneficial effects on tissue remodeling associated with cell therapy. Administration of MSCs-derived EVs has therefore the potential to open new and safer therapeutic avenues, alternative to cell-based approaches, for degenerative diseases. However, an enhanced knowledge about in vivo EVs trafficking upon delivery is required before effective clinical translation. Only a few studies have focused on the biodistribution analysis of exogenously administered MSCs-derived EVs. Nevertheless, current strategies for in vivo tracking in animal models have provided valuable insights on the biodistribution upon systemic delivery of EVs isolated from several cellular sources, indicating in liver, spleen, and lungs the preferential target organs. Different strategies for targeting EVs to specific tissues to enhance their therapeutic efficacy and reduce possible off-target effects have been investigated. Here, in the context of a possible clinical application of MSC-derived EVs for tissue regeneration, we review the existing strategies for in vivo tracking and targeting of EVs isolated from different cellular sources and the studies elucidating the biodistribution of exogenously administered EVs. PMID:27994623

  10. Dosimetry of radium-223 and progeny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, D.R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Sgouros, G. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Radium-223 is a short-lived (11.4 d) alpha emitter with potential applications in radioimmunotherapy of cancer. Radium-223 can be complexed and linked to protein delivery molecules for specific tumor-cell targeting. It decays through a cascade of short-lived alpha- and beta-emitting daughters with emission of about 28 MeV of energy through complete decay. The first three alpha particles are essentially instantaneous. Photons associated with Ra-223 and progeny provide the means for tumor and normal-organ imaging and dosimetry. Two beta particles provide additional therapeutic value. Radium-223 may be produced economically and in sufficient amounts for widescale application. Many aspects of the chemistry of carrier-free isotope preparation, complexation, and linkage to the antibody have been developed and are being tested. The radiation dosimetry of a Ra-223-labeled antibody shows favorable tumor to normal tissue dose ratios for therapy. The 11.4-d half-life of Ra-223 allows sufficient time for immunoconjugate preparation, administration, and tumor localization by carrier antibodies before significant radiological decay takes place. If 0.01 percent of a 37 MBq (1 mCi) injection deposits in a one gram tumor mass, and if the activity is retained with a typical effective half-time (75 h), the absorbed dose will be 163 mGy MBq{sup {minus}1} (600 rad mCi{sup {minus}1}) administered. 49 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. DRDC Ottawa working standard for biological dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segura, T.M.; Prud' homme-Lalonde, L. [Defence Research and Development Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Thorleifson, E. [Health Canada, Gatineau, Quebec (Canada); Lachapelle, S.; Mullins, D. [JERA Consulting (Canada); Qutob, S. [Health Canada, Gatineau, Quebec (Canada); Wilkinson, D.

    2005-07-15

    This Standard provides quality assurance, quality control, and evaluation of the performance criteria for the purpose of accreditation of the Radiation Biology laboratory at Defence Research and Development Canada - Ottawa (DRDC Ottawa) using biological dosimetry to predict radiation exposure doses. The International Standard (ISO 19238) and the International Atomic Energy Association (IAEA) Technical Report Series No. 405 are used as guiding documents in preparation of this working document specific to the DRDC Ottawa Radiation Biology Laboratory. This Standard addresses: 1. The confidentiality of personal information, for the customer and the service laboratory; 2. The laboratory safety requirements; 3. The calibration sources and calibration dose ranges useful for establishing the reference dose-effect curves allowing the dose estimation from chromosome aberration frequency, and the minimum detection levels; 4. Transportation criteria for shipping of test samples to the laboratory; 5. Preparation of samples for analysis; 6. The scoring procedure for unstable chromosome aberrations used for biological dosimetry; 7. The criteria for converting a measured aberration frequency into an estimate of absorbed dose; 8. The reporting of results; 9. The quality assurance and quality control plan for the laboratory; and 10. Informative annexes containing examples of a questionnaire, instructions for customers, a data sheet for recording aberrations, a sample report and other supportive documents. (author)

  12. Dosimetry methods in boron neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambarini, G.; Artuso, E.; Felisi, M.; Regazzoni, V.; Giove, D. [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Department of Physics, Via Festa del Patrono 7, 20122 Milano (Italy); Agosteo, S.; Barcaglioni, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milano (Italy); Campi, F.; Garlati, L. [Politecnico di Milano, Energy Department, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); De Errico, F. [Universita degli Studi di Pisa, Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering, Lungamo Pacinotti 43, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Borroni, M.; Carrara, M. [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Medical Physics Unit, Via Venezian 1, 20133 Milano (Italy); Burian, J.; Klupak, V.; Viererbl, L.; Marek, M. [Research Centre Rez, Department of Neutron Physics, 250-68 Husinec-Rez (Czech Republic)

    2014-08-15

    Dosimetry studies have been carried out at thermal and epithermal columns of Lvr-15 research reactor for investigating the spatial distribution of gamma dose, fast neutron dose and thermal neutron fluence. Two different dosimetry methods, both based on solid state detectors, have been studied and applied and the accuracy and consistency of the results have been inspected. One method is based on Fricke gel dosimeters that are dilute water solutions and have good tissue equivalence for neutrons and also for all the secondary radiations produced by neutron interactions in tissue or water phantoms. Fricke gel dosimeters give the possibility of separating the various dose contributions, i.e. the gamma dose, the fast neutron dose and the dose due to charged particles generated during thermal neutron reactions by isotopes having high cross section, like 10-B. From this last dose, thermal neutron fluence can be obtained by means of the kerma factor. The second method is based on thermoluminescence dosimeters. In particular, the developed method draw advantage from the different heights of the peaks of the glow curve of such phosphors when irradiated with photons or with thermal neutrons. The results show that satisfactory results can be obtained with simple methods, in spite of the complexity of the subject. However, the more suitable dosimeters and principally their utilization and analysis modalities are different for the various neutron beams, mainly depending on the relative intensities of the three components of the neutron field, in particular are different for thermal and epithermal columns. (Author)

  13. Effect of processor temperature on film dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Shiv P; Das, Indra J

    2012-01-01

    Optical density (OD) of a radiographic film plays an important role in radiation dosimetry, which depends on various parameters, including beam energy, depth, field size, film batch, dose, dose rate, air film interface, postexposure processing time, and temperature of the processor. Most of these parameters have been studied for Kodak XV and extended dose range (EDR) films used in radiation oncology. There is very limited information on processor temperature, which is investigated in this study. Multiple XV and EDR films were exposed in the reference condition (d(max.), 10 × 10 cm(2), 100 cm) to a given dose. An automatic film processor (X-Omat 5000) was used for processing films. The temperature of the processor was adjusted manually with increasing temperature. At each temperature, a set of films was processed to evaluate OD at a given dose. For both films, OD is a linear function of processor temperature in the range of 29.4-40.6°C (85-105°F) for various dose ranges. The changes in processor temperature are directly related to the dose by a quadratic function. A simple linear equation is provided for the changes in OD vs. processor temperature, which could be used for correcting dose in radiation dosimetry when film is used. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Monte Carlo simulations for heavy ion dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geithner, O.

    2006-07-26

    Water-to-air stopping power ratio (s{sub w,air}) calculations for the ionization chamber dosimetry of clinically relevant ion beams with initial energies from 50 to 450 MeV/u have been performed using the Monte Carlo technique. To simulate the transport of a particle in water the computer code SHIELD-HIT v2 was used which is a substantially modified version of its predecessor SHIELD-HIT v1. The code was partially rewritten, replacing formerly used single precision variables with double precision variables. The lowest particle transport specific energy was decreased from 1 MeV/u down to 10 keV/u by modifying the Bethe- Bloch formula, thus widening its range for medical dosimetry applications. Optional MSTAR and ICRU-73 stopping power data were included. The fragmentation model was verified using all available experimental data and some parameters were adjusted. The present code version shows excellent agreement with experimental data. Additional to the calculations of stopping power ratios, s{sub w,air}, the influence of fragments and I-values on s{sub w,air} for carbon ion beams was investigated. The value of s{sub w,air} deviates as much as 2.3% at the Bragg peak from the recommended by TRS-398 constant value of 1.130 for an energy of 50 MeV/u. (orig.)

  15. Eleventh DOE workshop on personnel neutron dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    Since its formation, the Office of Health (EH-40) has stressed the importance of the exchange of information related to and improvements in neutron dosimetry. This Workshop was the eleventh in the series sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). It provided a forum for operational personnel at DOE facilities to discuss current issues related to neutron dosimetry and for leading investigators in the field to discuss promising approaches for future research. A total of 26 papers were presented including the keynote address by Dr. Warren K. Sinclair, who spoke on, ``The 1990 Recommendations of the ICRP and their Biological Background.`` The first several papers discussed difficulties in measuring neutrons of different energies and ways of compensating or deriving correction factors at individual facilities. Presentations were also given by the US Navy and Air Force. Current research in neutron dosimeter development was the subject of the largest number of papers. These included a number on the development of neutron spectrometers. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  16. Dosimetry of ionising radiation in modern radiation oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kron, Tomas; Lehmann, Joerg; Greer, Peter B.

    2016-07-01

    Dosimetry of ionising radiation is a well-established and mature branch of physical sciences with many applications in medicine and biology. In particular radiotherapy relies on dosimetry for optimisation of cancer treatment and avoidance of severe toxicity for patients. Several novel developments in radiotherapy have introduced new challenges for dosimetry with small and dynamically changing radiation fields being central to many of these applications such as stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy. There is also an increasing awareness of low doses given to structures not in the target region and the associated risk of secondary cancer induction. Here accurate dosimetry is important not only for treatment optimisation but also for the generation of data that can inform radiation protection approaches in the future. The article introduces some of the challenges and highlights the interdependence of dosimetric calculations and measurements. Dosimetric concepts are explored in the context of six application fields: reference dosimetry, small fields, low dose out of field, in vivo dosimetry, brachytherapy and auditing of radiotherapy practice. Recent developments of dosimeters that can be used for these purposes are discussed using spatial resolution and number of dimensions for measurement as sorting criteria. While dosimetry is ever evolving to address the needs of advancing applications of radiation in medicine two fundamental issues remain: the accuracy of the measurement from a scientific perspective and the importance to link the measurement to a clinically relevant question. This review aims to provide an update on both of these.

  17. Development of a new software tool, based on ANN technology, in neutron spectrometry and dosimetry research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz R, J.M.; Martinez B, M.R.; Vega C, H.R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Av. Ramon Lopez Velarde 801, A.P. 336, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    Artificial Intelligence is a branch of study which enhances the capability of computers by giving them human-like intelligence. The brain architecture has been extensively studied and attempts have been made to emulate it as in the Artificial Neural Network technology. A large variety of neural network architectures have been developed and they have gained wide-spread popularity over the last few decades. Their application is considered as a substitute for many classical techniques that have been used for many years, as in the case of neutron spectrometry and dosimetry research areas. In previous works, a new approach called Robust Design of Artificial Neural network was applied to build an ANN topology capable to solve the neutron spectrometry and dosimetry problems within the Mat lab programming environment. In this work, the knowledge stored at Mat lab ANN's synaptic weights was extracted in order to develop for first time a customized software application based on ANN technology, which is proposed to be used in the neutron spectrometry and simultaneous dosimetry fields. (Author)

  18. Experimental and computational development of a natural breast phantom for dosimetry studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, Luciana B.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R., E-mail: lucibn19@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the experimental and computational development of a natural breast phantom, anthropomorphic and anthropometric for studies in dosimetry of brachytherapy and teletherapy of breast. The natural breast phantom developed corresponding to fibroadipose breasts of women aged 30 to 50 years, presenting radiographically medium density. The experimental breast phantom was constituted of three tissue-equivalents (TE's): glandular TE, adipose TE and skin TE. These TE's were developed according to chemical composition of human breast and present radiological response to exposure. Completed the construction of experimental breast phantom this was mounted on a thorax phantom previously developed by the research group NRI/UFMG. Then the computational breast phantom was constructed by performing a computed tomography (CT) by axial slices of the chest phantom. Through the images generated by CT a computational model of voxels of the thorax phantom was developed by SISCODES computational program, being the computational breast phantom represented by the same TE's of the experimental breast phantom. The images generated by CT allowed evaluating the radiological equivalence of the tissues. The breast phantom is being used in studies of experimental dosimetry both in brachytherapy as in teletherapy of breast. Dosimetry studies by MCNP-5 code using the computational model of the phantom breast are in progress. (author)

  19. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2009-08-28

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNL’s Hanford External Dosimetry Program (HEDP) which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee (HPDAC) which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. The first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database was designated Revision 0. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving changes to all chapters in the document. Revision numbers that include a decimal fraction reflect minor revisions, usually restricted to selected chapters or selected pages in the document.

  20. Preparation and biodistribution assessment of {sup 111}In-BPAMD as a novel agent for bone SPECT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousefnia, Hassan; Zolghadri, Samaneh; Jalilian, Amir Reza [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-07-01

    An early diagnosis of bone metastases is very important for providing a profound decision on a subsequent therapy. In this study, a new agent for SPECT-imaging of bone metastases, {sup 111}In-(4-{[(bis(phosphonomethyl))carbamoyl]methyl}-7,10-bis(carboxymethyl) -1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododec-1-yl) acetic acid ({sup 111}In-BPAMD) complex has been developed with specific activity of 2.85 TBq/mmol. Radiochemical purity of the radiolabeled complex was checked by instant thin layer chromatography method indicated high radiochemical purity > 95% at the optimal conditions. The complex demonstrated significant stability at room temperature and in human serum at least for 48 h. Hydroxyapatite (HA) binding assay showed high binding ability of the radiolabeled complex even at the low amounts of HA. Also, log P measurements highlighted the strong hydrophilic nature of the complex. Biodistribution studies as well as planar imaging after injection of the complex into the male Syrian mice showed major accumulation of the labelled compound in the bone tissue. Totally, the obtained results indicated that {sup 111}In-BPAMD has interesting characteristics as an agent for SPECT-imaging of the bone metastases.

  1. Safety and biodistribution profile of placental-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (PLX-PAD) following intramuscular delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramot, Yuval; Meiron, Moran; Toren, Amir; Steiner, Michal; Nyska, Abraham

    2009-08-01

    The administration of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) provides an exciting emerging therapeutic modality for the treatment of peripheral arterial disease, a condition that is associated with critical limb ischemia as its end stage. Placental-derived MSCs, termed PLX-PAD cells, are stable adhesive stromal cells isolated from full-term human placentae, cultured on carriers, and expanded in a bioreactor called the PluriX. These cells can be expanded in vitro without phenotypic or karyotypic changes. We studied the safety and biodistribution properties of PLX-PAD cells following intramuscular administration in NOD/SCID mice. No significant clinical signs, hematological and biochemical parameters, or major pathological changes were found in PLX-PAD-treated animals in comparison to vehicle controls. Several animals in the control and PLX-PAD-treated groups developed thymic malignant lymphoma, first seen after one month, as expected in this mouse strain. In addition, both groups developed spontaneous mesenteric vessel inflammation. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) demonstrated that distribution of PLX-PAD cells was confined to the injection site. Placental-derived MSCs remained in this site with gradual decrease in concentration during a three-month period. In view of these data, we conclude that the administration of PLX-PAD cells is not associated with any adverse effects in NOD/SCID mice.

  2. Radiolabeling of substance P with Lutetium-177 and biodistribution study in AR42J pancreatic tumor xenografted Nude mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Bortoleti de; Pujatti, Priscilla Brunelli; Barrio, Ofelia; Caldeira, Jose S.; Mengatti, Jair, E-mail: ebaraujo@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Radiopharmacy Center; Suzuki, Miriam F. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Biotecnologia

    2008-07-01

    Pancreatic tumor (PT) is a neuroendocrine neoplasm that usually origin metastases in the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract. In recent years, new developments in targeted therapies have emerged and the presence of peptide receptors at the cell membrane of PT constitutes the basis of the clinical use of specific radiolabeled ligands. Substance P, an 11-amino acid peptide which has an important role in modulating pain transmission trough neurokinin 1 and 2 receptors (NKr), may play a role in the pathogenesis of PT, because approximately 10% of these tumors over express NKr. The aim of the present work was to produce a pure and stable SP analog (DOTA-SP) radiolabeled with Lutetium-177 ({sup 177}Lu), and to evaluate its in vivo target to AR42J pancreatic tumor cells in Nude mice in other to verify if SP can be used in this pancreatic tumor detection and treatment. {sup 177}Lu (half-life 6.7 days) has both β and γ-emissions suitable for radiotherapy and imaging respectively. Substance P was successfully labeled with high yield (>99%) at optimized conditions and kept stable for more than 72 hours at 4 deg C and 24 hours in human plasma. Biodistribution studies showed that SP excretion was mainly performed by renal pathway. In addition, {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-SP showed higher uptake by tumor than normal pancreas, indicating the presence of NK receptors in AR42J pancreatic tumor. (author)

  3. Radiation Dosimetry for Quality Control of Food Preservation and Disinfestation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W.L.; Miller, Arne; Uribe, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    In the use of x and gamma rays and scanned electron beams to extend the shelf life of food by delay of sprouting and ripening, killing of microbes, and control of insect population, quality assurance is provided by standardized radiation dosimetry. By strategic placement of calibrated dosimeters...... speed) to meet changes that occur in product and source parameters (e.g. bulk density and radiation spectrum). Routine dosimetry methods and certain corrections of dosimetry data may be selected for the radiations used in typical food processes....

  4. Medical reference dosimetry using EPR measurements of alanine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helt-Hansen, Jakob; Rosendal, F.; Kofoed, I.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Electron spin resonance (EPR) is used to determine the absorbed dose of alanine dosimeters exposed to clinical photon beams in a solid-water phantom. Alanine is potentially suitable for medical reference dosimetry, because of its near water equivalence over a wide energy spectrum, low...... methods the proposed algorithm can be applied without normalisation of phase shifts caused by changes in the g-value of the cavity. The study shows that alanine dosimetry is a suitable candidate for medical reference dosimetry especially for quality control applications....

  5. Construction tool and suitability of voxel phantom for skin dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antunes, Paula C.G.; Siqueira, Paulo T.D.; Fonseca, Gabriel P.; Yoriyaz, Helio, E-mail: ptsiquei@ipen.b, E-mail: hyoriyaz@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes a new software tool called 'SkinVop' which was developed to enable accurate voxel phantom skin dosimetry. A voxel phantom is a model used to describe human anatomy in a realistic way in radiation transport codes. This model is a three-dimensional representation of the human body in the form of an array of identification numbers that are arranged in a 3D matrix. Each entry in this array represents a voxel (volume element) directly associated to the units of picture resolution (pixel) of medical images. Currently, these voxel phantoms, in association with the transport code MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle), have provided subsidies to the planning systems used on the hospital routine, once they afford accurate and personalized estimative of dose distribution. However, these assessments are limited to geometric representations of organs and tissues in the voxel phantom, which do not discriminates some thin body structure, such as the skin. In this context, to enable accurate dosimetric skin dose assessment by the MCNP code, it was developed this new software tool that discriminates this region with thickness and localization in the voxel phantoms similar to the real. This methodology consists in manipulating the skin volume elements by segmenting and subdividing them in different thicknesses. A graphical user interface was designed to fulfill display the modified voxel model. This methodology is extremely useful once the skin dose is inaccurately assessed of current hospital system planning, justified justly by its small thickness. (author)

  6. A phase 1 study of 131I-CLR1404 in patients with relapsed or refractory advanced solid tumors: dosimetry, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grudzinski, Joseph J; Titz, Benjamin; Kozak, Kevin; Clarke, William; Allen, Ernest; Trembath, LisaAnn; Stabin, Michael; Marshall, John; Cho, Steve Y; Wong, Terence Z; Mortimer, Joanne; Weichert, Jamey P

    2014-01-01

    (131)I-CLR1404 is a small molecule that combines a tumor-targeting moiety with a therapeutic radioisotope. The primary aim of this phase 1 study was to determine the administered radioactivity expected to deliver 400 mSv to the bone marrow. The secondary aims were to determine the pharmacokinetic (PK) and safety profiles of (131)I-CLR1404. Eight subjects with refractory or relapsed advanced solid tumors were treated with a single injection of 370 MBq of (131)I-CLR1404. Whole body planar nuclear medicine scans were performed at 15-35 minutes, 4-6, 18-24, 48, 72, 144 hours, and 14 days post injection. Optional single photon emission computed tomography imaging was performed on two patients 6 days post injection. Clinical laboratory parameters were evaluated in blood and urine. Plasma PK was evaluated on (127)I-CLR1404 mass measurements. To evaluate renal clearance of (131)I-CLR1404, urine was collected for 14 days post injection. Absorbed dose estimates for target organs were determined using the RADAR method with OLINDA/EXM software. Single administrations of 370 MBq of (131)I-CLR1404 were well tolerated by all subjects. No severe adverse events were reported and no adverse event was dose-limiting. Plasma (127)I-CLR1404 concentrations declined in a bi-exponential manner with a mean t½ value of 822 hours. Mean Cmax and AUC(0-t) values were 72.2 ng/mL and 15753 ng • hr/mL, respectively. An administered activity of approximately 740 MBq is predicted to deliver 400 mSv to marrow. Preliminary data suggest that (131)I-CLR1404 is well tolerated and may have unique potential as an anti-cancer agent. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00925275.

  7. A phase 1 study of 131I-CLR1404 in patients with relapsed or refractory advanced solid tumors: dosimetry, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and safety.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph J Grudzinski

    Full Text Available (131I-CLR1404 is a small molecule that combines a tumor-targeting moiety with a therapeutic radioisotope. The primary aim of this phase 1 study was to determine the administered radioactivity expected to deliver 400 mSv to the bone marrow. The secondary aims were to determine the pharmacokinetic (PK and safety profiles of (131I-CLR1404.Eight subjects with refractory or relapsed advanced solid tumors were treated with a single injection of 370 MBq of (131I-CLR1404. Whole body planar nuclear medicine scans were performed at 15-35 minutes, 4-6, 18-24, 48, 72, 144 hours, and 14 days post injection. Optional single photon emission computed tomography imaging was performed on two patients 6 days post injection. Clinical laboratory parameters were evaluated in blood and urine. Plasma PK was evaluated on (127I-CLR1404 mass measurements. To evaluate renal clearance of (131I-CLR1404, urine was collected for 14 days post injection. Absorbed dose estimates for target organs were determined using the RADAR method with OLINDA/EXM software.Single administrations of 370 MBq of (131I-CLR1404 were well tolerated by all subjects. No severe adverse events were reported and no adverse event was dose-limiting. Plasma (127I-CLR1404 concentrations declined in a bi-exponential manner with a mean t½ value of 822 hours. Mean Cmax and AUC(0-t values were 72.2 ng/mL and 15753 ng • hr/mL, respectively. An administered activity of approximately 740 MBq is predicted to deliver 400 mSv to marrow.Preliminary data suggest that (131I-CLR1404 is well tolerated and may have unique potential as an anti-cancer agent.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00925275.

  8. A Biodistribution and Toxicity Study of Cobalt Dichloride-N-Acetyl Cysteine in an Implantable MRI Marker for Prostate Cancer Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, Steven J., E-mail: sjfrank@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Texas (United States); Johansen, Mary J. [Department of Experimental Therapeutics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Texas (United States); Martirosyan, Karen S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Texas at Brownsville, Texas (United States); Gagea, Mihai; Van Pelt, Carolyn S.; Borne, Agatha [Department of Veterinary Medicine, Surgery, and Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Texas (United States); Carmazzi, Yudith; Madden, Timothy [Department of Experimental Therapeutics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Texas (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: C4, a cobalt dichloride-N-acetyl cysteine complex, is being developed as a positive-signal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) marker to localize implanted radioactive seeds in prostate brachytherapy. We evaluated the toxicity and biodistribution of C4 in rats with the goal of simulating the systemic effects of potential leakage from C4 MRI markers within the prostate. Methods and Materials: 9-μL doses (equivalent to leakage from 120 markers in a human) of control solution (0.9% sodium chloride), 1% (proposed for clinical use), and 10% C4 solution were injected into the prostates of male Sprague-Dawley rats via laparotomy. Organ toxicity and cobalt disposition in plasma, tissues, feces, and urine were evaluated. Results: No C4-related morbidity or mortality was observed in the biodistribution arm (60 rats). Biodistribution was measurable after 10% C4 injection: cobalt was cleared rapidly from periprostatic tissue; mean concentrations in prostate were 163 μg/g and 268 μg/g at 5 and 30 minutes but were undetectable by 60 minutes. Expected dual renal-hepatic elimination was observed, with percentages of injected dose recovered in tissues of 39.0 ± 5.6% (liver), >11.8 ± 6.5% (prostate), and >5.3 ± 0.9% (kidney), with low plasma concentrations detected up to 1 hour (1.40 μg/mL at 5-60 minutes). Excretion in urine was 13.1 ± 4.6%, with 3.1 ± 0.54% recovered in feces by 24 hours. In the toxicity arm, 3 animals died in the control group and 1 each in the 1% and 10% groups from surgical or anesthesia-related complications; all others survived to scheduled termination at 14 days. No C4-related adverse clinical signs or organ toxicity were observed. Conclusion: C4-related toxicity was not observed at exposures at least 10-fold the exposure proposed for use in humans. These data demonstrating lack of systemic toxicity with dual routes of elimination in the event of in situ rupture suggest that C4 warrants further investigation as an MRI marker for prostate

  9. Permanent Breast Seed Implant Dosimetry Quality Assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Brian M., E-mail: Brian.Keller@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, ON (Canada); Ravi, Ananth [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, ON (Canada); Sankreacha, Raxa [Carlo Fidani Regional Cancer Center, Mississauga, ON (Canada); Pignol, Jean-Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: A permanent breast seed implant is a novel method of accelerated partial breast irradiation for women with early-stage breast cancer. This article presents pre- and post-implant dosimetric data, relates these data to clinical outcomes, and makes recommendations for those interested in starting a program. Methods and Materials: A total of 95 consecutive patients were accrued into one of three clinical trials after breast-conserving surgery: a Phase I/II trial (67 patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma); a Phase II registry trial (25 patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma); or a multi-center Phase II trial for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (3 patients). Contouring of the planning target volume (PTV) was done on a Pinnacle workstation and dosimetry calculations, including dose-volume histograms, were done using a Variseed planning computer. Results: The mean pre-implant PTV coverage for the V{sub 90}, V{sub 100}, V{sub 150}, and V{sub 200} were as follows: 98.8% {+-} 1.2% (range, 94.5-100%); 97.3% {+-} 2.1% (range, 90.3-99.9%), 68.8% {+-} 14.3% (range, 32.7-91.5%); and 27.8% {+-} 8.6% (range, 15.1-62.3%). The effect of seed motion was characterized by post-implant dosimetry performed immediately after the implantation (same day) and at 2 months after the implantation. The mean V{sub 100} changed from 85.6% to 88.4% (p = 0.004) and the mean V{sub 200} changed from 36.2% to 48.3% (p < 0.001). Skin toxicity was associated with maximum skin dose (p = 0.014). Conclusions: Preplanning dosimetry should aim for a V{sub 90} of approximately 100%, a V{sub 100} between 95% and 100%, and a V{sub 200} between 20% and 30%, as these numbers are associated with no local recurrences to date and good patient tolerance. In general, the target volume coverage improved over the duration of the seed therapy. The maximum skin dose, defined as the average dose over the hottest 1 Multiplication-Sign 1-cm{sup 2} surface area, should be limited to 90% of the

  10. A new and convenient method for purification of {sup 86}Y using a Sr(II) selective resin and comparison of biodistribution of {sup 86}Y and {sup 111}In labeled Herceptin{sup TM}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garmestani, Kayhan; Milenic, Diane E.; Plascjak, Paul S.; Brechbiel, Martin W. E-mail: martinwb@mail.nih.gov

    2002-07-01

    A simple and rapid procedure was developed for purification of cyclotron produced {sup 86}Y via the {sup 86}Sr(p,n) {sup 86}Y reaction. A commercially available Sr(II) selective resin was used to separate {sup 86}Y from the cyclotron irradiated Sr(II) target with a recovery of the enriched Sr(II) target while yielding a 75-80% recovery of {sup 86}Y suitable for radiolabeling either proteins or peptides. To demonstrate the utility of this methodology, the anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody Herceptin{sup TM} was radiolabeled with the purified {sup 86}Y and compared to {sup 111}In labeled Herceptin{sup TM}. The biodistribution study demonstrated that {sup 111}In-Herceptin{sup TM}, while a suitable surrogate for {sup 90}Y in the major organs, did not parallel the uptake of {sup 86}Y-Herceptin{sup TM} in the bone, and thus may not accurately predict the level of {sup 90}Y accumulation in the bone for clinical RIT applications. This result exemplifies the requirement of employing appropriate matched pair isotopes for imaging and therapy to insure that dosimetry considerations may be addressed accurately.

  11. Proceedings of the third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaja, R.E.; Sims, C.S.; Casson, W.H. [eds.

    1991-10-01

    The Third Conference on Radiation Protection and Dosimetry was held during October 21--24, 1991, at the Sheraton Plaza Hotel in Orlando, Florida. This meeting was designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection, and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To meet these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection was prepared. General topics considered in the technical session included external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, accident dosimetry, regulations and standards, research advances, and applied program experience. In addition, special sessions were held to afford attendees the opportunity to make short presentations of recent work or to discuss topics of general interest. Individual reports are processed separately on the database.

  12. Clinical radionuclide therapy dosimetry: the quest for the "Holy Gray".

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brans, B.; Bodei, L.; Giammarile, F.; Linden, O.; Luster, M.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Tennvall, J.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Radionuclide therapy has distinct similarities to, but also profound differences from external radiotherapy. REVIEW: This review discusses techniques and results of previously developed dosimetry methods in thyroid carcinoma, neuro-endocrine tumours, solid tumours and lymphoma. In each

  13. The physics of small megavoltage photon beam dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreo, Pedro

    2017-11-27

    The increased interest during recent years in the use of small megavoltage photon beams in advanced radiotherapy techniques has led to the development of dosimetry recommendations by different national and international organizations. Their requirement of data suitable for the different clinical options available, regarding treatment units and dosimetry equipment, has generated a considerable amount of research by the scientific community during the last decade. The multiple publications in the field have led not only to the availability of new invaluable data, but have also contributed substantially to an improved understanding of the physics of their dosimetry. This work provides an overview of the most important aspects that govern the physics of small megavoltage photon beam dosimetry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Image noise in X-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilts, M [Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Duzenli, C [Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre (Canada)

    2004-01-01

    This work investigates factors which affect image noise in CT polymer gel dosimetry, discusses techniques that can be used to further improve image noise and provides overall recommendations for the CT imaging of polymer gels.

  15. The radiation dosimetry of intrathecally administered radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stabin, M.G. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Evans, J.F. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1999-01-01

    The radiation dose to the spine, spinal cord, marrow, and other organs of the body from intrathecal administration of several radiopharmaceuticals was studied. Anatomic models were developed for the spine, spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), spinal cord, spinal skeleton, cranial skeleton, and cranial CSF. A kinetic model for the transport of CSF was used to determine residence times in the CSF; material leaving the CSF was thereafter assumed to enter the bloodstream and follow the kinetics of the radiopharmaceutical as if intravenously administered. The radiation transport codes MCNP and ALGAMP were used to model the electron and photon transport and energy deposition. The dosimetry of Tc-99m DTPA and HSA, In-111 DTPA, I-131 HSA, and Yb-169 DTPA was studied. Radiation dose profiles for the spinal cord and marrow in the spine were developed and average doses to all other organs were estimated, including dose distributions within the bone and marrow.

  16. Optically stimulated luminescence techniques in retrospective dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence signals from natural quartz and feldspar are now used routinely in dating geological and archaeological materials. More recently they have also been employed in accident dosimetry, i.e. the retrospective assessment of doses received as a result of a nuclear...... accident. Since 1990 the exploration of this wide variety of applications has driven an intensive investigation and development programme at Riso, in measurement facilities and techniques. This paper reviews some of the outcomes of this programme, including (i) optimisation of stimulation and emission...... windows, and detection sensitivity, (ii) experience with various stimulation light sources, including filtered incandescent lamps (420-550 nm) and high intensity light emitting diodes (470 nm) and laser diodes (830-850 nm). We also discuss recently developed high-precision single-aliquot measurement...

  17. High sensitive radiation detector for radiology dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valente, M.; Malano, F. [Instituto de Fisica Enrique Gaviola, Oficina 102 FaMAF - UNC, Av. Luis Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Molina, W.; Vedelago, J., E-mail: valente@famac.unc.edu.ar [Laboratorio de Investigaciones e Instrumentacion en Fisica Aplicada a la Medicina e Imagenes por Rayos X, Laboratorio 448 FaMAF - UNC, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina)

    2014-08-15

    Fricke solution has a wide range of applications as radiation detector and dosimetry. It is particularly appreciated in terms of relevant comparative advantages, like tissue equivalence when prepared in aqueous media like gel matrix, continuous mapping capability, dose rate recorded and incident direction independence as well as linear dose response. This work presents the development and characterization of a novel Fricke gel system, based on modified chemical compositions making possible its application in clinical radiology. Properties of standard Fricke gel dosimeter for high dose levels are used as starting point and suitable chemical modifications are introduced and carefully investigated in order to attain high resolution for low dose ranges, like those corresponding to radiology interventions. The developed Fricke gel radiation dosimeter system achieves the expected typical dose dependency, actually showing linear response in the dose range from 20 up to 4000 mGy. Systematic investigations including several chemical compositions are carried out in order to obtain a good enough dosimeter response for low dose levels. A suitable composition among those studied is selected as a good candidate for low dose level radiation dosimetry consisting on a modified Fricke solution fixed to a gel matrix containing benzoic acid along with sulfuric acid, ferrous sulfate, xylenol orange and ultra-pure reactive grade water. Dosimeter samples are prepared in standard vials for its in phantom irradiation and further characterization by spectrophotometry measuring visible light transmission and absorbance before and after irradiation. Samples are irradiated by typical kV X-ray tubes and calibrated Farmer type ionization chamber is used as reference to measure dose rates inside phantoms in at vials locations. Once sensitive material composition is already optimized, dose-response curves show significant improvement regarding overall sensitivity for low dose levels. According to

  18. Latest developments in silica fibre luminescence dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, D. A.; Abdul S, S. F.; Jafari, S. M.; Alanazi, A. [University of Surrey, Department of Physics, GU2 7XH Guildford, Surrey (United Kingdom); Amouzad M, G. [University of Malaya, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering, Integrated Lightwave Research Group, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Addul R, H. A.; Mizanur R, A. K. M.; Zubair, H. T.; Begum, M.; Yusoff, Z.; Omar, N. Y. M. [Multimedia University, Faculty of Engineering, 2010 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Maah, M. J. [University of Malaya, Department of Chemistry, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Collin, S. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, TW11 OLW Middlesex (United Kingdom); Mat-Sharif, K. A.; Muhd-Yassin, S. Z.; Zulkifli, M. I., E-mail: d.a.bradley@surrey.ac.uk [Telekom Malaysia Research and Development Sdn Bhd., 63000 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Using tailor made sub-mm diameter doped-silica fibres, we are carrying out luminescence dosimetry studies for a range of situations, including thermoluminescence (Tl)investigations on a liquid alpha source formed of {sup 223}RaCl (the basis of the Bayer Health care product Xofigo), the Tl response to a 62 MeV proton source and Tl response to irradiation from an {sup 241}Am-Be neutron source. In regard to the former, in accord with the intrinsic high linear energy transfer (Let) and short path length (<100 um) of the α-particles in calcified tissue, the product is in part intended as a bone-seeking radionuclide for treatment of metastatic cancer, offering high specificity and efficacy. The Tl yield of Ge-doped SiO{sub 2} fibres has been investigated including for photonic crystal fibre un collapsed, flat fibres and single mode fibres, these systems offering many advantages over conventional passive dosimetry types. In particular, one can mention comparable and even superior sensitivity, an effective atomic number Z{sub eff} of the silica dosimetric material close to that of bone, and the glassy nature of the fibres offering the additional advantage of being able to place such dosimeters directly into liquid environments. Finally we review the use of our tailor made fibres for on-line radioluminescence measurements of radiotherapy beams. The outcome from these various lines of research is expected to inform development of doped fiber radiation dosimeters of versatile utility, ranging from clinical applications through to industrial studies and environmental evaluations. (Author)

  19. Fast neutron activation dosimetry with TLDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, D.W.; Moran, P.R.

    1975-01-01

    Fast neutron activation using threshold reactions is the only neutron dosimetry method which offers complete discrimination against gamma-rays and preserves some information about the neutron energy. Conventional activation foil technique requires sensitive radiation detectors to count the decay of the neutron induced activity. For extensive measurements at low neutron fluences, vast outlays of counting equipment are required. TL dosimeters are inexpensive, extremely sensitive radiation detectors. The work of Mayhugh et al. (Proc. Third Int. Conf. on Luminescence Dosimetry, Riso Report 249, 1040, (1971)) showed that CaSO/sub 4/: DyTLDs could be used to measure the integrated dose from the decay of the radioactivity produced in the dosimeters by exposure to thermal neutrons. This neatly combines the activation detector and counter functions in one solid state device. This work has been expanded to fast neutron exposures and other TL phosphors. The reactions /sup 19/F(n, 2n)/sup 18/F, /sup 32/S(n,p)/sup 32/P, /sup 24/Mg(n,p)/sup 24/, and /sup 64/Zn(n,p)/sup 64/Cu were found useful for fast neutron activation in commercial TLDs. As each TLD is its own integrating decay particle counter, many activation measurements can be made at the same time. The subsequent readings of the TL signals can be done serially after the induced radioactivity has decayed, using only one TL reader. The neutron detection sensitivity is limited mainly by the number statistics of the neutron activations. The precision of the neutron measurement is within a factor of two of conventional foil activation for comparable mass detectors. Commercially available TLDs can measure neutron fluences of 10/sup 9/n/cm/sup 2/ with 10 percent precision.

  20. Dosimetry of low-energy beta radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, J.

    1996-08-01

    Useful techniques and procedures for determination of absorbed doses from exposure in a low-energy {beta} radiation field were studied and evaluated in this project. The four different techniques included were {beta} spectrometry, extrapolation chamber dosimetry, Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, and exoelectron dosimetry. As a typical low-energy {beta} radiation field a moderated spectrum from a {sup 14}C source (E{sub {beta}},{sub max} =156 keV) was chosen for the study. The measured response of a Si(Li) detector to photons (bremsstrahlung) showed fine agreement with the MC calculated photon response, whereas the difference between measured and MC calculated responses to electrons indicates an additional dead layer thickness of about 12 {mu}m in the Si(Li) detector. The depth-dose profiles measured with extrapolation chambers at two laboratories agreed very well, and it was confirmed that the fitting procedure previously reported for {sup 147}Pm depth-dose profiles is also suitable for {beta} radiation from {sup 14}C. An increasing difference between measured and MC calculated dose rates for increasing absorber thickness was found, which is explained by limitations of the EGS4 code for transport of very low-energy electrons (below 10-20 keV). Finally a study of the thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE) response of BeO thin film dosemeters to {beta} radiation for radiation fields with maximum {beta} energies ranging from 67 keV to 2.27 MeV is reported. For maximum {beta} energies below approximately 500 keV, a decrease in the response amounting to about 20% was observed. It is thus concluded that a {beta} dose higher than about 10 {mu}Gy can be measured with these dosemeters to within 0 to -20% independently of the {beta}energy for E{sub {beta}},{sub max} values down to 67 keV. (au) 12 tabs., 38 ills., 71 refs.

  1. In vivo dosimetry during tangential breast treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heukelom, S; Lanson, J H; van Tienhoven, G; Mijnheer, B J

    1991-12-01

    The 3-dimensional (3-D) dose distribution as calculated in clinical practice for tangential breast treatment was verified by means of in vivo dosimetry. Clinical practice in our institution implies the use of 8 MV X-ray beams, a 2-D treatment planning system, collimator rotation and a limited set of patient data for dose calculations. By positioning diodes at the central beam axes as well as in the periphery of the breast the magnitude of the dose values at the isocentre and in points situated in the high-dose regions behind the lung could be assessed. The position of the diodes was verified by means of an on-line portal imaging device. The reproducibility of these in vivo dose measurements was better than 2% (1 SD). Our study showed that on the average the dose delivery at the isocentre is 2% less and at the points behind the lung, 5.7% higher with respect to the calculated dose values. Detailed analysis of these in vivo dosimetry results, based on dose measurements performed with a breast shaped phantom, yielded the magnitudes of the errors in the predicted dose due to several limitations in the dose calculation algorithms and dose calculation procedure. These limitations are each introducing an error of several percent but are compensating each other for the dose calculation at the isocentre. We concluded that the dose distribution in a patient for our treatment technique and dose calculation procedure can be predicted with a 2-D treatment planning system in an acceptable way. A more accurate prediction of the dose distribution can be performed but requires an estimation of the lack of scatter due to missing tissue, the change in the dose distribution due to oblique incident beams and the incorporation of the actual output of the treatment machine in the assessment of the number of monitor units.

  2. Biodistribution of the Informal Group Basommatophora in the Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Noel Y. Young

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Basommatophora is an informal group within the molluscan subclass Pulmonata comprising of air-breathing freshwater snails that are typically characterized by eyespots located at the base of two noncontractile tentacles and two external genital orifices. They also have varied shell structures and habitats, not only within the group but also within families. Families of the Basommatophora are highly ubiquitous and may play a role in the life cycles of various parasites of humans and animals. Basommatophora has a worldwide geographical distribution across freshwater, terrestrial and marine habitats. However, little is known on their distribution in the Philippines. This report focuses on describing the biogeographical distribution of the basommatophorans in the Philippines through data gathered from museum collections, foreign databases accessed online, and identification of species found in various literatures. A qualitative description of the distribution of each Basommatophora family in the Philippines is given by distribution maps, indicating locations where specimens were collected and/or identified. A total of 336 counts of basommatophorans from 22 genera were encountered from available literature, museums and public databases. The majority of the occurrences are from the genera Siphonaria. The data and maps generated describe most of the distribution to be in Luzon, with Visayas and Mindanao having close counts with each other. The Philippines has the third most occurrences and genera of basommatophorans of all tropical countries in the world. However, the true diversity of the group could be higher if a more systematic sampling of the archipelago is conducted.

  3. LHON gene therapy vector prevents visual loss and optic neuropathy induced by G11778A mutant mitochondrial DNA: biodistribution and toxicology profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koilkonda, Rajeshwari; Yu, Hong; Talla, Venu; Porciatti, Vittorio; Feuer, William J; Hauswirth, William W; Chiodo, Vince; Erger, Kirsten E; Boye, Sanford L; Lewin, Alfred S; Conlon, Thomas J; Renner, Lauren; Neuringer, Martha; Detrisac, Carol; Guy, John

    2014-10-23

    To demonstrate safety and efficacy of allotopic human ND4 for treatment of a Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) mouse model harboring the G11778A mitochondrial mutation. We induced LHON in mice by intravitreal injection of mutant (G11778A) human ND4 DNA, responsible for most cases of LHON, that was directed to mitochondria using an AAV2 vector to which we appended a mitochondrial targeting sequence to the VP2 capsid. We then attempted rescue of visual loss using our test article (ScAAV2-P1ND4v2) containing a synthetic nuclear encoded G11778G ND4 gene that was allotopically expressed. Control mice either were uninjected or received AAV2-GFP or AAV2-mCherry. We performed RT-PCR and confocal microscopy at 2 weeks post injection. Pattern electroretinograms (PERGs), spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), histology, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were performed. For toxicology and biodistribution studies, the test article was administered intravitreally to rats and rhesus macaques at different doses. Mutant and wild-type ND4 were efficiently expressed in the mitochondria of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Visual function assessed by serial PERGs and retinal structure by serial SD-OCT showed a significant rescue by the test article. Histology and ultrastructural analysis confirmed that loss of RGCs and demise of axons was prevented by ScAAV2-P1ND4v2. Rat and nonhuman primate biodistribution studies showed that vector spread outside the injected eye into spleen and lymph nodes was minimal. Histopathology of tissues and organs including the eyes was comparable to that of uninfected and saline-injected eyes. Allotopically expressed wild-type ND4 prevents the phenotype induced by G11778A mitochondrial DNA with a toxicology profile acceptable for testing in a phase I clinical trial. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  4. Individual dosimetry of workers and patients: implementation and perspectives; La dosimetrie individuelle des travailleurs et de patients: mise en oeuvre et perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rannou, A.; Aubert, B.; Lahaye, Th.; Scaff, P.; Casanova, Ph.; Van Bladel, L.; Queinnec, F.; Valendru, N.; Jehanno, J.; Grude, E.; Berard, Ph.; Desbree, A.; Kafrouni, H.; Paquet, F.; Vanhavere, F.; Bridier, A.; Ginestet, Ch.; Magne, S.; Donadille, L.; Bordy, J.M.; Bottollier-Depois, J.F.; Barrere, J.L.; Ferragut, A.; Metivier, H.; Gaillard-Lecanu, E

    2008-07-01

    These days organised by the section of the technical protection of the S.F.R.P. review the different techniques of dosimetry used in France and Europe, and present the future orientations.The different interventions are as follow: Individual exposures of the workers: historic assessment and perspectives; medical exposure: where are the doses; legal obligations in individual dosimetry: which are the objective and the need on the subject; the dosimetry follow-up of workers by the S.I.S.E.R.I. system: assessment and perspectives; impact of the norm ISO 20553 on the follow-up of internal exposure; the implementation of the patient dose measurement in Belgium; techniques of passive dosimetry used in Europe; Supervision radiation protection at EDF: long term and short term approach; Comparison active and passive dosimetry at Melox; methodology for the choice of new neutron dosemeters; the working group M.E.D.O.R.: guide of internal dosimetry for the use of practitioners; O.E.D.I.P.E.: tool of modeling for the personalized internal dosimetry; the use of the Monte-Carlo method for the planning of the cancer treatment by radiotherapy becomes a reality; the works of the committee 2 of the ICRP; passive dosimetry versus operational dosimetry: situation in Europe; Implementation of the in vivo dosimetry in a radiotherapy department: experience of the Gustave Roussy institute; experience feedback on the in vivo measures in radiotherapy, based on the use of O.S.L. pellets; multi points O.S.L. instrumentation for the radiation dose monitoring in radiotherapy; dosimetry for extremities for medical applications: principle results of the European contract C.O.N.R.A.D.; references and perspectives in dosimetry; what perspectives for numerical dosimetry, an example: Sievert; system of dose management: how to answer to needs; the last technical evolutions in terms of electronic dosimetry in nuclear power plant; the fourth generation type reactors: what dosimetry. (N.C.)

  5. On the re-calibration process in radiochromic film dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Morales, Carmen; Vera-Sánchez, Juan Antonio; González-López, Antonio

    2017-10-01

    The accuracy and precision of the dose estimates obtained with radiochromic film dosimetry are investigated in a clinical environment. The improvement in the accuracy of dose estimates reached with corrective methods is analyzed. Two novel re-calibration algorithms for radiochromic film dosimetry are presented. Two different EBT3 lots are evaluated in two different centres. They are calibrated in Varian linacs and read in two different EPSON scaners. Once the lots are calibrated, three films per lot are considered and divided into stripes that are exposed to known doses. Several dosimetry protocols usually employed in radiochromic film dosimetry are used to convert film responses to absorbed doses. These protocols are characterized by different choices of the film responses or different sensitometric curves. Finally, the accuracy and reproducibility of the dose estimates is investigated with and without the corrective methods. The variabilities that affect radiochromic film dosimetry, such as intra-lot variability, inter-scan variability, post-exposure time and film autodevelopment may give rise to inaccuracies in the dose estimates. However, the implementation of re-calibration methods leads to more accurate dose estimates. All the investigated protocols showed more accurate and reproducible results when the re-calibrated methods were employed. So, the novel re-calibration methods may be applied in order to improve the accuracy and reproducibility of radiochromic film dosimetry. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Analysis methodology and development of a statistical tool for biodistribution data from internal contamination with actinides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamart, Stephanie; Griffiths, Nina M; Tchitchek, Nicolas; Angulo, Jaime F; Van der Meeren, Anne

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a computational tool that integrates several statistical analysis features for biodistribution data from internal contamination experiments. These data represent actinide levels in biological compartments as a function of time and are derived from activity measurements in tissues and excreta. These experiments aim at assessing the influence of different contamination conditions (e.g. intake route or radioelement) on the biological behavior of the contaminant. The ever increasing number of datasets and diversity of experimental conditions make the handling and analysis of biodistribution data difficult. This work sought to facilitate the statistical analysis of a large number of datasets and the comparison of results from diverse experimental conditions. Functional modules were developed using the open-source programming language R to facilitate specific operations: descriptive statistics, visual comparison, curve fitting, and implementation of biokinetic models. In addition, the structure of the datasets was harmonized using the same table format. Analysis outputs can be written in text files and updated data can be written in the consistent table format. Hence, a data repository is built progressively, which is essential for the optimal use of animal data. Graphical representations can be automatically generated and saved as image files. The resulting computational tool was applied using data derived from wound contamination experiments conducted under different conditions. In facilitating biodistribution data handling and statistical analyses, this computational tool ensures faster analyses and a better reproducibility compared with the use of multiple office software applications. Furthermore, re-analysis of archival data and comparison of data from different sources is made much easier. Hence this tool will help to understand better the influence of contamination characteristics on actinide biokinetics. Our approach can aid

  7. Comparative biodistribution of PAMAM dendrimers and HPMA copolymers in ovarian-tumor-bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadekar, S; Ray, A; Janàt-Amsbury, M; Peterson, C M; Ghandehari, H

    2011-01-10

    The biodistribution profile of a series of linear N-(2-hydroxylpropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymers was compared with that of branched poly(amido amine) dendrimers containing surface hydroxyl groups (PAMAM-OH) in orthotopic ovarian-tumor-bearing mice. Below an average molecular weight (MW) of 29 kDa, the HPMA copolymers were smaller than the PAMAM-OH dendrimers of comparable molecular weight. In addition to molecular weight, hydrodynamic size and polymer architecture affected the biodistribution of these constructs. Biodistribution studies were performed by dosing mice with (125)iodine-labeled polymers and collecting all major organ systems, carcass, and excreta at defined time points. Radiolabeled polymers were detected in organ systems by measuring gamma emission of the (125)iodine radiolabel. The hyperbranched PAMAM dendrimer, hydroxyl-terminated, generation 5 (G5.0-OH), was retained in the kidney over 1 week, whereas the linear HPMA copolymer of comparable molecular weight was excreted into the urine and did not show persistent renal accumulation. PAMAM dendrimer, hydroxyl-terminated, generation 6.0 (G6.0-OH), was taken up by the liver to a higher extent, whereas the HPMA copolymer of comparable molecular weight was observed to have a plasma exposure three times that of this dendrimer. Tumor accumulation and plasma exposure were correlated with the hydrodynamic sizes of the polymers. PAMAM dendrimer, hydroxyl-terminated, generation 7.0 (G7.0-OH), showed extended plasma circulation, enhanced tumor accumulation, and prolonged retention with the highest tumor/blood ratio for the polymers under study. Head-to-head comparative study of HPMA copolymers and PAMAM dendrimers can guide the rational design and development of carriers based on these systems for the delivery of bioactive and imaging agents.

  8. COMPARATIVE BIODISTRIBUTION OF PAMAM DENDRIMERS AND HPMA COPOLYMERS IN OVARIAN TUMOR-BEARING MICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadekar, S.; Ray, A.; Janàt-Amsbury, M.; Peterson, C. M.; Ghandehari, H.

    2010-01-01

    The biodistribution profile of a series of linear N-(2-hydroxylpropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymers were compared with that of branched poly (amido amine) dendrimers containing surface hydroxyl groups (PAMAM-OH) in orthotopic ovarian tumor-bearing mice. Below an average molecular weight (MW) of 29 kDa, the HPMA copolymers were smaller than the PAMAM-OH dendrimers of comparable molecular weight. In addition to molecular weight, hydrodynamic size and polymer architecture affected the biodistribution of these constructs. Biodistribution studies were performed by dosing mice with 125Iodine-labeled polymers and collecting all major organ systems, carcass and excreta at defined time points. Radiolabeled polymers were detected in organ systems by measuring gamma emission of the 125Iodine radiolabel. The hyperbranched PAMAM dendrimer, hydroxyl terminated, generation 5 (G5.0-OH) was retained in the kidney over one week while the linear HPMA copolymer of comparable molecular weight was excreted into the urine and did not show persistent renal accumulation. PAMAM dendrimer, hydroxyl terminated, generation 6.0 (G6.0-OH) was taken up by the liver to a higher extent while the HPMA copolymer of comparable molecular weight was observed to have a plasma exposure three times that of this dendrimer. Tumor accumulation and plasma exposure were correlated with the hydrodynamic sizes of the polymers. PAMAM dendrimer, hydroxyl terminated, generation 7.0 (G7.0-OH) showed extended plasma circulation, enhanced tumor accumulation and prolonged retention with the highest tumor/blood ratio for the polymers under study. Head-to-head comparative study of HPMA copolymers and PAMAM dendrimers can guide the rational design and development of carriers based on these systems for delivery of bioactive and imaging agents. PMID:21128624

  9. Magnetically driven nanoparticles: 18 FDG-radiolabelling and positron emission tomography biodistribution study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Simone, Mariarosaria; Panetta, Daniele; Bramanti, Emilia; Giordano, Cristiana; Salvatici, Maria C; Gherardini, Lisa; Menciassi, Arianna; Burchielli, Silvia; Cinti, Caterina; Salvadori, Piero A

    2016-11-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have received increasing interest as contrast media in biomedical imaging and innovative therapeutic tools, in particular for loco-regional ablative treatments and drug delivery. The future of therapeutic applications would strongly benefit from improving the capability of the nanostructured constructs to reach the selected target, in particular beyond the intravascular space. Besides the decoration of SPIONs surface with ad hoc bioactive molecules, external magnetic fields are in principle able to remotely influence SPIONs' physiological biodistribution and concentrate them to a specific anatomical region or portion of a tissue. The reduction of SPIONs administered to the body and the need for defining the effective SPIONs local concentration suggest that PET/CT may be a method to quantitatively detect the nanoparticles accumulation in vivo at low concentration and assess their tridimensional distribution in response to an external magnetic field and in relation to the local anatomy highlighted by CT imaging. Here, we report on the possibility to assess the spatial distribution of magnetically-driven radiolabelled SPIONs in a peripheral tissue (mouse thigh) with microPET/CT imaging. To this aim we labelled SPIONs using 18 F-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose as a synthon, by chemoselective oxime formation between its open-chain tautomer and nanoparticle amino-groups, and employed microPET/CT imaging to measure the radiolabelled construct biodistribution in a small animal model, following intravenous administration, with and without the application of a permanent magnet onto the skin. The in vivo and ex vivo results showed that micro-PET/CT was able to demonstrate the localizing action of the magnet on SPIONs and provide information, in a multimodal 3D data set, about SPIONs biodistribution taking into account the local anatomy. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Chemical glycan conjugation controls the biodistribution and kinetics of proteins in live animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, A; Kurbangalieva, A; Tanaka, K

    2015-01-01

    The biodistributions and in vivo kinetics of chemically prepared neoglycoproteins have been examined previously and are reviewed here. A variety of mono- and oligosaccharides may be conjugated onto a protein surface using chemical methods. The kinetics and organ-specific accumulation profiles of these glycoconjugates, introduced through intravenous injection, have been analyzed using conventional dissection studies as well as noninvasive methods, such as SPECT, PET, or fluorescence imaging. These studies have revealed glycan-dependent protein distribution kinetics that may be useful for pharmacological and diagnostic applications.

  11. Dependence of pharmacokinetics and biodistribution on polymer architecture: effect of cyclic versus linear polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasongkla, Norased; Chen, Bo; Macaraeg, Nichole; Fox, Megan E; Fréchet, Jean M J; Szoka, Francis C

    2009-03-25

    The ability of a polymer to reptate through a nanopore has an influence on its circulatory half-life and biodistribution, since many physiological barriers contain nanopores. A cyclic polymer lacks chain ends, and therefore, cyclic polymers with molecular weights greater than the renal threshold for elimination should circulate longer than their linear-polymer counterparts when injected into animals. As predicted, radiolabeled cyclic polymers with molecular weights greater than the renal threshold have longer blood circulation times in mice than do linear polymers of comparable molecular weight.

  12. Biodistribution of doxorubicin and nanostructured ferrocarbon carrier particles in organism during magnetically controlled drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, Anatoly A.; Filippov, Victor I.; Nikolskaya, Tatiana A. [Institute of Biochemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Kosygin St. 4, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Budko, Andrei P. [Oncological Center, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kovarskii, Alexander L. [Institute of Biochemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Kosygin St. 4, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Zontov, Sergei V. [Oncological Center, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kogan, Boris Ya. [Institute of Biochemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Kosygin St. 4, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, Oleg A. [Institute of Biochemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Kosygin St. 4, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: kuznetsov_oa@yahoo.com

    2009-05-15

    Biodistribution of doxorubicin and ferrocarbon carrier particles in organism during and after magnetically controlled anti-tumor drug delivery and deposition was studied. Animal tests show high concentration of the cytostatic drug in the target zone, while its concentration is three orders of magnitude lower in bloodstream and other organs. A significant depot of the drug remains on the deposited particles days after the procedure. Macrophages actively phagocytose the ferrocarbon (FeC) particles and remain viable long enough to carry them to the lymph nodes.

  13. Histological assessments for toxicity and functionalization-dependent biodistribution of carbon nanohorns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahara, Yoshio; Zhang Minfang; Yang Mei; Iijima, Sumio; Yudasaka, Masako [Nanotube Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 5-2, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Miyawaki, Jin [JST/SORST, c/o NEC, 34 Miyukigaoka, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8501 (Japan); Waga, Iwao [VALWAY Technology Center, NEC Soft, Ltd, 1-18-7, Shinkiba, Koto-Ku, Tokyo 136-8627 (Japan); Irie, Hiroshi, E-mail: miyawaki@cm.kyushu-u.ac.jp, E-mail: m-yudasaka@aist.go.jp [Teikyo University School of Medicine, 2-11-1 Kaga, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan)

    2011-07-01

    Single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) intravenously administered to mice did not show severe toxicity during a 26-week test period, which was confirmed by normal gross appearance, normal weight gain and the lack of abnormality in the tissues on histological observations of the mice. SWNH biodistribution was influenced by chemical functionalization. Accumulation of SWNH in the lungs reduced as SWNH hydrophilicity increased; however, the most hydrophilic SWNHs modified with bovine serum albumin (BSA) were most likely to be trapped in the lungs, suggesting that the BSA moiety enhanced macrophage phagocytosis in the lungs. Clearance of some of the hydrophobic SWNHs from the lungs was observed, the mechanism of which is briefly discussed.

  14. Application of computed tomography images in the evaluation of magnetic nanoparticles biodistribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Argleydson Leao [Area de Ciencias Tecnologicas, Centro Universitario Franciscano, Rua dos Andradas, 1614, CEP 97010-032, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Kuenzel, Roseli, E-mail: roselikunzel@gmail.co [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-900, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Savarino Levenhagen, Ronaldo [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Rua Arthur Ridel, 275 Jardim Eldorado, CEP 09941-510, Diadema, SP (Brazil); Okuno, Emico [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-900, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2010-08-15

    In this work we evaluate the effectiveness of computed tomography images as a tool to determine magnetic nanoparticle biodistribution over biological tissues. For this purpose, tomography images for magnetic nanoparticles, composed of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, coated with 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), were generated at several material concentrations. The comparison of CT numbers, calculated from these images generated at clinical conditions, with typical CT numbers for biological tissues, shows that the detection of nanoparticle in most tissues is only possible for high material concentrations.

  15. Dosimetry audit simulation of treatment planning system in multicenters radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasmuri, S.; Pawiro, S. A.

    2017-07-01

    Treatment Planning System (TPS) is an important modality that determines radiotherapy outcome. TPS requires input data obtained through commissioning and the potentially error occurred. Error in this stage may result in the systematic error. The aim of this study to verify the TPS dosimetry to know deviation range between calculated and measurement dose. This study used CIRS phantom 002LFC representing the human thorax and simulated all external beam radiotherapy stages. The phantom was scanned using CT Scanner and planned 8 test cases that were similar to those in clinical practice situation were made, tested in four radiotherapy centers. Dose measurement using 0.6 cc ionization chamber. The results of this study showed that generally, deviation of all test cases in four centers was within agreement criteria with average deviation about -0.17±1.59 %, -1.64±1.92 %, 0.34±1.34 % and 0.13±1.81 %. The conclusion of this study was all TPS involved in this study showed good performance. The superposition algorithm showed rather poor performance than either analytic anisotropic algorithm (AAA) and convolution algorithm with average deviation about -1.64±1.92 %, -0.17±1.59 % and -0.27±1.51 % respectively.

  16. On the role of exponential smoothing in circadian dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Luke L A

    2014-01-01

    The effects lighting has on health through modulation of circadian rhythms are becoming increasingly well documented. Data are still needed to show how light exposures are influenced by architecture and lighting design and circadian dosimetry analyses should provide duration, phase and amplitude measures of 24 h exposure profiles. Exponential smoothing is used to derive suitable metrics from 24 h light measurements collected from private dwellings. A further application of these modified exposure time series as physiological models of the light drive is discussed. Unlike previous light drive models, the dose rate persists into periods of darkness following exposures. Comparisons to long duration exposure studies suggest this type of persistent light drive model could be incorporated into contemporary physiological models of the human circadian oscillator. © 2014 Crown copyright. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology. This article is published with the permission of the Controller of HMSO and the Queen's Printer for Scotland and Public Health England.

  17. Manganese dosimetry: species differences and implications for neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschner, Michael; Erikson, Keith M; Dorman, David C

    2005-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential mineral that is found at low levels in food, water, and the air. Under certain high-dose exposure conditions, elevations in tissue manganese levels can occur. Excessive manganese accumulation can result in adverse neurological, reproductive, and respiratory effects in both laboratory animals and humans. In humans, manganese-induced neurotoxicity (manganism) is the overriding concern since affected individuals develop a motor dysfunction syndrome that is recognized as a form of parkinsonism. This review primarily focuses on the essentiality and toxicity of manganese and considers contemporary studies evaluating manganese dosimetry and its transport across the blood-brain barrier, and its distribution within the central nervous system (CNS). These studies have dramatically improved our understanding of the health risks posed by manganese by determining exposure conditions that lead to increased concentrations of this metal within the CNS and other target organs. Most individuals are exposed to manganese by the oral and inhalation routes of exposure; however, parenteral injection and other routes of exposure are important. Interactions between manganese and iron and other divalent elements occur and impact the toxicokinetics of manganese, especially following oral exposure. The oxidation state and solubility of manganese also influence the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination of manganese. Manganese disposition is influenced by the route of exposure. Rodent inhalation studies have shown that manganese deposited within the nose can undergo direct transport to the brain along the olfactory nerve. Species differences in manganese toxicokinetics and response are recognized with nonhuman primates replicating CNS effects observed in humans while rodents do not. Potentially susceptible populations, such as fetuses, neonates, individuals with compromised hepatic function, individuals with suboptimal manganese or iron intake, and

  18. Exploring uptake and biodistribution of polystyrene (nano)particles in zebrafish embryos at different developmental stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Pomeren, M; Brun, N R; Peijnenburg, W J G M; Vijver, M G

    2017-09-01

    In ecotoxicology, it is continuously questioned whether (nano)particle exposure results in particle uptake and subsequent biodistribution or if particles adsorb to the epithelial layer only. To contribute to answering this question, we investigated different uptake routes in zebrafish embryos and how they affect particle uptake into organs and within whole organisms. This is addressed by exposing three different life stages of the zebrafish embryo in order to cover the following exposure routes: via chorion and dermal exposure; dermal exposure; oral and dermal exposure. How different nanoparticle sizes affect uptake routes was assessed by using polystyrene particles of 25, 50, 250 and 700nm. In our experimental study, we showed that particle uptake in biota is restricted to oral exposure, whereas the dermal route resulted in adsorption to the epidermis and gills only. Ingestion followed by biodistribution was observed for the tested particles of 25 and 50nm. The particles spread through the body and eventually accumulated in specific organs and tissues such as the eyes. Particles larger than 50nm were predominantly adsorbed onto the intestinal tract and outer epidermis of zebrafish embryos. Embryos exposed to particles via both epidermis and intestine showed highest uptake and eventually accumulated particles in the eye, whereas uptake of particles via the chorion and epidermis resulted in marginal uptake. Organ uptake and internal distribution should be monitored more closely to provide more in depth information of the toxicity of particles. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Biocompatibility of thermally hydrocarbonized porous silicon nanoparticles and their biodistribution in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimbo, Luis M; Sarparanta, Mirkka; Santos, Hélder A; Airaksinen, Anu J; Mäkilä, Ermei; Laaksonen, Timo; Peltonen, Leena; Lehto, Vesa-Pekka; Hirvonen, Jouni; Salonen, Jarno

    2010-06-22

    Porous silicon (PSi) particles have been studied for the effects they elicit in Caco-2 and RAW 264.7 macrophage cells in terms of toxicity, oxidative stress, and inflammatory response. The most suitable particles were then functionalized with a novel (18)F label to assess their biodistribution after enteral and parenteral administration in a rat model. The results show that thermally hydrocarbonized porous silicon (THCPSi) nanoparticles did not induce any significant toxicity, oxidative stress, or inflammatory response in Caco-2 and RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. Fluorescently labeled nanoparticles were associated with the cells surface but were not extensively internalized. Biodistribution studies in rats using novel (18)F-labeled THCPSi nanoparticles demonstrated that the particles passed intact through the gastrointestinal tract after oral administration and were also not absorbed from a subcutaneous deposit. After intravenous administration, the particles were found mainly in the liver and spleen, indicating rapid removal from the circulation. Overall, these silicon-based nanosystems exhibit excellent in vivo stability, low cytotoxicity, and nonimmunogenic profiles, ideal for oral drug delivery purposes.

  20. Intravenous delivery of hydrophobin-functionalized porous silicon nanoparticles: stability, plasma protein adsorption and biodistribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarparanta, Mirkka; Bimbo, Luis M; Rytkönen, Jussi; Mäkilä, Ermei; Laaksonen, Timo J; Laaksonen, Päivi; Nyman, Markus; Salonen, Jarno; Linder, Markus B; Hirvonen, Jouni; Santos, Hélder A; Airaksinen, Anu J

    2012-03-05

    Rapid immune recognition and subsequent elimination from the circulation hampers the use of many nanomaterials as carriers to targeted drug delivery and controlled release in the intravenous route. Here, we report the effect of a functional self-assembled protein coating on the intravenous biodistribution of (18)F-labeled thermally hydrocarbonized porous silicon (THCPSi) nanoparticles in rats. (18)F-Radiolabeling enables the sensitive and easy quantification of nanoparticles in tissues using radiometric methods and allows imaging of the nanoparticle biodistribution with positron emission tomography. Coating with Trichoderma reesei HFBII altered the hydrophobicity of (18)F-THCPSi nanoparticles and resulted in a pronounced change in the degree of plasma protein adsorption to the nanoparticle surface in vitro. The HFBII-THCPSi nanoparticles were biocompatible in RAW 264.7 macrophages and HepG2 liver cells making their intravenous administration feasible. In vivo, the distribution of the nanoparticles between the liver and spleen, the major mononuclear phagocyte system organs in the body, was altered compared to that of uncoated (18)F-THCPSi. Identification of the adsorbed proteins revealed that certain opsonins and apolipoproteins are enriched in HFBII-functionalized nanoparticles, whereas the adsorption of abundant plasma components such as serum albumin and fibrinogen is decreased.

  1. Toxicity and biodistribution of activated and non-activated intravenous iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, J. A.; Ogden, J. A.; Strawbridge, R. R.; Pierce, Z. E.; Hoopes, P. J.

    2009-02-01

    The use of nanoparticles in medical treatment has prompted the question of their safety. In this study, the pathophysiology and biodistribution of three different concentrations of intravenously-delivered dextran-coated Fe3O4 iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) were evaluated in mice. Some groups of mice were exposed to an AC magnetic field (AMF) at levels comparable with those proposed for cancer treatments. Iron biodistribution analysis for both AMF and non-AMF treated mice was performed for all three concentrations used (.6 mg Fe/mouse, 1.8 mg Fe/mouse, and 5.6 mg Fe/mouse). Blood urea nitrogen, alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, total serum protein, and creatinine were also assessed at 4 hours, 7 days, and 14 days post-injection. Histological analysis of lung, spleen, heart, liver, and kidney tissue was conducted at 7 and 14 days post-injection. Prussian blue and H&E stains were used to histomorphometrically assess iron content in the tissues studied. Preliminary results demonstrate small temporary elevation in liver enzymes and hepatocyte vacuolization at all iron concentrations studied. Liver and spleen were the primary sites of IONP deposition. None of the animals demonstrated systemic or local toxicity or illness, with or without AMF activation.

  2. Cytoreductive chemotherapy improves the biodistribution of antibodies directed against tumor necrosis in murine solid tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Julie K; Khawli, Leslie A; Park, Ryan; Wu, Brian W; Li, Zibo; Canter, David; Conti, Peter S; Epstein, Alan L

    2013-12-01

    Current strategies in cancer treatment employ combinations of different treatment modalities, which include chemotherapy, radiotherapy, immunotherapy, and surgery. Consistent with that approach, the present study demonstrates how chemotherapeutic agents can potentiate the delivery of radiolabeled, necrosis-targeting antibodies (chTNT-3, NHS76) to tumor. All chemotherapeutics in this study (5-fluorouracil, etoposide, vinblastine, paclitaxel, and doxorubicin) resulted in statistically significant increases in tumor uptake of radiolabeled antibodies and their F(ab')2 fragments compared to no pretreatment with chemotherapy. Labeled antibodies were administered at various time points following a single dose of chemotherapy in multiple tumor models, and the biodistribution of the antibodies was determined by measuring radioactivity in harvested tissues. MicroPET/CT was also done to demonstrate clinical relevancy of using chemotherapy pretreatment to increase antibody uptake. Results of biodistribution and imaging data reveal specific time frames following chemotherapy when necrosis-targeting antibodies are best delivered, either for imaging or radiotherapy. Thus, the present work offers the prospect of using cytoreductive chemotherapy to increase tumor accumulation of select therapeutic antibodies, especially when combined with other forms of immunotherapy, for the successful treatment of solid tumors. ©2013 AACR.

  3. Effect of iron deficiency anemia on the biodistribution of {sup 99m}Tc radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmanovici, Gabriela P. [Radioisotopes Laboratory, Physics Department, School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, University of Buenos Aires, Junin 956 - 1113, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Salgueiro, Maria J. [Radioisotopes Laboratory, Physics Department, School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, University of Buenos Aires, Junin 956 - 1113, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Janjetic, Mariana A. [Physics Department, School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, University of Buenos Aires, Junin 956 - 1113, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Leonardi, Natalia M. [Radioisotopes Laboratory, Physics Department, School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, University of Buenos Aires, Junin 956 - 1113, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Boccio, Jose R. [Physics Department, School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, University of Buenos Aires, Junin 956 - 1113, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Zubillaga, Marcela B. [Radioisotopes Laboratory, Physics Department, School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, University of Buenos Aires, Junin 956 - 1113, Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. E-mail: mzubi@ffyb.uba.ar

    2006-05-15

    The distribution of colloids and labeled cells in organs is influenced by their intrinsic properties and by the state of the investigated subject. Iron deficiency remains an unsolved nutritional problem all over the world; one of its severe consequences is anemia. Because iron metabolism principally takes place in the liver, spleen, bone marrow, skeletal muscle and blood, we studied the effect of iron deficiency anemia on the biodistribution of {sup 99m}Tc phytate, {sup 99m}Tc gelatin colloid and {sup 99m}Tc RBC (red blood cells labeled with {sup 99m}Tc). Our results show that iron deficiency anemia modifies the pattern of biodistribution of the two colloids assayed. However, this behavior is different for both of them. This work contributes to studies that kinetically and statistically establish that iron deficiency anemia induces a significant inversion in the spleen-liver activity relationship when centellographic studies are performed with colloids such as {sup 99m}Tc phytate.

  4. Photophysical characterization of cumarin-doped poly (lactic acid) microparticles and visualization of the biodistribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Shigeaki, E-mail: sabe@den.hokudai.ac.j [Department of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita 13, Nishi 7, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan); Kiba, Takayuki; Hosokawa, Kiyotada; Nitobe, Satoru; Hirota, Takashi; Kobayashi, Hirohisa [Division of Biotechnology and Macromolecular Chemistry, Graduate School of Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Akasaka, Tsukasa; Uo, Motohiro; Kuboki, Yoshinori [Department of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita 13, Nishi 7, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan); Sato, Shin-Ichiro [Division of Biotechnology and Macromolecular Chemistry, Graduate School of Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Watari, Fumio [Department of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita 13, Nishi 7, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan); Rosca, Iosif D. [Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science, Concordia University, 1455 de Maisonneuve Blvd. W, Montreal, QC H3G 1M8 (Canada)

    2010-08-15

    We prepared fluorescent coumarin dye-doped poly (acrylic acid) microparticles, which are well known as a biodegradable polyester, and the photophysical properties were characterized by scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscope and spectroscopic investigation. Spherical particles with diameters ranging from 0.5 to a few {mu}m were obtained. Based on spectroscopic investigation, the internal environment was close to that of a polar solvent such as methanol, and the dyes were dispersed without aggregation inside the particles. The obtained particles were administered to a mouse through the tail vein, and the biodistribution was then observed after some organs were excited at 1-day and 1-week post-injection. The particles were accumulated in the organs, especially in the lung and spleen. After injection, the particles were trapped temporally in the lung, and then seemed to be transported to other organs by blood circulation. This tendency is similar to the biodistribution of TiO{sub 2} microparticles that we have reported previously.

  5. Toxicology and biodistribution study of CIGB-230, a DNA vaccine against hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacardí, Dania; Amador-Cañizares, Yalena; Cosme, Karelia; Urquiza, Dioslaida; Suárez, José; Marante, Jeny; Viña, Ariel; Vázquez, Ariel; Concepción, Joel; Pupo, Maylín; Aldana, Lizet; Soria, Yordanka; Romero, Juan; Madrigal, Roberto; Martínez, Leticia; Hernández, Lourdes; González, Idania; Dueñas-Carrera, Santiago

    2009-08-01

    CIGB-230, a mixture of a DNA plasmid expressing hepatitis C virus (HCV) structural antigens and a HCV recombinant capsid protein, has demonstrated to elicit strong immune responses in animals. The present study evaluated the plasmid biodistribution after the administration of CIGB-230 in mice, as well as toxicity of this vaccine candidate in rats. In the biodistribution study, mice received single or repeated intramuscular injections of CIGB-230, 50 microg of plasmid DNA mixed with 5 microg of Co.120 protein. Plasmid presence was assessed in ovaries, kidney, liver, pancreas, mesenteric ganglion, blood, and muscle of the injection site by a qualitative polymerase chain reaction. The toxicology evaluation included treatment groups receiving doses 5, 15, or 50 times higher, according to the body weight, than the expected therapeutic clinical dose. During the first hour after repeated inoculation, a promiscuous distribution was observed. However, 3 months later, plasmid could not be detected in any tissue. There was an absence of detectable adverse effects on key toxicology parameters and no damage evidenced in inspected organs and tissues. These results indicate that CIGB-230 is nontoxic at local and systemic levels and no concerns about persistence are observed, which support clinical testing of this vaccine candidate against HCV.

  6. Proteomic Analysis of Serum Opsonins Impacting Biodistribution and Cellular Association of Porous Silicon Microparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita E. Serda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mass transport of drug delivery vehicles is guided by particle properties, such as size, shape, composition, and surface chemistry, as well as biomolecules and serum proteins that adsorb to the particle surface. In an attempt to identify serum proteins influencing cellular associations and biodistribution of intravascularly injected particles, we used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry to identify proteins eluted from the surface of cationic and anionic silicon microparticles. Cationic microparticles displayed a 25-fold greater abundance of Ig light variable chain, fibrinogen, and complement component 1 compared to their anionic counterparts. Anionic microparticles were found to accumulate in equal abundance in murine liver and spleen, whereas cationic microparticles showed preferential accumulation in the spleen. Immunohistochemistry supported macrophage uptake of both anionic and cationic microparticles in the liver, as well as evidence of association of cationic microparticles with hepatic endothelial cells. Furthermore, scanning electron micrographs supported cellular competition for cationic microparticles by endothelial cells and macrophages. Despite high macrophage content in the lungs and tumor, microparticle uptake by these cells was minimal, supporting differences in the repertoire of surface receptors expressed by tissue-specific macrophages. In summary, particle surface chemistry drives selective binding of serum components impacting cellular interactions and biodistribution.

  7. Real-time liver uptake and biodistribution of magnetic nanoparticles determined by AC biosusceptometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quini, Caio C; Próspero, André G; Calabresi, Marcos F F; Moretto, Gustavo M; Zufelato, Nicholas; Krishnan, Sunil; Pina, Diana R; Oliveira, Ricardo B; Baffa, Oswaldo; Bakuzis, Andris F; Miranda, Jose R A

    2017-05-01

    We describe the development of a joint in vivo/ex vivo protocol to monitor magnetic nanoparticles in animal models. Alternating current biosusceptometry (ACB) enables the assessment of magnetic nanoparticle accumulation, followed by quantitative analysis of concentrations in organs of interest. We present a study of real-time liver accumulation, followed by the assessment of sequential biodistribution using the same technique. For quantification, we validated our results by comparing all of the data with electron spin resonance (ESR). The ACB had viable temporal resolution and accuracy to differentiate temporal parameters of liver accumulation, caused by vasculature extravasation and macrophages action. The biodistribution experiment showed different uptake profiles for different doses and injection protocols. Comparisons with the ESR system indicated a correlation index of 0.993. We present the ACB system as an accessible and versatile tool to monitor magnetic nanoparticles, allowing in vivo and real-time evaluations of distribution and quantitative assessments of particle concentrations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Quantitative biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of multimodal gadolinium-based nanoparticles for lungs using ultrashort TE MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Andrea; Dufort, Sandrine; Lux, François; Courtois, Arnaud; Tillement, Olivier; Coll, Jean-Luc; Crémillieux, Yannick

    2014-08-01

    To study the biodistribution and lung pharmacokinetics of tracheally administered gadolinium-based contrast agents [gadoteric acid and multimodal ultra-small rigid platforms (USRPs)], to validate their pharmacokinetics against optical imaging of fluorescent USRPs, and to test their short-term toxicity. Ultrashort echo-time (UTE) lung proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed at 4.7-Tesla (T) after the intratracheal instillation of different concentrations of contrast agent solutions in mice. Pharmacokinetic models were implemented on the absolute concentration calculated from the MRI signal enhancement measurements. Fluorescent USRPs were used to obtain optical images with the same protocol. Bronchoalveolar lavage inflammatory cell count and serum creatinine measurement were performed on four groups of instilled mice (sham, saline, USRPs, lipopolysaccharide). MR and optical imaging showed similar kinetics of the USRPs, passing from the airways to the lung tissue and to the kidneys, with negligible hepatic clearance. No significant increase of lung and renal inflammation markers were observed in USRP-instilled animals. A T 1-weighted radial UTE sequence was found to be valuable in quantitatively monitoring the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of nanoparticles in the lungs of mice. The observed favorable pharmacokinetics, which was validated by fluorescence imaging, ensures the negligible toxicity of the nanoprobes, making the USRPs and the developed protocol good candidates for applications on selected lung diseases.

  9. Proteomic Analysis of Serum Opsonins Impacting Biodistribution and Cellular Association of Porous Silicon Microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serda, Rita E.; Blanco, Elvin; Mack, Aaron; Stafford, Susan J.; Amra, Sarah; Li, Qingpo; van de Ven, Anne L.; Tanaka, Takemi; Torchilin, Vladimir P.; Wiktorowicz, John E.; Ferrari, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Mass transport of drug delivery vehicles is guided by particle properties, such as shape, composition and surface chemistry, as well as biomolecules and serum proteins that adsorb to the particle surface. In an attempt to identify serum proteins influencing cellular associations and biodistribution of intravascularly injected particles, we used two dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry to identify proteins eluted from the surface of cationic and anionic silicon microparticles. Cationic microparticles displayed a 25-fold greater abundance of Ig light chain variable region, fibrinogen, and complement component 1 compared to their anionic counterparts. The anionic-surface favored equal accumulation of microparticles in the liver and spleen, while cationic-surfaces favored preferential accumulation in the spleen. Immunohistochemistry supported macrophage internalization of both anionic and cationic silicon microparticles in the liver, as well as evidence of association of cationic microparticles with hepatic endothelial cells. Furthermore, scanning electron micrographs supported cellular competition for cationic microparticles by endothelial cells and macrophages. Despite high macrophage content in the lungs and tumor, microparticle uptake by these cells was minimal, supporting differences in the repertoire of surface receptors expressed by tissue-specific macrophages. In summary, particle surface chemistry drives selective binding of serum components impacting cellular interactions and biodistribution. PMID:21303614

  10. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of recently-developed siRNA nanomedicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinho; Park, Joonyoung; Pei, Yihua; Xu, Jun; Yeo, Yoon

    2016-09-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) is a promising drug candidate, expected to have broad therapeutic potentials toward various diseases including viral infections and cancer. With recent advances in bioconjugate chemistry and carrier technology, several siRNA-based drugs have advanced to clinical trials. However, most cases address local applications or diseases in the filtering organs, reflecting remaining challenges in systemic delivery of siRNA. The difficulty in siRNA delivery is in large part due to poor circulation stability and unfavorable pharmacokinetics and biodistribution profiles of siRNA. This review describes the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of siRNA nanomedicines, focusing on those reported in the past 5years, and their pharmacological effects in selected disease models such as hepatocellular carcinoma, liver infections, and respiratory diseases. The examples discussed here will provide an insight into the current status of the art and unmet needs in siRNA delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. In vivo evaluation of the biodistribution of intravenously administered naked and functionalised silver nanoparticles in rabbit

    KAUST Repository

    Ashraf, Ayesha

    2015-12-01

    Water-based suspension of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and dextran coated AgNPs (dextran-AgNPs) are fabricated and characterised for intravenous administration. A simple method for radiolabelling of nanoparticles with 99mTc was used. Labelling efficiency for AgNPs and dextran-AgNPs was found to be more than 80 and 88%, respectively. In vivo tissue uptake of nanoparticles during dynamic phase, after systematic administration by biodistribution analysis with single-photon emission computed tomography imaging has been evaluated. Biodistribution analysis revealed that 99mTc-AgNPs and 99mTc-dextran-AgNPs are mainly accumulated in liver/spleen region but 99mTc-dextran-AgNPs delayed recognition and uptake by liver. Results indicate that dextran-AgNPs are able to evade reticuloendothelum system with enhanced blood retention time. Accumulation of nanoparticles in liver/spleen region implicates the utilisation of AgNPs for liver cancer treatment. © 2015 The Institution of Engineering and Technology.

  12. Boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) as a potential therapy for rheumatoid arthritis: boron biodistribution study in a model of antigen-induced arthritis in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivillin, Verónica A; Abramson, David B; Bumaguin, Gaston E; Bruno, Leandro J; Garabalino, Marcela A; Monti Hughes, Andrea; Heber, Elisa M; Feldman, Sara; Schwint, Amanda E

    2014-11-01

    Boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) is explored for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the present study was to perform boron biodistribution studies in a model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) in female New Zealand rabbits, with the boron carriers boronophenylalanine (BPA) and sodium decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) to assess the potential feasibility of BNCS for RA. Rabbits in chronic phase of AIA were used for biodistribution studies employing the following protocols: intra-articular (ia) (a) BPA-f 0.14 M (0.7 mg (10)B), (b) GB-10 (5 mg (10)B), (c) GB-10 (50 mg (10)B) and intravenous (iv), (d) BPA-f 0.14 M (15.5 mg (10)B/kg), (e) GB-10 (50 mg (10)B/kg), and (f) BPA-f (15.5 mg (10)B/kg) + GB-10 (50 mg (10)B/kg). At different post-administration times (13-85 min for ia and 3 h for iv), samples of blood, pathological synovium (target tissue), cartilage, tendon, muscle, and skin were taken for boron measurement by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The intra-articular administration protocols at boron concentrations (>20 ppm) in the pathological synovium. Dosimetric estimations suggest that BNCS would be able to achieve a therapeutically useful dose in pathological synovium without exceeding the radiotolerance of normal tissues in the treatment volume, employing boron carriers approved for use in humans. Radiobiological in vivo studies will be necessary to determine the actual therapeutic efficacy of BNCS to treat RA in an experimental model.

  13. The program of international intercomparison of accident dosimetry; Le programme d'intercomparaison internationale de dosimetrie d'accident 10-12 juin 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-06-01

    The French institute of radioprotection and nuclear safety (IRSN) has carried out in June 2002 an international intercomparison program for the testing of the physical and biological accident dosimetry techniques. The intercomparison is jointly organized by the IRSN and the OECD-NEA with the sustain of the European commission and the collaboration of the CEA centre of Valduc (France). About 30 countries have participated to this program. Each country has supplied its own dosimeters and biological samples which have been irradiated using the Silene reactor of CEA-Valduc or a {sup 60}Co source. These experiments allow to test the new dosimetric techniques that have been developed since the previous intercomparison program (1993) and to confirm or improve the performances of older techniques. Aside from the intercomparison exercise, this report makes a status of the known radiological accidents and of the effects of high doses of ionizing radiations on human health (symptoms, therapeutics). It explains the phenomenology of criticality accidents, the prevention means, and the history of such accidents up to the Tokai-Mura one in 1999. Finally, the dosimetry of criticality is presented with its physical and biological techniques. (J.S.)

  14. Optoacoustic online dosimetry during selective RPE treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuele, Georg; Elsner, Hanno; Hoerauf, Hans; Framme, Carsten; Roider, Johann; Birngruber, Reginald; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2004-07-01

    Introduction: The selective RPE treatment (SRT) is a new method, which targets retinal diseases associated with disorders in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). By applying a train of μs laser pulses, it is possible to selectively damage RPE cells while sparing the adjacent photoreceptors and the neural retina. Due to the ophthalmoscopic invisibility of the RPE effects we investigated an optoacoustic (OA) on-line dosimetry system to monitor RPE damage non-invasively. Material and Methods: For in vitro experiments porcine RPE was irradiated with a Nd:YLF laser pulse train (527nm, 1.7μs, 5-40μJ, 30 pulses, 100 Hz). Pressure waves (optoacoustic transients) generated at the RPE were measured with a piezoelectric transducer. The RPE cell damage was visualised by fluorescence microscopy by means of the vitality stain CalceinAM. During 27 patient treatments (527nm, 1.7μs, 50-150μJ, 30 pulses, 100 Hz) the optoacoustic signals were measured with an ultrasonic transducer embedded in the contact lens. The RPE leakage was visualized by fluorescein and ICG angiography. Results: In vitro: Below the RPE cell damage threshold, the optoacoustic transients from each single pulse are almost similar. With RPE damage, fluctuations of the individual transients are observed during the pulse train. These fluctuations can be explained by statistical irregular microbubble formation around the strong light absorbing melanosomes inside the RPE cells, which occur after the temperature exceeds the vaporization threshold. The transient microbubbles probably lead to RPE cell disruption. An optoacoustic value (OA-value) calculated from the fluctuations was defined in order to assess RPE damage. Patient treatment: If optoacoustic pulse-to-pulse fluctuations were measured, RPE leakage was observed in fluorescein and ICG angiography. In 96% of the irradiated areas, RPE-leakage in fluorescein angiography and OA-value correlated. The stronger the optoacoustic pulse-to-pulse fluctuations, thus

  15. Imaging bio-distribution of a topically applied dermatological cream on minipig skin using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Aneesh; Chaney, Eric J.; Criley, Jennifer M.; Spillman, Darold R.; Hutchison, Phaedra B.; Li, Joanne; Marjanovic, Marina; Frey, Steve; Cook, Steven; Boppart, Stephen A.; Arp, Zane A.

    2017-02-01

    Currently there is a lack of in vivo techniques to evaluate the spatial bio-distribution of dermal drugs over time without the need to take multiple serial biopsies. To address this gap, we investigated the use of multi-photon optical imaging methods to non-invasively track drug distribution on miniature pig (Species: Sus scrofa, Strain: Göttingen) skin in vivo. Minipig skin is the standard comparative research model to human skin, and is anatomically and functionally similar. We employed fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to visualize the spatial distribution and residency time of a topically applied experimental dermatological cream. This was made possible by the endogenous fluorescent optical properties of the experimental drug (fluorescence lifetime > 3000 ps). Two different drug formulations were applied on 2 minipigs for 7 consecutive days, with the control creams applied on the contralateral side, followed by 7 days of post-application monitoring using a multi-modal optical imaging system (MPTflex-CARS, JenLab, Germany). FLIM images were obtained from the treated regions 24 hr post-application from day 1 to day 14 that allowed visualization of cellular and sub-cellular features associated with different dermal layers non-invasively to a depth of 200 µm. Five punch biopsies per animal were obtained from the corresponding treated regions between days 8 and 14 for bioanalytical analysis and comparison with results obtained using FLIM. In conclusion, utilization of non-invasive optical biopsy methods for dermal drug evaluation can provide true longitudinal monitoring of drug spatial distribution, remove sampling limitations, and be more time-efficient compared to traditional methods.

  16. Fluorescent nanoparticles present in Coca-Cola and Pepsi-Cola: physiochemical properties, cytotoxicity, biodistribution and digestion studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shen; Jiang, Chengkun; Wang, Haitao; Cong, Shuang; Tan, Mingqian

    2018-02-01

    Foodborne nanoparticles (NPs) have drawn great attention due to human health concerns. This study reports the detection of the presence of fluorescent NPs, about 5 nm, in two of the most popular beverages, Coca-Cola (Coke) and Pepsi-Cola (Pepsi). The NPs contain H, C and O, three elements with a tunable emission and with a quantum yield of 3.3 and 4.3% for Coke and Pepsi, respectively. The presence of sp 3 -hybridized carbon atoms of alcohols and ethers bonds was confirmed by NMR analysis. The NPs can be taken up by living cells and accumulate within cell membrane and cytoplasm. Evaluation of the acute toxicity of the NPs revealed that the BALB/c mice appeared healthy after administration of a single dose of 2 g kg -1 body weight. Analysis of glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT), glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), urea and creatinine showed that there were statistically, but not biologically, significant differences in some of these biochemical parameters between the test and control groups. No obvious organ damage or apparent histopathological abnormality was observed in the tested mice. The biodistribution study in major organs indicated that the NPs were easily accumulated in the digestive tract, and they were able to cross the blood-brain barrier and dispersed in the brain. In vitro digestion of the NPs showed a significant fluorescence quenching of the NPs. This work represents the first report of foodborne fluorescent NPs present in Coke and Pepsi, and provides valuable insights into physicochemical properties of these NPs and their toxicity characteristics both in vitro and in vivo.

  17. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2011-04-04

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with requirements of 10 CFR 835, the DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program, the DOE Richland Operations Office, DOE Office of River Protection, DOE Pacific Northwest Office of Science, and Hanford’s DOE contractors. The dosimetry system is operated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Hanford External Dosimetry Program which provides dosimetry services to PNNL and all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since its inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. The first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture database was designated Revision 0. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving significant changes to all chapters in the document. Revision

  18. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2010-04-01

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with requirements of 10 CFR 835, the DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program, the DOE Richland Operations Office, DOE Office of River Protection, DOE Pacific Northwest Office of Science, and Hanford’s DOE contractors. The dosimetry system is operated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Hanford External Dosimetry Program which provides dosimetry services to PNNL and all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since its inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. The first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture database was designated Revision 0. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving significant changes to all chapters in the document. Revision

  19. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2007-03-12

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNL’s Hanford External Dosimetry Program (HEDP) which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee (HPDAC) which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. Rev. 0 marks the first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving changes to all chapters in the document. Revision numbers that include a decimal fraction reflect minor revisions, usually restricted to selected chapters or selected pages in the document. Revision Log: Rev. 0 (2/25/2005) Major revision and expansion. Rev. 0.1 (3/12/2007) Minor

  20. Oxygen measurements to improve singlet oxygen dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Michele M.; Penjweini, Rozhin; Ong, Yi Hong; Finlay, Jarod C.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2017-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves interactions between the three main components of light fluence, photosensitizer concentration, and oxygenation. Currently, singlet oxygen explicit dosimetry (SOED) has focused on the first two of these components. The macroscopic model to calculate reacted singlet oxygen has previously involved a fixed initial ground state oxygen concentration. A phosphorescence-based oxygen probe was used to measure ground state oxygen concentration throughout treatments for mice bearing radioactively induced fibroscarcoma tumors. Photofrin-, BPD-, and HPPH-mediated PDT was performed on mice. Model-calculated oxygen and measured oxygen was compared to evaluate the macroscopic model as well as the photochemical parameters involved. Oxygen measurements at various depths were compared to calculated values. Furthermore, we explored the use of noninvasive diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) to measure tumor blood flow changes in response to PDT to improve the model calculation of reacted singlet oxygen. Mice were monitored after treatment to see the effect of oxygenation on long-term recurrence-free survival as well as the efficacy of using reacted singlet oxygen as a predictive measure of outcome. Measurement of oxygenation during treatment helps to improve SOED as well as confirm the photochemical parameters involved in the macroscopic model. Use of DCS in predicting oxygenation changes was also investigated.

  1. IMBA Expert: internal dosimetry made simple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchall, A; Puncher, M; James, A C; Marsh, J W; Jarvis, N S; Peace, M S; Davis, K; King, D J

    2003-01-01

    In 1997, a collaboration between British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL), Westlakes Research Institute and NRPB started, with the aim of producing IMBA (Integrated Modules for Bioassay Analysis), a suite of software modules that implement the new ICRP models for estimation of intakes and doses. This was partly in response to new UK regulations, and partly due to the requirement for a unified approach in estimating intakes and doses from bioassay measurements within the UK. Over the past 5 years, the IMBA modules have been developed further, have gone through extensive quality assurance, and are now used for routine dose assessment by approved dosimetry services throughout the UK. More recently, interest in the IMBA methodology has been shown by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), and in 2001 an ambitious project to develop a software package (IMBA Expert USDOE Edition) which would meet the requirements of all of the major USDOE sites began. Interest in IMBA Expert is now being expressed in many other countries. The aim of this paper is to outline the origin and evolution of the IMBA modules (the past); to describe the full capabilities of the current IMBA Expert system (the present) and to indicate possible future directions in terms of capabilities and availability (the future).

  2. Artificial neural networks in neutron dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H.R.; Hernandez D, V.M.; Manzanares A, E.; Mercado, G.A.; Perales M, W.A.; Robles R, J.A. [Unidades Academicas de Estudios Nucleares, UAZ, A.P. 336, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico); Gallego, E.; Lorente, A. [Depto. de Ingenieria Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    An artificial neural network has been designed to obtain the neutron doses using only the Bonner spheres spectrometer's count rates. Ambient, personal and effective neutron doses were included. 187 neutron spectra were utilized to calculate the Bonner count rates and the neutron doses. The spectra were transformed from lethargy to energy distribution and were re-binned to 31 energy groups using the MCNP 4C code. Re-binned spectra, UTA4 response matrix and fluence-to-dose coefficients were used to calculate the count rates in Bonner spheres spectrometer and the doses. Count rates were used as input and the respective doses were used as output during neural network training. Training and testing was carried out in Mat lab environment. The artificial neural network performance was evaluated using the {chi}{sup 2}- test, where the original and calculated doses were compared. The use of Artificial Neural Networks in neutron dosimetry is an alternative procedure that overcomes the drawbacks associated in this ill-conditioned problem. (Author)

  3. Student perceptions of an online medical dosimetry program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenards, Nishele

    2011-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin-La Crosse offers the first online medical dosimetry program in the nation. There is no data to research a program of this type. This research consisted of the evaluation of other distance education programs including health profession programs in addition to face-to-face medical dosimetry programs. There was a need to collect and analyze student perceptions of online learning in medical dosimetry. This research provided a guide for future implementation by other programs as well as validated the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse program. Methodology used consisted of an electronic survey sent to all previous and currently enrolled students in the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse medical dosimetry program. The survey was both quantitative and qualitative in demonstrating attitudinal perceptions of students in the program. Quantitative data was collected and analyzed using a 5-point Likert scale. Qualitative data was gathered based on the open-ended responses and the identifying themes from the responses. The results demonstrated an overall satisfaction with this program, the instructor, and the online courses. Students felt a sense of belonging to the courses and the program. Considering that a majority of the students had never taken an online course previously, the students felt there were no technology issues. Future research should include an evaluation of board exam statistics for students enrolled in the online and face-to-face medical dosimetry programs. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The relevance of dosimetry in animal models of cochlear irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujica-Mota, Mario A; Devic, Slobodan; Daniel, Sam J

    2014-04-01

    To compare dose measurements of three different irradiation setups for an animal model of unilateral cochlear irradiation using radiochromic films positioned at the cochlear plane. A method of dosimetry is proposed. Radiation field simulation was performed to locate the cochlear plane for irradiation experiments using CT scan images. Fifteen film pieces were irradiated at the cochlear plane with 3 different irradiation field sizes. A 12-mm diameter field (n = 5), 5.7 mm diameter field (n = 5), and a 6.5 × 7.2 mm field (n = 5). After obtaining an ideal irradiation field size, 15 film pieces were used to compare dosimetry between tissue substitute materials (PVC n = 5 and PVC + Teflon, 5 each) and real tissue (frozen animal, n = 5). Auditory brainstem responses at 3 frequencies (8, 16, 20, and 25 kHz) were performed on 7 guinea pigs after a cycle of fractionated unilateral irradiation. Dosimetry in real tissue demonstrated an asymmetric dose distribution at the cochlear plane and ultimately a lower dose deposition (30%) when compared with tissue substitute materials. Auditory brainstem responses of ears subjected to radiotherapy demonstrated progressive hearing loss in long-term assessment. Asymmetric dose deposition at the cochlear plane highlights the need of comprehensive real tissue dosimetry in animal studies of cochlear irradiation. To avoid misleading discrepancies in dose-deposition between different studies using the same animal model, appropriate planning and confirmatory dosimetry systems are highly desirable.

  5. Biodistribution of [{sup 11}C] methylaminoisobutyric acid, a tracer for PET studies on system A amino acid transport in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutinen, E.; Jyrkkioe, S. [Dept. of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Turku University Central Hospital (Finland); Turku PET Centre, Turku University Central Hospital (Finland); Groenroos, T.; Haaparanta, M.; Lehikoinen, P.; Naagren, K. [Turku PET Centre, Turku University Central Hospital (Finland)

    2001-07-01

    [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]{alpha}-Methylaminoisobutyric acid ({sup 11}C-MeAIB) is a potentially useful tracer for positron emission tomography (PET) studies on hormonally regulated system A amino acid transport. {sup 11}C-MeAIB is a metabolically stable amino acid analogue specific for system A amino acid transport. We evaluated the biodistribution of {sup 11}C-MeAIB in rats and humans to estimate the usefulness of the tracer for in vivo human PET studies, for example, on regulation of system A amino acid transport and on tumour imaging. Healthy Sprague-Dawley rats (n=14) were killed 5, 20, 40 or 60 min after the injection of {sup 11}C-MeAIB, and the tissue samples were weighed and counted for {sup 11}C radioactivity. Ten lymphoma patients with relatively limited tumour burden underwent whole-body (WB) PET imaging with {sup 11}C-MeAIB. In addition, three other patients had dynamic PET scanning of the head and neck area, and the tracer uptake was quantitated by calculating the kinetic influx constants (K{sub i} values) for the tracer. In animal studies, the highest activity was detected in the kidney, pancreas, adrenal gland and intestines. In humans, the highest activity was found in the salivary glands, and after that in the kidney and pancreas, similar to the results in animal studies. Rapid uptake was also detected in the skeletal muscle. In the graphical analysis, linear plots were obtained, and the mean fractional tracer uptake values (K{sub i}) of the parotid glands (n=3) and cervical muscles (n=3) were 0.039{+-}0.008 min{sup -1} and 0.013{+-}0.006 min{sup -1}, respectively. The K{sub i} value of the tumour (n=1) was 0.064 min{sup -1}. Higher uptake of {sup 11}C-MeAIB into the tumour tissue was encountered. These results encourage further {sup 11}C-MeAIB PET studies in humans on the physiology and pathology of system A amino acid transport and on tumour detection. (orig.)

  6. Effects of broccoli extract on biodistribution and labeling blood components with {sup 99m}Tc-GH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cekic, Betul; Muftuler, Fazilet Zumrut Biber; Kilcar, Ayfer Yurt; Ichedef, Cigdem; Unak, Perihan [Ege University, Izmir (Turkey). Inst. of Nuclear Sciences. Dept. of Nuclear Applications

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: people consume vegetables without the knowledge of the side effects of the biological and chemical contents and interactions between radiopharmaceuticals and herbal extract. To this end, current study is focused on the effects of broccoli extract on biodistribution of radiolabeled glucoheptonate ({sup 99m}Tc-GH) and radiolabeling of blood components. Methods: GH was labeled with {sup 99m}Tc. Quality control studies were done utilizing TLC method. Biodistribution studies were performed on male rats which were treated via gavage with either broccoli extract or SF as control group for 15 days. Blood samples were withdrawn from rats' heart. Radiolabeling of blood constituents performed incubating with GH, SnCl{sub 2} and {sup 99m} Tc. Results: radiochemical yield of {sup 99m}Tc-GH is 98.46{+-}1.48 % (n=8). Biodistribution studies have shown that according to the control, the treated group with broccoli has approximately 10 times less uptake in kidney. The percentage of the radioactivity ratios of the blood components is found to be same in both groups. Conclusions: although there is no considerable effect on the radiolabeling of blood components, there is an outstanding change on the biodistribution studies especially on kidneys. The knowledge of this change on kidney uptake may contribute to reduce the risk of misdiagnosis and/or repetition of the examinations in Nuclear Medicine. (author)

  7. The bio-distribution of the antidepressant clomipramine is modulated by chronic stress in mice: Effects on behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia eBalsevich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Major depression is one of the most common psychiatric disorders, severely affecting the quality of life of millions of people worldwide. Despite the availability of several classes of antidepressants, treatment efficacy is still very variable and many patients do not respond to the treatment. Clomipramine (CMI, a classical and widely used antidepressant, shows widespread interindividual variability of efficacy, while the environmental factors contributing to such variability remain unclear. We investigated whether chronic stress modulates the bio-distribution of CMI, and as a result the behavioral response to CMI treatment in a mouse model of chronic social defeat stress. Our results show that stress exposure increased anxiety-like and depressive-like behaviors and altered the stress response. Chronic defeat stress furthermore significantly altered CMI bio-distribution. Interestingly, CMI bio-distribution highly correlated with anxiety-like and depressive-like behaviors only under basal conditions. Taken together, we provide first evidence demonstrating that chronic stress exposure modulates CMI bio-distribution and behavioral responses. This may contribute to CMI’s broad interindividual variability, and is especially relevant in clinical practice.

  8. Antitumor activity and biodistribution of cisplatin nanocapsules in nude mice bearing human ovarian carcinoma xenografts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staffhorst, R.W.H.M.; van der Born, K.; Erkelens, C.A.M.; Hamelers, I.H.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/243021550; Peters, G.J.; Boven, E.; de Kroon, A.I.P.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/084765283

    2008-01-01

    Cisplatin nanocapsules represent a novel lipid formulation of the anticancer drug cis-diamminedichloridoplatinum(II) (cisplatin), characterized by an unprecedented cisplatin-tolipid molar ratio, and exhibiting strongly increased in-vitro cytotoxicity compared with the free drug. In this study,

  9. Threshold analysis and biodistribution of fluorescently labeled bevacizumab in human breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, Maximillian; de Jong, Johannes S; Glatz, Jürgen; Symvoulidis, Panagiotis; Lamberts, Laetitia E; Adams, Arthur; Kranendonk, Mariëtte E G; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Anton G T; Aichler, Michaela; Jansen, Liesbeth; de Vries, Jakob; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N; Schröder, Carolina P; Jorritsma-Smit, Annelies; Linssen, Matthijs D; de Boer, Esther; van der Vegt, Bert; Nagengast, Wouter B; Elias, Sjoerd G; Oliveira, Sabrina; Witkamp, Arjen; Mali, Willem P Th M; van der Wall, Elsken; Garcia-Allende, Beatriz P; Van Diest, Paul J; de Vries, Elisabeth G; Walch, Axel; van Dam, Gooitzen M; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    In vivo tumor labeling with fluorescent agents may assist endoscopic and surgical guidance for cancer therapy as well as create opportunities to directly observe cancer biology in patients. However, malignant and non-malignant tissues are usually distinguished on fluorescence images by applying

  10. Threshold Analysis and Biodistribution of Fluorescently Labeled Bevacizumab in Human Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, Maximilian; de Jong, Johannes S.; Glatz, Juergen; Symvoulidis, Panagiotis; Lamberts, Laetitia E.; Adams, Arthur L. L.; Kranendonk, Mariette E. G.; Terwisscha Van Scheltinga, Anton; Aichler, Michaela; Jansen, Liesbeth; de Vries, Jakob; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N.; Schroder, Carolien P.; Jorritsma-Smit, Annelies; Linssen, Matthijs D.; de Boer, Esther; van der Vegt, Bert; Nagengast, Wouter B.; Elias, Sjoerd G.; Oliveira, Sabrina; Witkamp, Arjen J.; Mali, Willem P. T. M.; Van der Wall, Elsken; Garcia-Allende, P. Beatriz; van Diest, Paul J.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Walch, Axel; van Dam, Gooitzen M.; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2017-01-01

    In vivo tumor labeling with fluorescent agents may assist endoscopic and surgical guidance for cancer therapy as well as create opportunities to directly observe cancer biology in patients. However, malignant andnonmalignant tissues are usually distinguished on fluorescence images by applying

  11. Threshold analysis and biodistribution of fluorescently labeled bevacizumab in human breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, Maximillian; de Jong, Johannes S; Glatz, Jürgen; Symvoulidis, Panagiotis; Lamberts, Laetitia E; Adams, Arthur; Kranendonk, Mariëtte E G; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Anton G T; Aichler, Michaela; Jansen, Liesbeth; de Vries, Jakob; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N; Schröder, Carolina P; Jorritsma-Smit, Annelies; Linssen, Matthijs D; de Boer, Esther; van der Vegt, Bert; Nagengast, Wouter B; Elias, Sjoerd G; Oliveira, Sabrina; Witkamp, Arjen; Mali, Willem P Th M; van der Wall, Elsken; Garcia-Allende, Beatriz P; Van Diest, Paul J; de Vries, Elisabeth G; Walch, Axel; van Dam, Gooitzen M; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2017-01-01

    In vivo tumor labeling with fluorescent agents may assist endoscopic and surgical guidance for cancer therapy as well as create opportunities to directly observe cancer biology in patients. However, malignant and non-malignant tissues are usually distinguished on fluorescence images by applying

  12. Interaction of extremophilic archaeal viruses with human and mouse complement system and viral biodistribution in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Linping; Uldahl, Kristine Buch; Chen, Fangfang

    2017-01-01

    is a necessary prerequisite if their potential for biomedical applications to be realized. Here we show complement activation through lectin (via direct binding of MBL/MASPs) and alternative pathways by two extremophilic archaeal viruses (Sulfolobus monocaudavirus 1 and Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus 2...

  13. Surface modification-mediated biodistribution of ¹³C-fullerene C₆₀ in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenglong; Bai, Yitong; Li, Hongliang; Liao, Rong; Li, Jiaxin; Zhang, Han; Zhang, Xian; Zhang, Sujuan; Yang, Sheng-Tao; Chang, Xue-Ling

    2016-03-08

    Functionalization is believed to have a considerable impact on the biodistribution of fullerene in vivo. However, a direct comparison of differently functionalized fullerenes is required to prove the hypothesis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influences of surface modification on the biodistribution of fullerene following its exposure via several routs of administration. (13)C skeleton-labeled fullerene C60 ((13)C-C60) was functionalized with carboxyl groups ((13)C-C60-COOH) or hydroxyl groups ((13)C-C60-OH). Male ICR mice (~25 g) were exposed to a single dose of 400 μg of (13)C-C60-COOH or (13)C-C60-OH in 200 μL of aqueous 0.9% NaCl solution by three different exposure pathways, including tail vein injection, gavage and intraperitoneal exposure. Tissue samples, including blood, heart, liver, spleen, stomach, kidneys, lungs, brain, large intestine, small intestine, muscle, bone and skin were subsequently collected, dissected, homogenized, lyophilized, and analyzed by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The liver, bone, muscle and skin were found to be the major target organs for C60-COOH and C60-OH after their intravenous injection, whereas unmodified C60 was mainly found in the liver, spleen and lung. The total uptakes in liver and spleen followed the order: C60 > > C60-COOH > C60-OH. The distribution rate over 24 h followed the order: C60 > C60-OH > C60-COOH. C60-COOH and C60-OH were both cleared from the body at 7 d post exposure. C60-COOH was absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract following gavage exposure and distributed into the heart, liver, spleen, stomach, lungs, intestine and bone tissues. The translocation of C60-OH was more widespread than that of C60-COOH after intraperitoneal injection. The surface modification of fullerene C60 led to a decreased in its accumulation level and distribution rate, as well as altering its target organs. These results therefore demonstrate that the chemical functionalization of fullerene

  14. Dosimetry-based treatment planning for molecular radiotherapy: a summary of the 2017 report from the Internal Dosimetry Task Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Stokke

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The European directive on basic safety standards (Council directive 2013/59 Euratom mandates dosimetry-based treatment planning for radiopharmaceutical therapies. The directive comes into operation February 2018, and the aim of a report produced by the Internal Dosimetry Task Force of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine is to address this aspect of the directive. A summary of the report is presented. Results A brief review of five of the most common therapy procedures is included in the current text, focused on the potential to perform patient-specific dosimetry. In the full report, 11 different therapeutic procedures are included, allowing additional considerations of effectiveness, references to specific literature on quantitative imaging and dosimetry, and existing evidence for absorbed dose-effect correlations for each treatment. Individualized treatment planning with tracer diagnostics and verification of the absorbed doses delivered following therapy is found to be scientifically feasible for almost all procedures investigated, using quantitative imaging and/or external monitoring. Translation of this directive into clinical practice will have significant implications for resource requirements. Conclusions Molecular radiotherapy is undergoing a significant expansion, and the groundwork for dosimetry-based treatment planning is already in place. The mandated individualization is likely to improve the effectiveness of the treatments, although must be adequately resourced.

  15. A Comparison of Singlet Oxygen Explicit Dosimetry (SOED and Singlet Oxygen Luminescence Dosimetry (SOLD for Photofrin-Mediated Photodynamic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele M. Kim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate photodynamic therapy (PDT dosimetry is critical for the use of PDT in the treatment of malignant and nonmalignant localized diseases. A singlet oxygen explicit dosimetry (SOED model has been developed for in vivo purposes. It involves the measurement of the key components in PDT—light fluence (rate, photosensitizer concentration, and ground-state oxygen concentration ([3O2]—to calculate the amount of reacted singlet oxygen ([1O2]rx, the main cytotoxic component in type II PDT. Experiments were performed in phantoms with the photosensitizer Photofrin and in solution using phosphorescence-based singlet oxygen luminescence dosimetry (SOLD to validate the SOED model. Oxygen concentration and photosensitizer photobleaching versus time were measured during PDT, along with direct SOLD measurements of singlet oxygen and triplet state lifetime (τΔ and τt, for various photosensitizer concentrations to determine necessary photophysical parameters. SOLD-determined cumulative [1O2]rx was compared to SOED-calculated [1O2]rx for various photosensitizer concentrations to show a clear correlation between the two methods. This illustrates that explicit dosimetry can be used when phosphorescence-based dosimetry is not feasible. Using SOED modeling, we have also shown evidence that SOLD-measured [1O2]rx using a 523 nm pulsed laser can be used to correlate to singlet oxygen generated by a 630 nm laser during a clinical malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM PDT protocol by using a conversion formula.

  16. Comparative study of two different Bombesin derivates labeled with {sup 111}In and biodistribution in normal mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Ricardo S.; Alcarde, Lais F.; Correa, Beatriz L.; Massicano, Adriana V.F.; Couto, Renata M.; Mengatti, Jair; Araujo, Elaine B. de, E-mail: ricardooliveira@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear medicine is a medical speciality that uses radioactive compounds (radiopharmaceuticals), consisting of a substrate and a radioactive isotope, for diagnostic. Among the peptides of interest for Nuclear Medicine, bombesin (BBN), a 14 amino acid neuropeptide analog of human gastrin-releasing peptide, is one of the highlights. This is a comparative study aiming to establish the best condition to radiolabel two BBN derivatives, (DTPA-Phe-Gly{sub 5}-BBN{sub (6-14)}) and (DTPA-Phe-Gly{sub 2}-BBN{sub (6-14})) with 111-indium. Specific objectives of this study were evaluate a good condition of radiolabelling in search excellent specific activity the bombesin derivatives and determinate the biodistribution in health mice model. Ten micrograms (10μg) of the derivative DTPA-Phe-Gly2-BBN (6-14) was labeled with 18.5 MBq (0.5 mCi) of {sup 111}InCl{sub 3} at 25°C for different times (5, 15 and 30 minutes). The best condition was applied to peptide mass variation (10, 5, 2.5, 1, 0.5, 0.25 and 0.1 μg), keeping all other parameters fixed. Finally, the influence of {sup 111}InCl{sub 3} activity in the radiolabeling process (18.5, 37, 55.5, 74, 185 MBq) was evaluated. The best conditions were repeated for the second derivate, DTPA-Phe-Gly{sub 5}-BBN{sub (6-14}). The radiochemical purity was assessed by thin layer chromatography (TLC), using 0.2 M EDTA pH 5 as solvent, and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a C18 column with linear gradient 10% A to 90% A (v/v) (A: 0,1% of TFA in CH3CN; B: 0,1% of TFA in H2O) at a flow rate of 1 mL/minute for 15 minutes. Considering the reaction time, the higher radiochemical purity was obtained when 10μg of the peptide was labeled with 18.5 MBq (0.5 mCi) of {sup 111}In for 15 minutes at 25°C (97.33 ± 0.50%, n=3). In the mass variation study, the best results of radiochemical purity were obtained when 10 μg of the peptide was employed (97.69 ± 0.4%, n = 4). Finally, the maximum specific activity of the radiolabelled

  17. Development of 3D Slicer based film dosimetry analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, K. M.; Robinson, A.; Pinter, C.; Fichtinger, G.; Schreiner, L. J.

    2017-05-01

    Radiochromic film dosimetry has been widely adopted in the clinic as it is a convenient option for dose measurement and verification. Film dosimetry analysis is typically performed using expensive commercial software, or custom made scripts in Matlab. However, common clinical film analysis software is not transparent regarding what corrections/optimizations are running behind the scenes. In this work, an extension to the open-source medical imaging platform 3D Slicer was developed and implemented in our centre for film dosimetry analysis. This extension streamlines importing treatment planning system dose and film imaging data, film calibration, registration, and comparison of 2D dose distributions, enabling greater accessibility to film analysis and higher reliability.

  18. Dosimetry in clinical static magnetic fields using plastic scintillation detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefanowicz, S.; Latzel, H.; Lindvold, Lars René

    2013-01-01

    To further improve the accuracy of dose delivery to the patient, several projects are pursuing the integration of linear accelerators with magnetic resonance imaging systems. Generally, this is conceived as the next generation of image-guided radiotherapy. For technical and physical reason it is......, however, not clear yet how dosimetry will be conducted as standard methods and might not be easily transferred to systems with clinical magnetic fields. For dosimetry in MRI accelerators, we have tested plastic scintillation detectors (PSD) coupled to optical fibers. They are suitable for real-time and in......-vivo dosimetry in radiation treatments and diagnostics and could be, being all-optical, promising candidates for this application. To study the basic feasibility of using PSDs with organic scintillators in magnetic fields, we measured the response of these dosimeters in presence of magnetic fields up to 1 T...

  19. Applied physics of external radiation exposure dosimetry and radiation protection

    CERN Document Server

    Antoni, Rodolphe

    2017-01-01

    This book describes the interaction of living matter with photons, neutrons, charged particles, electrons and ions. The authors are specialists in the field of radiation protection. The book synthesizes many years of experiments with external radiation exposure in the fields of dosimetry and radiation shielding in medical, industrial and research fields. It presents the basic physical concepts including dosimetry and offers a number of tools to be used by students, engineers and technicians to assess the radiological risk and the means to avoid them by calculating the appropriate shields. The theory of radiation interaction in matter is presented together with empirical formulas and abacus. Numerous numerical applications are treated to illustrate the different topics. The state of the art in radiation protection and dosimetry is presented in detail, especially in the field of simulation codes for external exposure to radiation, medical projects and advanced research. Moreover, important data spread in differ...

  20. Review on the characteristics of radiation detectors for dosimetry and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seco, Joao; Clasie, Ben; Partridge, Mike

    2014-10-01

    The enormous advances in the understanding of human anatomy, physiology and pathology in recent decades have led to ever-improving methods of disease prevention, diagnosis and treatment. Many of these achievements have been enabled, at least in part, by advances in ionizing radiation detectors. Radiology has been transformed by the implementation of multi-slice CT and digital x-ray imaging systems, with silver halide films now largely obsolete for many applications. Nuclear medicine has benefited from more sensitive, faster and higher-resolution detectors delivering ever-higher SPECT and PET image quality. PET/MR systems have been enabled by the development of gamma ray detectors that can operate in high magnetic fields. These huge advances in imaging have enabled equally impressive steps forward in radiotherapy delivery accuracy, with 4DCT, PET and MRI routinely used in treatment planning and online image guidance provided by cone-beam CT. The challenge of ensuring safe, accurate and precise delivery of highly complex radiation fields has also both driven and benefited from advances in radiation detectors. Detector systems have been developed for the measurement of electron, intensity-modulated and modulated arc x-ray, proton and ion beams, and around brachytherapy sources based on a very wide range of technologies. The types of measurement performed are equally wide, encompassing commissioning and quality assurance, reference dosimetry, in vivo dosimetry and personal and environmental monitoring. In this article, we briefly introduce the general physical characteristics and properties that are commonly used to describe the behaviour and performance of both discrete and imaging detectors. The physical principles of operation of calorimeters; ionization and charge detectors; semiconductor, luminescent, scintillating and chemical detectors; and radiochromic and radiographic films are then reviewed and their principle applications discussed. Finally, a general

  1. Accuracy of helium accumulation fluence monitor for fast reactor dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Chikara; Aoyama, Takafumi [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1998-03-01

    A helium (He) accumulation fluence monitor (HAFM) has been developed for fast reactor dosimetry. In order to evaluate the measurement accuracy of neutron fluence by the HAFM method, the HAFMs of enriched boron (B) and beryllium (Be) were irradiated in the Fast Neutron Source Reactor `YAYOI`. The number of He atoms produced in the HAFMs were measured and compared with the calculated values. As a result of this study, it was confirmed that the neutron fluence could be measured within 5 % by the HAFM method, and that met the required accuracy for fast reactor dosimetry. (author)

  2. The use of a portable electronic device in accident dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beerten, Koen; Vanhavere, Filip

    2008-01-01

    The use of a portable electronic device in accident dosimetry has been investigated. The thermoluminescence properties of a surface-mount alumina-rich ceramic resonator from a USB flash drive were investigated. The following characteristics were verified: the absence of a zero-dose signal, gamma dose response, dose recycling behaviour, fading and optical bleaching. Finally, this component has been successfully used to determine a simulated accident dose (1 d following the irradiation event). It is concluded that it should be possible to perform rapid and reliable accident dose assessments with such components using conventional thermoluminescence dosimetry equipment.

  3. Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program Manual, PNL-MA-552

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbaugh, Eugene H.; Bihl, Donald E.; Maclellan, Jay A.

    2009-09-24

    This manual is a guide to the services provided by the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program (IDP), which is operated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.( ) for the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office, Office of River Protection and their Hanford Site contractors. The manual describes the roles of and relationships between the IDP and the radiation protection programs of the Hanford Site contractors. Recommendations and guidance are also provided for consideration in implementing bioassay monitoring and internal dosimetry elements of radiation protection programs.

  4. Overview of the Hanford Environmental Thermoluminescent Dosimetry Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endres, A.W.; Peters, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    The Hanford Environmental Thermoluminescent Dosimetry Program has been in operation for 30 years. The program`s main goal is to report ambient penetrating radiation levels at specified locations on the Hanford Site and at nearby and distant communities. Dosimeter processing, dose calculation, and dose-reporting functions are provided by the Instrumentation and External Dosimetry section of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s Health Physics Department. This presentation provides a brief historical overview of dosimeter designs, processing procedures, dose-calculation methodologies, calibration techniques, and quality control.

  5. Overview of the Hanford Environmental Thermoluminescent Dosimetry Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endres, A.W.; Peters, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    The Hanford Environmental Thermoluminescent Dosimetry Program has been in operation for 30 years. The program's main goal is to report ambient penetrating radiation levels at specified locations on the Hanford Site and at nearby and distant communities. Dosimeter processing, dose calculation, and dose-reporting functions are provided by the Instrumentation and External Dosimetry section of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Health Physics Department. This presentation provides a brief historical overview of dosimeter designs, processing procedures, dose-calculation methodologies, calibration techniques, and quality control.

  6. Third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry. Program and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-01-01

    This conference has been designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To partly fulfill these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection has been prepared. General topics include external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, regulations and standards, accreditation and test programs, research advances, and applied program experience. This publication provides a summary of the technical program and a collection of abstracts of the oral presentations.

  7. Eurados trial performance test for neutron personal dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordy, J.M.; Stadtmann, H.; Ambrosi, P.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of a neutron trial performance test sponsored by the European Commission and organised by EURADOS. As anticipated, neutron dosimetry results were very dependent on the dosemeter type and the dose calculation algorithm. Fast neutron fields were generally well...... measured, but particular problems were noted in the determination of intermediate energy fields and large incident angles, demonstrating the difficulties of neutron personal dosimetry. Of particular concern from a radiological protection point of view was the large number of results underestimating...... personal dose equivalent. A considerable over-response was noted in a few cases....

  8. Current state of the art brachytherapy treatment planning dosimetry algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantelis, E; Karaiskos, P

    2014-01-01

    Following literature contributions delineating the deficiencies introduced by the approximations of conventional brachytherapy dosimetry, different model-based dosimetry algorithms have been incorporated into commercial systems for 192Ir brachytherapy treatment planning. The calculation settings of these algorithms are pre-configured according to criteria established by their developers for optimizing computation speed vs accuracy. Their clinical use is hence straightforward. A basic understanding of these algorithms and their limitations is essential, however, for commissioning; detecting differences from conventional algorithms; explaining their origin; assessing their impact; and maintaining global uniformity of clinical practice. PMID:25027247

  9. Tetrazolium salt monomers for gel dosimetry I: Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penev, Kalin I.; Wang, Meng; Mequanint, Kibret

    2017-05-01

    Tetrazolium salts (TS) have been previously used for radiochromic dosimetry in solutions, films and three dimensional (3D) gelatine-based gels. However, widespread application for 3D dosimetry has not been achieved due to the required high concentrations and associated high costs of the TS dimer used in prior research. Through careful selection of TS monomer, sensitivity-enhancing additives and inert gel forming material, we report the preparation of a non-diffusing, chemically stable, 3D dosimeter with linear sensitivity between 0 and 80 Gy with submillimolar requirements for the active TS.

  10. An improved in vitro micronucleus assay to biological dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocampo, Ivette Z.; Okazaki, Kayo; Vieira, Daniel P., E-mail: dpvieira@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), So Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The biological dosimetry is widely used to estimate the absorbed dose in people occupationally or accidentally exposed to the radiation for a better medical treatment, minimizing the harmful effects. Many techniques and methods have been proposed to detect and quantify the radioinduced lesions in genetic material, among them, the micronucleus (MN) assay. In the present study, we proposed an improved in vitro micronucleus technique that is rapid, sensitive and with minor cell manipulations. Assays were carried out with human tumor cells (MCF-7) seeded (3x10{sup 4} cells) in slides placed into Petri dishes. Adherent cells were maintained with RPMI medium, supplemented with fetal calf serum, 1 % antibiotics, cytochalasin B (2 μg/mL), and incubated at 37 deg C in the presence of 5% CO2 for 72h. Cells were pre-treated for 24h with aminoguanidine, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor. Nitric oxide is an intracellular free-radical, involved in DNA double-strand break repair mechanisms. After incubation, adherent cells on slides were briefly fixed with paraformaldehyde and stained with acridine orange (100 μg/mL) for analysis through fluorescence microscopy. Dye fluorescence permitted accurate discrimination between nuclei and micronuclei (bright green) and cytoplasm (red), and made possible a faster counting of binucleated cells. Aminoguanidine (2 mM) induced significant increase (p< 0.05) in frequencies of binucleated cells with micronuclei and in the number of micronuclei per binucleated cell. Data showed that proposed modifications permit to understand an early aspect of NO inhibition and suggested an improved protocol to MN assays. (author)

  11. Boron biodistribution in Beagles after intravenous infusion of 4-dihydroxyborylphenylalanine-fructose complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulvik, M.E. E-mail: martti.kulvik@welho.com; Vaehaetalo, J.K.; Benczik, J.; Snellman, M.; Laakso, J.; Hermans, R.; Jaerviluoma, E.; Rasilainen, M.; Faerkkilae, M.; Kallio, M.E

    2004-11-01

    Boron biodistribution after intravenous infusion of 4-dihydroxyborylphenylalanine-fructose (BPA-F) complex was investigated in six dogs. Blood samples were evaluated during and following doses of 205 and 250 mg/kgbw BPA in a 30 min infusion, and 500 mg/kgbw in a 1 h infusion. Samples from whole blood, urine, brain and other organs were analysed for boron content after varying times following the onset of infusion. The whole blood boron concentrations declined from 27 to 8.4 ppm over the period of 39-165 min after the onset of infusion and the levels increased from 1.9 to 12 ppm in the grey matter of the brain over the same period. The boron concentrations in whole blood decreased steadily, whereas the boron values in brain tissue rose steadily with time. It was concluded that whole blood boron concentrations do not seem to reflect accurately the boron concentration in brain tissue at respective time points.

  12. Biodistribution of Intraperitoneally-administered {sup 125}I-labeled IgG in Mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sooyong; Dho, So Hee; Cho, Eunha; Lee, Soyoung; Jung, Sunghee; Lim, Jaecheong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The use of radiolabeled antibodies is one of the most effective strategies to diagnose and treat cancers. However, it is hindered by the relatively low delivery to tumors following intravenous administration, in particular, cancers in peritoneal cavity. Intraperitoneal administration of radiolabeled antibodies results in significantly higher exposure to the peritoneal cavity than does intravenous administration. Therefore, intraperitoneal administration of the radiolabeled antibodies can be more effective to diagnose and treat cancers in peritoneal cavity such as ovarian and colonic cancers. This study was performed to determine the biodistribution pattern of intraperitoneally-administered radiolabeled antibodies. The {sup 125}I-labeled IgG was rapidly absorbed into the blood and organs, and the radioactivities were dropped in 24 hr p.i. These results suggest that the intraperitoneal administration of the radiolabeled antibodies can be an effective way to treat diseases in the peritoneal cavity.

  13. Biodistribution and Clearance of TiO2 Nanoparticles in Rats after Intravenous Injection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Elgrabli

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanoparticles are used in many applications. Due to their small size, easy body penetration and toxicological adverse effects have been suspected. Numerous studies have tried to characterize TiO2 translocation after oral, dermal or respiratory exposure. In this study, we focused on TiO2 nanoparticle biodistribution, clearance and toxicological effects after intravenous injection, considering TiO2 translocation in the blood occurs. Using ICP-OES, transmission electron microscopy, and histological methods, we found TiO2 accumulation in liver, lungs and spleen. We estimated TiO2 nanoparticles' half life in the body to about 10 days. Clinical biomarkers were also quantified for 56 days to identify potential toxicological impact on lungs, blood, liver, spleen and kidneys. Results showed absence of toxicological effects after TiO2 intravenous injection at concentrations of 7.7 to 9.4 mg/kg.

  14. Effects of external magnetic field on biodistribution of nanoparticles: A histological study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Tony [Department of Neurology, Chang Gung University College of Medicine and Memorial Hospital, 199 Tung-Hwa N Rd, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hua, M.-Y. [Department of Chemical and Material Engineering, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Chen Jyhping [Department of Chemical and Material Engineering, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Wei, K.-C. [Department of Neurosurgery, Chang Gung University College of Medicine and Memorial Hospital, 199 Tung-Hwa N Rd, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Jung, S.-M. [Department of Pathology, Chang Gung University College of Medicine and Memorial Hospital, 199 Tung-Hwa N Rd, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Y.-J. [Department of Neurology, Chang Gung University College of Medicine and Memorial Hospital, 199 Tung-Hwa N Rd, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Jou, M.-J. [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Ma, Y.-H. [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: yhma@mail.cgu.edu.tw

    2007-04-15

    This study investigates the effect of external magnetic fields on the biodistribution of nanoparticles (NP). A NdFeB magnet of 2.4 kG was externally applied over the left femoral artery or right kidney. The 250 nm dextran-coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NP was injected via tail vein in healthy rats, and organs were taken 1 or 24 h later. Prussian blue stain revealed that NP were more rapidly retained in the liver and spleen than in the lungs. NP aggregation observed in the kidney and femoral artery after application of external magnets was time dependent. Hollow organs such as the intestine, colon, and urinary bladder retained little NP.

  15. Synthesis and biodistribution of {sup 99m}Tc-Vancomycin in a model of bacterial infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roohi, S.; Mushtaq, A. [Isotope Production Div., Pakistan Inst. of Nuclear Science and Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan); Malik, S.A. [Dept. of Biological Sciences, Quaid-e-Azam Univ., Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2005-07-01

    Vancomycin Hydrochloride is an antibiotic produced by the growth of certain strains of Streptomyces orientalis. As vancomycin hydrochloride is poorly absorbed after oral administration; it is given intravenously for therapy of systemic infections. Vancomycin was labeled with technetium-99m pertechnetate using SnCl{sub 2} . 2H{sub 2}O as reducing agent. The labeling efficiency depends on ligand/reductant ratio, pH, and volume of reaction mixture. Radiochemical purity and stability of {sup 99m}Tc-Vancomycin was determined by thin layer chromatography. Biodistribution studies of {sup 99m}Tc-Vancomycin were performed in a model of bacterial infection in Sprague-Dawley rats. A significantly higher accumulation of {sup 99m}Tc-Vancomycin was seen at sites of S. aureus infected animals. Whereas uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-Vancomycin in turpentine inflamed rats were quite low. (orig.)

  16. A Simple and Sensitive Method to Quantify Biodegradable Nanoparticle Biodistribution using Europium Chelates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Lindsey; Higgins, Jaclyn; Putnam, David

    2015-09-08

    The biodistribution of biodegradable nanoparticles can be difficult to quantify. We report a method using time resolved fluorescence (TRF) from a lanthanide chelate to minimize background autofluorescence and maximize the signal to noise ratio to detect biodegradable nanoparticle distribution in mice. Specifically, antenna chelates containing europium were entrapped within nanoparticles composed of polylactic acid-polyethylene glycol diblock copolymers. Tissue accumulation of nanoparticles following intravenous injection was quantified in mice. The TRF of the nanoparticles was found to diminish as a second order function in the presence of serum and tissue compositions interfered with the europium signal. Both phenomena were corrected by linearization of the signal function and calculation of tissue-specific interference, respectively. Overall, the method is simple and robust with a detection limit five times greater than standard fluorescent probes.

  17. Time-dependent biodistribution, clearance and biocompatibility of magnetic fibrin nanoparticles: an in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabu, Periyathambi; Vedakumari, Weslen S; Sastry, Thotapalli P

    2015-06-07

    Recently, bioretention and toxicity of injected nanoparticles in the body has drawn much attention in biomedical research. In the present study, 5 mg Fe per kg body weight of magnetic fibrin nanoparticles (MFNPs) were injected into mice intravenously and investigated for their blood clearance profile, biodistribution, haematology and pathology studies for a time period of 28 days. Moderately long circulation of MFNPs in blood was observed with probable degradation and excretion into the bloodstream via monoatomic iron forms. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and Prussian blue staining results showed increased accumulation of MFNPs in the liver, followed by spleen and other organs. Body weight, spleen/thymus indexes, haematology, serum biochemistry and histopathology studies demonstrated that MFNPs were biocompatible. These results suggest the feasibility of using MFNPs for drug delivery and imaging applications.

  18. Radioiodination and biodistribution of the monoclonal antibody TU-20 and its scFv fragment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubaštová, H.; Kleinova, V.; Seifert, D.; Fišer, M.; Kranda, K.

    2006-01-01

    The ability of the monoclonal antibody TU-20 and its scFv fragment to specifically bind to the C-end of the class III beta-tubulin makes these preparations useful as potential diagnostics for in vivo determination of neurodegenerative diseases that entail degradation of neuronal cytoskeleton. To examine this hypothesis, TU-20 and its scFv were labelled with 125I and their properties were extensively investigated. TU-20 and its scFv were labelled via chloramine-T with the yield 90 95% and 64 78%, respectively. Their quality control, performed by an ELISA and gel electrophoresis, determined adequate properties for further studies. The in vitro experiment, involving autoradiography and immunohistochemistry of mice’ brain slices, enabled confirmation of preserved immunospecificity of the radiolabelled substances. Finally, the in vivo biodistribution proved differences in elimination of either TU-20, scFv TU-20, or iodide from the mice.

  19. Pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and biodistribution following oral administration of nanocarriers containing peptide and protein drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Brendan T; Guo, Jianfeng; Presas, Elena; Donovan, Maria D; Alonso, María J; O'Driscoll, Caitriona M

    2016-11-15

    The influence of nanoparticle (NP) formulations on the pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and biodistribution profiles of peptide- and protein-like drugs following oral administration is critically reviewed. The possible mechanisms of absorption enhancement and the effects of the physicochemical properties of the NP are examined. The potential advantages and challenges of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modelling to help predict efficacy in man are discussed. The importance of developing and expanding the regulatory framework to help translate the technology into the clinic and accelerate the availability of oral nanoparticulate formulations is emphasized. In conclusion, opportunities for future work to improve the state of the art of oral nanomedicines are identified. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Tenth ORNL Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaja, R.E.; Chou, T.L.; Sims, C.S.; Greene, R.T.

    1985-03-01

    The Tenth Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study was conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory during April 9-11, 1984. Dosemeter badges from 31 participating organizations were mounted on 40cm Lucite phantoms and exposed to a range of dose equivalents which could be encountered during routine personnel monitoring in mixed radiation fields. The Health Physics Research Reactor served as the only source of radiation for eight of the ten irradiations which included a low (approx. 0.50 mSv) and high (approx. 10.00 mSv) neutron dose equivalent run for each of four shield conditions. Two irradiations were also conducted for which concrete- and Lucite-shield reactor irradiations were gamma-enhanced using a /sup 137/Cs source. Results indicated that some participants had difficulty obtaining measurable indication of neutron and gamma exposures at dose equivalents less than about 0.50 mSv and 0.20 mSv, respectively. Albedo dosemeters provided the best overall accuracy and precision for the neutron measurements. Direct interaction TLD systems showed significant variation in accuracy with incident spectrum, and threshold neutron dosemeters (film and recoil track) underestimated reference values by more than 50%. Gamma dose equivalents estimated in the mixed fields were higher than reference values with TL gamma dosemeters generally yielding more accurate results than film. Under the conditions of this study in which participants had information concerning exposure conditions and radiation field characteristics prior to dosemeter evaluation, only slightly more than half of all reported results met regulatory standards for neutron and gamma accuracy. 19 refs., 2 figs., 29 tabs.

  1. How flatbed scanners upset accurate film dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Battum, L J; Huizenga, H; Verdaasdonk, R M; Heukelom, S

    2016-01-21

    Film is an excellent dosimeter for verification of dose distributions due to its high spatial resolution. Irradiated film can be digitized with low-cost, transmission, flatbed scanners. However, a disadvantage is their lateral scan effect (LSE): a scanner readout change over its lateral scan axis. Although anisotropic light scattering was presented as the origin of the LSE, this paper presents an alternative cause. Hereto, LSE for two flatbed scanners (Epson 1680 Expression Pro and Epson 10000XL), and Gafchromic film (EBT, EBT2, EBT3) was investigated, focused on three effects: cross talk, optical path length and polarization. Cross talk was examined using triangular sheets of various optical densities. The optical path length effect was studied using absorptive and reflective neutral density filters with well-defined optical characteristics (OD range 0.2-2.0). Linear polarizer sheets were used to investigate light polarization on the CCD signal in absence and presence of (un)irradiated Gafchromic film. Film dose values ranged between 0.2 to 9 Gy, i.e. an optical density range between 0.25 to 1.1. Measurements were performed in the scanner's transmission mode, with red-green-blue channels. LSE was found to depend on scanner construction and film type. Its magnitude depends on dose: for 9 Gy increasing up to 14% at maximum lateral position. Cross talk was only significant in high contrast regions, up to 2% for very small fields. The optical path length effect introduced by film on the scanner causes 3% for pixels in the extreme lateral position. Light polarization due to film and the scanner's optical mirror system is the main contributor, different in magnitude for the red, green and blue channel. We concluded that any Gafchromic EBT type film scanned with a flatbed scanner will face these optical effects. Accurate dosimetry requires correction of LSE, therefore, determination of the LSE per color channel and dose delivered to the film.

  2. {sup 99m}Tc-glycopeptide: Synthesis, biodistribution and imaging in breast tumor-bearing rodents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, I-C. [Center for Innovation Development, Taiwan Hopax Chems Mfg. Co., Ltd., No. 28, Hua Dong Road, Daliao, Kaohsiung 83162, Taiwan (China); Tsao Ning [Division of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Box 59, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Huang Yahui; Ho Yensheng; Wu Chungchin [Center for Innovation Development, Taiwan Hopax Chems Mfg. Co., Ltd., No. 28, Hua Dong Road, Daliao, Kaohsiung 83162, Taiwan (China); Yu Dongfang [Division of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Box 59, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Yang, David J. [Division of Diagnostic Imaging, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Box 59, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)], E-mail: dyang@di.mdacc.tmc.edu

    2008-03-15

    This study was aimed to develop a glycopeptide (GP) to be used as a carrier for anti-cancer drug delivery. GP was synthesized by conjugating glutamate peptide and chitosan using carbodiimide as a coupling agent. Elemental analysis and capillary electrophoresis confirmed the purity was >95%. GP was labeled with sodium pertechnetate (Na{sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}) for in vitro and in vivo studies. Rhenium-GP was synthesized to support the binding site of {sup 99m}Tc at the glutamate positions 3-5. In vitro cellular uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-GP was performed in breast cancer cells. Cytosol had 60% whereas nucleus had 40% uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-GP. When cancer cells were incubated with glutamate or aspartate, followed by {sup 99m}Tc-GP, there was decreased uptake in cells treated with glutamate but not aspartate. The findings indicated that cellular uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-GP was via glutamate transporters. In addition, {sup 99m}Tc-GP was able to measure uptake differences after cells treated with paclitaxel. Biodistribution and planar imaging were conducted in breast tumor-bearing rats. Biodistribution of {sup 99m}Tc-GP showed increased tumor-to-tissue ratios as a function of time. Planar images confirmed that {sup 99m}Tc-GP could assess tumor uptake changes after paclitaxel treatment. In vitro and in vivo studies indicated that GP could target tumor cells, thus, GP may be a useful carrier for anti-cancer drug delivery.

  3. Comparative biodistribution and safety profiling of olmesartan medoxomil oil-in-water oral nanoemulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorain, Bapi; Choudhury, Hira; Tekade, Rakesh Kumar; Karan, Saumen; Jaisankar, P; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2016-12-01

    Poor aqueous solubility and unfavourable de-esterification of olmesartan medoxomil (a selective angiotensin II receptor blocker), results in low oral bioavailability of less than 26%. Improvement of oral bioavailability with prolonged pharmacodynamics activity of olmesartan in Wistar rats had been approached by nanoemulsification strategy in our previous article [Colloid Surface B, 115, 2014: 286]. In continuation to that work, we herewith report the biodistribution behaviour and 28-day repeated dose sub-chronic toxicity of olmesartan medoxomil nanoemulsion in Wistar rats following oral administration. The levels of olmesartan in collected biological samples were estimated using our validated LC-MS/MS technique. Our biodistribution study showed significantly higher brain concentrations of olmesartan (0.290 ± 0.089 μg/mL, 0.333 ± 0.071 μg/mL and 0.217 ± 0.062 μg/mL at 0.5, 2.0 and 8.0 h post dosing, respectively) when administered orally as nanoemulsion formulation as compared to the aqueous suspension. In addition, the olmesartan nanoemulsion was found to be safe and non-toxic, as it neither produced any lethality nor remarkable haematological, biochemical and structural adverse effects as observed during the 28-days sub-chronic toxicity studies in experimental Wistar rats. It is herewith envisaged that the developed nanoemulsion formulation approach for the delivery of olmesartan medoxomil via oral route can further be explored in memory dysfunction and brain ischemia, for better brain penetration and improved clinical application in stroke patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Biodistribution of sub-10 nm PEG-modified radioactive/upconversion nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Tianye; Yang, Yang; Sun, Yun; Wu, Yongquan; Gao, Yuan; Feng, Wei; Li, Fuyou

    2013-09-01

    The biodistribution of lanthanide-based upconversion nanophosphors (UCNPs) has attracted increasing attention, and all of the reported UCNPs display metabolism in the liver and spleen mainly. Herein, ∼8 nm poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-coated NaYF4 nanoparticles codoped with Yb(3+), Er(3+), and (or) radioactive (153)Sm(3+) ions were synthesized, through a hydrothermal synthetic system assisted by binary cooperative ligands with oleic acid and PEG dicarboxylic acids. The as-prepared PEG-coating NaYF4:Yb,Er and NaYF4:Yb,Er,(153)Sm are denoted as PEG-UCNPs and PEG-UCNPs((153)Sm), respectively. PEG-UCNPs were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The PEG-UCNPs showed excellent water solubility with a hydrodynamic diameter of ∼10 nm and displayed upconversion luminescence (UCL) under continuous-wave excitation at 980 nm. At the same time, the (153)Sm-doped nanoparticles PEG-UCNPs((153)Sm) displayed radioactivity, and time-dependent biodistribution of PEG-UCNPs((153)Sm) was investigated, through single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging and γ-counter analysis. Interestingly, PEG-UCNPs((153)Sm) had a long blood retention time and were partly eliminated through urinary pathways in vivo. Therefore, the concept of fabricating PEG-coated, small nanosize (sub-10 nm) nanoparticles with radioactive property is a useful strategy for providing a potential method to monitor lanthanide nanoparticles renal clearable. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Toxicology and Biodistribution Studies for MGH2.1, an Oncolytic Virus that Expresses Two Prodrug-activating Genes, in Combination with Prodrugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazue Kasai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available MGH2.1 is a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1 oncolytic virus that expresses two prodrug-activating transgenes: the cyclophosphamide (CPA-activating cytochrome P4502B1 (CYP2B1 and the CPT11-activating secreted human intestinal carboxylesterase (shiCE. Toxicology and biodistribution of MGH2.1 in the presence/absence of prodrugs was evaluated in mice. MGH2.1 ± prodrugs was cytotoxic to human glioma cells, but not to normal cells. Pharmacokinetically, intracranial MGH2.1 did not significantly alter the metabolism of intraperitoneally (i.p. administered prodrugs in mouse plasma, brain, or liver. MGH2.1 did not induce an acute inflammatory reaction. MGH2.1 DNA was detected in brains of mice inoculated with 108 pfus for up to 60 days. However, only one animal showed evidence of viral gene expression at this time. Expression of virally encoded genes was restricted to brain. Intracranial inoculation of MGH2.1 did not induce lethality at 108 pfus in the absence of prodrugs and at 106 pfus in the presence of prodrugs. This study provides safety and toxicology data justifying a possible clinical trial of intratumoral injection of MGH2.1 with peripheral administration of CPA and/or CPT11 prodrugs in humans with malignant gliomas.

  6. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNL’s Hanford External Dosimetry Program (HEDP) which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee (HPDAC) which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since its inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. The first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database was designated Revision 0. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving significant changes to all chapters in the document. Revision numbers that include a decimal fraction reflect minor revisions, usually restricted to selected chapters or selected pages in the document. Maintenance and distribution of controlled hard copies of the

  7. Interest of numerical dosimetry in radiation protection: mean of substitution or measurements consolidation?; Interet de la dosimetrie numerique en radioprotection: moyen de substitution ou de consolidation des mesures?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahaye, T.; Chau, Q. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN/DPHD/SDOS), Service Dosimetrie, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Ferragut, A.; Gillot, J.Y. [SAPHYMO, 91 - Massy (France)

    2003-07-01

    The use of calculation codes allows to reduce the costs and the time limits. These codes brings to operators elements to reinforce their projected dosimetry. In the cases of accidental overexposure, the numerical dosimetry comes in complement of clinical and biological investigations to give an estimation as precise as possible of the received dose. For particular situations where it does not exist an adapted instrumentation, the numerical dosimetry can substitute to conventional techniques used by regulatory dosimetry (project for aviation personnel). (N.C.)

  8. Primary Study about Intensity Signal of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance in vivo Tooth Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hoon; Gang, Seo Gon; Kim, Jeong In; Lee, Byung Il [KHNP Radiation Health Institute, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The signal of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance(EPR) dosimetry system using human tooth has been well introduced as one of the efficient tool to evaluate radiation exposure. But, EPR dosimetry, even in the case of classical in vitro EPR system using tooth sample(measured molars), was regarded as having big signal fluctuation. One of reason for such difficulty in getting accurate intensity was the big effect of organic materials mixed in enamel part of teeth samples. They are mainly caused by the adaptation process of system itself to the movement of measured human subject. Generally, when we measured human teeth in vivo, five of six teeth spectrum were gathered and averaged for real evaluation. The these spectrum are measured under very different environment like angle of external magnet making magnetic filed with teeth(incisor). Random movement of these signals should be considered in different view point to understand and compare each EPR in vivo EPR spectrum. The peak to peak value of obtained five or six in vivo EPR system to get averaged value for final quantity of free radicals in hydroxy apatite crystal construction in enamel part of human teeth looks so randomly changed without regulation. But, in overall view, the EPR signal, especially at no irradiation level, is almost same for every measurement trial which is mainly composed of big noise and very small signal from real free radicals. The peak to peak value of obtained five or six in vivo EPR system to get averaged value for final quantity of free radicals in hydroxy apatite crystal construction in enamel part of human teeth looks so randomly changed without regulation.

  9. Infants and young children modeling method for numerical dosimetry studies: application to plane wave exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahdouh, S.; Varsier, N.; Nunez Ochoa, M. A.; Wiart, J.; Peyman, A.; Bloch, I.

    2016-02-01

    Numerical dosimetry studies require the development of accurate numerical 3D models of the human body. This paper proposes a novel method for building 3D heterogeneous young children models combining results obtained from a semi-automatic multi-organ segmentation algorithm and an anatomy deformation method. The data consist of 3D magnetic resonance images, which are first segmented to obtain a set of initial tissues. A deformation procedure guided by the segmentation results is then developed in order to obtain five young children models ranging from the age of 5 to 37 months. By constraining the deformation of an older child model toward a younger one using segmentation results, we assure the anatomical realism of the models. Using the proposed framework, five models, containing thirteen tissues, are built. Three of these models are used in a prospective dosimetry study to analyze young child exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields. The results lean to show the existence of a relationship between age and whole body exposure. The results also highlight the necessity to specifically study and develop measurements of child tissues dielectric properties.

  10. Carbon beam dosimetry using VIP polymer gel and MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantemiris, I; Petrokokkinos, L; Angelopoulos, A

    2009-01-01

    VIP polymer gel dosimeter was used for Carbon ion beam dosimetry using a 150 MeV/n beam with 10 Gy plateau dose and a SOBP irradiation scheme with 5 Gy Bragg peak dose. The results show a decrease by 8 mm in the expected from Monte Carlo simulation range in water, suggesting that the dosimeter...

  11. Semi- and virtual 3D dosimetry in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, S. S.

    2013-01-01

    In this review, 3D dosimetry is divided in three categories; "true" 3D, semi-3D and virtual 3D. Virtual 3D involves the use of measurement arrays either before or after beam entry in the patient/phantom, whereas semi-3D involves use of measurement arrays in phantoms mimicking the patient. True 3D...

  12. Fiber-coupled Luminescence Dosimetry in Therapeutic and Diagnostic Radiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Claus Erik

    2011-01-01

    Fiber-coupled luminescence dosimetry is an emerging technology with several potentially attractive features of relevance for uses in therapeutic and diagnostic radiology: direct water equivalence (i.e. no significant perturbation of the radiation field in a water phantom or a patient), sub...

  13. Graphite mixed magnesium borate TL dosemeters for beta ray dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prokic, M; Christensen, Poul

    1984-01-01

    Sintered MgB4O7:Dy dosemeters with graphite contents from 1 to 10% were investigated for application for personnel dosimetry. Data are given on dose response, dose threshold, reproducibility, beta energy response and fading. Furthermore, results from practical field experiments are presented...

  14. (KNa)Br phosphor for ionizing radiation dosimetry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lyoluminescence; γ-ray dose; radiation dosimetry; phosphor; (KNa)Br. 1. Introduction. The measurement of radiation dose has become a science of ever increasing importance due to the estimation of risk and benefits inherent to the uses and to the exposure of ionizing radiation. When strongly energized, crystals are ...

  15. Preclinical animal research on therapy dosimetry with dual isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W. Konijnenberg (Mark); M. de Jong (Marion)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPreclinical research into radionuclide therapies based on radiation dosimetry will enable the use of any LET-equivalent radionuclide. Radiation dose and dose rate have significant influence on dose effects in the tumour depending on its radiation sensitivity, possibilities for repair of

  16. Albedo neutron dosimetry in Germany: regulations and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luszik-Bhadra, M; Zimbal, A; Busch, F; Eichelberger, A; Engelhardt, J; Figel, M; Frasch, G; Günther, K; Jordan, M; Martini, E; Haninger, T; Rimpler, A; Seifert, R

    2014-12-01

    Personal neutron dosimetry has been performed in Germany using albedo dosemeters for >20 y. This paper describes the main principles, the national standards, regulations and recommendations, the quality management and the overall performance, giving some examples. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry using natural and synthetic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; McKeever, S.W.S.

    1996-01-01

    The application of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) for use in radiation dosimetry is reviewed. A broad description is given of OSL techniques developed at Riso National Laboratory and at Oklahoma State University, and recent collaborative investigations on the properties of a variety...

  18. Precision dosimetry system suited for low temperature radiation damage experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.H.; Hanke, C.C.; Sørensen, H.

    1967-01-01

    A calorimetric system for dosimetry on a beam of charged particles is described. The calorimeter works at liquid helium temperature. The total dose may be measured with an accuracy of 0.3%, and the dose per area with 0.4%. No theoretical corrections are needed. © 1967 The American Institute...

  19. In vivo dosimetry: trends and prospects for brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kertzscher, Gustavo; Rosenfeld, A.; Beddar, S.

    2014-01-01

    The error types during brachytherapy (BT) treatments and their occurrence rates are not well known. The limited knowledge is partly attributed to the lack of independent verification systems of the treatment progression in the clinical workflow routine. Within the field of in vivo dosimetry (IVD...

  20. Chemical dosimetry techniques for various applications under different geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, B L; Narayan, G R; Nilekani, S R

    2000-01-01

    This paper gives the results of dosimetry for various applications under different geometrical arrangements. These applications include: gamma chambers, blood irradiators, radiotherapy using both sup 6 sup 0 Co and accelerators, animal irradiations with different types of radiation sources, fluid irradiators for sludge and rubber latex and industrial electron irradiators. The dosimeters used were Fricke, FBX and alanine/glutamine (spectrophotometric readout).

  1. Development of probabilistic internal dosimetry computer code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Siwan; Kwon, Tae-Eun; Lee, Jai-Ki

    2017-02-01

    Internal radiation dose assessment involves biokinetic models, the corresponding parameters, measured data, and many assumptions. Every component considered in the internal dose assessment has its own uncertainty, which is propagated in the intake activity and internal dose estimates. For research or scientific purposes, and for retrospective dose reconstruction for accident scenarios occurring in workplaces having a large quantity of unsealed radionuclides, such as nuclear power plants, nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and facilities in which nuclear medicine is practiced, a quantitative uncertainty assessment of the internal dose is often required. However, no calculation tools or computer codes that incorporate all the relevant processes and their corresponding uncertainties, i.e., from the measured data to the committed dose, are available. Thus, the objective of the present study is to develop an integrated probabilistic internal-dose-assessment computer code. First, the uncertainty components in internal dosimetry are identified, and quantitative uncertainty data are collected. Then, an uncertainty database is established for each component. In order to propagate these uncertainties in an internal dose assessment, a probabilistic internal-dose-assessment system that employs the Bayesian and Monte Carlo methods. Based on the developed system, we developed a probabilistic internal-dose-assessment code by using MATLAB so as to estimate the dose distributions from the measured data with uncertainty. Using the developed code, we calculated the internal dose distribution and statistical values ( e.g. the 2.5th, 5th, median, 95th, and 97.5th percentiles) for three sample scenarios. On the basis of the distributions, we performed a sensitivity analysis to determine the influence of each component on the resulting dose in order to identify the major component of the uncertainty in a bioassay. The results of this study can be applied to various situations. In cases of

  2. Development of Probabilistic Internal Dosimetry Computer Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Siwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Tae-Eun [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jai-Ki [Korean Association for Radiation Protection, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Internal radiation dose assessment involves biokinetic models, the corresponding parameters, measured data, and many assumptions. Every component considered in the internal dose assessment has its own uncertainty, which is propagated in the intake activity and internal dose estimates. For research or scientific purposes, and for retrospective dose reconstruction for accident scenarios occurring in workplaces having a large quantity of unsealed radionuclides, such as nuclear power plants, nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and facilities in which nuclear medicine is practiced, a quantitative uncertainty assessment of the internal dose is often required. However, no calculation tools or computer codes that incorporate all the relevant processes and their corresponding uncertainties, i.e., from the measured data to the committed dose, are available. Thus, the objective of the present study is to develop an integrated probabilistic internal-dose-assessment computer code. First, the uncertainty components in internal dosimetry are identified, and quantitative uncertainty data are collected. Then, an uncertainty database is established for each component. In order to propagate these uncertainties in an internal dose assessment, a probabilistic internal-dose-assessment system that employs the Bayesian and Monte Carlo methods. Based on the developed system, we developed a probabilistic internal-dose-assessment code by using MATLAB so as to estimate the dose distributions from the measured data with uncertainty. Using the developed code, we calculated the internal dose distribution and statistical values (e.g. the 2.5{sup th}, 5{sup th}, median, 95{sup th}, and 97.5{sup th} percentiles) for three sample scenarios. On the basis of the distributions, we performed a sensitivity analysis to determine the influence of each component on the resulting dose in order to identify the major component of the uncertainty in a bioassay. The results of this study can be applied to various

  3. SEVENTH DOE WORKSHOP ON PERSONNEL NEUTRON DOSIMETRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallario, E J

    1978-10-24

    This workshop was the seventh of a series and was held on October 23-24. 1978, at the Central Electricity Generating Board, HQ, London, England. Typically~ attendees at the Workshop were concerned with one of three activities: studying and refining existing techniques in an attempt to quantify already-known parameters with greater precision, looking for ways to apply existing neutron dosirr:etry techniques to a specific local problem, identifying the needs and weaknesses of existing systems, with the goal of improving and passibly simplifying field measurements. The types of neutron dosimetry techniques discussed by participants included albedo dosimeters, track etch, and TLD. One speaker reported on NTA film, noting that fading could be eliminated by drying the emulsion in dry nitrogen before field use. There were no reports on tissue equivalent proportional counters or activation analysis. One participant discussed a metal oxide silicon dosimeter. The need to develop a consistent standard terminology, as well as calibration sources and techniques, on both the national and international level was evident. The need for standardization is particularly acute in the U.S. Techniques for evaluating dosimeter response in the field should he standardized, since several different instruments with widely different response characteristics are currently being used. The choice of instruments is often parochial. Also. the type and use of phantoms should be standardized. Neutron dose assignment is significantly affected by the position of the dosimeter on the body. for example, a typical albedo dosimeter may give differences of up to 20% depending on whether it is worn on the belt or chest. Larger errors are encountered with front-to-back (angular} orientation. 1n an attempt to minimize such errors~ at least two European facilities are using neutron dosimeter belts, which provide dosimeters both in front and in back of the wearer. The gamma-to-neutron ratio around nuclear power

  4. The personal dosimetry in Mexico; La dosimetria personal en Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar, M.A. [Proxtronics/ Asesoria Integral en Dosimetria Termoluminiscente S.A. de C.V., Canal de Miramontes 2030-14, Col. Educacion, 04400 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. e-mail: aidtsa@avantel.net

    2006-07-01

    The Personal Dosimetry in Mexico, has an approximately 30 year-old history; and it had been and it is at the moment, one of the more important resources with which the personnel that works with ionizing radiation sources counts for its protection. The Personal Dosimetry begins with the film dosimetry, technique that even continues being used at the present time by some users, and the main reason of its use is for economic reasons. At the moment this technique, it has been surpassed, by the Thermoluminescent dosimetry, which has taken a lot of peak, mainly by the technological development with which it is counted at the present time; what has given as a result that this technique becomes tip technology; that supported in the characteristic of the used materials, as the handling and processing of the information associated with the new PC, digitizer cards, software etc, what has allowed increases it potential. In this work the current necessities of the market are presented as well as an analysis of the future real necessities in Mexico, at national level, the companies that provide this service and that they spread to satisfy this necessity of the market, including the different used technologies are also mentioned. The application ranges, at the same time, of the advantages and disadvantages of the different systems of Personal Dosimetry in the market. The companies that at the moment provide the service of Personal Dosimetry, its use materials and equipment in indistinct form, for the monitoring of gamma radiation, beta particles, different qualities of x-ray radiation, and sometimes neutrons. The monitoring of the exposed personnel at the diverse sources of ionizing radiation mentioned is carried out in many occasions without having with the materials (detectors), neither the appropriate infrastructure and therefore without the quality control that guarantees a correct evaluation of the dose equivalent, as a result of the exposure to the ionizing radiations; it

  5. Freeze-dried formulation for direct {sup 99m}Tc-labeling ior-egf/r3 MAb: additives, biodistribution, and stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales, Alejo A. Morales; Nunez-Gandolff, Gilda; Perez, Niuvis Perez; Veliz, Belkis Chico; Caballero-Torres, Idania; Duconge, Jorge; Fernandez, Eduardo; Crespo, Francisco Zayas; Veloso, Ana; Iznaga-Escobar, Normando E-mail: normando@ict.sld.cu

    1999-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have been useful for immunoscintigraphic applications in clinical diagnosis since they were introduced in nuclear medicine practice. The MAb ior egf/r3 developed at the Center of Molecular Immunology (Havana, Cuba) is a murine antibody that recognizes the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) and has been used widely in the radioimmunodiagnosis of tumors of epithelial origin. Based on the direct Schwarz method, the present report describes the preparation of a freeze-dried formulation for radiolabeling the MAb ior egf/r3 with {sup 99m}Tc for immunoscintigraphic applications. Radiolabeling efficiency, effects on immunoreactivity, biodistribution, pharmacokinetic, and stability of the formulation are reported. The study demonstrated that the freeze-dried formulation can be labeled with {sup 99m}Tc at high yield. The resulting {sup 99m}Tc-labeled ior egf/r3 MAb can be used to visualize in vivo human tumors of epithelial origin by immunoscintigraphy studies. The kit does not need any other addition or purification at the time of tagging other than the requisite amount of pertechnetate (40-50 mCi). Because the contents of the kit are lyophilized, no special storage or transportation is required.

  6. What is New in Internal Dosimetry and Monitoring?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henrichs, K. [Siemens AG, Corporate Radiation Safety and Dangerous Goods Transport, Munich (Germany); Nosske, D. [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Neuherberg (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    This file is divided in two parts:the first one concerns the progress in internal dosimetry. This part gives an overview on new model developments by ICRP, the series of age dependent doses for members of the public was continued by biokinetic and dosimetric models for the embryo and foetus due to activity intake by the mother (ICRP,2001) and for the infant via consumption of mother's milk after activity intake by the mother (ICRP, 2004). In both publications dose coefficients for the embryo and foetus as well the infant were given for various intake scenarios by mother. The present model development work of ICRP is a revision of Publications 30, 54, 68, and 78 based on the new human Alimentary tract model (H.A.T.M.) of ICRP (ICRP, 2006), a revision of absorption parameters for the human respiratory tract model (ICRP, 1994a), new systemic models as well as new dosimetric parameters derived with new Voxel models for the reference male and female adult. The second part concerns the progress in workers monitoring for radionuclide intake. The initiatives to improve the situation are the guidelines published by the International Atomic Energy Agency (2004), giving guidance for the assessment of occupational exposures due to intakes of radionuclides, research project funded by the European Commission: the objective of O.M.I.N.E.X. was the improvement of monitoring programmes, taking into account the uncertainties of biokinetic models and data, the programme I.D.E.A. tried to improve measuring techniques and I.D.E.A.S derives rules for the evaluation of measured activity values in terms of exposure. Standardization projects by the International Standardization Organization I.S.O.: I.S.O. (2001) published a standard defining the requirements for bioassay laboratories, which will soon followed by a second part giving the rationale behind these rules., presently the final version (I.S.O. 2005) of a standard is circulating among the I.S.O. member states which guidance on

  7. GENII (Generation II): The Hanford Environmental Radiation Dosimetry Software System: Volume 3, Code maintenance manual: Hanford Environmental Dosimetry Upgrade Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, B.A.; Peloquin, R.A.; Strenge, D.L.; Ramsdell, J.V.

    1988-09-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dosimetry Upgrade Project was undertaken to incorporate the internal dosimetry models recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in updated versions of the environmental pathway analysis models used at Hanford. The resulting second generation of Hanford environmental dosimetry computer codes is compiled in the Hanford Environmental Dosimetry System (Generation II, or GENII). This coupled system of computer codes is intended for analysis of environmental contamination resulting from acute or chronic releases to, or initial contamination of, air, water, or soil, on through the calculation of radiation doses to individuals or populations. GENII is described in three volumes of documentation. This volume is a Code Maintenance Manual for the serious user, including code logic diagrams, global dictionary, worksheets to assist with hand calculations, and listings of the code and its associated data libraries. The first volume describes the theoretical considerations of the system. The second volume is a Users' Manual, providing code structure, users' instructions, required system configurations, and QA-related topics. 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Sucralose sweetener in vivo effects on blood constituents radiolabeling, red blood cell morphology and radiopharmaceutical biodistribution in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, G S; Pereira, M O; Benarroz, M O; Frydman, J N G; Rocha, V C; Pereira, M J; Fonseca, A S; Medeiros, A C; Bernardo-Filho, M

    2011-01-01

    Effects of sucralose sweetener on blood constituents labelled with technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) on red blood cell (RBC) morphology, sodium pertechnetate (Na(99m)TcO(4)) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid labeled with (99m)Tc ((99m)Tc-DTPA) biodistribution in rats were evaluated. Radiolabeling on blood constituents from Wistar rats was undertaken for determining the activity percentage (%ATI) on blood constituents. RBC morphology was also evaluated. Na(99m)TcO(4) and (99m)Tc-DTPA biodistribution was used to determine %ATI/g in organs. There was no alteration on RBC blood constituents and morphology %ATI. Sucralose sweetener was capable of altering %ATI/g of the radiopharmaceuticals in different organs. These findings are associated to the sucralose sweetener in specific organs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sucralose sweetener in vivo effects on blood constituents radiolabeling, red blood cell morphology and radiopharmaceutical biodistribution in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, G.S.; Pereira, M.O. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, Vila Isabel, 20551030 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias da Saude, Avenida General Gustavo Cordeiro de Farias, s/n, 59010180 Natal, Rio Grande do Norte (Brazil); Benarroz, M.O.; Frydman, J.N.G.; Rocha, V.C. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, Vila Isabel, 20551030 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Pereira, M.J. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Fisiologia, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, Vila Isabel, 20551030 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Fonseca, A.S., E-mail: adnfonseca@ig.com.b [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, Vila Isabel, 20551030 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto Biomedico, Departamento de Ciencias Fisiologicas, Rua Frei Caneca, 94, Rio de Janeiro 20211040 (Brazil); Medeiros, A.C. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias da Saude, Avenida General Gustavo Cordeiro de Farias, s/n, 59010180 Natal, Rio Grande do Norte (Brazil); Bernardo-Filho, M. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87,